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Sample records for prostate cancer imaging

  1. Prostate Cancer MR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fütterer, Jurgen J.

    With a total of 192,280 new cases predicted for 2009, prostate cancer (PC) now accounts for 25% of all new male cancers diagnosed in the United States [1]. Furthermore, in their lifetime, one in six men will be clinically diagnosed with having PC, although many more men are found to have histological evidence of PC at autopsy [2,3,4]. Presently, approximately 1 in 10 men will die of PC [5,6]. The ever-aging population and wider spread use of the blood prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test [7,8], as well as the tendency to apply lower cut-off levels for this test [9], will further increase the diagnosis of this disease [10].

  2. Imaging Prostate Cancer with Positron Emission Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0125 TITLE: Imaging Prostate Cancer with Positron Emission Tomography...ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 01 Sept 2013-31 Aug 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Imaging Prostate Cancer ...proposal is to develop peptide based radiopharmaceuticals and evaluate them as PET imaging agents in preclinical animal models of prostate cancer

  3. Functional imaging for prostate cancer: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Mari Aparici, Carina; Seo, Youngho

    2012-09-01

    Functional radionuclide imaging modalities, now commonly combined with anatomical imaging modalities computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT]/CT, positron emission tomography [PET]/CT, and PET/magnetic resonance imaging), are promising tools for the management of prostate cancer, particularly for therapeutic implications. Sensitive detection capability of prostate cancer using these imaging modalities is one issue; however, the treatment of prostate cancer using the information that can be obtained from functional radionuclide imaging techniques is another challenging area. There are not many SPECT or PET radiotracers that can cover the full spectrum of the management of prostate cancer from initial detection to staging, prognosis predictor, and all the way to treatment response assessment. However, when used appropriately, the information from functional radionuclide imaging improves, and sometimes significantly changes, the whole course of the cancer management. The limitations of using SPECT and PET radiotracers with regard to therapeutic implications are not so much different from their limitations solely for the task of detecting prostate cancer; however, the specific imaging target and how this target is reliably imaged by SPECT and PET can potentially make significant impact in the treatment of prostate cancer. Finally, although the localized prostate cancer is considered manageable, there is still significant need for improvement in noninvasive imaging of metastatic prostate cancer, in treatment guidance, and in response assessment from functional imaging, including radionuclide-based techniques. In this review article, we present the rationale of using functional radionuclide imaging and the therapeutic implications for each of radionuclide imaging agent that have been studied in human subjects.

  4. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    saturation bands (six for fat and two for water) were used to minimize lipid/water contamination to the VOI. The 2D MRSI sequence details are: TR/TE... fat as measured by in-vivo imaging using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging in the prediction of prostate disease aggressiveness...histology, in-vivo intraprostatic fat as measured by 1H MRSI, metabolic signatures of lipid oxidation and metabolism, and prostate cancer

  5. Functional CT imaging of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Elizabeth; Milosevic, Michael F.; Haider, Masoom A.; Yeung, Ivan W. T.

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the distribution of blood flow (F), mean capillary transit time (Tc), capillary permeability (PS) and blood volume (vb) in prostate cancer using contrast-enhanced CT. Nine stage T2-T3 prostate cancer patients were enrolled in the study. Following bolus injection of a contrast agent, a time series of CT images of the prostate was acquired. Functional maps showing the distribution of F, Tc, PS and vb within the prostate were generated using a distributed parameter tracer kinetic model, the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity model. The precision of the maps was assessed using covariance matrix analysis. Finally, maps were compared to the findings of standard clinical investigations. Eight of the functional maps demonstrated regions of increased F, PS and vb, the locations of which were consistent with the results of standard clinical investigations. However, model parameters other than F could only be measured precisely within regions of high F. In conclusion functional CT images of cancer-containing prostate glands demonstrate regions of elevated F, PS and vb. However, caution should be used when applying a complex tracer kinetic model to the study of prostate cancer since not all parameters can be measured precisely in all areas.

  6. State-of-the-art imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Marko, Jamie; Gould, C Frank; Bonavia, Grant H; Wolfman, Darcy J

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Modern medical imaging is intimately involved in the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. Ultrasound is primarily used to guide prostate biopsy to establish the diagnosis of prostate carcinoma. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging uses a multiparametric approach, including anatomic and functional imaging sequences. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging can be used for detection and localization of prostate cancer and to evaluate for disease recurrence. Computed tomography and scintigraphic imaging are primarily used to detect regional lymph node spread and distant metastases. Recent advancements in ultrasound, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphic imaging have the potential to change the way prostate cancer is diagnosed and managed. This article addresses the major imaging modalities involved in the evaluation of prostate cancer and updates the reader on the state of the art for each modality.

  7. Prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  8. Imaging Prostate Cancer (PCa) Phenotype and Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0386 TITLE: Imaging Prostate Cancer (PCa) Phenotype and Evolution PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jason A. Koutcher...CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research New York, NY 10065 REPORT DATE: October 2015 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual Report...time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this

  9. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate cancer using cylinder diffuse radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wenming; Li, Li; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of diseases with high mortality in man. Many clinical imaging modalities are utilized for the detection, grading and staging of prostate cancer, such as ultrasound, CT, MRI, etc. But they lacked adequate sensitivity and specificity for finding cancer in transition or central zone of prostate. To overcome these problems, we propose a photoacoustic imaging modality based on cylinder diffuse radiation through urethra for prostate cancer detection. We measure the related parameters about this system like lateral resolution (~2mm) and axial resolution(~333μm). Finally, simulated sample was imaged by our system. The results demonstrate the feasibility for detecting prostate cancer by our system.

  10. Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by Collagen Hybridization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Michael S. Yu CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Utah Salt Lake City, UT 84112 REPORT DATE: October 2015 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual...SUBTITLE Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by Collagen Hybridization 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0555 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...peptide (CMP) as a collagen targeting agents that will allow imaging of invasive PCa. Since CMP binds to unstructured collagens more readily, it is

  11. Challenges in Clinical Prostate Cancer: Role of Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kelloff, Gary J.; Choyke, Peter; Coffey, Donald S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This article reviews a recent 2-day workshop on prostate cancer and imaging technology that was conducted by the Cancer Imaging Program of the National Cancer Institute. The workshop dealt with research trends and avenues for improving imaging and applications across the clinical spectrum of the disease. Conclusion After a summary of prostate cancer incidence and mortality, four main clinical challenges in prostate cancer treatment and management—diagnostic accuracy; risk stratification, initial staging, active surveillance, and focal therapy; prostate-specific antigen relapse after radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy; and assessing response to therapy in advanced disease—were discussed by the 55-member panel. The overarching issue in prostate cancer is distinguishing lethal from nonlethal disease. New technologies and fresh uses for established procedures make imaging effective in both assessing and treating prostate cancer. PMID:19457806

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Du, Yong; Huang, Yayong; Meng, Jun; Xiao, Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    As prostate cancer is a biologically heterogeneous disease for which a variety of treatment options are available, the major objective of prostate cancer imaging is to achieve more precise disease characterization. In clinical practice, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the imaging tools for the evaluation of prostate cancer, the fusion of MRI or dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is improving the evaluation of cancer location, size, and extent, while providing an indication of tumor aggressiveness. This review summarizes the role of MRI in the application of prostate cancer and describes molecular MRI techniques (including MRSI and DCE-MRI) for aiding prostate cancer management. PMID:23592906

  13. Prostate cancer: multiparametric MR imaging for detection, localization, and staging.

    PubMed

    Hoeks, Caroline M A; Barentsz, Jelle O; Hambrock, Thomas; Yakar, Derya; Somford, Diederik M; Heijmink, Stijn W T P J; Scheenen, Tom W J; Vos, Pieter C; Huisman, Henkjan; van Oort, Inge M; Witjes, J Alfred; Heerschap, Arend; Fütterer, Jurgen J

    2011-10-01

    This review presents the current state of the art regarding multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of prostate cancer. Technical requirements and clinical indications for the use of multiparametric MR imaging in detection, localization, characterization, staging, biopsy guidance, and active surveillance of prostate cancer are discussed. Although reported accuracies of the separate and combined multiparametric MR imaging techniques vary for diverse clinical prostate cancer indications, multiparametric MR imaging of the prostate has shown promising results and may be of additional value in prostate cancer localization and local staging. Consensus on which technical approaches (field strengths, sequences, use of an endorectal coil) and combination of multiparametric MR imaging techniques should be used for specific clinical indications remains a challenge. Because guidelines are currently lacking, suggestions for a general minimal protocol for multiparametric MR imaging of the prostate based on the literature and the authors' experience are presented. Computer programs that allow evaluation of the various components of a multiparametric MR imaging examination in one view should be developed. In this way, an integrated interpretation of anatomic and functional MR imaging techniques in a multiparametric MR imaging examination is possible. Education and experience of specialist radiologists are essential for correct interpretation of multiparametric prostate MR imaging findings. Supportive techniques, such as computer-aided diagnosis are needed to obtain a fast, cost-effective, easy, and more reproducible prostate cancer diagnosis out of more and more complex multiparametric MR imaging data.

  14. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    FAS activity in prostatectomy samples, intraprostatic lipid as measured by MRSI and prostate tumor aggressiveness. 3) To quantify key metabolic ...intermediates involved in lipid metabolism , mitochondrial function, inflammation, and apoptosis in the prostatectomy samples. 15. SUBJECT TERMS : none...vivo intraprostatic fat as measured by 1H MRSI, metabolic signatures of lipid oxidation and metabolism , and prostate cancer aggressiveness, our

  15. Imaging Prostate Cancer (Pca) Phenotype and Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    prostate cancer cells. To further investigate the effects of DFP on prostate cancer cells we carried out extracellular flux analysis experiments. Our...Extracellular flux analysis experiments with the Seahorse system showed a marked decrease in OCR after inhibition of ATP synthase by oligomycin...the means. Figure 5 – Extracellular flux analysis in TRAMP C2 cells incubated with different concentrations of DFP. Left: OCR measurements. Right

  16. Feasibility of Prostate Cancer Diagnosis by Transrectal Photoacoustic Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    11-1-0232 TITLE: Feasibility of Prostate Cancer Diagnosis by Transrectal Photoacoustic Imaging PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Hanli Liu... Photoacoustic Imaging Hanli Liu University of Texas at Arlington Arlington, TX 76019 There is no effective imaging tool currently available for prostate... photoacoustic (PA) imaging [4]. It has been reported that the ratio of the imaging depth to spatial resolution can reach to ~100 for PA techniques

  17. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  18. Angiogenesis in prostate cancer: onset, progression and imaging.

    PubMed

    Russo, Giovanna; Mischi, Massimo; Scheepens, Wout; De la Rosette, Jean J; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2012-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Today, angiogenesis is known to play a key role in cancer growth and development. Emerging cancer treatments are based on the suppression of angiogenesis, and modern imaging techniques investigate changes in the microvasculature that are caused by angiogenesis. As for other forms of cancers, angiogenesis is well recognised as a fundamental process in the development of prostate cancer. The novelty of this extensive report on angiogenesis in cancer, with particular attention on prostate cancer and the imaging techniques able to detect it, is the new prospective to the subject. In contrast with the other available reviews, this report goes from 'theory' to 'practice', establishing a clear link between angiogenesis development and imaged angiogenesis features. Once the key role of angiogenesis in the development of cancer and in particular prostate cancer has been fully described, attention is turned to the current imaging methods with the potential to assess the angiogenesis process and, as a consequence, to detect and localise prostate cancer. • As confirmed by all available statistics, cancer represents a major clinical and societal problem in the developed world. The form of cancer with the highest incidence in men is prostate cancer. For prostate cancer, as well as for most forms of cancer, detection of the disease at an early stage is critical to reduce mortality and morbidity. • Today, it is well known that pathological angiogenesis represents a crucial step in cancer development and progression. Comparable with most forms of cancer, angiogenesis also plays a fundamental role for prostate cancer growth. • As a consequence, angiogenesis is an ideal target not only for novel anti-angiogenic therapies, but also for modern imaging techniques that aim at cancer localisation by detection of angiogenic microvascular changes. • These techniques are mainly based on magnetic resonance, ultrasound, and

  19. Prostate Cancer: The Role of Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dias, João Lopes; Pina, João Magalhães; João, Raquel; Fialho, Joana; Carmo, Sandra; Leal, Cecília; Bilhim, Tiago; Marques, Rui Mateus; Pinheiro, Luís Campos

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging has been increasingly used for detection, localization and staging of prostate cancer over the last years. It combines high-resolution T2 weighted-imaging and at least two functional techniques, which include dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy. Although the combined use of a pelvic phased-array and an endorectal coil is considered the state-of-the-art for magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of prostate cancer, endorectal coil is only absolute mandatory for magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy at 1.5 T. Sensitivity and specificity levels in cancer detection and localization have been improving with functional technique implementation, compared to T2 weighted-imaging alone. It has been particularly useful to evaluate patients with abnormal PSA and negative biopsy. Moreover, the information added by the functional techniques may correlate to cancer aggressiveness and therefore be useful to select patients for focal radiotherapy, prostate sparing surgery, focal ablative therapy and active surveillance. However, more studies are needed to compare the functional techniques and understand the advantages and disadvantages of each one. This article reviews the basic principles of prostatic mp-magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing its role on detection, staging and active surveillance of prostate cancer.

  20. Prostate cancer: state of the art imaging and focal treatment.

    PubMed

    Woodrum, D A; Kawashima, A; Gorny, K R; Mynderse, L A

    2017-04-03

    In 2016, it is estimated 180,890 men are newly diagnosed with prostate cancer and 3,306,760 men live with prostate cancer in the United States. The introduction of multiparametric (mp) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate, standardised interpretation guidelines such as Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS version 2), and MRI-based targeted biopsy has improved detection of clinically significant prostate cancer. Accurate risk stratification (Gleason grade/score and tumour stage) using imaging and image-guided targeted biopsy has become critical for the management of patients with prostate cancer. Recent advances in MRI-guided minimally invasive ablative treatment (MIAT) utilising cryoablation, laser ablation, high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation, have allowed accurate focal or regional delivery of optimal thermal energy to the biopsy proven, MRI-detected tumour, under real-time or near simultaneous MRI monitoring of the ablation zone. A contemporary review on prostate mpMRI, MRI-based targeted biopsy, and MRI-guided ablation techniques is presented.

  1. Prostate cancer magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): multidisciplinary standpoint.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Wang, Liang; Feng, Zhaoyan; Hu, Zhiquan; Wang, Guoping; Yuan, Xianglin; Wang, He; Hu, Daoyu

    2013-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men and a leading cause of death. Accurate assessment is a prerequisite for optimal clinical management and therapy selection of prostate cancer. There are several parameters and nomograms to differentiate between patients with clinically insignificant disease and patients in need of treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a technique which provides more detailed anatomical images due to high spatial resolution, superior contrast resolution, and multiplanar capability. State-of-the-art MRI techniques, such as diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), improve interpretation of prostate cancer imaging. In this article, we review the major role of MRI in the advanced management of prostate cancer to noninvasively improve tumor staging, biologic potential, treatment planning, therapy response, local recurrence, and to guide target biopsy for clinical suspected cancer with previous negative biopsy. Finally, future challenges and opportunities in prostate cancer management in the area of functional MRI are discussed as well.

  2. Parametric PET/MR Fusion Imaging to Differentiate Aggressive from Indolent Primary Prostate Cancer with Application for Image-Guided Prostate Cancer Biopsies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The study investigates whether fusion PET/ MRI imaging with 18F-choline PET/CT and...diffusion-weighted MRI can be successfully applied to target prostate cancer using image-guided prostate biopsies. The study further aims to establish...whether fusion PET/ MRI -derived parametric imaging parameters identify significant prostate cancer better than standard prostate biopsies. In order to

  3. ProxiScan™: A Novel Camera for Imaging Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph James

    2009-10-27

    ProxiScan is a compact gamma camera suited for high-resolution imaging of prostate cancer. Developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Hybridyne Imaging Technologies, Inc., ProxiScan won a 2009 R&D 100 Award, sponsored by R&D Magazine to recognize t

  4. Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by Collagen Hybridization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    bearing a range of selected subcutaneous prostate cancer xenografts resulted in the observation of a trend in which CMP-800 accumulates with higher...xenogratfs to reflect androgen receptor sensitivity status, expression of the biomarker PSMA and speed at which the tumors were growing. Mice bearing ...2. [111In](CXH-A)-(lys2)-DTPA-CMP9-(cys1)-IRDye800CW SPECT-CT at 3-6 h post-injection. Five mice, each bearing a single PC-3 PIP (higher Δ collagen

  5. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer What Is Prostate Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  6. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and prostate cancer: what's new?

    PubMed

    Catalá, V; Vilanova, J C; Gaya, J M; Algaba, F; Martí, T

    2017-02-21

    Prostatic multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) has recently had a wide development becoming a key tool in the diagnostic and therapeutic decisions in prostate cancer (Pca). The fast development both in technology and in reading (PIRADS V2) requires a continuous updating of knowledge within this area. The aim of this article is to present an updated revision of technical aspects, reading patterns and prostatic MP-MRI in Pca, with a multidisciplinary approach. Currently guidelines establish the use of the MP-MRI when there is a high PSA and a negative prostatic biopsy; tumor staging; evaluation in candidates to active surveillance; focal treatments plans and tumoral recurrence evaluation. Although it is used in other indications in some centers, like its use in patients suspicious of Pca but with no previous biopsy, there is still the need of a cost/benefit assessment for its use to be wider.

  7. Synthesis of PSA Inhibitors as SPECT- and PET-Based Imaging Agents for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    for their ability to inhibit PSA and chymotrypsin. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer , PSA inhibitors, boronic acids, peptidomimetics, serine protease...prostate cancer . First, all men undergoing androgen ablation, eventually relapse and no longer respond to hormone treatment . Therefore, there is an...Imaging Agents for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Maya Kostova, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Johns Hopkins University

  8. Gold nanocages for imaging and therapy of prostate cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Laura; Avvakumova, Svetlana; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Locarno, Silvia A.; Macchi, Chiara; D'Alfonso, Laura; Ruscica, Massimiliano; Magni, Paolo; Collini, Maddalena; Romeo, Sergio; Chirico, Giuseppe; Prosperi, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanocages (AuNCs) have been shown to be a useful tool both for imaging and hyperthermia therapy of cancer, thanks to their outstanding optical properties, low toxicity and facile functionalization with targeting molecules, including peptides and antibodies. In particular, hyperthermia is a minimally invasive therapy which takes advantage of the peculiar properties of gold nanoparticles to efficiently convert the absorbed light into heat. Here, we use AuNCs for the selective targeting and imaging of prostate cancer cells. Moreover, we report the hyperthermic effect characterization of the AuNCs both in solution and internalized in cells. Prostate cancer cells were irradiated at different exposure times, with a pulsed near infrared laser, and the cellular viability was evaluated by confocal microscopy.

  9. Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using (64)Cu-Labeled Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Ligand.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aviral; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Baum, Richard P

    2017-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer among men, rendering the diagnosis and staging of significant medical and public interest. One of the most interesting developments in the application of nuclear oncology has been the development of novel diagnostic agents that are able to facilitate targeted therapies using the concept of theranostics. This review summarizes the current and emerging molecular imaging techniques for the investigation of patients with prostate cancer with emphasis on the potential of (64)Cu-PSMA PET/CT in staging, restaging, and the application of theranostics.

  10. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  11. Tomographic needles and catheters for optical imaging of prostatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Steven L.; Motamedi, Massoud

    1995-05-01

    Early detection of prostatic cancer currently depends on Prostate Serum Antigen or TransRectal UltraSound. Unfortunately, these techniques are not always reliable indicators for early small lesions still localized within the prostate. This paper presents a feasibility study on the use of `tomographic needles and catheters' for optical imaging of early lesions. Three needles are inserted perianeally into the prostate or two catheters are inserted into the rectal and urethral passages. Each contains a set of optical fibers which terminate at evenly spaced positions along the needle. Each termination serves as either a source or collector for light transmission as each fiber is sequentially illuminated. Application of a tomographic algorithm based on diffuse light transmission between each source/collector pair yields a fuzzy but spectrally informative image of the prostate. This paper addresses the issue of feasibility by asking whether such a technique can distinguish a large zone of slightly alter optical properties (essentially a region of normal tissue) from a small zone of strongly altered optical properties (a tumor). The paper simulates both steady-state and 3-GHz frequency-domain optical measurements.

  12. Thermoacoustic imaging of prostate cancer: comparison to histology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patch, S. K.; Griep, S. K.; Jacobsohn, K.; See, W. A.; Hull, D.

    2014-03-01

    Ex vivo imaging of fresh prostate specimens was performed to test the hypothesis that the thermoacoustic (TA) contrast mechanism generated with very high frequency electromagnetic (EM) irradiation is sensitive to prostate cancer. Ex vivo imaging was performed immediately after radical prostatectomy, performed as part of normal care. Irradiation pulsewidth was 700 ns and duty cycle was extremely low. Typical specific absorption rate (SAR) throughout the prostate was 70-90 kW/kg during pulsing, but time-averaged SAR was below 2 W/kg. TA pressure pulses generated by rapid heating due to EM energy deposition were detected using single element transducers. 15g/L glycine powder mixed into DI water served as acoustic couplant, which was chilled to prevent autolysis. Spatial encoding was performed by scanning in tomographic "step-and-shoot" mode, with 3 mm translation between slices and 1.8-degree rotation between tomographic views. Histology slides for 3 cases scanned with 2.25 MHz transducers were marked for comparison to TA reconstructions. These three cases showed little, moderate, and severe involvement in the histology levels surrounding the verumontanum. TA signal strength decreased with percent cancerous involvement. When VHF is used for tissue heating, the TA contrast mechanism is driven by ionic content and we observed suppressed TA signal from diseased prostate tissue in the peripheral zone. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity.

  13. Intermittent Ultrasound Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Gleason score for non-palpable lesions. Urology 49:709-715, 1997. Bogers HA. Sedelaar JP. Beerlage HP. de la Rosette JJ. Debruyne FM. Wijkstra H. Aarnink...Specimens in Twelve Patients. Radiology 222:361-366, 2002. xliv Eskew LA, Bare RL, McCullough DL . Systematic 5 region prostate biopsy is superior to

  14. A Review of Imaging Methods for Prostate Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Saradwata; Das, Sudipta

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is playing an increasingly important role in the detection of prostate cancer (PCa). This review summarizes the key imaging modalities—multiparametric ultrasound (US), multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MRI–US fusion imaging, and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging—used in the diagnosis and localization of PCa. Emphasis is laid on the biological and functional characteristics of tumors that rationalize the use of a specific imaging technique. Changes to anatomical architecture of tissue can be detected by anatomical grayscale US and T2-weighted MRI. Tumors are known to progress through angiogenesis—a fact exploited by Doppler and contrast-enhanced US and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. The increased cellular density of tumors is targeted by elastography and diffusion-weighted MRI. PET imaging employs several different radionuclides to target the metabolic and cellular activities during tumor growth. Results from studies using these various imaging techniques are discussed and compared. PMID:26966397

  15. Molecular Engineering of Vector-Based Oncolytic and Imaging Approaches for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    Oncolytic and Imaging Approaches for Advanced Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lily Wu, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...SUBTITLE Molecular Engineering of Vector-based Oncolytic and Imaging Approaches for 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Advanced Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT...reproductions will be in black and white. 14. ABSTRACT Hormone refractory and metastatic prostate cancer are not well understood. Better animal models

  16. Recent Advances in Metabolic Profiling And Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Titus, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a metabolic disease. Cancer cells, being highly proliferative, show significant alterations in metabolic pathways such as glycolysis, respiration, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism, and amino acid metabolism. Metabolites like peptides, nucleotides, products of glycolysis, the TCA cycle, fatty acids, and steroids can be an important read out of disease when characterized in biological samples such as tissues and body fluids like urine, serum, etc. The cancer metabolome has been studied since the 1960s by analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Current research is focused on the identification and validation of biomarkers in the cancer metabolome that can stratify high-risk patients and distinguish between benign and advanced metastatic forms of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current state of prostate cancer metabolomics, the biomarkers that show promise in distinguishing indolent from aggressive forms of the disease, the strengths and limitations of the analytical techniques being employed, and future applications of metabolomics in diagnostic imaging and personalized medicine of prostate cancer. PMID:25632377

  17. Comparison of image-guided radiotherapy technologies for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Das, Satya; Liu, Tian; Jani, Ashesh B; Rossi, Peter; Shelton, Joseph; Shi, Zheng; Khan, Mohammad K

    2014-12-01

    Radiation oncology has seen a rapid increase in the use of image-guided radiotherapy technology (IGRT) for prostate cancer patients over the past decade. The increase in the use of IGRT is largely driven by the fact that these technologies have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and are now readily reimbursed by many insurance companies. Prostate cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) now have access to a wide variety of IGRTs that can cost anywhere from $500,000 or more in upfront costs, and can add anywhere from 10 to 15 thousand dollars to a course of IMRT. Some of the IGRT options include daily cone beam computed tomography, ultrasound, orthogonal x-ray units using implanted fiducial markers, implanted radiofrequency markers with the ability to localize and track prostate motion during radiotherapy (Calypso 4D), and cine magnetic resonance imaging. Although these technologies add to the cost of IMRT, there is little direct comparative effectiveness data to help patients, physicians, and policy makers decide if one technology is better than another. In our critical review, the first of its kind, we summarize the advantages, disadvantages, and the limitations of each technology. We also provide an overview of existing literature as it pertains to the comparison of existing IGRTs. Lastly, we provide insights about the need for future outcomes research that may have a significant impact on health policies as it comes to reimbursement in the modern era.

  18. Metabolic Imaging in Prostate Cancer: Where We Are

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Claudia; Pultrone, Cristian; Manners, David Neil; Schiavina, Riccardo; Lodi, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the development of diagnostic methods based on metabolic imaging has been aimed at improving diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) and perhaps at improving therapy. Molecular imaging methods can detect specific biological processes that are different when detected within cancer cells relative to those taking place in surrounding normal tissues. Many methods are sensitive to tissue metabolism; among them, positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) are widely used in clinical practice and clinical research. There is a rich literature that establishes the role of these metabolic imaging techniques as valid tools for the diagnosis, staging, and monitoring of PCa. Until recently, European guidelines for PCa detection still considered both MRSI/MRI and PET/CT to be under evaluation, even though they had demonstrated their value in the staging of high risk PCa, and in the restaging of patients presenting elevated prostatic-specific antigen levels following radical treatment of PCa, respectively. Very recently, advanced methods for metabolic imaging have been proposed in the literature: multiparametric MRI (mpMRI), hyperpolarized MRSI, PET/CT with the use of new tracers and finally PET/MRI. Their detection capabilities are currently under evaluation, as is the feasibility of using such techniques in clinical studies. PMID:27882307

  19. Molecular Imaging and Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Our objective is to develop an arsenic-based radiopharmaceutical platform for IGF1R-targeted imaging and therapy of PCa. The hypothesis is that...arsenic-based, IGF1R-targeted radiopharmaceuticals can allow for PET imaging, IRT, and monitoring the therapeutic response of PCa. Specific Aims: Aim 1: To...models with PET imaging. Aim 3: To monitor the efficacy of 76As-based IRT of PCa with multimodality imaging.

  20. Incorporating imaging into personalized medicine for the detection of prostate cancer: Pharmacological research-Urogenital pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Mertan, Francesca; Turkbey, Baris

    2016-12-01

    Imaging has played an important role in the administration of personalized medicine. From diagnosing diseases to guiding therapies, imaging has become an all-encompassing modality. With respect to prostate cancer, personalized management of the disease has been transformed by imaging. Specifically, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging has emerged as a vital player in the detection, characterization, and localization of the disease thus making the incorporation of imaging in personalized prostate cancer management integral. In this review, the current role of imaging in personalized medicine for the management of prostate cancer is discussed.

  1. Imaging Axl expression in pancreatic and prostate cancer xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Lisok, Ala; Hu, Chaoxin; Maitra, Anirban; Pomper, Martin G

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Axl is overexpressed in a variety of cancers. •Axl overexpression confers invasive phenotype. •Axl imaging would be useful for therapeutic guidance and monitoring. •Axl expression imaging is demonstrated in pancreatic and prostate cancer xenografts. •Graded levels of Axl expression imaging is feasible. -- Abstract: The receptor tyrosine kinase Axl is overexpressed in and leads to patient morbidity and mortality in a variety of cancers. Axl–Gas6 interactions are critical for tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of imaging graded levels of Axl expression in tumors using a radiolabeled antibody. We radiolabeled anti-human Axl (Axl mAb) and control IgG1 antibodies with {sup 125}I with high specific radioactivity and radiochemical purity, resulting in an immunoreactive fraction suitable for in vivo studies. Radiolabeled antibodies were investigated in severe combined immunodeficient mice harboring subcutaneous CFPAC (Axl{sup high}) and Panc1 (Axl{sup low}) pancreatic cancer xenografts by ex vivo biodistribution and imaging. Based on these results, the specificity of [{sup 125}I]Axl mAb was also validated in mice harboring orthotopic Panc1 or CFPAC tumors and in mice harboring subcutaneous 22Rv1 (Axl{sup low}) or DU145 (Axl{sup high}) prostate tumors by ex vivo biodistribution and imaging studies at 72 h post-injection of the antibody. Both imaging and biodistribution studies demonstrated specific and persistent accumulation of [{sup 125}I]Axl mAb in Axl{sup high} (CFPAC and DU145) expression tumors compared to the Axl{sup low} (Panc1 and 22Rv1) expression tumors. Axl expression in these tumors was further confirmed by immunohistochemical studies. No difference in the uptake of radioactivity was observed between the control [{sup 125}I]IgG1 antibody in the Axl{sup high} and Axl{sup low} expression tumors. These data demonstrate the feasibility of imaging Axl expression in pancreatic

  2. Image Guidance Based on Prostate Position for Prostate Cancer Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos Wagner, Marcus; Indelicato, Daniel; Fryer, Amber; Horne, David; Chellini, Angela; McKenzie, Craig; Lawlor, Paula; Mahajan, Chaitali; Li Zuofeng; Lin Liyong; Keole, Sameer

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To determine the target coverage for proton therapy with and without image guidance and daily prebeam reorientation. Methods and Materials: A total of 207 prostate positions were analyzed for 9 prostate cancer patients treated using our low-risk prostate proton therapy protocol (University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute 001). The planning target volume was defined as the prostate plus a 5-mm axial and 8-mm superoinferior extension. The prostate was repositioned using 5- and 10-mm shifts (anteriorly, inferiorly, posteriorly, and superiorly) and for Points A-D using a combination of 10-mm multidimensional movements (anteriorly or inferiorly; posteriorly or superiorly; and left or right). The beams were then realigned using the new prostate position. The prescription dose was 78 Gray equivalent (GE) to 95% of the planning target volume. Results: For small movements in the anterior, inferior, and posterior directions within the planning target volume ({<=}5 mm), treatment realignment demonstrated small, but significant, improvements in the clinical target volume (CTV) coverage to the prescribed dose (78 GE). The anterior and posterior shifts also significantly increased the minimal CTV dose ({delta} +1.59 GE). For prostate 10-mm movements in the inferior, posterior, and superior directions, the beam realignment produced larger and significant improvements for both the CTV V{sub 78} ({delta} +6.4%) and the CTV minimal dose ({delta} +8.22 GE). For the compounded 10-mm multidimensional shifts, realignment significantly improved the CTV V{sub 78} ({delta} +11.8%) and CTV minimal dose ({delta} +23.6 GE). After realignment, the CTV minimal dose was >76.6 GE (>98%) for all points (A-D). Conclusion: Proton beam realignment after target shift will enhance CTV coverage for different prostate positions.

  3. Association of multiparametric MRI quantitative imaging features with prostate cancer gene expression in MRI-targeted prostate biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Stoyanova, Radka; Pollack, Alan; Takhar, Mandeep; Lynne, Charles; Parra, Nestor; Lam, Lucia L.C.; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Buerki, Christine; Castillo, Rosa; Jorda, Merce; Ashab, Hussam Al-deen; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N.; Punnen, Sanoj; Parekh, Dipen J.; Abramowitz, Matthew C.; Gillies, Robert J.; Davicioni, Elai; Erho, Nicholas; Ishkanian, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Standard clinicopathological variables are inadequate for optimal management of prostate cancer patients. While genomic classifiers have improved patient risk classification, the multifocality and heterogeneity of prostate cancer can confound pre-treatment assessment. The objective was to investigate the association of multiparametric (mp)MRI quantitative features with prostate cancer risk gene expression profiles in mpMRI-guided biopsies tissues. Global gene expression profiles were generated from 17 mpMRI-directed diagnostic prostate biopsies using an Affimetrix platform. Spatially distinct imaging areas (‘habitats’) were identified on MRI/3D-Ultrasound fusion. Radiomic features were extracted from biopsy regions and normal appearing tissues. We correlated 49 radiomic features with three clinically available gene signatures associated with adverse outcome. The signatures contain genes that are over-expressed in aggressive prostate cancers and genes that are under-expressed in aggressive prostate cancers. There were significant correlations between these genes and quantitative imaging features, indicating the presence of prostate cancer prognostic signal in the radiomic features. Strong associations were also found between the radiomic features and significantly expressed genes. Gene ontology analysis identified specific radiomic features associated with immune/inflammatory response, metabolism, cell and biological adhesion. To our knowledge, this is the first study to correlate radiogenomic parameters with prostate cancer in men with MRI-guided biopsy. PMID:27438142

  4. Imaging Primary Prostate Cancer and Bone Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    Bone Metastasis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Xiaoyuan Chen, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Leland Stanford Junior University...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Leland Stanford Junior University...Schonbrunn A. Bombesin receptors in a human duodenal tumor cell line: binding properties and function. Cancer Res 1994;54:818–24. [11] Chung DH, Evers

  5. Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by collagen Hybridization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    from enlarged lymph nodes. Figure 3. Ex vivo NIRF imaging of PC-3 PIP xenograft. AI = androgen independent, AR = androgen receptor negative, PSMA ...center O.D. rim/focal ROI PC-3 rapid 0.25 ± .09 1.21 ± 0.40 PC-3 ( PSMA +) PIP rapid 0.26 ± .12 NA DU-145 slow 0.01 ± 0.01 0.06 ± 0.02 HP LNCaP

  6. Imaging Prostate Cancer Microenvironment by Collagen Hybridization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    microdialysis cassette against PBS, pH 7.5 for 1 hour. Radio TLC was used to assess radiochemical purity before and after a test-decaging. The presence of... TLC and in vivo imaging results. Radio TLC in bottom left shows multiple labeled species following photodeprotection in the presence and absence of...portion of both DTPA and DOTA-chelated radioindium complex, which is also suggested by the radio TLC data. 7    Labeling with radioiodine, however

  7. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    determine the association between fatty acid synthase (FAS) overexpression and intraprostatic fat as measured by in-vivo imaging using proton magnetic...between FAS protein overexpression by histology, in-vivo intraprostatic fat as measured by 1H MRSI, metabolic signatures of lipid oxidation and...Woodward, G. Thomas, E. Dacey, X. Wang , P. Farris, W. Stoller, A. M. Acevedo, A. Palma, M. Sammi, W. D. Rooney, F. V. Coakley, J. Purnell

  8. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    regulatory documents are stored per VA protocol. 5. Review protocol and procedures with clinical staff; establish pathology residents’ formal...have recruited 10 men whose data will only be utilized during this optimization time period. Independent contracts with the pathology residents...agent (1) for endorectal coil (Ecoil) imaging was also tested on phantoms (fat, water, and pork muscle piece) made in-house. Compared to Ecoil filled

  9. (68)Ga-PSMA PET/MR with multimodality image analysis for primary prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Eiber, Matthias; Nekolla, Stephan G; Maurer, Tobias; Weirich, Gregor; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Current imaging procedures for prostate cancer including positron emission tomography (PET) exhibit considerable limitations and are not always able to meet the diagnostic needs. Recently, a (68)Gallium-labeled ligand of the prostate-specific membrane antigen ((68)Ga-PSMA) has been introduced in PET-imaging of prostate cancer with first promising results. Due to relatively exclusive expression of PSMA in prostatic tissue as well as increased expression in prostate cancer, 68 Ga-PSMA was reported to exhibit a favorable lesion to background ratio. Together with the novel development of combined PET/MRI, the combination of excellent morphological detail, multiparametric functional information, and molecular PET data might lead to a significant improvement in detection of prostate cancer. We present an exemplarily case of primary staging using multiparametric (68)Ga-PSMA PET/MR by combining molecular and structural information.

  10. A Novel Imaging Approach for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer Based on Endogenous Zinc Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Subrata K.; Kim, Pilhan; Zhang, Xiao-an; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Moore, Anna; Lippard, Stephen J.; Medarova, Zdravka

    2010-01-01

    The early detection of prostate cancer is a life-saving event in patients harboring potentially aggressive disease. With the development of malignancy there is a dramatic reduction in the zinc content of prostate tissue associated with the inability of cancer cells to accumulate the ion. In the current study, we utilized endogenous zinc as an imaging biomarker for prostate cancer detection and progression monitoring. We employed a novel fluorescent sensor for mobile zinc (ZPP1) to detect and monitor the development of prostate cancer in a transgenic mouse model of prostate adenocarcinoma, using in vivo optical imaging correlated with biological fluid-based methods. We demonstrated that the progression of prostate cancer could be monitored in vivo judging by decreasing zinc content in the prostates of tumor-bearing mice in an age-dependent manner. In a novel quantitative assay, we determine the concentration of mobile zinc in both prostate cell lysates and mouse prostate extracts through simple titration of the ZPP1 sensor. Our findings fulfill the promise of zinc-based prostate cancer diagnostics with the prospect for immediate clinical translation. PMID:20610630

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in the new paradigm for the diagnosis of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, J C; Catalá, V

    For various reasons, prostate cancer is a major public health problem. It is a very common cancer, but has a very low mortality rate because it comprises two types of disease: one insignificant, indolent, and much more common, and the other aggressive, significant, and much less common. The routine diagnostic approach to prostate cancer has been systematic blind biopsies, which has low detection rates and might detect low risk, insignificant prostate cancer, leading to overdiagnosis and overtreatment of indolent cancers. The possibility of including multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnostic management to improve the detection of aggressive cancer while reducing the overdiagnosis of indolent cancer represents a change in the diagnostic management. This article updates knowledge about the diagnostic management of prostate cancer including multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging.

  12. PSMA-targeted contrast agents for intraoperative imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bao, Kai; Lee, Jeong Heon; Kang, Homan; Park, G Kate; El Fakhri, Georges; Choi, Hak Soo

    2017-02-04

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) can serve as a molecular cell surface target for the detection and treatment of prostate cancer. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging enables highly sensitive, rapid, and non-radioactive imaging of PSMA, though specific targeting still remains a challenge because no optimized contrast agents exist.

  13. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of prostate cancer using heptamethine carbocyanine dyes

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, JIANLIN; YI, XIAOMIN; YAN, FEI; WANG, FULI; QIN, WEIJUN; WU, GUOJUN; YANG, XIAOJIAN; SHAO, CHEN; CHUNG, LELAND W.K.

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is an attractive novel modality for the detection of cancer. A previous study defined two organic polymethine cyanine dyes as ideal NIRF probes, IR-783 and its derivative MHI-148, which have excellent optical characteristics, superior biocompatibility and cancer targeting abilities. To investigate the feasibility of NIRF dye-mediated prostate cancer imaging, dye uptake and subcellular co-localization were investigated in PC-3, DU-145 and LNCaP human prostate cancer cells and RWPE-1 normal prostate epithelial cells. Different organic anion transporting peptide (OATP) inhibitors were utilized to explore the potential role of the OATP subtype, including the nonspecific OATP inhibitor bromosulfophthalein, the OATP1 inhibitor 17β-estradiol, the selective OATP1B1 inhibitor rifampicin and the selective OATP1B3 inhibitor cholecystokinin octapeptide. NIRF dyes were also used for the simulated detection of circulating tumor cells and the rapid detection of prostate cancer in human prostate cancer tissues and prostate cancer xenografts in mouse models. The results revealed that the cancer-specific uptake of these organic dyes in prostate cancer cells occurred primarily via OATP1B3. A strong NIRF signal was detected in prostate cancer tissues, but not in normal tissues that were stained with IR-783. Prostate cancer cells were recognized with particular NIR fluorescence in isolated mononuclear cell mixtures. The results of the present study demonstrated that NIRF dye-mediated imaging is a feasible and practicable method for prostate cancer detection, although further investigative studies are required before clinical translation. PMID:25354708

  14. Prostate cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate cancer screening - PSA; Prostate cancer screening - digital rectal exam; Prostate cancer screening - DRE ... level of PSA could mean you have prostate cancer. But other conditions can also cause a high ...

  15. Improving Prediction of Prostate Cancer Recurrence using Chemical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jin Tae; Kajdacsy-Balla, André; Macias, Virgilia; Walsh, Michael; Sinha, Saurabh; Bhargava, Rohit

    2015-03-01

    Precise Outcome prediction is crucial to providing optimal cancer care across the spectrum of solid cancers. Clinically-useful tools to predict risk of adverse events (metastases, recurrence), however, remain deficient. Here, we report an approach to predict the risk of prostate cancer recurrence, at the time of initial diagnosis, using a combination of emerging chemical imaging, a diagnostic protocol that focuses simultaneously on the tumor and its microenvironment, and data analysis of frequent patterns in molecular expression. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging was employed to record the structure and molecular content from tumors prostatectomy. We analyzed data from a patient cohort that is mid-grade dominant - which is the largest cohort of patients in the modern era and in whom prognostic methods are largely ineffective. Our approach outperforms the two widely used tools, Kattan nomogram and CAPRA-S score in a head-to-head comparison for predicting risk of recurrence. Importantly, the approach provides a histologic basis to the prediction that identifies chemical and morphologic features in the tumor microenvironment that is independent of conventional clinical information, opening the door to similar advances in other solid tumors.

  16. Improving PET spatial resolution and detectability for prostate cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, H.; Guerin, L.; Casey, M. E.; Conti, M.; Eriksson, L.; Michel, C.; Fanti, S.; Pettinato, C.; Adler, S.; Choyke, P.

    2014-08-01

    Prostate cancer, one of the most common forms of cancer among men, can benefit from recent improvements in positron emission tomography (PET) technology. In particular, better spatial resolution, lower noise and higher detectability of small lesions could be greatly beneficial for early diagnosis and could provide a strong support for guiding biopsy and surgery. In this article, the impact of improved PET instrumentation with superior spatial resolution and high sensitivity are discussed, together with the latest development in PET technology: resolution recovery and time-of-flight reconstruction. Using simulated cancer lesions, inserted in clinical PET images obtained with conventional protocols, we show that visual identification of the lesions and detectability via numerical observers can already be improved using state of the art PET reconstruction methods. This was achieved using both resolution recovery and time-of-flight reconstruction, and a high resolution image with 2 mm pixel size. Channelized Hotelling numerical observers showed an increase in the area under the LROC curve from 0.52 to 0.58. In addition, a relationship between the simulated input activity and the area under the LROC curve showed that the minimum detectable activity was reduced by more than 23%.

  17. IR-780 Dye for Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiaomin; Yan, Fei; Wang, Fuli; Qin, Weijun; Wu, Guojun; Yang, Xiaojian; Shao, Chen; Chung, Leland W.K.; Yuan, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging as a novel imaging modality that allows for early detection of cancer and real-time monitoring to acquire related information. IR-780 iodide, a lipophilic dye, accumulates selectively in breast cancer cells and drug-resistant human lung cancer cells, with a peak emission at 780 nm that can be easily detected by the NIRF imaging system. The application of IR-780 for prostate cancer imaging was thoroughly investigated to further expand its clinical value. Material/Methods The impact of IR-780 on the survival of prostate cancer cells PC-3 and LNCaP as well as normal prostate epithelial cells RWPE-1 was determined. Duration of IR-780 dye staining was optimized in PC-3 cells. The involvement of specific OATP1B3 inhibitor in the selective accumulation of IR-780 was investigated. IR-780 for prostate cancer imaging was carried out in athymic nude mouse models and, acute toxicity of IR-780 was evaluated. Results IR-780 incubation resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition to cell proliferation. Mean fluorescence intensity of prostate cancer cells peaked at 20-min IR-780 incubation. Specific uptake of IR-780 dye in prostate cancer cells was mainly through the function of OATP1B3. We also demonstrated that NIRF dye effectively identified the subcutaneous prostate cancer xenografts, subsequently confirmed by histological examination. There was no significant impact on the physical activity, weight, and tissue histology of BABL/C mice with 10-fold imaging dose of 1-month IR-780 dye administration. Conclusions NIRF imaging using IR-780 dye is a feasible and practicable method for prostate cancer detection, with potential tumor-killing ability, although more investigations are needed before clinical translation. PMID:25686161

  18. [Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Bey, P; Beckendorf, V; Stinès, J

    2001-10-01

    Radiation therapy of prostate carcinoma with a curative intent implies to treat the whole prostate at high dose (at least 66 Gy). According to clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason's score, the clinical target volume may include seminal vesicles and less often pelvic lymph nodes. Microscopic extracapsular extension is found in 15 to 60% of T1-T2 operated on, specially in apex tumors. On contrary, cancers developing from the transitional zone may stay limited to the prostate even with a big volume and with a high PSA level. Zonal anatomy of the prostate identifies internal prostate, including the transitional zone (5% of the prostate in young people). External prostate includes central and peripheral zones. The inferior limit of the prostate is not lower than the inferior border of the pubic symphysis. Clinical and radiological examination: ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), CT-scan identify prognostic factors as tumor volume, capsule effraction, seminal vesicles invasion and lymph node extension. The identification of the clinical target volume is now done mainly by CT-Scan which identifies prostate and seminal vesicles. NMR could be helpful to identify more precisely prostate apex. The definition of margins around the clinical target volume has to take in account daily reproducibility and organ motion and of course the maximum tolerable dose for organs at risk.

  19. Image-guided diagnosis of prostate cancer can increase detection of tumors

    Cancer.gov

    In the largest prospective study to date of image-guided technology for identifying suspicious regions of the prostate to biopsy, researchers compared the ability of this technology to detect high-risk prostate cancer with that of the current standard of

  20. Protease-Activated Pore-Forming Peptides for the Treatment and Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    LeBeau, Aaron M.; Denmeade, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    A common hallmark of cancers with highly aggressive phenotypes is increased proteolysis in the tumor and the surrounding microenvironment. Prostate cancer has a number of proteases uniquely associated with it that may play various important roles in disease progression. In this report, we utilize the peritumoral proteolytic activity of prostate cancer to activate engineered peptide constructs for the treatment and noninvasive imaging of prostate cancer. Using a modular "propeptide" approach, a cationic diastereomeric pore-forming peptide domain was linked to an inactivating acidic peptide domain. The inactivating acidic peptide domain was engineered to be a cleavable substrate for the secreted serine protease prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or the transmembrane metalloprotease prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA). The propeptides were then evaluated in a direct comparison study. Both the PSA and PSMA activated propeptides were found to be cytotoxic to prostate cancer cells in vitro. In vivo, however, treatment of LNCaP and CWR22Rv1 xenografts with the PSMA propeptide resulted in a pronounced cytostatic effect when compared with xenografts treated with the PSA propeptide or the cationic diastereomeric peptide alone. The PSMA activated propeptide also proved to be an effective optical imaging probe in vivo when labeled with a near-infrared fluorophore. These data suggest that protease-activated pore-forming peptides could potentially be used for both imaging and treating prostate cancer. PMID:25537662

  1. Restriction spectrum imaging improves MRI-based prostate cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    McCammack, Kevin C.; Schenker-Ahmed, Natalie M.; White, Nathan S.; Best, Shaun R.; Marks, Robert M.; Heimbigner, Jared; Kane, Christopher J.; Parsons, J. Kellogg; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Bartsch, Hauke; Desikan, Rahul S.; Rakow-Penner, Rebecca A.; Liss, Michael A.; Margolis, Daniel J. A.; Raman, Steven S.; Shabaik, Ahmed; Dale, Anders M.; Karow, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic performance of restriction spectrum imaging (RSI), with that of conventional multi-parametric (MP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for prostate cancer (PCa) detection in a blinded reader-based format. Methods Three readers independently evaluated 100 patients (67 with proven PCa) who underwent MP-MRI and RSI within 6 months of systematic biopsy (N = 67; 23 with targeting performed) or prostatectomy (N = 33). Imaging was performed at 3 Tesla using a phased-array coil. Readers used a five-point scale estimating the likelihood of PCa present in each prostate sextant. Evaluation was performed in two separate sessions, first using conventional MP-MRI alone then immediately with MP-MRI and RSI in the same session. Four weeks later, another scoring session used RSI and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) without conventional diffusion-weighted or dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. Reader interpretations were then compared to prostatectomy data or biopsy results. Receiver operating characteristic curves were performed, with area under the curve (AUC) used to compare across groups. Results MP-MRI with RSI achieved higher AUCs compared to MP-MRI alone for identifying high-grade (Gleason score greater than or equal to 4 + 3=7) PCa (0.78 vs. 0.70 at the sextant level; P < 0.001 and 0.85 vs. 0.79 at the hemigland level; P = 0.04). RSI and T2WI alone achieved AUCs similar to MP-MRI for high-grade PCa (0.71 vs. 0.70 at the sextant level). With hemigland analysis, high-grade disease results were similar when comparing RSI + T2WI with MP-MRI, although with greater AUCs compared to the sextant analysis (0.80 vs. 0.79). Conclusion Including RSI with MP-MRI improves PCa detection compared to MP-MRI alone, and RSI with T2WI achieves similar PCa detection as MP-MRI. PMID:26910114

  2. Prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, D; Waxman, J

    2002-01-01

    It is a paradigm in cancer treatment that early detection and treatment improves survival. However, although screening measures lead to a higher rate of detection, for small bulk localised prostate cancer it remains unclear whether early detection and early treatment will lead to an overall decrease in mortality. The management options include surveillance, radiotherapy, and radical prostatectomy but there is no evidence base to evaluate the benefits of each approach. Advanced prostate cancer is managed by hormonal therapy. There have been major changes in treatment over the last two decades with the use of more humane treatment and developments in both chemotherapy and radiation. In this article we review the natural history and management of prostate cancer. PMID:12415080

  3. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... If the cancer has not spread outside the prostate gland, common treatments include: Surgery ( radical prostatectomy ) Radiation therapy , including brachytherapy and proton therapy If you are older, your doctor may recommend simply monitoring the cancer with PSA tests and biopsies. Hormone therapy is ...

  4. A Rare Case of Omentum Invasive Prostate Cancer: Staging With PSMA PET/CT Imaging and Response to Systemic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ladwa, Rahul; Gustafson, Sonja; McCaffrey, Elizabeth; Miles, Kenneth; O'Byrne, Kenneth

    2017-02-24

    The omentum is a rare metastatic site for prostatic adenocarcinoma. We present a case of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer, with progressive omentum invasive prostate cancer identified on prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT scan. Omental biopsy revealed metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma, and cabazitaxel chemotherapy was instituted with a prostate-specific antigen biochemical response. Repeat PSMA PET/CT imaging revealed increased avidity in omental metastasis. Despite prostate-specific antigen response, PSMA PET/CT did not correlate with a therapeutic response.

  5. PET Imaging in Prostate Cancer: Focus on Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Mease, Ronnie C.; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with emerging radiopharmaceuticals promises accurate staging of primary disease, restaging of recurrent disease, detection of metastatic lesions and, ultimately, for predicting the aggressiveness of disease. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a well-characterized imaging biomarker of PCa. Because PSMA levels are directly related to androgen independence, metastasis and progression, PSMA could prove an important target for the development of new radiopharmaceuticals for PET. Preclinical data for new PSMA-based radiotracers are discussed and include new 89Zr- and 64Cu-labeled anti-PSMA antibodies and antibody fragments, 64Cu-labeled aptamers, and 11C-, 18F-, 68Ga-, 64Cu-, and 86Y-labeled low molecular weight inhibitors of PSMA. Several of these agents, namely 68Ga-HBED-CC conjugate 15, 18F-DCFBC 8, and BAY1075553 are particularly promising, each having detected sites of PCa in initial clinical studies. These early clinical results suggest that PET/CT using PSMA-targeted agents, especially with compounds of low molecular weight, will make valuable contributions to the management of PCa. PMID:23590171

  6. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  7. Echo-Planar Imaging Based J-Resolved Spectroscopic Imaging for Improved Metabolite Detection in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    2007;15(3):433–48. 18. Turkbey B, Pinto PA, Mani H, et al. Prostate cancer: value of multiparamet- ric MR imaging at 3T for detection—histopathologic...Padhani AR, Gapinski CJ, Macvicar DA, Parker GJ, Suckling J, Revell PB, Leach MO, Dearnaley DP, Husband JE. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI of prostate

  8. Prostate Cancer Detection Using Near Infrared Spectral Polarization Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Electrical Engineering 2Department of Physics Introduction The City College of the City Univ. of NY The increasing incidence and mortality rate of...imaging methods on human rectum-membrane-prostate semiconductor, quantum well- based semiconductor devices, optical imaging samples using light... lasers , photonics, biomedical optics, condensed matter physics , and nonlinear optics. He has been one of the prime movers in optical biopsy and

  9. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  10. The role of imaging in the diagnosis of primary prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Hugh; deSouza, Nandita M

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are key imaging modalities in prostate cancer diagnosis. MRI offers a range of intrinsic contrast mechanisms (T2, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), MR spectroscopy (MRS)) and extrinsic contrast-generating options based on tumour vascular state following injection of weakly paramagnetic agents such as gadolinium. Together these parameters are referred to as multiparametric (mp)MRI and are used for detecting and guiding biopsy and staging prostate cancer. Although sensitivity of mpMRI is <75% for disease detection, specificity is >90% and a standardised reporting system together with MR-guided targeted biopsy is the optimal diagnostic pathway. Shear wave ultrasound elastography is a new technique which also holds promise for future studies. This article describes the developments in imaging the primary site of prostate cancer and reviews their current and future utility for screening, diagnosis and T-staging the disease. PMID:28344811

  11. Prediction of Prostate Cancer Recurrence Using Quantitative Phase Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Macias, Virgilia; Tangella, Krishnarao; Kajdacsy-Balla, André; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-05-01

    The risk of biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer among individuals who undergo radical prostatectomy for treatment is around 25%. Current clinical methods often fail at successfully predicting recurrence among patients at intermediate risk for recurrence. We used a label-free method, spatial light interference microscopy, to perform localized measurements of light scattering in prostatectomy tissue microarrays. We show, for the first time to our knowledge, that anisotropy of light scattering in the stroma immediately adjoining cancerous glands can be used to identify patients at higher risk for recurrence. The data show that lower value of anisotropy corresponds to a higher risk for recurrence, meaning that the stroma adjoining the glands of recurrent patients is more fractionated than in non-recurrent patients. Our method outperformed the widely accepted clinical tool CAPRA-S in the cases we interrogated irrespective of Gleason grade, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and pathological tumor-node-metastasis (pTNM) stage. These results suggest that QPI shows promise in assisting pathologists to improve prediction of prostate cancer recurrence.

  12. Evaluation of the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer in Patients with Prostate-specific Antigen <20 ng/ml

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Wang, Jian-Ye; Li, Chun-Mei; Zhang, Ya-Qun; Wang, Jian-Long; Wan, Ben; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Min; Li, Sa-Ying; Wan, Gang; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: The European Society of Urogenital Radiology has built the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) for standardizing the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). This study evaluated the PI-RADS diagnosis method in patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <20 ng/ml. Methods: A total of 133 patients with PSA <20 ng/ml were prospectively recruited. T2-weighted (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance images of the prostate were acquired before a 12-core transrectal prostate biopsy. Each patient's peripheral zone was divided into six regions on the images; each region corresponded to two of the 12 biopsy cores. T2WI, DWI, and T2WI + DWI scores were computed according to PI-RADS. The diagnostic accuracy of the PI-RADS score was evaluated using histopathology of prostate biopsies as the reference standard. Results: PCa was histologically diagnosed in 169 (21.2%) regions. Increased PI-RADS score correlated positively with increased cancer detection rate. The cancer detection rate for scores 1 to 5 was 2.8%, 15.0%, 34.6%, 52.6%, and 88.9%, respectively, using T2WI and 12.0%, 20.2%, 48.0%, 85.7%, and 93.3%, respectively, using DWI. For T2WI + DWI, the cancer detection rate was 1.5% (score 2), 13.5% (scores 3–4), 41.3% (scores 5–6), 75.9% (scores 7–8), and 92.3% (scores 9–10). The area under the curve for cancer detection was 0.700 (T2WI), 0.735 (DWI) and 0.749 (T2WI + DWI). The sensitivity and specificity were 53.8% and 89.2%, respectively, when using scores 5–6 as the cutoff value for T2WI + DWI. Conclusions: The PI-RADS score correlates with the PCa detection rate in patients with PSA <20 ng/ml. The summed score of T2WI + DWI has the highest accuracy in detection of PCa. However, the sensitivity should be further improved. PMID:27270538

  13. Automated classification of histopathology images of prostate cancer using a Bag-of-Words approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghavi, Foram M.; Agaian, Sos S.

    2016-05-01

    The goals of this paper are (1) test the Computer Aided Classification of the prostate cancer histopathology images based on the Bag-of-Words (BoW) approach (2) evaluate the performance of the classification grade 3 and 4 of the proposed method using the results of the approach proposed by the authors Khurd et al. in [9] and (3) classify the different grades of cancer namely, grade 0, 3, 4, and 5 using the proposed approach. The system performance is assessed using 132 prostate cancer histopathology of different grades. The system performance of the SURF features are also analyzed by comparing the results with SIFT features using different cluster sizes. The results show 90.15% accuracy in detection of prostate cancer images using SURF features with 75 clusters for k-mean clustering. The results showed higher sensitivity for SURF based BoW classification compared to SIFT based BoW.

  14. ProxiScan™: A Novel Camera for Imaging Prostate Cancer

    ScienceCinema

    Ralph James

    2016-07-12

    ProxiScan is a compact gamma camera suited for high-resolution imaging of prostate cancer. Developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Hybridyne Imaging Technologies, Inc., ProxiScan won a 2009 R&D 100 Award, sponsored by R&D Magazine to recognize t

  15. Prostate-specific membrane antigen as a target for cancer imaging and therapy

    PubMed Central

    KIESS, A. P.; BANERJEE, S. R.; MEASE, R. C.; ROWE, S. P.; RAO, A.; FOSS, C. A.; CHEN, Y.; YANG, X.; CHO, S. Y.; NIMMAGADDA, S.; POMPER, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a molecular target whose use has resulted in some of the most productive work toward imaging and treating prostate cancer over the past two decades. A wide variety of imaging agents extending from intact antibodies to low-molecular-weight compounds permeate the literature. In parallel there is a rapidly expanding pool of antibody-drug conjugates, radiopharmaceutical therapeutics, small-molecule drug conjugates, theranostics and nanomedicines targeting PSMA. Such productivity is motivated by the abundant expression of PSMA on the surface of prostate cancer cells and within the neovasculature of other solid tumors, with limited expression in most normal tissues. Animating the field is a variety of small-molecule scaffolds upon which the radionuclides, drugs, MR-detectable species and nanoparticles can be placed with relative ease. Among those, the urea-based agents have been most extensively leveraged, with expanding clinical use for detection and more recently for radiopharmaceutical therapy of prostate cancer, with surprisingly little toxicity. PSMA imaging of other cancers is also appearing in the clinical literature, and may overtake FDG for certain indications. Targeting PSMA may provide a viable alternative or first-line approach to managing prostate and other cancers. PMID:26213140

  16. Preclinical Evaluation of (18)F-PSMA-1007, a New Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Ligand for Prostate Cancer Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Jens; Schäfer, Martin; Benešová, Martina; Bauder-Wüst, Ulrike; Leotta, Karin; Eder, Matthias; Neels, Oliver C; Haberkorn, Uwe; Giesel, Frederik L; Kopka, Klaus

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, several radiotracers targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have been introduced. Some of them have had a high clinical impact on the treatment of patients with prostate cancer. However, the number of (18)F-labeled tracers addressing PSMA is still limited. Therefore, we aimed to develop a radiofluorinated molecule resembling the structure of therapeutic PSMA-617. Methods: The nonradioactive reference compound PSMA-1007 and the precursor were produced by solid-phase chemistry. The radioligand (18)F-PSMA-1007 was produced by a 2-step procedure with the prosthetic group 6-(18)F-fluoronicotinic acid 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl ester. The binding affinity of the ligand for PSMA and its internalization properties were evaluated in vitro with PSMA-positive LNCaP (lymph node carcinoma of the prostate) cells. Further, organ distribution studies were performed with mice bearing LNCaP and PC-3 (prostate cancer cell line; PSMA-negative) tumors. Finally, small-animal PET imaging of an LNCaP tumor-bearing mouse was performed. Results: The identified ligand had a binding affinity of 6.7 ± 1.7 nM for PSMA and an exceptionally high internalization ratio (67% ± 13%) in vitro. In organ distribution studies, high and specific tumor uptake (8.0 ± 2.4 percentage injected dose per gram) in LNCaP tumor-bearing mice was observed. In the small-animal PET experiments, LNCaP tumors were clearly visualized. Conclusion: The radiofluorinated PSMA ligand showed promising characteristics in its preclinical evaluation, and the feasibility of prostate cancer imaging was demonstrated by small-animal PET studies. Therefore, we recommend clinical transfer of the radioligand (18)F-PSMA-1007 for use as a diagnostic PET tracer in prestaging and monitoring of prostate cancer.

  17. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF? Featured Blue Jacket Fashion Show Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms The conversation about PSA screening really applies ... That’s why screening is such an important topic. Prostate Cancer Basics About the Prostate Risk Factors Prevention Symptoms ...

  18. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  19. Role of serial multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in prostate cancer active surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Larissa J; Janoski, Michele; Wachowicz, Keith; Yahya, Atiyah; Boychak, Oleksandr; Amanie, John; Pervez, Nadeem; Parliament, Matthew B; Pituskin, Edith; Fallone, B Gino; Usmani, Nawaid

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine whether addition of 3T multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to an active surveillance protocol could detect aggressive or progressive prostate cancer. METHODS: Twenty-three patients with low risk disease were enrolled on this active surveillance study, all of which had Gleason score 6 or less disease. All patients had clinical assessments, including digital rectal examination and prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, every 6 mo with annual 3T mpMRI scans with gadolinium contrast and minimum sextant prostate biopsies. The MRI images were anonymized of patient identifiers and clinical information and each scan underwent radiological review without the other results known. Descriptive statistics for demographics and follow-up as well as the sensitivity and specificity of mpMRI to identify prostate cancer and progressive disease were calculated. RESULTS: During follow-up (median 24.8 mo) 11 of 23 patients with low-risk prostate cancer had disease progression and were taken off study to receive definitive treatment. Disease progression was identified through upstaging of Gleason score on subsequent biopsies for all 11 patients with only 2 patients also having a PSA doubling time of less than 2 years. All 23 patients had biopsy confirmed prostate cancer but only 10 had a positive index of suspicion on mpMRI scans at baseline (43.5% sensitivity). Aggressive disease prediction from baseline mpMRI scans had satisfactory specificity (81.8%) but low sensitivity (58.3%). Twenty-two patients had serial mpMRI scans and evidence of disease progression was seen for 3 patients all of whom had upstaging of Gleason score on biopsy (30% specificity and 100% sensitivity). CONCLUSION: Addition of mpMRI imaging in active surveillance decision making may help in identifying aggressive disease amongst men with indolent prostate cancer earlier than traditional methods. PMID:27158428

  20. Image segmentation in treatment planning for prostate cancer using the region growing technique.

    PubMed

    Mazonakis, M; Damilakis, J; Varveris, H; Prassopoulos, P; Gourtsoyiannis, N

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of a region growing technique for segmenting prostate, bladder and rectum in CT images of prostate cancer patients. Prostate, bladder and rectum were segmented in all CT images of 10 patients using the region growing technique and manual tracing. Volumes of the above organs computed with the region growing technique were compared with those from manually traced images on a slice-by-slice basis. Measurement reproducibility of both segmentation techniques was evaluated using the data obtained from four independent observers. The region growing technique was 1.5 times faster than manual tracing. There was no statistical difference between the slice volumes of prostate, bladder and rectum obtained by the two segmentation techniques (p > 0.05, paired Student's t-test). Correlation between slice volumes of all organs of interest provided both by region growing and by manual tracing was very good (prostate r2 = 0.84; bladder r2 = 0.93; rectum r2 = 0.85). An overall reasonable agreement was found between the two segmentation techniques. The intraobserver and interobserver variations for prostate, bladder and rectum volume segmentation were found to be lower with the region growing technique than with manual tracing. The suggested semi-automatic technique allows the possibility of generating accurate and reproducible segmentation of prostate, bladder and rectum from CT data with great saving in labour.

  1. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging for improved treatment planning of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Niranjan

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy afflicting Canadian men in 2011. Physicians use digital rectal exams (DRE), blood tests for prostate specific antigen (PSA) and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsies for the initial diagnosis of prostate cancer. None of these tests detail the spatial extent of prostate cancer - information critical for using new therapies that can target cancerous prostate. With an MRI technique called proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H-MRSI), biochemical analysis of the entire prostate can be done without the need for biopsy, providing detailed information beyond the non-specific changes in hardness felt by an experienced urologist in a DRE, the presence of PSA in blood, or the "blind-guidance" of TRUS-guided biopsy. A hindrance to acquiring high quality 1H-MRSI data comes from signal originating from fatty tissue surrounding prostate that tends to mask or distort signal from within the prostate, thus reducing the overall clinical usefulness of 1H-MRSI data. This thesis has three major areas of focus: 1) The development of an optimized 1H-MRSI technique, called conformal voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy (CV-MRS), to deal the with removal of unwanted lipid contaminating artifacts at short and long echo times. 2) An in vivo human study to test the CV-MRS technique, including healthy volunteers and cancer patients scheduled for radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy. 3) A study to determine the efficacy of using the 1H-MRSI data for optimized radiation treatment planning using modern delivery techniques like intensity modulated radiation treatment. Data collected from the study using the optimized CV-MRS method show significantly reduced lipid contamination resulting in high quality spectra throughout the prostate. Combining the CV-MRS technique with spectral-spatial excitation further reduced lipid contamination and opened up the possibility of detecting metabolites with short T2 relaxation times

  2. Image-guided adaptive radiotherapy for prostate and head-and-neck cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Daniel, Jennifer C.

    In the current practice of radiation therapy, daily patient alignments have been based on external skin marks or on bone. However, internal organ variation (both motion and volumetric changes) between treatment fractions can displace the treatment target, causing target underdosage and normal tissue overdosage. In order to deliver the radiation treatment as planned, more accurate knowledge of the daily internal anatomy was needed. Additionally, treatments needed to adapt to these variations by either shifting the patient to account for the daily target position or by altering the treatment plan. In this dissertation, the question of whether inter-fractional variations in internal patient anatomy combined with external set-up uncertainties produced measurable differences between planned and delivered doses for prostate and head-and-neck cancer patients was investigated. Image-guided adaptive treatment strategies to improve tumor coverage and/or reduce normal tissue dose were examined. Treatment deliveries utilizing various alignment procedures for ten prostate cancer patients and eleven head-and-neck cancer patients, each of whom received multiple CT scans over the course of treatment, were simulated. The largest prostate dose losses between planning and delivery were correlated with anterior/posterior and superior/inferior prostate displacement. Daily bone alignment sufficiently maintained target coverage for 70% of patients, ultrasound for 90%, and CT for 100%. A no-action-level correction protocol, which corrected the daily bone alignment for the systematic internal displacement of the prostate based on a pre-determined number of CT image sets, successfully improved the prostate and seminal vesicle dosimetric coverage. Three CT image sets were sufficient to accurately correct the bone alignment scheme for the prostate internal systematic shifts. For head-and-neck cancer patient treatment, setup uncertainties and internal organ variations did not greatly affect

  3. Tuberculous prostatitis: mimicking a cancer.

    PubMed

    Aziz, El Majdoub; Abdelhak, Khallouk; Hassan, Farih Moulay

    2016-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common type of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis . The kidneys, ureter, bladder or genital organs are usually involved. Tuberculosis of the prostate has mainly been described in immune-compromised patients. However, it can exceptionally be found as an isolated lesion in immune-competent patients. Tuberculosis of the prostate may be difficult to differentiate from carcinoma of the prostate and the chronic prostatitis when the prostate is hard and nodular on digital rectal examination and the urine is negative for tuberculosis bacilli. In many cases, a diagnosis of tuberculous prostatitis is made by the pathologist, or the disease is found incidentally after transurethral resection. Therefore, suspicion of tuberculous prostatitis requires a confirmatory biopsy of the prostate. We report the case of 60-year-old man who presented a low urinary tract syndrome. After clinical and biological examination, and imaging, prostate cancer was highly suspected. Transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed and histological examination showed tuberculosis lesions.

  4. COMPACT CdZnTe-BASED GAMMA CAMERA FOR PROSTATE CANCER IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    CUI, Y.; LALL, T.; TSUI, B.; YU, J.; MAHLER, G.; BOLOTNIKOV, A.; VASKA, P.; DeGERONIMO, G.; O'CONNOR, P.; MEINKEN, G.; JOYAL, J.; BARRETT, J.; CAMARDA, G.; HOSSAIN, A.; KIM, K.H.; YANG, G.; POMPER, M.; CHO, S.; WEISMAN, K.; SEO, Y.; BABICH, J.; LaFRANCE, N.; AND JAMES, R.B.

    2011-10-23

    In this paper, we discuss the design of a compact gamma camera for high-resolution prostate cancer imaging using Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) radiation detectors. Prostate cancer is a common disease in men. Nowadays, a blood test measuring the level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) is widely used for screening for the disease in males over 50, followed by (ultrasound) imaging-guided biopsy. However, PSA tests have a high false-positive rate and ultrasound-guided biopsy has a high likelihood of missing small cancerous tissues. Commercial methods of nuclear medical imaging, e.g. PET and SPECT, can functionally image the organs, and potentially find cancer tissues at early stages, but their applications in diagnosing prostate cancer has been limited by the smallness of the prostate gland and the long working distance between the organ and the detectors comprising these imaging systems. CZT is a semiconductor material with wide band-gap and relatively high electron mobility, and thus can operate at room temperature without additional cooling. CZT detectors are photon-electron direct-conversion devices, thus offering high energy-resolution in detecting gamma rays, enabling energy-resolved imaging, and reducing the background of Compton-scattering events. In addition, CZT material has high stopping power for gamma rays; for medical imaging, a few-mm-thick CZT material provides adequate detection efficiency for many SPECT radiotracers. Because of these advantages, CZT detectors are becoming popular for several SPECT medical-imaging applications. Most recently, we designed a compact gamma camera using CZT detectors coupled to an application-specific-integrated-circuit (ASIC). This camera functions as a trans-rectal probe to image the prostate gland from a distance of only 1-5 cm, thus offering higher detection efficiency and higher spatial resolution. Hence, it potentially can detect prostate cancers at their early stages. The performance tests of this camera

  5. Compact CdZnTe-based gamma camera for prostate cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yonggang; Lall, Terry; Tsui, Benjamin; Yu, Jianhua; Mahler, George; Bolotnikov, Aleksey; Vaska, Paul; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; O'Connor, Paul; Meinken, George; Joyal, John; Barrett, John; Camarda, Giuseppe; Hossain, Anwar; Kim, Ki Hyun; Yang, Ge; Pomper, Marty; Cho, Steve; Weisman, Ken; Seo, Youngho; Babich, John; LaFrance, Norman; James, Ralph B.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we discuss the design of a compact gamma camera for high-resolution prostate cancer imaging using Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) radiation detectors. Prostate cancer is a common disease in men. Nowadays, a blood test measuring the level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) is widely used for screening for the disease in males over 50, followed by (ultrasound) imaging-guided biopsy. However, PSA tests have a high falsepositive rate and ultrasound-guided biopsy has a high likelihood of missing small cancerous tissues. Commercial methods of nuclear medical imaging, e.g. PET and SPECT, can functionally image the organs, and potentially find cancer tissues at early stages, but their applications in diagnosing prostate cancer has been limited by the smallness of the prostate gland and the long working distance between the organ and the detectors comprising these imaging systems. CZT is a semiconductor material with wide band-gap and relatively high electron mobility, and thus can operate at room temperature without additional cooling. CZT detectors are photon-electron direct-conversion devices, thus offering high energy-resolution in detecting gamma rays, enabling energy-resolved imaging, and reducing the background of Compton-scattering events. In addition, CZT material has high stopping power for gamma rays; for medical imaging, a few-mm-thick CZT material provides adequate detection efficiency for many SPECT radiotracers. Because of these advantages, CZT detectors are becoming popular for several SPECT medical-imaging applications. Most recently, we designed a compact gamma camera using CZT detectors coupled to an application-specific-integratedcircuit (ASIC). This camera functions as a trans-rectal probe to image the prostate gland from a distance of only 1-5 cm, thus offering higher detection efficiency and higher spatial resolution. Hence, it potentially can detect prostate cancers at their early stages. The performance tests of this camera

  6. An MR Contrast Agent for Intra-Prostatic Imaging of Prostatic Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    nanoparticle MR contrast targeted to the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRP receptor) that will be used to image the intra-prostatic distribution of...develop a magnetic nanoparticle MR contrast targeted to the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRP receptor) that will be used to image the intra...the receptor in a convenient animal model, the normal mouse. The GRP receptor is expressed at high levels in the normal rodent pancreas. I. Synthesis

  7. Usefulness of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in the Localization of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kajihara, Hiroo; Hayashida, Yoshiko; Murakami, Ryuji Katahira, Kazuhiro; Nishimura, Ryuichi; Hamada, Yasuyuki; Kitani, Kousuke; Kitaoka, Mitsuhiko; Suzuki, Yasuko; Kitajima, Mika; Hirai, Toshinori; Morishita, Shoji; Awai, Kazuo; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Advances in high-precision radiation therapy techniques for patients with prostate cancer permit selective escalation of the radiation dose delivered to the dominant intraprostatic lesion and improve the therapeutic ratio. We evaluated the value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for dominant intraprostatic lesion assessment. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 23 patients with early prostate cancer. Before undergoing total prostatectomy, they were evaluated by means of magnetic resonance imaging, including DWI. T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) with and without DWI were retrospectively assessed by six independent observers. Imaging findings were compared with pathologic results from whole prostate specimens on a lesion-by-lesion basis. Results: Pathologic study identified 43 lesions in 23 patients. On magnetic resonance imaging, the six observers correctly identified 11-22 of 43 lesions (sensitivity, 26-51%) on T2WI alone and 20-31 (sensitivity, 47-72%) on T2WI plus DWI. Positive predictive values were 42-73% on T2WI alone and 58-80% on T2WI plus DWI. For all observers, detection was higher on combined T2WI and DWI than on T2WI alone. Conclusion: Because the addition of DWI to T2WI improves the detectability of prostate cancer, DWI may offer a promising new approach for radiation therapy planning.

  8. State-of-the-art uroradiologic imaging in the diagnosis of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Heijmink, Stijn W T P J; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Strum, Stephen S; Oyen, Wim J G; Frauscher, Ferdinand; Witjes, J Alfred; Barentsz, Jelle O

    2011-06-01

    In the diagnostic process of prostate cancer, several radiologic imaging modalities significantly contribute to the detection and localization of the disease. These range from transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to positron emission tomography (PET). Within this review, after evaluation of the literature, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these imaging modalities in clarifying the patient's clinical status as to whether he has prostate cancer or not and if so, where it is located, so that therapy appropriate to the patient's disease may be administered. TRUS, specifically with the usage of intravenous contrast agents, provides an excellent way of directing biopsy towards suspicious areas within the prostate in the general (screening) population. MRI using functional imaging techniques allows for highly accurate detection and localization, particularly in patients with prior negative ultrasound guided biopsies. A promising new development is the performance of biopsy within the magnetic resonance scanner. Subsequently, a proposal for optimal use of radiologic imaging is presented and compared with the European and American urological guidelines on prostate cancer.

  9. Monitoring the clinical outcomes in advanced prostate cancer: what imaging modalities and other markers are reliable?

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael J; Autio, Karen A; Basch, Ethan M; Danila, Daniel C; Larson, Steven; Scher, Howard I

    2013-06-01

    Effective patient care and efficient drug development require accurate tools to assess treatment effects. For metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), response biomarkers have historically been poorly reproducible, inaccurate, inconsistently applied, or only loosely associated with tangible clinical benefits such as survival. However, the field of response assessments for prostate cancer is maturing, in compliance with a rigorous process defined by analytic validation, clinical validation, and clinical qualification. For example, bone imaging with technetium-99m scintigraphy has historically been poorly used in prostate cancer clinical trials and routine patient care, and frequently has led to poor decision-making. However, contemporary clinical trial consensus criteria (Prostate Cancer Working Group 2 [PCWG2]) have standardized the definition of progression on bone scintigraphy and the clinical trials endpoint of radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS). A validated bone scan interpretation form captures the relevant data elements. rPFS and the forms have been undergoing prospective testing in multiple phase III studies. The first of these trials demonstrated a high degree of reproducibility and correlation with overall survival, and rPFS was used by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for approval of abiraterone in chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC. Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are another class of assays with significant promise as response-indicator biomarkers. CTC enumeration has undergone analytic validation and has been FDA-cleared for monitoring patients with prostate cancer in conjunction with other clinical methods. It is not yet a surrogate for survival. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are direct indicators of patient benefit. The assays to measure PROs must undergo each of the steps of biomarker development, and are increasingly being standardized and used as clinical trial endpoints. In this review, we critically assess each of

  10. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back After Treatment Prostate Cancer Treating Prostate Cancer Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  11. Prostate Cancer Detection with Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System Version 1 versus Version 2

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhao-Yan; Wang, Liang; Min, Xiang-De; Wang, Shao-Gang; Wang, Guo-Ping; Cai, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) is a globally acceptable standardization for multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) in prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis. The American College of Radiology revised the PI-RADS to address the limitations of version 1 in December 2014. This study aimed to determine whether the PI-RADS version 2 (PI-RADS v2) scoring system improves the diagnostic accuracy of mp-MRI of the prostate compared with PI-RADS v1. Methods: This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board. A total of 401 consecutive patients, with clinically suspicious PCa undergoing 3.0 T mp-MRI (T2-weighted imaging + diffusion-weighted imaging + DCE) before transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy between June 2013 and July 2015, were included in the study. All patients were scored using the 5-point PI-RADS scoring system based on either PI-RADS v1 or v2. Receiver operating characteristics were calculated for statistical analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy were compared using McNemar's test. Results: PCa was present in 150 of 401 (37.41%) patients. When we pooled data from both peripheral zone (PZ) and transition zone (TZ), the areas under the curve were 0.889 for PI-RADS v1 and 0.942 for v2 (P = 0.0001). Maximal accuracy was achieved with a score threshold of 4. At this threshold, in the PZ, similar sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were achieved with v1 and v2 (all P > 0.05). In the TZ, sensitivity was higher for v2 than for v1 (96.36% vs. 76.36%, P = 0.003), specificity was similar for v2 and v1 (90.24% vs. 84.15%, P = 0.227), and accuracy was higher for v2 than for v1 (92.70% vs. 81.02%, P = 0.002). Conclusions: Both v1 and v2 showed good diagnostic performance for the detection of PCa. However, in the TZ, the performance was better with v2 than with v1. PMID:27748338

  12. Comparison of transrectal photoacoustic, Doppler, and magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Miya; Horiguchi, Akio; Shinmoto, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Irisawa, Kaku; Wada, Takatsugu; Asano, Tomohiko

    2016-03-01

    Transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) is the most popular imaging modality for diagnosing and treating prostate cancer. TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is mandatory for the histological diagnosis of patients with elevated serum prostatespecific antigen (PSA), but its diagnostic accuracy is not satisfactory due to TRUS's low resolution. As a result, a considerable number of patients are required to undergo an unnecessary repeated biopsy. Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) can be used to provide microvascular network imaging using hemoglobin as an intrinsic, optical absorption molecule. We developed an original TRUS-type PAI probe consisting of a micro-convex array transducer with an optical illumination system to provide superimposed PAI and ultrasound images. TRUS-type PAI has the advantage of having much higher resolution and greater contrast than does Doppler TRUS. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the clinical feasibility of the transrectal PAI system. We performed a clinical trial to compare the image of the cancerous area obtained by transrectal PAI with that obtained by TRUS Doppler during prostate biopsy. The obtained prostate biopsy cores were stained with anti-CD34 antibodies to provide a microvascular distribution map. We also confirmed its consistency with PAI and pre-biopsy MRI findings. Our study demonstrated that transrectal identification of tumor angiogenesis under superimposed photoacoustic and ultrasound images was easier than that under TRUS alone. We recognized a consistent relationship between PAI and MRI findings in most cases. However, there were no correspondences in some cases.

  13. Multimodal imaging guided preclinical trials of vascular targeting in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalmuk, James; Folaron, Margaret; Buchinger, Julian; Pili, Roberto; Seshadri, Mukund

    2015-01-01

    The high mortality rate associated with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) underscores the need for improving therapeutic options for this patient population. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential of vascular targeting in prostate cancer. Experimental studies were carried out in subcutaneous and orthotopic Myc-CaP prostate tumors implanted into male FVB mice to examine the efficacy of a novel microtubule targeted vascular disrupting agent (VDA), EPC2407 (Crolibulin™). A non-invasive multimodality imaging approach based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and ultrasound (US) was utilized to guide preclinical trial design and monitor tumor response to therapy. Imaging results were correlated with histopathologic assessment, tumor growth and survival analysis. Contrast-enhanced MRI revealed potent antivascular activity of EPC2407 against subcutaneous and orthotopic Myc-CaP tumors. Longitudinal BLI of Myc-CaP tumors expressing luciferase under the androgen response element (Myc-CaP/ARE-luc) revealed changes in AR signaling and reduction in intratumoral delivery of luciferin substrate following castration suggestive of reduced blood flow. This reduction in blood flow was validated by US and MRI. Combination treatment resulted in sustained vascular suppression, inhibition of tumor regrowth and conferred a survival benefit in both models. These results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of vascular targeting in combination with androgen deprivation against prostate cancer. PMID:26203773

  14. Comparison study of distinguishing cancerous and normal prostate epithelial cells by confocal and polarization diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wenhuan; Lu, Jun Qing; Yang, Li V.; Sa, Yu; Feng, Yuanming; Ding, Junhua; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Accurate classification of malignant cells from benign ones can significantly enhance cancer diagnosis and prognosis by detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). We have investigated two approaches of quantitative morphology and polarization diffraction imaging on two prostate cell types to evaluate their feasibility as single-cell assay methods toward CTC detection after cell enrichment. The two cell types have been measured by a confocal imaging method to obtain their three-dimensional morphology parameters and by a polarization diffraction imaging flow cytometry (p-DIFC) method to obtain image texture parameters. The support vector machine algorithm was applied to examine the accuracy of cell classification with the morphology and diffraction image parameters. Despite larger mean values of cell and nuclear sizes of the cancerous prostate cells than the normal ones, it has been shown that the morphologic parameters cannot serve as effective classifiers. In contrast, accurate classification of the two prostate cell types can be achieved with high classification accuracies on measured data acquired separately in three measurements. These results provide strong evidence that the p-DIFC method has the potential to yield morphology-related "fingerprints" for accurate and label-free classification of the two prostate cell types.

  15. Time-gated optical imaging to detect positive prostate cancer margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zi-Jing; Alexandrakis, George; Patel, Nimit; Shen, Jinhui; Tang, Liping; Liu, Hanli

    2009-02-01

    Laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) has revolutionized the surgical treatment of prostate cancer. This procedure permits complete removal of the prostate and seminal vesicles while minimizing pain and recovery time. However, the laparoscopic approach greatly limits the surgeon's tactile sensation during the procedure. This is particularly true with robot-assisted LRP where no tactile feedback is available forcing the surgeon to rely solely on visual cues. The surgeon and pathologist perform intraoperative frozen section pathologic analysis of a few select tissue fragments, but this is time consuming and costly. Concrete conclusions based on such samples are unreliable as they do not reflect the entire surgical margin status. In this case a conservative approach might dictate removal of more marginal material than necessary, thereby compromising the important nerve-sparing aspects of the procedure. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of using multi-modal time-gated optical imaging, i.e. time-resolved light reflectance and auto-fluorescence life-time imaging performed by an ICCD (Intensified Charge-Coupled Device) imaging system to enable clinicians to detect positive tumor margins with high sensitivity and specificity over the prostate. Results from animal experiments present the potential of identifying differences in optical signals between prostate cancer and control tissues. Results also show that the use of classification algorithms can identify cancerous regions with high sensitivity and specificity.

  16. Molecular Imaging with Quantum Dots Probing EMT and Prostate Cancer Metastasis in Live Animals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    model for prostate cancer . Lab Invest 1998;78(6):i–xv. 9. Greenberg NM. Androgens and growth factors in prostate cancer : A transgenic perspective...16. Zhau HY, Chang SM, Chen BQ, Wang Y, Zhang H, Kao C, Sang QA, Pathak SJ, Chung LW. Androgen -repressed phenotype in human prostate cancer . Proc Natl...CWR22: Androgen -dependent xenograft model derived from a primary human prostatic carcinoma. Cancer Res 1994;54(23): 6049–6052. 18. Corey E, Quinn JE

  17. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy and Near Infrared Imaging for Prostate Cancer Detection: Receptor-targeted and Native Biomarker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang

    Optical spectroscopy and imaging using near-infrared (NIR) light provides powerful tools for non-invasive detection of cancer in tissue. Optical techniques are capable of quantitative reconstructions maps of tissue absorption and scattering properties, thus can map in vivo the differences in the content of certain marker chromophores and/or fluorophores in normal and cancerous tissues (for example: water, tryptophan, collagen and NADH contents). Potential clinical applications of optical spectroscopy and imaging include functional tumor detection and photothermal therapeutics. Optical spectroscopy and imaging apply contrasts from intrinsic tissue chromophores such as water, collagen and NADH, and extrinsic optical contrast agents such as Indocyanine Green (ICG) to distinguish disease tissue from the normal one. Fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging also gives high sensitivity and specificity for biomedical diagnosis. Recent developments on specific-targeting fluorophores such as small receptor-targeted dye-peptide conjugate contrast agent offer high contrast between normal and cancerous tissues hence provide promising future for early tumour detection. This thesis focus on a study to distinguish the cancerous prostate tissue from the normal prostate tissues with enhancement of specific receptor-targeted prostate cancer contrast agents using optical spectroscopy and imaging techniques. The scattering and absorption coefficients, and anisotropy factor of cancerous and normal prostate tissues were investigated first as the basis for the biomedical diagnostic and optical imaging. Understanding the receptors over-expressed prostate cancer cells and molecular target mechanism of ligand, two small ICG-derivative dye-peptides, namely Cypate-Bombesin Peptide Analogue Conjugate (Cybesin) and Cypate-Octreotate Peptide Conjugate (Cytate), were applied to study their clinical potential for human prostate cancer detection. In this work, the steady-state and time

  18. Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor PET.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Persson, Morten; Kjaer, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) overexpression is an important biomarker for aggressiveness in cancer including prostate cancer (PC) and provides independent clinical information in addition to prostate-specific antigen and Gleason score. This article focuses on uPAR PET as a new diagnostic and prognostic imaging biomarker in PC. Many preclinical uPAR-targeted PET imaging studies using AE105 in cancer models have been undertaken with promising results. A major breakthrough was obtained with the recent human translation of uPAR PET in using (64)Cu- and (68)Ga-labelled versions of AE105, respectively. Clinical results from patients with PC included in these studies are encouraging and support continuation with large-scale clinical trials.

  19. Role of Intra- or Periprostatic Calcifications in Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Samir Abdallah; Neves-Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Marta, Gustavo Nader; Haddad, Cecilia Maria Kalil; Fernandes da Silva, Joao Luis

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) allows more precise localization of the prostate, thus minimizing errors resulting from organ motion and set-up during treatment of prostate cancer. Using megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MVCBCT), references such as bones, the prostate itself or implanted fiducial markers can be used as surrogates to correct patient positioning immediately before each treatment fraction. However, the use of fiducials requires an invasive procedure and may increase costs. We aimed to assess whether intra- or periprostatic calcifications (IPC) could be used as natural fiducials. Methods and Materials: Data on patients treated with IGRT for prostate cancer with clearly visible IPC and implanted fiducials in both planning CT and MVCBCT images were reviewed. IPC were classified as central when inside the prostate and peripheral when within the planning target volume. Daily deviations in lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions from baseline positioning using fiducials and using IPC were compared. Results: A total of 287 MVCBCT images were obtained and analyzed from 10 patients. The mean {+-} standard deviation daily deviation (mm) in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical coordinates were 0.55 {+-} 3.11, 0.58 {+-} 3.45, and -0.54 {+-} 4.03, respectively, for fiducials, and 0.72 {+-} 3.22, 0.63 {+-} 3.58, and -0.69 {+-} 4.26, for IPC. The p values for comparisons (fiducials vs. IPC) were 0.003, 0.653, and 0.078 for lateral, longitudinal, and vertical coordinates, respectively. When cases with central IPC were analyzed (n = 7), no significant difference was found in such comparisons. Central IPC and fiducials exhibited a similar pattern of displacement during treatment, with equal values for daily displacements in the three directions for more than 90% of measurements. Conclusions: Our data suggest that centrally located IPC may be used as natural fiducials for treatment positioning during IGRT for prostate cancer, with potential

  20. In Vivo Photoacoustic Imaging of Prostate Cancer Using Targeted Contrast Agent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    detection of early stage prostate cancer, development of near infrared dyes - labeled RNA aptamer that recognizes the prostate specific cell surface protein...the application of PAI for the detection of early stage prostate cancer, development of a NIR dye - labeled RNA aptamer that recognizes the prostate...proposed to enhance the application of PAI for the detection of early stage PrCa: 1. Use of a NIR dye labeled RNA aptamer that recognizes the prostate

  1. [The Diagnostic Value of Pre-Biopsy Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for Detecting Prostate Cancer].

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohei; Miyoshi, Yasuhide; Yoneyama, Shuko; Ishida, Hiroaki; Hattori, Yusuke; Teranishi, Jun-ichi; Kondo, Keiichi; Noguchi, Kazumi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the value of pre-biopsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting prostate cancer. We analyzed 267 men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels of 3-10 ng/ml who underwent systematic prostate needle biopsy. From April 2009 to March 2011, a total of 98 male patients underwent 16-core prostatic biopsies without pre-biopsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (nonenforcement group). From April 2011 to March 2013, 169 men underwent pre-biopsy MRI [T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)] (enforcement group). When MRI findings indicated cancer in the latter group, in addition to the systematic 16-core biopsy one or two targeted biopsies were performed. Patients without suspicious MRI findings underwent only systematic 16-core biopsy. Cancer detection rates in the nonenforcement and enforcement groups were 42.9% (48/92) and 46. 2% (78/169), respectively. The difference did not reach significance (p=0.612). Although the cancer detection rates were 39.4% (41/104) in the MRI-negative group and 56. 9% (37/65) in the MRI-positive group (p=0.039), the sensitivity and specificity for cancer detection by MRI were relatively low: 47.4% and 69.2%, respectively. By receiver-operating curve analysis, the area under the curve for cancer detection by MRI was only 0.583. There were two study limitations. First, the patient sample size was small. Second, it is unclear whether an adequate sample of the suspicious lesion was obtained by biopsy. We thus demonstrated that it might be improper to base a diagnosis solely on pre-biopsy MRI (T2WI and DWI) findings in men with serum PSA levels of 3-10 ng/ml.

  2. Echo-Planar Imaging-Based, J-Resolved Spectroscopic Imaging for Improved Metabolite Detection in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Am J Surg Pathol 1988;12:619- 633. PMID: 2456702 3) Weinreb JC, Blume JD, Coakley FV, et al. Prostate cancer: sextant localization at MR imaging and...ultrasound-guided sextant biopsy. The entire protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and informed consent was obtained from each patient

  3. MR Imaging Based Treatment Planning for Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    treatment planning for radiotherapy : Dosimetric verification for prostate IiMRT" and " Dosimetric evaluation of MRI-based treatment planning for...Shawn M, Ma C-M, Freedman GM and Pollack A. MRI-Based Treatment Planning for Radiotherapy : Dosimetric Verification for Prostate IMRT. International...Freedman GM and Pollack A. MRI- Based Treatment Planning for Radiotherapy : Dosimetric Verification for Prostate ]IMRT. International Journal of Radiation

  4. Imaging techniques for local recurrence of prostate cancer: for whom, why and how?

    PubMed

    Rouvière, O

    2012-04-01

    Since there are salvage solutions, it is important to detect local recurrence of prostate cancer as early as possible. The first sign is "biochemical failure" in that the prostate specific antigen (PSA) concentration rises again. The definition of biochemical failure varies depending on the initial treatment: PSA greater than 0.2ng/mL after prostatectomy, nadir+2ng/mL after radiotherapy. There is no standardised definition of biochemical failure after cryotherapy, focused ultrasound, or brachytherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (particularly dynamic MRI) can detect local recurrence with good sensitivity. The role of spectroscopy is still under discussion. For the moment, ultrasound techniques are less effective than MRI.

  5. Imaging-guided preclinical trials of vascular targeting in prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmuk, James

    Purpose: Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy in American men and is characterized by dependence on androgens (Testosterone/Dihydrotestosterone) for growth and survival. Although reduction of serum testosterone levels by surgical or chemical castration transiently inhibits neoplastic growth, tumor adaptation to castrate levels of androgens results in the generation of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Progression to CRPC following androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been associated with changes in vascular morphology and increased angiogenesis. Based on this knowledge, we hypothesized that targeting tumor vasculature in combination with ADT would result in enhanced therapeutic efficacy against prostate cancer. Methods: To test this hypothesis, we examined the therapeutic activity of a tumor-vascular disrupting agent (tumor-VDA), EPC2407 (Crolibulin(TM)), alone and in combination with ADT in a murine model of prostate cancer (Myc-CaP). A non-invasive multimodality imaging approach based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and ultrasound (US) was utilized to characterize tumor response to therapy and to guide preclinical trial design. Imaging results were correlated with histopathologic (H&E) and immunohistochemical (CD31) assessment as well as tumor growth inhibition and survival analyses. Results: Our imaging techniques were able to capture an acute reduction (within 24 hours) in tumor perfusion following castration and VDA monotherapy. BLI revealed onset of recurrent disease 5-7 days post castration prior to visible tumor regrowth suggestive of vascular recovery. Administration of VDA beginning 1 week post castration for 3 weeks resulted in sustained vascular suppression, inhibition of tumor regrowth, and conferred a more pronounced survival benefit compared to either monotherapy. Conclusion: The high mortality rate associated with CRPC underscores the need for investigating novel treatment

  6. Decision support system for localizing prostate cancer based on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vijay; Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Pang, Yuxi; Pohida, Thomas; Merino, Maria J.; Pinto, Peter A.; Choyke, Peter L.; Bernardo, Marcelino

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: There is a growing need to localize prostate cancers on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to facilitate the use of image guided biopsy, focal therapy, and active surveillance follow up. Our goal was to develop a decision support system (DSS) for detecting and localizing peripheral zone prostate cancers by using machine learning approach to calculate a cancer probability map from multiparametric MR images (MP-MRI). Methods: This IRB approved Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant retrospective study consisted of 31 patients (mean age and serum prostate specific antigen of 60.4 and 6.62 ng/ml, respectively) who had MP-MRI at 3 T followed by radical prostatectomy. Seven patients were excluded due to technical issues with their MP-MRI (e.g., motion artifact, failure to perform all sequences). Cancer and normal regions were identified in the peripheral zone by correlating them to whole mount histology slides of the excised prostatectomy specimens. To facilitate the correlation, tissue blocks matching the MR slices were obtained using a MR-based patient-specific mold. Segmented regions on the MP-MRI were correlated to histopathology and used as training sets for the learning system that generated the cancer probability maps. Leave-one-patient-out cross-validation on the cancer and normal regions was performed to determine the learning system's efficacy, an evolutionary strategies approach (also known as a genetic algorithm) was used to find the optimal values for a set of parameters, and finally a cancer probability map was generated. Results: For the 24 patients that were used in the study, 225 cancer and 264 noncancerous regions were identified from the region maps. The efficacy of DSS was first determined without optimizing support vector machines (SVM) parameters, where a region having a cancer probability greater than or equal to 50% was considered as a correct classification. The nonoptimized system had an f-measure of 85% and the

  7. Bone-Targeted Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iagaru, Andrei H.; Mittra, Erik; Colletti, Patrick M.

    2016-01-01

    Although selective metabolic and receptor-based molecular agents will surely be included in the future of prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy, currently available inorganic compounds—such as 18F-NaF for the diagnosis of bony disease and 223RaCl2 for the therapy of bone metastases—were recently shown to be superior to standard 99mTc-phosphonates for diagnosis and 153Sm-ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate or 89SrCl2 for therapy. The advantages of 18F-NaF include improved lesion detection and, when used in combination with CT, improved diagnostic confidence and specificity. In addition to being the first approved α-emitter, 223RaCl2 is the first radiopharmaceutical to show an increase in overall survival, a decrease in skeletal events, palliation of bone pain, and a low profile of adverse reactions (which are mild and manageable). The management of metastatic bone disease with 223RaCl2 is uniquely satisfying, as patients can be monitored directly during their monthly treatment visits. PMID:27694165

  8. MR-CT registration using a Ni-Ti prostate stent in image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Korsager, Anne Sofie; Ostergaard, Lasse Riis; Carl, Jesper

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: In image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer defining the clinical target volume often relies on magnetic resonance (MR). The task of transferring the clinical target volume from MR to standard planning computed tomography (CT) is not trivial due to prostate mobility. In this paper, an automatic local registration approach is proposed based on a newly developed removable Ni-Ti prostate stent.Methods: The registration uses the voxel similarity measure mutual information in a two-step approach where the pelvic bones are used to establish an initial registration for the local registration.Results: In a phantom study, the accuracy was measured to 0.97 mm and visual inspection showed accurate registration of all 30 data sets. The consistency of the registration was examined where translation and rotation displacements yield a rotation error of 0.41 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.45 Degree-Sign and a translation error of 1.67 {+-} 2.24 mm.Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility for an automatic local MR-CT registration using the prostate stent.

  9. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those ... PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have ...

  10. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000907.htm Cryotherapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing features ... first treatment for prostate cancer. What Happens During Cryotherapy Before the procedure, you will be given medicine ...

  11. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer poses a major public health problem, particularly in the US and Europe, where it constitutes the most common type of malignancy among men, excluding nonmelanoma skin cancers. The disease is characterized by a wide spectrum of biological and clinical phenotypes, and its evaluation by imaging remains a challenge in view of this heterogeneity. Imaging in prostate cancer can be used in the initial diagnosis of the primary tumor, to determine the occurrence and extent of any extracapsular spread, for guidance in delivery and evaluation of local therapy in organ-confined disease, in locoregional lymph node staging, to detect locally recurrent and metastatic disease in biochemical relapse, to predict and assess tumor response to systemic therapy or salvage therapy, and in disease prognostication (in terms of the length of time taken for castrate-sensitive disease to become refractory to hormones and overall patient survival). Evidence from animal-based translational and human-based clinical studies points to a potential and emerging role for PET, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose as a radiotracer, in the imaging evaluation of prostate cancer. PMID:19434102

  12. Salvage image-guided intensity modulated or stereotactic body reirradiation of local recurrence of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jereczek-Fossa, B A; Fodor, C; Bazzani, F; Maucieri, A; Ronchi, S; Ferrario, S; Colangione, S P; Gerardi, M A; Caputo, M; Cecconi, A; Gherardi, F; Vavassori, A; Comi, S; Cambria, R; Garibaldi, C; Cattani, F; De Cobelli, O; Orecchia, R

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate external beam reirradiation (re-EBRT) delivered to the prostate/prostatic bed for local recurrence, after radical or adjuvant/salvage radiotherapy (RT). Methods: 32 patients received re-EBRT between February 2008 and October 2013. All patients had clinical/radiological local relapse in the prostate or prostatic bed and no distant metastasis. re-EBRT was delivered with selective RT technologies [stereotactic RT including CyberKnifeTM (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA); image-guidance and intensity-modulated RT etc.]. Toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. Biochemical control was assessed according to the Phoenix definition (NADIR + 2 ng ml−1). Results: Acute urinary toxicity: G0, 24 patients; G1, 6 patients; G2, 2 patients. Acute rectal toxicity: G0, 28 patients; G1, 2 patients; and G2, 1 patient. Late urinary toxicity (evaluated in 30 cases): G0, 23 patients; G1, 6 patients; G2, 1 patient. Late renal toxicity: G0, 25 patients; G1, 5 patients. A mean follow-up of 21.3 months after re-EBRT showed that 13 patients were free of cancer, 3 were alive with biochemical relapse and 12 patients were alive with clinically evident disease. Four patients had died: two of disease progression and two of other causes. Conclusion: re-EBRT using modern technology is a feasible approach for local prostate cancer recurrence offering 2-year tumour control in about half of the patients. Toxicity of re-EBRT is low. Future studies are needed to identify the patients who would benefit most from this treatment. Advances in knowledge: Our series, based on experience in one hospital alone, shows that re-EBRT for local relapse of prostate cancer is feasible and offers a 2-year cure in about half of the patients. PMID:26055506

  13. The gastrin/cholecystokinin-B receptor on prostate cells--a novel target for bifunctional prostate cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Sturzu, Alexander; Klose, Uwe; Sheikh, Sumbla; Echner, Hartmut; Kalbacher, Hubert; Deeg, Martin; Nägele, Thomas; Schwentner, Christian; Ernemann, Ulrike; Heckl, Stefan

    2014-02-14

    The means of identifying prostate carcinoma and its metastases are limited. The contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging clinical diagnostics are not taken up into the tumor cells, but only accumulate in the interstitial space of the highly vasculated tumor. We examined the gastrin/cholecystokinin-B receptor as a possible target for prostate-specific detection using the C-terminal seven amino acid sequence of the gastrin peptide hormone. The correct sequence and a scrambled control sequence were coupled to the fluorescent dye rhodamine and the magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadolinium (Gd)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). Expression analysis of the gastrin receptor mRNA was performed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction on PC3 prostate carcinoma cells, U373 glioma, U2OS osteosarcoma and Colo205 colon carcinoma cells. After having confirmed elevated expression of gastrin receptor in PC3 cells and very low expression of the receptor in Colo205 cells, these two cell lines were used to create tumor xenografts on nude mice for in vivo experiments. Confocal lasers scanning microscopy and magnetic resonance imaging showed a high specificity of the correct conjugate for the PC3 xenografts. Staining of the PC3 xenografts was much weaker with the scrambled conjugate while the Colo205 xenografts showed no marked staining with any of the conjugates. In vitro experiments comparing the correct and scrambled conjugates on PC3 cells by magnetic resonance relaxometry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting confirmed markedly higher specificity of the correct conjugate. The investigations show that the gastrin receptor is a promising tumor cell surface target for future prostate-cancer-specific imaging applications.

  14. PSMA Ligands for Radionuclide Imaging and Therapy of Prostate Cancer: Clinical Status.

    PubMed

    Lütje, Susanne; Heskamp, Sandra; Cornelissen, Alexander S; Poeppel, Thorsten D; van den Broek, Sebastiaan A M W; Rosenbaum-Krumme, Sandra; Bockisch, Andreas; Gotthardt, Martin; Rijpkema, Mark; Boerman, Otto C

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignancy in men worldwide, leading to substantial morbidity and mortality. At present, imaging of PCa has become increasingly important for staging, restaging, and treatment selection. Until recently, choline-based positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) represented the state-of-the-art radionuclide imaging technique for these purposes. However, its application is limited to patients with high PSA levels and Gleason scores. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a promising new target for specific imaging of PCa, because it is upregulated in the majority of PCa. Moreover, PSMA can serve as a target for therapeutic applications. Currently, several small-molecule PSMA ligands with excellent in vivo tumor targeting characteristics are being investigated for their potential in theranostic applications in PCa. Here, a review of the recent developments in PSMA-based diagnostic imaging and therapy in patients with PCa with radiolabeled PSMA ligands is provided.

  15. Detection of Prostate Cancer: Quantitative Multiparametric MR Imaging Models Developed Using Registered Correlative Histopathology.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Gregory J; Kalavagunta, Chaitanya; Spilseth, Benjamin; Bolan, Patrick J; Li, Xiufeng; Hutter, Diane; Nam, Jung W; Johnson, Andrew D; Henriksen, Jonathan C; Moench, Laura; Konety, Badrinath; Warlick, Christopher A; Schmechel, Stephen C; Koopmeiners, Joseph S

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To develop multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging models to generate a quantitative, user-independent, voxel-wise composite biomarker score (CBS) for detection of prostate cancer by using coregistered correlative histopathologic results, and to compare performance of CBS-based detection with that of single quantitative MR imaging parameters. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Patients with a diagnosis of prostate cancer underwent multiparametric MR imaging before surgery for treatment. All MR imaging voxels in the prostate were classified as cancer or noncancer on the basis of coregistered histopathologic data. Predictive models were developed by using more than one quantitative MR imaging parameter to generate CBS maps. Model development and evaluation of quantitative MR imaging parameters and CBS were performed separately for the peripheral zone and the whole gland. Model accuracy was evaluated by using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and confidence intervals were calculated with the bootstrap procedure. The improvement in classification accuracy was evaluated by comparing the AUC for the multiparametric model and the single best-performing quantitative MR imaging parameter at the individual level and in aggregate. Results Quantitative T2, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), volume transfer constant (K(trans)), reflux rate constant (kep), and area under the gadolinium concentration curve at 90 seconds (AUGC90) were significantly different between cancer and noncancer voxels (P < .001), with ADC showing the best accuracy (peripheral zone AUC, 0.82; whole gland AUC, 0.74). Four-parameter models demonstrated the best performance in both the peripheral zone (AUC, 0.85; P = .010 vs ADC alone) and whole gland (AUC, 0.77; P = .043 vs ADC alone). Individual-level analysis showed statistically significant improvement in AUC in 82% (23 of 28) and 71% (24 of 34

  16. Bone imaging in prostate cancer: the evolving roles of nuclear medicine and radiology.

    PubMed

    Cook, Gary J R; Azad, Gurdip; Padhani, Anwar R

    2016-01-01

    The bone scan continues to be recommended for both the staging and therapy response assessment of skeletal metastases from prostate cancer. However, it is widely recognised that bone scans have limited sensitivity for disease detection and is both insensitive and non-specific for determining treatment response, at an early enough time point to be clinically useful. We, therefore, review the evolving roles of nuclear medicine and radiology for this application. We have reviewed the published literature reporting recent developments in imaging bone metastases in prostate cancer, and provide a balanced synopsis of the state of the art. The development of single-photon emission computed tomography combined with computed tomography has improved detection sensitivity and specificity but has not yet been shown to lead to improvements in monitoring therapy. A number of bone-specific and tumour-specific tracers for positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) are now available for advanced prostate cancer that show promise in both clinical settings. At the same time, the development of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) that incorporates diffusion-weighted imaging also offers significant improvements for detection and therapy response assessment. There are emerging data showing comparative SPECT/CT, PET/CT, and WB-MRI test performance for disease detection, but no compelling data on the usefulness of these technologies in response assessment have yet emerged.

  17. Significance of Image Guidance to Clinical Outcomes for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qiuzi; Gao, Hong; Li, Gaofeng; Xiu, Xia; Wu, Qinhong; Li, Ming; Xu, Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To compare toxicity profiles and biochemical tumor control outcomes between patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and non-IGRT intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods. Between 2009 and 2012, 65 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with IG-IMRT. This group of patients was retrospectively compared with a similar cohort of 62 patients who were treated between 2004 and 2009 with IMRT to the same dose without image guidance. Results. The median follow-up time was 4.8 years. The rectal volume receiving ≥40 and ≥70 Gy was significantly lower in the IG-IMRT group. Grade 2 and higher acute and late GI and GU toxicity rates were lower in IG-IMRT group, but there was no statistical difference. No significant improvement in biochemical control at 5 years was observed in two groups. In a Cox regression analysis identifying predictors for PSA relapse-free survival, only preradiotherapy PSA was significantly associated with biochemical control; IG-IMRT was not a statistically significant indicator. Conclusions. The use of image guidance in the radiation of prostate cancer at our institute did not show significant reduction in the rates of GI and GU toxicity and did not improve the biochemical control compared with IMRT. PMID:25110701

  18. Living with Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer treatment and can improve many aspects of health, including muscle strength, balance, fatigue, cardiovascular fitness, and depression. Physical activity after a prostate cancer diagnosis is linked to ...

  19. Prostate MR Imaging: An Update.

    PubMed

    Shaish, Hiram; Taneja, Samir S; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2017-03-01

    Improvements in prostate MR imaging techniques and the introduction of MR imaging-targeted biopsies have had central roles in prostate cancer (PCa) management. The role of MR imaging has progressed from largely staging patients with biopsy-proven PCa to detecting, characterizing, and guiding the biopsy of suspected PCa. These diagnostic advances, combined with improved therapeutic interventions, have led to a more sophisticated and individually tailored approach to patients' unique PCa profile. This review discusses the MR imaging, a standardized reporting scheme, and the role of fusion-targeted prostate biopsy.

  20. Evaluation of an Automated Analysis Tool for Prostate Cancer Prediction Using Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Roethke, Matthias C.; Kuru, Timur H.; Mueller-Wolf, Maya B.; Agterhuis, Erik; Edler, Christopher; Hohenfellner, Markus; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Hadaschik, Boris A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic performance of an automated analysis tool for the assessment of prostate cancer based on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) of the prostate. Methods A fully automated analysis tool was used for a retrospective analysis of mpMRI sets (T2-weighted, T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced, and diffusion-weighted sequences). The software provided a malignancy prediction value for each image pixel, defined as Malignancy Attention Index (MAI) that can be depicted as a colour map overlay on the original images. The malignancy maps were compared to histopathology derived from a combination of MRI-targeted and systematic transperineal MRI/TRUS-fusion biopsies. Results In total, mpMRI data of 45 patients were evaluated. With a sensitivity of 85.7% (with 95% CI of 65.4–95.0), a specificity of 87.5% (with 95% CI of 69.0–95.7) and a diagnostic accuracy of 86.7% (with 95% CI of 73.8–93.8) for detection of prostate cancer, the automated analysis results corresponded well with the reported diagnostic accuracies by human readers based on the PI-RADS system in the current literature. Conclusion The study revealed comparable diagnostic accuracies for the detection of prostate cancer of a user-independent MAI-based automated analysis tool and PI-RADS-scoring-based human reader analysis of mpMRI. Thus, the analysis tool could serve as a detection support system for less experienced readers. The results of the study also suggest the potential of MAI-based analysis for advanced lesion assessments, such as cancer extent and staging prediction. PMID:27454770

  1. A magnetic resonance imaging-based workflow for planning radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Greer, Peter B; Dowling, Jason A; Lambert, Jonathon A; Fripp, Jurgen; Parker, Joel; Denham, James W; Wratten, Chris; Capp, Anne; Salvado, Olivier

    2011-02-21

    Dose planning for prostate radiation therapy is performed using computed tomography (CT) scans that provide the electron density information needed for individual patients' radiation dose calculations. For visualising the prostate and determining the target volume for radiation treatment, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gives vastly superior soft-tissue contrast. However, currently, MRI scans cannot be used for dose planning, as they do not provide the electron density information. We aimed to develop an alternative and efficient MRI-only image-based workflow, enabling both organ delineation and dose planning to be performed using MRI, with "pseudo-CT scans" generated from MRI scans supplying the information for dose planning. The feasibility of implementing MRI-based prostate radiation therapy planning is being investigated through collaboration between the clinical and medical physics group at the Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital/University of Newcastle and the biomedical imaging processing group at the CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) Australian e-Health Research Centre. Results comparing Hounsfield units calculated from CT scans and from MRI-based pseudo-CT scans for 39 patients showed very similar average values for the prostate, bladder, bones and rectum, confirming that pseudo-CT scans can replace CT scans for accurate radiation dose calculations. MRI-based radiotherapy planning can also be used for tumours in other locations, such as head and neck, and breast cancers.

  2. Evaluation of Online/Offline Image Guidance/Adaptation Approaches for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, An; Sun, Ying; Liang, Jian; Yan, Di

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate online/offline image-guided/adaptive treatment techniques for prostate cancer radiation therapy with daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. Methods and Materials: Three treatment techniques were evaluated retrospectively using daily pre- and posttreatment CBCT images on 22 prostate cancer patients. Prostate, seminal vesicles (SV), rectal wall, and bladder were delineated on all CBCT images. For each patient, a pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy plan with clinical target volume (CTV) = prostate + SV and planning target volume (PTV) = CTV + 3 mm was created. The 3 treatment techniques were as follows: (1) Daily Correction: The pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy plan was delivered after online CBCT imaging, and position correction; (2) Online Planning: Daily online inverse plans with 3-mm CTV-to-PTV margin were created using online CBCT images, and delivered; and (3) Hybrid Adaption: Daily Correction plus an offline adaptive inverse planning performed after the first week of treatment. The adaptive plan was delivered for all remaining 15 fractions. Treatment dose for each technique was constructed using the daily posttreatment CBCT images via deformable image registration. Evaluation was performed using treatment dose distribution in target and critical organs. Results: Treatment equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for the CTV was within [85.6%, 100.8%] of the pretreatment planned target EUD for Daily Correction; [98.7%, 103.0%] for Online Planning; and [99.2%, 103.4%] for Hybrid Adaptation. Eighteen percent of the 22 patients in Daily Correction had a target dose deficiency >5%. For rectal wall, the mean ± SD of the normalized EUD was 102.6% ± 2.7% for Daily Correction, 99.9% ± 2.5% for Online Planning, and 100.6% ± 2.1% for Hybrid Adaptation. The mean ± SD of the normalized bladder EUD was 108.7% ± 8.2% for Daily Correction, 92.7% ± 8.6% for Online Planning, and 89.4% ± 10.8% for Hybrid

  3. A Comparison of daily megavoltage CT and ultrasound image guided radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Cheng; Kainz, Kristofer; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X. Allen

    2008-12-15

    In order to quantify the differences between ultrasound-imaging and megavoltage-CT (MVCT) daily prostate localization in prostate-cancer radiotherapy and their dosimetric impacts, daily shifts were analyzed for a total of 140 prostate cancer patients; 106 positioned using ultrasound-based imaging [B-mode Acquisition and Targeting (BAT)], and 34 using the MVCT from a TomoTherapy Hi-Art unit. The shifts indicated by the two systems were compared statistically along the right/left (R/L), superior/inferior (S/I), and anterior/posterior (A/P) directions. The systematic and random variations among the daily alignments were calculated. Margins to account for these shifts were estimated. The mean shifts and standard deviations along the R/L, S/I, and A/P directions were -0.11{+-}3.80, 0.67{+-}4.67, and 2.71{+-}6.31 mm for BAT localizations and -0.98{+-}5.13, 0.27{+-}3.35, and 1.00{+-}4.22 mm for MVCT localizations, respectively. The systematic and random variations in daily shifts based on MVCT were generally smaller than those based on BAT, especially along the A/P direction. A t-test showed this difference to be statistically significant. The planning target volume margins in the A/P direction estimated to account for daily variations were 8.81 and 14.66 mm based on MVCT and BAT data, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the daily prostate movement pattern between the first few fractions and the remaining fractions. Dosimetric comparison of MVCT and BAT prostate alignments was performed for seven fractions from a patient. The degradation from the plan caused by the MVCT alignment is trivial, while that by BAT is substantial. The MVCT technique results in smaller variations in daily shifts than ultrasound imaging, indicating that MVCT is more reliable and precise for prostate localization. Ultrasound-based localization may overestimate the daily prostate motion, particularly in the A/P direction, negatively impacting prostate dose coverage

  4. Inverse Relationship Between Biochemical Outcome and Acute Toxicity After Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vesprini, Danny; Catton, Charles; Jacks, Lindsay; Lockwood, Gina; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Nichol, Alan; Skala, Marketa; Warde, Padraig; Bristow, Robert G.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Prostate cancer patients exhibit variability in normal tissue reactions and biochemical failure. With the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), there is a greater likelihood that the differences in normal tissue and tumor response are due to biological rather than physical factors. We tested the hypothesis that prospectively scored acute toxicity is associated with biochemical failure-free rate (BFFR) in prostate cancer patients treated with IGRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed BFFR in 362 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with IGRT. We compared BFFR with prospectively collected Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity scores. Median follow-up for all patients was 58.3 months after total radiotherapy doses of 75.6-79.8 Gy. Results: Patients reporting RTOG acute GU or GI toxicity scores of {>=}2 were considered 'sensitive' (n = 141, 39%) and patients reporting scores <2 were considered 'nonsensitive' (n = 221, 61%). When calculating biochemical failure (BF) using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition at 5 years, 76% (CI 70-82%) of the 'nonsensitive' patients were failure free, compared with only 53% (CI 43-62%) of the 'sensitive' patients (log-rank test, p < 0.0001). This difference was also observed using the Phoenix definition; 'nonsensitive' 5-year BFFR was 81% (CI 74-86%) vs. 'sensitive' BFFR was 68% (CI 58-76%; log-rank test p = 0.0012). The difference in BF between cohorts remained significant when controlled for radiation dose (75.6 vs. 79.8 Gy), prognostic stratification (T category, prostate-specific antigen, and Gleason score), and prostate volume. Conclusions: This study unexpectedly shows that prostate cancer patients who develop {>=}Grade 2 RTOG acute toxicity during radiotherapy are less likely to remain BFF at 5 years. These results deserve further study and, if validated in other large IGRT cohorts

  5. Selection and characterization of DNA aptamer for metastatic prostate cancer recognition and tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoqiu; Sun, Yang; Li, Jianglin; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Lin, Wei; Han, Dongmei; Zhao, Yifan; Liu, Jing; Ye, Mao; Tan, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of death and most prevalent cancer in men. The absence of curative options for castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer and biomarkers able to discriminate between indolent and aggressive tumors contribute to these statistics. In this study, a DNA aptamer termed DML-7 was successfully selected against human PCa cell line DU145 by using the cell-based systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method. The selected aptamer DML-7 was found to internalize into target cells in a temperature-dependent manner and exhibit high binding affinity for target cells with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range. Binding analysis further revealed that DML-7 only binds to DU145 and PC-3 cells with metastatic potential, but not to LNCaP or 22Rv1 cells with low or nonmetastatic potential, demonstrating that DML-7 has excellent selectivity for the recognition of the metastatic PCa cells. Clinical tissue imaging further confirmed these results. Therefore, both high binding affinity and specificity to metastatic PCa cells and tissues afford DML-7 with the potential for development into a novel tool for diagnosis and targeted drug delivery against metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:27183906

  6. PET guidance in prostate cancer radiotherapy: Quantitative imaging to predict response and guide treatment.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, G M; Bettinardi, V; Mapelli, P; Picchio, M

    2016-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows a monitoring and recording of the spatial and temporal distribution of molecular/cellular processes for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The aim of this review is to describe the current applications and to explore the role of PET in prostate cancer management, mainly in the radiation therapy (RT) scenario. The state-of-the art of PET for prostate cancer will be presented together with the impact of new specific PET tracers and technological developments aiming at obtaining better imaging quality, increased tumor detectability and more accurate volume delineation. An increased number of studies have been focusing on PET quantification methods as predictive biomarkers capable of guiding individualized treatment and improving patient outcome; the sophisticated advanced intensity modulated and imaged guided radiation therapy techniques (IMRT/IGRT) are capable of boosting more radioresistant tumor (sub)volumes. The use of advanced feature analyses of PET images is an approach that holds great promise with regard to several oncological diseases, but needs further validation in managing prostate diseases.

  7. A curated collection of tissue microarray images and clinical outcome data of prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qing; Guo, Tiannan; Rechsteiner, Markus; Rüschoff, Jan H.; Rupp, Niels; Fankhauser, Christian; Saba, Karim; Mortezavi, Ashkan; Poyet, Cédric; Hermanns, Thomas; Zhu, Yi; Moch, Holger; Aebersold, Ruedi; Wild, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Microscopy image data of human cancers provide detailed phenotypes of spatially and morphologically intact tissues at single-cell resolution, thus complementing large-scale molecular analyses, e.g., next generation sequencing or proteomic profiling. Here we describe a high-resolution tissue microarray (TMA) image dataset from a cohort of 71 prostate tissue samples, which was hybridized with bright-field dual colour chromogenic and silver in situ hybridization probes for the tumour suppressor gene PTEN. These tissue samples were digitized and supplemented with expert annotations, clinical information, statistical models of PTEN genetic status, and computer source codes. For validation, we constructed an additional TMA dataset for 424 prostate tissues, hybridized with FISH probes for PTEN, and performed survival analysis on a subset of 339 radical prostatectomy specimens with overall, disease-specific and recurrence-free survival (maximum 167 months). For application, we further produced 6,036 image patches derived from two whole slides. Our curated collection of prostate cancer data sets provides reuse potential for both biomedical and computational studies. PMID:28291248

  8. Can Prostate Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Prostate Cancer Be Found Early? Screening is testing to find ... Health Care Team About Prostate Cancer? More In Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  9. Screening for prostate cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weirich, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    Despite recent advances in both the survival and cure rates for many forms of cancer, unfortunately the same has not been true for prostate cancer. In fact, the age-adjusted death rate from prostate cancer has not significantly improved since 1949, and prostate cancer remains the most common cancer in American men, causing the second highest cancer mortality rate. Topics discussed include the following: serum testosterone levels; diagnosis; mortality statistics; prostate-sppecific antigen (PSA) tests; and the Occupational Medicine Services policy at LeRC.

  10. Prostate cancer - treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... well. Proton therapy is another kind of radiation therapy used to treat prostate cancer. Proton beams target the tumor precisely, so there is less damage to the surrounding tissue. This therapy is not widely accepted or used. Prostate Brachytherapy ...

  11. WE-EF-210-07: Development of a Minimally Invasive Photo Acoustic Imaging System for Early Prostate Cancer Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, M; Yousefi, S; Xing, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to design, implement and characterize a catheter-based ultrasound/photoacoustic imaging probe for early-diagnosis of prostate cancer and to aid in image-guided radiation therapy. Methods: The need to image across 6–10cm of tissue to image the whole prostate gland limits the resolution achievable with a transrectal ultrasound approach. In contrast, the urethra bisects the prostate gland, providing a minimally invasive pathway for deploying a high resolution ultrasound transducer. Utilizing a high-frequency (20MHz) ultrasound/photoacoustic probe, high-resolution structural and molecular imaging of the prostate tissue is possible. A custom 3D printed probe containing a high-frequency single-element ultrasound transducer is utilized. The diameter of the probe is designed to fit inside a Foley catheter and the probe is rotated around the central axis to achieve a circular B-scan. A custom ultrasound amplifier and receiver was set up to trigger the ultrasound pulse transmission and record the reflected signal. The reconstructed images were compared to images generated by traditional 5 MHz ultrasound transducers. Results: The preliminary results using the high-frequency ultrasound probe show that it is possible to resolve finely detailed information in a prostate tissue phantom that was not achievable with previous low-frequency ultrasound systems. Preliminary ultrasound imaging was performed on tissue mimicking phantom and sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio of the catheter was measured. Conclusion: In order to achieve non-invasive, high-resolution, structural and molecular imaging for early-diagnosis and image-guided radiation therapy of the prostate tissue, a transurethral catheter was designed. Structural/molecular imaging using ultrasound/photoacoustic of the prostate tissue will allow for localization of hyper vascularized areas for early-stage prostate cancer diagnosis.

  12. Transrectal high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of prostate cancer: effective treatment requiring accurate imaging.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Souchon, Rémi; Salomir, Rarès; Gelet, Albert; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lyonnet, Denis

    2007-09-01

    Transrectal HIFU ablation has become a reasonable option for the treatment of localized prostate cancer in non-surgical patients, with 5-year disease-free survival similar to that of radiation therapy. It is also a promising salvage therapy of local recurrence after radiation therapy. These favourable results are partly due to recent improvements in prostate cancer imaging. However, further improvements are needed in patient selection, pre-operative localization of the tumor foci, assessment of the volume treated and early detection of recurrence. A better knowledge of the factors influencing the HIFU-induced tissue destruction and a better pre-operative assessment of them by imaging techniques should improve treatment outcome. Whereas prostate HIFU ablation is currently performed under transrectal ultrasound guidance, MR guidance with real-time operative monitoring of temperature will be available in the near future. If this technique will give better targeting and more uniform tissue destruction, its cost-effectiveness will have to be carefully evaluated. Finally, a recently reported synergistic effect between HIFU ablation and chemotherapy opens possibilities for treatment in high-risk or clinically advanced tumors.

  13. Incidental Malignancies identified during staging for Prostate Cancer with (68)Ga -PSMA HBED-CC PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Andre; Nicholson, Cheryl; Rhee, Handoo; Gustafson, Sonja; Miles, Ken; Vela, Ian

    2017-03-20

    The rapid uptake of 68Ga Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) HBED-CC PET imaging for prostate cancer staging has led to concerns regarding its specificity, with uptake in both malignant and non-malignant tissues. We describe three separate malignancies identified on 68Ga PSMA HBED-CC PET imaging. The misnomer of "prostate specific membrane antigen" is demonstrated by this case and highlights the importance of continued investigation of the potential role for 68Ga PSMA HBED-CC PET in other malignancies.

  14. Prostate and Urologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    [[{"fid":"183","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_folder[und]":"15"},"type":"media","attributes":{"alt":"Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","title":"Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","height":"266","width":"400","clas | Conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of prostate, bladder, and skin cancers.

  15. In vivo prostate cancer detection and grading using restriction spectrum imaging-MRI

    PubMed Central

    McCammack, KC; Kane, CJ; Parsons, JK; White, NS; Schenker-Ahmed, NM; Kuperman, JM; Bartsch, H; Desikan, RS; Rakow-Penner, RA; Adams, D; Liss, MA; Mattrey, RF; Bradley, WG; Margolis, DJA; Raman, SS; Shabaik, A; Dale, AM; Karow, DS

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as a robust, noninvasive method for detecting and characterizing prostate cancer (PCa), but limitations remain in its ability to distinguish cancerous from non-cancerous tissue. We evaluated the performance of a novel MRI technique, restriction spectrum imaging (RSI-MRI), to quantitatively detect and grade PCa compared with current standard-of-care MRI. METHODS In a retrospective evaluation of 33 patients with biopsy-proven PCa who underwent RSI-MRI and standard MRI before radical prostatectomy, receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were performed for RSI-MRI and each quantitative MRI term, with area under the ROC curve (AUC) used to compare each term’s ability to differentiate between PCa and normal prostate. Spearman rank-order correlations were performed to assess each term’s ability to predict PCa grade in the radical prostatectomy specimens. RESULTS RSI-MRI demonstrated superior differentiation of PCa from normal tissue, with AUC of 0.94 and 0.85 for RSI-MRI and conventional diffusion MRI, respectively (P = 0.04). RSI-MRI also demonstrated superior performance in predicting PCa aggressiveness, with Spearman rank-order correlation coefficients of 0.53 (P = 0.002) and − 0.42 (P = 0.01) for RSI-MRI and conventional diffusion MRI, respectively, with tumor grade. CONCLUSIONS RSI-MRI significantly improves upon current noninvasive PCa imaging and may potentially enhance its diagnosis and characterization. PMID:26754261

  16. 1.5-Tesla Multiparametric-Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    POPITA, CRISTIAN; POPITA, ANCA RALUCA; SITAR-TAUT, ADELA; PETRUT, BOGDAN; FETICA, BOGDAN; COMAN, IOAN

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim Multiparametric-magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) is the main imaging modality used for prostate cancer detection. The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic performance of mp-MRI at 1.5-Tesla (1.5-T) for the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer. Methods In this ethical board approved prospective study, 39 patients with suspected prostate cancer were included. Patients with a history of positive prostate biopsy and patients treated for prostate cancer were excluded. All patients were examined at 1.5-T MRI, before standard transrectal ultrasonography–guided biopsy. Results The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for mp-MRI were 100%, 73.68%, 80% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion Our results showed that 1.5 T mp-MRI has a high sensitivity for detection of clinically significant prostate cancer and high negative predictive value in order to rule out significant disease. PMID:28246496

  17. Pathological Gleason prediction through gland ring morphometry in immunofluorescent prostate cancer images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Richard; Khan, Faisal M.; Zeineh, Jack; Donovan, Michael; Fernandez, Gerardo

    2016-03-01

    The Gleason score is the most common architectural and morphological assessment of prostate cancer severity and prognosis. There have been numerous quantitative techniques developed to approximate and duplicate the Gleason scoring system. Most of these approaches have been developed in standard H and E brightfield microscopy. Immunofluorescence (IF) image analysis of tissue pathology has recently been proven to be extremely valuable and robust in developing prognostic assessments of disease, particularly in prostate cancer. There have been significant advances in the literature in quantitative biomarker expression as well as characterization of glandular architectures in discrete gland rings. In this work we leverage a new method of segmenting gland rings in IF images for predicting the pathological Gleason; both the clinical and the image specific grade, which may not necessarily be the same. We combine these measures with nuclear specific characteristics as assessed by the MST algorithm. Our individual features correlate well univariately with the Gleason grades, and in a multivariate setting have an accuracy of 85% in predicting the Gleason grade. Additionally, these features correlate strongly with clinical progression outcomes (CI of 0.89), significantly outperforming the clinical Gleason grades (CI of 0.78). This work presents the first assessment of morphological gland unit features from IF images for predicting the Gleason grade.

  18. Lipids and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suburu, Janel; Chen, Yong Q.

    2012-01-01

    The role of lipid metabolism has gained particular interest in prostate cancer research. A large body of literature has outlined the unique upregulation of de novo lipid synthesis in prostate cancer. Concordant with this lipogenic phenotype is a metabolic shift, in which cancer cells use alternative enzymes and pathways to facilitate the production of fatty acids. These newly synthesized lipids may support a number of cellular processes to promote cancer cell proliferation and survival. Hence, de novo lipogenesis is under intense investigation as a therapeutic target. Epidemiologic studies suggest dietary fat may also contribute to prostate cancer; however, whether dietary lipids and de novo synthesized lipids are differentially metabolized remains unclear. Here, we highlight the lipogenic nature of prostate cancer, especially the promotion of de novo lipid synthesis, and the significance of various dietary lipids in prostate cancer development and progression. PMID:22503963

  19. Evaluation of Multimodal Imaging Biomarkers of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    scan duration ~ 21 min). PET imaging was performed on a Concorde Microsystems microPET Focus 220. Approximately 120 uCi of tracer was administered...acquired anatomic MRI and PET data in orthotopic tumors within the Pten/p53 mouse model, to assess tumor volume, track growth and tumor angiogenesis...In fic speciregards to PET imaging, we have further characterized the use of FMISO, FDHT and TSPO imaging to evaluate tumor hypoxia, androgen

  20. New frontiers in prostate cancer imaging: clinical utility of prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Afaq, Asim; Batura, Deepak; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2017-02-14

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography (PSMA PET) is a relatively new method of imaging prostate cancer that increases diagnostic accuracy in detecting and guiding management in various stages of the disease pathway. Gallium-68-labelled PSMA PET has increased the sensitivity of detection of disease recurrence at low PSA levels, thus allowing an optimal window for salvage treatment. Apart from its use in disease recurrence, PSMA PET has the potential for increasing sensitivity and specificity for primary tumour localisation and in detecting lymph node disease, leading to a more accurate initial staging of the condition. In advanced disease, the use of PSMA PET may be able to assess response to treatment and also guide treatment with radionuclide therapy. Newer ligands under development might provide avenues for theranostic or personalised therapy applications with early data showing high PSA response rates. The rate of translation of PSMA PET into clinical practice has been remarkable. The use of this modality is likely to increase with future efforts to modify the radiotracer including (18)F labelling to improve availability.

  1. Ultrasound Activated Contrast Imaging for Prostate Cancer Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Goldberg. Nonlinear imaging with a new contrast agent. Ultrasound Med Biol, vol. 29, pp. S97, 2003. R. J. Ro, F. Forsberg, M. Knauer, W. T. Shi, P. A ... Lewin , R. Bernardi. On the temperature and concentration dependency of excitation-enhanced imaging. Proc Biomed Eng Soc Ann Fall Meetg, abstract no

  2. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers that don't respond to hormone therapy. Biological therapy Biological therapy (immunotherapy) uses your body's immune system to fight cancer cells. One type of biological therapy called sipuleucel-T (Provenge) has been developed ...

  3. Tuberculous prostatitis: mimicking a cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, El Majdoub; Abdelhak, Khallouk; Hassan, Farih Moulay

    2016-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common type of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis . The kidneys, ureter, bladder or genital organs are usually involved. Tuberculosis of the prostate has mainly been described in immune-compromised patients. However, it can exceptionally be found as an isolated lesion in immune-competent patients. Tuberculosis of the prostate may be difficult to differentiate from carcinoma of the prostate and the chronic prostatitis when the prostate is hard and nodular on digital rectal examination and the urine is negative for tuberculosis bacilli. In many cases, a diagnosis of tuberculous prostatitis is made by the pathologist, or the disease is found incidentally after transurethral resection. Therefore, suspicion of tuberculous prostatitis requires a confirmatory biopsy of the prostate. We report the case of 60-year-old man who presented a low urinary tract syndrome. After clinical and biological examination, and imaging, prostate cancer was highly suspected. Transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed and histological examination showed tuberculosis lesions. PMID:28292092

  4. In vivo imaging of prostate cancer using an anti-PSMA scFv fragment as a probe

    PubMed Central

    Mazzocco, Claire; Fracasso, Giulio; Germain-Genevois, Coralie; Dugot-Senant, Nathalie; Figini, Mariangela; Colombatti, Marco; Grenier, Nicolas; Couillaud, Franck

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate a fluorescent-labeled single chain variable fragment (scFv) of the anti-PSMA antibody as a specific probe for the detection of prostate cancer by in vivo fluorescence imaging. An orthotopic model of prostate cancer was generated by injecting LNCaP cells into the prostate lobe. ScFvD2B, a high affinity anti-PSMA antibody fragment, was labeled using a near-infrared fluorophore to generate a specific imaging probe (X770-scFvD2B). PSMA-unrelated scFv-X770 was used as a control. Probes were injected intravenously into mice with prostate tumors and fluorescence was monitored in vivo by fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT). In vitro assays showed that X770-scFvD2B specifically bound to PSMA and was internalized in PSMA-expressing LNCaP cells. After intravenous injection, X770-scFvD2B was detected in vivo by FMT in the prostate region. On excised prostates the scFv probe co-localized with the cancer cells and was found in PSMA-expressing cells. The PSMA-unrelated scFv used as a control did not label the prostate cancer cells. Our data demonstrate that scFvD2B is a high affinity contrast agent for in vivo detection of PSMA-expressing cells in the prostate. NIR-labeled scFvD2B could thus be further developed as a clinical probe for imaging-guided targeted biopsies. PMID:26996325

  5. MR Imaging Based Treatment Planning for Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    after the gradient distortion correction (GDC) could be quantified by phantom measurements and further reduced by our point-by-point correction...oncologists on the fused CT-MR images. A special computer code was developed to convert the patient CT and MR image data from the DICOM format to... phantoms and perform dose calculations to determine monitor units (MU) for IMRT plans and then compare with ion chamber measurements. We will integrate

  6. Localized Prostate Cancer Detection with 18F FACBC PET/CT: Comparison with MR Imaging and Histopathologic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Esther; Shih, Joanna; Pinto, Peter A.; Merino, Maria J.; Lindenberg, Maria L.; Bernardo, Marcelino; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Adler, Stephen; Owenius, Rikard; Choyke, Peter L.; Kurdziel, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To characterize uptake of 1-amino-3-fluorine 18-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (18F FACBC) in patients with localized prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and normal prostate tissue and to evaluate its potential utility in delineation of intraprostatic cancers in histopathologically confirmed localized prostate cancer in comparison with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study. Twenty-one men underwent dynamic and static abdominopelvic 18F FACBC combined positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) and multiparametric (MP) 3-T endorectal MR imaging before robotic-assisted prostatectomy. PET/CT and MR images were coregistered by using pelvic bones as fiducial markers; this was followed by manual adjustments. Whole-mount histopathologic specimens were sliced with an MR-based patient-specific mold. 18F FACBC PET standardized uptake values (SUVs) were compared with those at MR imaging and histopathologic analysis for lesion- and sector-based (20 sectors per patient) analysis. Positive and negative predictive values for each modality were estimated by using generalized estimating equations with logit link function and working independence correlation structure. Results 18F FACBC tumor uptake was rapid but reversible. It peaked 3.6 minutes after injection and reached a relative plateau at 15–20 minutes (SUVmax[15–20min]). Mean prostate tumor SUVmax(15–20min) was significantly higher than that of the normal prostate (4.5 ± 0.5 vs 2.7 ± 0.5) (P < .001); however, it was not significantly different from that of BPH (4.3 ± 0.6) (P = .27). Sector-based comparison with histopathologic analysis, including all tumors, revealed sensitivity and specificity of 67% and 66%, respectively, for 18F FACBC PET/CT and 73% and 79%, respectively, for T2-weighted MR imaging. 18F FACBC PET/CT and MP MR

  7. J-aggregate Nanoparticles as Photoacoustic Contrast Agents for Prostate Cancer Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakiba, Mojdeh

    Management of early stage prostate cancer (PCa) is plagued with the dilemma between active surveillance that risks progression, and aggressive treatments of potentially indolent disease that significantly reduces quality of life. This results from the inability of current diagnostic techniques to accurately distinguish between indolent and aggressive disease, which has resulted in overtreatment of PCa. Photoacoutic imaging allows for imaging of specific molecular constituents in tissue. To enable for its use in PCa imaging, we designed a novel organic nanoparticle that combines the unique spectral properties and efficient photon capture of nature's photosynthetic apparatus with the stable and specific delivery offered by nanoparticles. These Jaggregate nanoparticles are shown to produce an intense, narrow photo acoustic signal and to have nanoparticle-dependent photonic properties that enable for assessment of the state of the particle. Preliminary assessment of their use in an orthotopic PCa model showed accumulation in and delineation of the tumor boundary.

  8. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... for prostate cancer. It concluded that the expected harms of PSA screening are greater than the potential ... exam or other screening tests. Potential Benefits and Harms The main goal of a cancer screening test ...

  9. Prostate cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... test. A faster increase could show a more aggressive tumor. A prostate biopsy is done in your ... suggest the cancer is slow growing and not aggressive. Higher numbers indicate a faster growing cancer that ...

  10. Prostate-specific membrane antigen targeted protein contrast agents for molecular imaging of prostate cancer by MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Fan; Salarian, Mani; Xue, Shenghui; Qiao, Jingjuan; Feng, Jie; Tan, Shanshan; Patel, Anvi; Li, Xin; Mamouni, Kenza; Hekmatyar, Khan; Zou, Juan; Wu, Daqing; Yang, Jenny J.

    2016-06-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high resolution has yet to be achieved due to the lack of contrast agents with significantly improved relaxivity for sensitivity, targeting capabilities and metal selectivity. We have previously reported our creation of a novel class of protein Gd3+ contrast agents, ProCA32, which displayed significantly improved relaxivity while exhibiting strong Gd3+ binding selectivity over physiological metal ions. In this study, we report our effort in further developing biomarker-targeted protein MRI contrast agents for molecular imaging of PSMA. Among three PSMA targeted contrast agents engineered with addition of different molecular recognition sequences, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits a binding affinity of 1.1 +/- 0.1 μM for PSMA while the metal binding affinity is maintained at 0.9 +/- 0.1 × 10-22 M. In addition, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits r1 of 27.6 mM-1 s-1 and r2 of 37.9 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (55.2 and 75.8 mM-1 s-1 per molecule r1 and r2, respectively) at 1.4 T. At 7 T, ProCA32.PSMA also has r2 of 94.0 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (188.0 mM-1 s-1 per molecule) and r1 of 18.6 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (37.2 mM-1 s-1 per molecule). This contrast capability enables the first MRI enhancement dependent on PSMA expression levels in tumor bearing mice using both T1 and T2-weighted MRI at 7 T. Further development of these PSMA-targeted contrast agents are expected to be used for the precision imaging of prostate cancer at an early stage and to monitor disease progression and staging, as well as determine the effect of therapeutic treatment by non-invasive evaluation of the PSMA level using MRI.Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high

  11. An imaging agent to detect androgen receptor and its active splice variants in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Yusuke; Tien, Amy H.; Pan, Jinhe; Leung, Jacky K.; Banuelos, Carmen A.; Jian, Kunzhong; Wang, Jun; Mawji, Nasrin R.; Fernandez, Javier Garcia; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Andersen, Raymond J.; Sadar, Marianne D.

    2016-01-01

    Constitutively active splice variants of androgen receptor (AR-Vs) lacking ligand-binding domain (LBD) are a mechanism of resistance to androgen receptor LBD–targeted (AR LBD–targeted) therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). There is a strong unmet clinical need to identify prostate cancer patients with AR-V–positive lesions to determine whether they will benefit from further AR LBD–targeting therapies or should receive taxanes or investigational drugs like EPI-506 or galeterone. Both EPI-506 (NCT02606123) and galeterone (NCT02438007) are in clinical trials and are proposed to have efficacy against lesions that are positive for AR-Vs. AR activation function-1 (AF-1) is common to the N-terminal domains of full-length AR and AR-Vs. Here, we provide proof of concept for developing imaging compounds that directly bind AR AF-1 to detect both AR-Vs and full-length AR. 123I-EPI-002 had specific binding to AR AF-1, which enabled direct visualization of CRPC xenografts that express full-length AR and AR-Vs. Our findings highlight the potential of 123I-EPI-002 as an imaging agent for the detection of full-length AR and AR-Vs in CRPC. PMID:27525313

  12. Prediction of prostate cancer recurrence using quantitative phase imaging: Validation on a general population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Macias, Virgilia; Tangella, Krishnarao; Melamed, Jonathan; Dube, Emily; Kong, Max Xiangtian; Kajdacsy-Balla, André; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-09-01

    Prediction of biochemical recurrence risk of prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy is critical for determining whether the patient would benefit from adjuvant treatments. Various nomograms exist today for identifying individuals at higher risk for recurrence; however, an optimistic under-estimation of recurrence risk is a common problem associated with these methods. We previously showed that anisotropy of light scattering measured using quantitative phase imaging, in the stromal layer adjacent to cancerous glands, is predictive of recurrence. That nested-case controlled study consisted of specimens specifically chosen such that the current prognostic methods fail. Here we report on validating the utility of optical anisotropy for prediction of prostate cancer recurrence in a general population of 192 patients, with 17% probability of recurrence. Our results show that our method can identify recurrent cases with 73% sensitivity and 72% specificity, which is comparable to that of CAPRA-S, a current state of the art method, in the same population. However, our results show that optical anisotropy outperforms CAPRA-S for patients with Gleason grades 7–10. In essence, we demonstrate that anisotropy is a better biomarker for identifying high-risk cases, while Gleason grade is better suited for selecting non-recurrence. Therefore, we propose that anisotropy and current techniques be used together to maximize prediction accuracy.

  13. Prediction of prostate cancer recurrence using quantitative phase imaging: Validation on a general population

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Shamira; Macias, Virgilia; Tangella, Krishnarao; Melamed, Jonathan; Dube, Emily; Kong, Max Xiangtian; Kajdacsy-Balla, André; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Prediction of biochemical recurrence risk of prostate cancer following radical prostatectomy is critical for determining whether the patient would benefit from adjuvant treatments. Various nomograms exist today for identifying individuals at higher risk for recurrence; however, an optimistic under-estimation of recurrence risk is a common problem associated with these methods. We previously showed that anisotropy of light scattering measured using quantitative phase imaging, in the stromal layer adjacent to cancerous glands, is predictive of recurrence. That nested-case controlled study consisted of specimens specifically chosen such that the current prognostic methods fail. Here we report on validating the utility of optical anisotropy for prediction of prostate cancer recurrence in a general population of 192 patients, with 17% probability of recurrence. Our results show that our method can identify recurrent cases with 73% sensitivity and 72% specificity, which is comparable to that of CAPRA-S, a current state of the art method, in the same population. However, our results show that optical anisotropy outperforms CAPRA-S for patients with Gleason grades 7–10. In essence, we demonstrate that anisotropy is a better biomarker for identifying high-risk cases, while Gleason grade is better suited for selecting non-recurrence. Therefore, we propose that anisotropy and current techniques be used together to maximize prediction accuracy. PMID:27658807

  14. Initial Evaluation of [18F]DCFPyL for Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)-Targeted PET Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Zsolt; Mena, Esther; Rowe, Steven P.; Plyku, Donika; Nidal, Rosa; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Fan, Hong; Dannals, Robert F.; Chen, Ying; Mease, Ronnie C.; Vranesic, Melin; Bhatnagar, Akrita; Sgouros, George; Cho, Steve Y.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a recognized target for imaging prostate cancer. Here we present initial safety, biodistribution, and radiation dosimetry results with [18F]DCFPyL, a second-generation fluorine-18-labeled small-molecule PSMA inhibitor, in patients with prostate cancer. Procedures Biodistribution was evaluated using sequential positron-emission tomography (PET) scans in nine patients with prostate cancer. Time-activity curves from the most avid tumor foci were determined. The radiation dose to selected organs was estimated using OLINDA/EXM. Results No major radiotracer-specific adverse events were observed. Physiologic accumulation was observed in known sites of PSMA expression. Accumulation in putative sites of prostate cancer was observed (SUVmax up to >100, and tumor-to-blood ratios up to >50). The effective radiation dose from [18F]DCFPyL was 0.0139 mGy/MBq or 5 mGy (0.5 rem) from an injected dose of 370 MBq (10 mCi). Conclusions [18F]DCFPyL is safe with biodistribution as expected, and its accumulation is high in presumed primary and metastatic foci. The radiation dose from [18F]DCFPyL is similar to that from other PET radiotracers. PMID:25896814

  15. Ultrasound Activated Contrast Imaging for Prostate Cancer Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    ultrasound engine with a P4-2 phased array transducer were modified to perform EEI on a vector-by-vector basis in fundamental and pulse inversion harmonic...albumin-encapsulated Abunex® bubble is 18 times greater than that for a free bubble if the two bubbles oscillate with the same relative amplitude at...utilizes two acoustic fields: the activation field for intermittently activating contrast bubbles and the imaging field, applied shortly afterwards, for

  16. Phosphoramidate-based Peptidomimetic Prostate Cancer PET Imaging Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    develop a PET imaging agent based on modifying the peptidomimetic PSMA inhibitor which will result in improved tumor uptake and clearance mechanism...Different fluorination approaches were attempted with PSMA module compounds such as direct labeling, cupper free chemistry and the use of...labeling approaches are established, and then the labeling of the modified PSMA inhibitor analogues will be investigated in vitro as well as in vivo. 15

  17. Phosphoramidate-based Peptidomimetic Prostate Cancer PET Imaging Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    goal is to develop a PET imaging agent based on modifying the peptidomimetic PSMA inhibitor which will result in improved tumor uptake and clearance...mechanism. Different fluorination approaches were attempted with PSMA module compounds such as direct labeling, cupper free chemistry and the use of...the labeling approaches are established, and then the labeling of the modified PSMA inhibitor analogues will be investigated in vitro as well as in

  18. Predicting and replacing the pathological Gleason grade with automated gland ring morphometric features from immunofluorescent prostate cancer images.

    PubMed

    Khan, Faisal M; Scott, Richard; Donovan, Michael; Fernandez, Gerardo

    2017-04-01

    The Gleason grade is the most common architectural and morphological assessment of prostate cancer severity and prognosis. There have been numerous algorithms developed to approximate and duplicate the Gleason scoring system, mostly developed in standard H&E brightfield microscopy. Immunofluorescence (IF) image analysis of tissue pathology has recently been proven to be robust in developing prognostic assessments of disease, particularly in prostate cancer. We leverage a method of segmenting gland rings in IF images for predicting the pathological Gleason, both the clinical and the image specific grades, which may not necessarily be the same. We combine these measures with nuclear specific characteristics. In 324 images from 324 patients, our individual features correlate well univariately with the Gleason grades and in a multivariate setting have an accuracy of 85% in predicting the Gleason grade. Additionally, these features correlate strongly with clinical progression outcomes [concordance index (CI) of 0.89], significantly outperforming the clinical Gleason grades (CI of 0.78). Finally, in multivariate models for multiple prostate cancer progression endpoints, replacing the Gleason with these features results in equivalent or improved performances. This work presents the first assessment of morphological gland unit features from IF images for predicting the Gleason grade, and even replacing it in prostate cancer prognostics.

  19. In Vivo Imaging of Branched Chain Amino Acid Metabolism in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Daniel Spielman Betty Diamond 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER E-Mail: spielman@stanford.edu 5f...substrate for monocarboxylate trans- porters such as MCT1, which are readily expressed prostate cancer cell lines and prostate tissue [27–29]. Further

  20. Defining the radiobiology of prostate cancer progression: An important question in translational prostate cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Vourganti, Srinivas; Donaldson, Jeffrey; Johnson, Linda; Turkbey, Baris; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Kotula, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting men worldwide. High mortality rates from advanced and metastatic prostate cancer in the United States are contrasted by a relatively indolent course in the majority of cases. This gives hope for finding methods that could direct personalized diagnostic, preventative, and treatment approaches to patients with prostate cancer. Recent advances in multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) offer a noninvasive diagnostic intervention which allows correlation of prostate tumor image characteristics with underlying biologic evidence of tumor progression. The power of MP-MRI includes examination of both local invasion and nodal disease and might overcome the challenges of analyzing the multifocal nature of prostate cancer. Future directions include a careful analysis of the genomic signature of individual prostatic lesions utilizing image-guided biopsies. This review examines the diagnostic potential of MRI in prostate cancer. PMID:24879423

  1. (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT: Joint EANM and SNMMI procedure guideline for prostate cancer imaging: version 1.0.

    PubMed

    Fendler, Wolfgang P; Eiber, Matthias; Beheshti, Mohsen; Bomanji, Jamshed; Ceci, Francesco; Cho, Steven; Giesel, Frederik; Haberkorn, Uwe; Hope, Thomas A; Kopka, Klaus; Krause, Bernd J; Mottaghy, Felix M; Schöder, Heiko; Sunderland, John; Wan, Simon; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Fanti, Stefano; Herrmann, Ken

    2017-03-10

    The aim of this guideline is to provide standards for the recommendation, performance, interpretation and reporting of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT for prostate cancer imaging. These recommendations will help to improve accuracy, precision, and repeatability of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT for prostate cancer essentially needed for implementation of this modality in science and routine clinical practice.

  2. Iterative normalization method for improved prostate cancer localization with multispectral magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Samil Yetik, Imam

    2012-04-01

    Use of multispectral magnetic resonance imaging has received a great interest for prostate cancer localization in research and clinical studies. Manual extraction of prostate tumors from multispectral magnetic resonance imaging is inefficient and subjective, while automated segmentation is objective and reproducible. For supervised, automated segmentation approaches, learning is essential to obtain the information from training dataset. However, in this procedure, all patients are assumed to have similar properties for the tumor and normal tissues, and the segmentation performance suffers since the variations across patients are ignored. To conquer this difficulty, we propose a new iterative normalization method based on relative intensity values of tumor and normal tissues to normalize multispectral magnetic resonance images and improve segmentation performance. The idea of relative intensity mimics the manual segmentation performed by human readers, who compare the contrast between regions without knowing the actual intensity values. We compare the segmentation performance of the proposed method with that of z-score normalization followed by support vector machine, local active contours, and fuzzy Markov random field. Our experimental results demonstrate that our method outperforms the three other state-of-the-art algorithms, and was found to have specificity of 0.73, sensitivity of 0.69, and accuracy of 0.79, significantly better than alternative methods.

  3. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vemana, Goutham; Hamilton, Robert J; Andriole, Gerald L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Large prospective randomized trials, such as the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) trial, and Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), have provided practitioners with considerable data regarding methods of treatment and prevention of prostate cancer. The best-studied medications for prevention are 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Their efficacy and side effects are well characterized. Other medications, dietary nutrients, and supplements have not been as well studied and generally do not demonstrate efficacy for disease prevention with an acceptable level of evidence.

  4. Newer Imaging Modalities to Assist With Target Localization in the Radiation Treatment of Prostate Cancer and Possible Lymph Node Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    John, Subhash S. Zietman, Anthony L.; Shipley, William U.; Harisinghani, Mukesh G.

    2008-05-01

    Precise localization of prostate cancer and the drainage lymph nodes is mandatory to define an accurate clinical target volume for conformal radiotherapy. Better target definition and delineation on a daily basis is surely important in quality assurance for fractionated radiation therapy. This article reviews the evidence for major emerging techniques that show promise in better identifying the clinical target volume. Partial prostate boost by brachytherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, or protons has become possible not only with standard imaging techniques but also with the availability of metabolic images obtained by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Even though fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography has not been found to be useful, novel radiolabeled tracers may eventually prove of value in the diagnosis and treatment planning of prostate cancer. For the metastatic lymph nodes, lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles has greater accuracy as compared with conventional techniques and has been instrumental in delineating the lymphatic drainage of the prostate gland. These novel investigational techniques could further help in optimizing conformal radiotherapy for patients with prostate cancer. The concepts of biologic target volume, real target volume, and multidimensional conformal radiotherapy are being explored.

  5. Newer imaging modalities to assist with target localization in the radiation treatment of prostate cancer and possible lymph node metastases.

    PubMed

    John, Subhash S; Zietman, Anthony L; Shipley, William U; Harisinghani, Mukesh G

    2008-01-01

    Precise localization of prostate cancer and the drainage lymph nodes is mandatory to define an accurate clinical target volume for conformal radiotherapy. Better target definition and delineation on a daily basis is surely important in quality assurance for fractionated radiation therapy. This article reviews the evidence for major emerging techniques that show promise in better identifying the clinical target volume. Partial prostate boost by brachytherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, or protons has become possible not only with standard imaging techniques but also with the availability of metabolic images obtained by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Even though fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography has not been found to be useful, novel radiolabeled tracers may eventually prove of value in the diagnosis and treatment planning of prostate cancer. For the metastatic lymph nodes, lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles has greater accuracy as compared with conventional techniques and has been instrumental in delineating the lymphatic drainage of the prostate gland. These novel investigational techniques could further help in optimizing conformal radiotherapy for patients with prostate cancer. The concepts of biologic target volume, real target volume, and multidimensional conformal radiotherapy are being explored.

  6. Cryosurgery for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, W E; Bissada, N K

    2003-01-01

    Choice of management for patients with prostate cancer is influenced by patient and disease characteristics and life expectancy. Management options include expectance (watchful waiting), radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and cryosurgical ablation of the prostate (CSAP). The role of cryotherapy in the management of prostate cancer is still evolving. Continued research has allowed the introduction of efficient and safe cryosurgical equipment exemplified by the current third-generation cryosurgical machines. CSAP can be performed in an ambulatory surgery setting or as inpatient surgery with overnight stay. The procedure is performed under continuous ultrasonic monitoring. Mature data from the use of second-generation cryosurgical equipment indicate that CSAP is an effective therapeutic modality for managing patients with prostate cancer. Current data with the third-generation cryosurgical equipment are not mature. However, the favorable side effect profile and the good early responses seem to indicate that this modality will have a prominent role in the management of patients with prostate cancer.

  7. Piezoelectric Composite Micromachined Multifrequency Transducers for High-Resolution, High-Contrast Ultrasound Imaging for Improved Prostate Cancer Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    682. S. Li, W. Chang, W. Huang, and X. Jiang, ൰-MHz Micromachined PMN-PT Composite Ultrasound Array for Medical Imaging ," in ASME 2015...Jiang, ൰-MHz Micromachined PMN-PT Composite Ultrasound Array for Medical Imaging ," in ASME 2015 International Mechanical Engineering Congress...Resolution, High- Contrast Ultrasound Imaging For Improved Prostate Cancer Assessment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paul A. Dayton CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION

  8. Automatic classification of prostate cancer Gleason scores from multiparametric magnetic resonance images

    PubMed Central

    Fehr, Duc; Veeraraghavan, Harini; Wibmer, Andreas; Gondo, Tatsuo; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Vargas, Herbert Alberto; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive, radiological image-based detection and stratification of Gleason patterns can impact clinical outcomes, treatment selection, and the determination of disease status at diagnosis without subjecting patients to surgical biopsies. We present machine learning-based automatic classification of prostate cancer aggressiveness by combining apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and T2-weighted (T2-w) MRI-based texture features. Our approach achieved reasonably accurate classification of Gleason scores (GS) 6(3+3) vs. ≥7 and 7(3+4) vs. 7(4+3) despite the presence of highly unbalanced samples by using two different sample augmentation techniques followed by feature selection-based classification. Our method distinguished between GS 6(3+3) and ≥7 cancers with 93% accuracy for cancers occurring in both peripheral (PZ) and transition (TZ) zones and 92% for cancers occurring in the PZ alone. Our approach distinguished the GS 7(3+4) from GS 7(4+3) with 92% accuracy for cancers occurring in both the PZ and TZ and with 93% for cancers occurring in the PZ alone. In comparison, a classifier using only the ADC mean achieved a top accuracy of 58% for distinguishing GS 6(3+3) vs. GS ≥7 for cancers occurring in PZ and TZ and 63% for cancers occurring in PZ alone. The same classifier achieved an accuracy of 59% for distinguishing GS 7(3+4) from GS 7(4+3) occurring in the PZ and TZ and 60% for cancers occurring in PZ alone. Separate analysis of the cancers occurring in TZ alone was not performed owing to the limited number of samples. Our results suggest that texture features derived from ADC and T2-w MRI together with sample augmentation can help to obtain reasonably accurate classification of Gleason patterns. PMID:26578786

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging - ultrasound fusion targeted biopsy outperforms standard approaches in detecting prostate cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuping; Zhang, Jiayi; Tang, Jingyuan; Xu, Zhen; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Qing; Guo, Hongqian; Zhou, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether magnetic resonance imaging - ultrasound (MRI-US) fusion prostate biopsy is superior to systematic biopsy for making a definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer. The two strategies were also compared regarding their ability to detect clinically significant and insignificant prostate cancer. A literature search was conducted through the PubMed, EMBASE and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases using appropriate search terms. A total of 3,415 cases from 21 studies were included in the present meta-analysis. Data were expressed as relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval. The results revealed that MRI-US fusion biopsy achieved a higher rate of overall prostate cancer detection compared with systematic biopsy (RR=1.09; P=0.047). Moreover, MRI-US fusion biopsy detected more clinically significant cancers compared with systematic biopsy (RR=1.22; P<0.01). It is therefore recommended that multi-parametric MRI-US is performed in men suspected of having prostate cancer to optimize the detection of clinically significant disease, while reducing the burden of biopsies. PMID:27446568

  10. 68Ga-prostate-specific Membrane Antigen Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Prostate Cancer Imaging: A Narrative Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jose M.; Gomes, Catarina; Faria, Diogo B.; Vieira, Tiago S.; Silva, Fernando A.; Vale, Joana; Pimentel, Francisco L.

    2017-01-01

    The 68Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen ( 68Ga-PSMA) has been recently developed to be used, as a ligand, in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) prostate cancer imaging, to detect prostate disease. The main objective of this review was to collect data and findings from other studies and articles to assess, theoretically, if 68GA-PSMA PET/CT is a more appropriate prostate cancer diagnostic technique in comparison with others available such as CT, 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose PET/CT, or 18F-fluoromethylcholine ( 18F-choline) PET/CT. For that purpose, PubMed, the online scientific articles’ database, was consulted where the keywords “PSMA” and “PET” were used to find relevant articles. The clinicaltrials.gov, clinical trials’ database, was also consulted where the keywords “68Ga-PSMA” and “prostate” were used to search clinical trials. Based on the reviewed scientific literature, several studies were conducted to assess and compare the 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT detection rate in prostate cancer with other available techniques. One of those studies, conducted by Giesel et al., concluded, within study sample, that 75% of patients with lymph nodes detected by 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT would have not been identified using other conventional morphological criteria based techniques. In Eiber et al.'s study, 68Ga-PSMA PET detected prostatic disease findings in 67% of patients with prostate-specific antigen levels <1 ng/mL, when compared with choline-based PET that presented detection rates between 19% and 36%. In Bluemel et al.'s study, 68Ga-PSMA identified positive prostatic disease in 43.8% of the patients with negative findings in F-choline PET/CT. Findings from this review demonstrate that 68Ga-PSMA PET/C is more effective in detecting metastases, lymph nodes, and recurrent prostate cancer when compared to 18F-choline-based PET/CT and CT. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT presents also more imaging contrast and can be more cost-effective. 68Ga-PSMA has already

  11. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer Abiraterone Acetate Bicalutamide Cabazitaxel Casodex (Bicalutamide) Degarelix Docetaxel ...

  12. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Brand, Timothy C; Canby-Hagino, Edith D; Pratap Kumar, A; Ghosh, Rita; Leach, Robin J; Thompson, Ian M

    2006-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy with multiple potential opportunities for cancer prevention. As the genetic basis of this malignancy is further understood, prevention strategies will be developed for individual patients based on specific risk factors and pathways of carcinogenesis. The PCPT has conclusively proven that prostate cancer prevention is possible. The results of the SELECT should be available within several years. An enormous challenge for the medical community will be the development of an efficient strategy to evaluate the substantial number of dietary, behavioral, and pharmacologic prevention opportunities. Ultimately, the goal of prostate can-cer prevention is to (1) identify men who are destined to develop clinically significant prostate cancer, and (2) provide individualized agents to prevent disease development.

  13. Evaluation of a technetium-99m labeled bombesin homodimer for GRPR imaging in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zilin; Carlucci, Giuseppe; Ananias, Hildo J K; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Liu, Shuang; Helfrich, Wijnand; Wang, Fan; de Jong, Igle J; Elsinga, Philip H

    2013-02-01

    Multimerization of peptides can improve the binding characteristics of the tracer by increasing local ligand concentration and decreasing dissociation kinetics. In this study, a new bombesin homodimer was developed based on an ε-aminocaproic acid-bombesin(7-14) (Aca-bombesin(7-14)) fragment, which has been studied for targeting the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) in prostate cancer. The bombesin homodimer was conjugated to 6-hydrazinopyridine-3-carboxylic acid (HYNIC) and labeled with (99m)Tc for SPECT imaging. The in vitro binding affinity to GRPR, cell uptake, internalization and efflux kinetics of the radiolabeled bombesin dimer were investigated in the GRPR-expressing human prostate cancer cell line PC-3. Biodistribution and the GRPR-targeting potential were evaluated in PC-3 tumor-bearing athymic nude mice. When compared with the bombesin monomer, the binding affinity of the bombesin dimer is about ten times lower. However, the (99m)Tc labeled bombesin dimer showed a three times higher cellular uptake at 4 h after incubation, but similar internalization and efflux characters in vitro. Tumor uptake and in vivo pharmacokinetics in PC-3 tumor-bearing mice were comparable. The tumor was visible on the dynamic images in the first hour and could be clearly distinguished from non-targeted tissues on the static images after 4 h. The GRPR-targeting ability of the (99m)Tc labeled bombesin dimer was proven in vitro and in vivo. This bombesin homodimer provides a good starting point for further studies on enhancing the tumor targeting activity of bombesin multimers.

  14. Multiparametric 3-Tesla Endorectal MR Imaging after External Beam Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Westphalen, Antonio C.; Reed, Galen D.; Vinh, Phillip P.; Sotto, Christopher; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the best combination of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging parameters for the detection of locally recurrent prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy. Materials and Methods Our IRB approved this study with a waiver of informed consent. Twenty-six patients with suspected recurrence due to biochemical failure were part of this research. The MR protocol included T2-weighted, MR spectroscopic, and diffusion-weighted MR imaging. Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy was the standard of reference. We used logistic regression to model the probability of a positive outcome and generalized estimating equations to account for clustering. The diagnostic performance of imaging was described using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results The area under the ROC curve of MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) was 83.0% (95% CI = 75.5 to 89.1). The combination of all MR techniques did not significantly improve the performance of imaging beyond the accuracy of MRSI alone, but a trend towards improved discrimination was noted (86.9%; 95% CI = 77.6 to 93.4; P = 0.09). Conclusion In conclusion, incorporation of MRSI to T2-weighted and/or diffusion-weighted MR imaging significantly improves the assessment of patients with suspected recurrence after radiotherapy and a combined approach with all three modalities may have the best diagnostic performance. PMID:22535708

  15. Improving supervised classification accuracy using non-rigid multimodal image registration: detecting prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappelow, Jonathan; Viswanath, Satish; Monaco, James; Rosen, Mark; Tomaszewski, John; Feldman, Michael; Madabhushi, Anant

    2008-03-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems for the detection of cancer in medical images require precise labeling of training data. For magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) of the prostate, training labels define the spatial extent of prostate cancer (CaP); the most common source for these labels is expert segmentations. When ancillary data such as whole mount histology (WMH) sections, which provide the gold standard for cancer ground truth, are available, the manual labeling of CaP can be improved by referencing WMH. However, manual segmentation is error prone, time consuming and not reproducible. Therefore, we present the use of multimodal image registration to automatically and accurately transcribe CaP from histology onto MRI following alignment of the two modalities, in order to improve the quality of training data and hence classifier performance. We quantitatively demonstrate the superiority of this registration-based methodology by comparing its results to the manual CaP annotation of expert radiologists. Five supervised CAD classifiers were trained using the labels for CaP extent on MRI obtained by the expert and 4 different registration techniques. Two of the registration methods were affi;ne schemes; one based on maximization of mutual information (MI) and the other method that we previously developed, Combined Feature Ensemble Mutual Information (COFEMI), which incorporates high-order statistical features for robust multimodal registration. Two non-rigid schemes were obtained by succeeding the two affine registration methods with an elastic deformation step using thin-plate splines (TPS). In the absence of definitive ground truth for CaP extent on MRI, classifier accuracy was evaluated against 7 ground truth surrogates obtained by different combinations of the expert and registration segmentations. For 26 multimodal MRI-WMH image pairs, all four registration methods produced a higher area under the receiver operating characteristic curve compared to that

  16. Automated prostate cancer detection using T2-weighted and high-b-value diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Jin Tae; Xu, Sheng; Wood, Bradford J.; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L.; Pinto, Peter A.; Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The authors propose a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for prostate cancer to aid in improving the accuracy, reproducibility, and standardization of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: The proposed system utilizes two MRI sequences [T2-weighted MRI and high-b-value (b = 2000 s/mm2) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)] and texture features based on local binary patterns. A three-stage feature selection method is employed to provide the most discriminative features. The authors included a total of 244 patients. Training the CAD system on 108 patients (78 MR-positive prostate cancers and 105 benign MR-positive lesions), two validation studies were retrospectively performed on 136 patients (68 MR-positive prostate cancers, 111 benign MR-positive lesions, and 117 MR-negative benign lesions). Results: In distinguishing cancer from MR-positive benign lesions, an area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.83 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.76–0.89] was achieved. For cancer vs MR-positive or MR-negative benign lesions, the authors obtained an AUC of 0.89 AUC (95% CI: 0.84–0.93). The performance of the CAD system was not dependent on the specific regions of the prostate, e.g., a peripheral zone or transition zone. Moreover, the CAD system outperformed other combinations of MRI sequences: T2W MRI, high-b-value DWI, and the standard apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map of DWI. Conclusions: The novel CAD system is able to detect the discriminative texture features for cancer detection and localization and is a promising tool for improving the quality and efficiency of prostate cancer diagnosis. PMID:25979032

  17. Learning about Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gene Mapped To X Chromosome 1998 Researchers Link Gene to Hereditary Form of Prostate Cancer 2002 Get Email Updates Advancing human health through genomics research Privacy Copyright Contact Accessibility Plug-ins Site Map Staff Search FOIA Share Top

  18. Cholesterol and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Kristine; Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer risk can be modified by environmental factors, however the molecular mechanisms affecting susceptibility to this disease are not well understood. As a result of a series of recently published studies, the steroidal lipid, cholesterol, has emerged as a clinically relevant therapeutic target in prostate cancer. This review summarizes the findings from human studies as well as animal and cell biology models, which suggest that high circulating cholesterol increases risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while cholesterol lowering strategies may confer protective benefit. Relevant molecular processes that have been experimentally tested and might explain these associations are described. We suggest that these promising results now could be applied prospectively to attempt to lower risk of prostate cancer in select populations.

  19. Advanced Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... if it has spread to: • Bones • Lungs • Liver • Brain • Lymph nodes outside the pelvis • Other organs You may be diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer when you are first diagnosed, after having completed ...

  20. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Białek, Waldemar; Rudzki, Sławomir; Iberszer, Paweł; Wronecki, Lech

    2016-12-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin.

  1. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rudzki, Sławomir; Iberszer, Paweł; Wronecki, Lech

    2016-01-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin. PMID:28138411

  2. Zinc and prostatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Ho, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Aim to understand the connection between zinc and prostatic cancer, and to summarize the recent findings about the functions of zinc in the maintenance of prostate health. Recent findings Contradictory findings have been reported by epidemiologic studies examining the association between zinc intake and the risk of prostate cancer. However, a growing body of experimental evidence support that high zinc levels are essential for prostate health. The possible mechanisms include the effects of zinc on the inhibition of terminal oxidation, induction of mitochondrial apoptogenesis, and suppression of NFκB activity. The most recent finding is the effects of zinc in the maintenance of DNA integrity in normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) by modulating the expression and activity of DNA repair and damage response proteins, especially p53. Zinc depletion in PrEC increased p53 expression but compromised p53 DNA binding activity resulting an impaired DNA repair function. Moreover, recent findings support the role of zinc transporters as tumor suppressors in the prostate. Summary Future studies need to discover sensitive and specific zinc biomarkers and perform more in vivo studies on the effects of zinc on prostate functions in normal animals or prostate cancer models. PMID:19684515

  3. Early Outcomes From Three Prospective Trials of Image-Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Li Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Marcus, Robert B.; Mendenhall, William M.; Nichols, R. Charles; Morris, Christopher G.; Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph; Henderson, Randal

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We accrued 211 prostate cancer patients on prospective Institutional Review Board-approved trials of 78 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 39 fractions for low-risk disease, dose escalation from 78 to 82 CGE for intermediate-risk disease, and 78 CGE with concomitant docetaxel followed by androgen deprivation for high-risk disease. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. Results: One intermediate-risk patient and 2 high-risk patients had disease progression. Pretreatment genitourinary (GU) symptom management was required in 38% of patients. A cumulative 88 (42%) patients required posttreatment GU symptom management. Four transient Grade 3 GU toxicities occurred, all among patients requiring pretreatment GU symptom management. Multivariate analysis showed correlation between posttreatment GU 2+ symptoms and pretreatment GU symptom management (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.0048). Only 1 Grade 3+ gastrointestinal (GI) symptom occurred. The prevalence of Grade 2+ GI symptoms was 0 (0%), 10 (5%), 12 (6%), and 8 (4%) at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months, with a cumulative incidence of 20 (10%) patients at 2 years after proton therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed significant correlation between Grade 2+ rectal bleeding and proctitis and the percentage of rectal wall (rectum) receiving doses ranging from 40 CGE (10 CGE) to 80 CGE. Conclusions: Early outcomes with image-guided proton therapy suggest high efficacy and minimal toxicity with only 1.9% Grade 3 GU symptoms and <0.5% Grade 3 GI toxicities.

  4. Multifunctional iron platinum stealth immunomicelles: targeted detection of human prostate cancer cells using both fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Robert M.; Huber, Dale L.; Monson, Todd C.; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi S.; Bisoffi, Marco; Sillerud, Laurel O.

    2011-10-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are the most common type of contrast agents used in contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Still, there is a great deal of room for improvement, and nanoparticles with increased MRI relaxivities are needed to increase the contrast enhancement in MRI applied to various medical conditions including cancer. We report the synthesis of superparamagnetic iron platinum nanoparticles (SIPPs) and subsequent encapsulation using PEGylated phospholipids to create stealth immunomicelles (DSPE-SIPPs) that can be specifically targeted to human prostate cancer cell lines and detected using both MRI and fluorescence imaging. SIPP cores and DSPE-SIPPs were 8.5 ± 1.6 nm and 42.9 ± 8.2 nm in diameter, respectively, and the SIPPs had a magnetic moment of 120 A m2/kg iron. J591, a monoclonal antibody against prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was conjugated to the DSPE-SIPPs (J591-DSPE-SIPPs), and specific targeting of J591-DSPE-SIPPs to PSMA-expressing human prostate cancer cell lines was demonstrated using fluorescence confocal microscopy. The transverse relaxivity of the DSPE-SIPPs, measured at 4.7 Tesla, was 300.6 ± 8.5 s-1 mM-1, which is 13-fold better than commercially available SPIONs (23.8 ± 6.9 s-1 mM-1) and 3-fold better than reported relaxivities for Feridex® and Resovist®. Our data suggest that J591-DSPE-SIPPs specifically target human prostate cancer cells in vitro, are superior contrast agents in T 2-weighted MRI, and can be detected using fluorescence imaging. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the synthesis of multifunctional SIPP micelles and using SIPPs for the specific detection of prostate cancer.

  5. Multifunctional iron platinum stealth immunomicelles: targeted detection of human prostate cancer cells using both fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Dale L.; Monson, Todd C.; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi S.; Bisoffi, Marco; Sillerud, Laurel O.

    2011-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are the most common type of contrast agents used in contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Still, there is a great deal of room for improvement, and nanoparticles with increased MRI relaxivities are needed to increase the contrast enhancement in MRI applied to various medical conditions including cancer. We report the synthesis of superparamagnetic iron platinum nanoparticles (SIPPs) and subsequent encapsulation using PEGylated phospholipids to create stealth immunomicelles (DSPE-SIPPs) that can be specifically targeted to human prostate cancer cell lines and detected using both MRI and fluorescence imaging. SIPP cores and DSPE-SIPPs were 8.5 ± 1.6 nm and 42.9 ± 8.2 nm in diameter, respectively, and the SIPPs had a magnetic moment of 120 A m2/kg iron. J591, a monoclonal antibody against prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was conjugated to the DSPE-SIPPs (J591-DSPE-SIPPs), and specific targeting of J591-DSPE-SIPPs to PSMA-expressing human prostate cancer cell lines was demonstrated using fluorescence confocal microscopy. The transverse relaxivity of the DSPE-SIPPs, measured at 4.7 Tesla, was 300.6 ± 8.5 s−1 mM−1, which is 13-fold better than commercially available SPIONs (23.8 ± 6.9 s−1 mM−1) and ~3-fold better than reported relaxivities for Feridex® and Resovist®. Our data suggest that J591-DSPE-SIPPs specifically target human prostate cancer cells in vitro, are superior contrast agents in T2-weighted MRI, and can be detected using fluorescence imaging. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the synthesis of multifunctional SIPP micelles and using SIPPs for the specific detection of prostate cancer. PMID:22121333

  6. Photoacoustic imaging with an acoustic lens detects prostate cancer cells labeled with PSMA-targeting near-infrared dye-conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogra, Vikram; Chinni, Bhargava; Singh, Shalini; Schmitthenner, Hans; Rao, Navalgund; Krolewski, John J.; Nastiuk, Kent L.

    2016-06-01

    There is an urgent need for sensitive and specific tools to accurately image early stage, organ-confined human prostate cancers to facilitate active surveillance and reduce unnecessary treatment. Recently, we developed an acoustic lens that enhances the sensitivity of photoacoustic imaging. Here, we report the use of this device in conjunction with two molecular imaging agents that specifically target the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expressed on the tumor cell surface of most prostate cancers. We demonstrate successful imaging of phantoms containing cancer cells labeled with either of two different PSMA-targeting agents, the ribonucleic acid aptamer A10-3.2 and a urea-based peptidomimetic inhibitor, each linked to the near-infrared dye IRDye800CW. By specifically targeting cells with these agents linked to a dye chosen for optimal signal, we are able to discriminate prostate cancer cells that express PSMA.

  7. [Paget's disease mimicking metastatic prostate cancer on bone scan image : a case report].

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Ken; Koie, Takuya; Yamamoto, Hayato; Okamoto, Akiko; Imai, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ohyama, Chikara

    2013-04-01

    A 61-year-old man was referred to our hospital complaining of elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (5.1 ng/ml). Histopathologic diagnosis with trans-rectal prostate biopsy specimen was adenocarcinoma, Gleason score 4+5 = 9. Bone scintigraphy revealed an abnormal uptake on left coxal bone. The patient was diagnosed with prostate cancer with bone metastasis. He received androgen deprivation therapy for two years. Serum PSA decreased to an undetected level. However, the abnormal activity of left coxal bone lesion was not changed on bone scintigraphy. Coxal bone biopsy was performed. The bone lesion was histopathologically diagnosed as Paget's disease of bone.

  8. Dual-modality image guided high intensity focused ultrasound device design for prostate cancer: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Dexter; Curiel, Laura; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Pichardo, Samuel

    2012-10-01

    In this study the feasibility of designing a multi-element prostate cancer treatment device using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and ultrasound imaging for guidance was determined. A parametric study was performed to determine the optimal focal length (L), operating frequency (f), element size (a) and central hole radius for lodging an imaging probe (r) of a device that would safely treat cancerous tissue within the prostate. Images from the Visible Human Project were used to determine simulated organ sizes and treatment locations. Elliptical tumors were placed throughout the simulated prostate and their lateral and axial limits were selected as test locations. Using Tesla C1060 (NVIDIA, Santa Clara, CA, USA) graphics processors, the Bio-Heat Transfer Equation was implemented to calculate the heating produced during the simulated treatment. L, f a and r were varied from 45 to 75mm, 2.25 to 3.00MHz, 1.5 to 8 times λ and 9 to 11mm, respectively. Results indicated that a device of 761 elements with a combination of L, f a and r of 68mm, 2.75MHz, 2.05λ and 9mm, respectively, could safely ablate tumors within the prostate and spare the surrounding organs.

  9. In vivo small animal imaging for early assessment of therapeutic efficacy of photodynamic therapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Baowei; Wang, Hesheng; Chen, Xiang; Meyers, Joseph; Mulvilhill, John; Feyes, Denise; Edgehouse, Nancy; Duerk, Jeffrey L.; Pretlow, Thomas G.; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2007-03-01

    We are developing in vivo small animal imaging techniques that can measure early effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for prostate cancer. PDT is an emerging therapeutic modality that continues to show promise in the treatment of cancer. At our institution, a new second-generation photosensitizing drug, the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4, has been developed and evaluated at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. In this study, we are developing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques that provide therapy monitoring and early assessment of tumor response to PDT. We generated human prostate cancer xenografts in athymic nude mice. For the imaging experiments, we used a highfield 9.4-T small animal MR scanner (Bruker Biospec). High-resolution MR images were acquired from the treated and control tumors pre- and post-PDT and 24 hr after PDT. We utilized multi-slice multi-echo (MSME) MR sequences. During imaging acquisitions, the animals were anesthetized with a continuous supply of 2% isoflurane in oxygen and were continuously monitored for respiration and temperature. After imaging experiments, we manually segmented the tumors on each image slice for quantitative image analyses. We computed three-dimensional T2 maps for the tumor regions from the MSME images. We plotted the histograms of the T2 maps for each tumor pre- and post-PDT and 24 hr after PDT. After the imaging and PDT experiments, we dissected the tumor tissues and used the histologic slides to validate the MR images. In this study, six mice with human prostate cancer tumors were imaged and treated at the Case Center for Imaging Research. The T2 values of treated tumors increased by 24 +/- 14% 24 hr after the therapy. The control tumors did not demonstrate significant changes of the T2 values. Inflammation and necrosis were observed within the treated tumors 24 hour after the treatment. Preliminary results show that Pc 4-PDT is effective for the treatment of human prostate cancer in mice. The small animal MR

  10. In Vivo Small Animal Imaging for Early Assessment of Therapeutic Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fei, Baowei; Wang, Hesheng; Chen, Xiang; Meyers, Joseph; Mulvihill, John; Feyes, Denise; Edgehouse, Nancy; Duerk, Jeffrey L; Pretlow, Thomas G; Oleinick, Nancy L

    2007-03-29

    We are developing in vivo small animal imaging techniques that can measure early effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for prostate cancer. PDT is an emerging therapeutic modality that continues to show promise in the treatment of cancer. At our institution, a new second-generation photosensitizing drug, the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4, has been developed and evaluated at the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center. In this study, we are developing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques that provide therapy monitoring and early assessment of tumor response to PDT. We generated human prostate cancer xenografts in athymic nude mice. For the imaging experiments, we used a high-field 9.4-T small animal MR scanner (Bruker Biospec). High-resolution MR images were acquired from the treated and control tumors pre- and post-PDT and 24 hr after PDT. We utilized multi-slice multi-echo (MSME) MR sequences. During imaging acquisitions, the animals were anesthetized with a continuous supply of 2% isoflurane in oxygen and were continuously monitored for respiration and temperature. After imaging experiments, we manually segmented the tumors on each image slice for quantitative image analyses. We computed three-dimensional T2 maps for the tumor regions from the MSME images. We plotted the histograms of the T2 maps for each tumor pre- and post-PDT and 24 hr after PDT. After the imaging and PDT experiments, we dissected the tumor tissues and used the histologic slides to validate the MR images. In this study, six mice with human prostate cancer tumors were imaged and treated at the Case Center for Imaging Research. The T2 values of treated tumors increased by 24 ± 14% 24 hr after the therapy. The control tumors did not demonstrate significant changes of the T2 values. Inflammation and necrosis were observed within the treated tumors 24 hour after the treatment. Preliminary results show that Pc 4-PDT is effective for the treatment of human prostate cancer in mice. The small animal MR

  11. Understanding your prostate cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000931.htm Understanding your prostate cancer risk To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. Are you at risk for developing prostate cancer in your lifetime? Learn about the risk factors ...

  12. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  13. Stokes polarimetry imaging of dog prostate tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Johnston, William K., III; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2010-02-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States in 2009. Radical prostatectomy (complete removal of the prostate) is the most common treatment for prostate cancer, however, differentiating prostate tissue from adjacent bladder, nerves, and muscle is difficult. Improved visualization could improve oncologic outcomes and decrease damage to adjacent nerves and muscle important for preservation of potency and continence. A novel Stokes polarimetry imaging (SPI) system was developed and evaluated using a dog prostate specimen in order to examine the feasibility of the system to differentiate prostate from bladder. The degree of linear polarization (DOLP) image maps from linearly polarized light illumination at different visible wavelengths (475, 510, and 650 nm) were constructed. The SPI system used the polarization property of the prostate tissue. The DOLP images allowed advanced differentiation by distinguishing glandular tissue of prostate from the muscular-stromal tissue in the bladder. The DOLP image at 650 nm effectively differentiated prostate and bladder by strong DOLP in bladder. SPI system has the potential to improve surgical outcomes in open or robotic-assisted laparoscopic removal of the prostate. Further in vivo testing is warranted.

  14. Targeted molecular-genetic imaging and ligand-directed therapy in aggressive variant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I; Driessen, Wouter H P; D'Angelo, Sara; Dobroff, Andrey S; Barry, Marc; Lomo, Lesley C; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Soghomonyan, Suren; Alauddin, Mian M; Flores, Leo G; Arap, Marco A; Lauer, Richard C; Mathew, Paul; Efstathiou, Eleni; Aparicio, Ana M; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora M; Logothetis, Christopher J; Marchiò, Serena; Gelovani, Juri G; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-10-24

    Aggressive variant prostate cancers (AVPC) are a clinically defined group of tumors of heterogeneous morphologies, characterized by poor patient survival and for which limited diagnostic and treatment options are currently available. We show that the cell surface 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), a receptor that binds to phage-display-selected ligands, such as the SNTRVAP motif, is a candidate target in AVPC. We report the presence and accessibility of this receptor in clinical specimens from index patients. We also demonstrate that human AVPC cells displaying GRP78 on their surface could be effectively targeted both in vitro and in vivo by SNTRVAP, which also enabled specific delivery of siRNA species to tumor xenografts in mice. Finally, we evaluated ligand-directed strategies based on SNTRVAP-displaying adeno-associated virus/phage (AAVP) particles in mice bearing MDA-PCa-118b, a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) of castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis that we exploited as a model of AVPC. For theranostic (a merging of the terms therapeutic and diagnostic) studies, GRP78-targeting AAVP particles served to deliver the human Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase type-1 (HSVtk) gene, which has a dual function as a molecular-genetic sensor/reporter and a cell suicide-inducing transgene. We observed specific and simultaneous PET imaging and treatment of tumors in this preclinical model of AVPC. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of GPR78-targeting, ligand-directed theranostics for translational applications in AVPC.

  15. Targeted molecular-genetic imaging and ligand-directed therapy in aggressive variant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I.; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; D’Angelo, Sara; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Barry, Marc; Lomo, Lesley C.; Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Soghomonyan, Suren; Alauddin, Mian M.; Flores, Leo G.; Arap, Marco A.; Lauer, Richard C.; Mathew, Paul; Efstathiou, Eleni; Aparicio, Ana M.; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora M.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Marchiò, Serena; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive variant prostate cancers (AVPC) are a clinically defined group of tumors of heterogeneous morphologies, characterized by poor patient survival and for which limited diagnostic and treatment options are currently available. We show that the cell surface 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), a receptor that binds to phage-display-selected ligands, such as the SNTRVAP motif, is a candidate target in AVPC. We report the presence and accessibility of this receptor in clinical specimens from index patients. We also demonstrate that human AVPC cells displaying GRP78 on their surface could be effectively targeted both in vitro and in vivo by SNTRVAP, which also enabled specific delivery of siRNA species to tumor xenografts in mice. Finally, we evaluated ligand-directed strategies based on SNTRVAP-displaying adeno-associated virus/phage (AAVP) particles in mice bearing MDA-PCa-118b, a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) of castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis that we exploited as a model of AVPC. For theranostic (a merging of the terms therapeutic and diagnostic) studies, GRP78-targeting AAVP particles served to deliver the human Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase type-1 (HSVtk) gene, which has a dual function as a molecular-genetic sensor/reporter and a cell suicide-inducing transgene. We observed specific and simultaneous PET imaging and treatment of tumors in this preclinical model of AVPC. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of GPR78-targeting, ligand-directed theranostics for translational applications in AVPC. PMID:27791181

  16. Tissue-type imaging (TTI) based on ultrasonic spectral and clinical parameters for detecting, evaluating, and managing prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feleppa, Ernest J.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Dasgupta, Shreedevi; Kalisz, Andrew; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Porter, Christopher R.

    2005-04-01

    This study seeks to develop more-sensitive and -specific ultrasonic methods of imaging cancerous prostate tissue and thereby to improve means of guiding biopsies and planning, targeting, and monitoring treatment. Ultrasonic radio-frequency, echo-signal data, and clinical variables, e.g., PSA, voiding function, etc., during biopsy examinations were acquired. Spectra of the radio-frequency signals were computed in each biopsied region, and used to train neural networks; biopsy results served as the gold standard. A lookup table gave scores for cancer likelihood on a pixel-by-pixel basis from locally computed spectral-parameter and global clinical-parameter values. ROC curves used leave-one-patient- and leave-one-biopsy-out approaches to minimize classification bias. Resulting ROC-curve areas were 0.80+/-0.03 for neural-networks versus 0.66+/-0.03 for conventional classification. TTIs generated from data acquired pre-surgically showed tumors that were unrecognized in conventional images and during surgery. 3-D renderings of prostatectomy histology and TTIs showed encouraging correlations, which shows promise for improving the detection and management of prostate cancer, e.g., for biopsy guidance, planning dose-escalation and tissue-sparing options for radiation or cryotherapy, and assessing the effects of treatment. Combining MRS parameters with US spectral parameters appears capable of further improving prostate-cancer imaging. [Work supported by NIH.

  17. SU-E-I-82: PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Prostate Cancer Imaging: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, F; Silva, D da; Rodrigues, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to review new and clinical practice PET radiopharmaceuticals for prostate cancer imaging. Methods: PET radiopharmaceuticals were reviewed on the main databases. Availability, dosimetry, accuracy and limitations were considered. Results: The following radioisotopes with respective physical half-life and mean positron energy were found: {sup 18}F (109,7 min, 249,8 keV), {sup 89}Zr (78,4 hs, 395,5 keV), {sup 11}C (20,4 min, 385,7 keV) and {sup 68}Ga (67,8 min, 836 keV). {sup 68}Ga was the only one not produced by cyclotron. Radiopharmaceuticals uptake by glucose metabolism ({sup 18}F-FDG), lipogenesis ({sup 11}C-Choline and {sup 11}C-Acetate), amino acid transport (Anti-{sup 18}F-FACBC), bone matrix ({sup 18}F-NaF), prostatespecific membrane antigen ({sup 68}Ga-PSMA and {sup 89}Zr-J591), CXCR receptors ({sup 89}Ga-Pentixafor), adrenal receptors ({sup 18}F-FDHT) and gastrin release peptide receptor (bombesin analogue). Most of radiopharmaceuticals are urinary excretion, so bladder is the critical organ. 11C-choline (pancreas), Anti-{sup 18}FFACBC (liver) and {sup 18}F-FBDC (stomach wall) are the exception. Higher effective dose was seen {sup 18}F-NaF (27 μSv/MBq) while the lowest was {sup 11}CAcetate (3,5 μSv/MBq). Conclusion: Even though {sup 18}F-FDG has a large availability its high urinary excretion and poor uptake to slow growing disease offers weak results for prostate cancer. Better accuracy is obtained when {sup 18}F-NaF is used for bone metastatic investigation although physicians tend to choose bone scintigraphy probably due to its cost and practice. Many guidelines in oncology consider {sup 11}C or {sup 18}F labeled with Choline the gold standard for biochemical relapse after radical treatment. Local, lymph node and distant metastatic relapse can be evaluated at same time with this radiopharmaceutical. There is no consensus over bigger urinary excretion for {sup 18}F labeling. Anti-{sup 18}F-FACBC, {sup 68}Ga-PSMA and {sup

  18. VPAC1 targeted 64Cu-TP3805 PET imaging of prostate cancer: preliminary evaluation in man

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Sushil; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Gomella, Leonard; Kim, Sung; McCue, Peter; Intenzo, Charles; Birbe, Ruth; Gandhe, Ashish; Kumar, Pardeep; Thakur, Mathew

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate 64Cu-TP3805 as a novel biomolecule, to PET image prostate cancer (PC), at the onset of which VPAC1, the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors, is expressed in high density on PC cells, but not on normal cells. Methods 25 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy were PET/CT imaged preoperatively with 64Cu-TP3805. Standardized uptake values (SUVmax) were determined, malignant lesions (SUV > 1.0) counted, and compared with histologic findings. Whole mount pathology slides from 6 VPAC1 PET imaged patients, 3 BPH patients, one malignant and one benign lymph node underwent digital autoradiography (DAR) after 64Cu-TP3805 incubation and compared to H&E stained slides. Results In 25 patient PET imaging, 212 prostate gland lesions had SUVmax > 1.0 vs.127 lesions identified by histology of biopsy tissues. The status of the additional 85 PET identified prostate lesions remains to be determined. In 68 histological slides from 6 PET imaged patients, DAR identified 105/107 PC foci, 19/19 HGPIN, and ejaculatory ducts and verumontanum involved with cancer. Additionally, DAR found 9 PC lesions not previously identified histologically. The positive and negative lymph nodes were correctly identified and in 3/3 BPH patients and 5/5 cysts, DAR was negative. Conclusion This feasibility study demonstrated that 64Cu-TP3805 delineates PC in vivo and ex vivo, provided normal images for benign masses, and is worthy of further studies. PMID:26519886

  19. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for pre-treatment local staging of prostate cancer: A Cancer Care Ontario clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Salerno, Jennifer; Finelli, Antonio; Morash, Chris; Morgan, Scott C.; Power, Nicholas; Schieda, Nichola; Haider, Masoom A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The utility of T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the local staging of prostate cancer is controversial. Due to the success of multiparametric MRI in cancer localization, there is renewed interested in MRI (± functional sequences) for local staging. Guidance on pre-treatment local staging of prostate cancer by MRI was developed using systematic review methodology and expert consultation. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and other databases were searched to identify studies comparing: (1) MRI staging vs. radical prostatectomy staging on diagnostic accuracy outcomes; and (2) MRI staging vs. routine clinical staging on clinical and patient outcomes. Studies meeting inclusion criteria were synthesized by outcome and sensitivity/specificity analysis by tumour location was performed. Evidence quality of included studies was assessed and considered in recommendation formulation. Results: The literature search identified 2510 citations; 62 studies were included. Analysis of MRI ≥1.5 T plus endorectal coil (ER) (± functional sequences) in the detection of extraprostatic extension or seminal vesicle invasion showed modest sensitivities (≥50%) and excellent specificities (>85%) among patients scheduled for radical prostatectomy. MRI upstaging was shown in 20/21 studies, with large variation in correctness (11–85%). Scarcity of clinical and patient outcomes among studies limited synthesis and evaluation. Quality assessment found non-trivial biases. Conclusions: Modest imaging performance was shown for MRI (1.5 T + ER and 3 T ± ER) ± functional sequences in regards to sensitivity. Limitations in study design, reporting of clinical and patient outcomes, and the heterogeneous use of MRI tempered the strength of the recommendations. PMID:27800062

  20. Magnetic Resonance-Based Electrical Property Tomography (MR- EPT) for Prostate Cancer Grade Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    inclusion gelatin phantom. Top row shows T1 MR images along the axis of phantom; two playdough inclusions at different planes show up as low intensity ...new data published in The Prostate [6] in which we demonstrated significant electrical property differences between high- and low -grade prostate...have hypothesize that it is possible to use these properties to discriminate between normal, low -grade, and high-grade malignant formations in a

  1. Reduction of Dose Delivered to Organs at Risk in Prostate Cancer Patients via Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowski, Jason M.; Yang, Eddy S.; Malcolm, Arnold W.; Coffey, Charles W.; Ding, George X.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether image guidance can improve the dose delivered to target organs and organs at risk (OARs) for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Eight prostate cancer patients were treated with IMRT to 76 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Daily target localization was performed via alignment of three intraprostatic fiducials and weekly kV-cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. The prostate and OARs were manually contoured on each CBCT by a single physician. Daily patient setup shifts were obtained by comparing alignment of skin tattoos with the treatment position based on fiducials. Treatment fields were retrospectively applied to CBCT scans. The dose distributions were calculated using actual treatment plans (an 8-mm PTV margin everywhere except for 6-mm posteriorly) with and without image guidance shifts. Furthermore, the feasibility of margin reduction was evaluated by reducing planning margins to 4 mm everywhere except for 3 mm posteriorly. Results: For the eight treatment plans on the 56 CBCT scans, the average doses to 98% of the prostate (D98) were 102% (range, 99-104%) and 99% (range, 45-104%) with and without image guidance, respectively. Using margin reduction, the average D98s were 100% (range, 84-104%) and 92% (range, 40-104%) with and without image guidance, respectively. Conclusions: Currently, margins used in IMRT plans are adequate to deliver a dose to the prostate with conventional patient positioning using skin tattoos or bony anatomy. The use of image guidance may facilitate significant reduction of planning margins. Future studies to assess the efficacy of decreasing margins and improvement of treatment-related toxicities are warranted.

  2. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Localization of Recurrent Prostate Cancer After External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Masoom A. Chung, Peter; Sweet, Joan; Toi, Ants; Jhaveri, Kartik; Menard, Cynthia; Warde, Padraig; Trachtenberg, John; Lockwood, Gina M.Math.; Milosevic, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the performance of T2-weighted (T2w) imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate gland in the localization of recurrent prostate cancer in patients with biochemical failure after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: T2-weighted imaging and DCE MRI were performed in 33 patients with suspected relapse after EBRT. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed with a temporal resolution of 95 s. Voxels enhancing at 46 s after injection to a greater degree than the mean signal intensity of the prostate at 618 s were considered malignant. Results from MRI were correlated with biopsies from six regions in the peripheral zone (PZ) (base, mid, and apex). The percentage of biopsy core positive for malignancy from each region was correlated with the maximum diameter of the tumor on DCE MRI with a linear regression model. Results: On a sextant basis, DCE MRI had significantly better sensitivity (72% [21of 29] vs. 38% [11 of 29]), positive predictive value (46% [21 of 46] vs. 24% [11 of 45]) and negative predictive value (95% [144 of 152] vs. 88% [135 of 153] than T2w imaging. Specificities were high for both DCE MRI and T2w imaging (85% [144 of 169] vs. 80% [135 of 169]). There was a linear relationship between tumor diameters on DCE MRI and the percentage of cancer tissue in the corresponding biopsy core (r = 0.9, p < 0.001), with a slope of 1.2. Conclusions: Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI performs better than T2w imaging in the detection and localization of prostate cancer in the peripheral zone after EBRT. This may be helpful in the planning of salvage therapy.

  3. MYC and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Cheryl M.; Bieberich, Charles J.; Dang, Chi V.; Nelson, William G.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer, the majority of which is adenocarcinoma, is the most common epithelial cancer affecting a majority of elderly men in Western nations. Its manifestation, however, varies from clinically asymptomatic insidious neoplasms that progress slowly and do not threaten life to one that is highly aggressive with a propensity for metastatic spread and lethality if not treated in time. A number of somatic genetic and epigenetic alterations occur in prostate cancer cells. Some of these changes, such as loss of the tumor suppressors PTEN and p53, are linked to disease progression. Others, such as ETS gene fusions, appear to be linked more with early phases of the disease, such as invasion. Alterations in chromosome 8q24 in the region of MYC have also been linked to disease aggressiveness for many years. However, a number of recent studies in human tissues have indicated that MYC appears to be activated at the earliest phases of prostate cancer (e.g., in tumor-initiating cells) in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, a key precursor lesion to invasive prostatic adenocarcinoma. The initiation and early progression of prostate cancer can be recapitulated in genetically engineered mouse models, permitting a richer understanding of the cause and effects of loss of tumor suppressors and activation of MYC. The combination of studies using human tissues and mouse models paints an emerging molecular picture of prostate cancer development and early progression. This picture reveals that MYC contributes to disease initiation and progression by stimulating an embryonic stem cell–like signature characterized by an enrichment of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and by repressing differentiation. These insights pave the way to potential novel therapeutic concepts based on MYC biology. PMID:21779461

  4. Appropriate and inappropriate imaging rates for prostate cancer go hand in hand by region, as if set by thermostat.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Danil V; Desai, Rani; Yu, James B; Sharma, Richa; Abraham, Nitya; Albertsen, Peter C; Krumholz, Harlan M; Penson, David F; Gross, Cary P

    2012-04-01

    Policy makers interested in containing health care costs are targeting regional variation in utilization, including the use of advanced imaging. However, bluntly decreasing utilization among the highest-utilization regions may have negative consequences. In a cross-sectional study of prostate cancer patients from 2004 to 2005, we found that regions with lower rates of inappropriate imaging also had lower rates of appropriate imaging. Similarly, regions with higher overall imaging rates tended to have not only higher rates of inappropriate imaging, but also higher rates of appropriate imaging. In fact, men with high-risk prostate cancer were more likely to receive appropriate imaging if they resided in areas with higher rates of inappropriate imaging. This "thermostat model" of regional health care utilization suggests that poorly designed policies aimed at reducing inappropriate imaging could limit access to appropriate imaging for high-risk patients. Health care organizations need clearly defined quality metrics and supportive systems to encourage appropriate treatment for patients and to ensure that cost containment does not occur at the expense of quality.

  5. A Dosimetric Comparison between Conventional Fractionated and Hypofractionated Image-guided Radiation Therapies for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Li, Gao-Feng; Hou, Xiu-Yu; Gao, Hong; Xu, Yong-Gang; Zhao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Background: Image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is the preferred method for curative treatment of localized prostate cancer, which could improve disease outcome and reduce normal tissue toxicity reaction. IGRT using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in combination with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) potentially allows smaller treatment margins and dose escalation to the prostate. The aim of this study was to compare the difference of dosimetric diffusion in conventional IGRT using 7-field, step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and hypofractionated IGRT using VMAT for patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods: We studied 24 patients who received 78 Gy in 39 daily fractions or 70 Gy in 28 daily fractions to their prostate with/without the seminal vesicles using IMRT (n = 12) or VMAT (n = 12) for prostate cancer between November 2013 and October 2015. Image guidance was performed using kilovoltage CBCT scans equipped on the linear accelerator. Offline planning was performed using the daily treatment images registered with simulation computed tomography (CT) images. A total of 212 IMRT plans in conventional cohort and 292 VMAT plans in hypofractionated cohort were enrolled in the study. Dose distributions were recalculated on CBCT images registered with the planning CT scanner. Results: Compared with 7-field, step-and-shoot IMRT, VMAT plans resulted in improved planning target volume (PTV) D95% (7663.17 ± 69.57 cGy vs. 7789.17 ± 131.76 cGy, P < 0.001). VMAT reduced the rectal D25 (P < 0.001), D35 (P < 0.001), and D50 (P < 0.001), bladder V50 (P < 0.001), D25 (P = 0.002), D35 (P = 0.028), and D50 (P = 0.029). However, VMAT did not statistically significantly reduce the rectal V50, compared with 7-field, step-and-shoot IMRT (25.02 ± 5.54% vs. 27.43 ± 8.79%, P = 0.087). Conclusions: To deliver the hypofractionated radiotherapy in prostate cancer, VMAT significantly increased PTV D95% dose and decreased the dose of radiation

  6. [Sexuality and prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Colson, M-H; Lechevallier, E; Rambeaud, J-J; Alimi, J-C; Faix, A; Gravis, G; Hannoun-Levi, J-M; Quintens, H; Rébillard, X; Droupy, S

    2012-09-01

    All treatments of prostate cancer have a negative effect on both sexuality and male fertility. There is a specific profile of changes in the fields of quality of life, sexual, urinary, bowel and vitality according to the treatment modalities chosen. Maintain a satisfying sex is the main concern of a majority of men facing prostate cancer and its treatment. It is essential to assess the couple's sexuality before diagnosis of prostate cancer in order to deliver complete information and to consider early and appropriate treatment options at the request of the couple. Forms of sexuality sexual preference settings stored (orgasm) may, when the erection is not yet recovered, be an alternative to the couple to maintain intimacy and complicity. In all cases, a specific management and networking will in many cases to find a satisfactory sexuality. Consequences of the treatment on male fertility should be part of the information of patients with prostate cancer and their partners. The choice of treatment must take into account the desire of paternity of the couple. A semen analysis with sperm cryopreservation before any therapy should be routinely offered in men with prostate cancer, particularly among men under 55, with a partner under 43 years old or without children. If the desire for parenthood among couples, sperm cryopreservation before treatment and medical assisted reproduction are recommended.

  7. Feasibility of Dual Optics/Ultrasound Imaging and Contrast Media for the Detection and Characterization of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    acousto - optic effect will be used to only modulate light (at the ultrasound frequency) which propagates through a small ultrasound focal zone. This...DOD Idea Development Award is concerned with the development of a novel acousto - optic detection idea based on quadrature measurements with a gain...perform acousto - optic molecular imaging of prostate cancer with incoherent photons using endogenous contrast, e.g. hypoxia, and with fluorescent probes and microbubbles for increased specificity and signal enhancement.

  8. Promoter Hypermethylation in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prostate gland is the most common site of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer mortality in American men. It is well known that epigenetic alterations such as DNA methylation within the regulatory (promoter) regions of genes are associated with transcriptional silencing in cancer. Promoter hypermethylation of critical pathway genes could be potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for prostate cancer. Methods This review discusses current information on methylated genes associated with prostate cancer development and progression. Results Over 30 genes have been investigated for promoter methylation in prostate cancer. These methylated genes are involved in critical pathways, such as DNA repair, metabolism, and invasion/metastasis. The role of hypermethylated genes in regulation of critical pathways in prostate cancer is reviewed. Conclusions These findings may provide new information of the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Certain epigenetic alterations in prostate tumors are being translated into clinical practice for therapeutic use. PMID:20861812

  9. Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPV-Associated Lung Ovarian Skin Uterine Cancer Home Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English Español ( ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of men getting prostate cancer or dying from prostate cancer varies by race ...

  10. Development of Targeted Nanobubbles for Ultrasound Imaging and Ablation of Metastatic Prostate Cancer Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    cytotoxicity experiments using a resazurin viability assay. Both prostate cancer cell lines were treated with a variety of concentrations between 0 to 100 mg/mL...the ATPS method. The cells were stained with LIVE/DEAD® assay to observe viability of each spheroid. As seen in the Figure 2 (ii and iv) there are no...fractionate the cancer cells . Figure 33 The concentration and size distribution of PFP (blue line) and PFH (red line)-loaded nanodroplets calculated

  11. Updates of prostate cancer staging: Prostate-specific membrane antigen

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Alastair; Nair, Rajesh; Geurts, Nicolas; Mitchell, Catherine; Lawrentschuk, Nathan L; Moon, Daniel A; Murphy, Declan G

    2016-01-01

    The ability to accurately stage prostate cancer in both the primary and secondary staging setting can have a major impact on management. Until recently radiological staging has relied on computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear bone scans to evaluate the extent of disease. However, the utility of these imaging technologies has been limited by their sensitivity and specificity especially in detecting early recurrence. Functional imaging using positron-emission tomography with a radiolabeled ligand targeted to prostate-specific membrane antigen has transformed the prostate cancer imaging landscape. Initial results suggest that it is a substantial improvement over conventional imaging in the setting of recurrence following primary therapy by having a superior ability to detect disease and to do so at an earlier stage. Additionally, it appears that the benefits seen in the secondary staging setting may also exist in the primary staging setting. PMID:27995218

  12. American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Prevention and Early Detection American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends that men have a chance to ...

  13. Expectant Management (Watchful Waiting) and Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Watchful Waiting or Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer Because prostate cancer often grows very slowly, some ... Away or Comes Back After Treatment More In Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  14. What Are the Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer How common is prostate cancer? ... at some point are still alive today. For statistics related to survival, see Survival Rates for Prostate ...

  15. NBN gain is predictive for adverse outcome following image-guided radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Jenna; Zafarana, Gaetano; Chu, Kenneth C.; Ramnarine, Varune R.; Ishkanian, Adrian; Sendorek, Dorota H.S.; Pasic, Ivan; Lam, Wan L.; Jurisica, Igor; van der Kwast, Theo; Milosevic, Michael; Boutros, Paul C.; Bristow, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the use of clinical prognostic factors (PSA, T-category and Gleason score), 20-60% of localized prostate cancers (PCa) fail primary local treatment. Herein, we determined the prognostic importance of main sensors of the DNA damage response (DDR): MRE11A, RAD50, NBN, ATM, ATR and PRKDC. We studied copy number alterations in DDR genes in localized PCa treated with image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT; n=139) versus radical prostatectomy (RadP; n=154). In both cohorts, NBN gains were the most frequent genomic alteration (14.4 and 11% of cases, respectively), and were associated with overall tumour genomic instability (p<0.0001). NBN gains were the only significant predictor of 5yrs biochemical relapse-free rate (bRFR) following IGRT (46% versus 77%; p=0.00067). On multivariate analysis, NBN gain remained a significant independent predictor of bRFR after adjusting for known clinical prognostic variables (HR=3.28, 95% CI 1.56–6.89, Wald p-value=0.0017). No DDR-sensing gene was prognostic in the RadP cohort. In vitro studies correlated NBN gene overexpression with PCa cells radioresistance. In conclusion, NBN gain predicts for decreased bRFR in IGRT, but not in RadP patients. If validated independently, Nibrin gains may be the first PCa predictive biomarker to facilitate local treatment decisions using precision medicine approaches with surgery or radiotherapy. PMID:25415046

  16. In Vivo Molecular MRI Imaging of Prostate Cancer by Targeting PSMA with Polypeptide-Labeled Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yunkai; Sun, Ying; Chen, Yaqing; Liu, Weiyong; Jiang, Jun; Guan, Wenbin; Zhang, Zhongyang; Duan, Yourong

    2015-01-01

    The prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is broadly overexpressed on prostate cancer (PCa) cell surfaces. In this study, we report the synthesis, characterization, in vitro binding assay, and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluation of PSMA targeting superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). PSMA-targeting polypeptide CQKHHNYLC was conjugated to SPIONs to form PSMA-targeting molecular MRI contrast agents. In vitro studies demonstrated specific uptake of polypeptide-SPIONs by PSMA expressing cells. In vivo MRI studies found that MRI signals in PSMA-expressing tumors could be specifically enhanced with polypeptide-SPION, and further Prussian blue staining showed heterogeneous deposition of SPIONs in the tumor tissues. Taken altogether, we have developed PSMA-targeting polypeptide-SPIONs that could specifically enhance MRI signal in tumor-bearing mice, which might provide a new strategy for the molecular imaging of PCa. PMID:25927579

  17. Vitamin E and Prostate Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin E, its metabolites or its analogs, might help prevent prostate cancer initiation or progression. Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States, exceeded only by lung cancer. About 218,890 new cases of prost...

  18. [Grading of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, G; Roth, W; Helpap, B

    2016-07-01

    The current grading of prostate cancer is based on the classification system of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) following a consensus conference in Chicago in 2014. The foundations are based on the frequently modified grading system of Gleason. This article presents a brief description of the development to the current ISUP grading system.

  19. A prostate cancer computer-aided diagnosis system using multimodal magnetic resonance imaging and targeted biopsy labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peter; Wang, Shijun; Turkbey, Baris; Grant, Kinzya; Pinto, Peter; Choyke, Peter; Wood, Bradford J.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2013-02-01

    We propose a new method for prostate cancer classification based on supervised statistical learning methods by integrating T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI images with targeted prostate biopsy results. In the first step of the method, all three imaging modalities are registered based on the image coordinates encoded in the DICOM images. In the second step, local statistical features are extracted in each imaging modality to capture intensity, shape, and texture information at every biopsy target. Finally, using support vector machines, supervised learning is conducted with the biopsy results to train a classification system that predicts the pathology of suspicious cancer lesions. The algorithm was tested with a dataset of 54 patients that underwent 164 targeted biopsies (58 positive, 106 negative). The proposed tri-modal MRI algorithm shows significant improvement over a similar approach that utilizes only T2-weighted MRI images (p= 0.048). The areas under the ROC curve for these methods were 0.82 (95% CI: [0.71, 0.93]) and 0.73 (95% CI: [0.55, 0.84]), respectively.

  20. Multiparametric MR imaging of prostate cancer foci: assessing the detectability and localizability of Gleason 7 peripheral zone cancers based on image contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Eli; Gaed, Mena; Hrinivich, Thomas; Gómez, José A.; Moussa, Madeleine; Romagnoli, Cesare; Mandel, Jonathan; Bastian-Jordan, Matthew; Cool, Derek W.; Ghoul, Suha; Pautler, Stephen E.; Chin, Joseph L.; Crukley, Cathie; Bauman, Glenn S.; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MPMRI) supports detection and staging of prostate cancer, but the image characteristics needed for tumor boundary delineation to support focal therapy have not been widely investigated. We quantified the detectability (image contrast between tumor and non-cancerous contralateral tissue) and the localizability (image contrast between tumor and non-cancerous neighboring tissue) of Gleason score 7 (GS7) peripheral zone (PZ) tumors on MPMRI using tumor contours mapped from histology using accurate 2D-3D registration. Methods: MPMRI [comprising T2-weighted (T2W), dynamic-contrast-enhanced (DCE), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and contrast transfer coefficient images] and post-prostatectomy digitized histology images were acquired for 6 subjects. Histology contouring and grading (approved by a genitourinary pathologist) identified 7 GS7 PZ tumors. Contours were mapped to MPMRI images using semi-automated registration algorithms (combined target registration error: 2 mm). For each focus, three measurements of mean +/- standard deviation of image intensity were taken on each image: tumor tissue (mT+/-sT), non-cancerous PZ tissue < 5 mm from the tumor (mN+/-sN), and non-cancerous contralateral PZ tissue (mC+/-sC). Detectability [D, defined as mT-mC normalized by sT and sC added in quadrature] and localizability [L, defined as mT-mN normalized by sT and sN added in quadrature] were quantified for each focus on each image. Results: T2W images showed the strongest detectability, although detectability |D|>=1 was observed on either ADC or DCE images, or both, for all foci. Localizability on all modalities was variable; however, ADC images showed localizability |L|>=1 for 3 foci. Conclusions: Delineation of GS7 PZ tumors on individual MPMRI images faces challenges; however, images may contain complementary information, suggesting a role for fusion of

  1. Survival in prostate cancer prevention trial detailed

    Cancer.gov

    In the NCI-sponsored Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, initial findings from a decade ago showed that the drug finasteride significantly reduced the risk of prostate cancer, but among those who did develop prostate cancer, paradoxically, the drug was asso

  2. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging: challenges of implementation.

    PubMed

    Loch, Ronald; Fowler, Kathryn; Schmidt, Ryan; Ippolito, Joseph; Siegel, Cary; Narra, Vamsi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is among the most common causes of cancer and cancer deaths in men. Screening methods and optimal treatments have become controversial in recent years. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is gaining popularity as a tool to assist diagnosis, risk assessment, and staging. However, implementation into clinical practice can be difficult, with many challenges associated with image acquisition, postprocessing, interpretation, reporting, and radiologic-pathologic correlation. Although state-of-the-art technology is available at select sites for targeting tissue biopsy and interpreting multiparametric prostate MRI, many institutions struggle with adapting this new technology into an efficient multidisciplinary model of patient care. This article reviews several of the challenges that radiologists should be aware of when integrating prostate MRI into their clinical practice.

  3. Five-Year Outcomes from 3 Prospective Trials of Image-Guided Proton Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Nichols, Romaine C.; Mendenhall, William M.; Morris, Christopher G.; Li, Zuofeng; Su, Zhong; Williams, Christopher R.; Costa, Joseph; Henderson, Randal H.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To report 5-year clinical outcomes of 3 prospective trials of image-guided proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 211 prostate cancer patients (89 low-risk, 82 intermediate-risk, and 40 high-risk) were treated in institutional review board-approved trials of 78 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) in 39 fractions for low-risk disease, 78 to 82 CGE for intermediate-risk disease, and 78 CGE with concomitant docetaxel therapy followed by androgen deprivation therapy for high-risk disease. Toxicities were graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0. Median follow-up was 5.2 years. Results: Five-year rates of biochemical and clinical freedom from disease progression were 99%, 99%, and 76% in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. Actuarial 5-year rates of late CTCAE, version 3.0 (or version 4.0) grade 3 gastrointestinal and urologic toxicity were 1.0% (0.5%) and 5.4% (1.0%), respectively. Median pretreatment scores and International Prostate Symptom Scores at >4 years posttreatment were 8 and 7, 6 and 6, and 9 and 8, respectively, among the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. There were no significant changes between median pretreatment summary scores and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite scores at >4 years for bowel, urinary irritative and/or obstructive, and urinary continence. Conclusions: Five-year clinical outcomes with image-guided proton therapy included extremely high efficacy, minimal physician-assessed toxicity, and excellent patient-reported outcomes. Further follow-up and a larger patient experience are necessary to confirm these favorable outcomes.

  4. Cerebellar Metastases From Prostate Cancer on 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mico; Hsiao, Edward; Turner, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen PET/CT is increasingly used to evaluate extent of disease in prostate carcinoma. Parenchymal brain metastases originating from prostate cancer have highly variable imaging appearance. We present a 77-year-old man with cerebellar metastasis from prostate cancer showing focal uptake on prostate-specific membrane antigen PET/CT.

  5. In Vivo Imaging of Branched Chain Amino Acid Metabolism in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    BCAA ) metabolism, which are known to be modified in the tumor-bearing state. For example, recent reports have demonstrated the critical role of BCAAs ...in the proliferation of tumorgenic prostate tissue.5 In particular, many of the features of BCAA metabolism in cancerous tissue are generally...characterized by altered BCAA availability and elevated rates of BCAA oxidation.6 Body In order to determine the ideal animal model for investigating

  6. In Vivo Imaging of Branched Chain Amino Acid Metabolism in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports (0704-0188), 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway...Instruments Molecular Biotools, Oxford, UK). All MR measurements were performed using a custom- built carbon-13 surface coil (∅inner = 28 mm), operating at...Anal Biochem 1996; 238: 65–71. 23. Sobel RE, et al. Cell lines used in prostate cancer research: a compendium of old and new lines. J Urol 2005; 173

  7. Cholesterol and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2004-01-01

    Cholesterol is a neutral lipid that accumulates in liquid-ordered, detergent-resistant membrane domains called lipid rafts. Lipid rafts serve as membrane platforms for signal transduction mechanisms that mediate cell growth, survival, and a variety of other processes relevant to cancer. A number of studies, going back many years, demonstrate that cholesterol accumulates in solid tumors and that cholesterol homeostasis breaks down in the prostate with aging and with the transition to the malignant state. This review summarizes the established links between cholesterol and prostate cancer (PCa), with a focus on how accumulation of cholesterol within the lipid raft component of the plasma membrane may stimulate signaling pathways that promote progression to hormone refractory disease. We propose that increases in cholesterol in prostate tumor cell membranes, resulting from increases in circulating levels or from dysregulation of endogenous synthesis, results in the coalescence of raft domains. This would have the effect of sequestering positive regulators of oncogenic signaling within rafts, while maintaining negative regulators in the liquid-disordered membrane fraction. This approach toward examining the function of lipid rafts in prostate cancer cells may provide insight into the role of circulating cholesterol in malignant growth and on the potential relationship between diet and aggressive disease. Large-scale characterization of proteins that localize to cholesterol-rich domains may help unveil signaling networks and pathways that will lead to identification of new biomarkers for disease progression and potentially to novel targets for therapeutic intervention.

  8. 11C-Acetate PET/CT Imaging in Localized Prostate Cancer: A study with MRI and Histopathologic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Esther; Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Adler, Stephen; Valera, Vladimir A.; Bernardo, Marcelino; Shah, Vijay; Pohida, Thomas; McKinney, Yolanda; Kwarteng, Gideon; Daar, Dagane; Lindenberg, Maria L.; Eclarinal, Philip; Wade, Revia; Linehan, W. Marston; Merino, Maria J.; Pinto, Peter A.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kurdziel, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    This work characterizes the uptake of 11C-Acetate in prostate cancer (PCa), benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and normal prostate tissue in comparison with multi-parametric MRI, whole mount histopathology and clinical markers, to evaluate its potential utility for delineating intra-prostatic tumors in a population of patients with localized PCa. METHODS 39 men with presumed localized PCa underwent dynamic/static abdomen-pelvic 11C-Acetate PET/CT for 30-minutes and 3T multi-parametric (MP) MRI prior to prostatectomy. PET/CT images were registered to MRI using pelvic bones for initial rotation-translation, followed by manual adjustments to account for prostate motion and deformation from the MRI endorectal coil. Whole-mount pathology specimens were sectioned using an MRI-based patient specific mold resulting in improved registration between the MRI, PET and pathology. 11C-Acetate PET standardized uptake values were compared with MP-MRI and pathology. RESULTS 11C-Acetate uptake was rapid but reversible, peaking at 3–5 minutes post-injection and reaching a relative plateau at ~10 minutes. The average SUVmax(10–12min) of tumors was significantly higher than that of normal prostate tissue (4.4±2.05, range 1.8–9.2 vs. 2.1±0.94, range 0.7–3.4; p<0.001); however it was not significantly different from benign prostatic hyperplasia (4.8±2.01; range 1.8–8.8). A sector-based comparison with histopathology, including all tumors > 0.5 cm, revealed a sensitivity and specificity of 61.6 % and 80.0 % for 11C-Acetate PET/CT, and 82.3% and 95.1% for MRI, respectively. Considering only tumors >0.9 cm the 11C-Acetate accuracy was comparable to that of MRI. In a small cohort (n=9), 11C-Acetate uptake was independent of fatty acid synthase expression based on immunohistochemistry. CONCLUSION 11C-Acetate PET/CT demonstrates higher uptake in tumor foci than normal prostate tissue; however 11C-Acetate uptake in tumors is similar to BPH nodules. While 11C-Acetate PET/CT is not

  9. Evolving Recommendations on Prostate Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Brawley, Otis W; Thompson, Ian M; Grönberg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Results of a number of studies demonstrate that the serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in and of itself is an inadequate screening test. Today, one of the most pressing questions in prostate cancer medicine is how can screening be honed to identify those who have life-threatening disease and need aggressive treatment. A number of efforts are underway. One such effort is the assessment of men in the landmark Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial that has led to a prostate cancer risk calculator (PCPTRC), which is available online. PCPTRC version 2.0 predicts the probability of the diagnosis of no cancer, low-grade cancer, or high-grade cancer when variables such as PSA, age, race, family history, and physical findings are input. Modern biomarker development promises to provide tests with fewer false positives and improved ability to find high-grade cancers. Stockholm III (STHLM3) is a prospective, population-based, paired, screen-positive, prostate cancer diagnostic study assessing a combination of plasma protein biomarkers along with age, family history, previous biopsy, and prostate examination for prediction of prostate cancer. Multiparametric MRI incorporates anatomic and functional imaging to better characterize and predict future behavior of tumors within the prostate. After diagnosis of cancer, several genomic tests promise to better distinguish the cancers that need treatment versus those that need observation. Although the new technologies are promising, there is an urgent need for evaluation of these new tests in high-quality, large population-based studies. Until these technologies are proven, most professional organizations have evolved to a recommendation of informed or shared decision making in which there is a discussion between the doctor and patient.

  10. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging findings in men with low-risk prostate cancer followed using active surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, Jeffrey K.; Bonekamp, David; Landis, Patricia; Begum, Hosne; Partin, Alan W.; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Carter, H. Ballentine; Macura, Katarzyna J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the performance of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in identifying pathological-index (path-index) lesions, defined as cancer present in the same prostate sextant in two separate surveillance biopsies, in men followed within an active surveillance (AS) programme for low-risk prostate cancer (CaP) with extended follow-up. Materials and Methods A total of 50 men, representing >215 person-years of follow-up in an AS programme, who were referred for prostate MRI were randomly chosen to have their images reviewed by a radiologist with expertise in prostate MRI, who was blinded to biopsy results. Index lesions on MRI were defined as a single suspicious lesion ≥10 mm or >2 lesions in a given prostate sextant. Lesions on MRI were considered suspicious if ≥2 abnormal parameters co-registered anatomically. Path-index lesions were defined as cancer present in a given prostate sextant on two separate biopsy sessions. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated to test the performance of MRI for identifying path-index lesions. Clinical and pathological features were compared between men with and without a MRI-index lesion. Results A total of 31 path-index and 13 MRI-index lesions were detected in 22 and 10 patients, respectively. Multiparametric MRI demonstrated excellent specificity and negative predictive value (0.974 and 0.897, respectively) for the detection of path-index lesions. Sensitivity (0.19) and positive predictive value (0.46) were considerably lower. Patients with an index lesion on MRI were younger and less likely to have met the ‘Epstein’ criteria for very low-risk CaP. Compared with men without an MRI lesion, a significant increase in biopsy reclassification was noted for men with a MRI lesion (40 vs 12.5%, P = 0.04). Conclusions A non-suspicious MRI was highly correlated with a lack of path-index lesions in an AS population. Multiparametric MRI may be useful in both the selection and monitoring of patients undergoing

  11. Enhanced noscapine delivery using uPAR-targeted optical-MR imaging trackable nanoparticles for prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Mohamed O; Karna, Prasanthi; Sajja, Hari Krishna; Mao, Hui; Yates, Clayton; Turner, Timothy; Aneja, Ritu

    2011-02-10

    The tubulin-binding anticancer activity of noscapine, an orally available plant-derived anti-tussive alkaloid, has been recently identified. Noscapine inhibits tumor growth in nude mice bearing human xenografts of hematopoietic, breast, lung, ovarian, brain and prostate origin. Despite its nontoxic attributes, significant elimination of the disease has not been achieved, perhaps since the bioavailability of noscapine to tumors saturates at an oral dose of 300 mg/kg body weight. To enable the selective and specific delivery of noscapine to prostate cancer cells, we have engineered a multifunctional nanoscale delivery vehicle that takes advantage of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) overexpression in prostate cancer compared to normal prostate epithelia and can be tracked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared (NIR) imaging. Specifically, we employed the human-type 135 amino-acid amino-terminal fragment (hATF) of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), a high-affinity natural ligand for uPAR. Noscapine (Nos) was efficiently adsorbed onto the amphiphilic polymer coating of uPAR-targeted nanoparticles (NPs). Nos-loaded NPs were uniformly compact-sized, stable at physiological pH and efficiently released the drug at pH 4 to 5 within a span of 4h. Our results demonstrate that these uPAR-targeted NPs were capable of binding to the receptor and were internalized by PC-3 cells. uPAR-targeted Nos-loaded NPs enhanced intracellular noscapine accumulation as evident by the ~6-fold stronger inhibitory effect on PC-3 growth compared to free noscapine. In addition, Nos-loaded iron oxide NPs maintained their T2 MRI contrast effect upon internalization into tumor cells owing to their significant susceptibility effect in cells. Thus, our data provide compelling evidence that these optically and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-trackable uPAR-targeted NPs may offer a great potential for image-directed targeted delivery of noscapine for the management of

  12. Radioisotopes in management of metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Amar; Dan, Tu D.; Williams, Noelle L.; Pridjian, Andrew; Den, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Metastatic prostate cancer continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in men with prostate cancer. Over the last decade, the treatment landscape for patients with castrate-resistant disease has drastically changed, with several novel agents demonstrating an improvement in overall survival in large, multi-institutional randomized trials. Traditional treatment with radioisotopes has largely been in the palliative setting. However, the first in class radiopharmaceutical radium-223 has emerged as the only bone-directed treatment option demonstrating an improvement in overall survival. Methods: Medline publications from 1990 to 2016 were searched and reviewed to assess the use of currently approved radioisotopes in the management of prostate cancer including emerging data regarding integration with novel systemic therapies. New positron emission tomography-based radiotracers for advanced molecular imaging of prostate cancer were also queried. Results: Radioisotopes play a crucial role in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the definitive and metastatic setting. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer and theranostics are currently being investigated in the clinical arena. Conclusions: The use of modern radioisotopes in selected patients with mCRPC is associated with improvements in overall survival, pain control, and quality of life. PMID:27843209

  13. Testosterone Therapy and Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Emily; Morgentaler, Abraham

    2016-05-01

    Changes in understanding regarding the relationship of androgens and prostate cancer have led to changes in the use of testosterone therapy. The evidence supports a finite ability of androgens to stimulate prostate cancer growth, with a maximum achieved at low testosterone concentrations, called the saturation model. The saturation point corresponds with maximal androgenic stimulation at 250 ng/dL. Evidence is reviewed herein regarding the relationship of testosterone to prostate cancer and the relatively new practice of offering testosterone therapy to men with a history of prostate cancer. Although no prospective controlled trials have been performed, results have been reassuring.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Based Electrical Property Tomography (MR-EPT) for Prostate Cancer Grade Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    concentration of CuSO4), while the saline solution appears as a low intensity (black) region (see Figure 6). This magnitude MR image provides a high...exciting new data published in The Prostate [6] in which we demonstrated significant electrical property differences between high- and low -grade...and we have hypothesize that it is possible to use these properties to discriminate between normal, low -grade, and high-grade malignant formations in

  15. Intensity Modulated Radiation Treatment of Prostate Cancer Guided by High Field MR Spectroscopic Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    through a set of phantom studies and at least two previously treated prostate cases who had undergone CT/MRSI scans. Under the generous support from the...using digital phantoms and patient CT images. The deformable registration algorithm developed in this project was also applied to several other...method is extended to provide the spatial distribution information as well all within a reasonable scan time (17 min). Phantom and in vivo data are

  16. A prospective study of the efficacy of magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging for predicting locally advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Ali; Parizi, Mehdi Kardoust; Kazemeini, Seid Mohammad; Abedi, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) for predicting locally advanced prostate cancer (PC). Materials and methods: Between April 2009 and July 2012, 80 consecutive patients with clinically localized PC had undergone endorectal MRSI before radical retropubic prostatectomy. Clinicopathological parameters, including age, preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA), Gleason score (GS) at biopsy, perinural invasion at biopsy, prostate weight at surgery, GS of surgical specimen, and pathological staging were recorded. The MRSI findings were compared with the histopathological findings of the radical prostatectomy. The diagnostic accuracy measures consisting of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) of MRSI, and other variables in the diagnosis of locally advanced PC (Pathology Stages pT3a, pT3b, or pT4) were evaluated. Results: Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRSI in detecting locally advanced PC is 42.4%, 93.6%, 82.3%, and 69.8%, respectively [area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve=0.658, p value <0.0001]. MRSI, cancer-positive core percentage at biopsy, and GS at biopsy are more accurate factors among all the predictive variables in predicting locally advanced PC. Conclusion: MRSI may be considered as a complementary diagnostic modality with high specificity and moderate sensitivity in predicting locally advanced PC. Combination of this modality with other predictive factors helps the surgeon and patient to select an appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:26328204

  17. Application of dual-energy spectral CT imaging in differential diagnosis of bladder cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Anliang; Liu, Ailian; Liu, Jinghong; Tian, Shifeng; Wang, Heqing; Liu, Yijun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the clinical value of dual-energy spectral CT imaging in the differential diagnosis between bladder cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We retrospectively analyzed images of 118 patients who received pelvic dual-energy spectral CT imaging. These patients were later confirmed to have bladder cancer in 61 patients and BPH in 57 patients. CT values of the 2 lesion types from 40 to 140 keV were measured from the monochromatic spectral CT image to generate spectral HU curves. The slope of the spectral curve and the lesion effective atomic number were calculated. The measured parameters were analyzed with independent-sample Mann-Whitney U test. There was a statistically significant difference in CT value between the 2 groups from 40 to 90 keV, with the biggest difference at 40 keV (median and interquartile range: 83.3 HU and 22.9 HU vs 60.6 HU and 16.7 HU, Z = 5.932, P < 0.001). The slope of the spectral HU curve for bladder cancer was markedly higher than that of BPH (median and interquartile range: 0.48 and 0.23 vs 0.26 and 0.22, Z = 5.162, P < 0.001); the difference in effective atomic number (median and interquartile range: 7.99 and 0.21 vs 7.80 and 0.20, Z = 5.233, P < 0.001) was also statistically significant. Dual-energy spectral CT imaging provides high sensitivity and specificity for differentiating bladder cancer from benign prostate hyperplasia. PMID:28033269

  18. The value of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography (MRI/US)-fusion biopsy platforms in prostate cancer detection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gayet, Maudy; van der Aa, Anouk; Beerlage, Harrie P; Schrier, Bart Ph; Mulders, Peter F A; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2016-03-01

    Despite limitations considering the presence, staging and aggressiveness of prostate cancer, ultrasonography (US)-guided systematic biopsies (SBs) are still the 'gold standard' for the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Recently, promising results have been published for targeted prostate biopsies (TBs) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (MRI/US)-fusion platforms. Different platforms are USA Food and Drug Administration registered and have, mostly subjective, strengths and weaknesses. To our knowledge, no systematic review exists that objectively compares prostate cancer detection rates between the different platforms available. To assess the value of the different MRI/US-fusion platforms in prostate cancer detection, we compared platform-guided TB with SB, and other ways of MRI TB (cognitive fusion or in-bore MR fusion). We performed a systematic review of well-designed prospective randomised and non-randomised trials in the English language published between 1 January 2004 and 17 February 2015, using PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. Search terms included: 'prostate cancer', 'MR/ultrasound(US) fusion' and 'targeted biopsies'. Extraction of articles was performed by two authors (M.G. and A.A.) and were evaluated by the other authors. Randomised and non-randomised prospective clinical trials comparing TB using MRI/US-fusion platforms and SB, or other ways of TB (cognitive fusion or MR in-bore fusion) were included. In all, 11 of 1865 studies met the inclusion criteria, involving seven different fusion platforms and 2626 patients: 1119 biopsy naïve, 1433 with prior negative biopsy, 50 not mentioned (either biopsy naïve or with prior negative biopsy) and 24 on active surveillance (who were disregarded). The Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) tool was used to assess the quality of included articles. No clear advantage of MRI/US fusion-guided TBs was seen for cancer detection rates (CDRs) of all prostate

  19. SU-C-17A-03: Evaluation of Deformable Image Registration Methods Between MRI and CT for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, N; Glide-Hurst, C; Zhong, H; Chin, K; Kumarasiri, A; Liu, C; Liu, M; Siddiqui, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We evaluated the performance of two commercially available and one open source B-Spline deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms between T2-weighted MRI and treatment planning CT using the DICE indices. Methods: CT simulation (CT-SIM) and MR simulation (MR-SIM) for four prostate cancer patients were conducted on the same day using the same setup and immobilization devices. CT images (120 kVp, 500 mAs, voxel size = 1.1x1.1x3.0 mm3) were acquired using an open-bore CT scanner. T2-weighted Turbo Spine Echo (T2W-TSE) images (TE/TR/α = 80/4560 ms/90°, voxel size = 0.7×0.7×2.5 mm3) were scanned on a 1.0T high field open MR-SIM. Prostates, seminal vesicles, rectum and bladders were delineated on both T2W-TSE and CT images by the attending physician. T2W-TSE images were registered to CT images using three DIR algorithms, SmartAdapt (Varian), Velocity AI (Velocity) and Elastix (Klein et al 2010) and contours were propagated. DIR results were evaluated quantitatively or qualitatively by image comparison and calculating organ DICE indices. Results: Significant differences in the contours of prostate and seminal vesicles were observed between MR and CT. On average, volume changes of the propagated contours were 5%, 2%, 160% and 8% for the prostate, seminal vesicles, bladder and rectum respectively. Corresponding mean DICE indices were 0.7, 0.5, 0.8, and 0.7. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.9 among three algorithms for the Dice indices. Conclusion: Three DIR algorithms for CT/MR registration yielded similar results for organ propagation. Due to the different soft tissue contrasts between MRI and CT, organ delineation of prostate and SVs varied significantly, thus efforts to develop other DIR evaluation metrics are warranted. Conflict of interest: Submitting institution has research agreements with Varian Medical System and Philips Healthcare.

  20. Tocotrienols and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    factors [1-3]. Some evidence supports the protective effects of tomato products ( lycopene ), soy products (isoflavonoids) and fruits. Secondary...tocopherols and tocotrienols, have variable growth inhibitory effects on both types of prostate cancer cell line models. The gamma isoforms are more... effective than the alpha isoforms and the tocotrienols are more effective than the tocopherols. This study further showed that the vitamin E-mediated

  1. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-11-11

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems.

  2. Estimation of effective imaging dose for kilovoltage intratreatment monitoring of the prostate position during cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ng, J A; Booth, J; Poulsen, P; Kuncic, Z; Keall, P J

    2013-01-01

    Kilovoltage Intratreatment Monitoring (KIM) is a novel real-time localization modality where the tumor position is continuously measured during Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) or Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy (IMAT) by a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imager. Adding kV imaging during therapy adds radiation dose. The additional effective dose is quantified for prostate radiotherapy and compared to dose from other localization modalities. The software PCXMC 2.0 was used to calculate the effective dose delivered to a phantom as a function of imager angle and field size for a Varian On-Board Imager. The average angular effective dose was calculated for a field size of 6 cm × 6 cm. The average angular effective dose was used in calculations for different treatment scenarios. Treatment scenarios considered were treatment type and fractionation. For all treatment scenarios, (i.e. conventionally fractionated and SBRT; IMRT and IMAT), the total KIM dose at 1 Hz ranged from 2–10 mSv. This imaging dose is less than the Navotek radioactive implant dose (64 mSv) and a standard SBRT CBCT pretreatment scan dose (22 mSv) over an entire treatment regime. KIM delivers an acceptably low effective dose for daily use as a real-time image-guidance method for prostate radiotherapy. PMID:23938470

  3. Estimation of effective imaging dose for kilovoltage intratreatment monitoring of the prostate position during cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, J. A.; Booth, J.; Poulsen, P.; Kuncic, Z.; Keall, P. J.

    2013-09-01

    Kilovoltage intratreatment monitoring (KIM) is a novel real-time localization modality where the tumor position is continuously measured during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) by a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imager. Adding kV imaging during therapy adds radiation dose. The additional effective dose is quantified for prostate radiotherapy and compared to dose from other localization modalities. The software PCXMC 2.0 was used to calculate the effective dose delivered to a phantom as a function of imager angle and field size for a Varian On-Board Imager. The average angular effective dose was calculated for a field size of 6 cm × 6 cm. The average angular effective dose was used in calculations for different treatment scenarios. Treatment scenarios considered were treatment type and fractionation. For all treatment scenarios, (i.e. conventionally fractionated and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), IMRT and IMAT), the total KIM dose at 1 Hz ranged from 2-10 mSv. This imaging dose is less than the Navotek radioactive implant dose (64 mSv) and a standard SBRT cone beam computed tomography pretreatment scan dose (22 mSv) over an entire treatment regime. KIM delivers an acceptably low effective dose for daily use as a real-time image-guidance method for prostate radiotherapy.

  4. Prostate Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . The prostate is just below the bladder (the ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  5. Genomic Rearrangements in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Christopher E.; Rubin, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Genomic instability is a fundamental feature of human cancer, leading to the activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressors. In prostate cancer, structural genomic rearrangements, resulting in gene fusions, amplifications and deletions, are a critical mechanism effecting these alterations. Here we review recent literature regarding the importance of genomic rearrangements in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and the potential impact on patient care. Recent findings Next generation sequencing has revealed a striking abundance, complexity, and heterogeneity of genomic rearrangements in prostate cancer. These recent studies have nominated a number of processes in predisposing prostate cancer to genomic rearrangements, including androgen-induced transcription. Summary Structural rearrangements are the critical mechanism resulting in the characteristic genomic changes associated with prostate cancer pathogenesis and progression. Future studies will determine if the impact of these events on tumor phenotypes can be translated to clinical utility for patient prognosis and choices of management strategies. PMID:25393273

  6. Predicting biochemical recurrence in patients with high-risk prostate cancer using the apparent diffusion coefficient of magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Min Young; Park, Juhyun; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Jeong, Chang Wook; Ku, Ja Hyeon; Kim, Hyeon Hoe

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to investigate whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value in diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging predicts the prognoses of patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 157 patients with high-risk prostate cancer (based on D'Amico's criteria) were included in the analysis. Patients underwent preoperative 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging within 2 months before radical prostatectomy. Those who received neoadjuvant hormone therapy (33 persons) or radiation therapy (18 persons) were excluded. The ADC of the tumor calculated from 2 b-values (0 and 1,000 s/mm2) was measured. Areas under receiver operating characteristics curves were calculated to maximize the accuracy of the ADC value. Based on the obtained cutoff value, the patients were stratified into 2 groups: Group A consisted of patients with ADC values <746×10−6 mm2/s and group B comprised those with ADC values ≥746×10−6 mm2/s. Results Group A showed higher rate of lymph positive and biochemical recurrence (BCR) rates than group B. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the BCR-free survival rate of group A was much lower than that of group B (p<0.001). On Cox proportional regression analyses, ADC group A (hazard ratio [HR], 3.238, p=0.002) and pathologic lymph node positive (HR, 2.242; p=0.009) were independent predictors of BCR. Conclusions In patients with high-risk prostate cancer, ADC value is significantly associated with BCR-free survival. Therefore, the ADC value is a useful tool for predicting the prognoses of these high-risk patients. PMID:28097263

  7. Technical Note: evaluation of the uncertainties in (choline + creatine)/citrate ratios measured by proton MR spectroscopic imaging in patients suspicious for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zbýň, Š; Krššák, M; Memarsadeghi, M; Gholami, B; Haitel, A; Weber, M; Helbich, T H; Trattnig, S; Moser, E; Gruber, S

    2014-07-01

    The presented evaluation of the relative uncertainty (δ'CCC) of the (choline + creatine)/citrate (CC/C) ratios can provide objective information about the quality and diagnostic value of prostate MR spectroscopic imaging data. This information can be combined with the numeric values of CC/C ratios and provides metabolic-quality maps enabling accurate cancer detection and user-independent data evaluation. In addition, the prostate areas suffering most from the low precision of CC/C ratios (e. g., prostate base) were identified.

  8. Influence of image slice thickness on rectal dose-response relationships following radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, C.; Thor, M.; Liu, M.; Moissenko, V.; Petersen, S. E.; Høyer, M.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2014-07-01

    When pooling retrospective data from different cohorts, slice thicknesses of acquired computed tomography (CT) images used for treatment planning may vary between cohorts. It is, however, not known if varying slice thickness influences derived dose-response relationships. We investigated this for rectal bleeding using dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum and rectal wall for dose distributions superimposed on images with varying CT slice thicknesses. We used dose and endpoint data from two prostate cancer cohorts treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to either 74 Gy (N = 159) or 78 Gy (N = 159) at 2 Gy per fraction. The rectum was defined as the whole organ with content, and the morbidity cut-off was Grade ≥2 late rectal bleeding. Rectal walls were defined as 3 mm inner margins added to the rectum. DVHs for simulated slice thicknesses from 3 to 13 mm were compared to DVHs for the originally acquired slice thicknesses at 3 and 5 mm. Volumes, mean, and maximum doses were assessed from the DVHs, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values were calculated. For each organ and each of the simulated slice thicknesses, we performed predictive modeling of late rectal bleeding using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. For the most coarse slice thickness, rectal volumes increased (≤18%), whereas maximum and mean doses decreased (≤0.8 and ≤4.2 Gy, respectively). For all a values, the gEUD for the simulated DVHs were ≤1.9 Gy different than the gEUD for the original DVHs. The best-fitting LKB model parameter values with 95% CIs were consistent between all DVHs. In conclusion, we found that the investigated slice thickness variations had minimal impact on rectal dose-response estimations. From the perspective of predictive modeling, our results suggest that variations within 10 mm in slice thickness between cohorts are unlikely to be a limiting factor when pooling multi-institutional rectal dose data that include slice thickness

  9. Prostate Diffusion Imaging with Distortion Correction

    PubMed Central

    Rakow-Penner, Rebecca A.; White, Nathan S.; Margolis, Daniel J. A.; Parsons, J. Kellogg; Schenker-Ahmed, Natalie; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Bartsch, Hauke; Choi, Hyung W.; Bradley, William G.; Shabaik, Ahmed; Huang, Jiaoti; Liss, Michael A.; Marks, Leonard; Kane, Christopher J.; Reiter, Robert E.; Raman, Steven S.; Karow, David S.; Dale, Anders M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Diffusion imaging in the prostate is susceptible to distortion from B0 inhomogeneity. Distortion correction in prostate imaging is not routinely performed, resulting in diffusion images without accurate localization of tumors. We performed and evaluated distortion correction for diffusion imaging in the prostate. Materials and Methods 28 patients underwent pre-operative MRI (T2, Gadolinium perfusion, diffusion at b = 800 s/mm2). The restriction spectrum protocol parameters included b-values of 0, 800, 1500, and 4000 s/mm2 in 30 directions for each nonzero b-value. To correct for distortion, forward and reverse trajectories were collected at b = 0 s/mm2. Distortion maps were generated to reflect the offset of the collected data versus the corrected data. Whole-mount histology, was available for correlation. Results: Across the 27 patients evaluated (excluding one patient due to data collection error), the average root mean square distortion distance of the prostate was 3.1 mm (standard deviation, 2.2 mm; and maximum distortion, 12 mm). Conclusion Improved localization of prostate cancer by MRI will allow better surgical planning, targeted biopsies and image-guided treatment therapies. Distortion distances of up to 12 mm due to standard diffusion imaging may grossly misdirect treatment decisions. Distortion correction for diffusion imaging in the prostate improves tumor localization. PMID:26220859

  10. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  11. What's New in Prostate Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer What’s New in Prostate Cancer Research? Research into the causes, ... in many medical centers throughout the world. Genetics New research on gene changes linked to prostate cancer ...

  12. Impact of the use of an endorectal coil for 3 T prostate MRI on image quality and cancer detection rate

    PubMed Central

    Gawlitza, Josephin; Reiss-Zimmermann, Martin; Thörmer, Gregor; Schaudinn, Alexander; Linder, Nicolas; Garnov, Nikita; Horn, Lars-Christian; Minh, Do Hoang; Ganzer, Roman; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael; Busse, Harald

    2017-01-01

    This work aims to assess the impact of an additional endorectal coil on image quality and cancer detection rate within the same patients. At a single academic medical center, this transversal study included 41 men who underwent T2- and diffusion-weighted imaging at 3 T using surface coils only or in combination with an endorectal coil in the same session. Two blinded readers (A and B) randomly evaluated all image data in separate sessions. Image quality with respect to localization and staging was rated on a five-point scale. Lesions were classified according to their prostate imaging reporting and data system (PIRADS) score version 1. Standard of reference was provided by whole-mount step-section analysis. Mean image quality scores averaged over all localization-related items were significantly higher with additional endorectal coil for both readers (p < 0.001), corresponding staging-related items were only higher for reader B (p < 0.001). With an endorectal coil, the rate of correctly detecting cancer per patient was significantly higher for reader B (p < 0.001) but not for reader A (p = 0.219). The numbers of histologically confirmed tumor lesions were rather similar for both settings. The subjectively rated 3-T image quality was improved with an endorectal coil. In terms of diagnostic performance, the use of an additional endorectal coil was not superior. PMID:28145525

  13. Impact of the use of an endorectal coil for 3 T prostate MRI on image quality and cancer detection rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawlitza, Josephin; Reiss-Zimmermann, Martin; Thörmer, Gregor; Schaudinn, Alexander; Linder, Nicolas; Garnov, Nikita; Horn, Lars-Christian; Minh, Do Hoang; Ganzer, Roman; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael; Busse, Harald

    2017-02-01

    This work aims to assess the impact of an additional endorectal coil on image quality and cancer detection rate within the same patients. At a single academic medical center, this transversal study included 41 men who underwent T2- and diffusion-weighted imaging at 3 T using surface coils only or in combination with an endorectal coil in the same session. Two blinded readers (A and B) randomly evaluated all image data in separate sessions. Image quality with respect to localization and staging was rated on a five-point scale. Lesions were classified according to their prostate imaging reporting and data system (PIRADS) score version 1. Standard of reference was provided by whole-mount step-section analysis. Mean image quality scores averaged over all localization-related items were significantly higher with additional endorectal coil for both readers (p < 0.001), corresponding staging-related items were only higher for reader B (p < 0.001). With an endorectal coil, the rate of correctly detecting cancer per patient was significantly higher for reader B (p < 0.001) but not for reader A (p = 0.219). The numbers of histologically confirmed tumor lesions were rather similar for both settings. The subjectively rated 3-T image quality was improved with an endorectal coil. In terms of diagnostic performance, the use of an additional endorectal coil was not superior.

  14. PSMA-Based [18F]DCFPyL PET/CT Is Superior to Conventional Imaging for Lesion Detection in Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven P.; Macura, Katarzyna J.; Mena, Esther; Blackford, Amanda L.; Nadal, Rosa; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Eisenberger, Mario; Carducci, Michael; Fan, Hong; Dannals, Robert F.; Chen, Ying; Mease, Ronnie C.; Szabo, Zsolt; Pomper, Martin G.; Cho, Steve Y.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Current standard of care conventional imaging modalities (CIM) such as X-ray computed tomography (CT) and bone scan can be limited for detection of metastatic prostate cancer and therefore improved imaging methods are an unmet clinical need. We evaluated the utility of a novel second-generation low molecular weight radiofluorinated prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer, [18F]DCFPyL, in patients with metastatic prostate cancer. Procedures Nine patients with suspected prostate cancer recurrence, eight with CIM evidence of metastatic prostate cancer and one with biochemical recurrence, were imaged with [18F]DCFPyL PET/CT. Eight of the patients had contemporaneous CIM for comparison. A lesion-by-lesion comparison of the detection of suspected sites of metastatic prostate cancer was carried out between PET and CIM. Statistical analysis for estimated proportions of inter-modality agreement for detection of metastatic disease was calculated accounting for intra-patient correlation using general estimating equation (GEE) intercept-only regression models. Results One hundred thirty-nine sites of PET positive [18F]DCFPyL uptake (138 definite, 1 equivocal) for metastatic disease were detected in the eight patients with available comparison CIM. By contrast, only 45 lesions were identified on CIM (30 definite, 15 equivocal). When lesions were negative or equivocal on CIM, it was estimated that a large portion of these lesions or 0.72 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.55–0.84) would be positive on [18F]DCFPyL PET. Conversely, of those lesions negative or equivocal on [18F]DCFPyL PET, it was estimated that only a very small proportion or 0.03 (95 % CI 0.01–0.07) would be positive on CIM. Delayed 2-h-post-injection time point PET yielded higher tumor radiotracer uptake and higher tumor-to-background ratios than an earlier 1-h-post-injection time point. Conclusions A novel PSMA-targeted PET radiotracer, [18F

  15. National Cancer Institute Prostate Cancer Genetics Workshop.

    PubMed

    Catalona, William J; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Camp, Nicola J; Chanock, Stephen J; Cooney, Kathleen A; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A; FitzGerald, Liesel M; Freedman, Matthew L; Gudmundsson, Julius; Kittles, Rick A; Margulies, Elliott H; McGuire, Barry B; Ostrander, Elaine A; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Witte, John S; Isaacs, William B

    2011-05-15

    Compelling evidence supports a genetic component to prostate cancer susceptibility and aggressiveness. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified more than 30 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with prostate cancer susceptibility. It remains unclear, however, whether such genetic variants are associated with disease aggressiveness--one of the most important questions in prostate cancer research today. To help clarify this and substantially expand research in the genetic determinants of prostate cancer aggressiveness, the first National Cancer Institute Prostate Cancer Genetics Workshop assembled researchers to develop plans for a large new research consortium and patient cohort. The workshop reviewed the prior work in this area and addressed the practical issues in planning future studies. With new DNA sequencing technology, the potential application of sequencing information to patient care is emerging. The workshop, therefore, included state-of-the-art presentations by experts on new genotyping technologies, including sequencing and associated bioinformatics issues, which are just beginning to be applied to cancer genetics.

  16. Biomarkers in localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Matteo; Buonerba, Carlo; Terracciano, Daniela; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Cosimato, Vincenzo; Bottero, Danilo; Deliu, Victor M; Ditonno, Pasquale; Perdonà, Sisto; Autorino, Riccardo; Coman, Ioman; De Placido, Sabino; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; De Cobelli, Ottavio

    2016-02-01

    Biomarkers can improve prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment. Accuracy of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for early diagnosis of prostate cancer is not satisfactory, as it is an organ- but not cancer-specific biomarker, and it can be improved by using models that incorporate PSA along with other test results, such as prostate cancer antigen 3, the molecular forms of PSA (proPSA, benign PSA and intact PSA), as well as kallikreins. Recent reports suggest that new tools may be provided by metabolomic studies as shown by preliminary data on sarcosine. Additional molecular biomarkers have been identified by the use of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics. We review the most relevant biomarkers for early diagnosis and management of localized prostate cancer.

  17. PET imaging of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in prostate cancer: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Persson, Morten; Kjaer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptors (uPAR) represents an important biomarker for aggressiveness in most common malignant diseases, including prostate cancer (PC). Accordingly, uPAR expression either assessed directly in malignant PC tissue or assessed directly in plasma (intact/cleaved forms)-provides independent additional clinical information to that contributed by PSA, Gleason score, and other relevant pathological and clinical parameters. In this respect, non-invasive molecular imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) offers a very attractive technology platform, which can provide the required quantitative information on the uPAR expression profile, without the need for invasive procedures and the risk of missing the target due to tumor heterogeneity. These observations support non-invasive PET imaging of uPAR in PC as a clinically relevant diagnostic and prognostic imaging method. In this review, we will focus on the recent development of uPAR PET and the relevance within prostate cancer imaging. Novel antibody and small-molecule radiotracers-targeting uPAR, including a series of uPAR-targeting PET ligands, based on the high affinity peptide ligand AE105, have been synthesized and tested in vitro and in vivo in preclinical murine xenograft models and, recently, in a first-ever clinical uPAR PET study in cancer patients, including patients with PC. In this phase I study, a high and specific uptake of the tracer (64)Cu-DOTA-AE105 was found in both primary tumors and lymph node metastases. The results are encouraging and support large-scale clinical trials to determine the utility of uPAR PET in the management of patients with PC with the goal of improving outcome.

  18. Molecular Innovations Toward Theranostics of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    objective is to develop dendrimer -based theranostic agent with prostate cancer specificity and positron emission tomography imaging capability that...The goal of this project is to construct dendrimer nanoconjuate containing a prostate specific cell permeation peptide, peptide therapeutic(s) and...bifunctional chelator for PET imaging. Dr. Simanek’s laboratory will make dendrimers that bear functional handles for conjugation with imaging

  19. Evaluating Prostate Cancer Using Fractional Tissue Composition of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens and Pre-Operative Diffusional Kurtosis Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Edward M.; Warren, Anne Y.; Priest, Andrew N.; Barrett, Tristan; Goldman, Debra A.; Gill, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluating tissue heterogeneity using non-invasive imaging could potentially improve prostate cancer assessment and treatment. Methods 20 patients with intermediate/high-risk prostate cancer underwent diffusion kurtosis imaging, including calculation of apparent diffusion (Dapp) and kurtosis (Kapp), prior to radical prostatectomy. Whole-mount tissue composition was quantified into: cellularity, luminal space, and fibromuscular stroma. Peripheral zone tumors were subdivided according to Gleason score. Results Peripheral zone tumors had increased cellularity (p<0.0001), decreased fibromuscular stroma (p<0.05) and decreased luminal space (p<0.0001). Gleason score ≥4+3 tumors had significantly increased cellularity and decreased fibromuscular stroma compared to Gleason score ≤3+4 (p<0.05). In tumors, there was a significant positive correlation between median Kapp and cellularity (ρ = 0.50; p<0.05), and a negative correlation with fibromuscular stroma (ρ = -0.45; p<0.05). In normal tissue, median Dapp had a significant positive correlation with luminal space (ρ = 0.65; p<0.05) and a negative correlation with cellularity (ρ = -0.49; p<0.05). Median Kapp and Dapp varied significantly between tumor and normal tissue (p<0.0001), but only median Kapp was significantly different between Gleason score ≥4+3 and ≤3+4 (p<0.05). Conclusions Peripheral zone tumors have increased cellular heterogeneity which is reflected in mean Kapp, while normal prostate has a more homogeneous luminal space and cellularity better represented by Dapp. PMID:27467064

  20. Dosimetric evaluation of planning target volume margin reduction for prostate cancer via image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Taejin; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Park, Soah; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Han, Taejin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Meyeon; Kim, Kyoung-Joo; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively estimate the dosimetric benefits of the image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system for the prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery. The cases of eleven patients who underwent IMRT for prostate cancer without a prostatectomy at our institution between October 2012 and April 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. For every patient, clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margins were uniformly used: 3 mm, 5 mm, 7 mm, 10 mm, 12 mm, and 15 mm. For each margin size, the IMRT plans were independently optimized by one medical physicist using Pinnalce3 (ver. 8.0.d, Philips Medical System, Madison, WI) in order to maintain the plan quality. The maximum geometrical margin (MGM) for every CT image set, defined as the smallest margin encompassing the rectum at least at one slice, was between 13 mm and 26 mm. The percentage rectum overlapping PTV (%V ROV ), the rectal normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and the mean rectal dose (%RD mean ) increased in proportion to the increase of PTV margin. However the bladder NTCP remained around zero to some extent regardless of the increase of PTV margin while the percentage bladder overlapping PTV (%V BOV ) and the mean bladder dose (%BD mean ) increased in proportion to the increase of PTV margin. Without relatively large rectum or small bladder, the increase observed for rectal NTCP, %RDmean and %BD mean per 1-mm PTV margin size were 1.84%, 2.44% and 2.90%, respectively. Unlike the behavior of the rectum or the bladder, the maximum dose on each femoral head had little effect on PTV margin. This quantitative study of the PTV margin reduction supported that IG-IMRT has enhanced the clinical effects over prostate cancer with the reduction of normal organ complications under the similar level of PTV control.

  1. Relationship between Gleason score and apparent diffusion coefficients of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Heon; Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Byung Kwan; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Jeong, Byung Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong; Jeon, Seong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We assessed the correlation between the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and pathological Gleason score (GS) of prostate cancer patients. Methods A total of 125 patients who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging before radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer were included in this study. ADC values were compared with different GS. We used receiver operating characteristic analysis and determined the ADC cutoff value to differentiate tumours with a GS of 6 from those with a GS ≥7. Results We identified 34 patients (27.2%) with a GS of 6; 33 patients (26.4%) with a GS of 7; 22 patients (17.6%) with a GS of 8; and 36 patients (28.8%) with a GS of ≥9. The mean ADC value for disease with a GS of 6 was 0.914 ± 0.161 ×10−3 mm2/s; GS of 7: 0.741 ± 0.164 ×10−3 mm2/s; GS of 8: 0.679 ± 0.130 ×10−3 mm2/s; and GS of ≥9: 0.593 ± 0.089 ×10−3 mm2/s. An ADC value of 0.830 ×10−3mm2/s was the best cutoff value to identify prostate cancer with a GS of 6. Conclusions We observed an inverse relationship between GS and ADC value. Moreover, a cutoff ADC value may help differentiate disease with a GS of 6 from disease with a GS ≥7. PMID:28096922

  2. Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) for Prostate Cancer Comparing kV Imaging of Fiducial Markers With Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, Brandon M.; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Handrahan, Diana; Welsh, Keith T.; Cook, J. Taylor; Sause, William T.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To present our single-institution experience with image-guided radiotherapy comparing fiducial markers and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for daily localization of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2007 to October 2008, 36 patients with prostate cancer received intensity-modulated radiotherapy with daily localization by use of implanted fiducials. Orthogonal kilovoltage (kV) portal imaging preceded all 1244 treatments. Cone-beam computed tomography images were also obtained before 286 treatments (23%). Shifts in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right (LR) dimensions were made from kV fiducial imaging. Cone-beam computed tomography shifts based on soft tissues were recorded. Shifts were compared by use of Bland-Altman limits of agreement. Mean and standard deviation of absolute differences were also compared. A difference of 5 mm or less was acceptable. Subsets including start date, body mass index, and prostate size were analyzed. Results: Of 286 treatments, 81 (28%) resulted in a greater than 5.0-mm difference in one or more dimensions. Mean differences in the AP, SI, and LR dimensions were 3.4 {+-} 2.6 mm, 3.1 {+-} 2.7 mm, and 1.3 {+-} 1.6 mm, respectively. Most deviations occurred in the posterior (fiducials, 78%; CBCT, 59%), superior (79%, 61%), and left (57%, 63%) directions. Bland-Altman 95% confidence intervals were -4.0 to 9.3 mm for AP, -9.0 to 5.3 mm for SI, and -4.1 to 3.9 mm for LR. The percentages of shift agreements within {+-}5 mm were 72.4% for AP, 72.7% for SI, and 97.2% for LR. Correlation between imaging techniques was not altered by time, body mass index, or prostate size. Conclusions: Cone-beam computed tomography and kV fiducial imaging are similar; however, more than one-fourth of CBCT and kV shifts differed enough to affect target coverage. This was even more pronounced with smaller margins (3 mm). Fiducial imaging requires less daily physician input, is less time-consuming, and is

  3. Robotic Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy, for Isolated Recurrent Primary, Lymph Node or Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Beltramo, Giancarlo; Fariselli, Laura; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario; Gherardi, Federica; Ascione, Carmen; Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta; Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). Results: The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. Conclusions: CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor

  4. A dimerized urea-based inhibitor of the prostate-specific membrane antigen for 68Ga-PET imaging of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Alternative positron-emission tomography (PET) probes like labeled inhibitors of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are of emerging clinical impact as they show the ability to image small lesions of recurrent prostate cancer. Here, the dimerization of the pharmacophore Glu‐ureido‐Lys via the 68Ga chelator N,N′-bis[2-hydroxy-5-(carboxyethyl)benzyl]ethylenediamine-N,N′-diacetic acid (HBED-CC) was investigated to further improve the binding characteristics and pharmacokinetics. Methods The peptidomimetic structures were synthesized by solid-phase chemistry, and the resulting products were coupled with the respective 2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenol esters of HBED-CC to form the monomeric reference and the dimeric Glu‐ureido‐Lys derivative. The binding properties were analyzed in competitive binding, internalization, and cell surface retention experiments. PET images and biodistribution data were obtained 1 h after injection in BALB/c nu/nu mice bearing LNCaP tumor xenografts. Results Cell binding data revealed significant better binding properties of the dimer (IC50 = 3.9 ± 1.8 nM; IC50 (monomer) = 12.1 ± 2.1 nM). The inhibition potency investigated by the enzyme-based NAALADase assay confirmed these results. Specific internalization in LNCaP cells was demonstrated for both, the monomer and dimer. As shown by efflux measurements, the dimeric compound was more effectively retained on the cell surface, resulting in advanced in vivo properties (T/BMonomer = 9.2; T/BDimer = 26.5). Conclusions The dimeric [68Ga]7 is a promising imaging agent for PSMA-expressing tumors as it shows higher tumor uptake while observing more favorable background clearance. As compared to the respective monomer, the higher affinity and prolonged tumor retention additionally represent promising features and warrant further evaluation regarding 68Ga-PET imaging of PSMA expression. PMID:22673157

  5. Hetero-bivalent Imaging Agents for Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) and Hepsin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen ( PSMA ) and Hepsin PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Youngjoo Byun, Ph. D. CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Hetero-bivalent Imaging Agents for Simultaneous Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen ( PSMA ) and Hepsin 5b...prostate cancer by targeting simultaneously PSMA and hepsin, which are highly expressed in advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. In Year 3, we

  6. Clinical Application of High-Dose, Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bayley, Andrew; Rosewall, Tara; Craig, Tim; Bristow, Rob; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility and early toxicity of dose-escalated image-guided IMRT to the pelvic lymph nodes (LN), prostate (P), and seminal vesicles (SV). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 high-risk prostate cancer patients received two-phase, dose-escalated, image-guided IMRT with 3 years of androgen deprivation therapy. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) were delineated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance co-registration and included the prostate, portions of the SV, and the LN. Planning target volume margins (PTV) used were as follows: P (10 mm, 7 mm posteriorly), SV (10 mm), and LN (5 mm). Organs at risk (OaR) were the rectal and bladder walls, femoral heads, and large and small bowel. The IMRT was planned with an intended dose of 55.1 Gy in 29 fractions to all CTVs (Phase 1), with P+SV consecutive boost of 24.7 Gy in 13 fractions. Daily online image guidance was performed using bony landmarks and intraprostatic markers. Feasibility criteria included delivery of intended doses in 80% of patients, 95% of CTV displacements incorporated within PTV during Phase 1, and acute toxicity rate comparable to that of lower-dose pelvic techniques. Results: A total of 91 patients (88%) received the total prescription dose. All patients received at least 72 Gy. In Phase 1, 63 patients (61%) received the intended 55.1 Gy, whereas 87% of patients received at least 50 Gy. Dose reductions were caused by small bowel and rectal wall constraints. All CTVs received the planned dose in >95% of treatment fractions. There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicities greater than Grade 3, although there were five incidences equivalent to Grade 3 within a median follow-up of 23 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that dose escalation to the PLN+P+SV using IMRT is feasible, with acceptable rates of acute toxicity.

  7. Interfractional Prostate Shifts: Review of 1870 Computed Tomography (CT) Scans Obtained During Image-Guided Radiotherapy Using CT-on-Rails for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, James R. Gao Zhanrong; Uematsu, Minoru; Merrick, Scott; Machernis, Nolan P.; Chen, Timothy; Cheng, C.W.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To review 1870 CT scans of interfractional prostate shift obtained during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 1870 pretreatment CT scans were acquired with CT-on-rails, and the corresponding shift data for 329 patients with prostate cancer were analyzed. Results: Of the 1870 scans reviewed, 44% required no setup adjustments in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction, 14% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 29% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 13% had shifts of >10 mm. In the superior-inferior direction, 81% had no adjustments, 2% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 15% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 2% had shifts of >10 mm. In the left-right direction, 65% had no adjustment, 13% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 17% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 5% had shifts of >10 mm. Further analysis of the first 66 consecutive patients divided into three groups according to body mass index indicates that the shift in the AP direction for the overweight subgroup was statistically larger than those for the control and obese subgroups (p < 0.05). The interfractional shift in the lateral direction for the obese group (1 SD, 5.5 mm) was significantly larger than those for the overweight and control groups (4.1 and 2.9 mm, respectively) (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These data demonstrate that there is a significantly greater shift in the AP direction than in the lateral and superior-inferior directions for the entire patient group. Overweight and obese patient groups show a significant difference from the control group in terms of prostate shift.

  8. Multimodality imaging using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in local prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shukla-Dave, Amita; Wassberg, Cecilia; Pucar, Darko; Schöder, Heiko; Goldman, Debra A; Mazaheri, Yousef; Reuter, Victor E; Eastham, James; Scardino, Peter T; Hricak, Hedvig

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the relationship using multimodality imaging between intermediary citrate/choline metabolism as seen on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H-MRSI) and glycolysis as observed on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) in prostate cancer (PCa) patients. METHODS The study included 22 patients with local PCa who were referred for endorectal magnetic resonance imaging/1H-MRSI (April 2002 to July 2007) and 18F-FDG-PET/CT and then underwent prostatectomy as primary or salvage treatment. Whole-mount step-section pathology was used as the standard of reference. We assessed the relationships between PET parameters [standardized uptake value (SUVmax and SUVmean)] and MRSI parameters [choline + creatine/citrate (CC/Cmax and CC/Cmean) and total number of suspicious voxels] using spearman’s rank correlation, and the relationships of PET and 1H-MRSI index lesion parameters to surgical Gleason score. RESULTS Abnormal intermediary metabolism on 1H-MRSI was present in 21/22 patients, while abnormal glycolysis on 18F-FDG-PET/CT was detected in only 3/22 patients. Specifically, index tumor localization rates were 0.95 (95%CI: 0.77-1.00) for 1H-MRSI and 0.14 (95%CI: 0.03-0.35) for 18F-FDG-PET/CT. Spearman rank correlations indicated little relationship (ρ = -0.36-0.28) between 1H-MRSI parameters and 18F-FDG-PET/CT parameters. Both the total number of suspicious voxels (ρ = 0.55, P = 0.0099) and the SUVmax (ρ = 0.46, P = 0.0366) correlated weakly with the Gleason score. No significant relationship was found between the CC/Cmax, CC/Cmean or SUVmean and the Gleason score (P = 0.15-0.79). CONCLUSION The concentration of intermediary metabolites detected by 1H MRSI and glycolytic flux measured 18F-FDG PET show little correlation. Furthermore, only few tumors were FDG avid on PET, possibly because increased glycolysis represents a late and rather ominous event in the progression of PCa.

  9. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  10. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that ... up part of semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  11. Hyperspectral-stimulated Raman scattering imaging of cholesteryl ester accumulation: new avenue to diagnosis of human prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jun; Wang, Ping; Yue, Shuhua

    2016-10-01

    Most prostate cancers (PCa) are slowly growing, and only the aggressive ones require early diagnosis and effective treatment. The current standard for PCa diagnosis remains histopathology. Nonetheless, for the differentiation between Gleason score 6 (low-risk PCa), which can be left without treatment, and Gleason score 7 (high-risk PCa), which requires active treatment, the inter-observer discordance can be up to 40%. Our previous study reveals that cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation induced by PI3K/AKT activation underlies human PCa aggressiveness. However, Raman spectromicroscopy used in this study could only provide compositional information of certain lipid droplets (LDs) selected by the observer, which overlooked cell-to-cell variation and hindered translation to accurate automated diagnosis. Here, we demonstrated quantitative mapping of CE level in human prostate tissues using hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy that renders compositional information for every pixel in the image. Specifically, hundreds of SRS images at Raman shift between 1620-1800 cm-1 were taken, and multivariate curve resolution algorism was used to retrieve concentration images of acyl C=C bond, sterol C=C bond, and ester C=O bond. Given that the ratio between images of sterol C=C and ester C=O (sterol C=C/C=O) is nonlinearly proportional to CE percentage out of total lipid, we were able to quantitatively map CE level. Our data showed that CE level was significantly greater in high Gleason grade compared to low Gleason grade, and could be a factor that significantly contributed to cancer recurrence. Our study provides an opportunity towards more accurate PCa diagnosis and prediction of aggressiveness.

  12. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-08-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process.

  13. Automatic Segmentation of Pelvic Structures From Magnetic Resonance Images for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquier, David . E-mail: d-pasquier@o-lambret.fr; Lacornerie, Thomas; Vermandel, Maximilien; Rousseau, Jean; Lartigau, Eric; Betrouni, Nacim

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: Target-volume and organ-at-risk delineation is a time-consuming task in radiotherapy planning. The development of automated segmentation tools remains problematic, because of pelvic organ shape variability. We evaluate a three-dimensional (3D), deformable-model approach and a seeded region-growing algorithm for automatic delineation of the prostate and organs-at-risk on magnetic resonance images. Methods and Materials: Manual and automatic delineation were compared in 24 patients using a sagittal T2-weighted (T2-w) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence and an axial T1-weighted (T1-w) 3D fast-field echo (FFE) or TSE sequence. For automatic prostate delineation, an organ model-based method was used. Prostates without seminal vesicles were delineated as the clinical target volume (CTV). For automatic bladder and rectum delineation, a seeded region-growing method was used. Manual contouring was considered the reference method. The following parameters were measured: volume ratio (Vr) (automatic/manual), volume overlap (Vo) (ratio of the volume of intersection to the volume of union; optimal value = 1), and correctly delineated volume (Vc) (percent ratio of the volume of intersection to the manually defined volume; optimal value 100). Results: For the CTV, the Vr, Vo, and Vc were 1.13 ({+-}0.1 SD), 0.78 ({+-}0.05 SD), and 94.75 ({+-}3.3 SD), respectively. For the rectum, the Vr, Vo, and Vc were 0.97 ({+-}0.1 SD), 0.78 ({+-}0.06 SD), and 86.52 ({+-}5 SD), respectively. For the bladder, the Vr, Vo, and Vc were 0.95 ({+-}0.03 SD), 0.88 ({+-}0.03 SD), and 91.29 ({+-}3.1 SD), respectively. Conclusions: Our results show that the organ-model method is robust, and results in reproducible prostate segmentation with minor interactive corrections. For automatic bladder and rectum delineation, magnetic resonance imaging soft-tissue contrast enables the use of region-growing methods.

  14. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy.

  15. Evaluating stability of histomorphometric features across scanner and staining variations: predicting biochemical recurrence from prostate cancer whole slide images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, Patrick; Lee, George; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative histomorphometry (QH) is the process of computerized extraction of features from digitized tissue slide images. Typically these features are used in machine learning classifiers to predict disease presence, behavior and outcome. Successful robust classifiers require features that both discriminate between classes of interest and are stable across data from multiple sites. Feature stability may be compromised by variation in slide staining and scanning procedures. These laboratory specific variables include dye batch, slice thickness and the whole slide scanner used to digitize the slide. The key therefore is to be able to identify features that are not only discriminating between the classes of interest (e.g. cancer and non-cancer or biochemical recurrence and non- recurrence) but also features that will not wildly fluctuate on slides representing the same tissue class but from across multiple different labs and sites. While there has been some recent efforts at understanding feature stability in the context of radiomics applications (i.e. feature analysis of radiographic images), relatively few attempts have been made at studying the trade-off between feature stability and discriminability for histomorphometric and digital pathology applications. In this paper we present two new measures, preparation-induced instability score (PI) and latent instability score (LI), to quantify feature instability across and within datasets. Dividing PI by LI yields a ratio for how often a feature for a specific tissue class (e.g. low grade prostate cancer) is different between datasets from different sites versus what would be expected from random chance alone. Using this ratio we seek to quantify feature vulnerability to variations in slide preparation and digitization. Since our goal is to identify stable QH features we evaluate these features for their stability and thus inclusion in machine learning based classifiers in a use case involving prostate cancer

  16. Metabolically Stabilized (68)Ga-NOTA-Bombesin for PET Imaging of Prostate Cancer and Influence of Protease Inhibitor Phosphoramidon.

    PubMed

    Richter, Susan; Wuest, Melinda; Bergman, Cody N; Krieger, Stephanie; Rogers, Buck E; Wuest, Frank

    2016-04-04

    Peptide receptor-based targeted molecular imaging and therapy of cancer is on the current forefront of nuclear medicine preclinical research and clinical practice. The frequent overexpression of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors in prostate cancer stimulated the development of radiolabeled bombesin derivatives as high affinity peptide ligands for selective targeting of the GRP receptor. In this study, we have evaluated a novel (68)Ga-labeled bombesin derivative for PET imaging of prostate cancer in vivo. In addition, we were interested in testing the recently proposed "serve-and-protect" strategy to improve metabolic stability of radiolabeled peptides in vivo and to enhance tumor uptake. GRP receptor targeting peptides NOTA-BBN2 and (nat)Ga-NOTA-BBN2 demonstrated a characteristic antagonistic profile and high binding affinity toward the GRP receptor in PC3 cells (IC50 4.6-8.2 nM). Radiolabeled peptide (68)Ga-NOTA-BBN2 was obtained from NOTA-BBN2 in radiochemical yields greater than 62% (decay-corrected). Total synthesis time was 35 min, including purification using solid-phase extraction. (68)Ga-NOTA-BBN2 exhibited favorable resistance against metabolic degradation by peptidases in vivo within the investigated time frame of 60 min. Interestingly, metabolic stability was not further enhanced in the presence of protease inhibitor phosphoramidon. Dynamic PET studies showed high tumor uptake in both PC3- and LNCaP-bearing BALB/c nude mice (SUV5min > 0.6; SUV60min > 0.5). Radiotracer (68)Ga-NOTA-BBN2 represents a novel radiometal-based bombesin derivative suitable for GRP receptor targeting in PC3 and LNCaP mouse xenografts. Further increase of metabolic stability in vivo and enhanced tumor uptake were not observed upon administration of protease inhibitor phosphoramidon. This led to the conclusion that the recently proposed "serve-and-protect" strategy may not be valid for peptides exhibiting favorable intrinsic metabolic stability in vivo.

  17. Thermoacoustic imaging of fresh prostates up to 6-cm diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patch, S. K.; Hanson, E.; Thomas, M.; Kelly, H.; Jacobsohn, K.; See, W. A.

    2013-03-01

    Thermoacoustic (TA) imaging provides a novel contrast mechanism that may enable visualization of cancerous lesions which are not robustly detected by current imaging modalities. Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most notorious example. Imaging entire prostate glands requires 6 cm depth penetration. We therefore excite TA signal using submicrosecond VHF pulses (100 MHz). We will present reconstructions of fresh prostates imaged in a well-controlled benchtop TA imaging system. Chilled glycine solution is used as acoustic couplant. The urethra is routinely visualized as signal dropout; surgical staples formed from 100-micron wide wire bent to 3 mm length generate strong positive signal.

  18. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in focal therapy for prostate cancer: recommendations from a consensus panel

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Berrend G.; Fütterer, Jurgen J.; Gupta, Rajan T.; Katz, Aaron; Kirkham, Alexander; Kurhanewicz, John; Moul, Judd W.; Pinto, Peter A.; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Robertson, Cary; de la Rosette, Jean; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Jones, J. Stephen; Ukimura, Osamu; Verma, Sadhna; Wijkstra, Hessel; Marberger, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish a consensus on the utility of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to identify patients for focal therapy. Methods Urological surgeons, radiologists, and basic researchers, from Europe and North America participated in a consensus meeting about the use of mpMRI in focal therapy of prostate cancer.The consensus process was face-to-face and specific clinical issues were raised and discussed with agreement sought when possible. All participants are listed among the authors.Topics specifically did not include staging of prostate cancer, but rather identifying the optimal requirements for performing MRI, and the current status of optimally performed mpMRI to (i) determine focality of prostate cancer (e.g. localising small target lesions of ≥0.5 mL), (ii) to monitor and assess the outcome of focal ablation therapies, and (iii) to identify the diagnostic advantages of new MRI methods.In addition, the need for transperineal template saturation biopsies in selecting patients for focal therapy was discussed, if a high quality mpMRI is available. In other words, can mpMRI replace the role of transperineal saturation biopsies in patient selection for focal therapy? Results Consensus was reached on most key aspects of the meeting; however, on definition of the optimal requirements for mpMRI, there was one dissenting voice.mpMRI is the optimum approach to achieve the objectives needed for focal therapy, if made on a high quality machine (3T with/without endorectal coil or 1.5T with endorectal coil) and judged by an experienced radiologist.Structured and standardised reporting of prostate MRI is paramount.State of the art mpMRI is capable of localising small tumours for focal therapy.State of the art mpMRI is the technique of choice for follow-up of focal ablation. Conclusions The present evidence for MRI in focal therapy is limited.mpMRI is not accurate enough to consistently grade tumour aggressiveness.Template-guided saturation biopsies

  19. Polyphenols and Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    prostate chemoprevention are the soy isoflavone, genistein, and the tea catechin , (-)- epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Another polyphenol that has...diet high in soy products have reduced incidence of clinically manifested prostate cancers. Likewise, Asians have a long history of drinking tea

  20. Facile radiosynthesis of new carbon-11-labeled propanamide derivatives as selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) radioligands for prostate cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingzhang; Wang, Min; Miller, Kathy D; Zheng, Qi-Huang

    2011-12-11

    The androgen receptor (AR) is an attractive target for the treatment and molecular imaging of prostate cancer. New carbon-11-labeled propanamide derivatives were first designed and synthesized as selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) radioligands for prostate cancer imaging using the biomedical imaging technique positron emission tomography (PET). The target tracers, (S)-N-(4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-hydroxy-3-(2-[(11)C]methoxyphenoxy)-2-methylpropanamide ([(11)C]8a), (S)-2-hydroxy-3-(2-[(11)C]methoxyphenoxy)-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)propanamide ([(11)C]8 e), (S)-N-(4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-hydroxy-3-(4-[(11)C]methoxyphenoxy)-2-methylpropanamide ([(11)C]8c) and (S)-2-hydroxy-3-(4-[(11)C]methoxyphenoxy)-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)propanamide ([(11)C]8 g), were prepared by O-[(11)C]methylation of their corresponding precursors, (S)-N-(4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-hydroxy-3-(2-hydroxyphenoxy)-2-methylpropanamide (9a), (S)-2-hydroxy-3-(2-hydroxyphenoxy)-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)propanamide (9b), (S)-N-(4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-2-hydroxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)-2-methylpropanamide (9 c) and (S)-2-hydroxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)propanamide (9 d), with [(11)C]CH(3)OTf under basic conditions and isolated by a simplified C-18 solid-phase extraction (SPE) method in 55 ± 5% (n = 5) radiochemical yields based on [(11)C]CO(2) and decay corrected to end of bombardment (EOB). The overall synthesis time from EOB was 23 min, the radiochemical purity was >99%, and the specific activity at end of synthesis (EOS) was 277.5 ± 92.5 GBq/μmol (n = 5).

  1. Molecular Profiling of Prostate Cancer Specimens Using Multicolor Quantum Dots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    0117 TITLE: Molecular profiling of prostate cancer specimens using Multicolor Quantum Dots PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Xiaohu Gao...profiling of prostate cancer specimens using Multicolor Quantum Dots 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0117 5b. GRANT NUMBER PC061345 5c...based on the biology of their tumors. We proposed to develop oligonucleotide tagged quantum dots and antibodies for multiplexed imaging of prostate

  2. Molecular Innovations Towards Theranostics of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    quantitative PET imaging of PSMA expression in prostate cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...design for noninvasive assessment of prostate specific membrane antigen ( PSMA ) expression in prostate cancer. • We have published two peer-reviewed...other is on the use of our proposed bifunctional chelator system to exploit the multivalent effect for the detection of PSMA . REPORTABLE OUTCOMES

  3. Prostate Cancer Skeletal Metastases: Pathobiology and Interventions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    in higher levels in prostate carcinoma than in benign prostatic hyperplasia [35, 36], and is found in human metastatic lesions in bone [37]. However...compared to normal controls, benign prostatic hyperplasia , prostatitis, and localized or recurrent disease. In an animal model, prostate tumor cells...Malakouti S, Antar S, Kukreja S. Enhanced expression of parathyroid hormone-related protein in prostate cancer as compared with benign prostatic hyperplasia . Hum

  4. Urinary Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tosoian, Jeffrey J; Ross, Ashley E; Sokoll, Lori J; Partin, Alan W; Pavlovich, Christian P

    2016-02-01

    In light of the overdiagnosis and overtreatment associated with widespread prostate-specific antigen-based screening, controversy persists surrounding the detection and diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). Given its anatomic proximity to the prostate, urine has been proposed as a noninvasive substrate for prostatic biomarkers. With greater understanding of the molecular pathways of carcinogenesis and significant technological advances, the breadth of potential biomarkers is substantial. In this review, the authors aim to provide an evidence-based assessment of current and emerging urinary biomarkers used in the detection and prognostication of PCa and high-grade PCa, with particular attention on clinically relevant findings.

  5. A Promising Future for Prostate Cancer Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Assinder, Stephen J.; Bhoopalan, Vanitha

    2017-01-01

    It has been estimated that globally there is a death attributable to prostate cancer every four minutes. As life expectancy in all world regions increases, so too incidence of this disease of the ageing male will increase. For many men diagnosis occurs after presentation with symptoms of altered urinary dynamics. Unfortunately, these changes, whilst also associated with benign disease, are evident quite late in the aetiology of prostate cancer. Early detection provides for better management and prognosis. This Special Issue provides an up to date view of the advances made towards early diagnosis and prognosis. It provides reviews of advanced imaging techniques (e.g., multiparametric MRI and protocols), and of biomaterials and molecular biomarkers currently being explored (e.g., microRNAs, proteomics) and the technologies that are revolutionizing this field. It describes the multi-disciplinary approaches that are essential to inexpensive, deliverable and accurate platforms for prostate cancer diagnostics. PMID:28106714

  6. Blood oxygenation level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging during carbogen breathing: differentiation between prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia and correlation with vessel maturity

    PubMed Central

    Di, Ningning; Mao, Ning; Cheng, Wenna; Pang, Haopeng; Ren, Yan; Wang, Ning; Liu, Xinjiang; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can evaluate tumor maturity and preoperatively differentiate prostate cancer (PCa) from benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). Patients and methods BOLD MRI based on transverse relaxation time*-weighted echo planar imaging was performed to assess PCa (19) and BPH (22) responses to carbogen (95% O2 and 5% CO2). The average signal values of PCa and BPH before and after carbogen breathing and the relative increased signal values were computed, respectively. The endothelial-cell marker, CD31, and the pericyte marker, α-smooth muscle actin (mature vessels), were detected with immunofluorescence, and were assessed by microvessel density (MVD) and microvessel pericyte density (MPD). The microvessel pericyte coverage index (MPI) was used to evaluate the degree of vascular maturity. The changed signal from BOLD MRI was correlated with MVD, MPD, and MPI. Results After inhaling carbogen, both PCa and BPH showed an increased signal, but a lower slope was found in PCa than that in BPH (P<0.05). PCa had a higher MPD and MVD but a lower MPI than BPH. The increased signal intensity was positively correlated with MPI in PCa and that in BPH (r=0.616, P=0.011; r=0.658, P=0.002); however, there was no correlation between the increased signal intensity and MPD or MVD in PCa than that in BPH (P>0.05). Conclusion Our results confirmed that the increased signal values induced by BOLD MRI well differentiated PCa from BPH and had a positive correlation with vessel maturity in both of them. BOLD MRI can be utilized as a surrogate marker for the noninvasive assessment of the degree of vessel maturity. PMID:27462169

  7. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive planning and online image guidance for prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Wu, Qiuwen

    2011-08-07

    For prostate cancer patients, online image-guided (IG) radiotherapy has been widely used in clinic to correct the translational inter-fractional motion at each treatment fraction. For uncertainties that cannot be corrected online, such as rotation and deformation of the target volume, margins are still required to be added to the clinical target volume (CTV) for the treatment planning. Offline adaptive radiotherapy has been implemented to optimize the treatment for each individual patient based on the measurements at early stages of treatment process. It has been shown that offline adaptive radiotherapy can effectively reduce the required margin. Recently a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive replanning and online IG was proposed and the geometric evaluation was performed. It was found that the planning margins can further be reduced by 1-2 mm compared to online IG only strategy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric benefits of such a hybrid strategy on the target and organs at risk. A total of 420 repeated helical computed tomography scans from 28 patients were included in the study. Both low-risk patients (LRP, CTV = prostate) and intermediate-risk patients (IRP, CTV = prostate + seminal vesicles, SV) were included in the simulation. Two registration methods, based on center-of-mass shift of prostate only and prostate plus SV, were performed for IRP. The intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in the simulation. Criteria on both cumulative and fractional doses were evaluated. Furthermore, the geometric evaluation was extended to investigate the optimal number of fractions necessary to construct the internal target volume (ITV) for the hybrid strategy. The dosimetric margin improvement was smaller than its geometric counterpart and was in the range of 0-1 mm. The optimal number of fractions necessary for the ITV construction is 2 for LRPs and 3-4 for IRPs in a hypofractionation protocol. A new cumulative index of target volume was proposed

  8. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive planning and online image guidance for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Han; Wu, Qiuwen

    2011-08-01

    For prostate cancer patients, online image-guided (IG) radiotherapy has been widely used in clinic to correct the translational inter-fractional motion at each treatment fraction. For uncertainties that cannot be corrected online, such as rotation and deformation of the target volume, margins are still required to be added to the clinical target volume (CTV) for the treatment planning. Offline adaptive radiotherapy has been implemented to optimize the treatment for each individual patient based on the measurements at early stages of treatment process. It has been shown that offline adaptive radiotherapy can effectively reduce the required margin. Recently a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive replanning and online IG was proposed and the geometric evaluation was performed. It was found that the planning margins can further be reduced by 1-2 mm compared to online IG only strategy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric benefits of such a hybrid strategy on the target and organs at risk. A total of 420 repeated helical computed tomography scans from 28 patients were included in the study. Both low-risk patients (LRP, CTV = prostate) and intermediate-risk patients (IRP, CTV = prostate + seminal vesicles, SV) were included in the simulation. Two registration methods, based on center-of-mass shift of prostate only and prostate plus SV, were performed for IRP. The intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in the simulation. Criteria on both cumulative and fractional doses were evaluated. Furthermore, the geometric evaluation was extended to investigate the optimal number of fractions necessary to construct the internal target volume (ITV) for the hybrid strategy. The dosimetric margin improvement was smaller than its geometric counterpart and was in the range of 0-1 mm. The optimal number of fractions necessary for the ITV construction is 2 for LRPs and 3-4 for IRPs in a hypofractionation protocol. A new cumulative index of target volume was proposed

  9. Genetics Home Reference: prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genes. Others act as tumor suppressors through different pathways. Changes in these genes probably make only a small contribution to overall prostate cancer risk. However, researchers suspect that the combined influence ...

  10. A novel approach for establishing benchmark CBCT/CT deformable image registrations in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinkoo; Kumar, Sanath; Liu, Chang; Zhong, Hualiang; Pradhan, Deepak; Shah, Mira; Cattaneo, Richard; Yechieli, Raphael; Robbins, Jared R.; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2013-11-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is an integral component for adaptive radiation therapy. However, accurate registration between daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and treatment planning CT is challenging, due to significant daily variations in rectal and bladder fillings as well as the increased noise levels in CBCT images. Another significant challenge is the lack of ‘ground-truth’ registrations in the clinical setting, which is necessary for quantitative evaluation of various registration algorithms. The aim of this study is to establish benchmark registrations of clinical patient data. Three pairs of CT/CBCT datasets were chosen for this institutional review board approved retrospective study. On each image, in order to reduce the contouring uncertainty, ten independent sets of organs were manually delineated by five physicians. The mean contour set for each image was derived from the ten contours. A set of distinctive points (round natural calcifications and three implanted prostate fiducial markers) were also manually identified. The mean contours and point features were then incorporated as constraints into a B-spline based DIR algorithm. Further, a rigidity penalty was imposed on the femurs and pelvic bones to preserve their rigidity. A piecewise-rigid registration approach was adapted to account for the differences in femur pose and the sliding motion between bones. For each registration, the magnitude of the spatial Jacobian (|JAC|) was calculated to quantify the tissue compression and expansion. Deformation grids and finite-element-model-based unbalanced energy maps were also reviewed visually to evaluate the physical soundness of the resultant deformations. Organ DICE indices (indicating the degree of overlap between registered organs) and residual misalignments of the fiducial landmarks were quantified. Manual organ delineation on CBCT images varied significantly among physicians with overall mean DICE index of only 0.7 among redundant

  11. A novel approach for establishing benchmark CBCT/CT deformable image registrations in prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkoo; Kumar, Sanath; Liu, Chang; Zhong, Hualiang; Pradhan, Deepak; Shah, Mira; Cattaneo, Richard; Yechieli, Raphael; Robbins, Jared R; Elshaikh, Mohamed A; Chetty, Indrin J

    2013-11-21

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is an integral component for adaptive radiation therapy. However, accurate registration between daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and treatment planning CT is challenging, due to significant daily variations in rectal and bladder fillings as well as the increased noise levels in CBCT images. Another significant challenge is the lack of 'ground-truth' registrations in the clinical setting, which is necessary for quantitative evaluation of various registration algorithms. The aim of this study is to establish benchmark registrations of clinical patient data. Three pairs of CT/CBCT datasets were chosen for this institutional review board approved retrospective study. On each image, in order to reduce the contouring uncertainty, ten independent sets of organs were manually delineated by five physicians. The mean contour set for each image was derived from the ten contours. A set of distinctive points (round natural calcifications and three implanted prostate fiducial markers) were also manually identified. The mean contours and point features were then incorporated as constraints into a B-spline based DIR algorithm. Further, a rigidity penalty was imposed on the femurs and pelvic bones to preserve their rigidity. A piecewise-rigid registration approach was adapted to account for the differences in femur pose and the sliding motion between bones. For each registration, the magnitude of the spatial Jacobian (|JAC|) was calculated to quantify the tissue compression and expansion. Deformation grids and finite-element-model-based unbalanced energy maps were also reviewed visually to evaluate the physical soundness of the resultant deformations. Organ DICE indices (indicating the degree of overlap between registered organs) and residual misalignments of the fiducial landmarks were quantified. Manual organ delineation on CBCT images varied significantly among physicians with overall mean DICE index of only 0.7 among redundant

  12. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Trial of Concomitant Boost Using Indium-111-Capromab Pendetide (ProstaScint) Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, William W.; Schild, Steven E.; Vora, Sujay A.; Ezzell, Gary A.; Nguyen, Ba D.; Ram, Panol C.; Roarke, Michael C.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a prospective study, the use of {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan to guide the delivery of a concomitant boost to intraprostatic region showing increased uptake while treating the entire gland with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From September 2002 to November 2005, 71 patients were enrolled. Planning pelvic CT and {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan images were coregistered. The entire prostate gland received 75.6 Gy/42 fractions, whereas areas of increased uptake in {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan received 82 Gy. For patients with T3/T4 disease, or Gleason score {>=}8, or prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, 12 months of adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy was given. In January 2005 the protocol was modified to give 6 months of androgen deprivation therapy to patients with a prostate-specific antigen level of 10-20 ng/mL or Gleason 7 disease. Results: Thirty-one patients had low-risk, 30 had intermediate-risk, and 10 had high-risk disease. With a median follow-up of 66 months, the 5-year biochemical control rates were 94% for the entire cohort and 97%, 93%, and 90% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Maximum acute and late urinary toxicities were Grade 2 for 38 patients (54%) and 28 patients (39%) and Grade 3 for 1 and 3 patients (4%), respectively. One patient had Grade 4 hematuria. Maximum acute and late gastrointestinal toxicities were Grade 2 for 32 patients (45%) and 15 patients (21%), respectively. Most of the side effects improved with longer follow-up. Conclusion: Concomitant boost to areas showing increased uptake in {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan to 82 Gy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy while the entire prostate received 75.6 Gy was feasible and tolerable, with 94% biochemical control rate at 5 years.

  13. Hyaluronan Biosynthesis in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT: Despite advances in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the last several years, metastasis represents the... metastasis to lymph nodes and bone. Metastasis to bone is especially noteworthy, not only because it reflects more advanced tumors, but also because of the...the growth and metastasis of androgen-independent tumors, it may be possible to better diagnose and treat prostate cancers by inhibiting growth of

  14. Evaluations of an adaptive planning technique incorporating dose feedback in image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Han; Wu Qiuwen

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Online image guidance (IG) has been used to effectively correct the setup error and inter-fraction rigid organ motion for prostate cancer. However, planning margins are still necessary to account for uncertainties such as deformation and intra-fraction motion. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of an adaptive planning technique incorporating offline dose feedback to manage inter-fraction motion and residuals from online correction. Methods: Repeated helical CT scans from 28 patients were included in the study. The contours of prostate and organs-at-risk (OARs) were delineated on each CT, and online IG was simulated by matching center-of-mass of prostate between treatment CTs and planning CT. A seven beam intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan was designed for each patient on planning CT for a total of 15 fractions. Dose distribution at each fraction was evaluated based on actual contours of the target and OARs from that fraction. Cumulative dose up to each fraction was calculated by tracking each voxel based on a deformable registration algorithm. The cumulative dose was compared with the dose from initial plan. If the deviation exceeded the pre-defined threshold, such as 2% of the D{sub 99} to the prostate, an adaptive planning technique called dose compensation was invoked, in which the cumulative dose distribution was fed back to the treatment planning system and the dose deficit was made up through boost radiation in future treatment fractions. The dose compensation was achieved by IMRT inverse planning. Two weekly compensation delivery strategies were simulated: one intended to deliver the boost dose in all future fractions (schedule A) and the other in the following week only (schedule B). The D{sub 99} to prostate and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) to rectal wall and bladder were computed and compared with those without the dose compensation. Results: If only 2% underdose is allowed at the end of the

  15. Immunotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Slovin, Susan F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prostate cancer remains a challenge as a target for immunological approaches. The approval of the first cell-based immune therapy, Sipuleucel-T for prostate cancer introduced prostate cancer as a solid tumor with the potential to be influenced by the immune system. Methods: We reviewed articles on immunological management of prostate cancer and challenges that lie ahead for such strategies. Results: Treatments have focused on the identification of novel cell surface antigens thought to be unique to prostate cancer. These include vaccines against carbohydrate and blood group antigens, xenogeneic and naked DNA vaccines, and pox viruses used as prime-boost or checkpoint inhibitors. No single vaccine construct to date has resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect. The checkpoint inhibitor, anti-CTLA-4 has resulted in several long-term remissions, but phase III trials have not demonstrated an antitumor effect or survival benefit. Conclusions: Multiple clinical trials suggest that prostate cancer may not be optimally treated by single agent immune therapies and that combination with biologic agents, chemotherapies, or radiation may offer some enhancement of benefit. PMID:27843208

  16. Chronic Chlorpyrifos Exposure Does Not Promote Prostate Cancer in Prostate Specific PTEN Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Robert U.; Bannick, Nadine L.; Marin, Maximo J.; Robertson, Larry W.; Lynch, Charles F.; Henry, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental factors are likely to interact with genetic determinants to influence prostate cancer progression. The Agricultural Health Study has identified an association between exposure to organophosphorous pesticides including chlorpyrifos, and increased prostate cancer risk in pesticide applicators with a first-degree family history of this disease. Exploration of this potential gene-environment interaction would benefit from the development of a suitable animal model. Utilizing a previously described mouse model that is genetically predisposed to prostate cancer through a prostate-specific heterozygous PTEN deletion, termed C57/Luc/Ptenp+/−, we used bioluminescence imaging and histopathological analyses to test whether chronic exposure to chlorpyrifos in a grain-based diet for 32 weeks was able to promote prostate cancer development. Chronic exposure to chlorpyrifos in the diet did not promote prostate cancer development in C57/Luc/Ptenp+/− mice despite achieving sufficient levels to inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity in plasma. We found no significant differences in numbers of murine prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions or disease progression in chlorpyrifos versus control treated animals up to 32 weeks. The mechanistic basis of pesticide-induced prostate cancer may be complex and may involve other genetic variants, multiple genes, or nongenetic factors that might alter prostate cancer risk during pesticide exposure in agricultural workers. PMID:23758150

  17. Transurethral light delivery for prostate photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has broad clinical potential to enhance prostate cancer detection and treatment, yet it is challenged by the lack of minimally invasive, deeply penetrating light delivery methods that provide sufficient visualization of targets (e.g., tumors, contrast agents, brachytherapy seeds). We constructed a side-firing fiber prototype for transurethral photoacoustic imaging of prostates with a dual-array (linear and curvilinear) transrectal ultrasound probe. A method to calculate the surface area and, thereby, estimate the laser fluence at this fiber tip was derived, validated, applied to various design parameters, and used as an input to three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations. Brachytherapy seeds implanted in phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo canine prostates at radial distances of 5 to 30 mm from the urethra were imaged with the fiber prototype transmitting 1064 nm wavelength light with 2 to 8 mJ pulse energy. Prebeamformed images were displayed in real time at a rate of 3 to 5 frames per second to guide fiber placement and beamformed offline. A conventional delay-and-sum beamformer provided decreasing seed contrast (23 to 9 dB) with increasing urethra-to-target distance, while the short-lag spatial coherence beamformer provided improved and relatively constant seed contrast (28 to 32 dB) regardless of distance, thus improving multitarget visualization in single and combined curvilinear images acquired with the fiber rotating and the probe fixed. The proposed light delivery and beamforming methods promise to improve key prostate cancer detection and treatment strategies.

  18. Lycopene: redress for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pisipati, Sai Venkata Vedavyas; Pathapati, Harshavardhan; Bhukya, Ganesh; Nuthakki, Suresh; Chandu, Baburao; Nama, SreeKanth; Adeps, RajDev

    2012-03-01

    Lycopene, a carotenoid is what that gives red colour to some fruits like pomegranate, tomato, papaya etc... People with a sound diet of lycopene may have a less risk of cancers especially prostate cancer which is most impedent for the males of age 40-50 years. So, in countries of north America and Europe food contains much of the lycopene supplements. In accordance with the American journal of epidemiology 2002 studies implies that men with crushed serum lycopene levels are more divulged to prostate cancer and those with sound diet of lycopene have a less risk of prostate cancer. In a care study conveyed by The British journal of urology, men with prostate cancer are subjected to surgery and the tumour is detonated. Amongst the men half a set were supplemented with lycopene supplements and half were not. Those subjected with lycopene supplements have less bone pains and live longer than those not supplemented. This paints a picture about importance of lycopene in treatment of prostate cancer. This article evokes the importance of lycopene and its way of destroying the cancer. Lycopene reduces the risk of cancer by diverging its effect on the plasma Insulin like growth factor, on Connexins , and the most acceptable one, by quench of free radicals.

  19. Lycopene: Redress for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pisipati, Sai Venkata Vedavyas; Pathapati, Harshavardhan; Bhukya, Ganesh; Nuthakki, Suresh; Chandu, Baburao; Nama, SreeKanth; Adeps, RajDev

    2012-01-01

    Lycopene, a carotenoid is what that gives red colour to some fruits like pomegranate, tomato, papaya etc... People with a sound diet of lycopene may have a less risk of cancers especially prostate cancer which is most impedent for the males of age 40-50 years. So, in countries of north America and Europe food contains much of the lycopene supplements. In accordance with the American journal of epidemiology 2002 studies implies that men with crushed serum lycopene levels are more divulged to prostate cancer and those with sound diet of lycopene have a less risk of prostate cancer. In a care study conveyed by The British journal of urology, men with prostate cancer are subjected to surgery and the tumour is detonated. Amongst the men half a set were supplemented with lycopene supplements and half were not. Those subjected with lycopene supplements have less bone pains and live longer than those not supplemented. This paints a picture about importance of lycopene in treatment of prostate cancer. This article evokes the importance of lycopene and its way of destroying the cancer. Lycopene reduces the risk of cancer by diverging its effect on the plasma Insulin like growth factor, on Connexins , and the most acceptable one, by quench of free radicals. PMID:24826034

  20. Specificity of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT for Prostate Cancer - Myths and Reality

    PubMed Central

    Sasikumar, Arun

    2017-01-01

    68Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT for imaging prostate cancer is a novel imaging technique, which is rapidly gaining popularity. Sufficient evidence has been accumulated in literature regarding the usefulness of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in prostate cancer. Recently literature regarding the localization of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging in non-prostatic malignancies is also published, thus questioning the specificity of the tracer with regards to prostate cancer. This commentary tries to address the issue of specificity of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT and its relevance in imaging prostate cancer. PMID:28242976

  1. Specificity of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT for Prostate Cancer - Myths and Reality.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun

    2017-01-01

    68Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT for imaging prostate cancer is a novel imaging technique, which is rapidly gaining popularity. Sufficient evidence has been accumulated in literature regarding the usefulness of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT in prostate cancer. Recently literature regarding the localization of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging in non-prostatic malignancies is also published, thus questioning the specificity of the tracer with regards to prostate cancer. This commentary tries to address the issue of specificity of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT and its relevance in imaging prostate cancer.

  2. MR Spectroscopic Imaging of Peripheral Zone in Prostate Cancer Using a 3T MRI Scanner: Endorectal versus External Phased Array Coils.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Rajakumar; Margolis, Daniel Ja; Raman, Steven S; Ouellette, David; Sarma, Manoj K; Reiter, Robert E; Thomas, M Albert

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) detects alterations in major prostate metabolites, such as citrate (Cit), creatine (Cr), and choline (Ch). We evaluated the sensitivity and accuracy of three-dimensional MRSI of prostate using an endorectal compared to an external phased array "receive" coil on a 3T MRI scanner. Eighteen patients with prostate cancer (PCa) who underwent endorectal MR imaging and proton (1H) MRSI were included in this study. Immediately after the endorectal MRSI scan, the PCa patients were scanned with the external phased array coil. The endorectal coil-detected metabolite ratio [(Ch+Cr)/Cit] was significantly higher in cancer locations (1.667 ± 0.663) compared to non-cancer locations (0.978 ± 0.420) (P < 0.001). Similarly, for the external phased array, the ratio was significantly higher in cancer locations (1.070 ± 0.525) compared to non-cancer locations (0.521 ± 0.310) (P < 0.001). The sensitivity and accuracy of cancer detection were 81% and 78% using the endorectal 'receive' coil, and 69% and 75%, respectively using the external phased array 'receive' coil.

  3. PSMA-PET/CT-Positive Paget Disease in a Patient with Newly Diagnosed Prostate Cancer: Imaging and Bone Biopsy Findings.

    PubMed

    Froehner, Michael; Toma, Marieta; Zöphel, Klaus; Novotny, Vladimir; Laniado, Michael; Wirth, Manfred P

    2017-01-01

    A 67-year-old man diagnosed with Gleason score 4 + 5 = 9 clinically localized prostate cancer with (68)Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted ligand positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PSMA-PET/CT) positive Paget bone disease is described. Immunohistochemical staining revealed weak PSMA positivity of the bone lesion supporting the hypothesis that neovasculature might explain positive PSMA-PET/CT findings in Paget disease.

  4. PSMA-PET/CT-Positive Paget Disease in a Patient with Newly Diagnosed Prostate Cancer: Imaging and Bone Biopsy Findings

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Marieta; Zöphel, Klaus; Novotny, Vladimir; Laniado, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A 67-year-old man diagnosed with Gleason score 4 + 5 = 9 clinically localized prostate cancer with 68Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted ligand positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PSMA-PET/CT) positive Paget bone disease is described. Immunohistochemical staining revealed weak PSMA positivity of the bone lesion supporting the hypothesis that neovasculature might explain positive PSMA-PET/CT findings in Paget disease.

  5. Nanoparticle therapeutics for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Vanna; Sechi, Mario

    2012-09-01

    The application of nanotechnology in medicine is offering many exciting possibilities in healthcare. Engineered nanoparticles have the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and the therapy of several diseases, particularly by targeted delivery of anticancer drugs and imaging contrast agents. Prostate cancer, the second most common cancer in men, represents one of the major epidemiological problems, especially for patients in the advanced age. There is a substantial interest in developing therapeutic options for treatment of prostate cancer based on use of nanodevices, to overcome the lack of specificity of conventional chemotherapeutic agents as well as for the early detection of precancerous and malignant lesions. Herein, we highlight on the recent development of nanotechnology strategies adopted for the management of prostate cancer. In particular, the combination of targeted and controlled-release polymer nanotechnologies has recently resulted in the clinical development of BIND-014, a promising targeted Docetaxel-loaded nanoprototype, which can be validated for use in the prostate cancer therapy. However, several limitations facing nanoparticle delivery to solid tumours, such as heterogeneity of intratumoural barriers and vasculature, cytotoxicity and/or hypersensitivity reactions to currently available cancer nanomedicines, and the difficult in developing targeted nanoparticles with optimal biophysicochemical properties, should be still addressed for a successful tumour eradication.

  6. A high-affinity [18F]-labeled phosphoramidate peptidomimetic PSMA-targeted inhibitor for PET imaging of prostate cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Ganguly, Tanushree; Dannoon, Shorouk; Hopkins, Mark R.; ...

    2015-06-09

    Here in this study, a structurally modified phosphoramidate scaffold, with improved prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) avidity, stability and in vivo characteristics, as a PET imaging agent for prostate cancer (PCa), was prepared and evaluated. p-Fluorobenzoyl-aminohexanoate and 2-(3-hydroxypropyl)glycine were introduced into the PSMA-targeting scaffold yielding phosphoramidate 5. X-ray crystallography was performed on the PSMA/5 complex. [18F]5 was synthesized, and cell uptake and internalization studies were conducted in PSMA(+) LNCaP and CWR22Rv1 cells and PSMA(-) PC-3 cells. In vivo PET imaging and biodistribution studies were performed at 1 and 4 h post injection in mice bearing CWR22Rv1 tumor, with or without blockingmore » agent. The crystallographic data showed interaction of the p-fluorobenzoyl group with an arene-binding cleft on the PSMA surface. In vitro studies revealed elevated uptake of [18F]5 in PSMA(+) cells (2.2% in CWR22Rv1 and 12.1% in LNCaP) compared to PSMA(-) cells (0.08%) at 4 h. In vivo tumor uptake of 2.33% ID/g and tumor-to-blood ratio of 265:1 was observed at 4 h. In conclusion, we have successfully synthesized, radiolabeled and evaluated a new PSMA-targeted PET agent. The crystal structure of the PSMA/5 complex highlighted the interactions within the arene-binding cleft contributing to the overall complex stability. The high target uptake and rapid non-target clearance exhibited by [18F]5 in PSMA(+) xenografts substantiates its potential use for PET imaging of PCa.« less

  7. Sirolimus, Docetaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-10

    Castration Levels of Testosterone; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; PSA Progression; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  8. Prostate MRI for brachytherapists: Diagnosis, imaging pitfalls, and post-therapy assessment.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, A M; Stafford, R J; Duran, C; Soni, P D; Berlin, A; McLaughlin, P W

    2017-01-27

    Optimal integration of multiparametric MRI (mp MRI) into prostate brachytherapy practice necessitates an understanding of imaging findings pertinent to prostate cancer detection and staging. This review will summarize prostate cancer imaging findings and tumor staging on mp MRI, including an overview of the Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PIRADS)-structured reporting schema, mp MRI findings observed in the post-therapy setting including cases of post-treatment recurrence, and MRI concepts integral to successful salvage brachytherapy.

  9. [Interdisciplinary and individualized therapy of prostate cancer : International prostate cancer symposium Bonn 2013 - challenges and targets].

    PubMed

    Schwardt, M; Debus, J; Feick, G; Hadaschik, B; Hohenfellner, M; Schüle, R; Zacharias, J-P; Combs, S E

    2015-11-01

    Multimodal treatment of prostate cancer is based on specific staging via imaging, clinical parameters, tumor markers and histopathological grading. Risk-adapted therapy encompasses wait and see, active surveillance, surgical intervention, radiotherapy and hormone therapy. Some patients also need a combination of these treatment options. Even though clinical parameters guide the treatment plan, patient wishes and preferences are incorporated. Against this background leading basic research scientists, urologists, radiotherapists, epidemiologists and members of other associated disciplines discussed state of the art treatment concepts, innovative trial designs and translational research projects at the international meeting "Challenges and Chances in Prostate Cancer Research" organized by the German Cancer Aid (Deutsche Krebshilfe).

  10. The Danish Prostate Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Nielsen, Mary; Høyer, Søren; Friis, Søren; Hansen, Steinbjørn; Brasso, Klaus; Jakobsen, Erik Breth; Moe, Mette; Larsson, Heidi; Søgaard, Mette; Nakano, Anne; Borre, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish Prostate Cancer Database (DAPROCAdata) is a nationwide clinical cancer database that has prospectively collected data on patients with incident prostate cancer in Denmark since February 2010. The overall aim of the DAPROCAdata is to improve the quality of prostate cancer care in Denmark by systematically collecting key clinical variables for the purposes of health care monitoring, quality improvement, and research. Study population All Danish patients with histologically verified prostate cancer are included in the DAPROCAdata. Main variables The DAPROCAdata registers clinical data and selected characteristics for patients with prostate cancer at diagnosis. Data are collected from the linkage of nationwide health registries and supplemented with online registration of key clinical variables by treating physicians at urological and oncological departments. Main variables include Gleason scores, cancer staging, prostate-specific antigen values, and therapeutic measures (active surveillance, surgery, radiotherapy, endocrine therapy, and chemotherapy). Descriptive data In total, 22,332 patients with prostate cancer were registered in DAPROCAdata as of April 2015. A key feature of DAPROCAdata is the routine collection of patient-reported outcome measures (PROM), including data on quality-of-life (pain levels, physical activity, sexual function, depression, urine and fecal incontinence) and lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, and body mass index). PROM data are derived from questionnaires distributed at diagnosis and at 1-year and 3-year follow-up. Hitherto, the PROM data have been limited by low completeness (26% among newly diagnosed patients in 2014). Conclusion DAPROCAdata is a comprehensive, yet still young clinical database. Efforts to improve data collection, data validity, and completeness are ongoing and of high priority. PMID:27843346

  11. What Tests Can Detect Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention and Early Detection What Tests Can Detect Prostate Cancer Early? The tests discussed below are used to ... also found in the blood. Most men without prostate cancer have PSA levels under 4 nanograms per milliliter ( ...

  12. Deregulated Wnt Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    transgene. The entire transgene will be “knocked-in” to the ROSA locus via homologous recombination in mouse ES cells. The resulting “knock-in” mice ...at 25 mg/kg mouse body weight. Ten minutes after injection, mice were imaged with an IVIS Imaging System™ (Xenogen) with continuous isoflurane...promote prostate cancer in the mouse . Furthermore, an increase in the frequency or size of osteoblastic bone metastases in bigenic mice compared to age

  13. Evaluation of theranostic nanocarriers for near-infrared imaging and photodynamic therapy on human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Leandro, Fernanda Z; Martins, Júlia; Fontes, Aparecida M; Tedesco, Antonio C

    2017-03-21

    This paper evaluates how effectively chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (ClAlPc) entrapped in colloidal nanocarriers, such as nanocapsule (NC) and nanoemulsion (NE), induces photodamage in human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) during photodynamic therapy (PDT). The MTT cell viability assay showed that both ClAlPc-NC and ClAlPc-NE induced phototoxicity and efficiently killed LNCaP cells at low ClAlPc-NC and ClAlPc-NE concentrations (0.3μgmL(-1)) as well as under low light doses of 4Jcm(-2) and 7Jcm(-2), respectively, upon PDT with a 670-nm diode laser line. Confocal imaging studies indicated that ClAlPc-NC and ClAlPc-NE were preferentially localized in the perinuclear region of LNCaP cells both in the dark and upon irradiation with laser light. After PDT treatment, ClAlPc-NC-treated LNCaP cells exhibited a higher green fluorescence signal, possibly due to the larger shrinkage of the actin cytoskeleton, compared to ClAlPc-NE-treated LNCaP cells. Additionally, ClAlPc-NC or ClAlPc-NE and mitochondria showed a relatively high co-localization level. The cellular morphology did not change in the dark, but confocal micrographs recorded after PDT revealed that LNCaP cells treated with ClAlPc-NC or ClAlPc-NE underwent morphological alterations. Our preliminary in vitro studies reinforced the hypothesis that biocompatible theranostic ClAlPc-loaded nanocarriers could act as an attractive photosensitizer system in PDT and could serve as an interesting molecular probe for the early diagnosis of prostate cancer and other carcinomas.

  14. A high-affinity [18F]-labeled phosphoramidate peptidomimetic PSMA-targeted inhibitor for PET imaging of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Tanushree; Dannoon, Shorouk; Hopkins, Mark R.; Murphy, Stephanie; Cahaya, Hendry; Blecha, Joseph E.; Jivan, Salma; Drake, Christopher R.; Barinka, Cyril; Jones, Ella F.; VanBrocklin, Henry F.; Berkman, Clifford E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In this study, a structurally modified phosphoramidate scaffold, with improved prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) avidity, stability and in vivo characteristics, as a PET imaging agent for prostate cancer (PCa), was prepared and evaluated. Methods p-Fluorobenzoyl-aminohexanoate and 2-(3-hydroxypropyl)glycine were introduced into the PSMA-targeting scaffold yielding phosphoramidate 5. X-ray crystallography was performed on the PSMA/5 complex. [18F]5 was synthesized, and cell uptake and internalization studies were conducted in PSMA(+) LNCaP and CWR22Rv1 cells and PSMA(−) PC-3 cells. In vivo PET imaging and biodistribution studies were performed at 1 and 4 h post injection in mice bearing CWR22Rv1 tumor, with or without blocking agent. Results The crystallographic data showed interaction of the p-fluorobenzoyl group with an arene-binding cleft on the PSMA surface. In vitro studies revealed elevated uptake of [18F]5 in PSMA(+) cells (2.2% in CWR22Rv1 and 12.1% in LNCaP) compared to PSMA(−) cells (0.08%) at 4 h. In vivo tumor uptake of 2.33% ID/g and tumor-to-blood ratio of 265:1 was observed at 4 h. Conclusions We have successfully synthesized, radiolabeled and evaluated a new PSMA-targeted PET agent. The crystal structure of the PSMA/5 complex highlighted the interactions within the arene-binding cleft contributing to the overall complex stability. The high target uptake and rapid non-target clearance exhibited by [18F]5 in PSMA(+) xenografts substantiates its potential use for PET imaging of PCa. Advances in Knowledge The only FDA-approved imaging agent for PCa, Prostascint®, targets PSMA but suffers from inherent shortcomings. The data acquired in this manuscript confirmed that our new generation of [18F]-labeled PSMA inhibitor exhibited promising in vivo performance as a PET imaging agent for PCa and is well-positioned for subsequent clinical trials. Implications for Patient Care Our preliminary data demonstrate that this tracer possesses

  15. Epigenetics of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    McKee, Tawnya C; Tricoli, James V

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of novel technologies that can be applied to the investigation of the molecular underpinnings of human cancer has allowed for new insights into the mechanisms associated with tumor development and progression. They have also advanced the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of cancer. These technologies include microarray and other analysis methods for the generation of large-scale gene expression data on both mRNA and miRNA, next-generation DNA sequencing technologies utilizing a number of platforms to perform whole genome, whole exome, or targeted DNA sequencing to determine somatic mutational differences and gene rearrangements, and a variety of proteomic analysis platforms including liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis to survey alterations in protein profiles in tumors. One other important advancement has been our current ability to survey the methylome of human tumors in a comprehensive fashion through the use of sequence-based and array-based methylation analysis (Bock et al., Nat Biotechnol 28:1106-1114, 2010; Harris et al., Nat Biotechnol 28:1097-1105, 2010). The focus of this chapter is to present and discuss the evidence for key genes involved in prostate tumor development, progression, or resistance to therapy that are regulated by methylation-induced silencing.

  16. Image of the Month: Multifocal 68Ga Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Ligand Uptake in the Skeleton in a Man With Both Prostate Cancer and Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Isabel; Maurer, Tobias; Steiger, Katja; Schwaiger, Markus; Eiber, Matthias

    2017-03-31

    Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) HBED-CC PET/CT in a 65-year-old man with first diagnosis of prostate cancer (PC) and a history of multiple myeloma showing multifocal PSMA ligand uptake in the skeleton with corresponding osteolytic lesions in CT. Although osteolytic bone metastases are very rare in PC, PSMA expression in PET raised the suspicion of PC bone metastases. Bone marrow biopsy excluded PC metastases with immunohistochemistry showing endothelial expression of PSMA in small vessels within the myeloma.

  17. Proton therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Bradford; Henderson, Randal; Mendenhall, William M; Nichols, Romaine C; Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2011-06-01

    Proton therapy has been used in the treatment of cancer for over 50 years. Due to its unique dose distribution with its spread-out Bragg peak, proton therapy can deliver highly conformal radiation to cancers located adjacent to critical normal structures. One of the important applications of its use is in prostate cancer, since the prostate is located adjacent to the rectum and bladder. Over 30 years of data have been published on the use of proton therapy in prostate cancer; these data have demonstrated high rates of local and biochemical control as well as low rates of urinary and rectal toxicity. Although before 2000 proton therapy was available at only a couple of centers in the United States, several new proton centers have been built in the last decade. With the increased availability of proton therapy, research on its use for prostate cancer has accelerated rapidly. Current research includes explorations of dose escalation, hypofractionation, and patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes. Early results from these studies are promising and will likely help make proton therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer more cost-effective.

  18. Active surveillance for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Romero-Otero, Javier; García-Gómez, Borja; Duarte-Ojeda, José M; Rodríguez-Antolín, Alfredo; Vilaseca, Antoni; Carlsson, Sigrid V; Touijer, Karim A

    2016-03-01

    It is worth distinguishing between the two strategies of expectant management for prostate cancer. Watchful waiting entails administering non-curative androgen deprivation therapy to patients on development of symptomatic progression, whereas active surveillance entails delivering curative treatment on signs of disease progression. The objectives of the two management strategies and the patients enrolled in either are different: (i) to review the role of active surveillance as a management strategy for patients with low-risk prostate cancer; and (ii) review the benefits and pitfalls of active surveillance. We carried out a systematic review of active surveillance for prostate cancer in the literature using the National Center for Biotechnology Information's electronic database, PubMed. We carried out a search in English using the terms: active surveillance, prostate cancer, watchful waiting and conservative management. Selected studies were required to have a comprehensive description of the demographic and disease characteristics of the patients at the time of diagnosis, inclusion criteria for surveillance, and a protocol for the patients' follow up. Review articles were included, but not multiple papers from the same datasets. Active surveillance appears to reduce overtreatment in patients with low-risk prostate cancer without compromising cancer-specific survival at 10 years. Therefore, active surveillance is an option for select patients who want to avoid the side-effects inherent to the different types of immediate treatment. However, inclusion criteria for active surveillance and the most appropriate method of monitoring patients on active surveillance have not yet been standardized.

  19. Imaging primary prostate cancer with 11C-Choline PET/CT: relation to tumour stage, Gleason score and biomarkers of biologic aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji; Zhao, Yong; Li, Xin; Sun, Peng; Wang, Muwen; Wang, Ridong; Jin, Xunbo

    2012-01-01

    Background As a significant overlap of 11C-Choline standardized uptake value (SUV) between prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) tissue, controversy exists regarding the clinical value of 11C-Choline PET/CT scan in primary prostate cancer. In this study, the SUVmax of the prostate lesions and the pelvic muscles were measured and their ratios (SUVmax-P/M ratio) were calculated. Then we evaluated whether the tracer 11C-Choline uptake, quantified as SUVmax-P/M ratio, correlated with tumour stage, Gleason score, and expression levels of several biomarkers of aggressiveness. Methods Twenty-six patients with primary prostate cancer underwent 11C-Choline PET/CT. Tumour specimens from these patients were graded histopathologically, and immunnohistochemistry for Ki-67, CD31, androgen receptor (AR), Her-2/neu, Bcl-2, and PTEN were performed. Results Both SUVmax and SUVmax-P/M ratio showed no significant difference between patients with tumour stage II and III, but significantly elevated in patients with tumour stage IV. SUVmax-P/M ratio was also significantly higher in lesions with Gleason score of 4+3 or higher versus less than or equal to 3+4. SUVmax-P/M ratio was found significantly correlated with expression levels of Ki-67 and CD31. In addition, a higher SUVmax-P/M ratio was demonstrated in Her-2/neu positive subgroup than negative subgroup. At the same time, Gleason score and expression levels of these biomarkers showed no significant association with SUVmax. Conclusions Using the parameter SUVmax-P/M ratio, 11C-Choline PET/CT may be a valuable non-invasive imaging technology in the diagnosis of primary prostate cancer. PMID:23077456

  20. Proteomics in prostate cancer research.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Magnus; Lexander, Helena; Franzén, Bo; Egevad, Lars

    2007-02-01

    The incidence of early prostate cancer (PCa) among middle-aged men has increased rapidly. For many of these men, curatively intended treatment does more harm than good. Established prognostic factors are tumor stage and grade. As a result of earlier detection a majority of patients now have nonpalpable tumors (T1c) of intermediate grade (Gleason score 6). Prostate specific antigen in serum in such cases is generally at a low level and not a reliable predictor of prognosis. Altogether there is an urgent need for adjunctive prognostic indicators. In the search for relevant tumor markers for improved patient selection an exploration of the proteome (the human proteins) could be fruitful. This paper critically reviews the use of 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) for proteome research. Additional steps such as image analysis and mass spectrometry are described. Techniques based on non-2-DE platforms: surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI), isotope coded affinity tags (ICAT) and array-based technologies are also summarized. Although labor-intensive and time-consuming, 2-DE is presently the most powerful method for analysis of cellular protein phenotype and may potentially reveal gene regulations that cannot be detected on a genetic level.

  1. A Phase I/II Study for Analytic Validation of 89Zr-J591 ImmunoPET as a Molecular Imaging Agent for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; O'Donoghue, Joseph A.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Lyashchenko, Serge K.; Cheal, Sarah M.; Beylergil, Volkan; Lefkowitz, Robert A.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Martinez, Danny F.; Fung, Alex Mak; Solomon, Stephen B.; Gonen, Mithat; Heller, Glenn; Loda, Massimo; Nanus, David M.; Tagawa, Scott T.; Feldman, Jarett L.; Osborne, Joseph R.; Lewis, Jason S.; Reuter, Victor E.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Bander, Neil H.; Scher, Howard I.; Larson, Steven M.; Morris, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Standard imaging for assessing osseous metastases in advanced prostate cancer remains focused on altered bone metabolism and is inadequate for diagnostic, prognostic, or predictive purposes. We performed a first-in-human phase I/II study of 89Zr-DFO-huJ591 (89Zr-J591) PET/CT immunoscintigraphy to assess performance characteristics for detecting metastases compared to conventional imaging modalities (CIMs) and pathology. Experimental Design Fifty patients with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancers were injected with 5 mCi of 89Zr-J591. Whole body PET/CT scans were obtained, and images were analyzed for tumor visualization. Comparison was made to contemporaneously obtained bone scintigraphy and cross-sectional imaging on a lesion-by-lesion basis, and with biopsies of metastatic sites. Results Median standardized uptake value for 89Zr-J591-positive bone lesions (n = 491) was 8.9; soft tissue lesions (n = 90): 4.8 (p < .00003). 89Zr-J591 detected 491 osseous sites compared to 339 by MDP, and 90 soft tissue lesions compared to 124 by CT. Compared to all CIMs combined, 89Zr-J591 detected an additional 99 osseous sites. Forty-six lesions (21 bone, 25 soft tissue) were biopsied in 34 patients; 18/19 89Zr-J591-positive osseous sites and 14/16 89Zr-J591-positive soft tissue sites were positive for prostate cancer. The overall accuracy of 89Zr-J591 was 95.2% (20/21) for osseous lesions and 60% (15/25) for soft tissue lesions. Conclusions 89Zr-J591 imaging demonstrated superior targeting of bone lesions relative to CIMs. Targeting soft tissue lesions was less optimal, although 89Zr-J591 had similar accuracy as individual CIMs. This study will provide benchmark data for comparing performance of proposed PSMA targeting agents for prostate cancer. PMID:26175541

  2. M13-templated magnetic nanoparticles for targeted in vivo imaging of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debadyuti; Lee, Youjin; Thomas, Stephanie; Kohli, Aditya G.; Yun, Dong Soo; Belcher, Angela M.; Kelly, Kimberly A.

    2012-10-01

    Molecular imaging allows clinicians to visualize the progression of tumours and obtain relevant information for patient diagnosis and treatment. Owing to their intrinsic optical, electrical and magnetic properties, nanoparticles are promising contrast agents for imaging dynamic molecular and cellular processes such as protein-protein interactions, enzyme activity or gene expression. Until now, nanoparticles have been engineered with targeting ligands such as antibodies and peptides to improve tumour specificity and uptake. However, excessive loading of ligands can reduce the targeting capabilities of the ligand and reduce the ability of the nanoparticle to bind to a finite number of receptors on cells. Increasing the number of nanoparticles delivered to cells by each targeting molecule would lead to higher signal-to-noise ratios and would improve image contrast. Here, we show that M13 filamentous bacteriophage can be used as a scaffold to display targeting ligands and multiple nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging of cancer cells and tumours in mice. Monodisperse iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles assemble along the M13 coat, and its distal end is engineered to display a peptide that targets SPARC glycoprotein, which is overexpressed in various cancers. Compared with nanoparticles that are directly functionalized with targeting peptides, our approach improves contrast because each SPARC-targeting molecule delivers a large number of nanoparticles into the cells. Moreover, the targeting ligand and nanoparticles could be easily exchanged for others, making this platform attractive for in vivo high-throughput screening and molecular detection.

  3. Bladder dose accumulation based on a biomechanical deformable image registration algorithm in volumetric modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, E. S.; Muren, L. P.; Sørensen, T. S.; Noe, K. Ø.; Thor, M.; Petersen, J. B.; Høyer, M.; Bentzen, L.; Tanderup, K.

    2012-11-01

    Variations in bladder position, shape and volume cause uncertainties in the doses delivered to this organ during a course of radiotherapy for pelvic tumors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of dose accumulation based on repeat imaging and deformable image registration (DIR) to improve the accuracy of bladder dose assessment. For each of nine prostate cancer patients, the initial treatment plan was re-calculated on eight to nine repeat computed tomography (CT) scans. The planned bladder dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters were compared to corresponding parameters derived from DIR-based accumulations as well as DVH summation based on dose re-calculations. It was found that the deviations between the DIR-based accumulations and the planned treatment were substantial and ranged (-0.5-2.3) Gy and (-9.4-13.5) Gy for D2% and Dmean, respectively, whereas the deviations between DIR-based accumulations and DVH summation were small and well within 1 Gy. For the investigated treatment scenario, DIR-based bladder dose accumulation did not result in substantial improvement of dose estimation as compared to the straightforward DVH summation. Large variations were found in individual patients between the doses from the initial treatment plan and the accumulated bladder doses. Hence, the use of repeat imaging has a potential for improved accuracy in treatment dose reporting.

  4. Counseling the Client with Prostate Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Russell C.; Juhnke, Gerald A.

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is prevalent in the United States and has a far-reaching effect on men and their relationships. Being diagnosed with and treated for prostate cancer often causes men to experience side effects that induce physical, emotional, and social change. Counselors need to be aware of prostate cancer's impact on men and their families.…

  5. Microtubule Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lynne Cassimeris CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...Microtubule Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0071 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The current standard chemotherapy treatment for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer is the microtubule

  6. Microtubule Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lynne Cassimeris CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Lehigh University Bethlehem, PA 18015-3008 REPORT...Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Dr. Lynne Cassimeris lc07@lehigh.edu Lehigh University 526 Brodhead Avenue Bethlehem, PA 18015-3008 U.S...tested whether metabolic inhibitors, metformin or 2-deoxy-glucose, function synergistically with docetaxel to block prostate cancer cell proliferation

  7. Reduction of Racial Disparities in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    JF, Levine AC. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 suppresses angiogenesis and the growth of prostate cancer in vivo. J Urol 2000:164:820-5 10. Mahmud...Tzivony Y, Flescher E. Contrasting effects of aspirin on prostate cancer cells: suppression of proliferation and induction of drug resistance...TITLE: Reduction of Racial Disparities in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nicholas Daniels, MD MPH, Principal Investigator

  8. Prostate cancer brachytherapy: guidelines overview

    PubMed Central

    Białas, Brygida

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer, due to wide availability of PSA tests, is very often diagnosed in early stage, nowadays. This makes management of this disease even harder in every day oncology care. There is a wide range of treatment options including surgery, radiotherapy and active surveillance, but essential question is which treatment patient and oncologist should decide for. Due to recent publication of Prostate Cancer Results Study Group, in which brachytherapy is one of supreme curative options for prostate cancer, we decided to overview most present european and north american recommendations. National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Brachytherapy Society, European Association of Urology and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie of European Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology guidelines are overviewed, particularly focusing on HDR and LDR brachytherapy. PMID:23349655

  9. Prostate cancer brachytherapy: guidelines overview.

    PubMed

    Wojcieszek, Piotr; Białas, Brygida

    2012-06-01

    Prostate cancer, due to wide availability of PSA tests, is very often diagnosed in early stage, nowadays. This makes management of this disease even harder in every day oncology care. There is a wide range of treatment options including surgery, radiotherapy and active surveillance, but essential question is which treatment patient and oncologist should decide for. Due to recent publication of Prostate Cancer Results Study Group, in which brachytherapy is one of supreme curative options for prostate cancer, we decided to overview most present european and north american recommendations. National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Brachytherapy Society, European Association of Urology and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie of European Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology guidelines are overviewed, particularly focusing on HDR and LDR brachytherapy.

  10. Computer-Aided Detection of Prostate Cancer on Tissue Sections

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yahui; Jiang, Yulei; Chuang, Shang-Tian; Yang, Ximing J.

    2009-01-01

    We report an automated computer technique for detection of prostate cancer in prostate tissue sections processed with immunohistochemistry. Two sets of color optical images were acquired from prostate tissue sections stained with a double-chromogen triple-antibody cocktail combining alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR), p63, and high-molecular-weight cytokeratin (HMWCK). The first set of images consisted of 20 training images (10 malignant) used for developing the computer technique and 15 test images (7 malignant) used for testing and optimizing the technique. The second set of images consisted of 299 images (114 malignant) used for evaluation of the performance of the computer technique. The computer technique identified image segments of AMACR-labeled malignant epithelial cells (red), p63-and HMWCK-labeled benign basal cells (brown), and secretory and stromal cells (blue) for identifying prostate cancer automatically. The sensitivity and specificity of the computer technique were 94% (16/17) and 94% (17/18), respectively, on the first (training and test) set of images, and 88% (79/90) and 97% (136/140), respectively, on the second (validation) set of images. If high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), which is a precursor of cancer, and atypical cases were included, the sensitivity and specificity were 85% (97/114) and 89% (165/185), respectively. These results show that the novel automated computer technique can accurately identify prostatic adenocarcinoma in the triple-antibody cocktail-stained prostate sections. PMID:19417626

  11. The Relationship between Statins and Prostate Cancer Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    In 2011, it is estimated that 240,890 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 33,720 men will die from prostate cancer. Few prevention ...strategies for prostate cancer exist. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, statins, may prevent prostate cancer incidence and progression. We previously...prostate cancer in the Physicians’ Health Study and Early Stage Prostate Cancer Cohort study. Prostate cancer is commonly diagnosed and prevention

  12. Prostate Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing prostate cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  13. Implementation of a Novel Algorithm For Generating Synthetic CT Images From Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Sets for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Joshua Glide-Hurst, Carri; Doemer, Anthony; Wen, Ning; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe and evaluate a method for generating synthetic computed tomography (synCT) images from magnetic resonance simulation (MR-SIM) data for accurate digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation and dose calculations in prostate cancer radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective evaluation was performed in 9 prostate cancer patients who had undergone MR-SIM in addition to CT simulation (CT-SIM). MR-SIM data were used to generate synCT images by using a novel, voxel-based weighted summation approach. A subset of patients was used for weight optimization, and the number of patients to use during optimization was determined. Hounsfield unit (HU) differences between CT-SIM and synCT images were analyzed via mean absolute error (MAE). Original, CT-based treatment plans were mapped onto synCTs. DRRs were generated, and agreement between CT and synCT-generated DRRs was evaluated via Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Dose was recalculated, and dose-volume metrics and gamma analysis were used to evaluate resulting treatment plans. Results: Full field-of-view synCT MAE across all patients was 74.3 ± 10.9 HU with differences from CTs of 2.0 ± 8.1 HU and 11.9 ± 46.7 HU for soft tissue structures (prostate, bladder, and rectum) and femoral bones, respectively. Calculated DSCs for anterior-posterior and lateral DRRs were 0.90 ± 0.04 and 0.92 ± 0.05, respectively. Differences in D99%, mean dose, and maximum dose to the clinical target volume from CT-SIM dose calculations were 0.75% ± 0.35%, 0.63% ± 0.34%, and 0.54% ± 0.33%, respectively, for synCT-generated plans. Gamma analysis (2%/2 mm dose difference/distance to agreement) revealed pass rates of 99.9% ± 0.1% (range, 99.7%-100%). Conclusion: Generated synCTs enabled accurate DRR generation and dose computation for prostate MR-only simulation. Dose recalculated on synCTs agreed well with original planning distributions. Further validation using a larger patient

  14. Augmented mast cell infiltration and microvessel density in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wagrowska-Danilewicz, Małgorzata; Stasikowska-Kanicka, Olga; Tuka, Elżbieta; Danilewicz, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study Recent investigations have taken into account the role of mast cells in prostate cancer formation, analyzing their dual functions (as tumour growth promoters and tumour growth inhibitors). The aim of our study was to compare mast cell infiltration and microvessel density in prostate cancer and in benign prostate hyperplasia. We also attempted to find possible relationships among mast cell infiltration and microvessel density, Gleason score, as well as serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Material and methods The investigation was confined to evaluations of material from prostate needle biopsies, carried out in 26 patients with prostate cancer, and of 14 specimens diagnosed as benign hyperplasia. The numbers of tryptase positive mast cells and CD34 positive vessels were determined using a computer image analysis system. In the patients with prostate cancer, both mast cell infiltrates and microvessel density were significantly increased, as compared to the control patients. Results Significant positive correlations were identified between the mean numbers of mast cells and microvessel densities, both in the prostate cancer group and in the control group. Moreover, significant positive correlations were observed between Gleason score on one hand and the number of mast cells and microvessel density on the other. The correlations between PSA serum levels and both mast cell infiltration and microvessel density were positive, but not in a statistically significant way. Conclusions The reported investigations may support the assumption of mast cell promoter function in prostate cancer development, whereas no evidence was found for their opposite PMID:24592126

  15. Echo-Planar Imaging-Based, J-Resolved Spectroscopic Imaging for Improved Metabolite Detection in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    cancer is through imaging techniques including ultrasound , computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with or without the help...performed at least 8 weeks after transrectal ultrasound -guided sextant biopsy. The entire protocol was ap- proved by the Institutional Review Board...volume of interest (VOI) was localized using three slice-selective radiofrequency (RF) pulses (90°–180°–180°) (Fig. 1). The total time for the

  16. Pretreatment Endorectal Coil Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings Predict Biochemical Tumor Control in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Combination Brachytherapy and External-Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Riaz, Nadeem; Afaq, Asim; Akin, Oguz; Pei Xin; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Cox, Brett; Hricak, Hedvig; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of endorectal coil magenetic resonance imaging (eMRI) in predicting biochemical relapse in prostate cancer patients treated with combination brachytherapy and external-beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2008, 279 men with intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer underwent eMRI of their prostate before receiving brachytherapy and supplemental intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Endorectal coil MRI was performed before treatment and retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists experienced in genitourinary MRI. Image-based variables, including tumor diameter, location, number of sextants involved, and the presence of extracapsular extension (ECE), were incorporated with other established clinical variables to predict biochemical control outcomes. The median follow-up was 49 months (range, 1-13 years). Results: The 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival for the cohort was 92%. Clinical findings predicting recurrence on univariate analysis included Gleason score (hazard ratio [HR] 3.6, p = 0.001), PSA (HR 1.04, p = 0.005), and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (HR 4.1, p = 0.002). Clinical T stage and the use of androgen deprivation therapy were not correlated with biochemical failure. Imaging findings on univariate analysis associated with relapse included ECE on MRI (HR 3.79, p = 0.003), tumor size (HR 2.58, p = 0.04), and T stage (HR 1.71, p = 0.004). On multivariate analysis incorporating both clinical and imaging findings, only ECE on MRI and Gleason score were independent predictors of recurrence. Conclusions: Pretreatment eMRI findings predict for biochemical recurrence in intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with combination brachytherapy and external-beam radiotherapy. Gleason score and the presence of ECE on MRI were the only significant predictors of biochemical relapse in this group of patients.

  17. Detection of DNA viruses in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Smelov, Vitaly; Bzhalava, Davit; Arroyo Mühr, Laila Sara; Eklund, Carina; Komyakov, Boris; Gorelov, Andrey; Dillner, Joakim; Hultin, Emilie

    2016-04-28

    We tested prostatic secretions from men with and without prostate cancer (13 cases and 13 matched controls) or prostatitis (18 cases and 18 matched controls) with metagenomic sequencing. A large number (>200) of viral reads was only detected among four prostate cancer cases (1 patient each positive for Merkel cell polyomavirus, JC polyomavirus and Human Papillomavirus types 89 or 40, respectively). Lower numbers of reads from a large variety of viruses were detected in all patient groups. Our knowledge of the biology of the prostate may be furthered by the fact that DNA viruses are commonly shed from the prostate and can be readily detected by metagenomic sequencing of expressed prostate secretions.

  18. MRI-Derived Cellularity Index as a Potential Noninvasive Imaging Biomarker of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Reiter, R.E., Marks, L., Kesari, S., Mundt, A.J., Kane, C.J., Carter, B.S., Bradley , W.G., and Dale, A.M. Diffusion- Weighted Imaging in Cancer...Parsons, J.K., Choi, H.W., Liss, M.A., Kuperman, J.M., Schenker-Ahmed, N., Bartsch, H., Mattrey, R.F., Bradley , W.G., Shabaik, A., Huang, J., Margolis...J.M, Bartsch, H., Choi, H.W., Mattrey, R.F., Bradley , W.G., Shabaik, A., Huang, J., Margolis, D.J., Raman, S.S., Marks, L., Kane, C.J., Reiter, R.E

  19. Copper signaling axis as a target for prostate cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Safi, Rachid; Nelson, Erik R; Chitneni, Satish K; Franz, Katherine J; George, Daniel J; Zalutsky, Michael R; McDonnell, Donald P

    2014-10-15

    Previously published reports indicate that serum copper levels are elevated in patients with prostate cancer and that increased copper uptake can be used as a means to image prostate tumors. It is unclear, however, to what extent copper is required for prostate cancer cell function as we observed only modest effects of chelation strategies on the growth of these cells in vitro. With the goal of exploiting prostate cancer cell proclivity for copper uptake, we developed a "conditional lethal" screen to identify compounds whose cytotoxic actions were manifested in a copper-dependent manner. Emerging from this screen was a series of dithiocarbamates, which, when complexed with copper, induced reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis of malignant, but not normal, prostate cells. One of the dithiocarbamates identified, disulfiram (DSF), is an FDA-approved drug that has previously yielded disappointing results in clinical trials in patients with recurrent prostate cancer. Similarly, in our studies, DSF alone had a minimal effect on the growth of prostate cancer tumors when propagated as xenografts. However, when DSF was coadministered with copper, a very dramatic inhibition of tumor growth in models of hormone-sensitive and of castrate-resistant disease was observed. Furthermore, we determined that prostate cancer cells express high levels of CTR1, the primary copper transporter, and additional chaperones that are required to maintain intracellular copper homeostasis. The expression levels of most of these proteins are increased further upon treatment of androgen receptor (AR)-positive prostate cancer cell lines with androgens. Not surprisingly, robust CTR1-dependent uptake of copper into prostate cancer cells was observed, an activity that was accentuated by activation of AR. Given these data linking AR to intracellular copper uptake, we believe that dithiocarbamate/copper complexes are likely to be effective for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer whose

  20. [Possibilities of using magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound fusion in the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kapustin, V V

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) can be fused, by applying an external bobbin with transrectal ultrasound imaging. The author has studied whether imaging fusion can be used to select a targeted needle biopsy (NB) portion if the development of recurrent prostate cancer (PC) is suspected after radical prostatectomy (RP). MRI-TRUS fusion was performed in 11 patients in different periods after RP. All the patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and then MRI-TRUS fusion during TRUS studies (TRUSS). MRI-TRUS fusion-guided NBs of suspected portions in the vesicourethral anastomotic area were carried out in 7 patients. A control group comprised 18 patients, of whom 12 patients underwent isolated TRUS-guided NB. The use of the fusion technology was shown to make a simultaneous assessment of the MRI and TRUS images of a vesicourethral anastomotic area in post-RP patients. At the same time, the high accuracy of comparison of MRI and TRUS images ensures the steady position of portions with early intensive accumulation of a MRI contrast agent during real-time TRUSS. Thus, morphologically relevant materials could be obtained in 6 of the 7 patients in the MRI-TRUS-guided NB group and only in 3 of the 12 control patients. Therefore, the use of MRI-TRUS fusion enhances the efficiency of NB in post-RP patients suspected of having recurrent PC. The criterion for selecting a target portion is the abnormal accumulation of a MRI contrast agent.

  1. SU-E-QI-19: Evaluation of a Clinical 1.5T MRI for Prostate Cancer MRS Imaging Using a In Vivo Tumor Model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X; Chen, L; Hensley, H; Cvetkovic, D; Fan, J; Ma, C; Zhang, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance spectroscopic (MRS) imaging may provide important bio-markers to distinguish normal/cancerous prostate tissue. While MRS imaging requires a high uniform magnetic field, the ability of a clinical 1.5T MRI to achieve a comparable MRS signal is of interest for radiation treatment planning/assessment. This study is to evaluate the MRS imaging of a 1.5T clinical MRI for prostate cancers by comparing with a small animal 7T MRS scanner. Methods: A tumor model was developed by implanting LNCaP tumor cells in nude mice prostates. Tumor was monitored 3 weeks after implantation using MRI, and MRS imaging was performed on the tumor area when the tumor reached around 1cm in diameter. The 1.5T GE clinical MR scanner and the 7T Bruker small animal MR scanner were used for each mouse. MR spectrums acquired with these scanners were analyzed and compared. The signals of Choline and Citrate were considered. Results: The prostate tumor MR spectrum under the 1.5T clinical MRI showed a similar spectrum pattern to that acquired using the 7T animal MRI. The Choline signal (3.2ppm) is clear and there is no clear peak for Citrate (2.6ppm). However, the signal magnitude for Choline is not dominant compared to the background signal under 1.5T MRI. Typical cancerous prostate tissue MR spectrum with an increased Choline signal and a reduced Citrate signal was observed. In addition, signal variation is noticeable between repeated spectrum scans. The average of these scans showed a comparable and consistent spectrum to those under 7T MRI. Conclusion: The clinical 1.5T MRI is able to acquire a MR spectrum for prostate cancer comparable to those acquired using a dedicated 7T MRS scanner. However, to achieve a consistent and reliable spectrum, multiple repeated scans were necessary to get a statistical result and reduce the noise-induced artifact. This work was supported in part by the National Cancer Institute Grant R21 CA131979 and R01CA172638.

  2. Targeting Prostate Cancer with Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    4 Fig 1. Characterization of three prostate cancer cell lines by western blot. COXIV is used as a loading control...characterize our three prostate cancer cell lines , LNCaP, DU145 and PC3, which are being used in this project. We showed that prostate specific antigen...PSA) is expressed in the LNCaP cells, but absent in the DU145 cells whereas AMACR (P504S) is expressed in all prostate cancer cell lines (Fig 1

  3. Prostate cancer: comparison of local staging accuracy of pelvic phased-array coil alone versus integrated endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils. Local staging accuracy of prostate cancer using endorectal coil MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Fütterer, Jurgen J; Engelbrecht, Marc R; Jager, Gerrit J; Hartman, Robert P; King, Bernard F; Hulsbergen-Van de Kaa, Christina A; Witjes, J Alfred; Barentsz, Jelle O

    2007-04-01

    To compare the visibility of anatomical details and prostate cancer local staging performance of pelvic phased-array coil and integrated endorectal-pelvic phased-array coil MR imaging, with histologic analysis serving as the reference standard. MR imaging was performed in 81 consecutive patients with biopsy-proved prostate cancer, prior to radical prostatectomy, on a 1.5T scanner. T2-weighted fast spin echo images of the prostate were obtained using phased-array coil and endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils. Prospectively, one radiologist, retrospectively, two radiologists and two less experienced radiologists working in consensus, evaluated and scored all endorectal-pelvic phased-array imaging, with regard to visibility of anatomical details and local staging. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis was performed. Anatomical details of the overall prostate were significantly better evaluated using the endorectal-pelvic phased-array coil setup (P<0.05). The overall local staging accuracy, sensitivity and specificity for the pelvic phased-array coil was 59% (48/81), 56% (20/36) and 62% (28/45), and for the endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils 83% (67/81), 64% (23/36) and 98% (44/45) respectively, for the prospective reader. Accuracy and specificity were significantly better with endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils (P<0.05). The overall staging accuracy, sensitivity and specificity for the retrospective readers were 78-79% (P<0.05), 56-58% and 96%, for the endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils. Area under the ROC curve (Az) was significantly higher for endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils (Az=0.74) compared to pelvic phased-array coil (Az=0.57), for the prospective reader. The use of endorectal-pelvic phased array coils resulted in significant improvement of anatomic details, extracapsular extension accuracy and specificity. Overstaging is reduced significantly with equal sensitivity when an endorectal-pelvic phased-array coil is used.

  4. Metastatic Prostate Cancer of Hand

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Koji; Ishimaru, Daichi; Nishimoto, Yutaka; Ohno, Yoshiyuki; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue metastases of prostate cancer to other sites are extremely rare, and, to our best knowledge, there have been no reports of metastasis to soft tissue of the hand. A 63-year-old man was diagnosed with prostatic cancer. During treatment, bone and soft tissue metastases to the right hand, appearing in the first web space, were observed. The tumor was resected, along with both the first and second metacarpal bones. The thumb was reconstructed by pollicization of the remaining index finger, enabling the patient to use the pollicized thumb for activities of daily living. This is the first case report of prostate cancer metastasizing to the soft tissue in hand. After wide resection, pollicization was able to reconstruct a functional hand and thumb. PMID:27843661

  5. SU-E-J-95: Predicting Treatment Outcomes for Prostate Cancer: Irradiation Responses of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Most prostate cancers are slow-growing diseases but normally require much higher doses (80Gy) with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, comparing to other more aggressive cancers. This study is to disclose the radiobiological basis of this discrepancy by proposing the concept of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) and examining their specific irradiation responses. Methods: There are overwhelming evidences that CSC may keep their stemness, e.g. the competency of cell differentiation, in hypoxic microenvironments and hence become radiation resistive, though the probability is tiny for aggressiveness cancers. Tumor hypoxia used to be considered as an independent reason for poor treatment outcomes, and recent evidences showed that even prostate cancers were also hypoxic though they are very slow-growing. In addition, to achieve comparable outcomes to other much more aggressive cancers, much higher doses (rather than lower doses) are always needed for prostate cancers, regardless of its non-aggressiveness. All these abnormal facts can only be possibly interpreted by the irradiation responses characteristics of prostate CSCs. Results: Both normal cancer cells (NCCs) and CSCs exiting in tumors, in which NCCs are mainly for symptoms whereas killing all CSCs achieves disease-free. Since prostate cancers are slow-growing, the hypoxia in prostate cancers cannot possibly from NCCs, thus it is caused by hypoxic CSCs. However, single hypoxic cell cannot be imaged due to limitation of imaging techniques, unless a large group of hypoxic cells exist together, thus most of CSCs in prostate cancers are virtually hypoxic, i.e. not in working mode because CSCs in proliferating mode have to be normoxic, and this explains why prostate cancers are unaggressive. Conclusion: The fractional dose in conventional radiotherapy (∼2Gy) could only kill NCCs and CSCs in proliferating modes, whereas most CSCs survived fractional treatments since they were hypoxic, thus to eliminate all

  6. Complementary medicine, chemoprevention, and staging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Crawford, E David

    2003-01-01

    The 13th International Prostate Cancer Update was held in Vail, Colorado, in February 2003. This article provides an overview of the high points in the areas of complementary medicine, chemoprevention, and staging that were discussed at this meeting. M. Scott Lucia, MD, addressed the use of various hormonal agents, antiproliferative or differentiating agents, antiinflammatory agents, and antioxidants in patients with prostate cancer. Wael A. Sakr, MD, provided an overview of prognostic markers for this disease. Arturo Mendoza-Valdes, MD, explored the potential role of exercise for patients with prostate cancer, and Bruce Sodee, MD, described some exciting new developments in prostate imaging. E. David Crawford, MD, discussed the ongoing Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.

  7. Medical Tests for Prostate Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... than age 50 is inflammation, called prostatitis. Prostate enlargement, or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), is another common ... cannot distinguish between cancerous tumors and noncancerous prostate enlargement. Once a biopsy has confirmed cancer, these imaging ...

  8. MRI-Derived Restriction Spectrum Imaging Cellularity Index is Associated with High Grade Prostate Cancer on Radical Prostatectomy Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Liss, Michael A.; White, Nathan S.; Parsons, J. Kellogg; Schenker-Ahmed, Natalie M.; Rakow-Penner, Rebecca; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Bartsch, Hauke; Choi, Hyung W.; Mattrey, Robert F.; Bradley, William G.; Shabaik, Ahmed; Huang, Jiaoti; Margolis, Daniel J. A.; Raman, Steven S.; Marks, Leonard S.; Kane, Christopher J.; Reiter, Robert E.; Dale, Anders M.; Karow, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluate a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique to improve detection of aggressive prostate cancer (PCa). Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of pre-surgical prostate MRI scans using an advanced diffusion-weighted imaging technique called restriction spectrum imaging (RSI), which can be presented as a normalized z-score statistic. Scans were acquired prior to radical prostatectomy. Prostatectomy specimens were processed using whole-mount sectioning and regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around individual PCa tumors. Corresponding ROIs were drawn on the MRI imaging and paired with ROIs in regions with no pathology. RSI z-score and conventional apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were recorded for each ROI. Paired t-test, ANOVA, and logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: We evaluated 28 patients with 64 ROIs (28 benign and 36 PCa). The mean difference in RSI z-score (PCa ROI–Benign ROI) was 2.17 (SE = 0.11; p < 0.001) and in ADC was 551 mm2/s (SE = 80 mm2/s; paired t-test, p < 0.001). The differences in the means among all groups (benign, primary Gleason 3, and primary Gleason 4) was significant for both RSI z-score (F3,64 = 97.7, p < 0.001) and ADC (F3,64 = 13.9, p < 0.001). A t-test was performed on only PCa tumor ROIs (n = 36) to determine PCa aggressiveness (Gleason 3 vs. Gleason 4) revealing that RSI z-score was still significant (p = 0.03), whereas, ADC values were no longer significant (p = 0.08). In multivariable analysis adjusting for age and race, RSI z-score was associated with PCa aggressiveness (OR 10.3, 95% CI: 1.4–78.0, p = 0.02) while ADC trended to significance (p = 0.07). Conclusion: The RSI-derived normalized cellularity index is associated with aggressive PCa as determined by pathologic Gleason scores. Further utilization of RSI techniques may serve to enhance standardized reporting systems for PCa in the future

  9. The Prostate Health Index Selectively Identifies Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Stacy; Sanda, Martin G.; Broyles, Dennis L.; Shin, Sanghyuk S.; Bangma, Chris H.; Wei, John T.; Partin, Alan W.; Klee, George G.; Slawin, Kevin M.; Marks, Leonard S.; van Schaik, Ron H. N.; Chan, Daniel W.; Sokoll, Lori J.; Cruz, Amabelle B.; Mizrahi, Isaac A.; Catalona, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Prostate Health Index (phi) is a new test combining total, free and [-2]proPSA into a single score. It was recently approved by the FDA and is now commercially available in the U.S., Europe and Australia. We investigate whether phi improves specificity for detecting clinically significant prostate cancer and can help reduce prostate cancer over diagnosis. Materials and Methods From a multicenter prospective trial we identified 658 men age 50 years or older with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 ng/ml and normal digital rectal examination who underwent prostate biopsy. In this population we compared the performance of prostate specific antigen, % free prostate specific antigen, [-2]proPSA and phi to predict biopsy results and, specifically, the presence of clinically significant prostate cancer using multiple criteria. Results The Prostate Health Index was significantly higher in men with Gleason 7 or greater and “Epstein significant” cancer. On receiver operating characteristic analysis phi had the highest AUC for overall cancer (AUCs phi 0.708, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.648, [-2]proPSA 0.550 and prostate specific antigen 0.516), Gleason 7 or greater (AUCs phi 0.707, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.661, [-2]proPSA 0.558, prostate specific antigen 0.551) and significant cancer (AUCs phi 0.698, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.654, [-2]proPSA 0.550, prostate specific antigen 0.549). At the 90% sensitivity cut point for phi (a score less than 28.6) 30.1% of patients could have been spared an unnecessary biopsy for benign disease or insignificant prostate cancer compared to 21.7% using percent free prostate specific antigen. Conclusions The new phi test outperforms its individual components of total, free and [-2]proPSA for the identification of clinically significant prostate cancer. Phi may be useful as part of a multivariable approach to reduce prostate biopsies and over diagnosis. PMID:25463993

  10. [Markers of prostate cancer stem cells: research advances].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shun-Qi; Huang, Sheng-Song

    2013-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most seriously malignant diseases threatening men's health, and the mechanisms of its initiation and progression are not yet completely understood. Recent years have witnessed distinct advances in researches on prostate cancer stem cells in many aspects using different sources of materials, such as human prostate cancer tissues, human prostate cancer cell lines, and mouse models of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer stem cell study offers a new insight into the mechanisms of the initiation and progression of prostate cancer and contributes positively to its treatment. This article presents an overview on the prostate cancer stem cell markers utilized in the isolation and identification of prostate cancer stem cells.

  11. Which metabolic imaging, besides bone scan with 99mTc-phosphonates, for detecting and evaluating bone metastases in prostatic cancer patients? An open discussion.

    PubMed

    Bombardieri, E; Setti, L; Kirienko, M; Antunovic, L; Guglielmo, P; Ciocia, G

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer bone metastases occur frequently in advanced cancer and this is matter of particular attention, due to the great impact on patient's management and considering that a lot of new emerging therapeutic options have been recently introduced. Imaging bone metastases is essential to localize lesions, to establish their size and number, to study characteristics and changes during therapy. Besides radiological imaging, nuclear medicine modalities can image their features and offer additional information about their metabolic behaviour. They can be classified according to physical characteristics, type of detection, mechanism of uptake, availability for daily use. The physiopathology of metastases formation and the mechanisms of tracer uptake are essential to understand the interpretation of nuclear medicine images. Therefore, radiopharmaceuticals for bone metastases can be classified in agents targeting bone (99mTc-phosphonates, 18F-fluoride) and those targeting prostatic cancer cells (18F-fluoromethylcholine, 11C-choline, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose). The modalities using the first group of tracers are planar bone scan, SPECT or SPECT/CT with 99mTc-diphosphonates, and 18F-fluoride PET/CT, while the modalities using the second group include 18F/11C-choline derivatives PET/CT, 18F-FDG PET/CT and PET/CT scans with several other radiopharmaceuticals described in the literature, such as 18F/11C-acetate derivatives, 18F-fluoro-5α-dihydrotestosterone (FDHT), 18F-anti-1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (FACBC), 18F-2'-fluoro-5-methyl-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyluracil (FMAU) and 68Ga-labeled-prostate specific membrane antigen (PMSA) PET/TC. However, since data on clinical validation for these last novel modalities are not conclusive and/or are not still sufficient in number, at present they can be still considered as promising tools under evaluation. The present paper considers the nuclear modalities today available for the clinical routine. This overview wants

  12. Prostate cancer immunotherapy: beyond immunity to curability.

    PubMed

    Simons, Jonathan W

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. It is the first prevalent cancer in which overall survival in advanced disease is modestly, but objectively, improved with outpatient delivered dendritic cell-based immunotherapy. More prostate cancer patients have enrolled through Facebook and trusted-site Internet searches in clinical trials for prostate cancer vaccine-based immunotherapy than in immunotherapy trials for lung, breast, colon, pancreas, ovarian, and bladder cancer combined in the past 7 years. Exceptional responses to anti-CTLA-4 treatment have been documented in clinics, and prostate cancer neoantigen characterization and T-cell clonotyping are in their research ascendancy. The prostate is an accessory organ; it is not required for fertility, erectile function, or urinary continence. The true evolutionary advantage of having a prostate for male mammalian physiology is a topic of speculation in seminar rooms and on bar stools, but it remains unknown. Hundreds of prostate lineage-unique proteins (PLUP) exist among the >37,000 normal human prostate lineage-unique open reading frames that can be targeted for immunologic ablation of PLUP(+) prostate cancer cells by prostate-specific autoimmunity. This bioengineered graft-versus-prostate disease is a powerful strategy that can eliminate deaths from prostate cancer. Immunologic tolerance to prostate cancer can be overcome at every clinical stage of presentation. This Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads article aims to present advances in the past two decades of basic, translational, and clinical research in prostate cancer, including bioengineering B-cell and T-cell responses, and ongoing prostate cancer immunotherapy trials.

  13. Analysis of Prostate Deformation during a Course of Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, Takuya; Tateoka, Kunihiko; Saito, Yuichi; Abe, Tadanori; Yano, Masaki; Yaegashi, Yuji; Narimatsu, Hirokazu; Fujimoto, Kazunori; Nakata, Akihiro; Nakata, Kensei; Someya, Masanori; Hori, Masakazu; Hareyama, Masato; Sakata, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Accurate analysis of the correlation between deformation of the prostate and displacement of its center of gravity (CoG) is important for efficient radiation therapy for prostate cancer. In this study, we addressed this problem by introducing a new analysis approach. Method A planning computed tomography (CT) scan and 7 repeat cone-beam CT scans during the course of treatment were obtained for 19 prostate cancer patients who underwent three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy. A single observer contoured the prostate gland only. To evaluate the local deformation of the prostate, it was divided into 12 manually defined segments. Prostate deformation was calculated using in-house developed software. The correlation between the displacement of the CoG and the local deformation of the prostate was evaluated using multiple regression analysis. Results The mean value and standard deviation (SD) of the prostate deformation were 0.6 mm and 1.7 mm, respectively. For the majority of the patients, the local SD of the deformation was slightly lager in the superior and inferior segments. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the anterior-posterior displacement of the CoG of the prostate had a highly significant correlation with the deformations in the middle-anterior (p < 0.01) and middle-posterior (p < 0.01) segments of the prostate surface (R2 = 0.84). However, there was no significant correlation between the displacement of the CoG and the deformation of the prostate surface in other segments. Conclusion Anterior-posterior displacement of the CoG of the prostate is highly correlated with deformation in its middle-anterior and posterior segments. In the radiation therapy for prostate cancer, it is necessary to optimize the internal margin for every position of the prostate measured using image-guided radiation therapy. PMID:26120840

  14. Hormonal therapy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Labrie, Fernand

    2010-01-01

    Of all cancers, prostate cancer is the most sensitive to hormones: it is thus very important to take advantage of this unique property and to always use optimal androgen blockade when hormone therapy is the appropriate treatment. A fundamental observation is that the serum testosterone concentration only reflects the amount of testosterone of testicular origin which is released in the blood from which it reaches all tissues. Recent data show, however, that an approximately equal amount of testosterone is made from dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) directly in the peripheral tissues, including the prostate, and does not appear in the blood. Consequently, after castration, the 95-97% fall in serum testosterone does not reflect the 40-50% testosterone (testo) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) made locally in the prostate from DHEA of adrenal origin. In fact, while elimination of testicular androgens by castration alone has never been shown to prolong life in metastatic prostate cancer, combination of castration (surgical or medical with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist) with a pure anti-androgen has been the first treatment shown to prolong life. Most importantly, when applied at the localized stage, the same combined androgen blockade (CAB) can provide long-term control or cure of the disease in more than 90% of cases. Obviously, since prostate cancer usually grows and metastasizes without signs or symptoms, screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is absolutely needed to diagnose prostate cancer at an 'early' stage before metastasis occurs and the cancer becomes non-curable. While the role of androgens was believed to have become non-significant in cancer progressing under any form of androgen blockade, recent data have shown increased expression of the androgen receptor (AR) in treatment-resistant disease with a benefit of further androgen blockade. Since the available anti-androgens have low affinity for AR and cannot block androgen action completely

  15. Echo-Planar Imaging Based J-Resolved Spectroscopic Imaging for Improved Metabolite Detection in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    phantom containing several metabolites which have been reported in prostate tissues, and to optimize the EP-JJRESI sequence and other acquisition...parameters using the phantom (Months 6-12). Accomplished during September 29, 2011-October 28 2012: The sequence was tested using a prostate phantom ...containing 10 different metabolites at physiological concentrations (pH set to 7.2). A 500 ml prostate phantom was prepared containing the following

  16. Identifying Clinically Significant Prostate Cancers using 3-D In Vivo Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging with Whole-Mount Histology Validation.

    PubMed

    Palmeri, Mark L; Glass, Tyler J; Miller, Zachary A; Rosenzweig, Stephen J; Buck, Andrew; Polascik, Thomas J; Gupta, Rajan T; Brown, Alison F; Madden, John; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2016-06-01

    Overly aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) treatment adversely affects patients and places an unnecessary burden on our health care system. The inability to identify and grade clinically significant PCa lesions is a factor contributing to excessively aggressive PCa treatment, such as radical prostatectomy, instead of more focal, prostate-sparing procedures such as cryotherapy and high-dose radiation therapy. We have performed 3-D in vivo B-mode and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using a mechanically rotated, side-fire endorectal imaging array to identify regions suspicious for PCa in 29 patients being treated with radical prostatectomies for biopsy-confirmed PCa. Whole-mount histopathology analyses were performed to identify regions of clinically significant/insignificant PCa lesions, atrophy and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Regions of suspicion for PCa were reader-identified in ARFI images based on boundary delineation, contrast, texture and location. These regions of suspicion were compared with histopathology identified lesions using a nearest-neighbor regional localization approach. Of all clinically significant lesions identified on histopathology, 71.4% were also identified using ARFI imaging, including 79.3% of posterior and 33.3% of anterior lesions. Among the ARFI-identified lesions, 79.3% corresponded to clinically significant PCa lesions, with these lesions having higher indices of suspicion than clinically insignificant PCa. ARFI imaging had greater sensitivity for posterior versus anterior lesions because of greater displacement signal-to-noise ratio and finer spatial sampling. Atrophy and benign prostatic hyperplasia can cause appreciable prostate anatomy distortion and heterogeneity that confounds ARFI PCa lesion identification; however, in general, ARFI regions of suspicion did not coincide with these benign pathologies.

  17. Monitoring tumor response of prostate cancer to radiation therapy by multi-parametric 1H and hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Vickie Yi

    Radiation therapy is one of the most common curative therapies for patients with localized prostate cancer, but despite excellent success rates, a significant number of patients suffer post- treatment cancer recurrence. The accurate characterization of early tumor response remains a major challenge for the clinical management of these patients. Multi-parametric MRI/1H MR spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) has been shown to increase the diagnostic performance in evaluating the effectiveness of radiation therapy. 1H MRSI can detect altered metabolic profiles in cancerous tissue. In this project, the concentrations of prostate metabolites from snap-frozen biopsies of recurrent cancer after failed radiation therapy were correlated with histopathological findings to identify quantitative biomarkers that predict for residual aggressive versus indolent cancer. The total choline to creatine ratio was significantly higher in recurrent aggressive versus indolent cancer, suggesting that use of a higher threshold tCho/Cr ratio in future in vivo 1H MRSI studies could improve the selection and therapeutic planning for patients after failed radiation therapy. Varying radiation doses may cause a diverse effect on prostate cancer micro-environment and metabolism, which could hold the key to improving treatment protocols for individual patients. The recent development and clinical translation of hyperpolarized 13C MRI have provided the ability to monitor both changes in the tumor micro-environment and its metabolism using a multi-probe approach, [1-13C]pyruvate and 13C urea, combined with 1H Multi-parametric MRI. In this thesis, hyperpolarized 13C MRI, 1H dynamic contrast enhancement, and diffusion weighted imaging were used to identify early radiation dose response in a transgenic prostate cancer model. Hyperpolarized pyruvate to lactate metabolism significantly decreased in a dose dependent fashion by 1 day after radiation therapy, prior to any changes observed using 1H DCE and diffusion

  18. Image guided radiation therapy applications for head and neck, prostate, and breast cancers using 3D ultrasound imaging and Monte Carlo dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Danielle

    In radiation therapy an uncertainty in the delivered dose always exists because anatomic changes are unpredictable and patient specific. Image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) relies on imaging in the treatment room to monitor the tumour and surrounding tissue to ensure their prescribed position in the radiation beam. The goal of this thesis was to determine the dosimetric impact on the misaligned radiation therapy target for three cancer sites due to common setup errors; organ motion, tumour tissue deformation, changes in body habitus, and treatment planning errors. For this purpose, a novel 3D ultrasound system (Restitu, Resonant Medical, Inc.) was used to acquire a reference image of the target in the computed tomography simulation room at the time of treatment planning, to acquire daily images in the treatment room at the time of treatment delivery, and to compare the daily images to the reference image. The measured differences in position and volume between daily and reference geometries were incorporated into Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations. The EGSnrc (National Research Council, Canada) family of codes was used to model Varian linear accelerators and patient specific beam parameters, as well as to estimate the dose to the target and organs at risk under several different scenarios. After validating the necessity of MC dose calculations in the pelvic region, the impact of interfraction prostate motion, and subsequent patient realignment under the treatment beams, on the delivered dose was investigated. For 32 patients it is demonstrated that using 3D conformal radiation therapy techniques and a 7 mm margin, the prescribed dose to the prostate, rectum, and bladder is recovered within 0.5% of that planned when patient setup is corrected for prostate motion, despite the beams interacting with a new external surface and internal tissue boundaries. In collaboration with the manufacturer, the ultrasound system was adapted from transabdominal imaging to neck

  19. 68 Ga-PSMA Uptake by Dermatofibroma in a Patient With Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Funda; Akçal, Arzu; Ünal, Betül; Sezgin Göksu, Sema; Güngör, Firat

    2017-02-24

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a typ. 2 transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in prostate cancer cells. Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging is a modality used to determine the extent of prostate cancer. Various other neoplasias may also express PSMA, which appears as Ga-PSMA uptake in PET/CT imaging. A 71-year-old man with prostate cancer underwent Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging for restaging after having an elevated prostate-specific antigen level. Subcutaneous lesions showing focal PSMA uptake were detected, one of which was excised. The histopathologic diagnosis was dermatofibroma.

  20. A novel SPECT camera for molecular imaging of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebula, Alan; Gilland, David; Su, Li-Ming; Wagenaar, Douglas; Bahadori, Amir

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this work is to develop an improved SPECT camera for dedicated prostate imaging. Complementing the recent advancements in agents for molecular prostate imaging, this device has the potential to assist in distinguishing benign from aggressive cancers, to improve site-specific localization of cancer, to improve accuracy of needle-guided prostate biopsy of cancer sites, and to aid in focal therapy procedures such as cryotherapy and radiation. Theoretical calculations show that the spatial resolution/detection sensitivity of the proposed SPECT camera can rival or exceed 3D PET and further signal-to-noise advantage is attained with the better energy resolution of the CZT modules. Based on photon transport simulation studies, the system has a reconstructed spatial resolution of 4.8 mm with a sensitivity of 0.0001. Reconstruction of a simulated prostate distribution demonstrates the focal imaging capability of the system.

  1. Infections and inflammation in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sfanos, Karen S; Isaacs, William B; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2013-12-25

    The frequent observation of both acute and chronic inflammation of unknown stimulus in the adult prostate has motivated a large body of research aimed at identifying potential infectious agents that may elicit prostatic inflammation. The overarching hypothesis is that infection-induced inflammation may be associated with prostate cancer development or progression, as inflammation is known to serve as an "enabling characteristic" of cancer. With recent advances in molecular techniques for microorganism identification, a panoply of microorganisms has been scrutinized in prostate tissues and in relation to prostate carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literature on the evidence for infectious agents as a contributing factor to prostatic inflammation and prostate cancer, and to highlight recent literature suggesting an infectious etiology to the biogenesis of prostatic corpora amylacea and on the development of mouse models of prostatic infections.

  2. Infections and inflammation in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sfanos, Karen S; Isaacs, William B; Marzo, Angelo M De

    2013-01-01

    The frequent observation of both acute and chronic inflammation of unknown stimulus in the adult prostate has motivated a large body of research aimed at identifying potential infectious agents that may elicit prostatic inflammation. The overarching hypothesis is that infection-induced inflammation may be associated with prostate cancer development or progression, as inflammation is known to serve as an “enabling characteristic” of cancer. With recent advances in molecular techniques for microorganism identification, a panoply of microorganisms has been scrutinized in prostate tissues and in relation to prostate carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literature on the evidence for infectious agents as a contributing factor to prostatic inflammation and prostate cancer, and to highlight recent literature suggesting an infectious etiology to the biogenesis of prostatic corpora amylacea and on the development of mouse models of prostatic infections. PMID:25110720

  3. Expression of the KAI1 protein in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, T.; Ichikawa, T.; Tamaru, J.; Mikata, A.; Akakura, K.; Akimoto, S.; Imai, T.; Yoshie, O.; Shiraishi, T.; Yatani, R.; Ito, H.; Shimazaki, J.

    1996-01-01

    The KAI1 gene, recently identified as a metastatic suppressor gene for prostate cancer, was cloned and was revealed to be identical to the C33/IA4/ R2/4R9 gene. The expression of KAI1 protein was examined immunohistochemically in the tissues from 14 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia and 46 cases of prostate cancer using mouse monoclonal anti-human C33 antibody. In benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues, KAI1 protein was uniformly expressed in the glandular cell membrane at cell-to-cell borders. The KAI1 protein in the tissues of untreated prostate cancer was also located at similar sites to those of benign prostatic hyperplasia, but the percentage of strongly positive cancer cells was correlated inversely to the Gleason pattern (P < 0.0001, one-way analysis of variance). There was also a statistically inverse correlation between the percentage of KAI1-positive cancer cells and the clinical stage (chi 2 = 9.6; P = 0.0081). In 4 cancer death cases relapsed from endocrine therapy, KAI1 protein was not stained in either primary or metastatic foci. These results indicate that the expression of KAI1 protein correlates to tumor characteristics in prostate cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:8909232

  4. Learning image context for segmentation of prostate in CT-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Liao, Shu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Shen, Dinggang

    2011-01-01

    Segmentation of prostate is highly important in the external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer. However, it is challenging to localize prostate in the CT images due to low image contrast, prostate motion, and both intensity and shape changes of bladder and rectum around the prostate. In this paper, an online learning and patient-specific classification method based on location-adaptive image context is proposed to precisely segment prostate in the CT image. Specifically, two sets of position-adaptive classifiers are respectively placed along the two coordinate directions, and further trained with the previous segmented treatment images to jointly perform the prostate segmentation. In particular, each location-adaptive classifier is recursively trained with different image context collected at different scales and orientations for better identification of each prostate region. The proposed learning-based prostate segmentation method has been extensively evaluated on a large set of patients, achieving very promising results.

  5. Screening spectroscopy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolenko, S. B.; Voloshynskyy, D. I.; Fedoruk, O. S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to establish objective parameters of the field of laser and incoherent radiation of different spectral ranges (UV, visible, IR) as a non-invasive optical method of interaction with different samples of biological tissues and fluids of patients to determine the state of prostate cancer and choosing the best personal treatment. The objects of study were selected venous blood plasma of patient with prostate cancer, histological sections of rat prostate gland in the postoperative period. As diagnostic methods have been used ultraviolet spectrometry samples of blood plasma in the liquid state, infrared spectroscopy middle range (2,5-25 microns) dry residue of plasma by spectral diagnostic technique of thin histological sections of biological tissues.

  6. Particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Sinoto, Makoto; Matsunobu, Akira; Toyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Kudo, Sho

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in external beam radiotherapy have allowed us to deliver higher doses to the tumors while decreasing doses to the surrounding tissues. Dose escalation using high-precision radiotherapy has improved the treatment outcomes of prostate cancer. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy has been widely used throughout the world as the most advanced form of photon radiotherapy. In contrast, particle radiotherapy has also been under development, and has been used as an effective and non-invasive radiation modality for prostate and other cancers. Among the particles used in such treatments, protons and carbon ions have the physical advantage that the dose can be focused on the tumor with only minimal exposure of the surrounding normal tissues. Furthermore, carbon ions also have radiobiological advantages that include higher killing effects on intrinsic radio-resistant tumors, hypoxic tumor cells and tumor cells in the G0 or S phase. However, the degree of clinical benefit derived from these theoretical advantages in the treatment of prostate cancer has not been adequately determined. The present article reviews the available literature on the use of particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer as well as the literature on the physical and radiobiological properties of this treatment, and discusses the role and the relative merits of particle radiotherapy compared with current photon-based radiotherapy, with a focus on proton beam therapy and carbon ion radiotherapy.

  7. Vaccine Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Center IRB, and the I owa City VA Medical Center Research and Development Committee. During the second and t hird years we have been recruiting pa...American Urologic Association (AUA). (3) Talks to prostate cancer survivor support groups in at the University of I owa , Mercy Medical Center in Cedar

  8. Sanguinarine: A Novel Agent Against Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    surgical approaches have not been successful in the management of prostate cancer (CaP). Natural plant - based products have shown promise as anticancer...or treatment of prostate cancer . Several studies have shown that plant -derived alkaloids possess remarkable anticancer effects. Sanguinarine, an...Preclinical evaluation of plant alkaloid sanguinarine against prostate cancer development in a nude mice xenograft model. Proc Amer Assoc Cancer

  9. Regulation of the Prostate Cancer Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    epithelium , stroma, as well as immune system, and the fixed nature of the prostate model with expression of the large T antigen, which may have...prostate cancer glandular architecture formed (Figure 10). Figure 10. Subcutanous TRAMP Model to Recapitulate Prostate Cancer. TRAMP C2 cells...specifically modulate the TLR signaling pathway in prostate epithelium , stroma, and immune system. To parse out the role of TLR signaling in

  10. On-line Adaptive Radiation Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Angels, CA, 2007 5. D. Schulze, T. Zhang, et al, “ Dosimetric Comparison of Various Online Adaptive Prostate Cancer Treatment Techniques ”, Los...is to develop an online adaptive treatment technique for prostate cancer treatments . During the first year, we have developed parallel deformable...1 The new system design for online imaging: Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT): (a) mounted on radiotherapy treatment machine, (b) diagram

  11. Transurethral light delivery for prostate photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Photoacoustic imaging has broad clinical potential to enhance prostate cancer detection and treatment, yet it is challenged by the lack of minimally invasive, deeply penetrating light delivery methods that provide sufficient visualization of targets (e.g., tumors, contrast agents, brachytherapy seeds). We constructed a side-firing fiber prototype for transurethral photoacoustic imaging of prostates with a dual-array (linear and curvilinear) transrectal ultrasound probe. A method to calculate the surface area and, thereby, estimate the laser fluence at this fiber tip was derived, validated, applied to various design parameters, and used as an input to three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations. Brachytherapy seeds implanted in phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo canine prostates at radial distances of 5 to 30 mm from the urethra were imaged with the fiber prototype transmitting 1064 nm wavelength light with 2 to 8 mJ pulse energy. Prebeamformed images were displayed in real time at a rate of 3 to 5 frames per second to guide fiber placement and beamformed offline. A conventional delay-and-sum beamformer provided decreasing seed contrast (23 to 9 dB) with increasing urethra-to-target distance, while the short-lag spatial coherence beamformer provided improved and relatively constant seed contrast (28 to 32 dB) regardless of distance, thus improving multitarget visualization in single and combined curvilinear images acquired with the fiber rotating and the probe fixed. The proposed light delivery and beamforming methods promise to improve key prostate cancer detection and treatment strategies. PMID:25734406

  12. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    setting of cancer. Current efforts are focused on selecting RNA aptamers to receptors expressed on the surface of target cells with...institutions. A major project in the lab is targeted therapy of prostate cancer using PSMA-guided aptamers . Prabhat Goswami, PhD; Professor...participate. The Schultz lab also works to identify key cell-surface receptor residues as targets for novel peptide- and aptamer -based receptor

  13. Targeting prostate cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Crea, Francesco; Mathews, Lesley A; Farrar, William L; Hurt, Elaine M

    2009-12-01

    Cancer stem cells are the sub-population of cells present within tumors responsible for tumorigenesis. These cells have unique biological properties including self-renewal and the ability to differentiate. Furthermore, it is thought that these cells are more resistant to conventional chemotherapy and, as a result, are responsible for patient relapse. We will discuss the identification of prostate cancer stem cells, their unique properties and how these cells may be targeted for more efficacious therapies.

  14. Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    effective marker for diagnosis and detection of prostate cancer. Low concentrations of PSA would be detected using acoustic wave sensors because of...associated electrical field. For biological sensors, binding of a substance onto the resonating membrane surface causes a decrease in the acoustic...of diverse conditions and diseases including those that affect the thyroid, HIV, diabetes , pregnancy, and several types of cancer. In clinical

  15. Progress Against Prostate Cancer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Progress Against Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Click ... This can narrow the urethra, decreasing urine flow. Prostate cancer is made up of cells the body does ...

  16. Intensity Modulated Radiation Treatment of Prostate Cancer Guided by High Field MR Spectroscopic Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    and demonstrate the feasibility of concurrent dose escalation to intraprostatic lesion(s) through a set of phantom studies and at least two previously...TPS) method 12" 3 to deal with the registration of endorectal MRI/MRSI and verified the accuracy of the registration by phantom and patient studies...hypothetical phantom case and a prostate case and comparison of the results with that obtained using conventional inverse planning technique with structure

  17. Specific PET Imaging Probes for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer Metastases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    MALDI - TOF mass spectrometry (see Supplementary information). Benzyl-2- acetamido-2-deoxy-a-D-galactopyranoside (BG), Swainsonine (SW) and Clostridium...by HPLC and MALDI - TOF mass spectrometry (see Supplementary information). Benzyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-a-D-galactopyranoside (BG), swainsonine (SW) and...that the involvement of Rho protein in the uptake of R11 peptide by prostate cells may be minimal. GAGs and anionic polymers have been shown to affect

  18. Development of PCSA-Targeted Minibodies for Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    is still far from being useful due to reports of variable sensitivities and specificities [3, 4]. In addition, molecular targeted therapy of...tumor localization, phenotyping, and response to therapy . To this end, we have generated humanized antibody to prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a...fragments (year 1). A knock-in mouse model was successfully generated, in which the human (h) PSCA cDNA substituted for the murine PSCA gene . The

  19. Dose-Volume Differences for Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Segmentation and Planning for Proton Prostate Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, Anamaria R.; Vargas, Carlos E. Falchook, Aaron; Louis, Debbie C.; Olivier, Kenneth; Keole, Sameer; Yeung, Daniel; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Li Zuofeng

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI)-vs. computed-tomography (CT)-based prostate and normal structure delineation on the dose to the target and organs at risk during proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients were simulated in the supine position using both CT and T2 MRI. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were delineated on both imaging modalities. The planning target volume (PTV) was generated from the delineated prostates with a 5-mm axial and 8-mm superior and inferior margin. Two plans were generated and analyzed for each patient: an MRI plan based on the MRI-delineated PTV, and a CT plan based on the CT-delineated PTV. Doses of 78 Gy equivalents (GE) were prescribed to the PTV. Results: Doses to normal structures were lower when MRI was used to delineate the rectum and bladder compared with CT: bladder V50 was 15.3% lower (p = 0.04), and rectum V50 was 23.9% lower (p = 0.003). Poor agreement on the definition of the prostate apex was seen between CT and MRI (p = 0.007). The CT-defined prostate apex was within 2 mm of the apex on MRI only 35.7% of the time. Coverage of the MRI-delineated PTV was significantly decreased with the CT-based plan: the minimum dose to the PTV was reduced by 43% (p < 0.001), and the PTV V99% was reduced by 11% (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Using MRI to delineate the prostate results in more accurate target definition and a smaller target volume compared with CT, allowing for improved target coverage and decreased doses to critical normal structures.

  20. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging for Prostate Pathology Practice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    status of biopsied tissue forms the definitive diagnosis for prostate cancer and constitutes an important cornerstone of therapy and prognosis.4...106-130 (2006). 2 SM Gilbert, CB Cavallo, H Kahane, FC Lowe Evidence suggesting PSA cutpoint of 2.5 ng/mL for prompting prostate biopsy: Review of...provides critical input for therapy . In particular, prostate cancer accounts for one third of noncutaneous cancers diagnosed in US men. Hence, it is

  1. Molecular Innovations Toward Theranostics of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    to develop dendrimer -based theranostic agent with prostate cancer specificity and positron emission tomography imaging capability that can prevent...laboratories to develop a new molecular medicine. The goal of this project is to construct dendrimer nanoconjuate containing a prostate specific...cell permeation peptide, peptide therapeutic(s) and bifunctional chelator for PET imaging. Dr. Simanek’s laboratory will make dendrimers that bear

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Prostate Multiparametric MR Images for Detection of Aggressive Prostate Cancer in the Peripheral Zone: A Multiple Imager Study.

    PubMed

    Hoang Dinh, Au; Melodelima, Christelle; Souchon, Rémi; Lehaire, Jérôme; Bratan, Flavie; Mège-Lechevallier, Florence; Ruffion, Alain; Crouzet, Sébastien; Colombel, Marc; Rouvière, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To assess the intermanufacturer variability of quantitative models in discriminating cancers with a Gleason score of at least 7 among peripheral zone (PZ) lesions seen at 3-T multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods An institutional review board-approved prospective database of 257 patients who gave written consent and underwent T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast material-enhanced imaging before prostatectomy was retrospectively reviewed. It contained outlined lesions found to be suspicious for malignancy by two independent radiologists and classified as malignant or benign after correlation with prostatectomy whole-mount specimens. One hundred six patients who underwent imaging with 3-T MR systems from two manufacturers were selected (data set A, n = 72; data set B, n = 34). Eleven parameters were calculated in PZ lesions: normalized T2-weighted signal intensity, skewness and kurtosis of T2-weighted signal intensity, T2 value, wash-in rate, washout rate, time to peak (TTP), mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), 10th percentile of the ADC, and skewness and kurtosis of the histogram of the ADC values. Parameters were selected on the basis of their specificity for a sensitivity of 0.95 in diagnosing cancers with a Gleason score of at least 7, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the models was calculated. Results The model of the 10th percentile of the ADC with TTP yielded the highest AUC in both data sets. In data set A, the AUC was 0.90 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.85, 0.95) or 0.89 (95% CI: 0.82, 0.94) when it was trained in data set A or B, respectively. In data set B, the AUC was 0.84 (95% CI: 0.74, 0.94) or 0.86 (95% CI: 0.76, 0.95) when it was trained in data set A or B, respectively. No third variable added significantly independent information in any data set. Conclusion The model of the 10th percentile of the ADC with TTP yielded accurate results in

  3. Evidence-based guideline recommendations on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of prostate cancer: A Cancer Care Ontario clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Masoom A.; Yao, Xiaomei; Loblaw, Andrew; Finelli, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This clinical guideline focuses on: 1) the use of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) in diagnosing clinically significant prostate cancer (CSPC) in patients with an elevated risk of CSPC and who are biopsy-naïve; and 2) the use of mpMRI in diagnosing CSPC in patients with a persistently elevated risk of having CSPC and who have a negative transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided systematic biopsy. The methods of the Practice Guideline Development Cycle were used. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library (1997‒April 2014), main guideline websites, and relevant annual meeting abstracts (2011‒2014) were searched. Internal and external reviews were conducted. The two main recommendations are: Recommendation 1: In patients with an elevated risk of CSPC (according to prostate-specific antigen [PSA] levels and/or nomograms) who are biopsy-naïve: mpMRI followed by targeted biopsy (biopsy directed at cancer-suspicious foci detected with mpMRI) should not be considered the standard of care.Data from future research studies are essential and should receive high-impact trial funding to determine the value of mpMRI in this clinical context.Recommendation 2: In patients who had a prior negative TRUS-guided systematic biopsy and demonstrate an increasing risk of having CSPC since prior biopsy (e.g., continued rise in PSA and/or change in findings from digital rectal examination): mpMRI followed by targeted biopsy may be considered to help in detecting more CSPC patients compared with repeated TRUS-guided systematic biopsy. PMID:28163805

  4. An imaging-based approach predicts clinical outcomes in prostate cancer through a novel support vector machine classification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Dong; Wang, Jing; Wu, Chen-Jiang; Bao, Mei-Ling; Li, Hai; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Tao, Jun; Shi, Hai-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Preoperatively predict the probability of Prostate cancer (PCa) biochemical recurrence (BCR) is of definite clinical relevance. The purpose of this study was to develop an imaging-based approach in the prediction of 3-years BCR through a novel support vector machine (SVM) classification. We collected clinicopathologic and MR imaging datasets in 205 patients pathologically confirmed PCa after radical prostatectomy. Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to assess the association between MR findings and 3-years BCR, and modeled the imaging variables and follow-up data to predict 3-year PCa BCR using SVM analysis. The performance of SVM was compared with conventional Logistic regression (LR) and D'Amico risk stratification scheme by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) analysis. We found that SVM had significantly higher Az (0.959 vs. 0.886; p = 0.007), sensitivity (93.3% vs. 83.3%; p = 0.025), specificity (91.7% vs. 77.2%; p = 0.009) and accuracy (92.2% vs. 79.0%; p = 0.006) than LR analysis. Performance of popularized D'Amico scheme was effectively improved by adding MRI-derived variables (Az: 0.970 vs. 0.859, p < 0.001; sensitivity: 91.7% vs. 86.7%, p = 0.031; specificity: 94.5% vs. 78.6%, p = 0.001; and accuracy: 93.7% vs. 81.0%, p = 0.007). Additionally, beside pathological Gleason score (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.560, p = 0.008), surgical-T3b (HR = 4.525, p < 0.001) and positive surgical margin (HR = 1.314, p = 0.007), apparent diffusion coefficient (HR = 0.149, p = 0.035) was the only independent imaging predictor of time to PSA failure. Therefore, We concluded that imaging-based approach using SVM was superior to LR analysis in predicting PCa outcome. Adding MR variables improved the performance of D'Amico scheme. PMID:27542201

  5. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of Prostatic Fluids for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    most widely used marker of prostate cancer - and prostate cancer risk. Moreover, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is also strongly associated...Vigneron, D.B., Konety, B., Nelson, S.J., Narayan, P., and Hricak, H. Citrate as in vivo marker to discriminate prostate cancer from benign prostatic hyperplasia and

  6. Interfractional Seminal Vesicle Motion Relative to the Prostate Gland for Image-guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer with/without Androgen Deprivation Therapy: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Waki, Takahiro; Katsui, Kuniaki; Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu; Ogata, Takeshi; Katayama, Norihisa; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kumon, Hiromi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2017-02-01

    We investigated differences in seminal vesicle (SV) length and interfractional SV motion relative to the prostate gland in prostate cancer patients. We compared 32 patients who received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) before radiotherapy with 12 patients receiving radiotherapy alone at Okayama University Hospital in August 2008-July 2011. We examined the right and left SVs' length and motion by computed tomography (CT) to determine the ADT's effects and analyzed 347 CT scans in a multiple linear regression model. The ADT patients' SV length was significantly shorter than the non-ADT patients'. The differences in right and left SV lengths between the ADT and non-ADT patients were 6.8 mm (95% CI 2.0-11.7 mm) and 7.2 mm (95% CI 3.1- 11.3 mm) respectively in an adjusted regression model. SV motion did not differ between the ADT and non- ADT patients in terms of interfractional motion of the SV tips and the SVs' center relative to the prostate gland. The ADT patients had significantly shorter SVs compared to the non-ADT patients, but no difference in SV motion was observed. SV interfractional motion should thus be compensated using the same planning margins, regardless of whether ADT is used.

  7. The 22nd annual prostate cancer foundation scientific retreat report.

    PubMed

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Simons, Jonathan W; Soule, Howard R

    2016-09-01

    The 22nd Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) Scientific Retreat was convened in Washington, D.C. from October 8 to 10, 2015. This event is the foremost scientific conference in the world focusing on basic, translational, and clinical prostate cancer research with the highest potential for accelerating the understanding of prostate cancer biology and improving the lives and outcomes of prostate cancer patients. Topics highlighted during the 2015 Retreat included: (i) new strategies and treatments for localized high-risk, hormone-naïve, oligometastatic, castrate-resistant, and treatment-refractory prostate cancer settings; (ii) the biology and genomics of tumor heterogeneity and tumor evolution; (iii) new understandings on the mechanisms and targeting of oncogenic drivers of prostate cancer; (iv) bioengineering of novel therapies and drug delivery methods; (v) innovative approaches to tumor immunotherapy; (vi) emerging molecular imaging technologies with improved sensitivity and specificity; and (vii) advancements in prognostic and predictive biomarkers and precision medicine strategies. Prostate 76:1037-1052, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Sodium Iodide Symporter Gene Transfer for Imaging and Ablation of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    MMTV-c-myc X MMTV-v-Ha-ras’ 45 3 0 (0) 0 0 N/A DMBA + pituitary isograft only’ 41 5 0 (0) 0 0 N/A PM, Plasma membrane; C, cytoplasm; N/A, not applicable...carcinogen and implantation of pituitary isograft . Prostate steroid binding protein C3 (1) promoter driving SV40 large T antigen gene. d p53 null...mammary explants implanted in wild-type mice treated with DMBA and pituitary isograft . ’Whey acidic protein promoter driving IGF gene. fBitransgenic mice

  9. [Prostate cancer brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Pommier, P; Guérif, S; Peiffert, D; Créhange, G; Hannoun-Lévi, J-M; de Crevoisier, R

    2016-09-01

    Prostate brachytherapy techniques are described, concerning both Iodine 125 high dose rate brachytherapy. The following parts are presented: brachytherapy indications, technical description, immediate postoperative management and post-treatment evaluation, and 4 to 6 weeks as well as long-term follow-up.

  10. Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0226 TITLE: Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Rafael Fridman...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0226 Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15...DDRs in prostate cancer . During the first funding period, we conducted immunohistochemical studies by staining a 200 case Grade/Stage tissue

  11. Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    therapy for drug resistant prostate cancer cells. In addition the findings from this study can be extended to the combinatorial therapy involving...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0571 TITLE: “Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer ...29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0571 5b

  12. Prostate Cancer Presenting with Parietal Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Pare, Abdoul Karim; Abubakar, Babagana Mustapha; Kabore, Moussa

    2017-01-01

    Bone metastases from prostate cancer are very common. They are usually located on the axial skeleton. However, cranial bone metastases especially to the parietal bone are rare. We report a case of metastatic prostate cancer presenting with left parietal bone metastasis in a patient with no urological symptoms or signs. We should consider prostate cancer in any man above 60 years presenting unusual bone lesions.

  13. Prostate Cancer Disparities in an Incarcerated Community

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Florida Department of Corrections (FDOC) as a model for elucidating the genetic, epigenetic , and socio-environmental etiologies of prostate cancer . 9 | P...TITLE: Prostate Cancer Disparities in an Incarcerated Community PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Meghan E. Borysova, Ph.D...1 Sep 2011 - 31 Aug 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prostate Cancer Disparities in an Incarcerated Community 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  14. The Infectious Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    al. Plasma antibodies against Trichomonas vaginalis and subsequent risk of prostate cancer. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention 2006;15...infectious agents with respect to prostate cancer: T vaginalis , the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection, and the recently identified...To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis in prostate carcinogenesis and progression. The current study is nested within the

  15. Roles of Eicosanoids in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nithipatikom, Kasem; Campbell, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Eicosanoids, the metabolites of arachidonic acid, have diverse functions in the regulation of cancer including prostate cancer. This review will provide an overview of the roles of eicosanoids and endocannabinoids and their potential as therapeutic targets for prostate cancer treatment. PMID:24563660

  16. Radiation Induced Immune Response in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    trials of antibodies to TIP-1 in patients receiving radiotherapy for radiation. Publications, Abstracts, and Presentations none Inventions...therapy. Because radiotherapy is a primary mode of treatment of both localized prostate cancer and metastatic prostate cancer. These antigens are...antigens that are specifically over- expressed in cancer resulting in too few molecular targets and small percentages of patients who can be treated

  17. Vitamin D, Sunlight and Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Donkena, Krishna Vanaja; Young, Charles Y. F.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second common cancer in men worldwide. The prevention of prostate cancer remains a challenge to researchers and clinicians. Here, we review the relationship of vitamin D and sunlight to prostate cancer risk. Ultraviolet radiation of the sunlight is the main stimulator for vitamin D production in humans. Vitamin D's antiprostate cancer activities may be involved in the actions through the pathways mediated by vitamin D metabolites, vitamin D metabolizing enzymes, vitamin D receptor (VDR), and VDR-regulated genes. Although laboratory studies including the use of animal models have shown that vitamin D has antiprostate cancer properties, whether it can effectively prevent the development and/or progression of prostate cancer in humans remains to be inconclusive and an intensively studied subject. This review will provide up-to-date information regarding the recent outcomes of laboratory and epidemiology studies on the effects of vitamin D on prostate cancer prevention. PMID:21991434

  18. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) from diagnostic to therapeutic target: radionuclide therapy comes of age in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Violet, John A; Hofman, Michael S

    2017-04-05

    Without doubt, molecular imaging using PET/CT directed against prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) has generated much interest for its impressive accuracy in detecting prostate cancer, particularly for biochemical recurrence[1]. PSMA expression is up regulated in advanced prostate cancer, including metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), and provides a novel therapeutic target for radionuclide therapy directed towards PSMA-avid disease. Radionuclide therapy relies on the identification of a suitable tumour associated 'target' and an appropriate 'vehicle' that can bind to this with high selectivity and specificity to allow delivery of a therapeutic radionuclide. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Specific PET Imaging Probes for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer Metastases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    cancer: H1299 and A549; kidney cancer: SW839 and A-498; bladder cancer: T24 and 253J; and Liver cancer: HepG2). A group of 2 animals will be used...animal models All the cell lines used in this work (A549, H1299 , HepG2, A498, RFV, T-24, H2009, PC3, and PC3-KD) were obtained from the American Type...models, A549 (1 × 106 cells per site), H1299 (1 × 106 cells per site), HepG2 (3 × 106 cells per site, 50% matrigel), A498 (1.5 × 106 cells per site

  20. Characterization of aggressive prostate cancer using ultrasound RF time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khojaste, Amir; Imani, Farhad; Moradi, Mehdi; Berman, David; Siemens, D. Robert; Sauerberi, Eric E.; Boag, Alexander H.; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Mousavi, Parvin

    2015-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalently diagnosed and the second cause of cancer-related death in North American men. Several approaches have been proposed to augment detection of prostate cancer using different imaging modalities. Due to advantages of ultrasound imaging, these approaches have been the subject of several recent studies. This paper presents the results of a feasibility study on differentiating between lower and higher grade prostate cancer using ultrasound RF time series data. We also propose new spectral features of RF time series to highlight aggressive prostate cancer in small ROIs of size 1 mm × 1 mm in a cohort of 19 ex vivo specimens of human prostate tissue. In leave-one-patient-out cross-validation strategy, an area under accumulated ROC curve of 0.8 has been achieved with overall sensitivity and specificity of 81% and 80%, respectively. The current method shows promising results on differentiating between lower and higher grade of prostate cancer using ultrasound RF time series.

  1. Bone Matrix Osteonectin Limits Prostate Cancer Cell Growth and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kapinas, Kristina; Lowther, Katie M.; Kessler, Catherine B.; Tilbury, Karissa; Lieberman, Jay R.; Tirnauer, Jennifer S.; Campagnola, Paul; Delany, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable interest in understanding prostate cancer metastasis to bone and the interaction of these cells with the bone microenvironment. Osteonectin/SPARC/BM-40 is a collagen binding matricellular protein that is enriched in bone. Its expression is increased in prostate cancer metastases, and it stimulates the migration of prostate carcinoma cells. However, the presence of osteonectin in cancer cells and the stroma may limit prostate tumor development and progression. To determine how bone matrix osteonectin affects the behavior of prostate cancer cells, we modeled prostate cancer cell-bone interactions using the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3, and mineralized matrices synthesized by wild type and osteonectin-null osteoblasts in vitro. We developed this in vitro system because the structural complexity of collagen matrices in vivo is not mimicked by reconstituted collagen scaffolds or by more complex substrates, like basement membrane extracts. Second harmonic generation imaging demonstrated that the wild type matrices had thick collagen fibers organized into longitudinal bundles, whereas osteonectin-null matrices had thinner fibers in random networks. Importantly, a mouse model of prostate cancer metastases to bone showed a collagen fiber phenotype similar to the wild type matrix synthesized in vitro. When PC-3 cells were grown on the wild type matrices, they displayed decreased cell proliferation, increased cell spreading, and decreased resistance to radiation-induced cell death, compared to cells grown on osteonectin-null matrix. Our data support the idea that osteonectin can suppress prostate cancer pathogenesis, expanding this concept to the microenvironment of skeletal metastases. PMID:22525512

  2. The Infectious Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    progression; 2-) To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis in prostate carcinogenesis and progression. The current study is...understanding of the infectious pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Aim II. To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis in prostate

  3. Microsatellite instability in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, A.L.; Wick, M.J.; Persons, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellite instability (MIN) has been documented in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) as well as in sporadic forms of human cancers. Two of the genes which appear to be responsible for this particular tumor phenotype, hMSH2 and hMLH1, have now been identified. To determine the potential role of these mutator genes in prostate cancer, we have examined 95 prostate adenocarcinomas (40 paraffin embedded and 55 fresh frozen) for the presence of genetic instability at four microsatellite markers. The markers are localized to chromosome arms 5q(APC-CA1), 8p(Mfd 210Z), 15q(635/636), and 17q(p53-CA). Patients from whom paraffin embedded material was obtained were divided into short term (<3 years, n=18), and long term (>3 years, n=22) survivors. Of the 95 tumors examined, only four tumors (4%) demonstrated MIN: two tumors demonstrated MIN at 3 loci (p53-CA, APC-CA1, 635/636), one tumor demonstrated MIN at 2 loci (APC-CA1 and 635/636), and one tumor demonstrated instability at 635/636 only. All tumors exhibiting MIN had Gleason scores of {ge} 4+4. A correlation between MIN and survival was not observed. Information on family history was limited. However, of the two patients demonstrating MIN at three loci, one patient was diagnosed with a second malignancy (TCC of the ureter), but otherwise had a negative family history, while the second patient had one first degree relative with esophageal cancer. The patient demonstrating MIN at two loci had a negative family history, while the remaining patient had two first degree relatives with cancer (prostate and stomach). These results suggest that hMSH2 and hMLH1 (as reflected by the small percentage of tumors displaying MIN) do not play a prominent role in the process of prostate tumorigenesis.

  4. Preclinical Evaluation and First Patient Application of 99mTc-PSMA-I&S for SPECT Imaging and Radioguided Surgery in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Robu, Stephanie; Schottelius, Margret; Eiber, Matthias; Maurer, Tobias; Gschwend, Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Wester, Hans-Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    Initial studies in patients have demonstrated the suitability of (111)In-PSMA-I&T ((111)In-DOTAGA-(3-iodo-y)-f-k-Sub(KuE)) (PSMA is prostate-specific membrane antigen and I&T is imaging and therapy) for radioguided surgery (RGS) of small metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) soft-tissue lesions. To meet the clinical need for a more cost-effective alternative, the PSMA-I&T-based tracer concept was adapted to (99m)Tc-labeling chemistry. Two PSMA-I&T-derived inhibitors with all-L-serine- (MAS3) and all-D-serine- (mas3) chelating moieties were evaluated in parallel, and a kit procedure for routine (99m)Tc labeling was developed.

  5. PET/CT and radiotherapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    De Jong, I J; De Haan, T D; Wiegman, E M; Van Den Bergh, A C M; Pruim, J; Breeuwsma, A J

    2010-10-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the corner stone treatments for patients with prostate cancer. Especially for locally advanced tumors radiotherapy +/- adjuvant androgen deprivation treatment is standard of care. This brings up the need for accurate assessment of extra prostatic tumor growth and/or the presence of nodal metastases for selection of the optimal radiation dose and treatment volume. Morphological imaging like transrectal ultra sound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are routinely used but are limited in their accuracy in detecting extra prostatic extension and nodal metastases. In this article we present a structured review of the literature on positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and radiotherapy in prostate cancer patients with emphasis on: 1) the pretreatment assessment of extra prostatic tumor extension, nodal and distant metastases; 2) the intraprostatic tumor characterization and radiotherapy treatment planning; and 3) treatment evaluation and the use of PET/CT in guidance of salvage treatment. PET/CT is not an appropriate imaging technique for accurate T-staging of prostate cancer prior to radiotherapy. Although macroscopic disease beyond the prostatic capsule and into the periprostatic fat or in seminal vesicle is often accurately detected, the microscopic extension of prostate cancer remains undetected. Choline PET/CT holds a great potential as a single step diagnostic procedure of lymph nodes and skeleton, which could facilitate radiotherapy treatment planning. At present the use of PET/CT for treatment planning in radiotherapy is still experimental. Choline PET based tumor delineation is not yet standardized and different segmentation-algorithms are under study. However, dose escalation using dose-painting is feasible with only limited increases of the doses to the bladder and rectum wall. PET/CT using either acetate or choline is able to detect recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy but stratification of patients

  6. Simulated prostate biopsy: prostate cancer distribution and clinical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Dean, Robert; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-04-01

    Our group has recently obtained data based upon whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens using a 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator that suggests an increased detection rate is possible using laterally placed biopsies. A new 10-core biopsy pattern was demonstrated to be superior to the traditional sextant biopsy. This patter includes the traditional sextant biopsy cores and four laterally placed biopsies in the right and left apex and mid portion of the prostate gland. The objective of this study is to confirm the higher prostate cancer defection rate obtained using our simulated 10-core biopsy pattern in a small clinical trial. We retrospectively reviewed 35 consecutive patients with a pathologic diagnosis of prostate cancer biopsied by a single urologist using the 10-core prostate biopsy patterns were compared with respect to prostate cancer detection rate. Of the 35 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, 54.3 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent of patients were diagnosed solely with the laterally placed biopsies. Our results suggest that biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon a five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern.

  7. Mitochondria, prostate cancer, and biopsy sampling error.

    PubMed

    Parr, Ryan L; Mills, John; Harbottle, Andrew; Creed, Jennifer M; Crewdson, Gregory; Reguly, Brian; Guimont, François S

    2013-04-01

    Mitochondria and their associated genome are emerging as sophisticated indicators of prostate cancer biology. Alterations in the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome) have been implicated in cell proliferation, metastatic behavior, androgen independence, as a signal for apoptosis, and as a predictor of biochemical recurrence. Somatic mutation patterns in complete mtgenomes are associated with prostate specific antigen levels (PSA) in prostate cancer patients and a large-scale mtgenome deletion (3.4 kb) is consistent with a prostate "cancerization" field effect. This review will focus on the biological characteristics of mitochondria and their direct clinical application to prostate cancer. Mitochondrial science is currently influencing clinical prostate cancer diagnostics and the rapid progress in this area indicates future, break-through contributions in the general field of oncology.

  8. WITHDRAWN: Can the conventional sextant prostate biopsy reliably diagnose unilateral prostate cancer in low-risk, localized, prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Mayes, J M; Mouraviev, V; Sun, L; Madden, J F; Polascik, T J

    2008-05-13

    The authors hereby retract the e-publication dated 13 May 2008 and entitled, 'Can the conventional sextant prostate biopsy reliably diagnose unilateral prostate cancer in low-risk, localized, prostate cancer?' The authors are submitting a revised version with the same title. This article's statistics were performed for predicting bilateral prostate cancer outcomes. The article was written to help predict unilateral prostate cancer. Although the statistical numbers are correct, they are backwards. We apologize that the statistics indicate a contrary outcome (eg predicting bilateral cancer instead of unilateral disease).

  9. Fast cine-magnetic resonance imaging point tracking for prostate cancer radiation therapy planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, J.; Dang, K.; Fox, Chris D.; Chandra, S.; Gill, Suki; Kron, T.; Pham, D.; Foroudi, F.

    2014-03-01

    The analysis of intra-fraction organ motion is important for improving the precision of radiation therapy treatment delivery. One method to quantify this motion is for one or more observers to manually identify anatomic points of interest (POIs) on each slice of a cine-MRI sequence. However this is labour intensive and inter- and intra- observer variation can introduce uncertainty. In this paper a fast method for non-rigid registration based point tracking in cine-MRI sagittal and coronal series is described which identifies POIs in 0.98 seconds per sagittal slice and 1.35 seconds per coronal slice. The manual and automatic points were highly correlated (r>0.99, p<0.001) for all organs and the difference generally less than 1mm. For prostate planning peristalsis and rectal gas can result in unpredictable out of plane motion, suggesting the results may require manual verification.

  10. Olaparib With or Without Cediranib in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Castration-Resistant Prostate Carcinoma; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma With Focal Neuroendocrine Differentiation; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Prostate Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Adenocarcinoma

  11. Functional Angiogenic Mediators in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    FUNDING NUMBERS Functional Angiogenic Mediators in Prostate Cancer DAMD17-99- 1 -9521 6. AUTHOR(S) Jennifer A. Doll, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME...transition in the prostate by 1 ) identifying the key angiogenic mediators , 2) investigating the clinical significance of mediator levels in prostatic fluid...our proposal, we set out to 1 ) identify such mediators in the prostate, 2) assess the clinical usefulness of measuring angiogenic mediator levels in

  12. [Medical treatment of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Lobel, B; Cipolla, B; Labrador, J

    1994-03-01

    Hormone dependence of prostate cancer is well known. In 80% of cases with metastases, hormone suppression leads to the reduction of tumour volume and related disorders. However the treatment is generally palliative because malignant process recurs after about around 16 months. Mean survival is less than 3 years in these forms. Lack of response come always together with a poor prognosis, and there is 90% mortality at 2 years. Advanced prostatic cancer should not be treated with hormones if the patient has few symptoms and his quality of life is satisfactory. Symptomatic forms require hormone manipulation. Orchidectomy or LH-RH are recommended. Total androgen ablation (combined treatment) leads rapidly to more relief of symptoms, but its drawbacks and especially high cost indicate that its use should be weighed individually. Estramustine is not a first-lune treatment. Presently, there is no criteria to predict response to treatment.

  13. Development of Targeted Nanobubbles for Ultrasound Imaging and Ablation of Metastatic Prostate Cancer Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    upon incubation with BSA for 24 hours at 37ºC, which prove their promise for cancer cell ablation and warrant their future testing in vivo. All...concentration upon incubation with BSA for 24 hours at 37ºC, which prove their promise for cancer cell ablation and warrant their future testing in vivo...hours at 37ºC, which prove their promise for cancer cell ablation and warrant their future testing in vivo. 14 6. References [1] a) M

  14. Current Status of Cryotherapy for Prostate and Kidney Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seok

    2014-01-01

    In terms of treating diseases, minimally invasive treatment has become a key element in reducing perioperative complications. Among the various minimally invasive treatments, cryotherapy is often used in urology to treat various types of cancers, especially prostate cancer and renal cancer. In prostate cancer, the increased incidence of low-risk, localized prostate cancer has made minimally invasive treatment modalities an attractive option. Focal cryotherapy for localized unilateral disease offers the added benefit of minimal morbidities. In renal cancer, owing to the increasing utilization of cross-sectional imaging, nearly 70% of newly detected renal masses are stage T1a, making them more susceptible to minimally invasive nephron-sparing therapies including laparoscopic and robotic partial nephrectomy and ablative therapies. This article reviews the various outcomes of cryotherapy compared with other treatments and the possible uses of cryotherapy in surgery. PMID:25512811

  15. A meta-classifier for detecting prostate cancer by quantitative integration of in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanath, Satish; Tiwari, Pallavi; Rosen, Mark; Madabhushi, Anant

    2008-03-01

    Recently, in vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) have emerged as promising new modalities to aid in prostate cancer (CaP) detection. MRI provides anatomic and structural information of the prostate while MRS provides functional data pertaining to biochemical concentrations of metabolites such as creatine, choline and citrate. We have previously presented a hierarchical clustering scheme for CaP detection on in vivo prostate MRS and have recently developed a computer-aided method for CaP detection on in vivo prostate MRI. In this paper we present a novel scheme to develop a meta-classifier to detect CaP in vivo via quantitative integration of multimodal prostate MRS and MRI by use of non-linear dimensionality reduction (NLDR) methods including spectral clustering and locally linear embedding (LLE). Quantitative integration of multimodal image data (MRI and PET) involves the concatenation of image intensities following image registration. However multimodal data integration is non-trivial when the individual modalities include spectral and image intensity data. We propose a data combination solution wherein we project the feature spaces (image intensities and spectral data) associated with each of the modalities into a lower dimensional embedding space via NLDR. NLDR methods preserve the relationships between the objects in the original high dimensional space when projecting them into the reduced low dimensional space. Since the original spectral and image intensity data are divorced from their original physical meaning in the reduced dimensional space, data at the same spatial location can be integrated by concatenating the respective embedding vectors. Unsupervised consensus clustering is then used to partition objects into different classes in the combined MRS and MRI embedding space. Quantitative results of our multimodal computer-aided diagnosis scheme on 16 sets of patient data obtained from the ACRIN trial, for which

  16. Nebraska Prostate Cancer Research Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Effect of Metal Ion Chelators on Mannose 6-Phosphate/Insulin-like Growth Factor II Receptor in DU145 Prostate Cancer Cells. UNMC Summer Undergraduate...Lynnette Lefall Date Published: Friday, August 6, 2010 Keidra Bryant – Abstract Effect of Metal Ion Chelators on Mannose 6-Phosphate/Insulin...cleaved at the cell surface by a protease that is inhibited by metal ion chelators. This work was done in a human embryonic kidney cell line. The goal

  17. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    this laboratory concentrates on the area of tumor immunology with an emphasis on immunotherapy. We have constructed microbial vaccines to be used...to the transgene product induced by the vaccine are underway. Additionally, we are carrying our "translational" research in the form of clinical...trials of our adenovirus vaccine in men with prostate cancer. Important in these trials is the safety of the vaccine and its ability to induce anti

  18. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    i mmunology with an emphasis on immunotherapy. We ha ve constructed microbial vaccines to be used for the investigation of gene and immunotherapy... vaccine are underway. Additionally, we are carrying our "translational" research in the fo rm of clinical trials of our adenovirus vaccine in men with...prostate cancer. Important in thes e trials is the safety of the vaccine and its ability to in duce anti-tumor immunity. We have recently completed

  19. Vaccine Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE...growth of androgen-dependent cancer cells, and result in clinical tumor control . After a median time of 2 years, patients progress into a clinical...calculogenesis. Finally, Bischoff and Goerttler (38) used Gelfoam in human prostate therapeutic embolization with success. Our laboratory, in collaboration

  20. Protease Profiling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    acid synthase, which contains a serine hydrolase domain. We identified a lead inhibitor of this domain of fatty acid synthase, called Orlistat, which...SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Prostate cancer, tumor biology, protease, proteomics, transgenic, 20 animal model, fatty acid synthase, orlistat 16...the enzymes we identified is fatty acid synthase. Fatty acid synthase is the sole enzyme responsible for the cellular synthesis of fatty acids . This

  1. PROSTATE SPECIFIC MEMBRANE ANTIGEN-BASED IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Joseph R.; Akhtar, Naveed H.; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Anand, Alok; Deh, Kofi; Tagawa, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy affecting men in North America. Despite significant efforts, conventional imaging of PC does not contribute to patient management as much as imaging performed for other common cancers. Given the lack of specificity in conventional imaging techniques, one possible solution is to screen for PC specific antigenic targets and generate agents able to specifically bind. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is over-expressed in PC tissue, with low levels of expression in the small intestine, renal tubular cells and salivary gland. The first clinical agent for targeting PSMA was 111In-capromab, involving an antibody recognizing the internal domain of PSMA. The second- and third-generation humanized PSMA binding antibodies have the potential to overcome some of the limitations inherent to capromab pendetide i.e. inability to bind to live PC cells. One example is the humanized monoclonal antibody J591 (Hu mAb J591) that was developed primarily for therapeutic purposes but also has interesting imaging characteristics including the identification of bone metastases in PC. The major disadvantage of use of mAb for imaging is slow target recognition and background clearance in an appropriate timeframe for diagnostic imaging. Urea-based compounds such as small molecule inhibitors may also present promising agents for PC imaging with SPECT and PET. Two such small-molecule inhibitors targeting PSMA, MIP-1072 and MIP-1095, have exhibited high affinity for PSMA. The uptake of 123I-MIP-1072 and 123I-MIP-1095 in PC xenografts have imaged successfully with favorable properties amenable to human trials. While advances in conventional imaging will continue, Ab and small molecule imaging exemplified by PSMA targeting have the greatest potential to improve diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. PMID:22658884

  2. Utility of ADC measurement on diffusion-weighted MRI in differentiation of prostate cancer, normal prostate and prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Esen, Meltem; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Akpolat, Nusret; Orhan, Irfan; Kocakoc, Ercan

    2013-08-01

    To determine the utility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in differentiation of prostate cancer from normal prostate parenchyma and prostatitis we obtained ADC values of 50 patients at b 100, 600 and 1,000 s/mm(2) diffusion gradients. The ADC values of prostate cancer group were significantly lower than normal prostate and prostatitis group at b 600 and 1,000 s/mm(2) gradients. The ADC values at high diffusion gradients may be used in differentiation prostate cancer from normal prostate and prostatitis.

  3. Utility of Ultrasound in the Diagnosis, Treatment, and Follow-up of Prostate Cancer: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Chen, Frank K; de Castro Abreu, Andre Luis; Palmer, Suzanne L

    2016-10-01

    Prostate cancer screening currently consists of serum prostate-specific antigen and digital rectal examination, followed by transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy for diagnostic confirmation. Although the current paradigm of prostate cancer screening has led to a decrease in advanced disease and cancer-related mortality, these techniques have limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity, resulting in missed cancers that are clinically significant and the overdetection of clinically insignificant cancers. New imaging techniques and technologies are required to improve the detection of prostate cancer. This article summarizes the use of novel ultrasound techniques and technologies in the detection, biopsy, and treatment of prostate cancer.

  4. DNA Vaccines for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McNeel, Douglas G.; Becker, Jordan T.; Johnson, Laura E.; Olson, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding an antigen of interest has been demonstrated to be an effective means of immunization, capable of eliciting antigen-specific T cells. Plasmid DNA vaccines offer advantages over other anti-tumor vaccine approaches in terms of simplicity, manufacturing, and possibly safety. The primary disadvantage is their poor transfection efficiency and subsequent lower immunogenicity relative to other genetic vaccine approaches. However, multiple preclinical models demonstrate anti-tumor efficacy, and many efforts are underway to improve the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effect of these vaccines. Clinical trials using DNA vaccines as treatments for prostate cancer have begun, and to date have demonstrated safety and immunological effect. This review will focus on DNA vaccines as a specific means of antigen delivery, advantages and disadvantages of this type of immunization, previous experience in preclinical models and human trials specifically conducted for the treatment of prostate cancer, and future directions for the application of DNA vaccines to prostate cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24587772

  5. Difference in the rate of rectal complications following prostate brachytherapy based on the prostate-rectum distance and the prostate longitudinal length among early prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Moon Hyung; Yu, Young Dong; Shin, Hyun Soo; Oh, Jong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the difference in rectal complications rate following prostate low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy based on prostate-rectum distance and prostate longitudinal length among early prostate cancer patients. Materials and Methods From March 2008 to February 2013, 245 prostate cancer patients with a Gleason score ≤7 were treated with 125-I LDR brachytherapy. Among them, 178 patients with prostate volume 20-35 mL and a follow-up period ≥6 months were evaluated for radiation proctitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed for a prebrachytherapy evaluation, and prostate-rectum distance and prostate longitudinal length were measured. The radiation proctitis was confirmed and graded via colonoscopy based on the radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG) toxicity criteria. Results Twenty-three patients received a colonoscopy for proctitis evaluation, and 12 were identified as grade 1 on the RTOG scale. Nine patients were diagnosed as grade 2 and 2 patients were grade 3. No patient developed grade 4 proctitis. The rectal-complication group had a mean prostate-rectum distance of 2.51±0.16 mm, while non-rectal-complication control group had 3.32±0.31 mm. The grade 1 proctitis patients had a mean prostate-rectum distance of 2.80±0.15 mm, which was significantly longer than 2.12±0.31 mm of grades 2 and 3 patient groups (p=0.045). All 11 patients of grades 2 and 3 had a prostate longitudinal length of 35.22±2.50 mm, which was longer than group 1, but the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.214). Conclusions As the prostate-rectum distance increased, fewer postimplantation rectal symptoms were observed. Patients with a shorter prostate-rectum distance in MRI should receive modified implantation techniques or radical prostatectomy. PMID:26366276

  6. Interfraction rotation of the prostate as evaluated by kilovoltage X-ray fiducial marker imaging in intensity-modulated radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Graf, Reinhold; Boehmer, Dirk; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the daily rotation of the prostate during a radiotherapy course using stereoscopic kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imaging and intraprostatic fiducials for localization and positioning correction. From 2005 to 2009, radio-opaque fiducial markers were inserted into 38 patients via perineum into the prostate. The ExacTrac/Novalis Body X-ray 6-day image acquisition system (ET/NB; BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) was used to determine and correct the target position. During the first period in 10 patients we recorded all rotation errors but used only Y (table) for correction. For the next 28 patients we used for correction all rotational coordinates, i.e., in addition Z (superior-inferior [SI] or roll) and X (left-right [LR] or tilt/pitch) according to the fiducial marker position by use of the Robotic Tilt Module and Varian Exact Couch. Rotation correction was applied above a threshold of 1° displacement. The systematic and random errors were specified. Overall, 993 software-assisted rotational corrections were performed. The interfraction rotation errors of the prostate as assessed from the radiodense surrogate markers around the three axes Y, Z, and X were on average 0.09, -0.52, and -0.01° with standard deviations of 2.01, 2.30, and 3.95°, respectively. The systematic uncertainty per patient for prostate rotation was estimated with 2.30, 1.56, and 4.13° and the mean random components with 1.81, 2.02, and 3.09°. The largest rotational errors occurred around the X-axis (pitch), but without preferring a certain orientation. Although the error around Z (roll) can be compensated on average by a transformation with 4 coordinates, a significant error around X remains and advocates the full correction with 6 coordinates. Rotational errors as assessed via daily stereoscopic online imaging are significant and dominate around X. Rotation possibly degrades the dosimetric coverage of the target volume and may require suitable strategies for correction.

  7. Interfraction rotation of the prostate as evaluated by kilovoltage X-ray fiducial marker imaging in intensity-modulated radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Reinhold; Boehmer, Dirk; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the daily rotation of the prostate during a radiotherapy course using stereoscopic kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imaging and intraprostatic fiducials for localization and positioning correction. From 2005 to 2009, radio-opaque fiducial markers were inserted into 38 patients via perineum into the prostate. The ExacTrac/Novalis Body X-ray 6-day image acquisition system (ET/NB; BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) was used to determine and correct the target position. During the first period in 10 patients we recorded all rotation errors but used only Y (table) for correction. For the next 28 patients we used for correction all rotational coordinates, i.e., in addition Z (superior-inferior [SI] or roll) and X (left-right [LR] or tilt/pitch) according to the fiducial marker position by use of the Robotic Tilt Module and Varian Exact Couch. Rotation correction was applied above a threshold of 1 Degree-Sign displacement. The systematic and random errors were specified. Overall, 993 software-assisted rotational corrections were performed. The interfraction rotation errors of the prostate as assessed from the radiodense surrogate markers around the three axes Y, Z, and X were on average 0.09, -0.52, and -0.01 Degree-Sign with standard deviations of 2.01, 2.30, and 3.95 Degree-Sign , respectively. The systematic uncertainty per patient for prostate rotation was estimated with 2.30, 1.56, and 4.13 Degree-Sign and the mean random components with 1.81, 2.02, and 3.09 Degree-Sign . The largest rotational errors occurred around the X-axis (pitch), but without preferring a certain orientation. Although the error around Z (roll) can be compensated on average by a transformation with 4 coordinates, a significant error around X remains and advocates the full correction with 6 coordinates. Rotational errors as assessed via daily stereoscopic online imaging are significant and dominate around X. Rotation possibly degrades the dosimetric coverage of the target volume and may require

  8. Arachidonic acid metabolism in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    YANG, PEIYING; CARTWRIGHT, CARRIE A.; LI, JIN; WEN, SIJIN; PROKHOROVA, INA N.; SHUREIQI, IMAD; TRONCOSO, PATRICIA; NAVONE, NORA M.; NEWMAN, ROBERT A.; KIM, JERI

    2012-01-01

    The arachidonic acid pathway is important in the development and progression of numerous malignant diseases, including prostate cancer. To more fully evaluate the role of individual cyclooxygenases (COXs), lipoxygenases (LOXs) and their metabolites in prostate cancer, we measured mRNA and protein levels of COXs and LOXs and their arachidonate metabolites in androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (PC-3 and DU145) prostate cancer cell lines, bone metastasis-derived MDA PCa 2a and MDA PCa 2b cell lines and their corresponding xenograft models, as well as core biopsy specimens of primary prostate cancer and nonneoplastic prostate tissue taken ex vivo after prostatectomy. Relatively high levels of COX-2 mRNA and its product PGE2 were observed only in PC-3 cells and their xenografts. By contrast, levels of the exogenous 12-LOX product 12-HETE were consistently higher in MDA PCa 2b and PC-3 cells and their corresponding xenograft tissues than were those in LNCaP cells. More strikingly, the mean endogenous level of 12-HETE was significantly higher in the primary prostate cancers than in the nonneoplastic prostate tissue (0.094 vs. 0.010 ng/mg protein, respectively; p=0.019). Our results suggest that LOX metabolites such as 12-HETE are critical in prostate cancer progression and that the LOX pathway may be a target for treating and preventing prostate cancer. PMID:22895552

  9. Caveolin-1 and prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Yang, Wei; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Caveolin-1 was identified in the 1990s as a marker of aggressive prostate cancer. The caveolin-1 protein localizes to vesicular structures called caveolae and has been shown to bind and regulate many signaling proteins involved in oncogenesis. Caveolin-1 also has lipid binding properties and mediates aspects of cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism and can elicit biological responses in a paracrine manner when secreted. Caveolin-1 is also present in the serum of prostate cancer patients and circulating levels correlate with extent of disease. Current evidence indicates that increased expression of caveolin-1 in prostate adenocarcinoma cells and commensurate downregulation of the protein in prostate stroma, mediate progression to the castration-resistant phase of prostate cancer through diverse pathways. This chapter summarizes the current state of our understanding of the cellular and physiologic mechanisms in which caveolin-1 participates in the evolution of prostate cancer cell phenotypes.

  10. Development of New Treatments for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DiPaola, R. S.; Abate-Shen, C.; Hait, W. N.

    2005-02-01

    The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center (GPCC) was established with the goal of eradicating prostate cancer and improving the lives of men at risk for the disease through research, treatment, education and prevention. GPCC was founded in the memory of Dean Gallo, a beloved New Jersey Congressman who died tragically of prostate cancer diagnosed at an advanced stage. GPCC unites a team of outstanding researchers and clinicians who are committed to high-quality basic research, translation of innovative research to the clinic, exceptional patient care, and improving public education and awareness of prostate cancer. GPCC is a center of excellence of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, which is the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in the state. GPCC efforts are now integrated well as part of our Prostate Program at CINJ, in which Dr. Robert DiPaola and Dr. Cory Abate-Shen are co-leaders. The Prostate Program unites 19 investigators from 10 academic departments who have broad and complementary expertise in prostate cancer research. The overall goal and unifying theme is to elucidate basic mechanisms of prostate growth and oncogenesis, with the ultimate goal of promoting new and effective strategies for the eradication of prostate cancer. Members' wide range of research interests collectively optimize the chances of providing new insights into normal prostate biology and unraveling the molecular pathophysiology of prostate cancer. Cell culture and powerful animal models developed by program members recapitulate the various stages of prostate cancer progression, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinoma, androgen-independence, invasion and metastases. These models promise to further strengthen an already robust program of investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, including studies adopted by national cooperative groups. Efforts to translate laboratory results into clinical studies of early detection and chemoprevention

  11. Prevention and Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cuzick, Jack; Thorat, Mangesh A.; Andriole, Gerald; Brawley, Otis W.; Brown, Powel H.; Culig, Zoran; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Ford, Leslie G.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Holmberg, Lars; Ilic, Dragan; Key, Timothy J.; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lilja, Hans; Marberger, Michael; Meyskens, Frank L.; Minasian, Lori M.; Parker, Chris; Parnes, Howard L.; Perner, Sven; Rittenhouse, Harry; Schalken, Jack; Schmid, Hans-Peter; Schmitz-Dräger, Bernd J.; Schröder, Fritz H.; Stenzl, Arnulf; Tombal, Bertrand; Wilt, Timothy J.; Wolk, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men and the global burden of this disease is rising. Lifestyle modifications like smoking cessation, exercise and weight control offer opportunities to decrease the risk of developing prostate cancer. Early detection of prostate cancer by PSA screening remains controversial; yet, changes in PSA threshold, frequency of screening, and addition of other biomarkers have potential to minimise overdiagnosis associated with PSA screening. Several new biomarkers appear promising in individuals with elevated PSA levels or those diagnosed with prostate cancer, these are likely to guide in separating individuals who can be spared of aggressive treatment from those who need it. Several pharmacological agents like 5α-reductase inhibitors, aspirin etc. have a potential to prevent development of prostate cancer. In this review, we discuss the current evidence and research questions regarding prevention, early detection of prostate cancer and management of men either at high risk of prostate cancer or diagnosed with low-grade prostate cancer. PMID:25281467

  12. Linking Estrogens, Prostatitis and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    provide the first direct evidence linking phy siologic estr ogen up- regulation an d pr ostate ma lignancy via inflammation. Ellem, Stuart J...inflammation and malignancy in the prostate. The identification of estr ogen as a cause of prostatitis, as well as a fac tor in the development of

  13. Genetic variation: effect on prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sissung, Tristan M.; Price, Douglas K.; Del Re, Marzia; Ley, Ariel M.; Giovannetti, Elisa; Danesi, Romano

    2014-01-01

    Summary The crucial role of androgens in the development of prostate cancer is well established. The aim of this review is to examine the role of constitutional (germline) and tumor-specific (somatic) polymorphisms within important regulatory genes of prostate cancer. These include genes encoding enzymes of the androgen biosynthetic pathway, the androgen receptor gene, genes that encode proteins of the signal transduction pathways that may have a role in disease progression and survival, and genes involved in prostate cancer angiogenesis. Characterization of deregulated pathways critical to cancer cell growth have lead to the development of new treatments, including the CYP17 inhibitor abiraterone and clinical trials using novel drugs that are ongoing or recently completed [1]. The pharmacogenetics of the drugs used to treat prostate cancer will also be addressed. This review will define how germline polymorphisms are known affect a multitude of pathways, and therefore phenotypes, in prostate cancer etiology, progression, and treatment. PMID:25199985

  14. Review of selenium and prostate cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Pascal, Mouracade; Wu, Xiao-Hou

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men in the United States. Surgery or radiation are sometimes unsatisfactory treatments because of the complications such as incontinence or erectile dysfunction. Selenium was found to be effective to prevent prostate cancer in the Nutritional Prevention of Cancer Trial (NPC), which motivated two other clinical trials: the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) and a Phase III trial of selenium to prevent prostate cancer in men with high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. However, these two trials failed to confirm the results of the NPC trial and indicated that the selenium may not be preventive of prostate cancer. In this article we review the three clinical trials and discuss some different points which might be potential factors underlying variation in results obtained.

  15. Residual Seminal Vesicle Displacement in Marker-Based Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer and the Impact on Margin Design

    SciTech Connect

    Smitsmans, Monique H.P.; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Catton, Charles N.; Jaffray, David A.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Herk, Marcel van

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to quantify residual interfraction displacement of seminal vesicles (SV) and investigate the efficacy of rotation correction on SV displacement in marker-based prostate image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). We also determined the effect of marker registration on the measured SV displacement and its impact on margin design. Methods and Materials: SV displacement was determined relative to marker registration by using 296 cone beam computed tomography scans of 13 prostate cancer patients with implanted markers. SV were individually registered in the transverse plane, based on gray-value information. The target registration error (TRE) for the SV due to marker registration inaccuracies was estimated. Correlations between prostate gland rotations and SV displacement and between individual SV displacements were determined. Results: The SV registration success rate was 99%. Displacement amounts of both SVs were comparable. Systematic and random residual SV displacements were 1.6 mm and 2.0 mm in the left-right direction, respectively, and 2.8 mm and 3.1 mm in the anteroposterior (AP) direction, respectively. Rotation correction did not reduce residual SV displacement. Prostate gland rotation around the left-right axis correlated with SV AP displacement (R{sup 2} = 42%); a correlation existed between both SVs for AP displacement (R{sup 2} = 62%); considerable correlation existed between random errors of SV displacement and TRE (R{sup 2} = 34%). Conclusions: Considerable residual SV displacement exists in marker-based IGRT. Rotation correction barely reduced SV displacement, rather, a larger SV displacement was shown relative to the prostate gland that was not captured by the marker position. Marker registration error partly explains SV displacement when correcting for rotations. Correcting for rotations, therefore, is not advisable when SV are part of the target volume. Margin design for SVs should take these uncertainties into

  16. Novel concepts for risk stratification in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Patel, Keval M; Gnanapragasam, Vincent J

    2016-12-01

    Since Partin introduced the analysis of prostate-specific antigen, clinical T-stage and Gleason scores to estimate the risk of progression in men with localised prostate cancer, our understanding of factors that modify this risk has changed drastically. There are now multiple risk stratification tools available, including look-up tables, risk stratification/classification analyses, regression-tree analyses, nomograms and artificial neural networks. Concurrently, descriptions of novel biopsy strategies, imaging modalities and biomarkers are frequently published with the aim of improving risk stratification. With an abundance of new information available, incorporating advances into clinical practice can be confusing. This article aims to outline the major novel concepts in prostate cancer risk stratification for men with biopsy confirmed prostate cancer. We will detail which of these novel techniques and tools are likely to be adopted to aid treatment decisions and enable more accurate post-diagnosis, pretreatment risk stratification.

  17. Novel concepts for risk stratification in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Keval M; Gnanapragasam, Vincent J

    2016-01-01

    Since Partin introduced the analysis of prostate-specific antigen, clinical T-stage and Gleason scores to estimate the risk of progression in men with localised prostate cancer, our understanding of factors that modify this risk has changed drastically. There are now multiple risk stratification tools available, including look-up tables, risk stratification/classification analyses, regression-tree analyses, nomograms and artificial neural networks. Concurrently, descriptions of novel biopsy strategies, imaging modalities and biomarkers are frequently published with the aim of improving risk stratification. With an abundance of new information available, incorporating advances into clinical practice can be confusing. This article aims to outline the major novel concepts in prostate cancer risk stratification for men with biopsy confirmed prostate cancer. We will detail which of these novel techniques and tools are likely to be adopted to aid treatment decisions and enable more accurate post-diagnosis, pretreatment risk stratification.

  18. Prognostic factors in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Braeckman, Johan; Michielsen, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    In the nineteenth century the main goal of medicine was predictive: diagnose the disease and achieve a satisfying prognosis of the patient's chances. Today the effort has shifted to cure the disease. Since the twentieth century, the word prognosis has also been used in nonmedical contexts, for example in corporate finance or elections. The most accurate form of prognosis is achieved statistically. Based on different prognostic factors it should be possible to tell patients how they are expected to do after prostate cancer has been diagnosed and how different treatments may change this outcome. A prognosis is a prediction. The word prognosis comes from the Greek word (see text) and means foreknowing. In the nineteenth century this was the main goal of medicine: diagnose the disease and achieve a satisfying prognosis of the patient's chances. Today the effort has shifted towards seeking a cure. Prognostic factors in (prostate) cancer are defined as "variables that can account for some of the heterogeneity associated with the expected course and outcome of a disease". Bailey defined prognosis as "a reasoned forecast concerning the course, pattern, progression, duration, and end of the disease. Prognostic factors are not only essential to understand the natural history and the course of the disease, but also to predict possible different outcomes of different treatments or perhaps no treatment at all. This is extremely important in a disease like prostate cancer where there is clear evidence that a substantial number of cases discovered by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing are unlikely ever to become clinically significant, not to mention mortal. Furthermore, prognostic factors are of paramount importance for correct interpretation of clinical trials and for the construction of future trials. Finally, according to WHO national screening committee criteria for implementing a national screening programme, widely accepted prognostic factors must be defined before

  19. [Second cancer after starting treatment for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Mikata, Noriharu; Imao, Sadao; Fukasawa, Ritu

    2002-08-01

    The subjects for the present study were 270 patients with prostate cancer who underwent initial treatment at our hospital over the 14 years from 1986 to 1999. They were investigated to assess the relationship between their treatment and metachronous tumors. Sixteen patients (5.9%) developed cancer of other organs after starting treatment for prostate cancer. These metachronous tumors included gastric cancer in six patients as well as lung cancer, esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, liver cancer, renal cancer, bladder cancer, skin cancer, leukemia, and mediastinal adenocarcinoma. Treatment for prostate cancer other than surgery included radiotherapy in eight patients, administration of estramustine phosphate sodium in nine patients, and LH-RH analogues in six patients. The chi-square test showed no significant difference in the incidence of metachronous cancer in relation to the presence/absence of these three therapies. The present study therefore ruled out the possible induction of other tumors by treatment for prostate cancer.

  20. Regulation of the Prostate Cancer Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    epithelium , stroma, as well as immune system, and the fixed nature of the prostate model with expression of the large T antigen, which may have limited...cancer glandular architecture formed (Figure 8). Figure 8. Subcutanous TRAMP Model to Recapitulate Prostate Cancer. TRAMP C2 cells with and...model to be able to alter the aggressiveness of the tumor and specifically modulate the TLR signaling pathway in prostate epithelium , stroma, and immune

  1. Immune response to sipuleucel-T in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Thara, Eddie; Dorff, Tanya B; Averia-Suboc, Monica; Luther, Michael; Reed, Mary E; Pinski, Jacek K; Quinn, David I

    2012-04-18

    Historically, chemotherapy has remained the most commonly utilized therapy in patients with metastatic cancers. In prostate cancer, chemotherapy has been reserved for patients whose metastatic disease becomes resistant to first line castration or androgen deprivation. While chemotherapy palliates, decreases serum prostate specific antigen and improves survival, it is associated with significant side effects and is only suitable for approximately 60% of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer. On that basis, exploration of other therapeutic options such as active secondary hormone therapy, bone targeted treatments and immunotherapy are important. Until recently, immunotherapy has had no role in the treatment of solid malignancies aside from renal cancer and melanoma. The FDA-approved autologous cellular immunotherapy sipuleucel-T has demonstrated efficacy in improving overall survival in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer in randomized clinical trials. The proposed mechanism of action is reliant on activating the patients' own antigen presenting cells (APCs) to prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) fused with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and subsequent triggered T-cell response to PAP on the surface of prostate cancer cells in the patients body. Despite significant prolongation of survival in Phase III trials, the challenge to health care providers remains the dissociation between objective changes in serum PSA or on imaging studies after sipleucel-T and survival benefit. On that basis there is an unmet need for markers of outcome and a quest to identify immunologic or clinical surrogates to fill this role. This review focuses on the impact of sipuleucel-T on the immune system, the T and B cells, and their responses to relevant antigens and prostate cancer. Other therapeutic modalities such as chemotherapy, corticosteroids and GM-CSF and host factors can also affect immune response. The optimal timing for

  2. Immune Response to Sipuleucel-T in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thara, Eddie; Dorff, Tanya B.; Averia-Suboc, Monica; Luther, Michael; Reed, Mary E.; Pinski, Jacek K.; Quinn, David I.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, chemotherapy has remained the most commonly utilized therapy in patients with metastatic cancers. In prostate cancer, chemotherapy has been reserved for patients whose metastatic disease becomes resistant to first line castration or androgen deprivation. While chemotherapy palliates, decreases serum prostate specific antigen and improves survival, it is associated with significant side effects and is only suitable for approximately 60% of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer. On that basis, exploration of other therapeutic options such as active secondary hormone therapy, bone targeted treatments and immunotherapy are important. Until recently, immunotherapy has had no role in the treatment of solid malignancies aside from renal cancer and melanoma. The FDA-approved autologous cellular immunotherapy sipuleucel-T has demonstrated efficacy in improving overall survival in patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer in randomized clinical trials. The proposed mechanism of action is reliant on activating the patients’ own antigen presenting cells (APCs) to prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) fused with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and subsequent triggered T-cell response to PAP on the surface of prostate cancer cells in the patients body. Despite significant prolongation of survival in Phase III trials, the challenge to health care providers remains the dissociation between objective changes in serum PSA or on imaging studies after sipleucel-T and survival benefit. On that basis there is an unmet need for markers of outcome and a quest to identify immunologic or clinical surrogates to fill this role. This review focuses on the impact of sipuleucel-T on the immune system, the T and B cells, and their responses to relevant antigens and prostate cancer. Other therapeutic modalities such as chemotherapy, corticosteroids and GM-CSF and host factors can also affect immune response. The optimal timing for

  3. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    image . It was found that even with such a narrow field , scatter is great enough that a scatter correction is re- quired. Four sets of filters were...Fig. 4(a), and is suppressed substantially (b). Image uniformity is recovered after beam quality correction (c). The same correction parameters have... flood - field (referred to as open- field in this paper) and projection, respectively. used in the FDK algorithm is also relatively localized, so that the

  4. Nonmetastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jun Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    After the introduction of prostate cancer screening with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, we have witnessed a dramatic stage migration. As a result, an increasing number of patients are diagnosed at earlier stages and receive local treatments including surgery or radiation. When these local treatments fail by the definition of increasing PSA levels, patients are usually treated with androgen-deprivation therapy. A fraction of these patients will finally reach a state of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) even without radiological evidence of metastasis, which is referred to as nonmetastatic CRPC (NM-CRPC). Most men with advanced or metastatic prostate cancer initially respond to various types of androgen ablation, but a considerable portion of them eventually progress to NM-CRPC. Among patients with NM-CPRC, about one-third will develop bone metastasis within 2 years. In these patients, PSA kinetics is the most powerful indicator of progression and is usually used to trigger further imaging studies and enrollment in clinical trials. Although CRPC remains largely driven by the androgen receptor, the benefit of second-line hormonal manipulations, including first-generation antiandrogens, adrenal synthesis inhibitors, and steroids, has not been investigated in men with NM-CRPC. To date, denosumab is the only agent that has been shown to delay the onset of bone metastasis. However, overall survival did not differ. In treating NM-CRPC patients, physicians should recognize the heterogeneity of the disease and acknowledge that the recently approved second-line treatments have been studied only in advanced stages of the disease. PMID:24648868

  5. Circadian Genes and Risk for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial to determine if finasteride (an inhibitor of androgen bioactivation) could prevent prostate cancer... finasteride  (an inhibitor of androgen bioactivation) could  prevent prostate cancer. Included in our study are approximately 1,800 case‐control pairs

  6. Circadian Genes and Risk for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    placebo-controlled clinical trial to determine if finasteride (an inhibitor of androgen bioactivation) could prevent prostate cancer. In Year 3 of the...risk. Our study is nested within the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial to determine if finasteride

  7. Validation of Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Prognosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    developing cancer diagnostic biomarkers. Genome Research 22: 183-187, 2012. Sarah Hawley, Ladan Fazli , Jesse K. McKenney, Jeff Simko, Dean Troyer, Marlo...MUC1 in human prostate cancers. Prostate 74: 1059-1067, 2014. Troyer D, Jamaspishvili T, Wei W, Feng Z, Good J, Hawley S, Fazli L, McKenney J

  8. A history of prostate cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Denmeade, Samuel R.; Isaacs, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The increased incidence of prostate cancer has led to remarkable changes in diagnosis and treatment over the past century. What were the first ways in which prostate cancer was treated, and how did these evolve into the variety of therapeutic strategies from which patients have to choose today? PMID:12044015

  9. Prostate Cancer Genetics in African Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    receiving appropriate education, genetic counseling , and/or referral. During each interview the research coordinator identifies at risk family members...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0566 TITLE: Prostate Cancer Genetics in African...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 15 Aug 2013 – 14 Aug 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prostate Cancer Genetics in

  10. Prostate Cancer Genetics in African Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0566 TITLE: Prostate Cancer Genetics in African Americans PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Henry T. Lynch, MD CONTRACTING...W81XWH-11-1-0566 November 2015 Final 15Aug2011 - 14Aug2015 Prostate Cancer Genetics in African Americans Henry T. Lynch Nothing listed 36

  11. Texture analysis of tissues in Gleason grading of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandratou, Eleni; Yova, Dido; Gorpas, Dimitris; Maragos, Petros; Agrogiannis, George; Kavantzas, Nikolaos

    2008-02-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy among maturing men and the second leading cause of cancer death in USA. Histopathological grading of prostate cancer is based on tissue structural abnormalities. Gleason grading system is the gold standard and is based on the organization features of prostatic glands. Although Gleason score has contributed on cancer prognosis and on treatment planning, its accuracy is about 58%, with this percentage to be lower in GG2, GG3 and GG5 grading. On the other hand it is strongly affected by "inter- and intra observer variations", making the whole process very subjective. Therefore, there is need for the development of grading tools based on imaging and computer vision techniques for a more accurate prostate cancer prognosis. The aim of this paper is the development of a novel method for objective grading of biopsy specimen in order to support histopathological prognosis of the tumor. This new method is based on texture analysis techniques, and particularly on Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) that estimates image properties related to second order statistics. Histopathological images of prostate cancer, from Gleason grade2 to Gleason grade 5, were acquired and subjected to image texture analysis. Thirteen texture characteristics were calculated from this matrix as they were proposed by Haralick. Using stepwise variable selection, a subset of four characteristics were selected and used for the description and classification of each image field. The selected characteristics profile was used for grading the specimen with the multiparameter statistical method of multiple logistic discrimination analysis. The subset of these characteristics provided 87% correct grading of the specimens. The addition of any of the remaining characteristics did not improve significantly the diagnostic ability of the method. This study demonstrated that texture analysis techniques could provide valuable grading decision support to the pathologists

  12. Combined image-processing algorithms for improved optical coherence tomography of prostate nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitchian, Shahab; Weldon, Thomas P.; Fiddy, Michael A.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-07-01

    Cavernous nerves course along the surface of the prostate gland and are responsible for erectile function. These nerves are at risk of injury during surgical removal of a cancerous prostate gland. In this work, a combination of segmentation, denoising, and edge detection algorithms are applied to time-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of rat prostate to improve identification of cavernous nerves. First, OCT images of the prostate are segmented to differentiate the cavernous nerves from the prostate gland. Then, a locally adaptive denoising algorithm using a dual-tree complex wavelet transform is applied to reduce speckle noise. Finally, edge detection is used to provide deeper imaging of the prostate gland. Combined application of these three algorithms results in improved signal-to-noise ratio, imaging depth, and automatic identification of the cavernous nerves, which may be of direct benefit for use in laparoscopic and robotic nerve-sparing prostate cancer surgery.

  13. 18F-flouro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging of solitary prostatic and pulmonary tuberculosis mimicking metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kadihasanoglu, Mustafa; Yildiz, Tekin; Atahan, Safak; Ausmus, Andrew; Atahan, Ozcan

    2015-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis (TB) is a common type of extrathoracic TB and can be found in isolation or associated with pulmonary TB. It contributes to 10-14% of extrapulmonary TB. Prostate TB is rare and usually found incidentally following transurethral resection of the prostate for treatment of benign prostatic obstruction as an isolated lesion in immunocompetant patient. The authors report a case of prostatic and pulmonary TB in animmunocompetant patient investigating for the positive positron emission tomography in lung and prostate. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature presenting with simultaneous hypermetabolic lesions in the prostate and lung.

  14. Detection of DNA viruses in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smelov, Vitaly; Bzhalava, Davit; Arroyo Mühr, Laila Sara; Eklund, Carina; Komyakov, Boris; Gorelov, Andrey; Dillner, Joakim; Hultin, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    We tested prostatic secretions from men with and without prostate cancer (13 cases and 13 matched controls) or prostatitis (18 cases and 18 matched controls) with metagenomic sequencing. A large number (>200) of viral reads was only detected among four prostate cancer cases (1 patient each positive for Merkel cell polyomavirus, JC polyomavirus and Human Papillomavirus types 89 or 40, respectively). Lower numbers of reads from a large variety of viruses were detected in all patient groups. Our knowledge of the biology of the prostate may be furthered by the fact that DNA viruses are commonly shed from the prostate and can be readily detected by metagenomic sequencing of expressed prostate secretions. PMID:27121729

  15. Therapeutic efficacy of nanomedicines for prostate cancer: An update

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer nanomedicine have attracted remarkable attention in medical sectors. Pharmacologic research on nanomedicines, including targeted cancer therapy, has increased dramatically in the past 5 years. The success stories of nanomedicines in the clinical field include the fabrication of nanomedicines that show maximum loading efficiency into carriers, maximal release kinetics, and minimum toxicity to healthy cells. Nanoparticle-mediated medicines have been developed to specifically target prostate cancer tissue by use of aptamers, antibody targeting, and sustained release of nanomedicines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Nanomedicines have been developed for therapeutic application in combination with image-guided therapy in real time. The scope of one of these nanomedicines, Abraxane (paclitaxel), may be extended to prostate cancer therapeutic applications for better quality of patient life and longer survival. This review provides an update on the latest directions and developments in nanomedicines for prostate cancer. PMID:26966723

  16. Castration Induced Neuroendocrine Mediated Progression of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    androgen -insensitive prostate cancer patients based upon our work. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate Cancer , Neuroendocrine, Progression...two androgen - ines PC-3 and DU-145 by examining the status of publication. a Src kinase inhibitor AZ independent prostate cancer cell l...differentiation in prostate cancer . AR activation. Together with our studies in the chimeric growth of androgen -sensitive and androgen -insensitive cells,

  17. Correlation of contrast-enhanced MR images with the histopathology of minimally invasive thermal and cryoablation cancer treatments in normal dog prostates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouley, D. M.; Daniel, B.; Butts Pauly, K.; Liu, E.; Kinsey, A.; Nau, W.; Diederich, C. J.; Sommer, G.

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a promising tool for visualizing the delivery of minimally invasive cancer treatments such as high intensity ultrasound (HUS) and cryoablation. We use an acute dog prostate model to correlate lesion histopathology with contrast-enhanced (CE) T1 weighted MR images, to aid the radiologists in real time interpretation of in vivo lesion boundaries and pre-existing lesions. Following thermal or cryo treatments, prostate glands are removed, sliced, stained with the vital dye triphenyl tetrazolium chloride, photographed, fixed and processed in oversized blocks for routine microscopy. Slides are scanned by Trestle Corporation at .32 microns/pixel resolution, the various lesions traced using annotation software, and digital images compared to CE MR images. Histologically, HUS results in discrete lesions characterized by a "heat-fixed" zone, in which glands subjected to the highest temperatures are minimally altered, surrounded by a rim or "transition zone" composed of severely fragmented, necrotic glands, interstitial edema and vascular congestion. The "heat-fixed" zone is non-enhancing on CE MRI while the "transition zone" appears as a bright, enhancing rim. Likewise, the CE MR images for cryo lesions appear similar to thermally induced lesions, yet the histopathology is significantly different. Glands subjected to prolonged freezing appear totally disrupted, coagulated and hemorrhagic, while less intensely frozen glands along the lesion edge are partially fragmented and contain apoptotic cells. In conclusion, thermal and cryo-induced lesions, as well as certain pre-existing lesions (cystic hyperplasia - non-enhancing, chronic prostatitis - enhancing) have particular MRI profiles, useful for treatment and diagnostic purposes.

  18. Prostate Cancer Genetics in African Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    grant from the U.S. Department of Defense to study the role heredity plays in prostate cancer among African Americans. "Prostate cancer is the...visit our website at: www.creighton.edu. Creighton gets grant to study heredity -cancer link - Houston Chronicle Coogle offers Google Offers Deals on...traffic Nahan & world Politics Health News bizarre Deaths Hurncanes Creighton gets grant to study heredity -cancer link Published 04 :40a.m., Monday

  19. Sanguinarine: A Novel Agent Against Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    The traditional therapeutic and surgical approaches have not been successful in the management of prostate cancer (CaP). Natural plant - based...Natural plant -based products have shown promise as anticancer agents. Ideally, the anti- cancer drugs should specifically target the neoplastic cells... plant alkaloid sanguinarine against prostate cancer development in a nude mice xenograft model. Proc Amer Assoc Cancer Res 46: 1012-1013, 2005. 3

  20. Therapeutic Strategies for Localized Prostate Cancer II

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Michael D; Porter, Arthur T; Beyer, David C; Albert, Peter S; Chinn, Douglas; Harris, Michael J

    2000-01-01

    Application of improved imaging, diagnostic, and computer techniques is beginning to have an impact on the management of localized prostate cancer. It is possible to perform a range of surgical and radiation procedures with less morbidity than in the past. The changes in therapy for patients with localized disease derive from better knowledge of anatomy for invasive procedures and optimization of virtual planning for noninvasive methods. Perineal prostatectomy and combinations of beam and seed radiation offer both patient and physician reasonable therapeutic options. PMID:16986038

  1. Bone-targeting agents in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzman, Daniel L.; Boikos, Sosipatros A.; Carducci, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastases are present in the vast majority of men with advanced prostate cancer, representing the main cause for morbidity and mortality. Recurrent or metastatic disease is managed initially with androgen deprivation but the majority of the patients eventually will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer, with patients developing bone metastases in most of the cases. Survival and growth of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is dependent on a complex microenvironment (onco-niche) that includes the osteoblasts, the osteoclasts, the endothelium, and the stroma. This review summarizes agents that target the pathways involved in this complex interaction between prostate cancer and bone micro-environment and aim to transform lethal metastatic prostate cancer into a chronic disease. PMID:24398856

  2. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy-associated granulomatous prostatitis mimicking prostate cancer on MRI: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    SUDITU, NICOLAIE; NEGRU, DRAGOS

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatous prostatitis following bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy is a well-known pathological entity, developing following initiation of BCG therapy as a prophylactic measure against the recurrence of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. In addition, there are certain imaging similarities between granulomatous prostatitis and prostate cancer, including hypoechoic area on transrectal ultrasonography and low T2 signal intensity in some prostate areas on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This is the report of a case exhibiting a perfect imaging cross-match between granulomatous prostatitis and potential prostate cancer on repeated MRI exams, adding two supplementary aspects to the already known similarities, namely progressive restricted diffusion and increased contrast enhancement, which are specific to prostate cancer. PMID:25469304

  3. PSA and beyond: alternative prostate cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of biomarkers for prostate cancer screening, diagnosis and prognosis has the potential to improve the clinical management of the patients. Owing to inherent limitations of the biomarker prostate-specific antigen (PSA), intensive efforts are currently directed towards a search for alternative prostate cancer biomarkers, particularly those that can predict disease aggressiveness and drive better treatment decisions. Methods A literature search of Medline articles focused on recent and emerging advances in prostate cancer biomarkers was performed. The most promising biomarkers that have the potential to meet the unmet clinical needs in prostate cancer patient management and/or that are clinically implemented were selected. Conclusions With the advent of advanced genomic and proteomic technologies, we have in recent years seen an enormous spurt in prostate cancer biomarker research with several promising alternative biomarkers being discovered that show an improved sensitivity and specificity over PSA. The new generation of biomarkers can be tested via serum, urine, or tissue-based assays that have either received regulatory approval by the US Food and Drug Administration or are available as Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-based laboratory developed tests. Additional emerging novel biomarkers for prostate cancer, including circulating tumor cells, microRNAs and exosomes, are still in their infancy. Together, these biomarkers provide actionable guidance for prostate cancer risk assessment, and are expected to lead to an era of personalized medicine. PMID:26790878

  4. Endometase in Androgen-Repressed Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    intraepithelial neoplasia from multiple patients were significantly higher than those in prostatitis, benign prostate hyperplasia, and normal prostate glandular...prostate cancer cell invasion. 3. We showed that the levels of MMP-26 protein in human prostate carcinomas from multiple patients were significantly...inhibitors of MMP-26 block prostate cancer invasion. We have showed that the levels of MMP-26 protein in human prostate carcinomas from multiple patients were

  5. Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ghilezan, Michel; Yan, Di; Martinez, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive radiotherapy has been introduced to manage an individual's treatment by, including patient-specific treatment variation identified and quantified during the course of radiotherapy in the treatment planning and delivering optimization. Early studies have demonstrated that this technique could significantly improve the therapeutic ratio by safely reducing the large target margin that has to be used in conventional radiotherapy for prostate cancer treatment. Clinical application of off-line image-guided adaptive radiotherapy for prostate cancer has demonstrated encouraging clinical outcome. Long-term clinical follow-up has shown significant improvement in terms of tumor control and low toxicity profile, emphasizing the beneficial effect of image-guidance and adaptive treatment. Continuous development in adaptive radiotherapy has made possible additional increases in target dose by further reducing target margin when using online image-guided adaptive intensity-modulated radiation therapy. However, clinical implementation of new techniques should be explored cautiously and should include a comprehensive management strategy to address uncertainties in target definition and delineation in the preclinical implementation studies. PMID:20219551

  6. Development of Targeted Nanobubbles for Ultrasound Imaging and Ablation of Metastatic Prostate Cancer Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    the ultrasound pulses to vaporize the nanodroplets delivered to the surface of the tumor nodules and form gas bubbles. Using the resulting gas...of 1 Hz. The camera was externally triggered from the FPGA board with each ultrasound pulse . The camera recorded 20 images after each pulse . In...different samples at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 0.5 Hz. The PRF was kept very low to minimize the possibility that cavitation from 1

  7. High Resolution PET Imaging Probe for the Detection, Molecular Characterization and Treatment Monitoring of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Compton camera in nuclear medical imaging. IEEE Trans Nucl Sci 2002; 49:812–16. [15] Linhart V, Burdette D, Chessi E, et al. Spectroscopy study of...applications can be recognized in both emission modalities, SPECT and PET. Compton camera is a subspecies of SPECT, where a silicon based scatter as a MR...Introducing a Compton camera also relaxes requirements of the radiotracers used, extending the range of conceivable photon energies beyond 140.5 keV of the

  8. Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Transdisciplinary Research in Epigenetics and Cancer Journal Clubs and Transdisciplinary Science Meetings, biweekly and monthly 3. To gain expertise...Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Laura Lamb CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Washington University...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genes in

  9. New developments in ultrasonography for the detection of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    de la Rosette, J J; Aarnink, R G

    2001-02-01

    The introduction of contrast agents has changed the diagnostic role of ultrasonography dramatically. Advanced ultrasound techniques, although currently largely unexplored, especially for prostate applications, were introduced to improve, for example, differential diagnosis. Also, new technologies became available using the interaction of the angioemboli with the transmitted ultrasound waves, and sensitive methods to detect microbubbles were developed. As the traveling of microbubbles through the vascular system is a dynamic process, new information becomes available: when the concentration of the contrast agent can be determined as a function of time, a measure for the actual blood flow can be obtained that provides quantitative information. Initially developed to enhance the ultrasound examinations in cardiac applications, contrast agents can currently be found in radiologic applications as well. The first reports of enhanced Doppler examinations of prostatic blood flow have been published, and the results indicate that contrast agents are a promising addition to the conventional ultrasound examination. In this paper, we present a short overview of the status of transrectal ultrasound imaging in prostate cancer, background information on contrast agents and imaging modalities, and early results of enhanced Doppler studies of the prostate to identify cancer. The early results suggest the feasibility of using angioemboli to enhance ultrasound imaging of prostate diseases, and although many issues remain to be solved, angioemboli in combination with a dedicated imaging modality have the potential to improve the diagnostic application of ultrasound in evaluating the prostate for disease.

  10. Feasibility of monitoring HIFU prostate cancer therapy using elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souchon, Remi; Chapelon, Jean Y.; Bertrand, Michel J.; Kallel, Faouzi; Ophir, Jonathan

    2001-05-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of elastographic monitoring of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy of prostate cancer. Elastography is an imaging technique based on strain estimation in soft tissues under quasi-static compression. Since pathological tissues and HIFU-induced lesions exhibit different elastic properties than normal tissues, elastography is potentially able to achieve these goals. An ultrasound scanner was connected to a PC to acquire RF images. This setup is compatible with a HIFU device used for prostate cancer therapy by transrectal route. The therapy transducer and the biplane-imaging probe are covered with a balloon filled with a coupling liquid. Compression of the prostate is applied by inflating the balloon, while imaging sector scans of the prostate. In-vivo elastograms of the prostate were acquired before HIFU treatment. Problems inherent to in-vivo acquisitions are reported, such as undesired tangential displacements during the radial compression. This study shows the potential for in-vivo elastogram acquisition of HIFU-induced lesions in the human prostate.

  11. Diagnosis of prostate cancer via nanotechnological approach.

    PubMed

    Kang, Benedict J; Jeun, Minhong; Jang, Gun Hyuk; Song, Sang Hoon; Jeong, In Gab; Kim, Choung-Soo; Searson, Peter C; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths among the Caucasian adult males in Europe and the USA. Currently available diagnostic strategies for patients with prostate cancer are invasive and unpleasant and have poor accuracy. Many patients have been overly or underly treated resulting in a controversy regarding the reliability of current conventional diagnostic approaches. This review discusses the state-of-the-art research in the development of novel noninvasive prostate cancer diagnostics using nanotechnology coupled with suggested diagnostic strategies for their clinical implication.

  12. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    and y = −2.5 cm, passing through the Shepp-Logan phantom, as indicated in Fig. 15b. For comparison, we also plot the corresponding true profile as...demonstrating the chordless region along z-axis for a two-turn reverse helical trajectory. (a) An exemplary chord plotted on the plane defined by the chord and...previously specified lines are plot - ted in Fig. 12. Dotted curves represent the line profiles of the images obtained from truncated data and solid curves

  13. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). Methods A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1–2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5–7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. Results The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p < 0.001). For GU toxicity the numbers were 41.8% and 29.7%, respectively (p = 0.011). On multivariate analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p < 0.001, HR = 11.59 [CI: 6.67-20.14]). 3DCRT was also associated with an increased risk of developing GU toxicity compared to IG-IMRT. The 3-year actuarial biochemical progression-free survival probability was 86.0% for 3DCRT and 90.3% for IG-IMRT (p = 0.386). On multivariate analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. Conclusion The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction. PMID:24495815

  14. Prostate cancer vaccines in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lubaroff, David M

    2012-07-01

    This review presents important information about the current state of the art for vaccine immunotherapy of prostate cancer. It includes important preclinical research for each of the important prostate cancer vaccines to have reached clinical trials. To date, the only prostate cancer vaccine that has completed Phase III trials and has been approved and licensed by the US FDA is Sipuleucel-T, which immunizes patients against the prostate-associated antigen prostatic acid phosphatase. The benefits and concerns associated with the vaccine are presented. A current Phase III trial is currently underway using the vaccinia-based prostate-specific antigen vaccine Prostvac-TRICOM. Other immunotherapeutic vaccines in trials include the Ad/prostate-specific antigen vaccine Ad5-prostate-specific antigen and the DNA/prostatic acid phosphatase vaccine. A cellular vaccine, GVAX, has been in clinical trials but has not seen continuous study. This review also delves into the multiple immune regulatory elements that must be overcome in order to obtain strong antitumor-associated antigen immune responses capable of effectively destroying prostate tumor cells.

  15. ETS fusion genes in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gasi Tandefelt, Delila; Boormans, Joost; Hermans, Karin; Trapman, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Prostate cancer is very common in elderly men in developed countries. Unravelling the molecular and biological processes that contribute to tumor development and progressive growth, including its heterogeneity, is a challenging task. The fusion of the genes ERG and TMPRSS2 is the most frequent genomic alteration in prostate cancer. ERG is an oncogene that encodes a member of the family of ETS transcription factors. At lower frequency, other members of this gene family are also rearranged and overexpressed in prostate cancer. TMPRSS2 is an androgen-regulated gene that is preferentially expressed in the prostate. Most of the less frequent ETS fusion partners are also androgen-regulated and prostate-specific. During the last few years, novel concepts of the process of gene fusion have emerged, and initial experimental results explaining the function of the ETS genes ERG and ETV1 in prostate cancer have been published. In this review, we focus on the most relevant ETS gene fusions and summarize the current knowledge of the role of ETS transcription factors in prostate cancer. Finally, we discuss the clinical relevance of TMRPSS2-ERG and other ETS gene fusions in prostate cancer.

  16. Prostate Cancer and Bone: The Elective Affinities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The onset of metastases dramatically changes the prognosis of prostate cancer patients, determining increased morbidity and a drastic fall in survival expectancy. Bone is a common site of metastases in few types of cancer, and it represents the most frequent metastatic site in prostate cancer. Of note, the prevalence of tumor relapse to the bone appears to be increasing over the years, likely due to a longer overall survival of prostate cancer patients. Bone tropism represents an intriguing challenge for researchers also because the preference of prostate cancer cells for the bone is the result of a sequential series of targetable molecular events. Many factors have been associated with the peculiar ability of prostate cancer cells to migrate in bone marrow and to determine mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic lesions. As anticipated by the success of current targeted therapy aimed to block bone resorption, a better understanding of molecular affinity between prostate cancer and bone microenvironment will permit us to cure bone metastasis and to improve prognosis of prostate cancer patients. PMID:24971315

  17. Comparison of CT on Rails With Electronic Portal Imaging for Positioning of Prostate Cancer Patients With Implanted Fiducial Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Rebecca Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Milner, Alvin; Cox, Jennifer; Duchesne, Gillian; Cleeve, Laurence; Zhu Li; Cramb, Jim; Sparks, Laura; Laferlita, Marcus

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this investigation was to measure the agreement between in-room computed tomography (CT) on rails and electronic portal image (EPI) radiography. Methods and Materials: Agreement between the location of the center of gravity (COG) of fiducial markers (FMs) on CT and EPI images was determined in phantom studies and a patient cohort. A secondary analysis between the center of volume (COV) of the prostate on CT and the COG of FMs on CT and EPI was performed. Agreement was defined as the 95% probability of a difference of {<=}3.0 mm between images. Systematic and random errors from CT and EPI are reported. Results: From 8 patients, 254 CT and EPI pairs were analyzed. FMs were localized to within 3 mm on CT and EPI images 96.9% of the time in the left-right (LR) plane, 85.8% superior-inferior (SI), and 89% anterior-posterior (AP). The differences between the COV on CT and the COG on EPI were not within 3 mm in any plane: 87.8% (LR), 64.2% (SI), and 70.9% (AP). The systematic error varied from 1.2 to 2.9 mm (SI) and 1.8-2.9 mm (AP) between the COG on EPI and COV on CT. Conclusions: Considerable differences between in-room CT and EPI exist. The phantom measurements showed slice thickness affected the accuracy of localization in the SI plane, and couch sag that occurs at the CT on rails gantry could not be totally corrected for in the AP plane. Other confounding factors are the action of rotating the couch and associated time lag between image acquisitions (prostate motion), EPI image quality, and outlining uncertainties.

  18. Studying circulating prostate cancer cells by in-vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2011-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. We have measured the depletion kinetics of cancer cells with different metastatic potential. Interestingly, more invasive PC-3 prostate cancer cells are depleted faster from the circulation than LNCaP cells.

  19. Studying circulating prostate cancer cells by in-vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. We have measured the depletion kinetics of cancer cells with different metastatic potential. Interestingly, more invasive PC-3 prostate cancer cells are depleted faster from the circulation than LNCaP cells.

  20. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate: technical aspects and role in clinical management.

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniel N; Pedrosa, Ivan; Roehrborn, Claus; Rofsky, Neil M

    2014-08-01

    The heterogeneity and largely indolent nature of prostate cancer require better tools to avoid overdetection of low-risk disease and improve diagnostic accuracy in high-risk patients. During the last 3 decades, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved to become the most accurate imaging technique for prostate cancer detection and staging, with a promising role in risk stratification. Because each MRI technique has advantages and limitations, state of the art of the so-called multiparametric MRI of the prostate is achieved combining anatomical T2-weighted imaging integrated with other techniques in which image contrast is related to the pathophysiology of the disease, such as diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, and MR spectroscopy. After reviewing this article, readers will understand the clinical challenges in the management of patients with confirmed or suspected prostate cancer, when and how multiparametric MRI of the prostate can provide meaningful information, and how to perform and interpret it.

  1. Multimodal Wavelet Embedding Representation for data Combination (MaWERiC): Integrating Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy for Prostate Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Pallavi; Kurhanewicz, John; Viswanath, Satish; Sridhar, Akshay; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To develop a computerized data integration framework (MaWERiC) for quantitatively combining structural and metabolic information from different Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging modalities. Materials and Methods In this paper, we present a novel computerized support system that we call Multimodal Wavelet Embedding Representation for data Combination (MaWERiC) which (1) employs wavelet theory and dimensionality reduction for providing a common, uniform representation of the different imaging (T2-w) and non-imaging (spectroscopy) MRI channels, and (2) leverages a random forest classifier for automated prostate cancer detection on a per voxel basis from combined 1.5 Tesla in vivo MRI and MRS. Results A total of 36 1.5 T endorectal in vivo T2-w MRI, MRS patient studies were evaluated on a per-voxel via MaWERiC, using a three-fold cross validation scheme across 25 iterations. Ground truth for evaluation of the results was obtained via ex-vivo whole-mount histology sections which served as the gold standard for expert radiologist annotations of prostate cancer on a per-voxel basis. The results suggest that MaWERiC based MRS-T2-w meta-classifier (mean AUC, μ = 0.89 ± 0.02) significantly outperformed (i) a T2-w MRI (employing wavelet texture features) classifier (μ = 0.55± 0.02), (ii) a MRS (employing metabolite ratios) classifier (μ= 0.77 ± 0.03), (iii) a decision-fusion classifier, obtained by combining individual T2-w MRI and MRS classifier outputs (μ = 0.85 ± 0.03) and (iv) a data combination scheme involving combination of metabolic MRS and MR signal intensity features (μ = 0.66± 0.02). Conclusion A novel data integration framework, MaWERiC, for combining imaging and non-imaging MRI channels was presented. Application to prostate cancer detection via combination of T2-w MRI and MRS data demonstrated significantly higher AUC and accuracy values compared to the individual T2-w MRI, MRS modalities and other data integration strategies

  2. Use of shear waves for diagnosis and ablation monitoring of prostate cancer: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, A.; Rus, G.; Saffari, N.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains as a major healthcare issue. Limitations in current diagnosis and treatment monitoring techniques imply that there is still a need for improvements. The efficacy of prostate cancer diagnosis is still low, generating under and over diagnoses. High intensity focused ultrasound ablation is an emerging treatment modality, which enables the noninvasive ablation of pathogenic tissue. Clinical trials are being carried out to evaluate its longterm efficacy as a focal treatment for prostate cancer. Successful treatment of prostate cancer using non-invasive modalities is critically dependent on accurate diagnostic means and is greatly benefited by a real-time monitoring system. While magnetic resonance imaging remains the gold standard for prostate imaging, its wider implementation for prostate cancer diagnosis remains prohibitively expensive. Conventional ultrasound is currently limited to guiding biopsy. Elastography techniques are emerging as a promising real-time imaging method, as cancer nodules are usually stiffer than adjacent healthy prostatic tissue. In this paper, a new transurethral approach is proposed, using shear waves for diagnosis and ablation monitoring of prostate cancer. A finite-difference time domain model is developed for studying the feasibility of the method, and an inverse problem technique based on genetic algorithms is proposed for reconstructing the location, size and stiffness parameters of the tumour. Preliminary results indicate that the use of shear waves for diagnosis and monitoring ablation of prostate cancer is feasible.

  3. Novel trends in transrectal ultrasound imaging of prostate gland carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Szopiński, Tomasz; Nowicki, Andrzej; Záťura, František; Gołąbek, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr

    2014-09-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate gland is the most common neoplasm in men. Its treatment depends on multiple factors among which local staging plays a significant role. The basic method is transrectal ultrasound imaging. This examination enables imaging of the prostate gland and its abnormalities, but it also allows ultrasound-guided biopsies to be conducted. A conventional gray-scale ultrasound examination enables assessment of the size, echostructure and outlines of the anatomic capsule, but in many cases, neoplastic lesions cannot be observed. For this reason, new sonographic techniques are implemented in order to facilitate detectability of cancer. The usage of contrast agents during transrectal ultrasound examination must be emphasized since, in combination with color Doppler, it facilitates detection of cancerous lesions by visualizing flow which is not observable without contrast enhancement. Elastography, in turn, is a different solution. It uses the differences in tissue elasticity between a neoplastic region and normal prostatic parenchyma that surrounds it. This technique facilitates detection of lesions irrespective of their echogenicity and thereby supplements conventional transrectal examinations. However, the size of the prostate gland and its relatively far location from the transducer may constitute limitations to the effectiveness of elastography. Moreover, the manner of conducting such an examination depends on the examiner and his or her subjective assessment. Another method, which falls within the novel, popular trend of combining imaging methods, is fusion of magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal sonography. The application of multidimensional magnetic resonance imaging, which is currently believed to be the best method for prostate cancer staging, in combination with the availability of a TRUS examination and the possibility of monitoring biopsies in real-time sonography is a promising alternative, but it is associated with higher costs and

  4. Novel trends in transrectal ultrasound imaging of prostate gland carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Andrzej; Záťura, František; Gołąbek, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate gland is the most common neoplasm in men. Its treatment depends on multiple factors among which local staging plays a significant role. The basic method is transrectal ultrasound imaging. This examination enables imaging of the prostate gland and its abnormalities, but it also allows ultrasound-guided biopsies to be conducted. A conventional gray-scale ultrasound examination enables assessment of the size, echostructure and outlines of the anatomic capsule, but in many cases, neoplastic lesions cannot be observed. For this reason, new sonographic techniques are implemented in order to facilitate detectability of cancer. The usage of contrast agents during transrectal ultrasound examination must be emphasized since, in combination with color Doppler, it facilitates detection of cancerous lesions by visualizing flow which is not observable without contrast enhancement. Elastography, in turn, is a different solution. It uses the differences in tissue elasticity between a neoplastic region and normal prostatic parenchyma that surrounds it. This technique facilitates detection of lesions irrespective of their echogenicity and thereby supplements conventional transrectal examinations. However, the size of the prostate gland and its relatively far location from the transducer may constitute limitations to the effectiveness of elastography. Moreover, the manner of conducting such an examination depends on the examiner and his or her subjective assessment. Another method, which falls within the novel, popular trend of combining imaging methods, is fusion of magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal sonography. The application of multidimensional magnetic resonance imaging, which is currently believed to be the best method for prostate cancer staging, in combination with the availability of a TRUS examination and the possibility of monitoring biopsies in real-time sonography is a promising alternative, but it is associated with higher costs and

  5. Poster — Thur Eve — 13: Inter-Fraction Target Movement in Image-Guided Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Congwu; Zeng, Grace G.

    2014-08-15

    We investigated the setup variations over the treatment courses of 113 patients with intact prostate treated with 78Gy/39fx. Institutional standard bladder and bowel preparation and image guidance protocols were used in CT simulation and treatment. The RapidArc treatment plans were optimized in Varian Eclipse treatment planning system and delivered on Varian 2100X Clinacs equipped with On-Board Imager to localize the target before beam-on. The setup variations were calculated in terms of mean and standard deviation of couch shifts. No correlation was observed between the mean shift and standard deviation over the treatment course and patient age, initial prostate volume and rectum size. The mean shifts in the first and last 5 fractions are highly correlated (P < 10{sup −10}) while the correlation of the standard deviations cannot be determined. The Mann-Kendall tests indicate trends of the mean daily Ant-Post and Sup-Inf shifts of the group. The target is inferior by ∼1mm to the planned position when the treatment starts and moves superiorly, approaching the planned position at 10th fraction, and then gradually moves back inferiorly by ∼1mm in the remain fractions. In the Ant-Post direction, the prostate gradually moves posteriorly during the treatment course from a mean shift of ∼2.5mm in the first fraction to ∼1mm in the last fraction. It may be related to a systematic rectum size change in the progress of treatment. The biased mean shifts in Ant-Post and Sup-Inf direction of most patients suggest systematically larger rectum and smaller bladder during the treatment than at CT simulation.

  6. Risks of Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that ... up part of semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Prostate Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  8. General Information about Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  9. Detection of benign prostatic hyperplasia nodules in T2W MR images using fuzzy decision forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Nathan; Freeman, Sabrina; Turkbey, Baris; Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men MRI has proven useful for detecting prostate cancer, and CAD may further improve detection. One source of false positives in prostate computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) is the presence of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) nodules. These nodules have a distinct appearance with a pseudo-capsule on T2 weighted MR images but can also resemble cancerous lesions in other sequences such as the ADC or high B-value images. Describing their appearance with hand-crafted heuristics (features) that also exclude the appearance of cancerous lesions is challenging. This work develops a method based on fuzzy decision forests to automatically learn discriminative features for the purpose of BPH nodule detection in T2 weighted images for the purpose of improving prostate CAD systems.

  10. Acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity of image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer using a daily water-filled endorectal balloon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Our purpose was to report acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity rates for prostate cancer patients undergoing image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) with a daily endorectal water-filled balloon (ERBH2O), and assess associations with planning parameters and pretreatment clinical characteristics. Methods The first 100 patients undergoing prostate and proximal seminal vesicle IG-IMRT with indexed-lumen 100 cc ERBH2O to 79.2 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions at our institution from 12/2008- 12/2010 were assessed. Pretreatment characteristics, organ-at-risk dose volume histograms, and maximum GU and GI toxicities (CTCAE 3.0) were evaluated. Logistic regression models evaluated univariate association between toxicities and dosimetric parameters, and uni- and multivariate association between toxicities and pretreatment characteristics. Results Mean age was 68 (range 51–88). Thirty-two, 49, and 19 patients were low, intermediate, and high-risk, respectively; 40 received concurrent androgen deprivation. No grade 3 or greater toxicities were recorded. Maximum GI toxicity was grade 0, 1, and 2 in 69%, 23%, and 8%, respectively. Infield (defined as 1 cm above/below the CTV) rectal mean/median doses, D75, V30, and V40 and hemorrhoid history were associated with grade 2 GI toxicity (Ps < 0.05). Maximum acute GU toxicity was grade 0, 1, and 2 for 17%, 41%, and 42% of patients, respectively. Infield bladder V20 (P = 0.03) and pretreatment International Prostate Symptom Scale (IPSS) (P = 0.003) were associated with grade 2 GU toxicity. Conclusion Prostate IG-IMRT using a daily ERBH2O shows low rates of acute GI toxicity compared to previous reports of air-filled ERB IMRT when using stringent infield rectum constraints and comparable GU toxicities. PMID:22621764

  11. Detection of micrometastatic prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow of patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Deguchi, T.; Yang, M.; Ehara, H.; Ito, S.; Nishino, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Ito, Y.; Shimokawa, K.; Tanaka, T.; Imaeda, T.; Doi, T.; Kawada, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with prostate cancer were examined for micrometastases to the bone marrow using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with primers specific for the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) gene. Of nine patients with bone metastases detectable by bone scan imaging, five patients had PSA mRNA expression in the bone marrow detectable by RT-PCR. Of 26 patients with negative bone scan findings, seven patients had PSA mRNA expression detectable in the bone marrow. RT-PCR could detect micrometastatic prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow that were not detectable by bone scan imaging. Of 16 patients with a serum PSA concentration of 25 ng ml(-1) or greater, only nine (56.3%) had bone metastases detected by bone scans. Of the remaining seven patients, five had micrometastases to the bone marrow detected by RT-PCR. Overall, 14 of 16 patients (87.5%) with a serum PSA concentration of 25 ng ml(-1) or greater had metastatic bone diseases including bone marrow micrometastases. Of 19 patients with a serum PSA concentration of less than 25 ng ml(-1), two (10.5%) had only micrometastatic disease detected by RT-PCR. A significant correlation was observed between the incidence of bone involvement and the serum PSA concentration. This study suggests that RT-PCR will potentially develop into a relevant tool to assess bone involvement including bone marrow micrometastases and establish a precise correlation between serum PSA concentration and metastatic bone disease in patients with prostate cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:9043017

  12. Incidence of prostate cancer in Lithuania after introduction of the Early Prostate Cancer Detection Programme.

    PubMed

    Smailyte, G; Aleknaviciene, B

    2012-12-01

    In Lithuania, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing is offered to healthy asymptomatic men as a screening test in the population-based Early Prostate Cancer Detection Programme (EPCDP). The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence of prostate cancer before and after introduction of the EPCDP in Lithuania. Prostate cancer incidence and mortality data from the Lithuanian Cancer Registry were analysed for the period 1990-2008. Age-specific incidence and mortality data were adjusted to the European Standard Population. There have been extraordinary changes in the incidence of prostate cancer in Lithuania following introduction of the EPCDP, and there is strong evidence that these changes are the result of increased detection rates, especially in men of screening age. Further observation of changes in prostate cancer incidence and mortality in Lithuania may help to determine the extent to which PSA testing at the population level influences incidence and mortality in the general population.

  13. Presence of PSA auto-antibodies in men with prostate abnormalities (prostate cancer/benign prostatic hyperplasia/prostatitis).

    PubMed

    Lokant, M T; Naz, R K

    2015-04-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), produced by the prostate, liquefies post-ejaculate semen. PSA is detected in semen and blood. Increased circulating PSA levels indicate prostate abnormality [prostate cancer (PC), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatitis (PTIS)], with variance among individuals. As the prostate has been proposed as an immune organ, we hypothesise that variation in PSA levels among men may be due to presence of auto-antibodies against PSA. Sera from healthy men (n = 28) and men having prostatitis (n = 25), BPH (n = 30) or PC (n = 29) were tested for PSA antibody presence using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) values converted to standard deviation (SD) units, and Western blotting. Taking ≥2 SD units as cut-off for positive immunoreactivity, 0% of normal men, 0% with prostatitis, 33% with BPH and 3.45% with PC demonstrated PSA antibodies. One-way analysis of variance (anova) performed on the mean absorbance values and SD units of each group showed BPH as significantly different (P < 0.01) compared with PC and prostatitis. All others were nonsignificant (P < 0.05). Men (33%) with BPH had PSA antibodies by ELISA and Western blot. These discoveries may find clinical application in differential diagnosis among prostate abnormalities, especially differentiating BPH from prostate cancer and prostatitis.

  14. Imaging of prostate cancer: a platform for 3D co-registration of in-vivo MRI ex-vivo MRI and pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orczyk, Clément; Mikheev, Artem; Rosenkrantz, Andrew; Melamed, Jonathan; Taneja, Samir S.; Rusinek, Henry

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: Multi-parametric MRI is emerging as a promising method for prostate cancer diagnosis. prognosis and treatment planning. However, the localization of in-vivo detected lesions and pathologic sites of cancer remains a significant challenge. To overcome this limitation we have developed and tested a system for co-registration of in-vivo MRI, ex-vivo MRI and histology. Materials and Methods: Three men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer (ages 54-72, PSA levels 5.1-7.7 ng/ml) were prospectively enrolled in this study. All patients underwent 3T multi-parametric MRI that included T2W, DCEMRI, and DWI prior to robotic-assisted prostatectomy. Ex-vivo multi-parametric MRI was performed on fresh prostate specimen. Excised prostates were then sliced at regular intervals and photographed both before and after fixation. Slices were perpendicular to the main axis of the posterior capsule, i.e., along the direction of the rectal wall. Guided by the location of the urethra, 2D digital images were assembled into 3D models. Cancer foci, extra-capsular extensions and zonal margins were delineated by the pathologist and included in 3D histology data. A locally-developed software was applied to register in-vivo, ex-vivo and histology using an over-determined set of anatomical landmarks placed in anterior fibro-muscular stroma, central. transition and peripheral zones. The mean root square distance across corresponding control points was used to assess co-registration error. Results: Two specimens were pT3a and one pT2b (negative margin) at pathology. The software successfully fused invivo MRI. ex-vivo MRI fresh specimen and histology using appropriate (rigid and affine) transformation models with mean square error of 1.59 mm. Coregistration accuracy was confirmed by multi-modality viewing using operator-guided variable transparency. Conclusion: The method enables successful co-registration of pre-operative MRI, ex-vivo MRI and pathology and it provides initial evidence

  15. Statistical modeling and visualization of localized prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue J.; Xuan, Jianhua; Sesterhenn, Isabel