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Sample records for prostate cancer tissues

  1. Tissue Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tran, PT; Hales, RK; Zeng, J; Aziz, K; Salih, T; Gajula, RP; Chettiar, S; Gandhi, N; Wild, AT; Kumar, R; Herman, JM; Song, DY; DeWeese, TL

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer and second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States. Most men have localized disease diagnosed following an elevated serum prostate specific antigen test for cancer screening purposes. Standard treatment options consist of surgery or definitive radiation therapy directed by clinical factors that are organized into risk stratification groups. Current clinical risk stratification systems are still insufficient to differentiate lethal from indolent disease. Similarly, a subset of men in poor risk groups need to be identified for more aggressive treatment and enrollment into clinical trials. Furthermore, these clinical tools are very limited in revealing information about the biologic pathways driving these different disease phenotypes and do not offer insights for novel treatments which are needed in men with poor-risk disease. We believe molecular biomarkers may serve to bridge these inadequacies of traditional clinical factors opening the door for personalized treatment approaches that would allow tailoring of treatment options to maximize therapeutic outcome. We review the current state of prognostic and predictive tissue-based molecular biomarkers which can be used to direct localized prostate cancer treatment decisions, specifically those implicated with definitive and salvage radiation therapy. PMID:22292443

  2. Tissue elasticity properties as biomarkers for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Kenneth; Castaneda, Benjamin; Zhang, Man; Nigwekar, Priya; di Sant'agnese, P Anthony; Joseph, Jean V; Strang, John; Rubens, Deborah J; Parker, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate tissue elasticity as a longstanding but qualitative biomarker for prostate cancer and sonoelastography as an emerging imaging tool for providing qualitative and quantitative measurements of prostate tissue stiffness. A Kelvin-Voigt Fractional Derivative (KVFD) viscoelastic model was used to characterize mechanical stress relaxation data measured from human prostate tissue samples. Mechanical testing results revealed that the viscosity parameter for cancerous prostate tissue is greater than that derived from normal tissue by a factor of approximately 2.4. It was also determined that a significant difference exists between normal and cancerous prostate tissue stiffness (p < 0.01) yielding an average elastic contrast that increases from 2.1 at 0.1 Hz to 2.5 at 150 Hz. Qualitative sonoelastographic results show promise for cancer detection in prostate and may prove to be an effective adjunct imaging technique for biopsy guidance. Elasticity images obtained with quantitative sonoelastography agree with mechanical testing and histological results. Overall, results indicate tissue elasticity is a promising biomarker for prostate cancer.

  3. Characterization of adenoviral transduction profile in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Ai, Jianzhong; Tai, Phillip W L; Lu, Yi; Li, Jia; Ma, Hong; Su, Qin; Wei, Qiang; Li, Hong; Gao, Guangping

    2017-09-01

    Prostate diseases are common in males worldwide with high morbidity. Gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic strategy for prostate diseases, however, it is currently underdeveloped. As well known, adeno virus (Ad) is the most widely used gene therapy vector. The aims of this study are to explore transduction efficiency of Ad in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue, thus further providing guidance for future prostate pathophysiological studies and therapeutic development of prostate diseases. We produced Ad expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), and characterized the transduction efficiency of Ad in both human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines in vitro, as well as prostate tumor xenograft, and wild-type mouse prostate tissue in vivo. Ad transduction efficiency was determined by EGFP fluorescence using microscopy and flow cytometry. Cell type-specific transduction was examined by immunofluorescence staining of cell markers. Our data showed that Ad efficiently transduced human and mouse prostate cancer cells in vitro in a dose dependent manner. Following intratumoral and intraprostate injection, Ad could efficiently transduce prostate tumor xenograft and the major prostatic cell types in vivo, respectively. Our findings suggest that Ad can efficiently transduce prostate tumor cells in vitro as well as xenograft and normal prostate tissue in vivo, and further indicate that Ad could be a potentially powerful toolbox for future gene therapy of prostate diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Discovery and Classification of Fusion Transcripts in Prostate Cancer and Normal Prostate Tissue.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian-Hua; Liu, Silvia; Zuo, Ze-Hua; Chen, Rui; Tseng, George C; Yu, Yan P

    2015-07-01

    Fusion transcript formation is one of the fundamental mechanisms that drives the development of prostate cancer. Because of the advance of high-throughput parallel sequencing, many fusion transcripts have been discovered. However, the discovery rate of fusion transcripts specific for prostate cancer is lagging behind the discoveries made on chromosome abnormalities of prostate cancer. Recent analyses suggest that many fusion transcripts are present in both benign and cancerous tissues. Some of these fusion transcripts likely represent important components of normal gene expression in cells. It is necessary to identify the criteria and features of fusion transcripts that are specific for cancer. In this review, we discuss optimization of RNA sequencing depth for fusion transcript discovery and the characteristics of fusion transcripts in normal prostate tissues and prostate cancer. We also propose a new classification of cancer-specific fusion transcripts on the basis of their tail gene fusion protein product and the roles that these fusions may play in cancer development.

  5. Computer-Aided Detection of Prostate Cancer on Tissue Sections

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yahui; Jiang, Yulei; Chuang, Shang-Tian; Yang, Ximing J.

    2009-01-01

    We report an automated computer technique for detection of prostate cancer in prostate tissue sections processed with immunohistochemistry. Two sets of color optical images were acquired from prostate tissue sections stained with a double-chromogen triple-antibody cocktail combining alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR), p63, and high-molecular-weight cytokeratin (HMWCK). The first set of images consisted of 20 training images (10 malignant) used for developing the computer technique and 15 test images (7 malignant) used for testing and optimizing the technique. The second set of images consisted of 299 images (114 malignant) used for evaluation of the performance of the computer technique. The computer technique identified image segments of AMACR-labeled malignant epithelial cells (red), p63-and HMWCK-labeled benign basal cells (brown), and secretory and stromal cells (blue) for identifying prostate cancer automatically. The sensitivity and specificity of the computer technique were 94% (16/17) and 94% (17/18), respectively, on the first (training and test) set of images, and 88% (79/90) and 97% (136/140), respectively, on the second (validation) set of images. If high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), which is a precursor of cancer, and atypical cases were included, the sensitivity and specificity were 85% (97/114) and 89% (165/185), respectively. These results show that the novel automated computer technique can accurately identify prostatic adenocarcinoma in the triple-antibody cocktail-stained prostate sections. PMID:19417626

  6. Inflammation in Benign Prostate Tissue and Prostate Cancer in the Finasteride Arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.

    PubMed

    Murtola, Teemu J; Gurel, Bora; Umbehr, Martin; Lucia, M Scott; Thompson, Ian M; Goodman, Phyllis J; Kristal, Alan R; Parnes, Howard L; Lippman, Scott M; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Peskoe, Sarah B; Barber, John R; Drake, Charles G; Nelson, William G; De Marzo, Angelo M; Platz, Elizabeth A

    2016-03-01

    A previous analysis of the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) reported 82% overall prevalence of intraprostatic inflammation and identified a link between inflammation and higher-grade prostate cancer and serum PSA. Here, we studied these associations in the PCPT finasteride arm. Prostate cancer cases (N = 197) detected either on a clinically indicated biopsy or on protocol-directed end-of-study biopsy, and frequency-matched controls (N = 248) with no cancer on an end-of-study biopsy were sampled from the finasteride arm. Inflammation in benign prostate tissue was visually assessed using digital images of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. Logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. In the finasteride arm, 91.6% of prostate cancer cases and 92.4% of controls had at least one biopsy core with inflammation in benign areas (P < 0.001 for difference compared with placebo arm). Overall, the odds of prostate cancer did not differ by prevalence [OR, 0.90; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.44-1.84] or extent (P trend = 0.68) of inflammation. Inflammation was not associated with higher-grade disease (prevalence: OR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.43-2.69). Furthermore, mean PSA concentration did not differ by the prevalence or extent of inflammation in either cases or controls. The prevalence of intraprostatic inflammation was higher in the finasteride than placebo arm of the PCPT, with no association with higher-grade prostate cancer. Finasteride may attenuate the association between inflammation and higher-grade prostate cancer. Moreover, the missing link between intraprostatic inflammation and PSA suggests that finasteride may reduce inflammation-associated PSA elevation. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed prostate cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Hood, Brian L; Darfler, Marlene M; Guiel, Thomas G; Furusato, Bungo; Lucas, David A; Ringeisen, Bradley R; Sesterhenn, Isabell A; Conrads, Thomas P; Veenstra, Timothy D; Krizman, David B

    2005-11-01

    Proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue would enable retrospective biomarker investigations of this vast archive of pathologically characterized clinical samples that exist worldwide. These FFPE tissues are, however, refractory to proteomic investigations utilizing many state of the art methodologies largely due to the high level of covalently cross-linked proteins arising from formalin fixation. A novel tissue microdissection technique has been developed and combined with a method to extract soluble peptides directly from FFPE tissue for mass spectral analysis of prostate cancer (PCa) and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). Hundreds of proteins from PCa and BPH tissue were identified, including several known PCa markers such as prostate-specific antigen, prostatic acid phosphatase, and macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1. Quantitative proteomic profiling utilizing stable isotope labeling confirmed similar expression levels of prostate-specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase in BPH and PCa cells, whereas the expression of macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 was found to be greater in PCa as compared with BPH cells.

  8. Inflammation in benign prostate tissue and prostate cancer in the finasteride arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial*

    PubMed Central

    Murtola, Teemu J.; Gurel, Bora; Umbehr, Martin; Lucia, M. Scott; Thompson, Ian M.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Kristal, Alan R.; Parnes, Howard L.; Lippman, Scott M.; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Barber, John R.; Drake, Charles G.; Nelson, William G.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A previous analysis of the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) reported 82% overall prevalence of intraprostatic inflammation and identified a link between inflammation and higher-grade prostate cancer and serum PSA. Here we studied these associations in the PCPT finasteride arm. Methods Prostate cancer cases (N=197) detected either on a clinically indicated biopsy or on protocol-directed end-of-study biopsy, and frequency-matched controls (N=248) with no cancer on an end-of-study biopsy were sampled from the finasteride arm. Inflammation in benign prostate tissue was visually assessed using digital images of H&E stained sections. Logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. Results In the finasteride arm, 91.6% of prostate cancer cases and 92.4% of controls had at least one biopsy core with inflammation in benign areas; p < 0.001 for difference compared to placebo arm. Overall, the odds of prostate cancer did not differ by prevalence (OR=0.90, 95% CI 0.44-1.84) or extent (P-trend=0.68) of inflammation. Inflammation was not associated with higher-grade disease (prevalence: OR=1.07, 95% CI 0.43-2.69). Furthermore, mean PSA concentration did not differ by the prevalence or extent of inflammationin either cases or controls. Conclusion The prevalence of intraprostatic inflammation was higher in the finasteride than placebo arm of the PCPT, with no association with higher-grade prostate cancer. Impact Finasteride may attenuate the association between inflammation and higher-grade prostate cancer. Moreover, the missing link between intraprostatic inflammation and PSA suggests that finasteride may reduce inflammation-associated PSA elevation. PMID:26715424

  9. Androgenic Regulation of White Adipose Tissue-Prostate Cancer Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    April 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Androgenic Regulation of White Adipose Tissue -Prostate Cancer Interactions 5b. GRANT NUMBER...Floryk D, Kurosaka S, Tanimoto R, Yang G, Goltsov A, Park S, Thompson TC. Castration- induced changes in mouse epididymal white adipose tissue . Mol Cell...1. Floryk D, Kurosaka S, Tanimoto R, Yang G, Goltsov A, Park S, Thompson TC. Castration- induced changes in mouse epididymal white adipose tissue

  10. Development of Assays for Detecting Significant Prostate Cancer Based on Molecular Alterations Associated with Cancer in Non-Neoplastic Prostate Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    prostate cancer ." Am J Pathol 181(1): 34-42. Li, M. and L. A. Cannizzaro (1999). "Identical clonal origin of synchronous and metachronous low-grade...significant prostate cancer based on molecular alterations associated with cancer in non-neoplastic prostate tissue PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...significant prostate cancer based on molecular alterations associated with cancer in non-neoplastic prostate tissue 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  11. Reduced expression of NGEP is associated with high-grade prostate cancers: a tissue microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Mohsenzadegan, Monireh; Madjd, Zahra; Asgari, Mojgan; Abolhasani, Maryam; Shekarabi, Mehdi; Taeb, Jaleh; Shariftabrizi, Ahmad

    2013-10-01

    New gene expressed in prostate (NGEP) is a newly diagnosed prostate-specific gene that is expressed only in normal prostate and prostate cancer cells. Discovery of tissue-specific markers may promote the development of novel targets for immunotherapy of prostate cancer. In the present study, the staining pattern and clinical significance of NGEP were evaluated in a series of prostate tissues composed of 123 prostate cancer, 19 high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and 44 samples of benign prostate tissue included in tissue microarrays using immunohistochemistry. Our study demonstrated that NGEP localized mainly in the apical and lateral membranes and was also partially distributed in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells of normal prostate tissue. All of the examined prostate tissues expressed NGEP with a variety of intensities; the level of expression was significantly more in the benign prostate tissues compared to malignant prostate samples (P value <0.001). Among prostate adenocarcinoma samples, a significant and inverse correlation was observed between the intensity of NGEP expression and increased Gleason score (P = 0.007). Taken together, we found that NGEP protein is widely expressed in low-grade to high-grade prostate adenocarcinomas as well as benign prostate tissues, and the intensity of expression is inversely proportional to the level of malignancy. NGEP could be an attractive target for immune-based therapy of prostate cancer patients as an alternative to the conventional therapies particularly in indolent patients.

  12. Indentation loading response of a resonance sensor--discriminating prostate cancer and normal tissue.

    PubMed

    Jalkanen, Ville; Andersson, Britt M; Bergh, Anders; Ljungberg, Börje; Lindahl, Olof A

    2013-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer among men worldwide. Mechanical properties of prostate tissue are promising for distinguishing prostate cancer from healthy prostate tissue. The aim was to investigate the indentation loading response of a resonance sensor for discriminating prostate cancer tissue from normal tissue. Indentation measurements were done on prostate tissue specimens ex vivo from 10 patients from radical prostatectomy. The measurement areas were analysed using standard histological methods. The stiffness parameter was linearly dependent on the loading force (average R(2 )= 0.90) and an increased loading force caused a greater stiffness contrast of prostate cancer vs normal tissue. The accuracy of the stiffness contrast was assessed by the ROC curve with the area under the curve being 0.941 for a loading force of 12.8 mN. The results are promising for the development of a resonance sensor instrument for detecting prostate cancer.

  13. Texture analysis of tissues in Gleason grading of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandratou, Eleni; Yova, Dido; Gorpas, Dimitris; Maragos, Petros; Agrogiannis, George; Kavantzas, Nikolaos

    2008-02-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy among maturing men and the second leading cause of cancer death in USA. Histopathological grading of prostate cancer is based on tissue structural abnormalities. Gleason grading system is the gold standard and is based on the organization features of prostatic glands. Although Gleason score has contributed on cancer prognosis and on treatment planning, its accuracy is about 58%, with this percentage to be lower in GG2, GG3 and GG5 grading. On the other hand it is strongly affected by "inter- and intra observer variations", making the whole process very subjective. Therefore, there is need for the development of grading tools based on imaging and computer vision techniques for a more accurate prostate cancer prognosis. The aim of this paper is the development of a novel method for objective grading of biopsy specimen in order to support histopathological prognosis of the tumor. This new method is based on texture analysis techniques, and particularly on Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) that estimates image properties related to second order statistics. Histopathological images of prostate cancer, from Gleason grade2 to Gleason grade 5, were acquired and subjected to image texture analysis. Thirteen texture characteristics were calculated from this matrix as they were proposed by Haralick. Using stepwise variable selection, a subset of four characteristics were selected and used for the description and classification of each image field. The selected characteristics profile was used for grading the specimen with the multiparameter statistical method of multiple logistic discrimination analysis. The subset of these characteristics provided 87% correct grading of the specimens. The addition of any of the remaining characteristics did not improve significantly the diagnostic ability of the method. This study demonstrated that texture analysis techniques could provide valuable grading decision support to the pathologists

  14. High risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) are present in benign prostate tissues before development of HPV associated prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Wendy K; Ngan, Christopher C; Amos, Timothy G; Edwards, Richard J; Swift, Joshua; Lutze-Mann, Louise; Shang, Fei; Whitaker, Noel J; Lawson, James S

    2017-01-01

    Although high risk HPVs are associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer it is not known if they have a causal role. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential role of human papilloma viruses (HPVs) in prostate cancer. The aims are (i) to investigate the presence and confirm the identity of high risk HPVs in benign prostate tissues prior to the development of HPV positive prostate cancer in the same patients, and (ii) to determine if HPVs are biologically active. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify HPVs in specimens from 52 Australian men with benign prostate biopsies who 1 to 10 years later developed prostate cancer. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to assess the expression of HPV E7 oncoproteins, cytokeratin and prostate specific antigen (PSA). We used RNASeq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to identify possible HPV RNA sequences in prostate cancer. HPV screening using standard PCR was conducted on 28 of the 52 sets of benign and later prostate cancers. HPV L1 genes were identified in 13 (46%) benign and 8 (29%) of 28 later prostate cancers in the same patients. HPV E7 genes were identified in 23 (82%) benign and 19 (68%) of 28 subsequent prostate cancers in the same patients. The same HPV types were present in both the benign and subsequent prostate cancers in 9 sets of specimens. HPV type 16 was identified in 15% of benign and 3% of prostate cancers. HPV type 18 was identified in 26% of benign and 16% of prostate cancers. Small numbers of HPV types 45, 47, 76 and 115 were also identified. High confidence RNA-Seq evidence for high risk HPV types 16 and 18 was identified in 12 (2%) of the 502 TCGA prostate cancer transcriptomes. High risk HPV E7 oncoprotein was positively expressed in 23 (82%) of 28 benign prostate specimens but only in 8 (29%) of 28 of the later prostate cancer specimens. This difference is statistically significant (p = 0.001). Prostate specific antigen (PSA) was more highly expressed in 26

  15. Prostate cancer outcome and tissue levels of metal ions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarafanov, A.G.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; MacIas, V.; Gao, W.; Liang, W.-M.; Beam, C.; Gray, Michael A.; Kajdacsy-Balla, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are several studies examining prostate cancer and exposure to cadmium, iron, selenium, and zinc. Less data are available on the possible influence of these metal ions on prostate cancer outcome. This study measured levels of these ions in prostatectomy samples in order to examine possible associations between metal concentrations and disease outcome. METHODS We obtained formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks of prostatectomy samples of 40 patients with PSA recurrence, matched 1:1 (for year of surgery, race, age, Gleason grading, and pathology TNM classification) with tissue blocks from 40 patients without recurrence (n = 80). Case-control pairs were compared for the levels of metals in areas adjacent to tumors. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for quantification of Cd, Fe, Zn, and Se. RESULTS Patients with biochemical (PSA) recurrence of disease had 12% lower median iron (95 ??g/g vs. 111 ??g/g; P = 0.04) and 21% lower zinc (279 ??g/g vs. 346 ??g/g; P = 0.04) concentrations in the normal-appearing tissue immediately adjacent to cancer areas. Differences in cadmium (0.489 ??g/g vs. 0.439 ??g/g; 4% higher) and selenium (1.68 ??g/g vs. 1.58 ??g/g; 5% higher) levels were not statistically significant in recurrence cases, when compared to non-recurrences (P = 0.40 and 0.21, respectively). CONCLUSIONS There is an association between low zinc and low iron prostate tissue levels and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. Whether these novel findings are a cause or effect of more aggressive tumors, or whether low zinc and iron prostatic levels raise implications for therapy, remains to be investigated. Copyright ?? 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Human periprostatic adipose tissue promotes prostate cancer aggressiveness in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness and mortality. The contribution of periprostatic adipose tissue, which is often infiltrated by malignant cells, to cancer progression is largely unknown. Thus, this study aimed to determine if periprostatic adipose tissue is linked with aggressive tumor biology in prostate cancer. Methods Supernatants of whole adipose tissue (explants) or stromal vascular fraction (SVF) from paired fat samples of periprostatic (PP) and pre-peritoneal visceral (VIS) anatomic origin from different donors were prepared and analyzed for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9 activity. The effects of those conditioned media (CM) on growth and migration of hormone-refractory (PC-3) and hormone-sensitive (LNCaP) prostate cancer cells were measured. Results We show here that PP adipose tissue of overweight men has higher MMP9 activity in comparison with normal subjects. The observed increased activities of both MMP2 and MMP9 in PP whole adipose tissue explants, likely reveal the contribution of adipocytes plus stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) as opposed to SVF alone. MMP2 activity was higher for PP when compared to VIS adipose tissue. When PC-3 cells were stimulated with CM from PP adipose tissue explants, increased proliferative and migratory capacities were observed, but not in the presence of SVF. Conversely, when LNCaP cells were stimulated with PP explants CM, we found enhanced motility despite the inhibition of proliferation, whereas CM derived from SVF increased both cell proliferation and motility. Explants culture and using adipose tissue of PP origin are most effective in promoting proliferation and migration of PC-3 cells, as respectively compared with SVF culture and using adipose tissue of VIS origin. In LNCaP cells, while explants CM cause increased migration compared to SVF, the use of PP adipose tissue to generate CM result in the increase of both cellular proliferation and migration. Conclusions Our

  17. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  18. Genome-wide DNA methylation measurements in prostate tissues uncovers novel prostate cancer diagnostic biomarkers and transcription factor binding patterns.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Marie K; Ramaker, Ryne C; Roberts, Brian S; Lasseigne, Brittany N; Gunther, David S; Burwell, Todd C; Davis, Nicholas S; Gulzar, Zulfiqar G; Absher, Devin M; Cooper, Sara J; Brooks, James D; Myers, Richard M

    2017-04-17

    Current diagnostic tools for prostate cancer lack specificity and sensitivity for detecting very early lesions. DNA methylation is a stable genomic modification that is detectable in peripheral patient fluids such as urine and blood plasma that could serve as a non-invasive diagnostic biomarker for prostate cancer. We measured genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in 73 clinically annotated fresh-frozen prostate cancers and 63 benign-adjacent prostate tissues using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. We overlaid the most significantly differentially methylated sites in the genome with transcription factor binding sites measured by the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements consortium. We used logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curves to assess the performance of candidate diagnostic models. We identified methylation patterns that have a high predictive power for distinguishing malignant prostate tissue from benign-adjacent prostate tissue, and these methylation signatures were validated using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas Project. Furthermore, by overlaying ENCODE transcription factor binding data, we observed an enrichment of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 binding in gene regulatory regions with higher DNA methylation in malignant prostate tissues. DNA methylation patterns are greatly altered in prostate cancer tissue in comparison to benign-adjacent tissue. We have discovered patterns of DNA methylation marks that can distinguish prostate cancers with high specificity and sensitivity in multiple patient tissue cohorts, and we have identified transcription factors binding in these differentially methylated regions that may play important roles in prostate cancer development.

  19. Automated prostate tissue referencing for cancer detection and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Jin Tae; Hewitt, Stephen M; Kajdacsy-Balla, André Alexander; Sinha, Saurabh; Bhargava, Rohit

    2016-06-01

    The current practice of histopathology review is limited in speed and accuracy. The current diagnostic paradigm does not fully describe the complex and complicated patterns of cancer. To address these needs, we develop an automated and objective system that facilitates a comprehensive and easy information management and decision-making. We also develop a tissue similarity measure scheme to broaden our understanding of tissue characteristics. The system includes a database of previously evaluated prostate tissue images, clinical information and a tissue retrieval process. In the system, a tissue is characterized by its morphology. The retrieval process seeks to find the closest matching cases with the tissue of interest. Moreover, we define 9 morphologic criteria by which a pathologist arrives at a histomorphologic diagnosis. Based on the 9 criteria, true tissue similarity is determined and serves as the gold standard of tissue retrieval. Here, we found a minimum of 4 and 3 matching cases, out of 5, for ~80 % and ~60 % of the queries when a match was defined as the tissue similarity score ≥5 and ≥6, respectively. We were also able to examine the relationship between tissues beyond the Gleason grading system due to the tissue similarity scoring system. Providing the closest matching cases and their clinical information with pathologists will help to conduct consistent and reliable diagnoses. Thus, we expect the system to facilitate quality maintenance and quality improvement of cancer pathology.

  20. Pilot Comparison of Stromal Gene Expression Among Normal Prostate Tissues and Primary Prostate Cancer Tissues in White and Black Men

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    microdissection, and expression analysis of prostate-stroma specific cells in normal and cancerous prostates, and aims to develop preliminary data...differences in both normal epithelial and stromal cells from fully normal prostates as compared to prostates containing adenocarcinoma which are now...4 Introduction Recent advances in prostate biology suggest that stromal cells surrounding prostate epithelia may play a key role in

  1. Sonohistology - ultrasonic tissue characterization for prostate cancer diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Scheipers, U; König, K; Sommerfeld, H-J; Garcia-Schürmann, M; Senge, T; Ermert, H

    2008-01-01

    A computer-aided diagnostic system for imaging prostate cancer has been developed in order to supplement today's conventional methods for the early detection of prostate carcinoma. The system is based on analysis of the spectral content of radiofrequency ultrasonic echo data in combination with evaluations of textural, contextual, morphological and clinical features in a multiparameter approach. A state-of-the-art, non-linear classifier, the so-called adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system, is used for higher-order classification of the underlying tissue-describing parameters. The system has been evaluated on radio-frequency ultrasound data originating from 100 patients using histological specimens obtained after prostatectomy as the gold standard. Leave-one-out cross-validation over patient data sets results in areas under the ROC curve of 0.86 +/- 0.01 for hypoechoic and hyperechoic tumors and of 0.84 +/- 0.02 for isoechoic tumors, respectively.

  2. Expression of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) in prostate cancer: a tissue microarray study of Iranian patients.

    PubMed

    Taeb, Jaleh; Asgari, Mojgan; Abolhasani, Maryam; Farajollahi, Mohammad M; Madjd, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Proteins expressed in prostate cancer, including prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), have been investigated as biomarkers for diagnosis and therapy of prostate cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of PSCA expression was performed on tissue microarrays of 185 paraffin-embedded tissues of Iranian patients, including 114 prostate cancers (PCa), 21 High Grade Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasias (HGPIN) and 50 samples of benign prostate tissue. The level of PSCA expression was compared between benign tissues, HGPIN and PCa. Then the correlations of PSCA expression with clinicopathologic parameters were assessed in PCa. The PSCA expression was detected in the membrane and cytoplasm of epithelial secretory cells in normal prostate tissues, HGPIN and PCa with a variety of intensities. The intensity of PSCA staining was significantly increased in the PCa group as compared with HGPIN and benign prostate tissues (P-value<0.05). Moreover, the level of PSCA expression was increased with higher Gleason score of PCa (P-value=0.036). The data presented here revealed that expression of PSCA as a cell surface marker increased from benign prostate tissues (BPH) and HGPIN to PCa, and its expression in PCa was positively associated with poor cell differentiation, suggesting that PSCA could be considered as a valuable target for diagnosis and therapy of PCa. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Do Black NonHispanic Men Produce Less Prostate Specific Antigen in Benign Prostate Tissue or Cancer Compared to White NonHispanic Men with Gleason Score 6 (Grade Group 1) Prostate Cancer?

    PubMed

    Kryvenko, Oleksandr N; Epstein, Jonathan I; Cote, Richard J

    2016-12-01

    We evaluated prostate specific antigen production by benign prostate tissue and Gleason score 3+3=6 (Grade Group 1) prostate cancer in black and white nonHispanic men. We used Gleason score 3+3=6 (Grade Group 1) cases to assess prostate specific antigen production by benign prostate tissue in cases with low volume cancer that did not influence prostate specific antigen and in those with high volume cancer in which gland weight did not influence prostate specific antigen. We then created age, prostate specific antigen and prostate weight adjusted cohorts to demonstrate tumor volume per 1 ng/ml prostate specific antigen and 1 μg prostate specific antigen mass. Prostate specific antigen density and prostate specific antigen mass density were used to adjust for prostate weight. Comparison of 58 black and 301 white men with low volume cancer demonstrated equal prostate specific antigen production by benign prostate tissue. Comparison of 30 black and 75 white men with high volume cancer indicated that prostate specific antigen was being driven by cancer volume, with lower prostate specific antigen production in black men. In the cohort of 54 black and 134 white men matched by age, prostate specific antigen and prostate weight, tumor volume per 1 ng/ml prostate specific antigen or 1 μg prostate specific antigen mass adjusted for prostate weight was 25% and 26% higher in black men, respectively. Benign prostate tissue produces equal amounts of prostate specific antigen in black and white men. Gleason score 3+3=6 (Grade Group 1) prostate cancer produces less prostate specific antigen in black men. These data should be considered for lowering prostate specific antigen and its derivatives in determining biopsy thresholds and for adjusting values for active surveillance criteria in black men. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Obesity and prostate cancer: gene expression signature of human periprostatic adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ricardo; Monteiro, Cátia; Catalán, Victoria; Hu, Pingzhao; Cunha, Virgínia; Rodríguez, Amaia; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Fraga, Avelino; Príncipe, Paulo; Lobato, Carlos; Lobo, Francisco; Morais, António; Silva, Vitor; Sanches-Magalhães, José; Oliveira, Jorge; Pina, Francisco; Lopes, Carlos; Medeiros, Rui; Frühbeck, Gema

    2012-09-25

    Periprostatic (PP) adipose tissue surrounds the prostate, an organ with a high predisposition to become malignant. Frequently, growing prostatic tumor cells extend beyond the prostatic organ towards this fat depot. This study aimed to determine the genome-wide expression of genes in PP adipose tissue in obesity/overweight (OB/OW) and prostate cancer patients. Differentially expressed genes in human PP adipose tissue were identified using microarrays. Analyses were conducted according to the donors' body mass index characteristics (OB/OW versus lean) and prostate disease (extra prostatic cancer versus organ confined prostate cancer versus benign prostatic hyperplasia). Selected genes with altered expression were validated by real-time PCR. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was used to investigate gene ontology, canonical pathways and functional networks. In the PP adipose tissue of OB/OW subjects, we found altered expression of genes encoding molecules involved in adipogenic/anti-lipolytic, proliferative/anti-apoptotic, and mild immunoinflammatory processes (for example, FADS1, down-regulated, and LEP and ANGPT1, both up-regulated). Conversely, in the PP adipose tissue of subjects with prostate cancer, altered genes were related to adipose tissue cellular activity (increased cell proliferation/differentiation, cell cycle activation and anti-apoptosis), whereas a downward impact on immunity and inflammation was also observed, mostly related to the complement (down-regulation of CFH). Interestingly, we found that the microRNA MIRLET7A2 was overexpressed in the PP adipose tissue of prostate cancer patients. Obesity and excess adiposity modified the expression of PP adipose tissue genes to ultimately foster fat mass growth. In patients with prostate cancer the expression profile of PP adipose tissue accounted for hypercellularity and reduced immunosurveillance. Both findings may be liable to promote a favorable environment for prostate cancer progression.

  5. Obesity and prostate cancer: gene expression signature of human periprostatic adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Periprostatic (PP) adipose tissue surrounds the prostate, an organ with a high predisposition to become malignant. Frequently, growing prostatic tumor cells extend beyond the prostatic organ towards this fat depot. This study aimed to determine the genome-wide expression of genes in PP adipose tissue in obesity/overweight (OB/OW) and prostate cancer patients. Methods Differentially expressed genes in human PP adipose tissue were identified using microarrays. Analyses were conducted according to the donors' body mass index characteristics (OB/OW versus lean) and prostate disease (extra prostatic cancer versus organ confined prostate cancer versus benign prostatic hyperplasia). Selected genes with altered expression were validated by real-time PCR. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was used to investigate gene ontology, canonical pathways and functional networks. Results In the PP adipose tissue of OB/OW subjects, we found altered expression of genes encoding molecules involved in adipogenic/anti-lipolytic, proliferative/anti-apoptotic, and mild immunoinflammatory processes (for example, FADS1, down-regulated, and LEP and ANGPT1, both up-regulated). Conversely, in the PP adipose tissue of subjects with prostate cancer, altered genes were related to adipose tissue cellular activity (increased cell proliferation/differentiation, cell cycle activation and anti-apoptosis), whereas a downward impact on immunity and inflammation was also observed, mostly related to the complement (down-regulation of CFH). Interestingly, we found that the microRNA MIRLET7A2 was overexpressed in the PP adipose tissue of prostate cancer patients. Conclusions Obesity and excess adiposity modified the expression of PP adipose tissue genes to ultimately foster fat mass growth. In patients with prostate cancer the expression profile of PP adipose tissue accounted for hypercellularity and reduced immunosurveillance. Both findings may be liable to promote a favorable environment for

  6. A comparison of virtual touch tissue quantification and digital rectal examination for discrimination between prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaozhi; Ji, Ping; Mao, Hongwei; Hu, Jianqun

    2012-03-01

    Virtual touch tissue quantification (VTTQ) is a new, promising technique for detecting the stiffness of tissues. The aim of this study is to compare the performance of VTTQ and digital rectal examination (DRE) in discrimination between prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). VTTQ was performed in 209 prostate nodular lesions of 107 patients with BPH and suspected prostate cancer before the prostate histopathologic examination. The shear wave velocity (SWV) at each nodular lesion was quantified by implementing an acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI). The performance of VTTQ and DRE in discrimination between prostate cancer and BPH was compared. The diagnostic value of VTTQ and DRE for prostate cancer was evaluated in terms of the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy. Prostate cancer was detected in 57 prostate nodular lesions by histopathologic examination. The SWV values (m/s) were significantly greater in prostate cancer and BPH than in normal prostate (2.37 ± 0.94, 1.98 ± 0.82 vs. 1.34 ± 0.47). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for VTTQ (SWV>2.5m/s) to differentiate prostate nodules as benign hyperplasia or malignancy was 0.86, while it was 0.67 for DRE. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 71.93 %, 87.5 %, 68.33 %, 89.26 %, 83.25 %, respectively for VTTQ (SWV>2.5m/s), whereas they were 33.33 %, 81.57 %, 40.43 %, 76.54 %, 68.42 % respectively for DRE. VTTQ can effectively detect the stiffness of prostate nodular lesions, which has a significantly higher performance than DRE in discrimination between prostate cancer and BPH.

  7. Estradiol suppresses tissue androgens and prostate cancer growth in castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Estrogens suppress tumor growth in prostate cancer which progresses despite anorchid serum androgen levels, termed castration resistant prostate cancers (CRPC), although the mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that estrogen inhibits CRPC in anorchid animals by suppressing tumoral androgens, an effect independent of the estrogen receptor. Methods The human CRPC xenograft LuCaP 35V was implanted into orchiectomized male SCID mice and established tumors were treated with placebo, 17β-estradiol or 17β-estradiol and estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. Effects of 17β-estradiol on tumor growth were evaluated and tissue testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) evaluated by mass spectrometry. Results Treatment of LuCaP 35V with 17β-estradiol slowed tumor growth compared to controls (tumor volume at day 21: 785 ± 81 mm3 vs. 1195 ± 84 mm3, p = 0.002). Survival was also significantly improved in animals treated with 17β-estradiol (p = 0.03). The addition of the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 did not significantly change survival or growth. 17β-estradiol in the presence and absence of ICI 182,780 suppressed tumor testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) as assayed by mass spectrometry. Tissue androgens in placebo treated LuCaP 35V xenografts were; T = 0.71 ± 0.28 pg/mg and DHT = 1.73 ± 0.36 pg/mg. In 17β-estradiol treated LuCaP35V xenografts the tissue androgens were, T = 0.20 ± 0.10 pg/mg and DHT = 0.15 ± 0.15 pg/mg, (p < 0.001 vs. controls). Levels of T and DHT in control liver tissue were < 0.2 pg/mg. Conclusions CRPC in anorchid animals maintains tumoral androgen levels despite castration. 17β-estradiol significantly suppressed tumor T and DHT and inhibits growth of CRPC in an estrogen receptor independent manner. The ability to manipulate tumoral androgens will be critical in the development and testing of agents targeting CRPC through tissue steroidogenesis. PMID:20509933

  8. Gene expression profiling of prostate tissue identifies chromatin regulation as a potential link between obesity and lethal prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ebot, Ericka M; Gerke, Travis; Labbé, David P; Sinnott, Jennifer A; Zadra, Giorgia; Rider, Jennifer R; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Wilson, Kathryn M; Kelly, Rachel S; Shui, Irene M; Loda, Massimo; Kantoff, Philip W; Finn, Stephen; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Brown, Myles; Giovannucci, Edward L; Mucci, Lorelei A

    2017-07-12

    Obese men are at higher risk of advanced prostate cancer and cancer-specific mortality; however, the biology underlying this association remains unclear. This study examined gene expression profiles of prostate tissue to identify biological processes differentially expressed by obesity status and lethal prostate cancer. Gene expression profiling was performed on tumor (n = 402) and adjacent normal (n = 200) prostate tissue from participants in 2 prospective cohorts who had been diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1982 to 2005. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from the questionnaire immediately preceding cancer diagnosis. Men were followed for metastases or prostate cancer-specific death (lethal disease) through 2011. Gene Ontology biological processes differentially expressed by BMI were identified using gene set enrichment analysis. Pathway scores were computed by averaging the signal intensities of member genes. Odds ratios (ORs) for lethal prostate cancer were estimated with logistic regression. Among 402 men, 48% were healthy weight, 31% were overweight, and 21% were very overweight/obese. Fifteen gene sets were enriched in tumor tissue, but not normal tissue, of very overweight/obese men versus healthy-weight men; 5 of these were related to chromatin modification and remodeling (false-discovery rate < 0.25). Patients with high tumor expression of chromatin-related genes had worse clinical characteristics (Gleason grade > 7, 41% vs 17%; P = 2 × 10(-4) ) and an increased risk of lethal disease that was independent of grade and stage (OR, 5.26; 95% confidence interval, 2.37-12.25). This study improves our understanding of the biology of aggressive prostate cancer and identifies a potential mechanistic link between obesity and prostate cancer death that warrants further study. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  9. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate cancer Overview Prostate cancer is cancer that occurs in the prostate — a small walnut-shaped gland in men that produces the seminal fluid that nourishes and transports sperm. Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of ...

  10. Racial differences in adipose tissue distribution and risk of aggressive prostate cancer among men undergoing radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Allott, Emma H; Howard, Lauren E; Song, Hai-Jun; Sourbeer, Katharine N; Koontz, Bridget F; Salama, Joseph K; Freedland, Stephen J

    2014-11-01

    Although elevated body mass index (BMI) has been associated with increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer, the importance of adipose tissue distribution is not well understood. We examined associations between overall and visceral obesity and aggressive prostate cancer risk. Moreover, given racial differences in adipose tissue distribution, we examined whether race modified these associations. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 308 radiotherapy-treated patients with prostate cancer within the Durham VA from 2005 to 2011. Multivariable logistic regression examined the association between BMI categories and tertiles of waist circumference (WC), visceral fat area (VFA), and periprostatic adipose tissue area (PPAT) with high-grade prostate cancer risk (Gleason score ≥7 vs. ≤6). Models stratified by race examined whether these associations differed between black and nonblack men. Both elevated BMI (Ptrend = 0.054) and WC (Ptrend = 0.040) were associated with increased high-grade prostate cancer risk, with similar results between races, although the association with BMI was not statistically significant. In contrast, elevated VFA was associated with increased aggressive prostate cancer risk in black men (Ptrend = 0.002) but not nonblack men (Ptrend = 0.831), with a significant interaction between race and VFA (Pinteraction = 0.035). Though similar patterns were observed for PPAT, none was statistically significant. Among men undergoing radiotherapy for prostate cancer, visceral obesity is associated with increased aggressive prostate cancer risk, particularly among black men. If confirmed in future studies, these results suggest that adipose tissue distribution differences may contribute to prostate cancer racial disparity. These findings highlight the need to elucidate mechanisms contributing to racial differences in the association between visceral obesity and aggressive prostate cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. MicroRNA-181b expression in prostate cancer tissues and its influence on the biological behavior of the prostate cancer cell line PC-3.

    PubMed

    He, L; Yao, H; Fan, L H; Liu, L; Qiu, S; Li, X; Gao, J P; Hao, C Q

    2013-04-02

    We examined microRNA-181b (miRNA) expression in prostate cancer tissues and its effect on the prostate cancer cell line PC-3. Tissues from 27 cases of prostate cancer and 30 samples of normal human prostate were collected by surgical removal. Total miRNA was extracted, and the relative expression of miR-181b was quantified using RT-PCR. miR-181b ASO was transfected into prostate cancer PC-3 cells. miR-181b expression in transfected and non-transfected cells was measured using RT-PCR. Changes in cell apoptosis were measured using flow cytometry. MTT and cell growth curve methods were used to assess the influence of miR-181b expression on cell proliferation. The changes in cell invasive ability in vitro were detected using the Transwell chamber method. miR-181b was up-regulated in the prostate cancer tissues compared with the normal prostate samples. It was down-regulated after miR-181b ASO transfection into the prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Down-regulation of miR-181b in the PC-3 cell induced apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, and depressed invasion of PC-3 cells in vitro. As miR-181b is over-expressed in prostate cancer, its down-regulation could have potential as gene therapy for prostate cancer by inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation and depressing invasion by cancer cells.

  12. Prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  13. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy of human body fluids and tissues in relation to prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virendra; Dwivedi, Durgesh K; Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution NMR spectroscopic studies of prostate tissue extracts, prostatic fluid, seminal fluid, serum and urine can be used for the detection of prostate cancer, based on the differences in their metabolic profiles. Useful diagnostic information is obtained by the detection or quantification of as many metabolites as possible and comparison with normal samples. Only a few studies have shown the potential of high-resolution in vitro NMR of prostate tissues. A survey of the literature has revealed that studies on body fluids, such as urine and serum, in relation to prostate cancer are rare. In addition, the potential of NMR of nuclei other than (1)H, such as (13)C and (31)P, has not been exploited fully. The metabolomic analysis of metabolites, detected by high-resolution NMR, may help to identify metabolites which could serve as useful biomarkers for prostate cancer detection. Such NMR-derived biomarkers would not only help in prostate cancer detection and in understanding the in vivo MRS metabolic profile, but also to investigate the biochemical and metabolic changes associated with cancer. Here, we review the published research work on body fluids in relation to prostate and prostate tissue extracts, and highlight the potential of such studies for future work. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Determination of optical coefficients and fractal dimensional parameters of cancerous and normal prostate tissues.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Al-Rubaiee, Mohammad; Gayen, Swapan Kumar; Xu, Min

    2012-07-01

    Optical extinction and diffuse reflection spectra of cancerous and normal prostate tissues in the 750 to 860 nm spectral range were measured. Optical extinction measurements using thin ex vivo prostate tissue samples were used to determine the scattering coefficient (μ(s)), while diffuse reflection measurements using thick prostate tissue samples were used to extract the absorption coefficient (μ(a)) and the reduced scattering coefficient (μ'(s)). The anisotropy factor (g) was obtained using the extracted values of μ(s) and μ'(s). The values of fractal dimension (D(f)) of cancerous and normal prostate tissues were obtained by fitting to the wavelength dependence of μ'(s). The number of scattering particles contributing to μ(s) as a function of particle size and the cutoff diameter d(max) as a function of g were investigated using the fractal soft tissue model and Mie theory. Results show that d(max) of the normal tissue is larger than that of the cancerous tissue. The cutoff diameter d(max) is observed to agree with the nuclear size for the normal tissues and the nucleolar size for the cancerous tissues. Transmission spectral polarization imaging measurements were performed that could distinguish the cancerous prostate tissue samples from the normal tissue samples based on the differences between their absorption and scattering parameters.

  15. Prostate Cancer Pathology Resource Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    researchers. Specimens include prostatectomy tissues (frozen, paraffin embedded, and tissue microarrays (TMAs), serum, plasma, buffy coat, prostatic fluid...Prostate Cancer, biorepository, biomarkers, tissue microarrays 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a...usage by the prostate cancer research community. The specimens in the PCBN include tissues from prostatectomies, serum, plasma, buffy coat, prostatic

  16. Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    annotated with the biospecimens. Specialized processing consists of tissue microarray design and construction. Biospecimens (mainly tissue ...provide much sought after biospecimens for prostate cancer research. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate Cancer, Biorepository, tissue microarrays, tissue ...and harmonizing a set of common data elements (CDEs): Completed in 1st quarter (October 2014) Task 3. Submit SOPs currently in use to Coordinating

  17. Biomarkers of Oxidative Injury and Their Modulation in Prostate Tissue from Patients with Prostatic Tissue from Patients with Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    several of these agents, including vitamin E and sulindac , may be protective against prostate and other epithelial cancers (7) (8). In fact, there is in...vitro data suggesting that human PCa cell line growth is also inhibited by sulindac treatment (9). There is conflicting data on whether consumption of...Celano, P., Booker, S.V., Robinson, C.R. and Offerhaus, G.J., Treatment of colonic and rectal adenomas with sulindac in familial adenomatous polyposis

  18. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  19. An informatics model for tissue banks – Lessons learned from the Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashokkumar A; Gilbertson, John R; Parwani, Anil V; Dhir, Rajiv; Datta, Milton W; Gupta, Rajnish; Berman, Jules J; Melamed, Jonathan; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Orenstein, Jan; Becich, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    Background Advances in molecular biology and growing requirements from biomarker validation studies have generated a need for tissue banks to provide quality-controlled tissue samples with standardized clinical annotation. The NCI Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource (CPCTR) is a distributed tissue bank that comprises four academic centers and provides thousands of clinically annotated prostate cancer specimens to researchers. Here we describe the CPCTR information management system architecture, common data element (CDE) development, query interfaces, data curation, and quality control. Methods Data managers review the medical records to collect and continuously update information for the 145 clinical, pathological and inventorial CDEs that the Resource maintains for each case. An Access-based data entry tool provides de-identification and a standard communication mechanism between each group and a central CPCTR database. Standardized automated quality control audits have been implemented. Centrally, an Oracle database has web interfaces allowing multiple user-types, including the general public, to mine de-identified information from all of the sites with three levels of specificity and granularity as well as to request tissues through a formal letter of intent. Results Since July 2003, CPCTR has offered over 6,000 cases (38,000 blocks) of highly characterized prostate cancer biospecimens, including several tissue microarrays (TMA). The Resource developed a website with interfaces for the general public as well as researchers and internal members. These user groups have utilized the web-tools for public query of summary data on the cases that were available, to prepare requests, and to receive tissues. As of December 2005, the Resource received over 130 tissue requests, of which 45 have been reviewed, approved and filled. Additionally, the Resource implemented the TMA Data Exchange Specification in its TMA program and created a computer program for

  20. An informatics model for tissue banks--lessons learned from the Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ashokkumar A; Gilbertson, John R; Parwani, Anil V; Dhir, Rajiv; Datta, Milton W; Gupta, Rajnish; Berman, Jules J; Melamed, Jonathan; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Orenstein, Jan; Becich, Michael J

    2006-05-05

    Advances in molecular biology and growing requirements from biomarker validation studies have generated a need for tissue banks to provide quality-controlled tissue samples with standardized clinical annotation. The NCI Cooperative Prostate Cancer Tissue Resource (CPCTR) is a distributed tissue bank that comprises four academic centers and provides thousands of clinically annotated prostate cancer specimens to researchers. Here we describe the CPCTR information management system architecture, common data element (CDE) development, query interfaces, data curation, and quality control. Data managers review the medical records to collect and continuously update information for the 145 clinical, pathological and inventorial CDEs that the Resource maintains for each case. An Access-based data entry tool provides de-identification and a standard communication mechanism between each group and a central CPCTR database. Standardized automated quality control audits have been implemented. Centrally, an Oracle database has web interfaces allowing multiple user-types, including the general public, to mine de-identified information from all of the sites with three levels of specificity and granularity as well as to request tissues through a formal letter of intent. Since July 2003, CPCTR has offered over 6,000 cases (38,000 blocks) of highly characterized prostate cancer biospecimens, including several tissue microarrays (TMA). The Resource developed a website with interfaces for the general public as well as researchers and internal members. These user groups have utilized the web-tools for public query of summary data on the cases that were available, to prepare requests, and to receive tissues. As of December 2005, the Resource received over 130 tissue requests, of which 45 have been reviewed, approved and filled. Additionally, the Resource implemented the TMA Data Exchange Specification in its TMA program and created a computer program for calculating PSA recurrence

  1. Androgenic Regulation of White Adipose Tissue-Prostate Cancer Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    with prostate cancer, is associated with insulin resistance, type-2 diabetes , the metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease in general (Bain, 2010...initially sensitive to hormonal manipulation, and androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) generally reverses androgen receptor (AR)– dependent growth and...hormone-insensitive population of cancer cells as a result of suppression by androgen ablation of the androgen- dependent cell population; activation of

  2. Evidence for a Proapoptotic Role of Matrix Metalloproteinase-26 in Human Prostate Cancer Cells and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Khamis, Zahraa I.; Iczkowski, Kenneth A.; Man, Yan-Gao; Bou-Dargham, Mayassa J.; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play intricate roles in cancer progression; some promote invasion and angiogenesis while others suppress tumor growth. For example, human MMP-26/endometase/matrilysin-2 was reported to be either protective or pro-tumorigenic. Our previous reports suggested pro-invasion and anti-inflammation properties in prostate cancer. Here, we provide evidence for a protective role of MMP-26 in the prostate. MMP-26 expression levels in androgen-repressed human prostate cancer (ARCaP) cells, transfected with sense or anti-sense MMP-26 cDNA, are directly correlated with those of the pro-apoptotic marker Bax. Immunohistochemical staining of prostate cancer tissue samples shows similar protein expression patterns, correlating the expression levels of MMP-26 and Bax in benign, neoplastic, and invasive prostate cancer tissues. The MMP-26 protein levels were upregulated in high grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and decreased during the course of disease progression. Further analysis using an indirect terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay showed that many tumor cells expressing MMP-26 were undergoing apoptosis. This study showed that the high level of MMP-26 expression is positively correlated with the presence of apoptotic cells. This pro-apoptotic role of MMP-26 in human prostate cancer cells and tissues may enhance our understanding of the paradoxical roles of MMP-26 in tumor invasion and progression. PMID:26722363

  3. Tissue mimicking materials for the detection of prostate cancer using shear wave elastography: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Cao, Rui; Huang, Zhihong; Varghese, Tomy; Nabi, Ghulam

    2013-02-01

    Quantification of stiffness changes may provide important diagnostic information and aid in the early detection of cancers. Shear wave elastography is an imaging technique that assesses tissue stiffness using acoustic radiation force as an alternate to manual palpation reported previously with quasistatic elastography. In this study, the elastic properties of tissue mimicking materials, including agar, polyacrylamide (PAA), and silicone, are evaluated with an objective to determine material characteristics which resemble normal and cancerous prostate tissue. Acoustic properties and stiffness of tissue mimicking phantoms were measured using compressional mechanical testing and shear wave elastography using supersonic shear imaging. The latter is based on the principles of shear waves generated using acoustic radiation force. The evaluation included tissue mimicking materials (TMMs) within the prostate at different positions and sizes that could mimic cancerous and normal prostate tissue. Patient data on normal and prostate cancer tissues quantified using biopsy histopathology were used to validate the findings. Pathologist reports on histopathology were blinded to mechanical testing and elastographic findings. Young's modulus values of 86.2 ± 4.5 and 271.5 ± 25.7 kPa were obtained for PAA mixed with 2% Al(2)O(3) particles and silicone, respectively. Young's modulus of TMMs from mechanical compression testing showed a clear trend of increasing stiffness with an increasing percentage of agar. The silicone material had higher stiffness values when compared with PAA with Al(2)O(3). The mean Young's modulus value in cancerous tissue was 90.5 ± 4.5 kPa as compared to 93.8 ± 4.4 and 86.2 ± 4.5 kPa obtained with PAA with 2% Al(2)O(3) phantom at a depth of 52.4 and 36.6 mm, respectively. PAA mixed with Al(2)O(3) provides the most suitable tissue mimicking material for prostate cancer tumor material, while agar could form the surrounding background to simulate normal

  4. Chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue is associated with high-grade prostate cancer in the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial*

    PubMed Central

    Gurel, Bora; Lucia, M. Scott; Thompson, Ian M.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Tangen, Catherine M.; Kristal, Alan R.; Parnes, Howard L.; Hoque, Ashraful; Lippman, Scott M.; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Drake, Charles G.; Nelson, William G.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is hypothesized to influence prostate cancer development, although a definitive link has not been established. Methods Prostate cancer cases (N=191) detected on a for-cause (clinically indicated) or end-of-study (protocol directed) biopsy, and frequency-matched controls (N=209), defined as negative for cancer on an end-of-study biopsy, were sampled from the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. Inflammation prevalence and extent in benign areas of biopsy cores were visually assessed using digital images of H&E stained sections. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations. Results 86.2% of cases and 78.2% of controls had at least one biopsy core (of 3 assessed) with inflammation in benign areas, most of which was chronic. Men who had at least one biopsy core with inflammation had 1.78 (95% CI 1.04–3.06) times the odds of prostate cancer compared with men who had zero cores with inflammation. The association was stronger for high-grade disease (Gleason sum 7–10, N=94; odds ratio [OR]=2.24, 95% CI 1.06–4.71). These patterns were present when restricting to cases and controls in whom intraprostatic inflammation was the least likely to have influenced biopsy recommendation because their PSA was low (<2 ng/mL at biopsy). Conclusion Inflammation, most of which was chronic, was common in benign prostate tissue, and was positively associated with prostate cancer, especially high-grade. The association did not appear to be due to detection bias. Impact This study supports an etiologic link between inflammation and prostate carcinogenesis, and suggests an avenue for prevention by mitigating intraprostatic inflammation. PMID:24748218

  5. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Prostate Cancer Key Points Prostate cancer is a disease in ...

  6. A Prospective Study of Chronic Inflammation in Benign Prostate Tissue and Risk of Prostate Cancer: Linked PCPT and SELECT Cohorts.

    PubMed

    Platz, Elizabeth A; Kulac, Ibrahim; Barber, John R; Drake, Charles G; Joshu, Corinne E; Nelson, William G; Lucia, M Scott; Klein, Eric A; Lippman, Scott M; Parnes, Howard L; Thompson, Ian M; Goodman, Phyllis J; Tangen, Catherine M; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2017-10-01

    Background: We leveraged two trials to test the hypothesis of an inflammation-prostate cancer link prospectively in men without indication for biopsy.Methods: Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) participants who had an end-of-study biopsy performed per protocol that was negative for cancer and who subsequently enrolled in the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) were eligible. We selected all 100 cases and sampled 200 frequency-matched controls and used PCPT end-of-study biopsies as "baseline." Five men with PSA > 4 ng/mL at end-of-study biopsy were excluded. Tissue was located for 92 cases and 193 controls. We visually assessed inflammation in benign tissue. We estimated ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) using logistic regression adjusting for age and race.Results: Mean time between biopsy and diagnosis was 5.9 years. In men previously in the PCPT placebo arm, 78.1% of cases (N = 41) and 68.2% of controls (N = 85) had at least one baseline biopsy core (∼5 evaluated per man) with inflammation. The odds of prostate cancer (N = 41 cases) appeared to increase with increasing mean percentage of tissue area with inflammation, a trend that was statistically significant for Gleason sum <4+3 disease (N = 31 cases; vs. 0%, >0-<1.8% OR = 1.70, 1.8-<5.0% OR = 2.39, ≥5% OR = 3.31, Ptrend = 0.047). In men previously in the finasteride arm, prevalence of inflammation did not differ between cases (76.5%; N = 51) and controls (75.0%; N = 108).Conclusions: Benign tissue inflammation was positively associated with prostate cancer.Impact: This first prospective study of men without biopsy indication supports the hypothesis that inflammation influences prostate cancer development. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(10); 1549-57. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Selective expression of myosin IC Isoform A in mouse and human cell lines and mouse prostate cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Sielski, Neil L; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2014-01-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily. We recently identified a novel isoform and showed that the MYOIC gene in mammalian cells encodes three isoforms (isoforms A, B, and C). Furthermore, we demonstrated that myosin IC isoform A but not isoform B exhibits a tissue specific expression pattern. In this study, we extended our analysis of myosin IC isoform expression patterns by analyzing the protein and mRNA expression in various mammalian cell lines and in various prostate specimens and tumor tissues from the transgenic mouse prostate (TRAMP) model by immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, and by indirect immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded prostate specimen. Analysis of a panel of mammalian cell lines showed an increased mRNA and protein expression of specifically myosin IC isoform A in a panel of human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines but not in non-cancer prostate or other (non-prostate-) cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myosin IC isoform A expression is significantly increased in TRAMP mouse prostate samples with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) lesions and in distant site metastases in lung and liver when compared to matched normal tissues. Our observations demonstrate specific changes in the expression of myosin IC isoform A that are concurrent with the occurrence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse prostate cancer model that closely mimics clinical prostate cancer. These data suggest that elevated levels of myosin IC isoform A may be a potential marker for the detection of prostate cancer.

  8. Blood and tissue biomarkers in prostate cancer: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Capizzi, Elisa; Loda, Massimo

    2010-02-01

    The prevalence of prostate cancer (PCa) is high and increases with age. PCa is the most common cutaneous cancer in American men. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening has impacted the detection of PCa and is directly responsible for a dramatic decrease in stage at diagnosis. Gleason score and stage at the time of diagnosis remain the mainstay to predict prognosis, in the absence of more accurate and reliable tissue or blood biomarkers. Despite extensive research efforts, very few biomarkers of PCa have been introduced to date in clinical practice. Even screening with PSA has recently been questioned. A thorough analysis of all tissue and serum biomarkers in prostate cancer research cannot be easily synthesized, and goes beyond the scope of the present article. Therefore the authors focus here on the most recently reported tissue and circulating biomarkers for PCa whose application in clinical practice is either current or expected in the near future.

  9. Vitamin D Receptor Protein Expression in Tumor Tissue and Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Whitney K.; Flavin, Richard; Kasperzyk, Julie L.; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Fang, Fang; Lis, Rosina; Fiore, Christopher; Penney, Kathryn L.; Ma, Jing; Kantoff, Philip W.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Loda, Massimo; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Giovannucci, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Data suggest that circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] interacts with the vitamin D receptor (VDR) to decrease proliferation and increase apoptosis for some malignancies, although evidence for prostate cancer is less clear. How VDR expression in tumor tissue may influence prostate cancer progression has not been evaluated in large studies. Patients and Methods We examined protein expression of VDR in tumor tissue among 841 patients with prostate cancer in relation to risk of lethal prostate cancer within two prospective cohorts, the Physicians' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. We also examined the association of VDR expression with prediagnostic circulating 25(OH)D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels and with two VDR single nucleotide polymorphisms, FokI and BsmI. Results Men whose tumors had high VDR expression had significantly lower prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at diagnosis (P for trend < .001), lower Gleason score (P for trend < .001), and less advanced tumor stage (P for trend < .001) and were more likely to have tumors harboring the TMPRSS2:ERG fusion (P for trend = .009). Compared with the lowest quartile, men whose tumors had the highest VDR expression had significantly reduced risk of lethal prostate cancer (hazard ratio [HR], 0.17; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.41). This association was only slightly attenuated after adjustment for Gleason score and PSA at diagnosis (HR, 0.33; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.83) or, additionally, for tumor stage (HR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.14 to 0.94). Neither prediagnostic plasma vitamin D levels nor VDR polymorphisms were associated with VDR expression. Conclusion High VDR expression in prostate tumors is associated with a reduced risk of lethal cancer, suggesting a role of the vitamin D pathway in prostate cancer progression. PMID:21537045

  10. Prevention of human PC-346C prostate cancer growth in mice by a xenogeneic tissue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Mark A; Rosen, Elliot D; Wolter, William R; Sailes, Valerie; Jeffrey, Randy; Tenniswood, Martin

    2007-08-01

    Vaccination, as an approach to prostate cancer, has largely focused on immunotherapy utilizing specific molecules or allogeneic cells. Such methods are limited by the focused antigenic menu presented to the immune system and by immunotolerance to antigens recognized as "self". To examine if a xenogeneic tissue vaccine could stimulate protective immunity in a human prostate cancer cell line, a vaccine was produced by glutaraldehyde fixation of harvested PAIII prostate cancer cells tumors (GFT cell vaccine) from Lobund-Wistar rats. Immunocompetent Ncr-Foxn1 mice were vaccinated with the GFT cell vaccine four times, 7 days apart. The control animals were either not vaccinated or vaccinated with media or glutaraldehyde-fixed PC346C human prostate cancer cells and adjuvant. About 8 days after the final boost, serum and spleens were harvested. The splenocytes were co-incubated with PC346C cells and then transplanted orthotopically into sygneneic immunodeficient nude mice. About 10 weeks later, the prostates were weighed and sampled for histolologic examination. The spleens were harvested from additional mice, and the splenocytes were cultured, either with or without pulsing by GFT cells, and the supernatants harvested 72 h later for cytokine analysis. Results showed that vaccination with GFT cells resulted in increased serum antibody to a PAIII cell lysate; reduced weight of the prostate/seminal vesicle complex and reduced incidence of prostate cancer in nude mice; increased splenocyte supernatant levels of TNF-alpha, IL-2, IFN-gamma and IL-12, cytokines associated with Th1 immunity; and increased splenocyte supernatant levels of IL-4 and IL-10, cytokines associated with Th2 immunity. In summary, the results suggest that use of a xenogeneic tissue vaccine can stimulate protective immunity against human prostate cancer cells.

  11. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of estrogen receptor gene expression in laser microdissected prostate cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Walton, Thomas J; Li, Geng; McCulloch, Thomas A; Seth, Rashmi; Powe, Desmond G; Bishop, Michael C; Rees, Robert C

    2009-06-01

    Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis of laser microdissected tissue is considered the most accurate technique for determining tissue gene expression. The discovery of estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) has focussed renewed interest on the role of estrogen receptors in prostate cancer, yet few studies have utilized the technique to analyze estrogen receptor gene expression in prostate cancer. Fresh tissue was obtained from 11 radical prostatectomy specimens and from 6 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia. Pure populations of benign and malignant prostate epithelium were laser microdissected, followed by RNA isolation and electrophoresis. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed using primers for androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta), estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha), progesterone receptor (PGR) and prostate specific antigen (PSA), with normalization to two housekeeping genes. Differences in gene expression were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Correlation coefficients were analyzed using Spearman's test. Significant positive correlations were seen when AR and AR-dependent PSA, and ERalpha and ERalpha-dependent PGR were compared, indicating a representative population of RNA transcripts. ERbeta gene expression was significantly over-expressed in the cancer group compared with benign controls (P < 0.01). In contrast, PGR expression was significantly down-regulated in the cancer group (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in AR, ERalpha or PSA expression between the groups. This study represents the first to show an upregulation of ERbeta gene expression in laser microdissected prostate cancer specimens. In concert with recent studies the findings suggest differential production of ERbeta splice variants, which may play important roles in the genesis of prostate cancer. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. [Prostate cancer detection by assessing stiffness of different tissues using shear wave ultrasound elastog- raphy].

    PubMed

    Glybochko, P V; Alyaev, Yu G; Amosov, A V; Krupinov, G E; Ganzha, T M; Vorobev, A V; Lumpov, I S; Semendyaev, R I

    2016-08-01

    Early detection of prostate cancer (PCa) remains a challenging issue. There are studies underway aimed to develop and implement new methods for prostate cancer screening by tumor imaging and obtaining tissue samples from suspicious areas for morphological examination. One of these new methods is shear wave ultrasound elastography (SWUE). The current literature is lacking sufficient coverage of informativeness and specificity of SWUE in the prostate cancer detection, there is no clear criteria for assessing tissue stiffness at different values of PSA and tumor grade, and in prostate hyperplasia and prostatitis. To evaluate the informativeness and specificity of SWUE compared with other diagnostic methods. SWUE has been used in the Clinic of Urology of Sechenov First MSMU since October 2015. During this period, 302 patients were examined using SWUE. SWUE was performed with Aixplorer ultrasound system (Super Sonic Imagine), which provides a single-stage SWUE imaging with both B-mode and real-time mode. The first group (prospective study) included 134 men aged 47 to 81 years with suspected prostate cancer scheduled to either initial or repeat prostate biopsy. PSA levels ranged from 4 to 24 ng/ml. The second group (retrospective study) comprised 120 men with confirmed prostate cancer and PSA levels between 4 and 90 ng/ml. The third group (the control group), comprised 48 healthy men whose PSA level did not exceed 3 ng/ml. All patients of the groups 1 and 2 underwent a standard comprehensive examination. Patients in group 1 were subsequently subjected to transrectal prostate biopsy guided by localization of areas with abnormal tissue stiffness. PCa was detected in 100 of 134 patients. 217 patients of groups 1 and 2 underwent radical prostatectomy. In 28 of them, the match between the cancer location and differentiation in the removed prostate and SWUE findings before surgery was examined. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic organs was performed in 63

  13. Dual-modality probe intended for prostate cancer detection combining Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance technology--discrimination of normal human prostate tissues ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, M; Jalkanen, V; Ramser, K; Ljungberg, B; Bergh, A; Lindahl, O A

    2015-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer for men in the western world. For the first time, a dual-modality probe, combining Raman spectroscopy and tactile resonance technology, has been used for assessment of fresh human prostate tissue. The study investigates the potential of the dual-modality probe by testing its ability to differentiate prostate tissue types ex vivo. Measurements on four prostates show that the tactile resonance modality was able to discriminate soft epithelial tissue and stiff stroma (p < 0.05). The Raman spectra exhibited a strong fluorescent background at the current experimental settings. However, stroma could be discerned from epithelia by integrating the value of the spectral background. Combining both parameters by a stepwise analysis resulted in 100% sensitivity and 91% specificity. Although no cancer tissue was analysed, the results are promising for further development of the instrument and method for discriminating prostate tissues and cancer.

  14. Photodynamic therapy in prostate cancer: optical dosimetry and response of normal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun; Shetty, Sugandh D.; Heads, Larry; Bolin, Frank; Wilson, Brian C.; Patterson, Michael S.; Sirls, Larry T., II; Schultz, Daniel; Cerny, Joseph C.; Hetzel, Fred W.

    1993-06-01

    The present study explores the possibility of utilizing photodynamic therapy (PDT) in treating localized prostate carcinoma. Optical properties of ex vivo human prostatectomy specimens, and in vivo and ex vivo dog prostate glands were studied. The size of the PDT induced lesion in dog prostate was pathologically evaluated as a biological endpoint. The data indicate that the human normal and carcinoma prostate tissues have similar optical properties. The average effective attenuation depth is less in vivo than that of ex vivo. The PDT treatment generated a lesion size of up to 16 mm in diameter. The data suggest that PDT is a promising modality in prostate cancer treatment. Multiple fiber system may be required for clinical treatment.

  15. Association of prostate cancer risk variants with gene expression in normal and tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Penney, Kathryn L; Sinnott, Jennifer A; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Gerke, Travis; Shui, Irene M; Kraft, Peter; Sesso, Howard D; Freedman, Matthew L; Loda, Massimo; Mucci, Lorelei A; Stampfer, Meir J

    2015-01-01

    Numerous germline genetic variants are associated with prostate cancer risk, but their biologic role is not well understood. One possibility is that these variants influence gene expression in prostate tissue. We therefore examined the association of prostate cancer risk variants with the expression of genes nearby and genome-wide. We generated mRNA expression data for 20,254 genes with the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST microarray from normal prostate (N = 160) and prostate tumor (N = 264) tissue from participants of the Physicians' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. With linear models, we tested the association of 39 risk variants with nearby genes and all genes, and the association of each variant with canonical pathways using a global test. In addition to confirming previously reported associations, we detected several new significant (P < 0.05) associations of variants with the expression of nearby genes including C2orf43, ITGA6, MLPH, CHMP2B, BMPR1B, and MTL5. Genome-wide, five genes (MSMB, NUDT11, RBPMS2, NEFM, and KLHL33) were significantly associated after accounting for multiple comparisons for each SNP (P < 2.5 × 10(-6)). Many more genes had an FDR <10%, including SRD5A1 and PSCA, and we observed significant associations with pathways in tumor tissue. The risk variants were associated with several genes, including promising prostate cancer candidates and lipid metabolism pathways, suggesting mechanisms for their impact on disease. These genes should be further explored in biologic and epidemiologic studies. Determining the biologic role of these variants can lead to improved understanding of prostate cancer etiology and identify new targets for chemoprevention. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Castration radiosensitizes prostate cancer tissue by impairing DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Tarish, Firas L; Schultz, Niklas; Tanoglidi, Anna; Hamberg, Hans; Letocha, Henry; Karaszi, Katalin; Hamdy, Freddie C; Granfors, Torvald; Helleday, Thomas

    2015-11-04

    Chemical castration improves responses to radiotherapy in prostate cancer, but the mechanism is unknown. We hypothesized that this radiosensitization is caused by castration-mediated down-regulation of nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). To test this, we enrolled 48 patients with localized prostate cancer in two arms of the study: either radiotherapy first or radiotherapy after neoadjuvant castration treatment. We biopsied patients at diagnosis and before and after castration and radiotherapy treatments to monitor androgen receptor, NHEJ, and DSB repair in verified cancer tissue. We show that patients receiving neoadjuvant castration treatment before radiotherapy had reduced amounts of the NHEJ protein Ku70, impaired radiotherapy-induced NHEJ activity, and higher amounts of unrepaired DSBs, measured by γ-H2AX foci in cancer tissues. This study demonstrates that chemical castration impairs NHEJ activity in prostate cancer tissue, explaining the improved response of patients with prostate cancer to radiotherapy after chemical castration. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  17. A Balanced Tissue Composition Reveals New Metabolic and Gene Expression Markers in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tessem, May-Britt; Bertilsson, Helena; Angelsen, Anders; Bathen, Tone F.; Drabløs, Finn; Rye, Morten Beck

    2016-01-01

    Molecular analysis of patient tissue samples is essential to characterize the in vivo variability in human cancers which are not accessible in cell-lines or animal models. This applies particularly to studies of tumor metabolism. The challenge is, however, the complex mixture of various tissue types within each sample, such as benign epithelium, stroma and cancer tissue, which can introduce systematic biases when cancers are compared to normal samples. In this study we apply a simple strategy to remove such biases using sample selections where the average content of stroma tissue is balanced between the sample groups. The strategy is applied to a prostate cancer patient cohort where data from MR spectroscopy and gene expression have been collected from and integrated on the exact same tissue samples. We reveal in vivo changes in cancer-relevant metabolic pathways which are otherwise hidden in the data due to tissue confounding. In particular, lowered levels of putrescine are connected to increased expression of SRM, reduced levels of citrate are attributed to upregulation of genes promoting fatty acid synthesis, and increased succinate levels coincide with reduced expression of SUCLA2 and SDHD. In addition, the strategy also highlights important metabolic differences between the stroma, epithelium and prostate cancer. These results show that important in vivo metabolic features of cancer can be revealed from patient data only if the heterogeneous tissue composition is properly accounted for in the analysis. PMID:27100877

  18. Serum tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) in patients with prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Marczyńska, A; Kulpa, J; Leńko, J; Augustyn, M

    1988-01-01

    Concurrent measurements of serum TPA and PAP concentrations by double antibody radioimmunoassays were done in 49 patients with prostatic cancer in different clinical stages. The reference group comprised patients suffering from BPH. Positive TPA was found in 32.7% of cancer patients, the lowest percentage in stage A (11.1%) and the highest in stage D (55.6%). The additional value as a diagnostic aid of the TPA test was revealed on the basis of examination of the selected group of patients with not increased PAP. Positive TPA was found in 16.7% of patients: none in stage A, 22.2% in stage B, and 33.3% in stage D. Prostatic cancer remains the most common malignancy of the genitourinary tract. The improvement in the results of treatment involves not only a modernization of treatment modalities but also the introduction of laboratory tests which give the most ample information on the stage of tumour development and improve possibilities to control tumour therapy. Besides the refinement of the determination procedures of specific prostatic markers, prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), through radio- and enzyme-immunological methods, there is a search for additional markers which might be helpful in diagnosis and follow-up of treatment.

  19. Exome enrichment and SOLiD sequencing of formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) prostate cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Menon, Roopika; Deng, Mario; Boehm, Diana; Braun, Martin; Fend, Falko; Boehm, Detlef; Biskup, Saskia; Perner, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized cancer research allowing the comprehensive study of cancer using high throughput deep sequencing methodologies. These methods detect genomic alterations, nucleotide substitutions, insertions, deletions and copy number alterations. SOLiD (Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection, Life Technologies) is a promising technology generating billions of 50 bp sequencing reads. This robust technique, successfully applied in gene identification, might be helpful in detecting novel genes associated with cancer initiation and progression using formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue. This study's aim was to compare the validity of whole exome sequencing of fresh-frozen vs. FFPE tumor tissue by normalization to normal prostatic FFPE tissue, obtained from the same patient. One primary fresh-frozen sample, corresponding FFPE prostate cancer sample and matched adjacent normal prostatic tissue was subjected to exome sequencing. The sequenced reads were mapped and compared. Our study was the first to show comparable exome sequencing results between FFPE and corresponding fresh-frozen cancer tissues using SOLiD sequencing. A prior study has been conducted comparing the validity of sequencing of FFPE vs. fresh frozen samples using other NGS platforms. Our validation further proves that FFPE material is a reliable source of material for whole exome sequencing.

  20. Exome Enrichment and SOLiD Sequencing of Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded (FFPE) Prostate Cancer Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Roopika; Deng, Mario; Boehm, Diana; Braun, Martin; Fend, Falko; Boehm, Detlef; Biskup, Saskia; Perner, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have revolutionized cancer research allowing the comprehensive study of cancer using high throughput deep sequencing methodologies. These methods detect genomic alterations, nucleotide substitutions, insertions, deletions and copy number alterations. SOLiD (Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection, Life Technologies) is a promising technology generating billions of 50 bp sequencing reads. This robust technique, successfully applied in gene identification, might be helpful in detecting novel genes associated with cancer initiation and progression using formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue. This study’s aim was to compare the validity of whole exome sequencing of fresh-frozen vs. FFPE tumor tissue by normalization to normal prostatic FFPE tissue, obtained from the same patient. One primary fresh-frozen sample, corresponding FFPE prostate cancer sample and matched adjacent normal prostatic tissue was subjected to exome sequencing. The sequenced reads were mapped and compared. Our study was the first to show comparable exome sequencing results between FFPE and corresponding fresh-frozen cancer tissues using SOLiD sequencing. A prior study has been conducted comparing the validity of sequencing of FFPE vs. fresh frozen samples using other NGS platforms. Our validation further proves that FFPE material is a reliable source of material for whole exome sequencing. PMID:22942743

  1. Tissue mimicking materials for the detection of prostate cancer using shear wave elastography: A validation study

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Rui; Huang, Zhihong; Varghese, Tomy; Nabi, Ghulam

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of stiffness changes may provide important diagnostic information and aid in the early detection of cancers. Shear wave elastography is an imaging technique that assesses tissue stiffness using acoustic radiation force as an alternate to manual palpation reported previously with quasistatic elastography. In this study, the elastic properties of tissue mimicking materials, including agar, polyacrylamide (PAA), and silicone, are evaluated with an objective to determine material characteristics which resemble normal and cancerous prostate tissue. Methods: Acoustic properties and stiffness of tissue mimicking phantoms were measured using compressional mechanical testing and shear wave elastography using supersonic shear imaging. The latter is based on the principles of shear waves generated using acoustic radiation force. The evaluation included tissue mimicking materials (TMMs) within the prostate at different positions and sizes that could mimic cancerous and normal prostate tissue. Patient data on normal and prostate cancer tissues quantified using biopsy histopathology were used to validate the findings. Pathologist reports on histopathology were blinded to mechanical testing and elastographic findings. Results: Young's modulus values of 86.2 ± 4.5 and 271.5 ± 25.7 kPa were obtained for PAA mixed with 2% Al2O3 particles and silicone, respectively. Young's modulus of TMMs from mechanical compression testing showed a clear trend of increasing stiffness with an increasing percentage of agar. The silicone material had higher stiffness values when compared with PAA with Al2O3. The mean Young's modulus value in cancerous tissue was 90.5 ± 4.5 kPa as compared to 93.8 ± 4.4 and 86.2 ± 4.5 kPa obtained with PAA with 2% Al2O3 phantom at a depth of 52.4 and 36.6 mm, respectively. Conclusions: PAA mixed with Al2O3 provides the most suitable tissue mimicking material for prostate cancer tumor material, while agar could form the surrounding

  2. Prostate cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate cancer screening - PSA; Prostate cancer screening - digital rectal exam; Prostate cancer screening - DRE ... level of PSA could mean you have prostate cancer. But other conditions can also cause a high ...

  3. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-06

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  4. A model for the design and construction of a resource for the validation of prognostic prostate cancer biomarkers: the Canary Prostate Cancer Tissue Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Sarah; Fazli, Ladan; McKenney, Jesse K.; Simko, Jeff; Troyer, Dean; Nicolas, Marlo; Newcomb, Lisa F.; Cowan, Janet E.; Crouch, Luis; Ferrari, Michelle; Hernandez, Javier; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Kuchinsky, Kyle; Liew, Janet; Mendez-Meza, Rosario; Smith, Elizabeth; Tenggara, Imelda; Zhang, Xiaotun; Carroll, Peter R.; Chan, June M.; Gleave, Martin; Lance, Raymond; Lin, Daniel W.; Nelson, Peter S.; Thompson, Ian M.; Feng, Ziding; True, Lawrence D.; Brooks, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue microarrays provide unique resources for rapid evaluation and validation of tissue biomarkers. The Canary Foundation Retrospective Prostate Tissue Microarray Resource used a rigorous statistical design, quota sampling, a variation of the case-cohort study, to select patients for inclusion in a multicenter, retrospective prostate cancer tissue microarray cohort. The study is designed to definitively validate tissue biomarkers of prostate cancer recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Tissue samples from over 1,000 participants treated for prostate cancer with radical prostatectomy between 1995 and 2004 were selected at six participating institutions in the United States and Canada. This design captured the heterogeneity of screening and clinical practices in the contemporary North American population. Standardized clinical data were collected in a centralized database. The project has been informative in several respects. The scale and complexity of assembling tissue microarrays (TMAs) with over 200 cases at each of six sites involved unanticipated levels of effort and time. Our statistical design promises to provide a model for outcome-based studies where tissue localization methods are applied to high-density tissue microarrays. PMID:23232570

  5. Differentially expressed androgen-regulated genes in androgen-sensitive tissues reveal potential biomarkers of early prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Dogus Murat; Allioli, Nathalie; Decaussin, Myriam; de Bernard, Simon; Ruffion, Alain; Samarut, Jacques; Vlaeminck-Guillem, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    Several data favor androgen receptor implication in prostate cancer initiation through the induction of several gene activation programs. The aim of the study is to identify potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) among androgen-regulated genes (ARG) and to evaluate comparative expression of these genes in normal prostate and normal prostate-related androgen-sensitive tissues that do not (or rarely) give rise to cancer. ARG were selected in non-neoplastic adult human prostatic epithelial RWPE-1 cells stably expressing an exogenous human androgen receptor, using RNA-microarrays and validation by qRT-PCR. Expression of 48 preselected genes was quantified in tissue samples (seminal vesicles, prostate transitional zones and prostate cancers, benign prostatic hypertrophy obtained from surgical specimens) using TaqMan® low-density arrays. The diagnostic performances of these potential biomarkers were compared to that of genes known to be associated with PCa (i.e. PCA3 and DLX1). By crossing expression studies in 26 matched PCa and normal prostate transitional zone samples, and 35 matched seminal vesicle and PCa samples, 14 genes were identified. Similarly, 9 genes were overexpressed in 15 benign prostatic hypertrophy samples, as compared to PCa samples. Overall, we selected 8 genes of interest to evaluate their diagnostic performances in comparison with that of PCA3 and DLX1. Among them, 3 genes: CRYAB, KCNMA1 and SDPR, were overexpressed in all 3 reference non-cancerous tissues. The areas under ROC curves of these genes reached those of PCA3 (0.91) and DLX1 (0.94). We identified ARG with reduced expression in PCa and with significant diagnostic values for discriminating between cancerous and non-cancerous prostatic tissues, similar that of PCA3. Given their expression pattern, they could be considered as potentially protective against prostate cancer. Moreover, they could be complementary to known genes overexpressed in PCa and included along

  6. [Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Bey, P; Beckendorf, V; Stinès, J

    2001-10-01

    Radiation therapy of prostate carcinoma with a curative intent implies to treat the whole prostate at high dose (at least 66 Gy). According to clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason's score, the clinical target volume may include seminal vesicles and less often pelvic lymph nodes. Microscopic extracapsular extension is found in 15 to 60% of T1-T2 operated on, specially in apex tumors. On contrary, cancers developing from the transitional zone may stay limited to the prostate even with a big volume and with a high PSA level. Zonal anatomy of the prostate identifies internal prostate, including the transitional zone (5% of the prostate in young people). External prostate includes central and peripheral zones. The inferior limit of the prostate is not lower than the inferior border of the pubic symphysis. Clinical and radiological examination: ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), CT-scan identify prognostic factors as tumor volume, capsule effraction, seminal vesicles invasion and lymph node extension. The identification of the clinical target volume is now done mainly by CT-Scan which identifies prostate and seminal vesicles. NMR could be helpful to identify more precisely prostate apex. The definition of margins around the clinical target volume has to take in account daily reproducibility and organ motion and of course the maximum tolerable dose for organs at risk.

  7. Analysis of Mel-18 expression in prostate cancer tissues and correlation with clinicopathologic features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Lin, Tianxin; Huang, Jian; Hu, Weilie; Xu, Kewei; Liu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Mel-18 is a member of the polycomb group (PcG) of proteins, which are chromatin regulatory factors that play an important role in development and oncogenesis. This study was designed to investigate the clinical and prognostic significance of Mel-18 in the patients with prostate cancer. Immunostaining with Mel-18 specific antibodies was performed on paraffin sections from 202 patients. Correlations between Mel-18 and the Gleason grading system, clinical stage, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, and age were evaluated. PSA recurrence in 76 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy and survival in 59 patients with metastases at diagnosis were analyzed to evaluate the influence of Mel-18 expression in cancer progression using Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariate Cox regression analysis. Staining was seen in all prostatic tissues. Mel-18 expression was significantly reduced in the prostate cancer patients with PSA levels over 100 ng/ml (P=0.009), advanced clinical stage (>T4, N1, or M1 disease, P=0.029), higher Gleason grade or with a higher Gleason score (P=0.018) than in those with other clinicopathologic features. Negative expression of Mel-18 was associated with significantly higher rates of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy than with positive expression of Mel-18 (P = 0.029), and was an independent predictor of PSA recurrence (P=0.034, HR=2.143) in multivariate analysis. Similarly, metastatic prostate cancer patients with negative expression of Mel-18 showed significantly worse survival compared with the positive expression of Mel-18 (P=0.025). In multivariate analysis, negative expression of Mel-18 was an independent predictor of cancer-specific survival (P=0.024, HR=2.365). Our study provides important evidence for the recognition of Mel-18 as a tumor suppressor. The expression of Mel-18 showed potential as a prognostic marker for human prostate cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Expression and significance of S100P, CD147, and OCT4 in different prostate cancer tissue TNM stages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Zhang, J G; Wang, W

    2015-06-18

    The aim of this project was to investigate the expression and significance of S100P, CD147, and OCT4 in prostate cancer tissue at different TNM stages. We enrolled 54 patients with prostate cancer, 40 with benign prostatic hyperplasia, and 20 subjects with normal prostates. S100P, CD147, and OCT4 were detected by immunohistochemistry. The positive rate of S100P detection was 18.52% in prostate cancer tissues, significantly lower than in normal and benign prostate hyperplasia tissues (P ˂ 0.05). The positive expression rate of CD147 and OCT4 were 100 and 77.38% in prostate cancer tissue, respectively, both markedly higher than in normal and benign prostate hyperplasia tissue (P ˂ 0.05). The positive rate of S100P in stage V was 0, which was significantly lower than in stages I (37.50%) and II (35.71%) (P ˂ 0.05). OCT4 expression in stages III (86.67%) and V (94.12%) was higher than in stage I (37.50%). The positive rate of S100P in patients with distant metastasis was 4%, which was significantly lower than that in patients without metastases (P ˂ 0.05). In contrast, the positive rate of OCT4 in patients with distant metastasis was 92%. S100P, CD147, and OCT4 expression in prostate cancer patients with different degrees of differentiation had no significant difference (P > 0.05). Overall, our results demonstrated that S100P expression in prostate cancer tissue was significantly decreased, whereas CD147 and OCT4 expression was increased. Their expression levels were closely associated with TNM stage and distant metastasis, but were not related to the degree of differentiation.

  9. Metastasis initiating cells in primary prostate cancer tissues from transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) predicts castration-resistant progression and survival of prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinlong; Li, Quanlin; Nuccio, Jill; Liu, Chunyan; Duan, Peng; Wang, Ruoxiang; Jones, Lawrence W; Chung, Leland W K; Zhau, Haiyen E

    2015-09-01

    We previously reported that the activation of RANK and c-Met signaling components in both experimental mouse models and human prostate cancer (PC) specimens predicts bone metastatic potential and PC patient survival. This study addresses whether a population of metastasis-initiating cells (MICs) known to express a stronger RANKL, phosphorylated c-Met (p-c-Met), and neuropilin-1 (NRP1) signaling network than bystander or dormant cells (BDCs) can be detected in PC tissues from patients subjected to transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) for urinary obstruction prior to the diagnosis of PC with or without prior hormonal manipulation, and whether the relative abundance of MICs over BDCs could predict castration-resistant progression and PC patient survival. We employed a multiplexed quantum-dot labeling (mQDL) protocol to detect and quantify MICs and BDCs at the single cell level in TURP tissues obtained from 44 PC patients with documented overall survival and castration resistance status. PC tissues with a higher number of MICs and an activated RANK signaling network, including increased expression of RANKL, p-c-Met, and NRP1 compared to BDCs, were found to correlate with the development of castration resistance and overall survival. The assessment of PC cells with MIC and BDC phenotypes in primary PC tissues from hormone-naïve patients can predict the progression to castration resistance and the overall survival of PC patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Metastasis Initiating Cells in Primary Prostate Cancer Tissues From Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP) Predicts Castration-Resistant Progression and Survival of Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qinlong; Li, Quanlin; Nuccio, Jill; Liu, Chunyan; Duan, Peng; Wang, Ruoxiang; Jones, Lawrence W.; Chung, Leland W. K.; Zhau, Haiyen E.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We previouslyreported that the activation of RANK and c-Met signaling components in both experimental mouse models and human prostate cancer (PC) specimens predicts bone metastatic potential and PC patient survival. This study addresses whether a population of metastasis-initiating cells (MICs) known to express a stronger RANKL, phosphorylated c-Met (p-c-Met), and neuropilin-1 (NRP1) signaling network than bystander or dormant cells (BDCs) can be detected in PC tissues from patients subjected to transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) for urinary obstruction prior to the diagnosis of PC with or without prior hormonal manipulation, and whether the relative abundance of MICs over BDCs could predict castration-resistant progression and PC patient survival. METHODS We employed a multiplexed quantum-dot labeling (mQDL) protocol to detect and quantify MICs and BDCs at the single cell level in TURP tissues obtained from 44 PC patients with documented overall survival and castration resistance status. RESULTS PC tissues with a higher number of MICs and an activated RANK signaling network, including increased expression of RANKL, p-c-Met, and NRP1 compared to BDCs, were found to correlate with the development of castration resistance and overall survival. CONCLUSIONS The assessment of PC cells with MIC and BDC phenotypes in primary PC tissues from hormone-naïve patients can predict the progression to castration resistance and the overall survival of PC patients. PMID:25990623

  11. A curated collection of tissue microarray images and clinical outcome data of prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qing; Guo, Tiannan; Rechsteiner, Markus; Rüschoff, Jan H; Rupp, Niels; Fankhauser, Christian; Saba, Karim; Mortezavi, Ashkan; Poyet, Cédric; Hermanns, Thomas; Zhu, Yi; Moch, Holger; Aebersold, Ruedi; Wild, Peter J

    2017-03-14

    Microscopy image data of human cancers provide detailed phenotypes of spatially and morphologically intact tissues at single-cell resolution, thus complementing large-scale molecular analyses, e.g., next generation sequencing or proteomic profiling. Here we describe a high-resolution tissue microarray (TMA) image dataset from a cohort of 71 prostate tissue samples, which was hybridized with bright-field dual colour chromogenic and silver in situ hybridization probes for the tumour suppressor gene PTEN. These tissue samples were digitized and supplemented with expert annotations, clinical information, statistical models of PTEN genetic status, and computer source codes. For validation, we constructed an additional TMA dataset for 424 prostate tissues, hybridized with FISH probes for PTEN, and performed survival analysis on a subset of 339 radical prostatectomy specimens with overall, disease-specific and recurrence-free survival (maximum 167 months). For application, we further produced 6,036 image patches derived from two whole slides. Our curated collection of prostate cancer data sets provides reuse potential for both biomedical and computational studies.

  12. A curated collection of tissue microarray images and clinical outcome data of prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Qing; Guo, Tiannan; Rechsteiner, Markus; Rüschoff, Jan H.; Rupp, Niels; Fankhauser, Christian; Saba, Karim; Mortezavi, Ashkan; Poyet, Cédric; Hermanns, Thomas; Zhu, Yi; Moch, Holger; Aebersold, Ruedi; Wild, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    Microscopy image data of human cancers provide detailed phenotypes of spatially and morphologically intact tissues at single-cell resolution, thus complementing large-scale molecular analyses, e.g., next generation sequencing or proteomic profiling. Here we describe a high-resolution tissue microarray (TMA) image dataset from a cohort of 71 prostate tissue samples, which was hybridized with bright-field dual colour chromogenic and silver in situ hybridization probes for the tumour suppressor gene PTEN. These tissue samples were digitized and supplemented with expert annotations, clinical information, statistical models of PTEN genetic status, and computer source codes. For validation, we constructed an additional TMA dataset for 424 prostate tissues, hybridized with FISH probes for PTEN, and performed survival analysis on a subset of 339 radical prostatectomy specimens with overall, disease-specific and recurrence-free survival (maximum 167 months). For application, we further produced 6,036 image patches derived from two whole slides. Our curated collection of prostate cancer data sets provides reuse potential for both biomedical and computational studies. PMID:28291248

  13. Prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, D; Waxman, J

    2002-01-01

    It is a paradigm in cancer treatment that early detection and treatment improves survival. However, although screening measures lead to a higher rate of detection, for small bulk localised prostate cancer it remains unclear whether early detection and early treatment will lead to an overall decrease in mortality. The management options include surveillance, radiotherapy, and radical prostatectomy but there is no evidence base to evaluate the benefits of each approach. Advanced prostate cancer is managed by hormonal therapy. There have been major changes in treatment over the last two decades with the use of more humane treatment and developments in both chemotherapy and radiation. In this article we review the natural history and management of prostate cancer. PMID:12415080

  14. Selection and characterization of DNA aptamer for metastatic prostate cancer recognition and tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoqiu; Sun, Yang; Li, Jianglin; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Lin, Wei; Han, Dongmei; Zhao, Yifan; Liu, Jing; Ye, Mao; Tan, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of death and most prevalent cancer in men. The absence of curative options for castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer and biomarkers able to discriminate between indolent and aggressive tumors contribute to these statistics. In this study, a DNA aptamer termed DML-7 was successfully selected against human PCa cell line DU145 by using the cell-based systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) method. The selected aptamer DML-7 was found to internalize into target cells in a temperature-dependent manner and exhibit high binding affinity for target cells with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range. Binding analysis further revealed that DML-7 only binds to DU145 and PC-3 cells with metastatic potential, but not to LNCaP or 22Rv1 cells with low or nonmetastatic potential, demonstrating that DML-7 has excellent selectivity for the recognition of the metastatic PCa cells. Clinical tissue imaging further confirmed these results. Therefore, both high binding affinity and specificity to metastatic PCa cells and tissues afford DML-7 with the potential for development into a novel tool for diagnosis and targeted drug delivery against metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:27183906

  15. Early Growth Response1and Fatty Acid Synthase Expression is Altered in Tumor Adjacent Prostate Tissue and Indicates Field Cancerization

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Anna C.; Trujillo, Kristina A.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Fleet, Trisha M.; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Severns, Virginia; Shah, Satyan K.; Davis, Michael S.; Smith, Anthony Y.; Griffith, Jeffrey K.; Fischer, Edgar G.; Bisoffi, Marco

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Field cancerization denotes the occurrence of molecular alterations in histologically normal tissues adjacent to tumors. In prostate cancer, identification of field cancerization has several potential clinical applications. However, prostate field cancerization remains ill defined. Our previous work has shown up-regulated mRNA of the transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR-1) and the lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS) in tissues adjacent to prostate cancer. METHODS Immunofluorescence data were analyzed quantitatively by spectral imaging and linear unmixing to determine the protein expression levels of EGR-1 and FAS in human cancerous, histologically normal adjacent, and disease-free prostate tissues. RESULTS EGR-1 expression was elevated in both structurally intact tumor adjacent (1.6× on average) and in tumor (3.0× on average) tissues compared to disease-free tissues. In addition, the ratio of cytoplasmic versus nuclear EGR-1 expression was elevated in both tumor adjacent and tumor tissues. Similarly, FAS expression was elevated in both tumor adjacent (2.7× on average) and in tumor (2.5× on average) compared to disease-free tissues. CONCLUSIONS EGR-1 and FAS expression is similarly deregulated in tumor and structurally intact adjacent prostate tissues and defines field cancerization. In cases with high suspicion of prostate cancer but negative biopsy, identification of field cancerization could help clinicians target areas for repeat biopsy. Field cancerization at surgical margins on prostatectomy specimen should also be looked at as a predictor of cancer recurrence. EGR-1 and FAS could also serve as molecular targets for chemoprevention. PMID:22127986

  16. Prostate cancer in native Japanese and Japanese-American men: effects of dietary differences on prostatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Marks, Leonard S; Kojima, Munekado; Demarzo, Angelo; Heber, David; Bostwick, David G; Qian, Junqi; Dorey, Frederick J; Veltri, Robert W; Mohler, James L; Partin, Alan W

    2004-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between diet and prostate cancer (CaP) among native Japanese (NJ) and second-generation or third-generation Japanese-American (J-A) men--focusing on the effects of animal fat and soy on prostatic tissues. The subjects were 50 Japanese men undergoing radical prostatectomy, 25 NJ living in Nagoya, Japan and 25 U.S.-born J-A men, living in Los Angeles, California. A priori, the NJ men were believed to be a low-fat, high-soy group and the J-A men, a high-fat, low-soy group. The studies included postoperative measurements of diet (Block questionnaire), body fat (bioimpedance), blood, urine, and prostatic biomarkers in malignant and adjacent normal tissue, using a tissue microarray made from the original paraffin blocks. The NJ and J-A men were similar in age (65 to 70 years old; P <0.05), prostate-specific antigen level (7.1 to 8.6 ng/mL), prostate volume (35 to 38 cm3), and Gleason score (5.6 to 6.6), but their body composition differed. J-A men had more body fat (24% versus 19%), higher serum triglyceride levels (245 versus 106 mg/dL), lower estradiol levels (27 versus 31 ng/mL), and much lower urinary soy-metabolite levels (1:3) than NJ men (P <0.02). In both NJ and J-A groups, expression of numerous tissue biomarkers separated normal from CaP tissue, including markers for apoptosis (Bcl-2, caspase-3), growth factor receptors (epidermal growth factor receptor), racemase, 5-lipoxygenase, kinase inhibition (p27), and cell proliferation (Ki-67; all P <0.02). Furthermore, within both normal and CaP tissues, caspase-3 and 5-lipoxygenase were expressed more in NJ than in J-A men (P <0.01). Nuclear morphometry showed that the chromatin in each of the four groups (normal versus CaP, NJ versus J-A) was different (area under the curve 85% to 94%, P <0.01), despite fundamental genetic homogeneity. NJ and J-A men, products of similar genetics but differing environments, were shown to have differences in body composition that could influence Ca

  17. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  18. Investigation of scattering coefficients and anisotropy factors of human cancerous and normal prostate tissues using Mie theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Chen, Jun; Wang, Wubao

    2014-02-01

    The scattering coefficient, μs, the anisotropy factor, g, the scattering phase function, p(θ), and the angular dependence of scattering intensity distributions of human cancerous and normal prostate tissues were systematically investigated as a function of wavelength, scattering angle and scattering particle size using Mie theory and experimental parameters. The Matlab-based codes using Mie theory for both spherical and cylindrical models were developed and applied for studying the light propagation and the key scattering properties of the prostate tissues. The optical and structural parameters of tissue such as the index of refraction of cytoplasm, size of nuclei, and the diameter of the nucleoli for cancerous and normal human prostate tissues obtained from the previous biological, biomedical and bio-optic studies were used for Mie theory simulation and calculation. The wavelength dependence of scattering coefficient and anisotropy factor were investigated in the wide spectral range from 300 nm to 1200 nm. The scattering particle size dependence of μs, g, and scattering angular distributions were studied for cancerous and normal prostate tissues. The results show that cancerous prostate tissue containing larger size scattering particles has more contribution to the forward scattering in comparison with the normal prostate tissue. In addition to the conventional simulation model that approximately considers the scattering particle as sphere, the cylinder model which is more suitable for fiber-like tissue frame components such as collagen and elastin was used for developing a computation code to study angular dependence of scattering in prostate tissues. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to deal with both spherical and cylindrical scattering particles in prostate tissues.

  19. Identification of candidate genes for prostate cancer-risk SNPs utilizing a normal prostate tissue eQTL data set

    PubMed Central

    Thibodeau, S. N.; French, A. J.; McDonnell, S. K.; Cheville, J.; Middha, S.; Tillmans, L.; Riska, S.; Baheti, S.; Larson, M. C.; Fogarty, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Larson, N.; Nair, A.; O'Brien, D.; Wang, L.; Schaid, D J.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple studies have identified loci associated with the risk of developing prostate cancer but the associated genes are not well studied. Here we create a normal prostate tissue-specific eQTL data set and apply this data set to previously identified prostate cancer (PrCa)-risk SNPs in an effort to identify candidate target genes. The eQTL data set is constructed by the genotyping and RNA sequencing of 471 samples. We focus on 146 PrCa-risk SNPs, including all SNPs in linkage disequilibrium with each risk SNP, resulting in 100 unique risk intervals. We analyse cis-acting associations where the transcript is located within 2 Mb (±1 Mb) of the risk SNP interval. Of all SNP–gene combinations tested, 41.7% of SNPs demonstrate a significant eQTL signal after adjustment for sample histology and 14 expression principal component covariates. Of the 100 PrCa-risk intervals, 51 have a significant eQTL signal and these are associated with 88 genes. This study provides a rich resource to study biological mechanisms underlying genetic risk to PrCa. PMID:26611117

  20. Analysis of the genetic phylogeny of multifocal prostate cancer identifies multiple independent clonal expansions in neoplastic and morphologically normal prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Colin S; Eeles, Rosalind; Wedge, David C; Van Loo, Peter; Gundem, Gunes; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Kremeyer, Barbara; Butler, Adam; Lynch, Andrew G; Camacho, Niedzica; Massie, Charlie E; Kay, Jonathan; Luxton, Hayley J; Edwards, Sandra; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Dennis, Nening; Merson, Sue; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Zamora, Jorge; Corbishley, Cathy; Thomas, Sarah; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Ramakrishna, Manasa; O'Meara, Sarah; Matthews, Lucy; Clark, Jeremy; Hurst, Rachel; Mithen, Richard; Bristow, Robert G; Boutros, Paul C; Fraser, Michael; Cooke, Susanna; Raine, Keiran; Jones, David; Menzies, Andrew; Stebbings, Lucy; Hinton, Jon; Teague, Jon; McLaren, Stuart; Mudie, Laura; Hardy, Claire; Anderson, Elizabeth; Joseph, Olivia; Goody, Victoria; Robinson, Ben; Maddison, Mark; Gamble, Stephen; Greenman, Christopher; Berney, Dan; Hazell, Steven; Livni, Naomi; Fisher, Cyril; Ogden, Christopher; Kumar, Pardeep; Thompson, Alan; Woodhouse, Christopher; Nicol, David; Mayer, Erik; Dudderidge, Tim; Shah, Nimish C; Gnanapragasam, Vincent; Voet, Thierry; Campbell, Peter; Futreal, Andrew; Easton, Douglas; Warren, Anne Y; Foster, Christopher S; Stratton, Michael R; Whitaker, Hayley C; McDermott, Ultan; Brewer, Daniel S; Neal, David E

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide DNA sequencing was used to decrypt the phylogeny of multiple samples from distinct areas of cancer and morphologically normal tissue taken from the prostates of three men. Mutations were present at high levels in morphologically normal tissue distant from the cancer, reflecting clonal expansions, and the underlying mutational processes at work in morphologically normal tissue were also at work in cancer. Our observations demonstrate the existence of ongoing abnormal mutational processes, consistent with field effects, underlying carcinogenesis. This mechanism gives rise to extensive branching evolution and cancer clone mixing, as exemplified by the coexistence of multiple cancer lineages harboring distinct ERG fusions within a single cancer nodule. Subsets of mutations were shared either by morphologically normal and malignant tissues or between different ERG lineages, indicating earlier or separate clonal cell expansions. Our observations inform on the origin of multifocal disease and have implications for prostate cancer therapy in individual cases.

  1. Analysis of the Genetic Phylogeny of Multifocal Prostate Cancer Identifies Multiple Independent Clonal Expansions in Neoplastic and Morphologically Normal Prostate Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gundem, Gunes; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Kremeyer, Barbara; Butler, Adam; Lynch, Andrew G; Camacho, Niedzica; Massie, Charlie E; Kay, Jonathan; Luxton, Hayley J; Edwards, Sandra; Kote-Jarai, ZSofia; Dennis, Nening; Merson, Sue; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Zamora, Jorge; Corbishley, Cathy; Thomas, Sarah; Nik-Zainal, Serena; O’Meara, Sarah; Matthews, Lucy; Clark, Jeremy; Hurst, Rachel; Mithen, Richard; Bristow, Robert G; Boutros, Paul C; Fraser, Michael; Cooke, Susanna; Raine, Keiran; Jones, David; Menzies, Andrew; Stebbings, Lucy; Hinton, Jon; Teague, Jon; McLaren, Stuart; Mudie, Laura; Hardy, Claire; Anderson, Elizabeth; Joseph, Olivia; Goody, Victoria; Robinson, Ben; Maddison, Mark; Gamble, Stephen; Greenman, Christopher; Berney, Dan; Hazell, Steven; Livni, Naomi; Fisher, Cyril; Ogden, Christopher; Kumar, Pardeep; Thompson, Alan; Woodhouse, Christopher; Nicol, David; Mayer, Erik; Dudderidge, Tim; Shah, Nimish C; Gnanapragasam, Vincent; Voet, Thierry; Campbell, Peter; Futreal, Andrew; Easton, Douglas; Stratton, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome DNA sequencing was used to decrypt the phylogeny of multiple samples from distinct areas of cancer and morphologically normal tissue taken from the prostates of three men. Mutations were present at high levels in morphologically normal tissue distant from the cancer reflecting clonal expansions, and the underlying mutational processes at work in morphologically normal tissue were also at work in cancer. Our observations demonstrate the existence of on-going abnormal mutational processes, consistent with field-effects, underlying carcinogenesis. This mechanism gives rise to extensive branching evolution and cancer clone mixing as exemplified by the coexistence of multiple cancer lineages harboring distinct ERG fusions within a single cancer nodule. Subsets of mutations were shared either by morphologically normal and malignant tissue or between different ERG-lineages, indicating earlier or separate clonal cell expansions. Our observations inform on the origin of multifocal disease and have implications for prostate cancer therapy in individual cases. PMID:25730763

  2. Risks of Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Prostate Cancer Key Points Prostate cancer is a disease in ...

  3. LINE-1 methylation status in prostate cancer and non-neoplastic tissue adjacent to tumor in association with mortality.

    PubMed

    Fiano, Valentina; Zugna, Daniela; Grasso, Chiara; Trevisan, Morena; Delsedime, Luisa; Molinaro, Luca; Gillio-Tos, Anna; Merletti, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo

    2017-01-02

    Aberrant DNA methylation seems to be associated with prostate cancer behavior. We investigated LINE-1 methylation in prostate cancer and non-neoplastic tissue adjacent to tumor (NTAT) in association with mortality from prostate cancer. We selected 157 prostate cancer patients with available NTAT from 2 cohorts of patients diagnosed between 1982-1988 and 1993-1996, followed up until 2010. An association between LINE-1 hypomethylation and prostate cancer mortality in tumor was suggested [hazard ratio per 5% decrease in LINE-1 methylation levels: 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.95-2.01]. After stratification of the patients for Gleason score, the association was present only for those with a Gleason score of at least 8. Among these, low (<75%) vs. high (>80%) LINE-1 methylation was associated with a hazard ratio of 4.68 (95% CI: 1.03-21.34). LINE-1 methylation in the NTAT was not associated with prostate cancer mortality. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that tumor tissue global hypomethylation may be a late event in prostate cancerogenesis and is associated with tumor progression.

  4. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  5. Proteomic Upregulation of Fatty Acid Synthase and Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 and Identification of Cancer- and Race-Specific Pathway Associations in Human Prostate Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jennifer S.; von Lersner, Ariana K.; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2016-01-01

    Protein profiling studies of prostate cancer have been widely used to characterize molecular differences between diseased and non-diseased tissues. When combined with pathway analysis, profiling approaches are able to identify molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer, group patients by cancer subtype, and predict prognosis. This strategy can also be implemented to study prostate cancer in very specific populations, such as African Americans who have higher rates of prostate cancer incidence and mortality than other racial groups in the United States. In this study, age-, stage-, and Gleason score-matched prostate tumor specimen from African American and Caucasian American men, along with non-malignant adjacent prostate tissue from these same patients, were compared. Protein expression changes and altered pathway associations were identified in prostate cancer generally and in African American prostate cancer specifically. In comparing tumor to non-malignant samples, 45 proteins were significantly cancer-associated and 3 proteins were significantly downregulated in tumor samples. Notably, fatty acid synthase (FASN) and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (FABP5) were upregulated in human prostate cancer tissues, consistent with their known functions in prostate cancer progression. Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 member A3 (ALDH1A3) was also upregulated in tumor samples. The Metastasis Associated Protein 3 (MTA3) pathway was significantly enriched in tumor samples compared to non-malignant samples. While the current experiment was unable to detect statistically significant differences in protein expression between African American and Caucasian American samples, differences in overrepresentation and pathway enrichment were found. Structural components (Cytoskeletal Proteins and Extracellular Matrix Protein protein classes, and Biological Adhesion Gene Ontology (GO) annotation) were overrepresented in African American but not Caucasian American tumors. Additionally, 5

  6. Protein profiling of isolated leukocytes, myofibroblasts, epithelial, Basal, and endothelial cells from normal, hyperplastic, cancerous, and inflammatory human prostate tissues.

    PubMed

    Khamis, Zahraa I; Iczkowski, Kenneth A; Sahab, Ziad J; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2010-06-15

    In situ neoplastic prostate cells are not lethal unless they become invasive and metastatic. For cells to become invasive, the prostate gland must undergo degradation of the basement membrane and disruption of the basal cell layer underneath the luminal epithelia. Although the roles of proteinases in breaking down the basement membrane have been well-studied, little is known about the factors that induce basal cell layer disruption, degeneration, and its eventual disappearance in invasive cancer. It is hypothesized that microenvironmental factors may affect the degradation of the basal cell layer, which if protected may prevent tumor progression and invasion. In this study, we have revealed differential protein expression patterns between epithelial and stromal cells isolated from different prostate pathologies and identified several important epithelial and stromal proteins that may contribute to inflammation and malignant transformation of human benign prostate tissues to cancerous tissues using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and proteomics methods. Cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 2 was downregulated in basal cells of benign prostate. Caspase-1 and interleukin-18 receptor 1 were highly expressed in leukocytes of prostate cancer. Proto-oncogene Wnt-3 was downregulated in endothelial cells of prostatitis tissue and tyrosine phosphatase non receptor type 1 was only found in normal and benign endothelial cells. Poly ADP-ribose polymerase 14 was downregulated in myofibroblasts of prostatitis tissue. Interestingly, integrin alpha-6 was upregulated in epithelial cells but not detected in myofibroblasts of prostate cancer. Further validation of these proteins may generate new strategies for the prevention of basal cell layer disruption and subsequent cancer invasion.

  7. Detection of benign epithelia, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and cancer regions in radical prostatectomy tissues using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devpura, Suneetha; Thakur, Jagdish S.; Naik, Ratna; Sarkar, Fazlul H.; Sakr, Wael A.; Naik, Vaman M.

    2010-04-01

    In this study we have investigated Benign Epithelia (BE), Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia (PIN), adenocarcinoma, and different Gleason scores in human prostate bulk tissues using Raman spectroscopy. A careful investigation of the data shows that two main differences in the Raman spectral features of BE, PIN, and cancerous tissues: (i) a strong variations in the band intensities of certain bands, (ii) shift in certain band positions. In order to quantify these variations, Raman data were further analyzed using chemometric methods of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA). The PCA and DFA clearly separated the data into three main distinct pathological groups representing BE, PIN, and cancerous state in tissue. Similarly the analysis of the Raman data of tissues with different Gleason scores shows that the data can be categorized into three distinct groups representing Gleason scores 6, 7, and 8. The results of this study demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy can diagnose different stages of the prostate cancer.

  8. Targeted proteomic approach in prostatic tissue: a panel of potential biomarkers for cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Terracciano, Rosa; Damiano, Rocco; Savino, Rocco; Sindona, Giovanni; Napoli, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the sixth highest causes of cancer-related deaths in men. The molecular events underlying its behavior and evolution are not completely understood. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the only approved Food and Drug Administration biomarker. A panel of ten stage-specific tumoral and adjacent non tumoral tissues from patients affected by PCa (Gleason score 6, 3+3; PSA 10 ÷19 ng/ml) was investigated by MS-based proteomics approach. The proposed method was based on identifying the base-soluble proteins from tissue, established an efficient study, which lead to a deeper molecular perspective understanding of the PCa. A total of 164 proteins were found and 132 of these were evaluated differentially expressed in tumoral tissues. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) showed that among all dataset obtained, 105 molecules were involved in epithelial neoplasia with a p-value of 3.62E-05, whereas, only 11 molecules detected were ascribed to sentinel tissue and bodily fluids. PMID:27713912

  9. Differentially Expressed Androgen-Regulated Genes in Androgen-Sensitive Tissues Reveal Potential Biomarkers of Early Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Altintas, Dogus Murat; Allioli, Nathalie; Decaussin, Myriam; de Bernard, Simon; Ruffion, Alain; Samarut, Jacques; Vlaeminck-Guillem, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    Background Several data favor androgen receptor implication in prostate cancer initiation through the induction of several gene activation programs. The aim of the study is to identify potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) among androgen-regulated genes (ARG) and to evaluate comparative expression of these genes in normal prostate and normal prostate-related androgen-sensitive tissues that do not (or rarely) give rise to cancer. Methods ARG were selected in non-neoplastic adult human prostatic epithelial RWPE-1 cells stably expressing an exogenous human androgen receptor, using RNA-microarrays and validation by qRT-PCR. Expression of 48 preselected genes was quantified in tissue samples (seminal vesicles, prostate transitional zones and prostate cancers, benign prostatic hypertrophy obtained from surgical specimens) using TaqMan® low-density arrays. The diagnostic performances of these potential biomarkers were compared to that of genes known to be associated with PCa (i.e. PCA3 and DLX1). Results and Discussion By crossing expression studies in 26 matched PCa and normal prostate transitional zone samples, and 35 matched seminal vesicle and PCa samples, 14 genes were identified. Similarly, 9 genes were overexpressed in 15 benign prostatic hypertrophy samples, as compared to PCa samples. Overall, we selected 8 genes of interest to evaluate their diagnostic performances in comparison with that of PCA3 and DLX1. Among them, 3 genes: CRYAB, KCNMA1 and SDPR, were overexpressed in all 3 reference non-cancerous tissues. The areas under ROC curves of these genes reached those of PCA3 (0.91) and DLX1 (0.94). Conclusions We identified ARG with reduced expression in PCa and with significant diagnostic values for discriminating between cancerous and non-cancerous prostatic tissues, similar that of PCA3. Given their expression pattern, they could be considered as potentially protective against prostate cancer. Moreover, they could be complementary

  10. Androgenic Regulation of White Adipose Tissue-Prostate Cancer Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    52.2 CES7 carboxylesterase 7 46.4 C4BP complement component 4 binding protein 39.2 PI3 peptidase inhibitor 3, skin -derived 38.0 CRISP3 cysteine...polypeptide 10.1 MTUS1 microtubule associated tumor suppressor 1 7.9 NNMT nicotinamide N-methyltransferase 6.6 SNCG synuclein, gamma (breast cancer-specific

  11. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSM) is expressed in various human tissues: implication for the use of PSM reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to detect hematogenous prostate cancer spread.

    PubMed

    Renneberg, H; Friedetzky, A; Konrad, L; Kurek, R; Weingärtner, K; Wennemuth, G; Tunn, U W; Aumüller, G

    1999-01-01

    Detection of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSM)-mRNA expression in blood samples using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is discussed as a new diagnostic marker of circulating micrometastases in prostate cancer patients. We applied the RT-PCR technique to different human tissues and obtained positive signals for PSM transcripts in human genital and multiple extra-genital tissue sites. The cDNAs were prepared from different human tissues and prostatic cell lines. RT-PCR and nested RT-PCR for PSM was performed with primers derived from the published PSM cDNA. The RT-PCR fragments obtained were cloned and showed 100% sequence homology to PSM. Southern blot hybridization with labeled probes was used to confirm the specificity of the amplicons. In addition to the known PSM expression in the human brain, PSM-mRNA was detected in cDNA isolated from human testis, epididymis and seminal vesicles and in the PC-3 prostatic cancer cell line. Furthermore, we found PSM-mRNA in heart, liver, lung, kidney, spleen, and thyroid gland. The results indicate that PSM expression is not restricted to the prostate gland, but represents a more general component of genital and extra-genital human tissues. This must be considered when RT-PCR and nested RT-PCR screening for PSM expression is performed as a diagnostic measure in blood from prostate cancer patients.

  12. Tissue-scale, personalized modeling and simulation of prostate cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Guillermo; Scott, Michael A; Tew, Kevin; Hughes, Thomas J R; Zhang, Yongjie Jessica; Liu, Lei; Vilanova, Guillermo; Gomez, Hector

    2016-11-29

    Recently, mathematical modeling and simulation of diseases and their treatments have enabled the prediction of clinical outcomes and the design of optimal therapies on a personalized (i.e., patient-specific) basis. This new trend in medical research has been termed "predictive medicine." Prostate cancer (PCa) is a major health problem and an ideal candidate to explore tissue-scale, personalized modeling of cancer growth for two main reasons: First, it is a small organ, and, second, tumor growth can be estimated by measuring serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA, a PCa biomarker in blood), which may enable in vivo validation. In this paper, we present a simple continuous model that reproduces the growth patterns of PCa. We use the phase-field method to account for the transformation of healthy cells to cancer cells and use diffusion-reaction equations to compute nutrient consumption and PSA production. To accurately and efficiently compute tumor growth, our simulations leverage isogeometric analysis (IGA). Our model is shown to reproduce a known shape instability from a spheroidal pattern to fingered growth. Results of our computations indicate that such shift is a tumor response to escape starvation, hypoxia, and, eventually, necrosis. Thus, branching enables the tumor to minimize the distance from inner cells to external nutrients, contributing to cancer survival and further development. We have also used our model to perform tissue-scale, personalized simulation of a PCa patient, based on prostatic anatomy extracted from computed tomography images. This simulation shows tumor progression similar to that seen in clinical practice.

  13. Tissue-scale, personalized modeling and simulation of prostate cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Guillermo; Scott, Michael A.; Tew, Kevin; Hughes, Thomas J. R.; Zhang, Yongjie Jessica; Liu, Lei; Vilanova, Guillermo; Gomez, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Recently, mathematical modeling and simulation of diseases and their treatments have enabled the prediction of clinical outcomes and the design of optimal therapies on a personalized (i.e., patient-specific) basis. This new trend in medical research has been termed “predictive medicine.” Prostate cancer (PCa) is a major health problem and an ideal candidate to explore tissue-scale, personalized modeling of cancer growth for two main reasons: First, it is a small organ, and, second, tumor growth can be estimated by measuring serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA, a PCa biomarker in blood), which may enable in vivo validation. In this paper, we present a simple continuous model that reproduces the growth patterns of PCa. We use the phase-field method to account for the transformation of healthy cells to cancer cells and use diffusion−reaction equations to compute nutrient consumption and PSA production. To accurately and efficiently compute tumor growth, our simulations leverage isogeometric analysis (IGA). Our model is shown to reproduce a known shape instability from a spheroidal pattern to fingered growth. Results of our computations indicate that such shift is a tumor response to escape starvation, hypoxia, and, eventually, necrosis. Thus, branching enables the tumor to minimize the distance from inner cells to external nutrients, contributing to cancer survival and further development. We have also used our model to perform tissue-scale, personalized simulation of a PCa patient, based on prostatic anatomy extracted from computed tomography images. This simulation shows tumor progression similar to that seen in clinical practice. PMID:27856758

  14. Tissue-scale, personalized modeling and simulation of prostate cancer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, Guillermo; Scott, Michael A.; Tew, Kevin; Hughes, Thomas J. R.; Zhang, Yongjie Jessica; Liu, Lei; Vilanova, Guillermo; Gomez, Hector

    2016-11-01

    Recently, mathematical modeling and simulation of diseases and their treatments have enabled the prediction of clinical outcomes and the design of optimal therapies on a personalized (i.e., patient-specific) basis. This new trend in medical research has been termed “predictive medicine.” Prostate cancer (PCa) is a major health problem and an ideal candidate to explore tissue-scale, personalized modeling of cancer growth for two main reasons: First, it is a small organ, and, second, tumor growth can be estimated by measuring serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA, a PCa biomarker in blood), which may enable in vivo validation. In this paper, we present a simple continuous model that reproduces the growth patterns of PCa. We use the phase-field method to account for the transformation of healthy cells to cancer cells and use diffusion-reaction equations to compute nutrient consumption and PSA production. To accurately and efficiently compute tumor growth, our simulations leverage isogeometric analysis (IGA). Our model is shown to reproduce a known shape instability from a spheroidal pattern to fingered growth. Results of our computations indicate that such shift is a tumor response to escape starvation, hypoxia, and, eventually, necrosis. Thus, branching enables the tumor to minimize the distance from inner cells to external nutrients, contributing to cancer survival and further development. We have also used our model to perform tissue-scale, personalized simulation of a PCa patient, based on prostatic anatomy extracted from computed tomography images. This simulation shows tumor progression similar to that seen in clinical practice.

  15. MRS measured fatty acid composition of periprostatic adipose tissue correlates with pathological measures of prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Iordanescu, Gheorghe; Brendler, Charles; Crawford, Susan E; Wyrwicz, Alice M; Venkatasubramanian, Palamadai N; Doll, Jennifer A

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the association between magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopically measured fatty acid composition of periprostatic adipose tissue and pathological markers of prostate cancer aggressiveness. Periprostatic adipose (PPA) and subcutaneous adipose (SQA) tissue from prostate cancer patients undergoing radical prostatectomy were examined ex vivo by proton MR spectroscopy at 14.1T (n = 31). Fractions of monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, total unsaturated, and saturated fatty acids, as well as T2 relaxation times were measured from the spectra. Univariate and multivariate analyses based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and support vector machines (SVM) were used to evaluate the association between differential measures of fatty acid levels in the PPA and SQA tissues and Gleason score and extracapsular extension (ECE), which are pathological measures of prostate cancer aggressiveness. Both pathological markers for aggressive prostate cancer have separable patterns in the MRS features space. The association between ECE and PPA tissue fatty acid composition is linear (area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AROC) and 95% confidence intervals [CIs]: 1.00, [1.00, 1.00]), along the Δ(fM /fS ) measure, and is marked by elevated monounsaturated and reduced saturated fatty acids in the PPA tissue relative to SQA. In contrast, the association between Gleason score and PPA tissue fatty acid composition is nonlinear (classifier AROC and 95% CIs: 0.86, [0.71, 1.00]). Fatty acid composition is altered in the PPA tissue of patients with aggressive prostate cancer. Ex vivo MR spectroscopy may be a useful tool in studying the altered fatty acid metabolism in prostate cancer. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Epigenomic profiling of DNA methylation in paired prostate cancer versus adjacent benign tissue.

    PubMed

    Geybels, Milan S; Zhao, Shanshan; Wong, Chao-Jen; Bibikova, Marina; Klotzle, Brandy; Wu, Michael; Ostrander, Elaine A; Fan, Jian-Bing; Feng, Ziding; Stanford, Janet L

    2015-12-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation may promote prostate carcinogenesis. We investigated epigenome-wide DNA methylation profiles in prostate cancer (PCa) compared to adjacent benign tissue to identify differentially methylated CpG sites. The study included paired PCa and adjacent benign tissue samples from 20 radical prostatectomy patients. Epigenetic profiling was done using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Linear models that accounted for the paired study design and False Discovery Rate Q-values were used to evaluate differential CpG methylation. mRNA expression levels of the genes with the most differentially methylated CpG sites were analyzed. In total, 2,040 differentially methylated CpG sites were identified in PCa versus adjacent benign tissue (Q-value < 0.001), the majority of which were hypermethylated (n = 1,946; 95%). DNA methylation profiles accurately distinguished between PCa and benign tissue samples. Twenty-seven top-ranked hypermethylated CpGs had a mean methylation difference of at least 40% between tissue types, which included 25 CpGs in 17 genes. Furthermore, for 10 genes over 50% of promoter region CpGs were hypermethylated in PCa versus benign tissue. The top-ranked differentially methylated genes included three genes that were associated with both promoter hypermethylation and reduced gene expression: SCGB3A1, HIF3A, and AOX1. Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data provided confirmatory evidence for our findings. This study of PCa versus adjacent benign tissue showed many differentially methylated CpGs and regions in and outside gene promoter regions, which may potentially be used for the development of future epigenetic-based diagnostic tests or as therapeutic targets. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  18. Helical antenna arrays for interstitial microwave thermal therapy for prostate cancer: tissue phantom testing and simulations for treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherar, Michael D.; Gladman, Aviv S.; Davidson, Sean R. H.; Trachtenberg, John; Gertner, Mark R.

    2001-07-01

    Interstitial microwave therapy is an experimental treatment for prostate cancer. The objective of this work was to measure the power deposition (specific absorption rate, SAR) patterns of helical microwave antennae both individually and in array patterns that would be useful for clinical treatment protocols. Commercial helical antenna 3D SAR patterns were measured in muscle equivalent phantoms using a thermographic technique. Two array patterns were tested: a `square' and a `crescent' array, both surrounding the urethra. To assess the feasibility of pre-treatment planning, the measured SAR patterns were input to a treatment planning computer simulation program based on a series of trans-rectal ultrasound images from a prostate cancer patient. The simulation solved the Pennes linear bioheat heat transfer equation in prostate tissue, with the aim of achieving a target of 55 °C at the prostate periphery while not allowing normal surrounding tissues (bladder, urethra, rectum) to rise above 42 °C. These criteria could not be met with the square array but they could be met with the crescent array, provided that the prostate was first dissected away from the rectum. This can be done with a procedure such as `hydrodissection', where sterile saline is injected to separate the prostate and rectum. The results of these SAR measurements and heat transfer simulations indicate that arrays of helical antennae could be used for safe and effective thermal therapy for prostate cancer.

  19. Inhibition of prostate cancer metastasis by administration of a tissue vaccine.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Mark A; Wolter, William R; Sailes, Valerie T

    2008-01-01

    Immunotherapy by vaccination represents a novel method for treatment of cancer. In this regard, vaccines with the broadest possible menu of relevant antigens stand the greatest chance of success. Tissue vaccines are composed of material harvested directly from tumors and contain not only antigens associated with neoplastic epithelium, but also those that may be unique to in vivo growth and antigens associated with the tumor stroma. To test the hypothesis that a tissue vaccine, produced by glutaraldehyde fixation of harvested syngeneic prostate tumors (GFT vaccine), could be used for treatment of prostate cancer, male Lobund-Wistar (LW) rats were treated with methylnitrosourea (MNU) and testosterone propionate to induce autochthonous prostate tumors. Tumor-bearing rats were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: no treatment (11 rats); vaccination with media (10 rats); or vaccination with the GFT vaccine (19 rats). Vaccination was given initially with Freund's complete adjuvant and booster doses were given with incomplete Freund's adjuvant every week until the time of euthanasia. There were no significant differences in mean tumor weight between groups; however, GFT-vaccinated rats had a prolonged survival time; and 4/19 (21%) GFT-vaccinated rats were found to be tumor-free compared to none of the untreated or media-treated controls. Further, pulmonary metastasis occurred in only 5/15 (33%) of GFT-vaccinated rats compared to 10/11 (91%) and 10/10 (100%) of untreated and media-vaccinated controls, respectively. Supernatants of cultured splenocytes from similarly media- and GFT-vaccinated rats demonstrated significant (P < 0.001) increases in IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha from splenocytes of GFT-vaccinated rats, suggesting that GFT vaccination stimulates a Th1 response. In summary, treatment of tumor-bearing rats with a tissue vaccine stimulated a protective immune response that resulted in complete tumor regression in 21% of animals and reduced the number of

  20. MYC and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Cheryl M.; Bieberich, Charles J.; Dang, Chi V.; Nelson, William G.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer, the majority of which is adenocarcinoma, is the most common epithelial cancer affecting a majority of elderly men in Western nations. Its manifestation, however, varies from clinically asymptomatic insidious neoplasms that progress slowly and do not threaten life to one that is highly aggressive with a propensity for metastatic spread and lethality if not treated in time. A number of somatic genetic and epigenetic alterations occur in prostate cancer cells. Some of these changes, such as loss of the tumor suppressors PTEN and p53, are linked to disease progression. Others, such as ETS gene fusions, appear to be linked more with early phases of the disease, such as invasion. Alterations in chromosome 8q24 in the region of MYC have also been linked to disease aggressiveness for many years. However, a number of recent studies in human tissues have indicated that MYC appears to be activated at the earliest phases of prostate cancer (e.g., in tumor-initiating cells) in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, a key precursor lesion to invasive prostatic adenocarcinoma. The initiation and early progression of prostate cancer can be recapitulated in genetically engineered mouse models, permitting a richer understanding of the cause and effects of loss of tumor suppressors and activation of MYC. The combination of studies using human tissues and mouse models paints an emerging molecular picture of prostate cancer development and early progression. This picture reveals that MYC contributes to disease initiation and progression by stimulating an embryonic stem cell–like signature characterized by an enrichment of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and by repressing differentiation. These insights pave the way to potential novel therapeutic concepts based on MYC biology. PMID:21779461

  1. [Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Morote, Joan; Maldonado, Xavier; Morales-Bárrera, Rafael

    2016-02-05

    The Vall d'Hebron multidisciplinary prostate cancer (PC) team reviews recent advances in the management of this neoplasm. Screening studies with long follow-up show a reduction in mortality, whereas active surveillance is emerging as a therapeutic approach of non-aggressive cancers. New markers increase the specificity of PSA and also allow targeting suspected aggressive cancers. Multiparametric magnetic resonance (mMRI) has emerged as the most effective method in the selection of patients for biopsy and also for local tumor staging. The paradigm of random prostatic biopsy is changing through the fusion techniques that allow guiding ultrasonography-driven biopsy of suspicious areas detected in mMRI. Radical prostatectomy (RP) and radiotherapy (RT) are curative treatments of localized PC and both have experienced significant technological improvements. RP is highly effective and the incorporation of robotic surgery is reducing morbidity. Modern RT allows the possibility of high tumor dose with minimal adjacent dose reducing its toxicity. Androgen deprivation therapy with LHRH analogues remains the treatment of choice for advanced PC, but should be limited to this indication. The loss of bone mass and adverse metabolic effects increases the frequency of fractures and cardiovascular morbimortality. After castration resistance in metastatic disease, new hormone-based drugs have demonstrated efficacy even after chemotherapy resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. [Markers of prostate cancer stem cells: research advances].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shun-Qi; Huang, Sheng-Song

    2013-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most seriously malignant diseases threatening men's health, and the mechanisms of its initiation and progression are not yet completely understood. Recent years have witnessed distinct advances in researches on prostate cancer stem cells in many aspects using different sources of materials, such as human prostate cancer tissues, human prostate cancer cell lines, and mouse models of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer stem cell study offers a new insight into the mechanisms of the initiation and progression of prostate cancer and contributes positively to its treatment. This article presents an overview on the prostate cancer stem cell markers utilized in the isolation and identification of prostate cancer stem cells.

  3. Reference-tissue correction of T2-weighted signal intensity for prostate cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yahui; Jiang, Yulei; Oto, Aytekin

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether correction with respect to reference tissue of T2-weighted MRimage signal intensity (SI) improves its effectiveness for classification of regions of interest (ROIs) as prostate cancer (PCa) or normal prostatic tissue. Two image datasets collected retrospectively were used in this study: 71 cases acquired with GE scanners (dataset A), and 59 cases acquired with Philips scanners (dataset B). Through a consensus histology- MR correlation review, 175 PCa and 108 normal-tissue ROIs were identified and drawn manually. Reference-tissue ROIs were selected in each case from the levator ani muscle, urinary bladder, and pubic bone. T2-weighted image SI was corrected as the ratio of the average T2-weighted image SI within an ROI to that of a reference-tissue ROI. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the effectiveness of T2-weighted image SIs for differentiation of PCa from normal-tissue ROIs. AUC (+/- standard error) for uncorrected T2-weighted image SIs was 0.78+/-0.04 (datasets A) and 0.65+/-0.05 (datasets B). AUC for corrected T2-weighted image SIs with respect to muscle, bladder, and bone reference was 0.77+/-0.04 (p=1.0), 0.77+/-0.04 (p=1.0), and 0.75+/-0.04 (p=0.8), respectively, for dataset A; and 0.81+/-0.04 (p=0.002), 0.78+/-0.04 (p<0.001), and 0.79+/-0.04 (p<0.001), respectively, for dataset B. Correction in reference to the levator ani muscle yielded the most consistent results between GE and Phillips images. Correction of T2-weighted image SI in reference to three types of extra-prostatic tissue can improve its effectiveness for differentiation of PCa from normal-tissue ROIs, and correction in reference to the levator ani muscle produces consistent T2-weighted image SIs between GE and Phillips MR images.

  4. Biological Differences Between Prostate Cancer Cells that Metastasize to Bone Versus Soft Tissue Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    retinoic acid inducible in neuroblastoma Homo sapiens, clone IMAGE:4183312, mRNA Homo sapiens, clone IMAGE.a183312, mRNA thlopurine S-methyltransterase...lines compared to normal of human prostatic epithelial cell lines. Non- prostate tissue (see Table I). Immunohis- tumorigenic RWPE-1 prostate epithelial...epithelial cells more than interleukin -1-stimulated human umbilical vein collagen in an integrin-mediated manner [Elga- endothelial cells [Romanov and

  5. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... their doctors even knew they had it. Possible pre-cancerous conditions of the prostate Some research suggests that prostate cancer starts out as a pre-cancerous condition, although this is not yet known ...

  6. Vaccine Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Hormone-Resistant, Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  7. Linking obesogenic dysregulation to prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Renea A; Lo, Jennifer; Ascui, Natasha; Watt, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    The global epidemic of obesity is closely linked to the development of serious co-morbidities, including many forms of cancer. Epidemiological evidence consistently shows that obesity is associated with a similar or mildly increased incidence of prostate cancer but, more prominently, an increased risk for aggressive prostate cancer and prostate cancer-specific mortality. Studies in mice demonstrate that obesity induced by high-fat feeding increases prostate cancer progression; however, the mechanisms underpinning this relationship remain incompletely understood. Adipose tissue expansion in obesity leads to local tissue dysfunction and is associated with low-grade inflammation, alterations in endocrine function and changes in lipolysis that result in increased delivery of fatty acids to tissues of the body. The human prostate gland is covered anteriorly by the prominent peri-prostatic adipose tissue and laterally by smaller adipose tissue depots that lie directly adjacent to the prostatic surface. We discuss how the close association between dysfunctional adipose tissue and prostate epithelial cells might result in bi-directional communication to cause increased prostate cancer aggressiveness and progression. However, the literature indicates that several ‘mainstream’ hypotheses regarding obesity-related drivers of prostate cancer progression are not yet supported by a solid evidence base and, in particular, are not supported by experiments using human tissue. Understanding the links between obesity and prostate cancer will have major implications for the health policy for men with prostate cancer and the development of new therapeutic or preventative strategies. PMID:26581226

  8. Differential Effects of Tissue Culture Coating Substrates on Prostate Cancer Cell Adherence, Morphology and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Liberio, Michelle S.; Sadowski, Martin C.; Soekmadji, Carolina; Davis, Rohan A.; Nelson, Colleen C.

    2014-01-01

    Weak cell-surface adhesion of cell lines to tissue culture surfaces is a common problem and presents technical limitations to the design of experiments. To overcome this problem, various surface coating protocols have been developed. However, a comparative and precise real-time measurement of their impact on cell behavior has not been conducted. The prostate cancer cell line LNCaP, derived from a patient lymph node metastasis, is a commonly used model system in prostate cancer research. However, the cells’ characteristically weak attachment to the surface of tissue culture vessels and cover slips has impeded their manipulation and analysis and use in high throughput screening. To improve the adherence of LNCaP cells to the culture surface, we compared different coating reagents (poly-l-lysine, poly-l-ornithine, collagen type IV, fibronectin, and laminin) and culturing conditions and analyzed their impact on cell proliferation, adhesion, morphology, mobility and gene expression using real-time technologies. The results showed that fibronectin, poly-l-lysine and poly-l-ornithine improved LNCaP cells adherence and provoked cell morphology alterations, such as increase of nuclear and cellular area. These coating reagents also induced a higher expression of F-actin and reduced cell mobility. In contrast, laminin and collagen type IV did not improve adherence but promoted cell aggregation and affected cell morphology. Cells cultured in the presence of laminin displayed higher mobility than control cells. All the coating conditions significantly affected cell viability; however, they did not affect the expression of androgen receptor-regulated genes. Our comparative findings provide important insight for the selection of the ideal coating reagent and culture conditions for the cancer cell lines with respect to their effect on proliferation rate, attachment, morphology, migration, transcriptional response and cellular cytoskeleton arrangement. PMID:25375165

  9. Capillary Force Seeding of Sphere-Templated Hydrogels for Tissue-Engineered Prostate Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Long, Thomas J.; Takeno, Marc; Sprenger, Cynthia C.; Plymate, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial-based tissue-engineered tumor models are now widely used in cancer biology studies. However, specific methods for efficient and reliable cell seeding into these and tissue-engineering constructs used for regenerative medicine often remain poorly defined. Here, we describe a capillary force-based method for seeding the human prostate cancer cell lines M12 and LNCaP C4-2 into sphere-templated poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) hydrogels. The capillary force seeding method improved the cell number and distribution within the porous scaffolds compared to well-established protocols such as static and centrifugation seeding. Seeding efficiency was found to be strongly dependent on the rounded cell diameter relative to the pore diameter and pore interconnect size, parameters that can be controllably modulated during scaffold fabrication. Cell seeding efficiency was evaluated quantitatively using a PicoGreen DNA assay, which demonstrated some variation in cell retention using the capillary force method. When cultured within the porous hydrogels, both cell lines attached and proliferated within the network, but histology showed the formation of a necrotic zone by 7 days likely due to oxygen and nutrient diffusional limitations. The necrotic zone thickness was decreased by dynamically culturing cells in an orbital shaker. Proliferation analysis showed that despite a variable seeding efficiency, by 7 days in culture, scaffolds contained a roughly consistent number of cells as they proliferated to fill the pores of the scaffold. These studies demonstrate that sphere-templated polymeric scaffolds have the potential to serve as an adaptable cell culture substrate for engineering a three-dimensional prostate cancer model. PMID:23373788

  10. Differential effects of tissue culture coating substrates on prostate cancer cell adherence, morphology and behavior.

    PubMed

    Liberio, Michelle S; Sadowski, Martin C; Soekmadji, Carolina; Davis, Rohan A; Nelson, Colleen C

    2014-01-01

    Weak cell-surface adhesion of cell lines to tissue culture surfaces is a common problem and presents technical limitations to the design of experiments. To overcome this problem, various surface coating protocols have been developed. However, a comparative and precise real-time measurement of their impact on cell behavior has not been conducted. The prostate cancer cell line LNCaP, derived from a patient lymph node metastasis, is a commonly used model system in prostate cancer research. However, the cells' characteristically weak attachment to the surface of tissue culture vessels and cover slips has impeded their manipulation and analysis and use in high throughput screening. To improve the adherence of LNCaP cells to the culture surface, we compared different coating reagents (poly-L-lysine, poly-L-ornithine, collagen type IV, fibronectin, and laminin) and culturing conditions and analyzed their impact on cell proliferation, adhesion, morphology, mobility and gene expression using real-time technologies. The results showed that fibronectin, poly-L-lysine and poly-L-ornithine improved LNCaP cells adherence and provoked cell morphology alterations, such as increase of nuclear and cellular area. These coating reagents also induced a higher expression of F-actin and reduced cell mobility. In contrast, laminin and collagen type IV did not improve adherence but promoted cell aggregation and affected cell morphology. Cells cultured in the presence of laminin displayed higher mobility than control cells. All the coating conditions significantly affected cell viability; however, they did not affect the expression of androgen receptor-regulated genes. Our comparative findings provide important insight for the selection of the ideal coating reagent and culture conditions for the cancer cell lines with respect to their effect on proliferation rate, attachment, morphology, migration, transcriptional response and cellular cytoskeleton arrangement.

  11. Heterogeneous patterns of DNA methylation-based field effects in histologically normal prostate tissue from cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Mia; Strand, Siri Hundtofte; Mundbjerg, Kamilla; Liang, Gangning; Gill, Inderbir; Haldrup, Christa; Borre, Michael; Høyer, Søren; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) diagnosis is based on histological evaluation of prostate needle biopsies, which have high false negative rates. Here, we investigated if cancer-associated epigenetic field effects in histologically normal prostate tissue may be used to increase sensitivity for PC. We focused on nine genes (AOX1, CCDC181 (C1orf114), GABRE, GAS6, HAPLN3, KLF8, MOB3B, SLC18A2, and GSTP1) known to be hypermethylated in PC. Using quantitative methylation-specific PCR, we analysed 66 malignant and 134 non-malignant tissue samples from 107 patients, who underwent ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (67 patients had at least one cancer-positive biopsy, 40 had exclusively cancer-negative biopsies). Hypermethylation was detectable for all genes in malignant needle biopsy samples (AUC: 0.80 to 0.98), confirming previous findings in prostatectomy specimens. Furthermore, we identified a four-gene methylation signature (AOX1xGSTP1xHAPLN3xSLC18A2) that distinguished histologically non-malignant biopsies from patients with vs. without PC in other biopsies (AUC = 0.65; sensitivity = 30.8%; specificity = 100%). This signature was validated in an independent patient set (59 PC, 36 adjacent non-malignant, and 9 normal prostate tissue samples) analysed on Illumina 450 K methylation arrays (AUC = 0.70; sensitivity = 40.6%; specificity = 100%). Our results suggest that a novel four-gene signature may be used to increase sensitivity for PC diagnosis through detection of epigenetic field effects in histologically non-malignant prostate tissue samples. PMID:28084441

  12. Heterogeneous patterns of DNA methylation-based field effects in histologically normal prostate tissue from cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Møller, Mia; Strand, Siri Hundtofte; Mundbjerg, Kamilla; Liang, Gangning; Gill, Inderbir; Haldrup, Christa; Borre, Michael; Høyer, Søren; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard

    2017-01-13

    Prostate cancer (PC) diagnosis is based on histological evaluation of prostate needle biopsies, which have high false negative rates. Here, we investigated if cancer-associated epigenetic field effects in histologically normal prostate tissue may be used to increase sensitivity for PC. We focused on nine genes (AOX1, CCDC181 (C1orf114), GABRE, GAS6, HAPLN3, KLF8, MOB3B, SLC18A2, and GSTP1) known to be hypermethylated in PC. Using quantitative methylation-specific PCR, we analysed 66 malignant and 134 non-malignant tissue samples from 107 patients, who underwent ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (67 patients had at least one cancer-positive biopsy, 40 had exclusively cancer-negative biopsies). Hypermethylation was detectable for all genes in malignant needle biopsy samples (AUC: 0.80 to 0.98), confirming previous findings in prostatectomy specimens. Furthermore, we identified a four-gene methylation signature (AOX1xGSTP1xHAPLN3xSLC18A2) that distinguished histologically non-malignant biopsies from patients with vs. without PC in other biopsies (AUC = 0.65; sensitivity = 30.8%; specificity = 100%). This signature was validated in an independent patient set (59 PC, 36 adjacent non-malignant, and 9 normal prostate tissue samples) analysed on Illumina 450 K methylation arrays (AUC = 0.70; sensitivity = 40.6%; specificity = 100%). Our results suggest that a novel four-gene signature may be used to increase sensitivity for PC diagnosis through detection of epigenetic field effects in histologically non-malignant prostate tissue samples.

  13. Detection and grading of prostate cancer using temporal enhanced ultrasound: combining deep neural networks and tissue mimicking simulations.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Shekoofeh; Bayat, Sharareh; Yan, Pingkun; Tahmasebi, Amir; Nir, Guy; Kwak, Jin Tae; Xu, Sheng; Wilson, Storey; Iczkowski, Kenneth A; Lucia, M Scott; Goldenberg, Larry; Salcudean, Septimiu E; Pinto, Peter A; Wood, Bradford; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Mousavi, Parvin

    2017-08-01

    PURPOSE  : Temporal Enhanced Ultrasound (TeUS) has been proposed as a new paradigm for tissue characterization based on a sequence of ultrasound radio frequency (RF) data. We previously used TeUS to successfully address the problem of prostate cancer detection in the fusion biopsies. METHODS  : In this paper, we use TeUS to address the problem of grading prostate cancer in a clinical study of 197 biopsy cores from 132 patients. Our method involves capturing high-level latent features of TeUS with a deep learning approach followed by distribution learning to cluster aggressive cancer in a biopsy core. In this hypothesis-generating study, we utilize deep learning based feature visualization as a means to obtain insight into the physical phenomenon governing the interaction of temporal ultrasound with tissue. RESULTS  : Based on the evidence derived from our feature visualization, and the structure of tissue from digital pathology, we build a simulation framework for studying the physical phenomenon underlying TeUS-based tissue characterization. CONCLUSION  : Results from simulation and feature visualization corroborated with the hypothesis that micro-vibrations of tissue microstructure, captured by low-frequency spectral features of TeUS, can be used for detection of prostate cancer.

  14. Precise preoperative localization of prostate cancer employing 12-core needle biopsy with a tissue-marking method for effective surgical strategy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Satoko; Watanabe, Mika; Taniuchi, Shinji; Kasajima, Atsuko; Mitsuzuka, Koji; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Arai, Yoichi; Sasano, Hironobu

    2015-05-01

    Prostate needle biopsy plays a pivotal role not only in the diagnosis but also the management of patients with prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is often multifocal and diagnosis of the lesion could therefore be difficult with diagnostic imaging only; thus, multiple core biopsies are taken from several different regions of the prostate. In current practice, 10- or 12-core needle biopsy is considered the clinical standard. Several techniques have been reported to improve the orientation of the specimens, but tissue marking, which could theoretically provide important information on the location of the lesion in the prostate, has been rarely reported. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the clinical significance of systematic 12-core needle biopsy with tissue marking for preoperative prediction of lesion sites and clinicopathological features of patients. We evaluated 93 patients who underwent 12-core prostate biopsy and subsequent radical prostatectomy. We correlated the biopsy results to the prostate sites in which biopsies were performed and prognostic factors of the patients, especially the degree of extraprostatic extension (EPE) obtained in surgical specimens. Among 253 cancer foci detected in 93 prostatectomy specimens, 168 (66.4%) foci were detected by biopsy. All patients had proven cancer. EPE-positive cancers were associated with a larger number of positive cores, larger tumor length, and higher percentage of cancer tissue in the corresponding cores. Systematic 12-core prostate biopsy with tissue marking is useful for preoperative detection of cancer foci and provides valuable information that enables effective surgical strategies.

  15. Stokes polarimetry imaging of dog prostate tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Johnston, William K., III; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2010-02-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States in 2009. Radical prostatectomy (complete removal of the prostate) is the most common treatment for prostate cancer, however, differentiating prostate tissue from adjacent bladder, nerves, and muscle is difficult. Improved visualization could improve oncologic outcomes and decrease damage to adjacent nerves and muscle important for preservation of potency and continence. A novel Stokes polarimetry imaging (SPI) system was developed and evaluated using a dog prostate specimen in order to examine the feasibility of the system to differentiate prostate from bladder. The degree of linear polarization (DOLP) image maps from linearly polarized light illumination at different visible wavelengths (475, 510, and 650 nm) were constructed. The SPI system used the polarization property of the prostate tissue. The DOLP images allowed advanced differentiation by distinguishing glandular tissue of prostate from the muscular-stromal tissue in the bladder. The DOLP image at 650 nm effectively differentiated prostate and bladder by strong DOLP in bladder. SPI system has the potential to improve surgical outcomes in open or robotic-assisted laparoscopic removal of the prostate. Further in vivo testing is warranted.

  16. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Prostate Cancer The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation on Screening for Prostate Cancer . This recommendation is for ...

  17. Prostate Cancer FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coffey – Holden Prostate Cancer Academy Awards Challenge Awards Creativity Awards Young Investigator Awards Scientific Retreat – Meeting Agenda ... Retreat Coffey – Holden Prostate Cancer Academy Challenge Awards Creativity Awards Young Investigator Awards Featured Scientific Retreat – Meeting ...

  18. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coffey – Holden Prostate Cancer Academy Awards Challenge Awards Creativity Awards Young Investigator Awards Scientific Retreat – Meeting Agenda ... Retreat Coffey – Holden Prostate Cancer Academy Challenge Awards Creativity Awards Young Investigator Awards Featured Scientific Retreat – Meeting ...

  19. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000907.htm Cryotherapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing features ... first treatment for prostate cancer. What Happens During Cryotherapy Before the procedure, you will be given medicine ...

  20. Expression of spermidine/spermine N(1) -acetyl transferase (SSAT) in human prostate tissues is related to prostate cancer progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Eickhoff, Jens C; Mehraein-Ghomi, Farideh; Church, Dawn R; Wilding, George; Basu, Hirak S

    2015-08-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) in many patients remains indolent for the rest of their lives, but in some patients, it progresses to lethal metastatic disease. Gleason score is the current clinical method for PCa prognosis. It cannot reliably identify aggressive PCa, when GS is ≤ 7. It is shown that oxidative stress plays a key role in PCa progression. We have shown that in cultured human PCa cells, an activation of spermidine/spermine N(1) -acetyl transferase (SSAT; EC 2.3.1.57) enzyme initiates a polyamine oxidation pathway and generates copious amounts of reactive oxygen species in polyamine-rich PCa cells. We used RNA in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry methods to detect SSAT mRNA and protein expression in two tissue microarrays (TMA) created from patient's prostate tissues. We analyzed 423 patient's prostate tissues in the two TMAs. Our data show that there is a significant increase in both SSAT mRNA and the enzyme protein in the PCa cells as compared to their benign counterpart. This increase is even more pronounced in metastatic PCa tissues as compared to the PCa localized in the prostate. In the prostatectomy tissues from early-stage patients, the SSAT protein level is also high in the tissues obtained from the patients who ultimately progress to advanced metastatic disease. Based on these results combined with published data from our and other laboratories, we propose an activation of an autocrine feed-forward loop of PCa cell proliferation in the absence of androgen as a possible mechanism of castrate-resistant prostate cancer growth. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Comprehensive gene expression microarray analysis of Ets-1 blockade in PC3 prostate cancer cells and correlations with prostate cancer tissues: Insights into genes involved in the metastatic cascade.

    PubMed

    Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Lindstrot, Andreas; Langer, Berit; Buettner, Reinhard; Wernert, Nicolas

    2011-06-01

    Ets-1 is the prototype of the ETS family of transcription factors and is suggested to play an important role in the malignant progression of prostatic carcinomas. Therefore, in this study we investigated the effect of blocking Ets-1 in PC3 prostate cancer cells on genes involved in the metastatic cascade, and correlated these findings with prostate cancer tissues. Two stable PC3 cell cultures were established by transfection with either an Ets-1 inverse antisense expression vector or a mock control vector. The effect of blocking Ets-1 on genes involved in the metastatic cascade was assessed by a comprehensive gene expression microarray analysis of Ets-1 inverse and mock control cells. Correlating the sets of genes found in the PC3 microarray data with prostate cancer tissues was performed by verifying the genes in a comprehensive gene expression microarray analysis of RNA extracted from laser microdissected normal prostate glands and from carcinoma glands taken from prostate cancer patients. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of Ets-1 in mock cells and its absence in Ets-1 inverse cells. In the Ets-1 blockade microarray, many differentially expressed genes were found; however, only genes with a greater than 10-fold up- or down-regulation between the Ets-1 blockade and mock control were considered significant. The genes were placed into four groups that play a role in the so-called metastatic cascade based on their known functions in proliferation, apoptosis, migration and angiogenesis. The genes found in the Ets-1 blockade microarray analysis were verified for their presence in the microarray analysis of prostate cancer tissues. Genes found in the microarray analysis of prostate cancer tissues with an >2-fold change and a p-value <0.01 were considered significant. We identified sets of genes that are involved in the metastatic cascade and are known to be implicated in prostate cancer to show changes in the expression patterns due to the Ets-1 blockade in

  2. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Irene A.; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Vargas, Hebert Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy among men in the Western world. The natural history and clinical course of prostate cancer are markedly diverse, ranging from small indolent intraprostatic lesions to highly aggressive disseminated disease. An understanding of this biologic heterogeneity is considered a necessary requisite in the quest for the adoption of precise and personalized management strategies. Molecular imaging offers the potential for noninvasive assessment of the biologic interactions underpinning prostate carcinogenesis. Currently, numerous molecular imaging probes are in clinical use or undergoing preclinical or clinical evaluation. These probes can be divided into those that image increased cell metabolism, those that target prostate cancer–specific membrane proteins and receptor molecules, and those that bind to the bone matrix adjacent to metastases to bone. The increased metabolism and vascular changes in prostate cancer cells can be evaluated with radiolabeled analogs of choline, acetate, glucose, amino acids, and nucleotides. The androgen receptor, prostate-specific membrane antigen, and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (ie, bombesin) are overexpressed in prostate cancer and can be targeted by specific radiolabeled imaging probes. Because metastatic prostate cancer cells induce osteoblastic signaling pathways of adjacent bone tissue, bone-seeking radiotracers are sensitive tools for the detection of metastases to bone. Knowledge about the underlying biologic processes responsible for the phenotypes associated with the different stages of prostate cancer allows an appropriate choice of methods and helps avoid pitfalls. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26587888

  3. Changes of collagen and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in human cancerous and normal prostate tissues studied using native fluorescence spectroscopy with selective excitation wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Tang, Guichen; Alfano, Robert R.

    2010-07-01

    The fluorescence spectra of human cancerous and normal prostate tissues obtained by the selective excitation wavelength of 340 nm were measured. The contributions of principle biochemical components to tissue fluorescence spectra were investigated using the method of multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares. The results show that there is a reduced contribution from the emission of collagen and increased contribution from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) in cancerous tissues as compared with normal tissue. This difference is attributed to the changes of relative contents of NADH and collagen during cancer development. This research may present a potential native biomarker for prostate cancer detection.

  4. Analysis of XMRV integration sites from human prostate cancer tissues suggests PCR contamination rather than genuine human infection.

    PubMed

    Garson, Jeremy A; Kellam, Paul; Towers, Greg J

    2011-02-25

    XMRV is a gammaretrovirus associated in some studies with human prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome. Central to the hypothesis of XMRV as a human pathogen is the description of integration sites in DNA from prostate tumour tissues. Here we demonstrate that 2 of 14 patient-derived sites are identical to sites cloned in the same laboratory from experimentally infected DU145 cells. Identical integration sites have never previously been described in any retrovirus infection. We propose that the patient-derived sites are the result of PCR contamination. This observation further undermines the notion that XMRV is a genuine human pathogen.

  5. The Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network (PCBN)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    embedded material and tissue microarrays (TMAs)), prostate cancer patient derived xenografts (PDX) and derived specimens ( DNA and RNA) from prostate...derived RNA and DNA where required. Specimens were made available to prostate cancer researchers through the PCBN. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Biorepository...and derived specimens ( DNA and RNA) from prostate cancer patients; these specimens are linked to clinical and outcome data and supported by an

  6. Evaluation of tissue PCA3 expression in prostate cancer by RNA in situ hybridization--a correlative study with urine PCA3 and TMPRSS2-ERG.

    PubMed

    Warrick, Joshua I; Tomlins, Scott A; Carskadon, Shannon L; Young, Allison M; Siddiqui, Javed; Wei, John T; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Kunju, Lakshmi P; Palanisamy, Nallasivam

    2014-04-01

    PCA3 is a prostate-specific non-coding RNA, with utility as a urine-based early detection biomarker. Here, we report the evaluation of tissue PCA3 expression by RNA in situ hybridization in a cohort of 41 mapped prostatectomy specimens. We compared tissue PCA3 expression with tissue level ERG expression and matched pre-prostatectomy urine PCA3 and TMPRSS2-ERG levels. Across 136 slides containing 138 foci of prostate cancer, PCA3 was expressed in 55% of cancer foci and 71% of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia foci. Overall, the specificity of tissue PCA3 was >90% for prostate cancer and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia combined. Tissue PCA3 cancer expression was not significantly associated with urine PCA3 expression. PCA3 and ERG positivity in cancer foci was positively associated (P<0.01). We report the first comprehensive assessment of PCA3 expression in prostatectomy specimens, and find limited correlation between tissue PCA3 and matched urine in prostate cancer.

  7. Detection of benign epithelia, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and cancer regions in radical prostatectomy tissues using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devpura, Suneetha; Thakur, Jagdish S.; Sarkar, Fazlul H.; Sakr, Wael A.; Naik, Vaman M.; Naik, Ratna

    2010-03-01

    We have studied benign epithelia (BE), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), adenocarcinoma, and cancerous tissues of different Gleason scores in human prostrate bulk tissues using Raman spectroscopy. The data shows two main differences in the Raman spectral features of BE, PIN and cancerous tissues: (i) A strong variations in the peak intensities, (ii) shift in certain peak positions. In order to quantify these variations, Raman data were analyzed using chemometric methods of principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant function analysis (DFA). The PCA and DFA clearly separated the data into three main distinct pathological groups representing BE, PIN and cancer. Similarly the analysis of different Gleason scores shows that the data can be categorized into three distinct groups representing Gleason score 6, 7, and 8. The results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy can be used to distinguish different stages of the prostrate cancer.

  8. Selenoproteins and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-01

    1-0009 TITLE: Selenoproteins and Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Veda Navsariwala, Ph.D...Annual Summary 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 Oct 2004 – 14 Oct 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Selenoproteins and Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...ABSTRACT For this postdoctoral fellowship the specific role of selenoproteins in prostate carcinogenesis is being investigated using a cell

  9. Tissue-type imaging (TTI) based on ultrasonic spectral and clinical parameters for detecting, evaluating, and managing prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feleppa, Ernest J.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Dasgupta, Shreedevi; Kalisz, Andrew; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Porter, Christopher R.

    2005-04-01

    This study seeks to develop more-sensitive and -specific ultrasonic methods of imaging cancerous prostate tissue and thereby to improve means of guiding biopsies and planning, targeting, and monitoring treatment. Ultrasonic radio-frequency, echo-signal data, and clinical variables, e.g., PSA, voiding function, etc., during biopsy examinations were acquired. Spectra of the radio-frequency signals were computed in each biopsied region, and used to train neural networks; biopsy results served as the gold standard. A lookup table gave scores for cancer likelihood on a pixel-by-pixel basis from locally computed spectral-parameter and global clinical-parameter values. ROC curves used leave-one-patient- and leave-one-biopsy-out approaches to minimize classification bias. Resulting ROC-curve areas were 0.80+/-0.03 for neural-networks versus 0.66+/-0.03 for conventional classification. TTIs generated from data acquired pre-surgically showed tumors that were unrecognized in conventional images and during surgery. 3-D renderings of prostatectomy histology and TTIs showed encouraging correlations, which shows promise for improving the detection and management of prostate cancer, e.g., for biopsy guidance, planning dose-escalation and tissue-sparing options for radiation or cryotherapy, and assessing the effects of treatment. Combining MRS parameters with US spectral parameters appears capable of further improving prostate-cancer imaging. [Work supported by NIH.

  10. Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is expressed in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines and expression is differentially regulated in vitro by ghrelin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ghrelin is a 28 amino acid peptide hormone that is expressed in the stomach and a range of peripheral tissues, where it frequently acts as an autocrine/paracrine growth factor. Ghrelin is modified by a unique acylation required for it to activate its cognate receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), which mediates many of the actions of ghrelin. Recently, the enzyme responsible for adding the fatty acid residue (octanoyl/acyl group) to the third amino acid of ghrelin, GOAT (ghrelin O-acyltransferase), was identified. Methods We used cell culture, quantitative real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and immunohistochemistry to demonstrate the expression of GOAT in prostate cancer cell lines and tissues from patients. Real-time RT-PCR was used to demonstrate the expression of prohormone convertase (PC)1/3, PC2 and furin in prostate cancer cell lines. Prostate-derived cell lines were treated with ghrelin and desacyl ghrelin and the effect on GOAT expression was measured using quantitative RT-PCR. Results We have demonstrated that GOAT mRNA and protein are expressed in the normal prostate and human prostate cancer tissue samples. The RWPE-1 and RWPE-2 normal prostate-derived cell lines and the LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines express GOAT and at least one other enzyme that is necessary to produce mature, acylated ghrelin from proghrelin (PC1/3, PC2 or furin). Finally, ghrelin, but not desacyl ghrelin (unacylated ghrelin), can directly regulate the expression of GOAT in the RWPE-1 normal prostate derived cell line and the PC3 prostate cancer cell line. Ghrelin treatment (100nM) for 6 hours significantly decreased GOAT mRNA expression two-fold (P < 0.05) in the PC3 prostate cancer cell line, however, ghrelin did not regulate GOAT expression in the DU145 and LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines. Conclusions This study demonstrates that GOAT is expressed in prostate cancer specimens and cell lines. Ghrelin regulates GOAT

  11. Screening for prostate cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weirich, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    Despite recent advances in both the survival and cure rates for many forms of cancer, unfortunately the same has not been true for prostate cancer. In fact, the age-adjusted death rate from prostate cancer has not significantly improved since 1949, and prostate cancer remains the most common cancer in American men, causing the second highest cancer mortality rate. Topics discussed include the following: serum testosterone levels; diagnosis; mortality statistics; prostate-sppecific antigen (PSA) tests; and the Occupational Medicine Services policy at LeRC.

  12. Selective invocation of shape priors for deformable segmentation and morphologic classification of prostate cancer tissue microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sahirzeeshan; Veltri, Robert; Epstein, Jonathan I; Christudass, Christhunesa; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-04-01

    Shape based active contours have emerged as a natural solution to overlap resolution. However, most of these shape-based methods are computationally expensive. There are instances in an image where no overlapping objects are present and applying these schemes results in significant computational overhead without any accompanying, additional benefit. In this paper we present a novel adaptive active contour scheme (AdACM) that combines boundary and region based energy terms with a shape prior in a multi level set formulation. To reduce the computational overhead, the shape prior term in the variational formulation is only invoked for those instances in the image where overlaps between objects are identified; these overlaps being identified via a contour concavity detection scheme. By not having to invoke all three terms (shape, boundary, region) for segmenting every object in the scene, the computational expense of the integrated active contour model is dramatically reduced, a particularly relevant consideration when multiple objects have to be segmented on very large histopathological images. The AdACM was employed for the task of segmenting nuclei on 80 prostate cancer tissue microarray images from 40 patient studies. Nuclear shape based, architectural and textural features extracted from these segmentations were extracted and found to able to discriminate different Gleason grade patterns with a classification accuracy of 86% via a quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) classifier. On average the AdACM model provided 60% savings in computational times compared to a non-optimized hybrid active contour model involving a shape prior.

  13. Metastatic Prostate Cancer of Hand

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Koji; Ishimaru, Daichi; Nishimoto, Yutaka; Ohno, Yoshiyuki; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue metastases of prostate cancer to other sites are extremely rare, and, to our best knowledge, there have been no reports of metastasis to soft tissue of the hand. A 63-year-old man was diagnosed with prostatic cancer. During treatment, bone and soft tissue metastases to the right hand, appearing in the first web space, were observed. The tumor was resected, along with both the first and second metacarpal bones. The thumb was reconstructed by pollicization of the remaining index finger, enabling the patient to use the pollicized thumb for activities of daily living. This is the first case report of prostate cancer metastasizing to the soft tissue in hand. After wide resection, pollicization was able to reconstruct a functional hand and thumb. PMID:27843661

  14. Targeting tissue factor on tumor vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells for immunotherapy in mouse models of prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Garen, A

    2001-10-09

    The efficacy and safety of an immunoconjugate (icon) molecule, composed of a mutated mouse factor VII (mfVII) targeting domain and the Fc effector domain of an IgG1 Ig (mfVII/Fc icon), was tested with a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of human prostatic cancer and an immunocompetent mouse model of mouse prostatic cancer. The SCID mice were first injected s.c. with a human prostatic tumor line, forming a skin tumor that produces a high blood titer of prostate-specific antigen and metastasizes to bone. The icon was encoded in a replication-incompetent adenoviral vector that was injected directly into the skin tumor. The tumor cells infected by the vector synthesize and secrete the icon into the blood, and the blood-borne icon binds with high affinity and specificity to mouse tissue factor expressed on endothelial cells lining the lumen of the tumor vasculature and to human tissue factor expressed on the tumor cells. The Fc domain of the icon activates a cytolytic immune attack against cells that bind the icon. The immunotherapy tests in SCID mice demonstrated that intratumoral injections of the adenoviral vector encoding the mfVII/human Fc icon resulted in long-term regression of the injected human prostatic tumor and also of a distant uninjected tumor, without associated toxicity to the mice. Comparable results were obtained with a SCID mouse model of human melanoma. At the end of the experiments the mice appeared to be free of viable tumor cells. This protocol also could be efficacious for treating cancer patients who have vascularized tumors.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions prostate cancer prostate cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Prostate cancer is a common disease that affects men, usually ...

  16. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000908.htm Hormone therapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... the growth of prostate cancer. Male Hormones and Prostate Cancer Androgens are male sex hormones. Testosterone is one ...

  17. Tissue microarray analysis indicates hedgehog signaling as a potential prognostic factor in intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gonnissen, Annelies; Isebaert, Sofie; Perneel, Christiaan; McKee, Chad M; Verrill, Clare; Bryant, Richard J; Van Utterbeeck, Filip; Lerut, Evelyne; Haustermans, Karin; Muschel, Ruth J

    2017-09-06

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a heterogeneous disease with a variable natural history, genetics, and treatment outcome. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is increasingly recognized as being potentially important for the development and progression of PCa. In this retrospective study, we compared the activation status of the Hh signaling pathway between benign and tumor tissue, and evaluated the clinical significance of Hh signaling in PCa. In this tissue microarray (TMA) study, the protein expression of several Hh signaling components and Hh target proteins, along with microvessel density, were compared between benign (n = 64) and malignant (n = 170) prostate tissue, and correlated with PCa clinicopathological characteristics and biochemical recurrence (BCR). The Hh signaling pathway appeared to be more active in PCa than in benign prostate tissue, as demonstrated by lower expression of the negative regulators PTCH1 and GLI3 in the tumor tissue compared to benign. In addition, high epithelial GLI2 expression correlated with higher pathological Gleason score. Overall, higher epithelial GLI3 expression in the tumor was shown to be an independent marker of a favorable prognosis. Hh signaling activation might reflect aggressive tumoral behavior, since high epithelial GLI2 expression positively correlates with a higher pathological Gleason score. Moreover, higher epithelial GLI3 expression is an independent marker of a more favorable prognosis.

  18. Quantitative analysis of BTF3, HINT1, NDRG1 and ODC1 protein over-expression in human prostate cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Symes, Andrew J; Eilertsen, Marte; Millar, Michael; Nariculam, Joseph; Freeman, Alex; Notara, Maria; Feneley, Mark R; Patel, Hitendra R H; Patel, Hitenedra R H; Masters, John R W; Ahmed, Aamir

    2013-01-01

    Prostate carcinoma is the most common cancer in men with few, quantifiable, biomarkers. Prostate cancer biomarker discovery has been hampered due to subjective analysis of protein expression in tissue sections. An unbiased, quantitative immunohistochemical approach provided here, for the diagnosis and stratification of prostate cancer could overcome this problem. Antibodies against four proteins BTF3, HINT1, NDRG1 and ODC1 were used in a prostate tissue array (> 500 individual tissue cores from 82 patients, 41 case pairs matched with one patient in each pair had biochemical recurrence). Protein expression, quantified in an unbiased manner using an automated analysis protocol in ImageJ software, was increased in malignant vs non-malignant prostate (by 2-2.5 fold, p<0.0001). Operating characteristics indicate sensitivity in the range of 0.68 to 0.74; combination of markers in a logistic regression model demonstrates further improvement in diagnostic power. Triple-labeled immunofluorescence (BTF3, HINT1 and NDRG1) in tissue array showed a significant (p<0.02) change in co-localization coefficients for BTF3 and NDRG1 co-expression in biochemical relapse vs non-relapse cancer epithelium. BTF3, HINT1, NDRG1 and ODC1 could be developed as epithelial specific biomarkers for tissue based diagnosis and stratification of prostate cancer.

  19. Infections and inflammation in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sfanos, Karen S; Isaacs, William B; Marzo, Angelo M De

    2013-01-01

    The frequent observation of both acute and chronic inflammation of unknown stimulus in the adult prostate has motivated a large body of research aimed at identifying potential infectious agents that may elicit prostatic inflammation. The overarching hypothesis is that infection-induced inflammation may be associated with prostate cancer development or progression, as inflammation is known to serve as an “enabling characteristic” of cancer. With recent advances in molecular techniques for microorganism identification, a panoply of microorganisms has been scrutinized in prostate tissues and in relation to prostate carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literature on the evidence for infectious agents as a contributing factor to prostatic inflammation and prostate cancer, and to highlight recent literature suggesting an infectious etiology to the biogenesis of prostatic corpora amylacea and on the development of mouse models of prostatic infections. PMID:25110720

  20. Infections and inflammation in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sfanos, Karen S; Isaacs, William B; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2013-12-25

    The frequent observation of both acute and chronic inflammation of unknown stimulus in the adult prostate has motivated a large body of research aimed at identifying potential infectious agents that may elicit prostatic inflammation. The overarching hypothesis is that infection-induced inflammation may be associated with prostate cancer development or progression, as inflammation is known to serve as an "enabling characteristic" of cancer. With recent advances in molecular techniques for microorganism identification, a panoply of microorganisms has been scrutinized in prostate tissues and in relation to prostate carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literature on the evidence for infectious agents as a contributing factor to prostatic inflammation and prostate cancer, and to highlight recent literature suggesting an infectious etiology to the biogenesis of prostatic corpora amylacea and on the development of mouse models of prostatic infections.

  1. Proteomics analysis of malignant and benign prostate tissue by 2D DIGE/MS reveals new insights into proteins involved in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Davalieva, Katarina; Kostovska, Ivana Maleva; Kiprijanovska, Sanja; Markoska, Katerina; Kubelka-Sabit, Katerina; Filipovski, Vanja; Stavridis, Sotir; Stankov, Oliver; Komina, Selim; Petrusevska, Gordana; Polenakovic, Momir

    2015-10-01

    The key to a more effective diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic management of prostate cancer (PCa) could lie in the direct analysis of cancer tissue. In this study, by comparative proteomics analysis of PCa and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) tissues we attempted to elucidate the proteins and regulatory pathways involved in this disease. The samples used in this study were fresh surgical tissues with clinically and histologically confirmed PCa (n = 19) and BPH (n = 33). We used two dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) and bioinformatics analysis. Thirty-nine spots with statistically significant 1.8-fold variation or more in abundance, corresponding to 28 proteins were identified. The IPA analysis pointed out to 3 possible networks regulated within MAPK, ERK, TGFB1, and ubiquitin pathways. Thirteen of the identified proteins, namely, constituents of the intermediate filaments (KRT8, KRT18, DES), potential tumor suppressors (ARHGAP1, AZGP1, GSTM2, and MFAP4), transport and membrane organization proteins (FABP5, GC, and EHD2), chaperons (FKBP4 and HSPD1) and known cancer marker (NME1) have been associated with prostate and other cancers by numerous proteomics, genomics or functional studies. We evidenced for the first time the dysregulation of 9 proteins (CSNK1A1, ARID5B, LYPLA1, PSMB6, RABEP1, TALDO1, UBE2N, PPP1CB, and SERPINB1) that may have role in PCa. The UBE2N, PSMB6, and PPP1CB, involved in cell cycle regulation and progression were evaluated by Western blot analysis which confirmed significantly higher abundances of UBE2N and PSMB6 and significantly lower abundance of PPP1CB in PCa. In addition to the identification of substantial number of proteins with known association with PCa, the proteomic approach in this study revealed proteins not previously clearly related to PCa, providing a starting point for further elucidation of their function in disease initiation and progression. © 2015 Wiley

  2. Selenoproteins and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    W81XWH-05-1-0009 TITLE: Selenoproteins and Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Veda Diwadkar-Navsariwala, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...From - To) 14 Oct 2004 – 14 Oct 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Selenoproteins and Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT For this postdoctoral fellowship the specific role of selenoproteins (SP) in prostate cancer (PCa) was

  3. Prostate cancer ablation with transrectal high-intensity focused ultrasound: assessment of tissue destruction with contrast-enhanced US.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Glas, Ludivine; Girouin, Nicolas; Mège-Lechevallier, Florence; Gelet, Albert; Dantony, Emmanuelle; Rabilloud, Muriel; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lyonnet, Denis

    2011-05-01

    To assess contrast material-enhanced ultrasonographic (US) findings seen after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation of prostate cancer and correlate the US findings with post-HIFU biopsy findings. The study was ethics committee approved. Written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Twenty-eight patients referred for HIFU prostate cancer ablation underwent contrast-enhanced prostate US before treatment, gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and repeat contrast-enhanced US 1-3 days after treatment, and contrast-enhanced US-guided biopsy 30-45 days after treatment. The contrast-enhanced US enhancement patterns of the biopsy sites--assigned a score of S0 for no enhancement, S1 for mild and/or patchy enhancement, or S2 for marked enhancement--were compared with corresponding biopsy findings, which were assigned a score of B0 for necrosis and/or fibrosis without viable prostate gland tissue, B1 for vascularized tissue without viable gland tissue, or B2 for viable gland tissue (benign or malignant). Then, six additional patients underwent contrast-enhanced prostate US 15-30 minutes and 1 day after HIFU ablation, and the results of these two US examinations were compared. Contrast-enhanced US performed on days 1-3 and days 30-45 after HIFU ablation depicted a large devascularized zone with peripheral enhancing areas that were localized anteriorly in all 28 patients, posteriorly in nine, laterally in five, and at the apex in 20 patients. MR findings were concordant. At biopsy, viable gland tissue was found at nine (6.2%) of 146 S0 sites, 10 (34%) of 29 S1 sites, and 44 (60%) of 73 S2 sites. The odds ratios for finding viable tissue (score B1 or B2) at S1 and S2 sites as opposed to S0 sites were 21 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 6, 71) and 73 (95% CI: 22, 243), respectively (P < .0001). Contrast-enhanced US performed 15-30 minutes and 1 day after treatment in the six additional patients had similar findings. Contrast-enhanced US is a

  4. Lipids and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suburu, Janel; Chen, Yong Q.

    2012-01-01

    The role of lipid metabolism has gained particular interest in prostate cancer research. A large body of literature has outlined the unique upregulation of de novo lipid synthesis in prostate cancer. Concordant with this lipogenic phenotype is a metabolic shift, in which cancer cells use alternative enzymes and pathways to facilitate the production of fatty acids. These newly synthesized lipids may support a number of cellular processes to promote cancer cell proliferation and survival. Hence, de novo lipogenesis is under intense investigation as a therapeutic target. Epidemiologic studies suggest dietary fat may also contribute to prostate cancer; however, whether dietary lipids and de novo synthesized lipids are differentially metabolized remains unclear. Here, we highlight the lipogenic nature of prostate cancer, especially the promotion of de novo lipid synthesis, and the significance of various dietary lipids in prostate cancer development and progression. PMID:22503963

  5. Atlas of prostate cancer heritability in European and African-American men pinpoints tissue-specific regulation.

    PubMed

    Gusev, Alexander; Shi, Huwenbo; Kichaev, Gleb; Pomerantz, Mark; Li, Fugen; Long, Henry W; Ingles, Sue A; Kittles, Rick A; Strom, Sara S; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Nemesure, Barbara; Isaacs, William B; Zheng, Wei; Pettaway, Curtis A; Yeboah, Edward D; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B; Adjei, Andrew A; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P; John, Esther M; Murphy, Adam B; Signorello, Lisa B; Carpten, John; Leske, M Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anslem J M; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J; Klein, Eric A; Witte, John S; Casey, Graham; Kaggwa, Sam; Cook, Michael B; Stram, Daniel O; Blot, William J; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Benlloch, Sara; Muir, Kenneth; Giles, Graham G; Southey, Melissa C; Fitzgerald, Liesel M; Gronberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Aly, Markus; Henderson, Brian E; Schleutker, Johanna; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth C; Neal, David E; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; McDonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Teerlink, Craig; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Arndt, Volker; Park, Jong Y; Sellers, Thomas A; Lin, Hui-Yi; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Batra, Jyotsna; Spurdle, Amanda; Clements, Judith A; Teixeira, Manuel R; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Kierzek, Andrzej; Conti, David V; Albanes, Demetrius; Berg, Christine; Berndt, Sonja I; Campa, Daniele; Crawford, E David; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaziano, J Michael; Giovannucci, Edward; Hoover, Robert; Hunter, David J; Johansson, Mattias; Kraft, Peter; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindström, Sara; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Riboli, Elio; Siddiq, Afshan; Stevens, Victoria L; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Vineis, Paolo; Yeager, Meredith; Trynka, Gosia; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Schumacher, Frederick R; Price, Alkes L; Freedman, Matthew L; Haiman, Christopher A; Pasaniuc, Bogdan

    2016-04-07

    Although genome-wide association studies have identified over 100 risk loci that explain ∼33% of familial risk for prostate cancer (PrCa), their functional effects on risk remain largely unknown. Here we use genotype data from 59,089 men of European and African American ancestries combined with cell-type-specific epigenetic data to build a genomic atlas of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) heritability in PrCa. We find significant differences in heritability between variants in prostate-relevant epigenetic marks defined in normal versus tumour tissue as well as between tissue and cell lines. The majority of SNP heritability lies in regions marked by H3k27 acetylation in prostate adenoc7arcinoma cell line (LNCaP) or by DNaseI hypersensitive sites in cancer cell lines. We find a high degree of similarity between European and African American ancestries suggesting a similar genetic architecture from common variation underlying PrCa risk. Our findings showcase the power of integrating functional annotation with genetic data to understand the genetic basis of PrCa.

  6. Atlas of prostate cancer heritability in European and African-American men pinpoints tissue-specific regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gusev, Alexander; Shi, Huwenbo; Kichaev, Gleb; Pomerantz, Mark; Li, Fugen; Long, Henry W.; Ingles, Sue A.; Kittles, Rick A.; Strom, Sara S.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Nemesure, Barbara; Isaacs, William B.; Zheng, Wei; Pettaway, Curtis A.; Yeboah, Edward D.; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B.; Adjei, Andrew A.; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; John, Esther M.; Murphy, Adam B.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Carpten, John; Leske, M. Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anslem J. M.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W.; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Klein, Eric A.; Witte, John S.; Casey, Graham; Kaggwa, Sam; Cook, Michael B.; Stram, Daniel O.; Blot, William J.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas; Kote-Jarai, ZSofia; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Benlloch, Sara; Muir, Kenneth; Giles, Graham G.; Southey, Melissa C.; Fitzgerald, Liesel M.; Gronberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Aly, Markus; Henderson, Brian E.; Schleutker, Johanna; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L. J.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Key, Tim J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Kibel, Adam S.; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Teerlink, Craig; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida K.; Arndt, Volker; Park, Jong Y.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Batra, Jyotsna; Spurdle, Amanda; Clements, Judith A.; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Kierzek, Andrzej; Cook, Margaret; Guy, Michelle; Govindasami, Koveela; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Sawyer, Emma J.; Wilkinson, Rosemary; Saunders, Edward J.; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Dadaev, Tokhir; Morgan, Angela; Fisher, Cyril; Hazel, Steve; Livni, Naomi; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Pedersen, John; Hopper, John L.; Adolfson, Jan; Stattin, Paer; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Cavalli-Bjoerkman, Carin; Karlsson, Ami; Broms, Michael; Auvinen, Anssi; Kujala, Paula; Maeaettaenen, Liisa; Murtola, Teemu; Taari, Kimmo; Weischer, Maren; Nielsen, Sune F.; Klarskov, Peter; Roder, Andreas; Iversen, Peter; Wallinder, Hans; Gustafsson, Sven; Cox, Angela; Brown, Paul; George, Anne; Marsden, Gemma; Lane, Athene; Davis, Michael; Zheng, Wei; Signorello, Lisa B.; Blot, William J.; Tillmans, Lori; Riska, Shaun; Wang, Liang; Rinckleb, Antje; Lubiski, Jan; Stegmaier, Christa; Pow-Sang, Julio; Park, Hyun; Radlein, Selina; Rincon, Maria; Haley, James; Zachariah, Babu; Kachakova, Darina; Popov, Elenko; Mitkova, Atanaska; Vlahova, Aleksandrina; Dikov, Tihomir; Christova, Svetlana; Heathcote, Peter; Wood, Glenn; Malone, Greg; Saunders, Pamela; Eckert, Allison; Yeadon, Trina; Kerr, Kris; Collins, Angus; Turner, Megan; Srinivasan, Srilakshmi; Kedda, Mary-Anne; Alexander, Kimberly; Omara, Tracy; Wu, Huihai; Henrique, Rui; Pinto, Pedro; Santos, Joana; Barros-Silva, Joao; Conti, David V.; Albanes, Demetrius; Berg, Christine; Berndt, Sonja I.; Campa, Daniele; Crawford, E. David; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward; Hoover, Robert; Hunter, David J.; Johansson, Mattias; Kraft, Peter; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindström, Sara; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Riboli, Elio; Siddiq, Afshan; Stevens, Victoria L.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Vineis, Paolo; Yeager, Meredith; Trynka, Gosia; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Schumacher, Frederick R.; Price, Alkes L.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Pasaniuc, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Although genome-wide association studies have identified over 100 risk loci that explain ∼33% of familial risk for prostate cancer (PrCa), their functional effects on risk remain largely unknown. Here we use genotype data from 59,089 men of European and African American ancestries combined with cell-type-specific epigenetic data to build a genomic atlas of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) heritability in PrCa. We find significant differences in heritability between variants in prostate-relevant epigenetic marks defined in normal versus tumour tissue as well as between tissue and cell lines. The majority of SNP heritability lies in regions marked by H3k27 acetylation in prostate adenoc7arcinoma cell line (LNCaP) or by DNaseI hypersensitive sites in cancer cell lines. We find a high degree of similarity between European and African American ancestries suggesting a similar genetic architecture from common variation underlying PrCa risk. Our findings showcase the power of integrating functional annotation with genetic data to understand the genetic basis of PrCa. PMID:27052111

  7. First approach to studies of sulphur electron DOS in prostate cancer cell lines and tissues studied by XANES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Czapla, Joanna; Podgórczyk, Magdalena; Kisiel, Andrzej; Konior, Jerzy; Balerna, Antonella

    2011-10-01

    Urological cancers comprise approximately one-third of all cancers diagnosed in men worldwide and out of these, prostate cancer is the most common one ( WHO World Cancer Report, 2008). Several risk factors such as age, hormone levels, environmental conditions and family history are suspected to play a role in the onset of this disease of otherwise obscure aetiology. It is therefore the medical need that drives multidisciplinary research in this field, carried out by means of various experimental and theoretical techniques. Out of many relevant factors, it is believed that sulphur can take an important part in cancer transformations. We have investigated the prostate cancer cell lines and tissues, along with selected organic and inorganic compounds used as references, by the X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy near the sulphur edge energy region. Particularly, the comparison of the experimental results collected during XANES measurements and theoretical calculations of electron density of states with use of the FEFF8 code and LAPW (linearised augmented plane-wave) method has been performed and in this work the first results of our studies are presented.

  8. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers that don't respond to hormone therapy. Biological therapy Biological therapy (immunotherapy) uses your body's immune system to fight cancer cells. One type of biological therapy called sipuleucel-T (Provenge) has been developed ...

  9. Association of molecular biomarkers expression with biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer through tissue microarray immunostaining.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ding; Zhou, Zhe; Yang, Bing; He, Qun; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Xiang-Hua

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic role of metallothionein-2A (MT-2A), E-cadherin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), cyclin-E, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and B cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 in the biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer (PCa) using tissue microarray immunostaining. Tissue specimens from 128 PCa patients who underwent radical prostatectomy were processed and transferred onto tissue microarrays. The clinicopathological parameters of PCa patients were also recorded. Following immunohistochemical examination of MT-2A, E-cadherin, IL-6, cyclin-E, PCNA and Bcl-2 expression in PCa specimens, association analysis of biomarkers expression with the biochemical recurrence of PCa was performed. The results revealed that the overall rate of biochemical recurrence was 30.5% (39/128) and the median biochemical recurrence-free time was 19 months (range, 6-35 months). The biochemical recurrence rates in low-, intermediate- and high-risk PCa classification were 14.8 (8/54), 38.7 (24/62) and 58.3% (7/12), respectively. Survival analysis demonstrated that a decreased biochemical recurrence-free survival rate was noted in PCa cases with positive MT-2A and cyclin E expression as well as those with negative E-cadherin expression (P=0.022, 0.028 and 0.011, respectively). Subsequent multivariate Cox analysis revealed that MT-2A [hazard ratio (HR)=2.01; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.08-3.15; P=0.005], E-cadherin (HR=1.79; 95% CI=1.08-2.21; P=0.042) and cyclin E (HR=1.92; 95% CI=1.22-2.45; P=0.020) were independent predictors of the biochemical recurrence of PCa. In conclusion, the present study provided clinical evidence that evaluation of molecular biomarkers expression may improve clinical prognostic accuracy for the biochemical recurrence of PCa. Of note, the expression of MT-2A, cyclin E and E-cadherin may serve as independent predictors for biochemical recurrence of PCa.

  10. [Prostate cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Villers, Arnauld; Rébillard, Xavier; Soulié, Michel; Davin, Jean-Louis; Coloby, Patrick; Moreau, Jean-Luc; Mejean, Arnaud; Irani, Jacques; Coulange, Christian; Mangin, Philippe

    2003-04-01

    Prostate cancer has become the most frequent cancer and the second cause of cancer mortality in men. This public health problem is becoming increasingly important due to the increasing life expectancy. At the present time, prostate cancer will be discovered in one in every eight men during their lifetime. Prostate cancer represents 25% of all new cases of male cancers. Prostate cancer screening is designed to detect early stage, asymptomatic prostate cancer, as the patient's chances of cure are higher when the cancer is diagnosed at an early stage. The conclusions of the ANAES evaluation in 1998 did not recommend mass screening for prostate cancer. Several international prospective randomized studies based on serum PSA assay, sometimes associated with digital rectal examination, are currently underway. France is participating in the European ERSPC study (European Randomized Study of Screening for Cancer Prostate) and is organizing a national study on high-risk populations. While waiting for the final results of these studies, a recommendation needs to be proposed to inform general practitioners and specialists about optimal use of the currently available tests. Based on the conclusions of its oncology committee (composed of urologists, medical oncologists, radiotherapists, pathologists and radiologists), the Association Française d'Urologie proposes a recommendation concerning prostate cancer screening and defines its modalities, especially concerning the target population, screening tests and the information given to men before screening. The Association Française d'Urologie recommends prostate cancer screening by PSA assay (prostate specific antigen) and digital rectal examination annually between the ages of 50 and 75 years, and from the age of 45 years in men with a family or ethnic risk. If total PSA is above the normal value of the test or if digital rectal examination is abnormal, referral to a urologist is recommended. Information concerning the limits

  11. Allelic loss of chromosome 8p22 loci in a primary tissue culture from a patient with prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Godec, C.J.; Macera, M.J.; Szabo, P. |

    1994-09-01

    It is presently estimated that over 11 million men in the United States alone have histological prostate cancer. Approximately 200,000 new cases will be diagnosed in 1994 with 36,000 deaths attributed to the most common cancer in U.S. men. Although the incidence of this disease is so high, little is known about the molecular etiology of this cancer. Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes Rb and p53 have been observed at a low frequency in this disease, although allelic loss on chromosomes 8, 10 and 16 suggest possible unidentified tumor suppression genes may be more directly associated with this cancer. It was recently shown that allelic loss of D8S163, located at 8q22 {r_arrow} pter, was seen in a large percentage of primary prostate cancers. Our patient underwent a radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer. A portion of the tissue was minced, treated with collagenase and a fibroblast-like culture was established. DNA was obtained from the culture and peripheral blood of the patient. Probe K5R2 (American Type Culture Collection) specific for loci D8S163 was hybridized to Southern blots of TagI-digested DNA. Two alleles at 3.3 Kb and 1.9 Kb were seen in the peripheral blood, while only the 1.9 Kb fragment was seen in the DNA from the culture. Loss of the allele at 3.3 Kb resembles results obtained from primary tumors, suggesting that the established line may be derived from the tumor.

  12. Prostate cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... test. A faster increase could show a more aggressive tumor. A prostate biopsy is done in your ... suggest the cancer is slow growing and not aggressive. Higher numbers indicate a faster growing cancer that ...

  13. Evaluating Prostate Cancer Using Fractional Tissue Composition of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens and Pre-Operative Diffusional Kurtosis Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Edward M.; Warren, Anne Y.; Priest, Andrew N.; Barrett, Tristan; Goldman, Debra A.; Gill, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluating tissue heterogeneity using non-invasive imaging could potentially improve prostate cancer assessment and treatment. Methods 20 patients with intermediate/high-risk prostate cancer underwent diffusion kurtosis imaging, including calculation of apparent diffusion (Dapp) and kurtosis (Kapp), prior to radical prostatectomy. Whole-mount tissue composition was quantified into: cellularity, luminal space, and fibromuscular stroma. Peripheral zone tumors were subdivided according to Gleason score. Results Peripheral zone tumors had increased cellularity (p<0.0001), decreased fibromuscular stroma (p<0.05) and decreased luminal space (p<0.0001). Gleason score ≥4+3 tumors had significantly increased cellularity and decreased fibromuscular stroma compared to Gleason score ≤3+4 (p<0.05). In tumors, there was a significant positive correlation between median Kapp and cellularity (ρ = 0.50; p<0.05), and a negative correlation with fibromuscular stroma (ρ = -0.45; p<0.05). In normal tissue, median Dapp had a significant positive correlation with luminal space (ρ = 0.65; p<0.05) and a negative correlation with cellularity (ρ = -0.49; p<0.05). Median Kapp and Dapp varied significantly between tumor and normal tissue (p<0.0001), but only median Kapp was significantly different between Gleason score ≥4+3 and ≤3+4 (p<0.05). Conclusions Peripheral zone tumors have increased cellular heterogeneity which is reflected in mean Kapp, while normal prostate has a more homogeneous luminal space and cellularity better represented by Dapp. PMID:27467064

  14. Oxidative Stress, DNA Repair, and Prostate Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    have concluded that DRC is not a risk factor for prostate cancer microRNA prostate cancer Hua.Zhao@RoswellPark.org Table of Contents...known and suspected risk factors for prostate cancer are associated with elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (advancing age, inflammation...association between DNA repair capacity and prostate cancer risk might be due to the fact of using surrogate tissues , not the target tissues . In this study

  15. Increased Expression of Herpes Virus-Encoded hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H9-5p in Cancer-Containing Prostate Tissue Compared to That in Benign Prostate Hyperplasia Tissue.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seok Joong; Jeong, Pildu; Kang, Ho Won; Shinn, Helen Ki; Kim, Ye-Hwan; Yan, Chunri; Choi, Young-Ki; Kim, Dongho; Ryu, Dong Hee; Ha, Yun-Sok; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Kim, Jung Min; Suh, Sang Heon; Kim, Seon-Kyu; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, Sang Tae; Kim, Won Tae; Lee, Ok-Jun; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Isaac Yi; Kim, Jayoung; Cha, Hee-Jae; Choi, Yung-Hyun; Cha, Eun-Jong; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2016-06-01

    Previously, we reported the presence of virus-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) in the urine of prostate cancer (CaP) patients. In this study, we investigated the expression of two herpes virus-encoded miRNAs in prostate tissue. A total of 175 tissue samples from noncancerous benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), 248 tissue samples from patients with CaP and BPH, and 50 samples from noncancerous surrounding tissues from these same patients were analyzed for the expression of two herpes virus-encoded miRNAs by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunocytochemistry using nanoparticles as molecular beacons. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR results revealed significantly higher expression of hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miRH9- 5p in surrounding noncancerous and CaP tissues than that in BPH tissue (each comparison, P<0.001). Of note, these miRNA were expressed equivalently in the CaP tissues and surrounding noncancerous tissues. Moreover, immunocytochemistry clearly demonstrated a significant enrichment of both hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H9 beacon-labeled cells in CaP and surrounding noncancerous tissue compared to that in BPH tissue (each comparison, P<0.05 for hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2- miR-H9). These results suggest that increased expression of hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H95p might be associated with tumorigenesis in the prostate. Further studies will be required to elucidate the role of these miRNAs with respect to CaP and herpes viral infections.

  16. Examination of CK2α and NF-κB p65 expression in human benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Qaiser, Fatima; Trembley, Janeen H; Sadiq, Sarah; Muhammad, Iqbal; Younis, Rubina; Hashmi, Shoaib Naiyar; Murtaza, Badar; Rector, Thomas S; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Ahmed, Khalil

    2016-09-01

    Protein kinase CK2 plays a critical role in cell growth, proliferation, and suppression of cell death. CK2 is overexpressed, especially in the nuclear compartment, in the majority of cancers, including prostate cancer (PCa). CK2-mediated activation of transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 is a key step in cellular proliferation, resulting in translocation of NF-κB p65 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. As CK2 expression and activity are also elevated in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), we sought to increase the knowledge of CK2 function in benign and malignant prostate by examination of the relationships between nuclear CK2 and nuclear NF-κB p65 protein expression. The expression level and localization of CK2α and NF-κB p65 proteins in PCa and BPH tissue specimens was determined. Nuclear CK2α and NF-κB p65 protein levels are significantly higher in PCa compared with BPH, and these proteins are positively correlated with each other in both diseases. Nuclear NF-κB p65 levels correlated with Ki-67 or with cytoplasmic NF-κB p65 expression in BPH, but not in PCa. The findings provide information that combined analysis of CK2α and NF-κB p65 expression in prostate specimens relates to the disease status. Increased nuclear NF-κB p65 expression levels in PCa specifically related to nuclear CK2α levels, indicating a possible CK2-dependent relationship in malignancy. In contrast, nuclear NF-κB p65 protein levels related to both Ki-67 and cytoplasmic NF-κB p65 levels exclusively in BPH, suggesting a potential separate impact for NF-κB p65 function in proliferation for benign disease as opposed to malignant disease.

  17. Gene Expression in Single Cells Isolated from the CWR-R1 Prostate Cancer Cell Line and Human Prostate Tissue Based on the Side Population Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gangavarapu, Kalyan J; Miller, Austin; Huss, Wendy J

    2016-01-01

    Defining biological signals at the single cell level can identify cancer initiating driver mutations. Techniques to isolate single cells such as microfluidics sorting and magnetic capturing systems have limitations such as: high cost, labor intense, and the requirement of a large number of cells. Therefore, the goal of our current study is to identify a cost and labor effective, reliable, and reproducible technique that allows single cell isolation for analysis to promote regular laboratory use, including standard reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). In the current study, we utilized single prostate cells isolated from the CWR-R1 prostate cancer cell line and human prostate clinical specimens, based on the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter efflux of dye cycle violet (DCV), side population assay. Expression of four genes: ABCG2; Aldehyde dehydrogenase1A1 (ALDH1A1); androgen receptor (AR); and embryonic stem cell marker, Oct-4, were determined. Results from the current study in the CWR-R1 cell line showed ABCG2 and ALDH1A1 gene expression in 67% of single side population cells and in 17% or 100% of non-side population cells respectively. Studies using single cells isolated from clinical specimens showed that the Oct-4 gene is detected in only 22% of single side population cells and in 78% of single non-side population cells. Whereas, AR gene expression is in 100% single side population and non-side population cells isolated from the same human prostate clinical specimen. These studies show that performing RT-PCR on single cells isolated by FACS can be successfully conducted to determine gene expression in single cells from cell lines and enzymatically digested tissue. While these studies provide a simple yes/no expression readout, the more sensitive quantitative RT-PCR would be able to provide even more information if necessary. PMID:27785389

  18. [Benign prostatic hypertrophy and prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Mourey, Loïc; Doumerc, Nicolas; Gaudin, Clément; Gérard, Stéphane; Balardy, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Prostatic diseases are extremely common, especially in older men. Amongst them, benign prostatic hypertrophy may affect significantly the quality of life of patients by the symptoms it causes. It requires appropriate care. Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men after lung cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. It affects preferentially older men. An oncogeriatric approach is required for personalised care.

  19. Metabolic imbalance and prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Anya J; Tilling, Kate M; Holly, Jeff M; Hamdy, Freddie C; Rowlands, Mari-Anne E; Donovan, Jenny L; Martin, Richard M

    2010-01-01

    There is substantial evidence implicating environmental factors in the progression of prostate cancer. The metabolic consequences of a western lifestyle, such as obesity, insulin resistance and abnormal hormone production have been linked to prostate carcinogenesis through multiple overlapping pathways. Insulin resistance results in raised levels of the mitogens insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1, both of which may affect prostate cancer directly, or through their effect on other metabolic regulators. Obesity is associated with abnormal levels of adipocyte-derived peptides (adipokines), sex hormones and inflammatory cytokines. Adipokines have been shown to influence prostate cancer in both cell culture studies and observational, population level studies. Testosterone appears to have a complex relationship with prostate carcinogenesis, and it has been suggested that the lower levels associated with obesity may select for more aggressive androgen independent prostate cancer cells. Prostatic inflammation, caused by infection, urinary reflux or dietary toxins, frequently occurs prior to cancer development and may influence progression to advanced disease. High levels of ω-6 fatty acids in the diet may lead to the production of further inflammatory molecules that may influence prostate cancer. Increased fatty acid metabolism occurs within tumour cells, providing a potential target for prostate cancer therapies. Aberrations in amino acid metabolism have also been identified in prostate cancer tissue, particularly in metastatic cancer. This evidence indicates lifestyle interventions may be effective in reducing the incidence of clinical disease. However, much more research is needed before recommendations are made. PMID:21532839

  20. Exploring the Presence of microDNAs in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines, Tissue, and Sera of Prostate Cancer Patients and its Possible Application as Biomarker

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    content. However, hierarchical clustering on the basis of microDNA co-ordinates classified the prostate and ovarian cancer cell lines into two separate...all microDNA located within each bin was calculated for each cancer cell line and compared using hierarchical clustering . 9 Identification and...abundance of circles from each locus were compared by hierarchical clustering . For this whole human genome was divided in 5-mega base windows and in

  1. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vemana, Goutham; Hamilton, Robert J; Andriole, Gerald L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Large prospective randomized trials, such as the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) trial, and Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), have provided practitioners with considerable data regarding methods of treatment and prevention of prostate cancer. The best-studied medications for prevention are 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Their efficacy and side effects are well characterized. Other medications, dietary nutrients, and supplements have not been as well studied and generally do not demonstrate efficacy for disease prevention with an acceptable level of evidence.

  2. Tissue Effects in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Short-term Finasteride in Early Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeri; Davis, John W; Klein, Eric A; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Lotan, Yair; Ward, John F; Pisters, Louis L; Basler, Joseph W; Pettaway, Curtis A; Stephenson, Andrew; Li Ning Tapia, Elsa M; Efstathiou, Eleni; Wang, Xuemei; Do, Kim-Anh; Lee, J Jack; Gorlov, Ivan P; Vornik, Lana A; Hoque, Ashraful M; Prokhorova, Ina N; Parnes, Howard L; Lippman, Scott M; Thompson, Ian M; Brown, Powel H; Logothetis, Christopher J; Troncoso, Patricia

    2016-05-01

    In the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, finasteride selectively suppressed low-grade prostate cancer and significantly reduced the incidence of prostate cancer in men treated with finasteride compared with placebo. However, an apparent increase in high-grade disease was also observed among men randomized to finasteride. We aimed to determine why and hypothesized that there is a grade-dependent response to finasteride. From 2007 to 2012, we randomized dynamically by intranet-accessible software 183 men with localized prostate cancer to receive 5mg finasteride or placebo daily in a double-blind study during the 4-6weeks preceding prostatectomy. As the primary end point, the expression of a predefined molecular signature (ERβ, UBE2C, SRD5A2, and VEGF) differentiating high- and low-grade tumors in Gleason grade (GG) 3 areas of finasteride-exposed tumors from those in GG3 areas of placebo-exposed tumors, adjusted for Gleason score (GS) at prostatectomy, was compared. We also determined androgen receptor (AR) levels, Ki-67, and cleaved caspase 3 to evaluate the effects of finasteride on the expression of its downstream target, cell proliferation, and apoptosis, respectively. The expression of these markers was also compared across grades between and within treatment groups. Logistic regression was used to assess the expression of markers. We found that the predetermined molecular signature did not distinguish GG3 from GG4 areas in the placebo group. However, AR expression was significantly lower in the GG4 areas of the finasteride group than in those of the placebo group. Within the finasteride group, AR expression was also lower in GG4 than in GG3 areas, but not significantly. Expression of cleaved caspase 3 was significantly increased in both GG3 and GG4 areas in the finasteride group compared to the placebo group, although it was lower in GG4 than in GG3 areas in both groups. We showed that finasteride's effect on apoptosis and AR expression is tumor grade dependent

  3. Arachidonic acid metabolism in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    YANG, PEIYING; CARTWRIGHT, CARRIE A.; LI, JIN; WEN, SIJIN; PROKHOROVA, INA N.; SHUREIQI, IMAD; TRONCOSO, PATRICIA; NAVONE, NORA M.; NEWMAN, ROBERT A.; KIM, JERI

    2012-01-01

    The arachidonic acid pathway is important in the development and progression of numerous malignant diseases, including prostate cancer. To more fully evaluate the role of individual cyclooxygenases (COXs), lipoxygenases (LOXs) and their metabolites in prostate cancer, we measured mRNA and protein levels of COXs and LOXs and their arachidonate metabolites in androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (PC-3 and DU145) prostate cancer cell lines, bone metastasis-derived MDA PCa 2a and MDA PCa 2b cell lines and their corresponding xenograft models, as well as core biopsy specimens of primary prostate cancer and nonneoplastic prostate tissue taken ex vivo after prostatectomy. Relatively high levels of COX-2 mRNA and its product PGE2 were observed only in PC-3 cells and their xenografts. By contrast, levels of the exogenous 12-LOX product 12-HETE were consistently higher in MDA PCa 2b and PC-3 cells and their corresponding xenograft tissues than were those in LNCaP cells. More strikingly, the mean endogenous level of 12-HETE was significantly higher in the primary prostate cancers than in the nonneoplastic prostate tissue (0.094 vs. 0.010 ng/mg protein, respectively; p=0.019). Our results suggest that LOX metabolites such as 12-HETE are critical in prostate cancer progression and that the LOX pathway may be a target for treating and preventing prostate cancer. PMID:22895552

  4. Realizing the Translational Potential of Telomere Length Variation as a Tissue-Based Prognostic Marker for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    our compelling findings in two other cohort studies on prostate cancer outcomes: a) men surgically treated and followed for lethal prostate cancer...immunofluorescence, and for DAPI. The PHS and HPFS are existing cohort studies , and TMAs have been constructed for those participants who underwent a radical

  5. Biomarkers for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Leman, Eddy S; Getzenberg, Robert H

    2009-09-01

    The detection of prostate cancer using a blood test has by many standards changed the face of the disease. Despite this tremendous success, there are limitations attributed to the use of prostate specific antigen (PSA) as a means to screen and detect prostate cancer. PSA, as its name implies, is not specific for prostate cancer and as such is often found elevated in other prostatic diseases/symptoms associated with the aging male. Clearly, more specific marker(s) that could identify which individuals actually have prostate cancer and differentiate them from those without the disease would be of tremendous value. The search for more accurate and clinically useful biomarkers of prostate cancer has been extensive. This has focused on individual markers, as well as groups of markers. Included among these are PSA isoforms, pathological indicators and stains, nucleic acids and others. This article highlights the discovery of PSA as a first blood-based biomarker for prostate cancer detection, as well as other molecular biomarkers and their potential application in detection of the disease. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Cryosurgery for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, W E; Bissada, N K

    2003-01-01

    Choice of management for patients with prostate cancer is influenced by patient and disease characteristics and life expectancy. Management options include expectance (watchful waiting), radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and cryosurgical ablation of the prostate (CSAP). The role of cryotherapy in the management of prostate cancer is still evolving. Continued research has allowed the introduction of efficient and safe cryosurgical equipment exemplified by the current third-generation cryosurgical machines. CSAP can be performed in an ambulatory surgery setting or as inpatient surgery with overnight stay. The procedure is performed under continuous ultrasonic monitoring. Mature data from the use of second-generation cryosurgical equipment indicate that CSAP is an effective therapeutic modality for managing patients with prostate cancer. Current data with the third-generation cryosurgical equipment are not mature. However, the favorable side effect profile and the good early responses seem to indicate that this modality will have a prominent role in the management of patients with prostate cancer.

  7. Screening spectroscopy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolenko, S. B.; Voloshynskyy, D. I.; Fedoruk, O. S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to establish objective parameters of the field of laser and incoherent radiation of different spectral ranges (UV, visible, IR) as a non-invasive optical method of interaction with different samples of biological tissues and fluids of patients to determine the state of prostate cancer and choosing the best personal treatment. The objects of study were selected venous blood plasma of patient with prostate cancer, histological sections of rat prostate gland in the postoperative period. As diagnostic methods have been used ultraviolet spectrometry samples of blood plasma in the liquid state, infrared spectroscopy middle range (2,5-25 microns) dry residue of plasma by spectral diagnostic technique of thin histological sections of biological tissues.

  8. Metabolomic signatures of aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    McDunn, Jonathan E; Li, Zhen; Adam, Klaus-Peter; Neri, Bruce P; Wolfert, Robert L; Milburn, Michael V; Lotan, Yair; Wheeler, Thomas M

    2013-10-01

    Current diagnostic techniques have increased the detection of prostate cancer; however, these tools inadequately stratify patients to minimize mortality. Recent studies have identified a biochemical signature of prostate cancer metastasis, including increased sarcosine abundance. This study examined the association of tissue metabolites with other clinically significant findings. A state of the art metabolomics platform analyzed prostatectomy tissues (331 prostate tumor, 178 cancer-free prostate tissues) from two independent sites. Biochemicals were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Statistical analyses identified metabolites associated with cancer aggressiveness: Gleason score, extracapsular extension, and seminal vesicle and lymph node involvement. Prostate tumors had significantly altered metabolite profiles compared to cancer-free prostate tissues, including biochemicals associated with cell growth, energetics, stress, and loss of prostate-specific biochemistry. Many metabolites were further associated with clinical findings of aggressive disease. Aggressiveness-associated metabolites stratified prostate tumor tissues with high abundances of compounds associated with normal prostate function (e.g., citrate and polyamines) from more clinically advanced prostate tumors. These aggressive prostate tumors were further subdivided by abundance profiles of metabolites including NAD+ and kynurenine. When added to multiparametric nomograms, metabolites improved prediction of organ confinement (AUROC from 0.53 to 0.62) and 5-year recurrence (AUROC from 0.53 to 0.64). These findings support and extend earlier metabolomic studies in prostate cancer and studies where metabolic enzymes have been associated with carcinogenesis and/or outcome. Furthermore, these data suggest that panels of analytes may be valuable to translate metabolomic findings to clinically useful diagnostic tests

  9. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer Abiraterone Acetate Bicalutamide Cabazitaxel Casodex (Bicalutamide) Degarelix Docetaxel ...

  10. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Brand, Timothy C; Canby-Hagino, Edith D; Pratap Kumar, A; Ghosh, Rita; Leach, Robin J; Thompson, Ian M

    2006-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy with multiple potential opportunities for cancer prevention. As the genetic basis of this malignancy is further understood, prevention strategies will be developed for individual patients based on specific risk factors and pathways of carcinogenesis. The PCPT has conclusively proven that prostate cancer prevention is possible. The results of the SELECT should be available within several years. An enormous challenge for the medical community will be the development of an efficient strategy to evaluate the substantial number of dietary, behavioral, and pharmacologic prevention opportunities. Ultimately, the goal of prostate can-cer prevention is to (1) identify men who are destined to develop clinically significant prostate cancer, and (2) provide individualized agents to prevent disease development.

  11. Preventing and Treating Prostate Cancer Spread to Bone

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Treating Prostate Cancer Preventing and Treating Prostate Cancer Spread to Bones If prostate cancer spreads to ... Away or Comes Back After Treatment More In Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  12. Disparities in Prostate Cancer Treatment Modality and Quality of Life

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    producing hormones) 1 0 10 11 B8f. Watchful waiting (no treatment, wait and see if your prostate cancer grows) 1 0 10 11 B8g. Cryotherapy (process...your prostate cancer grows) 7 Cryotherapy (process to freeze and destroy prostate tissue) 8 Chemotherapy (use of anti-cancer drugs) 9 Any other

  13. Development of Assays for Detecting Significant Prostate Cancer Based on Molecular Alterations Associated with Cancer in Non-Neoplastic Prostate Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goal of this project is to develop biopsy based assays to...assess the probability that patients with a negative biopsy or with a prostate cancer (CaP) Gleason score 6 (GS6) biopsy actually have “significant” CaP...of Gleason score 7 or higher which was missed during the biopsy evaluations due to insufficient sampling. Experimental design includes discovery

  14. Cholesterol and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Kristine; Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer risk can be modified by environmental factors, however the molecular mechanisms affecting susceptibility to this disease are not well understood. As a result of a series of recently published studies, the steroidal lipid, cholesterol, has emerged as a clinically relevant therapeutic target in prostate cancer. This review summarizes the findings from human studies as well as animal and cell biology models, which suggest that high circulating cholesterol increases risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while cholesterol lowering strategies may confer protective benefit. Relevant molecular processes that have been experimentally tested and might explain these associations are described. We suggest that these promising results now could be applied prospectively to attempt to lower risk of prostate cancer in select populations.

  15. Advanced Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... if it has spread to: • Bones • Lungs • Liver • Brain • Lymph nodes outside the pelvis • Other organs You may be diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer when you are first diagnosed, after having completed ...

  16. Prostate tissue stiffness as measured with a resonance sensor system: a study on silicone and human prostate tissue in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jalkanen, Ville; Andersson, Britt M; Bergh, Anders; Ljungberg, Börje; Lindahl, Olof A

    2006-07-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men in Europe and in the USA. Some prostate tumours are stiffer than the surrounding normal tissue, and it could therefore be of interest to measure prostate tissue stiffness. Resonance sensor technology based on piezoelectric resonance detects variations in tissue stiffness due to a change in the resonance frequency. An impression-controlled resonance sensor system was used to detect stiffness in silicone rubber and in human prostate tissue in vitro using two parameters, both combinations of frequency change and force. Variations in silicone rubber stiffness due to the mixing ratio of the two components could be detected (p<0.05) using both parameters. Measurements on prostate tissue showed that there existed a statistically significant (MANOVA test, p<0.001) reproducible difference between tumour tissue (n=13) and normal healthy tissue (n=98) when studying a multivariate parameter set. Both the tumour tissue and normal tissue groups had variations within them, which were assumed to be related to differences in tissue composition. Other sources of error could be uneven surfaces and different levels of dehydration for the prostates. Our results indicated that the resonance sensor could be used to detect stiffness variations in silicone and in human prostate tissue in vitro. This is promising for the development of a future diagnostic tool for prostate cancer.

  17. Zinc and prostatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Ho, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Aim to understand the connection between zinc and prostatic cancer, and to summarize the recent findings about the functions of zinc in the maintenance of prostate health. Recent findings Contradictory findings have been reported by epidemiologic studies examining the association between zinc intake and the risk of prostate cancer. However, a growing body of experimental evidence support that high zinc levels are essential for prostate health. The possible mechanisms include the effects of zinc on the inhibition of terminal oxidation, induction of mitochondrial apoptogenesis, and suppression of NFκB activity. The most recent finding is the effects of zinc in the maintenance of DNA integrity in normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) by modulating the expression and activity of DNA repair and damage response proteins, especially p53. Zinc depletion in PrEC increased p53 expression but compromised p53 DNA binding activity resulting an impaired DNA repair function. Moreover, recent findings support the role of zinc transporters as tumor suppressors in the prostate. Summary Future studies need to discover sensitive and specific zinc biomarkers and perform more in vivo studies on the effects of zinc on prostate functions in normal animals or prostate cancer models. PMID:19684515

  18. Development of Assays for Detecting Significant Prostate Cancer Based on Molecular Alterations Associated with Cancer in Non-Neoplastic Prostate Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    4 Research Accomplishments ------------------------------------------------------------- 5 Additional related research...i) indolent GS6 CaP (Ni6 = 5 ), (ii) GS3+4 CaP (N3+4 = 5 ), and (iii) GS 8 and higher CaP (N8+ = 5 ). We also analyze benign prostate tissues from...patients free of CaP (BP = 5 ) as controls. BP Table I: Bulk and LCM samples proposed in the application for the biomarker discovery step by the

  19. Functions of normal and malignant prostatic stem/progenitor cells in tissue regeneration and cancer progression and novel targeting therapies.

    PubMed

    Mimeault, Murielle; Mehta, Parmender P; Hauke, Ralph; Batra, Surinder K

    2008-04-01

    This review summarizes the recent advancements that have improved our understanding of the functions of prostatic stem/progenitor cells in maintaining homeostasis of the prostate gland. We also describe the oncogenic events that may contribute to their malignant transformation into prostatic cancer stem/progenitor cells during cancer initiation and progression to metastatic disease stages. The molecular mechanisms that may contribute to the intrinsic or the acquisition of a resistant phenotype by the prostatic cancer stem/progenitor cells and their differentiated progenies with a luminal phenotype to the current therapies and disease relapse are also reviewed. The emphasis is on the critical functions of distinct tumorigenic signaling cascades induced through the epidermal growth factor system, hedgehog, Wnt/beta-catenin, and/or stromal cell-derived factor-1/CXC chemokine receptor-4 pathways as well as the deregulated apoptotic signaling elements and ATP-binding cassette multidrug transporter. Of particular therapeutic interest, we also discuss the potential beneficial effects associated with the targeting of these signaling elements to overcome the resistance to current treatments and prostate cancer recurrence. The combined targeted strategies toward distinct oncogenic signaling cascades in prostatic cancer stem/progenitor cells and their progenies as well as their local microenvironment, which could improve the efficacy of current clinical chemotherapeutic treatments against incurable, androgen-independent, and metastatic prostate cancers, are also described.

  20. Hormonal therapy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Labrie, Fernand

    2010-01-01

    Of all cancers, prostate cancer is the most sensitive to hormones: it is thus very important to take advantage of this unique property and to always use optimal androgen blockade when hormone therapy is the appropriate treatment. A fundamental observation is that the serum testosterone concentration only reflects the amount of testosterone of testicular origin which is released in the blood from which it reaches all tissues. Recent data show, however, that an approximately equal amount of testosterone is made from dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) directly in the peripheral tissues, including the prostate, and does not appear in the blood. Consequently, after castration, the 95-97% fall in serum testosterone does not reflect the 40-50% testosterone (testo) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) made locally in the prostate from DHEA of adrenal origin. In fact, while elimination of testicular androgens by castration alone has never been shown to prolong life in metastatic prostate cancer, combination of castration (surgical or medical with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist) with a pure anti-androgen has been the first treatment shown to prolong life. Most importantly, when applied at the localized stage, the same combined androgen blockade (CAB) can provide long-term control or cure of the disease in more than 90% of cases. Obviously, since prostate cancer usually grows and metastasizes without signs or symptoms, screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is absolutely needed to diagnose prostate cancer at an 'early' stage before metastasis occurs and the cancer becomes non-curable. While the role of androgens was believed to have become non-significant in cancer progressing under any form of androgen blockade, recent data have shown increased expression of the androgen receptor (AR) in treatment-resistant disease with a benefit of further androgen blockade. Since the available anti-androgens have low affinity for AR and cannot block androgen action completely

  1. Obesity and Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yin; Giovannucci, Edward

    Prostate cancer is a complex, heterogeneous disease. Factors related to detection, particularly PSA screening, further increase heterogeneity in the manifestation of the disease. It is thus not possible to provide a simple summary of the relationship between obesity and prostate cancer. Findings on obesity, often defined using body mass index (BMI), and total prostate cancer risk have been mixed; however, obesity is relatively consistently associated with a higher risk of aggressive prostate cancer, with aggressiveness defined in various ways (e.g., advanced stage, fatal, poorer prognosis in men with prostate cancer). Many methodologic issues (e.g., influence of PSA screening, detection bias and treatment) need to be thoroughly considered in both existing and future etiologic and prognostic research. Biological mechanisms supporting the link are under investigation, but may involve insulin and IGF axis, sex steroid hormones and alterations in metabolism. Some promising data suggest that molecular sub-types of prostate cancer may offer insights into etiology, but further study is required. A full evaluation of body fatness and weight change over the life course would not only provide insights to the underlying mechanisms but also allow more effective interventions.

  2. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissues to make echoes that form a sonogram (computer picture) of the prostate. Transrectal magnetic resonance imaging ( ... uses a strong magnet, radio waves , and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of ...

  3. Particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Sinoto, Makoto; Matsunobu, Akira; Toyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Kudo, Sho

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in external beam radiotherapy have allowed us to deliver higher doses to the tumors while decreasing doses to the surrounding tissues. Dose escalation using high-precision radiotherapy has improved the treatment outcomes of prostate cancer. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy has been widely used throughout the world as the most advanced form of photon radiotherapy. In contrast, particle radiotherapy has also been under development, and has been used as an effective and non-invasive radiation modality for prostate and other cancers. Among the particles used in such treatments, protons and carbon ions have the physical advantage that the dose can be focused on the tumor with only minimal exposure of the surrounding normal tissues. Furthermore, carbon ions also have radiobiological advantages that include higher killing effects on intrinsic radio-resistant tumors, hypoxic tumor cells and tumor cells in the G0 or S phase. However, the degree of clinical benefit derived from these theoretical advantages in the treatment of prostate cancer has not been adequately determined. The present article reviews the available literature on the use of particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer as well as the literature on the physical and radiobiological properties of this treatment, and discusses the role and the relative merits of particle radiotherapy compared with current photon-based radiotherapy, with a focus on proton beam therapy and carbon ion radiotherapy.

  4. A double-blind, randomized, neoadjuvant study of the tissue effects of POMx pills in men with prostate cancer before radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Freedland, Stephen J; Carducci, Michael; Kroeger, Nils; Partin, Alan; Rao, Jian-Yu; Jin, Yusheng; Kerkoutian, Susan; Wu, Hong; Li, Yunfeng; Creel, Patricia; Mundy, Kelly; Gurganus, Robin; Fedor, Helen; King, Serina A; Zhang, Yanjun; Heber, David; Pantuck, Allan J

    2013-10-01

    Pomegranates slow prostate cancer xenograft growth and prolong prostate-specific antigen (PSA) doubling times in single-arm human studies. Pomegranates' effects on human prostate tissue are understudied. We hypothesized that orally administered pomegranate extract (POMx; Pom Wonderful) would lower tissue 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), an oxidative stress biomarker. Seventy men were randomized to two tablets, POMx or placebo, daily up to four weeks before radical prostatectomy. Tissue was analyzed for intraprostatic urolithin A, a pomegranate metabolite, benign and malignant 8-OHdG, and cancer pS6 kinase, NF-κB, and Ki67. Primary endpoint was differences in 8-OHdG, and the study was powered to detect 35% reduction. POMx was associated with 16% lower benign tissue 8-OHdG (P = 0.095), which was not statistically significant. POMx was well tolerated with no treatment-related withdrawals. There were no differences in baseline clinicopathological features between arms. Urolithin A was detected in 21 of the 33 patients in the POMx group versus 12 of the 35 in the placebo group (P = 0.031). Cancer pS6 kinase, NF-κB, Ki67, and serum PSA changes were similar between arms. POMx before surgery results in pomegranate metabolite accumulation in prostate tissues. Our primary endpoint in this modest-sized short-term trial was negative. Future larger longer studies are needed to more definitively test whether POMx reduces prostate oxidative stress, as well as further animal testing to better understand the multiple mechanisms through which POMx may alter prostate cancer biology.

  5. A Double Blind, Randomized, Neoadjuvant Study of the Tissue effects of POMx Pills in Men with Prostate Cancer Prior to Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Freedland, Stephen J.; Carducci, Michael; Kroeger, Nils; Partin, Alan; Rao, Jian-yu; Jin, Yusheng; Kerkoutian, Susan; Wu, Hong; Li, Yunfeng; Creel, Patricia; Mundy, Kelly; Gurganus, Robin; Fedor, Helen; King, Serina A.; Zhang, Yanjun; Heber, David; Pantuck, Allan J.

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranates slow prostate cancer xenograft growth and prolong PSA doubling times in single-arm human studies. Pomegranates’ effects on human prostate tissue are understudied. We hypothesized orally administered pomegranate extract (POMx; PomWonderful, Los Angeles, CA) would lower tissue 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), an oxidative stress biomarker. 70 men were randomized to 2 tablets POMx or placebo daily up to 4 weeks prior to radical prostatectomy. Tissue was analyzed for intra-prostatic Urolithin A, a pomegranate metabolite, benign and malignant 8-OHdG, and cancer pS6 kinase, NFκB, and Ki67. Primary end-point was differences in 8-OHdG powered to detect 30% reduction. POMx was associated with 16% lower benign tissue 8-OHdG (p=0.095), which was not statistically significant. POMx was well-tolerated with no treatment-related withdrawals. There were no differences in baseline clinicopathological features between arms. Urolithin A was detected in 21/33 patient in the POMx group vs. 12/35 in the placebo group (p=0.031). Cancer pS6 kinase, NFκB, Ki67, and serum PSA changes were similar between arms. POMx prior to surgery results in pomegranate metabolite accumulation in prostate tissues. Our primary end-point in this modest-sized short-term trial was negative. Future larger longer studies are needed to more definitely test whether POMx reduces prostate oxidative stress as well as further animal testing to better understand the multiple mechanisms through which POMx may alter prostate cancer biology. PMID:23985577

  6. SoyCaP: Soy and Prostate Cancer Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    hormones and prostate tissue markers of cell proliferation and androgen action in men at high risk of prostate cancer. The hypothesis is that...alteration of endogenous hormones is a mechanism by which soy phytoestrogens prevent prostate cancer. A randomized parallel arm study is being...evaluation of serum hormones and prostate specific antigen, as well as urinary estrogen and phytoestrogen metabolites. At 0 and 12 mo, prostate

  7. [CCAFU Recommendations 2013: Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Salomon, L; Bastide, C; Beuzeboc, P; Cormier, L; Fromont, G; Hennequin, C; Mongiat-Artus, P; Peyromaure, M; Ploussard, G; Renard-Penna, R; Rozet, F; Azria, D; Coloby, P; Molinié, V; Ravery, V; Rebillard, X; Richaud, P; Villers, A; Soulié, M

    2013-11-01

    The sub Comittee prostate of the CCAFU established guidelines for diagnostic, treatment, evaluation and standart of care of prostate cancer. Guidelines 2010 were updated based on systematic literature search performed by the sub-Comittee in Medline and PubMed databases to evaluate references, levels of evidence and grade of recommandation. Pathological examination of the tissue specimens was defined specifically for Gleason score according to ISP 2005 recommandations. Prostate and pelvis RMN became the reference in terms of radiological exam. Individual and early diagnosis of prostate cancer was defined and role of PSA was precised. Active surveillance became one of the standart of care of low-risk tumors, radical prostatectomy remained one of the options for all risk group tumors, length of hormonotherapy in association with radiotherapy was precised according to the risk group. Side effects of hormonotherapy treament needed specific supervision ; hormonotherapy had no indication in case of non metastatic tumors and intermittent hormonotherapy in metastatic tumors. New hormonal drugs in pre and post chemotherapy and bone target drugs opened new therapeutics pathways. From 2010 to 2013, standarts of care of prostate cancer were modified because of results of prospective studies and new therapeutics. They allowed precise treatments for each specific clinical situation. In the future, multidisciplinary treatments for high risk tumors, time of adjuvant treatment and sequencies of new hormonal treatment had to be defined. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  9. Understanding your prostate cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000931.htm Understanding your prostate cancer risk To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. Are you at risk for developing prostate cancer in your lifetime? Learn about the risk factors ...

  10. Comparison of normal tissue pharmacokinetics with {sup 111}In/{sup 9}Y monoclonal antibody m170 for breast and prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, Joerg; O'Donnell, Robert T.; Richman, Carol M. . E-mail: sjdenardo@ucdavis.edu

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Radioactivity deposition in normal tissues limits the dose deliverable by radiopharmaceuticals (RP) in radioimmunotherapy (RIT). This study investigated the absorbed radiation dose in normal tissues for prostate cancer patients in comparison to breast cancer patients for 2 RPs using the monoclonal antibody (MAb) m170. Methods and Materials: {sup 111}In-DOTA-glycylglycylglycyl-L-p-isothiocyanatophenylalanine amide (GGGF)-m170 and {sup 111}In-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) 2-iminothiolane (2IT)-m170, representing the same MAb and chelate with and without a cleavable linkage, were studied in 13 breast cancer and 26 prostate cancer patients. Dosimetry for {sup 9}Y was calculated using {sup 111}In MAb pharmacokinetics from the initial imaging study for each patient, using reference man- and patient-specific masses. Results: The reference man-specific radiation doses (cGy/MBq) were not significantly different for the breast and the prostate cancer patients for both RPs in all but one tissue-RP combination (liver, DOTA-2IT). The patient-specific doses had differences between the groups most of which can be related to weight differences. Conclusions: Similar normal tissue doses were calculated for two groups of patients having different cancers and genders. This similarity combined with continued careful analysis of the imaging data might allow the use of higher starting doses in early phase RIT studies.

  11. Primary and salvage cryotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Finley, David S; Pouliot, Frederic; Miller, David C; Belldegrun, Arie S

    2010-02-01

    Cryotherapy is a technique to ablate tissue by local induction of extremely cold temperatures. Recently, the American Urological Association Best Practice Statement recognized cryoablation of the prostate as an established treatment option for men with newly diagnosed or radiorecurrent organ-confined prostate cancer. Emerging data suggest that, in select cases, cryoablation may have a role in focal ablation of prostate. The current state of the art of cryoablation in these applications is reviewed.

  12. Increased Expression of ALDH1A1 in Prostate Cancer is Correlated With Tumor Aggressiveness: A Tissue Microarray Study of Iranian Patients.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Elham; Saadi, Faezeh H; Asgari, Mojgan; Shariftabrizi, Ahmad; Roudi, Raheleh; Madjd, Zahra

    2017-09-01

    Subpopulations of prostate cancer (PCa) cells expressing putative stem cell markers possess the ability to promote tumor growth, maintenance, and progression. This study aimed to evaluate the expression patterns and clinical significance of putative stem cell marker aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 A1 (ALDH1A1) in prostate tumor tissues. ALDH1A1 expression was examined in a well-defined series of prostate tissues, including 105 (68%) samples of PCa, 21 (13%) samples of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and 31 (19%) samples of benign prostate hyperplasia, which were embedded in tissue microarray blocks. The correlation of ALDH1A1 expression with clinicopathologic parameters was also assessed. There was a significant difference between the expression level of ALDH1A1 in PCa compared with the high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and benign prostate hyperplasia samples (P<0.001). PCa cells expressing ALDH1A1 were more often seen in samples with advanced Gleason score (P=0.05) and high serum prostate specific antigen level (P=0.02). In addition, a positive correlation was found between ALDH1A1 expression and primary tumor stage and regional lymph node involvement (P=0.04 and 0.03, respectively). The significant association between ALDH1A1 expressions with Gleason score indicates the potential role of this protein in PCa tumorigenesis and aggressive behavior; therefore, this cancer stem cell marker can be used as a promising candidate for targeted therapy of PCa, especially those with high Gleason score.

  13. [Expressions of the androgen receptor in normal prostate, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Rui; Liu, Zhi-Yong; Sun, Ying-Hao; Xu, Chuan-Liang; Gao, Xu; Jiao, Li

    2010-11-01

    To study the expressions of the androgen receptor (AR) in the normal prostate, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer (PCa), and investigate the relationship of AR with prostatic hyperplasia and PCa. The expressions of AR were detected in 15 normal prostate, 20 benign prostatic hyperplasia and 40 PCa samples by immunofluorescent staining, real-time PCR and Western blotting. Real-time PCR and Western blotting revealed no statistically significant differences in the expressions of AR between the normal prostate and prostatic hyperplasia groups (P < 0.05), while immunofluorescent staining exhibited an increase of the expression in the BPH tissues. All the three methods showed that the AR expression was significantly higher in the PCa than in the normal prostate and prostatic hyperplasia groups (P < 0.05), in the well differentiated than in the poorly differentiated tumor, and in the early than in the advanced stage (P < 0.05), but the lowest in the hormone-refractory PCa (HRPC) tissue. The expression of AR is higher in PCa than in normal prostate and prostatic hyperplasia tissues, and is correlated with the pathological grade and clinical stage of PCa.

  14. A feasibility study of novel ultrasonic tissue characterization for prostate-cancer diagnosis: 2D spectrum analysis of in vivo data with histology as gold standard

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian; Mansukhani, Mahesh M.; Benson, Mitchell C.; Ennis, Ronald; Yoshida, Emi; Schiff, Peter B.; Zhang, Pengpeng; Zhou, Jun; Kutcher, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of using a novel 2D spectrum ultrasonic tissue characterization (UTC) technique for prostate-cancer diagnosis. Normalized 2D spectra are computed by performing Fourier transforms along the range (beam) and the cross-range directions of the digital radio-frequency echo data, then dividing by a reference spectrum. This 2D spectrum method provides axial and lateral information of tissue microstructures, an improvement over the current 1D spectrum analysis which only provides axial information. A pilot study was conducted on four prostate-cancer patients who underwent radical prostatectomies. Cancerous and noncancerous regions of interest, identified through histology, were compared using four 2D spectral parameters: peak value and 3 dB width of the radially integrated spectral power (RISP), slope and intercept of the angularly integrated spectral power (AISP). For noncancerous and cancerous prostatic tissues, respectively, our investigation yielded 23±1 and 26±1 dB for peak value of RISP, 7.8±0.5° and 7.6±0.6° for 3 dB of RISP, −2.1±0.2 and −2.7±0.4 dB∕MHz for slope of AISP, and 92±5 and 112±6 dB for intercept of AISP. Preliminary results indicated that 2D spectral UTC has the potential for identifying tumor-bearing regions within the prostate gland. PMID:19746784

  15. Increased cancer cell proliferation in prostate cancer patients with high levels of serum folate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: A recent clinical trial revealed that folic acid supplementation is associated with an increased incidence of prostate cancer (1). The present study evaluates serum and prostate tissue folate levels in men with prostate cancer, compared to histologically normal prostate glands from can...

  16. External Beam Radiation Therapy and Abiraterone in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer: Safety and Effect on Tissue Androgens

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Eunpi; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Russell, Kenneth J.; Liao, Jay J.; Konodi, Mark A.; Kurland, Brenda F.; Marck, Brett T.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Dalkin, Bruce L.; Montgomery, R. Bruce

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Optimizing androgen suppression may provide better control of localized prostate cancer (PCa). Numerous trials have supported the benefit of combining androgen deprivation therapy with definitive radiation therapy in men with locally advanced or high-grade disease. Addition of abiraterone to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa) with radiation has not been reported. We examined the safety of this combination as well as its impact on androgen suppression. Methods and Materials: A prospective, phase 2 study was conducted in men with localized PCa treated with 6 months of neoadjuvant and concurrent abiraterone with LHRHa and radiation. Duration of adjuvant LHRHa was at the discretion of the treating clinician. Prostate biopsy assays were obtained prior to the start of therapy and prior to radiation. Sera and tissue androgen levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: A total of 22 men with intermediate- (n=3) and high-risk PCa (n=19) received study therapy. Sixteen men completed the intended course of abiraterone, and 19 men completed planned radiation to 77.4 to 81 Gy. Radiation to pelvic nodes was administered in 20 men. The following grade 3 toxicities were reported: lymphopenia (14 patients), fatigue (1 patient), transaminitis (2 patients), hypertension (2 patients), and hypokalemia (1 patient). There were no grade 4 toxicities. All 21 men who complied with at least 3 months of abiraterone therapy had a preradiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration nadir of <0.3 ng/mL. Median levels of tissue androgen downstream of CYP17A were significantly suppressed after treatment with abiraterone, and upstream steroids were increased. At median follow-up of 21 months (range: 3-37 months), only 1 patient (who had discontinued abiraterone at 3 months) had biochemical relapse. Conclusions: Addition of abiraterone to LHRHa with radiation is safe and achieves effective prostatic androgen suppression

  17. [Sexuality and prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Colson, M-H; Lechevallier, E; Rambeaud, J-J; Alimi, J-C; Faix, A; Gravis, G; Hannoun-Levi, J-M; Quintens, H; Rébillard, X; Droupy, S

    2012-09-01

    All treatments of prostate cancer have a negative effect on both sexuality and male fertility. There is a specific profile of changes in the fields of quality of life, sexual, urinary, bowel and vitality according to the treatment modalities chosen. Maintain a satisfying sex is the main concern of a majority of men facing prostate cancer and its treatment. It is essential to assess the couple's sexuality before diagnosis of prostate cancer in order to deliver complete information and to consider early and appropriate treatment options at the request of the couple. Forms of sexuality sexual preference settings stored (orgasm) may, when the erection is not yet recovered, be an alternative to the couple to maintain intimacy and complicity. In all cases, a specific management and networking will in many cases to find a satisfactory sexuality. Consequences of the treatment on male fertility should be part of the information of patients with prostate cancer and their partners. The choice of treatment must take into account the desire of paternity of the couple. A semen analysis with sperm cryopreservation before any therapy should be routinely offered in men with prostate cancer, particularly among men under 55, with a partner under 43 years old or without children. If the desire for parenthood among couples, sperm cryopreservation before treatment and medical assisted reproduction are recommended.

  18. Evaluation of Lactate and Alanine as Metabolic Biomarkers of Prostate Cancer Using 1H HR-MAS Spectroscopy of Biopsy Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Tessem, May-Britt; Swanson, Mark G.; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Albers, Mark J.; Joun, David; Tabatabai, Z. Laura; Simko, Jeffry P.; Shinohara, Katsuto; Nelson, Sarah J.; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Gribbestad, Ingrid S.; Kurhanewicz, John

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the use of lactate and alanine as metabolic biomarkers of prostate cancer using 1H high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) spectroscopy of snap-frozen transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy tissues. A long-echo-time rotor-synchronized Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence including an electronic reference to access in vivo concentrations (ERETIC) standard was used to determine the concentrations of lactate and alanine in 82 benign and 16 malignant biopsies (mean 26.5% ± 17.2% of core). Low concentrations of lactate (0.61 ± 0.28 mmol/kg) and alanine (0.14 ± 0.06 mmol/kg) were observed in benign prostate biopsies, and there was no significant difference between benign predominantly glandular (N = 54) and stromal (N = 28) biopsies between patients with (N = 38) and without (N = 44) a positive clinical biopsy. In biopsies containing prostate cancer there was a highly significant (P < 0.0001) increase in lactate (1.59 ± 0.61 mmol/kg) and alanine (0.26 ± 0.07 mmol/kg), and minimal overlap with lactate concentrations in benign biopsies. This study demonstrates for the first time very low concentrations of lactate and alanine in benign prostate biopsy tissues. The significant increase in the concentration of both lactate and alanine in biopsy tissue containing as little as 5% cancer could be exploited in hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopic imaging (SI) studies of prostate cancer patients. PMID:18727052

  19. PSA and beyond: alternative prostate cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Saini, Sharanjot

    2016-04-01

    The use of biomarkers for prostate cancer screening, diagnosis and prognosis has the potential to improve the clinical management of the patients. Owing to inherent limitations of the biomarker prostate-specific antigen (PSA), intensive efforts are currently directed towards a search for alternative prostate cancer biomarkers, particularly those that can predict disease aggressiveness and drive better treatment decisions. A literature search of Medline articles focused on recent and emerging advances in prostate cancer biomarkers was performed. The most promising biomarkers that have the potential to meet the unmet clinical needs in prostate cancer patient management and/or that are clinically implemented were selected. With the advent of advanced genomic and proteomic technologies, we have in recent years seen an enormous spurt in prostate cancer biomarker research with several promising alternative biomarkers being discovered that show an improved sensitivity and specificity over PSA. The new generation of biomarkers can be tested via serum, urine, or tissue-based assays that have either received regulatory approval by the US Food and Drug Administration or are available as Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-based laboratory developed tests. Additional emerging novel biomarkers for prostate cancer, including circulating tumor cells, microRNAs and exosomes, are still in their infancy. Together, these biomarkers provide actionable guidance for prostate cancer risk assessment, and are expected to lead to an era of personalized medicine.

  20. PSA and beyond: alternative prostate cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of biomarkers for prostate cancer screening, diagnosis and prognosis has the potential to improve the clinical management of the patients. Owing to inherent limitations of the biomarker prostate-specific antigen (PSA), intensive efforts are currently directed towards a search for alternative prostate cancer biomarkers, particularly those that can predict disease aggressiveness and drive better treatment decisions. Methods A literature search of Medline articles focused on recent and emerging advances in prostate cancer biomarkers was performed. The most promising biomarkers that have the potential to meet the unmet clinical needs in prostate cancer patient management and/or that are clinically implemented were selected. Conclusions With the advent of advanced genomic and proteomic technologies, we have in recent years seen an enormous spurt in prostate cancer biomarker research with several promising alternative biomarkers being discovered that show an improved sensitivity and specificity over PSA. The new generation of biomarkers can be tested via serum, urine, or tissue-based assays that have either received regulatory approval by the US Food and Drug Administration or are available as Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-based laboratory developed tests. Additional emerging novel biomarkers for prostate cancer, including circulating tumor cells, microRNAs and exosomes, are still in their infancy. Together, these biomarkers provide actionable guidance for prostate cancer risk assessment, and are expected to lead to an era of personalized medicine. PMID:26790878

  1. Angiostatic Therapy: A New Treatment Modality for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    could be a new innovative treatment regimen for hormone-refractory prostate cancer. This was to be achieved with human prostate cancer tissue and...indices, low cell death and a highly invasive phenotype. Using this model we identified surgical castration, COX-2 inhibition and dendritic cell based immunotherapy as effective mono and combined therapies for prostate carcinoma.

  2. Emerging biomarkers of prostate cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    MARTIN, SARAH K.; VAUGHAN, TAYLOR B.; ATKINSON, TIMOTHY; ZHU, HAINING; KYPRIANOU, NATASHA

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer progression involves activation of signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, apoptosis, anoikis, angiogenesis and metastasis. The current PSA-based test for the diagnosis of prostate cancer lacks sensitivity and specificity, resulting in missed diagnoses and unnecessary biopsies. Intense research efforts to identify serum and tissue biomarkers will expand the opportunities to understand the functional activation of cancer-related pathways and consequently lead to molecular therapeutic targeting towards inhibition of tumor growth. Current literature describes multiple biomarkers that indicate the properties of prostate cancer including its presence, stage, metastatic potential and prognosis. Used singly, assays detecting these biomarkers have their respective shortcomings. Several recent studies evaluating the clinical utilization of multiple markers show promising results in improving prostate cancer profiling. This review discusses the current understanding of biomarker signature cluster-based approaches for the diagnosis and therapeutic response of prostate cancer derived from panels of biomarker tests that provide a selective molecular signature characteristic of the tumor. As these signatures are robustly defined and their pathways are exhaustively dissected, prostate cancer can be more accurately diagnosed, characterized, staged and targeted with inhibitory antitumor agents. The growing promise surrounding the recent evidence in identifying and utilizing such biomarker panels, will lead to improvement in cancer prognosis and management of the therapeutic response of prostate cancer patients. PMID:22641253

  3. Promoter Hypermethylation in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prostate gland is the most common site of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer mortality in American men. It is well known that epigenetic alterations such as DNA methylation within the regulatory (promoter) regions of genes are associated with transcriptional silencing in cancer. Promoter hypermethylation of critical pathway genes could be potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for prostate cancer. Methods This review discusses current information on methylated genes associated with prostate cancer development and progression. Results Over 30 genes have been investigated for promoter methylation in prostate cancer. These methylated genes are involved in critical pathways, such as DNA repair, metabolism, and invasion/metastasis. The role of hypermethylated genes in regulation of critical pathways in prostate cancer is reviewed. Conclusions These findings may provide new information of the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Certain epigenetic alterations in prostate tumors are being translated into clinical practice for therapeutic use. PMID:20861812

  4. Influence of daily imaging on plan quality and normal tissue toxicity for prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bell, Katharina; Heitfeld, Marina; Licht, Norbert; Rübe, Christian; Dzierma, Yvonne

    2017-01-10

    Modern radiotherapy offers various possibilities for image guided verification of patient positioning. Different clinically relevant IGRT (image guided radiotherapy) scenarios were considered with regard to their influence on dosimetric plan quality and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). This study is based on treatment plans of 50 prostate patients. We evaluate the clinically performed IGRT and simulate the influence of different daily IGRT scenarios on plan quality. Imaging doses of planar and cone-beam-CT (CBCT) images for three different energies (6 MV, 1 MV and 121 kV) were added to the treatment plans. The plan quality of the different scenarios was assessed by a visual inspection of the dose distribution and dose-volume-histogram (DVH) and a statistical analysis of DVH criteria. In addition, an assessment of the normal tissue complication probability was performed. Daily 1MV-CBCTs result in undesirable high dose regions in the target volume. The DVH shows that the scenarios with actual imaging performed, daily kV-CBCT and daily 6MV imaging (1x CBCT, 4x planar images per week) do not differ exceedingly from the original plan; especially imaging with daily kV-CBCT has little influence to the sparing of organs at risk. In contrast, daily 1MV- CBCT entails an additional dose of up to two fraction doses. Due to the additional dose amount some DVH constraints for plan acceptability could no longer be satisfied, especially for the daily 1MV-CBCT scenario. This scenario also shows increased NTCP for the rectum. Daily kV-CBCT has negligible influence on plan quality and is commendable for the clinical routine. If no kV-modality is available, a daily IGRT scenario with one CBCT per week and planar axial images on the other days should be preferred over daily MV-CBCT.

  5. Suppression of BRCA2 by Mutant Mitochondrial DNA in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    in prostate cancer specimens but not in age-matched benign prostate hyperplasia , and we have correlated their presence with loss of BRCA2 protein in... prostate cancer but not in age- matched benign prostate hyperplasia (Figure 2). We have also shown that the number of mtDNA deletions is associated...deletion of mtDNA can be detected in prostate cancer tissues but not benign or normal prostate tissues. Noticeably, our study excludes the germ-line

  6. Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPV-Associated Lung Ovarian Skin Uterine Cancer Home Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English Español ( ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of men getting prostate cancer or dying from prostate cancer varies by race ...

  7. [Overdiagnosis in prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Villeda, Christian; Gomez, Martha Olivia; Sotomayor, Mariano

    2014-06-01

    Prostate cancer screening is an absolutely controversial topic and under debate. The points of view from which the problem is analyzed also influence this issue; patient, physician and Health Care authorities have different interests that most of the times are not comprehensively analyzed. Currently, no clinical guideline supports the performance of a population screening with active recruitment, but they do support the credible information to the man who desires its performance of potential benefits and risks (opportunistic screening), as well as its performance in certain risk groups. Nevertheless, what is inherent to any screening program is the overdiagnosis of clinically irrelevant disease, which in prostate cancer has been calculated around 50%, and that, from our point of view, gives cause to the correct implementation of active surveillance programs to tamponade the potential deleterious effects of active therapies of prostate cancer.

  8. Hypofractionation for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Mark; Forman, Jeffrey; Kupelian, Patrick; Lawton, Colleen; Petereit, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Hypofractionation for prostate cancer was originally carried out in the pursuit of efficiency and convenience but has now attracted greatly renewed interest based upon a hypothesis that prostate cancers have a higher sensitivity to fraction size, reflected in a low alpha/beta ratio, than do late responding organs at risk such as the rectum or bladder. Tumor control and acceptable toxicity outcomes from several hypofractionation or brachytherapy analyses do in fact support an alpha/beta ratio for prostate cancer that is low, perhaps even lower that that for the normal organs that ordinarily constrain the delivery of radiation therapy. However, many of these studies lack sufficient patient numbers and follow-up, are clouded by dose inhomogeneity issues in the case of brachytherapy, or delivered effective doses that were too low by contemporary standards. Thus, the clinical efficacy of the approach has yet to be fully validated. However, a number of newer prospective trials, some randomized, are underway or have reached accrual but await sufficient follow-up for analysis. These studies, which cover a wide range of doses per fraction, should ultimately be capable of validating the utility of prostate hypofractionation and the models that predict its effects. With hypofractionation's significant potential for therapeutic gain, cost savings, and improved patient convenience, the future management of localized prostate cancer could be profoundly altered in the process.

  9. A comparison of isolated circulating tumor cells and tissue biopsies using whole-genome sequencing in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie-Fu; Lin, Millicent; Li, Fuqiang; Wu, Kui; Wu, Hanjie; Lichterman, Jake; Wan, Haolei; Lu, Chia-Lun; OuYang, William; Ni, Ming; Wang, Linlin; Li, Guibo; Lee, Tom; Zhang, Xiuqing; Yang, Jonathan; Rettig, Matthew; Chung, Leland W.K.; Yang, Huanming; Li, Ker-Chau; Hou, Yong; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Hou, Shuang; Xu, Xun; Wang, Jun; Posadas, Edwin M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated focal but limited molecular similarities between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and biopsies using isolated genetic assays. We hypothesized that molecular similarity between CTCs and tissue exists at the single cell level when characterized by whole genome sequencing (WGS). By combining the NanoVelcro CTC Chip with laser capture microdissection (LCM), we developed a platform for single-CTC WGS. We performed this procedure on CTCs and tissue samples from a patient with advanced prostate cancer who had serial biopsies over the course of his clinical history. We achieved 30X depth and ≥ 95% coverage. Twenty-nine percent of the somatic single nucleotide variations (SSNVs) identified were founder mutations that were also identified in CTCs. In addition, 86% of the clonal mutations identified in CTCs could be traced back to either the primary or metastatic tumors. In this patient, we identified structural variations (SVs) including an intrachromosomal rearrangement in chr3 and an interchromosomal rearrangement between chr13 and chr15. These rearrangements were shared between tumor tissues and CTCs. At the same time, highly heterogeneous short structural variants were discovered in PTEN, RB1, and BRCA2 in all tumor and CTC samples. Using high-quality WGS on single-CTCs, we identified the shared genomic alterations between CTCs and tumor tissues. This approach yielded insight into the heterogeneity of the mutational landscape of SSNVs and SVs. It may be possible to use this approach to study heterogeneity and characterize the biological evolution of a cancer during the course of its natural history. PMID:26575023

  10. [Diet and prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Romero Cagigal, I; Ferruelo Alonso, A; Berenguer Sánchez, A

    2003-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the first neoplasia in the United States accounting the second in cancer deaths. With all the treatments strategies in debate because of their side effects, is very important try to elucidate prevention mechanisms that may be implicate in the development of this disease, between these, nutrients have been of mayor importance. In the present review we tried to study the most important nutritional factors implicated in the development and prevention of prostate carcinoma. We focus our attention over the polyphenols of the red wine, which influence over cellular proliferation and apoptosis in LNCaP cells have been studied in our Department.

  11. Reduced Activity of Double-Strand Break Repair Genes in Prostate Cancer Patients With Late Normal Tissue Radiation Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Oorschot, Bregje van; Hovingh, Suzanne E.; Moerland, Perry D.; Medema, Jan Paul; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Vrieling, Harry; Franken, Nicolaas A.P.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate clinical parameters and DNA damage response as possible risk factors for radiation toxicity in the setting of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Clinical parameters of 61 prostate cancer patients, 34 with (overresponding, OR) and 27 without (non-responding, NR) severe late radiation toxicity were assembled. In addition, for a matched subset the DNA damage repair kinetics (γ-H2AX assay) and expression profiles of DNA repair genes were determined in ex vivo irradiated lymphocytes. Results: Examination of clinical data indicated none of the considered clinical parameters to be correlated with the susceptibility of patients to develop late radiation toxicity. Although frequencies of γ-H2AX foci induced immediately after irradiation were similar (P=.32), significantly higher numbers of γ-H2AX foci were found 24 hours after irradiation in OR compared with NR patients (P=.03). Patient-specific γ-H2AX foci decay ratios were significantly higher in NR patients than in OR patients (P<.0001). Consequently, NR patients seem to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) more efficiently than OR patients. Moreover, gene expression analysis indicated several genes of the homologous recombination pathway to be stronger induced in NR compared with OR patients (P<.05). A similar trend was observed in genes of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway (P=.09). This is congruent with more proficient repair of DNA DSBs in patients without late radiation toxicity. Conclusions: Both gene expression profiling and DNA DSB repair kinetics data imply that less-efficient repair of radiation-induced DSBs may contribute to the development of late normal tissue damage. Induction levels of DSB repair genes (eg, RAD51) may potentially be used to assess the risk for late radiation toxicity.

  12. Gene expression in normal-appearing tissue adjacent to prostate cancers are predictive of clinical outcome: evidence for a biologically meaningful field effect

    PubMed Central

    Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Maddala, Tara; Falzarano, Sara Moscovita; Cherbavaz, Diana B.; Zhang, Nan; Knezevic, Dejan; Febbo, Phillip G.; Lee, Mark; Lawrence, Hugh Jeffrey; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated gene expression in histologically normal-appearing tissue (NT) adjacent to prostate tumor in radical prostatectomy specimens, assessing for biological significance based on prediction of clinical recurrence (cR - metastatic disease or local recurrence). Results A total of 410 evaluable patients had paired tumor and NT. Fortysix genes, representing diverse biological pathways (androgen signaling, stromal response, stress response, cellular organization, proliferation, cell adhesion, and chromatin remodeling) were associated with cR in NT (FDR < 20%), of which 39 concordantly predicted cR in tumor (FDR < 20%). Overall GPS and its stromal response and androgen-signaling gene group components also significantly predicted time to cR in NT (RM-corrected HR/20 units = 1.25; 95% CI: 1.01-1.56; P = 0.024). Experimental Design Expression of 732 genes was measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) separately in tumor and adjacent NT specimens from 127 patients with and 374 without cR following radical prostatectomy for T1/T2 prostate cancer. A 17-gene expression signature (Genomic Prostate Score [GPS]), previously validated to predict aggressive prostate cancer when measured in tumor tissue, was also assessed using pre-specified genes and algorithms. Analysis used Cox proportional hazards models, Storey's false discovery rate (FDR) control, and regression to the mean (RM) correction. Conclusions Gene expression profiles, including GPS, from NT adjacent to tumor can predict prostate cancer outcome. These findings suggest that there is a biologically significant field effect in primary prostate cancer that is a marker for aggressive disease. PMID:27121323

  13. American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Prevention and Early Detection American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends that men have a chance to ...

  14. Immunohistochemical expression of minichromosome maintenance complex protein 2 predicts biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer: a tissue microarray and digital imaging analysis-based study of 428 cases.

    PubMed

    Toubaji, Antoun; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Chaux, Alcides; Lecksell, Kristen; Hicks, Jessica; De Marzo, Angelo M; Platz, Elizabeth A; Netto, George J

    2012-11-01

    Prostate cancer remains a major health problem in the United States. Established clinicopathologic parameters such as Gleason score, T stage, and prostate-specific antigen levels are currently the guiding tools for prognostication and disease management. The addition of biomarkers could increase the accuracy of these parameters for predicting disease progression, response to therapy, and survival. In this regard, the goal of this study was to evaluate minichromosome maintenance complex protein 2 and Ki-67 immunohistochemical expression as predictors of outcome in prostate cancer. For this purpose, 11 tissue microarrays were constructed using tumor and nontumor samples from 428 patients. Patients were divided into short-term (mean, 2.9 years) and long-term (mean, 14.1 years) follow-up groups. End points were biochemical recurrence for the short-term follow-up group and prostate cancer-related death for the long-term follow-up group. All men in the long-term follow-up group had biochemical recurrence at the time of recruitment. Expression of both markers was higher in tumor than in nontumor glands. Percentage of minichromosome maintenance complex protein 2 was associated with Gleason score in both groups. Percentage of Ki-67 was associated with Gleason score and pathologic stage only in the short-term follow-up group. Higher minichromosome maintenance complex protein 2 percentages were associated with biochemical recurrence in the short-term follow-up group. In the long-term follow-up group, neither minichromosome maintenance complex protein 2 nor Ki-67 levels predicted prostate cancer death. In conclusion, our results suggest that in patients treated by radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer, immunohistochemistry for minichromosome maintenance complex protein 2 expression could be used to predict biochemical recurrence, independent of other known clinicopathologic factors.

  15. Primary Cilia Are Lost in Preinvasive and Invasive Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hassounah, Nadia B.; Nagle, Ray; Saboda, Kathylynn; Roe, Denise J.; Dalkin, Bruce L.; McDermott, Kimberly M.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men worldwide. Little is known about the role of primary cilia in preinvasive and invasive prostate cancer. However, reduced cilia expression has been observed in human cancers including pancreatic cancer, renal cell carcinoma, breast cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, and melanoma. The aim of this study was to characterize primary cilia expression in preinvasive and invasive human prostate cancer, and to investigate the correlation between primary cilia and the Wnt signaling pathway. Human prostate tissues representative of stages of prostate cancer formation (normal prostate, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and invasive prostate cancer (including perineural invasion)) were stained for ciliary proteins. The frequency of primary cilia was determined. A decrease in the percentage of ciliated cells in PIN, invasive cancer and perineural invasion lesions was observed when compared to normal. Cilia lengths were also measured to indirectly test functionality. Cilia were shorter in PIN, cancer, and perineural invasion lesions, suggesting dysfunction. Primary cilia have been shown to suppress the Wnt pathway. Increased Wnt signaling has been implicated in prostate cancer. Therefore, we investigated a correlation between loss of primary cilia and increased Wnt signaling in normal prostate and in preinvasive and invasive prostate cancer. To investigate Wnt signaling in our cohort, serial tissue sections were stained for β-catenin as a measure of Wnt signaling. Nuclear β-catenin was analyzed and Wnt signaling was found to be higher in un-ciliated cells in the normal prostate, PIN, a subset of invasive cancers, and perineural invasion. Our results suggest that cilia normally function to suppress the Wnt signaling pathway in epithelial cells and that cilia loss may play a role in increased Wnt signaling in some prostate cancers. These results suggest that cilia are dysfunctional in human prostate cancer, and

  16. Vitamin E and Prostate Cancer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vitamin E, its metabolites or its analogs, might help prevent prostate cancer initiation or progression. Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States, exceeded only by lung cancer. About 218,890 new cases of prost...

  17. Serum Autoantibodies in Chronic Prostate Inflammation in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schlick, Bettina; Massoner, Petra; Lueking, Angelika; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Blattner, Mirjam; Schaefer, Georg; Marquart, Klaus; Theek, Carmen; Amersdorfer, Peter; Zielinski, Dirk; Kirchner, Matthias; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Rubin, Mark A.; Müllner, Stefan; Schulz-Knappe, Peter; Klocker, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is frequently observed on histological analysis of malignant and non-malignant prostate specimens. It is a suspected supporting factor for prostate diseases and their progression and a main cause of false positive PSA tests in cancer screening. We hypothesized that inflammation induces autoantibodies, which may be useful biomarkers. We aimed to identify and validate prostate inflammation associated serum autoantibodies in prostate cancer patients and evaluate the expression of corresponding autoantigens. Methods Radical prostatectomy specimens of prostate cancer patients (N = 70) were classified into high and low inflammation groups according to the amount of tissue infiltrating lymphocytes. The corresponding pre-surgery blood serum samples were scrutinized for autoantibodies using a low-density protein array. Selected autoantigens were identified in prostate tissue and their expression pattern analyzed by immunohistochemistry and qPCR. The identified autoantibody profile was cross-checked in an independent sample set (N = 63) using the Luminex-bead protein array technology. Results Protein array screening identified 165 autoantibodies differentially abundant in the serum of high compared to low inflammation patients. The expression pattern of three corresponding antigens were established in benign and cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry and qPCR: SPAST (Spastin), STX18 (Syntaxin 18) and SPOP (speckle-type POZ protein). Of these, SPAST was significantly increased in prostate tissue with high inflammation. All three autoantigens were differentially expressed in primary and/or castration resistant prostate tumors when analyzed in an inflammation-independent tissue microarray. Cross-validation of the inflammation autoantibody profile on an independent sample set using a Luminex-bead protein array, retrieved 51 of the significantly discriminating autoantibodies. Three autoantibodies were significantly upregulated in both screens, MUT

  18. [Grading of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, G; Roth, W; Helpap, B

    2016-07-01

    The current grading of prostate cancer is based on the classification system of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) following a consensus conference in Chicago in 2014. The foundations are based on the frequently modified grading system of Gleason. This article presents a brief description of the development to the current ISUP grading system.

  19. Absence of XMRV and closely related viruses in primary prostate cancer tissues used to derive the XMRV-infected cell line 22Rv1.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, Jaydip; Luk, Ka-Cheung; Tang, Ning; Gaughan, Christina; Klein, Eric A; Kandel, Eugene S; Hackett, John; Silverman, Robert H

    2012-01-01

    The 22Rv1 cell line is widely used for prostate cancer research and other studies throughout the world. These cells were established from a human prostate tumor, CWR22, that was serially passaged in nude mice and selected for androgen independence. The 22Rv1 cells are known to produce high titers of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV). Recent studies suggested that XMRV was inadvertently created in the 1990's when two murine leukemia virus (MLV) genomes (pre-XMRV1 and pre-XMRV-2) recombined during passaging of the CWR22 tumor in mice. The conclusion that XMRV originated from mice and not the patient was based partly on the failure to detect XMRV in early CWR22 xenografts. While that deduction is certainly justified, we examined the possibility that a closely related virus could have been present in primary tumor tissue. Here we report that we have located the original prostate tumor tissue excised from patient CWR22 and have assayed the corresponding DNA by PCR and the tissue sections by fluorescence in situ hybridization for the presence of XMRV or a similar virus. The primary tumor tissues lacked mouse DNA as determined by PCR for intracisternal A type particle DNA, thus avoiding one of the limitations of studying xenografts. We show that neither XMRV nor a closely related virus was present in primary prostate tissue of patient CWR22. Our findings confirm and reinforce the conclusion that XMRV is a recombinant laboratory-generated mouse virus that is highly adapted for human prostate cancer cells.

  20. Novel diagnostic biomarkers for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Chikezie O.; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in American men, and a more aggressive form of the disease is particularly prevalent among African Americans. The therapeutic success rate for prostate cancer can be tremendously improved if the disease is diagnosed early. Thus, a successful therapy for this disease depends heavily on the clinical indicators (biomarkers) for early detection of the presence and progression of the disease, as well as the prediction after the clinical intervention. However, the current clinical biomarkers for prostate cancer are not ideal as there remains a lack of reliable biomarkers that can specifically distinguish between those patients who should be treated adequately to stop the aggressive form of the disease and those who should avoid overtreatment of the indolent form. A biomarker is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention. A biomarker reveals further information to presently existing clinical and pathological analysis. It facilitates screening and detecting the cancer, monitoring the progression of the disease, and predicting the prognosis and survival after clinical intervention. A biomarker can also be used to evaluate the process of drug development, and, optimally, to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer treatment by enabling physicians to tailor treatment for individual patients. The form of the prostate cancer biomarkers can vary from metabolites and chemical products present in body fluid to genes and proteins in the prostate tissues. Current advances in molecular techniques have provided new tools facilitating the discovery of new biomarkers for prostate cancer. These emerging biomarkers will be beneficial and critical in developing new and clinically reliable indicators that will have a high specificity for the diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. The

  1. Prostate Cancer for the Internist.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Shikha; Sarmad, Rehan; Arora, Sumant; Dasaraju, Radhikha; Sarmad, Komal

    2015-10-01

    In the United States, approximately 240,000 men are diagnosed annually with prostate cancer. Although effective treatment options are available for clinically localized cancer, the potential burdensome co-morbidities and attendant healthcare costs from over diagnosis and over treatment have escalated the discussion and controversy regarding appropriate screening, diagnosis, and optimal management of prostate cancer. Although the lifetime risk of developing prostate cancer is approximately 1 in 6 (~16%), the risk of dying from the disease is only ~2%. The discrepancy between the cancer incidence and lethality has led to widespread scrutiny of prostate cancer patient management, particularly for low-grade, low-stage (indolent) disease. The vast majority of men diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer are treated with interventional therapies despite studies demonstrating that even without treatment, prostate cancer-specific mortality is low. A MedLine/PubMed search was performed using PICO format (Patient, Intervention, Comparison and Outcome) identifying all relevant articles. No restrictions were used for publication dates. The terms "Prostate Cancer", "Screening", "Mortality", "Morbidity" yielded 307 results. "Diagnosis", "Prognosis" and "Survival" yielded 1504 results. Further filters were applied to narrow down the results using keywords "Prostate cancer screening guidelines 2014", "Beyond PSA", "NCCN Guidelines prostate", "MRI guided Prostate biopsy" yielding 72, 274, 54 and 568 results respectively. Of these, approximately 137 articles were found relevant and were reviewed. References from the reviewed articles were included in the final article.

  2. Survival in prostate cancer prevention trial detailed

    Cancer.gov

    In the NCI-sponsored Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, initial findings from a decade ago showed that the drug finasteride significantly reduced the risk of prostate cancer, but among those who did develop prostate cancer, paradoxically, the drug was asso

  3. Survival in prostate cancer prevention trial detailed

    Cancer.gov

    In the NCI-sponsored Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, initial findings from a decade ago showed that the drug finasteride significantly reduced the risk of prostate cancer, but among those who did develop prostate cancer, paradoxically, the drug was asso

  4. Racial differences in adipose tissue distribution and risk of aggressive prostate cancer among men undergoing radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allott, Emma H.; Howard, Lauren E.; Song, Hai-Jun; Sourbeer, Katharine N.; Koontz, Bridget F.; Salama, Joseph K.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Background While elevated body mass index (BMI) has been associated with increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer (PC), the importance of adipose tissue distribution is not well understood. We examined associations between overall and visceral obesity and aggressive PC risk. Moreover, given racial differences in adipose tissue distribution, we examined whether race modified these associations. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 308 radiation-treated PC patients within the Durham VA from 2005–2011. Multivariable logistic regression examined the association between BMI categories and tertiles of waist circumference (WC), visceral fat area (VFA) and periprostatic adipose tissue area (PPAT) with high-grade PC risk (Gleason score ≥7 vs. ≤6). Models stratified by race examined whether these associations differed between black and non-black men. Results Both elevated BMI (p-trend=0.054) and WC (p-trend=0.040) were associated with increased high-grade PC risk, with similar results between races, although the association with BMI was not statistically significant. In contrast, elevated VFA was associated with increased aggressive PC risk in black men (p-trend=0.002) but not non-black men (p-trend=0.831), with a significant interaction between race and VFA (p-interaction=0.035). Though similar patterns were observed for PPAT, none were statistically significant. Conclusions Among men undergoing radiation therapy for PC, visceral obesity is associated with increased aggressive PC risk, particularly among black men. If confirmed in future studies, these results suggest adipose tissue distribution differences may contribute to PC racial disparity. Impact These findings highlight the need to elucidate mechanisms contributing to racial differences in the association between visceral obesity and aggressive PC. PMID:25146088

  5. Telomerase as an Androgen Receptor-Regulated Target in Selenium Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    samples and in all human prostate cancer cell lines, but not in normal or benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues (1-5). The inhibition of telomerase by...clinical implications. Telomerase activation has been reported in >90% of prostate cancer samples, but not in normal or benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues

  6. Tuberculous prostatitis: mimicking a cancer.

    PubMed

    Aziz, El Majdoub; Abdelhak, Khallouk; Hassan, Farih Moulay

    2016-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common type of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis . The kidneys, ureter, bladder or genital organs are usually involved. Tuberculosis of the prostate has mainly been described in immune-compromised patients. However, it can exceptionally be found as an isolated lesion in immune-competent patients. Tuberculosis of the prostate may be difficult to differentiate from carcinoma of the prostate and the chronic prostatitis when the prostate is hard and nodular on digital rectal examination and the urine is negative for tuberculosis bacilli. In many cases, a diagnosis of tuberculous prostatitis is made by the pathologist, or the disease is found incidentally after transurethral resection. Therefore, suspicion of tuberculous prostatitis requires a confirmatory biopsy of the prostate. We report the case of 60-year-old man who presented a low urinary tract syndrome. After clinical and biological examination, and imaging, prostate cancer was highly suspected. Transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed and histological examination showed tuberculosis lesions.

  7. Cholesterol and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2004-01-01

    Cholesterol is a neutral lipid that accumulates in liquid-ordered, detergent-resistant membrane domains called lipid rafts. Lipid rafts serve as membrane platforms for signal transduction mechanisms that mediate cell growth, survival, and a variety of other processes relevant to cancer. A number of studies, going back many years, demonstrate that cholesterol accumulates in solid tumors and that cholesterol homeostasis breaks down in the prostate with aging and with the transition to the malignant state. This review summarizes the established links between cholesterol and prostate cancer (PCa), with a focus on how accumulation of cholesterol within the lipid raft component of the plasma membrane may stimulate signaling pathways that promote progression to hormone refractory disease. We propose that increases in cholesterol in prostate tumor cell membranes, resulting from increases in circulating levels or from dysregulation of endogenous synthesis, results in the coalescence of raft domains. This would have the effect of sequestering positive regulators of oncogenic signaling within rafts, while maintaining negative regulators in the liquid-disordered membrane fraction. This approach toward examining the function of lipid rafts in prostate cancer cells may provide insight into the role of circulating cholesterol in malignant growth and on the potential relationship between diet and aggressive disease. Large-scale characterization of proteins that localize to cholesterol-rich domains may help unveil signaling networks and pathways that will lead to identification of new biomarkers for disease progression and potentially to novel targets for therapeutic intervention.

  8. Prostate field cancerization: deregulated expression of macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1 (MIC-1) and platelet derived growth factor A (PDGF-A) in tumor adjacent tissue.

    PubMed

    Jones, Anna C; Antillon, Kresta S; Jenkins, Shannon M; Janos, Sara N; Overton, Heidi N; Shoshan, Dor S; Fischer, Edgar G; Trujillo, Kristina A; Bisoffi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Prostate field cancerization denotes molecular alterations in histologically normal tissues adjacent to tumors. Such alterations include deregulated protein expression, as we have previously shown for the key transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR-1) and the lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS). Here we add the two secreted factors macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1 (MIC-1) and platelet derived growth factor A (PDGF-A) to the growing list of protein markers of prostate field cancerization. Expression of MIC-1 and PDGF-A was measured quantitatively by immunofluorescence and comprehensively analyzed using two methods of signal capture and several groupings of data generated in human cancerous (n = 25), histologically normal adjacent (n = 22), and disease-free (n = 6) prostate tissues. A total of 208 digitized images were analyzed. MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression in tumor tissues were elevated 7.1x to 23.4x and 1.7x to 3.7x compared to disease-free tissues, respectively (p<0.0001 to p = 0.08 and p<0.01 to p = 0.23, respectively). In support of field cancerization, MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression in adjacent tissues were elevated 7.4x to 38.4x and 1.4x to 2.7x, respectively (p<0.0001 to p<0.05 and p<0.05 to p = 0.51, respectively). Also, MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression were similar in tumor and adjacent tissues (0.3x to 1.0x; p<0.001 to p = 0.98 for MIC-1; 0.9x to 2.6x; p<0.01 to p = 1.00 for PDGF-A). All analyses indicated a high level of inter- and intra-tissue heterogeneity across all types of tissues (mean coefficient of variation of 86.0%). Our data shows that MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression is elevated in both prostate tumors and structurally intact adjacent tissues when compared to disease-free specimens, defining field cancerization. These secreted factors could promote tumorigenesis in histologically normal tissues and lead to tumor multifocality. Among several clinical applications, they could also be exploited as indicators of disease in false negative

  9. Prostate Field Cancerization: Deregulated Expression of Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine 1 (MIC-1) and Platelet Derived Growth Factor A (PDGF-A) in Tumor Adjacent Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Anna C.; Shoshan, Dor S.; Fischer, Edgar G.; Trujillo, Kristina A.; Bisoffi, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Prostate field cancerization denotes molecular alterations in histologically normal tissues adjacent to tumors. Such alterations include deregulated protein expression, as we have previously shown for the key transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR-1) and the lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS). Here we add the two secreted factors macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1 (MIC-1) and platelet derived growth factor A (PDGF-A) to the growing list of protein markers of prostate field cancerization. Expression of MIC-1 and PDGF-A was measured quantitatively by immunofluorescence and comprehensively analyzed using two methods of signal capture and several groupings of data generated in human cancerous (n = 25), histologically normal adjacent (n = 22), and disease-free (n = 6) prostate tissues. A total of 208 digitized images were analyzed. MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression in tumor tissues were elevated 7.1x to 23.4x and 1.7x to 3.7x compared to disease-free tissues, respectively (p<0.0001 to p = 0.08 and p<0.01 to p = 0.23, respectively). In support of field cancerization, MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression in adjacent tissues were elevated 7.4x to 38.4x and 1.4x to 2.7x, respectively (p<0.0001 to p<0.05 and p<0.05 to p = 0.51, respectively). Also, MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression were similar in tumor and adjacent tissues (0.3x to 1.0x; p<0.001 to p = 0.98 for MIC-1; 0.9x to 2.6x; p<0.01 to p = 1.00 for PDGF-A). All analyses indicated a high level of inter- and intra-tissue heterogeneity across all types of tissues (mean coefficient of variation of 86.0%). Our data shows that MIC-1 and PDGF-A expression is elevated in both prostate tumors and structurally intact adjacent tissues when compared to disease-free specimens, defining field cancerization. These secreted factors could promote tumorigenesis in histologically normal tissues and lead to tumor multifocality. Among several clinical applications, they could also be exploited as indicators of disease in false negative

  10. Realizing the Translational Potential of Telomere Length Variation as a Tissue-Based Prognostic Marker for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    feasible for the clinical setting. 2) Validate our compelling findings in two other cohort studies on prostate cancer outcomes: a) men surgically...staining for telomere-specific FISH, cytokeratin 903 immunofluorescence, and for DAPI. The PHS and HPFS are existing cohort studies , and TMAs have

  11. Urinary miR-183 and miR-205 do not surpass PCA3 in urine as predictive markers for prostate biopsy outcome despite their highly dysregulated expression in prostate cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carsten; Jung, Monika; Rabenhorst, Silke; Kilic, Ergin; Jung, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have shown to be promising novel biomarkers in various cancers. We aimed to translate the results of an own previous tissue-based miRNA profile of prostate carcinoma (PCa) with upregulated miR-183 and downregulated miR-205 into a urine-based testing procedure for diagnosis of PCa. Urine sediments were prepared from urine samples collected after a standardized digital-rectal examination (DRE) of patients undergoing prostate biopsy with PSA (prostate-specific antigen) values <20 μg/L in consecutive order. According to the sample-size calculation (α=0.05, power=0.95), 38 patients each with PCa and without PCa were randomly enrolled in this study. PCA3 (prostate cancer associated 3) in urine as Food and Drug Administration-approved assay was determined as reference standard for comparison. The miRNAs were measured by RT-qPCR using TaqMan assays and normalized using different approaches. Both miRNAs were correlated to the mRNA PSA concentrations in the sediments indicating a relationship to the released prostate cells after DRE. However, they had no discriminating capacity between patients with and without PCa. In contrast, PCA3 clearly differentiated between these two patients groups. There was also no significant correlation between miRNAs and standard clinicopathologic variables like Gleason score and serum PSA. The data of our study show that miR-183 and miR-205 failed to detect early and aggressive PCa despite their highly dysregulated expression in cancer tissue. Our results and the critical evaluation of the few data of other studies raise serious doubts concerning the capability of urinary miRNAs to replace or improve PCA3 as predictive marker for prostate biopsy outcome.

  12. Prostate Cancer Detection Using Composite Impedance Metric.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shadab; Mahara, Aditya; Hyams, Elias S; Schned, Alan R; Halter, Ryan J

    2016-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) recurrences are often predicted by assessing the status of surgical margins (SM)- positive surgical margins (PSM) increase the chances of biochemical recurrence by 2-4 times which may lead to PCa recurrence. To this end, an electrical impedance acquisition system with a microendoscopic probe was employed in an ex-vivo study of human prostates. This system measures the tissue bioimpedance over a range of frequencies (1 kHz to 1MHz), and computes a number of Composite Impedance Metrics (CIM). A classifier trained using CIM data can be used to classify tissue as benign or cancerous. The system was used to collect the impedance spectra from 14 excised prostates, which were obtained from men undergoing radical prostatectomy, for a total of 23 cancerous and 53 benign measurements. The data revealed statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences in the impedance properties of the benign and tumorous tissues, and among the measurements taken on the apical, base, and lateral surface of the prostate. Further, in the leave-one-patient-out cross validation, a maximum predictive accuracy of 90.79% was achieved by combining high frequency CIM phase data to train a support vector machine classifier with a radial basis function kernel. The observations are consistent with the physiology and morphology of benign and malignant prostate tissue. CIMs were found to be an effective tool in distinguishing benign from cancerous tissues.

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Identification of MSCs in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) Next, the presence of MSCs in pathological tissue from older men was investigated...inflammation was detected (Table 5). Inflammation was more frequently observed in benign areas of malignant prostates ; though it was commonly detected...Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Isaacs; Jeffrey Karp

  14. Near real-time automated dose restoration in IMPT to compensate for daily tissue density variations in prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagt, Thyrza; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; van de Water, Steven; Heijmen, Ben; Hoogeman, Mischa

    2017-06-01

    Proton therapy is very sensitive to daily density changes along the pencil beam paths. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate an automated method for adaptation of IMPT plans to compensate for these daily tissue density variations. A two-step restoration method for ‘densities-of-the-day’ was created: (1) restoration of spot positions (Bragg peaks) by adapting the energy of each pencil beam to the new water equivalent path length; and (2) re-optimization of pencil beam weights by minimizing the dosimetric difference with the planned dose distribution, using a fast and exact quadratic solver. The method was developed and evaluated using 8-10 repeat CT scans of 10 prostate cancer patients. Experiments demonstrated that giving a high weight to the PTV in the re-optimization resulted in clinically acceptable restorations. For all scans we obtained V 95%  ⩾  98% and V 107%  ⩽  2%. For the bladder, the differences between the restored and the intended treatment plan were below  +2 Gy and  +2%-point. The rectum differences were below  +2 Gy and  +2%-point for 90% of the scans. In the remaining scans the rectum was filled with air, which partly overlapped with the PTV. The air cavity distorted the Bragg peak resulting in less favorable rectum doses.

  15. Testosterone Therapy and Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Emily; Morgentaler, Abraham

    2016-05-01

    Changes in understanding regarding the relationship of androgens and prostate cancer have led to changes in the use of testosterone therapy. The evidence supports a finite ability of androgens to stimulate prostate cancer growth, with a maximum achieved at low testosterone concentrations, called the saturation model. The saturation point corresponds with maximal androgenic stimulation at 250 ng/dL. Evidence is reviewed herein regarding the relationship of testosterone to prostate cancer and the relatively new practice of offering testosterone therapy to men with a history of prostate cancer. Although no prospective controlled trials have been performed, results have been reassuring.

  16. Mouse Models of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valkenburg, Kenneth C.; Williams, Bart O.

    2011-01-01

    The development and optimization of high-throughput screening methods has identified a multitude of genetic changes associated with human disease. The use of immunodeficient and genetically engineered mouse models that mimic the human disease has been crucial in validating the importance of these genetic pathways in prostate cancer. These models provide a platform for finding novel therapies to treat human patients afflicted with prostate cancer as well as those who have debilitating bone metastases. In this paper, we focus on the historical development and phenotypic descriptions of mouse models used to study prostate cancer. We also comment on how closely each model recapitulates human prostate cancer. PMID:22111002

  17. Laser Illumination Modality of Photoacoustic Imaging Technique for Prostate Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dong-qing; Peng, Yuan-yuan; Guo, Jian; Li, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has recently emerged as a promising imaging technique for prostate cancer. But there was still a lot of challenge in the PAI for prostate cancer detection, such as laser illumination modality. Knowledge of absorbed light distribution in prostate tissue was essential since the distribution characteristic of absorbed light energy would influence the imaging depth and range of PAI. In order to make a comparison of different laser illumination modality of photoacoustic imaging technique for prostate cancer, optical model of human prostate was established and combined with Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the light absorption distribution in the prostate tissue. Characteristic of light absorption distribution of transurethral and trans-rectal illumination case, and of tumor at different location was compared with each other.The relevant conclusions would be significant for optimizing the light illumination in a PAI system for prostate cancer detection.

  18. Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Mukesh; Patel, Payal; Verma, Mudit

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the etiology of a disease such as prostate cancer may help in identifying populations at high risk, timely intervention of the disease, and proper treatment. Biomarkers, along with exposure history and clinical data, are useful tools to achieve these goals. Individual risk and population incidence of prostate cancer result from the intervention of genetic susceptibility and exposure. Biochemical, epigenetic, genetic, and imaging biomarkers are used to identify people at high risk for developing prostate cancer. In cancer epidemiology, epigenetic biomarkers offer advantages over other types of biomarkers because they are expressed against a person's genetic background and environmental exposure, and because abnormal events occur early in cancer development, which includes several epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. This article describes different biomarkers that have potential use in studying the epidemiology of prostate cancer. We also discuss the characteristics of an ideal biomarker for prostate cancer, and technologies utilized for biomarker assays. Among epigenetic biomarkers, most reports indicate GSTP1 hypermethylation as the diagnostic marker for prostate cancer; however, NKX2-5, CLSTN1, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS, and NSE1 also have been reported to be regulated by methylation mechanisms in prostate cancer. Current challenges in utilization of biomarkers in prostate cancer diagnosis and epidemiologic studies and potential solutions also are discussed. PMID:24213111

  19. Locus-specific gene repositioning in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leshner, Marc; Devine, Michelle; Roloff, Gregory W.; True, Lawrence D.; Misteli, Tom; Meaburn, Karen J.

    2016-01-01

    Genes occupy preferred spatial positions within interphase cell nuclei. However, positioning patterns are not an innate feature of a locus, and genes can alter their localization in response to physiological and pathological changes. Here we screen the radial positioning patterns of 40 genes in normal, hyperplasic, and malignant human prostate tissues. We find that the overall spatial organization of the genome in prostate tissue is largely conserved among individuals. We identify three genes whose nuclear positions are robustly altered in neoplastic prostate tissues. FLI1 and MMP9 position differently in prostate cancer than in normal tissue and prostate hyperplasia, whereas MMP2 is repositioned in both prostate cancer and hyperplasia. Our data point to locus-specific reorganization of the genome during prostate disease. PMID:26564800

  20. Prostate Cancer MR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fütterer, Jurgen J.

    With a total of 192,280 new cases predicted for 2009, prostate cancer (PC) now accounts for 25% of all new male cancers diagnosed in the United States [1]. Furthermore, in their lifetime, one in six men will be clinically diagnosed with having PC, although many more men are found to have histological evidence of PC at autopsy [2,3,4]. Presently, approximately 1 in 10 men will die of PC [5,6]. The ever-aging population and wider spread use of the blood prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test [7,8], as well as the tendency to apply lower cut-off levels for this test [9], will further increase the diagnosis of this disease [10].

  1. Rare Paravertebral and Skull Base Metastases in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Gbeminiyi; Isbell, Amir; Ogbonna, Onyekachi; Iftikhar, Hasan; Sakruti, Susmita; Atanda, Adebayo; Manchandani, Raj P.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed visceral cancer in the United States. A majority of cases exhibit an insidious course and nonaggressive tumor behavior. Prostate cancer can manifest as lesions which remain localized, regionally invading or metastasize to lymph nodes, bones, and lungs. Here, we report a unique case of metastatic prostate cancer to the right upper mediastinum, presenting as a paravertebral mass within 2 years of initial tissue diagnosis. Paravertebral spread has not been described for prostate cancer, and herein, we discuss the clinical presentation, diagnostic workup, and possible therapeutic options available in light of the literature. PMID:27920711

  2. Androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Heinlein, Cynthia A; Chang, Chawnshang

    2004-04-01

    The normal development and maintenance of the prostate is dependent on androgen acting through the androgen receptor (AR). AR remains important in the development and progression of prostate cancer. AR expression is maintained throughout prostate cancer progression, and the majority of androgen-independent or hormone refractory prostate cancers express AR. Mutation of AR, especially mutations that result in a relaxation of AR ligand specificity, may contribute to the progression of prostate cancer and the failure of endocrine therapy by allowing AR transcriptional activation in response to antiandrogens or other endogenous hormones. Similarly, alterations in the relative expression of AR coregulators have been found to occur with prostate cancer progression and may contribute to differences in AR ligand specificity or transcriptional activity. Prostate cancer progression is also associated with increased growth factor production and an altered response to growth factors by prostate cancer cells. The kinase signal transduction cascades initiated by mitogenic growth factors modulate the transcriptional activity of AR and the interaction between AR and AR coactivators. The inhibition of AR activity through mechanisms in addition to androgen ablation, such as modulation of signal transduction pathways, may delay prostate cancer progression.

  3. Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness Gene in Hereditary Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1274 REPORT DATE: March 2007 TYPE OF REPORT: Final PREPARED...REPORT DATE 01-03-2007 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 1 Mar 2004 – 28 Feb 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prostate... inherited prostate cancer susceptibility. This statement is based on the identification of prostate cancer linkage to distal 7q markers in a recently

  4. Synthetic Lethality as a Targeted Approach to Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    target for therapy of prostate cancer , but approaches aimed at Ras itself, or its critical signaling pathways, which are required in normal tissues...Impact: Current therapies for prostate cancer are inadequate, and aberrant activation of Ras or Ras pathways are common. A novel therapeutic modality...to Advanced Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Douglas V. Faller, PhD, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Trustees of Boston University

  5. Hypofractionated External-Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, L. Chinsoo; Timmerman, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian

    2013-01-01

    There are radiobiological rationales supporting hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The recent advancements in treatment planning and delivery allow sophisticated radiation treatments to take advantage of the differences in radiobiology of prostate cancer and the surrounding normal tissues. The preliminary results from clinical studies indicate that abbreviated fractionation programs can result in successful treatment of localized prostate cancer without escalation of late toxicity. PMID:23533777

  6. Targeting Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    drug t oxi c i t y and the e ffect i ve dose i n zebrafish and found the best perf ormi ng s t rat egi es usi ng zebrafish - metastasi s model s...CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c . THIS PAGE Unclassified Unclassified Unclassified screen, zebrafish , mouse, 17. LIMITATION 18. NUMBER OF... zebrafish -metastasis models and mouse models of prostate cancer, we aim to investigate whether FDA approved drugs that target these pathways can be

  7. GIT2 Gene: Androgenic Regulation of White Adipose Tissue-Prostate Cancer Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    survival of growth factor–expressing ASCs, which enter the systemic circulation and promote PCa progression. An important note is that the prostate...surgical castration and systemic GLIPR1-ΔTM in vivo using VCaP xenograft model: 1. Generate orthotopic VCaP tumors in athymic nude male mice and...effects of systemic GLIPR1-ΔTM on orthotopic VCaP tumor growth and ASCs infiltration profiles ± surgical castration at acute (3d), intermediate (14d

  8. Enoxacin penetration into human prostatic tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, M G; Roy, R; Lessard, C; Foucault, P

    1988-01-01

    Concurrent enoxacin concentrations in serum and prostatic tissue were determined in 14 patients. The mean ratios of enoxacin concentration in tissue over concentration in serum were 1.4 +/- 0.2 (standard error of the mean). The levels in serum and prostatic tissue were above the MICs for most urinary pathogens. PMID:3196004

  9. Identification of shared and unique susceptibility pathways among cancers of the lung, breast, and prostate from genome-wide association studies and tissue-specific protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Qian, David C.; Byun, Jinyoung; Han, Younghun; Greene, Casey S.; Field, John K.; Hung, Rayjean J.; Brhane, Yonathan; Mclaughlin, John R.; Fehringer, Gordon; Landi, Maria Teresa; Rosenberger, Albert; Bickeböller, Heike; Malhotra, Jyoti; Risch, Angela; Heinrich, Joachim; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Seminara, Daniela; Amos, Christopher I.

    2015-01-01

    Results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have indicated that strong single-gene effects are the exception, not the rule, for most diseases. We assessed the joint effects of germline genetic variations through a pathway-based approach that considers the tissue-specific contexts of GWAS findings. From GWAS meta-analyses of lung cancer (12 160 cases/16 838 controls), breast cancer (15 748 cases/18 084 controls) and prostate cancer (14 160 cases/12 724 controls) in individuals of European ancestry, we determined the tissue-specific interaction networks of proteins expressed from genes that are likely to be affected by disease-associated variants. Reactome pathways exhibiting enrichment of proteins from each network were compared across the cancers. Our results show that pathways associated with all three cancers tend to be broad cellular processes required for growth and survival. Significant examples include the nerve growth factor (P = 7.86 × 10−33), epidermal growth factor (P = 1.18 × 10−31) and fibroblast growth factor (P = 2.47 × 10−31) signaling pathways. However, within these shared pathways, the genes that influence risk largely differ by cancer. Pathways found to be unique for a single cancer focus on more specific cellular functions, such as interleukin signaling in lung cancer (P = 1.69 × 10−15), apoptosis initiation by Bad in breast cancer (P = 3.14 × 10−9) and cellular responses to hypoxia in prostate cancer (P = 2.14 × 10−9). We present the largest comparative cross-cancer pathway analysis of GWAS to date. Our approach can also be applied to the study of inherited mechanisms underlying risk across multiple diseases in general. PMID:26483192

  10. Phase I/II prospective trial of cancer-specific imaging using ultrasound spectrum analysis tissue-type imaging to guide dose-painting prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Ennis, Ronald D; Quinn, S Aidan; Trichter, Frieda; Ryemon, Shannon; Jain, Anudh; Saigal, Kunal; Chandrashekhar, Sarayu; Romas, Nicholas A; Feleppa, Ernest J

    2015-01-01

    To assess the technical feasibility, toxicity, dosimetry, and preliminary efficacy of dose-painting brachytherapy guided by ultrasound spectrum analysis tissue-type imaging (TTI) in low-risk, localized prostate cancer. Fourteen men with prostate cancer who were candidates for brachytherapy as sole treatment were prospectively enrolled. Treatment planning goal was to escalate the tumor dose to 200% with a modest de-escalation of dose to remaining prostate compared with our standard. Primary end points included technical feasibility of TTI-guided brachytherapy and equivalent or better toxicity compared with standard brachytherapy. Secondary end points included dose escalation to tumor regions and de-escalated dose to nontumor regions on the preimplant plan, negative prostate biopsy at 2 years, and freedom from biochemical failure. Thirteen of fourteen men successfully completed the TTI-guided brachytherapy procedure for a feasibility rate of 93%. A software malfunction resulted in switching one patient from TTI-guided to standard brachytherapy. An average of 2.7 foci per patient was demonstrated and treated with an escalated dose. Dosimetric goals on preplan were achieved. One patient expired from unrelated causes 65 days after brachytherapy. Toxicity was at least as low as standard brachytherapy. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from six men; five (83%) were definitively negative, one showed evidence of disease with treatment effect, and none were positive. No patients experienced biochemical recurrence after a median followup of 31.5 (24-52) months. We have demonstrated that TTI-guided dose-painting prostate brachytherapy is technically feasible and results in clinical outcomes that are encouraging in terms of low toxicity and successful biochemical disease control. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Periprostatic adipose tissue from obese prostate cancer patients promotes tumor and endothelial cell proliferation: a functional and MR imaging pilot study.

    PubMed

    Venkatasubramanian, Palamadai N; Brendler, Charles B; Plunkett, Beth A; Crawford, Susan E; Fitchev, Philip S; Morgan, Gina; Cornwell, Mona L; McGuire, Michael S; Wyrwicz, Alice M; Doll, Jennifer A

    2014-02-01

    Obesity, particularly visceral adiposity, confers a worse prognosis for prostate cancer (PCa) patients, and increasing periprostatic adipose (PPA) tissue thickness or density is positively associated with more aggressive disease. However, the cellular mechanism of this activity remains unclear. Therefore, in this pilot study, we assessed the functional activity of PPA tissue secretions and established a biochemical profile of PPA as compared to subcutaneous adipose (SQA) tissues from lean, overweight and obese PCa patients. Adipose tissues were collected from PCa patients undergoing surgical prostate removal. Tissues were analyzed by histologic and magnetic resonance (MR) techniques. Explant tissue culture secretions were used in proliferation assays on PCa and endothelial cells. PPA secretions obtained from obese patients were significantly more pro-proliferative in both PCa and endothelial cells as compared to PPA obtained from lean or overweight men and SQA tissues. Consistent with this, PPA microvessel density was increased, and the T2 relaxation time was decreased, compared to SQA tissues, and we observed a modest, inverse correlation between the T2 and tumor stage. Moreover, the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids, obtained using MR spectroscopy, showed a modest, inverse correlation with Gleason score. These pilot data show that PPA stimulates PCa cell proliferation and angiogenesis and that obesity intensifies this activity, thus generating a mechanistic hypothesis to explain the worse prognosis observed in obese PCa patients. Our pilot study also shows that MR technology may be useful in further elucidating the relationship between obesity and PCa progression.

  12. Altered Endosome Biogenesis in Prostate Cancer has Biomarker Potential

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ian R D; Parkinson-Lawrence, Emma J; Shandala, Tetyana; Weigert, Roberto; Butler, Lisa M; Brooks, Doug A

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common form of cancer in males, affecting one in eight men by the time they reach the age of 70. Current diagnostic tests for prostate cancer have significant problems with both false negatives and false positives, necessitating the search for new molecular markers. A recent investigation of endosomal and lysosomal proteins revealed that the critical process of endosomal biogenesis might be altered in prostate cancer. Here, a panel of endosomal markers was evaluated in prostate cancer and non-malignant cells and a significant increase in gene and protein expression was found for early, but not late endosomal proteins. There was also a differential distribution of early endosomes, and altered endosomal traffic and signalling of the transferrin receptors (TFRC and TFR2) in prostate cancer cells. These findings support the concept that endosome biogenesis and function is altered in prostate cancer. Microarray analysis of a clinical cohort confirmed the altered endosomal gene expression observed in cultured prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, in prostate cancer patient tissue specimens, the early endosomal marker and adaptor protein APPL1 showed consistently altered basement membrane histology in the vicinity of tumours and concentrated staining within tumour masses. These novel observations on altered early endosome biogenesis provide a new avenue for prostate cancer biomarker investigation and suggest new methods for the early diagnosis and accurate prognosis of prostate cancer. PMID:25080433

  13. Discriminating cancer from noncancer tissue in the prostate by 3-dimensional proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging: a prospective multicenter validation study.

    PubMed

    Scheenen, Tom W J; Fütterer, Jurgen; Weiland, Elisabeth; van Hecke, Paul; Lemort, Marc; Zechmann, Christian; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Broome, Dale; Villeirs, Geert; Lu, Jianping; Barentsz, Jelle; Roell, Stefan; Heerschap, Arend

    2011-01-01

    A prospective multicenter validation of the ability of 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) to distinguish cancer from noncancer tissues throughout the prostate with histopathology of the resected organ as the standard of reference. Institutional review board approval was obtained for all centers and all participating patients and volunteers provided written informed consent. Ninety-nine patients and 10 age-matched volunteers from 8 participating centers underwent magnetic resonance imaging and 3-dimensional MRSI with an endorectal coil at 1.5 T. Selected MRSI voxels were assigned to the peripheral zone (PZ), the central gland (CG), the periurethral area, and cancer tissue. Signal ratios of choline + creatine to citrate (CC/C) in spectra of these voxels were automatically calculated. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to assess the accuracy by which this ratio can discriminate cancer from noncancer tissue. A total of 70% of voxels in noncancer tissue and 90% of voxels in cancer tissue passed the quality check of the automatically fitted spectra. The median CC/C was significantly different between any noncancer and cancer tissue (P < 0.0001), but not between the different contributing centers. CC/C increased with cancer focus size (P =0.0008) and certainty of voxel mapping to histopathologic cancer site (P 0.0001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for discriminating voxels of cancer tissue from noncancer tissue was 0.88 (confidence interval: 0.84-0.92) in the PZ and 0.76 (confidence interval: 0.71- 0.81) in the CG.

  14. Assessment of normal tissue complications following prostate cancer irradiation: Comparison of radiation treatment modalities using NTCP models

    SciTech Connect

    Takam, Rungdham; Bezak, Eva; Yeoh, Eric E.; Marcu, Loredana

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of the rectum, bladder, urethra, and femoral heads following several techniques for radiation treatment of prostate cancer were evaluated applying the relative seriality and Lyman models. Methods: Model parameters from literature were used in this evaluation. The treatment techniques included external (standard fractionated, hypofractionated, and dose-escalated) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy (I-125 seeds), and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (Ir-192 source). Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum, bladder, and urethra retrieved from corresponding treatment planning systems were converted to biological effective dose-based and equivalent dose-based DVHs, respectively, in order to account for differences in radiation treatment modality and fractionation schedule. Results: Results indicated that with hypofractionated 3D-CRT (20 fractions of 2.75 Gy/fraction delivered five times/week to total dose of 55 Gy), NTCP of the rectum, bladder, and urethra were less than those for standard fractionated 3D-CRT using a four-field technique (32 fractions of 2 Gy/fraction delivered five times/week to total dose of 64 Gy) and dose-escalated 3D-CRT. Rectal and bladder NTCPs (5.2% and 6.6%, respectively) following the dose-escalated four-field 3D-CRT (2 Gy/fraction to total dose of 74 Gy) were the highest among analyzed treatment techniques. The average NTCP for the rectum and urethra were 0.6% and 24.7% for LDR-BT and 0.5% and 11.2% for HDR-BT. Conclusions: Although brachytherapy techniques resulted in delivering larger equivalent doses to normal tissues, the corresponding NTCPs were lower than those of external beam techniques other than the urethra because of much smaller volumes irradiated to higher doses. Among analyzed normal tissues, the femoral heads were found to have the lowest probability of complications as most of their volume was irradiated to lower

  15. Multivariate normal tissue complication probability modeling of gastrointestinal toxicity after external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The risk of radio-induced gastrointestinal (GI) complications is affected by several factors other than the dose to the rectum such as patient characteristics, hormonal or antihypertensive therapy, and acute rectal toxicity. Purpose of this work is to study clinical and dosimetric parameters impacting on late GI toxicity after prostate external beam radiotherapy (RT) and to establish multivariate normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for radiation-induced GI complications. Methods A total of 57 men who had undergone definitive RT for prostate cancer were evaluated for GI events classified using the RTOG/EORTC scoring system. Their median age was 73 years (range 53–85). The patients were assessed for GI toxicity before, during, and periodically after RT completion. Several clinical variables along with rectum dose-volume parameters (Vx) were collected and their correlation to GI toxicity was analyzed by Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (Rs). Multivariate logistic regression method using resampling techniques was applied to select model order and parameters for NTCP modeling. Model performance was evaluated through the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results At a median follow-up of 30 months, 37% (21/57) patients developed G1-2 acute GI events while 33% (19/57) were diagnosed with G1-2 late GI events. An NTCP model for late mild/moderate GI toxicity based on three variables including V65 (OR = 1.03), antihypertensive and/or anticoagulant (AH/AC) drugs (OR = 0.24), and acute GI toxicity (OR = 4.3) was selected as the most predictive model (Rs = 0.47, p < 0.001; AUC = 0.79). This three-variable model outperforms the logistic model based on V65 only (Rs = 0.28, p < 0.001; AUC = 0.69). Conclusions We propose a logistic NTCP model for late GI toxicity considering not only rectal irradiation dose but also clinical patient-specific factors. Accordingly, the risk of G1

  16. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  17. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  18. General Information about Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems after prostate cancer surgery include the following: Impotence . Leakage of urine from the bladder or stool ... and/or gastrointestinal cancer. Radiation therapy can cause impotence and urinary problems. Hormone therapy Hormone therapy is ...

  19. Comparative analyses of chromosome alterations in soft-tissue metastases within and across patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, Ilona N.; Young, Janet M.; Coleman, Ilsa M.; Salari, Keyan; Grove, Douglas I.; Hsu, Li; True, Lawrence D.; Roudier, Martine P.; Morrissey, Colm M.; Higano, Celestia S.; Nelson, Peter S.; Vessella, Robert L.; Trask, Barbara J.

    2009-01-01

    Androgen deprivation is the mainstay of therapy for progressive prostate cancer. Despite initial and dramatic tumor inhibition, most men eventually fail therapy and die of metastatic castration-resistant (CR) disease. Here, we characterize the profound degree of genomic alteration found in CR tumors using array CGH, gene expression arrays, and FISH. By cluster analysis, we show that the similarity of the genomic profiles from primary and metastatic tumors is driven by the patient. Using data adjusted for this similarity, we identify numerous high-frequency alterations in the CR tumors, such as 8p loss and chromosome 7 and 8q gain. By integrating array CGH and expression array data, we reveal genes whose correlated values suggest they are relevant to prostate cancer biology. We find alterations that are significantly associated with the metastases of specific organ sites, and others with CR tumors versus the tumors of patients with localized prostate cancer not treated with androgen deprivation. Within the high-frequency sites of loss in CR metastases, we find an over-representation of genes involved in cellular lipid metabolism, including PTEN. Finally, using FISH we verify the presence of a gene fusion between TMPRSS2 and ERG suggested by chromosome-21 deletions detected by array CGH. We find the fusion in 54% of our CR tumors, and 81% of the fusion-positive tumors contain cells with multiple copies of the fusion. Our investigation lays the foundation for a better understanding of and possible therapeutic targets for CR disease, the poorly responsive and final stage of prostate cancer. PMID:19773449

  20. Urinary biomarkers for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, John T

    2015-01-01

    The field of urology has been beset by several major trends that have affected the early detection of prostate cancer. These stem primarily from a backlash against overdiagnosis due to prostate specific antigen-based screening efforts and are epitomized by the US Preventive Services Task Force giving prostate specific antigen-based prostate cancer screening a 'D' recommendation. Consequently, the active surveillance strategy for low-risk prostate cancer has become commonplace, leading many to ask how best to follow these patients. More importantly, this public outcry has shifted the focus of early detection from an effort to diagnose any and all prostate cancers to an effort to diagnose only 'high-risk' cancer. Along with a trend for minimally invasive procedures, these forces have challenged the early detection field to more efficiently identify clinically significant prostate cancers at an early stage while limiting the number of biopsies. With US Food and Drug Administration approval, prostate cancer antigen 3 has emerged as the first bona-fide urinary biomarker for prostate cancer. Using the same platform, investigators have developed a second urinary test based on TMPRSS2:erg fusion. Recent literature supports the use of these biomarkers as a combined panel that improves risk evaluation in the setting of prostate cancer detection. Early works for applying urinary biomarkers for active surveillance are underway. Other biomarkers in the pipeline will require further prevalidation and validation work. Recent literature would support that urinary biomarkers have a clear role to supplement risk evaluation for men undergoing prostate biopsy and for prognostication.

  1. What's New in Prostate Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer What’s New in Prostate Cancer Research? Research into the causes, ... in many medical centers throughout the world. Genetics New research on gene changes linked to prostate cancer ...

  2. The essential role of methylthioadenosine phosphorylase in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Barbara A.; Karasik, Ellen; Gillard, Bryan; Morrison, Carl; Mohler, James; Phillips, James G.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic epithelial cells secrete high levels of acetylated polyamines into the prostatic lumen. This distinctive characteristic places added strain on the connected pathways, which are forced to increase metabolite production to maintain pools. The methionine salvage pathway recycles the one-carbon unit lost to polyamine biosynthesis back to the methionine cycle, allowing for replenishment of SAM pools providing a mechanism to help mitigate metabolic stress associated with high flux through these pathways. The rate-limiting enzyme involved in this process is methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), which, although commonly deleted in many cancers, is protected in prostate cancer. We report near universal retention of MTAP expression in a panel of human prostate cancer cell lines as well as patient samples. Upon metabolic perturbation, prostate cancer cell lines upregulate MTAP and this correlates with recovery of SAM levels. Furthermore, in a mouse model of prostate cancer we find that both normal prostate and diseased prostate maintain higher SAM levels than other tissues, even under increased metabolic stress. Finally, we show that knockdown of MTAP, both genetically and pharmacologically, blocks androgen sensitive prostate cancer growth in vivo. Our findings strongly suggest that the methionine salvage pathway is a major player in homeostatic regulation of metabolite pools in prostate cancer due to their high level of flux through the polyamine biosynthetic pathway. Therefore, this pathway, and specifically the MTAP enzyme, is an attractive therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:26910893

  3. Raman spectroscopy for prostate cancer detection and characterization (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubertin, Kelly; Trinh, Quoc-Huy; Jermyn, Michael; St-Pierre, Catherine; Vladoiu, Maria-Claudia; Grosset, Andrée.-Anne; Saad, Fred; Trudel, Dominique; Leblond, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent diagnosed cancers among men. When prostate cancer occurs, the cancer does not result in only one or few localized malignant tumor, but is generally spread within the whole prostate. In order to counteract the very high level of heterogeneities exhibited by prostate tissues, we developed a method for high-resolution co-registration of Raman spectroscopy with prostate cancer diagnosis. Raman spectra were acquired on fresh ex vivo prostate within 2 hours after radical prostatectomy using a multi-wavelength hand-held contact probe. After the measurements, the prostate was reintegrated to the usual pathological workflow: formalin fixated and paraffin embedded (FFPE), and prepared for microscope histopathological analyses. The precise reconstruction of the prostate slice with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) tissue allows the spatial correlation of the measured area (0.2 mm2) with the correspondent histopathological information, for point-by-point diagnosis determination. The tissue was classified into groups (normal/cancer) and subgroups according to the percentage of benign glands, stroma or cancer. Different machine learning algorithms were tested to classify the spectra with increasing levels of categorization. Preliminary results showed that Raman spectroscopy is capable of detecting prostate cancer with an accuracy >90%. In addition, high percentages of stroma (vs. glands) have been correlated with spectral signature of collagen, which is the main constituent of extracellular matrix.

  4. Biomarkers in localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Matteo; Buonerba, Carlo; Terracciano, Daniela; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Cosimato, Vincenzo; Bottero, Danilo; Deliu, Victor M; Ditonno, Pasquale; Perdonà, Sisto; Autorino, Riccardo; Coman, Ioman; De Placido, Sabino; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; De Cobelli, Ottavio

    2016-02-01

    Biomarkers can improve prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment. Accuracy of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for early diagnosis of prostate cancer is not satisfactory, as it is an organ- but not cancer-specific biomarker, and it can be improved by using models that incorporate PSA along with other test results, such as prostate cancer antigen 3, the molecular forms of PSA (proPSA, benign PSA and intact PSA), as well as kallikreins. Recent reports suggest that new tools may be provided by metabolomic studies as shown by preliminary data on sarcosine. Additional molecular biomarkers have been identified by the use of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics. We review the most relevant biomarkers for early diagnosis and management of localized prostate cancer.

  5. Biomarkers in localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Matteo; Buonerba, Carlo; Terracciano, Daniela; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Cosimato, Vincenzo; Bottero, Danilo; Deliu, Victor M; Ditonno, Pasquale; Perdonà, Sisto; Autorino, Riccardo; Coman, Ioman; De Placido, Sabino; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; De Cobelli, Ottavio

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers can improve prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment. Accuracy of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for early diagnosis of prostate cancer is not satisfactory, as it is an organ- but not cancer-specific biomarker, and it can be improved by using models that incorporate PSA along with other test results, such as prostate cancer antigen 3, the molecular forms of PSA (proPSA, benign PSA and intact PSA), as well as kallikreins. Recent reports suggest that new tools may be provided by metabolomic studies as shown by preliminary data on sarcosine. Additional molecular biomarkers have been identified by the use of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics. We review the most relevant biomarkers for early diagnosis and management of localized prostate cancer. PMID:26768791

  6. Poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 Protein Expression in Normal and Neoplastic Prostatic Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Salemi, M.; Galia, A.; Fraggetta, F.; La Corte, C.; Pepe, P.; La Vignera, S.; Improta, G.; Bosco, P.; Calogero, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    A genetic background has been implicated in the development of prostate cancer. Protein microarrays have enabled the identification of proteins, some of which associated with apoptosis, that may play a role in the development of such a tumor. Inhibition of apoptosis is a co-factor that contributes to the onset and progression of prostate cancer, though the molecular mechanisms are not entirely understood. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) gene is required for translocation of the apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria to the nucleus. Hence, it is involved in programmed cell death. Different PARP-1 gene expression has been observed in various tumors such as glioblastoma, lung, ovarian, endometrial, and skin cancers. We evaluated the expression of PARP-1 protein in prostatic cancer and normal prostate tissues by immunohistochemistry in 40 men with prostate cancer and in 37 normal men. Positive nuclear PARP-1 staining was found in all samples (normal prostate and prostate cancer tissues). No cytoplasmic staining was observed in any sample. PARP-1-positive cells resulted significantly higher in patients with prostate carcinoma compared with controls (P<0.001). PARP-1 over-expression in prostate cancer tissue compared with normal prostate suggests a greater activity of PARP-1 in these tumors. These findings suggest that PARP-1 expression in prostate cancer is an attempt to trigger apoptosis in this type of tumor similarly to what reported in other cancers. PMID:23807292

  7. Prostate cancer on computed tomography: A direct comparison with multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging and tissue pathology.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jemianne Bautista; Houshyar, Roozbeh; Verma, Sadhna; Uchio, Edward; Lall, Chandana

    2016-01-01

    Multi-parametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the current imaging standard for detection and staging of prostate cancer. The combination of anatomical and functional imaging provided in this exam significantly increases the accuracy of prostate cancer detection. Computed tomography (CT) imaging has so far been found to be lacking in this regard, however observations at our academic institution as well as evidence present in the literature support the proposition that CT could indeed be helpful in detecting prostate abnormalities that correspond to neoplasm. The purpose of this study was to prove that areas of focal mass-like enhancement on CT imaging directly correlate with prostate neoplasms as revealed on multi-parametric MRI and follow-up targeted biopsy. This was a single institution retrospective study with 27 male subjects. Inclusion criteria required subjects to have a multi-parametric MRI of the prostate between January 1, 2014 and June 1, 2015 and a pelvic venous phase contrast-enhanced CT study between January 1, 2000 and June 1, 2015. Two blinded Radiologists read subjects' CT scans for any abnormalities of the prostate. CT and multi-parametric MRI results were compared and were considered concordant if focal or mass like enhancement to a greater degree than the background parenchyma was detected in the same areas of the prostate on CT scan as areas of decreased T2 signal, perfusion abnormalities, and restricted diffusion on multi-parametric MRI. CT results were directly compared to multi-parametric MRI findings and biopsy results. The overall agreement of MRI and CT is 85.19% (95% CI: 67.52-94.08%). The positive percent agreement is 78.95% (95% CI: 54.43-93.95%) and the negative percent agreement is 100.0% (95% CL: 63.06-100.0%). When CT results are directly compared to biopsy results, sensitivity and specificity of CT are 63.64% (95% CI: 30.79-89.07%) and 100.0% (95% CI: 47.82-100.0%). The positive predictive value (PPV) is

  8. A Novel Monoclonal Antibody Against Alpha-Methylacyl-CoA Racemase Applicable for Paraffin-Embedded Tissues and Diagnostics of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Olga V; Samoilova, Daria V; Shitova, Maria S; Oleinikova, Nina A; Danilova, Natalia V; Malkov, Pavel G; Gratchev, Alexei

    2017-02-01

    AMACR (alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase) has been recently described as a prostate cancer-specific gene that encodes a protein involved in the beta-oxidation of branched chain fatty acids. Expression of AMACR protein is found in prostatic adenocarcinoma, but not in benign prostatic tissue. Thus, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for AMACR detection are an important tool for the diagnosis of AMACR-positive cancers. However, only a few mAbs, especially those applicable for immunohistochemistry (IHC), have been established to date. In this study, we describe the generation of a new hybridoma clone G8 producing anti-AMACR antibodies. G8 mAb specifically binds human AMACR and was successfully used in immunoblotting and immunofluorescence on paraformaldehyde-fixed cells and in IHC of paraffin-embedded tumor specimens. These results indicate that this new anti-AMACR mAb G8 would be useful in the diagnosis of AMACR-related cancers and would be a strong tool in both basic and clinical research on AMACR.

  9. Immunohistochemical expression of interleukin-2 receptor and interleukin-6 in patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia: association with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis NIH category IV.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Paul Friedrich; Seklehner, Stephan; Brustmann, Hermann; Lusuardi, Lukas; Riedl, Claus R

    2015-04-01

    This study prospectively investigated the immunohistochemical expression of interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and a possible association of these conditions with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis National Institutes of Health (NIH) category IV. The study included 139 consecutive patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate and transvesical enucleation of the prostate (n = 82) or radical prostatectomy (n = 57). To characterize inflammatory changes the criteria proposed by Irani et al. [J Urol 1997;157:1301-3] were used. IL-2R and IL-6 expression was studied by a standard immunohistochemical method. Results were correlated with tumour, node, metastasis stage, Gleason scores, total prostate-specific antigen, International Prostate Symptom Score and body mass index. IL-2R and IL-6 expression was significantly higher in neoplastic prostate cancer tissue than in normal tissue of prostate cancer patients (p < 0.001 and p < 0.04, respectively). Prostate cancer patients with prostatitis showed significantly higher IL-2R expression than those without inflammation (p < 0.03). In patients with BPH, expression of IL-2R as well as IL-6 was higher in patients with prostatitis than in those without (p < 0.01 and p < 0.02, respectively). IL-2R and IL-6 expression was significantly higher in prostate cancer tissue than in normal tissue. Patients with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis NIH category IV showed significantly greater activity.

  10. Radiobiological Impact of Reduced Margins and Treatment Technique for Prostate Cancer in Terms of Tumor Control Probability (TCP) and Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP)

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Ingelise; Carl, Jesper; Lund, Bente; Larsen, Erik H.; Nielsen, Jane

    2011-07-01

    Dose escalation in prostate radiotherapy is limited by normal tissue toxicities. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of margin size on tumor control and side effects for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) treatment plans with increased dose. Eighteen patients with localized prostate cancer were enrolled. 3DCRT and IMRT plans were compared for a variety of margin sizes. A marker detectable on daily portal images was presupposed for narrow margins. Prescribed dose was 82 Gy within 41 fractions to the prostate clinical target volume (CTV). Tumor control probability (TCP) calculations based on the Poisson model including the linear quadratic approach were performed. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was calculated for bladder, rectum and femoral heads according to the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman method. All plan types presented essentially identical TCP values and very low NTCP for bladder and femoral heads. Mean doses for these critical structures reached a minimum for IMRT with reduced margins. Two endpoints for rectal complications were analyzed. A marked decrease in NTCP for IMRT plans with narrow margins was seen for mild RTOG grade 2/3 as well as for proctitis/necrosis/stenosis/fistula, for which NTCP <7% was obtained. For equivalent TCP values, sparing of normal tissue was demonstrated with the narrow margin approach. The effect was more pronounced for IMRT than 3DCRT, with respect to NTCP for mild, as well as severe, rectal complications.

  11. Functional CT imaging of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Elizabeth; Milosevic, Michael F.; Haider, Masoom A.; Yeung, Ivan W. T.

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the distribution of blood flow (F), mean capillary transit time (Tc), capillary permeability (PS) and blood volume (vb) in prostate cancer using contrast-enhanced CT. Nine stage T2-T3 prostate cancer patients were enrolled in the study. Following bolus injection of a contrast agent, a time series of CT images of the prostate was acquired. Functional maps showing the distribution of F, Tc, PS and vb within the prostate were generated using a distributed parameter tracer kinetic model, the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity model. The precision of the maps was assessed using covariance matrix analysis. Finally, maps were compared to the findings of standard clinical investigations. Eight of the functional maps demonstrated regions of increased F, PS and vb, the locations of which were consistent with the results of standard clinical investigations. However, model parameters other than F could only be measured precisely within regions of high F. In conclusion functional CT images of cancer-containing prostate glands demonstrate regions of elevated F, PS and vb. However, caution should be used when applying a complex tracer kinetic model to the study of prostate cancer since not all parameters can be measured precisely in all areas.

  12. Targeting the Neural Microenvironment in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    studies have shown that chemical or surgical ablation of nerves inhibits tumorigenesis and metastasis in both xenograft and transgenic mouse models...GFRA1 and GDNF in human prostate cancer tissues including localized, metastatic and castrate resistant with quantitation (months 4- 36) We are

  13. Metabolomic Profiling of Prostate Cancer Progression During Active Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    collected under a separate ongoing protocol of Dr. Trock’s, WIRB protocol #20011642 “Molecular Epidemiology of Prostate Cancer.” This protocol also...PhD, and WIRB protocol #20011642 “Molecular Epidemiology of Prostate Cancer”, PI: Bruce Trock, PhD. Dr. Trock obtained tissues from these...and Evaluation of a Tumor Marker for Prostate Cancer “ (PI: Alan Partin, MD, PhD), and under WIRB protocol #20011642 “Molecular Epidemiology of

  14. Ethnicity and Prostate Cancer: Vitamin D Genetic and Sociodemographic Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    DHT in the prostate.(7) Men who lack the gene that codes for 5α-reductase type II have low DHT levels and small prostates.(8) Finasteride , an...decrease in tissue DHT levels.(10) The Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) demonstrated that men given finasteride had a 24.8% reduction in cancer...hypospadias. N Engl J Med 1974;291:944-9. 9. Bologna M, Muzi P, Biordi L, Festuccia C, Vicentini C. Finasteride dose-dependently reduces the

  15. Candidate Serum Biomarkers for Prostate Adenocarcinoma Identified by mRNA Differences in Prostate Tissue and Verified with Protein Measurements in Tissue and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Klee, Eric W.; Bondar, Olga P.; Goodmanson, Marcia K.; Dyer, Roy B.; Erdogan, Sibel; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Bergen, H. Robert; Sebo, Thomas J.; Klee, George G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Improved tests are needed for detection and management of prostate cancer. We hypothesized that differential gene expression in prostate tissue could help identify candidate blood biomarkers for prostate cancer and that blood from men with advanced prostate disease could be used to verify their presence in circulation. METHODS Candidate markers were identified using mRNA expression patterns from laser-capture microdissected prostate tissue. Tissue expression was confirmed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) for the subset of candidates having commercial antisera. Tissue extracts were analyzed with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Blood concentrations were measured using immunoassays and MS/MS of trypsin-digested, immuno-extracted peptides. RESULTS Thirty-five novel candidate prostate adenocarcinoma biomarkers were selected. Tissue expression was confirmed for all of the 13 markers having commercial antisera for IHC and six of these markers showed statistical discrimination between normal and malignant tissue. Only 5 of these markers were detected in tissue extracts using MS/MS. Sixteen of the 35 candidate markers were successfully assayed in blood. Four of eight biomarkers measured with ELISA and 3 of 10 biomarkers measured by targeted MS showed statistically significant increases in blood concentrations of advanced prostate cancer cases, compared to controls. CONCLUSION Seven novel biomarkers identified by gene expression profiles in prostate tissue were shown to have statistically significant increased levels in blood from men with advanced prostate adenocarcinoma compared to controls: APOC1, ASPN, COMP, CXCL11, CXCL9, F5, and PCSK6. PMID:22247499

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    tissue specimens were matched with the frozen section slides to enable macrodissection of benign tissue away from tumor nodules . Typically, 2–10 grams of...this proposal are based on the observations from our initial studies with human prostate cancer surgical specimens. We discovered that prostate stem...staff facilitated specimen macrodissection and benign/tumor nodule separation and isolation from surgical samples. Generally, after the prostate

  17. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-08-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process.

  18. ProPSA and Diagnostic Biopsy Tissue DNA Content Combination Improves Accuracy to Predict Need for Prostate Cancer Treatment Among Men Enrolled in an Active Surveillance Program

    PubMed Central

    Isharwal, Sumit; Makarov, Danil V.; Sokoll, Lori J.; Landis, Patricia; Marlow, Cameron; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Partin, Alan W.; Carter, H. Ballentine; Veltri, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To assess a novel application of the Prostate Health Index (phi) and biopsy tissue DNA content in benign-adjacent and cancer areas to predict which patients would eventually require treatment of prostate cancer in the Proactive Surveillance cohort. METHODS We identified 71 men who had had serum and biopsy tissue from their diagnosis banked and available for the present study. Of the 71 patients, 39 had developed unfavorable biopsy findings and 32 had maintained favorable biopsy status during surveillance. The serum total prostate-specific antigen (tPSA), free PSA (fPSA) and [−2]proPSA were measured using the Beckman Coulter immunoassay. The DNA content measurements of Feulgen-stained biopsy sections were performed using the AutoCyte imaging system. RESULTS The ratio of phi was significantly greater (37.23 ± 15.76 vs 30.60 ± 12.28; P = .03) in men who ultimately had unfavorable biopsy findings. The serum phi ratio (P = .003), [−2]proPSA/%fPSA (P = .004), biopsy tissue DNA content (ie, benign-adjacent excess of optical density, P = .019; and cancer area standard deviation of optical density, P = .002) were significant predictors of unfavorable biopsy conversion on Cox regression analysis. However, phi and [−2]proPSA/%fPSA showed a highly significant correlation (rho = 0.927, P < .0001) and no difference in accuracy (c-index, 0.6247 vs 0.6158; P = .704) for unfavorable biopsy conversion prediction. Furthermore, phi and [−2]proPSA/%fPSA remained significant (P = .047 and P = .036, respectively) in the multivariate models and, combined with the biopsy tissue DNA content, showed improvement in the predictive accuracy (c-index, 0.6908 and 0.6884, respectively) for unfavorable biopsy conversion. CONCLUSIONS The Prostate Health Index to proPSA/%fPSA, combined with biopsy tissue DNA content, improved the accuracy to about 70% to predict unfavorable biopsy conversion at the annual surveillance biopsy examination among men enrolled in an Active

  19. [Surgery of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Villers, Arnauld; Rébillard, Xavier

    2003-12-31

    Radical prostatectomy is one of the standard treatment of localised prostate cancer. It is considered that cure is obtain if PSA value is undetectable (< 0,1 ng/mL) for at least 5 to 7 years post surgery. 8 to 9 men out of 10 are currently cured by prostatectomy if the cancer is detected at organ confined stage, with PSA < 10 ng/mL. Major technical progress related to patient setting, surgical approach, instrumentation, periprostatic fascial exposure and surgical strategy clearly decreased perioperative morbidity and late effects (erectile dysfunction and incontinence). Laparoscopic approach was described mainly by French teams since 1997 and represents a validated alternative to the gold standard suprapubic open approach.

  20. Human papillomavirus and Epstein Barr virus in prostate cancer: Koilocytes indicate potential oncogenic influences of human papillomavirus in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Noel J; Glenn, Wendy K; Sahrudin, Arisha; Orde, Matthew M; Delprado, Warick; Lawson, James S

    2013-02-15

    The purpose of this study is to determine if high risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) and Epstein Barr virus (EBV) are both present in the same prostate cancer specimens. We used a range of analytical techniques including in situ polymerase chain reaction (IS-PCR) and standard liquid PCR followed by sequencing of the product to seek to identify HPV and EBV in normal, benign, and malignant prostate tissues. Both HPV type 18 and EBV gene sequences were identified in a high and approximately equal proportion of normal, benign, and prostate cancer specimens. These sequences were located in the nuclei of prostate epithelial cells. HPV associated koilocytes were identified in 24% of prostate cancer specimens. The presence of both HPV and EBV gene sequences in most of the same normal, benign, and malignant prostate specimens is particularly noteworthy because of recent experimental evidence demonstrating that EBV and HPV can collaborate to increase proliferation of cultured cervical cells. Because the presence of EBV and HPV in normal, benign, and malignant prostate tissues appears to be ubiquitous, it is possible that they are harmless. On the other hand HPV type 18 in particular, has high oncogenic potential and may be associated with some prostate cancers. The identification of HPV associated koilocytes in prostate cancer specimens is an indication of HPV infection and potential oncogenic influences of human papillomavirus in prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Vitamins, metabolomics, and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mondul, Alison M; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Albanes, Demetrius

    2017-06-01

    How micronutrients might influence risk of developing adenocarcinoma of the prostate has been the focus of a large body of research (especially regarding vitamins E, A, and D). Metabolomic profiling has the potential to discover molecular species relevant to prostate cancer etiology, early detection, and prevention, and may help elucidate the biologic mechanisms through which vitamins influence prostate cancer risk. Prostate cancer risk data related to vitamins E, A, and D and metabolomic profiling from clinical, cohort, and nested case-control studies, along with randomized controlled trials, are examined and summarized, along with recent metabolomic data of the vitamin phenotypes. Higher vitamin E serologic status is associated with lower prostate cancer risk, and vitamin E genetic variant data support this. By contrast, controlled vitamin E supplementation trials have had mixed results based on differing designs and dosages. Beta-carotene supplementation (in smokers) and higher circulating retinol and 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentrations appear related to elevated prostate cancer risk. Our prospective metabolomic profiling of fasting serum collected 1-20 years prior to clinical diagnoses found reduced lipid and energy/TCA cycle metabolites, including inositol-1-phosphate, lysolipids, alpha-ketoglutarate, and citrate, significantly associated with lower risk of aggressive disease. Several active leads exist regarding the role of micronutrients and metabolites in prostate cancer carcinogenesis and risk. How vitamins D and A may adversely impact risk, and whether low-dose vitamin E supplementation remains a viable preventive approach, require further study.

  2. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fox, Josef J; Schöder, Heiko; Larson, Steven M

    2012-07-01

    Prostate cancer is a complex and biologically heterogeneous disease that is not adequately assessed with conventional imaging alone. Molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) is poised to fill this unmet need through noninvasive probing of the multiple molecular and cellular processes that are active in prostate cancer patients. Several PET tracers are active in early-stage and late-stage prostate cancer in humans. F18-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), C11/F18-choline and sodium F18-fluoride have been studied most extensively. There is a growing body of literature supporting the utility of choline in early-stage prostate cancer. FDG and sodium F18-fluoride are more valuable in advanced disease, especially for assessing bone metastases, the prevalent form of metastases in this patient population. F18-fluorodihydrotestosterone is active in castrate disease and is emerging as a valuable pharmacodynamic marker in the development of novel androgen receptor-targeted therapies. Prostate-specific membrane antigen PET tracers are in the early stages of clinical development. Multiple PET tracers are currently available to aid in the detection and management of prostate cancer across the clinical spectrum of the disease. Prospective, rigorously controlled, clinical imaging trials are needed to establish the optimal role of PET in prostate cancer.

  3. SRD5A1 Genetic Variation and Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    finasteride (Makridakis, M, et al. 2004). In the prostate cancer prevention trial, daily oral dosing of finasteride decreased prostate cancer risk by...roughly 25%, while those that did develop cancer and who had taken finasteride were at a 6 fold higher risk for more aggressive, higher grade cancers...tissue. Oncogene (2004) 23, 7399-7405. Thompson IM, Goodman PJ, Tangen CM, Lucia MS, Miller GJ, Ford LC, et al. The influence of finasteride on the

  4. Disruption of Prostate Epithelial Differentiation Pathways and Prostate Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Sander B.; Miranti, Cindy K.

    2013-01-01

    One of the foremost problems in the prostate cancer (PCa) field is the inability to distinguish aggressive from indolent disease, which leads to difficult prognoses and thousands of unnecessary surgeries. This limitation stems from the fact that the mechanisms of tumorigenesis in the prostate are poorly understood. Some genetic alterations are commonly reported in prostate tumors, including upregulation of Myc, fusion of Ets genes to androgen-regulated promoters, and loss of Pten. However, the specific roles of these aberrations in tumor initiation and progression are poorly understood. Likewise, the cell of origin for PCa remains controversial and may be linked to the aggressive potential of the tumor. One important clue is that prostate tumors co-express basal and luminal protein markers that are restricted to their distinct cell types in normal tissue. Prostate epithelium contains layer-specific stem cells as well as rare bipotent cells, which can differentiate into basal or luminal cells. We hypothesize that the primary oncogenic cell of origin is a transient-differentiating bipotent cell. Such a cell must maintain tight temporal and spatial control of differentiation pathways, thus increasing its susceptibility for oncogenic disruption. In support of this hypothesis, many of the pathways known to be involved in prostate differentiation can be linked to genes commonly altered in PCa. In this article, we review what is known about important differentiation pathways (Myc, p38MAPK, Notch, PI3K/Pten) in the prostate and how their misregulation could lead to oncogenesis. Better understanding of normal differentiation will offer new insights into tumor initiation and may help explain the functional significance of common genetic alterations seen in PCa. Additionally, this understanding could lead to new methods for classifying prostate tumors based on their differentiation status and may aid in identifying more aggressive tumors. PMID:24199173

  5. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... while you are hooked up to a special machine. The cells are then sent to a lab, where they are exposed to a protein from prostate cancer cells called prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP). The cells are then sent back to the doctor’s office or hospital, where they are given back to ... Information, ...

  6. Endocrine fibroblast growth factor FGF19 promotes prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shu; Dakhova, Olga; Creighton, Chad J; Ittmann, Michael

    2013-04-15

    Prostate cancer is the most common visceral malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in US men. There is broad evidence that fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors are important in prostate cancer initiation and progression, but the contribution of particular FGFs in this disease is not fully understood. The FGF family members FGF19, FGF21, and FGF23 comprise a distinct subfamily that circulate in serum and act in an endocrine manner. These endocrine FGFs require α-Klotho (KL) and/or β-Klotho (KLB), two related single-pass transmembrane proteins restricted in their tissue distribution, to act as coreceptors along with classic FGF receptors (FGFR) to mediate potent biologic activity. Here we show that FGF19 is expressed in primary and metastatic prostate cancer tissues, where it functions as an autocrine growth factor. Exogenous FGF19 promoted the growth, invasion, adhesion, and colony formation of prostate cancer cells at low ligand concentrations. FGF19 silencing in prostate cancer cells expressing autocrine FGF19 decreased invasion and proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Consistent with these observations, KL and/or KLB were expressed in prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, raising the possibility that additional endocrine FGFs may also exert biologic effects in prostate cancer. Our findings support the concept that therapies targeting FGFR signaling may have efficacy in prostate cancer and highlight FGF19 as a relevant endocrine FGF in this setting.

  7. Clinical evaluation of prostate cancer gene 3 score in diagnosis among Chinese men with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Reilly, Kathleen H; Zhang, Hui-Zhen; Wang, Hai-Bo

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common diagnosed cancer in men. Due to the low specificity of current diagnosis methods for detecting prostate cancer, identification of new biomarkers is highly desirable. The study was conducted to determine the clinical utility of the prostate cancer gene 3 (PCA3) assay to predict biopsy-detected cancers in Chinese men. The study included men who had a biopsy at The Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital of Shanghai Jiao Tong University from January 2013 to December 2013. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were used to test PCA3 and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) mRNA. The diagnostic accuracy of the PCA3 score for predicting a positive biopsy outcome was studied using sensitivity and specificity, and it was compared with PSA. The probability of a positive biopsy increased with increasing PCA3 scores. The mean PCA3 score was significantly higher in men with prostate cancer (198.03, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 74.79-321.27) vs benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) (84.31, 95 % CI 6.47-162.15, P < 0.01). The PCA3 score (cutoff 35) had a sensitivity of 85.7 % and specificity of 62.5 %. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed higher areas under the ROC curve for the PCA3 score vs PSA, but without statistical significance. Increased PCA3 in biopsy tissue correlated with prostate cancer and the PCA3 assay may improve the diagnosis efficacy as the PCA3 score being independent of PSA level. The diagnostic significance of urinary PCA3 testing should be explored in future study to determine the prediction value in guiding biopsy decision as the clinical relevance of current study was limited for PCA3 testing based on biopsy tissue in a limited number of Chinese men.

  8. Notch signaling in prostate cancer: refining a therapeutic opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qingtai; Xin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Summary Notch is an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway that plays a critical role in specifying cell fate and regulating tissue homeostasis and carcinogenesis. Studies using organ cultures and genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that Notch signaling regulates prostate development and homeostasis. However, the role of the Notch signaling pathway in prostate cancer remains inconclusive. Many published studies have documented consistent deregulation of major Notch signaling components in human prostate cancer cell lines, mouse models for prostate cancers, and human prostate cancer specimens at both the mRNA and the protein levels. However, functional studies in human cancer cells by modulation of Notch pathway elements suggest both tumor suppressive and oncogenic roles of Notch. These controversies may originate from our inadequate understanding of the regulation of Notch signaling under versatile genetic contexts, and reflect the multifaceted and pleiotropic roles of Notch in regulating different aspects of prostate cancer cell biology, such as proliferation, metastasis, and chemo-resistance. Future comprehensive studies using various mouse models for prostate cancer may help clarify the role of Notch signaling in prostate cancer and provide a solid basis for determining whether and how Notch should be employed as a therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:26521657

  9. Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness Genes in Hereditary Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    W81XWH-04- 1 -0314 TITLE: Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness Genes in Hereditary Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kathleen A...burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching...ADDRESS. 1 . REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) March 2006 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Mar 05 – 28 Feb 06 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  10. Interfractional Variations in the Setup of Pelvic Bony Anatomy and Soft Tissue, and Their Implications on the Delivery of Proton Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Trofimov, Alexei; Nguyen, Paul L.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Wang, Yi; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Engelsman, Martijn; Merrick, Scott; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Wong, James R.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To quantify daily variations in the anatomy of patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma, to estimate their effect on dose distribution, and to evaluate the effectiveness of current standard planning and setup approaches employed in proton therapy. Methods: We used series of computed tomography data, which included the pretreatment scan, and between 21 and 43 in-room scans acquired on different treatment days, from 10 patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy at Morristown Memorial Hospital. Variations in femur rotation angles, thickness of subcutaneous adipose tissue, and physical depth to the distal surface of the prostate for lateral beam arrangement were recorded. Proton dose distributions were planned with the standard approach. Daily variations in the location of the prescription isodose were evaluated. Results: In all 10 datasets, substantial variation was observed in the lateral tissue thickness (standard deviation of 1.7-3.6 mm for individual patients, variations of >5 mm from the planning computed tomography observed in all series), and femur rotation angle (standard deviation between 1.3{sup o} and 4.8{sup o}, with the maximum excursion exceeding 10{sup o} in 6 of 10 datasets). Shifts in the position of treated volume (98% isodose) were correlated with the variations in the lateral tissue thickness. Conclusions: Analysis suggests that, combined with image-guided setup verification, the range compensator expansion technique prevents loss of dose to target from femur rotation and soft-tissue deformation, in the majority of cases. Anatomic changes coupled with the uncertainties of particle penetration in tissue restrict possibilities for margin reduction in proton therapy of prostate cancer.

  11. Prostate Cancer Skeletal Metastases: Pathobiology and Interventions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    in higher levels in prostate carcinoma than in benign prostatic hyperplasia [35, 36], and is found in human metastatic lesions in bone [37]. However...compared to normal controls, benign prostatic hyperplasia , prostatitis, and localized or recurrent disease. In an animal model, prostate tumor cells...Malakouti S, Antar S, Kukreja S. Enhanced expression of parathyroid hormone-related protein in prostate cancer as compared with benign prostatic hyperplasia . Hum

  12. The role of inflammatory mediators in the development of prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elkahwaji, Johny E

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer remain the most prevalent urologic health concerns affecting elderly men in their lifetime. Only 20% of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer cases coexist in the same zone of the prostate and require a long time for initiation and progression. While the pathogenesis of both diseases is not fully understood, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer are thought to have a multifactorial etiology, their incidence and prevalence are indeed affected by age and hormones, and they are associated with chronic prostatic inflammation. At least 20% of all human malignancies arise in a tissue microenvironment dominated by chronic or recurrent inflammation. In prostate malignancy, chronic inflammation is an extremely common histopathologic finding; its origin remains a subject of debate and may in fact be multifactorial. Emerging insights suggest that prostate epithelium damage potentially inflicted by multiple environmental factors such as infectious agents, dietary carcinogens, and hormones triggers procarcinogenic inflammatory processes and promotes cell transformation and disease development. Also, the coincidence of chronic inflammation and tumorigenesis in the peripheral zone has recently been linked by studies identifying so-called proliferative inflammatory atrophy as a possible precursor of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and prostate cancer. This paper will discuss the available evidence suggesting that chronic inflammation may be involved in the development and progression of chronic prostatic disease, although a direct causal role for chronic inflammation or infection in prostatic carcinogenesis has yet to be established in humans. Further basic and clinical research in the area, trying to understand the etiology of prostatic inflammation and its signaling pathway may help to identify new therapeutic targets and novel preventive strategies for reducing the risk of developing benign and malignant

  13. Stromal Androgen Receptor Roles in the Development of Normal Prostate, Benign Prostate Hyperplasia, and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Simeng; Chang, Hong-Chiang; Tian, Jing; Shang, Zhiqun; Niu, Yuanjie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-01-01

    The prostate is an androgen-sensitive organ that needs proper androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signals for normal development. The progression of prostate diseases, including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa), also needs proper androgen/AR signals. Tissue recombination studies report that stromal, but not epithelial, AR plays more critical roles via the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions to influence the early process of prostate development. However, in BPH and PCa, much more attention has been focused on epithelial AR roles. However, accumulating evidence indicates that stromal AR is also irreplaceable and plays critical roles in prostate disease progression. Herein, we summarize the roles of stromal AR in the development of normal prostate, BPH, and PCa, with evidence from the recent results of in vitro cell line studies, tissue recombination experiments, and AR knockout animal models. Current evidence suggests that stromal AR may play positive roles to promote BPH and PCa progression, and targeting stromal AR selectively with AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9, may allow development of better therapies with fewer adverse effects to battle BPH and PCa. PMID:25432062

  14. Urinary Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tosoian, Jeffrey J; Ross, Ashley E; Sokoll, Lori J; Partin, Alan W; Pavlovich, Christian P

    2016-02-01

    In light of the overdiagnosis and overtreatment associated with widespread prostate-specific antigen-based screening, controversy persists surrounding the detection and diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). Given its anatomic proximity to the prostate, urine has been proposed as a noninvasive substrate for prostatic biomarkers. With greater understanding of the molecular pathways of carcinogenesis and significant technological advances, the breadth of potential biomarkers is substantial. In this review, the authors aim to provide an evidence-based assessment of current and emerging urinary biomarkers used in the detection and prognostication of PCa and high-grade PCa, with particular attention on clinically relevant findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Prostate Cancer Tissues by SWATH Mass Spectrometry Discovers N-acylethanolamine Acid Amidase and Protein Tyrosine Kinase 7 as Signatures for Tumor Aggressiveness*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yansheng; Chen, Jing; Sethi, Atul; Li, Qing K.; Chen, Lijun; Collins, Ben; Gillet, Ludovic C. J.; Wollscheid, Bernd; Zhang, Hui; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers indicating the level of aggressiveness of prostate cancer (PCa) will address the urgent clinical need to minimize the general overtreatment of patients with non-aggressive PCa, who account for the majority of PCa cases. Here, we isolated formerly N-linked glycopeptides from normal prostate (n = 10) and from non-aggressive (n = 24), aggressive (n = 16), and metastatic (n = 25) PCa tumor tissues and analyzed the samples using SWATH mass spectrometry, an emerging data-independent acquisition method that generates a single file containing fragment ion spectra of all ionized species of a sample. The resulting datasets were searched using a targeted data analysis strategy in which an a priori spectral reference library representing known N-glycosites of the human proteome was used to identify groups of signals in the SWATH mass spectrometry data. On average we identified 1430 N-glycosites from each sample. Out of those, 220 glycoproteins showed significant quantitative changes associated with diverse biological processes involved in PCa aggressiveness and metastasis and indicated functional relationships. Two glycoproteins, N-acylethanolamine acid amidase and protein tyrosine kinase 7, that were significantly associated with aggressive PCa in the initial sample cohort were further validated in an independent set of patient tissues using tissue microarray analysis. The results suggest that N-acylethanolamine acid amidase and protein tyrosine kinase 7 may be used as potential tissue biomarkers to avoid overtreatment of non-aggressive PCa. PMID:24741114

  16. Prostate Cancer Screening: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Screening (National Cancer Institute) Also in Spanish Latest News Prostate Cancer Symptoms Aren't Always ... Be Found Early? (American Cancer Society) Also in Spanish Risks of Prostate Cancer Screening (National Cancer Institute) ...

  17. Molecular subtyping of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaffenberger, Samuel D; Barbieri, Christopher E

    2016-05-01

    The recent publication of The Cancer Genome Atlas molecular taxonomy of primary prostate cancer highlights the increased understanding of the genomic basis of human prostate cancer, but also emphasizes the complexity and heterogeneity of prostate cancer. Seven molecular subclasses have been defined on the basis of early genomic alterations, which are largely mutually exclusive. We review the recent advances in the genomic understanding of human prostate cancer, with focus on molecular subclassification. Broadly, prostate cancer can be classified based upon whether specific genomic rearrangements, such as the Transmembrane Protease, Serine 2-ETS-related gene fusion occur or whether specific alterations such as Speckle-type POZ protein and forkhead box A1 mutations occur. The molecular drivers remain to be identified in a further quarter of human prostate cancers. Depending upon the molecular subclassification and the coincident genomic alterations, specific clinical insights can be gained from this information, including associations with pathologic factors, race, and prognosis, as well as the possibility for future precision therapies.

  18. Photosensitizers in prostate cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gheewala, Taher; Skwor, Troy; Munirathinam, Gnanasekar

    2017-01-01

    The search for new therapeutics for the treatment of prostate cancer is ongoing with a focus on the balance between the harms and benefits of treatment. New therapies are being constantly developed to offer treatments similar to radical therapies, with limited side effects. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising strategy in delivering focal treatment in primary as well as post radiotherapy prostate cancer. PDT involves activation of a photosensitizer (PS) by appropriate wavelength of light, generating transient levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Several photosensitizers have been developed with a focus on treating prostate cancer like mTHPC, motexafin lutetium, padoporfin and so on. This article will review newly developed photosensitizers under clinical trials for the treatment of prostate cancer, along with the potential advantages and disadvantages in delivering focal therapy. PMID:28430624

  19. Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3-4):251-258. [PubMed Abstract] Lee RJ, Smith MR. Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer. In: Chabner ... 1, 2014. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1405095 Ryan CJ, Smith MR, Fizazi K, et al. Abiraterone acetate plus ...

  20. Parthenolide Selectively Sensitizes Prostate Tumor Tissue to Radiotherapy while Protecting Healthy Tissues In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Morel, Katherine L; Ormsby, Rebecca J; Bezak, Eva; Sweeney, Christopher J; Sykes, Pamela J

    2017-05-01

    Radiotherapy is widely used in cancer treatment, however the benefits can be limited by radiation-induced damage to neighboring normal tissues. Parthenolide (PTL) exhibits anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties and selectively induces radiosensitivity in prostate cancer cell lines, while protecting primary prostate epithelial cell lines from radiation-induced damage. Low doses of radiation have also been shown to protect from subsequent high-dose-radiation-induced apoptosis as well as DNA damage. These properties of PTL and low-dose radiation could be used to improve radiotherapy by killing more tumor cells and less normal cells. Sixteen-week-old male Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) and C57BL/6J mice were treated with PTL (40 mg/kg), dimethylaminoparthenolide (DMAPT, a PTL analogue with increased bioavailability) (100 mg/kg), or vehicle control three times over one week prior to combinations of low (10 mGy) and high (6 Gy) doses of whole-body X-irradiation. Tissues were analyzed for apoptosis at a range of time points up to 72 h postirradiation. Both PTL and DMAPT protected normal tissues, but not prostate tumor tissues, from a significant proportion of high-dose-radiation-induced apoptosis. DMAPT provided superior protection compared to PTL in normal dorsolateral prostate (71.7% reduction, P = 0.026), spleen (48.2% reduction, P = 0.0001) and colorectal tissue (38.0% reduction, P = 0.0002), and doubled radiation-induced apoptosis in TRAMP prostate tumor tissue (101.3% increase, P = 0.039). Both drugs induced the greatest radiosensitivity in TRAMP prostate tissue in areas with higher grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) lesions. A 10 mGy dose delivered 3 h prior to a 6 Gy dose induced a radioadaptive apoptosis response in normal C57Bl/6J prostate (28.4% reduction, P = 0.045) and normal TRAMP spleen (13.6% reduction, P = 0.047), however the low-dose-adaptive radioprotection did not significantly add to the PTL

  1. Tuberculous prostatitis: mimicking a cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, El Majdoub; Abdelhak, Khallouk; Hassan, Farih Moulay

    2016-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common type of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis . The kidneys, ureter, bladder or genital organs are usually involved. Tuberculosis of the prostate has mainly been described in immune-compromised patients. However, it can exceptionally be found as an isolated lesion in immune-competent patients. Tuberculosis of the prostate may be difficult to differentiate from carcinoma of the prostate and the chronic prostatitis when the prostate is hard and nodular on digital rectal examination and the urine is negative for tuberculosis bacilli. In many cases, a diagnosis of tuberculous prostatitis is made by the pathologist, or the disease is found incidentally after transurethral resection. Therefore, suspicion of tuberculous prostatitis requires a confirmatory biopsy of the prostate. We report the case of 60-year-old man who presented a low urinary tract syndrome. After clinical and biological examination, and imaging, prostate cancer was highly suspected. Transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed and histological examination showed tuberculosis lesions. PMID:28292092

  2. Characterization of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) for Use in Therapeutic and Diagnostic Strategies Against Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    target, however there have been reports of PSMA expression in non-prostatic tissues, including brain , kidney and liver. Such expression of PSMA could...however there have been reports of PSMA expression in non- prostatic tissues, including brain , kidney and liver. Such expression of PSMA could weaken...expressed in kidney and liver. The PSMA gene is expressed in prostate, prostate cancer, tumor neovasculature, the brain and small intestine, and in

  3. Nebraska Prostate Cancer Research Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Effect of Metal Ion Chelators on Mannose 6-Phosphate/ Insulin -like Growth Factor II Receptor in DU145 Prostate Cancer Cells. UNMC Summer Undergraduate...Lynnette Lefall Date Published: Friday, August 6, 2010 Keidra Bryant – Abstract Effect of Metal Ion Chelators on Mannose 6-Phosphate/ Insulin ...chelators would inhibit this process in the insulin -like growth factor-responsive human prostate cancer cell line DU145. Cells were grown to 70-80

  4. Nebraska Prostate Cancer Research Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    Expression in Prostate Cancer Cells Exposed to Heavy Metal Carcinogen. UNMC Summer Undergraduate Research Program, August 2010. • Keidra A. Bryant...Joseph R. Wheeler, Michelle A. Montgomery, and Richard G. MacDonald. (2010). Effect of Metal Ion Chelators on Mannose 6-Phosphate/Insulin-like... Effect of 4’-Bis-Thiosemicarbazide, a New Ribonucleotide Reductase Inhibitor, on Prostate Cancer Cell Proliferation. UNMC Summer Undergraduate Research

  5. Hyaluronan Biosynthesis in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT: Despite advances in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the last several years, metastasis represents the... metastasis to lymph nodes and bone. Metastasis to bone is especially noteworthy, not only because it reflects more advanced tumors, but also because of the...the growth and metastasis of androgen-independent tumors, it may be possible to better diagnose and treat prostate cancers by inhibiting growth of

  6. Metabolite Analysis and Histology on the Exact Same Tissue: Comprehensive Metabolomic Profiling and Metabolic Classification of Prostate Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Tao; Troyer, Dean A.; Li, Liang

    2016-08-01

    We report a method of metabolomic profiling of intact tissue based on molecular preservation by extraction and fixation (mPREF) and high-performance chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). mPREF extracts metabolites by aqueous methanol from tissue biopsies without altering tissue architecture and thus conventional histology can be performed on the same tissue. In a proof-of-principle study, we applied dansylation LC-MS to profile the amine/phenol submetabolome of prostate needle biopsies from 25 patient samples derived from 16 subjects. 2900 metabolites were consistently detected in more than 50% of the samples. This unprecedented coverage allowed us to identify significant metabolites for differentiating tumor and normal tissues. The panel of significant metabolites was refined using 36 additional samples from 18 subjects. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis showed area-under-the-curve (AUC) of 0.896 with sensitivity of 84.6% and specificity of 83.3% using 7 metabolites. A blind study of 24 additional validation samples gave a specificity of 90.9% at the same sensitivity of 84.6%. The mPREF extraction can be readily implemented into the existing clinical workflow. Our method of combining mPREF with CIL LC-MS offers a powerful and convenient means of performing histopathology and discovering or detecting metabolite biomarkers in the same tissue biopsy.

  7. Metabolite Analysis and Histology on the Exact Same Tissue: Comprehensive Metabolomic Profiling and Metabolic Classification of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Tao; Troyer, Dean A.; Li, Liang

    2016-01-01

    We report a method of metabolomic profiling of intact tissue based on molecular preservation by extraction and fixation (mPREF) and high-performance chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). mPREF extracts metabolites by aqueous methanol from tissue biopsies without altering tissue architecture and thus conventional histology can be performed on the same tissue. In a proof-of-principle study, we applied dansylation LC-MS to profile the amine/phenol submetabolome of prostate needle biopsies from 25 patient samples derived from 16 subjects. 2900 metabolites were consistently detected in more than 50% of the samples. This unprecedented coverage allowed us to identify significant metabolites for differentiating tumor and normal tissues. The panel of significant metabolites was refined using 36 additional samples from 18 subjects. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis showed area-under-the-curve (AUC) of 0.896 with sensitivity of 84.6% and specificity of 83.3% using 7 metabolites. A blind study of 24 additional validation samples gave a specificity of 90.9% at the same sensitivity of 84.6%. The mPREF extraction can be readily implemented into the existing clinical workflow. Our method of combining mPREF with CIL LC-MS offers a powerful and convenient means of performing histopathology and discovering or detecting metabolite biomarkers in the same tissue biopsy. PMID:27578275

  8. Notch signaling in the prostate: critical roles during development and in the hallmarks of prostate cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gang; Ma, Libin; Meng, Qi; Ju, Xiang; Jiang, Kang; Jiang, Peiwu; Yu, Zhijian

    2016-03-01

    This review aims to summarize the evidence that Notch signaling is associated with prostate development, tumorigenesis and prostate tumor progression. Studies in PubMed database were searched using the keywords of Notch signaling, prostate development and prostate cancer. Relevant literatures were identified and summarized. The Notch pathway plays an important role in determining cell fate, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Recent findings have highlighted the involvement of Notch signaling in prostate development and in the maintenance of adult prostate homeostasis. Aberrant Notch expression in tissues leads to dysregulation of Notch functions and promotes various neoplasms, including prostate cancer. High expression of Notch has been implicated in prostate cancer, and its expression increases with higher cancer grade. However, the precise role of Notch in prostate cancer has yet to be clearly defined. The roles of Notch either as an oncogene or tumor suppressor in prostate cancer hallmarks such as cell proliferation, apoptosis and anoikis, hypoxia, migration and invasion, angiogenesis as well as the correlation with metastasis are therefore discussed. Notch signaling is a complicated signaling pathway in modulating prostate development and prostate cancer. Understanding and manipulating Notch signaling could therefore be of potential therapeutic value in combating prostate cancer.

  9. Expression of the KAI1 protein in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, T.; Ichikawa, T.; Tamaru, J.; Mikata, A.; Akakura, K.; Akimoto, S.; Imai, T.; Yoshie, O.; Shiraishi, T.; Yatani, R.; Ito, H.; Shimazaki, J.

    1996-01-01

    The KAI1 gene, recently identified as a metastatic suppressor gene for prostate cancer, was cloned and was revealed to be identical to the C33/IA4/ R2/4R9 gene. The expression of KAI1 protein was examined immunohistochemically in the tissues from 14 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia and 46 cases of prostate cancer using mouse monoclonal anti-human C33 antibody. In benign prostatic hyperplasia tissues, KAI1 protein was uniformly expressed in the glandular cell membrane at cell-to-cell borders. The KAI1 protein in the tissues of untreated prostate cancer was also located at similar sites to those of benign prostatic hyperplasia, but the percentage of strongly positive cancer cells was correlated inversely to the Gleason pattern (P < 0.0001, one-way analysis of variance). There was also a statistically inverse correlation between the percentage of KAI1-positive cancer cells and the clinical stage (chi 2 = 9.6; P = 0.0081). In 4 cancer death cases relapsed from endocrine therapy, KAI1 protein was not stained in either primary or metastatic foci. These results indicate that the expression of KAI1 protein correlates to tumor characteristics in prostate cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:8909232

  10. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Josef J.; Schöder, Heiko; Larson, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Prostate cancer is a complex and biologically heterogeneous disease that is not adequately assessed with conventional imaging alone. Molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) is poised to fill this unmet need through noninvasive probing of the multiple molecular and cellular processes that are active in prostate cancer patients. Recent findings Several PET tracers are active in early and late stage prostate cancer in humans. F18-FDG, C11/F18-choline and F18-sodium fluoride (NaF) have been studied most extensively. There is a growing body of literature supporting to the utility of choline in early stage prostate cancer. FDG and NaF are more valuable in advanced disease, especially for assessing bone metastases, the prevalent form of metastases in this patient population. F18-Fluoro-dihydrotestosterone is active in castrate disease and is emerging as a valuable pharmacodynamic marker in the development of novel AR-targeted therapies. Anti-PSMA PET tracers are in the early stages of clinical development. Summary Multiple PET tracers are currently available to aid in the detection and management of prostate cancer across the clinical spectrum of the disease. Prospective, rigorously controlled, clinical imaging trials are needed to establish the optimal role of PET in prostate cancer. PMID:22617062

  11. Immunotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Slovin, Susan F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prostate cancer remains a challenge as a target for immunological approaches. The approval of the first cell-based immune therapy, Sipuleucel-T for prostate cancer introduced prostate cancer as a solid tumor with the potential to be influenced by the immune system. Methods: We reviewed articles on immunological management of prostate cancer and challenges that lie ahead for such strategies. Results: Treatments have focused on the identification of novel cell surface antigens thought to be unique to prostate cancer. These include vaccines against carbohydrate and blood group antigens, xenogeneic and naked DNA vaccines, and pox viruses used as prime-boost or checkpoint inhibitors. No single vaccine construct to date has resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect. The checkpoint inhibitor, anti-CTLA-4 has resulted in several long-term remissions, but phase III trials have not demonstrated an antitumor effect or survival benefit. Conclusions: Multiple clinical trials suggest that prostate cancer may not be optimally treated by single agent immune therapies and that combination with biologic agents, chemotherapies, or radiation may offer some enhancement of benefit. PMID:27843208

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Prostate Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissues to make echoes that form a sonogram (computer picture) of the prostate. Transrectal magnetic resonance imaging ( ... uses a strong magnet, radio waves , and a computer to make a series of detailed pictures of ...

  13. Evaluating the Anticancer Properties of Liposomal Copper in a Nude Mouse Xenograft Model of Human Prostate Cancer: Formulation, In Vitro, In Vivo, Histology and Tissue Distribution Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Zeng, San; Lin, Tien-Min; Krugner-Higby, Lisa; Lyman, Doug; Steffen, Dana; Xiong, May P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although copper (Cu) complexes have been investigated as anticancer agents, there has been no description of Cu itself as a cancer killing agent. A stealth liposomal Cu formulation (LpCu) was studied in vitro and in vivo. Methods LpCu was evaluated in prostate cancer origin PC-3 cells by a metabolic cytotoxicity assay, by monitoring reactive oxygen species (ROS), and by flow cytometry. LpCu efficacy was evaluated in vivo using intratumoral and intravenous injections into mice bearing PC-3 xenograft tumors. Toxicology was assessed by performing hematological and blood biochemistry assays, and tissue histology and Cu distribution was investigated by elemental analysis. Results LpCu and free Cu salts displayed similar levels of cell metabolic toxicity and ROS. Flow cytometry indicated that the mechanisms of cell death were both apoptosis and necrosis. Animals injected i.t. with 3.5 mg/kg or i.v. with 3.5 and 7.0 mg/kg LpCu exhibited significant tumor growth inhibition. Kidney and eye were the main organs affected by Cu-mediated toxicities, but spleen and liver were the major organs of Cu deposition. Conclusions LpCu was effective at reducing tumor burden in the xenograft prostate cancer model. There was histological evidence of Cu toxicity in kidneys and eyes of animals treated at the maximum tolerated dose of LpCu 7.0 mg/kg. PMID:24848339

  14. Lycopene: Redress for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pisipati, Sai Venkata Vedavyas; Pathapati, Harshavardhan; Bhukya, Ganesh; Nuthakki, Suresh; Chandu, Baburao; Nama, SreeKanth; Adeps, RajDev

    2012-01-01

    Lycopene, a carotenoid is what that gives red colour to some fruits like pomegranate, tomato, papaya etc... People with a sound diet of lycopene may have a less risk of cancers especially prostate cancer which is most impedent for the males of age 40-50 years. So, in countries of north America and Europe food contains much of the lycopene supplements. In accordance with the American journal of epidemiology 2002 studies implies that men with crushed serum lycopene levels are more divulged to prostate cancer and those with sound diet of lycopene have a less risk of prostate cancer. In a care study conveyed by The British journal of urology, men with prostate cancer are subjected to surgery and the tumour is detonated. Amongst the men half a set were supplemented with lycopene supplements and half were not. Those subjected with lycopene supplements have less bone pains and live longer than those not supplemented. This paints a picture about importance of lycopene in treatment of prostate cancer. This article evokes the importance of lycopene and its way of destroying the cancer. Lycopene reduces the risk of cancer by diverging its effect on the plasma Insulin like growth factor, on Connexins , and the most acceptable one, by quench of free radicals. PMID:24826034

  15. Lycopene: redress for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pisipati, Sai Venkata Vedavyas; Pathapati, Harshavardhan; Bhukya, Ganesh; Nuthakki, Suresh; Chandu, Baburao; Nama, SreeKanth; Adeps, RajDev

    2012-03-01

    Lycopene, a carotenoid is what that gives red colour to some fruits like pomegranate, tomato, papaya etc... People with a sound diet of lycopene may have a less risk of cancers especially prostate cancer which is most impedent for the males of age 40-50 years. So, in countries of north America and Europe food contains much of the lycopene supplements. In accordance with the American journal of epidemiology 2002 studies implies that men with crushed serum lycopene levels are more divulged to prostate cancer and those with sound diet of lycopene have a less risk of prostate cancer. In a care study conveyed by The British journal of urology, men with prostate cancer are subjected to surgery and the tumour is detonated. Amongst the men half a set were supplemented with lycopene supplements and half were not. Those subjected with lycopene supplements have less bone pains and live longer than those not supplemented. This paints a picture about importance of lycopene in treatment of prostate cancer. This article evokes the importance of lycopene and its way of destroying the cancer. Lycopene reduces the risk of cancer by diverging its effect on the plasma Insulin like growth factor, on Connexins , and the most acceptable one, by quench of free radicals.

  16. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    lipids in test controls. Key Metabolomics Research Accomplishments 1) Developed unbiased mass spectrometry methods to profile 500 lipids . 2) Completed...Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0168 TITLE: Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jackilen...Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0168 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  17. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    test controls. Key Metabolomics Research Accomplishments 1) Developed unbiased mass spectrometry methods to profile 500 lipids . 2) Completed...Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0169 PC110361P1 TITLE: Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0169 5c. PROGRAM

  18. PTEN loss in circulating tumour cells correlates with PTEN loss in fresh tumour tissue from castration-resistant prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Punnoose, Elizabeth A; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Szafer-Glusman, Edith; Tucker, Eric K; Mohan, Sankar; Flohr, Penelope; Riisnaes, Ruth; Miranda, Susana; Figueiredo, Ines; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Omlin, Aurelius; Pezaro, Carmel; Zhu, Jin; Amler, Lukas; Patel, Premal; Yan, Yibing; Bales, Natalee; Werner, Shannon L; Louw, Jessica; Pandita, Ajay; Marrinucci, Dena; Attard, Gerhardt; de Bono, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Background: PTEN gene loss occurs frequently in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and may drive progression through activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway. Here, we developed a novel CTC-based assay to determine PTEN status and examined the correlation between PTEN status in CTCs and matched tumour tissue samples. Methods: PTEN gene status in CTCs was evaluated on an enrichment-free platform (Epic Sciences) by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). PTEN status in archival and fresh tumour tissue was evaluated by FISH and immunohistochemistry. Results: Peripheral blood was collected from 76 patients. Matched archival and fresh cancer tissue was available for 48 patients. PTEN gene status detected in CTCs was concordant with PTEN status in matched fresh tissues and archival tissue in 32 of 38 patients (84%) and 24 of 39 patients (62%), respectively. CTC counts were prognostic (continuous, P=0.001). PTEN loss in CTCs associated with worse survival in univariate analysis (HR 2.05; 95% CI 1.17–3.62; P=0.01) and with high lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in metastatic CRPC patients. Conclusions: Our results illustrate the potential use of CTCs as a non-invasive, real-time liquid biopsy to determine PTEN gene status. The prognostic and predictive value of PTEN in CTCs warrants investigation in CRPC clinical trials of PI3K/AKT-targeted therapies. PMID:26379078

  19. Prostate cancer: endogenous chemical castration.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Olugbemisola Oredein; Prasad, Michaella M; Singer, Natalie

    2016-04-28

    We report treatment of intermediate risk prostate cancer in a patient with a brief period of androgen deprivation secondary to a pituitary adenoma. This was a patient with intermediate risk prostate cancer diagnosed in the setting of an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA). The patient subsequently demonstrated a decline in PSA along with symptoms of hypogonadism and visual disturbance, and was consequently found to have a pituitary tumour. Trans-sphenoidal resection of the sellar mass was performed with normalisation of hormone profiles. The patient subsequently completed a course of radiation therapy for prostate cancer with PSA nadir to undetectable levels without evidence of biochemical recurrence at 7 months follow-up. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  20. Hypermethylation of CpG islands in primary and metastatic human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Kowalski, Jeanne; Gonzalgo, Mark L; Zahurak, Marianna; Piantadosi, Steven; Walsh, Patrick C; Bova, G Steven; De Marzo, Angelo M; Isaacs, William B; Nelson, William G

    2004-03-15

    Aberrant DNA methylation patterns may be the earliest somatic genome changes in prostate cancer. Using real-time methylation-specific PCR, we assessed the extent of hypermethylation at 16 CpG islands in DNA from seven prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, PC-3, DU-145, LAPC-4, CWR22Rv1, VCaP, and C42B), normal prostate epithelial cells, normal prostate stromal cells, 73 primary prostate cancers, 91 metastatic prostate cancers, and 25 noncancerous prostate tissues. We found that CpG islands at GSTP1, APC, RASSF1a, PTGS2, and MDR1 were hypermethylated in >85% of prostate cancers and cancer cell lines but not in normal prostate cells and tissues; CpG islands at EDNRB, ESR1, CDKN2a, and hMLH1 exhibited low to moderate rates of hypermethylation in prostate cancer tissues and cancer cell lines but were entirely unmethylated in normal tissues; and CpG islands at DAPK1, TIMP3, MGMT, CDKN2b, p14/ARF, and CDH1 were not abnormally hypermethylated in prostate cancers. Receiver operator characteristic curve analyses suggested that CpG island hypermethylation changes at GSTP1, APC, RASSF1a, PTGS2, and MDR1 in various combinations can distinguish primary prostate cancer from benign prostate tissues with sensitivities of 97.3-100% and specificities of 92-100%. Hypermethylation of the CpG island at EDNRB was correlated with the grade and stage of the primary prostate cancers. PTGS2 CpG island hypermethylation portended an increased risk of recurrence. Furthermore, CpG island hypermethylation patterns in prostate cancer metastases were very similar to the primary prostate cancers and tended to show greater differences between cases than between anatomical sites of metastasis.

  1. Sirolimus, Docetaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-10

    Castration Levels of Testosterone; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; PSA Progression; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  2. The Thoc1 ribonucleoprotein and prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Chinnam, Meenalakshmi; Wang, Yanqing; Zhang, Xiaojing; Gold, David L; Khoury, Thaer; Nikitin, Alexander Yu; Foster, Barbara A; Li, Yanping; Bshara, Wiam; Morrison, Carl D; Payne Ondracek, Rochelle D; Mohler, James L; Goodrich, David W

    2014-11-01

    The majority of newly diagnosed prostate cancers will remain indolent, but distinguishing between aggressive and indolent disease is imprecise. This has led to the important clinical problem of overtreatment. THOC1 encodes a nuclear ribonucleoprotein whose expression is higher in some cancers than in normal tissue. The hypothesis that THOC1 may be a functionally relevant biomarker that can improve the identification of aggressive prostate cancer has not been tested. THOC1 protein immunostaining was evaluated in a retrospective collection of more than 700 human prostate cancer specimens and the results associated with clinical variables and outcome. Thoc1 was conditionally deleted in an autochthonous mouse model (n = 22 or 23 per genotype) to test whether it is required for prostate cancer progression. All statistical tests were two-sided. THOC1 protein immunostaining increases with higher Gleason score and more advanced Tumor/Node/Metastasis stage. Time to biochemical recurrence is statistically significantly shorter for cancers with high THOC1 protein (log-rank P = .002, and it remains statistically significantly associated with biochemical recurrence after adjusting for Gleason score, clinical stage, and prostate-specific antigen levels (hazard ratio = 1.61, 95% confidence interval = 1.03 to 2.51, P = .04). Thoc1 deletion prevents prostate cancer progression in mice, but has little effect on normal tissue. Prostate cancer cells deprived of Thoc1 show gene expression defects that compromise cell growth. Thoc1 is required to support the unique gene expression requirements of aggressive prostate cancer in mice. In humans, high THOC1 protein immunostaining associates with prostate cancer aggressiveness and recurrence. Thus, THOC1 protein is a functionally relevant molecular marker that may improve the identification of aggressive prostate cancers, potentially reducing overtreatment. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  3. Prostate cancer risk alleles are associated with prostate cancer volume and prostate size.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Daniel; Helfand, Brian T; Cooper, Phillip R; Roehl, Kimberly A; Catalona, William J; Loeb, Stacy

    2014-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified an increasing number of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with prostate cancer risk. Some of these genetic variants are also associated with serum prostate specific antigen levels and lower urinary tract symptoms, raising the question of whether they are truly prostate cancer biomarkers or simply lead to detection bias. Therefore, we determined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with prostate cancer risk are more strongly associated with tumor or prostate volume. The genotypes of 38 validated prostate cancer risk single nucleotide polymorphisms were determined in 1,321 white men who underwent radical prostatectomy. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to compare the relationship of single nucleotide polymorphism frequency with total prostate and tumor volumes. On multivariate analysis 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 8q24, rs16901979 (A) and rs6983267 (G), were significantly associated with increased tumor volume (p=0.01 and 0.02, respectively). In contrast, rs17632542 (T) near the PSA gene on 19q13 was associated with significantly lower tumor volume and rs10788160 (A) on 10q26 was associated with significantly larger prostate volume (p=0.02 and 0.01, respectively). Analysis of 38 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with prostate cancer risk revealed a significant association between several on chromosome 8q24 and increased tumor volume but not prostate volume. This suggests that they are bona fide markers of prostate cancer susceptibility and possibly more aggressive disease. Other prostate cancer risk alleles are associated with prostate specific antigen and increased prostate or decreased tumor volume, suggesting detection bias due to their phenotypic influence. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Proton radiation for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Coen, John J; Zietman, Anthony L

    2009-06-01

    Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized prostate cancer that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications; the Bragg peak allows for deposition of dose at a well-defined depth with essentially no exit dose. Thus, high doses can be delivered to a target while largely sparing adjacent normal tissue. Proton radiation has proven effective in dose escalation for prostate cancer. This is important, as high-dose conformal radiation is now the standard form of external radiation for this disease. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy, which uses X-rays, is another means of delivering high radiation doses to the prostate and is currently the most widely used form of external radiation in the US. At present prices, it is probably more cost-effective than proton radiation; this could change. Clear dosimetric superiority of protons in the high-dose region has not yet been demonstrated. A dosimetric advantage may emerge as pencil-beam scanning replaces passive scanning, and intensity-modulated proton therapy becomes possible. This technique would be particularly well suited to partial prostate 'boosts', hypofractionation regimens and stereotactic delivery of radiation, all new approaches to prostate cancer that are being investigated.

  5. The Danish Prostate Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Nielsen, Mary; Høyer, Søren; Friis, Søren; Hansen, Steinbjørn; Brasso, Klaus; Jakobsen, Erik Breth; Moe, Mette; Larsson, Heidi; Søgaard, Mette; Nakano, Anne; Borre, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish Prostate Cancer Database (DAPROCAdata) is a nationwide clinical cancer database that has prospectively collected data on patients with incident prostate cancer in Denmark since February 2010. The overall aim of the DAPROCAdata is to improve the quality of prostate cancer care in Denmark by systematically collecting key clinical variables for the purposes of health care monitoring, quality improvement, and research. Study population All Danish patients with histologically verified prostate cancer are included in the DAPROCAdata. Main variables The DAPROCAdata registers clinical data and selected characteristics for patients with prostate cancer at diagnosis. Data are collected from the linkage of nationwide health registries and supplemented with online registration of key clinical variables by treating physicians at urological and oncological departments. Main variables include Gleason scores, cancer staging, prostate-specific antigen values, and therapeutic measures (active surveillance, surgery, radiotherapy, endocrine therapy, and chemotherapy). Descriptive data In total, 22,332 patients with prostate cancer were registered in DAPROCAdata as of April 2015. A key feature of DAPROCAdata is the routine collection of patient-reported outcome measures (PROM), including data on quality-of-life (pain levels, physical activity, sexual function, depression, urine and fecal incontinence) and lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, and body mass index). PROM data are derived from questionnaires distributed at diagnosis and at 1-year and 3-year follow-up. Hitherto, the PROM data have been limited by low completeness (26% among newly diagnosed patients in 2014). Conclusion DAPROCAdata is a comprehensive, yet still young clinical database. Efforts to improve data collection, data validity, and completeness are ongoing and of high priority. PMID:27843346

  6. Molecular therapeutics in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, B; Theodorescu, D

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide information on the molecular basis of prostate cancer biology and to identify some of the targets for therapy, and highlight some potential strategies for molecular treatment. Here we give a synopsis of what we have learned regarding molecular biology of cancer in general and the directions research might take in the future in order to impact prostate cancer specifically. This work is certainly not encyclopedic in nature and we apologize in advance to colleagues whose work we were no able to include. Hope lies in learning to utilize some of these molecular workings for better prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of the most common solid organ cancer in men. Prostate cancer is a formidable disease and at current rates of diagnosis will affect one-in-six men living in the United States (Greenlee et al., 2000) Many of these men are diagnosed at an early stage of the disease and can be effectively treated by surgery or radiation. However, a significant fraction of men are diagnosed with later stage disease or progress despite early curative therapeutic attempts. Unfortunately, many of these men succumb to prostate cancer, as management options are limited and not always successful. Through an understanding of the molecular processes that occur in the development and progression of prostate cancer, novel therapies will arise that will provide longer survival, better quality of life, and a chance for cure in men afflicted with this disease.

  7. [The epidemiology of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Rébillard, Xavier; Tretarre, Brigitte; Villers, Arnauld

    2003-12-31

    Prostate cancer is a public health problem. Currently, it is the most frequent cause of cancer, and the second most common cause of cancer mortality, in men in most developed countries. Its incidence in France in 2000 is close to 40 000 new cases, a consistent increase of 7,9% per year. One man in 8 in France will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in the course of his life. More than half of these cancers are diagnosed before 75 years, most often at a localized stage accessible to a curative treatment. The increasing practice of PSA testing and systematic prostatic biopsies are responsible for this rise in incidence. The mortality is stable at around 10 000 per year in France. Hereditary risk factors permit a definition of a target population for screening. Environmental factors are little known, but a diet rich in fat seems to be associated with a more elevated risk.

  8. Harvesting Human Prostate Tissue Material and Culturing Primary Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Frame, Fiona M; Pellacani, Davide; Collins, Anne T; Maitland, Norman J

    2016-01-01

    In order to fully explore the biology of a complex solid tumor such as prostate cancer, it is desirable to work with patient tissue. Only by working with cells from a tissue can we take into account patient variability and tumor heterogeneity. Cell lines have long been regarded as the workhorse of cancer research and it could be argued that they are of most use when considered within a panel of cell lines, thus taking into account specified mutations and variations in phenotype between different cell lines. However, often very different results are obtained when comparing cell lines to primary cells cultured from tissue. It stands to reason that cells cultured from patient tissue represents a close-to-patient model that should and does produce clinically relevant data. This chapter aims to illustrate the methods of processing, storing and culturing cells from prostate tissue, with a description of potential uses.

  9. Prostate Cancer: Symptoms, Tests, and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Prostate Cancer: Symptoms, Tests, and Treatment Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... Linkedin Pin it Email Print Risk factors for prostate cancer include family history, age and race; but new ...

  10. Metabolic Risk Factors in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chu, David I.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    The biology of prostate cancer is influenced by the metabolic profile of each individual. We examine the evidence available interlinking prostate cancer with obesity, diabetes, and other metabolic syndrome components. PMID:21523712

  11. Prostate cancer gene 3 urine assay for prostate cancer in Japanese men undergoing prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Atsushi; Okihara, Koji; Kamoi, Kazumi; Iwata, Tsuyoshi; Kawauchi, Akihiro; Miki, Tsuneharu; Fors, Zephyr

    2011-03-01

    To examine the clinical utility of the prostate cancer gene 3 (PCA3) urine test in predicting prostate cancer in Japanese men undergoing prostate biopsy. The study group included 105 men who underwent extended prostate biopsy based on an elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA). In all cases, the patients' race was Asian. Urine specimens were collected after digital rectal examination, and PCA3 score (PCA3/PSA mRNA) was determined in the urine using the APTIMA PCA3 assay. PCA3 score was investigated for a correlation with serum PSA, prostate volume (PV), PSA density and biopsy outcome. All urine samples collected were successfully analyzed (i.e. the informative specimen rate was 100%). Biopsy showed prostate cancer in 38 men (36%). The PCA3 score was not associated with serum PSA nor PV. The median PCA3 score in prostate cancer was significantly higher than that in negative biopsy (59.5 vs 14.2 P<0.0001). The probability of prostate cancer was 69% at a PCA3 score of more than 50 and 5% at a PCA3 score of less than 20. On multivariable logistic regression, PSA density (P<0.05) and PCA3 score (P<0.0001) were the independent predictors for prostate cancer. There was no significant difference in AUC between PCA3 score and PSA density. The combination of PCA3 score and PSA density increased the AUC from 0.72 for PSA alone to 0.88. The specificity of the PCA3 urine assay for prostate cancer was excellent in Japanese men undergoing biopsy. PCA3 score could improve the prediction for prostate cancer and help to better select men who might benefit from prostate biopsy. © 2011 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. Isolation of cancer stem cells from human prostate cancer samples.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Samuel J; Quinn, S Aidan; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Bonal, Dennis M; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Firpo-Betancourt, Adolfo; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2014-03-14

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model has been considerably revisited over the last two decades. During this time CSCs have been identified and directly isolated from human tissues and serially propagated in immunodeficient mice, typically through antibody labeling of subpopulations of cells and fractionation by flow cytometry. However, the unique clinical features of prostate cancer have considerably limited the study of prostate CSCs from fresh human tumor samples. We recently reported the isolation of prostate CSCs directly from human tissues by virtue of their HLA class I (HLAI)-negative phenotype. Prostate cancer cells are harvested from surgical specimens and mechanically dissociated. A cell suspension is generated and labeled with fluorescently conjugated HLAI and stromal antibodies. Subpopulations of HLAI-negative cells are finally isolated using a flow cytometer. The principal limitation of this protocol is the frequently microscopic and multifocal nature of primary cancer in prostatectomy specimens. Nonetheless, isolated live prostate CSCs are suitable for molecular characterization and functional validation by transplantation in immunodeficient mice.

  13. Height and Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Zuccolo, Luisa; Harris, Ross; Gunnell, David; Oliver, Steven; Lane, Jane Athene; Davis, Michael; Donovan, Jenny; Neal, David; Hamdy, Freddie; Beynon, Rebecca; Savovic, Jelena; Martin, Richard Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background Height, a marker of childhood environmental exposures, is positively associated with prostate cancer risk, perhaps through the insulin-like growth factor system. We investigated the relationship of prostate cancer with height and its components (leg and trunk length) in a nested case-control study and with height in a dose-response meta-analysis. Methods We nested a case-control study within a population-based randomized controlled trial evaluating treatments for localized prostate cancer in British men ages 50 to 69 years, including 1,357 cases detected through prostate-specific antigen testing and 7,990 controls (matched on age, general practice, assessment date). Nine bibliographic databases were searched systematically for studies on the height-prostate cancer association that were pooled in a meta-analysis. Results Based on the nested case-control, the odds ratio (OR) of prostate-specific antigen-detected prostate cancer per 10 cm increase in height was 1.06 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.97-1.16; ptrend = 0.2]. There was stronger evidence of an association of height with high-grade prostate cancer (OR: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.06-1.43), mainly due to the leg component, but not with low-grade disease (OR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.90-1.10). In general, associations with leg or trunk length were similar. A meta-analysis of 58 studies found evidence that height is positively associated with prostate cancer (random-effects OR per 10 cm: 1.06; 95% CI: 1.03-1.09), with a stronger effect for prospective studies of more advanced/aggressive cancers (random-effects OR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.05-1.19). Conclusion These data indicate a limited role for childhood environmental exposures—as indexed by adult height—on prostate cancer incidence, while suggesting a greater role for progression, through mechanisms requiring further investigation. PMID:18768501

  14. Epigenetics of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    McKee, Tawnya C; Tricoli, James V

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of novel technologies that can be applied to the investigation of the molecular underpinnings of human cancer has allowed for new insights into the mechanisms associated with tumor development and progression. They have also advanced the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of cancer. These technologies include microarray and other analysis methods for the generation of large-scale gene expression data on both mRNA and miRNA, next-generation DNA sequencing technologies utilizing a number of platforms to perform whole genome, whole exome, or targeted DNA sequencing to determine somatic mutational differences and gene rearrangements, and a variety of proteomic analysis platforms including liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis to survey alterations in protein profiles in tumors. One other important advancement has been our current ability to survey the methylome of human tumors in a comprehensive fashion through the use of sequence-based and array-based methylation analysis (Bock et al., Nat Biotechnol 28:1106-1114, 2010; Harris et al., Nat Biotechnol 28:1097-1105, 2010). The focus of this chapter is to present and discuss the evidence for key genes involved in prostate tumor development, progression, or resistance to therapy that are regulated by methylation-induced silencing.

  15. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 02: Radiogenomic Modeling of Normal Tissue Toxicities in Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Hypofractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, J; Jeyaseelan, K; Ybarra, N; David, M; Faria, S; Souhami, L; Cury, F; Duclos, M; El Naqa, I

    2014-08-15

    Inter-patient radiation sensitivity variability has recently been shown to have a genetic component. This genetic component may play a key role in explaining the fluctuating rates of radiation-induced toxicities (RITs). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have thus far yielded inconsistent results in delineating RITs while copy number variations (CNVs) have not yet been investigated for such purposes. We explore a radiogenomic modeling approach to investigate the association of CNVs and SNPs, along with clinical and dosimetric variables, in radiation induced rectal bleeding (RB) and erectile dysfunction (ED) in prostate cancer patients treated with curative hypofractionated irradiation. A cohort of 62 prostate cancer patients who underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (66 Gy in 22 fractions) between 2002 to 2010 were retrospectively genotyped for CNV and SNP rs5489 in the xrcc1 DNA repair gene. Late toxicity rates for RB grade 2 and 3 and grade 3 alone were 29.0% and 12.9%, respectively. ED toxicity was found to be 62.9%. Radiogenomic model performance was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC) and resampling by cross-validation. Binary variables were evaluated using Chi-squared contingency table analysis and multivariate models by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). Ten patients were found to have three copies of xrcc1 CNV (RB: χ{sup 2}=14.6, p<0.001 and ED: χ{sup 2}=4.88, p=0.0272) and twelve had heterozygous rs25489 SNP (RB: χ{sup 2}=0.278, p=0.599 and ED: χ{sup 2}=0.112, p=0.732). Radiogenomic modeling yielded significant, cross-validated NTCP models for RB (AUC=0.665) and ED (AUC=0.754). These results indicate that CNVs may be potential predictive biomarkers of both late ED and RB.

  16. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  17. Urine biomarkers in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ploussard, Guillaume; de la Taille, Alexandre

    2010-02-01

    The deficiencies of serum PSA as a prostate-cancer-specific diagnostic test are well recognized. Thus, the development of novel biomarkers for prostate cancer detection remains an important and exciting challenge. Noninvasive urine-based tests are particularly attractive candidates for large-scale screening protocols, and biomarker discovery programs using urine samples have emerged for detecting and predicting aggressiveness of prostate cancer. Some new biomarkers already outperform serum PSA in the diagnosis of this disease. Currently, the PCA3 (prostate cancer antigen 3) urine test is probably the best adjunct to serum PSA for predicting biopsy outcome, and has proven its clinical relevance by surpassing the predictive abilities of traditional serum biomarkers. New research methods are also emerging, and high-throughput technologies will facilitate high-dimensional biomarker discovery. Future approaches will probably integrate proteomic, transcriptomic and multiplex approaches to detect novel biomarkers, and aim to identify combinations of multiple biomarkers to optimize the detection of prostate cancer. In addition, an unmet need remains for markers that differentiate indolent from aggressive cancers, to better inform treatment decisions.

  18. Proton therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Bradford; Henderson, Randal; Mendenhall, William M; Nichols, Romaine C; Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2011-06-01

    Proton therapy has been used in the treatment of cancer for over 50 years. Due to its unique dose distribution with its spread-out Bragg peak, proton therapy can deliver highly conformal radiation to cancers located adjacent to critical normal structures. One of the important applications of its use is in prostate cancer, since the prostate is located adjacent to the rectum and bladder. Over 30 years of data have been published on the use of proton therapy in prostate cancer; these data have demonstrated high rates of local and biochemical control as well as low rates of urinary and rectal toxicity. Although before 2000 proton therapy was available at only a couple of centers in the United States, several new proton centers have been built in the last decade. With the increased availability of proton therapy, research on its use for prostate cancer has accelerated rapidly. Current research includes explorations of dose escalation, hypofractionation, and patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes. Early results from these studies are promising and will likely help make proton therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer more cost-effective.

  19. Active surveillance for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Romero-Otero, Javier; García-Gómez, Borja; Duarte-Ojeda, José M; Rodríguez-Antolín, Alfredo; Vilaseca, Antoni; Carlsson, Sigrid V; Touijer, Karim A

    2016-03-01

    It is worth distinguishing between the two strategies of expectant management for prostate cancer. Watchful waiting entails administering non-curative androgen deprivation therapy to patients on development of symptomatic progression, whereas active surveillance entails delivering curative treatment on signs of disease progression. The objectives of the two management strategies and the patients enrolled in either are different: (i) to review the role of active surveillance as a management strategy for patients with low-risk prostate cancer; and (ii) review the benefits and pitfalls of active surveillance. We carried out a systematic review of active surveillance for prostate cancer in the literature using the National Center for Biotechnology Information's electronic database, PubMed. We carried out a search in English using the terms: active surveillance, prostate cancer, watchful waiting and conservative management. Selected studies were required to have a comprehensive description of the demographic and disease characteristics of the patients at the time of diagnosis, inclusion criteria for surveillance, and a protocol for the patients' follow up. Review articles were included, but not multiple papers from the same datasets. Active surveillance appears to reduce overtreatment in patients with low-risk prostate cancer without compromising cancer-specific survival at 10 years. Therefore, active surveillance is an option for select patients who want to avoid the side-effects inherent to the different types of immediate treatment. However, inclusion criteria for active surveillance and the most appropriate method of monitoring patients on active surveillance have not yet been standardized.

  20. Detection of aggressive prostate cancer associated glycoproteins in urine using glycoproteomics and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xingwang; Chen, Jing; Sun, Shisheng; Yang, Weiming; Yang, Shuang; Shah, Punit; Hoti, Naseruddin; Veltri, Bob; Zhang, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Clinical management of prostate cancer remains a significant challenge due to the lack of available tests for guiding treatment decisions. The blood prostate-specific antigen test has facilitated early detection and intervention of prostate cancer. However, blood prostate-specific antigen levels are less effective in distinguishing aggressive from indolent prostate cancers and other benign prostatic diseases. Thus, the development of novel approaches specific for prostate cancer that can differentiate aggressive from indolent disease remains an urgent medical need. In the current study, we evaluated urine specimens from prostate cancer patients using LC-MS/MS, with the aim of identifying effective urinary prostate cancer biomarkers. Glycoproteins from urine samples of prostate cancer patients with different Gleason scores were characterized via solid phase extraction of N-linked glycosite-containing peptides and LC-MS/MS. A total of 2923 unique glycosite-containing peptides were identified. Glycoproteomic comparison on urine and tissues from aggressive and non-aggressive prostate cancers as well as sera from prostate cancer patients revealed that the majority of AG prostate cancer associated glycoproteins were more readily detected in patient's urine than serum samples. Our data collectively indicate that urine provides a potential source for biomarker testing in patients with AG prostate cancer. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Function of Klotho and is MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer and Aging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    completely absent in prostate cancer samples whereas all of non- cancer tissues investigated showed strong staining for this miRNA , suggesting that...CONTRACT NUMBER Function of Klotho and is MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer and Aging 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0264 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...ABSTRACT We have observed the expression of CD164, IGFR, and Klotho proteins in human prostate cancer tissue microarrays as determined by

  2. Reconstructing the Prostate Cancer Transcriptional Regulatory Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    TITLE: Reconstructing the prostate cancer transcriptional regulatory network PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Keyan Salari...CONTRACT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Reconstructing the prostate cancer transcriptional regulatory network 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1...of this study is to reconstruct the prostate cancer transcriptional regulatory network and to experimentally validate novel, clinically-relevant

  3. Counseling the Client with Prostate Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Russell C.; Juhnke, Gerald A.

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is prevalent in the United States and has a far-reaching effect on men and their relationships. Being diagnosed with and treated for prostate cancer often causes men to experience side effects that induce physical, emotional, and social change. Counselors need to be aware of prostate cancer's impact on men and their families.…

  4. Counseling the Client with Prostate Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Russell C.; Juhnke, Gerald A.

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is prevalent in the United States and has a far-reaching effect on men and their relationships. Being diagnosed with and treated for prostate cancer often causes men to experience side effects that induce physical, emotional, and social change. Counselors need to be aware of prostate cancer's impact on men and their families.…

  5. Prostate cancer brachytherapy: guidelines overview.

    PubMed

    Wojcieszek, Piotr; Białas, Brygida

    2012-06-01

    Prostate cancer, due to wide availability of PSA tests, is very often diagnosed in early stage, nowadays. This makes management of this disease even harder in every day oncology care. There is a wide range of treatment options including surgery, radiotherapy and active surveillance, but essential question is which treatment patient and oncologist should decide for. Due to recent publication of Prostate Cancer Results Study Group, in which brachytherapy is one of supreme curative options for prostate cancer, we decided to overview most present european and north american recommendations. National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Brachytherapy Society, European Association of Urology and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie of European Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology guidelines are overviewed, particularly focusing on HDR and LDR brachytherapy.

  6. Prostate cancer brachytherapy: guidelines overview

    PubMed Central

    Białas, Brygida

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer, due to wide availability of PSA tests, is very often diagnosed in early stage, nowadays. This makes management of this disease even harder in every day oncology care. There is a wide range of treatment options including surgery, radiotherapy and active surveillance, but essential question is which treatment patient and oncologist should decide for. Due to recent publication of Prostate Cancer Results Study Group, in which brachytherapy is one of supreme curative options for prostate cancer, we decided to overview most present european and north american recommendations. National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Brachytherapy Society, European Association of Urology and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie of European Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology guidelines are overviewed, particularly focusing on HDR and LDR brachytherapy. PMID:23349655

  7. Potential Cross-Talk between Alternative and Classical NF-κB Pathways in Prostate Cancer Tissues as Measured by a Multi-Staining Immunofluorescence Co-Localization Assay.

    PubMed

    Labouba, Ingrid; Le Page, Cécile; Communal, Laudine; Kristessen, Torbjoern; You, Xiaotian; Péant, Benjamin; Barrès, Véronique; Gannon, Philippe O; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Saad, Fred

    2015-01-01

    While the classical NF-κB/p65 pathway is known to be involved in prostate cancer progression and is associated with poor patient outcome, the role of the NF-κB /RelB alternative protein is not well defined. Here we analyzed the activation of both NF-κB pathways in prostate cancer tissues and correlate this activation with clinical features of the disease. A multiple immunofluorescence technique was employed to concomitantly and quantitatively visualize the nuclear localization of p65 and RelB in 200 paraffin embedded samples. Epithelia were defined using appropriate fluorochrome markers and the resulting immunofluorescent signals were quantified with an automated scoring system. The nuclear frequency of p65 was found to be significantly increased in tumor tissues as compared with normal adjacent tissue, whereas the frequency for RelB was decreased (p < 0.001, Wilcoxon test). As previously reported, p65 nuclear frequency was associated with a risk of biochemical recurrence. Although, RelB nuclear frequency alone did not predict recurrence, the presence of activated RelB reduced the risk of recurrence associated with the activation of p65. For the first time p65/RelB co-distribution was assessed in prostate cancer tissues and suggested a negative crosstalk between the two NF-κB pathways in prostate cancer progression.

  8. Prostate Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing prostate cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  9. proPSA Measurements in Serum and Tissue are Associated with Treatment Necessity Among Men Enrolled in Expectant Management for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Makarov, Danil V.; Isharwal, Sumit; Sokoll, Lori J.; Landis, Patricia; Marlow, Cameron; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Partin, Alan W.; Carter, H. Ballentine; Veltri, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the association of quantitative clinical and pathologic information, including serum and tissue proPSA, with outcomes among men with prostate cancer (PCa) managed expectantly. Experimental Design We identified 71 men enrolled in expectant management (EM) with frozen serum and tissue available from diagnosis. 39 subsequently developed unfavorable biopsies (Gleason score>=7, >=3 cores positive for cancer, >50% of any core involved with cancer), while 32 maintained favorable biopsies (median follow-up: 3.93 years). Serum tPSA, fPSA and [−2]proPSA were measured by the Beckman Coulter immunoassay. [−5/−7]proPSA was evaluated in cancer and benign adjacent tissue areas (BAA) by quantitative immunohistochemistry. Cox proportional hazards and Kaplan-Meier analyses were used to identify significant associations with unfavorable biopsy conversion. Results The ratio [−2]proPSA/%fPSA in serum was significantly higher at diagnosis (0.87+/−0.44pg/mL vs. 0.65+/−0.36pg/mL, p=0.02) in men developing unfavorable biopsies. [−5/−7]proPSA tissue staining was more intense (4104.09+/−3033.50 vs. 2418.06+/−1606.04, p=0.03) and comprised a greater fractional area (11.58%+/−7.08% vs. 6.88%+/−5.20%, p=0.01) in BAA of these men. Serum [−2]proPSA/%fPSA [HR:2.53(1.18–5.41), p=0.02], BAA [−5/−7]proPSA %area [HR:1.06(1.01–1.12), p=0.02] and BAA [−5/−7]proPSA stain intensity [HR:1.000213(1.000071–1.000354), p=0.003] were significantly associated with unfavorable biopsy in Kaplan-Meier and Cox analyses. Serum [−2]proPSA/%fPSA significantly correlated with BAA [−5/−7]proPSA %area (rho=0.40, p=0.002) and BAA [−5/−7]proPSA stain intensity (rho=0.33, p=0.016). Conclusions In a prospective cohort of men enrolled into EM for PCa, serum and tissue levels of proPSA at diagnosis are associated with need for subsequent treatment. The increase in serum proPSA/%fPSA might be driven by increased proPSA production from “pre-malignant” cells

  10. Differential diagnosis of prostate cancer and noncancerous tissue in the peripheral zone and central gland using the quantitative parameters of DCE-MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng; Shi, Changzheng; Zhao, Lianping; Zhou, Quan; Luo, Liangping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of Ktrans, Kep, and Ve values in the differential diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) and noncancerous tissue in the peripheral zone (PZ) and central gland (CG). Methods: A search was conducted of the PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang databases from January 2000 to October 2015 using the search terms “prostate cancer,” “ dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE),” “magnetic resonance imaging,” “Ktrans,” “Kep,” and “Ve.” Studies were selected and included according to strict eligibility criteria. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to compare Ktrans, Kep, and Ve values between PCa and noncancerous tissue. Results: Fourteen studies representing 484 patients highly suspicious for prostate adenocarcinoma were selected for the meta-analysis. We found that Ktrans values measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) were significantly higher in PCa tissue than in noncancerous tissue in the PZ (SMD 1.57, 95% CI 0.98–2.16; z = 5.21, P <0.00001) and CG (SMD 1.19, 95% CI 0.46–1.91; z = 3.21, P = 0.001). Kep values measured by DCE-MRI were significantly higher in PCa than in noncancerous tissue in the PZ (SMD 1.41, 95% CI 0.92–1.91; z = 5.59, P < 0.00001) and CG (SMD 1.57, 95% CI 0.69–2.46; z = 3.49, P = 0.0005). Ve values generated by DCE-MRI were slightly higher in PCa than in noncancerous tissue in the PZ (SMD 0.72, 95% CI 0.17–1.27; z = 2.58, P = 0.010), but sensitivity analysis found that the Ve value was unstable for differentiation between PCa and noncancerous PZ tissue. However, there was no significant difference in the Ve value between PCa and noncancerous CG tissue (SMD −0.29, 95% CI −1.18, 0.59; z = 0.65, P = 0.51). Conclusion: Our meta-analysis shows that Ktrans and Kep were the most

  11. Methylselenium and Prostate Cancer Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    15. NUMBER OF PAGES Selenium, methylselenol , prostate cancer chemoprevention, apoptosis 15 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY...that Methylselenol has been implicated as an active metabolite inhibit one or more steps in the natural history of prostate for the anticancer effect of...in PCa chemoprevention and therapy activity) for their apoptosis responses to the methylselenol by selenium compounds (8). Methylselenol has been impli

  12. Carotenoid intake and adipose tissue carotenoid levels in relation to prostate cancer aggressiveness among African-American and European-American men in the North Carolina-Louisiana prostate cancer project (PCaP).

    PubMed

    Antwi, Samuel O; Steck, Susan E; Su, L Joseph; Hebert, James R; Zhang, Hongmei; Craft, Neal E; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Smith, Gary J; Bensen, Jeannette T; Mohler, James L; Arab, Lenore

    2016-09-01

    Associations between carotenoid intake and prostate cancer (CaP) incidence have varied across studies. This may result from combining indolent with aggressive disease in most studies. This study examined whether carotenoid intake and adipose tissue carotenoid levels were inversely associated with CaP aggressiveness. Data on African-American (AA, n = 1,023) and European-American (EA, n = 1,079) men with incident CaP from North Carolina and Louisiana were analyzed. Dietary carotenoid intake was assessed using a detailed-food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), and abdominal adipose tissue samples were analyzed for carotenoid concentrations using high-performance liquid chromatography. Multivariable logistic regression was used in race-stratified analyses to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) comparing high aggressive CaP with low/intermediate aggressive CaP. Carotenoid intake differed significantly between AAs and EAs, which included higher intake of lycopene among EAs and higher β-cryptoxanthin intake among AAs. Comparing the highest and lowest tertiles, dietary lycopene was associated inversely with high aggressive CaP among EAs (OR = 0.55, 95%CI: 0.34-0.89, Ptrend  = 0.02), while an inverse association was observed between dietary β-cryptoxanthin intake and high aggressive CaP among AAs (OR = 0.56, 95%CI: 0.36-0.87, Ptrend  = 0.01). Adipose tissue α-carotene and lycopene (cis + trans) concentrations were higher among EAs than AAs, and marginally significant inverse linear trends were observed for adipose α-carotene (Ptrend  = 0.07) and lycopene (Ptrend  = 0.11), and CaP aggressiveness among EAs only. These results suggest that diets high in lycopene and β-cryptoxanthin may protect against aggressive CaP among EAs and AAs, respectively. Differences in dietary behaviors may explain the observed racial differences in associations. Prostate 76:1053-1066, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016

  13. Adipose Tissue Derived Stem Cells Promote Prostate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Prantl, Lukas; Muehlberg, Fabian; Navone, Nora M.; Song, Yao-Hua; Vykoukal, Jody; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Alt, Eckhard U.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent evidence indicates that cancer stem cells play an important role in tumor initiation and maintenance. Additionally, the effect of tissue-resident stem cells located in the surrounding healthy tissue on tumor progression has been demonstrated. While most knowledge has been derived from studies of breast cancer cells, little is known regarding the influence of tissue resident stem cells on the tumor biology of prostate cancer. METHODS Twenty male athymic Swiss nu/nu mice (age: 6–8 weeks) were randomized into two treatment groups: 1) subcutaneous injection of 106 MDA PCa 118b human prostate cancer cells into the upper back or 2) subcutaneous injection of 106 MDA PCa 118b cells mixed directly with 105 GFP-labeled human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs). Tumor growth and volumes over the ensuing 3 weeks were assessed using calipers and micro-computed tomography. Immunohistochemistry was performed to identify engrafted hASCs in tumor sections. RESULTS At 3 weeks after injection, the mean tumor volume in the MDA PCa 118b/hASC co-injection group (1019.95 ± 73.49 mm3) was significantly higher than that in the MDA PCa 118b-only group (308.70 ± 21.06 mm3). Engrafted hASCs exhibited the nuclear marker of proliferation Ki67 and expressed markers for endothelial differentiation, indicating their engraftment in tumor vessels. CONCLUSION Our study revealed for the first time that ASCs subcutaneously co-injected with prostate cancer cells engraft and promote tumor progression. Further evaluation of the cross-talk between tumor and local tissue-resident stem cells may lead to new strategies for prostate cancer therapy. PMID:20564322

  14. Interaction Between a Novel p21 Activated Kinase (PAK6) and Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    cancer. The cell cycle signaling regulated by the mitogen activated protein/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) have been linked to tumor...biological roles of PAK6 in prostate cancer cells , and to examine the expression of PAK6 in prostate tissues. We anticipate that by completing the...of prostate cells (Balk, 2002; Gelmann, 2002). Androgen ablation is an effective treatment for the majority of advanced prostate cancer patients

  15. Natural history of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Estebanez, Javier; Teyrouz, Antoin; Gutierrez, Miguel Angel; Linazasoro, Ione; Belloso, Jon; Cano, Carlos; Peralta, Jose Maria; Sanz, Juan Pablo

    2014-06-01

    Prostatic cancer can be a silent tumor, with no symptoms remaining undetectable throughout life . But when it keeps growing, enough to produce symptoms such as bladder neck obstruction, invasion of adjacent organs or distant metastasis, curative treatment is usually impossible. Since PSA emerges, data shows a dramatic increasing in the diagnosis of prostatic cancer, specially low risk tumor. Since then, We are wondering which tumors are suitable to be treated and which ones remain asymptomatic without treatment. Analysing the natural history of prostate cancer, helps us to choose the best atitude treating the tumor, this subjet has been in constant discusión in the last decade. Our article consistes of a reviewing the main publications treating natural history of prostate cancer in prehyphen;and post-PSA era. The indicated studied suggest that most prostate tumors diagnosed today are low grade cancer, as a result with a low mortality. This conclusión shows us the importance of modifying the algorithm of treatment of these tumors.

  16. Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) modeling of late rectal bleeding following external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer: A Test of the QUANTEC-recommended NTCP model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mitchell; Moiseenko, Vitali; Agranovich, Alexander; Karvat, Anand; Kwan, Winkle; Saleh, Ziad H; Apte, Aditya A; Deasy, Joseph O

    2010-10-01

    Validating a predictive model for late rectal bleeding following external beam treatment for prostate cancer would enable safer treatments or dose escalation. We tested the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model recommended in the recent QUANTEC review (quantitative analysis of normal tissue effects in the clinic). One hundred and sixty one prostate cancer patients were treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer at the British Columbia Cancer Agency in a prospective protocol. The total prescription dose for all patients was 74 Gy, delivered in 2 Gy/fraction. 159 3D treatment planning datasets were available for analysis. Rectal dose volume histograms were extracted and fitted to a Lyman-Kutcher-Burman NTCP model. Late rectal bleeding (>grade 2) was observed in 12/159 patients (7.5%). Multivariate logistic regression with dose-volume parameters (V50, V60, V70, etc.) was non-significant. Among clinical variables, only age was significant on a Kaplan-Meier log-rank test (p=0.007, with an optimal cut point of 77 years). Best-fit Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model parameters (with 95% confidence intervals) were: n = 0.068 (0.01, +infinity); m =0.14 (0.0, 0.86); and TD50 = 81 (27, 136) Gy. The peak values fall within the 95% QUANTEC confidence intervals. On this dataset, both models had only modest ability to predict complications: the best-fit model had a Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of rs = 0.099 (p = 0.11) and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.62; the QUANTEC model had rs=0.096 (p= 0.11) and a corresponding AUC of 0.61. Although the QUANTEC model consistently predicted higher NTCP values, it could not be rejected according to the χ(2) test (p = 0.44). Observed complications, and best-fit parameter estimates, were consistent with the QUANTEC-preferred NTCP model. However, predictive power was low, at least partly because the rectal dose distribution characteristics do not vary greatly within this patient

  17. Real-time elastography for the detection of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Georg; Schiffmann, Jonas

    2014-03-01

    The lack of reliable imaging tools in detecting prostate cancer makes a random biopsy still the standard of care to detect prostate cancer. To reduce the number of cores during a biopsy and therefore the risk of biopsy-related complications, an imaging tool which provides reliable guided biopsies is required. Transrectal real-time elastography has shown to have the ability to visualize prostate cancer foci to some extent. In addition to the conventional B-mode image of transrectal ultrasound, it adds information about the stiffness of the prostate tissue. This review highlights the most important studies on elastography to follow the improvements in techniques and to outline the ability to detect prostate cancer and guide biopsies.

  18. Detection of DNA viruses in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Smelov, Vitaly; Bzhalava, Davit; Arroyo Mühr, Laila Sara; Eklund, Carina; Komyakov, Boris; Gorelov, Andrey; Dillner, Joakim; Hultin, Emilie

    2016-04-28

    We tested prostatic secretions from men with and without prostate cancer (13 cases and 13 matched controls) or prostatitis (18 cases and 18 matched controls) with metagenomic sequencing. A large number (>200) of viral reads was only detected among four prostate cancer cases (1 patient each positive for Merkel cell polyomavirus, JC polyomavirus and Human Papillomavirus types 89 or 40, respectively). Lower numbers of reads from a large variety of viruses were detected in all patient groups. Our knowledge of the biology of the prostate may be furthered by the fact that DNA viruses are commonly shed from the prostate and can be readily detected by metagenomic sequencing of expressed prostate secretions.

  19. Carotenoid Intake and Adipose Tissue Carotenoid Levels in Relation to Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness among African-American and European-American Men in the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP)

    PubMed Central

    Antwi, Samuel O.; Steck, Susan E.; Su, L. Joseph; Hebert, James R.; Zhang, Hongmei; Craft, Neal E.; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Smith, Gary J.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Mohler, James L.; Arab, Lenore

    2016-01-01

    Background Associations between carotenoid intake and prostate cancer (CaP) incidence have varied across studies. This may be due to combining indolent with aggressive disease in most studies. This study examined whether carotenoid intake and adipose tissue carotenoid levels were inversely associated with CaP aggressiveness. Methods Data on African-American (AA, n=1,023) and European-American (EA, n=1,079) men with incident CaP from North Carolina and Louisiana were analyzed. Dietary carotenoid intake was assessed using a detailed food frequency questionnaire, and abdominal adipose tissue samples were analyzed for carotenoid concentrations using high-performance liquid chromatography. Multivariable logistic regression was used in race-stratified analysis to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) comparing high aggressive CaP with low/intermediate aggressive CaP. Results Carotenoid intake differed significantly between AAs and EAs, which included higher intake of lycopene among EAs and higher β–cryptoxanthin intake among AAs. Comparing the highest and lowest tertiles, dietary lycopene was associated inversely with high aggressive CaP among EAs (OR=0.55, 95%CI: 0.34–0.89, Ptrend=0.02), while an inverse association was observed between dietary β–cryptoxanthin intake and high aggressive CaP among AAs (OR=0.56, 95%CI: 0.36–0.87, Ptrend=0.01). Adipose tissue α–carotene and lycopene (cis + trans) concentrations were higher among EAs than AAs, and marginally significant inverse linear trends were observed for adipose α–carotene (Ptrend=0.07) and lycopene (Ptrend=0.11), and CaP aggressiveness among EAs only. Conclusions These results suggest that diets high in lycopene and β–cryptoxanthin may protect against aggressive CaP among EAs and AAs, respectively. Differences in dietary behaviors may explain the racial differences in associations. PMID:27271547

  20. Integration of tissue metabolomics, transcriptomics and immunohistochemistry reveals ERG- and gleason score-specific metabolomic alterations in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Meller, Sebastian; Meyer, Hellmuth-A; Bethan, Bianca; Dietrich, Dimo; Maldonado, Sandra González; Lein, Michael; Montani, Matteo; Reszka, Regina; Schatz, Philipp; Peter, Erik; Stephan, Carsten; Jung, Klaus; Kamlage, Beate; Kristiansen, Glen

    2016-01-12

    Integrated analysis of metabolomics, transcriptomics and immunohistochemistry can contribute to a deeper understanding of biological processes altered in cancer and possibly enable improved diagnostic or prognostic tests. In this study, a set of 254 metabolites was determined by gas-chromatography/liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in matched malignant and non-malignant prostatectomy samples of 106 prostate cancer (PCa) patients. Transcription analysis of matched samples was performed on a set of 15 PCa patients using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Expression of several proteins was immunohistochemically determined in 41 matched patient samples and the association with clinico-pathological parameters was analyzed by an integrated data analysis. These results further outline the highly deregulated metabolism of fatty acids, sphingolipids and polyamines in PCa. For the first time, the impact of the ERG translocation on the metabolome was demonstrated, highlighting an altered fatty acid oxidation in TMPRSS2-ERG translocation positive PCa specimens. Furthermore, alterations in cholesterol metabolism were found preferentially in high grade tumors, enabling the cells to create energy storage. With this integrated analysis we could not only confirm several findings from previous metabolomic studies, but also contradict others and finally expand our concepts of deregulated biological pathways in PCa.

  1. National Cancer Institute Prostate Cancer Genetics Workshop.

    PubMed

    Catalona, William J; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Camp, Nicola J; Chanock, Stephen J; Cooney, Kathleen A; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A; FitzGerald, Liesel M; Freedman, Matthew L; Gudmundsson, Julius; Kittles, Rick A; Margulies, Elliott H; McGuire, Barry B; Ostrander, Elaine A; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Witte, John S; Isaacs, William B

    2011-05-15

    Compelling evidence supports a genetic component to prostate cancer susceptibility and aggressiveness. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified more than 30 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with prostate cancer susceptibility. It remains unclear, however, whether such genetic variants are associated with disease aggressiveness--one of the most important questions in prostate cancer research today. To help clarify this and substantially expand research in the genetic determinants of prostate cancer aggressiveness, the first National Cancer Institute Prostate Cancer Genetics Workshop assembled researchers to develop plans for a large new research consortium and patient cohort. The workshop reviewed the prior work in this area and addressed the practical issues in planning future studies. With new DNA sequencing technology, the potential application of sequencing information to patient care is emerging. The workshop, therefore, included state-of-the-art presentations by experts on new genotyping technologies, including sequencing and associated bioinformatics issues, which are just beginning to be applied to cancer genetics. ©2011 AACR

  2. Raman Spectroscopy Study of Prostatic Adenocarcinoma Bulk Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devpura, S.; Dai, H.; Thakur, J. S.; Naik, R.; Cao, A.; Pandya, A.; Auner, G. W.; Sarkar, F.; Sakr, W.; Naik, V.

    2009-03-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer among men. The mortality rate for this disease can be dramatically reduced if it can be diagnosed in its early stages. Raman spectroscopy is one of the optical techniques which can provide fingerprints of a disease in terms of its molecular composition which changes due to the onset of disease. The aim of this project is to investigate the differences in the Raman spectra to identify benign epithelium (BE), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and adenocarcinoma of various Gleason grades in archived bulk tissues embedded in paraffin wax. For each tissue, two adjacent tissue sections were cut and dewaxed, where one of the sections was stained using haematoxylin and eosin for histological examination and the other unstained adjacent section was used for Raman spectroscopic studies. We have collected Raman spectra from 10 prostatic adenocarcinoma dewaxed tissue sections using Raman microscope (785 nm excitation laser). The data were analyzed using statistical methods of principal component analysis and discriminant function analysis to classify the tissue regions. The results indicate that Raman Spectroscopy can differentiate between BE, PIN and Cancer regions.

  3. Unusual Soft Tissue Uptake of F-18 Sodium Fluoride in Three Patients Undergoing F-18 NaF PET/CT Bone Scans for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Andrew S; Howard, Brandon A

    2017-09-01

    Three males aged 71 to 80 years with known stage IV metastatic prostate cancer underwent F-18 sodium fluoride (NaF) PET/CT to assess osseous metastatic disease burden and stability. In addition to F-18 NaF avid known osseous metastases, each patient also exhibited increased F-18 NaF activity in soft tissues. The first patient exhibited multiple F-18 NaF avid enlarged retroperitoneal and pelvic lymph nodes on consecutive PET/CT scans. The second patient demonstrated an F-18 NaF avid thyroid nodule on consecutive PET/CT scans. The third patient exhibited increased F-18 NaF activity in a hepatic metastasis.

  4. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    institutions. A major project in the lab is targeted therapy of prostate cancer using PSMA-guided aptamers. Prabhat Goswami, PhD; Professor...derived dendritic cell (DC) and T cell functional deficiencies. Long-term goals are to develop novel, immune-based therapies for advanced solid tumors...and radiolabeling of peptides and small molecules for small molecule cancer therapy , molecular imaging, and radionuclide therapy for cancer. He

  5. The Prostate Health Index Selectively Identifies Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Stacy; Sanda, Martin G.; Broyles, Dennis L.; Shin, Sanghyuk S.; Bangma, Chris H.; Wei, John T.; Partin, Alan W.; Klee, George G.; Slawin, Kevin M.; Marks, Leonard S.; van Schaik, Ron H. N.; Chan, Daniel W.; Sokoll, Lori J.; Cruz, Amabelle B.; Mizrahi, Isaac A.; Catalona, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Prostate Health Index (phi) is a new test combining total, free and [-2]proPSA into a single score. It was recently approved by the FDA and is now commercially available in the U.S., Europe and Australia. We investigate whether phi improves specificity for detecting clinically significant prostate cancer and can help reduce prostate cancer over diagnosis. Materials and Methods From a multicenter prospective trial we identified 658 men age 50 years or older with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 ng/ml and normal digital rectal examination who underwent prostate biopsy. In this population we compared the performance of prostate specific antigen, % free prostate specific antigen, [-2]proPSA and phi to predict biopsy results and, specifically, the presence of clinically significant prostate cancer using multiple criteria. Results The Prostate Health Index was significantly higher in men with Gleason 7 or greater and “Epstein significant” cancer. On receiver operating characteristic analysis phi had the highest AUC for overall cancer (AUCs phi 0.708, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.648, [-2]proPSA 0.550 and prostate specific antigen 0.516), Gleason 7 or greater (AUCs phi 0.707, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.661, [-2]proPSA 0.558, prostate specific antigen 0.551) and significant cancer (AUCs phi 0.698, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.654, [-2]proPSA 0.550, prostate specific antigen 0.549). At the 90% sensitivity cut point for phi (a score less than 28.6) 30.1% of patients could have been spared an unnecessary biopsy for benign disease or insignificant prostate cancer compared to 21.7% using percent free prostate specific antigen. Conclusions The new phi test outperforms its individual components of total, free and [-2]proPSA for the identification of clinically significant prostate cancer. Phi may be useful as part of a multivariable approach to reduce prostate biopsies and over diagnosis. PMID:25463993

  6. Prostate cancer immunotherapy: beyond immunity to curability.

    PubMed

    Simons, Jonathan W

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. It is the first prevalent cancer in which overall survival in advanced disease is modestly, but objectively, improved with outpatient delivered dendritic cell-based immunotherapy. More prostate cancer patients have enrolled through Facebook and trusted-site Internet searches in clinical trials for prostate cancer vaccine-based immunotherapy than in immunotherapy trials for lung, breast, colon, pancreas, ovarian, and bladder cancer combined in the past 7 years. Exceptional responses to anti-CTLA-4 treatment have been documented in clinics, and prostate cancer neoantigen characterization and T-cell clonotyping are in their research ascendancy. The prostate is an accessory organ; it is not required for fertility, erectile function, or urinary continence. The true evolutionary advantage of having a prostate for male mammalian physiology is a topic of speculation in seminar rooms and on bar stools, but it remains unknown. Hundreds of prostate lineage-unique proteins (PLUP) exist among the >37,000 normal human prostate lineage-unique open reading frames that can be targeted for immunologic ablation of PLUP(+) prostate cancer cells by prostate-specific autoimmunity. This bioengineered graft-versus-prostate disease is a powerful strategy that can eliminate deaths from prostate cancer. Immunologic tolerance to prostate cancer can be overcome at every clinical stage of presentation. This Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads article aims to present advances in the past two decades of basic, translational, and clinical research in prostate cancer, including bioengineering B-cell and T-cell responses, and ongoing prostate cancer immunotherapy trials.

  7. A basal stem cell signature identifies aggressive prostate cancer phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bryan A.; Sokolov, Artem; Uzunangelov, Vladislav; Baertsch, Robert; Newton, Yulia; Graim, Kiley; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M.; Witte, Owen N.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from numerous cancers suggests that increased aggressiveness is accompanied by up-regulation of signaling pathways and acquisition of properties common to stem cells. It is unclear if different subtypes of late-stage cancer vary in stemness properties and whether or not these subtypes are transcriptionally similar to normal tissue stem cells. We report a gene signature specific for human prostate basal cells that is differentially enriched in various phenotypes of late-stage metastatic prostate cancer. We FACS-purified and transcriptionally profiled basal and luminal epithelial populations from the benign and cancerous regions of primary human prostates. High-throughput RNA sequencing showed the basal population to be defined by genes associated with stem cell signaling programs and invasiveness. Application of a 91-gene basal signature to gene expression datasets from patients with organ-confined or hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer revealed that metastatic small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma was molecularly more stem-like than either metastatic adenocarcinoma or organ-confined adenocarcinoma. Bioinformatic analysis of the basal cell and two human small cell gene signatures identified a set of E2F target genes common between prostate small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and primary prostate basal cells. Taken together, our data suggest that aggressive prostate cancer shares a conserved transcriptional program with normal adult prostate basal stem cells. PMID:26460041

  8. Telomerase activity in needle biopsies from prostate cancer and benign prostates.

    PubMed

    Wymenga, L F; Wisman, G B; Veenstra, R; Ruiters, M H; Mensink, H J

    2000-04-01

    Telomerase activation is thought to be essential for the immortality of cancer cells. It may be a prognostic factor in small volume well differentiated prostate cancers and hence a guide for the aggressiveness of the approach. The length of the chromosome tips (telomeres) are maintained by a specific enzyme (telomerase) independently of the normal cell division cycle. Although telomerase is not expressed in most normal human tissues, it is expressed in most human tumours. For the detection of telomerase in small prostate needle biopsy samples a recently developed telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay was used. The aim of the present study was: to measure telomerase activity in human prostate samples, and to evaluate the applicability of this assay on specimens from a prostate biopsy. From 36 patients referred for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) or suspicion of having prostate cancer a total of 288 prostate biopsy samples were obtained (8 in each patient). When the digital rectal examination was abnormal and/or when the PSA level was elevated in L.U.T.S., or asymptomatic patients' tissue samples were obtained by transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided biopsies. Samples were tested for telomerase activity by a modified TRAP and forwarded for histology. In 19 out of 36 patients prostate cancer was diagnosed on histology. In 11 of these 19 tumours substantial telomerase activity was detected, whereas only very low telomerase activity existed in 2 of 17 samples from benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) patients. In this small series the relative telomerase activity in prostate cancer correlated with histopathological grade. Our results show the applicability of a TRAP assay to measure telomerase activity in small needle biopsied prostate samples. In poorly differentiated and metastatic cancer we observed that levels of telomerase activity were high. To establish accuracy and to distinguish the 'relative good from the ugly' further study is needed.

  9. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic castrationresistant prostate cancer: a report from the PETRUS prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Massard, Christophe; Oulhen, Marianne; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Auger, Nathalie; Foulon, Stéphanie; Abou-Lovergne, Aurélie; Billiot, Fanny; Valent, Alexander; Marty, Virginie; Loriot, Yohann; Fizazi, Karim; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Francoise

    2016-01-01

    Molecular characterization of cancer samples is hampered by tumor tissue availability in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. We reported the results of prospective PETRUS study of biomarker assessment in paired primary prostatic tumors, metastatic biopsies and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Among 54 mCRPC patients enrolled, 38 (70%) had biopsies containing more than 50% tumour cells. 28 (52%) patients were analyzed for both tissue samples and CTCs. FISH for AR-amplification and TMPRSS2-ERG translocation were successful in 54% and 32% in metastatic biopsies and primary tumors, respectively. By comparing CellSearch and filtration (ISET)-enrichment combined to four color immunofluorescent staining, we showed that CellSearch and ISET isolated distinct subpopulations of CTCs: CTCs undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, CTC clusters and large CTCs with cytomorphological characteristics but no detectable markers were isolated using ISET. Epithelial CTCs detected by the CellSearch were mostly lost during the ISET-filtration. AR-amplification was detected in CellSearch-captured CTCs, but not in ISET-enriched CTCs which harbor exclusively AR gain of copies. Eighty-eight percent concordance for ERG-rearrangement was observed between metastatic biopsies and CTCs even if additional ERG-alteration patterns were detected in ISET-enriched CTCs indicating a higher heterogeneity in CTCs. Molecular screening of metastatic biopsies is achievable in a multicenter context. Our data indicate that CTCs detected by the CellSearch and the ISET-filtration systems are not only phenotypically but also genetically different. Close attention must be paid to CTC characterization since neither approach tested here fully reflects the tremendous phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity present in CTCs from mCRPC patients. PMID:27391263

  10. Sonic Hedgehog pathway activity in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    BRAGINA, OLGA; NJUNKOVA, NATALJA; SERGEJEVA, SVETLANA; JÄRVEKÜLG, LILIAN; KOGERMAN, PRIIT

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal activation of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway has been demonstrated in a number of human tumors, including prostate cancer. The study aimed to assess the activity of Shh pathway components (Shh, Gli1, Gli2 and Gli3), as well as the proliferation markers FoxA1 and Notch1 during cancer progression in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP). We evaluated changes in respective proteins by immunohistochemistry at three time points (12, 17 and 21 weeks of age) in the tissue of TRAMP and C57Bl/6 mice. Moreover, the expression of mRNA of these proteins was assessed. The present study shows a significant age-dependent increase in the number of Shh, Gli1, Gli3 and FoxA1-positive prostate cells and a decrease in Gli2-positive cells in TRAMP. The study also supports the hypothesis that the development of prostate cancer and its metastasis is associated with activation of the Shh signaling pathway. PMID:22966302

  11. Evaluation of two mitochondrial DNA biomarkers for prostate cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Maragh, Samantha; Veltri, Robert W; Lund, Steven P; Mangold, Leslie; Isharwal, Sumit; Christudass, Christhunesa S; Partin, Alan W; Humphreys, Elizabeth B; Sorbara, Lynn; Srivastava, Sudhir; Wagner, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    A 3.4kb deletion (3.4kbΔ ) in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) found in histologically normal prostate biopsy specimens has been reported to be a biomarker for the increased probability of prostate cancer. Increased mtDNA copy number is also reported as associated with cancer. Independent evaluation of these two potential prostate cancer biomarkers using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) prostate tissue and matched urine and serum from a high risk cohort of men with and without prostate cancer. Biomarker levels were detected via qPCR. Both 3.4kbΔ and mtDNA levels were significantly higher in cancer patient FFPE cores (p= 0.045 and p= 0.070 respectively at > 90% confidence). Urine from cancer patients contained significantly higher levels of mtDNA (p= 0.006, 64.3% sensitivity, 86.7% specificity). Combining the 3.4kbΔ and mtDNA gave better performance of detecting prostate cancer than either biomarker alone (FFPE 73.7% sensitivity, 65% specificity; urine 64.3% sensitivity, 100% specificity). In serum, there was no difference for any of the biomarkers. This is the first report on detecting the 3.4kbΔ in urine and evaluating mtDNA levels as a prostate cancer biomarker. A confirmation study with increased sample size and possibly with additional biomarkers would need to be conducted to corroborate and extend these observations.

  12. Obesity and prostate enlargement in men with localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Ryan P; Han, Misop; Partin, Alan W; Humphreys, Elizabeth; Freedland, Stephen J; Parsons, J Kellogg

    2011-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Obesity is associated with prostate enlargement in men without prostate cancer. This study demonstrates an association between obesity and prostate enlargement in men with prostate cancer, and leads to possible implications for prostate cancer screening and diagnosis. • To determine if obesity is associated with prostate size in men with prostate cancer. • We examined preoperative body mass index (BMI) and whole prostate weight in a cohort of 16,325 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer from 1975 to 2008 at a single institution. • We used multivariable regression modelling adjusting for age, year of surgery, preoperative serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), pathological stage and Gleason grade. • Of the entire cohort, 13,343 (82%) patients had a prostate weight of at least 40 g. These men were older (P < 0.001), had a higher preoperative BMI (P < 0.002), higher preoperative PSA (P < 0.001), and were more likely to have pT2 disease (P < 0.001). • In multivariable regression, preoperative BMI was associated with increased prostate weight: for each 1 kg/m(2) increase in BMI, prostate weight increased by 0.45 g (95% CI 0.35-0.55, P-trend < 0.001). • Compared with men with BMI < 25 kg/m(2) , men with a BMI ≥35 kg/m(2) had a 40% (odds ratio 1.40, 95% CI 1.01-1.95) increased risk of prostate weight of at least 40 g and a 70% (odds ratio 1.70, 95% CI 1.32-2.20) increased risk of prostate weight of at least 50 g. • In men with localized prostate cancer, obesity is associated with an increased risk of prostate enlargement. • These data validate other observations linking obesity with prostate enlargement and may have important ramifications for prostate cancer diagnosis in obese men. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  13. Prostate Cancer Mortality and Herbicide Exposure in Vietnam Veterans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    selection in case - control studies is to avoid choosing as 12controls persons with diseases potentially related to the exposure under study . We took as...1,149 controls for nested prostate cancer case - control studies "• Identified 556 cases and 2,731 controls for comparison studies of soft-tissue...prostate cancer case-control study and began records abstraction for comparison case - control studies * Carried out standardized mortality analysis of

  14. Voltage-gated sodium channels were differentially expressed in human normal prostate, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shan, Bin; Dong, Mei; Tang, He; Wang, Na; Zhang, Jin; Yan, Changqing; Jiao, Xiaocui; Zhang, Hailin; Wang, Chuan

    2014-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are expressed not only in excitable cells but also in numerous metastatic cells, particularly in certain types of cancer cells. In some types of cancer, including prostate cancer, the expression of VGSCs is associated with cancer migration, invasion and metastasis in vivo. However, the detailed expression profiles of VGSC α subunits in normal human prostate, in prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic cancer remain controversial. In the present study, quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to systematically detect all subtypes of VGSC α subunits in normal human prostate, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer cells. The expression profile of VGSC α subunits was observed to differ between these cell types. Nav1.5 was the major isoform expressed in normal human prostate tissue, while Nav1.5 and Nav1.2 were the predominant isoforms in BPH tissue. However, in PC-3 and LNCaP cells, two typical prostate cancer cell lines, Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 were abundantly expressed. By comparing the relative expression levels of Nav1.5, Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 in these cells, the mRNA levels of Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 were identified to be 6- to 27-fold higher in PC-3 and LNCaP cells than in either normal or BPH samples (P<0.05); however, Nav1.5 mRNA levels were relatively lower compared with those of Nav1.6 or Nav1.7 in all cells analyzed. To confirm whether Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 expression in cancer cells was functional, a patch-clamp technique was used to record whole-cell currents. A tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current was successfully recorded in PC-3 cells, but not in LNCaP cells. It was concluded that although all types of VGSC α subunits exhibited low expression levels in normal prostate and BPH cells, both Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 were significantly upregulated in the prostate cancer cell lines, suggesting these subtypes may be potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for certain types of prostate cancer in humans.

  15. Computer-aided detection of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Rafael; Pérez-Cortés, Juan C; Toselli, Alejandro H; Juan, Alfons

    2007-07-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in men and is a major cause of mortality in developed countries. Detection of prostate carcinoma at an early stage is crucial for successful treatment. A method for the analysis of transrectal ultrasound images aimed at computer-aided diagnosis of prostate cancer is tested in this paper. First, two classifiers based on k-nearest neighbors and Hidden Markov models are compared. Second, the diagnostic capacity of our system is tested by means of a set of experiments where humans with varying degrees of experience classified a set of ultrasound images with and without the aid of the computer-aided system. The corpus used in this study was specifically acquired for this purpose. It consists of 4944 ultrasound images corresponding to 303 patients, and is publicly available for non-commercial use upon request. The best classification results achieve an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 61.6%. However, the diagnostic capacity of an expert urologist using the computer-aided system improves only slightly compared with his/her capacity without the aid of the system. Despite the difficulty of this task, the obtained results indicate that discrimination between cancerous and non-cancerous tissue is possible to a certain degree. The computer-aided system helps an inexperienced user to make a better diagnosis, however it must be able to perform better in order to be useful in a real-world clinical context.

  16. Reconstructing the Prostate Cancer Transcriptional Regulatory Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    TITLE: Reconstructing the prostate cancer transcriptional regulatory network PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Keyan Salari...2009 – 30 Sep 2010 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0414 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Reconstructing the prostate cancer transcriptional regulatory...to novel diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic strategies in the future. The overall objective of this study was to reconstruct the prostate

  17. The epidemiology of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Peter; Severi, Gianluca; Giles, Graham G

    2003-05-01

    The etiology of prostate cancer remains virtually unknown. Although there are a number of new leads with regard to risk factors for prostate cancer, more research is required to confirm them. There is little purpose in conducting further case-control studies of prostate cancer-particularly since the use of PSA testing has become wide-spread. Instead, future epidemiologic studies should focus on prostate tumor subclassification, in terms of method of detection, markers of biological "aggressiveness," and genetic changes. Many of these new leads involve the possible influence of polymorphisms in key genes involved in important physiologic processes in the prostate. To fully explore the complexity of interrelationships between the several elements in these pathways will require large cohort studies in which blood is sampled prior to diagnosis. Such studies will be important for identifying which modifiable aspects of lifestyle (such as diet, alcohol, tobacco, physical activity) might be targeted for intervention, to reduce risk. The detection of early prostate cancers by PSA testing relatives of men with prostate cancer has affected the prevalence of phenocopies and, hence, the meaningfulness of risk estimation in prostate cancer families. Because multiple-case families form the substrate for gene hunting via linkage analysis, this phenocopy phenomenon is going to cause considerable confusion and wasted effort. Presently, men with a family history of prostate cancer can be provided with little advice in terms of preventive action. It is likely that one or more genetic mutations associated with a high risk for prostate cancer will be identified in the near future. Even so, the risks probably will be similar to those for mutations in the first two breast cancer genes--informative for very few families. It is difficult to foresee, as and when high-risk mutation carriers are identified, what advice should be offered to them: prophylactic prostatectomies seem to have less

  18. The histology of prostate tissue following prostatic artery embolization for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Camara-Lopes, George; Mattedi, Romulo; Antunes, Alberto A; Carnevale, Francisco C; Cerri, Giovanni G; Srougi, Miguel; Alves, Venancio A; Leite, Katia R M

    2013-01-01

    Prostatic artery embolization (PAE) for the treatment of patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is believed to be a safe procedure with a low risk of adverse side effects. Artery embolization is a viable treatment option in patients who are refractory to the classic noninvasive treatments. Knowledge of the histological characteristics of prostate tissue following the procedure is still limited. In this study, we describe the microscopic aspects of the prostate following PAE for BPH. Two patients underwent transurethral resections of the prostate (TURP) after PAE. Embolizations were performed under local anesthesia with an initial pelvic angiography to evaluate the iliac vessels and the prostate arteries using a 2.8 French microcatheter. The prostate was embolized with 300-500 µm Microspheres (Embosphere ®), using complete blood stasis as the end point. The prostate tissues were analyzed histologically to characterize the effects of the embolization. The embolic material within the prostate tissue was easily identified as homogeneous, bright eosin-red spheroids filling the vessel lumens. Ischemic necrosis surrounded or not by chronic inflammatory reactions containing macrophages were considered as a result of the artery embolization. Also, some aspects related to the healing process were observed being fibrotic nodules surrounded by glands with squamous metaplasia of the epithelial lining the most important. In the remaining sections, due to the precocious surgical intervention, the classic findings of BPH were still present with the glandular and stromal hyperplasia associated with nonspecific chronic prostatitis. This is the first description of prostate histology in BPH patients treated by PAE, a new procedure that is being used increasingly as a therapeutic intervention. The recognition of the changes caused by this new modality of treatment has become a very important differential in a chronic granulomatous reaction of the prostate

  19. Proton beam therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Thomas J; Lee, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    Through unique physical dose deposition properties, proton beam therapy (PBT) potentiates radiation dose escalation to target tissue while minimizing radiation exposure to nontarget organs. Proton beam therapy has been used to treat prostate cancer for several decades; however, access to proton centers has been restricted to the limited number of proton centers. Because of recent enhancements in availability and treatment delivery systems, interest in PBT has been burgeoning among oncologists, industry experts, and prostate cancer patients. As a result, the importance of understanding the collective experience to date and technical aspects of PBT delivery has become increasingly important in cancer medicine. This review article is intended to discuss the fundamentals of PBT treatment, critically review the literature on PBT for localized prostate cancer, and describe the continued development of proton beam technology for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  20. Promoter Methylation in Prostate Cancer and its Application for the Early Detection of Prostate Cancer Using Serum and Urine Samples

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Hafiz

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in men. However, prostate cancer can be effectively treated and cured, if it is diagnosed in its early stages when the tumor is still confined to the prostate. Combined with the digital rectal examination, the PSA test has been widely used to detect prostate cancer. But, the PSA screening method for early detection of prostate cancer is not reliable due to the high prevalence of false positive and false negative results. Epigenetic alterations including hypermethylation of gene promoters are believed to be the early events in neoplastic progression and thus these methylated genes can serve as biomarkers for the detection of cancer from clinical specimens. This review discusses DNA methylation of several gene promoters during prostate carcinogenesis and evaluates the usefulness of monitoring methylated DNA sequences, such as GSTP1, RASSF1A, RARβ2 and galectin-3, for early detection of prostate cancer in tissue biopsies, serum and urine. PMID:20657713

  1. Dosimetric effect of tissue heterogeneity for (125)I prostate implants.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Susana Maria; Teixeira, Nuno José; Fernandes, Lisete; Teles, Pedro; Vaz, Pedro

    2014-11-01

    To use Monte Carlo (MC) together with voxel phantoms to analyze the tissue heterogeneity effect in the dose distributions and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for (125)I prostate implants. Dose distribution calculations in low dose-rate brachytherapy are based on the dose deposition around a single source in a water phantom. This formalism does not take into account tissue heterogeneities, interseed attenuation, or finite patient dimensions effects. Tissue composition is especially important due to the photoelectric effect. The computed tomographies (CT) of two patients with prostate cancer were used to create voxel phantoms for the MC simulations. An elemental composition and density were assigned to each structure. Densities of the prostate, vesicles, rectum and bladder were determined through the CT electronic densities of 100 patients. The same simulations were performed considering the same phantom as pure water. Results were compared via dose-volume histograms and EUD for the prostate and rectum. The mean absorbed doses presented deviations of 3.3-4.0% for the prostate and of 2.3-4.9% for the rectum, when comparing calculations in water with calculations in the heterogeneous phantom. In the calculations in water, the prostate D 90 was overestimated by 2.8-3.9% and the rectum D 0.1cc resulted in dose differences of 6-8%. The EUD resulted in an overestimation of 3.5-3.7% for the prostate and of 7.7-8.3% for the rectum. The deposited dose was consistently overestimated for the simulation in water. In order to increase the accuracy in the determination of dose distributions, especially around the rectum, the introduction of the model-based algorithms is recommended.

  2. Dosimetric effect of tissue heterogeneity for 125I prostate implants

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Susana Maria; Teixeira, Nuno José; Fernandes, Lisete; Teles, Pedro; Vaz, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Aim To use Monte Carlo (MC) together with voxel phantoms to analyze the tissue heterogeneity effect in the dose distributions and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for 125I prostate implants. Background Dose distribution calculations in low dose-rate brachytherapy are based on the dose deposition around a single source in a water phantom. This formalism does not take into account tissue heterogeneities, interseed attenuation, or finite patient dimensions effects. Tissue composition is especially important due to the photoelectric effect. Materials and methods The computed tomographies (CT) of two patients with prostate cancer were used to create voxel phantoms for the MC simulations. An elemental composition and density were assigned to each structure. Densities of the prostate, vesicles, rectum and bladder were determined through the CT electronic densities of 100 patients. The same simulations were performed considering the same phantom as pure water. Results were compared via dose–volume histograms and EUD for the prostate and rectum. Results The mean absorbed doses presented deviations of 3.3–4.0% for the prostate and of 2.3–4.9% for the rectum, when comparing calculations in water with calculations in the heterogeneous phantom. In the calculations in water, the prostate D90 was overestimated by 2.8–3.9% and the rectum D0.1cc resulted in dose differences of 6–8%. The EUD resulted in an overestimation of 3.5–3.7% for the prostate and of 7.7–8.3% for the rectum. Conclusions The deposited dose was consistently overestimated for the simulation in water. In order to increase the accuracy in the determination of dose distributions, especially around the rectum, the introduction of the model-based algorithms is recommended. PMID:25337412

  3. Prostate cancer radiosensitization through PARP-1 hyperactivation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ying; Bey, Erik A.; Li, Long-Shan; Kabbani, Wareef; Yan, Jingsheng; Xie, Xian-Jin; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Gao, Jinming; Boothman, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The clinical experimental agent, β-lapachone (Arq 501), can act as a potent radiosensitizer in vitro through an unknown mechanism. In this study, we analyzed the mechanism to determine whether β-lapachone may warrant clinical evaluation as a radiosensitizer. β-lapachone killed prostate cancer cells by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) metabolic bioactivation, triggering a massive induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), irreversible DNA single strand breaks (SSBs), PARP-1 hyperactivation, NAD+/ATP depletion, and μ-calpain-induced programmed necrosis. In combination with ionizing radiation (IR), β-lapachone radiosensitized NQO1+ prostate cancer cells, under conditions where nontoxic doses of either agent alone achieved threshold levels of SSBs required for hyperactivation of PARP-1. Combination therapy significantly elevated SSBs, γ-H2AX foci formation, and poly(ADP-ribosylation) of PARP-1, which were associated with ATP loss and induction of μ-calpain-induced programmed cell death. Radiosensitization by β-lapachone was blocked by the NQO1 inhibitor, dicoumarol, or the PARP-1 inhibitor, DPQ. In a mouse xenograft model of prostate cancer, β-lapachone synergized with IR to promote antitumor efficacy. NQO1 levels were elevated in ~60% of human prostate tumors evaluated relative to adjacent normal tissue, where β-lapachone might be efficacious alone or in combination with radiation. Our findings offer a rationale for clinical assessment of β-lapachone (Arq501) as a radiosensitizer in prostate cancers that overexpress NQO1, offering a potentially synergistic targeting strategy to exploit PARP-1 hyperactivation. PMID:20940411

  4. T-cadherin in prostate cancer: relationship with cancer progression, differentiation and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Dasen, Boris; Vlajnic, Tatjana; Mengus, Chantal; Ruiz, Christian; Bubendorf, Lukas; Spagnoli, Giulio; Wyler, Stephen; Erne, Paul; Resink, Thérèse J; Philippova, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men. T-cadherin (CDH13) is an atypical GPI-anchored member of the cadherin family of adhesion molecules. Its gene was reported to be downregulated in a small series of prostate tumours. T-cadherin protein expression/localisation in prostate tissue has never been investigated. The purpose of our study was to analyse CDH13 gene and protein levels in large sets of healthy and cancer prostate tissue specimens and evaluate CDH13 effects on the sensitivity of prostate cancer cells to chemotherapy. Analysis of CDH13 gene expression in the TCGA RNAseq dataset for prostate adenocarcinoma (N = 550) and in tissue samples (N = 101) by qPCR revealed weak positive correlation with the Gleason score in cancer and no difference between benign and malignant specimens. Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue sections (N = 12) and microarrays (N = 128 specimens) demonstrated the presence of CDH13 on the apical surface and at intercellular contacts of cytokeratin 8-positive luminal cells and cells double-positive for cytokeratin 8 and basal marker p63. T-cadherin protein expression was markedly upregulated in cancer as compared to benign prostate hyperplasia, the increase being more prominent in organ-confined than in advanced hormone-resistant tumours, and correlated negatively with the Gleason pattern. T-cadherin protein level correlated strongly with cytokeratin 8 and with an abnormal diffuse/membrane localisation pattern of p63. Ectopic expression of CDH13 in metastatic prostate cancer cell line DU145 reduced cell growth in the presence of doxorubicin. We conclude that CDH13 protein, but not its gene expression, is strongly upregulated in early prostate cancer, correlates with changes in luminal/basal differentiation and p63 localisation, and promotes sensitivity of cancer cells to doxorubicin. These data identify CDH13 as a novel molecule relevant for prostate cancer progression and

  5. Aberrant DNA Methylation and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sunipa; Buckles, Eric; Estrada, John; Koochekpour, Shahriar

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most prevalent cancer, a significant contributor to morbidity and a leading cause of cancer-related death in men in Western industrialized countries. In contrast to genetic changes that vary among individual cases, somatic epigenetic alterations are early and highly consistent events. Epigenetics encompasses several different phenomena, such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, RNA interference, and genomic imprinting. Epigenetic processes regulate gene expression and can change malignancy-associated phenotypes such as growth, migration, invasion, or angiogenesis. Methylations of certain genes are associated with PCa progression. Compared to normal prostate tissues, several hypermethylated genes have also been identified in benign prostate hyperplasia, which suggests a role for aberrant methylation in this growth dysfunction. Global and gene-specific DNA methylation could be affected by environmental and dietary factors. Among other epigenetic changes, aberrant DNA methylation might have a great potential as diagnostic or prognostic marker for PCa and could be tested in tumor tissues and various body fluids (e.g., serum, urine). The DNA methylation markers are simple in nature, have high sensitivity, and could be detected either quantitatively or qualitatively. Availability of genome-wide screening methodologies also allows the identification of epigenetic signatures in high throughput population studies. Unlike irreversible genetic changes, epigenetic alterations are reversible and could be used for PCa targeted therapies. PMID:22547956

  6. Prostate cancer and inflammation: the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Sfanos, Karen S; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is now known to contribute to several forms of human cancer, with an estimated 20% of adult cancers attributable to chronic inflammatory conditions caused by infectious agents, chronic noninfectious inflammatory diseases and / or other environmental factors. Indeed, chronic inflammation is now regarded as an ‘enabling characteristic’ of human cancer. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literature on the evidence for a role for chronic inflammation in prostate cancer aetiology, with a specific focus on recent advances regarding the following: (i) potential stimuli for prostatic inflammation; (ii) prostate cancer immunobiology; (iii) inflammatory pathways and cytokines in prostate cancer risk and development; (iv) proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) as a risk factor lesion to prostate cancer development; and (v) the role of nutritional or other antiinflammatory compounds in reducing prostate cancer risk. PMID:22212087

  7. Vaccine Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Center IRB, and the I owa City VA Medical Center Research and Development Committee. During the second and t hird years we have been recruiting pa...American Urologic Association (AUA). (3) Talks to prostate cancer survivor support groups in at the University of I owa , Mercy Medical Center in Cedar

  8. Methylselenium and Prostate Cancer Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    methylselenol , prostate cancer chemoprevention, apoptosis 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...considered an immediate precursor to the in vivo active anticancer selenium metabolite methylselenol , greatly sensitized HRPCa cells to undergo

  9. Boron intake and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Alejandro; Peters, Ulrike; Lampe, Johanna W; White, Emily

    2007-12-01

    Experimental studies suggest that boron may prevent prostate cancer. Only one small epidemiological study has been conducted of boron, which found that those in the highest quartile of boron intake had less than half the risk of prostate cancer versus those in the lowest quartile. We evaluated the association between boron intake and prostate cancer within the VITamins And Lifestyle (VITAL) cohort. A total of 35,244 men completed the baseline supplement and food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) in 2000-2002. A boron database was constructed from published sources to estimate boron intake from the FFQ and from multivitamins. A total of 832 men developed prostate cancer from baseline to 31 December 2004. Dietary boron intake and total boron intake from diet plus multivitamins were not associated with prostate cancer risk. The hazard ratio of prostate cancer for those in the highest versus lowest quartile of total boron intake was 1.17 (95% CI 0.85, 1.61). This risk did not vary by prostate cancer stage or Gleason score. Furthermore, none of the foods high in boron content was associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer. This cohort study provides no evidence for a preventive role of boron intake on prostate cancer. Since few studies exist on this topic, future research is needed to better elucidate any role that boron may play in the prevention of prostate cancer.

  10. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Oncology Departments at the University of Iowa and other institutions. A major project in the lab is targeted therapy of prostate cancer using PSMA...develop novel, immune-based therapies for advanced solid tumors, using the knowledge we gain from our pre-clinical studies. Because her goal is to...in the molecular design, organic synthesis, characterization, and radiolabeling of peptides and small molecules for small molecule cancer therapy

  11. Targeting prostate cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Crea, Francesco; Mathews, Lesley A; Farrar, William L; Hurt, Elaine M

    2009-12-01

    Cancer stem cells are the sub-population of cells present within tumors responsible for tumorigenesis. These cells have unique biological properties including self-renewal and the ability to differentiate. Furthermore, it is thought that these cells are more resistant to conventional chemotherapy and, as a result, are responsible for patient relapse. We will discuss the identification of prostate cancer stem cells, their unique properties and how these cells may be targeted for more efficacious therapies.

  12. Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    effective marker for diagnosis and detection of prostate cancer. Low concentrations of PSA would be detected using acoustic wave sensors because of...associated electrical field. For biological sensors, binding of a substance onto the resonating membrane surface causes a decrease in the acoustic...of diverse conditions and diseases including those that affect the thyroid, HIV, diabetes , pregnancy, and several types of cancer. In clinical

  13. Integrative clinical genomics of advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Robinson; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Wu, Yi-Mi; Schultz, Nikolaus; Lonigro, Robert J.; Mosquera, Juan-Miguel; Montgomery, Bruce; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Pritchard, Colin C; Attard, Gerhardt; Beltran, Himisha; Abida, Wassim M.; Bradley, Robert K.; Vinson, Jake; Cao, Xuhong; Vats, Pankaj; Kunju, Lakshmi P.; Hussain, Maha; Feng, Felix Y.; Tomlins, Scott A.; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Smith, David C.; Brennan, Christine; Siddiqui, Javed; Mehra, Rohit; Chen, Yu; Rathkopf, Dana E.; Morris, Michael J.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Reuter, Victor E.; Gopalan, Anuradha; Gao, Jianjiong; Loda, Massimo; Lis, Rosina T.; Bowden, Michaela; Balk, Stephen P.; Gaviola, Glenn; Sougnez, Carrie; Gupta, Manaswi; Yu, Evan Y.; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Cheng, Heather H.; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; True, Lawrence D.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Dvinge, Heidi; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Flohr, Penny; Miranda, Susana; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Tunariu, Nina; Mateo, Joaquin; Lopez, Raquel Perez; Demichelis, Francesca; Robinson, Brian D.; Schiffman, Marc A.; Nanus, David M.; Tagawa, Scott T.; Sigaras, Alexandros; Eng, Kenneth W.; Elemento, Olivier; Sboner, Andrea; Heath, Elisabeth I.; Scher, Howard I.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Kantoff, Philip; de Bono, Johann S.; Rubin, Mark A.; Nelson, Peter S.; Garraway, Levi A.; Sawyers, Charles L.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Toward development of a precision medicine framework for metastatic, castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), we established a multi-institutional clinical sequencing infrastructure to conduct prospective whole exome and transcriptome sequencing of bone or soft tissue tumor biopsies from a cohort of 150 mCRPC affected individuals. Aberrations of AR, ETS genes, TP53 and PTEN were frequent (40–60% of cases), with TP53 and AR alterations enriched in mCRPC compared to primary prostate cancer. We identified novel genomic alterations in PIK3CA/B, R-spondin, BRAF/RAF1, APC, β-catenin and ZBTB16/PLZF. Aberrations of BRCA2, BRCA1 and ATM were observed at substantially higher frequencies (19.3% overall) than seen in primary prostate cancers. 89% of affected individuals harbored a clinically actionable aberration including 62.7% with aberrations in AR, 65% in other cancer-related genes, and 8% with actionable pathogenic germline alterations. This cohort study provides evidence that clinical sequencing in mCRPC is feasible and could impact treatment decisions in significant numbers of affected individuals. PMID:26000489

  14. Progress Against Prostate Cancer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Progress Against Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Click ... This can narrow the urethra, decreasing urine flow. Prostate cancer is made up of cells the body does ...

  15. The dosimetric impact of daily setup error on target volumes and surrounding normal tissue in the treatment of prostate cancer with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Algan, Ozer; Jamgade, Ambarish; Ali, Imad; Christie, Alana; Thompson, J. Spencer; Thompson, David; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of daily setup error and interfraction organ motion on the overall dosimetric radiation treatment plans. Twelve patients undergoing definitive intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments for prostate cancer were evaluated in this institutional review board-approved study. Each patient had fiducial markers placed into the prostate gland before treatment planning computed tomography scan. IMRT plans were generated using the Eclipse treatment planning system. Each patient was treated to a dose of 8100 cGy given in 45 fractions. In this study, we retrospectively created a plan for each treatment day that had a shift available. To calculate the dose, the patient would have received under this plan, we mathematically 'negated' the shift by moving the isocenter in the exact opposite direction of the shift. The individualized daily plans were combined to generate an overall plan sum. The dose distributions from these plans were compared with the treatment plans that were used to treat the patients. Three-hundred ninety daily shifts were negated and their corresponding plans evaluated. The mean isocenter shift based on the location of the fiducial markers was 3.3 {+-} 6.5 mm to the right, 1.6 {+-} 5.1 mm posteriorly, and 1.0 {+-} 5.0 mm along the caudal direction. The mean D95 doses for the prostate gland when setup error was corrected and uncorrected were 8228 and 7844 cGy (p < 0.002), respectively, and for the planning target volume (PTV8100) was 8089 and 7303 cGy (p < 0.001), respectively. The mean V95 values when patient setup was corrected and uncorrected were 99.9% and 87.3%, respectively, for the PTV8100 volume (p < 0.0001). At an individual patient level, the difference in the D95 value for the prostate volume could be >1200 cGy and for the PTV8100 could approach almost 2000 cGy when comparing corrected against uncorrected plans. There was no statistically significant difference in the D35 parameter

  16. Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill imaging of prostate cancer: quantitative T2 values for cancer discrimination.

    PubMed

    Roebuck, Joseph R; Haker, Steven J; Mitsouras, Dimitris; Rybicki, Frank J; Tempany, Clare M; Mulkern, Robert V

    2009-05-01

    Quantitative, apparent T(2) values of suspected prostate cancer and healthy peripheral zone tissue in men with prostate cancer were measured using a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) imaging sequence in order to assess the cancer discrimination potential of tissue T(2) values. The CPMG imaging sequence was used to image the prostates of 18 men with biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Whole gland coverage with nominal voxel volumes of 0.54 x 1.1 x 4 mm(3) was obtained in 10.7 min, resulting in data sets suitable for generating high-quality images with variable T(2)-weighting and for evaluating quantitative T(2) values on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Region-of-interest analysis of suspected healthy peripheral zone tissue and suspected cancer, identified on the basis of both T(1)- and T(2)-weighted signal intensities and available histopathology reports, yielded significantly (P<.0001) longer apparent T(2) values in suspected healthy tissue (193+/-49 ms) vs. suspected cancer (100+/-26 ms), suggesting potential utility of this method as a tissue specific discrimination index for prostate cancer. We conclude that CPMG imaging of the prostate can be performed in reasonable scan times and can provide advantages over T(2)-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) imaging alone, including quantitative T(2) values for cancer discrimination as well as proton density maps without the point spread function degradation associated with short effective echo time FSE sequences.

  17. Epigenetic Regulation of Chermokine Expression in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    M.R., Han B. Optimizing dendritic cell-based immunotherapy for cancer . Expert Review of Vaccine , 6(3): 333-345, 2007. 3. Aalamian-Matheis M...prostate cancer cells lose expression of a novel dendritic cell attracting chemokine CXCL14, which is normally expressed by virtually all non -malignant... cancer using CD83 marker for human DC revealed a significant reduction of DC numbers in the tumor tissues when compared to the non -malignant tissues

  18. Next generation patient-derived prostate cancer xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Dong; Xue, Hui; Wang, Yuwei; Wu, Rebecca; Watahiki, Akira; Dong, Xin; Cheng, Hongwei; Wyatt, Alexander W; Collins, Colin C; Gout, Peter W; Wang, Yuzhuo

    2014-01-01

    There is a critical need for more effective therapeutic approaches for prostate cancer. Research in this area, however, has been seriously hampered by a lack of clinically relevant, experimental in vivo models of the disease. This review particularly focuses on the development of prostate cancer xenograft models based on subrenal capsule grafting of patients’ tumor tissue into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. This technique allows successful development of transplantable, patient-derived cancer tissue xenograft lines not only from aggressive metastatic, but also from localized prostate cancer tissues. The xenografts have been found to retain key biological properties of the original malignancies, including histopathological and molecular characteristics, tumor heterogeneity, response to androgen ablation and metastatic ability. As such, they are highly clinically relevant and provide valuable tools for studies of prostate cancer progression at cellular and molecular levels, drug screening for personalized cancer therapy and preclinical drug efficacy testing; especially when a panel of models is used to cover a broader spectrum of the disease. These xenograft models could therefore be viewed as next-generation models of prostate cancer. PMID:24589467

  19. AEG-1 promoter-mediated imaging of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Akrita; Wang, Yuchuan; Mease, Ronnie C.; Gabrielson, Matthew; Sysa, Polina; Minn, Il; Green, Gilbert; Simmons, Brian; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Sarkar, Siddik; Fisher, Paul B.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new imaging method for detecting prostate cancer, whether localized or disseminated and metastatic to soft tissues and bone. The method relies on the use of imaging reporter genes under the control of the promoter of AEG-1 (MTDH), which is selectively active only in malignant cells. Through systemic, nanoparticle-based delivery of the imaging construct, lesions can be identified through bioluminescence imaging and single photon emission-computed tomography in the PC3-ML murine model of prostate cancer at high sensitivity. This approach is applicable for the detection of prostate cancer metastases, including bone lesions for which there is no current reliable agent for non-invasive clinical imaging. Further, the approach compares favorably to accepted and emerging clinical standards, including positron emission tomography with [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and [18F]sodium fluoride. Our results offer a preclinical proof of concept that rationalizes clinical evaluation in patients with advanced prostate cancer. PMID:25145668

  20. HES6 promotes prostate cancer aggressiveness independently of Notch signalling.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Filipe L F; Marchionni, Luigi; Gupta, Anuj; Kummangal, Basheer A; Schaeffer, Edward M; Ross, Ashley E; Berman, David M

    2015-07-01

    Notch signalling is implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of cancers, but its role in prostate cancer is poorly understood. However, selected Notch pathway members are overrepresented in high-grade prostate cancers. We comprehensively profiled Notch pathway components in prostate cells and found prostate cancer-specific up-regulation of NOTCH3 and HES6. Their expression was particularly high in androgen responsive lines. Up- and down-regulating Notch in these cells modulated expression of canonical Notch targets, HES1 and HEY1, which could also be induced by androgen. Surprisingly, androgen treatment also suppressed Notch receptor expression, suggesting that androgens can activate Notch target genes in a receptor-independent manner. Using a Notch-sensitive Recombination signal binding protein for immunoglobulin kappa J region (RBPJ) reporter assay, we found that basal levels of Notch signalling were significantly lower in prostate cancer cells compared to benign cells. Accordingly pharmacological Notch pathway blockade did not inhibit cancer cell growth or viability. In contrast to canonical Notch targets, HES6, a HES family member known to antagonize Notch signalling, was not regulated by Notch signalling, but relied instead on androgen levels, both in cultured cells and in human cancer tissues. When engineered into prostate cancer cells, reduced levels of HES6 resulted in reduced cancer cell invasion and clonogenic growth. By molecular profiling, we identified potential roles for HES6 in regulating hedgehog signalling, apoptosis and cell migration. Our results did not reveal any cell-autonomous roles for canonical Notch signalling in prostate cancer. However, the results do implicate HES6 as a promoter of prostate cancer progression.

  1. Stromal Response to Prostate Cancer: Nanotechnology-Based Detection of Thioredoxin-Interacting Protein Partners Distinguishes Prostate Cancer Associated Stroma from That of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Elizabeth; Linehan, Jennifer; Babilonia, Gail; Imam, S. Ashraf; Smith, David; Loera, Sofia; Wilson, Timothy; Smith, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Histological staining of reactive stroma has been shown to be a predictor of biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer, however, molecular markers of the stromal response to prostate cancer have not yet been fully delineated. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not the stromal biomarkers detected with a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice could be used to distinguish the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with PCA. In this regard, we recently demonstrated that a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice selectively binds to reactive stroma in frozen prostate tumor tissue sections. To accomplish this, random frozen prostate tissue sections from each of 35 patients who underwent resection were incubated with the nanodevice and graded for fluorescent intensity. An adjacent section from each case was stained with Hematoxylin & Eosin to confirm the diagnosis. Select cases were stained with Masson's Trichrome or immunohistochemically using antibodies to thioredoxin reductase 1, thioredoxin reductase 2 or peroxiredoxin 1. Our results demonstrate that the graded intensity of nanodevice binding to the stroma associated with PCA was significantly higher (p = 0.0127) than that of benign prostatic hyperplasia using the t-test. Immunohistochemical staining of adjacent sections in representative cases showed that none of the two commonly studied thioredoxin interacting protein partners mirrored the fluorescence pattern seen with the nanodevice. However, thioredoxin reductase 2 protein was clearly shown to be a biomarker of prostate cancer-associated reactive stroma whose presence distinguishes the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with prostate cancer. We conclude that the signal detected by the nanodevice, in contrast to individual targets detected with antibodies used in this study, originates from multiple thioredoxin interacting protein partners that distinguish the M2 neutrophil and

  2. Stromal response to prostate cancer: nanotechnology-based detection of thioredoxin-interacting protein partners distinguishes prostate cancer associated stroma from that of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Singer, Elizabeth; Linehan, Jennifer; Babilonia, Gail; Imam, S Ashraf; Smith, David; Loera, Sofia; Wilson, Timothy; Smith, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Histological staining of reactive stroma has been shown to be a predictor of biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer, however, molecular markers of the stromal response to prostate cancer have not yet been fully delineated. The objective of this study was to determine whether or not the stromal biomarkers detected with a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice could be used to distinguish the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with PCA. In this regard, we recently demonstrated that a thioredoxin-targeted nanodevice selectively binds to reactive stroma in frozen prostate tumor tissue sections. To accomplish this, random frozen prostate tissue sections from each of 35 patients who underwent resection were incubated with the nanodevice and graded for fluorescent intensity. An adjacent section from each case was stained with Hematoxylin & Eosin to confirm the diagnosis. Select cases were stained with Masson's Trichrome or immunohistochemically using antibodies to thioredoxin reductase 1, thioredoxin reductase 2 or peroxiredoxin 1. Our results demonstrate that the graded intensity of nanodevice binding to the stroma associated with PCA was significantly higher (p = 0.0127) than that of benign prostatic hyperplasia using the t-test. Immunohistochemical staining of adjacent sections in representative cases showed that none of the two commonly studied thioredoxin interacting protein partners mirrored the fluorescence pattern seen with the nanodevice. However, thioredoxin reductase 2 protein was clearly shown to be a biomarker of prostate cancer-associated reactive stroma whose presence distinguishes the stroma associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia from that associated with prostate cancer. We conclude that the signal detected by the nanodevice, in contrast to individual targets detected with antibodies used in this study, originates from multiple thioredoxin interacting protein partners that distinguish the M2 neutrophil and

  3. Keratin 13 expression reprograms bone and brain metastases of human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lawrence W.; Chu, Gina C-Y; Wu, Jason B-Y.; Huang, Jen-Ming; Li, Quanlin; You, Sungyong; Kim, Jayoung; Lu, Yi-Tsung; Mrdenovic, Stefan; Wang, Ruoxiang; Freeman, Michael R.; Garraway, Isla; Lewis, Michael S.; Chung, Leland W. K.; Zhau, Haiyen E.

    2016-01-01

    Lethal progression of prostate cancer metastasis can be improved by developing animal models that recapitulate the clinical conditions. We report here that cytokeratin 13 (KRT13), an intermediate filament protein, plays a directive role in prostate cancer bone, brain, and soft tissue metastases. KRT13 expression was elevated in bone, brain, and soft tissue metastatic prostate cancer cell lines and in primary and metastatic clinical prostate, lung, and breast cancer specimens. When KRT13 expression was determined at a single cell level in primary tumor tissues of 44 prostate cancer cases, KRT13 level predicted bone metastasis and the overall survival of prostate cancer patients. Genetically enforced KRT13 expression in human prostate cancer cell lines drove metastases toward mouse bone, brain and soft tissues through a RANKL-independent mechanism, as KRT13 altered the expression of genes associated with EMT, stemness, neuroendocrine/neuromimicry, osteomimicry, development, and extracellular matrices, but not receptor activator NF-κB ligand (RANKL) signaling networks in prostate cancer cells. Our results suggest new inhibitors targeting RANKL-independent pathways should be developed for the treatment of prostate cancer bone and soft tissue metastases. PMID:27835867

  4. Identification of Prostate Cancer-Related Genes Using Inhibition of NMD in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Identification of Prostate Cancer -Related Genes Using W81XWH-04- 1 -0045 Inhibition of NMD in Prostate Cancer Cell...analytical filter to the prostate cancer cell lines 22RV- 1 and DU-145. Ten genes for each cell line have been selected for sequencing analysis.(Table...list of candidate genes for sequencing analysis from the LNCaP, PC3, 22RV- 1 and DU- 145 prostate cancer cell lines has been produced REPORTABLE

  5. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Białek, Waldemar; Rudzki, Sławomir; Iberszer, Paweł; Wronecki, Lech

    2016-12-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin.

  6. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rudzki, Sławomir; Iberszer, Paweł; Wronecki, Lech

    2016-01-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin. PMID:28138411

  7. Discovery of Hyperpolarized Molecular Imaging Biomarkers in a Novel Prostate Tissue Slice Culture Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    compatible bioreactor and that hyperpolarized 13C spectroscopy could be employed to study real-time metabolism of normal and malignant tissues. The...function of prostate tissue slice cultures (TCSs) in an nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-compatible, 3-dimensional tissue culture bioreactor , (2) to use...the TSC/NMR bioreactor model to identify hyperpolarized metabolic biomarkers of prostate cancer presence and aggressiveness, and (3) to use the TSC

  8. Imaging for Prostate Cancer Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Tobias; Eiber, Matthias; Fanti, Stefano; Budäus, Lars; Panebianco, Valeria

    2016-06-01

    Correct identification of metastatic sites in recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) is of crucial importance because it leads to further treatment decisions. To provide an overview on current imaging procedures and their performance in recurrent PCa. Medline search via PubMed was performed with the keywords imaging, recurrent, and prostate cancer as well as more detailed searches including the keywords bone scan, bone scintigraphy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, PET, choline, FDG, prostate-specific membrane antigen, and PSMA, with emphasis on recent literature from 2010 to the present. Non-English published literature was excluded. Abstracts and full-text articles were reviewed and assessed for relevant content. In diagnostic imaging and particularly with newer technologies like positron emission tomography (PET), a profound lack of prospectively designed studies in recurrent PCa has to be noted. In most studies histologic validation has only been performed in a subset of patient cohorts. Heterogeneity of included patient cohorts, lack of standardized assessment, as well as diverging end points, hamper systematic comparison of different image modalities. Thus evidence for currently used imaging in recurrent PCa is only presented descriptively. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as bone scintigraphy still represent the standard imaging for recurrent PCa; however, particularly for detection of local recurrence, multiparametric MRI is a valuable imaging modality. PET using choline and particularly tracers against prostate-specific membrane antigen might improve visualization of metastatic lesions. These findings need to be validated in prospective trials. Imaging of recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) is important to guide further treatment. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and bone scintigraphy represent the current standard. Positron emission tomography, especially with cancer

  9. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of Prostatic Fluids for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    most widely used marker of prostate cancer - and prostate cancer risk. Moreover, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is also strongly associated...Vigneron, D.B., Konety, B., Nelson, S.J., Narayan, P., and Hricak, H. Citrate as in vivo marker to discriminate prostate cancer from benign prostatic hyperplasia and

  10. (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    García Garzón, J R; de Arcocha Torres, M; Delgado-Bolton, R; Ceci, F; Alvarez Ruiz, S; Orcajo Rincón, J; Caresia Aróztegui, A P; García Velloso, M J; García Vicente, A M

    2017-09-20

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with (68)Ga-PSMA is a non-invasive diagnostic technique to image prostate cancer with increased prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression. PSMA is a transmembrane protein present in all prostatic tissues. Increased PSMA expression is seen in several malignancies, although prostate cancer is the tumour where it presents higher concentrations. Almost all prostate adenocarcinomas show PSMA expression in most of lesions, primary and metastatic. Immunohistochemistry has demonstrated that the expression of PSMA increases in patients with de-differentiated, metastatic or hormone-refractory tumours. Moreover, the expression level of PSMA has a prognostic value for disease outcome. PET measures the three-dimensional distribution of (68)Ga-PSMA, producing semi-quantitative images that allow for non-invasive assessment of PSMA expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  11. [Prostate cancer brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Pommier, P; Guérif, S; Peiffert, D; Créhange, G; Hannoun-Lévi, J-M; de Crevoisier, R

    2016-09-01

    Prostate brachytherapy techniques are described, concerning both Iodine 125 high dose rate brachytherapy. The following parts are presented: brachytherapy indications, technical description, immediate postoperative management and post-treatment evaluation, and 4 to 6 weeks as well as long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  12. Response of Human Prostate Tissue to Hypofractionated Ionizing Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Summary01-07-2011 Response of Human Prostate Tissue to Hypofractionated Ionizing Radiation Dr. Thomas Sroka University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85719 The aim...of this proposal is to determine the differences in radiobiological response of human prostate tissue to conventional and hypofractionated ...conventional and hypofractionated ionizing radiation. Data generated in the first year of study has shown that normal prostate tissue and prostate

  13. The Early Prostate Cancer program: bicalutamide in nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Peter; Roder, Martin Andreas

    2008-03-01

    The Early Prostate Cancer program is investigating the addition of bicalutamide 150 mg to standard care for localized or locally advanced, nonmetastatic prostate cancer. The third program analysis, at 7.4 years' median follow-up, has shown that bicalutamide 150 mg does not benefit patients with localized disease, but does confer significant progression-free survival benefits in patients with locally advanced disease, irrespective of standard care received. In patients receiving radiotherapy for locally advanced disease, bicalutamide 150 mg significantly reduced the risk of death by 35%; the magnitude of this benefit compares favorably with that of adjuvant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy in a similar population. Bicalutamide 150 mg represents an alternative to castration for patients with locally advanced disease who wish to avoid the side effects associated with castration.

  14. Targeting Prostate Cancer with Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0487 TITLE: Targeting Prostate Cancer with Multifunctional Nanoparticles PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Darryl Martin...Targeting Prostate Cancer with Multifunctional Nanoparticles 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0487 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Darryl...STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Prostate cancer cells were transfected with claudin siRNA

  15. Prostate Cancer Presenting with Parietal Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Pare, Abdoul Karim; Abubakar, Babagana Mustapha; Kabore, Moussa

    2017-01-01

    Bone metastases from prostate cancer are very common. They are usually located on the axial skeleton. However, cranial bone metastases especially to the parietal bone are rare. We report a case of metastatic prostate cancer presenting with left parietal bone metastasis in a patient with no urological symptoms or signs. We should consider prostate cancer in any man above 60 years presenting unusual bone lesions.

  16. The Infectious Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    al. Plasma antibodies against Trichomonas vaginalis and subsequent risk of prostate cancer. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention 2006;15...infectious agents with respect to prostate cancer: T vaginalis , the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection, and the recently identified...To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis in prostate carcinogenesis and progression. The current study is nested within the

  17. Targeting TMPRSS2 ERG in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    molecules in prostate cancer cells for perturbations that would modulate the ERG signature. These results will provide new insights into ERG function...prostate cancer, however, the exact role of TMPRSS2-ERG in tumorigenesis is unclear, making it difficult to design assays to target its function...essential for TMPRSS2-ERG activity in prostate cancer cells (months 1-28) 1a. Generate and titer lentiviruses expressing shRNAs targeting

  18. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer: PET Radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent advances in the fundamental understanding of the complex biology of prostate cancer have provided an increasing number of potential targets for imaging and treatment. The imaging evaluation of prostate cancer needs to be tailored to the various phases of this remarkably heterogeneous disease. CONCLUSION In this article, I review the current state of affairs on a range of PET radiotracers for potential use in the imaging evaluation of men with prostate cancer. PMID:22826388

  19. Roles of Eicosanoids in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nithipatikom, Kasem; Campbell, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Eicosanoids, the metabolites of arachidonic acid, have diverse functions in the regulation of cancer including prostate cancer. This review will provide an overview of the roles of eicosanoids and endocannabinoids and their potential as therapeutic targets for prostate cancer treatment. PMID:24563660

  20. Vitamin D, Sunlight and Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Donkena, Krishna Vanaja; Young, Charles Y. F.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second common cancer in men worldwide. The prevention of prostate cancer remains a challenge to researchers and clinicians. Here, we review the relationship of vitamin D and sunlight to prostate cancer risk. Ultraviolet radiation of the sunlight is the main stimulator for vitamin D production in humans. Vitamin D's antiprostate cancer activities may be involved in the actions through the pathways mediated by vitamin D metabolites, vitamin D metabolizing enzymes, vitamin D receptor (VDR), and VDR-regulated genes. Although laboratory studies including the use of animal models have shown that vitamin D has antiprostate cancer properties, whether it can effectively prevent the development and/or progression of prostate cancer in humans remains to be inconclusive and an intensively studied subject. This review will provide up-to-date information regarding the recent outcomes of laboratory and epidemiology studies on the effects of vitamin D on prostate cancer prevention. PMID:21991434

  1. Prostate and Urologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    [[{"fid":"183","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_folder[und]":"15"},"type":"media","attributes":{"alt":"Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","title":"Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","height":"266","width":"400","clas | Conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of prostate, bladder, and skin cancers.

  2. The Infectious Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    progression; 2-) To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis in prostate carcinogenesis and progression. The current study is...understanding of the infectious pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Aim II. To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis in prostate

  3. Microsatellite instability in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, A.L.; Wick, M.J.; Persons, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellite instability (MIN) has been documented in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) as well as in sporadic forms of human cancers. Two of the genes which appear to be responsible for this particular tumor phenotype, hMSH2 and hMLH1, have now been identified. To determine the potential role of these mutator genes in prostate cancer, we have examined 95 prostate adenocarcinomas (40 paraffin embedded and 55 fresh frozen) for the presence of genetic instability at four microsatellite markers. The markers are localized to chromosome arms 5q(APC-CA1), 8p(Mfd 210Z), 15q(635/636), and 17q(p53-CA). Patients from whom paraffin embedded material was obtained were divided into short term (<3 years, n=18), and long term (>3 years, n=22) survivors. Of the 95 tumors examined, only four tumors (4%) demonstrated MIN: two tumors demonstrated MIN at 3 loci (p53-CA, APC-CA1, 635/636), one tumor demonstrated MIN at 2 loci (APC-CA1 and 635/636), and one tumor demonstrated instability at 635/636 only. All tumors exhibiting MIN had Gleason scores of {ge} 4+4. A correlation between MIN and survival was not observed. Information on family history was limited. However, of the two patients demonstrating MIN at three loci, one patient was diagnosed with a second malignancy (TCC of the ureter), but otherwise had a negative family history, while the second patient had one first degree relative with esophageal cancer. The patient demonstrating MIN at two loci had a negative family history, while the remaining patient had two first degree relatives with cancer (prostate and stomach). These results suggest that hMSH2 and hMLH1 (as reflected by the small percentage of tumors displaying MIN) do not play a prominent role in the process of prostate tumorigenesis.

  4. Simulated prostate biopsy: prostate cancer distribution and clinical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Dean, Robert; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-04-01

    Our group has recently obtained data based upon whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens using a 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator that suggests an increased detection rate is possible using laterally placed biopsies. A new 10-core biopsy pattern was demonstrated to be superior to the traditional sextant biopsy. This patter includes the traditional sextant biopsy cores and four laterally placed biopsies in the right and left apex and mid portion of the prostate gland. The objective of this study is to confirm the higher prostate cancer defection rate obtained using our simulated 10-core biopsy pattern in a small clinical trial. We retrospectively reviewed 35 consecutive patients with a pathologic diagnosis of prostate cancer biopsied by a single urologist using the 10-core prostate biopsy patterns were compared with respect to prostate cancer detection rate. Of the 35 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, 54.3 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent of patients were diagnosed solely with the laterally placed biopsies. Our results suggest that biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon a five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern.

  5. Temporal Changes in the Pathologic Assessment of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Thirty years have witnessed dramatic changes in the manner in which we diagnose and manage prostate cancer. With prostate-specific antigen screening, there was a shift towards smaller, clinically localized tumors. Tumors are often multifocal and display phenotypic and molecular heterogeneity. Pathologic evaluation of tissue obtained by needle biopsy remains the gold standard for the diagnosis and risk assessment of prostate cancer. Years of experience with grading, along with changes in the amount of biopsy tissue obtained and diagnostic tools available, have produced shifts in grading practices among genitourinary pathologists. Trends in Gleason grading and advances in pathological risk assessment are reviewed with particular emphasis on recent Gleason grading modifications of the International Society of Urologic Pathology. Efforts to maximize the amount of information from pathological specimens, whether it be morphometric, histochemical, or molecular, may improve predictive accuracy of prostate biopsies. New diagnostic techniques are needed to optimize management decisions. PMID:23271767

  6. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Haustermans, Karin; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011-0.013) clinical factor was 'previous abdominal surgery.' As second significant (p = 0.012-0.016) factor, 'cardiac history' was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including 'diabetes' was significant (p = 0.039-0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003-0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D{sub 50}. Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints. Conclusions: Comparable

  7. Microlocalization and Quantitation of Risk Associated Elements in Gleason Graded Prostate Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    non-tumor human prostate tissue. FASEB J. 2004; 18:A351.3 (351.3). Barranco W.T. and Eckhert C.D. Boric acid inhibits human prostate cancer cell...pay from the research effort. Kim Henderson (Student) Joey Miller (Student) Wade Barranco (Student) Curtis Eckhert (PI) CONCLUSIONS The project is on...selenium and elements associated with cancer risk in non-tumor human prostate tissue. FASEB J. 2004; 18:A351.3 (351.3). 16. Barranco W.T. and Eckhert C.D

  8. Second harmonic microscopic imaging and spectroscopic characterization in prostate pathological tissue.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyue; Zhuang, Zhengfei

    2014-01-01

    Second harmonic microscopic imaging and spectroscopy technology has become a powerful tool for biomedical studies, especially in cancer research. In this paper, second harmonic generation in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PC) tissues in mouse model (C57BL6) have been reported. Excitated samples with different wavelength near-infrared laser from 780 to 850 nm we found that second harmonic signals from BPH nuclei stronger than that from PC, and a wavelength sensitivity was also observed in this experiment. Providing useful help for prostate malignancy diagnosis and identifying tissue components on clinic. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. ANX7, a candidate tumor suppressor gene for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Meera; Bubendorf, Lukas; Srikantan, Vasantha; Fossom, Linda; Nolan, Lisa; Glasman, Mirta; Leighton, Ximena; Fehrle, Wilfred; Pittaluga, Stefania; Raffeld, Mark; Koivisto, Pasi; Willi, Niels; Gasser, Thomas C.; Kononen, Juha; Sauter, Guido; Kallioniemi, Olli P.; Srivastava, Shiv; Pollard, Harvey B.

    2001-01-01

    The ANX7 gene is located on human chromosome 10q21, a site long hypothesized to harbor a tumor suppressor gene(s) (TSG) associated with prostate and other cancers. To test whether ANX7 might be a candidate TSG, we examined the ANX7-dependent suppression of human tumor cell growth, stage-specific ANX7 expression in 301 prostate specimens on a prostate tissue microarray, and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of microsatellite markers at or near the ANX7 locus. Here we report that human tumor cell proliferation and colony formation are markedly reduced when the wild-type ANX7 gene is transfected into two prostate tumor cell lines, LNCaP and DU145. Consistently, analysis of ANX7 protein expression in human prostate tumor microarrays reveals a significantly higher rate of loss of ANX7 expression in metastatic and local recurrences of hormone refractory prostate cancer as compared with primary tumors (P = 0.0001). Using four microsatellite markers at or near the ANX7 locus, and laser capture microdissected tumor cells, 35% of the 20 primary prostate tumors show LOH. The microsatellite marker closest to the ANX7 locus showed the highest rate of LOH, including one homozygous deletion. We conclude that the ANX7 gene exhibits many biological and genetic properties expected of a TSG and may play a role in prostate cancer progression. PMID:11287641

  10. Mitochondria, prostate cancer, and biopsy sampling error.

    PubMed

    Parr, Ryan L; Mills, John; Harbottle, Andrew; Creed, Jennifer M; Crewdson, Gregory; Reguly, Brian; Guimont, François S

    2013-04-01

    Mitochondria and their associated genome are emerging as sophisticated indicators of prostate cancer biology. Alterations in the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome) have been implicated in cell proliferation, metastatic behavior, androgen independence, as a signal for apoptosis, and as a predictor of biochemical recurrence. Somatic mutation patterns in complete mtgenomes are associated with prostate specific antigen levels (PSA) in prostate cancer patients and a large-scale mtgenome deletion (3.4 kb) is consistent with a prostate "cancerization" field effect. This review will focus on the biological characteristics of mitochondria and their direct clinical application to prostate cancer. Mitochondrial science is currently influencing clinical prostate cancer diagnostics and the rapid progress in this area indicates future, break-through contributions in the general field of oncology.

  11. Expression of the cancer-testis antigen BORIS correlates with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Zubair; Hari-Gupta, Yukti; Kita, Georgia-Xanthi; Farrar, Dawn; Seddon, Ian; Corr, John; Klenova, Elena

    2014-02-01

    BORIS, a paralogue of the transcription factor CTCF, is a member of the cancer-testis antigen (CT) family. BORIS is normally present at high levels in the testis; however it is aberrantly expressed in various tumors and cancer cell lines. The main objectives of this study were to investigate BORIS expression together with sub-cellular localization in both prostate cell lines and tumor tissues, and assess correlations between BORIS and clinical/pathological characteristics. We examined BORIS mRNA expression, protein levels and cellular localization in a panel of human prostate tissues, cancer and benign, together with a panel prostate cell lines. We also compared BORIS levels and localization with clinical/pathological characteristics in prostate tumors. BORIS was detected in all inspected prostate cancer cell lines and tumors, but was absent in benign prostatic hyperplasia. Increased levels of BORIS protein positively correlated with Gleason score, T-stage and androgen receptor (AR) protein levels in prostate tumors. The relationship between BORIS and AR was further highlighted in prostate cell lines by the ability of ectopically expressed BORIS to activate the endogenous AR mRNA and protein. BORIS localization in the nucleus plus cytoplasm was also associated with higher BORIS levels and Gleason score. Detection of BORIS in prostate tumors suggests potential applications of BORIS as a biomarker for prostate cancer diagnosis, as an immunotherapy target and, potentially, a prognostic marker of more aggressive prostate cancer. The ability of BORIS to activate the AR gene indicates BORIS involvement in the growth and development of prostate tumors. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Differential Gene Expression in Benign Prostate Epithelium of Men with and without Prostate Cancer: Evidence for a Prostate Cancer Field Effect

    PubMed Central

    Risk, Michael C; Knudsen, Beatrice S; Coleman, Ilsa; Dumpit, Ruth F; Kristal, Alan R; LeMeur, Nolwenn; Gentleman, Robert C; True, Lawrence D; Nelson, Peter S; Lin, Daniel W

    2010-01-01

    Background Several malignancies are known to exhibit a “field-effect” whereby regions beyond tumor boundaries harbor histological or molecular changes that are associated with cancer. We sought to determine if histologically benign prostate epithelium collected from men with prostate cancer exhibits features indicative of pre-malignancy or field effect. Methods Prostate needle biopsies from 15 men with high grade(Gleason 8–10) prostate cancer and 15 age- and BMI-matched controls were identified from a biospecimen repository. Benign epithelia from each patient were isolated by laser capture microdissection. RNA was isolated, amplified, and used for microarray hybridization. Quantitative PCR(qPCR) was used to determine the expression of specific genes of interest. Alterations in protein expression were analyzed through immunohistochemistry. Results Overall patterns of gene expression in microdissected benign-associated benign epithelium (BABE) and cancer-associated benign epithelium (CABE) were similar. Two genes previously associated with prostate cancer, PSMA and SSTR1, were significantly upregulated in the CABE group(FDR <1%). Expression of other prostate cancer-associated genes, including ERG, HOXC4, HOXC5 and MME, were also increased in CABE by qRT-PCR, although other genes commonly altered in prostate cancer were not different between the BABE and CABE samples. The expression of MME and PSMA proteins on IHC coincided with their mRNA alterations. Conclusion Gene expression profiles between benign epithelia of patients with and without prostate cancer are very similar. However, these tissues exhibit differences in the expression levels of several genes previously associated with prostate cancer development or progression. These differences may comprise a field effect and represent early events in carcinogenesis. PMID:20935156

  13. WITHDRAWN: Can the conventional sextant prostate biopsy reliably diagnose unilateral prostate cancer in low-risk, localized, prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Mayes, J M; Mouraviev, V; Sun, L; Madden, J F; Polascik, T J

    2008-05-13

    The authors hereby retract the e-publication dated 13 May 2008 and entitled, 'Can the conventional sextant prostate biopsy reliably diagnose unilateral prostate cancer in low-risk, localized, prostate cancer?' The authors are submitting a revised version with the same title. This article's statistics were performed for predicting bilateral prostate cancer outcomes. The article was written to help predict unilateral prostate cancer. Although the statistical numbers are correct, they are backwards. We apologize that the statistics indicate a contrary outcome (eg predicting bilateral cancer instead of unilateral disease).

  14. Improved multiparametric MRI discrimination between low-risk prostate cancer and benign tissues in a small cohort of 5α-reductase inhibitor treated individuals as compared with an untreated cohort.

    PubMed

    Starobinets, Olga; Kurhanewicz, John; Noworolski, Susan M

    2017-02-06

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether 5α-reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) affect the discrimination between low-grade prostate cancer and benign tissues on multiparametric MRI (mpMRI). Twenty men with biopsy-proven Gleason 3 + 3 prostate cancer and 3 T mpMRI were studied. Ten patients (Tx) had been receiving 5-ARIs for at least a year at scan time. Ten untreated patients (Un) were matched to the treated cohort. For each subject two regions of interest representing cancerous and benign tissues were drawn within the peripheral zone of each prostate, MR measures evaluated, and cancer contrast versus benign (contrast = (MRTumor  - MRHealthy )/MRHealthy ) calculated. Decreased cancer contrast was noted on T2 -weighted images: 0.4 (Un) versus 0.3 (Tx). However, for functional MR measures, a better separation of cancerous and benign tissues was observed in the treated group. Cancer contrast on high-b diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was 0.61 (Un) versus 0.99 (Tx). Logistic regression analysis yielded higher AUC (area under the curve) values for distinguishing cancerous from benign regions in treated subjects on high-b DWI (0.71 (Un), 0.94 (Tx)), maximal enhancement slope (0.95 (Un), 1 (Tx)), peak enhancement (0.84 (Un), 0.93 (Tx)), washout slope (0.78 (Un), 0.99 (Tx)), K(trans) (0.9 (Un), 1 (Tx)), and combined measures (0.86 (Un), 0.99 (Tx)). Coefficients of variation for MR measures were lower in benign and cancerous tissues in the treated group compared with the untreated group. This study's results suggest an increase in homogeneity of benign and malignant peripheral zone prostatic tissues with 5-ARI exposure, observed as reduced variability of MR measures after treatment. Cancer discrimination was lower with T2 -weighted imaging, but was higher with functional MR measures in a 5-ARI-treated cohort compared with controls.

  15. Functional Angiogenic Mediators in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    FUNDING NUMBERS Functional Angiogenic Mediators in Prostate Cancer DAMD17-99- 1 -9521 6. AUTHOR(S) Jennifer A. Doll, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME...transition in the prostate by 1 ) identifying the key angiogenic mediators , 2) investigating the clinical significance of mediator levels in prostatic fluid...our proposal, we set out to 1 ) identify such mediators in the prostate, 2) assess the clinical usefulness of measuring angiogenic mediator levels in

  16. Hypofractionation for prostate cancer: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Miles, Edward F; Lee, W Robert

    2008-01-01

    In ideal circumstances, the fractionation schedule of radiotherapy should match the fractionation sensitivity of the tumor relative to the nearby normal tissues. A number of recent publications have suggested that the alpha-beta ratio (alpha/beta) for prostate is low, in the range of 1 to 3 Gy. If alpha/beta is truly low, then hypofractionated schedules using fewer, larger fractions should improve the therapeutic ratio. This critical review examines the clinical experience with hypofractionation. Several prospective trials indicate that toxicity is limited with sophisticated dose delivery and compact clinical target volume to planning target volume margins, but the single-arm nature of these trials precludes definitive statements on efficacy. Several large randomized trials comparing conventional fractionation to hypofractionation are ongoing and are described. Until these trials are completed and the results submitted for rigorous peer review, the notion that alpha/beta for prostate cancer is low remains an unconfirmed hypothesis.

  17. Prostate cancer metastatic to bone has higher expression of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) than primary prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jie; Xu, Xiaojun; Li, Bo; Brown, Edward; Farris, Alton B.; Sun, Shi-Yong; Yang, Jenny J.

    2015-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is the principal regulator of the secretion of parathyroid hormone and plays key roles in extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) homeostasis. It is also thought to participate in the development of cancer, especially bony metastases of breast and prostate cancer. However, the expression of CaSR has not been systematically analyzed in prostate cancer from patients with or without bony metastases. By comparing human prostate cancer tissue sections in microarrays, we found that the CaSR was expressed in both normal prostate and primary prostate cancer as assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). We used two methods to analyze the expression level of CaSR. One was the pathological score read by a pathologist, the other was the positivity% obtained from the Aperio positive pixel count algorithm. Both of the methods gave consistent results. Metastatic prostate cancer tissue obtained from bone had higher CaSR expression than primary prostate cancer (P <0.05). The expression of CaSR in primary prostate cancers of patients with metastases to tissues other than bone was not different from that in primary prostate cancer of patients with or without bony metastases (P >0.05). The expression of CaSR in cancer tissue was not associated with the stage or status of differentiation of the cancer. These results suggest that CaSR may have a role in promoting bony metastasis of prostate cancer, hence raising the possibility of reducing the risk of such metastases with CaSR-based therapeutics. PMID:26065011

  18. [Active surveillance of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Ploussard, G; Hennequin, C; Rozet, F

    2017-10-01

    Several prospective studies have demonstrated the safety of active surveillance as a first treatment of prostate cancer. It spares many patients of a useless treatment, with its potential sequelae. Patients with a low-risk cancer are all candidates for this approach, as recommended by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). Some patients with an intermediate risk could be also concerned by active surveillance, but this is still being discussed. Currently, the presence of grade 4 lesions on biopsy is a contra-indication. Modalities included a repeated prostate specific antigen test and systematic rebiopsy during the first year after diagnosis. MRI is now proposed to better select patients at inclusion and also during surveillance. No life style changes or drugs are significantly associated with a longer duration of surveillance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  19. [Medical treatment of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Lobel, B; Cipolla, B; Labrador, J

    1994-03-01

    Hormone dependence of prostate cancer is well known. In 80% of cases with metastases, hormone suppression leads to the reduction of tumour volume and related disorders. However the treatment is generally palliative because malignant process recurs after about around 16 months. Mean survival is less than 3 years in these forms. Lack of response come always together with a poor prognosis, and there is 90% mortality at 2 years. Advanced prostatic cancer should not be treated with hormones if the patient has few symptoms and his quality of life is satisfactory. Symptomatic forms require hormone manipulation. Orchidectomy or LH-RH are recommended. Total androgen ablation (combined treatment) leads rapidly to more relief of symptoms, but its drawbacks and especially high cost indicate that its use should be weighed individually. Estramustine is not a first-lune treatment. Presently, there is no criteria to predict response to treatment.

  20. Pre-therapeutic dosimetry of normal organs and tissues of (177)Lu-PSMA-617 prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) inhibitor in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kabasakal, Levent; AbuQbeitah, Mohammad; Aygün, Aslan; Yeyin, Nami; Ocak, Meltem; Demirci, Emre; Toklu, Turkay

    2015-12-01

    (177)Lu-617-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand seems to be a promising tracer for radionuclide therapy of progressive prostate cancer. However, there are no published data regarding the radiation dose given to the normal tissues. The aim of the present study was to estimate the pretreatment radiation doses in patients who will undergo radiometabolic therapy using a tracer amount of (177)Lu-labeled PSMA ligand. The study included seven patients with progressive prostate cancer with a mean age of 63.9 ± 3.9 years. All patients had prior PSMA positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and had intense tracer uptake at the lesions. The injected (177)Lu-PSMA-617 activity ranged from 185 to 210 MBq with a mean of 192.6 ± 11.0 MBq. To evaluate bone marrow absorbed dose 2-cc blood samples were withdrawn in short variable times (3, 15, 30, 60, and 180 min and 24, 48, and 120 h) after injection. Whole-body images were obtained at 4, 24, 48, and 120 h post-injection (p.i.). The geometric mean of anterior and posterior counts was determined through region of interest (ROI) analysis. Attenuation correction was applied using PSMA PET/CT images. The OLINDA/EXM dosimetry program was used for curve fitting, residence time calculation, and absorbed dose calculations. The calculated radiation-absorbed doses for each organ showed substantial variation. The highest radiation estimated doses were calculated for parotid glands and kidneys. Calculated radiation-absorbed doses per megabecquerel were 1.17 ± 0.31 mGy for parotid glands and 0.88 ± 0.40 mGy for kidneys. The radiation dose given to the bone marrow was significantly lower than those of kidney and parotid glands (p < 0.05). The calculated radiation dose to bone marrow was 0.03 ± 0.01 mGy/MBq. Our first results suggested that (177)Lu-PSMA-617 therapy seems to be a safe method. The dose-limiting organ seems to be the parotid glands rather than kidneys and bone marrow. The lesion

  1. Association of multiparametric MRI quantitative imaging features with prostate cancer gene expression in MRI-targeted prostate biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Stoyanova, Radka; Pollack, Alan; Takhar, Mandeep; Lynne, Charles; Parra, Nestor; Lam, Lucia L.C.; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Buerki, Christine; Castillo, Rosa; Jorda, Merce; Ashab, Hussam Al-deen; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N.; Punnen, Sanoj; Parekh, Dipen J.; Abramowitz, Matthew C.; Gillies, Robert J.; Davicioni, Elai; Erho, Nicholas; Ishkanian, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Standard clinicopathological variables are inadequate for optimal management of prostate cancer patients. While genomic classifiers have improved patient risk classification, the multifocality and heterogeneity of prostate cancer can confound pre-treatment assessment. The objective was to investigate the association of multiparametric (mp)MRI quantitative features with prostate cancer risk gene expression profiles in mpMRI-guided biopsies tissues. Global gene expression profiles were generated from 17 mpMRI-directed diagnostic prostate biopsies using an Affimetrix platform. Spatially distinct imaging areas (‘habitats’) were identified on MRI/3D-Ultrasound fusion. Radiomic features were extracted from biopsy regions and normal appearing tissues. We correlated 49 radiomic features with three clinically available gene signatures associated with adverse outcome. The signatures contain genes that are over-expressed in aggressive prostate cancers and genes that are under-expressed in aggressive prostate cancers. There were significant correlations between these genes and quantitative imaging features, indicating the presence of prostate cancer prognostic signal in the radiomic features. Strong associations were also found between the radiomic features and significantly expressed genes. Gene ontology analysis identified specific radiomic features associated with immune/inflammatory response, metabolism, cell and biological adhesion. To our knowledge, this is the first study to correlate radiogenomic parameters with prostate cancer in men with MRI-guided biopsy. PMID:27438142

  2. Vaccine Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position...Vaccine Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0462 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ...NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER University of Iowa Iowa City, IA 52242 9. SPONSORING

  3. Methylselenium and Prostate Cancer Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    award. Validation of these findings in animal models is currently in progress. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Selenium, methylselenol , prostate cancer...Pharmacologic inhibitors were used to manipulate caspases and c-Jun-N-terminal kinases (JNK). Results: The methylselenol precursor methylseleninic acid...Email: jlu@hi.umn.edu Methylselenol has been implicated as an active metabolite for the anticancer effect of selenium in part through the induction of

  4. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    this laboratory concentrates on the area of tumor immunology with an emphasis on immunotherapy. We have constructed microbial vaccines to be used...to the transgene product induced by the vaccine are underway. Additionally, we are carrying our "translational" research in the form of clinical...trials of our adenovirus vaccine in men with prostate cancer. Important in these trials is the safety of the vaccine and its ability to induce anti

  5. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    i mmunology with an emphasis on immunotherapy. We ha ve constructed microbial vaccines to be used for the investigation of gene and immunotherapy... vaccine are underway. Additionally, we are carrying our "translational" research in the fo rm of clinical trials of our adenovirus vaccine in men with...prostate cancer. Important in thes e trials is the safety of the vaccine and its ability to in duce anti-tumor immunity. We have recently completed

  6. Utility of ADC measurement on diffusion-weighted MRI in differentiation of prostate cancer, normal prostate and prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Esen, Meltem; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Akpolat, Nusret; Orhan, Irfan; Kocakoc, Ercan

    2013-08-01

    To determine the utility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in differentiation of prostate cancer from normal prostate parenchyma and prostatitis we obtained ADC values of 50 patients at b 100, 600 and 1,000 s/mm(2) diffusion gradients. The ADC values of prostate cancer group were significantly lower than normal prostate and prostatitis group at b 600 and 1,000 s/mm(2) gradients. The ADC values at high diffusion gradients may be used in differentiation prostate cancer from normal prostate and prostatitis.

  7. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mullane, Stephanie A; Van Allen, Eliezer M

    2016-05-01

    Precision cancer medicine, the use of genomic profiling of patient tumors at the point-of-care to inform treatment decisions, is rapidly changing treatment strategies across cancer types. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer may identify new treatment strategies and change clinical practice. In this review, we discuss the potential and challenges of precision medicine in advanced prostate cancer. Although primary prostate cancers do not harbor highly recurrent targetable genomic alterations, recent reports on the genomics of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer has shown multiple targetable alterations in castration-resistant prostate cancer metastatic biopsies. Therapeutic implications include targeting prevalent DNA repair pathway alterations with PARP-1 inhibition in genomically defined subsets of patients, among other genomically stratified targets. In addition, multiple recent efforts have demonstrated the promise of liquid tumor profiling (e.g., profiling circulating tumor cells or cell-free tumor DNA) and highlighted the necessary steps to scale these approaches in prostate cancer. Although still in the initial phase of precision medicine for prostate cancer, there is extraordinary potential for clinical impact. Efforts to overcome current scientific and clinical barriers will enable widespread use of precision medicine approaches for advanced prostate cancer patients.

  8. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mullane, Stephanie A.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Precision cancer medicine, the use of genomic profiling of patient tumors at the point-of-care to inform treatment decisions, is rapidly changing treatment strategies across cancer types. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer may identify new treatment strategies and change clinical practice. In this review, we discuss the potential and challenges of precision medicine in advanced prostate cancer. Recent findings Although primary prostate cancers do not harbor highly recurrent targetable genomic alterations, recent reports on the genomics of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer has shown multiple targetable alterations in castration-resistant prostate cancer metastatic biopsies. Therapeutic implications include targeting prevalent DNA repair pathway alterations with PARP-1 inhibition in genomically defined subsets of patients, among other genomically stratified targets. In addition, multiple recent efforts have demonstrated the promise of liquid tumor profiling (e.g., profiling circulating tumor cells or cell-free tumor DNA) and highlighted the necessary steps to scale these approaches in prostate cancer. Summary Although still in the initial phase of precision medicine for prostate cancer, there is extraordinary potential for clinical impact. Efforts to overcome current scientific and clinical barriers will enable widespread use of precision medicine approaches for advanced prostate cancer patients. PMID:26909474

  9. Characterization of aggressive prostate cancer using ultrasound RF time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khojaste, Amir; Imani, Farhad; Moradi, Mehdi; Berman, David; Siemens, D. Robert; Sauerberi, Eric E.; Boag, Alexander H.; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Mousavi, Parvin

    2015-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalently diagnosed and the second cause of cancer-related death in North American men. Several approaches have been proposed to augment detection of prostate cancer using different imaging modalities. Due to advantages of ultrasound imaging, these approaches have been the subject of several recent studies. This paper presents the results of a feasibility study on differentiating between lower and higher grade prostate cancer using ultrasound RF time series data. We also propose new spectral features of RF time series to highlight aggressive prostate cancer in small ROIs of size 1 mm × 1 mm in a cohort of 19 ex vivo specimens of human prostate tissue. In leave-one-patient-out cross-validation strategy, an area under accumulated ROC curve of 0.8 has been achieved with overall sensitivity and specificity of 81% and 80%, respectively. The current method shows promising results on differentiating between lower and higher grade of prostate cancer using ultrasound RF time series.

  10. Characterization of Desmoglein Expression in the Normal Prostatic Gland. Desmoglein 2 Is an Independent Prognostic Factor for Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Alison G.; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Bonal, Dennis M.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Christiano, Angela M.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The expression of desmogleins (DSGs), which are known to be crucial for establishing and maintaining the cell-cell adhesion required for tissue integrity, has been well characterized in the epidermis and hair follicle; however, their expression in other epithelial tissues such as prostate is poorly understood. Although downregulation of classical cadherins, such as E-cadherin, has been described in prostate cancer tissue samples, the expression of desmogleins has only been previously reported in prostate cancer cell lines. In this study we characterized desmoglein expression in normal prostate tissues, and further investigated whether Desmoglein 2 (DSG2) expression specifically can serve as a potential clinical prognostic factor for patients diagnosed with primary prostate cancer. Experimental Design We utilized immunofluorescence to examine DSG2 expression in normal prostate (n = 50) and in a clinically well-characterized cohort of prostate cancer patients (n = 414). Correlation of DSG2 expression with clinico-pathological characteristics and biochemical recurrence was analyzed to assess its clinical significance. Results These studies revealed that DSG2 and DSG4 were specifically expressed in prostatic luminal cells, whereas basal cells lack their expression. In contrast, DSG1 and DSG3 were not expressed in normal prostate epithelium. Further analyses of DSG2 expression in prostate cancer revealed that reduced levels of this biomarker were a significant independent marker of poor clinical outcome. Conclusion Here we report for the first time that a low DSG2 expression phenotype is a useful prognostic biomarker of tumor aggressiveness and may serve as an aid in identifying patients with clinically significant prostate cancer. PMID:24896103

  11. DNA Vaccines for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McNeel, Douglas G.; Becker, Jordan T.; Johnson, Laura E.; Olson, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding an antigen of interest has been demonstrated to be an effective means of immunization, capable of eliciting antigen-specific T cells. Plasmid DNA vaccines offer advantages over other anti-tumor vaccine approaches in terms of simplicity, manufacturing, and possibly safety. The primary disadvantage is their poor transfection efficiency and subsequent lower immunogenicity relative to other genetic vaccine approaches. However, multiple preclinical models demonstrate anti-tumor efficacy, and many efforts are underway to improve the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effect of these vaccines. Clinical trials using DNA vaccines as treatments for prostate cancer have begun, and to date have demonstrated safety and immunological effect. This review will focus on DNA vaccines as a specific means of antigen delivery, advantages and disadvantages of this type of immunization, previous experience in preclinical models and human trials specifically conducted for the treatment of prostate cancer, and future directions for the application of DNA vaccines to prostate cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24587772

  12. Targeted prodrug approaches for hormone refractory prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Aloysius, Herve; Hu, Longqin

    2015-05-01

    Due to the propensity of relapse and resistance with prolonged androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), there is a growing interest in developing non-hormonal therapeutic approaches as alternative treatment modalities for hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). Although the standard treatment for HRPC consists of a combination of ADT with taxanes and anthracyclines, the clinical use of chemotherapeutics is limited by systemic toxicity stemming from nondiscriminatory drug exposure to normal tissues. In order to improve the tumor selectivity of chemotherapeutics, various targeted prodrug approaches have been explored. Antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT) and gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) strategies leverage tumor-specific antigens and transcription factors for the specific delivery of cytotoxic anticancer agents using various prodrug-activating enzymes. In prostate cancer, overexpression of tumor-specific proteases such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is being exploited for selective activation of anticancer prodrugs designed to be activated through proteolysis by these prostate cancer-specific enzymes. PSMA- and PSA-activated prodrugs typically comprise an engineered high-specificity protease peptide substrate coupled to a potent cytotoxic agent via a linker for rapid release of cytotoxic species in the vicinity of prostate cancer cells following proteolytic cleavage. Over the past two decades, various such prodrugs have been developed and they were effective at inhibiting prostate tumor growth in rodent models; several of these prodrug approaches have been advanced to clinical trials and may be developed into effective therapies for HRPC.

  13. Novel Nuclear Localization of Fatty Acid Synthase Correlates with Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, Allison A.; Rycyna, Kevin J.; Parwani, Anil V.; Datiri, Yeipyeng J.; Basudan, Ahmed M.; Sobek, Kathryn M.; Cummings, Jessica L.; Basse, Per H.; Bacich, Dean J.; O'Keefe, Denise S.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase is up-regulated in a variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. Up-regulation of fatty acid synthase not only increases production of fatty acids in tumors but also contributes to the transformed phenotype by conferring growth and survival advantages. In addition, increased fatty acid synthase expression in prostate cancer correlates with poor prognosis, although the mechanism(s) by which this occurs are not completely understood. Because fatty acid synthase is expressed at low levels in normal cells, it is currently a major target for anticancer drug design. Fatty acid synthase is normally found in the cytosol; however, we have discovered that it also localizes to the nucleus in a subset of prostate cancer cells. Analysis of the fatty acid synthase protein sequence indicated the presence of a nuclear localization signal, and subcellular fractionation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells, as well as immunofluorescent confocal microscopy of patient prostate tumor tissue and LNCaPs confirmed nuclear localization of this protein. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis of prostate cancer tissue indicated that nuclear localization of fatty acid synthase correlates with Gleason grade, implicating a potentially novel role in prostate cancer progression. Possible clinical implications include improving the accuracy of prostate biopsies in the diagnosis of low- versus intermediate-risk prostate cancer and the uncovering of novel metabolic pathways for the therapeutic targeting of androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID:24907642

  14. Micro and bulk analysis of prostate tissues classified as hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatek, W. M.; Banaś, A.; Banaś, K.; Cinque, G.; Dyduch, G.; Falkenberg, G.; Kisiel, A.; Marcelli, A.; Podgórczyk, M.

    2007-07-01

    BPH (Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia) is the most common benign neoplasm (non cancerous enlargement of the prostate gland), whose prevalence increases with age. The gland, when increased in size, exerts pressure on the urethra, causing obstruction to urine flow. The latter may result in severe urinary tract and kidney conditions. In this work prostate samples from patients diagnosed with BPH were analyzed using synchrotron radiation. Micro-analysis of the hyperplastic samples was carried out on the L-beam line at HASYLAB, DESY (Germany), while bulk analysis on selected samples was performed at the DRX2 beamline at LNF, Frascati (Italy). Microanalysis with a mono-energetic beam 15 μm in diameter confirmed that concentrations of certain elements, such as S, Mn, Cu, Fe and Zn, are good indicators of pathological disorders in prostate tissue that may be considered effective tracers of developing compliant. The concentrations of Mn, Cu, Fe and Zn are higher in hyperplastic tissues, as compared to normal ones, while for sulphur the opposite is observed. Additionally, Fe and S K-edge XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) spectroscopy experiments were carried out in order to determine the chemical speciation of these elements in our samples.

  15. Genetic and Molecular Mechanisms in Assessing Response in Patients With Prostate Cancer Receiving Enzalutamide Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-23

    Castration Levels of Testosterone; Castration-Resistant Prostate Carcinoma; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma in the Soft Tissue; Metastatic Prostatic Adenocarcinoma; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; PSA Progression; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage III Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Adenocarcinoma

  16. Linking Estrogens, Prostatitis and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    provide the first direct evidence linking phy siologic estr ogen up- regulation an d pr ostate ma lignancy via inflammation. Ellem, Stuart J...inflammation and malignancy in the prostate. The identification of estr ogen as a cause of prostatitis, as well as a fac tor in the development of

  17. Therapeutic efficacy of nanomedicines for prostate cancer: An update

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer nanomedicine have attracted remarkable attention in medical sectors. Pharmacologic research on nanomedicines, including targeted cancer therapy, has increased dramatically in the past 5