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Sample records for prostate tumor-initiating cells

  1. Immunological Targeting of Tumor Initiating Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    clinically using well-accepted immuno-competent animal models. 2) Keywords: Prostate Cancer , Lymphocyte, Vaccine , Antibody 3) Overall Project Summary...generating a novel prostate cancer vaccine aimed at targeting the castration resistant epithelial cells left behind after initial androgen ablation. 6...of origin for prostate cancer . Nature 461:495-500. 2. Drake,C.G., E.J.Lipson, and J.R.Brahmer. 2014. Breathing new life into immunotherapy

  2. Isolation of prostate tumor initiating cells (TICs) through their dielectrophoretic signature.

    PubMed

    Salmanzadeh, Alireza; Romero, Lina; Shafiee, Hadi; Gallo-Villanueva, Roberto C; Stremler, Mark A; Cramer, Scott D; Davalos, Rafael V

    2012-01-07

    In this study, the dielectrophoretic response of prostate tumor initiating cells (TICs) was investigated in a microfluidic system utilizing contactless dielectrophoresis (cDEP). The dielectrophoretic response of prostate TICs was observed to be distinctively different than that for non-TICs, enabling them to be sorted using cDEP. Culturing the sorted TICs generated spheroids, indicating that they were indeed initiating cells. This study presents the first marker-free TIC separation from non-TICs utilizing their electrical fingerprints through dielectrophoresis.

  3. A convenient and effective strategy for the enrichment of tumor-initiating cell properties in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiming; Huang, Yiqiang; Jin, Zhong; Li, Xiezhao; Li, Bingkun; Xu, Peng; Huang, Peng; Liu, Chunxiao

    2016-09-01

    Stem-like prostate cancer (PrCa) cells, also called PrCa stem cells (PrCSCs) or PrCa tumor-initiating cells (PrTICs), are considered to be involved in the mediation of tumor metastasis and may be responsible for the poor prognosis of PrCa patients. Currently, the methods for PrTIC sorting are mainly based on cell surface marker or side population (SP). However, the rarity of these sorted cells limits the investigation of the molecular mechanisms and therapeutic strategies targeting PrTICs. For PrTIC enrichment, we induced cancer stem cell (CSC) properties in PrCa cells by transducing three defined factors (OCT3/4, SOX2, and KLF4), followed by culture with conventional serum-containing medium. The CSC properties in the transduced cells were evaluated by proliferation, cell cycle, SP assay, drug sensitivity technology, in vivo tumorigenicity, and molecular marker analysis of PrCSCs compared with parental cells and spheroids. After culture with serum-containing medium for 8 days, the PrCa cells transduced with the three factors showed significantly enhanced CSC properties in terms of marker gene expression, sphere formation, chemoresistance to docetaxel, and tumorigenicity. The percentage of CD133(+)/CD44(+) cells was ninefold higher in the transduced cell population than in the adherent PC3 cell population (2.25 ± 0.62 vs. 0.25 ± 0.12 %, respectively), and the SP increased to 1.22 ± 0.18 % in the transduced cell population, but was undetectable in the adherent population. This method can be used to obtain abundant PrTIC material and enables a complete understanding of PrTIC biology and development of novel therapeutic agents targeting PrTICs.

  4. Generation of prostate tumor-initiating cells is associated with elevation of reactive oxygen species and IL-6/STAT3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yi; Oyan, Anne Margrete; Liu, Runhui; Hua, Yaping; Zhang, Jigang; Hovland, Randi; Popa, Mihaela; Liu, Xiaojun; Brokstad, Karl A; Simon, Ronald; Molven, Anders; Lin, Biaoyang; Zhang, Wei-dong; McCormack, Emmet; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Ke, Xi-Song

    2013-12-01

    How prostate cancer is initiated remains a topic of debate. In an effort to establish a human model of prostate carcinogenesis, we adapted premalignant human prostate EPT2-D5 cells to protein-free medium to generate numerous tight prostate spheres (D5HS) in monolayer culture. In contrast to EPT2-D5 cells, the newly generated D5HS efficiently formed large subcutaneous tumors and subsequent metastases in vivo, showing the tumorigenicity of D5HS spheres. A striking production of interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA and protein was found in D5HS cells. The essential roles of IL-6 and the downstream STAT3 signaling in D5HS tumor sphere formation were confirmed by neutralizing antibody, chemical inhibitors, and fluorescent pathway reporter. In addition, elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced upon protein depletion was required for the activation of IL-6/STAT3 in D5HS. Importantly, a positive feedback loop was found between ROS and IL-6 during tumor sphere formation. The association of ROS/IL-6/STAT3 to the carcinogenesis of human prostate cells was further examined in xenograft tumors and verified by limiting dilution implantations. Collectively, we have for the first time established human prostate tumor-initiating cells based on physiologic adaption. The intrinsic association of ROS and IL-6/STAT3 signaling in human prostate carcinogenesis shed new light on this relationship and define therapeutic targets in this setting.

  5. CD54-NOTCH1 axis controls tumor initiation and cancer stem cell functions in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chong; Liu, Shengwu; Yan, Ruping; Han, Ning; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Li, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered one of the key contributors to chemoresistance and tumor recurrence. Therefore, the precise identification of reliable CSC markers and clarification of the intracellular signaling involved in CSCs remains a great challenge in fields relating to cancer biology. Here, we implemented a novel chemoresistant prostate cancer patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model in NOD/SCID mice and identified CD54 as a candidate gene among the most highly enriched gene expression profiles in prostate tumors exposed to chronic cisplatin administration. Additional in vitro and in vivo assays showed that CD54 played a critical role in the self-renewal and tumorigenesis of prostate CSCs. Moreover, silencing CD54 greatly reduced the tumorigenesis of prostate cancers both in vitro and in vivo and significantly extended the survival time of tumor-bearing mice in a prostate cancer xenograft model. Dissection of the molecular mechanism revealed that the p38-Notch1 axis was the main downstream signaling pathway in CD54-mediated regulation of CSCs in prostate cancers. Together, these results established that CD54 could be a novel reliable prostate CSC marker and provided a new potential therapeutic target in prostate cancer via CD54-Notch1 signaling. PMID:28042317

  6. Tumor-initiating cells of breast and prostate origin show alterations in the expression of genes related to iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tomkova, Veronika; Korenkova, Vlasta; Langerova, Lucie; Simonova, Ekaterina; Zjablovskaja, Polina; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Neuzil, Jiri; Truksa, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    The importance of iron in the growth and progression of tumors has been widely documented. In this report, we show that tumor-initiating cells (TICs), represented by spheres derived from the MCF7 cell line, exhibit higher intracellular labile iron pool, mitochondrial iron accumulation and are more susceptible to iron chelation. TICs also show activation of the IRP/IRE system, leading to higher iron uptake and decrease in iron storage, suggesting that level of properly assembled cytosolic iron-sulfur clusters (FeS) is reduced. This finding is confirmed by lower enzymatic activity of aconitase and FeS cluster biogenesis enzymes, as well as lower levels of reduced glutathione, implying reduced FeS clusters synthesis/utilization in TICs. Importantly, we have identified specific gene signature related to iron metabolism consisting of genes regulating iron uptake, mitochondrial FeS cluster biogenesis and hypoxic response (ABCB10, ACO1, CYBRD1, EPAS1, GLRX5, HEPH, HFE, IREB2, QSOX1 and TFRC). Principal component analysis based on this signature is able to distinguish TICs from cancer cells in vitro and also Leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) from non-LICs in the mouse model of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Majority of the described changes were also recapitulated in an alternative model represented by MCF7 cells resistant to tamoxifen (TAMR) that exhibit features of TICs. Our findings point to the critical importance of redox balance and iron metabolism-related genes and proteins in the context of cancer and TICs that could be potentially used for cancer diagnostics or therapy. PMID:28031527

  7. CDC20 maintains tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qi; Wu, Qiulian; Mack, Stephen C.; Yang, Kailin; Kim, Leo; Hubert, Christopher G.; Flavahan, William A.; Chu, Chengwei; Bao, Shideng; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most prevalent and lethal primary intrinsic brain tumor. Glioblastoma displays hierarchical arrangement with a population of self-renewing and tumorigenic glioma tumor initiating cells (TICs), or cancer stem cells. While non-neoplastic neural stem cells are generally quiescent, glioblastoma TICs are often proliferative with mitotic control offering a potential point of fragility. Here, we interrogate the role of cell-division cycle protein 20 (CDC20), an essential activator of anaphase-promoting complex (APC) E3 ubiquitination ligase, in the maintenance of TICs. By chromatin analysis and immunoblotting, CDC20 was preferentially expressed in TICs relative to matched non-TICs. Targeting CDC20 expression by RNA interference attenuated TIC proliferation, self-renewal and in vivo tumor growth. CDC20 disruption mediated its effects through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell cycle progression. CDC20 maintains TICs through degradation of p21CIP1/WAF1, a critical negative regulator of TICs. Inhibiting CDC20 stabilized p21CIP1/WAF1, resulting in repression of several genes critical to tumor growth and survival, including CDC25C, c-Myc and Survivin. Transcriptional control of CDC20 is mediated by FOXM1, a central transcription factor in TICs. These results suggest CDC20 is a critical regulator of TIC proliferation and survival, linking two key TIC nodes – FOXM1 and p21CIP1/WAF1 — elucidating a potential point for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25938542

  8. Metformin selectively affects human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Würth, Roberto; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Gatti, Monica; Bajetto, Adirana; Corsaro, Alessandro; Parodi, Alessia; Sirito, Rodolfo; Massollo, Michela; Marini, Cecilia; Zona, Gianluigi; Fenoglio, Daniela; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Filaci, Gilberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cell theory postulates that a small population of tumor-initiating cells is responsible for the development, progression and recurrence of several malignancies, including glioblastoma. In this perspective, tumor-initiating cells represent the most relevant target to obtain effective cancer treatment. Metformin, a first-line drug for type II diabetes, was reported to possess anticancer properties affecting the survival of cancer stem cells in breast cancer models. We report that metformin treatment reduced the proliferation rate of tumor-initiating cell-enriched cultures isolated from four human glioblastomas. Metformin also impairs tumor-initiating cell spherogenesis, indicating a direct effect on self-renewal mechanisms. Interestingly, analyzing by FACS the antiproliferative effects of metformin on CD133-expressing subpopulation, a component of glioblastoma cancer stem cells, a higher reduction of proliferation was observed as compared with CD133-negative cells, suggesting a certain degree of cancer stem cell selectivity in its effects. In fact, glioblastoma cell differentiation strongly reduced sensitivity to metformin treatment. Metformin effects in tumor-initiating cell-enriched cultures were associated with a powerful inhibition of Akt-dependent cell survival pathway, while this pathway was not affected in differentiated cells. The specificity of metformin antiproliferative effects toward glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells was confirmed by the lack of significant inhibition of normal human stem cells (umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells) in vitro proliferation after metformin exposure. Altogether, these data clearly suggest that metformin exerts antiproliferative activity on glioblastoma cells, showing a higher specificity toward tumor-initiating cells, and that the inhibition of Akt pathway may represent a possible intracellular target of this effect. PMID:23255107

  9. Tumor-Initiating Cells and Methods of Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlatky, Lynn (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided herein are an isolated or enriched population of tumor initiating cells derived from normal cells, cells susceptible to neoplasia, or neoplastic cells. Methods of use of the cells for screening for anti-hyperproliferative agents, and use of the cells for animal models of hyperproliferative disorders including metastatic cancer, diagnostic methods, and therapeutic methods are provided.

  10. Culture and isolation of brain tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Lenkiewicz, Monika; Li, Na; Singh, Sheila K

    2009-10-01

    This unit describes protocols for the culture and isolation of brain tumor initiating cells (BTIC). The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis suggests that tumors are maintained exclusively by a rare fraction of cells that have stem cell properties. We applied culture conditions and assays originally used for normal neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro to a variety of brain tumors. The BTIC were isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting for the neural precursor cell surface marker CD133. Only the CD133(+) brain tumor fraction contains cells capable of sphere formation and sustained self-renewal in vitro, and tumor initiation in NOD-SCID mouse brains. Therefore, CD133(+) BTICs satisfy the definition of cancer stem cells in that they are able to generate a replica of the patient's tumor and they exhibit self-renewal ability through serial retransplantation. This established that only a rare subset of brain tumor cells with stem cell properties are tumor-initiating, and, in this unit, we describe their culture and isolation.

  11. Cryptotanshinone targets tumor-initiating cells through down-regulation of stemness genes expression

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YING; CABARCAS, STEPHANIE M.; ZHENG, JI; SUN, LEI; MATHEWS, LESLEY A.; ZHANG, XIAOHU; LIN, HONGSHENG; FARRAR, WILLIAM L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that tumor-initiating cells (TICs), also called cancer stem cells (CSCs), are responsible for tumor initiation and progression, therefore representing an important cell population that may be used as a target for the development of future anticancer therapies. In the present study, Cryptotanshinone (CT), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, was demonstrated to regulate the behaviors of LNCaP prostate cells and prostate LNCaP TICs. The results demonstrate that treatment with CT alters cellular proliferation, cell cycle status, migration, viability, colony formation and notably, sphere formation and down-regulation of stemness genes (Nanog, OCT4, SOX2, β-catenin, CXCR4) in TICs. The present study demonstrates that CT targets the LNCaP CD44+CD24- population that is representative of prostate TICs and also affects total LNCaP cells as well via down-regulation of stemness genes. The strong effect with which CT has on prostate TICs suggests that CT may potentially function as a novel natural anticancer agent that specifically targets TICs. PMID:27313698

  12. Tumor-Initiating Cells: Emerging Biophysical Methods of Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Cermeño, Efraín A.; García, Andrés J.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery and subsequent isolation of tumor-initiating cells (TICs), a small population of highly tumorigenic and drug-resistant cancer cells also called cancer stem cells (CSCs), have revolutionized our understanding of cancer. TICs are isolated using various methodologies, including selection of surface marker expression, ALDH activity, suspension culture, and chemotherapy/drug resistance. These methods have several drawbacks, including their variability, lack of robustness and scalability, and low specificity. Alternative methods of purification take advantage of biophysical properties of TICs including their adhesion and stiffness. This review will provide a brief overview of TIC biology as well as review the most important methods of TIC isolation with a focus on biophysical methods of TIC purification. PMID:27141429

  13. Ovarian tumor-initiating cells display a flexible metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Angela S.; Roberts, Paul C.; Frisard, Madlyn I.; Hulver, Matthew W.; Schmelz, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    An altered metabolism during ovarian cancer progression allows for increased macromolecular synthesis and unrestrained growth. However, the metabolic phenotype of cancer stem or tumor-initiating cells, small tumor cell populations that are able to recapitulate the original tumor, has not been well characterized. In the present study, we compared the metabolic phenotype of the stem cell enriched cell variant, MOSE-LFFLv (TIC), derived from mouse ovarian surface epithelial (MOSE) cells, to their parental (MOSE-L) and benign precursor (MOSE-E) cells. TICs exhibit a decrease in glucose and fatty acid oxidation with a concomitant increase in lactate secretion. In contrast to MOSE-L cells, TICs can increase their rate of glycolysis to overcome the inhibition of ATP synthase by oligomycin and can increase their oxygen consumption rate to maintain proton motive force when uncoupled, similar to the benign MOSE-E cells. TICs have an increased survival rate under limiting conditions as well as an increased survival rate when treated with AICAR, but exhibit a higher sensitivity to metformin than MOSE-E and MOSE-L cells. Together, our data show that TICs have a distinct metabolic profile that may render them flexible to adapt to the specific conditions of their microenvironment. By better understanding their metabolic phenotype and external environmental conditions that support their survival, treatment interventions can be designed to extend current therapy regimens to eradicate TICs. PMID:25172556

  14. DNA repair: the culprit for tumor-initiating cell survival?

    PubMed

    Mathews, Lesley A; Cabarcas, Stephanie M; Farrar, William L

    2011-06-01

    The existence of "tumor-initiating cells" (TICs) has been a topic of heated debate for the last few years within the field of cancer biology. Their continuous characterization in a variety of solid tumors has led to an abundance of evidence supporting their existence. TICs are believed to be responsible for resistance against conventional treatment regimes of chemotherapy and radiation, ultimately leading to metastasis and patient demise. This review summarizes DNA repair mechanism(s) and their role in the maintenance and regulation of stem cells. There is evidence supporting the hypothesis that TICs, similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), display an increase in their ability to survive genotoxic stress and injury. Mechanistically, the ability of ES cells, HSCs and TICs to survive under stressful conditions can be attributed to an increase in the efficiency at which these cells undergo DNA repair. Furthermore, the data presented in this review summarize the results found by our lab and others demonstrating that TICs have an increase in their genomic stability, which can allow for TIC survival under conditions such as anticancer treatments, while the bulk population of tumor cells dies. We believe that these data will greatly impact the development and design of future therapies being engineered to target and eradicate this highly aggressive cancer cell population. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

  15. Kinetics of MDR Transport in Tumor-Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koshkin, Vasilij; Yang, Burton B.; Krylov, Sergey N.

    2013-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) driven by ABC (ATP binding cassette) membrane transporters is one of the major causes of treatment failure in human malignancy. MDR capacity is thought to be unevenly distributed among tumor cells, with higher capacity residing in tumor-initiating cells (TIC) (though opposite finding are occasionally reported). Functional evidence for enhanced MDR of TICs was previously provided using a “side population” assay. This assay estimates MDR capacity by a single parameter - cell’s ability to retain fluorescent MDR substrate, so that cells with high MDR capacity (“side population”) demonstrate low substrate retention. In the present work MDR in TICs was investigated in greater detail using a kinetic approach, which monitors MDR efflux from single cells. Analysis of kinetic traces obtained allowed for the estimation of both the velocity (Vmax) and affinity (KM) of MDR transport in single cells. In this way it was shown that activation of MDR in TICs occurs in two ways: through the increase of Vmax in one fraction of cells, and through decrease of KM in another fraction. In addition, kinetic data showed that heterogeneity of MDR parameters in TICs significantly exceeds that of bulk cells. Potential consequences of these findings for chemotherapy are discussed. PMID:24223908

  16. Culture and Isolation of Brain Tumor Initiating Cells.

    PubMed

    Vora, Parvez; Venugopal, Chitra; McFarlane, Nicole; Singh, Sheila K

    2015-08-03

    Brain tumors are typically composed of heterogeneous cells that exhibit distinct phenotypic characteristics and proliferative potentials. Only a relatively small fraction of cells in the tumor with stem cell properties, termed brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs), possess an ability to differentiate along multiple lineages, self-renew, and initiate tumors in vivo. This unit describes protocols for the culture and isolation BTICs. We applied culture conditions and assays originally used for normal neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro to a variety of brain tumors. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting for the neural precursor cell surface marker CD133/CD15, BTICs can be isolated and studied prospectively. Isolation of BTICs from GBM bulk tumor will enable examination of dissimilar morphologies, self-renewal capacities, tumorigenicity, and therapeutic sensitivities. As cancer is also considered a disease of unregulated self-renewal and differentiation, an understanding of BTICs is fundamental to understanding tumor growth. Ultimately, it will lead to novel drug discovery approaches that strategically target the functionally relevant BTIC population. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Targeting Unique Metabolic Properties of Breast Tumor Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Weiguo; Gentles, Andrew; Nair, Ramesh V.; Huang, Min; Lin, Yuan; Lee, Cleo Y.; Cai, Shang; Scheeren, Ferenc A.; Kuo, Angera H.; Diehn, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Normal stem cells from a variety of tissues display unique metabolic properties compared to their more differentiated progeny. However, relatively little is known about heterogeneity of metabolic properties cancer stem cells, also called tumor initiating cells (TICs). In this study we show that, analogous to some normal stem cells, breast TICs have distinct metabolic properties compared to non-tumorigenic cancer cells (NTCs). Transcriptome profiling using RNA-Seq revealed TICs under-express genes involved in mitochondrial biology and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and metabolic analyses revealed TICs preferentially perform glycolysis over oxidative phosphorylation compared to NTCs. Mechanistic analyses demonstrated that decreased expression and activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (Pdh), a key regulator of oxidative phosphorylation, play a critical role in promoting the pro-glycolytic phenotype of TICs. Metabolic reprogramming via forced activation of Pdh preferentially eliminates TICs both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings reveal unique metabolic properties of TICs and demonstrate that metabolic reprogramming represents a promising strategy for targeting these cells. PMID:24497069

  18. Mitochondrial control by DRP1 in brain tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Wu, Qiulian; Horbinski, Craig M; Flavahan, William A; Yang, Kailin; Zhou, Wenchao; Dombrowski, Stephen M; Huang, Zhi; Fang, Xiaoguang; Shi, Yu; Ferguson, Ashley N; Kashatus, David F; Bao, Shideng; Rich, Jeremy N

    2015-04-01

    Brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) co-opt the neuronal high affinity glucose transporter, GLUT3, to withstand metabolic stress. We investigated another mechanism critical to brain metabolism, mitochondrial morphology, in BTICs. BTIC mitochondria were fragmented relative to non-BTIC tumor cell mitochondria, suggesting that BTICs increase mitochondrial fission. The essential mediator of mitochondrial fission, dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1), showed activating phosphorylation in BTICs and inhibitory phosphorylation in non-BTIC tumor cells. Targeting DRP1 using RNA interference or pharmacologic inhibition induced BTIC apoptosis and inhibited tumor growth. Downstream, DRP1 activity regulated the essential metabolic stress sensor, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and targeting AMPK rescued the effects of DRP1 disruption. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) phosphorylated DRP1 to increase its activity in BTICs, whereas Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CAMK2) inhibited DRP1 in non-BTIC tumor cells, suggesting that tumor cell differentiation induces a regulatory switch in mitochondrial morphology. DRP1 activation correlated with poor prognosis in glioblastoma, suggesting that mitochondrial dynamics may represent a therapeutic target for BTICs.

  19. Isolation of melanoma tumor-initiating cells from surgical tissues.

    PubMed

    Boiko, Alexander D

    2013-01-01

    A new model of cancer progression has been put forward that predicts existence of tumor stem cells (TSCs) in the heterogeneous bulk tumor mass that self-renew, are resistant to chemo- and radiotherapies, and sustain tumor growth during the course of its progression or relapse (Ailles and Weissman, Curr Opin Biotechnol 18:460-466, 2007; Chan et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 106:14016-14021, 2009; D'Angelo and Wicha, Prog Mol Biol Transl Sci 95:113-158, 2010; O'Brien, Semin Radiat Oncol 19:71-77, 2009; Park et al., Mol Ther 17:219-230, 2009). Using most advanced methods of cell purification and transplantation, our laboratory and another independent study identified melanoma stem cells as CD271(NFGR/p75)+ cells from surgical human specimens (Boiko et al., Nature 466:133-137, 2010; Civenni et al., Cancer Res 71:3098-3109, 2011). Here we describe in great detail an approach for isolating tumor-initiating cells from freshly resected melanomas (Boiko et al., Nature 466:133-137, 2010).

  20. Tumor-initiating cell frequency is relevant for glioblastoma aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Richichi, Cristina; Osti, Daniela; Del Bene, Massimiliano; Fornasari, Lorenzo; Patanè, Monica; Pollo, Bianca; DiMeco, Francesco; Pelicci, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is maintained by a small subpopulation of tumor-initiating cells (TICs). The arduous assessment of TIC frequencies challenges the prognostic role of TICs in predicting the clinical outcome in GBM patients. We estimated the TIC frequency in human GBM injecting intracerebrally in mice dissociated cells without any passage in culture. All GBMs contained rare TICsand were tumorigenic in vivo but only 54% of them grew in vitro as neurospheres. We demonstrated that neurosphere formation in vitro did not foretell tumorigenic ability in vivo and frequencies calculated in vitro overestimated the TIC content. Our findings assert the pathological significance of GBM TICs. TIC number correlated positively with tumor incidence and inversely with survival of tumor-bearing mice. Stratification of GBM patients according to TIC content revealed that patients with low TIC frequency experienced a trend towards a longer progression free survival. The expression of either putative stem-cell markers or markers associated with different GBM molecular subtypes did not associate with either TIC content or neurosphere formation underlying the limitations of TIC identification based on the expression of some putative stem cell-markers. PMID:27582543

  1. Tumor-initiating cell frequency is relevant for glioblastoma aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Richichi, Cristina; Osti, Daniela; Del Bene, Massimiliano; Fornasari, Lorenzo; Patanè, Monica; Pollo, Bianca; DiMeco, Francesco; Pelicci, Giuliana

    2016-11-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is maintained by a small subpopulation of tumor-initiating cells (TICs). The arduous assessment of TIC frequencies challenges the prognostic role of TICs in predicting the clinical outcome in GBM patients. We estimated the TIC frequency in human GBM injecting intracerebrally in mice dissociated cells without any passage in culture.All GBMs contained rare TICsand were tumorigenic in vivo but only 54% of them grew in vitro as neurospheres. We demonstrated that neurosphere formation in vitro did not foretell tumorigenic ability in vivo and frequencies calculated in vitro overestimated the TIC content.Our findings assert the pathological significance of GBM TICs. TIC number correlated positively with tumor incidence and inversely with survival of tumor-bearing mice. Stratification of GBM patients according to TIC content revealed that patients with low TIC frequency experienced a trend towards a longer progression free survival. The expression of either putative stem-cell markers or markers associated with different GBM molecular subtypes did not associate with either TIC content or neurosphere formation underlying the limitations of TIC identification based on the expression of some putative stem cell-markers.

  2. Ovarian tumor-initiating cells display a flexible metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Angela S.; Roberts, Paul C.; Frisard, Madlyn I.; Hulver, Matthew W.; Schmelz, Eva M.

    2014-10-15

    An altered metabolism during ovarian cancer progression allows for increased macromolecular synthesis and unrestrained growth. However, the metabolic phenotype of cancer stem or tumor-initiating cells, small tumor cell populations that are able to recapitulate the original tumor, has not been well characterized. In the present study, we compared the metabolic phenotype of the stem cell enriched cell variant, MOSE-L{sub FFLv} (TIC), derived from mouse ovarian surface epithelial (MOSE) cells, to their parental (MOSE-L) and benign precursor (MOSE-E) cells. TICs exhibit a decrease in glucose and fatty acid oxidation with a concomitant increase in lactate secretion. In contrast to MOSE-L cells, TICs can increase their rate of glycolysis to overcome the inhibition of ATP synthase by oligomycin and can increase their oxygen consumption rate to maintain proton motive force when uncoupled, similar to the benign MOSE-E cells. TICs have an increased survival rate under limiting conditions as well as an increased survival rate when treated with AICAR, but exhibit a higher sensitivity to metformin than MOSE-E and MOSE-L cells. Together, our data show that TICs have a distinct metabolic profile that may render them flexible to adapt to the specific conditions of their microenvironment. By better understanding their metabolic phenotype and external environmental conditions that support their survival, treatment interventions can be designed to extend current therapy regimens to eradicate TICs. - Highlights: • Ovarian cancer TICs exhibit a decreased glucose and fatty acid oxidation. • TICs are more glycolytic and have highly active mitochondria. • TICs are more resistant to AICAR but not metformin. • A flexible metabolism allows TICs to adapt to their microenvironment. • This flexibility requires development of specific drugs targeting TIC-specific changes to prevent recurrent TIC outgrowth.

  3. Cellular microenvironment modulates the galvanotaxis of brain tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ja; Hoffmann, Gwendolyn; Wheeler, Benjamin; Schiapparelli, Paula; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Searson, Peter

    2016-02-22

    Galvanotaxis is a complex process that represents the collective outcome of various contributing mechanisms, including asymmetric ion influxes, preferential activation of voltage-gated channels, and electrophoretic redistribution of membrane components. While a large number of studies have focused on various up- and downstream signaling pathways, little is known about how the surrounding microenvironment may interact and contribute to the directional response. Using a customized galvanotaxis chip capable of carrying out experiments in both two- and three-dimensional microenvironments, we show that cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions modulate the galvanotaxis of brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs). Five different BTICs across three different glioblastoma subtypes were examined and shown to all migrate toward the anode in the presence of a direct-current electric field (dcEF) when cultured on a poly-L-ornithine/laminin coated surface, while the fetal-derived neural progenitor cells (fNPCs) migrated toward the cathode. Interestingly, when embedded in a 3D ECM composed of hyaluronic acid and collagen, BTICs exhibited opposite directional response and migrated toward the cathode. Pharmacological inhibition against a panel of key molecules involved in galvanotaxis further revealed the mechanistic differences between 2- and 3D galvanotaxis in BTICs. Both myosin II and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) were found to hold strikingly different roles in different microenvironments.

  4. Mitochondrial Control by DRP1 in Brain Tumor Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qi; Wu, Qiulian; Horbinski, Craig M.; Flavahan, William A.; Yang, Kailin; Zhou, Wenchao; Dombrowski, Stephen M.; Huang, Zhi; Fang, Xiaoguang; Shi, Yu; Ferguson, Ashley N.; Kashatus, David F.; Bao, Shideng; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2015-01-01

    Brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) coopt the neuronal high affinity GLUT3 glucose transporter to withstand metabolic stress. Here, we investigated another mechanism critical to brain metabolism, mitochondrial morphology. BTICs displayed mitochondrial fragmentation relative to non-BTICs, suggesting that BTICs have increased mitochondrial fission. The essential mediator of mitochondrial fission, dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1), was activated in BTICs and inhibited in non-BTICs. Targeting DRP1 using RNA interference or pharmacologic inhibition induced BTIC apoptosis and inhibited tumor growth. Downstream, DRP1 activity regulated the essential metabolic stress sensor, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and AMPK targeting rescued the effects of DRP1 disruption. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) phosphorylated DRP1 to increase its activity in BTICs, whereas Ca2+–calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CAMK2) inhibited DRP1 in non-BTICs, suggesting tumor cell differentiation induces a regulatory switch in mitochondrial morphology. DRP1 activation correlates with poor prognosis in glioblastoma, suggesting mitochondrial dynamics may represent a therapeutic target for BTICs. PMID:25730670

  5. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition can suppress major attributes of human epithelial tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Celià-Terrassa, Toni; Meca-Cortés, Óscar; Mateo, Francesca; Martínez de Paz, Alexia; Rubio, Nuria; Arnal-Estapé, Anna; Ell, Brian J.; Bermudo, Raquel; Díaz, Alba; Guerra-Rebollo, Marta; Lozano, Juan José; Estarás, Conchi; Ulloa, Catalina; ρlvarez-Simón, Daniel; Milà, Jordi; Vilella, Ramón; Paciucci, Rosanna; Martínez-Balbás, Marian; García de Herreros, Antonio; Gomis, Roger R.; Kang, Yibin; Blanco, Jerónimo; Fernández, Pedro L.; Thomson, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant progression in cancer requires populations of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) endowed with unlimited self renewal, survival under stress, and establishment of distant metastases. Additionally, the acquisition of invasive properties driven by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is critical for the evolution of neoplastic cells into fully metastatic populations. Here, we characterize 2 human cellular models derived from prostate and bladder cancer cell lines to better understand the relationship between TIC and EMT programs in local invasiveness and distant metastasis. The model tumor subpopulations that expressed a strong epithelial gene program were enriched in highly metastatic TICs, while a second subpopulation with stable mesenchymal traits was impoverished in TICs. Constitutive overexpression of the transcription factor Snai1 in the epithelial/TIC-enriched populations engaged a mesenchymal gene program and suppressed their self renewal and metastatic phenotypes. Conversely, knockdown of EMT factors in the mesenchymal-like prostate cancer cell subpopulation caused a gain in epithelial features and properties of TICs. Both tumor cell subpopulations cooperated so that the nonmetastatic mesenchymal-like prostate cancer subpopulation enhanced the in vitro invasiveness of the metastatic epithelial subpopulation and, in vivo, promoted the escape of the latter from primary implantation sites and accelerated their metastatic colonization. Our models provide new insights into how dynamic interactions among epithelial, self-renewal, and mesenchymal gene programs determine the plasticity of epithelial TICs. PMID:22505459

  6. Linneg Sca-1high CD49fhigh prostate cancer cells derived from the Hi-Myc mouse model are tumor-initiating cells with basal-epithelial characteristics and differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saha, Achinto; Blando, Jorge; Fernandez, Irina; Kiguchi, Kaoru; DiGiovanni, John

    2016-05-03

    A cell line was established from ventral prostate (VP) tumors of one-year-old Hi-Myc mice. These cells, called HMVP2 cells, are LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh with high CD44 and CD29 expression and express CK14, Sca-1 and CD49f (but not CK8), suggesting basal-epithelial characteristics. Furthermore, HMVP2 cells form spheroids and both the cells and spheroids produce tumors in syngeneic mice. After four days of culture, HMVP2 spheroids underwent a gradual transition from LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression to LinnegSca-1lowCD49flow while a subpopulation of the cells retained the original LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression pattern. Additional cell subpopulations expressing Lin positive markers were also present suggesting further differentiation of HMVP2 spheroids. Two additional highly tumorigenic cell lines (HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2) were isolated from HMVP2 cells after subsequent tumor formation in FVB/N mice. Concurrently, we also established cell lines from the VP of 6 months old Hi-Myc mice (named as HMVP1) and FVB/N mice (called NMVP) having less aggressive growth properties compared to the other three cell lines. AR expression was reduced in HMVP2 cells compared to NMVP and HMVP1 cells and almost absent in HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2 cells. These cell lines will provide valuable tools for further mechanistic studies as well as preclinical studies to evaluate preventive and/or therapeutic agents for prostate cancer.

  7. Linneg Sca-1high CD49fhigh prostate cancer cells derived from the Hi-Myc mouse model are tumor-initiating cells with basal-epithelial characteristics and differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Irina; Kiguchi, Kaoru; DiGiovanni, John

    2016-01-01

    A cell line was established from ventral prostate (VP) tumors of one-year-old Hi-Myc mice. These cells, called HMVP2 cells, are LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh with high CD44 and CD29 expression and express CK14, Sca-1 and CD49f (but not CK8), suggesting basal-epithelial characteristics. Furthermore, HMVP2 cells form spheroids and both the cells and spheroids produce tumors in syngeneic mice. After four days of culture, HMVP2 spheroids underwent a gradual transition from LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression to LinnegSca-1lowCD49flow while a subpopulation of the cells retained the original LinnegSca-1highCD49fhigh expression pattern. Additional cell subpopulations expressing Lin positive markers were also present suggesting further differentiation of HMVP2 spheroids. Two additional highly tumorigenic cell lines (HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2) were isolated from HMVP2 cells after subsequent tumor formation in FVB/N mice. Concurrently, we also established cell lines from the VP of 6 months old Hi-Myc mice (named as HMVP1) and FVB/N mice (called NMVP) having less aggressive growth properties compared to the other three cell lines. AR expression was reduced in HMVP2 cells compared to NMVP and HMVP1 cells and almost absent in HMVP2A1 and HMVP2A2 cells. These cell lines will provide valuable tools for further mechanistic studies as well as preclinical studies to evaluate preventive and/or therapeutic agents for prostate cancer. PMID:26910370

  8. Neuroblastoma cell lines contain pluripotent tumor initiating cells that are susceptible to a targeted oncolytic virus.

    PubMed

    Mahller, Yonatan Y; Williams, Jon P; Baird, William H; Mitton, Bryan; Grossheim, Jonathan; Saeki, Yoshinaga; Cancelas, Jose A; Ratner, Nancy; Cripe, Timothy P

    2009-01-01

    Although disease remission can frequently be achieved for patients with neuroblastoma, relapse is common. The cancer stem cell theory suggests that rare tumorigenic cells, resistant to conventional therapy, are responsible for relapse. If true for neuroblastoma, improved cure rates may only be achieved via identification and therapeutic targeting of the neuroblastoma tumor initiating cell. Based on cues from normal stem cells, evidence for tumor populating progenitor cells has been found in a variety of cancers. Four of eight human neuroblastoma cell lines formed tumorspheres in neural stem cell media, and all contained some cells that expressed neurogenic stem cell markers including CD133, ABCG2, and nestin. Three lines tested could be induced into multi-lineage differentiation. LA-N-5 spheres were further studied and showed a verapamil-sensitive side population, relative resistance to doxorubicin, and CD133+ cells showed increased sphere formation and tumorigenicity. Oncolytic viruses, engineered to be clinically safe by genetic mutation, are emerging as next generation anticancer therapeutics. Because oncolytic viruses circumvent typical drug-resistance mechanisms, they may represent an effective therapy for chemotherapy-resistant tumor initiating cells. A Nestin-targeted oncolytic herpes simplex virus efficiently replicated within and killed neuroblastoma tumor initiating cells preventing their ability to form tumors in athymic nude mice. These results suggest that human neuroblastoma contains tumor initiating cells that may be effectively targeted by an oncolytic virus.

  9. Fibroblasts—a key host cell type in tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Strell, Carina; Rundqvist, Helene

    2012-01-01

    Tumor initiation, growth, invasion, and metastasis occur as a consequence of a complex interplay between the host environment and cancer cells. Fibroblasts are now recognized as a key host cell type involved in host–cancer signaling. This review discusses some recent studies that highlight the roles of fibroblasts in tumor initiation, early progression, invasion, and metastasis. Some clinical studies describing the prognostic significance of fibroblast-derived markers and signatures are also discussed. PMID:22509805

  10. On the nature of the tumor-initiating cell.

    PubMed

    Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Caceres-Cortes, Julio Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Certain aspects of tumors that may influence areas of basic biology and medicine are reviewed. The hypothesis that malignant stem cells evolve from normal stem cells, is considered. Information is being accumulated on the possibility that certain cell populations that can be propagated as cell lines in vitro can produce cells with features of differentiated cells in addition to others that maintain the line and, in some cases may also initiate tumor formation in vivo. Up to the present time, there is evidence to show that cancer stem cells persist in many cell lines. Tyrosine kinase inhibition produces combinations of autophagy and apoptosis in the human erythroleukemia cell line TF-1 hinting at a heterotypic aggregation of cells containing cancer stem cells. Finally, the mechanisms of cancer development, invasion and metastasis are operatively defined. The purpose of this paper is to review some of the salient features of cancer stem cells in support of the proposal that research in neoplasia be increased. Rather than presenting details of various studies, we have attempted to indicate general areas in which work has been done or is in progress. It is hoped that this survey of the subject will demonstrate a variety of opportunities for additional research in human neoplasia.

  11. Matrix Metalloproteinase-10 Is Required for Lung Cancer Stem Cell Maintenance, Tumor Initiation and Metastatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, I-Chu; Walsh, Michael P.; Batra, Jyotica; Radisky, Evette S.; Murray, Nicole R.; Fields, Alan P.

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (Mmps) stimulate tumor invasion and metastasis by degrading the extracellular matrix. Here we reveal an unexpected role for Mmp10 (stromelysin 2) in the maintenance and tumorigenicity of mouse lung cancer stem-like cells (CSC). Mmp10 is highly expressed in oncosphere cultures enriched in CSCs and RNAi-mediated knockdown of Mmp10 leads to a loss of stem cell marker gene expression and inhibition of oncosphere growth, clonal expansion, and transformed growth in vitro. Interestingly, clonal expansion of Mmp10 deficient oncospheres can be restored by addition of exogenous Mmp10 protein to the culture medium, demonstrating a direct role for Mmp10 in the proliferation of these cells. Oncospheres exhibit enhanced tumor-initiating and metastatic activity when injected orthotopically into syngeneic mice, whereas Mmp10-deficient cultures show a severe defect in tumor initiation. Conversely, oncospheres implanted into syngeneic non-transgenic or Mmp10−/− mice show no significant difference in tumor initiation, growth or metastasis, demonstrating the importance of Mmp10 produced by cancer cells rather than the tumor microenvironment in lung tumor initiation and maintenance. Analysis of gene expression data from human cancers reveals a strong positive correlation between tumor Mmp10 expression and metastatic behavior in many human tumor types. Thus, Mmp10 is required for maintenance of a highly tumorigenic, cancer-initiating, metastatic stem-like cell population in lung cancer. Our data demonstrate for the first time that Mmp10 is a critical lung cancer stem cell gene and novel therapeutic target for lung cancer stem cells. PMID:22545096

  12. Brain tumor initiating cells adapt to restricted nutrition through preferential glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Flavahan, William A; Wu, Qiulian; Hitomi, Masahiro; Rahim, Nasiha; Kim, Youngmi; Sloan, Andrew E; Weil, Robert J; Nakano, Ichiro; Sarkaria, Jann N; Stringer, Brett W; Day, Bryan W; Li, Meizhang; Lathia, Justin D; Rich, Jeremy N; Hjelmeland, Anita B

    2013-10-01

    Like all cancers, brain tumors require a continuous source of energy and molecular resources for new cell production. In normal brain, glucose is an essential neuronal fuel, but the blood-brain barrier limits its delivery. We now report that nutrient restriction contributes to tumor progression by enriching for brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) owing to preferential BTIC survival and to adaptation of non-BTICs through acquisition of BTIC features. BTICs outcompete for glucose uptake by co-opting the high affinity neuronal glucose transporter, type 3 (Glut3, SLC2A3). BTICs preferentially express Glut3, and targeting Glut3 inhibits BTIC growth and tumorigenic potential. Glut3, but not Glut1, correlates with poor survival in brain tumors and other cancers; thus, tumor initiating cells may extract nutrients with high affinity. As altered metabolism represents a cancer hallmark, metabolic reprogramming may maintain the tumor hierarchy and portend poor prognosis.

  13. CD24 Is Not Required for Tumor Initiation and Growth in Murine Breast and Prostate Cancer Models.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Natascha; Neeb, Antje; Uhle, Tanja; Dimmler, Arno; Rothley, Melanie; Allgayer, Heike; Fodde, Riccardo; Sleeman, Jonathan Paul; Thiele, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    CD24 is a small, heavily glycosylated, GPI-linked membrane protein, whose expression has been associated with the tumorigenesis and progression of several types of cancer. Here, we studied the expression of CD24 in tumors of MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572/T+ and TRAMP genetic mouse models that spontaneously develop mammary or prostate carcinoma, respectively. We found that CD24 is expressed during tumor development in all three models. In MMTV-PyMT and Apc1572T/+ breast tumors, CD24 was strongly but heterogeneously expressed during early tumorigenesis, but decreased in more advanced stages, and accordingly was increased in poorly differentiated lesions compared with well differentiated lesions. In prostate tumors developing in TRAMP mice, CD24 expression was strong within hyperplastic lesions in comparison with non-hyperplastic regions, and heterogeneous CD24 expression was maintained in advanced prostate carcinomas. To investigate whether CD24 plays a functional role in tumorigenesis in these models, we crossed CD24 deficient mice with MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice, and assessed the influence of CD24 deficiency on tumor onset and tumor burden. We found that mice negative or positive for CD24 did not significantly differ in terms of tumor initiation and burden in the genetic tumor models tested, with the exception of Apc1572T/+ mice, in which lack of CD24 reduced the mammary tumor burden slightly but significantly. Together, our data suggest that while CD24 is distinctively expressed during the early development of murine mammary and prostate tumors, it is not essential for the formation of tumors developing in MMTV-PyMT, Apc1572T/+ and TRAMP mice.

  14. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Lee, Tae Hoon; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2015-08-14

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

  15. Senescence evasion by MCF-7 human breast tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Karimi-Busheri, Feridoun; Rasouli-Nia, Aghdass; Mackey, John R; Weinfeld, Michael

    2010-01-01

    A subpopulation of cancer cells, tumor-initiating cells, is believed to be the driving force behind tumorigenesis and resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. The persistence of tumor-initiating cells may depend on altered regulation of DNA damage and checkpoint proteins, as well as a reduced propensity to undergo apoptosis or senescence. To test this hypothesis, we isolated CD24-/low/CD44+ tumor-initiating cells (as mammospheres) from MCF-7 breast cancer cells grown in adherent monolayer culture, and carried out a comprehensive comparison of cell death and DNA damage response pathways prior to and after exposure to ionizing radiation in mammospheres and monolayer MCF-7 cells. Single and double-strand break repair was measured by single-cell gel electrophoresis. The latter was also examined by phosphorylation of histone H2AX and formation of 53BP1 and Rad51 foci. Apoptosis was quantified by flow-cytometric analysis of annexin V-binding and senescence was analyzed on the basis of cellular beta-galactosidase activity. We employed the telomeric repeat amplification protocol to quantify telomerase activity. Expression of key DNA repair and cell cycle regulatory proteins was detected and quantified by western blot analysis. Our data demonstrate that in comparison to the bulk population of MCF-7 cells (predominantly CD24+/CD44+), the MCF-7 mammosphere cells benefit from a multifaceted approach to cellular protection relative to that seen in monolayer cells, including a reduced level of reactive oxygen species, a more active DNA single-strand break repair (SSBR) pathway, possibly due to a higher level of expression of the key SSBR protein, human AP endonuclease 1 (Ape1), and a significantly reduced propensity to undergo senescence as a result of increased telomerase activity and a low level of p21 protein expression. No significant difference was seen in the rates of double-strand break repair (DSBR) between the two cell types, but DSBR in mammospheres appears to by

  16. Proteolysis-a characteristic of tumor-initiating cells in murine metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Larissa E; Bengsch, Fee; Hochrein, Jochen; Hülsdünker, Jan; Bender, Julia; Follo, Marie; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2016-09-06

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) have been identified and functionally characterized in hematological malignancies as well as in solid tumors such as breast cancer. In addition to their high tumor-initiating potential, TICs are founder cells for metastasis formation and are involved in chemotherapy resistance. In this study we explored molecular pathways which enable this tumor initiating potential for a cancer cell subset of the transgenic MMTV-PyMT mouse model for metastasizing breast cancer. The cell population, characterized by the marker profile CD24+CD90+CD45-, showed a high tumorigenicity compared to non-CD24+CD90+CD45- cancer cells in colony formation assays, as well as upon orthotopic transplantation into the mammary fat pad of mice. In addition, these orthotopically grown CD24+CD90+CD45- TICs metastasized to the lungs. The transcriptome of TICs freshly isolated from primary tumors by cell sorting was compared with that of sorted non-CD24+CD90+CD45- cancer cells by RNA-seq. In addition to more established TIC signatures, such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition or mitogen signaling, an upregulated gene set comprising several classes of proteolytic enzymes was uncovered in the TICs. Accordingly, TICs showed high intra- and extracellular proteolytic activity. Application of a broad range of protease inhibitors to TICs in a colony formation assay reduced anchorage independent growth and had an impact on colony morphology in 3D cell culture assays. We conclude that CD24+CD90+CD45- cells of the MMTV- PyMT mouse model possess an upregulated proteolytic signature which could very well represent a functional hallmark of metastatic TICs from mammary carcinomas.

  17. Proteolysis-a characteristic of tumor-initiating cells in murine metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hillebrand, Larissa E.; Bengsch, Fee; Hochrein, Jochen; Hülsdünker, Jan; Bender, Julia; Follo, Marie; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) have been identified and functionally characterized in hematological malignancies as well as in solid tumors such as breast cancer. In addition to their high tumor-initiating potential, TICs are founder cells for metastasis formation and are involved in chemotherapy resistance. In this study we explored molecular pathways which enable this tumor initiating potential for a cancer cell subset of the transgenic MMTV-PyMT mouse model for metastasizing breast cancer. The cell population, characterized by the marker profile CD24+CD90+CD45−, showed a high tumorigenicity compared to non-CD24+CD90+CD45− cancer cells in colony formation assays, as well as upon orthotopic transplantation into the mammary fat pad of mice. In addition, these orthotopically grown CD24+CD90+CD45− TICs metastasized to the lungs. The transcriptome of TICs freshly isolated from primary tumors by cell sorting was compared with that of sorted non-CD24+CD90+CD45− cancer cells by RNA-seq. In addition to more established TIC signatures, such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition or mitogen signaling, an upregulated gene set comprising several classes of proteolytic enzymes was uncovered in the TICs. Accordingly, TICs showed high intra- and extracellular proteolytic activity. Application of a broad range of protease inhibitors to TICs in a colony formation assay reduced anchorage independent growth and had an impact on colony morphology in 3D cell culture assays. We conclude that CD24+CD90+CD45− cells of the MMTV- PyMT mouse model possess an upregulated proteolytic signature which could very well represent a functional hallmark of metastatic TICs from mammary carcinomas. PMID:27542270

  18. Linking genomic reorganization to tumor initiation via the giant cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Niu, N; Zhang, J; Zhang, N; Mercado-Uribe, I; Tao, F; Han, Z; Pathak, S; Multani, A S; Kuang, J; Yao, J; Bast, R C; Sood, A K; Hung, M-C; Liu, J

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms underlying our recent paradoxical finding that mitotically incapacitated and genomically unstable polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs) are capable of tumor initiation, we labeled ovarian cancer cells with α-tubulin fused to green fluorescent protein, histone-2B fused to red fluorescent protein and FUCCI (fluorescent ubiquitination cell cycle indicator), and tracked the spatial and time-dependent change in spindle and chromosomal dynamics of PGCCs using live-cell fluorescence time-lapse recording. We found that single-dose (500 nm) treatment with paclitaxel paradoxically initiated endoreplication to form PGCCs after massive cell death. The resulting PGCCs continued self-renewal via endoreplication and further divided by nuclear budding or fragmentation; the small daughter nuclei then acquired cytoplasm, split off from the giant mother cells and acquired competency in mitosis. FUCCI showed that PGCCs divided via truncated endoreplication cell cycle (endocycle or endomitosis). Confocal microscopy showed that PGCCs had pronounced nuclear fragmentation and lacked expression of key mitotic proteins. PGCC-derived daughter cells were capable of long-term proliferation and acquired numerous new genome/chromosome alterations demonstrated by spectral karyotyping. These data prompt us to conceptualize a giant cell cycle composed of four distinct but overlapping phases, initiation, self-renewal, termination and stability. The giant cell cycle may represent a fundamental cellular mechanism to initiate genomic reorganization to generate new tumor-initiating cells in response to chemotherapy-induced stress and contributes to disease relapse. PMID:27991913

  19. Single Unpurified Breast Tumor-Initiating Cells from Multiple Mouse Models Efficiently Elicit Tumors in Immune-Competent Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Kurpios, Natasza A.; Girgis-Gabardo, Adele; Hallett, Robin M.; Rogers, Stephen; Gludish, David W.; Kockeritz, Lisa; Woodgett, James; Cardiff, Robert; Hassell, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor-initiating cell (TIC) frequency of bulk tumor cell populations is one of the criteria used to distinguish malignancies that follow the cancer stem cell model from those that do not. However, tumor-initiating cell frequencies may be influenced by experimental conditions and the extent to which tumors have progressed, parameters that are not always addressed in studies of these cells. We employed limiting dilution cell transplantation of minimally manipulated tumor cells from mammary tumors of several transgenic mouse models to determine their tumor-initiating cell frequency. We determined whether the tumors that formed following tumor cell transplantation phenocopied the primary tumors from which they were isolated and whether they could be serially transplanted. Finally we investigated whether propagating primary tumor cells in different tissue culture conditions affected their resident tumor-initiating cell frequency. We found that tumor-initiating cells comprised between 15% and 50% of the bulk tumor cell population in multiple independent mammary tumors from three different transgenic mouse models of breast cancer. Culture of primary mammary tumor cells in chemically-defined, serum-free medium as non-adherent tumorspheres preserved TIC frequency to levels similar to that of the primary tumors from which they were established. By contrast, propagating the primary tumor cells in serum-containing medium as adherent populations resulted in a several thousand-fold reduction in their tumor-initiating cell fraction. Our findings suggest that experimental conditions, including the sensitivity of the transplantation assay, can dramatically affect estimates of tumor initiating cell frequency. Moreover, conditional on cell culture conditions, the tumor-initiating cell fraction of bulk mouse mammary tumor cell preparations can either be maintained at high or low frequency in vitro thus permitting comparative studies of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cancer cells

  20. Single unpurified breast tumor-initiating cells from multiple mouse models efficiently elicit tumors in immune-competent hosts.

    PubMed

    Kurpios, Natasza A; Girgis-Gabardo, Adele; Hallett, Robin M; Rogers, Stephen; Gludish, David W; Kockeritz, Lisa; Woodgett, James; Cardiff, Robert; Hassell, John A

    2013-01-01

    The tumor-initiating cell (TIC) frequency of bulk tumor cell populations is one of the criteria used to distinguish malignancies that follow the cancer stem cell model from those that do not. However, tumor-initiating cell frequencies may be influenced by experimental conditions and the extent to which tumors have progressed, parameters that are not always addressed in studies of these cells. We employed limiting dilution cell transplantation of minimally manipulated tumor cells from mammary tumors of several transgenic mouse models to determine their tumor-initiating cell frequency. We determined whether the tumors that formed following tumor cell transplantation phenocopied the primary tumors from which they were isolated and whether they could be serially transplanted. Finally we investigated whether propagating primary tumor cells in different tissue culture conditions affected their resident tumor-initiating cell frequency. We found that tumor-initiating cells comprised between 15% and 50% of the bulk tumor cell population in multiple independent mammary tumors from three different transgenic mouse models of breast cancer. Culture of primary mammary tumor cells in chemically-defined, serum-free medium as non-adherent tumorspheres preserved TIC frequency to levels similar to that of the primary tumors from which they were established. By contrast, propagating the primary tumor cells in serum-containing medium as adherent populations resulted in a several thousand-fold reduction in their tumor-initiating cell fraction. Our findings suggest that experimental conditions, including the sensitivity of the transplantation assay, can dramatically affect estimates of tumor initiating cell frequency. Moreover, conditional on cell culture conditions, the tumor-initiating cell fraction of bulk mouse mammary tumor cell preparations can either be maintained at high or low frequency in vitro thus permitting comparative studies of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cancer cells.

  1. MIF Maintains the Tumorigenic Capacity of Brain Tumor-Initiating Cells by Directly Inhibiting p53.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, Raita; Ohta, Shigeki; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Sugihara, Eiji; Okano, Hideyuki; Saya, Hideyuki; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kawase, Takeshi; Yoshida, Kazunari; Toda, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Tumor-initiating cells thought to drive brain cancer are embedded in a complex heterogeneous histology. In this study, we isolated primary cells from 21 human brain tumor specimens to establish cell lines with high tumorigenic potential and to identify the molecules enabling this capability. The morphology, sphere-forming ability upon expansion, and differentiation potential of all cell lines were indistinguishable in vitro However, testing for tumorigenicity revealed two distinct cell types, brain tumor-initiating cells (BTIC) and non-BTIC. We found that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was highly expressed in BTIC compared with non-BTIC. MIF bound directly to both wild-type and mutant p53 but regulated p53-dependent cell growth by different mechanisms, depending on glioma cell line and p53 status. MIF physically interacted with wild-type p53 in the nucleus and inhibited its transcription-dependent functions. In contrast, MIF bound to mutant p53 in the cytoplasm and abrogated transcription-independent induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, MIF knockdown inhibited BTIC-induced tumor formation in a mouse xenograft model, leading to increased overall survival. Collectively, our findings suggest that MIF regulates BTIC function through direct, intracellular inhibition of p53, shedding light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the tumorigenicity of certain malignant brain cells. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2813-23. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Immunotherapy targeting HER2 with genetically modified T cells eliminates tumor-initiating cells in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Rainusso, N; Brawley, V S; Ghazi, A; Hicks, M J; Gottschalk, S; Rosen, J M; Ahmed, N

    2012-03-01

    Despite radical surgery and multi-agent chemotherapy, less than one third of patients with recurrent or metastatic osteosarcoma (OS) survive. The limited efficacy of current therapeutic approaches to target tumor-initiating cells (TICs) may explain this dismal outcome. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of modified T cells expressing a human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2)-specific chimeric antigen receptor in the OS TIC compartment of human established cell lines. Using the sarcosphere formation assay, we found that OS TICs were resistant to increasing methotrexate concentrations. In contrast, HER2-specific T cells decreased markedly sarcosphere formation capacity and the ability to generate bone tumors in immunodeficient mice after orthotopic transplantation. In vivo, administration of HER2-specific T cells significantly reduced TICs in bulky tumors as judged by decreased sarcosphere forming efficiency in OS cells isolated from explanted tumors. We demonstrate that HER2-specific T cells target drug resistant TICs in established OS cell lines, suggesting that incorporating immunotherapy into current treatment strategies for OS has the potential to improve outcomes.

  3. Cellular prion protein controls stem cell-like properties of human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Alessandro; Bajetto, Adriana; Thellung, Stefano; Begani, Giulia; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Solari, Agnese; Gatti, Monica; Pagano, Aldo; Würth, Roberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-06-21

    Prion protein (PrPC) is a cell surface glycoprotein whose misfolding is responsible for prion diseases. Although its physiological role is not completely defined, several lines of evidence propose that PrPC is involved in self-renewal, pluripotency gene expression, proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Moreover, PrPC regulates different biological functions in human tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM). We analyzed the role of PrPC in GBM cell pathogenicity focusing on tumor-initiating cells (TICs, or cancer stem cells, CSCs), the subpopulation responsible for development, progression and recurrence of most malignancies. Analyzing four GBM CSC-enriched cultures, we show that PrPC expression is directly correlated with the proliferation rate of the cells. To better define its role in CSC biology, we knocked-down PrPC expression in two of these GBM-derived CSC cultures by specific lentiviral-delivered shRNAs. We provide evidence that CSC proliferation rate, spherogenesis and in vivo tumorigenicity are significantly inhibited in PrPC down-regulated cells. Moreover, PrPC down-regulation caused loss of expression of the stemness and self-renewal markers (NANOG, Sox2) and the activation of differentiation pathways (i.e. increased GFAP expression). Our results suggest that PrPC controls the stemness properties of human GBM CSCs and that its down-regulation induces the acquisition of a more differentiated and less oncogenic phenotype.

  4. Cellular prion protein controls stem cell-like properties of human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Corsaro, Alessandro; Bajetto, Adriana; Thellung, Stefano; Begani, Giulia; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Solari, Agnese; Gatti, Monica; Pagano, Aldo; Würth, Roberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-01-01

    Prion protein (PrPC) is a cell surface glycoprotein whose misfolding is responsible for prion diseases. Although its physiological role is not completely defined, several lines of evidence propose that PrPC is involved in self-renewal, pluripotency gene expression, proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Moreover, PrPC regulates different biological functions in human tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM). We analyzed the role of PrPC in GBM cell pathogenicity focusing on tumor-initiating cells (TICs, or cancer stem cells, CSCs), the subpopulation responsible for development, progression and recurrence of most malignancies. Analyzing four GBM CSC-enriched cultures, we show that PrPC expression is directly correlated with the proliferation rate of the cells. To better define its role in CSC biology, we knocked-down PrPC expression in two of these GBM-derived CSC cultures by specific lentiviral-delivered shRNAs. We provide evidence that CSC proliferation rate, spherogenesis and in vivo tumorigenicity are significantly inhibited in PrPC down-regulated cells. Moreover, PrPC down-regulation caused loss of expression of the stemness and self-renewal markers (NANOG, Sox2) and the activation of differentiation pathways (i.e. increased GFAP expression). Our results suggest that PrPC controls the stemness properties of human GBM CSCs and that its down-regulation induces the acquisition of a more differentiated and less oncogenic phenotype. PMID:27229535

  5. Tumor-initiating label-retaining cancer cells in human gastrointestinal cancers undergo asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M; Mullinax, John E; Ambe, Chenwi M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J; Wiegand, Gordon W; Garfield, Susan H; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment.

  6. Tumor-Initiating Label-Retaining Cancer Cells in Human Gastrointestinal Cancers Undergo Asymmetric Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M.; Mullinax, John E.; Ambe, Chenwi M.; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J.; Wiegand, Gordon W.; Garfield, Susan H.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-01-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. PMID:22331764

  7. The emerging roles of Oct4 in tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Herlyn, Meenhard

    2015-01-01

    Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4), a homeodomain transcription factor, is well established as a master factor controlling the self-renewal and pluripotency of pluripotent stem cells. Also, a large body of research has documented the detection of Oct4 in tumor cells and tissues and has indicated its enrichment in a subpopulation of undifferentiated tumor-initiating cells (TICs) that critically account for tumor initiation, metastasis, and resistance to anticancer therapies. There is circumstantial evidence for low-level expression of Oct4 in cancer cells and TICs, and the participation of Oct4 in various TIC functions such as its self-renewal and survival, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis, and drug resistance development is implicated from considerable Oct4 knockdown and overexpression-based studies. In a few studies, efforts have been made to identify Oct4 target genes in TICs of different sources. Based on such information, Oct4 in TICs appears to act via mechanisms quite distinct from those in pluripotent stem cells, and a main challenge for future studies is to unravel the molecular mechanisms of action of Oct4, particularly to address the question on how such low levels of Oct4 may exert its functions in TICs. Acquiring cells from their native microenvironment that are of high enough quantity and purity is the key to reliably analyze Oct4 functions and its target genes in TICs, and the information gained may greatly facilitate targeting and eradicating those cells. PMID:26447206

  8. In vitro evidence for senescent multinucleated melanocytes as a source for tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Leikam, C; Hufnagel, A L; Otto, C; Murphy, D J; Mühling, B; Kneitz, S; Nanda, I; Schmid, M; Wagner, T U; Haferkamp, S; Bröcker, E-B; Schartl, M; Meierjohann, S

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic signaling in melanocytes results in oncogene-induced senescence (OIS), a stable cell-cycle arrest frequently characterized by a bi- or multinuclear phenotype that is considered as a barrier to cancer progression. However, the long-sustained conviction that senescence is a truly irreversible process has recently been challenged. Still, it is not known whether cells driven into OIS can progress to cancer and thereby pose a potential threat. Here, we show that prolonged expression of the melanoma oncogene N-RAS61K in pigment cells overcomes OIS by triggering the emergence of tumor-initiating mononucleated stem-like cells from senescent cells. This progeny is dedifferentiated, highly proliferative, anoikis-resistant and induces fast growing, metastatic tumors. Our data describe that differentiated cells, which are driven into senescence by an oncogene, use this senescence state as trigger for tumor transformation, giving rise to highly aggressive tumor-initiating cells. These observations provide the first experimental in vitro evidence for the evasion of OIS on the cellular level and ensuing transformation. PMID:25837487

  9. Regulation of Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells or Tumor-Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Mi Jeong; Shin, Young Kee

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells or tumor-initiating cells (CSC/TICs), which can undergo self-renewal and differentiation, are thought to play critical roles in tumorigenesis, therapy resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis. Tumor recurrence and chemoresistance are major causes of poor survival rates of ovarian cancer patients, which may be due in part to the existence of CSC/TICs. Therefore, elucidating the molecular mechanisms responsible for the ovarian CSC/TICs is required to develop a cure for this malignancy. Recent studies have indicated that the properties of CSC/TICs can be regulated by microRNAs, genes and signaling pathways which also function in normal stem cells. Moreover, emerging evidence suggests that the tumor microenvironments surrounding CSC/TICs are crucial for the maintenance of these cells. Similarly, efforts are now being made to unravel the mechanism involved in the regulation of ovarian CSC/TICs, although much work is still needed. This review considers recent advances in identifying the genes and pathways involved in the regulation of ovarian CSC/TICs. Furthermore, current approaches targeting ovarian CSC/TICs are described. Targeting both CSC/TICs and bulk tumor cells is suggested as a more effective approach to eliminating ovarian tumors. Better understanding of the regulation of ovarian CSC/TICs might facilitate the development of improved therapeutic strategies for recurrent ovarian cancer. PMID:23528891

  10. Immunomagnetic separation of tumor initiating cells by screening two surface markers

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chen; Hsieh, Yuan-Pang; Ma, Sai; Geng, Shuo; Cao, Zhenning; Li, Liwu; Lu, Chang

    2017-01-01

    Isolating tumor initiating cells (TICs) often requires screening of multiple surface markers, sometimes with opposite preferences. This creates a challenge for using bead-based immunomagnetic separation (IMS) that typically enriches cells based on one abundant marker. Here, we propose a new strategy that allows isolation of CD44+/CD24− TICs by IMS involving both magnetic beads coated by anti-CD44 antibody and nonmagnetic beads coated by anti-CD24 antibody (referred to as two-bead IMS). Cells enriched with our approach showed significant enhancement in TIC marker expression (examined by flow cytometry) and improved tumorsphere formation efficiency. Our method will extend the application of IMS to cell subsets characterized by multiple markers. PMID:28074882

  11. Scalable Production of Glioblastoma Tumor-initiating Cells in 3 Dimension Thermoreversible Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Lin, Haishuang; Wang, Ou; Qiu, Xuefeng; Kidambi, Srivatsan; Deleyrolle, Loic P.; Reynolds, Brent A.; Lei, Yuguo

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in developing drugs that specifically target glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Current cell culture methods, however, cannot cost-effectively produce the large numbers of glioblastoma TICs required for drug discovery and development. In this paper we report a new method that encapsulates patient-derived primary glioblastoma TICs and grows them in 3 dimension thermoreversible hydrogels. Our method allows long-term culture (~50 days, 10 passages tested, accumulative ~>1010-fold expansion) with both high growth rate (~20-fold expansion/7 days) and high volumetric yield (~2.0 × 107 cells/ml) without the loss of stemness. The scalable method can be used to produce sufficient, affordable glioblastoma TICs for drug discovery. PMID:27549983

  12. Scalable Production of Glioblastoma Tumor-initiating Cells in 3 Dimension Thermoreversible Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Lin, Haishuang; Wang, Ou; Qiu, Xuefeng; Kidambi, Srivatsan; Deleyrolle, Loic P.; Reynolds, Brent A.; Lei, Yuguo

    2016-08-01

    There is growing interest in developing drugs that specifically target glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Current cell culture methods, however, cannot cost-effectively produce the large numbers of glioblastoma TICs required for drug discovery and development. In this paper we report a new method that encapsulates patient-derived primary glioblastoma TICs and grows them in 3 dimension thermoreversible hydrogels. Our method allows long-term culture (~50 days, 10 passages tested, accumulative ~>1010-fold expansion) with both high growth rate (~20-fold expansion/7 days) and high volumetric yield (~2.0 × 107 cells/ml) without the loss of stemness. The scalable method can be used to produce sufficient, affordable glioblastoma TICs for drug discovery.

  13. Disulfiram eradicates tumor-initiating hepatocellular carcinoma cells in ROS-p38 MAPK pathway-dependent and -independent manners.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Suzuki, Eiichiro; Yuki, Kaori; Zen, Yoh; Oshima, Motohiko; Miyagi, Satoru; Saraya, Atsunori; Koide, Shuhei; Motoyama, Tenyu; Ogasawara, Sadahisa; Ooka, Yoshihiko; Tawada, Akinobu; Nakatsura, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Takehiro; Yamashita, Taro; Kaneko, Syuichi; Miyazaki, Masaru; Iwama, Atsushi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs) play a central role in tumor development, metastasis, and recurrence. In the present study, we investigated the effect of disulfiram (DSF), an inhibitor of aldehyde dehydrogenase, toward tumor-initiating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. DSF treatment suppressed the anchorage-independent sphere formation of both HCC cells. Flow cytometric analyses showed that DSF but not 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) drastically reduces the number of tumor-initiating HCC cells. The sphere formation assays of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)(+) HCC cells co-treated with p38-specific inhibitor revealed that DSF suppresses self-renewal capability mainly through the activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-p38 MAPK pathway. Microarray experiments also revealed the enrichment of the gene set involved in p38 MAPK signaling in EpCAM(+) cells treated with DSF but not 5-FU. In addition, DSF appeared to downregulate Glypican 3 (GPC3) in a manner independent of ROS-p38 MAPK pathway. GPC3 was co-expressed with EpCAM in HCC cell lines and primary HCC cells and GPC3-knockdown reduced the number of EpCAM(+) cells by compromising their self-renewal capability and inducing the apoptosis. These results indicate that DSF impaired the tumorigenicity of tumor-initiating HCC cells through activation of ROS-p38 pathway and in part through the downregulation of GPC3. DSF might be a promising therapeutic agent for the eradication of tumor-initiating HCC cells.

  14. Targeting Tumor Initiating Cells through Inhibition of Cancer Testis Antigens and Notch Signaling: A Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Michela; Mirandola, Leonardo; Reidy, Adair; Suvorava, Natallia; Konala, Venu; Chiaramonte, Raffaella; Grizzi, Fabio; Rahman, Rakhshanda Layeequr; Jenkins, Marjorie R; Nugyen, Diane D; Dalhbeck, Scott; Cobos, Everardo; Figueroa, Jose A; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) differ from normal stem cells (SCs) in their ability to initiate tumorigenesis, invasive growth, metastasis and the acquisition of chemo and/or radio-resistance. Over the past years, several studies have indicated the potential role of the Notch system as a key regulator of cellular stemness and tumor development. Furthermore, the expression of cancer testis antigens (CTA) in TICs, and their role in SC differentiation and biology, has become an important area of investigation. Here, we propose a model in which CTA expression and Notch signaling interacts to maintain the sustainability of self-replicating tumor populations, ultimately leading to the development of metastasis, drug resistance and cancer progression. We hypothesize that Notch-CTA interactions in TICs offer a novel opportunity for meaningful therapeutic interventions in cancer.

  15. Brain Tumor Initiating Cells Adapt to Restricted Nutrition through Preferential Glucose Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Flavahan, William A.; Wu, Qiulian; Hitomi, Masahiro; Rahim, Nasiha; Kim, Youngmi; Sloan, Andrew E.; Weil, Robert J.; Nakano, Ichiro; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Stringer, Brett W.; Day, Bryan W.; Li, Meizhang; Lathia, Justin D.; Rich, Jeremy N.; Hjelmeland, Anita B.

    2013-01-01

    Like all cancers, brain tumors require a continuous source of energy and molecular resources for new cell production. In normal brain, glucose is an essential neuronal fuel, but the blood-brain barrier limits its delivery. We now report that nutrient restriction contributes to tumor progression by enriching for brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) due to preferential BTIC survival and adaptation of non-BTICs through acquisition of BTIC features. BTICs outcompete for glucose uptake by co-opting the high affinity neuronal glucose transporter, type 3 (Glut3, SLC2A3). BTICs preferentially express Glut3 and targeting Glut3 inhibits BTIC growth and tumorigenic potential. Glut3, but not Glut1, correlates with poor survival in brain tumors and other cancers; thus, TICs may extract nutrients with high affinity. As altered metabolism represents a cancer hallmark, metabolic reprogramming may instruct the tumor hierarchy and portend poor prognosis. PMID:23995067

  16. Chromosomal instability affects the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Godek, Kristina M.; Venere, Monica; Wu, Quilian; Mills, Kevin D.; Hickey, William F.; Rich, Jeremy N.; Compton, Duane A.

    2016-01-01

    Tumors are dynamic organs that evolve during disease progression with genetic, epigenetic, and environmental differences among tumor cells serving as the foundation for selection and evolution in tumors. Tumor-initiating cells (TICs) that are responsible for tumorigenesis are a source of functional cellular heterogeneity while chromosomal instability (CIN) is a source of karyotypic genetic diversity. However, the extent that CIN contributes to TIC genetic diversity and its relationship to TIC function remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that glioblastoma TICs display chromosomal instability with lagging chromosomes at anaphase and extensive non-clonal chromosome copy number variations. Elevating the basal chromosome mis-segregation rate in TICs both decreases proliferation and the stem-like phenotype of TICs in vitro. Consequently tumor formation is abolished in an orthotopic mouse model. These results demonstrate that TICs generate genetic heterogeneity within tumors but that TIC function is impaired if the rate of genetic change is elevated above a tolerable threshold. PMID:27001151

  17. Functional Sphere Profiling Reveals the Complexity of Neuroblastoma Tumor-Initiating Cell Model12

    PubMed Central

    Coulon, Aurélie; Flahaut, Marjorie; Mühlethaler-Mottet, Annick; Meier, Roland; Liberman, Julie; Balmas-Bourloud, Katia; Nardou, Katya; Yan, Pu; Tercier, Stéphane; Joseph, Jean-Marc; Sommer, Lukas; Gross, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a neural crest-derived childhood tumor characterized by a remarkable phenotypic diversity, ranging from spontaneous regression to fatal metastatic disease. Although the cancer stem cell (CSC) model provides a trail to characterize the cells responsible for tumor onset, the NB tumor-initiating cell (TIC) has not been identified. In this study, the relevance of the CSC model in NB was investigated by taking advantage of typical functional stem cell characteristics. A predictive association was established between self-renewal, as assessed by serial sphere formation, and clinical aggressiveness in primary tumors. Moreover, cell subsets gradually selected during serial sphere culture harbored increased in vivo tumorigenicity, only highlighted in an orthotopic microenvironment. A microarray time course analysis of serial spheres passages from metastatic cells allowed us to specifically “profile” the NB stem cell-like phenotype and to identify CD133, ABC transporter, and WNT and NOTCH genes as spheres markers. On the basis of combined sphere markers expression, at least two distinct tumorigenic cell subpopulations were identified, also shown to preexist in primary NB. However, sphere markers-mediated cell sorting of parental tumor failed to recapitulate the TIC phenotype in the orthotopic model, highlighting the complexity of the CSC model. Our data support the NB stem-like cells as a dynamic and heterogeneous cell population strongly dependent on microenvironmental signals and add novel candidate genes as potential therapeutic targets in the control of high-risk NB. PMID:22028624

  18. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus kills stem-like tumor-initiating colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Susanne G; Haddad, Dana; Au, Joyce; Carson, Joshua S; O’Leary, Michael P; Lewis, Christina; Monette, Sebastien; Fong, Yuman

    2016-01-01

    Stem-like tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are implicated in cancer progression and recurrence, and can be identified by sphere-formation and tumorigenicity assays. Oncolytic viruses infect, replicate in, and kill a variety of cancer cells. In this study, we seek proof of principle that TICs are susceptible to viral infection. HCT8 human colon cancer cells were subjected to serum-free culture to generate TIC tumorspheres. Parent cells and TICs were infected with HSV-1 subtype NV1066. Cytotoxicity, viral replication, and Akt1 expression were assessed. TIC tumorigenicity was confirmed and NV1066 efficacy was assessed in vivo. NV1066 infection was highly cytotoxic to both parent HCT8 cells and TICs. In both populations, cell-kill of >80% was achieved within 3 days of infection at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1.0. However, the parent cells required 2-log greater viral replication to achieve the same cytotoxicity. TICs overexpressed Akt1 in vitro and formed flank tumors from as little as 100 cells, growing earlier, faster, larger, and with greater histologic atypia than tumors from parent cells. Treatment of TIC-induced tumors with NV1066 yielded tumor regression and slowed tumor growth. We conclude that colon TICs are selected for by serum-free culture, overexpress Akt1, and are susceptible to oncolytic viral infection. PMID:27347556

  19. Jarid2 is essential for the maintenance of tumor initiating cells in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Chun-Zhi; Jiang, Shan; Xu, Shan-Shan; Niu, Min; Wang, Xiang-Zhen; Zhong, Gen-Shen; Lu, Xi-Feng; Xue, Yu; Tian, Shaoqi; Li, Guangyao; Tang, Shaojun; Jiang, Yi-Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common urologic malignancy in China, with an increase of the incidence and mortality rates over past decades. Recent studies suggest that bladder tumors are maintained by a rare fraction of cells with stem cell proprieties. Targeting these bladder tumor initiating cell (TICs) population can overcome the drug-resistance of bladder cancer. However, the molecular and genetic mechanisms regulating TICs in bladder cancer remain poorly defined. Jarid2 is implicated in signaling pathways regulating cancer cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and stem cell maintenance. The goal of our study was to examine whether Jarid2 plays a role in the regulation of TICs in bladder cancer. We found that knockdown of Jarid2 was able to inhibit the invasive ability and sphere-forming capacity in bladder cancer cells. Moreover, knockdown of Jarid2 reduced the proportion of TICs and impaired the tumorigenicity of bladder cancer TICs in vivo. Conversely, ectopic overexpression of Jarid2 promoted the invasive ability and sphere-forming capacity in bladder cancer cells. Mechanistically, reduced Jarid2 expression led to the upregulation of p16 and H3K27me3 level at p16 promoter region. Collectively, we provided evidence that Jarid2 via modulation of p16 is a putative novel therapeutic target for treating malignant bladder cancer. PMID:28445934

  20. Residual Tumor Cells That Drive Disease Relapse after Chemotherapy Do Not Have Enhanced Tumor Initiating Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Ganapati V.; de la Cruz, Cecile; Eastham-Anderson, Jeffrey; Zheng, Yanyan; Sweet-Cordero, E. Alejandro; Jackson, Erica L.

    2012-01-01

    Although chemotherapy is used to treat most advanced solid tumors, recurrent disease is still the major cause of cancer-related mortality. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been the focus of intense research in recent years because they provide a possible explanation for disease relapse. However, the precise role of CSCs in recurrent disease remains poorly understood and surprisingly little attention has been focused on studying the cells responsible for re-initiating tumor growth within the original host after chemotherapy treatment. We utilized both xenograft and genetically engineered mouse models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to characterize the residual tumor cells that survive chemotherapy treatment and go on to cause tumor regrowth, which we refer to as tumor re-initiating cells (TRICs). We set out to determine whether TRICs display characteristics of CSCs, and whether assays used to define CSCs also provide an accurate readout of a cell’s ability to cause tumor recurrence. We did not find consistent enrichment of CSC marker positive cells or enhanced tumor initiating potential in TRICs. However, TRICs from all models do appear to be in EMT, a state that has been linked to chemoresistance in numerous types of cancer. Thus, the standard CSC assays may not accurately reflect a cell’s ability to drive disease recurrence. PMID:23115623

  1. Paracrine WNT5A Signaling Inhibits Expansion of Tumor-Initiating Cells.

    PubMed

    Borcherding, Nicholas; Kusner, David; Kolb, Ryan; Xie, Qing; Li, Wei; Yuan, Fang; Velez, Gabriel; Askeland, Ryan; Weigel, Ronald J; Zhang, Weizhou

    2015-05-15

    It is not well understood how paracrine communication between basal and luminal cell populations in the mammary gland affects tumorigenesis. During ErbB2-induced mammary tumorigenesis, enriched mammary stem cells that represent a subpopulation of basal cells exhibit enhanced tumorigenic capacity compared with the corresponding luminal progenitors. Transcript profiling of tumors derived from basal and luminal tumor-initiating cells (TIC) revealed preferential loss of the noncanonical Wnt ligand WNT5A in basal TIC-derived tumors. Heterozygous loss of WNT5A was correlated with shorter survival of breast cancer patients. In a mouse model of ErbB2-induced breast cancer, Wnt5a heterozygosity promoted tumor multiplicity and pulmonary metastasis. As a TGFβ substrate, luminal cell-produced WNT5A induced a feed-forward loop to activate SMAD2 in a RYK and TGFβR1-dependent manner to limit the expansion of basal TIC in a paracrine fashion, a potential explanation for the suppressive effect of WNT5A in mammary tumorigenesis. Our results identify the WNT5A/RYK module as a spatial regulator of the TGFβ-SMAD signaling pathway in the context of mammary gland development and carcinogenesis, offering a new perspective on tumor suppression provided by basal-luminal cross-talk in normal mammary tissue.

  2. Paracrine WNT5A signaling inhibits expansion of tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Borcherding, Nicholas; Kusner, David; Kolb, Ryan; Xie, Qing; Li, Wei; Yuan, Fang; Velez, Gabriel; Askeland, Ryan; Weigel, Ronald J.; Zhang, Weizhou

    2015-01-01

    It is not well understood how paracrine communication between basal and luminal cell populations in the mammary gland affects tumorigenesis. During ErbB2-induced mammary tumorigenesis, enriched mammary stem cells that represent a subpopulation of basal cells exhibit enhanced tumorigenic capacity compared to the corresponding luminal progenitors. Transcript profiling of tumors derived from basal and luminal tumor-initiating cells (TIC) revealed preferential loss of the noncanonical Wnt ligand WNT5A in basal TIC-derived tumors. Heterozygous loss of WNT5A was correlated with shorter survival of breast cancer patients. In a mouse model of ErbB2-induced breast cancer, Wnt5a heterozygosity promoted tumor multiplicity and pulmonary metastasis. As a TGFβ substrate, luminal cell-produced WNT5A induced a feed-forward loop to activate SMAD2 in a RYK and TGFβR1-dependent manner to limit the expansion of basal TIC in a paracrine fashion, a potential explanation for the suppressive effect of WNT5A in mammary tumorigenesis. Our results identify the WNT5A/RYK module as a spatial regulator of TGFβ/SMAD signaling pathway in the context of mammary gland development and carcinogenesis, offering a new perspective on tumor suppression provided by basal-luminal crosstalk in normal mammary tissue. PMID:25769722

  3. Tumor senescence and radioresistant tumor-initiating cells (TICs): let sleeping dogs lie!

    PubMed

    Zafarana, Gaetano; Bristow, Robert G

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical data from cell lines and experimental tumors support the concept that breast cancer-derived tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are relatively resistant to ionizing radiation and chemotherapy. This could be a major determinant of tumor recurrence following treatment. Increased clonogenic survival is observed in CD24-/low/CD44+ TICs derived from mammosphere cultures and is associated with (a) reduced production of reactive oxygen species, (b) attenuated activation of γH2AX and CHK2-p53 DNA damage signaling pathways, (c) reduced propensity for ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis, and (d) altered DNA double-strand or DNA single-strand break repair. However, recent data have shed further light on TIC radioresistance as irradiated TICs are resistant to tumor cell senescence following DNA damage. Taken together, the cumulative data support a model in which DNA damage signaling and repair pathways are altered in TICs and lead to an altered mode of cell death with unique consequences for long-term clonogen survival. The study of TIC senescence lays the foundation for future experiments in isogenic models designed to directly test the capacity for senescence and local control (that is, not solely local regression) and spontaneous metastases following treatment in vivo. The study also supports the targeting of tumor cell senescence pathways to increase TIC clonogen kill if the targeting also maintains the therapeutic ratio.

  4. Disulfiram modulates stemness and metabolism of brain tumor initiating cells in atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Ah; Choi, Jung Won; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Phi, Ji Hoon; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Park, Kyung Duk; Eum, Dayoung; Park, Sung-Hye; Kim, Il Han; Kim, Seung-Ki

    2015-06-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT) are among the most malignant pediatric brain tumors. Cells from brain tumors with high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity have a number of characteristics that are similar to brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs). This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of ALDH inhibition using disulfiram (DSF) against BTICs from AT/RT. Primary cultured BTICs from AT/RT were stained with Aldefluor and isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting. The therapeutic effect of DSF against BTICs from AT/RT was confirmed in vitro and in vivo. AT/RT cells displayed a high expression of ALDH. DSF demonstrated a more potent cytotoxic effect on ALDH(+) AT/RT cells compared with standard anticancer agents. Notably, treatment with DSF did not have a considerable effect on normal neural stem cells or fibroblasts. DSF significantly inhibited the ALDH enzyme activity of AT/RT cells. DSF decreased self-renewal ability, cell viability, and proliferation potential and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in ALDH(+) AT/RT cells. Importantly, DSF reduced the metabolism of ALDH(+) AT/RT cells by increasing the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ratio of NAD(+)/NADH and regulating Silent mating type Information Regulator 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1), nuclear factor-kappaB, Lin28A/B, and miRNA let-7g. Animals in the DSF-treated group demonstrated a reduction of tumor volume (P < .05) and a significant survival benefit (P = .02). Our study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of DSF against BTICs from AT/RT and suggested the possibility of ALDH inhibition for clinical application. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Disulfiram modulates stemness and metabolism of brain tumor initiating cells in atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Ah; Choi, Jung Won; Wang, Kyu-Chang; Phi, Ji Hoon; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Park, Kyung Duk; Eum, Dayoung; Park, Sung-Hye; Kim, Il Han; Kim, Seung-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Background Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT) are among the most malignant pediatric brain tumors. Cells from brain tumors with high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity have a number of characteristics that are similar to brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs). This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of ALDH inhibition using disulfiram (DSF) against BTICs from AT/RT. Methods Primary cultured BTICs from AT/RT were stained with Aldefluor and isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting. The therapeutic effect of DSF against BTICs from AT/RT was confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Results AT/RT cells displayed a high expression of ALDH. DSF demonstrated a more potent cytotoxic effect on ALDH+ AT/RT cells compared with standard anticancer agents. Notably, treatment with DSF did not have a considerable effect on normal neural stem cells or fibroblasts. DSF significantly inhibited the ALDH enzyme activity of AT/RT cells. DSF decreased self-renewal ability, cell viability, and proliferation potential and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in ALDH+ AT/RT cells. Importantly, DSF reduced the metabolism of ALDH+ AT/RT cells by increasing the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ratio of NAD+/NADH and regulating Silent mating type Information Regulator 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1), nuclear factor-kappaB, Lin28A/B, and miRNA let-7g. Animals in the DSF-treated group demonstrated a reduction of tumor volume (P < .05) and a significant survival benefit (P = .02). Conclusion Our study demonstrated the therapeutic potential of DSF against BTICs from AT/RT and suggested the possibility of ALDH inhibition for clinical application. PMID:25378634

  6. Drug-tolerant cancer cells show reduced tumor-initiating capacity: depletion of CD44 cells and evidence for epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Qiuping; Qin, Jichao; Li, Hangwen; Liu, Can; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Coletta, Luis Della; Klostergaard, Jim; Fokt, Izabela; Skora, Stanislaw; Priebe, Waldemar; Bi, Yongyi; Tang, Dean G

    2011-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) possess high tumor-initiating capacity and have been reported to be resistant to therapeutics. Vice versa, therapy-resistant cancer cells seem to manifest CSC phenotypes and properties. It has been generally assumed that drug-resistant cancer cells may all be CSCs although the generality of this assumption is unknown. Here, we chronically treated Du145 prostate cancer cells with etoposide, paclitaxel and some experimental drugs (i.e., staurosporine and 2 paclitaxel analogs), which led to populations of drug-tolerant cells (DTCs). Surprisingly, these DTCs, when implanted either subcutaneously or orthotopically into NOD/SCID mice, exhibited much reduced tumorigenicity or were even non-tumorigenic. Drug-tolerant DLD1 colon cancer cells selected by a similar chronic selection protocol also displayed reduced tumorigenicity whereas drug-tolerant UC14 bladder cancer cells demonstrated either increased or decreased tumor-regenerating capacity. Drug-tolerant Du145 cells demonstrated low proliferative and clonogenic potential and were virtually devoid of CD44(+) cells. Prospective knockdown of CD44 in Du145 cells inhibited cell proliferation and tumor regeneration, whereas restoration of CD44 expression in drug-tolerant Du145 cells increased cell proliferation and partially increased tumorigenicity. Interestingly, drug-tolerant Du145 cells showed both increases and decreases in many "stemness" genes. Finally, evidence was provided that chronic drug exposure generated DTCs via epigenetic mechanisms involving molecules such as CD44 and KDM5A. Our results thus reveal that 1) not all DTCs are necessarily CSCs; 2) conventional chemotherapeutic drugs such as taxol and etoposide may directly target CD44(+) tumor-initiating cells; and 3) DTCs generated via chronic drug selection involve epigenetic mechanisms.

  7. Metronomic chemotherapy prevents therapy-induced stromal activation and induction of tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tze-Sian; Hsu, Chung-Chi; Pai, Vincent C; Liao, Wen-Ying; Huang, Shenq-Shyang; Tan, Kok-Tong; Yen, Chia-Jui; Hsu, Shu-Ching; Chen, Wei-Yu; Shan, Yan-Shen; Li, Chi-Rong; Lee, Michael T; Jiang, Kuan-Ying; Chu, Jui-Mei; Lien, Gi-Shih; Weaver, Valerie M; Tsai, Kelvin K

    2016-12-12

    Although traditional chemotherapy kills a fraction of tumor cells, it also activates the stroma and can promote the growth and survival of residual cancer cells to foster tumor recurrence and metastasis. Accordingly, overcoming the host response induced by chemotherapy could substantially improve therapeutic outcome and patient survival. In this study, resistance to treatment and metastasis has been attributed to expansion of stem-like tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Molecular analysis of the tumor stroma in neoadjuvant chemotherapy-treated human desmoplastic cancers and orthotopic tumor xenografts revealed that traditional maximum-tolerated dose chemotherapy, regardless of the agents used, induces persistent STAT-1 and NF-κB activity in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts. This induction results in the expression and secretion of ELR motif-positive (ELR(+)) chemokines, which signal through CXCR-2 on carcinoma cells to trigger their phenotypic conversion into TICs and promote their invasive behaviors, leading to paradoxical tumor aggression after therapy. In contrast, the same overall dose administered as a low-dose metronomic chemotherapy regimen largely prevented therapy-induced stromal ELR(+) chemokine paracrine signaling, thus enhancing treatment response and extending survival of mice carrying desmoplastic cancers. These experiments illustrate the importance of stroma in cancer therapy and how its impact on treatment resistance could be tempered by altering the dosing schedule of systemic chemotherapy. © 2016 Chan et al.

  8. RBPJ maintains brain tumor-initiating cells through CDK9-mediated transcriptional elongation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Wu, Qiulian; Kim, Leo; Miller, Tyler E; Liau, Brian B; Mack, Stephen C; Yang, Kailin; Factor, Daniel C; Fang, Xiaoguang; Huang, Zhi; Zhou, Wenchao; Alazem, Kareem; Wang, Xiuxing; Bernstein, Bradley E; Bao, Shideng; Rich, Jeremy N

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastomas co-opt stem cell regulatory pathways to maintain brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs), also known as cancer stem cells. NOTCH signaling has been a molecular target in BTICs, but NOTCH antagonists have demonstrated limited efficacy in clinical trials. Recombining binding protein suppressor of hairless (RBPJ) is considered a central transcriptional mediator of NOTCH activity. Here, we report that pharmacologic NOTCH inhibitors were less effective than targeting RBPJ in suppressing tumor growth. While NOTCH inhibitors decreased canonical NOTCH gene expression, RBPJ regulated a distinct profile of genes critical to BTIC stemness and cell cycle progression. RBPJ was preferentially expressed by BTICs and required for BTIC self-renewal and tumor growth. MYC, a key BTIC regulator, bound the RBPJ promoter and treatment with a bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) family bromodomain inhibitor decreased MYC and RBPJ expression. Proteomic studies demonstrated that RBPJ binds CDK9, a component of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), to target gene promoters, enhancing transcriptional elongation. Collectively, RBPJ links MYC and transcriptional control through CDK9, providing potential nodes of fragility for therapeutic intervention, potentially distinct from NOTCH.

  9. Serotonin transporter antagonists target tumor-initiating cells in a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, Robin M.; Girgis-Gabardo, Adele; Gwynne, William D.; Giacomelli, Andrew O.; Bisson, Jennifer N.P.; Jensen, Jeremy E.; Dvorkin-Gheva, Anna; Hassell, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data suggests that the initiation and progression of human breast tumors is fueled by a rare subpopulation of tumor cells, termed breast tumor-initiating cells (BTIC), which resist radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Consequently, therapies that abrogate BTIC activity are needed to achieve durable cures for breast cancer patients. To identify such therapies we used a sensitive assay to complete a high-throughput screen of small molecules, including approved drugs, with BTIC-rich mouse mammary tumor cell populations. We found that inhibitors of the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) and serotonin receptors, which include approved drugs used to treat mood disorders, were potent inhibitors of mouse BTIC activity as determined by functional sphere-forming assays and the initiation of tumor formation by transplant of drug-exposed tumor cells into syngeneic mice. Moreover, sertraline (Zoloft), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), synergized with docetaxel (Taxotere) to shrink mouse breast tumors in vivo. Hence drugs targeting the serotonergic system might be repurposed to treat breast cancer patients to afford more durable breast cancer remissions. PMID:27447971

  10. The Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 pathway regulates growth of lung tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Donatella; De Marco, Carmela; Guerriero, Ilaria; Colelli, Fabiana; Rinaldo, Nicola; Scrima, Marianna; Mirante, Teresa; De Vitis, Claudia; Zoppoli, Pietro; Ceccarelli, Michele; Riccardi, Miriam; Ravo, Maria; Weisz, Alessandro; Federico, Antonella; Franco, Renato; Rocco, Gaetano; Mancini, Rita; Rizzuto, Antonia; Gulletta, Elio; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2015-12-15

    Here we report that the PI3K/Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 signalling pathway regulates generation and stem cell-like properties of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) tumor initiating cells (TICs). Mutant Akt1, mutant PIK3CA or PTEN loss enhances formation of lung cancer spheroids (LCS), self-renewal, expression of stemness markers and tumorigenic potential of human immortalized bronchial cells (BEAS-2B) whereas Akt inhibition suppresses these activities in established (NCI-H460) and primary NSCLC cells. Matched microarray analysis of Akt1-interfered cells and LCSs identified IL-6 as a critical target of Akt signalling in NSCLC TICs. Accordingly, suppression of Akt in NSCLC cells decreases IL-6 levels, phosphorylation of IkK and IkB, NF-kB transcriptional activity, phosphorylation and transcriptional activity of STAT3 whereas active Akt1 up-regulates them. Exposure of LCSs isolated from NSCLC cells to blocking anti-IL-6 mAbs, shRNA to IL-6 receptor or to STAT3 markedly reduces the capability to generate LCSs, to self-renew and to form tumors, whereas administration of IL-6 to Akt-interfered cells restores the capability to generate LCSs. Finally, immunohistochemical studies in NSCLC patients demonstrated a positive correlative trend between activated Akt, IL-6 expression and STAT3 phosphorylation (n = 94; p < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicate that aberrant Akt signalling contributes to maintaining stemness in lung cancer TICs through a NF-kB/IL-6/STAT3 pathway and provide novel potential therapeutic targets for eliminating these malignant cells in NSCLC.

  11. The Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 pathway regulates growth of lung tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Malanga, Donatella; De Marco, Carmela; Guerriero, Ilaria; Colelli, Fabiana; Rinaldo, Nicola; Scrima, Marianna; Mirante, Teresa; De Vitis, Claudia; Zoppoli, Pietro; Ceccarelli, Michele; Riccardi, Miriam; Ravo, Maria; Weisz, Alessandro; Federico, Antonella; Franco, Renato; Rocco, Gaetano; Mancini, Rita; Rizzuto, Antonia; Gulletta, Elio; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Viglietto, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Here we report that the PI3K/Akt1/IL-6/STAT3 signalling pathway regulates generation and stem cell-like properties of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) tumor initiating cells (TICs). Mutant Akt1, mutant PIK3CA or PTEN loss enhances formation of lung cancer spheroids (LCS), self-renewal, expression of stemness markers and tumorigenic potential of human immortalized bronchial cells (BEAS-2B) whereas Akt inhibition suppresses these activities in established (NCI-H460) and primary NSCLC cells. Matched microarray analysis of Akt1-interfered cells and LCSs identified IL-6 as a critical target of Akt signalling in NSCLC TICs. Accordingly, suppression of Akt in NSCLC cells decreases IL-6 levels, phosphorylation of IkK and IkB, NF-kB transcriptional activity, phosphorylation and transcriptional activity of STAT3 whereas active Akt1 up-regulates them. Exposure of LCSs isolated from NSCLC cells to blocking anti-IL-6 mAbs, shRNA to IL-6 receptor or to STAT3 markedly reduces the capability to generate LCSs, to self-renew and to form tumors, whereas administration of IL-6 to Akt-interfered cells restores the capability to generate LCSs. Finally, immunohistochemical studies in NSCLC patients demonstrated a positive correlative trend between activated Akt, IL-6 expression and STAT3 phosphorylation (n = 94; p < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicate that aberrant Akt signalling contributes to maintaining stemness in lung cancer TICs through a NF-kB/IL-6/STAT3 pathway and provide novel potential therapeutic targets for eliminating these malignant cells in NSCLC. PMID:26486080

  12. Therapeutic activation of macrophages and microglia to suppress brain tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Susobhan; Döring, Axinia; Zemp, Franz J; Silva, Claudia; Lun, Xueqing; Wang, Xiuling; Kelly, John; Hader, Walter; Hamilton, Mark; Mercier, Philippe; Dunn, Jeff F; Kinniburgh, Dave; van Rooijen, Nico; Robbins, Stephen; Forsyth, Peter; Cairncross, Gregory; Weiss, Samuel; Yong, V Wee

    2014-01-01

    Brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs) contribute to the genesis and recurrence of gliomas. We examined whether the microglia and macrophages that are abundant in gliomas alter BTIC growth. We found that microglia derived from non-glioma human subjects markedly mitigated the sphere-forming capacity of glioma patient-derived BTICs in culture by inducing the expression of genes that control cell cycle arrest and differentiation. This sphere-reducing effect was mimicked by macrophages, but not by neurons or astrocytes. Using a drug screen, we validated amphotericin B (AmpB) as an activator of monocytoid cells and found that AmpB enhanced the microglial reduction of BTIC spheres. In mice harboring intracranial mouse or patient-derived BTICs, daily systemic treatment with non-toxic doses of AmpB substantially prolonged life. Notably, microglia and monocytes cultured from glioma patients were inefficient at reducing the sphere-forming capacity of autologous BTICs, but this was rectified by AmpB. These results provide new insights into the treatment of gliomas.

  13. Disulfiram Eradicates Tumor-Initiating Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells in ROS-p38 MAPK Pathway-Dependent and -Independent Manners

    PubMed Central

    Yuki, Kaori; Zen, Yoh; Oshima, Motohiko; Miyagi, Satoru; Saraya, Atsunori; Koide, Shuhei; Motoyama, Tenyu; Ogasawara, Sadahisa; Ooka, Yoshihiko; Tawada, Akinobu; Nakatsura, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Takehiro; Yamashita, Taro; Kaneko, Syuichi; Miyazaki, Masaru; Iwama, Atsushi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs) play a central role in tumor development, metastasis, and recurrence. In the present study, we investigated the effect of disulfiram (DSF), an inhibitor of aldehyde dehydrogenase, toward tumor-initiating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. DSF treatment suppressed the anchorage-independent sphere formation of both HCC cells. Flow cytometric analyses showed that DSF but not 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) drastically reduces the number of tumor-initiating HCC cells. The sphere formation assays of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)+ HCC cells co-treated with p38-specific inhibitor revealed that DSF suppresses self-renewal capability mainly through the activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-p38 MAPK pathway. Microarray experiments also revealed the enrichment of the gene set involved in p38 MAPK signaling in EpCAM+ cells treated with DSF but not 5-FU. In addition, DSF appeared to downregulate Glypican 3 (GPC3) in a manner independent of ROS-p38 MAPK pathway. GPC3 was co-expressed with EpCAM in HCC cell lines and primary HCC cells and GPC3-knockdown reduced the number of EpCAM+ cells by compromising their self-renewal capability and inducing the apoptosis. These results indicate that DSF impaired the tumorigenicity of tumor-initiating HCC cells through activation of ROS-p38 pathway and in part through the downregulation of GPC3. DSF might be a promising therapeutic agent for the eradication of tumor-initiating HCC cells. PMID:24454751

  14. Targeting pancreatitis blocks tumor-initiating stem cells and pancreatic cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Madka, Venkateshwar; Brewer, Misty; Ritchie, Rebekah L.; Lightfoot, Stan; Kumar, Gaurav; Sadeghi, Michael; Patlolla, Jagan Mohan R.; Yamada, Hiroshi Y.; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; May, Randal; Houchen, Courtney W.; Steele, Vernon E.; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Recent development of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMs) for pancreatic cancer (PC) that recapitulates human disease progression has helped to identify new strategies to delay/inhibit PC development. We first found that expression of the pancreatic tumor-initiating/cancer stem cells (CSC) marker DclK1 occurs in early stage PC and in both early and late pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and that it increases as disease progresses in GEM and also in human PC. Genome-wide next generation sequencing of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) from GEM mice revealed significantly increased DclK1 along with inflammatory genes. Genetic ablation of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) decreased DclK1 in GEM. Induction of inflammation/pancreatitis with cerulein in GEM mice increased DclK1, and the novel dual COX/5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitor licofelone reduced it. Dietary licofelone significantly inhibited the incidence of PDAC and carcinoma in situ with significant inhibition of pancreatic CSCs. Licofelone suppressed pancreatic tumor COX-2 and 5-LOX activities and modulated miRNAs characteristic of CSC and inflammation in correlation with PDAC inhibition. These results offer a preclinical proof of concept to target the inflammation initiation to inhibit cancer stem cells early for improving the treatment of pancreatic cancers, with immediate clinical implications for repositioning dual COX/5-LOX inhibitors in human trials for high risk patients. PMID:25906749

  15. IDENTIFYING AND TARGETING TUMOR-INITIATING CELLS IN THE TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Lewis, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women (exclusive of skin cancer), and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Although conventional and targeted therapies have improved survival rates, there are still considerable challenges in treating breast cancer, including treatment resistance, disease recurrence, and metastasis. Treatment resistance can be either de novo - due to traits that tumor cells possess prior to treatment, or acquired, - due to traits that tumor cells gain in response to treatment. A recently proposed mechanism of de novo resistance invokes existence of a specialized subset of cancer cells defined as tumor-initiating cells (TICs), or cancer stem cells (CSC). TICs have the capacity to self-renew and regenerate new tumors that consist of all clonally-derived cell types present in the parental tumor. There are data to suggest that TICs are resistant to many conventional cancer therapies, and survive treatment in spite of dramatic shrinkage of the tumor. Residual TICs can then eventually regrow resulting in disease relapse. It is also hypothesized that TIC may be responsible for metastatic disease. If these hypotheses are correct, targeting TICs may be imperative to achieve cure. In this review, we discuss evidence for breast TICs and their apparent resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, as well as to various targeted therapies. We also address the potential impact of breast TIC plasticity and metastatic potential on therapeutic strategies. Finally, we describe several genes and signaling pathways that appear important for TIC function that may represent promising therapeutic targets. PMID:25876646

  16. Phenotypic heterogeneity and instability of human ovarian tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Jocelyn M.; Shaw, Patricia A.; Gedye, Craig; Bernardini, Marcus Q.; Neel, Benjamin G.; Ailles, Laurie E.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model proposes that tumors have a hierarchical organization in which only some cells indefinitely self-renew and thereby sustain tumor growth. In addition, the CSC model requires that tumor-initiating cells (TICs) be prospectively isolatable on the basis of their phenotype. Previous studies have suggested that serous ovarian cancer (SOC) conforms to the CSC model, but these used arguably nonfidelitous immortalized cell lines, cultured primary cells, or passaged xenografts as the source of tumor cells. We developed a robust assay for quantifying TICs from primary SOC. Using this assay, we find that TICs are rare when assayed in either NOD/SCID or NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ−/− (NSG) mice. TIC frequency (TICf) varies substantially between patients, although it is similar in primary ovarian masses and omental metastases, suggesting that TICf is an intrinsic property of ovarian tumors. CD133 marks all TICs from several primary SOC cases. However, in other cases, substantial TIC activity is found in both the CD133+ and CD133− fractions, whereas still other cases have exclusively CD133− TICs. Furthermore, the TIC phenotype can change in xenografts: primary tumors in which all TICs are CD133+ can give rise to xenografts that contain substantial numbers of CD133− TICs. Our results highlight the need for quantitative rigor in the evaluation of TICs and for caution when using passaged xenografts for such studies. Furthermore, although our data suggest that SOC conforms to the CSC hypothesis, the heterogeneity of the TIC phenotype may complicate its clinical application. PMID:21451132

  17. Identifying and targeting tumor-initiating cells in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Lewis, Michael T

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women (excluding skin cancer), and it is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Although conventional and targeted therapies have improved survival rates, there are still considerable challenges in treating breast cancer, including treatment resistance, disease recurrence, and metastasis. Treatment resistance can be either de novo - because of traits that tumor cells possess before treatment - or acquired - because of traits that tumor cells gain in response to treatment. A recently proposed mechanism of de novo resistance invokes the existence of a specialized subset of cancer cells defined as tumor-initiating cells (TICs), or cancer stem cells (CSCs). TICs have the capacity to self-renew and to generate new tumors that consist entirely of clonally derived cell types present in the parental tumor. There are data to suggest that TICs are resistant to many conventional cancer therapies and that they can survive treatment in spite of dramatic shrinkage of the tumor. Residual TICs can then eventually regrow, which results in disease relapse. It has also been hypothesized that TIC may be responsible for metastatic disease. If these hypotheses are correct, targeting TICs may be imperative for achieving a cure. In the present review, we discuss evidence for breast TICs and their apparent resistance to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy as well as to various targeted therapies. We also address the potential impact of breast TIC plasticity and metastatic potential on therapeutic strategies. Finally, we describe several genes and signaling pathways that appear to be important for TIC function and may represent promising therapeutic targets. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  18. Cell-Type-Specific Chromatin States Differentially Prime Squamous Cell Carcinoma Tumor-Initiating Cells for Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Latil, Mathilde; Nassar, Dany; Beck, Benjamin; Boumahdi, Soufiane; Wang, Li; Brisebarre, Audrey; Dubois, Christine; Nkusi, Erwin; Lenglez, Sandrine; Checinska, Agnieszka; Vercauteren Drubbel, Alizée; Devos, Michael; Declercq, Wim; Yi, Rui; Blanpain, Cédric

    2017-02-02

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer cells has been associated with metastasis, stemness, and resistance to therapy. Some tumors undergo EMT while others do not, which may reflect intrinsic properties of their cell of origin. However, this possibility is largely unexplored. By targeting the same oncogenic mutations to discrete skin compartments, we show that cell-type-specific chromatin and transcriptional states differentially prime tumors to EMT. Squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) derived from interfollicular epidermis (IFE) are generally well differentiated, while hair follicle (HF) stem cell-derived SCCs frequently exhibit EMT, efficiently form secondary tumors, and possess increased metastatic potential. Transcriptional and epigenomic profiling revealed that IFE and HF tumor-initiating cells possess distinct chromatin landscapes and gene regulatory networks associated with tumorigenesis and EMT that correlate with accessibility of key epithelial and EMT transcription factor binding sites. These findings highlight the importance of chromatin states and transcriptional priming in dictating tumor phenotypes and EMT.

  19. PTEN loss represses glioblastoma tumor initiating cell differentiation via inactivation of Lgl1

    PubMed Central

    Gont, Alexander; Hanson, Jennifer E L; Lavictoire, Sylvie J; Parolin, Doris A E; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Restall, Ian J; Soucie, Mathieu; Nicholas, Garth; Woulfe, John; Kassam, Amin; Da Silva, Vasco F; Lorimer, Ian AJ

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive and incurable type of brain tumor. A subset of undifferentiated glioblastoma cells, known as glioblastoma tumor initiating cells (GTICs), has an essential role in the malignancy of this disease and also appears to mediate resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. GTICs retain the ability to differentiate into cells with reduced malignant potential, but the signaling pathways controlling differentiation are not fully understood at this time. PTEN loss is a very common in glioblastoma multiforme and leads to aberrant activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway. Increased signalling through this pathway leads to activation of multiple protein kinases, including atypical protein kinase C. In Drosophila, active atypical protein kinase C has been shown to promote the self-renewal of neuroblasts, inhibiting their differentiation along a neuronal lineage. This effect is mediated by atypical protein kinase c-mediated phosphorylation and inactivation of Lgl, a protein that was first characterized as a tumour suppressor in Drosophila. The effects of the atypical protein kinase C/Lgl pathway on the differentiation status of GTICs, and its potential link to PTEN loss, have not been assessed previously. Here we show that PTEN loss leads to the phosphorylation and inactivation of Lgl by atypical protein kinase C in glioblastoma cells. Re-expression of PTEN in GTICs promoted their differentiation along a neuronal lineage. This effect was also seen when atypical protein kinase C was knocked down using RNA interference, and when a non-phosphorylatable, constitutively active form of Lgl was expressed in GTICs. Thus PTEN loss, acting via atypical protein kinase C activation and Lgl inactivation, helps to maintain GTICs in an undifferentiated state. PMID:23907540

  20. PTEN loss represses glioblastoma tumor initiating cell differentiation via inactivation of Lgl1.

    PubMed

    Gont, Alexander; Hanson, Jennifer E L; Lavictoire, Sylvie J; Parolin, Doris A; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Restall, Ian J; Soucie, Mathieu; Nicholas, Garth; Woulfe, John; Kassam, Amin; Da Silva, Vasco F; Lorimer, Ian A J

    2013-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive and incurable type of brain tumor. A subset of undifferentiated glioblastoma cells, known as glioblastoma tumor initiating cells (GTICs), has an essential role in the malignancy of this disease and also appears to mediate resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. GTICs retain the ability to differentiate into cells with reduced malignant potential, but the signaling pathways controlling differentiation are not fully understood at this time. PTEN loss is a very common in glioblastoma multiforme and leads to aberrant activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway. Increased signalling through this pathway leads to activation of multiple protein kinases, including atypical protein kinase C. In Drosophila, active atypical protein kinase C has been shown to promote the self-renewal of neuroblasts, inhibiting their differentiation along a neuronal lineage. This effect is mediated by atypical protein kinase c-mediated phosphorylation and inactivation of Lgl, a protein that was first characterized as a tumour suppressor in Drosophila. The effects of the atypical protein kinase C/Lgl pathway on the differentiation status of GTICs, and its potential link to PTEN loss, have not been assessed previously. Here we show that PTEN loss leads to the phosphorylation and inactivation of Lgl by atypical protein kinase C in glioblastoma cells. Re-expression of PTEN in GTICs promoted their differentiation along a neuronal lineage. This effect was also seen when atypical protein kinase C was knocked down using RNA interference, and when a non-phosphorylatable, constitutively active form of Lgl was expressed in GTICs. Thus PTEN loss, acting via atypical protein kinase C activation and Lgl inactivation, helps to maintain GTICs in an undifferentiated state.

  1. Telomerase inhibition abolishes the tumorigenicity of pediatric ependymoma tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Barszczyk, Mark; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Mack, Stephen C; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Mangerel, Joshua; Agnihotri, Sameer; Remke, Marc; Golbourn, Brian; Pajovic, Sanja; Elizabeth, Cynthia; Yu, Man; Luu, Betty; Morrison, Andrew; Adamski, Jennifer; Nethery-Brokx, Kathleen; Li, Xiao-Nan; Van Meter, Timothy; Dirks, Peter B; Rutka, James T; Taylor, Michael D; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric ependymomas are highly recurrent tumors resistant to conventional chemotherapy. Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein critical in permitting limitless replication, has been found to be critically important for the maintenance of tumor-initiating cells (TICs). These TICs are chemoresistant, repopulate the tumor from which they are identified, and are drivers of recurrence in numerous cancers. In this study, telomerase enzymatic activity was directly measured and inhibited to assess the therapeutic potential of targeting telomerase. Telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) (n = 36) and C-circle assay/telomere FISH/ATRX staining (n = 76) were performed on primary ependymomas to determine the prevalence and prognostic potential of telomerase activity or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) as telomere maintenance mechanisms, respectively. Imetelstat, a phase 2 telomerase inhibitor, was used to elucidate the effect of telomerase inhibition on proliferation and tumorigenicity in established cell lines (BXD-1425EPN, R254), a primary TIC line (E520) and xenograft models of pediatric ependymoma. Over 60 % of pediatric ependymomas were found to rely on telomerase activity to maintain telomeres, while no ependymomas showed evidence of ALT. Children with telomerase-active tumors had reduced 5-year progression-free survival (29 ± 11 vs 64 ± 18 %; p = 0.03) and overall survival (58 ± 12 vs 83 ± 15 %; p = 0.05) rates compared to those with tumors lacking telomerase activity. Imetelstat inhibited proliferation and self-renewal by shortening telomeres and inducing senescence in vitro. In vivo, Imetelstat significantly reduced subcutaneous xenograft growth by 40 % (p = 0.03) and completely abolished the tumorigenicity of pediatric ependymoma TICs in an orthotopic xenograft model. Telomerase inhibition represents a promising therapeutic approach for telomerase-active pediatric ependymomas found to characterize high-risk ependymomas.

  2. miR-17 inhibition enhances the formation of kidney cancer spheres with stem cell/ tumor initiating cell properties.

    PubMed

    Lichner, Zsuzsanna; Saleh, Carol; Subramaniam, Venkateswaran; Seivwright, Annetta; Prud'homme, Gerald Joseph; Yousef, George Makram

    2015-03-20

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an aggressive disease, with 35% chance of metastasis. The 'cancer stem cell' hypothesis suggests that a subset of cancer cells possess stem cell properties and is crucial in tumor initiation, metastasis and treatment resistance. We isolated RCC spheres and showed that they exhibit cancer stem cell/ tumor initiating cell-like properties including the formation of self-renewing spheres, high tumorigenicity and the ability to differentiate to cell types of the original tumor. Spheres showed increased expression of stem cell-related transcription factors and mesenchymal markers. miRNAs were differentially expressed between RCC spheres and their parental cells. Inhibition of miR-17 accelerated the formation of RCC spheres which shared molecular characteristics with the spontaneous RCC spheres. Target prediction pointed out TGFβ pathway activation as a possible mechanism to drive RCC sphere formation. We demonstrate that miR-17 overexpression interferes with the TGFβ-EMT axis and hinders RCC sphere formation; and validated TGFBR2 as a direct and biologically relevant target during this process. Thus, a single miRNA may have an impact on the formation of highly tumorigenic cancer spheres of kidney cancer.

  3. miR-17 inhibition enhances the formation of kidney cancer spheres with stem cell/tumor initiating cell properties

    PubMed Central

    Lichner, Zsuzsanna; Saleh, Carol; Subramaniam, Venkateswaran; Seivwright, Annetta; Prud'homme, Gerald Joseph; Yousef, George Makram

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an aggressive disease, with 35% chance of metastasis. The ‘cancer stem cell’ hypothesis suggests that a subset of cancer cells possess stem cell properties and is crucial in tumor initiation, metastasis and treatment resistance. We isolated RCC spheres and showed that they exhibit cancer stem cell/tumor initiating cell-like properties including the formation of self-renewing spheres, high tumorigenicity and the ability to differentiate to cell types of the original tumor. Spheres showed increased expression of stem cell-related transcription factors and mesenchymal markers.  miRNAs were differentially expressed between RCC spheres and their parental cells. Inhibition of miR-17 accelerated the formation of RCC spheres which shared molecular characteristics with the spontaneous RCC spheres. Target prediction pointed out TGFβ pathway activation as a possible mechanism to drive RCC sphere formation. We demonstrate that miR-17 overexpression interferes with the TGFβ-EMT axis and hinders RCC sphere formation; and validated TGFBR2 as a direct and biologically relevant target during this process. Thus, a single miRNA may have an impact on the formation of highly tumorigenic cancer spheres of kidney cancer. PMID:25011053

  4. Down-regulation of the Lamin A/C in neuroblastoma triggers the expansion of tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Nardella, Marta; Guglielmi, Loredana; Musa, Carla; Iannetti, Ilaria; Maresca, Giovanna; Amendola, Donatella; Porru, Manuela; Carico, Elisabetta; Sessa, Giuseppe; Camerlingo, Rosalba; Dominici, Carlo; Megiorni, Francesca; Milan, Marika; Bearzi, Claudia; Rizzi, Roberto; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; Leonetti, Carlo; Bucci, Barbara; Mercanti, Delio; Felsani, Armando; D'Agnano, Igea

    2015-10-20

    Tumor-initiating cells constitute a population within a tumor mass that shares properties with normal stem cells and is considered responsible for therapy failure in many cancers. We have previously demonstrated that knockdown of the nuclear envelope component Lamin A/C in human neuroblastoma cells inhibits retinoic acid-mediated differentiation and results in a more aggressive phenotype. In addition, Lamin A/C is often lost in advanced tumors and changes in the nuclear envelope composition occur during tumor progression. Based on our previous data and considering that Lamin A/C is expressed in differentiated tissues, we hypothesize that the lack of Lamin A/C could predispose cells toward a stem-like phenotype, thus influencing the development of tumor-initiating cells in neuroblastoma. This paper demonstrates that knockdown of Lamin A/C triggers the development of a tumor-initiating cell population with self-renewing features in human neuroblastoma cells. We also demonstrates that the development of TICs is due to an increased expression of MYCN gene and that in neuroblastoma exists an inverse relationship between LMNA and MYCN expression.

  5. MAPK13 is preferentially expressed in gynecological cancer stem cells and has a role in the tumor-initiation.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kazuyo; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Kuroda, Takafumi; Takaya, Akari; Kubo, Terufumi; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-04-15

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs)/cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are defined as small subpopulation of cancer cells that are endowed with higher tumor-initiating ability. CSCs/CICs are resistant to standard cancer therapies including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and they are thus thought to be responsible for cancer recurrence and metastasis. Therefore, elucidation of molecular mechanisms of CSCs/CICs is essential to cure cancer. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of gynecological CSCs/CICs isolated as aldehyde dehydrogenase high (ALDH(high)) cells, and found that MAPK13, PTTG1IP, CAPN1 and UBQLN2 were preferentially expressed in CSCs/CICs. MAPK13 is expressed in uterine, ovary, stomach, colon, liver and kidney cancer tissues at higher levels compared with adjacent normal tissues. MAPK13 gene knockdown using siRNA reduced the ALDH(high) population and abrogated the tumor-initiating ability. These results indicate that MAPK13 is expressed in gynecological CSCs/CICs and has roles in the maintenance of CSCs/CICs and tumor-initiating ability, and MAPK13 might be a novel molecular target for treatment-resistant CSCs/CICs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. MAPK13 is preferentially expressed in gynecological cancer stem cells and has a role in the tumor-initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Kazuyo; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Kuroda, Takafumi; Takaya, Akari; Kubo, Terufumi; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-04-15

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs)/cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are defined as small subpopulation of cancer cells that are endowed with higher tumor-initiating ability. CSCs/CICs are resistant to standard cancer therapies including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and they are thus thought to be responsible for cancer recurrence and metastasis. Therefore, elucidation of molecular mechanisms of CSCs/CICs is essential to cure cancer. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of gynecological CSCs/CICs isolated as aldehyde dehydrogenase high (ALDH{sup high}) cells, and found that MAPK13, PTTG1IP, CAPN1 and UBQLN2 were preferentially expressed in CSCs/CICs. MAPK13 is expressed in uterine, ovary, stomach, colon, liver and kidney cancer tissues at higher levels compared with adjacent normal tissues. MAPK13 gene knockdown using siRNA reduced the ALDH{sup high} population and abrogated the tumor-initiating ability. These results indicate that MAPK13 is expressed in gynecological CSCs/CICs and has roles in the maintenance of CSCs/CICs and tumor-initiating ability, and MAPK13 might be a novel molecular target for treatment-resistant CSCs/CICs.

  7. The potential role of COX-2 in cancer stem cell-mediated canine mammary tumor initiation: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Zhang, Di; Xie, Fuqiang; Lin, Degui

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Additionally, it is becoming apparent that cyclooxygenase (COX) signaling is associated with canine mammary tumor development. The goals of the present study were to investigate COX-2 expression patterns and their effect on CSC-mediated tumor initiation in primary canine mammary tissues and tumorsphere models using immunohistochemistry. Patterns of COX-2, CD44, octamer-binding transcription factor (Oct)-3/4, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression were examined in malignant mammary tumor (MMT) samples and analyzed in terms of clinicopathological characteristics. COX-2 and Oct-3/4 expression was higher in MMTs compared to other histological samples with heterogeneous patterns. In MMTs, COX-2 expression correlated with tumor malignancy features. Significant associations between COX-2, CD44, and EGFR were observed in low-differentiated MMTs. Comparative analysis showed that the levels of COX-2, CD44, and Oct-3/4 expression varied significantly among TSs of three histological grades. Enhanced COX-2 staining was consistently observed in TSs. Similar levels of staining intensity were found for CD44 and Oct-3/4, but EGFR expression was weak. Our findings indicate the potential role of COX-2 in CSC-mediated tumor initiation, and suggest that COX-2 inhibition may help treat canine mammary tumors by targeting CSCs.

  8. Stem Cells in Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    disease upon aging, specifically prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . In order to study the cell differentiation lineage associated with...specifically prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . In order to study the cell differentiation lineage associated with normal and diseased prostate

  9. Tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells and orthotopic site increase the tumor initiation potential of putative mouse mammary cancer stem cells derived from MMTV-PyMT mice.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Denise Grant; Ma, Jun; Guest, Ian; Uk-Lim, Chang; Glinskii, Anna; Glinsky, Gennadi; Sell, Stewart

    2012-12-01

    The ability to transplant mammary cancer stem cells, identified by the phenotype CD24(+)CD29(+)CD49f(+)Sca-1(low), is dependent on the microenvironment in which the cells are placed. Using the MMTV-PyMT mouse model of mammary cancer, we now report two methods of tumor growth enhancement: contributions of tumor stroma in the form of tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells and orthotopic vs. heterotopic transplantation sites. To support evidence of stem cell function, tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into adipocyte- and osteocyte-like cells after culture in specific medium. Co-injection of tumor-initiating cells with tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells significantly increased tumor initiation compared to subcutaneous injection of TICs alone; co-injection also allowed tumor initiation with a single TIC. Interestingly, we observed the formation of sarcomas after co-injections of tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells or mouse embryonic fibroblasts with TICs; sarcomas are not observed in spontaneous MMTV-PyMT tumors and rarely observed in injections of TICs alone. Tumor initiation was also significantly increased in the orthotopic injection site compared to heterotopic injections. We conclude that tumor stroma and orthotopic sites both enhance tumor initiation by mammary cancer stem cells.

  10. CD271 is a functional and targetable marker of tumor-initiating cells in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Sauca, Oihana; Chung, Man Ki; Shin, June Ho; Karamboulas, Christina; Kwok, Shirley; Jung, Young Ho; Oakley, Richard; Tysome, James R.; Farnebo, Lovisa O.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Sirjani, Davud; Divi, Vasu; Holsinger, F. Christopher; Tomeh, Chafeek; Nichols, Anthony; Le, Quynh T.; Colevas, A. A. Dimitrios; Kong, Christina S.; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Lewis, James S.; Ailles, Laurie E.; Sunwoo, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) are best characterized by their surface expression of CD44. Although there is great interest in identifying strategies to target this population, no marker of these cells has been found to be functionally active. Here, we examined the expression of the purported marker of normal human oral epithelial stem cells, CD271. We show that CD271 expression is restricted to a subset of the CD44+ cells. Using xenograft assays, we show that the CD44+CD271+ subpopulation contains the most tumorigenic cells. Loss of CD271 function results in a block in the G2-M phase of the cell cycle and a profound negative impact on the capacity of these cells to initiate tumor formation in vivo. Incubation with recombinant NGF results in enhanced phosphorylation of Erk, providing additional evidence that CD271 is functionally active. Finally, incubation of SCCHN cells with antibody to CD271 results in decreased Erk phosphorylation and decreased tumor formation in vivo. Thus, our data are the first to demonstrate that CD271 more specifically identifies the TIC subpopulation within the CD44+ compartment in SCCHN and that this receptor is a functionally active and targetable molecule. PMID:25149537

  11. Discovery of cell surface vimentin targeting mAb for direct disruption of GBM tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Noh, Hyangsoon; Yan, Jun; Hong, Sungguan; Kong, Ling-Yuan; Gabrusiewicz, Konrad; Xia, Xueqing; Heimberger, Amy B; Li, Shulin

    2016-11-01

    Intracellular vimentin overexpression has been associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, metastasis, invasion, and proliferation, but cell surface vimentin (CSV) is less understood. Furthermore, it remains unknown whether CSV can serve as a therapeutic target in CSV-expressing tumor cells. We found that CSV was present on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cancer stem cells and that CSV expression was associated with spheroid formation in those cells. A newly developed monoclonal antibody against CSV, 86C, specifically and significantly induced apoptosis and inhibited spheroid formation in GBM cells in vitro. The addition of 86C to GBM cells in vitro also led to rapid internalization of vimentin and decreased GBM cell viability. These findings were associated with an increase in caspase-3 activity, indicating activation of apoptosis. Finally, treatment with 86C inhibited GBM progression in vivo. In conclusion, CSV-expressing GBM cells have properties of tumor initiating cells, and targeting CSV with the monoclonal antibody 86C is a promising approach in the treatment of GBM.

  12. Targeting tumor-initiating cells: Eliminating anabolic cancer stem cells with inhibitors of protein synthesis or by mimicking caloric restriction

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Rebecca; Harrison, Hannah; Smith, Duncan L.; Townsend, Paul A.; Jackson, Thomas; Ozsvari, Bela; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Pestell, Richard G.; Howell, Anthony; Lisanti, Michael P.; Sotgia, Federica

    2015-01-01

    We have used an unbiased proteomic profiling strategy to identify new potential therapeutic targets in tumor-initiating cells (TICs), a.k.a., cancer stem cells (CSCs). Towards this end, the proteomes of mammospheres from two breast cancer cell lines were directly compared to attached monolayer cells. This allowed us to identify proteins that were highly over-expressed in CSCs and/or progenitor cells. We focused on ribosomal proteins and protein folding chaperones, since they were markedly over-expressed in mammospheres. Overall, we identified >80 molecules specifically associated with protein synthesis that were commonly upregulated in mammospheres. Most of these proteins were also transcriptionally upregulated in human breast cancer cells in vivo, providing evidence for their potential clinical relevance. As such, increased mRNA translation could provide a novel mechanism for enhancing the proliferative clonal expansion of TICs. The proteomic findings were functionally validated using known inhibitors of protein synthesis, via three independent approaches. For example, puromycin (which mimics the structure of tRNAs and competitively inhibits protein synthesis) preferentially targeted CSCs in both mammospheres and monolayer cultures, and was ~10-fold more potent for eradicating TICs, than “bulk” cancer cells. In addition, rapamycin, which inhibits mTOR and hence protein synthesis, was very effective at reducing mammosphere formation, at nanomolar concentrations. Finally, mammosphere formation was also markedly inhibited by methionine restriction, which mimics the positive effects of caloric restriction in cultured cells. Remarkably, mammosphere formation was >18-fold more sensitive to methionine restriction and replacement, as directly compared to monolayer cell proliferation. Methionine is absolutely required for protein synthesis, since every protein sequence starts with a methionine residue. Thus, the proliferation and survival of CSCs is very sensitive to

  13. Epigenetic states of cells of origin and tumor evolution drive tumor-initiating cell phenotype and tumor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Chow, Kin-Hoe; Shin, Dong-Mi; Jenkins, Molly H; Miller, Emily E; Shih, David J; Choi, Seungbum; Low, Benjamin E; Philip, Vivek; Rybinski, Brad; Bronson, Roderick T; Taylor, Michael D; Yun, Kyuson

    2014-09-01

    A central confounding factor in the development of targeted therapies is tumor cell heterogeneity, particularly in tumor-initiating cells (TIC), within clinically identical tumors. Here, we show how activation of the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) pathway in neural stem and progenitor cells creates a foundation for tumor cell evolution to heterogeneous states that are histologically indistinguishable but molecularly distinct. In spontaneous medulloblastomas that arise in Patched (Ptch)(+/-) mice, we identified three distinct tumor subtypes. Through cell type-specific activation of the SHH pathway in vivo, we determined that different cells of origin evolved in unique ways to generate these subtypes. Moreover, TICs in each subtype had distinct molecular and cellular phenotypes. At the bulk tumor level, the three tumor subtypes could be distinguished by a 465-gene signature and by differential activation levels of the ERK and AKT pathways. Notably, TICs from different subtypes were differentially sensitive to SHH or AKT pathway inhibitors, highlighting new mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapies. In summary, our results show how evolutionary processes act on distinct cells of origin to contribute to tumoral heterogeneity, at both bulk tumor and TIC levels.

  14. Inhibition of Cdk5 induces cell death of tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Mandl, Melanie M; Zhang, Siwei; Ulrich, Melanie; Schmoeckel, Elisa; Mayr, Doris; Vollmar, Angelika M; Liebl, Johanna

    2017-03-28

    Tumour-initiating cells (TICs) account for chemoresistance, tumour recurrence and metastasis, and therefore represent a major problem in tumour therapy. However, strategies to address TICs are limited. Recent studies indicate Cdk5 as a promising target for anti-cancer therapy and Cdk5 has recently been associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, a role of Cdk5 in TICs has not been described yet. Expression of Cdk5 in human cancer tissue was analysed by staining of a human tissue microarray (TMA). Functional effects of Cdk5 overexpression, genetic knockdown by siRNA and shRNA, and pharmacologic inhibition by the small molecule roscovitine were tested in migration, invasion, cell death, and tumorsphere assays and in tumour establishment in vivo. For mechanistic studies, molecular biology methods were applied. In fact, here we pin down a novel function of Cdk5 in TICs: knockdown and pharmacological inhibition of Cdk5 impaired tumorsphere formation and reduced tumour establishment in vivo. Conversely, Cdk5 overexpression promoted tumorsphere formation which was in line with increased expression of Cdk5 in human breast cancer tissues as shown by staining of a human TMA. In order to understand how Cdk5 inhibition affects tumorsphere formation, we identify a role of Cdk5 in detachment-induced cell death: Cdk5 inhibition induced apoptosis in tumorspheres by stabilizing the transcription factor Foxo1 which results in increased levels of the pro-apoptotic protein Bim. In summary, our study elucidates a Cdk5-Foxo1-Bim pathway in cell death in tumorspheres and suggests Cdk5 as a potential target to address TICs.

  15. Treatment of agarose-agarose RENCA macrobeads with docetaxel selects for OCT4(+) cells with tumor-initiating capability.

    PubMed

    Gazda, Lawrence S; Martis, Prithy C; Laramore, Melissa A; Bautista, Melissa A; Dudley, Atira; Vinerean, Horatiu V; Smith, Barry H

    2013-12-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory depicts such cells as having the capacity to produce both identical CSCs (symmetrical division) and tumor-amplifying daughter cells (asymmetric division). CSCs are thought to reside in niches similar to those of normal stem cells as described for neural, intestinal, and epidermal tissue, are resistant to chemotherapy, and are responsible for tumor recurrence. We recently described the niche-like nature of mouse renal adenocarcinoma (RENCA) cells following encapsulation in agarose macrobeads. In this paper we tested the hypothesis that encapsulated RENCA colonies function as an in vitro model of a CSC niche and that the majority of cells would undergo chemotherapy-induced death, followed by tumor recurrence. After exposure to docetaxel (5 µg/ml), 50% of cells were lost one week post-treatment while only one or two cells remained in each colony by 6 weeks. Surviving cells expressed OCT4 and reformed tumors at 16 weeks post-treatment. Docetaxel-resistant cells also grew as monolayers in cell culture (16-17 weeks post-exposure) or as primary tumors following transplantation to Balb/c mice (6 of 10 mice) or NOD.CB17-Prkdc(scid)/J mice (9 of 9 mice; 10 weeks post-transplantation or 28 weeks post-exposure). These data support the hypothesis that a rare subpopulation of OCT4(+) cells are resistant to docetaxel and these cells are sufficient for tumor recurrence. The reported methodology can be used to obtain purified populations of tumor-initiating cells, to screen for anti-tumor-initiating cell agents, and to investigate the in vitro correlate of a CSC niche, especially as it relates to chemo-resistance and tumor recurrence.

  16. Embryonic retinal tumors in SV40 T-Ag transgenic mice contain CD133+ tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Lalita; Bond, Wesley S; Perlaky, Laszlo; Overbeek, Paul A; Hurwitz, Mary Y; Chévez-Barrios, Patricia; Hurwitz, Richard L

    2012-06-08

    Human retinoblastomas form during the proliferative phase of retina development and are caused by mutations that result in absent or functionally defective Rb protein. Similar tumors occur in mice only when multiple Rb gene family members are absent. We asked if retinal tumors can arise from an undifferentiated retinal cell. The tumor-initiating cells isolated from these tumors that formed in early embryonic murine retinas were characterized. Transgenic mice were created using a Pax6 promoter to target expression of SV40 large T-antigen (T-Ag) in the undifferentiated murine embryonic retina. T-Ag, which sequesters all Rb family proteins and p53, is expressed in the retina and lens by murine embryonic day 10 (E10) and tumors are observed by E12.5. A cell line that is adherent in serum-containing media and forms neurospheres in supplemented serum-free media was developed from retinal tumors isolated on postnatal day 7. In all, 1.5% of attached cells form neurospheres when transferred to serum-free medium. All cultured cells express T-Ag, confirming that they derive from the original tumors; 0.5% of adherent cells express detectable levels of CD133. CD133+ FACS-sorted cells cultured in serum-free medium form 3-fold more neurospheres than do CD133- cells. Six of seven mice injected with CD133+ cells and one of seven mice injected with CD133- cells formed tumors during a 6-month period. Unlike primary adherent cells, primary and secondary tumors heterogeneously express markers of stem cells and differentiation similar to human retinoblastoma. CD133+ tumor-initiating cells can originate from proliferating undifferentiated precursor cells.

  17. Delineation of a cellular hierarchy in lung cancer reveals an oncofetal antigen expressed on tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Damelin, Marc; Geles, Kenneth G; Follettie, Maximillian T; Yuan, Ping; Baxter, Michelle; Golas, Jonathon; DiJoseph, John F; Karnoub, Maha; Huang, Shuguang; Diesl, Veronica; Behrens, Carmen; Choe, Sung E; Rios, Carol; Gruzas, Janet; Sridharan, Latha; Dougher, Maureen; Kunz, Arthur; Hamann, Philip R; Evans, Deborah; Armellino, Douglas; Khandke, Kiran; Marquette, Kimberly; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila; Boghaert, Erwin R; Abraham, Robert T; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Zhou, Bin-Bing S

    2011-06-15

    Poorly differentiated tumors in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been associated with shorter patient survival and shorter time to recurrence following treatment. Here, we integrate multiple experimental models with clinicopathologic analysis of patient tumors to delineate a cellular hierarchy in NSCLC. We show that the oncofetal protein 5T4 is expressed on tumor-initiating cells and associated with worse clinical outcome in NSCLC. Coexpression of 5T4 and factors involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition were observed in undifferentiated but not in differentiated tumor cells. Despite heterogeneous expression of 5T4 in NSCLC patient-derived xenografts, treatment with an anti-5T4 antibody-drug conjugate resulted in complete and sustained tumor regression. Thus, the aggressive growth of heterogeneous solid tumors can be blocked by therapeutic agents that target a subpopulation of cells near the top of the cellular hierarchy.

  18. The Isolation and Characterization of Human Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    following significant findings/observations: i) 3D culture of human prostate cancer cells with magnetic nanoparticles is not optimal for tumor initiation...include: magnetic nanoparticles and using a stable (non-transformed) human prostate fibroblast cell line as a feeder layer. The former uses inert magnetic... nanoparticles (3D Biosciences, Inc.) that passively diffuse into live cells that then allow 3D growth in an applied magnetic field1. Such a

  19. Biomechanical profile of cancer stem-like/tumor-initiating cells derived from a progressive ovarian cancer model.

    PubMed

    Babahosseini, Hesam; Ketene, Alperen N; Schmelz, Eva M; Roberts, Paul C; Agah, Masoud

    2014-07-01

    We herein report, for the first time, the mechanical properties of ovarian cancer stem-like/tumor-initiating cells (CSC/TICs). The represented model is a spontaneously transformed murine ovarian surface epithelial (MOSE) cell line that mimics the progression of ovarian cancer from early/non-tumorigenic to late/highly aggressive cancer stages. Elastic modulus measurements via atomic force microscopy (AFM) illustrate that the enriched CSC/TICs population (0.32±0.12kPa) are 46%, 61%, and 72% softer (P<0.0001) than their aggressive late-stage, intermediate, and non-malignant early-stage cancer cells, respectively. Exposure to sphingosine, an anti-cancer agent, induced an increase in the elastic moduli of CSC/TICs by more than 46% (0.47±0.14kPa, P<0.0001). Altogether, our data demonstrate that the elastic modulus profile of CSC/TICs is unique and responsive to anti-cancer treatment strategies that impact the cytoskeleton architecture of cells. These findings increase the chance for obtaining distinctive cell biomechanical profiles with the intent of providing a means for effective cancer detection and treatment control. This novel study utilized atomic force microscopy to demonstrate that the elastic modulus profile of cancer stem cell-like tumor initiating cells is unique and responsive to anti-cancer treatment strategies that impact the cytoskeleton of these cells. These findings pave the way to the development of unique means for effective cancer detection and treatment control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inhibition of SP1 by the mithramycin analog EC-8042 efficiently targets tumor initiating cells in sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tornin, Juan; Martinez-Cruzado, Lucia; Santos, Laura; Rodriguez, Aida; Núñez, Luz-Elena; Oro, Patricia; Hermosilla, Maria Ana; Allonca, Eva; Fernández-García, Maria Teresa; Astudillo, Aurora; Suarez, Carlos; Morís, Francisco; Rodriguez, Rene

    2016-01-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs), responsible for tumor initiation, and cancer stem cells (CSCs), responsible for tumor expansion and propagation, are often resistant to chemotherapeutic agents. To find therapeutic targets against sarcoma initiating and propagating cells we used models of myxoid liposarcoma (MLS) and undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS) developed from human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs), which constitute the most likely cell-of-origin for sarcoma. We found that SP1-mediated transcription was among the most significantly altered signaling. To inhibit SP1 activity, we used EC-8042, a mithramycin (MTM) analog (mithralog) with enhanced anti-tumor activity and highly improved safety. EC-8042 inhibited the growth of TIC cultures, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and upregulated the adipogenic factor CEBPα. SP1 knockdown was able to mimic the anti-proliferative effects induced by EC-8042. Importantly, EC-8042 was not recognized as a substrate by several ABC efflux pumps involved in drug resistance, and, opposite to the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin, repressed the expression of many genes responsible for the TIC/CSC phenotype, including SOX2, C-MYC, NOTCH1 and NFκB1. Accordingly, EC-8042, but not doxorubicin, efficiently reduced the survival of CSC-enriched tumorsphere sarcoma cultures. In vivo, EC-8042 induced a profound inhibition of tumor growth associated to a strong reduction of the mitotic index and the induction of adipogenic differentiation and senescence. Finally, EC-8042 reduced the ability of tumor cells to reinitiate tumor growth. These data suggest that EC-8042 could constitute an effective treatment against both TIC and CSC subpopulations in sarcoma. PMID:27105533

  1. Characterization and propagation of tumor initiating cells derived from colorectal liver metastases: trials, tribulations and a cautionary note.

    PubMed

    James, Mark I; Howells, Lynne M; Karmokar, Ankur; Higgins, Jennifer A; Greaves, Peter; Cai, Hong; Dennison, Ashley; Metcalfe, Matthew; Garcea, Giuseppe; Lloyd, David M; Berry, David P; Steward, William P; Brown, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TIC) are increasingly being put forward as a potential target for intervention within colorectal cancer. Whilst characterisation and outgrowth of these cells has been extensively undertaken in primary colorectal cancers, few data are available describing characteristics within the metastatic setting. Tissue was obtained from patients undergoing surgical resection for colorectal liver metastases, and processed into single cell suspension for assessment. Tumor initiating cells from liver metastases were characterised using combinations of EPCAM, Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, CD133 and CD26. CD133 expression was significantly lower in patients who had received chemotherapy, but this was accounted for by a decrease observed in the male patient cohort only. ALDHhigh populations were rare (0.4 and 0.3% for EPCAM+/ALDHhigh/CD133- and EPCAM+/ALDHhigh/CD133+ populations respectively) and below the limits of detection in 28% of samples. Spheroid outgrowth of metastatic tumor cells across all samples could not be readily achieved using standard spheroid-formation techniques, thus requiring further method validation to reliably propagate cells from the majority of tissues. Spheroid formation was not enhanced using additional growth factors or fibroblast co-culture, but once cells were passaged through NOD-SCID mice, spheroid formation was observed in 82% samples, accompanied by a significant increase in CD26. Order of spheroid forming ability was ALDHhigh>CD133>CD26. Samples sorted by these markers each had the ability to reform ALDHhigh, CD133 and CD26 positive populations to a similar extent, suggestive of a high degree of plasticity for each population. Ex vivo TIC models are increasingly being utilised to assess efficacy of therapeutic interventions. It is therefore essential that such investigations use well-characterised models that are able to sustain TIC populations across a large patient cohort in order that the inherent heterogeneity

  2. Inhibition of SP1 by the mithramycin analog EC-8042 efficiently targets tumor initiating cells in sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Tornin, Juan; Martinez-Cruzado, Lucia; Santos, Laura; Rodriguez, Aida; Núñez, Luz-Elena; Oro, Patricia; Hermosilla, Maria Ana; Allonca, Eva; Fernández-García, Maria Teresa; Astudillo, Aurora; Suarez, Carlos; Morís, Francisco; Rodriguez, Rene

    2016-05-24

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs), responsible for tumor initiation, and cancer stem cells (CSCs), responsible for tumor expansion and propagation, are often resistant to chemotherapeutic agents. To find therapeutic targets against sarcoma initiating and propagating cells we used models of myxoid liposarcoma (MLS) and undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS) developed from human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs), which constitute the most likely cell-of-origin for sarcoma. We found that SP1-mediated transcription was among the most significantly altered signaling. To inhibit SP1 activity, we used EC-8042, a mithramycin (MTM) analog (mithralog) with enhanced anti-tumor activity and highly improved safety. EC-8042 inhibited the growth of TIC cultures, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and upregulated the adipogenic factor CEBPα. SP1 knockdown was able to mimic the anti-proliferative effects induced by EC-8042. Importantly, EC-8042 was not recognized as a substrate by several ABC efflux pumps involved in drug resistance, and, opposite to the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin, repressed the expression of many genes responsible for the TIC/CSC phenotype, including SOX2, C-MYC, NOTCH1 and NFκB1. Accordingly, EC-8042, but not doxorubicin, efficiently reduced the survival of CSC-enriched tumorsphere sarcoma cultures. In vivo, EC-8042 induced a profound inhibition of tumor growth associated to a strong reduction of the mitotic index and the induction of adipogenic differentiation and senescence. Finally, EC-8042 reduced the ability of tumor cells to reinitiate tumor growth. These data suggest that EC-8042 could constitute an effective treatment against both TIC and CSC subpopulations in sarcoma.

  3. ERN1 and ALPK1 inhibit differentiation of bi-potential tumor-initiating cells in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Strietz, Juliane; Stepputtis, Stella S.; Vannier, Corinne; Kim, Mihee M.; Castro, David J.; Au, Qingyan; Boerries, Melanie; Busch, Hauke; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Heynen-Genel, Susanne; Bronsert, Peter; Kuster, Bernhard; Stickeler, Elmar; Brabletz, Thomas; Oshima, Robert G.; Maurer, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Cancers are heterogeneous by nature. While traditional oncology screens commonly use a single endpoint of cell viability, altering the phenotype of tumor-initiating cells may reveal alternative targets that regulate cellular growth by processes other than apoptosis or cell division. We evaluated the impact of knocking down expression of 420 kinases in bi-lineage triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells that express characteristics of both myoepithelial and luminal cells. Knockdown of ERN1 or ALPK1 induces bi-lineage MDA-MB-468 cells to lose the myoepithelial marker keratin 5 but not the luminal markers keratin 8 and GATA3. In addition, these cells exhibit increased β-casein production. These changes are associated with decreased proliferation and clonogenicity in spheroid cultures and anchorage-independent growth assays. Confirmation of these assays was completed in vivo, where ERN1- or ALPK1-deficient TNBC cells are less tumorigenic. Finally, treatment with K252a, a kinase inhibitor active on ERN1, similarly impairs anchorage-independent growth of multiple breast cancer cell lines. This study supports the strategy to identify new molecular targets for types of cancer driven by cells that retain some capacity for normal differentiation to a non-tumorigenic phenotype. ERN1 and ALPK1 are potential targets for therapeutic development. PMID:27829216

  4. Towards a Mathematical Formalism for Semi-stochastic Cell-Level Computational Modeling of Tumor Initiation.

    PubMed

    Vermolen, F J; Meijden, R P van der; Es, M van; Gefen, A; Weihs, D

    2015-07-01

    A phenomenological model is formulated to model the early stages of tumor formation. The model is based on a cell-based formalism, where each cell is represented as a circle or sphere in two-and three dimensional simulations, respectively. The model takes into account constituent cells, such as epithelial cells, tumor cells, and T-cells that chase the tumor cells and engulf them. Fundamental biological processes such as random walk, haptotaxis/chemotaxis, contact mechanics, cell proliferation and death, as well as secretion of chemokines are taken into account. The developed formalism is based on the representation of partial differential equations in terms of fundamental solutions, as well as on stochastic processes and stochastic differential equations. We also take into account the likelihood of seeding of tumors. The model shows the initiation of tumors and allows to study a quantification of the impact of various subprocesses and possibly even of various treatments.

  5. Dietary Regulation of PTEN Signaling and Mammary Tumor Initiating Cells: Implications for Breast Cancer Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    results in decreased latency of tumor formation in MMTV-Wnt1 transgenic mice (Wnt1-Tg) (7). Stem cell renewal is a tightly regulated process ...luminal epithelial (ductal and alveolar ) and myoepithelial cells (6). Self-renewal is an intrinsic property of stem cells that allow their m plate...are in the process of collecti aintenance and propagation. A mammosphere assay has been developed based on the ability of a small population of

  6. STAT3 signaling is activated preferentially in tumor-initiating cells in claudin-low models of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Tweardy, David J; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Landua, John; Petrovic, Ivana; Bu, Wen; Roarty, Kevin; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Lewis, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    In breast cancer, a subset of tumor-initiating cells (TIC) or "cancer stem cells" are thought to be responsible for tumor maintenance, treatment resistance, and disease recurrence. While current breast cancer stem cell markers (e.g., CD44(high) /CD24(low/neg) , ALDH positive) have allowed enrichment for such cells, they are not universally expressed and may actually identify distinct TIC subpopulations in the same tumor. Thus, additional markers of functional stem cells are needed. The STAT3 pathway is a critical regulator of the function of normal stem cells, and evidence is accumulating for its important role in breast cancer stem cells. However, due to the lack of a method for separating live cells based on their level of STAT3 activity, it remains unknown whether STAT3 functions in the cancer stem cells themselves, or in surrounding niche cells, or in both. To approach this question, we constructed a series of lentiviral fluorescent (enhanced green fluorescent protein, EGFP) reporters that enabled flow cytometric enrichment of cells differing in STAT3-mediated transcriptional activity, as well as in vivo/in situ localization of STAT3 responsive cells. Using in vivo claudin-low cell line xenograft models of human breast cancer, we found that STAT3 signaling reporter activity (EGFP(+) ) is associated with a subpopulation of cancer cells enriched for mammosphere-forming efficiency, as well as TIC function in limiting dilution transplantation assays compared to negative or unsorted populations. Our results support STAT3 signaling activity as another functional marker for human breast cancer stem cells thus making it an attractive therapeutic target for stem-cell-directed therapy in some breast cancer subtypes. © AlphaMed Press.

  7. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α promotes primary tumor growth and tumor-initiating cell activity in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Luciana P; Peacock, Danielle L; Majumdar, Debeshi; Ingels, Jesse F; Jensen, Laura C; Smith, Keisha D; Cushing, Richard C; Seagroves, Tiffany N

    2012-01-07

    Overexpression of the oxygen-responsive transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) correlates with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. The mouse mammary tumor virus polyoma virus middle T (MMTV-PyMT) mouse is a widely utilized preclinical mouse model that resembles human luminal breast cancer and is highly metastatic. Prior studies in which the PyMT model was used demonstrated that HIF-1α is essential to promoting carcinoma onset and lung metastasis, although no differences in primary tumor end point size were observed. Using a refined model system, we investigated whether HIF-1α is directly implicated in the regulation of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in breast cancer. Mammary tumor epithelial cells were created from MMTV-PyMT mice harboring conditional alleles of Hif1a, followed by transduction ex vivo with either adenovirus β-galactosidase or adenovirus Cre to generate wild-type (WT) and HIF-1α-null (KO) cells, respectively. The impact of HIF-1α deletion on tumor-initiating potential was investigated using tumorsphere assays, limiting dilution transplantation and gene expression analysis. Efficient deletion of HIF-1α reduced primary tumor growth and suppressed lung metastases, prolonging survival. Loss of HIF-1α led to reduced expression of markers of the basal lineage (K5/K14) in cells and tumors and of multiple genes involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. HIF-1α also enhanced tumorsphere formation at normoxia and hypoxia. Decreased expression of several genes in the Notch pathway as well as Vegf and Prominin-1 (CD133)was observed in response to Hif1a deletion. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that CD133 expression was reduced in KO cells and in tumorspheres. Tumorsphere formation was enhanced in CD133hi versus CD133neg cells sorted from PyMT tumors. Limiting dilution transplantation of WT and KO tumor cells into immunocompetent recipients revealed > 30-fold enrichment of TICs in WT cells. These results demonstrate

  8. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α promotes primary tumor growth and tumor-initiating cell activity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Overexpression of the oxygen-responsive transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) correlates with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. The mouse mammary tumor virus polyoma virus middle T (MMTV-PyMT) mouse is a widely utilized preclinical mouse model that resembles human luminal breast cancer and is highly metastatic. Prior studies in which the PyMT model was used demonstrated that HIF-1α is essential to promoting carcinoma onset and lung metastasis, although no differences in primary tumor end point size were observed. Using a refined model system, we investigated whether HIF-1α is directly implicated in the regulation of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in breast cancer. Methods Mammary tumor epithelial cells were created from MMTV-PyMT mice harboring conditional alleles of Hif1a, followed by transduction ex vivo with either adenovirus β-galactosidase or adenovirus Cre to generate wild-type (WT) and HIF-1α-null (KO) cells, respectively. The impact of HIF-1α deletion on tumor-initiating potential was investigated using tumorsphere assays, limiting dilution transplantation and gene expression analysis. Results Efficient deletion of HIF-1α reduced primary tumor growth and suppressed lung metastases, prolonging survival. Loss of HIF-1α led to reduced expression of markers of the basal lineage (K5/K14) in cells and tumors and of multiple genes involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. HIF-1α also enhanced tumorsphere formation at normoxia and hypoxia. Decreased expression of several genes in the Notch pathway as well as Vegf and Prominin-1 (CD133)was observed in response to Hif1a deletion. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that CD133 expression was reduced in KO cells and in tumorspheres. Tumorsphere formation was enhanced in CD133hi versus CD133neg cells sorted from PyMT tumors. Limiting dilution transplantation of WT and KO tumor cells into immunocompetent recipients revealed > 30-fold enrichment of TICs in WT cells

  9. Interplay between ROS and autophagy in cancer cells, from tumor initiation to cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Poillet-Perez, Laura; Despouy, Gilles; Delage-Mourroux, Régis; Boyer-Guittaut, Michaël

    2014-01-01

    Cancer formation is a complex and highly regulated multi-step process which is highly dependent of its environment, from the tissue to the patient. This complexity implies the development of specific treatments adapted to each type of tumor. The initial step of cancer formation requires the transformation of a healthy cell to a cancer cell, a process regulated by multiple intracellular and extracellular stimuli. The further steps, from the anarchic proliferation of cancer cells to form a primary tumor to the migration of cancer cells to distant organs to form metastasis, are also highly dependent of the tumor environment but of intracellular molecules and pathways as well. In this review, we will focus on the regulatory role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and autophagy levels during the course of cancer development, from cellular transformation to the formation of metastasis. These data will allow us to discuss the potential of this molecule or pathway as putative future therapeutic targets. PMID:25590798

  10. Promotion of Tumor-Initiating Cells in Primary and Recurrent Breast Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    elucidating alternative therapeutic targets in this disease. Her2- overexpression was first shown to activate NF-kB over a decade ago ( Galang et al...leads to activation of NF-kB family members involved in the canonical pathway, specifically the p65/p50 heterodimeric complex ( Galang et al., 1996; Biswas...normal luminal mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer cells from primary and metastatic sites using selective media. Cancer Res 53: 627–635. Galang

  11. The impact of age on oncogenic potential: tumor-initiating cells and the brain microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Elizabeth A; Horner, Philip J; Rostomily, Robert C

    2013-10-01

    Paradoxically, aging leads to both decreased regenerative capacity in the brain and an increased risk of tumorigenesis, particularly the most common adult-onset brain tumor, glioma. A shared factor contributing to both phenomena is thought to be age-related alterations in neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which function normally to produce new neurons and glia, but are also considered likely cells of origin for malignant glioma. Upon oncogenic transformation, cells acquire characteristics known as the hallmarks of cancer, including unlimited replication, altered responses to growth and anti-growth factors, increased capacity for angiogenesis, potential for invasion, genetic instability, apoptotic evasion, escape from immune surveillance, and an adaptive metabolic phenotype. The precise molecular pathogenesis and temporal acquisition of these malignant characteristics is largely a mystery. Recent studies characterizing NPCs during normal aging, however, have begun to elucidate mechanisms underlying the age-associated increase in their malignant potential. Aging cells are dependent upon multiple compensatory pathways to maintain cell cycle control, normal niche interactions, genetic stability, programmed cell death, and oxidative metabolism. A few multi-functional proteins act as 'critical nodes' in the coordination of these various cellular activities, although both intracellular signaling and elements within the brain environment are critical to maintaining a balance between senescence and tumorigenesis. Here, we provide an overview of recent progress in our understanding of how mechanisms underlying cellular aging inform on glioma pathogenesis and malignancy.

  12. Sulforaphane targets cancer stemness and tumor initiating properties in oral squamous cell carcinomas via miR-200c induction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Ming; Peng, Chih-Yu; Liao, Yi-Wen; Lu, Ming-Yi; Tsai, Meng-Lun; Yeh, Jung-Chun; Yu, Chuan-Hang; Yu, Cheng-Chia

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are deemed as the driving force of tumorigenesis in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). In this study, we investigated the chemotherapeutic effect of sulforaphane, a dietary component from broccoli sprouts, on targeting OSCC-CSCs. The effect of sulforaphane on normal oral epithelial cells (SG) and sphere-forming OSCC-CSCs isolated from SAS and GNM cells was examined. ALDH1 activity and CD44 positivity of OSCC-CSCs with sulforaphane treatment was assessed by flow cytometry analysis. In vitro and in vivo tumorigenicity assays of OSCC-CSCs with sulforaphane treatment were presented. We observed that the sulforaphane dose-dependently eliminated the proliferation rate of OSCC-CSCs, whereas the inhibition on SG cells proliferation was limited. Cancer stemness properties including self-renewal, CD44 positivity, and ALDH1 activity were also decreased in OSCC-CSCs with different doses of sulforaphane treatment. Moreover, sulforaphane treatment of OSCC-CSCs decreased the migration, invasion, clonogenicity, and in vivo tumorigenicity of xenograghts. Sulforaphane treatment resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the levels of tumor suppressive miR200c. These lines of evidence suggest that sulforaphane can suppress the cancer stemness and tumor-initiating properties in OSCC-CSCs both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. A mathematical model of cancer stem cell driven tumor initiation: implications of niche size and loss of homeostatic regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Sara N; Jackson, Trachette L

    2013-01-01

    Hierarchical organized tissue structures, with stem cell driven cell differentiation, are critical to the homeostatic maintenance of most tissues, and this underlying cellular architecture is potentially a critical player in the development of a many cancers. Here, we develop a mathematical model of mutation acquisition to investigate how deregulation of the mechanisms preserving stem cell homeostasis contributes to tumor initiation. A novel feature of the model is the inclusion of both extrinsic and intrinsic chemical signaling and interaction with the niche to control stem cell self-renewal. We use the model to simulate the effects of a variety of types and sequences of mutations and then compare and contrast all mutation pathways in order to determine which ones generate cancer cells fastest. The model predicts that the sequence in which mutations occur significantly affects the pace of tumorigenesis. In addition, tumor composition varies for different mutation pathways, so that some sequences generate tumors that are dominated by cancerous cells with all possible mutations, while others are primarily comprised of cells that more closely resemble normal cells with only one or two mutations. We are also able to show that, under certain circumstances, healthy stem cells diminish due to the displacement by mutated cells that have a competitive advantage in the niche. Finally, in the event that all homeostatic regulation is lost, exponential growth of the cancer population occurs in addition to the depletion of normal cells. This model helps to advance our understanding of how mutation acquisition affects mechanisms that influence cell-fate decisions and leads to the initiation of cancers.

  14. Neural tumor-initiating cells have distinct telomere maintenance and can be safely targeted for telomerase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Zhang, Cindy; Lipman, Tatiana; Fujitani, Mayumi; Hansford, Loen; Clarke, Ian; Harley, Calvin B; Tressler, Robert; Malkin, David; Walker, Erin; Kaplan, David R; Dirks, Peter; Tabori, Uri

    2011-01-01

    Cancer recurrence is one of the major setbacks in oncology. Maintaining telomeres is essential for sustaining the limitless replicative potential of such cancers. Because telomerase is thought to be active in all tumor cells and normal stem cells, telomerase inhibition may be nonspecific and have detrimental effects on tissue maintenance and development by affecting normal stem cell self-renewal. We examined telomerase activity, telomere maintenance, and stem cell maturation in tumor subpopulations from freshly resected gliomas, long-term, primary, neural tumor-initiating cells (TIC) and corresponding normal stem cell lines. We then tested the efficacy of the telomerase inhibitor Imetelstat on propagation and self-renewal capacity of TIC and normal stem cells in vitro and in vivo. Telomerase was undetectable in the majority of tumor cells and specific to the TIC subpopulation that possessed critically short telomeres. In contrast, normal tissue stem cells had longer telomeres and undetectable telomerase activity and were insensitive to telomerase inhibition, which results in proliferation arrest, cell maturation, and DNA damage in neural TIC. Significant survival benefit and late tumor growth arrest of neuroblastoma TIC were observed in a xenograft model (P = 0.02). Furthermore, neural TIC exhibited irreversible loss of self-renewal and stem cell capabilities even after cessation of treatment in vitro and in vivo. TIC exhaustion with telomerase inhibition and lack of telomerase dependency in normal stem cells add new dimensions to the telomere hypothesis and suggest that targeting TIC with telomerase inhibitors may represent a specific and safe therapeutic approach for tumors of neural origin. ©2011 AACR.

  15. Dietary Regulation of PTEN Signaling and Mammary Tumor Initiating Cells: Implications for Breast Cancer Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    predisposition to breast cancer and could help design better dietary guidelines early in life. Based on extensive evidence supporting a role for cancer...than their American counterparts (1). Our laboratory has shown that dietary exposure to soy protein isolate (SPI) protects against breast cancer in...Wnt-Tg mice were shown to originate from cancer stem cells (CD24+Thy1+) (9). Therefore, we hypothesize that dietary soy protein isolate protects

  16. CD117 and Stro-1 identify osteosarcoma tumor-initiating cells associated with metastasis and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Amit S.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Wood, Byron M.; Porretta, Constance; Ruiz, Bernardo; Pochampally, Radhika R.; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates the presence of tumor-initiating cells (TIC) or cancer stem cells (CSCs) in osteosarcoma. However, no study has demonstrated specific markers to identify osteosarcoma TICs with in vivo tumor formation ability. Additionally, there has been a lack of investigations gauging the contribution of osteosarcoma TICs to metastatic and drug-resistant properties. In this study, we have identified mouse and human osteosarcoma TICs using mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers CD117 and Stro-1. These markers were preferentially expressed in spheres and doxorubicin-resistant cells. Both mouse and human cells expressing these markers were sorted and analyzed for their abilities of tumor formation with as few as 200 cells, self-renewability, multipotency, drug resistance, metastatic potential, and enrichment of a metastasis-associated marker CXCR4 and a drug-resistance marker ABCG2. CD117+Stro-1+ cells efficiently formed serially transplantable tumors, whereas CD117−Stro-1− cells rarely initiated tumors. Upon orthotopic injections, CD117+Stro-1+ cell-derived tumors metastasized at a high frequency. Further, CD117+Stro-1+ cells showed high invasive and drug-resistant properties and were efficiently enriched for CXCR4 (20–90%) and ABCG2 (60–90%). These results suggest possible mechanisms for the high metastatic and drug-resistant properties of osteosarcoma TICs. In summary, CD117 and Stro-1 identify osteosarcoma TICs associated with the most lethal characteristics of the disease - metastasis and drug resistance - and these markers offer candidates for TIC-targeted drug delivery aimed at eradicating osteosarcoma. PMID:20460510

  17. Microenvironment mediated alterations to metabolic pathways confer increased chemo-resistance in CD133+ tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Alice; Dauer, Patricia; Gupta, Vineet; McGinn, Olivia; Arora, Nivedita; Majumdar, Kaustav; III, Charles Uhlrich; Dalluge, Joseph; Dudeja, Vikas; Saluja, Ashok; Banerjee, Sulagna

    2016-01-01

    Chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer has been attributed to tumor-initiating cells (TICs), a minor sub-population of tumor cells. However, the mechanism of chemo-resistance in these cells is still unclear. In the current study, immunohistochemical analysis of LSL-KrasG12D; LSL-Trp53R172H; PdxCre (KPC) murine tumors indicated that hypoxic regions developed through tumor progression. This hypoxic “niche” correlated with increased CD133+ population that had an increased HIF1A activity. Consistent with this observation, CD133+ cells had increased glucose uptake and activity of glycolytic pathway enzymes compared to CD133− cells. Mass spectrometric analysis (UPLC-TQD) following metabolic labeling of CD133+ cells with [13C]-U6 glucose confirmed this observation. Furthermore, although both populations had functionally active mitochondria, CD133+ cells had low mitochondrial complex I and complex IV activity and lesser accumulation of ROS in response to standard chemotherapeutic compounds like paclitaxel, 5FU and gemcitabine. CD133+ cells also showed increased resistance to all three chemotherapeutic compounds and treatment with Glut1 inhibitor (STF31) reversed this resistance, promoting apoptotic death in these cells similar to CD133− cells. Our study indicates that the altered metabolic profile of CD133+ pancreatic TIC protects them against apoptosis, by reducing accumulation of ROS induced by standard chemotherapeutic agents, thereby confering chemoresistance. Since resistance to existing chemotherapy contributes to the poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer, our study paves the way for identifying novel therapeutic targets for managing chemoresistance and tumor recurrence in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27472388

  18. Properties of internalization factors contributing to the uptake of extracellular DNA into tumor-initiating stem cells of mouse Krebs-2 cell line.

    PubMed

    Dolgova, Evgeniya V; Potter, Ekaterina A; Proskurina, Anastasiya S; Minkevich, Alexandra M; Chernych, Elena R; Ostanin, Alexandr A; Efremov, Yaroslav R; Bayborodin, Sergey I; Nikolin, Valeriy P; Popova, Nelly A; Kolchanov, Nikolay A; Bogachev, Sergey S

    2016-05-25

    Previously, we demonstrated that poorly differentiated cells of various origins, including tumor-initiating stem cells present in the ascites form of mouse cancer cell line Krebs-2, are capable of naturally internalizing both linear double-stranded DNA and circular plasmid DNA. The method of co-incubating Krebs-2 cells with extracellular plasmid DNA (pUC19) or TAMRA-5'-dUTP-labeled polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product was used. It was found that internalized plasmid DNA isolated from Krebs-2 can be transformed into competent Escherichia coli cells. Thus, the internalization processes taking place in the Krebs-2 cell subpopulation have been analyzed and compared, as assayed by E. coli colony formation assay (plasmid DNA) and cytofluorescence (TAMRA-DNA). We showed that extracellular DNA both in the form of plasmid DNA and a PCR product is internalized by the same subpopulation of Krebs-2 cells. We found that the saturation threshold for Krebs-2 ascites cells is 0.5 μg DNA/10(6) cells. Supercoiled plasmid DNA, human high-molecular weight DNA, and 500 bp PCR fragments are internalized into the Krebs-2 tumor-initiating stem cells via distinct, non-competing internalization pathways. Under our experimental conditions, each cell may harbor 340-2600 copies of intact plasmid material, or up to 3.097 ± 0.044×10(6) plasmid copies (intact or not), as detected by quantitative PCR. The internalization dynamics of extracellular DNA, copy number of the plasmids taken up by the cells, and competition between different types of double-stranded DNA upon internalization into tumor-initiating stem cells of mouse ascites Krebs-2 have been comprehensively analyzed. Investigation of the extracellular DNA internalization into tumor-initiating stem cells is an important part of understanding their properties and possible destruction mechanisms. For example, a TAMRA-labeled DNA probe may serve as an instrument to develop a target for the therapy of cancer, aiming at elimination of

  19. Casein kinase 2α regulates glioblastoma brain tumor-initiating cell growth through the β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Nitta, R T; Gholamin, S; Feroze, A H; Agarwal, M; Cheshier, S H; Mitra, S S; Li, G

    2015-07-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and fatal primary brain tumor in humans, and it is essential that new and better therapies are developed to treat this disease. Previous research suggests that casein kinase 2 (CK2) may be a promising therapeutic target for GBMs. CK2 has enhanced expression or activity in numerous cancers, including GBM, and it has been demonstrated that inhibitors of CK2 regressed tumor growth in GBM xenograft mouse models. Our studies demonstrate that the CK2 subunit, CK2α, is overexpressed in and has an important role in regulating brain tumor-initiating cells (BTIC) in GBM. Initial studies showed that two GBM cell lines (U87-MG and U138) transduced with CK2α had enhanced proliferation and anchorage-independent growth. Inhibition of CKα using siRNA or small-molecule inhibitors (TBBz, CX-4945) reduced cell growth, decreased tumor size, and increased survival rates in GBM xenograft mouse models. We also verified that inhibition of CK2α decreased the activity of a well-known GBM-initiating cell regulator, β-catenin. Loss of CK2α decreased two β-catenin-regulated genes that are involved in GBM-initiating cell growth, OCT4 and NANOG. To determine the importance of CK2α in GBM stem cell maintenance, we reduced CK2α activity in primary GBM samples and tumor spheres derived from GBM patients. We discovered that loss of CK2α activity reduced the sphere-forming capacity of BTIC and decreased numerous GBM stem cell markers, including CD133, CD90, CD49f and A2B5. Our study suggests that CK2α is involved in GBM tumorigenesis by maintaining BTIC through the regulation of β-catenin.

  20. Lung cancer tumorigenicity and drug resistance are maintained through ALDH(hi)CD44(hi) tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Xiao, Zhijie; Wong, Sunny Kit-Man; Tin, Vicky Pui-Chi; Ho, Ka-Yan; Wang, Junwen; Sham, Mai-Har; Wong, Maria Pik

    2013-10-01

    Limited improvement in long term survival of lung cancer patients has been achieved by conventional chemotherapy or targeted therapy. To explore the potentials of tumor initiating cells (TIC)-directed therapy, it is essential to identify the cell targets and understand their maintenance mechanisms. We have analyzed the performance of ALDH/CD44 co-expression as TIC markers and treatment targets of lung cancer using well-validated in vitro and in vivo analyses in multiple established and patient-derived lung cancer cells. The ALDH(hi)CD44(hi) subset showed the highest enhancement of stem cell phenotypic properties compared to ALDH(hi)CD44(lo), ALDH(lo)CD44(hi), ALDH(lo)CD44(lo) cells and unsorted controls. They showed higher invasion capacities, pluripotency genes and epithelial-mesenchymal transition transcription factors expression, lower intercellular adhesion protein expression and higher G2/M phase cell cycle fraction. In immunosuppressed mice, the ALDH(hi)CD44(hi)xenografts showed the highest tumor induction frequency, serial transplantability, shortest latency, largest volume and highest growth rates. Inhibition of sonic Hedgehog and Notch developmental pathways reduced ALDH+CD44+ compartment. Chemotherapy and targeted therapy resulted in higher AALDH(hi)CD44(hi) subset viability and ALDH(lo)CD44(lo) subset apoptosis fraction. ALDH inhibition and CD44 knockdown led to reduced stemness gene expression and sensitization to drug treatment. In accordance, clinical lung cancers containing a higher abundance of ALDH and CD44-coexpressing cells was associated with lower recurrence-free survival. Together, results suggested theALDH(hi)CD44(hi)compartment was the cellular mediator of tumorigenicity and drug resistance. Further investigation of the regulatory mechanisms underlying ALDH(hi)CD44(hi)TIC maintenance would be beneficial for the development of long term lung cancer control.

  1. Mel-18 controls the enrichment of tumor-initiating cells in SP fraction in mouse breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Janakiraman, Harinarayanan; Nobukiyo, Asako; Inoue, Hiroko; Kanno, Masamoto

    2011-06-01

    Side population (SP) cell analysis has been used to identify and isolate a minor population of cells with stem cell properties in normal tissues and in many cancers including breast cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that operate in tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in SP fraction remain unclear. The Polycomb group genes, including Bmi1 and Mel-18, have been implicated in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and suggested to be oncogenic and tumor suppressive, respectively, in breast cancer. In this study, we determined the critical role of Mel-18 in the enrichment mechanisms of TICs with the SP phenotype in a mouse breast cancer cell line, MMK3, that was established from a breast cancer developed spontaneously in Mel-18+/- mice. The Mel-18 protein expression level significantly correlates to the percentage of SP fraction in the mouse breast cancer cell line MMK3 series. The comparison between MMK3V3 (V3) cells containing one copy of the Mel-18 gene and MMK3S2 (S2) cells having twice the amount of Mel-18 expression clearly demonstrates the above relationship. Similar results obtained with the percentage of ALDH+ cells in V3 and S2 further confirmed the correlation between protein expression level of Mel-18 and the TICs. More importantly, transplantation of SP and non-SP cells of V3 and S2 cells into the NOD/SCID mice clearly showed that the heterozygous level of Mel-18 leads to the disappearance of enrichment of TICs into SP fraction in vivo. Stem cell pathway focused gene expression profiling of V3 and S2 cells revealed that the genes Abcg2, Aldh1a1 and Dhh were highly down-regulated in V3 compared to S2. These results indicate that the precise Mel-18 expression level controls TIC enrichment mechanisms through the regulation of channel molecule of Abcg2 and functional TIC marker of Aldhlal. In conclusion, our findings revealed the significance of fine-tuning mechanisms for Mel-18 protein expression level in the maintenance of TIC into SP

  2. A DLL3-targeted antibody-drug conjugate eradicates high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumor-initiating cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Laura R.; Bankovich, Alexander J.; Anderson, Wade C.; Aujay, Monette A.; Bheddah, Sheila; Black, KristenAnn; Desai, Radhika; Escarpe, Paul A.; Hampl, Johannes; Laysang, Amy; Liu, David; Lopez-Molina, Javier; Milton, Milly; Park, Albert; Pysz, Marybeth A.; Shao, Hui; Slingerland, Brian; Torgov, Michael; Williams, Samuel A.; Foord, Orit; Howard, Philip; Jassem, Jacek; Badzio, Andrzej; Czapiewski, Piotr; Harpole, David H.; Dowlati, Afshin; Massion, Pierre P.; Travis, William D.; Pietanza, M. Catherine; Poirier, J. T.; Rudin, Charles M.; Stull, Robert A.; Dylla, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    The high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors, small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC), remain among the most deadly malignancies. Therapies that effectively target and kill tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in these cancers should translate to improved patient survival. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumors serve as excellent models to study tumor biology and characterize TICs. Increased expression of delta-like 3 (DLL3) was discovered in SCLC and LCNEC PDX tumors and confirmed in primary SCLC and LCNEC tumors. DLL3 protein is expressed on the surface of tumor cells but not in normal adult tissues. A DLL3-targeted antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), SC16LD6.5, comprised of a humanized anti-DLL3 monoclonal antibody conjugated to a DNA-damaging pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) dimer toxin, induced durable tumor regression in vivo across multiple PDX models. Serial transplantation experiments executed with limiting dilutions of cells provided functional evidence confirming that the lack of tumor recurrence after SC16LD6.5 exposure resulted from effective targeting of DLL3-expressing TICs. In vivo efficacy correlated with DLL3 expression, and responses were observed in PDX models initiated from patients with both limited and extensive-stage disease and were independent of their sensitivity to standard-of-care chemotherapy regimens. SC16LD6.5 effectively targets and eradicates DLL3-expressing TICs in SCLC and LCNEC PDX tumors and is a promising first-in-class ADC for the treatment of high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:26311731

  3. A DLL3-targeted antibody-drug conjugate eradicates high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumor-initiating cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Laura R; Bankovich, Alexander J; Anderson, Wade C; Aujay, Monette A; Bheddah, Sheila; Black, KristenAnn; Desai, Radhika; Escarpe, Paul A; Hampl, Johannes; Laysang, Amy; Liu, David; Lopez-Molina, Javier; Milton, Milly; Park, Albert; Pysz, Marybeth A; Shao, Hui; Slingerland, Brian; Torgov, Michael; Williams, Samuel A; Foord, Orit; Howard, Philip; Jassem, Jacek; Badzio, Andrzej; Czapiewski, Piotr; Harpole, David H; Dowlati, Afshin; Massion, Pierre P; Travis, William D; Pietanza, M Catherine; Poirier, J T; Rudin, Charles M; Stull, Robert A; Dylla, Scott J

    2015-08-26

    The high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors, small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC), remain among the most deadly malignancies. Therapies that effectively target and kill tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in these cancers should translate to improved patient survival. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumors serve as excellent models to study tumor biology and characterize TICs. Increased expression of delta-like 3 (DLL3) was discovered in SCLC and LCNEC PDX tumors and confirmed in primary SCLC and LCNEC tumors. DLL3 protein is expressed on the surface of tumor cells but not in normal adult tissues. A DLL3-targeted antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), SC16LD6.5, comprised of a humanized anti-DLL3 monoclonal antibody conjugated to a DNA-damaging pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) dimer toxin, induced durable tumor regression in vivo across multiple PDX models. Serial transplantation experiments executed with limiting dilutions of cells provided functional evidence confirming that the lack of tumor recurrence after SC16LD6.5 exposure resulted from effective targeting of DLL3-expressing TICs. In vivo efficacy correlated with DLL3 expression, and responses were observed in PDX models initiated from patients with both limited and extensive-stage disease and were independent of their sensitivity to standard-of-care chemotherapy regimens. SC16LD6.5 effectively targets and eradicates DLL3-expressing TICs in SCLC and LCNEC PDX tumors and is a promising first-in-class ADC for the treatment of high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors.

  4. Activation of NOTCH Signaling by Tenascin-C Promotes Growth of Human Brain Tumor-Initiating Cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Susobhan; Mirzaei, Reza; Zemp, Franz J; Wei, Wu; Senger, Donna L; Robbins, Stephen M; Yong, V Wee

    2017-06-15

    Oncogenic signaling by NOTCH is elevated in brain tumor-initiating cells (BTIC) in malignant glioma, but the mechanism of its activation is unknown. Here we provide evidence that tenascin-C (TNC), an extracellular matrix protein prominent in malignant glioma, increases NOTCH activity in BTIC to promote their growth. We demonstrate the proximal localization of TNC and BTIC in human glioblastoma specimens and in orthotopic murine xenografts of human BTIC implanted intracranially. In tissue culture, TNC was superior amongst several extracellular matrix proteins in enhancing the sphere-forming capacity of glioma patient-derived BTIC. Exogenously applied or autocrine TNC increased BTIC growth through an α2β1 integrin-mediated mechanism that elevated NOTCH ligand Jagged1 (JAG1). Microarray analyses and confirmatory PCR and Western analyses in BTIC determined that NOTCH signaling components including JAG1, ADAMTS15, and NICD1/2 were elevated in BITC after TNC exposure. Inhibition of γ-secretase and metalloproteinase proteolysis in the NOTCH pathway, or silencing of α2β1 integrin or JAG1, reduced the proliferative effect of TNC on BTIC. Collectively, our findings identified TNC as a pivotal initiator of elevated NOTCH signaling in BTIC and define the establishment of a TN-α2β1-JAG1-NOTCH signaling axis as a candidate therapeutic target in glioma patients. Cancer Res; 77(12); 3231-43. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Small molecule epigenetic screen identifies novel EZH2 and HDAC inhibitors that target glioblastoma brain tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Grinshtein, Natalie; Rioseco, Constanza C.; Marcellus, Richard; Uehling, David; Aman, Ahmed; Lun, Xueqing; Muto, Osamu; Podmore, Lauren; Lever, Jake; Shen, Yaoqing; Blough, Michael D.; Cairncross, Greg J.; Robbins, Stephen M.; Jones, Steven J.; Marra, Marco A.; Al-Awar, Rima; Senger, Donna L.; Kaplan, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive adult brain tumor, requiring the development of efficacious therapeutics. Towards this goal, we screened five genetically distinct patient-derived brain-tumor initiating cell lines (BTIC) with a unique collection of small molecule epigenetic modulators from the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC). We identified multiple hits that inhibited the growth of BTICs in vitro, and further evaluated the therapeutic potential of EZH2 and HDAC inhibitors due to the high relevance of these targets for GBM. We found that the novel SAM-competitive EZH2 inhibitor UNC1999 exhibited low micromolar cytotoxicity in vitro on a diverse collection of BTIC lines, synergized with dexamethasone (DEX) and suppressed tumor growth in vivo in combination with DEX. In addition, a unique brain-penetrant class I HDAC inhibitor exhibited cytotoxicity in vitro on a panel of BTIC lines and extended survival in combination with TMZ in an orthotopic BTIC model in vivo. Finally, a combination of EZH2 and HDAC inhibitors demonstrated synergy in vitro by augmenting apoptosis and increasing DNA damage. Our findings identify key epigenetic modulators in GBM that regulate BTIC growth and survival and highlight promising combination therapies. PMID:27449082

  6. Comparative genomic and genetic analysis of glioblastoma-derived brain tumor-initiating cells and their parent tumors.

    PubMed

    Davis, Brad; Shen, Yaoqing; Poon, Candice C; Luchman, H Artee; Stechishin, Owen D; Pontifex, Carly S; Wu, Wei; Kelly, John J; Blough, Michael D

    2016-03-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a fatal cancer that has eluded major therapeutic advances. Failure to make progress may reflect the absence of a human GBM model that could be used to test compounds for anti-GBM activity. In this respect, the development of brain tumor-initiating cell (BTIC) cultures is a step forward because BTICs appear to capture the molecular diversity of GBM better than traditional glioma cell lines. Here, we perform a comparative genomic and genetic analysis of BTICs and their parent tumors as preliminary evaluation of the BTIC model. We assessed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genome-wide copy number variations (CNVs), gene expression patterns, and molecular subtypes of 11 established BTIC lines and matched parent tumors. Although CNV differences were noted, BTICs retained the major genomic alterations characteristic of GBM. SNP patterns were similar between BTICs and tumors. Importantly, recurring SNP or CNV alterations specific to BTICs were not seen. Comparative gene expression analysis and molecular subtyping revealed differences between BTICs and GBMs. These differences formed the basis of a 63-gene expression signature that distinguished cells from tumors; differentially expressed genes primarily involved metabolic processes. We also derived a set of 73 similarly expressed genes; these genes were not associated with specific biological functions. Although not identical, established BTIC lines preserve the core molecular alterations seen in their parent tumors, as well as the genomic hallmarks of GBM, without acquiring recurring BTIC-specific changes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Prostate cancer stem cells: from theory to practice.

    PubMed

    Adamowicz, Jan; Pakravan, Katayoon; Bakhshinejad, Babak; Drewa, Tomasz; Babashah, Sadegh

    2017-04-01

    None of the generally accepted theories on prostate cancer development can fully explain many distinguishing features of the disease, such as intratumoral heterogeneity, metastatic growth, drug resistance and tumor relapse. Prostate stem cells are a heterogeneous and small subpopulation of self-renewing cells which can actively proliferate in response to changes in the androgen level and give rise to all the cell lineages that build the prostate epithelium. According to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, prostate cancer could be a stem cell disease. Prostate cancer stem cells, which represent only a minimal percentage of the tumor mass, are characterized by a markedly increased clonogenicity and therapeutic resistance. These tumor-initiating cells reside in dynamic niches distributed within the prostate but at a higher concentration in proximal regions of the prostatic ducts. Several markers have been used to identify prostate cancer stem cells. Nevertheless, a definitive profile has not yet been established owing to specificity issues. As cancer stem cells play determining roles in the birth and burst of prostate malignancy, strategies that selectively target them have gained huge clinical attention. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying the physiological functions of cancer stem cells and gaining fundamental insights into their putative involvement in the pathogenesis of prostate tumors provide novel opportunities for the development of efficient and sophisticated therapeutic strategies in the future.

  8. Yap1 promotes the survival and self-renewal of breast tumor initiating cells via inhibiting Smad3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian-Guo; Chen, Xie-Wan; Zhang, Lu-Ping; Wang, Jiang; Diehn, Max

    2016-01-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) serve as the root of tumor growth. After identifying TICs in spontaneous breast tumors of the MMTV-Wnt1 mouse model, we confirmed the specific expression and activation of Yes-associated protein 1 (Yap1) within TICs. To investigate the role of Yap1 in the self-renewal of breast TICs and the underlying mechanism, we sorted CD49fhighEpCAMlow cells as breast TICs. Active Yap1 with ectopic expression in breast TICs promoted their colony formation in vitro (p< 0.01) and self-renewal in vivo (p< 0.01), and led to a 4-fold increase in TIC frequency (p< 0.05). A conditional knock-out mouse was reconstructed to generate Yap1 knock-out breast tumors. The loss of Yap1 led to a dramatic growth disadvantage of breast TICs in vitro (p< 0.01) and in vivo (p< 0.01), and it also led to an over 200-fold decrease in TIC frequency (p< 0.01). The expression of active Yap1 was negatively correlated with that of phosphorylated Smad3 (p-Smad3). Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) served as a strong enhancer of Smad3 and an inhibitor of clonogenesis of TICs. The presence of SIS3, a specific inhibitor of Smad3, could rescue the TGF-β -induced growth inhibition and reverse the Smad3 inhibition by Yap1. Analysis of a database containing 2,072 human breast cancer samples showed that higher expressions of Yap1 correlated with a poorer outcome of a 15-year survival rate and median overall survival (mOS)in patients, especially in those with basal breast tumors without estrogen receptor 1 (ER) expression. The findings indicate that active Yap1 promotes the self-renewal of breast TICs by inhibiting Smad3 signaling. PMID:26695440

  9. Transition from colitis to cancer: high Wnt activity sustains the tumor-initiating potential of colon cancer stem cell precursors.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Anitha K; Fisher, Robert C; Butterworth, Elizabeth A; Pi, Liya; Chang, Lung-Ji; Appelman, Henry D; Chang, Myron; Scott, Edward W; Huang, Emina H

    2012-10-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) increases the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the mechanisms involved in colitis-to-cancer transition (CCT) are not well understood. CCT may involve a inflammation-dysplasia-carcinoma progression sequence compared with the better characterized adenoma-carcinoma progression sequence associated with sporadic CRC. One common thread may be activating mutations in components of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which occur commonly as early events in sporadic CRC. To examine this hypothesis, we evaluated possible associations between Wnt/β-catenin signaling and CCT based on the cancer stem cell (CSC) model. Wnt/β-catenin immunostaining indicated that UC patients have a level of Wnt-pathway-active cells that is intermediate between normal colon and CRC. These UC cells exhibiting activation of the Wnt pathway constituted a major subpopulation (52% + 7.21) of the colonic epithelial cells positive for aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), a putative marker of precursor colon CSC (pCCSC). We further fractionated this subpopulation of pCCSC using a Wnt pathway reporter assay. Over successive passages, pCCSCs with the highest Wnt activity exhibited higher clonogenic and tumorigenic potential than pCCSCs with the lowest Wnt activity, thereby establishing the key role of Wnt activity in driving CSC-like properties in these cells. Notably, 5/20 single cell injections of high-Wnt pCCSC resulted in tumor formation, suggesting a correlation with CCT. Attenuation of Wnt/β-catenin in high-Wnt pCCSC by shRNA-mediated downregulation or pharmacological inhibition significantly reduced tumor growth rates. Overall, the results of our study indicates (i) that early activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is critical for CCT and (ii) that high levels of Wnt/β-catenin signaling can further demarcate high-ALDH tumor-initiating cells in the nondysplastic epithelium of UC patients. As such, our findings offer plausible diagnostic markers and therapeutic target in the

  10. Presence of a putative tumor-initiating progenitor cell population predicts poor prognosis in smokers with non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Aik T.; Mah, Vei; Nickerson, Derek W.; Gilbert, Jennifer L.; Ha, Vi Luan; Hegab, Ahmed E.; Horvath, Steve; Alavi, Mohammad; Maresh, Erin L.; Chia, David; Gower, Adam C.; Lenburg, Marc E.; Spira, Avrum; Solis, Luisa M.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Walser, Tonya C.; Wallace, William D.; Dubinett, Steven M.; Goodglick, Lee; Gomperts, Brigitte N.

    2010-01-01

    Smoking is the most important known risk factor for the development of lung cancer. Tobacco exposure results in chronic inflammation, tissue injury and repair. A recent hypothesis argues for a stem/progenitor cell involved in airway epithelial repair that may be a tumor-initiating cell in lung cancer, and which may be associated with recurrence and metastasis. We used immunostaining, quantitative real-time PCR, Western blots and lung cancer tissue microarrays to identify subpopulations of airway epithelial stem/progenitor cells under steady state conditions, normal repair, aberrant repair with premalignant lesions and lung cancer and their correlation with injury and prognosis. We identified a population of keratin 14 (K14)-expressing progenitor epithelial cells that was involved in repair after injury. Dysregulated repair resulted in persistence of K14+ cells in the airway epithelium in premalignant lesions. The presence of K14+ cells in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) samples predicted poorer outcomes. This was especially true in smokers where the presence of K14+ cells in NSCLC was predictive of metastasis. The presence of K14+ progenitor airway epithelial cells in NSCLC predicted a poor prognosis and this predictive value was strongest in smokers, where it also correlated with metastasis. This suggests that reparative K14+ progenitor cells may be tumor-initiating cells in this subgroup of smokers with NSCLC. PMID:20710044

  11. Live Imaging of Innate Immune Cell Sensing of Transformed Cells in Zebrafish Larvae: Parallels between Tumor Initiation and Wound Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yi; Santoriello, Cristina; Mione, Marina; Hurlstone, Adam; Martin, Paul

    2010-01-01

    It has not previously been possible to live image the earliest interactions between the host environment and oncogene-transformed cells as they initiate formation of cancers within an organism. Here we take advantage of the translucency of zebrafish larvae to observe the host innate immune cell response as oncogene-transformed melanoblasts and goblet cells multiply within the larval skin. Our studies indicate activation of leukocytes at very early stages in larvae carrying a transformed cell burden. Locally, we see recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages by 48 h post-fertilization, when transformed cells are still only singletons or doublets, and soon after this we see intimate associations between immune and transformed cells and frequent examples of cytoplasmic tethers linking the two cell types, as well as engulfment of transformed cells by both neutrophils and macrophages. We show that a major component of the signal drawing inflammatory cells to oncogenic HRASG12V-transformed cells is H2O2, which is also a key damage cue responsible for recruiting neutrophils to a wound. Our short-term blocking experiments show that preventing recruitment of immune cells at these early stages results in reduced growth of transformed cell clones and suggests that immune cells may provide a source of trophic support to the transformed cells just as they do at a site of tissue repair. These parallels between the inflammatory responses to transformed cells and to wounds reinforce the suggestion by others that cancers resemble non-healing wounds. PMID:21179501

  12. Surgery-induced wound response promotes stem-like and tumor-initiating features of breast cancer cells, via STAT3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Ilenia; Berton, Stefania; Sonego, Maura; Massarut, Samuele; Perin, Tiziana; Piccoli, Erica; Colombatti, Alfonso; Vecchione, Andrea; Baldassarre, Gustavo; Belletti, Barbara

    2014-08-15

    Inflammation is clinically linked to cancer but the mechanisms are not fully understood. Surgery itself elicits a range of inflammatory responses, suggesting that it could represent a perturbing factor in the process of local recurrence and/or metastasis. Post-surgery wound fluids (WF), drained from breast cancer patients, are rich in cytokines and growth factors, stimulate the in vitro growth of breast cancer cells and are potent activators of the STAT transcription factors. We wondered whether STAT signaling was functionally involved in the response of breast cancer cells to post-surgical inflammation. We discovered that WF induced the enrichment of breast cancer cells with stem-like phenotypes, via activation of STAT3. In vitro, WF highly stimulated mammosphere formation and self-renewal of breast cancer cells. In vivo, STAT3 signaling was critical for breast cancer cell tumorigenicity and for the formation of local relapse after surgery. Overall, we demonstrate here that surgery-induced inflammation promotes stem-like phenotypes and tumor-initiating abilities of breast cancer cells. Interfering with STAT3 signaling with a peri-surgical treatment was sufficient to strongly suppress this process. The understanding of the crosstalk between breast tumor-initiating cells and their microenvironment may open the way to successful targeting of these cells in their initial stages of growth and be eventually curative.

  13. Surgery-induced wound response promotes stem-like and tumor-initiating features of breast cancer cells, via STAT3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Segatto, Ilenia; Berton, Stefania; Sonego, Maura; Massarut, Samuele; Perin, Tiziana; Piccoli, Erica; Colombatti, Alfonso; Vecchione, Andrea; Baldassarre, Gustavo; Belletti, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is clinically linked to cancer but the mechanisms are not fully understood. Surgery itself elicits a range of inflammatory responses, suggesting that it could represent a perturbing factor in the process of local recurrence and/or metastasis formation. Post-surgery wound fluids (WF), drained from breast cancer patients, are rich in cytokines and growth factors, stimulate the in vitro growth of breast cancer cells and are potent activators of the STAT transcription factors. We wondered whether STAT signaling was functionally involved in the response of breast cancer cells to post-surgical inflammation. We discovered that WF induced the enrichment of breast cancer cells with stem-like phenotypes, via activation of STAT3. In vitro, WF highly stimulated mammosphere formation and self-renewal of breast cancer cells. In vivo, STAT3 signaling was critical for breast cancer cell tumorigenicity and for the formation of local relapse after surgery. Overall, we demonstrate here that surgery-induced inflammation promotes stem-like phenotypes and tumor-initiating abilities of breast cancer cells. Interfering with STAT3 signaling with a peri-surgical treatment is sufficient to strongly suppress this process. The understanding of the crosstalk between breast tumor-initiating cells and their microenvironment may open the way to successful targeting of these cells in their initial stages of growth and be eventually curative. PMID:25026286

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Bone Marrow Provide a Supportive Niche for Early Disseminated Breast Tumor-Initiating Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    ages of 40 -50, Nielsen et al. detected subclinical lesions in 39% of women who died of trauma [30,31]. Microscopic lesions can remain asymptomatic...9344.    6.   Dalerba  P , Cho RW, Clarke MF: Cancer stem cells: models and concepts. Annu Rev Med 2007, 58:  267‐284.    7.   Wicha MS: Cancer stem cells...Yu F, Yao H, Zhu  P , Zhang X, Pan Q, Gong C et al.: let‐7 regulates self renewal and tumorigenicity  of breast cancer cells. Cell 2007, 131: 1109‐1123

  15. Tumor cell-intrinsic PD-L1 promotes tumor-initiating cell generation and functions in melanoma and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Harshita B.; Clark, Curtis A.; Yuan, Bin; Sareddy, Gangadhara; Pandeswara, Srilakshmi; Padron, Alvaro S.; Hurez, Vincent; Conejo-Garcia, José; Vadlamudi, Ratna; Li, Rong; Curiel, Tyler J.

    2017-01-01

    As tumor PD-L1 provides signals to anti-tumor PD-1+ T cells that blunt their functions, αPD-1 and αPD-L1 antibodies have been developed as anti-cancer immunotherapies based on interrupting this signaling axis. However, tumor cell-intrinsic PD-L1 signals also regulate immune-independent tumor cell proliferation and mTOR signals, among other important effects. Tumor initiating cells (TIC) generate carcinomas, resist treatments and promote relapse. We show here that in murine B16 melanoma and ID8agg ovarian carcinoma cells, TIC express more PD-L1 versus non-TIC. Silencing PD-L1 in B16 and ID8agg cells by shRNA (“PD-L1lo”) reduced TIC numbers, the canonical TIC genes nanog and pou5f1 (oct4), and functions as assessed by tumorosphere development, immune-dependent and immune-independent tumorigenesis, and serial transplantability in vivo. Strikingly, tumor PD-L1 sensitized TIC to interferon-γ and rapamycin in vitro. Cell-intrinsic PD-L1 similarly drove functional TIC generation, canonical TIC gene expression, and sensitivity to interferon-γ and rapamycin in human ES2 ovarian cancer cells. Thus, tumor-intrinsic PD-L1 signals promote TIC generation and virulence, possibly by promoting canonical TIC gene expression, suggesting that PD-L1 has novel signaling effects on cancer pathogenesis and treatment responses. PMID:28798885

  16. Fractionation of a tumor-initiating UV dose introduces DNA damage-retaining cells in hairless mouse skin and renders subsequent TPA-promoted tumors non-regressing.

    PubMed

    van de Glind, Gerline; Rebel, Heggert; van Kempen, Marika; Tensen, Kees; de Gruijl, Frank

    2016-02-16

    Sunburns and especially sub-sunburn chronic UV exposure are associated with increased risk of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Here we focus on a possible difference in tumor initiation from a single severe-sunburn dose (on day 1, 21 hairless mice) and from an equal dose fractionated into very low sub-sunburn doses not causing any (growth-promoting) epidermal hyperplasia (40 days daily exposure, n=20). From day 47 all mice received 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) applications (2x/wk) for 20 weeks to promote tumor development within the lifetime of the animals. After the sub-sunburn regimen sparse DNA damage-retaining basal cells (quiescent stem cells, QSCs) remained in the non-hyperplastic epidermis. These cells were forced to divide by TPA. After discontinuation of TPA tumors regressed and disappeared in the 'sunburn group' but persisted and grew in the 'sub-sunburn group' (0.06 vs 2.50 SCCs and precursors ≥4 mm/mouse after 280 days, p=0.03). As the tumors carried no mutations in p53, H/K/N-Ras and Notch1/2, these 'usual suspects' were not involved in the UV-driven tumor initiation. Although we could not selectively eliminate QSCs (unknown phenotype) to establish causality, our data suggest that forcing specifically DNA damage-retaining QSCs to divide--with high mutagenic risk--gives rise to persisting (mainly 'in situ') skin carcinomas.

  17. Fractionation of a tumor-initiating UV dose introduces DNA damage-retaining cells in hairless mouse skin and renders subsequent TPA-promoted tumors non-regressing

    PubMed Central

    van de Glind, Gerline; Rebel, Heggert; van Kempen, Marika; Tensen, Kees; de Gruijl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Sunburns and especially sub-sunburn chronic UV exposure are associated with increased risk of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Here we focus on a possible difference in tumor initiation from a single severe-sunburn dose (on day 1, 21 hairless mice) and from an equal dose fractionated into very low sub-sunburn doses not causing any (growth-promoting) epidermal hyperplasia (40 days daily exposure, n=20). From day 47 all mice received 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) applications (2x/wk) for 20 weeks to promote tumor development within the lifetime of the animals. After the sub-sunburn regimen sparse DNA damage-retaining basal cells (quiescent stem cells, QSCs) remained in the non-hyperplastic epidermis. These cells were forced to divide by TPA. After discontinuation of TPA tumors regressed and disappeared in the ‘sunburn group’ but persisted and grew in the ‘sub-sunburn group’ (0.06 vs 2.50 SCCs and precursors ≥4mm/mouse after 280 days, p=0.03). As the tumors carried no mutations in p53, H/K/N-Ras and Notch1/2, these ‘usual suspects' were not involved in the UV-driven tumor initiation. Although we could not selectively eliminate QSCs (unknown phenotype) to establish causality, our data suggest that forcing specifically DNA damage-retaining QSCs to divide – with high mutagenic risk - gives rise to persisting (mainly ‘in situ’) skin carcinomas. PMID:26797757

  18. Tumor-initiating cells contribute to radiation resistance in primary human renal clear cell carcinomas by activating the DNA damage checkpoint response.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Gao, Yong-Ju; Wu, Xin-Yu; Cui, Jing; Long, Ye; Xu, Jun-Ling; Ding, De-Gang

    2017-09-01

    The use of radiotherapy in patients with clear cell renal carcinoma (ccRCC) is predominantly limited to palliation of metastases or control of local growth, because ccRCC cells readily develop radioresistance. The mechanisms underlying ccRCC resistance remain elusive. The present study demonstrated that ccRCC cells that survive fractionated radiation treatment display tumor-initiating cell (TIC) characteristics, such as high self-renewal and tumorigenic capacities, and overexpress stemness genes. ccRCC cells that survived fractionated radiation exhibited increased activation of the DNA damage checkpoint response and G2/M phase arrest compared with sham-irradiated cells. The results of the present study suggest that ionizing radiation destroys the bulk of tumor cells within ccRCC, but spares TICs; this subpopulation confers ccRCC radioresistance and may cause tumor recurrence or relapse following radiotherapy. Furthermore, these findings indicate that the DNA damage checkpoint response may serve as a potential therapeutic target for overcoming resistance of TICs in patients with ccRCC.

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Bone Marrow Provide a Supportive Niche for Early Disseminated Breast Tumor Initiating Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Polyak K, Weinberg RA: Transitions between epithelial and mesenchymal states: acquisition of malignant and stem cell traits. Nat Rev Cancer 2009, 9(4...distant metastases. Breast Cancer Res 5: R217– R222. 50. Polyak K, Weinberg RA (2009) Transitions between epithelial and mesenchymal states: acquisition

  20. CD8+ T-cell clones specific for the 5T4 antigen target renal cell carcinoma tumor-initiating cells in a murine xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Tykodi, Scott S; Satoh, Shoko; Deming, Janise D; Chou, Jeffrey; Harrop, Richard; Warren, Edus H

    2012-09-01

    The tumor antigen 5T4 is frequently expressed at high levels on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and other epithelial carcinomas. Surveys of normal tissues demonstrate abundant 5T4 expression on placental trophoblast cells with limited expression elsewhere. 5T4 is the target for a therapeutic cancer vaccine (MVA-5T4) that elicits 5T4-specific serological, proliferative, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. However, the antitumor activity of 5T4-specific CTL has not been extensively characterized. CD8 T cells from HLA-A2 healthy donors (n=4) or RCC patients (n=2) were stimulated in vitro with the HLA-A2-binding nonamer peptides 5T417-25 or 5T497-105 and screened by flow cytometry with specific tetramers (TET). CD8/TET T-cell clones specific for 5T417-25 or 5T497-105 peptide were isolated from 4/6 and 1/4 donors, respectively. A subset of clones specific for 5T417-25 was cytolytic for MVA-5T4-infected HLA-A2 EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line target cells and for constitutively HLA-A2-expressing and 5T4-expressing RCC tumor cell lines (including A498 RCC). In a xenoengraftment assay, the coinoculation of a representative 5T417-25-specific CTL clone with A498 RCC tumors cells into immune-deficient mice completely prevented growth of A498 tumors. Taken together, these data demonstrate high-avidity CD8 CTL able to recognize the naturally processed 5T417-25 epitope on RCC tumor cells including putative tumor-initiating cells are present in peripheral blood of both healthy donors and RCC patients. CD8T-cell immunity targeting 5T417-25 is therefore of substantial interest both as a potential target for further development of vaccination or adoptive cellular immunotherapy and for immune monitoring studies in association with nonspecific immunotherapies.

  1. Magnetic nanoparticles as a new approach to improve the efficacy of gene therapy against differentiated human uterine fibroid cells and tumor-initiating stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, Shahinaz Mahmood; Khater, Mostafa K; Perucho, Aymara Mas; Mohamed, Sara A; Helwa, Inas; Laknaur, Archana; Lebedyeva, Iryna; Liu, Yutao; Diamond, Michael P; Al-Hendy, Ayman A

    2016-06-01

    To study whether efficient transduction and subsequent elimination of fibroid tumor-initiating stem cells during debulking of tumor cells will aid in completely eradicating the tumor as well as decreasing the likelihood of recurrence. Case control study. Research laboratory. None. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) complexed to adenovirus (Ad-GFP) or (Ad-LacZ) used to transfect differentiated human fibroid cells in vitro. Rate of transduction and tumor growth inhibition. We have developed a localized nonsurgical adenovirus-based alternative for the treatment of uterine fibroids that combines viral-based gene delivery with nanotechnology for more efficient targeting. Magnetic nanoparticles complexed to adenovirus, in the presence of an external magnetic field, accelerate adenovirus transduction. We observed a statistically significant increase in transduction efficiency among differentiated human fibroid cells at two different multiplicities of infection (MOI), 1 and 10, respectively, with MNPs as compared with adenovirus alone. Human fibroid stem cells transfected with Ad-LacZ expressed β-galactosidaze at a MOI of 1, 10, and 50 at 19%, 62%, and 90%, respectively, which were statistically significantly enhanced with MNPs. When applied with adenovirus herpes simplex thymidine kinase, magnetofection statistically significantly suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in both cell types. Through the use of magnetofection, we will prove that a lower viral dose will effectively increase the overall safety profile of suicide gene therapy against fibroid tumors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Identification and gene expression profiling of tumor-initiating cells isolated from human osteosarcoma cell lines in an orthotopic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Rainusso, Nino; Man, Tsz-Kwong; Lau, Ching C; Hicks, John; Shen, Jianhe J; Yu, Alexander; Wang, Lisa L

    2011-01-01

    In the cancer stem cell model a cell hierarchy has been suggested as an explanation for intratumoral heterogeneity and tumor formation is thought to be driven by this tumor cell subpopulation. The identification of cancer stem cells in osteosarcoma (OS) and the biological processes dysregulated in this cell subpopulation, also known as tumor-initiating cells (TICs), may provide new therapeutic targets. The goal of this study, therefore, was to identify and characterize the gene expression profiles of TICs isolated from human OS cell lines. We analyzed the self-renewal capacity of OS cell lines and primary OS tumors based upon their ability to form sphere-like structures (sarcospheres) under serum-starving conditions. TICs were identify from OS cell lines using the long-term label retention dye PKH26. OS TICs and the bulk of tumor cells were isolated and used to assess their ability to initiate tumors in NOD/SCID mice. Gene expression profiles of OS TICs were obtained from fresh orthotopic tumor samples. We observed that increased sarcosphere efficiency correlated with an enhanced tumorigenic potential in OS. PKH26Hi cells were shown to constitute OS TICs based upon their capacity to form more sarcospheres, as well as to generate both primary bone tumors and lung metastases efficiently in NOD/SCID mice. Genomic profiling of OS TICs revealed that both bone development and cell migration processes were dysregulated in this tumor cell subpopulation. PKH26 labeling represents a valuable tool to identify OS TICs and gene expression analysis of this tumor cell compartment may identify potential therapeutic targets. PMID:21617384

  3. Laser Raman Tweezer Spectroscopy for the Molecular and Functional Characterization of Single Live Mouse Mammary Tumor-Initiating Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    signal was detected on a Peltier-cooled, back-illuminated, deep depletion CCD chip (Andor, Northern Ireland ) after passing a holographic transmissive...seen, indicated by the arrows, regions of heterogeneity in Raman shifts are observed a 1000, 1300, 1500 and 1700 cm-1 positions. Task 3. To...the tumor cells at 1000, 1300, 1500 and 1700 cm-1. Tumor Cell 1 Tumor Cell 2 Tumor Cell 3 Tumor Cell 4 Tumor Cell 5 7 Figure  4.    Plans  for

  4. Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase β2-subunit (AMOG) expression abrogates invasion of glioblastoma-derived brain tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Matthew Z; Kim, Joseph M; Oh, Michael C; Safaee, Michael; Kaur, Gurvinder; Clark, Aaron J; Bloch, Orin; Ivan, Michael E; Kaur, Rajwant; Oh, Taemin; Fouse, Shaun D; Phillips, Joanna J; Berger, Mitchel S; Parsa, Andrew T

    2013-11-01

    Mechanisms of glioma invasion remain to be fully elucidated. Glioma cells within glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) range from well-differentiated tumor cells to less-differentiated brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs). The β2-subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, called the adhesion molecule on glia (AMOG), is highly expressed in normal glia but is thought to be universally downregulated in GBM. To test our hypothesis that expression of AMOG is heterogeneous in GBM and confers a less invasive phenotype, we compared it between BTICs and differentiated cells from patient-matched GBM and then tested GBM invasion in vitro after AMOG overexpression. Immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and real-time PCR were used to characterize AMOG protein and mRNA expression in tumor samples, BTICs, and differentiated cells. Matrigel invasion assay, scratch assay, and direct cell counting were used for testing in vitro invasion, migration, and proliferation, respectively. While AMOG expression is heterogeneous in astrocytomas of grades II-IV, it is lost in most GBM. BTICs express higher levels of AMOG mRNA and protein compared with patient-matched differentiated tumor cells. Overexpression of AMOG decreased GBM cell and BTIC invasion without affecting migration or proliferation. Knockdown of AMOG expression in normal human astrocytes increased invasion. AMOG expression inhibits GBM invasion. Its downregulation increases invasion in glial cells and may also represent an important step in BTIC differentiation. These data provide compelling evidence implicating the role of AMOG in glioma invasion and provide impetus for further investigation.

  5. Evidence for self-renewing lung cancer stem cells and their implications in tumor initiation, progression, and targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, James P.; Minna, John D.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of rare tumor cells with stem cell features first in leukemia and later in solid tumors has emerged as an important area in cancer research. It has been determined that these stem-like tumor cells, termed cancer stem cells, are the primary cellular component within a tumor that drives disease progression and metastasis. In addition to their stem-like ability to self-renew and differentiate, cancer stem cells are also enriched in cells resistant to conventional radiation therapy and to chemotherapy. The immediate implications of this new tumor growth paradigm not only require a re-evaluation of how tumors are initiated, but also on how tumors should be monitored and treated. However, despite the relatively rapid pace of cancer stem cell research in solid tumors such as breast, brain, and colon cancers, similar progress in lung cancer remains hampered in part due to an incomplete understanding of lung epithelial stem cell hierarchy and the complex heterogeneity of the disease. In this review, we provide a critical summary of what is known about the role of normal and malignant lung stem cells in tumor development, the progress in characterizing lung cancer stem cells and the potential for therapeutically targeting pathways of lung cancer stem cell self-renewal. PMID:20094757

  6. Aberrant high expression of immunoglobulin G in epithelial stem/progenitor-like cells contributes to tumor initiation and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Qinyuan; Liu, Wei; Liu, Yang; Wang, Fulin; Wang, Chong; Zhang, Jingxuan; Chu, Ming; Jiang, Dongyang; Xiao, Lin; Shao, Wenwei; Sheng, Zhengzuo; Tao, Xia; Huo, Lei; Yin, C Cameron; Zhang, Youhui; Lee, Gregory; Huang, Jing; Li, Zihai; Qiu, Xiaoyan

    2015-11-24

    High expression of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in many non-B cell malignancies and its non-conventional roles in promoting proliferation and survival of cancer cells have been demonstrated. However, the precise function of non-B IgG remains incompletely understood. Here we define the antigen specificity of RP215, a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes the IgG in cancer cells. Using RP215, our study shows that IgG is overexpressed in cancer cells of epithelial lineage, especially cells with cancer stem/progenitor cell-like features. The RP215-recognized IgG is primarily localized on the cell surface, particularly lamellipodia-like structures. Cells with high IgG display higher migration, increased invasiveness and metastasis, and enhanced self-renewal and tumorgenecity ability in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, depletion of IgG in breast cancer leads to reduced adhesion, invasion and self-renewal and increased apoptosis of cancer cells. We conclude that high expression of IgG is a novel biomarker of tumor progression, metastasis and cancer stem cell maintenance and demonstrate the potential therapeutic benefits of RP215-recognized IgG targeted strategy.

  7. Analysis of the tumor-initiating and metastatic capacity of PDX1-positive cells from the adult pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Ischenko, Irene; Petrenko, Oleksi; Hayman, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest human malignancies. A striking feature of pancreatic cancer is that activating Kras mutations are found in ∼90% of cases. However, apart from a restricted population of cells expressing pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1), most pancreatic cells are refractory to Kras-driven transformation. In the present study, we sought to determine which subsets of PDX1+ cells may be responsible for tumor growth. Using the Lox-Stop-Lox–KrasG12D genetic mouse model of pancreatic carcinogenesis, we isolated a population of KrasG12D-expressing PDX1+ cells with an inherent capacity to metastasize. This population of cells bears the surface phenotype of EpCAM+CD24+CD44+CD133–SCA1− and is closer in its properties to stem-like cells than to more mature cell types. We further demonstrate that the tumorigenic capacity of PDX1+ cells is limited, becoming progressively lost as the cells acquire a mature phenotype. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the adult pancreas harbors a dormant progenitor cell population that is capable of initiating tumor growth under conditions of oncogenic stimulation. We present evidence that constitutive activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling and stabilization of the MYC protein are the two main driving forces behind the development of pancreatic cancer cells with stem-cell–like properties and high metastatic potential. Our results suggest that pancreatic cells bearing Kras mutation can be induced to differentiate into quasi-normal cells with suppressed tumorigenicity by selective inhibition of the MAPK/ERK/MYC signaling cascade. PMID:24550494

  8. Acetate Supplementation Induces Growth Arrest of NG2/PDGFRα-Positive Oligodendroglioma-Derived Tumor-Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Long, Patrick M.; Tighe, Scott W.; Driscoll, Heather E.; Moffett, John R.; Namboodiri, Aryan M. A.; Viapiano, Mariano S.; Lawler, Sean E.; Jaworski, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is associated with globally hypoacetylated chromatin and considerable attention has recently been focused on epigenetic therapies. N-acetyl-L-aspartate (NAA), the primary storage form of acetate in the brain, and aspartoacylase (ASPA), the enzyme responsible for NAA catalysis to generate acetate and ultimately acetyl-Coenzyme A for histone acetylation, are reduced in oligodendroglioma. The short chain triglyceride glyceryl triacetate (GTA), which increases histone acetylation and inhibits histone deacetylase expression, has been safely used for acetate supplementation in Canavan disease, a leukodystrophy due to ASPA mutation. We demonstrate that GTA induces cytostatic G0 growth arrest of oligodendroglioma-derived cells in vitro, without affecting normal cells. Sodium acetate, at doses comparable to that generated by complete GTA catalysis, but not glycerol also promoted growth arrest, whereas long chain triglycerides promoted cell growth. To begin to elucidate its mechanism of action, the effects of GTA on ASPA and acetyl-CoA synthetase protein levels and differentiation of established human oligodendroglioma cells (HOG and Hs683) and primary tumor-derived oligodendroglioma cells that exhibit some features of cancer stem cells (grade II OG33 and grade III OG35) relative to an oligodendrocyte progenitor line (Oli-Neu) were examined. The nuclear localization of ASPA and acetyl-CoA synthetase-1 in untreated cells was regulated during the cell cycle. GTA-mediated growth arrest was not associated with apoptosis or differentiation, but increased expression of acetylated proteins. Thus, GTA-mediated acetate supplementation may provide a safe, novel epigenetic therapy to reduce the growth of oligodendroglioma cells without affecting normal neural stem or oligodendrocyte progenitor cell proliferation or differentiation. PMID:24278309

  9. Acetate supplementation induces growth arrest of NG2/PDGFRα-positive oligodendroglioma-derived tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Patrick M; Tighe, Scott W; Driscoll, Heather E; Moffett, John R; Namboodiri, Aryan M A; Viapiano, Mariano S; Lawler, Sean E; Jaworski, Diane M

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is associated with globally hypoacetylated chromatin and considerable attention has recently been focused on epigenetic therapies. N-acetyl-L-aspartate (NAA), the primary storage form of acetate in the brain, and aspartoacylase (ASPA), the enzyme responsible for NAA catalysis to generate acetate and ultimately acetyl-Coenzyme A for histone acetylation, are reduced in oligodendroglioma. The short chain triglyceride glyceryl triacetate (GTA), which increases histone acetylation and inhibits histone deacetylase expression, has been safely used for acetate supplementation in Canavan disease, a leukodystrophy due to ASPA mutation. We demonstrate that GTA induces cytostatic G0 growth arrest of oligodendroglioma-derived cells in vitro, without affecting normal cells. Sodium acetate, at doses comparable to that generated by complete GTA catalysis, but not glycerol also promoted growth arrest, whereas long chain triglycerides promoted cell growth. To begin to elucidate its mechanism of action, the effects of GTA on ASPA and acetyl-CoA synthetase protein levels and differentiation of established human oligodendroglioma cells (HOG and Hs683) and primary tumor-derived oligodendroglioma cells that exhibit some features of cancer stem cells (grade II OG33 and grade III OG35) relative to an oligodendrocyte progenitor line (Oli-Neu) were examined. The nuclear localization of ASPA and acetyl-CoA synthetase-1 in untreated cells was regulated during the cell cycle. GTA-mediated growth arrest was not associated with apoptosis or differentiation, but increased expression of acetylated proteins. Thus, GTA-mediated acetate supplementation may provide a safe, novel epigenetic therapy to reduce the growth of oligodendroglioma cells without affecting normal neural stem or oligodendrocyte progenitor cell proliferation or differentiation.

  10. A Mathematical-Biological Joint Effort to Investigate the Tumor-Initiating Ability of Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fornari, Chiara; Beccuti, Marco; Lanzardo, Stefania; Conti, Laura; Balbo, Gianfranco; Cavallo, Federica; Calogero, Raffaele A.; Cordero, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs) in tumor progression and tumor recurrence is one of the most studied subjects in current cancer research. The CSC hypothesis states that cancer cell populations are characterized by a hierarchical structure that affects cancer progression. Due to the complex dynamics involving CSCs and the other cancer cell subpopulations, a robust theory explaining their action has not been established yet. Some indications can be obtained by combining mathematical modeling and experimental data to understand tumor dynamics and to generate new experimental hypotheses. Here, we present a model describing the initial phase of ErbB2+ mammary cancer progression, which arises from a joint effort combing mathematical modeling and cancer biology. The proposed model represents a new approach to investigate the CSC-driven tumorigenesis and to analyze the relations among crucial events involving cancer cell subpopulations. Using in vivo and in vitro data we tuned the model to reproduce the initial dynamics of cancer growth, and we used its solution to characterize observed cancer progression with respect to mutual CSC and progenitor cell variation. The model was also used to investigate which association occurs among cell phenotypes when specific cell markers are considered. Finally, we found various correlations among model parameters which cannot be directly inferred from the available biological data and these dependencies were used to characterize the dynamics of cancer subpopulations during the initial phase of ErbB2+ mammary cancer progression. PMID:25184361

  11. New-generation taxoid SB-T-1214 inhibits stem cell-related gene expression in 3D cancer spheroids induced by purified colon tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Growing evidence suggests that the majority of tumors are organized hierarchically, comprising a population of tumor-initiating, or cancer stem cells (CSCs) responsible for tumor development, maintenance and resistance to drugs. Previously we have shown that the CD133high/CD44high fraction of colon cancer cells is different from their bulk counterparts at the functional, morphological and genomic levels. In contrast to the majority of colon cancer cells expressing moderate levels of CD133, CD44 and CD166, cells with a high combined expression of CD133 and CD44 possessed several characteristic stem cell features, including profound self-renewal capacity in vivo and in vitro, and the ability to give rise to different cell phenotypes. The present study was undertaken for two aims: a) to determine stem cell-related genomic characteristics of floating 3D multicellular spheroids induced by CD133high/CD44high colon cancer cells; and b) to evaluate CSC-specific alterations induced by new-generation taxoid SB-T-1214. Results Selected CSC phenotype was isolated from three independent invasive colon cancer cell lines, HCT116, HT29 and DLD-1. A stem cell-specific PCR array assay (SABiosciences) revealed that colonospheres induced by purified CD133high/CD44high expressing cells display profound up-regulation of stem cell-related genes in comparison with their bulk counterparts. The FACS analysis has shown that the 3D colonospheres contained some minority cell populations with high levels of expression of Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and c-Myc, which are essential for stem cell pluripotency and self-renewal. Single administration of the SB-T-1214 at concentration 100 nM-1 μM for 48 hr not only induced growth inhibition and apoptotic cell death in these three types of colon cancer spheroids in 3D culture, but also mediated massive inhibition of the stem cell-related genes and significant down-regulation of the pluripotency gene expression. PCR array and FACS data were confirmed

  12. Investigating potential exogenous tumor initiating and promoting factors for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphomas (CTCL), a rare skin malignancy.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, Ivan V; Shtreis, Anna; Kobayashi, Kenneth; Glassman, Steven; Tsang, Matthew; Woetmann, Anders; Sasseville, Denis; Ødum, Niels; Duvic, Madeleine

    2016-07-01

    Most skin malignancies are caused by external and often preventable environmental agents. Multiple reports demonstrated that cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) can occur in married couples and cluster in families. Furthermore, recent studies document geographic clustering of this malignancy in Texas as well as in other areas of the United States. Multiple infectious, occupational, and medication causes have been proposed as triggers or promoters of this malignancy including hydrochlorothiazide diuretics, Staphylococcus aureus, dermatophytes, Mycobacterium leprae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, human T-Cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV1), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and herpes simplex virus (HSV). In this report, we review recent evidence evaluating the involvement of these agents in cancer initiation/progression. Most importantly, recent molecular experimental evidence documented for the first time that S. aureus can activate oncogenic STAT3 signaling in malignant T cells. Specifically, S. aureus Enterotoxin type A (SEA) was recently shown to trigger non-malignant infiltrating T cells to release IL-2 and other cytokines. These signals upon binging to their cognate receptors on malignant T cells are then able to activate STAT3 and STAT5 oncogenic signaling and promote cancer progression and IL-17 secretion. In light of these findings, it might be important for patients with exacerbation of their CTCL symptoms to maintain high index of suspicion and treat these individuals for S. aureus colonization and/or sepsis with topical and systemic antibiotics.

  13. Laser Raman Tweezer Spectroscopy (RTS) for the Molecular and Functional Characterization of Single Live Mouse Mammary Tumor Initiating Cells (TIC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    15 minutes), then bounded by a pap- pen in circular form. We then covered the cells with 15-20µl of PBS to be analyzed by a 100x immersion lens on...microscope stage and PBS was continually added to the pap- pen circle every 15 minutes to combat evaporation. In this way, the cells could be kept in...Bioengineering Research Center, Lawrence, Kansas, April 12, 2012. • An abstract was submitted to the 2013 Mammary Gland Biology Gordon Conference and was

  14. KLF4 regulates adult lung tumor-initiating cells and represses K-Ras-mediated lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, T; Chen, X; Zhang, W; Liu, J; Avdiushko, R; Napier, D L; Liu, A X; Neltner, J M; Wang, C; Cohen, D; Liu, C

    2016-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in both men and women worldwide. To identify novel factors that contribute to lung cancer pathogenesis, we analyzed a lung cancer database from The Cancer Genome Atlas and found that Krüppel-like Factor 4 (KLF4) expression is significantly lower in patients' lung cancer tissue than in normal lung tissue. In addition, we identified seven missense mutations in the KLF4 gene. KLF4 is a transcription factor that regulates cell proliferation and differentiation as well as the self-renewal of stem cells. To understand the role of KLF4 in the lung, we generated a tamoxifen-induced Klf4 knockout mouse model. We found that KLF4 inhibits lung cancer cell growth and that depletion of Klf4 altered the differentiation pattern in the developing lung. To understand how KLF4 functions during lung tumorigenesis, we generated the K-ras(LSL-G12D/+);Klf4(fl/fl) mouse model, and we used adenovirus-expressed Cre to induce K-ras activation and Klf4 depletion in the lung. Although Klf4 deletion alone or K-ras mutation alone can trigger lung tumor formation, Klf4 deletion combined with K-ras mutation significantly enhanced lung tumor formation. We also found that Klf4 deletion in conjunction with K-ras activation caused lung inflammation. To understand the mechanism whereby KLF4 is regulated during lung tumorigenesis, we analyzed KLF4 promoter methylation and the profiles of epigenetic factors. We found that Class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) are overexpressed in lung cancer and that HDAC inhibitors induced expression of KLF4 and inhibited proliferation of lung cancer cells, suggesting that KLF4 is probably repressed by histone acetylation and that HDACs are valuable drug targets for lung cancer treatment.

  15. Doxycycline down-regulates DNA-PK and radiosensitizes tumor initiating cells: Implications for more effective radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Rebecca; Fiorillo, Marco; Chadwick, Amy; Ozsvari, Bela; Reeves, Kimberly J.; Smith, Duncan L.; Clarke, Robert B.; Howell, Sacha J.; Cappello, Anna Rita; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-PK is an enzyme that is required for proper DNA-repair and is thought to confer radio-resistance in cancer cells. As a consequence, it is a high-profile validated target for new pharmaceutical development. However, no FDA-approved DNA-PK inhibitors have emerged, despite many years of drug discovery and lead optimization. This is largely because existing DNA-PK inhibitors suffer from poor pharmacokinetics. They are not well absorbed and/or are unstable, with a short plasma half-life. Here, we identified the first FDA-approved DNA-PK inhibitor by “chemical proteomics”. In an effort to understand how doxycycline targets cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), we serendipitously discovered that doxycycline reduces DNA-PK protein expression by nearly 15-fold (> 90%). In accordance with these observations, we show that doxycycline functionally radio-sensitizes breast CSCs, by up to 4.5-fold. Moreover, we demonstrate that DNA-PK is highly over-expressed in both MCF7- and T47D-derived mammospheres. Interestingly, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PK in MCF7 cells is sufficient to functionally block mammosphere formation. Thus, it appears that active DNA-repair is required for the clonal expansion of CSCs. Mechanistically, doxycycline treatment dramatically reduced the oxidative mitochondrial capacity and the glycolytic activity of cancer cells, consistent with previous studies linking DNA-PK expression to the proper maintenance of mitochondrial DNA integrity and copy number. Using a luciferase-based assay, we observed that doxycycline treatment quantitatively reduces the anti-oxidant response (NRF1/2) and effectively blocks signaling along multiple independent pathways normally associated with stem cells, including STAT1/3, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), Notch, WNT and TGF-beta signaling. In conclusion, we propose that the efficacy of doxycycline as a DNA-PK inhibitor should be tested in Phase-II clinical trials, in combination with radio-therapy. Doxycycline has

  16. Doxycycline down-regulates DNA-PK and radiosensitizes tumor initiating cells: Implications for more effective radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Rebecca; Fiorillo, Marco; Chadwick, Amy; Ozsvari, Bela; Reeves, Kimberly J; Smith, Duncan L; Clarke, Robert B; Howell, Sacha J; Cappello, Anna Rita; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2015-06-10

    DNA-PK is an enzyme that is required for proper DNA-repair and is thought to confer radio-resistance in cancer cells. As a consequence, it is a high-profile validated target for new pharmaceutical development. However, no FDA-approved DNA-PK inhibitors have emerged, despite many years of drug discovery and lead optimization. This is largely because existing DNA-PK inhibitors suffer from poor pharmacokinetics. They are not well absorbed and/or are unstable, with a short plasma half-life. Here, we identified the first FDA-approved DNA-PK inhibitor by "chemical proteomics". In an effort to understand how doxycycline targets cancer stem-like cells (CSCs), we serendipitously discovered that doxycycline reduces DNA-PK protein expression by nearly 15-fold (> 90%). In accordance with these observations, we show that doxycycline functionally radio-sensitizes breast CSCs, by up to 4.5-fold. Moreover, we demonstrate that DNA-PK is highly over-expressed in both MCF7- and T47D-derived mammospheres. Interestingly, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of DNA-PK in MCF7 cells is sufficient to functionally block mammosphere formation. Thus, it appears that active DNA-repair is required for the clonal expansion of CSCs. Mechanistically, doxycycline treatment dramatically reduced the oxidative mitochondrial capacity and the glycolytic activity of cancer cells, consistent with previous studies linking DNA-PK expression to the proper maintenance of mitochondrial DNA integrity and copy number. Using a luciferase-based assay, we observed that doxycycline treatment quantitatively reduces the anti-oxidant response (NRF1/2) and effectively blocks signaling along multiple independent pathways normally associated with stem cells, including STAT1/3, Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), Notch, WNT and TGF-beta signaling. In conclusion, we propose that the efficacy of doxycycline as a DNA-PK inhibitor should be tested in Phase-II clinical trials, in combination with radio-therapy. Doxycycline has excellent

  17. The anti-diabetic drug metformin suppresses self-renewal and proliferation of trastuzumab-resistant tumor-initiating breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Del Barco, Sonia; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Menendez, Javier A

    2011-04-01

    We here demonstrate that the anti-diabetic drug metformin interacts synergistically with the anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Tzb; Herceptin™) to eliminate stem/progenitor cell populations in HER2-gene-amplified breast carcinoma cells. When using the mammosphere culture technique, graded concentrations of single-agent metformin (range 50-1,000 μmol/l) were found to dose-dependently reduce the number of mammospheres formed by SKBR3 (a Tzb-naïve model), SKBR3 TzbR (a model of acquired auto-resistance to Tzb) and JIMT-1 (a model of refractoriness to Tzb and other HER2-targeted therapies ab initio) HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells. Single-agent Tzb likewise reduced mammosphere-forming efficiency (MSFE) in Tzb-naïve SKBR3 cells, but it failed to significantly decrease MSFE in Tzb-resistant SKBR3 TzbR and JIMT-1 cells. Of note, CD44-overexpressing Tzb-refractory SKBR3 TzbR and JIMT-1 cells retained an exquisite sensitivity to single-agent metformin. Concurrent combination of metformin with Tzb synergistically reduced MSFE as well as the size of mammospheres in Tzb-refractory SKBR3 TzbR and JIMT-1 cells. Flow cytometry analyses confirmed that metformin and Tzb functioned synergistically to down-regulate the percentage of Tzb-refractory JIMT-1 cells displaying the CD44(pos)/CD24(neg/low) stem/progenitor immunophenotype. Given that MSFE and mammosphere size are indicators of stem self-renewal and progenitor cell proliferation, respectively, our current findings reveal for the first time that: (a) Tzb refractoriness in HER2 overexpressors can be explained in terms of Tzb-resistant/CD44-overexpressing/tumor-initiating stem cells; (b) metformin synergistically interacts with Tzb to suppress self-renewal and proliferation of cancer stem/progenitor cells in HER2-positive carcinomas.

  18. The loss of Ezh2 drives the pathogenesis of myelofibrosis and sensitizes tumor-initiating cells to bromodomain inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Akinori; Mochizuki-Kashio, Makiko; Harada, Hironori; Shimoda, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    EZH2 is a component of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and functions as an H3K27 methyltransferase. Loss-of-function mutations in EZH2 are associated with poorer outcomes in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), particularly those with primary myelofibrosis (MF [PMF]). To determine how EZH2 insufficiency is involved in the pathogenesis of PMF, we generated mice compound for an Ezh2 conditional deletion and activating mutation in JAK2 (JAK2V617F) present in patients with PMF. The deletion of Ezh2 in JAK2V617F mice markedly promoted the development of MF, indicating a tumor suppressor function for EZH2 in PMF. The loss of Ezh2 in JAK2V617F hematopoietic cells caused significant reductions in H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) levels, resulting in an epigenetic switch to H3K27 acetylation (H3K27ac). These epigenetic switches were closely associated with the activation of PRC2 target genes including Hmga2, an oncogene implicated in the pathogenesis of PMF. The treatment of JAK2V617F/Ezh2-null mice with a bromodomain inhibitor significantly attenuated H3K27ac levels at the promoter regions of PRC2 targets and down-regulated their expression, leading to the abrogation of MF-initiating cells. Therefore, an EZH2 insufficiency not only cooperated with active JAK2 to induce MF, but also conferred an oncogenic addiction to the H3K27ac modification in MF-initiating cells that was capable of being restored by bromodomain inhibition. PMID:27401345

  19. CD133+ brain tumor-initiating cells are dependent on STAT3 signaling to drive medulloblastoma recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Garg, N; Bakhshinyan, D; Venugopal, C; Mahendram, S; Rosa, D A; Vijayakumar, T; Manoranjan, B; Hallett, R; McFarlane, N; Delaney, K H; Kwiecien, J M; Arpin, C C; Lai, P-S; Gómez-Biagi, R F; Ali, A M; de Araujo, E D; Ajani, O A; Hassell, J A; Gunning, P T; Singh, S K

    2017-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB), the most common malignant paediatric brain tumor, is currently treated using a combination of surgery, craniospinal radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Owing to MB stem cells (MBSCs), a subset of MB patients remains untreatable despite standard therapy. CD133 is used to identify MBSCs although its functional role in tumorigenesis has yet to be determined. In this work, we showed enrichment of CD133 in Group 3 MB is associated with increased rate of metastasis and poor clinical outcome. The signal transducers and activators of transcription-3 (STAT3) pathway are selectively activated in CD133+ MBSCs and promote tumorigenesis through regulation of c-MYC, a key genetic driver of Group 3 MB. We screened compound libraries for STAT3 inhibitors and treatment with the selected STAT3 inhibitors resulted in tumor size reduction in vivo. We propose that inhibition of STAT3 signaling in MBSCs may represent a potential therapeutic strategy to treat patients with recurrent MB. PMID:27775079

  20. CD133(+) brain tumor-initiating cells are dependent on STAT3 signaling to drive medulloblastoma recurrence.

    PubMed

    Garg, N; Bakhshinyan, D; Venugopal, C; Mahendram, S; Rosa, D A; Vijayakumar, T; Manoranjan, B; Hallett, R; McFarlane, N; Delaney, K H; Kwiecien, J M; Arpin, C C; Lai, P-S; Gómez-Biagi, R F; Ali, A M; de Araujo, E D; Ajani, O A; Hassell, J A; Gunning, P T; Singh, S K

    2017-02-02

    Medulloblastoma (MB), the most common malignant paediatric brain tumor, is currently treated using a combination of surgery, craniospinal radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Owing to MB stem cells (MBSCs), a subset of MB patients remains untreatable despite standard therapy. CD133 is used to identify MBSCs although its functional role in tumorigenesis has yet to be determined. In this work, we showed enrichment of CD133 in Group 3 MB is associated with increased rate of metastasis and poor clinical outcome. The signal transducers and activators of transcription-3 (STAT3) pathway are selectively activated in CD133(+) MBSCs and promote tumorigenesis through regulation of c-MYC, a key genetic driver of Group 3 MB. We screened compound libraries for STAT3 inhibitors and treatment with the selected STAT3 inhibitors resulted in tumor size reduction in vivo. We propose that inhibition of STAT3 signaling in MBSCs may represent a potential therapeutic strategy to treat patients with recurrent MB.

  1. Conversion of Stationary to Invasive Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs): Role of Hypoxia in Membrane Type 1-Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Zucker, Stanley; Pulkoski-Gross, Ashleigh; Kuscu, Cem; Karaayvaz, Mihriban; Ju, Jingfang; Yao, Herui; Song, Erwei; Cao, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence has implicated the role of tumor initiating cells (TICs) in the process of cancer metastasis. The mechanism underlying the conversion of TICs from stationary to invasive remains to be characterized. In this report, we employed less invasive breast cancer TICs, SK-3rd, that displays CD44high/CD24low with high mammosphere-forming and tumorigenic capacities, to investigate the mechanism by which stationary TICs are converted to invasive TICs. Invasive ability of SK-3rd TICs was markedly enhanced when the cells were cultured under hypoxic conditions. Given the role of membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) in cancer invasion/metastasis, we explored a possible involvement of MT1-MMP in hypoxia-induced TIC invasion. Silencing of MT1-MMP by a shRNA approach resulted in diminution of hypoxia-induced cell invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo. Under hypoxic conditions, MT1-MMP redistributed from cytoplasmic storage pools to the cell surface of TICs, which coincides with the increased cell invasion. In addition, CD44, a cancer stem-like cell marker, inversely correlated with increased cell surface MT1-MMP. Interestingly, cell surface MT1-MMP gradually disappeared when the hypoxia-treated cells were switched to normoxia, suggesting the plasticity of TICs in response to oxygen content. Furthermore, we dissected the pathways leading to upregulated MT1-MMP in cytoplasmic storage pools under normoxic conditions, by demonstrating a cascade involving Twist1-miR10b-HoxD10 leading to enhanced MT1-MMP expression in SK-3rd TICs. These observations suggest that MT1-MMP is a key molecule capable of executing conversion of stationary TICs to invasive TICs under hypoxic conditions and thereby controlling metastasis. PMID:22679501

  2. miR-125b can enhance skin tumor initiation and promote malignant progression by repressing differentiation and prolonging cell survival.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Ge, Yejing; Fuchs, Elaine

    2014-11-15

    Previously, we identified miR-125b as a key regulator of the undifferentiated state of hair follicle stem cells. Here, we show that in both mice and humans, miR-125b is abundantly expressed, particularly at early stages of malignant progression to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), the second most prevalent cancer worldwide. Moreover, when elevated in normal murine epidermis, miR-125b promotes tumor initiation and contributes to malignant progression. We further show that miR-125b can confer "oncomiR addiction" in early stage malignant progenitors by delaying their differentiation and favoring an SCC cancer stem cell (CSC)-like transcriptional program. To understand how, we systematically identified and validated miR125b targets that are specifically associated with tumors that are dependent on miR-125b. Through molecular and genetic analysis of these targets, we uncovered new insights underlying miR-125b's oncogenic function. Specifically, we show that, on the one hand, mir-125b directly represses stress-responsive MAP kinase genes and associated signaling. On the other hand, it indirectly prolongs activated (phosphorylated) EGFR signaling by repressing Vps4b (vacuolar protein-sorting 4 homolog B), encoding a protein implicated in negatively regulating the endosomal sorting complexes that are necessary for the recycling of active EGFR. Together, these findings illuminate miR-125b as an important microRNA regulator that is shared between normal skin progenitors and their early malignant counterparts.

  3. Selective small molecule Stat3 inhibitor reduces breast cancer tumor-initiating cells and improves recurrence free survival in a human-xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Dave, Bhuvanesh; Landis, Melissa D; Tweardy, David J; Chang, Jenny C; Dobrolecki, Lacey E; Wu, Meng-Fen; Zhang, Xiaomei; Westbrook, Thomas F; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Liu, Dan; Lewis, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis and disease relapse are hypothesized to result from tumor initiating cells (TICs). Previously, we have defined a CD44+/CD24-/low mammosphere-forming tumorigenic 493-gene signature in breast cancer. Stat3 was identified as a critical node in self-renewal based on an ongoing lentiviral shRNA screen being conducted in two breast cancer cell lines SUM159 and BT549. In corroborating work, targeting the SH2 domain of Stat3 with a novel small molecule decreased the percentage of cells expressing TIC markers (CD44+/CD24-/low and ALDH+) and mammosphere formation in p-Stat3 overexpressing human breast cancer xenografts in SCID-beige mice. Importantly, we observed a four-fold improvement in the 30-day recurrence-free survival relative to docetaxel alone with the addition of the Stat3 inhibitor in the chemoresistant tumor model. Thus, these findings provide a strong impetus for the development of selective Stat3 inhibitors in order to improve survival in patients with p-Stat3 overexpressing tumors.

  4. Selective Small Molecule Stat3 Inhibitor Reduces Breast Cancer Tumor-Initiating Cells and Improves Recurrence Free Survival in a Human-Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Bhuvanesh; Landis, Melissa D.; Dobrolecki, Lacey E.; Wu, Meng-Fen; Zhang, Xiaomei; Westbrook, Thomas F.; Hilsenbeck, Susan G.; Liu, Dan; Lewis, Michael T.; Tweardy, David J.; Chang, Jenny C.

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis and disease relapse are hypothesized to result from tumor initiating cells (TICs). Previously, we have defined a CD44+/CD24−/low mammosphere-forming tumorigenic 493-gene signature in breast cancer. Stat3 was identified as a critical node in self-renewal based on an ongoing lentiviral shRNA screen being conducted in two breast cancer cell lines SUM159 and BT549. In corroborating work, targeting the SH2 domain of Stat3 with a novel small molecule decreased the percentage of cells expressing TIC markers (CD44+/CD24−/low and ALDH+) and mammosphere formation in p-Stat3 overexpressing human breast cancer xenografts in SCID-beige mice. Importantly, we observed a four-fold improvement in the 30-day recurrence-free survival relative to docetaxel alone with the addition of the Stat3 inhibitor in the chemoresistant tumor model. Thus, these findings provide a strong impetus for the development of selective Stat3 inhibitors in order to improve survival in patients with p-Stat3 overexpressing tumors. PMID:22879872

  5. Hypoxia-responsive miR-210 promotes self-renewal capacity of colon tumor-initiating cells by repressing ISCU and by inducing lactate production

    PubMed Central

    Ullmann, Pit; Qureshi-Baig, Komal; Rodriguez, Fabien; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Nonnenmacher, Yannic; Ternes, Dominik; Weiler, Jil; Gäbler, Karoline; Bahlawane, Christelle; Hiller, Karsten; Haan, Serge; Letellier, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Low oxygen concentrations (hypoxia) are known to affect the cellular metabolism and have been suggested to regulate a subpopulation of cancer cells with tumorigenic properties, the so-called tumor-initiating cells (TICs). To better understand the mechanism of hypoxia-induced TIC activation, we set out to study the role of hypoxia-responsive miRNAs in recently established colon cancer patient-derived TICs. We were able to show that low oxygen concentrations consistently lead to the upregulation of miR-210 in different primary TIC-enriched cultures. Both stable overexpression of miR-210 and knockdown of its target gene ISCU resulted in enhanced TIC self-renewal. We could validate the tumorigenic properties of miR- 210 in in vivo experiments by showing that ectopic expression of miR-210 results in increased tumor incidence. Furthermore, enhanced miR-210 expression correlated with reduced TCA cycle activity and increased lactate levels. Importantly, by blocking lactate production via inhibition of LDHA, we could reverse the promoting effect of miR-210 on self-renewal capacity, thereby emphasizing the regulatory impact of the glycolytic phenotype on colon TIC properties. Finally, by assessing expression levels in patient tissue, we could demonstrate the clinical relevance of the miR-210/ISCU signaling axis for colorectal carcinoma. Taken together, our study highlights the importance of hypoxia-induced miR-210 in the regulation of colon cancer initiation. PMID:27589845

  6. Hypoxia-responsive miR-210 promotes self-renewal capacity of colon tumor-initiating cells by repressing ISCU and by inducing lactate production.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Pit; Qureshi-Baig, Komal; Rodriguez, Fabien; Ginolhac, Aurélien; Nonnenmacher, Yannic; Ternes, Dominik; Weiler, Jil; Gäbler, Karoline; Bahlawane, Christelle; Hiller, Karsten; Haan, Serge; Letellier, Elisabeth

    2016-10-04

    Low oxygen concentrations (hypoxia) are known to affect the cellular metabolism and have been suggested to regulate a subpopulation of cancer cells with tumorigenic properties, the so-called tumor-initiating cells (TICs). To better understand the mechanism of hypoxia-induced TIC activation, we set out to study the role of hypoxia-responsive miRNAs in recently established colon cancer patient-derived TICs. We were able to show that low oxygen concentrations consistently lead to the upregulation of miR-210 in different primary TIC-enriched cultures. Both stable overexpression of miR-210 and knockdown of its target gene ISCU resulted in enhanced TIC self-renewal. We could validate the tumorigenic properties of miR- 210 in in vivo experiments by showing that ectopic expression of miR-210 results in increased tumor incidence. Furthermore, enhanced miR-210 expression correlated with reduced TCA cycle activity and increased lactate levels. Importantly, by blocking lactate production via inhibition of LDHA, we could reverse the promoting effect of miR-210 on self-renewal capacity, thereby emphasizing the regulatory impact of the glycolytic phenotype on colon TIC properties. Finally, by assessing expression levels in patient tissue, we could demonstrate the clinical relevance of the miR-210/ISCU signaling axis for colorectal carcinoma. Taken together, our study highlights the importance of hypoxia-induced miR-210 in the regulation of colon cancer initiation.

  7. ZFHX4 interacts with the NuRD core member CHD4 and regulates the glioblastoma tumor-initiating cell state.

    PubMed

    Chudnovsky, Yakov; Kim, Dohoon; Zheng, Siyuan; Whyte, Warren A; Bansal, Mukesh; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Gopal, Shuba; Theisen, Matthew A; Bilodeau, Steve; Thiru, Prathapan; Muffat, Julien; Yilmaz, Omer H; Mitalipova, Maya; Woolard, Kevin; Lee, Jeongwu; Nishimura, Riko; Sakata, Nobuo; Fine, Howard A; Carpenter, Anne E; Silver, Serena J; Verhaak, Roel G W; Califano, Andrea; Young, Richard A; Ligon, Keith L; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Root, David E; Sabatini, David M; Hahn, William C; Chheda, Milan G

    2014-01-30

    Glioblastoma (GBM) harbors subpopulations of therapy-resistant tumor-initiating cells (TICs) that are self-renewing and multipotent. To understand the regulation of the TIC state, we performed an image-based screen for genes regulating GBM TIC maintenance and identified ZFHX4, a 397 kDa transcription factor. ZFHX4 is required to maintain TIC-associated and normal human neural precursor cell phenotypes in vitro, suggesting that ZFHX4 regulates differentiation, and its suppression increases glioma-free survival in intracranial xenografts. ZFHX4 interacts with CHD4, a core member of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex. ZFHX4 and CHD4 bind to overlapping sets of genomic loci and control similar gene expression programs. Using expression data derived from GBM patients, we found that ZFHX4 significantly affects CHD4-mediated gene expression perturbations, which defines ZFHX4 as a master regulator of CHD4. These observations define ZFHX4 as a regulatory factor that links the chromatin-remodeling NuRD complex and the GBM TIC state.

  8. Porfimer-sodium (Photofrin-II) in combination with ionizing radiation inhibits tumor-initiating cell proliferation and improves glioblastoma treatment efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Benayoun, Liat; Schaffer, Moshe; Bril, Rotem; Gingis-Velitski, Svetlana; Segal, Ehud; Nevelsky, Alexsander; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit; Shaked, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Tumor relapse and tumor cell repopulation has been explained partially by the drug-free break period between successive conventional treatments. Strategies to overcome tumor relapse have been proposed, such as the use of chemotherapeutic drugs or radiation in small, frequent fractionated doses without an extended break period between treatment intervals. Yet, tumors usually acquire resistance and eventually escape the therapy. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the resistance of tumors to therapy, one of which involves the cancer stem cell or tumor-initiating cell (TIC) concept. TICs are believed to resist many conventional therapies, in part due to their slow proliferation and self-renewal capacities. Therefore, emerging efforts to eradicate TICs are being undertaken. Here we show that treatment with Photofrin II, among the most frequently used photosensitizers, sensitized a TIC-enriched U-87MG human glioblastoma cell to radiation, and improve treatment outcome when used in combination with radiotherapy. A U-87MG tumor cell population enriched with radiation-resistant TICs becomes radio-sensitive, and an inhibition of cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis are found in the presence of Photofrin II. Furthermore, U-87MG tumors implanted in mice treated with Photofrin II and radiation exhibit a significant reduction in angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, and an increased percentage of apoptotic TICs when compared with tumors grown in mice treated with radiation alone. Collectively, our results offer a new possible explanation for the therapeutic effects of radiosensitizing agents, and suggest that combinatorial treatment modalities can effectively prolong treatment outcome of glioblastoma tumors by inhibiting tumor growth mediated by TICs. PMID:23114641

  9. Long-term tumor regression induced by an antibody-drug conjugate that targets 5T4, an oncofetal antigen expressed on tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Sapra, Puja; Damelin, Marc; Dijoseph, John; Marquette, Kimberly; Geles, Kenneth G; Golas, Jonathon; Dougher, Maureen; Narayanan, Bitha; Giannakou, Andreas; Khandke, Kiran; Dushin, Russell; Ernstoff, Elana; Lucas, Judy; Leal, Mauricio; Hu, George; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila; Abraham, Robert T; Gerber, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) represent a promising therapeutic modality for the clinical management of cancer. We sought to develop a novel ADC that targets 5T4, an oncofetal antigen expressed on tumor-initiating cells (TIC), which comprise the most aggressive cell population in the tumor. We optimized an anti-5T4 ADC (A1mcMMAF) by sulfydryl-based conjugation of the humanized A1 antibody to the tubulin inhibitor monomethylauristatin F (MMAF) via a maleimidocaproyl linker. A1mcMMAF exhibited potent in vivo antitumor activity in a variety of tumor models and induced long-term regressions for up to 100 days after the last dose. Strikingly, animals showed pathologic complete response in each model with doses as low as 3 mg antibody/kg dosed every 4 days. In a non-small cell lung cancer patient-derived xenograft model, in which 5T4 is preferentially expressed on the less differentiated tumor cells, A1mcMMAF treatment resulted in sustained tumor regressions and reduced TIC frequency. These results highlight the potential of ADCs that target the most aggressive cell populations within tumors, such as TICs. In exploratory safety studies, A1mcMMAF exhibited no overt toxicities when administered to cynomolgus monkeys at doses up to 10 mg antibody/kg/cycle × 2 and displayed a half-life of 5 days. The preclinical efficacy and safety data established a promising therapeutic index that supports clinical testing of A1mcMMAF.

  10. Radio-Photothermal Therapy Mediated by a Single Compartment Nanoplatform Depletes Tumor Initiating Cells and Reduces Lung Metastasis in Orthotopic 4T1 Breast Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Min; Zhao, Jun; Tian, Mei; Song, Shaoli; Zhang, Rui; Gupta, Sanjay; Tan, Dongfeng; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and has demonstrated promising application in clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress breast tumor metastasis through eradication of TICs. Positron electron tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies showed that more than 90% of [64Cu]CuS NPs was retained in subcutaneously grown BT474 breast tumor 24 h after intratumoral (i.t.) injection, indicating the NPs is suitable for the combination therapy. Combined RT/PTT therapy resulted in significant tumor growth delay in subcutaneous BT474 breast cancer model. Moreover, RT/PTT treatment significantly prolonged the survival of mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast tumors compared to no treatment, RT alone, or PTT alone. The RT/PTT combination therapy significantly reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung and the formation of tumor mammospheres from treated 4T1 tumors. No obvious side effects of the CuS NPs were noted in the treated mice in a pilot toxicity study. Taken together, our data support the feasibility of a therapeutic approach for suppression of tumor metastasis through localized RT/PTT therapy. PMID:26376843

  11. A Tumor initiating cell-enriched prognostic signature for HER2+:ERα- breast cancer; rationale, new features, controversies and future directions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jeff C; Egan, Sean E; Zacksenhaus, Eldad

    2013-08-01

    The high intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity of many types of cancers, including breast cancer (BC), poses great challenge to development of subtype-specific prognosis. In BC, the classification of tumors as either ERα+ (Luminal A and Luminal B), HER2+ (ERα+ or ERα-) or triple-negative (TNBC)(Basal-like, claudin-low) guides both prognostication and therapy. Indeed, prognostic signatures for ERα+ BC are being incorporated into clinical use. However, these signatures distinguish between luminal A (low risk) and Luminal B (high risk) BC; signatures that identify low/high risk patients with luminal B BC are yet to be developed. Likewise, no signature is in clinical use for HER2+ or TNBC. The major obstacles to development of robust signatures stem from diversity of BC, clonal evolution and heterogeneity within each subtype. We have recently generated a prognostic signature for HER2+:ERα- BC based on the identification of genes that were differentially expressed in a tumor-initiating cell (TIC)-enriched fraction versus non-TIC fraction from a mouse model of HER2+ BC (MMTV-Hers/Neu). Here we describe the rationale behind development of this prognosticator, and present new features of the signature, including elevated PI3K pathway activity and low TNFalpha and IFNgamma signaling in high-risk tumors. In addition, we address controversies in the field such as whether random gene expression signatures significantly associate with cancer outcome. Finally, we suggest a guideline for development of prognostic signatures and discuss future directions.

  12. Radio-photothermal therapy mediated by a single compartment nanoplatform depletes tumor initiating cells and reduces lung metastasis in the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Zhao, Jun; Tian, Mei; Song, Shaoli; Zhang, Rui; Gupta, Sanjay; Tan, Dongfeng; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Chun

    2015-12-14

    Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([(64)Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress breast tumor metastasis through eradication of TICs. Positron electron tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies showed that more than 90% of [(64)Cu]CuS NPs was retained in subcutaneously grown BT474 breast tumor 24 h after intratumoral (i.t.) injection, indicating the NPs are suitable for the combination therapy. Combined RT/PTT therapy resulted in significant tumor growth delay in the subcutaneous BT474 breast cancer model. Moreover, RT/PTT treatment significantly prolonged the survival of mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast tumors compared to no treatment, RT alone, or PTT alone. The RT/PTT combination therapy significantly reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung and the formation of tumor mammospheres from treated 4T1 tumors. No obvious side effects of the CuS NPs were noted in the treated mice in a pilot toxicity study. Taken together, our data support the feasibility of a therapeutic approach for the suppression of tumor metastasis through localized RT/PTT therapy.

  13. In vitro screen of a small molecule inhibitor drug library identifies multiple compounds that synergize with oncolytic myxoma virus against human brain tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Brienne A.; Zemp, Franz J.; Pisklakova, Alexandra; Narendran, Aru; McFadden, Grant; Lun, Xueqing; Kenchappa, Rajappa S.; Kurz, Ebba U.; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) are stem-like cells hypothesized to form a disease reservoir that mediates tumor recurrence in high-grade gliomas. Oncolytic virotherapy uses replication-competent viruses to target and kill malignant cells and has been evaluated in clinic for glioma therapy with limited results. Myxoma virus (MyxV) is a safe and highly effective oncolytic virus (OV) in conventional glioma models but, as seen with other OVs, is only modestly effective for patient-derived BTICs. The objective of this study was to determine whether MyxV treatment against human BTICs could be improved by combining chemotherapeutics and virotherapy. Methods A 73-compound library of drug candidates in clinical use or preclinical development was screened to identify compounds that sensitize human BTICs to MyxV treatment in vitro, and synergy was evaluated mathematically in lead compounds using Chou-Talalay analyses. The effects of combination therapy on viral gene expression and viral replication were also assessed. Results Eleven compounds that enhance MyxV efficacy were identified, and 6 were shown to synergize with the virus using Chou-Talalay analyses. Four of the synergistic compounds were shown to significantly increase viral gene expression, indicating a potential mechanism for synergy. Three highly synergistic compounds (axitinib, a VEGFR inhibitor; rofecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor; and pemetrexed, a folate anti-metabolite) belong to classes of compounds that have not been previously shown to synergize with oncolytic viruses in vitro. Conclusions This study has identified multiple novel drug candidates that synergistically improve MyxV efficacy in a preclinical BTIC glioma model. PMID:25605818

  14. miR-125b can enhance skin tumor initiation and promote malignant progression by repressing differentiation and prolonging cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Ge, Yejing

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we identified miR-125b as a key regulator of the undifferentiated state of hair follicle stem cells. Here, we show that in both mice and humans, miR-125b is abundantly expressed, particularly at early stages of malignant progression to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), the second most prevalent cancer worldwide. Moreover, when elevated in normal murine epidermis, miR-125b promotes tumor initiation and contributes to malignant progression. We further show that miR-125b can confer “oncomiR addiction” in early stage malignant progenitors by delaying their differentiation and favoring an SCC cancer stem cell (CSC)-like transcriptional program. To understand how, we systematically identified and validated miR125b targets that are specifically associated with tumors that are dependent on miR-125b. Through molecular and genetic analysis of these targets, we uncovered new insights underlying miR-125b’s oncogenic function. Specifically, we show that, on the one hand, mir-125b directly represses stress-responsive MAP kinase genes and associated signaling. On the other hand, it indirectly prolongs activated (phosphorylated) EGFR signaling by repressing Vps4b (vacuolar protein-sorting 4 homolog B), encoding a protein implicated in negatively regulating the endosomal sorting complexes that are necessary for the recycling of active EGFR. Together, these findings illuminate miR-125b as an important microRNA regulator that is shared between normal skin progenitors and their early malignant counterparts. PMID:25403182

  15. Origin and Properties of Prostatic Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    treating prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . prostate 6 integrin Bcl-2 S tem cell biology and tumorigenesis may be closely linked...In addition to being a source of carcinomas, stem cells may also give rise to benign prostatic hyperplasia (7). The isolation and characterization of...expression may contribute to the etiology of prostatic diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (48), proliferative inflam- matory atrophy, which

  16. Cell Lineage Analysis of Mouse Prostate Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    are derived from luminal or basal epithelial cells using genetic lineage tracing of prostate carcinogenesis in PSA-CreERT2;R26RmT/mG;EAF2-/-;PTEN...derived from luminal epithelial cells in the prostate, because a hallmark of prostate cancer is the loss of basal epithelial cells and prostate...publications [2, 3]. This project will determine whether prostate cancer cells are derived from luminal or basal epithelial cells in an EAF2-/- mouse

  17. "A novel in vivo model for the study of human breast cancer metastasis using primary breast tumor-initiating cells from patient biopsies"

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The study of breast cancer metastasis depends on the use of established breast cancer cell lines that do not accurately represent the heterogeneity and complexity of human breast tumors. A tumor model was developed using primary breast tumor-initiating cells isolated from patient core biopsies that would more accurately reflect human breast cancer metastasis. Methods Tumorspheres were isolated under serum-free culture conditions from core biopsies collected from five patients with clinical diagnosis of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). Isolated tumorspheres were transplanted into the mammary fat pad of NUDE mice to establish tumorigenicity in vivo. Tumors and metastatic lesions were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin (H+E) staining and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results Tumorspheres were successfully isolated from all patient core biopsies, independent of the estrogen receptor α (ERα)/progesterone receptor (PR)/Her2/neu status or tumor grade. Each tumorsphere was estimated to contain 50-100 cells. Transplantation of 50 tumorspheres (1-5 × 103 cells) in combination with Matrigel into the mammary fat pad of NUDE mice resulted in small, palpable tumors that were sustained up to 12 months post-injection. Tumors were serially transplanted three times by re-isolation of tumorspheres from the tumors and injection into the mammary fat pad of NUDE mice. At 3 months post-injection, micrometastases to the lung, liver, kidneys, brain and femur were detected by measuring content of human chromosome 17. Visible macrometastases were detected in the lung, liver and kidneys by 6 months post-injection. Primary tumors variably expressed cytokeratins, Her2/neu, cytoplasmic E-cadherin, nuclear β catenin and fibronectin but were negative for ERα and vimentin. In lung and liver metastases, variable redistribution of E-cadherin and β catenin to the membrane of tumor cells was observed. ERα was re-expressed in lung metastatic cells in two of five samples. Conclusions

  18. Radio-photothermal therapy mediated by a single compartment nanoplatform depletes tumor initiating cells and reduces lung metastasis in the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min; Zhao, Jun; Tian, Mei; Song, Shaoli; Zhang, Rui; Gupta, Sanjay; Tan, Dongfeng; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Chun

    2015-11-01

    Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress breast tumor metastasis through eradication of TICs. Positron electron tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies showed that more than 90% of [64Cu]CuS NPs was retained in subcutaneously grown BT474 breast tumor 24 h after intratumoral (i.t.) injection, indicating the NPs are suitable for the combination therapy. Combined RT/PTT therapy resulted in significant tumor growth delay in the subcutaneous BT474 breast cancer model. Moreover, RT/PTT treatment significantly prolonged the survival of mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast tumors compared to no treatment, RT alone, or PTT alone. The RT/PTT combination therapy significantly reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung and the formation of tumor mammospheres from treated 4T1 tumors. No obvious side effects of the CuS NPs were noted in the treated mice in a pilot toxicity study. Taken together, our data support the feasibility of a therapeutic approach for the suppression of tumor metastasis through localized RT/PTT therapy.Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress

  19. Prostate cancer stem cells: the role of androgen and estrogen receptors

    PubMed Central

    Di Zazzo, Erika; Galasso, Giovanni; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Di Santi, Annalisa; Cernera, Gustavo; Rossi, Valentina; Abbondanza, Ciro; Moncharmont, Bruno; Sinisi, Antonio Agostino; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men, and androgen deprivation therapy still represents the primary treatment for prostate cancer patients. This approach, however, frequently fails and patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer, which is almost untreatable. Cancer cells are characterized by a hierarchical organization, and stem/progenitor cells are endowed with tumor-initiating activity. Accumulating evidence indicates that prostate cancer stem cells lack the androgen receptor and are, indeed, resistant to androgen deprivation therapy. In contrast, these cells express classical (α and/or β) and novel (GPR30) estrogen receptors, which may represent new putative targets in prostate cancer treatment. In the present review, we discuss the still-debated mechanisms, both genomic and non-genomic, by which androgen and estradiol receptors (classical and novel) mediate the hormonal control of prostate cell stemness, transformation, and the continued growth of prostate cancer. Recent preclinical and clinical findings obtained using new androgen receptor antagonists, anti-estrogens, or compounds such as enhancers of androgen receptor degradation and peptides inhibiting non-genomic androgen functions are also presented. These new drugs will likely lead to significant advances in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:26506594

  20. Targeting prostate cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Crea, Francesco; Mathews, Lesley A; Farrar, William L; Hurt, Elaine M

    2009-12-01

    Cancer stem cells are the sub-population of cells present within tumors responsible for tumorigenesis. These cells have unique biological properties including self-renewal and the ability to differentiate. Furthermore, it is thought that these cells are more resistant to conventional chemotherapy and, as a result, are responsible for patient relapse. We will discuss the identification of prostate cancer stem cells, their unique properties and how these cells may be targeted for more efficacious therapies.

  1. Cobblestone-Area Forming Cells Derived from Patients with Mantle Cell Lymphoma Are Enriched for CD133+ Tumor-Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Daniel J.; Abass-Shereef, Jeneba; Walton, Kelly; Goodell, Lauri; Aviv, Hana; Strair, Roger K.; Budak-Alpdogan, Tulin

    2014-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is associated with a significant risk of therapeutic failure and disease relapse, but the biological origin of relapse is poorly understood. Here, we prospectively identify subpopulations of primary MCL cells with different biologic and immunophenotypic features. Using a simple culture system, we demonstrate that a subset of primary MCL cells co-cultured with either primary human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) or murine MS-5 cells form in cobblestone-areas consisting of cells with a primitive immunophenotype (CD19−CD133+) containing the chromosomal translocation t (11;14)(q13;q32) characteristic of MCL. Limiting dilution serial transplantation experiments utilizing immunodeficient mice revealed that primary MCL engraftment was only observed when either unsorted or CD19−CD133+ cells were utilized. No engraftment was seen using the CD19+CD133− subpopulation. Our results establish that primary CD19−CD133+ MCL cells are a functionally distinct subpopulation of primary MCL cells enriched for MCL-initiating activity in immunodeficient mice. This rare subpopulation of MCL-initiating cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of MCL. PMID:24722054

  2. Adipose Tissue Derived Stem Cells Promote Prostate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Prantl, Lukas; Muehlberg, Fabian; Navone, Nora M.; Song, Yao-Hua; Vykoukal, Jody; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Alt, Eckhard U.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recent evidence indicates that cancer stem cells play an important role in tumor initiation and maintenance. Additionally, the effect of tissue-resident stem cells located in the surrounding healthy tissue on tumor progression has been demonstrated. While most knowledge has been derived from studies of breast cancer cells, little is known regarding the influence of tissue resident stem cells on the tumor biology of prostate cancer. METHODS Twenty male athymic Swiss nu/nu mice (age: 6–8 weeks) were randomized into two treatment groups: 1) subcutaneous injection of 106 MDA PCa 118b human prostate cancer cells into the upper back or 2) subcutaneous injection of 106 MDA PCa 118b cells mixed directly with 105 GFP-labeled human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs). Tumor growth and volumes over the ensuing 3 weeks were assessed using calipers and micro-computed tomography. Immunohistochemistry was performed to identify engrafted hASCs in tumor sections. RESULTS At 3 weeks after injection, the mean tumor volume in the MDA PCa 118b/hASC co-injection group (1019.95 ± 73.49 mm3) was significantly higher than that in the MDA PCa 118b-only group (308.70 ± 21.06 mm3). Engrafted hASCs exhibited the nuclear marker of proliferation Ki67 and expressed markers for endothelial differentiation, indicating their engraftment in tumor vessels. CONCLUSION Our study revealed for the first time that ASCs subcutaneously co-injected with prostate cancer cells engraft and promote tumor progression. Further evaluation of the cross-talk between tumor and local tissue-resident stem cells may lead to new strategies for prostate cancer therapy. PMID:20564322

  3. Phenotypic characterization of the infiltrating immune cells in normal prostate, benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mahmoud-Rezk A; Al-Assiri, Mana; Musalam, Adel O

    2009-04-01

    Immune cell infiltrate is a constant feature in normal prostate, benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic adenocarcinoma. This study elaborates on the cells of the immune system present in normal prostate, benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic adenocarcinoma. Here, we hypothesized that "the development of benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic adenocarcinoma is associated with numeric alterations of the immune cell infiltrate". A total of 50 transurethral prostatic resection specimens, each entailing normal prostate, benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia and high grade prostatic adenocarcinoma were evaluated for the density and phenotype of the immune cells using immunohistological methods and mouse monoclonal antibodies decorating T cells (CD3), histiocytes (CD68) and B lymphocytes (CD20). Immune cell infiltrate was composed of T cells, histiocytes and B-lymphocytes. CD(+)3 T lymphocytes and CD68(+) cells were the predominant cell populations. We observed variations in the density of the immune cells among the normal prostate, benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia and high grade prostatic adenocarcinoma. Compared with normal prostate, benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia had a statistically significant high density of immune cells (3.4+/-0.4versus 13.5+/-1.0, P<0.00). In contrast, a significant decrease in the counts of these cells was observed in high-grade prostatic adenocarcinoma compared to benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia (13.5+/-1.0 versus 5.2+/-0.3, P<0.01). The increased density of immune cells (predominantly CD(+)3 T cells) in benign nodular prostatic hyperplasia suggests that the initial response to cellular damage is mediated by cell-mediated immunity. The decreased density of immune cells in high-grade prostatic adenocarcinoma may reflect immunosuppression. The underlying mechanisms of these numeric variations are open for further investigations.

  4. [Markers of prostate cancer stem cells: research advances].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shun-Qi; Huang, Sheng-Song

    2013-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most seriously malignant diseases threatening men's health, and the mechanisms of its initiation and progression are not yet completely understood. Recent years have witnessed distinct advances in researches on prostate cancer stem cells in many aspects using different sources of materials, such as human prostate cancer tissues, human prostate cancer cell lines, and mouse models of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer stem cell study offers a new insight into the mechanisms of the initiation and progression of prostate cancer and contributes positively to its treatment. This article presents an overview on the prostate cancer stem cell markers utilized in the isolation and identification of prostate cancer stem cells.

  5. Resistance to DNA-damaging treatment in non-small cell lung cancer tumor-initiating cells involves reduced DNA-PK/ATM activation and diminished cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Lundholm, L; Hååg, P; Zong, D; Juntti, T; Mörk, B; Lewensohn, R; Viktorsson, K

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that tumor-initiating cells (TICs), also called cancer stem cells, are partly responsible for resistance to DNA-damaging treatment. Here we addressed if such a phenotype may contribute to radio- and cisplatin resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We showed that four out of eight NSCLC cell lines (H125, A549, H1299 and H23) possess sphere-forming capacity when cultured in stem cell media and three of these display elevated levels of CD133. Indeed, sphere-forming NSCLC cells, hereafter called TICs, showed a reduced apoptotic response and increased survival after irradiation (IR), as compared with the corresponding bulk cell population. Decreased cytotoxicity and apoptotic signaling manifested by diminished poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and caspase 3 activity was also evident in TICs after cisplatin treatment. Neither radiation nor cisplatin resistance was due to quiescence as H125 TICs proliferated at a rate comparable to bulk cells. However, TICs displayed less pronounced G2 cell cycle arrest and S/G2-phase block after IR and cisplatin, respectively. Additionally, we confirmed a cisplatin-refractory phenotype of H125 TICs in vivo in a mouse xenograft model. We further examined TICs for altered expression or activation of DNA damage repair proteins as a way to explain their increased radio- and/or chemotherapy resistance. Indeed, we found that TICs exhibited increased basal γH2AX (H2A histone family, member X) expression and diminished DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), Krüppel-associated protein 1 (KAP1) and monoubiquitination of Fanconi anemia, complementation group D2 (FANCD2). As a proof of principle, ATM inhibition in bulk cells increased their cisplatin resistance, as demonstrated by reduced PARP cleavage. In conclusion, we show that reduced apoptotic response, altered DNA repair signaling and cell cycle perturbations in NSCLC

  6. Tumor Initiation in Human Malignant Melanoma and Potential Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Frank, Markus H.

    2010-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells, have been identified in several human malignancies, including human malignant melanoma. The frequency of malignant melanoma-initiating cells (MMICs), which are identified by their expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family member ABCB5, correlates with disease progression in human patients. Furthermore, targeted MMIC ablation through ABCB5 inhibits tumor initiation and growth in preclinical xenotransplantation models, pointing to potential therapeutic promise of the CSC concept. Recent advances also show that CSCs can exert pro-angiogenic roles in tumor growth and serve immunomodulatory functions related to the evasion of host anti-tumor immunity. Thus, MMICs might initiate and sustain tumorigenic growth not only as a result of CSC-intrinsic self-renewal, differentiation and proliferative capacity, but also based on pro-tumorigenic interactions with the host environment. PMID:20184545

  7. Tumor initiation in human malignant melanoma and potential cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Frank, Markus H

    2010-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells, have been identified in several human malignancies, including human malignant melanoma. The frequency of malignant melanoma-initiating cells (MMICs), which are identified by their expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family member ABCB5, correlates with disease progression in human patients. Furthermore, targeted MMIC ablation through ABCB5 inhibits tumor initiation and growth in preclinical xenotransplantation models, pointing to potential therapeutic promise of the CSC concept. Recent advances also show that CSCs can exert pro-angiogenic roles in tumor growth and serve immunomodulatory functions related to the evasion of host anti-tumor immunity. Thus, MMICs might initiate and sustain tumorigenic growth not only as a result of CSC-intrinsic self-renewal, differentiation and proliferative capacity, but also based on pro-tumorigenic interactions with the host environment.

  8. Tumor initiating but differentiated luminal-like breast cancer cells are highly invasive in the absence of basal-like activity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyoung; Villadsen, René; Sørlie, Therese; Fogh, Louise; Grønlund, Signe Z.; Fridriksdottir, Agla J.; Kuhn, Irene; Rank, Fritz; Wielenga, Vera Timmermans; Solvang, Hiroko; Edwards, Paul A. W.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J.; Petersen, Ole William

    2012-01-01

    The majority of human breast cancers exhibit luminal epithelial differentiation. However, most aggressive behavior, including invasion and purported cancer stem cell activity, are considered characteristics of basal-like cells. We asked the following questions: Must luminal-like breast cancer cells become basal-like to initiate tumors or to invade? Could luminally differentiated cells within a basally initiated hierarchy also be tumorigenic? To answer these questions, we used rare and mutually exclusive lineage markers to isolate subsets of luminal-like and basal-like cells from human breast tumors. We enriched for populations with or without prominent basal-like traits from individual tumors or single cell cloning from cell lines and recovered cells with a luminal-like phenotype. Tumor cells with basal-like traits mimicked phenotypic and functional behavior associated with stem cells assessed by gene expression, mammosphere formation and lineage markers. Luminal-like cells without basal-like traits, surprisingly, were fully capable of initiating invasive tumors in NOD SCID gamma (NSG) mice. In fact, these phenotypically pure luminal-like cells generated larger and more invasive tumors than their basal-like counterparts. The tumorigenicity and invasive potential of the luminal-like cancer cells relied strongly on the expression of the gene GCNT1, which encodes a key glycosyltransferase controlling O-glycan branching. These findings demonstrate that basal-like cells, as defined currently, are not a requirement for breast tumor aggressiveness, and that within a single tumor there are multiple “stem-like” cells with tumorigenic potential casting some doubt on the hypothesis of hierarchical or differentiative loss of tumorigenicity. PMID:22454501

  9. Role of prostatic interstitial cells in prostate motility

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Richard J; Hashitani, Hikaru

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The prostate is a gland whose secretions contribute to the seminal fluids ejaculated upon activation of autonomic sympathetic nerves. In elder males, the prostate undergoes an increase in stroma mass and myogenic tone, leading to benign prostatic hyperplasia that occludes the proximal urethra and the presentation of various lower urinary tract symptoms that decrease their quality of life. This review summarises the role of prostatic interstitial cells (PICs) in the generation of the spontaneous tone in the prostate. It presents current knowledge of the role of Ca2+ plays in PIC pacemaking, as well as the mechanisms by which this spontaneous activity triggers slow wave generation and stromal contraction. PICs display a small T-type Ca2+ current (ICaT) and a large L-type Ca2+ current (ICaL). In contrast to other interstitial cells in the urinary and gastrointestinal tracts, spontaneous Ca2+ signalling in PICs is uniquely dependent on Ca2+ influx through ICaL channels. A model of prostatic pacemaking is presented describing how ICaL can be triggered by an initial membrane depolarization evoked upon the selective opening of Ca2+-activated Cl– channels by Ca2+ flowing only through ICaT channels. The resulting current flow through ICaL results in release of Ca2+ from internal stores and the summation of Cl–-selective spontaneous transient depolarizations (STDs) to form pacemaker potentials that propagate passively into the prostatic stroma to evoke regenerative action potentials and excitation-contraction coupling. PMID:28652517

  10. Proteomic analysis of cancer stem cells in human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun-Kyung; Cho, Hyungdon; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} DU145 prostate cancer cell line was isolated into CD44+ or CD44- cells. {yields} We confirmed CD44+ DU145 cells are more proliferative and tumorigenic than CD44- DU145 cells. {yields} We analyzed and identified proteins that were differentially expressed between CD44+ and CD44- DU145 cells. {yields} Cofilin and Annexin A5 associated with cancer were found to be positively correlated with CD44 expression. -- Abstract: Results from recent studies support the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumor initiation and formation. Here, we applied a proteome profiling approach to investigate the mechanisms of CSCs and to identify potential biomarkers in the prostate cancer cell line DU145. Using MACS, the DU145 prostate cancer cell line was isolated into CD44+ or CD44- cells. In sphere culture, CD44+ cells possessed stem cell characteristics and highly expressed genes known to be important in stem cell maintenance. In addition, they showed strong tumorigenic potential in the clonogenic assay and soft agar colony formation assay. We then analyzed and identified proteins that were differentially expressed between CD44+ and CD44- using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS. Cofilin and Annexin A5, which are associated with proliferation or metastasis in cancer, were found to be positively correlated with CD44 expression. These results provide information that will be important to the development of new cancer diagnostic tools and understanding the mechanisms of CSCs although a more detailed study is necessary to investigate the roles of Cofilin and Annexin A5 in CSCs.

  11. Convection-enhanced delivery of topotecan into a PDGF-driven model of glioblastoma prolongs survival, ablates tumor initiating cells and recruited glial progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Kim A.; Tannenbaum, Aaron M.; Assanah, Marcela C.; Linskey, Katy; Yun, Jonathan; Kangarlu, Alayar; Gil, Orlando D.; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of microenvironment to tumor growth has important implications for optimizing chemotherapeutic response and understanding the biology of recurrent tumors. In this study, we tested the effects of locally administered topotecan on a rat model of glioblastoma that is induced by intracerebral injection of PDGF-IRES-GFP-expressing retrovirus, we treated the tumors by convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of topotecan (136 μM) for 1, 4, or 7 days and then characterized the effects on both the retrovirus-transformed tumor cells (GFP+ cells) as well as the uninfected glial progenitor cells (GFP- cells) that are recruited to the tumor. Topotecan treatment reduced GFP+ cells ~10-fold and recruited progenitors by ~80-fold while providing a significant survival advantage that improved with greater treatment duration. Regions of glial progenitor ablation occurred corresponding to the anatomical distribution of topotecan as predicted by MRI of a surrogate tracer. Histopathologic changes in recurrent tumors point to a decrease in recruitment, most likely due to the chemotherapeutic ablation of the recruitable progenitor pool. PMID:21464045

  12. High-Density and Very-Low-Density Lipoprotein Have Opposing Roles in Regulating Tumor-Initiating Cells and Sensitivity to Radiation in Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Adam R.; Atkinson, Rachel L.; Reddy, Jay P.; Debeb, Bisrat G.; Larson, Richard; Li, Li; Masuda, Hiroko; Brewer, Takae; Atkinson, Bradley J.; Brewster, Abeena; Ueno, Naoto T.; Woodward, Wendy A.

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: We previously demonstrated that cholesterol-lowering agents regulate radiation sensitivity of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) cell lines in vitro and are associated with less radiation resistance among IBC patients who undergo postmastectomy radiation. We hypothesized that decreasing IBC cellular cholesterol induced by treatment with lipoproteins would increase radiation sensitivity. Here, we examined the impact of specific transporters of cholesterol (ie lipoproteins) on the responses of IBC cells to self-renewal and to radiation in vitro and on clinical outcomes in IBC patients. Methods and Materials: Two patient-derived IBC cell lines, SUM 149 and KPL4, were incubated with low-density lipoproteins (LDL), very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), or high-density lipoproteins (HDL) for 24 hours prior to irradiation (0-6 Gy) and mammosphere formation assay. Cholesterol panels were examined in a cohort of patients with primary IBC diagnosed between 1995 and 2011 at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Lipoprotein levels were then correlated to patient outcome, using the log rank statistical model, and examined in multivariate analysis using Cox regression. Results: VLDL increased and HDL decreased mammosphere formation compared to untreated SUM 149 and KPL4 cells. Survival curves showed enhancement of survival in both of the IBC cell lines when pretreated with VLDL and, conversely, radiation sensitization in all cell lines when pretreated with HDL. In IBC patients, higher VLDL values (>30 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than normal values (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.9 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-3.45], P=.035). Lower-than-normal patient HDL values (<60 mg/dL) predicted a lower 5-year overall survival rate than values higher than 60 mg/dL (HR = 3.21 [95% CI: 1.25-8.27], P=.015). Conclusions: This study discovered a relationship among the plasma levels of lipoproteins, overall patient response, and radiation resistance in IBC patients

  13. Characterization of adenoviral transduction profile in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Ai, Jianzhong; Tai, Phillip W L; Lu, Yi; Li, Jia; Ma, Hong; Su, Qin; Wei, Qiang; Li, Hong; Gao, Guangping

    2017-09-01

    Prostate diseases are common in males worldwide with high morbidity. Gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic strategy for prostate diseases, however, it is currently underdeveloped. As well known, adeno virus (Ad) is the most widely used gene therapy vector. The aims of this study are to explore transduction efficiency of Ad in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue, thus further providing guidance for future prostate pathophysiological studies and therapeutic development of prostate diseases. We produced Ad expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), and characterized the transduction efficiency of Ad in both human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines in vitro, as well as prostate tumor xenograft, and wild-type mouse prostate tissue in vivo. Ad transduction efficiency was determined by EGFP fluorescence using microscopy and flow cytometry. Cell type-specific transduction was examined by immunofluorescence staining of cell markers. Our data showed that Ad efficiently transduced human and mouse prostate cancer cells in vitro in a dose dependent manner. Following intratumoral and intraprostate injection, Ad could efficiently transduce prostate tumor xenograft and the major prostatic cell types in vivo, respectively. Our findings suggest that Ad can efficiently transduce prostate tumor cells in vitro as well as xenograft and normal prostate tissue in vivo, and further indicate that Ad could be a potentially powerful toolbox for future gene therapy of prostate diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Targeting lactate dehydrogenase-A inhibits tumorigenesis and tumor progression in mouse models of lung cancer and impacts tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Han; Hanai, Jun-ichi; Ren, Jian-Guo; Kats, Lev; Burgess, Kerri; Bhargava, Parul; Signoretti, Sabina; Billiard, Julia; Duffy, Kevin J.; Grant, Aaron; Wang, Xiaoen; Lorkiewicz, Pawel K.; Schatzman, Sabrina; Bousamra, Michael; Lane, Andrew N.; Higashi, Richard M.; Fan, Teresa W.M.; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Sukhatme, Vikas P.; Seth, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Summary The lactate dehydrogenase-A (LDH-A) enzyme catalyzes the inter-conversion of pyruvate and lactate, is upregulated in human cancers and is associated with aggressive tumor outcomes. Here we use a novel inducible murine model and demonstrate that inactivation of LDH-A in mouse models of NSCLC driven by oncogenic K-RAS or EGFR leads to decreased tumorigenesis and disease regression in established tumors. We also show that abrogation of LDH-A results in reprogramming of pyruvate metabolism, with decreased lactic fermentation in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo. This was accompanied by re-activation of mitochondrial function in vitro but not in vivo or ex vivo. Finally, using a specific small molecule LDH-A inhibitor, we demonstrated that LDH-A is essential for cancer initiating cell survival and proliferation. Thus, LDH-A can be a viable therapeutic target for NSCLC including cancer stem cell-dependent drug resistant tumors. PMID:24726384

  15. Haloacetonitriles: metabolism, genotoxicity, and tumor-initiating activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, E.L.C.; Daniel, F.B.; Herren-Freund, S.L.; Pereira, M.A.

    1986-11-01

    Haloacetonitriles (HAN) are drinking water contaminants produced during chlorine disinfection. This paper evaluates metabolism, genotoxicity, and tumor-initiating activity of these chemicals. The alkylating potential of the HAN to react with the electrophile-trapping agent, 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine, followed the order dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN) > bromochloroacetonitrile (BCAN) > chloroacetonitrile (CAN) > dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) > trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN). When administered orally to rats, the HAN were metabolized to cyanide and excreted in the urine as thiocyanate. The extent of thiocyanate excretion was CAN > BCAN > DCAN > DDAN >> TCAN. Haloacetonitriles inhibited in vitro microsomal dimethylnitrosamine demethylase (DMN-DM) activity. The most potent inhibitors were DBAN and BCAN. The HAN produced DNA strand breaks in cultured human lymphoblastic (CCRF-CEM) cells. TCAN was the most potent DNA strand breaker. DCAN reacted with polyadenylic acid and DNA to form adducts in a cell-free system. None of the HAN initiated ..gamma..-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) foci when assayed for tumor-initiating activity in rat liver foci bioassay. In summary, the HAN were demonstrated to possess alkylating activity and genotoxicity in vitro and appeared after oral administration to possess biological activity as indicated by the inhibition of DMN-DM by TCAN but appeared to lack genotoxic and tumor-initiating activity in rat liver. It is proposed that if the HAN found in drinking water pose a carcinogenic hazard it would be limited to the gastrointestinal tract.

  16. [Single prostatic metastasis of a small cell lung carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Yañez, Isabel; Perez Lopez, Maria Eva; Rodriguez Lopez, Jose Angel; Arias Santos, Maria Dolores; Garcia Gomez, Jesus; Garcia Mata, Jesus

    2009-03-01

    To make the difference between two uncommon entities, small cell prostate carcinoma and prostatic metastasis of small cell lung cancer. We describe a case of single extrapulmonar metastasis in the prostate from small lung carcinoma. We describe a case of single extrapulmonar metastasis in the prostate from small lung carcinoma. Clinical and radiographic findings and inmunohistochemistry allow differential diagnosis.

  17. Identification of Prostate Cancer-Related Genes Using Inhibition of NMD in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Identification of Prostate Cancer -Related Genes Using W81XWH-04- 1 -0045 Inhibition of NMD in Prostate Cancer Cell...analytical filter to the prostate cancer cell lines 22RV- 1 and DU-145. Ten genes for each cell line have been selected for sequencing analysis.(Table...list of candidate genes for sequencing analysis from the LNCaP, PC3, 22RV- 1 and DU- 145 prostate cancer cell lines has been produced REPORTABLE

  18. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  19. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Tang, Dean G

    2016-02-29

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features.

  20. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease. PMID:26593898

  1. Secondary Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma of Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Kalyan; Bandyopadhyay, Arghya; Gangopadhyay, Mimi; Chakraborty, Subrata; Bera, Pranati

    2012-01-01

    True metastases to prostate from solid tumors are reported only in 0.2% of all surgical prostatic specimens and 2.9% of all male postmortems. Clinical context, morphological features, and immunohistochemical localization of prostate specific antigen (PSA) are supposed to clarify the differential diagnosis between a secondary and a primary tumor. We report an unusual and rare case of secondary signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) of prostate in which the clinical data and signet ring cell morphology pointed toward the diagnosis of a primary SRCC. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for PSA not only proved the case to be a secondary SRCC but also initiated the process for diagnosis of the occult primary malignancy in the patient′s stomach. PMID:24027389

  2. Prostate-Specific Natural Health Products (Dietary Supplements) Radiosensitize Normal Prostate Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Yasmin; Schoenherr, Diane; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific health products (dietary supplements) are taken by cancer patients to alleviate the symptoms linked with poor prostate health. However, the effect of these agents on evidence-based radiotherapy practice is poorly understood. The present study aimed to determine whether dietary supplements radiosensitized normal prostate or prostate cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: Three well-known prostate-specific dietary supplements were purchased from commercial sources available to patients (Trinovin, Provelex, and Prostate Rx). The cells used in the study included normal prostate lines (RWPE-1 and PWR-1E), prostate tumor lines (PC3, DU145, and LNCaP), and a normal nonprostate line (HaCaT). Supplement toxicity was assessed using cell proliferation assays [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] and cellular radiosensitivity using conventional clonogenic assays (0.5-4Gy). Cell cycle kinetics were assessed using the bromodeoxyuridine/propidium iodide pulse-labeling technique, apoptosis by scoring caspase-3 activation, and DNA repair by assessing gammaH2AX. Results: The cell growth and radiosensitivity of the malignant PC3, DU145, and LNcaP cells were not affected by any of the dietary prostate supplements (Provelex [2mug/mL], Trinovin [10mug/mL], and Prostate Rx [50 mug/mL]). However, both Trinovin (10mug/mL) and Prostate Rx (6mug/mL) inhibited the growth rate of the normal prostate cell lines. Prostate Rx increased cellular radiosensitivity of RWPE-1 cells through the inhibition of DNA repair. Conclusion: The use of prostate-specific dietary supplements should be discouraged during radiotherapy owing to the preferential radiosensitization of normal prostate cells.

  3. The Function of Neuroendocrine Cells in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0227 TITLE: The Function of Neuroendocrine Cells in Prostate Cancer ...REPORT TYPE Annual Report 3. DATES COVERED 1 April 2011 – 31 March 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Function of Neuroendocrine Cells in Prostate Cancer ...initiation and progression of human prostate cancer Scope: 1) Use a pten null mouse prostate cancer model to determine if ablation of NE cells by

  4. Therapy-induced developmental reprogramming of prostate cancer cells and acquired therapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mannan; Caradec, Josselin; Lubik, Amy Anne; Li, Na; Hollier, Brett G; Takhar, Mandeep; Altimirano-Dimas, Manuel; Chen, Mengqian; Roshan-Moniri, Mani; Butler, Miriam; Lehman, Melanie; Bishop, Jennifer; Truong, Sarah; Huang, Shih-Chieh; Cochrane, Dawn; Cox, Michael; Collins, Colin; Gleave, Martin; Erho, Nicholas; Alshalafa, Mohamed; Davicioni, Elai; Nelson, Colleen; Gregory-Evans, Sheryl; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Jenkins, Robert B; Klein, Eric A; Buttyan, Ralph

    2017-01-27

    Treatment-induced neuroendocrine transdifferentiation (NEtD) complicates therapies for metastatic prostate cancer (PCa). Based on evidence that PCa cells can transdifferentiate to other neuroectodermally-derived cell lineages in vitro, we proposed that NEtD requires first an intermediary reprogramming to metastable cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) of a neural class and we demonstrate that several different AR+/PSA+ PCa cell lines were efficiently reprogrammed to, maintained and propagated as CSCs by growth in androgen-free neural/neural crest (N/NC) stem medium. Such reprogrammed cells lost features of prostate differentiation; gained features of N/NC stem cells and tumor-initiating potential; were resistant to androgen signaling inhibition; and acquired an invasive phenotype in vitro and in vivo. When placed back into serum-containing mediums, reprogrammed cells could be re-differentiated to N-/NC-derived cell lineages or return back to an AR+ prostate-like state. Once returned, the AR+ cells were resistant to androgen signaling inhibition. Acute androgen deprivation or anti-androgen treatment in serum-containing medium led to the transient appearance of a sub-population of cells with similar characteristics. Finally, a 132 gene signature derived from reprogrammed PCa cell lines distinguished tumors from PCa patients with adverse outcomes. This model may explain neural manifestations of PCa associated with lethal disease. The metastable nature of the reprogrammed stem-like PCa cells suggests that cycles of PCa cell reprogramming followed by re-differentiation may support disease progression and therapeutic resistance. The ability of a gene signature from reprogrammed PCa cells to identify tumors from patients with metastasis or PCa-specific mortality implies that developmental reprogramming is linked to aggressive tumor behaviors.

  5. Isolation and Growth of Prostate Stem Cells and Establishing Cancer Cell Lines from Human Prostate Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Kim, Y., Dubey, P., and Witte , O. N. In vivo regeneration of murine prostate from dissociated cell populations of postnatal epithelia and urogenital...R. U., Cheng, D., and Witte , O. N. Isolation and functional characterization of murine prostate stem cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 2006. 34...of Medicine Flow Sorting Facility) for their expert assistance and Jessica Hicks and Yuko Konishi (Johns Hopkins Department of Pathology) for the

  6. Invariant NKT Cell Ligands for Prostate Cancer Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    NUMBER Invariant NKT Cell Ligands for Prostate Cancer Vaccines 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0156 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...efficacy in tumor bearing mice. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer , immunotherapy, NKT cells 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...proposal have shown that mice bearing prostate cancers in the TRAMP model ( prostate specific expression on SV40 T antigen, Tag, oncogene) do not respond

  7. CD49f and CD61 identify Her2/neu-induced mammary tumor initiating cells that are potentially derived from luminal progenitors and maintained by the integrin-TGFβ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Pang-Kuo; Kanojia, Deepak; Liu, Xinfeng; Singh, Udai P.; Berger, Franklin G.; Wang, Qian; Chen, Hexin

    2011-01-01

    HER2/Neu is overexpressed in 20-30% of breast cancers and associated with aggressive phenotypes and poor prognosis. For deciphering the role of HER2/Neu in breast cancer, mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-Her2/neu transgenic mice that develop mammary tumors resembling human HER2-subtype breast cancer have been established. Several recent studies have revealed that HER2/Neu is overexpressed in and regulates self renewal of breast tumor initiating cells (TICs). However, in the MMTV-Her2/neu transgenic mouse model, the identity of TICs remains elusive, despite previous studies showing supportive evidence for existence of TICs in Her2/neu-induced mammary tumors. Through systematic screening and characterization, we identified surface markers CD49f, CD61 and ESA were aberrantly overexpressed in Her2-overexpressing mammary tumor cells. Analysis of these markers as well as CD24 detected anomalous expansion of the luminal progenitor population in preneoplastic mammary glands of Her2/neu-transgenic mice, indicating that aberrant luminal progenitors originated Her2-induced mammary tumors. The combined markers, CD49f and CD61, further delineated the CD49fhighCD61high-sorted fraction as a TIC-enriched population, which displayed increased tumorsphere formation ability, enhanced tumorigenicity both in vitro and in vivo and drug resistance to pacitaxel and doxorubicin. Moreover, the TIC-enriched population manifested increased TGFβ signaling and exhibited gene expression signatures of stemness, TGFβ signaling and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition. Our findings that self-renewal and clonogenicity of TICs were suppressed by pharmacologically inhibiting the TGFβ signaling further indicate that the TGFβ pathway is vital for maintenance of the TIC population. Finally, we showed that the integrin β3 (CD61) signaling pathway was required for sustaining active TGFβ signaling and self-renewal of TICs. We for the first time developed a technique to highly enrich TICs from mammary

  8. Prostate Stem Cells in the Development of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia and Prostate Cancer: Emerging Role and Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Akhilesh; Gupta, Sharad; Mistry, Bhavesh; Gupta, Sarita

    2013-01-01

    Benign Prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa) are the most common prostatic disorders affecting elderly men. Multiple factors including hormonal imbalance, disruption of cell proliferation, apoptosis, chronic inflammation, and aging are thought to be responsible for the pathophysiology of these diseases. Both BPH and PCa are considered to be arisen from aberrant proliferation of prostate stem cells. Recent studies on BPH and PCa have provided significant evidence for the origin of these diseases from stem cells that share characteristics with normal prostate stem cells. Aberrant changes in prostate stem cell regulatory factors may contribute to the development of BPH or PCa. Understanding these regulatory factors may provide insight into the mechanisms that convert quiescent adult prostate cells into proliferating compartments and lead to BPH or carcinoma. Ultimately, the knowledge of the unique prostate stem or stem-like cells in the pathogenesis and development of hyperplasia will facilitate the development of new therapeutic targets for BPH and PCa. In this review, we address recent progress towards understanding the putative role and complexities of stem cells in the development of BPH and PCa. PMID:23936768

  9. Disruption of Prostate Epithelial Differentiation Pathways and Prostate Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Sander B.; Miranti, Cindy K.

    2013-01-01

    One of the foremost problems in the prostate cancer (PCa) field is the inability to distinguish aggressive from indolent disease, which leads to difficult prognoses and thousands of unnecessary surgeries. This limitation stems from the fact that the mechanisms of tumorigenesis in the prostate are poorly understood. Some genetic alterations are commonly reported in prostate tumors, including upregulation of Myc, fusion of Ets genes to androgen-regulated promoters, and loss of Pten. However, the specific roles of these aberrations in tumor initiation and progression are poorly understood. Likewise, the cell of origin for PCa remains controversial and may be linked to the aggressive potential of the tumor. One important clue is that prostate tumors co-express basal and luminal protein markers that are restricted to their distinct cell types in normal tissue. Prostate epithelium contains layer-specific stem cells as well as rare bipotent cells, which can differentiate into basal or luminal cells. We hypothesize that the primary oncogenic cell of origin is a transient-differentiating bipotent cell. Such a cell must maintain tight temporal and spatial control of differentiation pathways, thus increasing its susceptibility for oncogenic disruption. In support of this hypothesis, many of the pathways known to be involved in prostate differentiation can be linked to genes commonly altered in PCa. In this article, we review what is known about important differentiation pathways (Myc, p38MAPK, Notch, PI3K/Pten) in the prostate and how their misregulation could lead to oncogenesis. Better understanding of normal differentiation will offer new insights into tumor initiation and may help explain the functional significance of common genetic alterations seen in PCa. Additionally, this understanding could lead to new methods for classifying prostate tumors based on their differentiation status and may aid in identifying more aggressive tumors. PMID:24199173

  10. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Identification of MSCs in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) Next, the presence of MSCs in pathological tissue from older men was investigated...inflammation was detected (Table 5). Inflammation was more frequently observed in benign areas of malignant prostates ; though it was commonly detected...Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Isaacs; Jeffrey Karp

  11. New gene expressed in prostate: a potential target for T cell-mediated prostate cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cereda, Vittore; Poole, Diane J; Palena, Claudia; Das, Sudipto; Bera, Tapan K; Remondo, Cinzia; Gulley, James L; Arlen, Philip M; Yokokawa, Junko; Pastan, Ira; Schlom, Jeffrey; Tsang, Kwong Y

    2010-01-01

    New gene expressed in prostate (NGEP) is a prostate-specific gene encoding either a small cytoplasmic protein (NGEP-S) or a larger polytopic membrane protein (NGEP-L). NGEP-L expression is detectable only in prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia and normal prostate. We have identified an HLA-A2 binding NGEP epitope (designated P703) which was used to generate T cell lines from several patients with localized and metastatic prostate cancer. These T cell lines were able to specifically lyse HLA-A2 and NGEP-expressing human tumor cells. NGEP-P703 tetramer binding assays demonstrated that metastatic prostate cancer patients had a higher frequency of NGEP-specific T cells when compared with healthy donors. Moreover, an increased frequency of NGEP-specific T cells was detected in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of prostate cancer patients post-vaccination with a PSA-based vaccine, further indicating the immunogenicity of NGEP. These studies thus identify NGEP as a potential target for T cell-mediated immunotherapy of prostate cancer.

  12. The marrow niche controls the cancer stem cell phenotype of disseminated prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Yusuke; Berry, Janice E.; Eber, Matthew R.; Jung, Younghun; Yumoto, Kenji; Cackowski, Frank C.; Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Parsana, Princy; Mehra, Rohit; Wang, Jingcheng; McGee, Samantha; Lee, Eunsohl; Nagrath, Sunitha; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Taichman, Russell S.

    2016-01-01

    Dissemination of cancer stem cells (CSCs) serves as the basis of metastasis. Recently, we demonstrated that circulating prostate cancer targets the hematopoietic stem cell (HSCs) ‘niche’ in marrow during dissemination. Once in the niche, disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) may remain dormant for extended periods. As the major function of the HSC niche is to maintain stem cell functions, we hypothesized that the niche regulates CSC activities of DTCs. Here we show that DTCs recovered from marrow were significantly enriched for a CSC phenotype. Critically, the conversion of DTCs to CSCs is regulated by niche-derived GAS6 through the Mer/mTOR; molecules previously shown to regulate dormancy. The data demonstrate that the niche plays a significant role in maintaining tumor-initiating prostate cancer in marrow and suggests a functional relationship between CSCs and dormancy. Understanding how the marrow niche regulates the conversion of DTCs to CSCs is critical for the development of therapeutics specifically targeting skeletal bone metastasis and dormancy. PMID:27172799

  13. Prominin-1 (CD133) Expression in the Prostate and Prostate Cancer: A Marker for Quiescent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Pellacani, Davide; Oldridge, Emma E; Collins, Anne T; Maitland, Norman J

    2013-01-01

    The origin and phenotype of stem cells in human prostate cancer remains a subject of much conjecture. In this scenario, CD133 has been successfully used as a stem cell marker in both normal prostate and prostate cancer. However, cancer stem cells have been identified without the use of this marker, opening up the possibility of a CD133 negative cancer stem cell. In this chapter, we review the current literature regarding prostate cancer stem cells, with specific reference to the expression of CD133 as a stem cell marker to identify and purify stem cells in normal prostate epithelium and prostate cancer.

  14. The role of Cajal cells in chronic prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Haki Yuksel, Ozgur; Urkmez, Ahmet; Verit, Ayhan

    2016-07-04

    Types of prostatitis can be defined as groups of syndromes in adult men associated with infectious and noninfectious causes characterized frequently by lower abdominal and perineal signs and diverse clinical symptoms and complications. Etiopathogenesis of chronic prostatitis is not well defined. Moreover, its treatment outcomes are not satisfactory. Presence of c-kit positive interstitial cells in human prostate is already known. It has been demonstrated that these cells can be pacemaker cells which trigger spontaneous slow-wave electrical activity in the prostate and can be responsible for the transport of glandular secretion from acinar cells into major and minor prostatic ducts and finally into urethra. In the light of all these data, when presence of a possible inflammatory pathology is thought to involve prostate that secretes and has a reservoir which drains its secretion (for prostate, prostatic urethra), two points are worth mentioning. Impairment of secretion mechanism and collection of secretion within the organ with reflux of the microbial material from its reservoir back into prostate gland. Both of these potential conditions can be explained by ductal neuromuscular mechanism, which induces secretion. We think that in this neuromuscular mechanism interstitial Cajal cells have an important role in chronic prostatitis. Our hypothesis is that curability of prostatitis is correlated with the number of Cajal cells not subjected to apoptosis.

  15. Origin and Properties of Prostatic Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    α6 Fig 2. SP cells have greater proliferative potential than non-SP cells. A. FACS sorted SP and non-SP cells (4000/well) were seeded in collagen...proximal region also has the highest levels of telomerase [38], which is associated with germinative compartments of many self-renewing tissues [39, 40...2013. 3 Salm SN, Burger PE, Coetzee S et al. TGF- maintains dormancy of prostatic stem cells in the proximal region of ducts. J Cell Biol 2005; 170:81

  16. Antioxidant enzymes in malignant prostate cell lines and in primary cultured prostatic cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, K; Seidel, B; Rudolph, B; Lein, M; Cronauer, M V; Henke, W; Hampel, G; Schnorr, D; Loening, S A

    1997-01-01

    The antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were determined in the androgen-response LNCaP and androgen-nonresponsive PC-3 and DU 145 cells as well as in prostatic epithelial cell cultures of benign and malignant human prostatic tissue. There were no differences between the enzyme activities of the human primary cell cultures from cancerous tissue and their normal counterparts. The enzyme activities of the three permanent cell lines were either higher (SOD, catalase, GR) or lower (GST, GPx) than in the primary cell cultures. In LNCaP cells catalase and GR were significantly higher, GST, in contrast, was significantly lower than in PC-3 and DU 145 cells. GST in PC-3 and DU 145 cells, and SOD in all the three cell lines showed no significant differences. Catalase, GPx and GR values were significantly different in the three permanent cell lines. The different enzymatic equipment of the prostate cancer cell lines provides the basis for experimental testing of new concepts of cancer treatment with the help of systematic modulations of the antioxidant defence systems in prostate cancer.

  17. [Circulating tumor cells and advanced prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Murez, Thibaut; Droupy, Stéphane; Rebillard, Xavier; Alix-Panabieres, Catherine

    2012-07-01

    Despite development and widespread of PSA, current tools evaluating prostate cancer still give inconsistent or insufficiently relevant results. As encouraging data raised from circulating tumor cells detection in colon or breast cancer, they were evaluated as a surrogate prostate cancer biomarker. Tumor cells need to leave their surrounding primary environment and to survive in mesenchymal environment before they spill and metastasize. Basic research revealed several mutations required through a complex transition phenomenon, including dormancy steps. Circulating cells detection techniques are based on molecular and immunologic methods. Most of them need an enrichment step to improve sensibility and/or specificity. As of today, Veridex' CellSearch is the only FDA approved technique in the evaluation of castration resistant prostate cancer response to new drugs. Clinical research using other techniques highlighted the need for clinical endpoints, as there's no relevant tool and as techniques' target differ. Further studies are required to improve circulating tumors cells' staging and prognosis value. Cellular characterization may be the way to identify metastasis development potential more than the spillage burden. Those techniques still need improvements before they are included in daily practice decisional trees.

  18. Voltage-gated sodium channels were differentially expressed in human normal prostate, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shan, Bin; Dong, Mei; Tang, He; Wang, Na; Zhang, Jin; Yan, Changqing; Jiao, Xiaocui; Zhang, Hailin; Wang, Chuan

    2014-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are expressed not only in excitable cells but also in numerous metastatic cells, particularly in certain types of cancer cells. In some types of cancer, including prostate cancer, the expression of VGSCs is associated with cancer migration, invasion and metastasis in vivo. However, the detailed expression profiles of VGSC α subunits in normal human prostate, in prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic cancer remain controversial. In the present study, quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to systematically detect all subtypes of VGSC α subunits in normal human prostate, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer cells. The expression profile of VGSC α subunits was observed to differ between these cell types. Nav1.5 was the major isoform expressed in normal human prostate tissue, while Nav1.5 and Nav1.2 were the predominant isoforms in BPH tissue. However, in PC-3 and LNCaP cells, two typical prostate cancer cell lines, Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 were abundantly expressed. By comparing the relative expression levels of Nav1.5, Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 in these cells, the mRNA levels of Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 were identified to be 6- to 27-fold higher in PC-3 and LNCaP cells than in either normal or BPH samples (P<0.05); however, Nav1.5 mRNA levels were relatively lower compared with those of Nav1.6 or Nav1.7 in all cells analyzed. To confirm whether Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 expression in cancer cells was functional, a patch-clamp technique was used to record whole-cell currents. A tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current was successfully recorded in PC-3 cells, but not in LNCaP cells. It was concluded that although all types of VGSC α subunits exhibited low expression levels in normal prostate and BPH cells, both Nav1.6 and Nav1.7 were significantly upregulated in the prostate cancer cell lines, suggesting these subtypes may be potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for certain types of prostate cancer in humans.

  19. Killing Prostate Cancer Cells and Endothelial Cells with a VEGF-Triggered Cell Death Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-02- 1 -0029 TITLE: Killing Prostate Cancer Cells and...CONTRACT NUMBER Killing Prostate Cancer Cells and Endothelial Cells with a VEGF-Triggered Cell Death Receptor 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-02- 1 -0029...as a means to kill prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells in vitro. The scope of this project involved: ( 1 ) creating adenoviral

  20. EXAFS studies of prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla, J.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Lekki, J.; Kisiel, A.; Steininger, R.; Goettlicher, J.

    2013-04-01

    Sulphur plays a vital role in every human organism. It is known, that sulphur-bearing compounds, such as for example cysteine and glutathione, play critical roles in development and progression of many diseases. Any alteration in sulphur's biochemistry could become a precursor of serious pathological conditions. One of such condition is prostate cancer, the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in the western world and the second leading cause of cancer related death in men. The purpose of presented studies was to examine what changes occur in the nearest chemical environment of sulphur in prostate cancer cell lines in comparison to healthy cells. The Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was used, followed by theoretical calculations. The results of preliminary analysis is presented.

  1. Tyrosine Kinase Display of Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    Signaling 255 tion of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels (26). A variety of physiological and pharmacological agents can increase cAMP levels, such... pheochromocytoma cell line which can be induced by IL-6 to undergo neuronal differentiation-revealed the role of the P13K pathway in this process...growth effect of NT at physiological concentrations. Prostate 31:183--192. cancer xenograft with strongly androgen-dependent and relapsed strains 81

  2. Augmented mast cell infiltration and microvessel density in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wagrowska-Danilewicz, Małgorzata; Stasikowska-Kanicka, Olga; Tuka, Elżbieta; Danilewicz, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study Recent investigations have taken into account the role of mast cells in prostate cancer formation, analyzing their dual functions (as tumour growth promoters and tumour growth inhibitors). The aim of our study was to compare mast cell infiltration and microvessel density in prostate cancer and in benign prostate hyperplasia. We also attempted to find possible relationships among mast cell infiltration and microvessel density, Gleason score, as well as serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Material and methods The investigation was confined to evaluations of material from prostate needle biopsies, carried out in 26 patients with prostate cancer, and of 14 specimens diagnosed as benign hyperplasia. The numbers of tryptase positive mast cells and CD34 positive vessels were determined using a computer image analysis system. In the patients with prostate cancer, both mast cell infiltrates and microvessel density were significantly increased, as compared to the control patients. Results Significant positive correlations were identified between the mean numbers of mast cells and microvessel densities, both in the prostate cancer group and in the control group. Moreover, significant positive correlations were observed between Gleason score on one hand and the number of mast cells and microvessel density on the other. The correlations between PSA serum levels and both mast cell infiltration and microvessel density were positive, but not in a statistically significant way. Conclusions The reported investigations may support the assumption of mast cell promoter function in prostate cancer development, whereas no evidence was found for their opposite PMID:24592126

  3. Isolation, cultivation, and characterization of adult murine prostate stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lukacs, Rita U.; Goldstein, Andrew S.; Lawson, Devon A.; Cheng, Donghui; Witte, Owen N.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT/SUMMARY The successful isolation and cultivation of prostate stem cells will allow us to study their unique biological properties and their application in therapeutic approaches. Here we provide step-by-step procedures on the basis of previous work in our laboratory for: the harvesting of primary prostate cells from adolescent male mice by a modified enzymatic procedure; the isolation of an enriched population of prostate stem cells through cell sorting; the cultivation of prostate stem cells in vitro; and characterization of these cells and their stem-like activity, including in vivo tubule regeneration. Normally it will take approximately 8 hours to harvest prostate cells, isolate the stem cell enriched population, and set up the in vitro sphere assay. It will take up to 8 weeks to analyze the unique properties of the stem cells, including their regenerative capacity in vivo. PMID:20360765

  4. Isolation, cultivation and characterization of adult murine prostate stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, Rita U; Goldstein, Andrew S; Lawson, Devon A; Cheng, Donghui; Witte, Owen N

    2010-04-01

    The successful isolation and cultivation of prostate stem cells will allow us to study their unique biological properties and their application in therapeutic approaches. Here we describe step-by-step procedures on the basis of previous work in our laboratory for the harvesting of primary prostate cells from adolescent male mice by a modified enzymatic procedure; the isolation of an enriched population of prostate stem cells through cell sorting; and the cultivation of prostate stem cells in vitro and characterization of these cells and their stem-like activity, including in vivo tubule regeneration. Normally, it will take approximately 8 h to harvest prostate cells, isolate the stem cell-enriched population and set up the in vitro sphere assay. It will take up to 8 weeks to analyze the unique properties of the stem cells, including their regenerative capacity in vivo.

  5. Identification of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the reactive stroma of a prostate cancer xenograft by side population analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria-Martinez, Albert; Barquinero, Jordi; Barbosa-Desongles, Anna; Hurtado, Antoni; Pinos, Tomas; Seoane, Joan; Poupon, Marie-France; Morote, Joan; Reventos, Jaume; Munell, Francina

    2009-10-15

    Cancer stem cells are a distinct cellular population that is believed to be responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Recent data suggest that solid tumors also contain another type of stem cells, the mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which contribute to the formation of tumor-associated stroma. The Hoechst 33342 efflux assay has proved useful to identify a rare cellular fraction, named Side Population (SP), enriched in cells with stem-like properties. Using this assay, we identified SP cells in a prostate cancer xenograft containing human prostate cancer cells and mouse stromal cells. The SP isolation, subculture and sequential sorting allowed the generation of single-cell-derived clones of murine origin that were recognized as MSC by their morphology, plastic adherence, proliferative potential, adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation ability and immunophenotype (CD45{sup -}, CD81{sup +} and Sca-1{sup +}). We also demonstrated that SP clonal cells secrete transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) and that their inhibition reduces proliferation and accelerates differentiation. These results reveal the existence of SP cells in the stroma of a cancer xenograft, and provide evidence supporting their MSC nature and the role of TGF-{beta}1 in maintaining their proliferation and undifferentiated status. Our data also reveal the usefulness of the SP assay to identify and isolate MSC cells from carcinomas.

  6. Basal cell carcinoma of the prostate: unusual subtype of prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Komura, Kazumasa; Inamoto, Teruo; Tsuji, Motomu; Ibuki, Naokazu; Koyama, Kohei; Ubai, Takanobu; Azuma, Haruhito; Katsuoka, Yoji

    2010-12-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the prostate, which has been generally considered to be indolent, is an unusual histological type of prostatic carcinoma and is extremely rare. This tumor has been classified according to the prevalent pattern of growth as adenoid cystic carcinoma or basaloid cell carcinoma (BCC), with the former growth pattern being considered to be the main feature of this entity. A 67-year-old Japanese man was admitted to a general hospital with obstructive urinary symptoms. His prostate was slightly enlarged, stony hard, and with a rough surface on digital rectal examination, while serum prostate-specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase concentrations were within the normal ranges (0.007 and 0.9 ng/mL, respectively). 2-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) exhibited multiple accumulations suspicious for cancer metastases. Specimens obtained by prostatic needle biopsy showed immunohistochemical reactivity for cytokeratin 34βE12 and P63, findings that were identical to those seen in basal cell carcinoma. Basal cell carcinoma of the prostate is a rare tumor, reported in 56 cases so far, and among all these, the pure form of BCC is extremely rare. Immunohistochemistry is indispensable to distinguish this neoplasm from other unusual histological types of prostatic carcinomas. Our findings reveal that tumors with a basaloid cell-predominant pattern have significant potential for a poor prognosis, in contrast with the conventional understanding regarding this neoplasm.

  7. The Function of Neuroendocrine Cells in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    still many unanswered questions in prostate cancer. A fundamental and clinically important issue is why prostate cancer responds to hormonal therapy ...adenocarcinoma cells express low levels of CD49f. We then fractionated CD49fhi and CD49flo cells and transplanted both into recipient mice. Both phenotypic...Hsia E, Squires J, Li Z, Zhang Y, Li W, Chen X, Xu H, Huang J. Androgen-deprivation therapy -induced aggressive prostate cancer with neuroendocrine

  8. A basal stem cell signature identifies aggressive prostate cancer phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bryan A.; Sokolov, Artem; Uzunangelov, Vladislav; Baertsch, Robert; Newton, Yulia; Graim, Kiley; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M.; Witte, Owen N.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from numerous cancers suggests that increased aggressiveness is accompanied by up-regulation of signaling pathways and acquisition of properties common to stem cells. It is unclear if different subtypes of late-stage cancer vary in stemness properties and whether or not these subtypes are transcriptionally similar to normal tissue stem cells. We report a gene signature specific for human prostate basal cells that is differentially enriched in various phenotypes of late-stage metastatic prostate cancer. We FACS-purified and transcriptionally profiled basal and luminal epithelial populations from the benign and cancerous regions of primary human prostates. High-throughput RNA sequencing showed the basal population to be defined by genes associated with stem cell signaling programs and invasiveness. Application of a 91-gene basal signature to gene expression datasets from patients with organ-confined or hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer revealed that metastatic small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma was molecularly more stem-like than either metastatic adenocarcinoma or organ-confined adenocarcinoma. Bioinformatic analysis of the basal cell and two human small cell gene signatures identified a set of E2F target genes common between prostate small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and primary prostate basal cells. Taken together, our data suggest that aggressive prostate cancer shares a conserved transcriptional program with normal adult prostate basal stem cells. PMID:26460041

  9. Differential Cytotoxic Activity of a Novel Palladium-Based Compound on Prostate Cell Lines, Primary Prostate Epithelial Cells and Prostate Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cevatemre, Buse; Pellacani, Davide; Walker, Hannah; Mann, Vincent M.; Simms, Matthew S.; Stower, Michael J.; Yilmaz, Veysel T.; Maitland, Norman J.

    2013-01-01

    The outcome for patients with advanced metastatic and recurrent prostate cancer is still poor. Therefore, new chemotherapeutics are required, especially for killing cancer stem cells that are thought to be responsible for disease recurrence. In this study, we screened the effect of a novel palladium-based anticancer agent (Pd complex) against six different prostate cancer cell lines, and primary cultures from seven Gleason 6/7 prostate cancer, three Gleason 8/9 prostate cancer and four benign prostate hyperplasia patient samples, as well as cancer stem cells selected from primary cultures. MTT and ATP viability assays were used to assess cell growth and flow cytometry to assess cell cycle status. In addition, immunofluorescence was used to detect γH2AX nuclear foci, indicative of DNA damage, and Western blotting to assess the induction of apoptosis and autophagy. The Pd complex showed a powerful growth-inhibitory effect against both cell lines and primary cultures. More importantly, it successfully reduced the viability of cancer stem cells as first reported in this study. The Pd complex induced DNA damage and differentially induced evidence of cell death, as well as autophagy. In conclusion, this novel agent may be promising for use against the bulk of the tumour cell population as well as the prostate cancer stem cells, which are thought to be responsible for the resistance of metastatic prostate cancer to chemotherapy. This study also indicates that the combined use of the Pd complex with an autophagy modulator may be a more promising approach to treat prostate cancer. In addition, the differential effects observed between cell lines and primary cells emphasise the importance of the model used to test novel drugs including its genetic background, and indeed the necessity of using cells cultured from patient samples. PMID:23675532

  10. Differential cytotoxic activity of a novel palladium-based compound on prostate cell lines, primary prostate epithelial cells and prostate stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ulukaya, Engin; Frame, Fiona M; Cevatemre, Buse; Pellacani, Davide; Walker, Hannah; Mann, Vincent M; Simms, Matthew S; Stower, Michael J; Yilmaz, Veysel T; Maitland, Norman J

    2013-01-01

    The outcome for patients with advanced metastatic and recurrent prostate cancer is still poor. Therefore, new chemotherapeutics are required, especially for killing cancer stem cells that are thought to be responsible for disease recurrence. In this study, we screened the effect of a novel palladium-based anticancer agent (Pd complex) against six different prostate cancer cell lines, and primary cultures from seven Gleason 6/7 prostate cancer, three Gleason 8/9 prostate cancer and four benign prostate hyperplasia patient samples, as well as cancer stem cells selected from primary cultures. MTT and ATP viability assays were used to assess cell growth and flow cytometry to assess cell cycle status. In addition, immunofluorescence was used to detect γH2AX nuclear foci, indicative of DNA damage, and Western blotting to assess the induction of apoptosis and autophagy. The Pd complex showed a powerful growth-inhibitory effect against both cell lines and primary cultures. More importantly, it successfully reduced the viability of cancer stem cells as first reported in this study. The Pd complex induced DNA damage and differentially induced evidence of cell death, as well as autophagy. In conclusion, this novel agent may be promising for use against the bulk of the tumour cell population as well as the prostate cancer stem cells, which are thought to be responsible for the resistance of metastatic prostate cancer to chemotherapy. This study also indicates that the combined use of the Pd complex with an autophagy modulator may be a more promising approach to treat prostate cancer. In addition, the differential effects observed between cell lines and primary cells emphasise the importance of the model used to test novel drugs including its genetic background, and indeed the necessity of using cells cultured from patient samples.

  11. miR-199a-3p targets stemness-related and mitogenic signaling pathways to suppress the expansion and tumorigenic capabilities of prostate cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruifang; Liu, Can; Liu, Bigang; Jeter, Collene; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Li, Yandong; Yang, Tao; Wang, Junchen; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers exhibit significant cellular heterogeneity featuring tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSCs) in addition to more differentiated progeny with limited tumor-initiating capabilities. Recent studies suggest that microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate CSCs and tumor development. A previous library screening for differential miRNA expression in CD44+ (and other) prostate CSC vs. non-CSC populations identified miR-199a-3p to be among the most highly under-expressed miRNAs in CSCs. In this study, we characterized the biological functions of miR-199a-3p in CD44+ prostate cancer (PCa) cells and in tumor regeneration. Overexpression of miR-199a-3p in purified CD44+ or bulk PCa cells, including primary PCa, inhibited proliferation and clonal expansion without inducing apoptosis. miR-199a-3p overexpression also diminished tumor-initiating capacities of CD44+ PCa cells as well as tumor regeneration from bulk PCa cells. Importantly, inducible miR-199a-3p expression in pre-established prostate tumors in NOD/SCID mice inhibited tumor growth. Using target prediction program and luciferase assays, we show mechanistically that CD44 is a direct functional target of miR-199a-3p in PCa cells. Moreover, miR-199a-3p also directly or indirectly targeted several additional mitogenic molecules, including c-MYC, cyclin D1 (CCND1) and EGFR. Taken together, our results demonstrate how the aberrant loss of a miRNA-mediated mechanism can lead to the expansion and tumorigenic activity of prostate CSCs, further supporting the development and implementation of miRNA mimics for cancer treatment. PMID:27447749

  12. (-)-Gossypol reduces invasiveness in metastatic prostate cancer cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Acquisition of metastatic ability by prostatic cancer cells is the most lethal aspect of prostatic cancer progression. (-)-Gossypol, a polyphenolic compound present in cottonseeds, possesses anti-proliferation and pro-apoptotic effects in various cancer cells. In this study, the differences betwee...

  13. Androgen regulates ADAMTS15 gene expression in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Molokwu, Chidi N; Adeniji, Olajumoke O; Chandrasekharan, Shankar; Hamdy, Freddie C; Buttle, David J

    2010-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a major cause of mortality, largely as a consequence of metastases and transformation to androgen-independent growth. Metalloproteinases are implicated in cancer progression. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) are expressed in prostate cancer cells, with ADAMTS-1 and ADAMTS-15 being the most abundant. ADAMTS-15 but not ADAMTS-1 expression was downregulated by androgen in LNCaP prostate cancer cells, possibly through androgen response elements associated with the gene. ADAMTS-15 expression is predictive for survival in breast cancer, and the situation may be similar in prostate cancer, as androgen independence is usually due to aberrant signaling through its receptor.

  14. Selenoprotein expression is regulated at multiple levels in prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Rebsch, Cheryl M; Penna, Frank J; Copeland, Paul R

    2006-12-01

    Selenium supplementation in a population with low basal blood selenium levels has been reported to decrease the incidence of several cancers including prostate cancer. Based on the clinical findings, it is likely that the antioxidant function of one or more selenoproteins is responsible for the chemopreventive effect, although low molecular weight seleno-compounds have also been posited to selectively induce apoptosis in transformed cells. To address the effects of selenium supplementation on selenoprotein expression in prostate cells, we have undertaken an analysis of antioxidant selenoprotein expression as well as selenium toxicity in non-tumorigenic prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1) and prostate cancer cells (LNCaP and PC-3). Our results show that two of the glutathione peroxidase family members (GPX1 and GPX4) are highly induced by supplemental selenium in prostate cancer cells but only slightly induced in RWPE-1 cells. In addition, GPX1 levels are dramatically lower in PC-3 cells as compared to RWPE-1 or LNCaP cells. GPX2 protein and mRNA, however, are only detectable in RWPE-1 cells. Of the three selenium compounds tested (sodium selenite, sodium selenate and selenomethionine), only sodium selenite shows toxicity in a physiological range of selenium concentrations. Notably and in contrast to previous studies, RWPE-1 cells were significantly more sensitive to selenite than either of the prostate cancer cell lines. These results demonstrate that selenoproteins and selenium metabolism are regulated at multiple levels in prostate cells.

  15. CXCR4 Expression in Prostate Cancer Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovska, Anna; Elliott, Jimmy; Salamone, Richard J.; Telegeev, Gennady D.; Stakhovsky, Alexander E.; Schepotin, Ihor B.; Yan, Feng; Wang, Yan; Bouchez, Laure C.; Kularatne, Sumith A.; Watson, James; Trussell, Christopher; Reddy, Venkateshwar A.; Cho, Charles Y.; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor progenitor cells represent a population of drug-resistant cells that can survive conventional chemotherapy and lead to tumor relapse. However, little is known of the role of tumor progenitors in prostate cancer metastasis. The studies reported herein show that the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis, a key regulator of tumor dissemination, plays a role in the maintenance of prostate cancer stem-like cells. The CXCL4/CXCR12 pathway is activated in the CD44+/CD133+ prostate progenitor population and affects differentiation potential, cell adhesion, clonal growth and tumorigenicity. Furthermore, prostate tumor xenograft studies in mice showed that a combination of the CXCR4 receptor antagonist AMD3100, which targets prostate cancer stem-like cells, and the conventional chemotherapeutic drug Taxotere, which targets the bulk tumor, is significantly more effective in eradicating tumors as compared to monotherapy. PMID:22359577

  16. Cell Cycle Dependence of TRAIL Sensitivity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    or presence of proteasome inhibitors and measured HIF-1α levels by immunoblotting. We also incubated cells in cobalt chloride (to mimic hypoxia) in...Indistinguishable results were obtained in cells exposed to cobalt chloride . Figure 5: Effects of proteasome inhibitors on HIF- 1α promoter activity (LNCaP...havegenerated luciferase-transduced variants of our human prostate cancer cell lines in order touse them to generate orthotopic tumors in nude mice that can

  17. HLA class II antigen presentation by prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Younger, A R; Amria, S; Jeffrey, W A; Mahdy, A E M; Goldstein, O G; Norris, J S; Haque, A

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in men. Recent evidence suggests that reduced expression of target protein antigens and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules is the predominant immune escape mechanism of malignant prostate tumor cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prospect of antigen specific immunotherapy against prostate cancer via the HLA class II pathway of immune recognition. Here, we show for the first time that prostate cancer cells express HLA class II proteins that are recognized by CD4+ T cells. Prostate tumor cells transduced with class II molecules efficiently presented tumor-associated antigens/peptides to CD4+ T cells. This data suggests that malignant prostate tumors can be targeted via the HLA class II pathway, and that class II-positive tumors could be employed for direct antigen presentation, and CD4+ T-cell mediated tumor immunotherapy.Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases (2008) 11, 334-341; doi:10.1038/sj.pcan.4501021; published online 16 October 2007.

  18. N-Myc Drives Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Initiated from Human Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Smith, Bryan A; Park, Jung Wook; Stoyanova, Tanya; McCaffrey, Erin F; Baertsch, Robert; Sokolov, Artem; Meyerowitz, Justin G; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M; Shokat, Kevan M; Gustafson, W Clay; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-11

    MYCN amplification and overexpression are common in neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC). However, the impact of aberrant N-Myc expression in prostate tumorigenesis and the cellular origin of NEPC have not been established. We define N-Myc and activated AKT1 as oncogenic components sufficient to transform human prostate epithelial cells to prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC with phenotypic and molecular features of aggressive, late-stage human disease. We directly show that prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC can arise from a common epithelial clone. Further, N-Myc is required for tumor maintenance, and destabilization of N-Myc through Aurora A kinase inhibition reduces tumor burden. Our findings establish N-Myc as a driver of NEPC and a target for therapeutic intervention.

  19. N-Myc Drives Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Initiated from Human Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John K.; Phillips, John W.; Smith, Bryan A.; Park, Jung Wook; Stoyanova, Tanya; McCaffrey, Erin F.; Baertsch, Robert; Sokolov, Artem; Meyerowitz, Justin G.; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M.; Shokat, Kevan M.; Gustafson, W. Clay; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY MYCN amplification and overexpression are common in neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC). However, the impact of aberrant N-Myc expression in prostate tumorigenesis and the cellular origin of NEPC have not been established. We define N-Myc and activated AKT1 as oncogenic components sufficient to transform human prostate epithelial cells to prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC with phenotypic and molecular features of aggressive, late-stage human disease. We directly show that prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC can arise from a common epithelial clone. Further, N-Myc is required for tumor maintenance and destabilization of N-Myc through Aurora A kinase inhibition reduces tumor burden. Our findings establish N-Myc as a driver of NEPC and a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27050099

  20. Influence of sextant prostate needle biopsy or surgery on the detection and harvest of intact circulating prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Polascik, T J; Wang, Z P; Shue, M; Di, S; Gurganus, R T; Hortopan, S C; Ts'o, P O; Partin, A W

    1999-09-01

    The feasibility of harvesting intact, circulating prostate cancer cells from the blood of men with advanced prostate cancer has previously been demonstrated. We studied the influence of sextant prostate needle biopsy and radical prostatectomy on harvesting intact circulating prostate cancer cells. Via standard venipuncture 20 c.c. blood were obtained preoperatively, and 30 minutes and 3 days postoperatively from 23 men with clinically localized prostate cancer undergoing surgery. Similarly, blood was obtained before and after routine prostate biopsy from 13 men for an elevated prostate specific antigen level and/or abnormal digital rectal examination. The blood cells were removed via density centrifugation and magnetic cell sorting. The remaining prostate epithelial cells were characterized by indirect fluorescent immunocytochemical staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization using deoxyribonucleic acid probes. Sextant biopsy of the prostate induced circulating cells in 3 of 13 men (23%), only 1 of whom demonstrated cells with aneuploidy (Gleason score 3+4 = 7). Circulating cells were detected preoperatively, 30 minutes or 3 days postoperatively in 35% of radical prostatectomy cases. Of the patients 13% had detectable circulating cells 30 minutes postoperatively only and 9% had cells harvested on postoperative day 3. Persistence of circulating prostate cancer cells was noted in 13% of men on postoperative day 3. Serum prostate specific antigen level and pathological stage did not appear to be related to harvested cell number. Prostate cancer cells can be harvested from men with clinically localized disease undergoing sextant needle biopsy or radical prostatectomy. Routine prostate biopsy and surgery may influence the number of measurable circulating cells in the short term but the clinical significance and long-term prevalence of detectable circulating cells are unknown. Further studies are needed to evaluate the clinical usefulness of this assay for detecting

  1. Bone Matrix Osteonectin Limits Prostate Cancer Cell Growth and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kapinas, Kristina; Lowther, Katie M.; Kessler, Catherine B.; Tilbury, Karissa; Lieberman, Jay R.; Tirnauer, Jennifer S.; Campagnola, Paul; Delany, Anne M.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable interest in understanding prostate cancer metastasis to bone and the interaction of these cells with the bone microenvironment. Osteonectin/SPARC/BM-40 is a collagen binding matricellular protein that is enriched in bone. Its expression is increased in prostate cancer metastases, and it stimulates the migration of prostate carcinoma cells. However, the presence of osteonectin in cancer cells and the stroma may limit prostate tumor development and progression. To determine how bone matrix osteonectin affects the behavior of prostate cancer cells, we modeled prostate cancer cell-bone interactions using the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3, and mineralized matrices synthesized by wild type and osteonectin-null osteoblasts in vitro. We developed this in vitro system because the structural complexity of collagen matrices in vivo is not mimicked by reconstituted collagen scaffolds or by more complex substrates, like basement membrane extracts. Second harmonic generation imaging demonstrated that the wild type matrices had thick collagen fibers organized into longitudinal bundles, whereas osteonectin-null matrices had thinner fibers in random networks. Importantly, a mouse model of prostate cancer metastases to bone showed a collagen fiber phenotype similar to the wild type matrix synthesized in vitro. When PC-3 cells were grown on the wild type matrices, they displayed decreased cell proliferation, increased cell spreading, and decreased resistance to radiation-induced cell death, compared to cells grown on osteonectin-null matrix. Our data support the idea that osteonectin can suppress prostate cancer pathogenesis, expanding this concept to the microenvironment of skeletal metastases. PMID:22525512

  2. Elp3 drives Wnt-dependent tumor initiation and regeneration in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Ladang, Aurélie; Rapino, Francesca; Heukamp, Lukas C; Tharun, Lars; Shostak, Kateryna; Hermand, Damien; Delaunay, Sylvain; Klevernic, Iva; Jiang, Zheshen; Jacques, Nicolas; Jamart, Diane; Migeot, Valérie; Florin, Alexandra; Göktuna, Serkan; Malgrange, Brigitte; Sansom, Owen J; Nguyen, Laurent; Büttner, Reinhard; Close, Pierre; Chariot, Alain

    2015-11-16

    Tumor initiation in the intestine can rapidly occur from Lgr5(+) crypt columnar stem cells. Dclk1 is a marker of differentiated Tuft cells and, when coexpressed with Lgr5, also marks intestinal cancer stem cells. Here, we show that Elp3, the catalytic subunit of the Elongator complex, is required for Wnt-driven intestinal tumor initiation and radiation-induced regeneration by maintaining a subpool of Lgr5(+)/Dclk1(+)/Sox9(+) cells. Elp3 deficiency dramatically delayed tumor appearance in Apc-mutated intestinal epithelia and greatly prolonged mice survival without affecting the normal epithelium. Specific ablation of Elp3 in Lgr5(+) cells resulted in marked reduction of polyp formation upon Apc inactivation, in part due to a decreased number of Lgr5(+)/Dclk1(+)/Sox9(+) cells. Mechanistically, Elp3 is induced by Wnt signaling and promotes Sox9 translation, which is needed to maintain the subpool of Lgr5(+)/Dclk1(+) cancer stem cells. Consequently, Elp3 or Sox9 depletion led to similar defects in Dclk1(+) cancer stem cells in ex vivo organoids. Finally, Elp3 deficiency strongly impaired radiation-induced intestinal regeneration, in part because of decreased Sox9 protein levels. Together, our data demonstrate the crucial role of Elp3 in maintaining a subpopulation of Lgr5-derived and Sox9-expressing cells needed to trigger Wnt-driven tumor initiation in the intestine.

  3. Neuroendocrine Cells of the Prostate Derive from the Neural Crest*

    PubMed Central

    Szczyrba, Jaroslaw; Wagner, Mathias; Wandernoth, Petra M.; Aumüller, Gerhard; Wennemuth, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    The histogenesis of prostatic neuroendocrine cells is controversial: a stem cell hypothesis with a urogenital sinus-derived progeny of all prostatic epithelial cells is opposed by a dual origin hypothesis, favoring the derivation of neuroendocrine cells from the neural crest, with the secretory and basal cells being of urogenital sinus origin. A computer-assisted 3D reconstruction was used to analyze the distribution of chromogranin A immunoreactive cells in serial sections of human fetal prostate specimens (gestation weeks 18 and 25). Immunohistochemical double labeling studies with YFP and serotonin antisera combined with electron microscopy were carried out on double-transgenic Wnt1-Cre/ROSA26-YFP mice showing stable YFP expression in all neural crest-derived cell populations despite loss of Wnt1 expression. 3D reconstruction of the distribution pattern of neuroendocrine cells in the human fetal prostate indicates a migration of paraganglionic cells passing the stroma and reaching the prostate ducts. Double-transgenic mice showed 55% double labeling of periurethral neuroendocrine cells expressing both serotonin and YFP, whereas single serotonin labeling was observed in 36% and exclusive YFP labeling in 9%. The results favor the assumption of a major fraction of neural crest-derived neuroendocrine cells in both the human and murine prostates. PMID:28003366

  4. Metformin inhibits the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Rongbin; Li, Jijun; Johnson, Cameron W.; Rassoulian, Cyrus; Olumi, Aria F.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common proliferative abnormality of the prostate affecting elderly men throughout the world. Epidemiologic studies have shown that diabetes significantly increases the risk of developing BPH, although whether anti-diabetic medications preventing the development of BPH remains to be defined. We have previously found that stromally expressed insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) promotes benign prostatic epithelial cell proliferation through paracrine mechanisms. Here, we seek to understand if metformin, a first line medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, inhibits the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells through reducing the expression of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and regulating cell cycle. Methods BPE cell lines BPH-1 and P69, murine fibroblasts3T3 and primary human prostatic fibroblasts were cultured and tested in this study. Cell proliferation and the cell cycle were analyzed by MTS assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The expression of IGF-1R was determined by western-blot and immunocytochemistry. The level of IGF-1 secretion in culture medium was measured by ELISA. Results Metformin (0.5-10mM, 6-48h) significantly inhibited the proliferation of BPH-1 and P69 cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Treatment with metformin for 24 hours lowered the G2/M cell population by 43.24% in P69 cells and 24.22% in BPH-1 cells. On the other hand, IGF-1 (100ng/mL, 24h) stimulated the cell proliferation (increased by 28.81% in P69 cells and 20.95% in BPH-1 cells) and significantly enhanced the expression of IGF-1R in benign prostatic epithelial cells. Metformin (5mM) abrogated the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells induced by IGF-1. In 3T3 cells, the secretion of IGF-1 was significantly inhibited by metformin from 574.31pg/ml to 197.61pg/ml. The conditioned media of 3T3 cells and human prostatic fibroblasts promoted the proliferation of epithelial cells and the

  5. Morphological Differences between Circulating Tumor Cells from Prostate Cancer Patients and Cultured Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sunyoung; Ang, Richard R.; Duffy, Simon P.; Bazov, Jenny; Chi, Kim N.; Black, Peter C.; Ma, Hongshen

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration promises to be an important predictor of clinical outcome for a range of cancers. Established CTC enumeration methods primarily rely on affinity capture of cell surface antigens, and have been criticized for underestimation of CTC numbers due to antigenic bias. Emerging CTC capture strategies typically distinguish these cells based on their assumed biomechanical characteristics, which are often validated using cultured cancer cells. In this study, we developed a software tool to investigate the morphological properties of CTCs from patients with castrate resistant prostate cancer and cultured prostate cancer cells in order to establish whether the latter is an appropriate model for the former. We isolated both CTCs and cultured cancer cells from whole blood using the CellSearch® system and examined various cytomorphological characteristics. In contrast with cultured cancer cells, CTCs enriched by CellSearch® system were found to have significantly smaller size, larger nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio, and more elongated shape. These CTCs were also found to exhibit significantly more variability than cultured cancer cells in nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio and shape profile. PMID:24416373

  6. Microenvironment -Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0352 TITLE: Microenvironment-Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dean...Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Microenvironment-Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...that eventually kills the patient. Although many PCa cell -intrinsic molecules and end-organ factors have been implicated in the metastatic

  7. Isolation and Growth of Prostate Stem Cells and Establishing Cancer Cell Lines from Human Prostate Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    RU, Cheng D, and Witte ON. Isolation and functional characterization of murine prostate stem cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2006; 29. Cunha GR...Hopkins School of Medicine Flow Sorting Facility) for their expert assistance and Jessica Hicks and Yuko Konishi (Johns Hopkins Department of...P. Mouse urogenital development: a practical approach. Differentiation 2003;71:402–13. 29. Xin L, Ide H, Kim Y, Dubey P, Witte ON. In vivo

  8. Obesity promotes aerobic glycolysis in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cavazos, David A; deGraffenried, Matthew J; Apte, Shruti A; Bowers, Laura W; Whelan, Kaitlin A; deGraffenried, Linda A

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is the leading preventable comorbidity associated with increased prostate cancer-related recurrence and mortality. Epidemiological and clinical studies indicate that a body mass index >30 is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage within the prostate gland and increased prostate cancer-related mortality. Here we provide evidence that obesity promotes worse clinical outcome through induction of metabolic abnormalities known to promote genotoxic stress. We have previously reported that blood serum derived from obese mice may enhance the proliferative and invasive potential of human prostate cancer cell lines ex vivo. Here we show that a 1-h exposure of LNCaP or PacMetUT1 prostate cancer cell lines and nonmalignant RWPE-1 prostate epithelial cells to 2% serum from obese mice induces markers of aerobic glycolysis relative to those exposed to serum from nonobese mice. This metabolic change was correlated with accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased frequency of DNA double-strand breaks. Interestingly, N-tert-Butylhydroxylamine, an antioxidant, significantly suppressed markers of aerobic glycolysis in the cells exposed to the blood serum of obese mice, suggesting that ROS contributes to a metabolic shift toward aerobic glycolysis. Here we describe obesity-induced changes in key metabolic markers that impact prostate cancer cell progression and explore the role of antioxidants in ameliorating these effects.

  9. Nonylphenol effects on human prostate non tumorigenic cells.

    PubMed

    Forte, Maurizio; Di Lorenzo, Mariana; Carrizzo, Albino; Valiante, Salvatore; Vecchione, Carmine; Laforgia, Vincenza; De Falco, Maria

    2016-05-16

    Nonylphenol (NP) is an industrial chemical with estrogenic activity both in vivo and in vitro; estrogens play a critical role in the development of prostate and may be the cause of some pathological states, including cancer. In this study we examined the effects of NP on human prostate non tumorigenic epithelial cells (PNT1A) investigating on cell proliferation, interaction with estrogen receptors (ERs) and gene expression of genes involved in prostate diseases. We found that NP affects cell proliferation at 10(-6)M, promoting a cytoplasm-nucleus translocation of ERα and not ERβ, like the natural estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2). Moreover, we showed that NP enhances gene expression of key regulators of cell cycle. Estrogen selective antagonist ICI182780 in part reverted the observed effects of NP. These results confirm the estrogenic activity of NP and suggest that other transduction pathways may be involved in NP action on prostate.

  10. Prostate stem cell antigen: Identification of immunogenic peptides and assessment of reactive CD8+ T cells in prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Andrea; Schmitz, Marc; Stevanovic, Stefan; Weigle, Bernd; Hölig, Kristina; Füssel, Monika; Füssel, Susanne; Meye, Axel; Wirth, Manfred P; Rieber, Ernst Peter

    2002-12-01

    Identification of TAAs recognized by CD8(+) CTLs paved the way for new concepts in cancer therapy. In view of the heterogeneity of tumors and their diverse escape mechanisms, CTL-based cancer therapy largely depends on an appropriate number of TAAs. In prostate cancer, the number of antigens defined as suitable targets of CTLs remains rather limited. PSCA is widely distributed in prostate cancer. In this report, we define immunogenic peptides of PSCA which are recognized by circulating CD8(+) T cells from prostate cancer patients and able to activate CTLs in vitro. Screening the amino acid sequence of PSCA for peptides containing a binding motif for HLA-A*0201 resulted in 8 candidate peptides. Specificity and affinity of peptide binding were verified in a competition assay. Frequencies of CD8(+) T lymphocytes reactive against selected epitopes were determined in the blood of prostate cancer patients using the ELISPOT assay. Increased frequencies were revealed for CD8(+) T cells recognizing the peptides ALQPGTALL and AILALLPAL. CTLs from prostate cancer patients were raised against these 2 peptides in vitro when presented by autologous DCs. They specifically recognized peptide-pulsed T2 target cells and prostate cancer cells that were HLA-A*0201- and PSCA-positive, indicating that these peptides were naturally generated by tumor cells. These data suggest that PSCA is a promising target for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer.

  11. Mifepristone inhibits GRβ-coupled prostate cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ligr, Martin; Li, Yirong; Logan, Susan K.; Taneja, Semir; Melamed, Jonathan; Lepor, Hebert; Garabedian, Michael J.; Lee, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene produces GRα and GRβ isoforms by alternative splicing of a C-terminal exon. GRα binds glucocorticoids, modulates transcription in a glucocorticoid-dependent manner, and plays a growth inhibitory role in prostate cells. Due to this role, glucocorticoids are often used to treat androgen-independent prostate cancer. By contrast, GRβ possesses intrinsic transcriptional activity and binds mifepristone (RU486), but not glucocorticoids, to control gene expression. The role of GRβ in prostate cell proliferation is unknown. Materials and Methods We determined the levels of GRβ in various prostate cancer cell lines by RT-PCR and western blotting. The effect of GRβ on the kinetics of prostate cancer cell growth was determined by cell counting and flow cytometry upon mifepristone and dexamethasone treatment. Cell proliferation was also examined following siRNA-mediated knock-down and overexpression of GRβ. Results GRβ mRNA and protein were upregulated in LNCaP cells overexpressing the androgen receptor co-factor ARA70β. Treatment of LNCaP-ARA70β with mifepristone or siRNA targeting GRβ inhibited proliferation, compared to parental LNCaP cells. An immortal but non-tumorigenic (RC165) prostate cell line, as well as a tumorigenic (DU145) prostate cell line with endogenous GRβ also showed partial growth reduction upon depletion of GRβ, albeit to a lesser extent than LNCaP-ARA70β cells. The growth-stimulatory effect of ARA70β on LNCaP cells is, in part, GRβ-dependent, as is the proliferation of RC165 and, to a lesser extent, DU145 cells. Conclusions These results suggest that patients whose primary tumors express GRβ and ARA70β may benefit from mifepristone treatment. PMID:22819113

  12. [Small cell prostatic carcinoma detected at the stage of metastases].

    PubMed

    Rabii, Redouane; Meziane, Anas; Taha, Abdelatif; Joual, Abdenabi; El Mrini, Mohamed

    2004-09-01

    Small cell prostatic carcinoma is rare, with a poor prognosis. The authors report a case of small cell prostatic carcinoma in a 30-year-old patient diagnosed at the stage of metastases. Immunohistochemistry showed positive anti-neuron-specific enolase (NSE.) and anti-synaptophysin antibodies, while serum PSA was normal (1.2 ng/ml). The patient was treated by cisplatin-etoposide combination chemotherapy, but died 20 days after the first course.

  13. Effect of antifreeze proteins on frozen primary prostatic adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Koushafar, H; Rubinsky, B

    1997-03-01

    Recent studies show that prostate adenocarcinoma cells can survive cryosurgery and that cell destruction depends on the specific thermal parameters used during freezing. The goal of this preliminary study is to determine whether certain chemical compounds, known as antifreeze proteins, can induce complete human primary prostatic adenocarcinoma cell destruction by freezing, regardless of the thermal parameters used. The study also examines the mechanism by which antifreeze proteins bring about cell destruction. Antifreeze proteins were added to solutions containing human primary prostatic adenocarcinoma cells. The cells were frozen with controlled thermal parameters using a directional solidification apparatus attached to a light microscope. Cell viability was determined after thawing as a function of antifreeze protein concentration and cooling rate during freezing. The dose response study shows that for all the cooling rates tested, 10-mg/mL solutions of antifreeze protein cause the complete destruction of human primary prostatic adenocarcinoma cells frozen to a temperature at which, without these proteins, the cells survive freezing. Light microscopy shows that the lethal effect of the antifreeze proteins is related to the formation of intracellular ice in the frozen cells. CONCLUSIONS; This preliminary study has demonstrated that antifreeze proteins have the ability to generate complete destruction of prostatic adenocarcinoma cells frozen to high subzero temperatures irrespective of the cooling rates used during freezing. This suggests that introducing antifreeze proteins into undesirable tissues prior to freezing may increase the efficacy and the control over tissue destruction by cryosurgery.

  14. Prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Domingue, Gerald J.; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G.

    1998-01-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of acute bacterial prostatitis is straightforward and easily accomplished in clinical laboratories. Chronic bacterial prostatitis, and especially chronic idiopathic prostatitis (most often referred to as abacterial prostatitis), presents a real challenge to the clinician and clinical microbiologist. Clinically, the diagnosis of chronic idiopathic prostatitis is differentiated from that of acute prostatitis by a lack of prostatic inflammation and no “significant” (controversial) leukocytes or bacteria in the expressed prostatic secretions. Despite these diagnostic criteria, the etiology of chronic idiopathic prostatitis is unknown. While this review covers the entire spectrum of microbially caused acute prostatitis (including common and uncommon bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites) and microbially associated chronic prostatitis, a special focus has been given to chronic idiopathic prostatitis. The idiopathic syndrome is commonly diagnosed in men but is poorly treated. Recent data convincingly suggests a possible bacterial etiology for the condition. Provocative molecular studies have been published reporting the presence of 16S rRNA bacterial sequences in prostate biopsy tissue that is negative for ordinary bacteria by routine culture in men with chronic idiopathic prostatitis. Additionally, special culture methods have indicated that difficult-to-culture coryneforms and coagulase-negative staphylococci are present in expressed prostatic secretions found to be negative by routine culture techniques. Treatment failures are not uncommon in chronic prostatitis. Literature reports suggest that antimicrobial treatment failures in chronic idiopathic prostatitis caused by organisms producing extracellular slime might result from the virulent properties of coagulase-negative staphylococci or other bacteria. While it is difficult to definitively extrapolate from animal models, antibiotic pharmokinetic studies with a murine model have

  15. Losartan sensitizes selectively prostate cancer cell to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Yazdannejat, H; Hosseinimehr, S J; Ghasemi, A; Pourfallah, T A; Rafiei, A

    2016-01-11

    Losartan is an angiotensin II receptor (AT-II-R) blocker that is widely used by human for blood pressure regulation. Also, it has antitumor property. In this study, we investigated the radiosensitizing effect of losartan on cellular toxicity induced by ionizing radiation on prostate cancer and non-malignant fibroblast cells. Human prostate cancer (DU-145) and human non-malignant fibroblast cells (HFFF2) were treated with losartan at different concentrations (0.5, 1, 10, 50 and 100 µM) and then these cells were exposed to ionizing radiation. The cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay. Our results showed that losartan exhibited antitumor effect on prostate cancer cells; it was reduced cell survival to 66% at concentration 1 µM. Losartan showed an additive killing effect in combination with ionizing radiation on prostate cancer cell. The cell proliferation was reduced to 54% in the prostate cancer cells treated with losartan at concentration 1 µM in combination with ionizing radiation. Losartan did not exhibit any toxicity on HFFF2 cell. This result shows a promising effect of losartan on enhancement of therapeutic effect of ionizing radiation in patients during therapy.

  16. [Circulating tumor cells and prostate cancer prognosis].

    PubMed

    Capoun, Otakar; Soukup, Viktor; Mikulová, Veronika; Jančíková, Markéta; Honová, Hana; Kološtová, Katarína; Zima, Tomáš; Hanuš, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common malignant disease in men. Prognosis of patients with metastatic PC is generally unfavourable; however there are significant differences in survival at this stage of the disease. The definition of prognosis is essential for the selection of therapy, respecting an individual risk. In recent years, the association between circulating tumor cells (CTC) detection and response to PC treatment has been widely investigated. Detection of CTC is based on a metastatic process theory and uses well-known tumor-specific antigens on the cell surface. Individual methods assess CTC with different sensitivity and are not yet efficient at the localised PC stage. Only the method of immunomagnetic separation and semi-automatic visualisation (CellSearchTM) has been validated and approved for the use in the PC management. Assessment of the CTC count directly correlates with the prognosis of patients with castration-resistant PC. Change in the CTC count during the therapy also considerably improves risk estimation and represents a marker of overall survival. New methods of CTC cultivation and gene profiling may contribute to individualisation of the treatment similarly to breast cancer. The authors present a review article about theory, methods of detection and clinical use of CTC in castration-resistant PC.

  17. Schlafen 12 expression modulates prostate cancer cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Pavlo L; Basson, Marc D

    2014-07-01

    Schlafen proteins have previously been linked to leukocyte and intestinal epithelial differentiation. We hypothesized that Schlafen 12 (SLFN12) overexpression in human prostate epithelial cells would modulate expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), markers of prostatic epithelial differentiation. Differentiation of the human prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and PC-3 was compared after infection with an adenoviral vector coding for SLFN12 (Ad-SLFN12) or green fluorescent protein (GFP) only expressing virus (control). Transcript levels of SLFN12, PSA, and DPP4 were evaluated by real-time reverse transcription PCR and protein levels by Western blotting. Because mixed lineage kinase (MLK) and one of its downstream effectors (extracellular signal-regulated kinases [ERK]) have previously been implicated in some aspects of prostate epithelial differentiation, we conducted further studies in which LNCaP cells were cotreated with dimethyl sulfoxide (control), PD98059 (ERK inhibitor), or MLK inhibitor during transfection with Ad-SLFN12 for 72 h. Treatment of LNCaP or PC-3 cells with Ad-SLFN12 reduced PSA expression by 56.6±4.6% (P<0.05) but increased DPP4 transcript level by 4.8±1.0 fold (P<0.05) versus Ad-GFP-treated controls. Further studies in LNCaP cells showed that Ad-SLFN12 overexpression increased the ratio of the mature E-cadherin protein to its precursor protein. Furthermore, SLFN12 overexpression promoted DPP4 expression either when MLK or ERK was blocked. ERK inhibition did not reverse SLFN12-induced changes in PSA, E-cadherin, or DPP4. SLFN12 may regulate differentiation in prostate epithelial cells, at least in part independently of ERK or MLK. Understanding how SLFN12 influences prostatic epithelial differentiation may ultimately identify targets to influence the phenotype of prostatic malignancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Schlafen 12 expression modulates prostate cancer cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Pavlo L.; Basson, Marc D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Schlafen proteins have previously been linked to leukocyte and intestinal epithelial differentiation. We hypothesized that Schlafen 12 (SLFN12) overexpression in prostate epithelial cells would modulate expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4), markers of prostatic epithelial differentiation. Materials and Methods Differentiation of the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP and PC-3 was compared after infection with an adenoviral vector coding for SLFN12-GFP (Ad-SLFN12) or GFP only expressing virus (control). Transcript levels of SLFN12, PSA and DPP4 were evaluated by RT-PCR and protein levels by Western blotting. Because Mixed Lineage Kinase (MLK) and one of its downstream effectors (ERK) have previously been implicated in some aspects of prostate epithelial differentiation, we conducted further studies in which LNCaP cells were co-treated with DMSO (control), PD98059 (ERK inhibitor) or MLK inhibitor during transfection with Ad-GFP-SLFN12 for 72 hours. Results Treatment of LNCaP or PC-3 cells with Ad-SLFN12 reduced PSA expression by 56.6±4.6% (p<0.05) but increased DPP4 transcript level by 4.8±1.0 fold (p<0.05) vs. Ad-GFP-treated controls. Further studies in LNCaP cells showed that Ad-SLFN12 overexpression increased the ratio of the mature E-cadherin protein to its precursor protein. Furthermore, SLFN12 overexpression promoted DPP4 expression either when MLK or ERK were blocked. ERK inhibition did not reverse SLFN12-induced changes in PSA, E-cadherin or DPP4. Conclusions SLFN12 may regulate differentiation in prostate epithelial cells, at least in part independently of ERK or MLK. Understanding how SLFN12 influences prostatic epithelial differentiation may ultimately identify targets to influence the phenotype of prostatic malignancy. PMID:24768141

  19. Stable Upconversion Nanohybrid Particles for Specific Prostate Cancer Cell Immunodetection

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yu; Shi, Bingyang; Dass, Arun V. Everest; Lu, Yiqing; Sayyadi, Nima; Kautto, Liisa; Willows, Robert D.; Chung, Roger; Piper, James; Nevalainen, Helena; Walsh, Bradley; Jin, Dayong; Packer, Nicolle H.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the male killing diseases and early detection of prostate cancer is the key for better treatment and lower cost. However, the number of prostate cancer cells is low at the early stage, so it is very challenging to detect. In this study, we successfully designed and developed upconversion immune-nanohybrids (UINBs) with sustainable stability in a physiological environment, stable optical properties and highly specific targeting capability for early-stage prostate cancer cell detection. The developed UINBs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and luminescence spectroscopy. The targeting function of the biotinylated antibody nanohybrids were confirmed by immunofluorescence assay and western blot analysis. The UINB system is able to specifically detect prostate cancer cells with stable and background-free luminescent signals for highly sensitive prostate cancer cell detection. This work demonstrates a versatile strategy to develop UCNPs based sustainably stable UINBs for sensitive diseased cell detection. PMID:27874051

  20. Inhibitory effects of megakaryocytic cells in prostate cancer skeletal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Koh, Amy J; Wang, Zhengyan; Soki, Fabiana N; Park, Serk In; Pienta, Kenneth J; McCauley, Laurie K

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer cells commonly spread through the circulation, but few successfully generate metastatic foci in bone. Osteoclastic cellular activity has been proposed as an initiating event for skeletal metastasis. Megakaryocytes (MKs) inhibit osteoclastogenesis, which could have an impact on tumor establishment in bone. Given the location of mature MKs at vascular sinusoids, they may be the first cells to physically encounter cancer cells as they enter the bone marrow. Identification of the interaction between MKs and prostate cancer cells was the focus of this study. K562 (human MK precursors) and primary MKs derived from mouse bone marrow hematopoietic precursor cells potently suppressed prostate carcinoma PC-3 cells in coculture. The inhibitory effects were specific to prostate carcinoma cells and were enhanced by direct cell-cell contact. Flow cytometry for propidium iodide (PI) and annexin V supported a proapoptotic role for K562 cells in limiting PC-3 cells. Gene expression analysis revealed reduced mRNA levels for cyclin D1, whereas mRNA levels of apoptosis-associated specklike protein containing a CARD (ASC) and death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) were increased in PC-3 cells after coculture with K562 cells. Recombinant thrombopoietin (TPO) was used to expand MKs in the marrow and resulted in decreased skeletal lesion development after intracardiac tumor inoculation. These novel findings suggest a potent inhibitory role of MKs in prostate carcinoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo. This new finding, of an interaction of metastatic tumors and hematopoietic cells during tumor colonization in bone, ultimately will lead to improved therapeutic interventions for prostate cancer patients.

  1. Prostate cancer stem/progenitor cells: identification, characterization, and implications.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dean G; Patrawala, Lubna; Calhoun, Tammy; Bhatia, Bobby; Choy, Grace; Schneider-Broussard, Robin; Jeter, Collene

    2007-01-01

    Several solid tumors have now been shown to contain stem cell-like cells called cancer stem cells (CSC). These cells, although generally rare, appear to be highly tumorigenic and may be the cells that drive tumor formation, maintain tumor homeostasis, and mediate tumor metastasis. In this Perspective, we first provide our insight on how a CSC should be defined. We then summarize our current knowledge of stem/progenitor cells in the normal human prostate (NHP), an organ highly susceptible to hyperproliferative diseases such as benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa). We further review the evidence that cultured PCa cells, xenograft prostate tumors, and patient tumors may contain stem/progenitor cells. Along with our discussion, we present several methodologies that can be potentially used to identify putative tumor-reinitiating CSC. Finally, we present a hypothetical model for the hierarchical organization of human PCa cells and discuss the implications of this model in helping understand prostate carcinogenesis and design novel diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic approaches.

  2. Prostate cancer cells induce osteoblastic differentiation via semaphorin 3A.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuzhou; Shen, Weiwei; Qiu, Hao; Hu, Xu; Zhang, Chao; Chu, Tongwei

    2015-03-01

    Prostate cancer metastasis to bone is the second most commonly diagnosed malignant disease among men worldwide. Such metastatic disease is characterized by the presence of osteoblastic bone lesions, and is associated with high rates of mortality. However, the various mechanisms involved in prostate cancer-induced osteoblastic differentiation have not been fully explored. Semaphorin 3A (Sema 3A) is a newly identified regulator of bone metabolism which stimulates differentiation of pre-osteoblastic cells under physiological conditions. We investigated in this study whether prostate cancer cells can mediate osteoblastic activity through Sema 3A. We cultured osteoprogenitor MC3T3-E1 cells in prostate cancer-conditioned medium, and analyzed levels of Sema 3A protein in diverse prostate cancer cell lines to identify cell lines in which Sema 3A production showed a positive correlation with osteo-stimulation. C4-2 cells were stably transfected with Sema 3A short hairpin RNA to further determine whether Sema 3A contributes to the ability of C4-2 cells to induce osteoblastic differentiation. Down-regulation of Sema 3A expression decreased indicators of C4-2 CM-induced osteoblastic differentiation, including alkaline phosphatase production and mineralization. Additionally, silencing or neutralizing Sema 3A in C4-2 cells resulted in diminished β-catenin expression in osteogenitor MC3T3-E1 cells. Our results suggest that prostate cancer-induced osteoblastic differentiation is at least partially mediated by Sema 3A, and may be regulated by the β-catenin signalling pathway. Sema 3A may represent a novel target for treatment of prostate cancer-induced osteoblastic lesions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The Function of Neuroendocrine Cells in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-20

    sections were prepared from the top for quality control. For immunohistochemical studies, paraffin sections of 5 mm thickness were prepared from regular ...expression in 31 cases of prostatic SCNC using regular histological sections. Unlike NE cells in benign prostate or prostatic adenocarcinoma, the NE...mg/mL insulin , 0.01 mg/mL transferrin, 30 nmol/L sodium selenite, 10 nmol/L hydrocortisone, 10 nmol/L beta-estradiol, 4mmol/L L-glutamine, and 5%FBS

  4. Extracellular vesicles such as prostate cancer cell fragments as a fluid biopsy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Brett, S I; Kim, Y; Biggs, C N; Chin, J L; Leong, H S

    2015-09-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived vesicles generated through a process of cell membrane shedding or storage vesicle release, as occurs during apoptosis, necrosis or exocytosis. Initially perceived as cellular by-products or 'dust' of insignificant biological importance, recent research has shed light on the role of EVs as mediators of intercellular communication, blood coagulation and disease progression. The prostate is a source of EVs and their abundance in complex biological fluids such as plasma, serum and urine make them compelling entities for a 'fluid biopsy'. As such, prostate cancer cell fragments (PCCF) are EVs generated by the tumor resident within the prostate and are also present in blood, expressing a portion of biomarkers representative of the primary tumor. High-throughput analytical techniques to determine biomarker expression on EVs is the last hurdle towards translating the full potential of prostate EVs for clinical use. We describe current state-of-the-art methods for the analysis of prostate-derived EVs in patient fluids such as plasma and the challenges that lie ahead in this emerging field of translational research.

  5. Perioperative Search for Circulating Tumor Cells in Patients Undergoing Prostate Brachytherapy for Clinically Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsumura, Hideyasu; Satoh, Takefumi; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Tabata, Ken-ichi; Takenaka, Kouji; Sekiguchi, Akane; Nakamura, Masaki; Kitano, Masashi; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2017-01-01

    Despite the absence of local prostate cancer recurrence, some patients develop distant metastases after prostate brachytherapy. We evaluate whether prostate brachytherapy procedures have a potential risk for hematogenous spillage of prostate cancer cells. Fifty-nine patients who were undergoing high-dose-rate (HDR) or low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy participated in this prospective study. Thirty patients with high-risk or locally advanced cancer were treated with HDR brachytherapy after neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Twenty-nine patients with clinically localized cancer were treated with LDR brachytherapy without neoadjuvant ADT. Samples of peripheral blood were drawn in the operating room before insertion of needles (preoperative) and again immediately after the surgical manipulation (intraoperative). Blood samples of 7.5 mL were analyzed for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) using the CellSearch System. While no preoperative samples showed CTCs (0%), they were detected in intraoperative samples in 7 of the 59 patients (11.8%; preoperative vs. intraoperative, p = 0.012). Positive CTC status did not correlate with perioperative variables, including prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at diagnosis, use of neoadjuvant ADT, type of brachytherapy, Gleason score, and biopsy positive core rate. We detected CTCs from samples immediately after the surgical manipulation. Further study is needed to evaluate whether those CTCs actually can survive and proliferate at distant sites. PMID:28085051

  6. Actions of estrogens and endocrine disrupting chemicals on human prostate stem/progenitor cells and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen-Yang; Shi, Guang-Bin; Hu, Dan-Ping; Nelles, Jason L; Prins, Gail S

    2012-05-06

    Estrogen reprogramming of the prostate gland as a function of developmental exposures (aka developmental estrogenization) results in permanent alterations in structure and gene expression that lead to an increased incidence of prostatic lesions with aging. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with estrogenic activity have been similarly linked to an increased prostate cancer risk. Since it has been suggested that stem cells and cancer stem cells are potential targets of cancer initiation and disease management, it is highly possible that estrogens and EDCs influence the development and progression of prostate cancer through reprogramming and transforming the prostate stem and early stage progenitor cells. In this article, we review recent literature highlighting the effects of estrogens and EDCs on prostate cancer risk and discuss recent advances in prostate stem/progenitor cell research. Our laboratory has recently developed a novel prostasphere model using normal human prostate stem/progenitor cells and established that these cells express estrogen receptors (ERs) and are direct targets of estrogen action. Further, using a chimeric in vivo prostate model derived from these normal human prostate progenitor cells, we demonstrated for the first time that estrogens initiate and promote prostatic carcinogenesis in an androgen-supported environment. We herein discuss these findings and highlight new evidence using our in vitro human prostasphere assay for perturbations in human prostate stem cell self-renewal and differentiation by natural steroids as well as EDCs. These findings support the hypothesis that tissue stem cells may be direct EDC targets which may underlie life-long reprogramming as a consequence of developmental and/or transient adult exposures.

  7. Harvesting Human Prostate Tissue Material and Culturing Primary Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Frame, Fiona M; Pellacani, Davide; Collins, Anne T; Maitland, Norman J

    2016-01-01

    In order to fully explore the biology of a complex solid tumor such as prostate cancer, it is desirable to work with patient tissue. Only by working with cells from a tissue can we take into account patient variability and tumor heterogeneity. Cell lines have long been regarded as the workhorse of cancer research and it could be argued that they are of most use when considered within a panel of cell lines, thus taking into account specified mutations and variations in phenotype between different cell lines. However, often very different results are obtained when comparing cell lines to primary cells cultured from tissue. It stands to reason that cells cultured from patient tissue represents a close-to-patient model that should and does produce clinically relevant data. This chapter aims to illustrate the methods of processing, storing and culturing cells from prostate tissue, with a description of potential uses.

  8. Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death among men, killing an estimated 27,000 men each year in the United States. Men with advanced prostate cancer often become resistant to conventional therapies. Many researchers speculate that the emergence of resistance is due to the presence of cancer stem cells, which are believed to be a small subpopulation of tumor cells that can self-renew and give rise to more differentiated tumor cells. It is thought that these stem cells survive initial therapies (such as chemotherapy and hormone therapy) and then generate new tumor cells that are resistant to these standard treatments. If prostate cancer stem cells could be identified and characterized, it might be possible to design treatments that prevent resistance.

  9. Milk stimulates growth of prostate cancer cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Tate, Patricia L; Bibb, Robert; Larcom, Lyndon L

    2011-11-01

    Concern has been expressed about the fact that cows' milk contains estrogens and could stimulate the growth of hormone-sensitive tumors. In this study, organic cows' milk and two commercial substitutes were digested in vitro and tested for their effects on the growth of cultures of prostate and breast cancer cells. Cows' milk stimulated the growth of LNCaP prostate cancer cells in each of 14 separate experiments, producing an average increase in growth rate of over 30%. In contrast, almond milk suppressed the growth of these cells by over 30%. Neither cows' milk nor almond milk affected the growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells or AsPC-1 pancreatic cancer cells significantly. Soy milk increased the growth rate of the breast cancer cells. These data indicate that prostate and breast cancer patients should be cautioned about the possible promotional effects of commercial dairy products and their substitutes.

  10. [Relations between red cell structure, function and immune homeostasis in prostatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Shatokhin, M N; Teodorovich, O V; Konoplia, A I; Dolgareva, S A; Gavriliuk, V P; Krasnov, L V; Mavrin, M Iu

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic prostatitis alone and in combination with prostatic adenoma have changes in the activity of the complement system, neutrophil function and content of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Abnormal representation of the proteins of the red cell membrane in patients with prostatic diseases affects structural and functional activity of erythrocytes in these patients. Dynamic changes in immune status of patients with chronic prostatitis and prostatic adenoma correlate with changes in functional red cell activity. This fact helps better understanding of pathogenesis of chronic prostatitis and prostatic adenoma.

  11. Detection of circulating prostatic cells during radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Planz, B; Szyska, P; Valdor, M; Boeckmann, W; Füzesi, L; Jakse, G

    1997-01-01

    The detection of micrometastasis of prostate cancer could help to decide more appropriate therapeutic strategies in an individual patient. We have developed a flow cytometric method for detecting cytokeratin-positive cells in the peripheral blood before, during and after radical prostatectomy in patients with prostatic carcinoma. By means of this technique we were able to detect a higher number of cytokeratin-positive cells in the intraoperative blood sample than in the pre- and postoperative blood sample in 15 patients with prostate cancer (P < 0.05). Our results show an increase in the number of cytokeratin-positive cells with increasing tumor stage and grade, as well a good correlation of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value with the number of cytokeratin-positive cells (r > 0.6). Our results underline the importance of no-touch techniques at prostatectomy to minimize release of tumor cells into the circulation during surgery. In the light of our results we consider that the indication for cell savers during radical prostatectomy should be reevaluated. The possibility of detecting single metastatic cells in peripheral blood will enable better individual patient management, and open up new modalities for diagnosing early prostate cancer and enhancing patient monitoring in relapse and tumor progression.

  12. Primary Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Jonathan N.; Nakamura, Leah Y.; Pacelli, Anna; Humphreys, Mitchell R.; Castle, Erik P.

    2010-01-01

    Nine patients treated with primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the prostate were identified among 29,783 cases of prostate cancer evaluated at Mayo Clinic from January 15, 1970, until January 2, 2009. A PubMed search of the English-language literature published from January 1, 1980, to January 1, 2010, was then performed using the key words signet ring cell and prostate, identifying 42 cases. This study reviews those cases, along with the additional 9 reported herein, and evaluates clinical characteristics, histologic diagnoses, treatment modalities, and outcomes. Mean age at diagnosis was 68 years (range, 50-85 years), and mean prostate-specific antigen level was 95.3 ng/mL (range, 1.9-536.0 ng/mL; to convert to μg/L, multiply by 1). Most patients (66%) had non–stage IV carcinoma, the most common Gleason sum was 8 (33%), and mean survival was 29 months. The presence of a primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the prostate was best confirmed by negative findings on gastrointestinal work-up, a positive stain for prostate-specific acid phosphatase, and negative carcinoembryonic antigen test results. PMID:21123640

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    depletions with blood lineage antibodies. FACS analysis with representative lineage antibodies CD31 and CD45 confirmed removal of hematopoeitic...or if only a subset of basal cells have tissue regenerative activity. The neuroendocrine cell is the rarest epithelial cell type in the adult prostate

  14. Cells With Unique Properties in Prostate Cancer-Associated Storma Are Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Prostate Cancer-Associated Storma Are Mesenchymal Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Donna M. Peehl, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...NUMBER Cells with Unique Properties in Prostate Cancer-Associated Storma Are Mesenchymal Stem Cells 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0101 5c

  15. Evaluation of MENT on primary cell cultures from benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Patricia; Sánchez, Catherine; Contreras, Héctor R; Vergara, Jorge; Acevedo, Cristian; Cabezas, Juan; Huidobro, Christian; Noé, Gabriela; Castellón, Enrique A

    2009-12-01

    7-alpha-Methyl-19-Nortestosterone (MENT) is a synthetic androgen more potent than testosterone (T) and cannot be reduced at 5-alpha position. No important effects of MENT on prostate growth have been reported. However, little is known about the effect of MENT on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) or prostate carcinoma (CaP). We evaluate the effect of MENT, T and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on secretion, proliferation and gene expression of primary cell cultures from human BPH and CaP. Moreover, the effect of these androgens was examined in the presence of finasteride to determine the influence of the 5-alpha reductase (5-AR) activity on the androgenic potency. BPH and CaP primary cultures were treated with 0, 1, 10 and 100 nM of T, MENT or DHT during 24 and 48 h. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was measured by micro particles immunoassay and proliferation rate by spectrophotometric assay (MTT) and by the immunochemical detection of the proliferation marker Ki-67. Gene expression of FGF8b (androgen sensitive gene) was evaluated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Results showed that MENT treatments increased PSA secretion and proliferation rate with a potency ranged between T and DHT. Similar effects of MENT were observed in both BPH and CaP cultures. The studies with finasteride showed that in BPH and CaP cells, the conversion of T into DHT significantly contributes to its effect on the proliferation and PSA secretion, and corroborated the resistance of MENT to the 5-AR. The effect of MENT on the gene expression of FGF8b in CaP cells was similar to T and lower than DHT. It is concluded that MENT increases proliferative and secretory activities and gene expression on pathological prostate cells although in less extent than the active metabolite DHT. Furthermore, the fall of endogenous concentration of T during MENT treatment anticipates that this androgen will be of low impact for the prostate.

  16. Foxm1 expression in prostate epithelial cells is essential for prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuqi; Balli, David; Ustiyan, Vladimir; Fulford, Logan; Hiller, Andrea; Misetic, Vinko; Zhang, Yufang; Paluch, Andrew M; Waltz, Susan E; Kasper, Susan; Kalin, Tanya V

    2013-08-02

    The treatment of advanced prostate cancer (PCa) remains a challenge. Identification of new molecular mechanisms that regulate PCa initiation and progression would provide targets for the development of new cancer treatments. The Foxm1 transcription factor is highly up-regulated in tumor cells, inflammatory cells, and cells of tumor microenvironment. However, its functions in different cell populations of PCa lesions are unknown. To determine the role of Foxm1 in tumor cells during PCa development, we generated two novel transgenic mouse models, one exhibiting Foxm1 gain-of-function and one exhibiting Foxm1 loss-of-function under control of the prostate epithelial-specific Probasin promoter. In the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP) model of PCa that uses SV40 large T antigen to induce PCa, loss of Foxm1 decreased tumor growth and metastasis. Decreased prostate tumorigenesis was associated with a decrease in tumor cell proliferation and the down-regulation of genes critical for cell proliferation and tumor metastasis, including Cdc25b, Cyclin B1, Plk-1, Lox, and Versican. In addition, tumor-associated angiogenesis was decreased, coinciding with reduced Vegf-A expression. The mRNA and protein levels of 11β-Hsd2, an enzyme playing an important role in tumor cell proliferation, were down-regulated in Foxm1-deficient PCa tumors in vivo and in Foxm1-depleted TRAMP C2 cells in vitro. Foxm1 bound to, and increased transcriptional activity of, the mouse 11β-Hsd2 promoter through the -892/-879 region, indicating that 11β-Hsd2 was a direct transcriptional target of Foxm1. Without TRAMP, overexpression of Foxm1 either alone or in combination with inhibition of a p19(ARF) tumor suppressor caused a robust epithelial hyperplasia, but was insufficient to induce progression from hyperplasia to PCa. Foxm1 expression in prostate epithelial cells is critical for prostate carcinogenesis, suggesting that inhibition of Foxm1 is a promising therapeutic approach for

  17. MYC and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Cheryl M.; Bieberich, Charles J.; Dang, Chi V.; Nelson, William G.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer, the majority of which is adenocarcinoma, is the most common epithelial cancer affecting a majority of elderly men in Western nations. Its manifestation, however, varies from clinically asymptomatic insidious neoplasms that progress slowly and do not threaten life to one that is highly aggressive with a propensity for metastatic spread and lethality if not treated in time. A number of somatic genetic and epigenetic alterations occur in prostate cancer cells. Some of these changes, such as loss of the tumor suppressors PTEN and p53, are linked to disease progression. Others, such as ETS gene fusions, appear to be linked more with early phases of the disease, such as invasion. Alterations in chromosome 8q24 in the region of MYC have also been linked to disease aggressiveness for many years. However, a number of recent studies in human tissues have indicated that MYC appears to be activated at the earliest phases of prostate cancer (e.g., in tumor-initiating cells) in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, a key precursor lesion to invasive prostatic adenocarcinoma. The initiation and early progression of prostate cancer can be recapitulated in genetically engineered mouse models, permitting a richer understanding of the cause and effects of loss of tumor suppressors and activation of MYC. The combination of studies using human tissues and mouse models paints an emerging molecular picture of prostate cancer development and early progression. This picture reveals that MYC contributes to disease initiation and progression by stimulating an embryonic stem cell–like signature characterized by an enrichment of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and by repressing differentiation. These insights pave the way to potential novel therapeutic concepts based on MYC biology. PMID:21779461

  18. Nanoemulsion formulation of a novel taxoid DHA-SBT-1214 inhibits prostate cancer stem cell-induced tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Gulzar; El Sadda, Rana; Botchkina, Galina; Ojima, Iwao; Egan, James; Amiji, Mansoor

    2017-10-10

    The main aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of an oil-in-water nanoemulsion formulation encapsulating DHA-SBT-1214, a novel omega-3 fatty acid conjugated taxoid prodrug, against prostate cancer stem cells. Nanoemulsions of DHA-SBT-1214 (NE-DHA-SBT-1214) were prepared and characterized. In vitro delivery efficiency and cytotoxicity of NE-DHA-SBT-1214 was compared with solution formulation in PPT2 cells. In vivo studies included analysis of comparative efficacy of NE-DHA-SBT-1214 with Abraxane(®) and placebo nanoemulsions as well as post-treatment alternations in clonogenic and sphere-forming capabilities of the tumor cells. Qualitative intracellular uptake studies of dye encapsulated NEs by confocal imaging showed uptake by both monolayer and spheroid cultured PPT2 cells. Treatment of PPT2 cells with NE DHA-SBT-1214 (1nM-1μM for monolayer culture of cells grown on collagen-coated dishes for 48 h) induced complete cell death, showing higher efficacy as compared to the drug solution. This nanoemulsion (10nM-10μM) also showed toxicity in 3D culture of floating spheroids. Weekly intravenous administration of the NE-DHA-SBT-1214 to NOD/SCID mice bearing subcutaneous PPT2 tumor xenografts led to dramatic suppression of tumor growth compared to Abraxane(®) and placebo nanoemulsion formulation. Viable cells that survived from this in vivo treatment regimen were no longer able to induce floating spheroids and holoclones, whereas control and Abraxane(®) treated tumor cells induced a large number of both. The results show that NE-DHA-SBT-1214 possesses significant activity against prostate CD133(high)/CD44+/(high) tumor-initiating cells both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-18

    Male Breast Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  20. FOXP3-microRNA-146-NF-κB axis and therapy for precancerous lesions in prostate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runhua; Yi, Bin; Wei, Shi; Yang, Wei-Hsiung; Hart, Karen M.; Chauhan, Priyanka; Zhang, Wei; Mao, Xicheng; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Chang-Gong; Wang, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressive activity of FOXP3 has been observed in tumor initiation, but the underlying mechanism still remains largely unknown. Here, we identified a FOXP3-microRNA-146 (miR-146)-NF-κB axis in vitro and in vivo in prostate cancer cells. We observed that FOXP3 dramatically induced the expression of miR-146a/b, which contributed to transcriptional inhibition of IRAK1 and TRAF6, in prostate cancer cell lines. Tissue-specific deletion of Foxp3 in mouse prostate caused a significant reduction of miR-146a and upregulation of NF-κB activation. In addition, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions were observed in miR-146a mutant mice as well as in Foxp3 mutant mice. Notably, the NF-κB inhibitor bortezomib inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in prostate epithelial cells, attenuating prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia formation in Foxp3 mutant mice. Our data suggest that the FOXP3-miR-146-NF-κB axis has a functional role during tumor initiation in prostate cancer. Targeting the miR-146-NF-κB axis may provide a new therapeutic approach for prostate cancers with FOXP3 defects. PMID:25712341

  1. Neuroendocrine Transdifferentiation in Human Prostate Cancer Cells: An Integrated Approach.

    PubMed

    Cerasuolo, Marianna; Paris, Debora; Iannotti, Fabio A; Melck, Dominique; Verde, Roberta; Mazzarella, Enrico; Motta, Andrea; Ligresti, Alessia

    2015-08-01

    Prostate cancer is highly sensitive to hormone therapy because androgens are essential for prostate cancer cell growth. However, with the nearly invariable progression of this disease to androgen independence, endocrine therapy ultimately fails to control prostate cancer in most patients. Androgen-independent acquisition may involve neuroendocrine transdifferentiation, but there is little knowledge about this process, which is presently controversial. In this study, we investigated this question in a novel model of human androgen-dependent LNCaP cells cultured for long periods in hormone-deprived conditions. Strikingly, characterization of the neuroendocrine phenotype by transcriptomic, metabolomic, and other statistically integrated analyses showed how hormone-deprived LNCaP cells could transdifferentiate to a nonmalignantneuroendocrine phenotype. Notably, conditioned media from neuroendocrine-like cells affected LNCaP cell proliferation. Predictive in silico models illustrated how after an initial period, when LNCaP cell survival was compromised by an arising population of neuroendocrine-like cells, a sudden trend reversal occurred in which the neuroendocrine-like cells functioned to sustain the remaining androgen-dependent LNCaP cells. Our findings provide direct biologic and molecular support for the concept that neuroendocrine transdifferentiation in prostate cancer cell populations influences the progression to androgen independence.

  2. Isolation of cancer stem cells from human prostate cancer samples.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Samuel J; Quinn, S Aidan; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Bonal, Dennis M; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Firpo-Betancourt, Adolfo; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2014-03-14

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model has been considerably revisited over the last two decades. During this time CSCs have been identified and directly isolated from human tissues and serially propagated in immunodeficient mice, typically through antibody labeling of subpopulations of cells and fractionation by flow cytometry. However, the unique clinical features of prostate cancer have considerably limited the study of prostate CSCs from fresh human tumor samples. We recently reported the isolation of prostate CSCs directly from human tissues by virtue of their HLA class I (HLAI)-negative phenotype. Prostate cancer cells are harvested from surgical specimens and mechanically dissociated. A cell suspension is generated and labeled with fluorescently conjugated HLAI and stromal antibodies. Subpopulations of HLAI-negative cells are finally isolated using a flow cytometer. The principal limitation of this protocol is the frequently microscopic and multifocal nature of primary cancer in prostatectomy specimens. Nonetheless, isolated live prostate CSCs are suitable for molecular characterization and functional validation by transplantation in immunodeficient mice.

  3. Prostate cancer marker panel with single cell sensitivity in urine.

    PubMed

    Nickens, Kristen P; Ali, Amina; Scoggin, Tatiana; Tan, Shyh-Han; Ravindranath, Lakshmi; McLeod, David G; Dobi, Albert; Tacha, David; Sesterhenn, Isabell A; Srivastava, Shiv; Petrovics, Gyorgy

    2015-06-15

    Over one million men undergo prostate biopsies annually in the United States, a majority of whom due to elevated serum PSA. More than half of the biopsies turn out to be negative for prostate cancer (CaP). The limitations of both the PSA test and the biopsy procedure have led to the development for more precise CaP detection assays in urine (e.g., PCA3, TMPRSS2-ERG) or blood (e.g., PHI, 4K). Here, we describe the development and evaluation of the Urine CaP Marker Panel (UCMP) assay for sensitive and reproducible detection of CaP cells in post-digital rectal examination (post-DRE) urine. The cellular content of the post-DRE urine was captured on a translucent filter membrane, which is placed on Cytoclear slides for direct evaluation by microscopy and immuno-cytochemistry (ICC). Cells captured on the membrane were assayed for PSA and Prostein expression to identify prostate epithelial cells, and for ERG and AMACR to identify prostate tumor cells. Immunostained cells were analyzed for quantitative and qualitative features and correlated with biopsy positive and negative status for malignancy. The assay was optimized for single cell capture sensitivity and downstream evaluations by spiking a known number of cells from established CaP cell lines, LNCaP and VCaP, into pre-cleared control urine. The cells captured from the post-DRE urine of subjects, obtained prior to biopsy procedure, were co-stained for ERG, AMACR (CaP specific), and Prostein or PSA (prostate epithelium specific) rendering a whole cell based analysis and characterization. A feasibility cohort of 63 post-DRE urine specimens was assessed. Comparison of the UCMP results with blinded biopsy results showed an assay sensitivity of 64% (16 of 25) and a specificity of 68.8% (22 of 32) for CaP detection by biopsy. This pilot study assessing a minimally invasive CaP detection assay with single cell sensitivity cell-capture and characterization from the post-DRE urine holds promise for further development of this

  4. Expression of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) in prostate cancer: a tissue microarray study of Iranian patients.

    PubMed

    Taeb, Jaleh; Asgari, Mojgan; Abolhasani, Maryam; Farajollahi, Mohammad M; Madjd, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Proteins expressed in prostate cancer, including prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), have been investigated as biomarkers for diagnosis and therapy of prostate cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of PSCA expression was performed on tissue microarrays of 185 paraffin-embedded tissues of Iranian patients, including 114 prostate cancers (PCa), 21 High Grade Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasias (HGPIN) and 50 samples of benign prostate tissue. The level of PSCA expression was compared between benign tissues, HGPIN and PCa. Then the correlations of PSCA expression with clinicopathologic parameters were assessed in PCa. The PSCA expression was detected in the membrane and cytoplasm of epithelial secretory cells in normal prostate tissues, HGPIN and PCa with a variety of intensities. The intensity of PSCA staining was significantly increased in the PCa group as compared with HGPIN and benign prostate tissues (P-value<0.05). Moreover, the level of PSCA expression was increased with higher Gleason score of PCa (P-value=0.036). The data presented here revealed that expression of PSCA as a cell surface marker increased from benign prostate tissues (BPH) and HGPIN to PCa, and its expression in PCa was positively associated with poor cell differentiation, suggesting that PSCA could be considered as a valuable target for diagnosis and therapy of PCa. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. s-SHIP expression identifies a subset of murine basal prostate cells as neonatal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Brocqueville, Guillaume; Chmelar, Renee S.; Bauderlique-Le Roy, Hélène; Deruy, Emeric; Tian, Lu; Vessella, Robert L.; Greenberg, Norman M.; Bourette, Roland P.

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of prostate stem cells (PSCs) is crucial for understanding their biology during normal development and tumorigenesis. In this aim, we used a transgenic mouse model expressing GFP from the stem cell-specific s-SHIP promoter to mark putative stem cells during postnatal prostate development. Here we show that cells identified by GFP expression are present transiently during early prostate development and localize to the basal cell layer of the epithelium. These prostate GFP+ cells are a subpopulation of the Lin− CD24+ Sca-1+ CD49f+ cells and are capable of self-renewal together with enhanced growth potential in sphere-forming assay in vitro, a phenotype consistent with that of a PSC population. Transplantation assays of prostate GFP+ cells demonstrate reconstitution of prostate ducts containing both basal and luminal cells in renal grafts. Altogether, these results demonstrate that s-SHIP promoter expression is a new marker for neonatal basal prostate cells exhibiting stem cell properties that enables PSCs in situ identification and isolation via a single consistent parameter. Transcriptional profiling of these GFP+ neonatal stem cells showed an increased expression of several components of the Wnt signaling pathway. It also identified stem cell regulators with potential applications for further analyses of normal and cancer stem cells. PMID:27081082

  6. Prostate stem cell antigen: a Jekyll and Hyde molecule?

    PubMed

    Saeki, Norihisa; Gu, Jian; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Wu, Xifeng

    2010-07-15

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell surface protein. Although PSCA is thought to be involved in intracellular signaling, much remains unknown about its physiological function and regulatory mechanism in normal and cancer cells. It is up-regulated in several major cancers including prostate, bladder, and pancreatic cancers. The expression of PSCA is positively correlated with advanced clinical stage and metastasis in prostate cancers and is also associated with malignant progression of premalignant prostate lesions. Therefore, PSCA has been proposed as a biomarker of diagnosis and prognosis, as well as a target of therapy for these cancers. In addition, PSCA has also shown clinical potential in immunotherapy as a prostate-specific antigen, which, when presented by dendritic cells, may elicit strong tumor-specific immunity. In contrast, PSCA is down-regulated in esophageal and gastric cancer and may have a tumor-suppressing function in the gastric epithelium. Recent exciting findings that genetic variations of PSCA conferred increased risks of gastric cancer and bladder cancer have opened up a new avenue of research about the pathological function of PSCA. PSCA seems to be a Jekyll and Hyde molecule that plays differential roles, tumor promoting or suppressing, depending on the cellular context. Copyright 2010 AACR.

  7. Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA): a Jekyll and Hyde molecule?

    PubMed Central

    Saeki, Norihisa; Gu, Jian; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Wu, Xifeng

    2010-01-01

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell surface protein. Although PSCA is thought to be involved in intracellular signaling, much remain unknown regarding its physiological function and regulatory mechanism in normal and cancer cells. It is up-regulated in several major cancers including prostate, bladder and pancreatic cancers. The expression of PSCA is positively correlated with advanced clinical stage and metastasis in prostate cancers and is also associated with malignant progression of pre-malignant prostate lesions. Therefore, PSCA has been proposed as a biomarker of diagnosis and prognosis, as well as a target of therapy for these cancers. In addition, PSCA has also shown clinical potential in immunotherapy as a prostate specific antigen which, when presented by dendritic cells, may elicit strong tumor specific immunity. In contrast, PSCA is down-regulated in esophageal and gastric cancer and may have tumor-suppressing function in the gastric epithelium. Recent exciting findings that genetic variations of PSCA conferred increased risks of gastric cancer and bladder cancer have opened up a new avenue of research regarding the pathological function of PSCA. PSCA appears to be a Jekyll and Hyde molecule that plays differential roles, tumor promoting or suppressing, depending on the cellular context. PMID:20501618

  8. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stemlike Cells Through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    the cell surface GRP78-expressing subpopulation of cells supports nuclear Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling. These findings are important because they are...original tasks outlined in the approved statement of work. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer, cell surface GRP78, cancer stem cell, Snail -1 16. SECURITY...associated with cell surface GRP78 (Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1) were upregulated in GRP78(+) relative to GRP78(-) prostate cancer cells. Our results in this

  9. Proliferation of Prostate Stromal Cell Induced by Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Epithelial Cell Stimulated With Trichomonas vaginalis via Crosstalk With Mast Cell.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Su; Han, Ik-Hwan; Sim, Seobo; Ahn, Myoung-Hee; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2016-11-01

    Chronic inflammation has a role in the pathogenesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. Mast cells have been detected in chronic inflammatory infiltrate of the prostate, and it is possible that the interaction between prostate epithelial cells and Trichomonas vaginalis influences the activity of mast cells in the prostate stroma. Activated mast cells might influence the biological functions of nearby tissues and cells. In this study, we investigated whether mast cells reacted with the culture supernatant of BPH epithelial cells infected with T. vaginalis may induce the proliferation of prostate stromal cells. To measure the proliferation of prostate stromal cells in response to chronic inflammation caused by the infection of BPH-1 cells with T. vaginalis, the CCK-8 assay and wound healing assay were used. ELISAs, quantitative real-time PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to measure the production and expression of inflammatory cytokine and cytokine receptor. BPH-1 cells incubated with live trichomonads produced increased levels of CCL2, IL-1β, IL-6, and CXCL8, and induced the migration of mast cells and monocytes. When the culture supernatant of BPH-1 cells stimulated with trichomonads (TCM) was added to mast cells, they became activated, as confirmed by release of β-hexosaminidase and CXCL8. Prostate stromal cells incubated with the culture supernatant of mast cells activated with TCM (M-TCM) proliferated and expressed increased levels of CXCL8, CCL2, and the cytokine receptors CXCR1 and CCR2. Blocking the chemokine receptors reduced the proliferation of stromal cells and also decreased the production of CXCL8 and CCL2. Moreover, the expression of FGF2, cyclin D1, and Bcl-2 was increased in the proliferated stromal cells stimulated with M-TCM. Additionally, the M-TCM-treated stromal cells were more invasive than control cells. The inflammatory mediators released by BPH epithelial cells in response to infection by

  10. Prostate Epithelial Pten/TP53 Loss Leads to Transformation of Multipotential Progenitors and Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Philip; Liu, Yen-Nien; Pierce, Rachel; Abou-Kheir, Wassim; Casey, Orla; Seng, Victoria; Camacho, Daniel; Simpson, R. Mark; Kelly, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Loss of PTEN and loss of TP53 are common genetic aberrations occurring in prostate cancer. PTEN and TP53 contribute to the regulation of self-renewal and differentiation in prostate progenitors, presumptive tumor initiating cells for prostate cancer. Here we characterize the transformed phenotypes resulting from deletion of the Pten and TP53 tumor suppressors in prostate epithelium. Using the PB-Cre4+Ptenfl/flTP53fl/fl model of prostate cancer, we describe the histological and metastatic properties of primary tumors, transplanted primary tumor cells, and clonal cell lines established from tumors. Adenocarcinoma was the major primary tumor type that developed, which progressed to lethal sarcomatoid carcinoma at approximately 6 months of age. In addition, basal carcinomas and prostatic urothelial carcinomas were observed. We show that tumor heterogeneity resulted, at least in part, from the transformation of multipotential progenitors. CK8+ luminal epithelial cells were capable of undergoing epithelial to mesenchymal transition in vivo to sarcomatoid carcinomas containing osseous metaplasia. Metastasis rarely was observed from primary tumors, but metastasis to lung and lymph nodes occurred frequently from orthotopic tumors initiated from a biphenotypic clonal cell line. Androgen deprivation influenced the differentiated phenotypes of metastases. These data show that one functional consequence of Pten/TP53 loss in prostate epithelium is lineage plasticity of transformed cells. PMID:21703421

  11. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stemlike Cells through Cell Surface Expressed GRP78

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0478 TITLE: Targeting Prostate Cancer Stemlike Cells through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78 PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Targeting Prostate Cancer Stemlike Cells through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0478 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This study investigated a function for cell surface GRP78 in regulating prostate cancer stem-like cells . In year 1, we showed that

  12. High rates of chromosome missegregation suppress tumor progression but do not inhibit tumor initiation

    PubMed Central

    Zasadil, Lauren M.; Britigan, Eric M. C.; Ryan, Sean D.; Kaur, Charanjeet; Guckenberger, David J.; Beebe, David J.; Moser, Amy R.; Weaver, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy, an abnormal chromosome number that deviates from a multiple of the haploid, has been recognized as a common feature of cancers for >100 yr. Previously, we showed that the rate of chromosome missegregation/chromosomal instability (CIN) determines the effect of aneuploidy on tumors; whereas low rates of CIN are weakly tumor promoting, higher rates of CIN cause cell death and tumor suppression. However, whether high CIN inhibits tumor initiation or suppresses the growth and progression of already initiated tumors remained unclear. We tested this using the ApcMin/+ mouse intestinal tumor model, in which effects on tumor initiation versus progression can be discriminated. ApcMin/+ cells exhibit low CIN, and we generated high CIN by reducing expression of the kinesin-like mitotic motor protein CENP-E. CENP-E+/−;ApcMin/+ doubly heterozygous cells had higher rates of chromosome missegregation than singly heterozygous cells, resulting in increased cell death and a substantial reduction in tumor progression compared with ApcMin/+ animals. Intestinal organoid studies confirmed that high CIN does not inhibit tumor cell initiation but does inhibit subsequent cell growth. These findings support the conclusion that increasing the rate of chromosome missegregation could serve as a successful chemotherapeutic strategy. PMID:27146113

  13. Hydrodynamic cavitation kills prostate cells and ablates benign prostatic hyperplasia tissue.

    PubMed

    Itah, Zeynep; Oral, Ozlem; Perk, Osman Yavuz; Sesen, Muhsincan; Demir, Ebru; Erbil, Secil; Dogan-Ekici, A Isin; Ekici, Sinan; Kosar, Ali; Gozuacik, Devrim

    2013-11-01

    Hydrodynamic cavitation is a physical phenomenon characterized by vaporization and bubble formation in liquids under low local pressures, and their implosion following their release to a higher pressure environment. Collapse of the bubbles releases high energy and may cause damage to exposed surfaces. We recently designed a set-up to exploit the destructive nature of hydrodynamic cavitation for biomedical purposes. We have previously shown that hydrodynamic cavitation could kill leukemia cells and erode kidney stones. In this study, we analyzed the effects of cavitation on prostate cells and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissue. We showed that hydrodynamic cavitation could kill prostate cells in a pressure- and time-dependent manner. Cavitation did not lead to programmed cell death, i.e. classical apoptosis or autophagy activation. Following the application of cavitation, we observed no prominent DNA damage and cells did not arrest in the cell cycle. Hence, we concluded that cavitation forces directly damaged the cells, leading to their pulverization. Upon application to BPH tissues from patients, cavitation could lead to a significant level of tissue destruction. Therefore similar to ultrasonic cavitation, we propose that hydrodynamic cavitation has the potential to be exploited and developed as an approach for the ablation of aberrant pathological tissues, including BPH.

  14. Engineering chemically modified viruses for prostate cancer cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Mohan, K; Weiss, G A

    2015-12-01

    Specific detection of circulating tumor cells and characterization of their aggressiveness could improve cancer diagnostics and treatment. Metastasis results from such tumor cells, and causes the majority of cancer deaths. Chemically modified viruses could provide an inexpensive and efficient approach to detect tumor cells and quantitate their cell surface biomarkers. However, non-specific adhesion between the cell surface receptors and the virus surface presents a challenge. This report describes wrapping the virus surface with different PEG architectures, including as fusions to oligolysine, linkers, spacers and scaffolded ligands. The reported PEG wrappers can reduce by >75% the non-specific adhesion of phage to cell surfaces. Dynamic light scattering verified the non-covalent attachment by the reported wrappers as increased sizes of the virus particles. Further modifications resulted in specific detection of prostate cancer cells expressing PSMA, a key prostate cancer biomarker. The approach allowed quantification of PSMA levels on the cell surface, and could distinguish more aggressive forms of the disease.

  15. Prostate Cancer Stem Cell-Targeted Efficacy of a New-Generation Taxoid, SBT-1214 and Novel Polyenolic Zinc-Binding Curcuminoid, CMC2.24

    PubMed Central

    Botchkina, Galina I.; Zuniga, Edison S.; Rowehl, Rebecca H.; Park, Rosa; Bhalla, Rahuldev; Bialkowska, Agnieszka B.; Johnson, Francis; Golub, Lorne M.; Zhang, Yu; Ojima, Iwao; Shroyer, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among men. Multiple evidence suggests that a population of tumor-initiating, or cancer stem cells (CSCs) is responsible for cancer development and exceptional drug resistance, representing a highly important therapeutic target. The present study evaluated CSC-specific alterations induced by new-generation taxoid SBT-1214 and a novel polyenolic zinc-binding curcuminoid, CMC2.24, in prostate CSCs. Principal Findings The CD133high/CD44high phenotype was isolated from spontaneously immortalized patient-derived PPT2 cells and highly metastatic PC3MM2 cells. Weekly treatment of the NOD/SCID mice bearing PPT2- and PC3MM3-induced tumors with the SBT-1214 led to dramatic suppression of tumor growth. Four of six PPT2 and 3 of 6 PC3MM2 tumors have shown the absence of viable cells in residual tumors. In vitro, SBT-1214 (100nM-1µM; for 72 hr) induced about 60% cell death in CD133high/CD44+/high cells cultured on collagen I in stem cell medium (in contrast, the same doses of paclitaxel increased proliferation of these cells). The cytotoxic effects were increased when SBT-1214 was combined with the CMC2.24. A stem cell-specific PCR array assay revealed that this drug combination mediated massive inhibition of multiple constitutively up-regulated stem cell-related genes, including key pluripotency transcription factors. Importantly, this drug combination induced expression of p21 and p53, which were absent in CD133high/CD44high cells. Viable cells that survived this treatment regimen were no longer able to induce secondary spheroids, exhibited significant morphological abnormalities and died in 2-5 days. Conclusions We report here that the SBT-1214 alone, or in combination with CMC2.24, possesses significant activity against prostate CD133high/CD44+/high tumor-initiating cells. This drug combination efficiently inhibits expression of the majority of stem cell-related genes and pluripotency transcription

  16. Human Prostate Side Population Cells Demonstrate Stem Cell Properties in Recombination with Urogenital Sinus Mesenchyme

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Barbara A.; Gangavarapu, Kalyan J.; Mathew, Grinu; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Morrison, Carl D.; Miller, Austin; Huss, Wendy J.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell enrichment provides a tool to examine prostate stem cells obtained from benign and malignant tissue. Functional assays can enrich stem cells based on common stem cell phenotypes, such as high ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediated efflux of Hoechst substrates (side population assay). This functional assay is based upon mechanisms that protect cells from environmental insult thus contributing to the survival and protection of the stem cell population. We have isolated and analyzed cells digested from twelve clinical prostate specimens based on the side population assay. Prostate stem cell properties of the isolated cells were tested by serial recombination with rat urogenital mesenchyme. Recombinants with side population cells demonstrate an increase in the frequency of human ductal growth and the number of glands per recombinant when compared to recombinants with non-side population cells. Isolated cells were capable of prostatic growth for up to three generations in the recombination assay with as little as 125 sorted prostate cells. The ability to reproducibly use cells isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting from human prostate tissue is an essential step to a better understanding of human prostate stem cell biology. ABC transporter G2 (ABCG2) was expressed in recombinants from side population cells indicating the side population cells have self-renewal properties. Epithelial cell differentiation of recombinants was determined by immunohistochemical analysis for expression of the basal, luminal, and neuroendocrine markers, p63, androgen receptor, prostate specific antigen, and chromogranin A, respectively. Thus, the ABCG2 expressing side population demonstrates multipotency and self-renewal properties indicating stem cells are within this population. PMID:23383057

  17. Bioengineered viral vectors for targeting and killing prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai-xin; Jia, William; Rennie, Paul S

    2010-01-01

    Enabling the transduction of therapeutic gene expression exclusively in diseased sites is the key to developing more effective treatments for advanced prostate cancer using viral-based therapy. While prostate cancers that express high levels of HER-2 are resistant to the killing effects of trastuzumab, they can be targeted for selective gene expression and destruction by lentiviruses with envelope proteins engineered to bind to this therapeutic antibody. More importantly, after intravenous injection, this trastuzumab-bound lentivirus is able to target castration-resistant prostate tumor xenografts, albeit with low efficiency. This proof of principle opens up multiple possibilities for the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer using a viral-based therapy. However, to be safe and more effective, the viral vectors must target prostate cancer cells more selectively and efficiently. A higher degree of specificity and efficiency of cancer cell targeting can be achieved by engineering viral vectors to bind to a specific cell surface marker and by controlling the expression of the therapeutic payload at transcriptional level, with a tissue-specific promoter, and at the translational level, with a regulatory sequences inserted into either the 5'UTR or 3'UTR regions of the therapeutic gene(s). The latter would be designed to ensure that translation of this mRNA occurs exclusively in malignant cells. Furthermore, in order to obtain a potent anti-tumor effect, viral vectors would be engineered to express pro-apoptotic genes, intra-cellar antibodies/nucleotide aptamers to block critical proteins, or siRNAs to knockdown essential cellular mRNAs. Alternatively, controlled expression of an essential viral gene would restore replication competence to the virus and enable selective oncolysis of tumor cells. Successful delivery of such bioengineered viruses may provide a more effective way to treat advanced prostate cancer.

  18. SREBP-2 promotes stem cell-like properties and metastasis by transcriptional activation of c-Myc in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangyan; Wu, Jason Boyang; Li, Qinlong; Shigemura, Katsumi; Chung, Leland W.K.; Huang, Wen-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) transcription factor mainly controls cholesterol biosynthesis and homeostasis in normal cells. The role of SREBP-2 in lethal prostate cancer (PCa) progression remains to be elucidated. Here, we showed that expression of SREBP-2 was elevated in advanced pathologic grade and metastatic PCa and significantly associated with poor clinical outcomes. Biofunctional analyses demonstrated that SREBP-2 induced PCa cell proliferation, invasion and migration. Furthermore, overexpression of SREBP-2 increased the PCa stem cell population, prostasphere-forming ability and tumor-initiating capability, whereas genetic silencing of SREBP-2 inhibited PCa cell growth, stemness, and xenograft tumor growth and metastasis. Clinical and mechanistic data showed that SREBP-2 was positively correlated with c-Myc and induced c-Myc activation by directly interacting with an SREBP-2-binding element in the 5′-flanking c-Myc promoter region to drive stemness and metastasis. Collectively, these clinical and experimental results reveal a novel role of SREBP-2 in the induction of a stem cell-like phenotype and PCa metastasis, which sheds light on translational potential by targeting SREBP-2 as a promising therapeutic approach in PCa. PMID:26883200

  19. Prostate cancer marker panel with single cell sensitivity in urine

    PubMed Central

    Nickens, Kristen P.; Ali, Amina; Scoggin, Tatiana; Tan, Shyh‐Han; Ravindranath, Lakshmi; McLeod, David G.; Dobi, Albert; Tacha, David; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Srivastava, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    Background Over one million men undergo prostate biopsies annually in the United States, a majority of whom due to elevated serum PSA. More than half of the biopsies turn out to be negative for prostate cancer (CaP). The limitations of both the PSA test and the biopsy procedure have led to the development for more precise CaP detection assays in urine (e.g., PCA3, TMPRSS2‐ERG) or blood (e.g., PHI, 4K). Here, we describe the development and evaluation of the Urine CaP Marker Panel (UCMP) assay for sensitive and reproducible detection of CaP cells in post‐digital rectal examination (post‐DRE) urine. Methods The cellular content of the post‐DRE urine was captured on a translucent filter membrane, which is placed on Cytoclear slides for direct evaluation by microscopy and immuno‐cytochemistry (ICC). Cells captured on the membrane were assayed for PSA and Prostein expression to identify prostate epithelial cells, and for ERG and AMACR to identify prostate tumor cells. Immunostained cells were analyzed for quantitative and qualitative features and correlated with biopsy positive and negative status for malignancy. Results The assay was optimized for single cell capture sensitivity and downstream evaluations by spiking a known number of cells from established CaP cell lines, LNCaP and VCaP, into pre‐cleared control urine. The cells captured from the post‐DRE urine of subjects, obtained prior to biopsy procedure, were co‐stained for ERG, AMACR (CaP specific), and Prostein or PSA (prostate epithelium specific) rendering a whole cell based analysis and characterization. A feasibility cohort of 63 post‐DRE urine specimens was assessed. Comparison of the UCMP results with blinded biopsy results showed an assay sensitivity of 64% (16 of 25) and a specificity of 68.8% (22 of 32) for CaP detection by biopsy. Conclusions This pilot study assessing a minimally invasive CaP detection assay with single cell sensitivity cell‐capture and characterization from the

  20. Adipocyte secreted factors enhance aggressiveness of prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ângela; Pereira, Sofia S; Costa, Madalena; Morais, Tiago; Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Rúben; Monteiro, Mariana P

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased incidence and risk of mortality of prostate cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying this risk association is the change in adipokines expression that could promote the development and progression of the prostate tumor cells. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of preadipocyte and adipocyte secretome in the proliferation, migration and invasion of androgen independent prostate carcinoma cells (RM1) and to assess cell proliferation in the presence of the adiposity signals leptin and insulin. RM1 cells were co-cultured in with preadipocytes, adipocytes or cultured in their respective conditioned medium. Cell proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and XTT viability test. Cell migration was evaluated using a wound healing injury assay of RM1 cells cultured with conditioned media. Cellular invasion of RM1 cells co-cultured with adipocytes and preadipocytes was assessed using matrigel membranes. Preadipocyte conditioned medium was associated with a small increase in RM1 proliferation, while adipocytes conditioned media significantly increased RM1 cell proliferation (p<0.01). Adipocytes also significantly increased the RM1 cells proliferation in co-culture (p <0.01). Cell migration was higher in RM1 cells cultured with preadipocyte and adipocyte conditioned medium. RM1 cell invasion was significantly increased after co-culture with preadipocytes and adipocytes (p <0.05). Insulin also increased significantly the cell proliferation in contrast to leptin, which showed no effect. In conclusion, prostate carcinoma cells seem to be influenced by factors secreted by adipocytes that are able to increase their ability to proliferate, migrate and invade.

  1. Adipocyte Secreted Factors Enhance Aggressiveness of Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ângela; Pereira, Sofia S.; Costa, Madalena; Morais, Tiago; Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Rúben; Monteiro, Mariana P.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased incidence and risk of mortality of prostate cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying this risk association is the change in adipokines expression that could promote the development and progression of the prostate tumor cells. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of preadipocyte and adipocyte secretome in the proliferation, migration and invasion of androgen independent prostate carcinoma cells (RM1) and to assess cell proliferation in the presence of the adiposity signals leptin and insulin. RM1 cells were co-cultured in with preadipocytes, adipocytes or cultured in their respective conditioned medium. Cell proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and XTT viability test. Cell migration was evaluated using a wound healing injury assay of RM1 cells cultured with conditioned media. Cellular invasion of RM1 cells co-cultured with adipocytes and preadipocytes was assessed using matrigel membranes. Preadipocyte conditioned medium was associated with a small increase in RM1 proliferation, while adipocytes conditioned media significantly increased RM1 cell proliferation (p<0.01). Adipocytes also significantly increased the RM1 cells proliferation in co-culture (p <0.01). Cell migration was higher in RM1 cells cultured with preadipocyte and adipocyte conditioned medium. RM1 cell invasion was significantly increased after co-culture with preadipocytes and adipocytes (p <0.05). Insulin also increased significantly the cell proliferation in contrast to leptin, which showed no effect. In conclusion, prostate carcinoma cells seem to be influenced by factors secreted by adipocytes that are able to increase their ability to proliferate, migrate and invade. PMID:25928422

  2. Single cell transcriptomic analysis of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Welty, Christopher J; Coleman, Ilsa; Coleman, Roger; Lakely, Bryce; Xia, Jing; Chen, Shu; Gulati, Roman; Larson, Sandy R; Lange, Paul H; Montgomery, Bruce; Nelson, Peter S; Vessella, Robert L; Morrissey, Colm

    2013-02-16

    The ability to interrogate circulating tumor cells (CTC) and disseminated tumor cells (DTC) is restricted by the small number detected and isolated (typically <10). To determine if a commercially available technology could provide a transcriptomic profile of a single prostate cancer (PCa) cell, we clonally selected and cultured a single passage of cell cycle synchronized C4-2B PCa cells. Ten sets of single, 5-, or 10-cells were isolated using a micromanipulator under direct visualization with an inverted microscope. Additionally, two groups of 10 individual DTC, each isolated from bone marrow of 2 patients with metastatic PCa were obtained. RNA was amplified using the WT-Ovation™ One-Direct Amplification System. The amplified material was hybridized on a 44K Whole Human Gene Expression Microarray. A high stringency threshold, a mean Alexa Fluor® 3 signal intensity above 300, was used for gene detection. Relative expression levels were validated for select genes using real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). Using this approach, 22,410, 20,423, and 17,009 probes were positive on the arrays from 10-cell pools, 5-cell pools, and single-cells, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of gene detection on the single-cell analyses were 0.739 and 0.972 respectively when compared to 10-cell pools, and 0.814 and 0.979 respectively when compared to 5-cell pools, demonstrating a low false positive rate. Among 10,000 randomly selected pairs of genes, the Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.875 between the single-cell and 5-cell pools and 0.783 between the single-cell and 10-cell pools. As expected, abundant transcripts in the 5- and 10-cell samples were detected by RT-qPCR in the single-cell isolates, while lower abundance messages were not. Using the same stringency, 16,039 probes were positive on the patient single-cell arrays. Cluster analysis showed that all 10 DTC grouped together within each patient. A transcriptomic profile can be reliably obtained from a single cell using

  3. Cell Lineage Analysis of Mouse Prostate Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    the current funding year 2014 we have generated 6 intermediate breeding pairs with genotypes identified in Table 2 to produce mice with genotype CK5...prostate regression and testosterone -stimulated regrowth, see Figure 1. • Generated 6 breeding pairs (consisting of 1 male and 1 female) for generation

  4. Defective DNA strand break repair after DNA damage in prostate cancer cells: implications for genetic instability and prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rong; Kumaravel, Tirukalikundram S; Jalali, Farid; Marrano, Paula; Squire, Jeremy A; Bristow, Robert G

    2004-12-01

    Together with cell cycle checkpoint control, DNA repair plays a pivotal role in protecting the genome from endogenous and exogenous DNA damage. Although increased genetic instability has been associated with prostate cancer progression, the relative role of DNA double-strand break repair in malignant versus normal prostate epithelial cells is not known. In this study, we determined the RNA and protein expression of a series of DNA double-strand break repair genes in both normal (PrEC-epithelial and PrSC-stromal) and malignant (LNCaP, DU-145, and PC-3) prostate cultures. Expression of genes downstream of ATM after ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage reflected the p53 status of the cell lines. In the malignant prostate cell lines, mRNA and protein levels of the Rad51, Xrcc3, Rad52, and Rad54 genes involved in homologous recombination were elevated approximately 2- to 5-fold in comparison to normal PrEC cells. The XRCC1, DNA polymerase-beta and -delta proteins were also elevated. There were no consistent differences in gene expression relating to the nonhomologous end-joining pathway. Despite increased expression of DNA repair genes, malignant prostate cancer cells had defective repair of DNA breaks, alkali-labile sites, and oxidative base damage. Furthermore, after ionizing radiation and mitomycin C treatment, chromosomal aberration assays confirmed that malignant prostate cells had defective DNA repair. This discordance between expression and function of DNA repair genes in malignant prostate cancer cells supports the hypothesis that prostate tumor progression may reflect aberrant DNA repair. Our findings support the development of novel treatment strategies designed to reinstate normal DNA repair in prostate cancer cells.

  5. Identification of Genes Required for the Survival of Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    cancer lines ( PrCa ) versus the normal prostate epithelial line RWPE-1. Identifying PCL genes that are either common across all prostate cancer...marked differences between the PrCa cell lines and the normal prostate epithelial line RWPE-1. Many of these differences likely represent the sought...after PCL genes. Of the highest ranking PCL hairpins, based on absolute differences between PrCa and normal prostate epithelial cells (Δlog2

  6. Interleukin-18 may lead to benign prostatic hyperplasia via thrombospondin-1 production in prostatic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hamakawa, Takashi; Sasaki, Shoichi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Imura, Makoto; Kubota, Yasue; Kojima, Yoshiyuki; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2014-05-01

    Although inflammation plays an important role in the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), little is known about the exact mechanism underlying this pathogenesis. Here, we investigated the relationship between the inflammatory reaction and BPH. cDNA microarray analysis was used to identify changes in inflammation-related gene expression in a recently established rat model that mimics human BPH. To investigate the genes identified in the analysis, quantitative (q)RT-PCR, Western blotting, immunostaining, and a cell proliferation assay were conducted using BPH model tissues, human prostate tissues, and normal human prostate cultured cells. Of the 31,100 genes identified in the cDNA analysis, seven inflammatory-response-related genes were expressed at a >2-fold higher level in rat BPH tissues than in normal rat prostate tissues. The levels of the most commonly expressed pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-18, significantly increased in rat BPH tissues. In humans, IL-18 was localized in the epithelial and stromal components, while its receptor was strongly localized in smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, in human prostate smooth muscle cell line (PrSMC), IL-18 effected dose-dependent increases in the phosphorylated Akt and thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) levels. TSP-1 promoted proliferation of the human prostate stromal cells (PrSC). IL-18 may act directly in BPH pathogenesis by inducing TSP-1 production in prostatic smooth muscle cells via Akt phosphorylation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. T cells engineered with a T cell receptor against the prostate antigen TARP specifically kill HLA-A2+ prostate and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hillerdal, Victoria; Nilsson, Berith; Carlsson, Björn; Eriksson, Fredrik; Essand, Magnus

    2012-09-25

    To produce genetically engineered T cells directed against prostate and breast cancer cells, we have cloned the T-cell receptor recognizing the HLA-A2-restricted T-cell receptor γ-chain alternate reading-frame protein (TARP)(4-13) epitope. TARP is a protein exclusively expressed in normal prostate epithelium and in adenocarcinomas of the prostate and breast. Peripheral blood T cells transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding the TARP-TCR proliferated well when exposed to peptide-specific stimuli. These cells exerted peptide-specific IFN-γ production and cytotoxic activity. Importantly, HLA-A2(+) prostate and breast cancer cells expressing TARP were also killed, demonstrating that the TARP(4-13) epitope is a physiologically relevant target for T-cell therapy of prostate and breast cancer. In conclusion, we present the cloning of a T cell receptor (TCR) directed against a physiologically relevant HLA-A2 epitope of TARP. To our knowledge this report on engineering of T cells with a TCR directed against an antigen specifically expressed by prostate cells is unique.

  8. FGFR4 Downregulation of Cell Adhesion in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-1-0385 TITLE: FGFR4 Downregulation of Cell Adhesion...2007 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 Mar 2006 – 28 Feb 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FGFR4 Downregulation of Cell...our project to examine the role of FGFR4 G388R in altering cell adhesion in prostate cancer. This includes acquiring expertise in the passage and

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    specific type of healthy bone marrow derived cells and loading it with a therapeutic chemical so that when these loaded cells are injected into the...clinical trials for CRPC. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Trojan horse therapy, prostate cancer homing, allogeneic bone marrow , cell based therapeutics 16. SECURITY...from the bone marrow of healthy donors and expanded ex-vivo using well- established, FDA-approved protocols18. Displaying immune evasiveness, these

  10. Butyrate-Induced Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    butyrate-induced apoptosis was independent of cell cycle phase. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES prostate cancer, histone deacetylase inhibitors, bone...of cells plated) HDI histone deacetylase inhibitor SBHA suberoylbishydroxamate PKC protein kinase C activator SDS-PAGE SDS polyacrylamide gel...cancer cell lines 1. Summary of goals and findings Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDI) such as butyrate and suberoylbishydroxamate (SBHA) have

  11. Programmed Cell Death Pathways in Tumor Initiation & Progresssion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    Hockenbery, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center Seattle, Washington 98104 REPORT DATE: October 1997 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual...ADORESS(ES) Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center Seattle, Washington 98104 S. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESSES) U.S. Army Medical...stress Breast Cancer ~ ÄoVCLASS,F,CAT,ON’ Unclassified NbN 7540-01-280-5500" 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE Unclassified 19

  12. VEGF-mediated angiogenesis links EMT-induced cancer stemness to tumor initiation.

    PubMed

    Fantozzi, Anna; Gruber, Dorothea C; Pisarsky, Laura; Heck, Chantal; Kunita, Akiko; Yilmaz, Mahmut; Meyer-Schaller, Nathalie; Cornille, Karen; Hopfer, Ulrike; Bentires-Alj, Mohamed; Christofori, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    An epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) underlies malignant tumor progression and metastatic spread by enabling cancer cells to depart from the primary tumor, invade surrounding tissue, and disseminate to distant organs. EMT also enriches for cancer stem cells (CSC) and increases the capacity of cancer cells to initiate and propagate tumors upon transplantation into immune-deficient mice, a major hallmark of CSCs. However, the molecular mechanisms promoting the tumorigenicity of cancer cells undergoing an EMT and of CSCs have remained widely elusive. We here report that EMT confers efficient tumorigenicity to murine breast cancer cells by the upregulated expression of the proangiogenic factor VEGF-A and by increased tumor angiogenesis. On the basis of these data, we propose a novel interpretation of the features of CSCs with EMT-induced, VEGF-A-mediated angiogenesis as the connecting mechanism between cancer cell stemness and tumor initiation.

  13. The Isolation and Characterization of Human Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    magnetic field.1 This technique is based on the cellular uptake and magnetic levitation of a...culture based on magnetic cell levitation . Nature nanotechnology;5(4):291-6. Appendix None. ...have focused attention on two alternative strategies: magnetic nanoparticles and human prostate fibroblasts

  14. Proapoptotic effect of endocannabinoids in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ORELLANA-SERRADELL, O.; POBLETE, C.E.; SANCHEZ, C.; CASTELLÓN, E.A.; GALLEGOS, I.; HUIDOBRO, C.; LLANOS, M.N.; CONTRERAS, H.R.

    2015-01-01

    In the early stages, prostate cancer is androgen- dependent; therefore, medical castration has shown significant results during the initial stages of this pathology. Despite this early effect, advanced prostate cancer is resilient to such treatment. Recent evidence shows that derivatives of Cannabis sativa and its analogs may exert a protective effect against different types of oncologic pathologies. The purpose of the present study was to detect the presence of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) on cancer cells with a prostatic origin and to evaluate the effect of the in vitro use of synthetic analogs. In order to do this, we used a commercial cell line and primary cultures derived from prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The presence of the CB1 and CB2 receptors was determined by immunohistochemistry where we showed a higher expression of these receptors in later stages of the disease (samples with a high Gleason score). Later, treatments were conducted using anandamide, 2-arachidonoyl glycerol and a synthetic analog of anandamide, methanandamide. Using the MTT assay, we proved that the treatments produced a cell growth inhibitory effect on all the different prostate cancer cultures. This effect was demonstrated to be dose-dependent. The use of a specific CB1 receptor blocker (SR141716) confirmed that this effect was produced primarily from the activation of the CB1 receptor. In order to understand the MTT assay results, we determined cell cycle distribution by flow cytometry, which showed no variation at the different cell cycle stages in all the cultures after treatment. Treatment with endocannabinoids resulted in an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells as determined by Annexin V assays and caused an increase in the levels of activated caspase-3 and a reduction in the levels of Bcl-2 confirming that the reduction in cell viability noted in the MTT assay was caused by the activation of the apoptotic pathway. Finally, we observed that

  15. Proepithelin Regulates Prostate Cancer Cell Biology by Promoting Cell Growth, Migration, and Anchorage-Independent Growth

    PubMed Central

    Monami, Giada; Emiliozzi, Velia; Bitto, Alessandro; Lovat, Francesca; Xu, Shi-Qiong; Goldoni, Silvia; Fassan, Matteo; Serrero, Ginette; Gomella, Leonard G.; Baffa, Raffaele; Iozzo, Renato V.; Morrione, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    The growth factor proepithelin has recently emerged as an important regulator of transformation in several physiological and pathological systems. In this study, we determined the biological roles of proepithelin in prostate cancer cells using purified human recombinant proepithelin as well as proepithelin-depletion strategies. Proepithelin promoted the migration of androgen-dependent and -independent human prostate cancer cells; androgen-independent DU145 cells were the more responsive. In these cells, proepithelin additionally stimulated wound closure, invasion, and promotion of cell growth in vitro. These effects required the activation of both the Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. We have analyzed proepithelin expression levels in different available prostate cancer microarray studies using the Oncomine database and found a statistically significant increase in proepithelin mRNA expression levels in prostate cancers compared with nonneoplastic controls. Notably, depletion of endogenous proepithelin by siRNA and antisense strategies impaired the ability of DU145 cells to grow and migrate after serum withdrawal and inhibited anchorage-independent growth. Our results provide the first evidence for a role of proepithelin in stimulating the migration, invasion, proliferation, and anchorage-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. This study supports the hypothesis that proepithelin may play a critical role as an autocrine growth factor in the establishment and initial progression of prostate cancer. Furthermore, proepithelin may prove to be a useful clinical marker for the diagnosis of prostate tumors. PMID:19179604

  16. Boric acid inhibits human prostate cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Wade T; Eckhert, Curtis D

    2004-12-08

    The role of boron in biology includes coordinated regulation of gene expression in mixed bacterial populations and the growth and proliferation of higher plants and lower animals. Here we report that boric acid, the dominant form of boron in plasma, inhibits the proliferation of prostate cancer cell lines, DU-145 and LNCaP, in a dose-dependent manner. Non-tumorigenic prostate cell lines, PWR-1E and RWPE-1, and the cancer line PC-3 were also inhibited, but required concentrations higher than observed human blood levels. Studies using DU-145 cells showed that boric acid induced a cell death-independent proliferative inhibition, with little effect on cell cycle stage distribution and mitochondrial function.

  17. HLA Class II Antigen Presentation in Prostate Cancer Cells: A Novel Approach to Prostate Tumor Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Doonan, Bently Patrick; Haque, Azizul

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a deadly disease that is in drastic need of new treatment strategies for late stage and metastatic prostate cancer. Immunotherapy has emerged as a viable option to fill this void. Clinical trials have been conducted that induce tumor clearance through cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activation, these studies have had mixed outcomes with the overlying problem being the lack of a complete immune response with sustained killing and the formation of tumor specific memory cells. To overcome this, we have outlined the need for activating the HLA class II pathway in inducing a sustained CD8+ T cell response and the development of effective memory. We have also discussed the ability of prostate cancer cells to express stable HLA class II molecules that can be manipulated for tumor antigen (Ag) processing and presentation. This review also sets to outline new directions that exist for the use of class II-restricted Ags/peptides in devising cancer vaccines as well as combined chemoimmunotherapy. A better understanding of these concepts will improve future cancer vaccine studies and further the field of cancer immunobiology.

  18. A subset of high Gleason grade prostate carcinomas contain a large burden of prostate cancer syndecan-1 positive stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Benjamin; Alghezi, Dhafer A; Cattermole, Claire; Beresford, Mark; Bowen, Rebecca; Mitchard, John; Chalmers, Andrew D

    2017-05-01

    There is a pressing need to identify prognostic and predictive biomarkers for prostate cancer to aid treatment decisions in both early and advanced disease settings. Syndecan-1, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan, has been previously identified as a potential prognostic biomarker by multiple studies at the tissue and serum level. However, other studies have questioned its utility. Anti-Syndecan-1 immunohistochemistry was carried out on 157 prostate tissue samples (including cancerous, adjacent normal tissue, and non-diseased prostate) from three independent cohorts of patients. A population of Syndecan-1 positive stromal cells was identified and the number and morphological parameters of these cells quantified. The identity of the Syndecan-1-positive stromal cells was assessed by multiplex immunofluorescence using a range of common cell lineage markers. Finally, the burden of Syndecan-1 positive stromal cells was tested for association with clinical parameters. We identified a previously unreported cell type which is marked by Syndecan-1 expression and is found in the stroma of prostate tumors and adjacent normal tissue but not in non-diseased prostate. We call these cells Prostate Cancer Syndecan-1 Positive (PCSP) cells. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the PCSP cell population did not co-stain with markers of common prostate epithelial, stromal, or immune cell populations. However, morphological analysis revealed that PCSP cells are often elongated and displayed prominent lamellipodia, suggesting they are an unidentified migratory cell population. Analysis of clinical parameters showed that PCSP cells were found with a frequency of 20-35% of all tumors evaluated, but were not present in non-diseased normal tissue. Interestingly, a subset of primary Gleason 5 prostate tumors had a high burden of PCSP cells. The current study identifies PCSP cells as a novel, potentially migratory cell type, which is marked by Syndecan-1 expression and is found in the stroma

  19. Mitochondrial DNA in Tumor Initiation, Progression, and Metastasis: Role of Horizontal mtDNA Transfer.

    PubMed

    Berridge, Michael V; Dong, Lanfeng; Neuzil, Jiri

    2015-08-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), encoding 13 out of more than 1,000 proteins of the mitochondrial proteome, is of paramount importance for the bioenergetic machinery of oxidative phosphorylation that is required for tumor initiation, propagation, and metastasis. In stark contrast to the widely held view that mitochondria and mtDNA are retained and propagated within somatic cells of higher organisms, recent in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrates that mitochondria move between mammalian cells. This is particularly evident in cancer where defective mitochondrial respiration can be restored and tumor-forming ability regained by mitochondrial acquisition. This paradigm shift in cancer cell biology and mitochondrial genetics, concerning mitochondrial movement between cells to meet bioenergetic needs, not only adds another layer of plasticity to the armory of cancer cells to correct damaged mitochondria, but also points to potentially new therapeutic approaches.

  20. Re-epithelialization resulted from prostate basal cells in canine prostatic urethra may represent the ideal healing method after two-micron laser resection of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ying; Luo, Guang-Heng; Luo, Lei; Yang, Xiu-Shu; Hu, Jian-Xin; Shi, Hua; Huang, Ping; Sun, Zhao-Lin; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the re-epithelialization of wound healing in canine prostatic urethra and to evaluate the effect of this re-epithelialization way after two-micron laser resection of the prostate (TmLRP). TmLRP and partial bladder neck mucosa were performed in 15 healthy adult male crossbred canines. Wound specimens were harvested at 3 days, and 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after operation, respectively. The histopathologic characteristics were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The expression of cytokeratin 14 (CK14), CK5, CK18, synaptophysin (Syn), chromogranin A (CgA), uroplakin, transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1), and TGF-β type II receptor in prostatic urethra wound were examined by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Van Gieson staining was performed to determine the expression of collagen fibers in prostatic urethra and bladder neck would. The results showed that the re-epithelialization of the prostatic urethra resulted from the mobilization of proliferating epithelial cells from residual prostate tissue under the wound. The proliferating cells expressed CK14, CK5, but not CK18, Syn, and CgA and re-epithelialize expressed uroplakin since 3 weeks. There were enhanced TGF-β1 and TGF-β type II receptor expression in proliferating cells and regenerated cells, which correlated with specific phases of re-epithelialization. Compared with the re-epithelialization of the bladder neck, re-epithelialization of canine prostatic urethra was faster, and the expression of collagen fibers was relatively low. In conclusion, re-epithelialization in canine prostatic urethra resulted from prostate basal cells after TmLRP and this re-epithelialization way may represent the ideal healing method from anatomic repair to functional recovery after injury. PMID:25652631

  1. Re-epithelialization resulted from prostate basal cells in canine prostatic urethra may represent the ideal healing method after two-micron laser resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ying; Luo, Guang-Heng; Luo, Lei; Yang, Xiu-Shu; Hu, Jian-Xin; Shi, Hua; Huang, Ping; Sun, Zhao-Lin; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize the re-epithelialization of wound healing in canine prostatic urethra and to evaluate the effect of this re-epithelialization way after two-micron laser resection of the prostate (TmLRP). TmLRP and partial bladder neck mucosa were performed in 15 healthy adult male crossbred canines. Wound specimens were harvested at 3 days, and 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after operation, respectively. The histopathologic characteristics were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The expression of cytokeratin 14 (CK14), CK5, CK18, synaptophysin (Syn), chromogranin A (CgA), uroplakin, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 ), and TGF-β type II receptor in prostatic urethra wound were examined by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Van Gieson staining was performed to determine the expression of collagen fibers in prostatic urethra and bladder neck would. The results showed that the re-epithelialization of the prostatic urethra resulted from the mobilization of proliferating epithelial cells from residual prostate tissue under the wound. The proliferating cells expressed CK14, CK5, but not CK18, Syn, and CgA and re-epithelialize expressed uroplakin since 3 weeks. There were enhanced TGF-β1 and TGF-β type II receptor expression in proliferating cells and regenerated cells, which correlated with specific phases of re-epithelialization. Compared with the re-epithelialization of the bladder neck, re-epithelialization of canine prostatic urethra was faster, and the expression of collagen fibers was relatively low. In conclusion, re-epithelialization in canine prostatic urethra resulted from prostate basal cells after TmLRP and this re-epithelialization way may represent the ideal healing method from anatomic repair to functional recovery after injury.

  2. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells Through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    hypothesis that cell surface GRP78 drives cancer stem-like behavior by activating an Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling axis in prostate cancer stem-like...investigate the hypothesis that cell surface GRP78 drives cancer stem-like behavior by activating an Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling axis in prostate cancer stem...investigate these signaling pathways in year 2. Task 4: Investigate the relative expression of Snail -1, a GSK-3 target, in adherent prostate cancer cells

  3. Outcome of radical prostatectomy in primary circulating prostate cell negative prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nigel P; Aedo, Sócrates; Reyes, Eduardo; Fuentealba, Cynthia; Jacob, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Around 90% of prostate cancers detected using the serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) as a screening test are considered to be localised. However, 20–30% of men treated by radical prostatectomy experience biochemical failure within two years of treatment. The presence of primary circulating prostate cells (CPCs) in the blood of these men implies a dissemination of the tumour and could indicate a greater risk of treatment failure. Objective To evaluate the use of the number of primary CPCs detected before surgery in the prediction of biochemical failure at ten years. Hypothesis The dissemination of cancer cells to distant sites will determine the patient’s prognosis. The absence of primary CPCs in men undergoing radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer may imply a less aggressive disease and therefore could be utilised as a prognostic factor to predict biochemical failure after surgery. Methods and patients A single-centre observational study of a cohort of 285 men who underwent radical prostatectomy as monotherapy for prostate cancer, in whom the number of CPCs prior to treatment was determined, and who were followed up for ten years to determine biochemical failure. A Cox proportional risks with polynomial fractions analysis was used to predict biochemical failure based on the number of primary CPCs detected. A decision curve analysis was performed for the model obtained. Results Kaplan–Meier curves for biochemical free survival at ten years was 47.34% (95% CI 38.71–55.48%). It is important to note that in CPC negative men, the ten years Kaplan–Meier biochemical-free survival was 90.35% (95% CI 75.0–96.27) whereas in men who were primary CPC positive, the biochemical free survival rate was 30.00% (95% CI 20.34–40.60%). The Coxs´model to predict biochemical failure using transformed data with a power of minus one for the number of primary CPCs detected, showed a Harrell´s C concordance index of 0.74 and a decision analysis curve

  4. Influence of lycopene on cell viability, cell cycle, and apoptosis of human prostate cancer and benign hyperplastic cells.

    PubMed

    Soares, Nathalia da Costa Pereira; Teodoro, Anderson Junger; Oliveira, Felipe Leite; Santos, Carlos Antonio do Nascimento; Takiya, Christina Maeda; Junior, Oswaldo Saback; Bianco, Mario; Junior, Antonio Palumbo; Nasciutti, Luiz Eurico; Ferreira, Luciana Bueno; Gimba, Etel Rodrigues Pereira; Borojevic, Radovan

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in men of the Western world. Lycopene has received attention because of its expcted potential to prevent cancer. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of lycopene on cell viability, cell cycle, and apoptosis of human prostate cancer cells and benign prostate hyperplastic cells. Using MTT assay, we observed a decrease of cell viability in all cancer cell lines after treatment with lycopene, which decreased the percentage of cells in G0/G1 phase and increased in S and G2/M phases after 96 h of treatment in metastatic prostate cancer cell lineages. Flow citometry analysis of cell cycle revealed lycopene promoted cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase after 48 and 96 h of treatment in a primary cancer cell line. Using real time PCR assay, lycopene also induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells with altered gene expression of Bax and Bcl-2. No effect was observed in benign prostate hyperplasia cells. These results suggest an effect of lycopene on activity of human prostate cancer cells.

  5. Prostate specific G protein coupled receptor is associated with prostate cancer prognosis and affects cancer cell proliferation and invasion.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenqing; Li, Faqian; Yao, Jorge; Yu, Jiangzhou

    2015-11-18

    There is limited information about the clinical and biological significance of prostate specific G protein coupled receptor (PSGR) in prostate cancer (PCa) initiation and progression. Here, we evaluated the expression of PSGR protein, studied its diagnostic and prognostic value in PCa, and also explored its role in cancer cell growth and invasion. The expression of PSGR in paired adjacent normal prostate, high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and PCa were determined by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays constructed from 150 radical prostatectomy specimens. The effects of PSGR on PCa cell growth and invasion were investigated using human PCa cell lines. Membranous and cytoplasmic PSGR staining was observed at luminal epithelial cells of prostate. PSGR protein expression was significantly higher in PIN compared to normal prostate. Interestingly, the expression of PSGR decreased as PIN progressed to PCa. Low PSGR expression in PCa was associated with high Gleason score, and poor overall survival. Activated PSGR increased cancer cell invasive ability, but retarded cell growth. PSGR did not affect mTOR activity, but suppressed P70 S6 kinase activity. PSGR may participate in PCa progression through affecting cell proliferation and invasion. High expression of PSGR in PIN may implicate its role in early neoplastic transformation of PCa. Low expression of PSGR in PCa may serve as a potential indicator for poor prognosis.

  6. SU-E-J-95: Predicting Treatment Outcomes for Prostate Cancer: Irradiation Responses of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Most prostate cancers are slow-growing diseases but normally require much higher doses (80Gy) with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, comparing to other more aggressive cancers. This study is to disclose the radiobiological basis of this discrepancy by proposing the concept of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) and examining their specific irradiation responses. Methods: There are overwhelming evidences that CSC may keep their stemness, e.g. the competency of cell differentiation, in hypoxic microenvironments and hence become radiation resistive, though the probability is tiny for aggressiveness cancers. Tumor hypoxia used to be considered as an independent reason for poor treatment outcomes, and recent evidences showed that even prostate cancers were also hypoxic though they are very slow-growing. In addition, to achieve comparable outcomes to other much more aggressive cancers, much higher doses (rather than lower doses) are always needed for prostate cancers, regardless of its non-aggressiveness. All these abnormal facts can only be possibly interpreted by the irradiation responses characteristics of prostate CSCs. Results: Both normal cancer cells (NCCs) and CSCs exiting in tumors, in which NCCs are mainly for symptoms whereas killing all CSCs achieves disease-free. Since prostate cancers are slow-growing, the hypoxia in prostate cancers cannot possibly from NCCs, thus it is caused by hypoxic CSCs. However, single hypoxic cell cannot be imaged due to limitation of imaging techniques, unless a large group of hypoxic cells exist together, thus most of CSCs in prostate cancers are virtually hypoxic, i.e. not in working mode because CSCs in proliferating mode have to be normoxic, and this explains why prostate cancers are unaggressive. Conclusion: The fractional dose in conventional radiotherapy (∼2Gy) could only kill NCCs and CSCs in proliferating modes, whereas most CSCs survived fractional treatments since they were hypoxic, thus to eliminate all

  7. Cell Fusion as a Cause of Prostate Cancer Metastases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    Fusion as a Cause of Prostate Cancer Metastases 2 14. ABSTRACT The main goal of the study funded by this grant was to test a hypothesis that cell...24 4 INTRODUCTION The main goal of this study was to test a...PC3 cultured in normal medium were used as a control (B). Some of the cells in which expression of EGFP was induced are indicated by arrows

  8. Prostate Cell Specific Regulation of Androgen Receptor Phosphorylation in Vivo

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    the AR-P-S213 antigen was present in epithelial cells of the urogenital sinus when endogenous androgen levels are high, but absent at a later stage...of development when endogenous androgen levels are low. Immunoreactivity is evident in differentiated cells lining the lumen of the urogenital sinus ...sion in human prostate development. Sections of early (15-wk) and late (21 wk) urogenital sinus were stained using CREB and pCREB (S133) antibodies

  9. Radiosensitization of Prostate Tumor Cells by Prenyltransferase Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    and predicts a positive effect on the response to radiotherapy. Reportable Outcomes: 1. Development of new cell lines derived from immortalized human ...548-552. 14 Employment 1993 - 1996 Biologist, Laboratory of Mammalian Genes and Development , National Institute of Child Health and Human ...the use of prenyltransferase inhibitors. We have examined both rodent and human prostate tumor cell lines in vitro and determined that radiation

  10. ICRAC controls the rapid androgen response in human primary prostate epithelial cells and is altered in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Holzmann, Christian; Kilch, Tatiana; Kappel, Sven; Armbrüster, Andrea; Jung, Volker; Stöckle, Michael; Bogeski, Ivan; Schwarz, Eva C.; Peinelt, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Labelled 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) binding experiments have shown that expression levels of (yet unidentified) membrane androgen receptors (mAR) are elevated in prostate cancer and correlate with a negative prognosis. However, activation of these receptors which mediate a rapid androgen response can counteract several cancer hallmark functions such as unlimited proliferation, enhanced migration, adhesion and invasion and the inability to induce apoptosis. Here, we investigate the downstream signaling pathways of mAR and identify rapid DHT induced activation of store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) in primary cultures of human prostate epithelial cells (hPEC) from non-tumorous tissue. Consequently, down-regulation of Orai1, the main molecular component of Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels results in an almost complete loss of DHT induced SOCE. We demonstrate that this DHT induced Ca2+ influx via Orai1 is important for rapid androgen triggered prostate specific antigen (PSA) release. We furthermore identified alterations of the molecular components of CRAC channels in prostate cancer. Three lines of evidence indicate that prostate cancer cells down-regulate expression of the Orai1 homolog Orai3: First, Orai3 mRNA expression levels are significantly reduced in tumorous tissue when compared to non-tumorous tissue from prostate cancer patients. Second, mRNA expression levels of Orai3 are decreased in prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and DU145 when compared to hPEC from healthy tissue. Third, the pharmacological profile of CRAC channels in prostate cancer cell lines and hPEC differ and siRNA based knock-down experiments indicate changed Orai3 levels are underlying the altered pharmacological profile. The cancer-specific composition and pharmacology of CRAC channels identifies CRAC channels as putative targets in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:24240085

  11. Isolation and functional interrogation of adult human prostate epithelial stem cells at single cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen-Yang; Hu, Dan-Ping; Xie, Lishi; Li, Ye; Majumdar, Shyama; Nonn, Larisa; Hu, Hong; Shioda, Toshi; Prins, Gail S

    2017-08-01

    Using primary cultures of normal human prostate epithelial cells, we developed a novel prostasphere-based, label-retention assay that permits identification and isolation of stem cells at a single cell level. Their bona fide stem cell nature was corroborated using in vitro and in vivo regenerative assays and documentation of symmetric/asymmetric division. Robust WNT10B and KRT13 levels without E-cadherin or KRT14 staining distinguished individual stem cells from daughter progenitors in spheroids. Following FACS to isolate label-retaining stem cells from label-free progenitors, RNA-seq identified unique gene signatures for the separate populations which may serve as useful biomarkers. Knockdown of KRT13 or PRAC1 reduced sphere formation and symmetric self-renewal highlighting their role in stem cell maintenance. Pathways analysis identified ribosome biogenesis and membrane estrogen-receptor signaling enriched in stem cells with NF-ĸB signaling enriched in progenitors; activities that were biologically confirmed. Further, bioassays identified heightened autophagy flux and reduced metabolism in stem cells relative to progenitors. These approaches similarly identified stem-like cells from prostate cancer specimens and prostate, breast and colon cancer cell lines suggesting wide applicability. Together, the present studies isolate and identify unique characteristics of normal human prostate stem cells and uncover processes that maintain stem cell homeostasis in the prostate gland. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Gold nanocages for imaging and therapy of prostate cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sironi, Laura; Avvakumova, Svetlana; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Locarno, Silvia A.; Macchi, Chiara; D'Alfonso, Laura; Ruscica, Massimiliano; Magni, Paolo; Collini, Maddalena; Romeo, Sergio; Chirico, Giuseppe; Prosperi, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanocages (AuNCs) have been shown to be a useful tool both for imaging and hyperthermia therapy of cancer, thanks to their outstanding optical properties, low toxicity and facile functionalization with targeting molecules, including peptides and antibodies. In particular, hyperthermia is a minimally invasive therapy which takes advantage of the peculiar properties of gold nanoparticles to efficiently convert the absorbed light into heat. Here, we use AuNCs for the selective targeting and imaging of prostate cancer cells. Moreover, we report the hyperthermic effect characterization of the AuNCs both in solution and internalized in cells. Prostate cancer cells were irradiated at different exposure times, with a pulsed near infrared laser, and the cellular viability was evaluated by confocal microscopy.

  13. Sulphur XANES Analysis of Cultured Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatek, W. M.; Podgórczyk, M.; Paluszkiewicz, Cz.; Balerna, A.; Kisiel, A.

    2008-08-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in men throughout the world. It is believed that changes to the structure of protein binding sites, altering its metabolism, may play an important role in carcinogenesis. Sulphur, often present in binding sites, can influence such changes through its chemical speciation. Hence there is a need for precise investigation of coordination environment of sulphur. X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy offers such possibility. Cell culture samples offer histologically well defined areas of good homogeneity, suitable for successful and reliable X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis. This paper presents sulphur speciation data collected from three different human prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3, LNCaP and DU-145). Sulphur X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis was performed on K-edge structure. The spectra of cells were compared with those of cancerous tissue and with organic substances as well as inorganic compounds.

  14. Differentiation of Neonatal Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Prostate Epithelial Cells: A Model to Study Prostate Cancer Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    expression by RT-PCR showed that while human dermal fibroblasts have higher constitutive expression of Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2 compared to IMP90 cells...REPORT U b . ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U UU 12 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS: Item...mechanistic insights into prostate epithelial cell development can be gained. 8 a. DPYS DAY!O b . c. Fig. 1. Differentiation of human iPSC to

  15. Natural compound Alternol induces oxidative stress-dependent apoptotic cell death preferentially in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuzhe; Chen, Ruibao; Huang, Yan; Li, Guodong; Huang, Yiling; Chen, Jiepeng; Duan, Lili; Zhu, Bao-Ting; Thrasher, J Brantley; Zhang, Xu; Li, Benyi

    2014-06-01

    Prostate cancers at the late stage of castration resistance are not responding well to most of current therapies available in clinic, reflecting a desperate need of novel treatment for this life-threatening disease. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effect of a recently isolated natural compound, Alternol, in multiple prostate cancer cell lines with the properties of advanced prostate cancers in comparison to prostate-derived nonmalignant cells. As assessed by trypan blue exclusion assay, significant cell death was observed in all prostate cancer cell lines except DU145 but not in nonmalignant (RWPE-1 and BPH1) cells. Further analyses revealed that Alternol-induced cell death was an apoptotic response in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as evidenced by the appearance of apoptosis hallmarks such as caspase-3 processing and PARP cleavage. Interestingly, Alternol-induced cell death was completely abolished by reactive oxygen species scavengers N-acetylcysteine and dihydrolipoic acid. We also demonstrated that the proapoptotic Bax protein was activated after Alternol treatment and was critical for Alternol-induced apoptosis. Animal xenograft experiments in nude mice showed that Alternol treatment largely suppressed tumor growth of PC-3 xenografts but not Bax-null DU-145 xenografts in vivo. These data suggest that Alternol might serve as a novel anticancer agent for patients with late-stage prostate cancer. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. An integrin-linked machinery of cytoskeletal regulation that enables experimental tumor initiation and metastatic colonization

    PubMed Central

    Shibue, Tsukasa; Brooks, Mary W.; Weinberg, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Recently extravasated metastatic cancer cells employ the Rif/mDia2 actin-nucleating/polymerizing machinery in order to extend integrin β1-containing, filopodium-like protrusions (FLPs), which enable them to interact productively with the surrounding extracellular matrix; this process governs the initial proliferation of these cancer cells. Here we identify the signaling pathway governing FLP lifetime, which involves integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and β-parvin, two integrin:actin-bridging proteins, that block cofilin-mediated actin-filament severing. Importantly, the combined actions of Rif/mDia2 and ILK/β-parvin/cofilin pathways on FLPs are required not only for metastatic outgrowth but also for primary tumor formation following experimental implantation. This provides one mechanistic explanation for how the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program imparts tumor-initiating powers to carcinoma cells, since it enhances FLP formation through the activation of ILK/β-parvin/cofilin pathway. PMID:24035453

  17. Adipocytes promote prostate cancer stem cell self-renewal through amplification of the cholecystokinin autocrine loop

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kai-Dun; Liu, Ji; Jovanovic, Lidija; An, Jiyuan; Hill, Michelle M.; Vela, Ian; Lee, Terence Kin-Wah; Ma, Stephanie; Nelson, Colleen; Russell, Pamela J.; Clements, Judith A.; Ling, Ming-Tat

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has long been linked with prostate cancer progression, although the underlying mechanism is still largely unknown. Here, we report that adipocytes promote the enrichment of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) through a vicious cycle of autocrine amplification. In the presence of adipocytes, prostate cancer cells actively secrete the peptide hormone cholecystokinin (CCK), which not only stimulates prostate CSC self-renewal, but also induces cathepsin B (CTSB) production of the adipocytes. In return, CTSB facilitates further CCK secretion by the cancer cells. More importantly, inactivation of CCK receptor not only suppresses CTSB secretion by the adipocytes, but also synergizes the inhibitory effect of CTSB inhibitor on adipocyte-promoted prostate CSC self-renewal. In summary, we have uncovered a novel mechanism underlying the mutual interplay between adipocytes and prostate CSCs, which may help explaining the role of adipocytes in prostate cancer progression and provide opportunities for effective intervention. PMID:26700819

  18. Adipocytes promote prostate cancer stem cell self-renewal through amplification of the cholecystokinin autocrine loop.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kai-Dun; Liu, Ji; Jovanovic, Lidija; An, Jiyuan; Hill, Michelle M; Vela, Ian; Lee, Terence Kin-Wah; Ma, Stephanie; Nelson, Colleen; Russell, Pamela J; Clements, Judith A; Ling, Ming-Tat

    2016-01-26

    Obesity has long been linked with prostate cancer progression, although the underlying mechanism is still largely unknown. Here, we report that adipocytes promote the enrichment of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) through a vicious cycle of autocrine amplification. In the presence of adipocytes, prostate cancer cells actively secrete the peptide hormone cholecystokinin (CCK), which not only stimulates prostate CSC self-renewal, but also induces cathepsin B (CTSB) production of the adipocytes. In return, CTSB facilitates further CCK secretion by the cancer cells. More importantly, inactivation of CCK receptor not only suppresses CTSB secretion by the adipocytes, but also synergizes the inhibitory effect of CTSB inhibitor on adipocyte-promoted prostate CSC self-renewal. In summary, we have uncovered a novel mechanism underlying the mutual interplay between adipocytes and prostate CSCs, which may help explaining the role of adipocytes in prostate cancer progression and provide opportunities for effective intervention.

  19. Detection of micrometastatic prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow of patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Deguchi, T.; Yang, M.; Ehara, H.; Ito, S.; Nishino, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Ito, Y.; Shimokawa, K.; Tanaka, T.; Imaeda, T.; Doi, T.; Kawada, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with prostate cancer were examined for micrometastases to the bone marrow using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with primers specific for the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) gene. Of nine patients with bone metastases detectable by bone scan imaging, five patients had PSA mRNA expression in the bone marrow detectable by RT-PCR. Of 26 patients with negative bone scan findings, seven patients had PSA mRNA expression detectable in the bone marrow. RT-PCR could detect micrometastatic prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow that were not detectable by bone scan imaging. Of 16 patients with a serum PSA concentration of 25 ng ml(-1) or greater, only nine (56.3%) had bone metastases detected by bone scans. Of the remaining seven patients, five had micrometastases to the bone marrow detected by RT-PCR. Overall, 14 of 16 patients (87.5%) with a serum PSA concentration of 25 ng ml(-1) or greater had metastatic bone diseases including bone marrow micrometastases. Of 19 patients with a serum PSA concentration of less than 25 ng ml(-1), two (10.5%) had only micrometastatic disease detected by RT-PCR. A significant correlation was observed between the incidence of bone involvement and the serum PSA concentration. This study suggests that RT-PCR will potentially develop into a relevant tool to assess bone involvement including bone marrow micrometastases and establish a precise correlation between serum PSA concentration and metastatic bone disease in patients with prostate cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:9043017

  20. Subtypes of white blood cells in patients with prostate cancer or benign prostatic hyperplasia and healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Cihan, Yasemin Benderli; Arslan, Alaettin; Ergul, Mehmet Ali

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the baseline white blood cell (WBC), neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte, basophil, eosinophil count, total prostate-specific antigen (TPSA), free PSA (FPSA) level, neutrophil- to-lymphocyte and neutrophil-to-monocyte ratios among patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), as well as healthy individuals. 2005-2012 laboratory files of 160 patients with prostate cancer at Kayseri Training and Research Hospital, Oncology Outpatient Clinic, 285 patients who were pathologically diagnosed with BPH in Urology Outpatient Clinic and 200 healthy individuals who were admitted to Internal Medicine Outpatient Clinic were retrospectively analyzed. Baseline WBC, neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte, basophil, eosinophil count, TPSA, FPSA level, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and neutrophil-to-monocyte ratio were recorded and compared across groups. Patients with prostate cancer had a lower lymphocyte level compared to the patients with BPH and healthy controls (p<0.001). The mean monocyte count, leukocyte-to-monocyte ratio, and leukocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio were higher in patients with prostate cancer, but without significance. The mean WBC and leukocyte count were lower in patients with prostate cancer, but again without statistical significance (p=0.130). The mean TPSA and FPSA were 39.4 and 5.67, respectively in patients with prostate cancer, while they were 5.78 and 1.28 in patients with BPH. There was a significant difference in the mean TPSA and FPSA levels between the patient groups (p<0.001). Our study results showed that patients with prostate cancer had a lower level of lymphocytes, neutrophils and WBCs and a higher level of monocytes with a significant difference in lymphocyte count, compared to healthy controls. We suggest that lymphocyte count may be used in combination with other parameters in the diagnosis of prostate cancer, thanks to its ease of assessment.

  1. MicroRNA-181b expression in prostate cancer tissues and its influence on the biological behavior of the prostate cancer cell line PC-3.

    PubMed

    He, L; Yao, H; Fan, L H; Liu, L; Qiu, S; Li, X; Gao, J P; Hao, C Q

    2013-04-02

    We examined microRNA-181b (miRNA) expression in prostate cancer tissues and its effect on the prostate cancer cell line PC-3. Tissues from 27 cases of prostate cancer and 30 samples of normal human prostate were collected by surgical removal. Total miRNA was extracted, and the relative expression of miR-181b was quantified using RT-PCR. miR-181b ASO was transfected into prostate cancer PC-3 cells. miR-181b expression in transfected and non-transfected cells was measured using RT-PCR. Changes in cell apoptosis were measured using flow cytometry. MTT and cell growth curve methods were used to assess the influence of miR-181b expression on cell proliferation. The changes in cell invasive ability in vitro were detected using the Transwell chamber method. miR-181b was up-regulated in the prostate cancer tissues compared with the normal prostate samples. It was down-regulated after miR-181b ASO transfection into the prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Down-regulation of miR-181b in the PC-3 cell induced apoptosis, inhibited proliferation, and depressed invasion of PC-3 cells in vitro. As miR-181b is over-expressed in prostate cancer, its down-regulation could have potential as gene therapy for prostate cancer by inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation and depressing invasion by cancer cells.

  2. Apoptosis-Dependent and Apoptosis-Independent Functions Bim in Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    AD_ Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0146 TITLE: Apoptosis-Dependent and Apoptosis-Independent Functions of Bim in Prostate Cancer Cells PRINCIPAL...FUNDING NUMBERS Apoptosis-Dependent and Apoptosis-Independent Functions of DAMD17-03-1-0146 Bim in Prostate Cancer Cells 6. A UTHORs) Junwei Liu, M.D...extended cell survival have been implicated in prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression. We recently found that Bim , a BH3-only pro

  3. Molecular Characterization of Prostate Cancer Cell Oncolysis by Herpes Simplex Virus ICP0 Mutants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    W81XWH-04-1-0859 TITLE: Molecular Characterization of Prostate Cancer Cell Oncolysis byHerpes Simplex Virus ICP0 Mutants PRINCIPAL...2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 Sep 04 – 14 Mar 06 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Molecular Characterization of Prostate Cancer Cell...Herpes simplex virus type 1 ICP0 mutants in prostate cancer cells given the relationship between ICP0 and two tumor suppressors, RNase L and PML

  4. Optical Strategies for Studying Metastatic Mechanisms, Tumor Cell Detection and Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    undesirable side effects. The objective of this proposal is to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy ( PDT ) on prostate tumors in order to design...optimal treatment regimens. We have established subcurative PDT conditions in 2 prostate cancer cell lines. Using these conditions we observed a transient...Ab to detect circulating prostate cancer cells. The results obtained establishes that PDT alters cellular-molecular processes such as cell adhesion

  5. Development of Novel Bifunctional Compounds that Induce Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    one)-C6NC2-mustard (11β), and assessment of their toxicity in prostate cancer cells in vitro. The work described in Task 1 has been completed... toxicity toward LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Our results with the monochloro- 11β indicated that both chlorine atoms are required to induce...in greater toxicity towards AR-positive prostate cancer cells. Contrary to our expectations the presence of the methyl group has no effect on

  6. Biological Differences Between Prostate Cancer Cells that Metastasize to Bone Versus Soft Tissue Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    retinoic acid inducible in neuroblastoma Homo sapiens, clone IMAGE:4183312, mRNA Homo sapiens, clone IMAGE.a183312, mRNA thlopurine S-methyltransterase...lines compared to normal of human prostatic epithelial cell lines. Non- prostate tissue (see Table I). Immunohis- tumorigenic RWPE-1 prostate epithelial...epithelial cells more than interleukin -1-stimulated human umbilical vein collagen in an integrin-mediated manner [Elga- endothelial cells [Romanov and

  7. Circulating tumor cells in prostate cancer: beyond enumeration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie-Fu; Lu, Yi-Tsung; Cheng, Shirley; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Figlin, Robert A; Posadas, Edwin M

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a population of rare cancer cells that have detached from the primary tumor and/or metastatic lesions and entered the peripheral circulation. Enumeration of CTCs has demonstrated value as a prognostic biomarker, and newer studies have pointed to information beyond enumeration that is of critical importance in prostate cancer. Technologic advances that permit examination of the morphology, function, and molecular content of CTCs have made it possible to measure these factors as part of liquid biopsy. These advances provide a way to study tumor evolution and the development of resistance to therapy. Recent breakthroughs have created new applications for CTCs that will affect the care of patients with prostate cancer.

  8. Phase transitions in tumor growth: II prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Betancourt-Mar, A.; De Miguel, M. P.; Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Royuela-García, M.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a mechanism for prostate cancer cell lines growth, LNCaP and PC3 based on a Gompertz dynamics. This growth exhibits a multifractal behavior and a "second order" phase transition. Finally, it was found that the cellular line PC3 exhibits a higher value of entropy production rate compared to LNCaP, which is indicative of the robustness of PC3, over to LNCaP and may be a quantitative index of metastatic potential tumors.

  9. Effects of Radiation on Proteasome Function in Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U UU 13 19b...Radiation therapy plays an important role in the cure of prostate cancer. However, the outcome is limited by the existence of a highly radioresistant...lack of specific markers limited the outcome (Moscatelli et al. 2010; Richardson et al. 2004; Wang et al. 2009; Goldstein et al. 2010). Basal cells

  10. RhoE is required for contact inhibition and negatively regulates tumor initiation and progression.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Sánchez, Marta; Poch, Enric; Guasch, Rosa M; Ortega, Joaquín; López-Almela, Inmaculada; Palmero, Ignacio; Pérez-Roger, Ignacio

    2015-07-10

    RhoE is a small GTPase involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics, cell cycle and apoptosis. The role of RhoE in cancer is currently controversial, with reports of both oncogenic and tumor-suppressive functions for RhoE. Using RhoE-deficient mice, we show here that the absence of RhoE blunts contact-inhibition of growth by inhibiting p27Kip1 nuclear translocation and cooperates in oncogenic transformation of mouse primary fibroblasts. Heterozygous RhoE+/gt mice are more susceptible to chemically induced skin tumors and RhoE knock-down results in increased metastatic potential of cancer cells. These results indicate that RhoE plays a role in suppressing tumor initiation and progression.

  11. RhoE is required for contact inhibition and negatively regulates tumor initiation and progression

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Sánchez, Marta; Poch, Enric; Guasch, Rosa M.; Ortega, Joaquín; López-Almela, Inmaculada; Palmero, Ignacio; Pérez-Roger, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    RhoE is a small GTPase involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics, cell cycle and apoptosis. The role of RhoE in cancer is currently controversial, with reports of both oncogenic and tumor-suppressive functions for RhoE. Using RhoE-deficient mice, we show here that the absence of RhoE blunts contact-inhibition of growth by inhibiting p27Kip1 nuclear translocation and cooperates in oncogenic transformation of mouse primary fibroblasts. Heterozygous RhoE+/gt mice are more susceptible to chemically induced skin tumors and RhoE knock-down results in increased metastatic potential of cancer cells. These results indicate that RhoE plays a role in suppressing tumor initiation and progression. PMID:26036260

  12. Current Stem Cell Biomarkers and Their Functional Mechanisms in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kaile; Zhou, Shukui; Wang, Leilei; Wang, Jianlong; Zou, Qingsong; Zhao, Weixin; Fu, Qiang; Fang, Xiaolan

    2016-01-01

    Currently there is little effective treatment available for castration resistant prostate cancer, which is responsible for the majority of prostate cancer related deaths. Emerging evidence suggested that cancer stem cells might play an important role in resistance to traditional cancer therapies, and the studies of cancer stem cells (including specific isolation and targeting on those cells) might benefit the discovery of novel treatment of prostate cancer, especially castration resistant disease. In this review, we summarized major biomarkers for prostate cancer stem cells, as well as their functional mechanisms and potential application in clinical diagnosis and treatment of patients. PMID:27447616

  13. Notch signaling is required for normal prostatic epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi-De; Leow, Ching Ching; Zha, Jiping; Tang, Zhijun; Modrusan, Zora; Radtke, Freddy; Aguet, Michel; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2006-02-01

    Notch pathway is crucial for stem/progenitor cell maintenance, growth and differentiation in a variety of tissues. Using a transgenic cell ablation approach, we found in our previous study that cells expressing Notch1 are crucial for prostate early development and re-growth. Here, we further define the role of Notch signaling in regulating prostatic epithelial cell growth and differentiation using biochemical and genetic approaches in ex vivo or in vivo systems. Treatment of developing prostate grown in culture with inhibitors of gamma-secretase/presenilin, which is required for Notch cleavage and activation, caused a robust increase in proliferation of epithelial cells co-expressing cytokeratin 8 and 14, lack of luminal/basal layer segregation and dramatically reduced branching morphogenesis. Using conditional Notch1 gene deletion mouse models, we found that inactivation of Notch1 signaling resulted in profound prostatic alterations, including increased tufting, bridging and enhanced epithelial proliferation. Cells within these lesions co-expressed both luminal and basal cell markers, a feature of prostatic epithelial cells in predifferentiation developmental stages. Microarray analysis revealed that the gene expression in a number of genetic networks was altered following Notch1 gene deletion in prostate. Furthermore, expression of Notch1 and its effector Hey-1 gene in human prostate adenocarcinomas were found significantly down-regulated compared to normal control tissues. Taken together, these data suggest that Notch signaling is critical for normal cell proliferation and differentiation in the prostate, and deregulation of this pathway may facilitate prostatic tumorigenesis.

  14. The Basal Cell Marker p63 and Prostate Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-05-01

    CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Boston, Massachusetts 02115 REPORT DATE: May 2002 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical...Farber Cancer Institute Boston, Massachusetts 02115 E-Mail: SabinaSignoretti@dfci.harvard.edu 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS...prostate development, prostate cancer 13 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 19. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20

  15. Prostate Stem Cell Antigen DNA Vaccination Breaks Tolerance to Self-antigen and Inhibits Prostate Cancer Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Sarfraz; Casey, Garrett; Sweeney, Paul; Tangney, Mark; O'Sullivan, Gerald C

    2009-01-01

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a cell surface antigen expressed in normal human prostate and over expressed in prostate cancer. Elevated levels of PSCA protein in prostate cancer correlate with increased tumor stage/grade, with androgen independence and have higher expression in bone metastases. In this study, the PSCA gene was isolated from the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate cell line (TRAMPC1), and a vaccine plasmid construct was generated. This plasmid PSCA (pmPSCA) was delivered by intramuscular electroporation (EP) and induced effective antitumor immune responses against subcutaneous TRAMPC1 tumors in male C57 BL/6 mice. The pmPSCA vaccination inhibited tumor growth, resulting in cure or prolongation in survival. Similarly, the vaccine inhibited metastases in PSCA expressing B16 F10 tumors. There was activation of Th-1 type immunity against PSCA, indicating the breaking of tolerance to a self-antigen. This immunity was tumor specific and was transferable by adoptive transfer of splenocytes. The mice remained healthy and there was no evidence of collateral autoimmune responses in normal tissues. EP-assisted delivery of the pmPSCA evoked strong specific responses and could, in neoadjuvant or adjuvant settings, provide a safe and effective immune control of prostate cancer, given that there is significant homology between human and mouse PSCA. PMID:19337234

  16. Origin and Properties of Prostatic Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    express (6 integrin which is also found on many primitive cell types. We also show that SP cells have a greater proliferative capacity than non-SP cells as expected if SP cells are of more primitive origin than non-SP cells.

  17. Molecular genetics of prostate cancer: new prospects for old challenges

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Michael M.; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2010-01-01

    Despite much recent progress, prostate cancer continues to represent a major cause of cancer-related mortality and morbidity in men. Since early studies on the role of the androgen receptor that led to the advent of androgen deprivation therapy in the 1940s, there has long been intensive interest in the basic mechanisms underlying prostate cancer initiation and progression, as well as the potential to target these processes for therapeutic intervention. Here, we present an overview of major themes in prostate cancer research, focusing on current knowledge of principal events in cancer initiation and progression. We discuss recent advances, including new insights into the mechanisms of castration resistance, identification of stem cells and tumor-initiating cells, and development of mouse models for preclinical evaluation of novel therapuetics. Overall, we highlight the tremendous research progress made in recent years, and underscore the challenges that lie ahead. PMID:20844012

  18. Visualization of early prostatic adenocarcinoma as a stem cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Maggie Y; Lee, Tammy L; Hao, Su-Shin; Mahooti, Sepi; Baird, Stephen M; Donoghue, Daniel J; Haas, Martin

    2016-11-15

    Prostate Cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States, and the third leading cause of cancer death among men in Europe. We have previously shown that cells possessing Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) characteristics can be grown from human PrCa tissue harvested at the time of prostatectomy. However, the cellular origin of these CSCs was not previously known. In most cases, simple hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections are sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis of prostatic adenocarcinoma (PrCa) in needle biopsy samples. We utilized six different antibodies specific for stem cell antigens to examine paraffin sections of PrCa taken at the time of needle-biopsy diagnosis. These antisera were specific for CD44, CD133, ALDH7A1, LGR-5, Oct-4 and NANOG. We demonstrate specific staining of tumor cells with all six antisera specific for stem cell antigens. Some of these antibodies also react with cells of hyperplastic glands, but the patterns of reactivity differ from those of malignant glands. These findings demonstrate that at the time of diagnosis, PrCa consists of cells exhibiting properties of CSCs and consistent with the possibility that PrCa is a stem cell disease.

  19. Visualization of early prostatic adenocarcinoma as a stem cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Maggie Y.; Lee, Tammy L.; Hao, Su-Shin; Mahooti, Sepi; Baird, Stephen M.; Donoghue, Daniel J.; Haas, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Prostate Cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States, and the third leading cause of cancer death among men in Europe. We have previously shown that cells possessing Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) characteristics can be grown from human PrCa tissue harvested at the time of prostatectomy. However, the cellular origin of these CSCs was not previously known. In most cases, simple hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections are sufficient to make a definitive diagnosis of prostatic adenocarcinoma (PrCa) in needle biopsy samples. We utilized six different antibodies specific for stem cell antigens to examine paraffin sections of PrCa taken at the time of needle-biopsy diagnosis. These antisera were specific for CD44, CD133, ALDH7A1, LGR-5, Oct-4 and NANOG. We demonstrate specific staining of tumor cells with all six antisera specific for stem cell antigens. Some of these antibodies also react with cells of hyperplastic glands, but the patterns of reactivity differ from those of malignant glands. These findings demonstrate that at the time of diagnosis, PrCa consists of cells exhibiting properties of CSCs and consistent with the possibility that PrCa is a stem cell disease. PMID:27764770

  20. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-03-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene.

  1. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-01-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:28257035

  2. The significance of galectin-3 as a new basal cell marker in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Balan, V; Gao, X; Reddy, P G; Kho, D; Tait, L; Raz, A

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer may originate from distinct cell types, resulting in the heterogeneity of this disease. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) and androgen receptor (AR) have been reported to play important roles in the progression of prostate cancer, and their heterogeneous expressions might be associated with different cancer subtypes. Our study found that in various prostate cancer cell lines Gal-3 expression was always opposite to AR expression and other luminal cell markers but consistent with basal cell markers including glutathione S-transferase-π and Bcl-2. This expression pattern was confirmed in human prostate cancer tissues. Our results also showed that prostate cancer cells positive with basal cell markers were more aggressive. Downregulation of Gal-3 expression resulted in increased apoptotic potential and decreased metastasis potential of prostate cancer cells. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that Gal-3 may serve as a new marker for basal characteristics of prostate cancer epithelium. This study helps us to better understand the heterogeneity of prostate cancer. The clinical significance of this study lies in the application of Gal-3 to distinguish prostate cancer subtypes and improve treatment efficacy with designed personalized therapy. PMID:23907467

  3. Expression and initial promoter characterization of PCAN1 in retinal tissue and prostate cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cross, D; Reding, D J; Salzman, S A; Zhang, K Q; Catalona, W J; Burke, J; Burmester, J K

    2004-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed neoplasia in men and one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in men over 60. In an effort to understand the molecular events leading to prostate cancer, we have identified PCAN1 (prostate cancer gene 1) (also known as GDEP), a gene that is highly expressed in prostate epithelial tissue and frequently mutated in prostate tumors. Here we demonstrate its expression in neural retina, and retinoblastoma cell culture but not retinal pigment epithelial cell culture. We further characterize PCAN1 expression in the prostate cell lines RWPE1, RWPE2, and LnCAP FGC. We demonstrate an increase in expression when the cells are grown in the presence of Matrigel, an artificial extracellular basement membrane. Expression was time dependent, with expression observed on d 6 and little or no expression on d 12. Testosterone was not found to increase PCAN1 expression in this culture system. In addition, normal prostate epithelial cells co-cultured with normal prostate stromal cells did not exhibit PCAN1 expression at any time. To definitively locate the transcription initiation sites, we performed restriction-ligase-mediated 5' RACE, to selectively amplify only mRNA with a 5' cap. An initial characterization of the sequence upstream of the initiation sites determined six possible binding sites for the prostate specific regulatory protein NKX3.1 and four potential binding sites for the PPAR/RXR heterodimer that is involved in the control of cell differentiation and apoptosis.

  4. Regulated expression of diphtheria toxin in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Weidan; Verbitsky, Amy; Bao, Yunhua; Sawicki, Janet

    2002-10-01

    Despite their known potential for effectively killing cells, the therapeutic use of plant and bacterial toxins for the treatment of cancer has been slow to enter the clinical setting. This has been due in large part to the lack of gene regulatory elements that control expression of highly toxic genes in a sufficiently tight manner, such that the toxins are only expressed in specific target cells. "Leaky" promoters result in unwanted and harmful cell death. In this study, we tested a novel gene therapy strategy aimed at expressing diphtheria toxin (DT-A) in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells that express the protein BCL2. This strategy relies on both transcriptional regulation and inducibly regulated DNA recombination mediated by the site-directed Flp recombinase to control expression of the toxin. Adenoviruses are used to introduce the genetic elements required for this approach into cultured cells and xenografts. Administration of 4-hydroxytamoxifen, resulting in recombination and expression of the toxin, effectively kills the cancer cells. Our results suggest that following androgen ablation therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer, use of a regulated recombination system to target expression of DT-A to androgen-independent cancer cells would be an effective way to arrest the development of recurrent tumors.

  5. A novel mechanism of methylglyoxal cytotoxicity in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Antognelli, Cinzia; Mezzasoma, Letizia; Fettucciari, Katia; Talesa, Vincenzo Nicola

    2013-04-01

    Methylglyoxal is one of the most powerful glycating agents of proteins and other important cellular components and has been shown to be toxic to cultured cells. Methylglyoxal cytotoxicity appears to occur through cell-cycle arrest but, more often, through induction of apoptosis. In this study we examined whether, and through which molecular mechanism, methylglyoxal affects the growth of poorly aggressive LNCaP and invasive PC3 human prostate cancer cells, where its role has not been exhaustively investigated yet. We demonstrated that methylglyoxal is cytotoxic on LNCaP and PC3 and that such cytotoxicity occurs not via cell proliferation but apoptosis control. Moreover, we demonstrated that methylglyoxal cytotoxicity, potentiated by the silencing of its major scavenging enzyme Glyoxalase I, occurred via different apoptotic responses in LNCaP and PC3 cells that also showed a different susceptibility to this metabolite. Finally, we showed that the observed methylglyoxal apoptogenic role involved different molecular pathways, specifically mediated by methylglyoxal or methylglyoxal-derived argpyrimidine intracellular accumulation and NF-kB signaling-pathway. In particular, in LNCaP cells, methylglyoxal, through the accumulation of argpyrimidine, desensitized the key cell survival NF-kB signaling pathway, which was consistent with the modulation of NF-kB-regulated genes, triggering a mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. The results suggest that this physiological compound merits investigation as a potential chemo-preventive/-therapeutic agent, in differently aggressive prostate cancers.

  6. Signaling mechanisms that mediate invasion in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorsi, L; Marchiani, S; Muratori, M; Carloni, V; Forti, G; Baldi, E

    2004-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells have a less malignant phenotype characterized by reduced migration and invasion. We investigated whether the presence of the androgen receptor could affect EGFR-mediated signaling by evaluating autotransphosphorylation of the receptor as well as activation of the downstream signaling pathway PI3K/AKT. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated a reduction of EGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR in PC3-AR cells. In addition, EGF-stimulated PI3K activity, a key signaling pathway for invasion of these cells, was decreased in PC3-AR cells and further reduced by treatment with R1881, indicating decreased functionality of EGFR. Our results suggest that the expression of androgen receptors by transfection in PC3 cells confers a less malignant phenotype by interfering with EGFR autophosphorylation and signaling leading to invasion in response to EGF. We used the selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the EGFR gefitinib (also known as Iressa or ZD1839) to further investigate the role of EGFR in the invasion and growth of PC cells. We demonstrate that in the androgen-insensitive cell lines PC3 and DU145 this compound was able to decrease in vitro invasion of Matrigel by inhibiting EGFR autotransphosphorylation and subsequent PI3K activation. Gefitinib may be useful in the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer to limit not only the proliferation but also the invasion of these tumors.

  7. P2Y2 receptor promotes cell invasion and metastasis in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, W-H; Qiu, Y; Zhang, H-Q; Liu, Y; You, J-F; Tian, X-X; Fang, W-G

    2013-01-01

    Background: Our previous study demonstrated that extracellular adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) stimulated prostate cancer cell invasion via P2Y receptors. However, the purinergic receptor subtype(s) involved in this process remains unclear. Here we aimed to determine whether P2Y2, one subtype of P2Y receptors, was involved in the invasion and metastasis of prostate cancer cells, and elucidated the underlying mechanism. Methods: RNAi was introduced to silence the expression of P2Y2. In vitro invasion and migration assays and in vivo experiments were carried out to examine the role of P2Y2 receptor in cell invasion and metastasis. cDNA microarray was performed to identify the differentially expressed genes downstream of ATP treatment. Results: P2Y2 was significantly expressed in the prostate cancer cells. Knockdown of P2Y2 receptor suppressed cell invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Further experiments identified that ATP could promote IL-8 and Snail expression and inhibit E-cadherin and Claudin-1 expression. Knockdown of P2Y2 receptor affected the expression of these EMT/invasion-related genes in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: P2Y2 receptor promotes cell invasion and metastasis in prostate cancer cells via some EMT/invasion-related genes. Thereby, P2Y2 receptor could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:23969730

  8. P2Y2 receptor promotes cell invasion and metastasis in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, W-H; Qiu, Y; Zhang, H-Q; Liu, Y; You, J-F; Tian, X-X; Fang, W-G

    2013-09-17

    Our previous study demonstrated that extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) stimulated prostate cancer cell invasion via P2Y receptors. However, the purinergic receptor subtype(s) involved in this process remains unclear. Here we aimed to determine whether P2Y2, one subtype of P2Y receptors, was involved in the invasion and metastasis of prostate cancer cells, and elucidated the underlying mechanism. RNAi was introduced to silence the expression of P2Y2. In vitro invasion and migration assays and in vivo experiments were carried out to examine the role of P2Y2 receptor in cell invasion and metastasis. cDNA microarray was performed to identify the differentially expressed genes downstream of ATP treatment. P2Y2 was significantly expressed in the prostate cancer cells. Knockdown of P2Y2 receptor suppressed cell invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Further experiments identified that ATP could promote IL-8 and Snail expression and inhibit E-cadherin and Claudin-1 expression. Knockdown of P2Y2 receptor affected the expression of these EMT/invasion-related genes in vitro and in vivo. P2Y2 receptor promotes cell invasion and metastasis in prostate cancer cells via some EMT/invasion-related genes. Thereby, P2Y2 receptor could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  9. Metabolic Stress Induced by Arginine Deprivation Induces Autophagy Cell Death in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Arginine deiminase as a novel therapy for prostate cancer induces autophagy and caspase-independent apoptosis. Cancer Research, 69(2):700-708...TITLE: Metabolic stress induced by arginine deprivation induces autophagy cell death in prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Richard Bold, MD...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Metabolic stress induced by arginine deprivation induces autophagy cell 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER death in prostate cancer 5b

  10. Obstructing Androgen Receptor Activation in Prostate Cancer Cells through Posttranslational Modification by NEDD8

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    08-1-0143 TITLE: Obstructing Androgen Receptor Activation in Prostate Cancer Cells through Posttranslational modification by NEDD8...0143 Obstructing Androgen Receptor Activation in Prostate Cancer Cells through Posttranslational modification by NEDD8 Dr. Don Chen UMDNJ-Robert Wood...of prostate cancer. Post-translational modification has significant impacts on gene expression, but how it affects AR activity is largely unknown

  11. Targeting the Human Complement Membrane Attack Complex to Selectively Kill Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    1 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0309 TITLE: Targeting the Human Complement Membrane Attack Complex to Selectively Kill Prostate...Attack Complex to Selectively Kill Prostate Cancer Cells 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0309 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Samuel R...leading to the lytic death of PSA- producing prostate cancer cells as well as a significant bystander effect and killing of non-PSA producing cancer

  12. Clonotypic Diversification of Intratumoral T Cells Following Sipuleucel-T Treatment in Prostate Cancer Subjects.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Nadeem; Cham, Jason; Zhang, Li; DeVries, Todd; Letarte, Simon; Pufnock, Jeff; Hamm, David; Trager, James; Fong, Lawrence

    2016-07-01

    Sipuleucel-T is an autologous cellular therapy for asymptomatic, or minimally symptomatic, metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer, designed to stimulate an immune response against prostate cancer. In a recent clinical trial (NCT00715104), we found that neoadjuvant sipuleucel-T increased the number of activated T cells within the tumor microenvironment. The current analysis examined whether sipuleucel-T altered adaptive T-cell responses by expanding pre-existing T cells or by recruiting new T cells to prostate tissue. Next-generation sequencing of the T-cell receptor (TCR) genes from blood or prostate tissue was used to quantitate and track T-cell clonotypes in these treated subjects with prostate cancer. At baseline, there was a significantly greater diversity of circulating TCR sequences in subjects with prostate cancer compared with healthy donors. Among healthy donors, circulating TCR sequence diversity remained unchanged over the same time interval. In contrast, sipuleucel-T treatment reduced circulating TCR sequence diversity versus baseline as measured by the Shannon index. Interestingly, sipuleucel-T treatment resulted in greater TCR sequence diversity in resected prostate tissue in sipuleucel-T-treated subjects versus tissue of nonsipuleucel-T-treated subjects with prostate cancer. Furthermore, sipuleucel-T increased TCR sequence commonality between blood and resected prostate tissue in treated versus untreated subjects with prostate cancer. The broadening of the TCR repertoire within the prostate tissue supports the hypothesis that sipuleucel-T treatment facilitates the recruitment of T cells into the prostate. Our results highlight the importance of assessing T-cell response to immunotherapy both in the periphery and in tumor tissue. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3711-8. ©2016 AACR.

  13. Prostate stromal cell telomere shortening is associated with risk of prostate cancer in the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial*

    PubMed Central

    Heaphy, Christopher M.; Gaonkar, Gaurav; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Joshu, Corinne E.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Lucia, M. Scott; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Lippman, Scott M.; Thompson, Ian M.; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Meeker, Alan K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Telomeres are repetitive nucleoproteins that help maintain chromosomal stability by inhibiting exonucleolytic degradation, prohibiting inappropriate homologous recombination, and preventing chromosomal fusions by suppressing double-strand break signals. We recently observed that men treated for clinically localized prostate cancer with shorter telomeres in their cancer-associated stromal cells, in combination with greater variation in cancer cell telomere lengths, were significantly more likely to progress to distant metastases and die from their disease. Here, we hypothesized that shorter stromal cell telomere length would be associated with prostate cancer risk at time of biopsy. Methods Telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis was performed in normal-appearing stromal, basal epithelial, and luminal epithelial cells in biopsies from men randomized to the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. Prostate cancer cases (N=32) were either detected on a biopsy performed for cause or at the end of the study per trial protocol, and controls (N=50), defined as negative for cancer on an end-of-study biopsy performed per trial protocol (e.g. irrespective of indication), were sampled. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between mean telomere length of the particular cell populations, cell-to-cell telomere length variability, and risk of prostate cancer. Results Men with short stromal cell telomere lengths (below median) had 2.66 (95% CI 1.04-3.06; p=0.04) times the odds of prostate cancer compared with men who had longer lengths (at or above median). Conversely, we did not observe statistically significant associations for short telomere lengths in normal-appearing basal (OR=2.15, 95% CI 0.86-5.39; p=0.10) or luminal (OR=1.15, 95% CI 0.47-2.80; p=0.77) cells. Conclusions These findings suggest that telomere shortening in normal stromal cells is associated with prostate cancer risk. It is essential to

  14. Prostate stromal cell telomere shortening is associated with risk of prostate cancer in the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.

    PubMed

    Heaphy, Christopher M; Gaonkar, Gaurav; Peskoe, Sarah B; Joshu, Corinne E; De Marzo, Angelo M; Lucia, M Scott; Goodman, Phyllis J; Lippman, Scott M; Thompson, Ian M; Platz, Elizabeth A; Meeker, Alan K

    2015-08-01

    Telomeres are repetitive nucleoproteins that help maintain chromosomal stability by inhibiting exonucleolytic degradation, prohibiting inappropriate homologous recombination, and preventing chromosomal fusions by suppressing double-strand break signals. We recently observed that men treated for clinically localized prostate cancer with shorter telomeres in their cancer-associated stromal cells, in combination with greater variation in cancer cell telomere lengths, were significantly more likely to progress to distant metastases, and die from their disease. Here, we hypothesized that shorter stromal cell telomere length would be associated with prostate cancer risk at time of biopsy. Telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis was performed in normal-appearing stromal, basal epithelial, and luminal epithelial cells in biopsies from men randomized to the placebo arm of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. Prostate cancer cases (N = 32) were either detected on a biopsy performed for cause or at the end of the study per trial protocol, and controls (N = 50), defined as negative for cancer on an end-of-study biopsy performed per trial protocol (e.g., irrespective of indication), were sampled. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between mean telomere length of the particular cell populations, cell-to-cell telomere length variability, and risk of prostate cancer. Men with short stromal cell telomere lengths (below median) had 2.66 (95% CI 1.04-3.06; P = 0.04) times the odds of prostate cancer compared with men who had longer lengths (at or above median). Conversely, we did not observe statistically significant associations for short telomere lengths in normal-appearing basal (OR = 2.15, 95% CI 0.86-5.39; P= 0 .10) or luminal (OR = 1.15, 95% CI 0.47-2.80; P = 0.77) cells. These findings suggest that telomere shortening in normal stromal cells is associated with prostate cancer risk. It is essential

  15. Prostate Tumor Overexpressed-1 (PTOV1) promotes docetaxel-resistance and survival of castration resistant prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Cánovas, Verónica; Puñal, Yolanda; Maggio, Valentina; Redondo, Enric; Marín, Mercedes; Mellado, Begoña; Olivan, Mireia; Lleonart, Matilde; Planas, Jacques; Morote, Juan; Paciucci, Rosanna

    2017-01-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is presently incurable. The oncogenic protein PTOV1, first described in prostate cancer, was reported as overexpressed and significantly correlated with poor survival in numerous tumors. Here, we investigated the role of PTOV1 in prostate cancer survival to docetaxel and self-renewal ability. Transduction of PTOV1 in docetaxel-sensitive Du145 and PC3 cells significantly increased cell survival after docetaxel exposure and induced docetaxel-resistance genes expression (ABCB1, CCNG2 and TUBB2B). In addition, PTOV1 induced prostatospheres formation and self-renewal genes expression (ALDH1A1, LIN28A, MYC and NANOG). In contrast, Du145 and PC3 cells knockdown for PTOV1 significantly accumulated in the G2/M phase, presented a concomitant increased subG1 peak, and cell death by apoptosis. These effects were enhanced in docetaxel-resistant cells. Analyses of tumor datasets show that PTOV1 expression significantly correlated with prostate tumor grade, drug resistance (CCNG2) and self-renewal (ALDH1A1, MYC) markers. These genes are concurrently overexpressed in most metastatic lesions. Metastases also show PTOV1 genomic amplification in significant co-occurrence with docetaxel-resistance and self-renewal genes. Our findings identify PTOV1 as a promoter of docetaxel-resistance and self-renewal characteristics for castration resistant prostate cancer. The concomitant increased expression of PTOV1, ALDH1A1 and CCNG2 in primary tumors, may predict metastasis and bad prognosis. PMID:28938627

  16. Direct Effect of Zinc on Mitochondrial Apoptogenesis in Prostate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Pei; Li, Tie-Luo; Guan, Zhi-Xin; Franklin, Renty B.; Costello, Leslie C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate epithelial cells uniquely accumulate significantly higher levels of zinc than other mammalian cells. We previously showed that the accumulation of high intracellular zinc levels in specific prostate cells results in the induction of apoptosis and the inhibition of cell growth. The apoptotic effect is due to zinc induction of mitochondrial apoptogenesis. We now report additional studies that corroborate this effect of zinc and provide insight into the mechanism of this unique effect. METHODS The effect of exposure to physiological levels of zinc on apoptosis was determined for three human prostate cell lines (PC-3, BPH, and HPR-1). Zinc-induced apoptosis was identified by DNA fragmentation. The direct effect of zinc on isolated mitochondrial preparations from each cell line was determined. The mitochondrial release of cytochrome c was determined by Western blot. RESULTS Exposure to zinc induced apoptosis in PC-3 and BPH cells but not in HPR-1 cells. The zinc accumulation in PC-3 (4.3 ± 0.3) and BPH (2.8 ± 0.4) was higher than that in HPR-1 cells (1.8 ± 0.1). The apoptotic effect of zinc on PC-3 cells could be observed as early as 4–6 hr of zinc treatment, and this effect was not reversible. The exposure of isolated mitochondria from PC-3 and BPH cells to zinc resulted in the release of cytochrome c; but zinc had no effect on mitochondria from HPR-1 cells. CONCLUSIONS Exposure to zinc induces apoptosis in PC-3 and BPH cells, which accumulate high intracellular levels of zinc, but not in HPR-1 cells, which do not accumulate high levels of zinc. Once initiated, the induction of apoptosis is not reversed by the removal of zinc, i.e., it is an irreversible process. The apoptogenic effect is due to a direct effect of zinc on mitochondria that results in the release of cytochrome c. The cell specificity of zinc induction of apoptogenesis is dependent on the ability of the cells to accumulate high levels of intracellular zinc and on the ability of

  17. Selenomethionine Induced Transcriptional Programs in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongjuan; Brooks, James D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We determined the effects of selenomethionine, the major organic selenium containing compound found in the diet and the form of selenium being used in the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial, on prostate cancer cells. Materials and Methods We assessed global transcript profiles of selenomethionine treated LNCaP using cDNA microarrays and compared them to those of cells treated with methylselenic acid, a direct precursor of methylselenol, which is the active form of selenium in vivo. Results After treatment with selenomethionine 2,336 unique genes showed expression changes of at least 1.5-fold in at least 3 time points during 48 hours and 366 unique transcripts differed significantly between selenomethionine and methylselenic acid treated LNCaP. Approximately half of the 76 cell cycle regulated genes affected by selenomethionine were down-regulated and enriched for genes associated with the G2/M phase. Flow cytometry analysis showed that selenomethionine induced G2/M arrest in LNCaP at low concentrations. Selenomethionine also affected expression levels of 35 known androgen responsive genes and 18 of these transcripts showed changes that were the inverse of those seen after androgen stimulation. At high concentrations selenomethionine decreased prostate specific antigen promoter driven luciferase expression. Conclusions Selenomethionine modulates transcript levels of genes involved in a number of biological processes, including cell cycle/apoptosis androgen signaling, signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. Although the pathways affected paralleled in many ways those that are modulated by methylselenic acid, distinct differences in transcript patterns and effects on cell cycle regulation suggest that different selenium compounds could exert unique effects in prostate cells. PMID:17222674

  18. Selenomethionine induced transcriptional programs in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongjuan; Brooks, James D

    2007-02-01

    We determined the effects of selenomethionine, the major organic selenium containing compound found in the diet and the form of selenium being used in the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial, on prostate cancer cells. We assessed global transcript profiles of selenomethionine treated LNCaP using cDNA microarrays and compared them to those of cells treated with methylselenic acid, a direct precursor of methylselenol, which is the active form of selenium in vivo. After treatment with selenomethionine 2,336 unique genes showed expression changes of at least 1.5-fold in at least 3 time points during 48 hours and 366 unique transcripts differed significantly between selenomethionine and methylselenic acid treated LNCaP. Approximately half of the 76 cell cycle regulated genes affected by selenomethionine were down-regulated and enriched for genes associated with the G2/M phase. Flow cytometry analysis showed that selenomethionine induced G2/M arrest in LNCaP at low concentrations. Selenomethionine also affected expression levels of 35 known androgen responsive genes and 18 of these transcripts showed changes that were the inverse of those seen after androgen stimulation. At high concentrations selenomethionine decreased prostate specific antigen promoter driven luciferase expression. Selenomethionine modulates transcript levels of genes involved in a number of biological processes, including cell cycle/apoptosis androgen signaling, signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. Although the pathways affected paralleled in many ways those that are modulated by methylselenic acid, distinct differences in transcript patterns and effects on cell cycle regulation suggest that different selenium compounds could exert unique effects in prostate cells.

  19. Honokiol inhibits androgen receptor activity in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Karlsson, A Isabella; Bonner, Michael Y; Arbiser, Jack L; Singh, Shivendra V

    2014-04-01

    We have shown previously that honokiol (HNK), a bioactive component of the medicinal plant Magnolia officinalis, inhibits growth of human prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the effect of HNK on androgen receptor (AR) signaling has not been studied. LNCaP, C4-2, and TRAMP-C1 cells were used for various assays. Trypan blue dye exclusion assay or clonogenic assay was performed for determination of cell viability. The effects of HNK and/or its analogs on protein levels of AR and its target gene product prostate specific antigen (PSA) were determined by western blotting. RNA interference of p53 was achieved by transient transfection. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed for mRNA expression of AR. Nuclear level of AR was visualized by microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by DNA fragmentation assay or flow cytometry after Annexin V-propidium iodide staining. HNK and its dichloroacetate analog (HDCA) were relatively more effective in suppressing cell viability and AR protein level than honokiol epoxide or biseugenol. Nuclear translocation of AR stimulated by a synthetic androgen (R1881) was markedly suppressed in the presence of HNK. Downregulation of AR protein resulting from HNK exposure was attributable to transcriptional repression as well as proteasomal degradation. HNK-mediated suppression of AR protein was maintained in LNCaP cells after knockdown of p53 protein. HNK-induced apoptosis was not affected by R1881 treatment. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, that HNK inhibits activity of AR in prostate cancer cells regardless of the p53 status. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Investigating the cell death mechanisms in primary prostate cancer cells using low-temperature plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Deborah; Hirst, A. M.; Packer, J. R.; Simms, M. S.; Mann, V. M.; Frame, F. M.; Maitland, N. J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown considerable promise as a potential cancer therapy. An atmospheric pressure plasma driven with kHz kV excitation, operated with helium and oxygen admixtures is used to investigate the interaction with prostate cancer cells. The cytopathic effect was verified first in two commonly used prostate cancer cell lines (BPH-1 and PC-3 cells) and further extended to examine the effects in paired normal and tumour prostate epithelial cells cultured directly from patient tissues. Through the formation of reactive species in cell culture media, and potentially other plasma components, we observed high levels of DNA damage, together with reduced cell viability and colony-forming ability. We observed differences in response between the prostate cell lines and primary cells, particularly in terms of the mechanism of cell death. The primary cells ultimately undergo necrotic cell death in both the normal and tumour samples, in the complete absence of apoptosis. In addition, we provide the first evidence of an autophagic response in primary cells. This work highlights the importance of studying primary cultures in order to gain a more realistic insight into patient efficacy. EPSRC EP/H003797/1 & EP/K018388/1, Yorkshire Cancer Research: YCR Y257PA.

  1. Androgen deprivation and stem cell markers in prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yao; Hamburger, Anne W; Wang, Linbo; Khan, Mohammad Afnan; Hussain, Arif

    2010-01-01

    In our previous studies using human LNCaP xenografts and TRAMP (transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate) mice, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) resulted in a temporary cessation of prostate cancer (PCa) growth, but then tumors grew faster with more malignant behaviour. To understand whether cancer stem cells might play a role in PCa progression in these animal models, we investigated the expressions of stem cell-related markers in tumors at different time points after ADT. In both animal models, enhanced expressions of stem cell markers were observed in tumors of castrated mice, as compared to non-castrated controls. This increased cell population that expressed stem cell markers is designated as stem-like cells (SLC) in this article. We also observed that the SLC peaked at relatively early time points after ADT, before tumors resumed their growth. These results suggest that the SLC population may play a role in tumor re-growth and disease progression, and that targeting the SLC at their peak-expression time point may prevent tumor recurrence following ADT. PMID:20126580

  2. Hedgehog signaling in myofibroblasts directly promotes prostate tumor cell growth†

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, Maribella; Bjerregaard, Robert; Bushman, Wade; Beebe, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Despite strong evidence for the involvement of the stroma in Hedgehog signaling, little is known about the identity of the stromal cells and the signaling mechanisms that mediate the growth promoting effect of Hh signaling. We developed an in vitro co-culture model using microchannel technology to examine the effect of paracrine Hh signaling on proliferation of prostate cancer cells. We show here that activation of Hh signaling in myofibroblasts is sufficient to accelerate tumor cell growth. This effect was independent of any direct effect of Hh ligand on tumor cells or other cellular components of the tumor stroma. Further, the trophic effect of Hh pathway activation in myofibroblasts does not require collaboration of other elements of the stroma or direct physical interaction with the cancer cells. By isolating the tropic effect of Hh pathway activation in prostate stroma, we have taken the first step toward identifying cell-specific mechanisms that mediate the effect of paracrine Hh signaling on tumor growth. PMID:22234342

  3. Mantle cell lymphoma of the prostate gland treated with holmium laser enucleation

    PubMed Central

    Cable, Christian T.; Trevathan, Sean; El Tayeb, Marawan M.

    2017-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma of the prostate is rare and is seldom encountered in general urologic practice. It either arises primarily from the prostate or is a result of metastatic spread from another site. This specific type of lymphoma has an aggressive course and may respond poorly to traditional chemotherapy with frequent relapses. Mantle cell lymphoma occurs in middle age or older, which is also when symptoms of benign prostatic enlargement begin in men. This overlap makes the diagnosis of lymphoma of the prostate difficult and makes the treatment more complex. We describe a case of mantle cell lymphoma of the prostate that caused significant enlargement and bladder outlet obstruction with urinary retention. The obstruction was treated with holmium laser enucleation of the prostate with good functional results. PMID:28670079

  4. Monoallelic expression of TMPRSS2/ERG in prostate cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Polson, Euan S; Lewis, John L; Celik, Hamza; Mann, Vincent M; Stower, Michael J; Simms, Matthew S; Rodrigues, Greta; Collins, Anne T; Maitland, Norman J

    2013-01-01

    While chromosomal translocations have a fundamental role in the development of several human leukaemias, their role in solid tumour development has been somewhat more controversial. Recently, it was shown that up to 80% of prostate tumours harbour at least one such gene fusion, and that the most common fusion event, between the prostate-specific TMPRSS2 gene and the ERG oncogene, is a critical, and probably early factor in prostate cancer development. Here we demonstrate the presence and expression of this significant chromosomal rearrangement in prostate cancer stem cells. Moreover, we show that in the prostate epithelial hierarchy from both normal and tumour tissues, TMPRSS2 transcription is subjected to tight monoallelic regulation, which is retained upon asymmetric division and relaxed during epithelial cell differentiation. The presence and expression of TMPRSS2/ERG in prostate stem cells would provide ERG-driven survival advantages, allowing maintenance of this mutated genotype.

  5. Convergent Effects of Resveratrol and PYK2 on Prostate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Conte, Andrea; Kisslinger, Annamaria; Procaccini, Claudio; Paladino, Simona; Oliviero, Olimpia; de Amicis, Francesca; Faicchia, Deriggio; Fasano, Dominga; Caputo, Marilena; Matarese, Giuseppe; Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria; Tramontano, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol, a dietary polyphenol, is under consideration as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent for several diseases, including cancer. However, its mechanisms of action and its effects on non-tumor cells, fundamental to understand its real efficacy as chemopreventive agent, remain largely unknown. Proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2), a non-receptor tyrosine kinase acting as signaling mediator of different stimuli, behaves as tumor-suppressor in prostate. Since, PYK2 and RSV share several fields of interaction, including oxidative stress, we have investigated their functional relationship in human non-transformed prostate EPN cells and in their tumor-prone counterpart EPN-PKM, expressing a PYK2 dead-kinase mutant. We show that RSV has a strong biological activity in both cell lines, decreasing ROS production, inducing morphological changes and reversible growth arrest, and activating autophagy but not apoptosis. Interestingly, the PYK2 mutant increases basal ROS and autophagy levels, and modulates the intensity of RSV effects. In particular, the anti-oxidant effect of RSV is more potent in EPN than in EPN-PKM, whereas its anti-proliferative and pro-autophagic effects are more significant in EPN-PKM. Consistently, PYK2 depletion by RNAi replicates the effects of the PKM mutant. Taken together, our results reveal that PYK2 and RSV act on common cellular pathways and suggest that RSV effects on prostate cells may depend on mutational-state or expression levels of PYK2 that emerges as a possible mediator of RSV mechanisms of action. Moreover, the observation that resveratrol effects are reversible and not associated to apoptosis in tumor-prone EPN-PKM cells suggests caution for its use in humans. PMID:27649143

  6. Capillary morphogenesis gene 2 regulates adhesion and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    YE, LIN; SANDERS, ANDREW J.; SUN, PING-HUI; MASON, MALCOLM D.; JIANG, WEN G.

    2014-01-01

    Capillary morphogenesis gene 2 (CMG2), also known as anthrax toxin receptor 2, has been indicated in the formation of new vasculature and in the internalisation of the anthrax toxin. Anti-angiogenesis therapy that targets this molecule has been investigated. However, our recent studies of this molecule have indicated that this gene may also play certain roles in cancer cells. The present study aimed to examine the expression of CMG2 in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines, and also its impact on cellular functions. The expression of CMG2 was detectable in normal and prostate cancer tissues. The prostate cancer cell lines appeared to have relatively high expression compared with the prostatic epithelial cells. Knockdown of CMG2 impaired the adherence of the prostate cancer cells. CMG2 overexpression resulted in decreasing invasiveness, while the knockdown of CMG2 contrastingly enhanced this ability. The altered expression of CMG2 in the prostate cancer cells did not affect the in vitro or in vivo growth of the cells. Taken together, these results show that CMG2 is expressed in prostatic epithelia and cancer cells. In addition to its role in the angiogenesis and the internalisation of anthrax toxin, CMG2 also plays an important role in regulating the adhesion and invasion of prostate cancer cells. PMID:24932305

  7. TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in small cell carcinoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Guo, Charles C; Dancer, Jane Y; Wang, Yan; Aparicio, Ana; Navone, Nora M; Troncoso, Patricia; Czerniak, Bogdan A

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that most prostate cancers carry the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. Here we evaluated the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in small cell carcinoma of the prostate (n = 12) in comparison with small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (n = 12) and lung (n = 11). Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated rearrangement of the ERG gene in 8 cases of prostatic small cell carcinoma (67%), and the rearrangement was associated with deletion of the 5' ERG gene in 7 cases, but rearrangement of the ERG gene was not present in any small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder or lung. Next we evaluated the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in nude mouse xenografts that were derived from 2 prostatic small cell carcinomas carrying the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. Two transcripts encoded by the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing demonstrated that the 2 transcripts were composed of fusions of exon 1 of the TMPRSS2 gene to exon 4 or 5 of the ERG gene. Our study demonstrates the specific presence of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in prostatic small cell carcinoma, which may be helpful in distinguishing small cell carcinoma of prostatic origin from nonprostatic origins. The high prevalence of the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in prostatic small cell carcinoma as well as adenocarcinoma implies that small cell carcinoma may share a common pathogenic pathway with adenocarcinoma in the prostate.

  8. Frequently rearranged in advanced T-cell lymphomas-1 demonstrates oncogenic properties in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Xiong, Hua; Zou, Yanmei; Xu, Sanpeng; Quan, Lanping; Yuan, Xianglin; Xu, Ningzhi; Wang, Yihua

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer-associated mortality for males worldwide. Although dysregulation of the β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) pathway has been previously reported in prostate cancer, the mechanisms underlying this process remain unknown. Frequently rearranged in advanced T-cell lymphomas-1 (FRAT1) functions as a positive regulator of the β-catenin/TCF signaling pathway. However, to the best of our knowledge, the molecular association between FRAT1 and the β-catenin/TCF pathway in prostate cancer has not been investigated. In the present study, FRAT1 expression was analyzed in normal prostate tissues and prostate adenocarcinoma samples using publicly available databases, a commercial tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry techniques. In addition, FRAT1 expression levels were altered by overexpression or RNA interference-mediated depletion in prostate cancer cells. The effects of FRAT1 expression on tumor growth were determined using cell growth curves in vitro and xenografts in nude mice in vivo. The effects of FRAT1 on β-catenin/TCF activity were measured using the TOPFLASH reporter assay. FRAT1 was expressed exclusively in the nuclei of normal prostate basal cells, and nuclear FRAT1 was detected in 68% (40/59) of prostate adenocarcinoma samples. In addition, FRAT1 activated the TCF luciferase reporter gene promoter in prostate cancer cells, and was observed to promote the growth of prostate cancer cells in vitro. Furthermore, FRAT1 expression was sufficient to transform NIH3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells and lead to tumor formation in vivo. These results suggest that FRAT1 demonstrates oncogenic properties in prostate cancer, potentially by suppressing the inhibitory effect of nuclear glycogen synthase 3β against β-catenin/TCF activity, thus activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and promoting cell growth. PMID:27599661

  9. Aberrant Transforming Growth Factor-β Activation Recruits Mesenchymal Stem Cells During Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Long; Xie, Liang; Tintani, Francis; Xie, Hui; Li, Changjun; Cui, Zhuang; Wan, Mei; Zu, Xiongbing; Qi, Lin; Cao, Xu

    2017-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the overgrowth of prostate tissues with high prevalence in older men. BPH pathogenesis is not completely understood, but it is believed to be a result of de novo overgrowth of prostatic stroma. In this study, we show that aberrant activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) mobilizes mesenchymal/stromal stem cells (MSCs) in circulating blood, which are recruited for the prostatic stromal hyperplasia. Elevated levels of active TGF-β were observed in both a phenylephrine-induced prostatic hyperplasia mouse model and human BPH tissues. Nestin lineage tracing revealed that 39.6% ± 6.3% of fibroblasts and 73.3% ± 4.2% smooth muscle cells were derived from nestin(+) cells in Nestin-Cre, Rosa26-YFP(flox/+) mice. Nestin(+) MSCs were increased in the prostatic hyperplasia mice. Our parabiosis experiment demonstrate that nestin(+) MSCs were mobilized and recruited to the prostatic stroma of wild-type mice and gave rise to the fibroblasts. Moreover, injection of a TGF-β neutralizing antibody (1D11) inhibits mobilization of MSCs, their recruitment to the prostatic stroma and hyperplasia. Importantly, knockout of TβRII in nestin(+) cell lineage ameliorated stromal hyperplasia. Thus, elevated levels of TGF-β-induced mobilization and recruitment of MSCs to the reactive stroma resulting in overgrowth of prostate tissues in BPH and, thus, inhibition of TGF-β activity could be a potential therapy for BPH. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:394-404.

  10. Ginger phytochemicals exhibit synergy to inhibit prostate cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Brahmbhatt, Meera; Gundala, Sushma R.; Asif, Ghazia; Shamsi, Shahab A; Aneja, Ritu

    2014-01-01

    Dietary phytochemicals offer non-toxic therapeutic management as well as chemopreventive intervention for slow-growing prostate cancers. However, the limited success of several single-agent clinical trials suggest a paradigm shift that the health benefits of fruits and vegetables are not ascribable due to individual phytochemicals rather may be ascribed to but to synergistic interactions among them. We recently reported growth-inhibiting and apoptosis-inducing properties of ginger extract (GE) in in vitro and in vivo prostate cancer models. Nevertheless, the nature of interactions among the constituent ginger biophenolics, viz. 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 10-gingerol, and 6-shogoal, remains elusive. Here we show antiproliferative efficacy of the most-active GE biophenolics as single-agents and in binary combinations, and investigate the nature of their interactions using the Chou-Talalay combination-index (CI) method. Our data demonstrate that binary combinations of ginger phytochemicals synergistically inhibit proliferation of PC-3 cells with CI values ranging from 0.03-0.88. To appreciate synergy among phytochemicals present in GE, the natural abundance of ginger biophenolics was quantitated using LC-UV/MS. Interestingly, combining GE with its constituents (in particular, 6-gingerol) resulted in significant augmentation of GE’s antiproliferative activity. These data generate compelling grounds for further preclinical evaluation of GE alone and in combination with individual ginger biophenols for prostate cancer management. PMID:23441614

  11. Mechanisms of the androgen receptor splicing in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, L L; Xie, N; Sun, S; Plymate, S; Mostaghel, E; Dong, X

    2014-06-12

    Prostate tumors develop resistance to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) by multiple mechanisms, one of which is to express constitutively active androgen receptor (AR) splice variants lacking the ligand-binding domain. AR splice variant 7 (AR-V7, also termed AR3) is the most abundantly expressed variant that drives prostate tumor progression under ADT conditions. However, the molecular mechanism by which AR-V7 is generated remains unclear. In this manuscript, we demonstrated that RNA splicing of AR-V7 in response to ADT was closely associated with AR gene transcription initiation and elongation rates. Enhanced AR gene transcription by ADT provides a prerequisite condition that further increases the interactions between AR pre-mRNA and splicing factors. Under ADT conditions, recruitment of several RNA splicing factors to the 3' splicing site for AR-V7 was increased. We identified two RNA splicing enhancers and their binding proteins (U2AF65 and ASF/SF2) that had critical roles in splicing AR pre-mRNA into AR-V7. These data indicate that ADT-induced AR gene transcription rate and splicing factor recruitment to AR pre-mRNA contribute to the enhanced AR-V7 levels in prostate cancer cells.

  12. Mechanisms of the Androgen Receptor Splicing in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang liang; Xie, Ning; Sun, Shihua; Plymate, Stephen; Mostaghel, Elahe; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-01-01

    Prostate tumors develop resistance to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) by multiple mechanisms, one of which is to express constitutively active androgen receptor (AR) splice variants lacking the ligand binding domain. AR splice variant 7 (AR-V7, also termed AR3) is the most abundantly expressed variant that drives prostate tumor progression under ADT conditions. However, the molecular mechanism by which AR-V7 is generated remains unclear. In this manuscript, we demonstrated that RNA splicing of AR-V7 in response to ADT was closely associated with AR gene transcription initiation and elongation rates. Enhanced AR gene transcription by ADT provides a pre-requisite condition that further increases the interactions between AR pre-mRNA and splicing factors. Under ADT conditions, recruitment of several RNA splicing factors to the 3’ splicing site for AR-V7 was increased. We identified two RNA splicing enhancers and their binding proteins (U2AF65 and ASF/SF2) that played critical roles in splicing AR pre-mRNA into AR-V7. These data indicate that ADT-induced AR gene transcription rate and splicing factor recruitment to AR pre-mRNA contribute to the enhanced AR-V7 levels in prostate cancer cells. PMID:23851510

  13. Targeted Elimination of PCDH-PC Expressing Prostate Cancer Cells for Control of Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    66: 1100-1113. 3. Chen, M., Tanner, M., Levine, A., Levina , E., Ohouo, P. and Buttyan, R. (2009). Androgenic regulation of hedgehog signaling... Levina , E., Ohouo, P. and Buttyan, R. (2009). Androgenic regulation of hedgehog signaling pathway components in prostate cancer cells. Cell Cycle, 8: 149-157.

  14. Influence of zinc deficiency on AKT-MDM2-P53 signaling axes in normal and malignant human prostate cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With prostate being the highest zinc-accumulating tissue before the onset of cancer, the effects of physiologic levels of zinc on Akt-Mdm2-p53 and Akt-p21 signaling axes in human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) and malignant prostate LNCaP cells were examined. Cells were cultured for 6 d in...

  15. Apoptosis-Dependent and Apoptosis-Independent Functions of Bim in Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    Independent Functions of Bim in Prostate Cancer Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Dean Tang...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Apoptosis-Dependent and Apoptosis-Independent Functions of Bim in Prostate Cancer Cells 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Original contains colored plates: ALL DTIC reproductions will be in black and white. 14. ABSTRACT

  16. Perturbation of NK cell peripheral homeostasis accelerates prostate carcinoma metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Lu, Shengjun; Wang, Xuanjun; Page, Stephanie T.; Higano, Celestia S.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Greenberg, Norman M.; Sun, Shaoli; Li, Zihai; Wu, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    The activating receptor NK cell group 2 member D (NKG2D) mediates antitumor immunity in experimental animal models. However, whether NKG2D ligands contribute to tumor suppression or progression clinically remains controversial. Here, we have described 2 novel lines of “humanized” bi-transgenic (bi-Tg) mice in which native human NKG2D ligand MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence B (MICB) or the engineered membrane-restricted MICB (MICB.A2) was expressed in the prostate of the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model of spontaneous carcinogenesis. Bi-Tg TRAMP/MICB mice exhibited a markedly increased incidence of progressed carcinomas and metastasis, whereas TRAMP/MICB.A2 mice enjoyed long-term tumor-free survival conferred by sustained NKG2D-mediated antitumor immunity. Mechanistically, we found that cancer progression in TRAMP/MICB mice was associated with loss of the peripheral NK cell pool owing to high serum levels of tumor-derived soluble MICB (sMICB). Prostate cancer patients also displayed reduction of peripheral NK cells and high sMIC levels. Our study has not only provided direct evidence in “humanized” mouse models that soluble and membrane-restricted NKG2D ligands pose opposite impacts on cancer progression, but also uncovered a mechanism of sMIC-induced impairment of NK cell antitumor immunity. Our findings suggest that the impact of soluble NKG2D ligands should be considered in NK cell–based cancer immunotherapy and that our unique mouse models should be valuable for therapy optimization. PMID:24018560

  17. Targeting prostate cancer based on signal transduction and cell cycle pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John T.; Lehmann, Brian D.; Terrian, David M.; Chappell, William H.; Stivala, Franca; Libra, Massimo; Martelli, Alberto M.; Steelman, Linda S.

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains a leading cause of death in men despite increased capacity to diagnose at earlier stages. After prostate cancer has become hormone independent, which often occurs after hormonal ablation therapies, it is difficult to effectively treat. Prostate cancer may arise from mutations and dysregulation of various genes involved in regulation signal transduction (e.g., PTEN, Akt, etc.,) and the cell cycle (e.g., p53, p21Cip1, p27Kip1, Rb, etc.,). This review focuses on the aberrant interactions of signal transduction and cell cycle genes products and how they can contribute to prostate cancer and alter therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:18594202

  18. CD8+ T cells specific for the androgen receptor are common in patients with prostate cancer and are able to lyse prostate tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Olson, Brian M; McNeel, Douglas G

    2011-06-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a hormone receptor that plays a critical role in prostate cancer, and depletion of its ligand has long been the cornerstone of treatment for metastatic disease. Here, we evaluate the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) as an immunological target, seeking to identify HLA-A2-restricted epitopes recognized by T cells in prostate cancer patients. Ten AR LBD-derived, HLA-A2-binding peptides were identified and ranked with respect to HLA-A2 affinity and were used to culture peptide-specific T cells from HLA-A2+ prostate cancer patients. These T-cell cultures identified peptide-specific T cells specific for all ten peptides in at least one patient, and T cells specific for peptides AR805 and AR811 were detected in over half of patients. Peptide-specific CD8+ T-cell clones were then isolated and characterized for prostate cancer cytotoxicity and cytokine expression, identifying that AR805 and AR811 CD8+ T-cell clones could lyse prostate cancer cells in an HLA-A2-restricted fashion, but only AR811 CTL had polyfunctional cytokine expression. Epitopes were confirmed using immunization studies in HLA-A2 transgenic mice, in which the AR LBD is an autologous antigen with an identical protein sequence, which showed that mice immunized with AR811 developed peptide-specific CTL that lyse HLA-A2+ prostate cancer cells. These data show that AR805 and AR811 are HLA-A2-restricted epitopes for which CTL can be commonly detected in prostate cancer patients. Moreover, CTL responses specific for AR811 can be elicited by direct immunization of A2/DR1 mice. These findings suggest that it may be possible to elicit an anti-prostate tumor immune response by augmenting CTL populations using AR LBD-based vaccines.

  19. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Targeted Polymersomes for Delivering Mocetinostat and Docetaxel to Prostate Cancer Cell Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer cells overexpress the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) receptors on the surface. Targeting the PSMA receptor creates a unique opportunity for drug delivery. Docetaxel is a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for treating metastatic and androgen-independent prostate cancer, and mocetinostat is a potent inhibitor of class I histone deacetylases. In this study, we prepared reduction-sensitive polymersomes presenting folic acid on the surface and encapsulating either docetaxel or mocetinostat. The presence of folic acid allowed efficient targeting of the PSMA receptor and subsequent internalization of the polymeric vesicles in cultured LNCaP prostate cancer cell spheroids. The intracellular reducing agents efficiently released docetaxel and mocetinostat from the polymersomes. The combination of the two drug-encapsulated polymersome formulations significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the viability of the LNCaP cells (compared to free drugs or control) in three-dimensional spheroid cultures. The calculated combination index value indicated a synergistic effect for the combination of mocetinostat and docetaxel. Thus, our PSMA-targeted drug-encapsulated polymersomes has the potential to lead to a new direction in prostate cancer therapy that decreases the toxicity and increases the efficacy of the drug delivery systems. PMID:27917408

  20. HGF and the regulation of tight junctions in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, Tracey A; Mason, Malcolm D; Jiang, Wen G

    2014-07-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) may impact the metastasis of prostate cancer via its action on prostate stem cells or their progeny. Tight junctions (TJs) are crucial to the process of metastasis and have been previously shown to be regulated by HGF. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of HGF on the function of TJs in human prostate epithelial, prostate stem cell-like and prostate cancer cell lines. Four human prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3, DU-145, PZHPV-7, CaHPV-10), normal adult prostate parental epithelial cells (RWPE-1) and a stem cell-like derivative of RWPE-1 (WPE-STEM) were used to assess HGF-induced changes in TJs. A significant difference was noted in the behaviour between the WPE-STEM, RWPE-1 and the cancer cell lines which was HGF concentration-dependent. However, in the WPE-STEM cells, the effect was biphasic, with the cells seemingly resistant to HGF-modulated TJ disruption. Closer examination revealed that HGF affected the redistribution of ZO-1, ZO-2 and ZO-3 away from the TJs of confluent cells with concurrent loss of claudin-1 and claudin-5, and western blot analysis revealed a loss in TJ protein expression of ZO-1 and ZO-2. We demonstrated for the first time that HGF regulates TJ function in human prostate cells. Moreover, this regulation was dependent on the tumourigenicity of the cells, with the most aggressive cells most susceptible and the stem cell-like cells least susceptible. These data offer an intriguing glimpse of how TJs affect the behaviour of prostate cancer cells and how HGF modulates the expression and function of the molecules maintaining TJ structure and function.

  1. Small cell-like change in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductal carcinoma, and invasive prostatic carcinoma: a study of 7 cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephen; Han, Jeong S; Chang, Alex; Ross, Hillary M; Montironi, Rodolfo; Yorukoglu, Kutsal; Lane, Zhaoli; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2013-03-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the prostate is associated with poor prognosis and different treatment from conventional acinar adenocarcinoma. Given the important clinicopathologic implications of a diagnosis of small cell carcinoma, we report 7 cases showing unusual, extensive small cell-like change in intraductal carcinoma and invasive carcinoma. Prostatic biopsies from 3 patients and radical prostatectomy specimens from 4 patients showed variably extensive small cell-like high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and intraductal carcinoma. Five cases were associated with conventional acinar adenocarcinoma (2 cases with Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7; 3 cases with Gleason 3 + 4 = 7). No small cell carcinoma was seen. Small and large ducts with small cell-like change showed solid and cribriform proliferations of atypical cells with abrupt transition between centrally located populations of small cells and more typical large dysplastic cells at the duct periphery. Rosette-like formations were noted within some involved ducts. Small cell-like change was characterized by crowded cells with uniformly bland vesicular nuclei and minimal cytoplasm and no significant mitotic or apoptotic activity. In 3 cases, similar small cell-like morphology was noted focally in invasive carcinoma. The small cell-like areas were negative for synaptophysin and chromogranin, focally positive for TTF-1, and weakly positive for racemase. Ki-67 labeled less than 5% with predominant labeling of the larger atypical cells and minimal reactivity in the small cell-like population. In summary, small cell-like change in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductal carcinoma, and invasive carcinoma is not associated with small cell carcinoma; shows no immunohistochemical evidence of neuroendocrine differentiation; and likely is not an adverse prognostic feature.

  2. Keratin 13 expression reprograms bone and brain metastases of human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lawrence W.; Chu, Gina C-Y; Wu, Jason B-Y.; Huang, Jen-Ming; Li, Quanlin; You, Sungyong; Kim, Jayoung; Lu, Yi-Tsung; Mrdenovic, Stefan; Wang, Ruoxiang; Freeman, Michael R.; Garraway, Isla; Lewis, Michael S.; Chung, Leland W. K.; Zhau, Haiyen E.

    2016-01-01

    Lethal progression of prostate cancer metastasis can be improved by developing animal models that recapitulate the clinical conditions. We report here that cytokeratin 13 (KRT13), an intermediate filament protein, plays a directive role in prostate cancer bone, brain, and soft tissue metastases. KRT13 expression was elevated in bone, brain, and soft tissue metastatic prostate cancer cell lines and in primary and metastatic clinical prostate, lung, and breast cancer specimens. When KRT13 expression was determined at a single cell level in primary tumor tissues of 44 prostate cancer cases, KRT13 level predicted bone metastasis and the overall survival of prostate cancer patients. Genetically enforced KRT13 expression in human prostate cancer cell lines drove metastases toward mouse bone, brain and soft tissues through a RANKL-independent mechanism, as KRT13 altered the expression of genes associated with EMT, stemness, neuroendocrine/neuromimicry, osteomimicry, development, and extracellular matrices, but not receptor activator NF-κB ligand (RANKL) signaling networks in prostate cancer cells. Our results suggest new inhibitors targeting RANKL-independent pathways should be developed for the treatment of prostate cancer bone and soft tissue metastases. PMID:27835867

  3. Chemopreventive effect of PSP through targeting of prostate cancer stem cell-like population.

    PubMed

    Luk, Sze-Ue; Lee, Terence Kin-Wah; Liu, Ji; Lee, Davy Tak-Wing; Chiu, Yung-Tuen; Ma, Stephanie; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin; Wong, Yong-Chuan; Chan, Franky Leung; Ling, Ming-Tat

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggested that prostate cancer stem/progenitor cells (CSC) are responsible for cancer initiation as well as disease progression. Unfortunately, conventional therapies are only effective in targeting the more differentiated cancer cells and spare the CSCs. Here, we report that PSP, an active component extracted from the mushroom Turkey tail (also known as Coriolus versicolor), is effective in targeting prostate CSCs. We found that treatment of the prostate cancer cell line PC-3 with PSP led to the down-regulation of CSC markers (CD133 and CD44) in a time and dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, PSP treatment not only suppressed the ability of PC-3 cells to form prostaspheres under non-adherent culture conditions, but also inhibited their tumorigenicity in vivo, further proving that PSP can suppress prostate CSC properties. To investigate if the anti-CSC effect of PSP may lead to prostate cancer chemoprevention, transgenic mice (TgMAP) that spontaneously develop prostate tumors were orally fed with PSP for 20 weeks. Whereas 100% of the mice that fed with water only developed prostate tumors at the end of experiment, no tumors could be found in any of the mice fed with PSP, suggesting that PSP treatment can completely inhibit prostate tumor formation. Our results not only demonstrated the intriguing anti-CSC effect of PSP, but also revealed, for the first time, the surprising chemopreventive property of oral PSP consumption against prostate cancer.

  4. Plumbagin Nanoparticles Induce Dose and pH Dependent Toxicity on Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Nair, Harikrishnan A; Snima, K S; Kamath, Ravindranath C; Nair, Shantikumar V; Lakshmanan, Vinoth-Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Stable nano-formulation of Plumbagin nanoparticles from Plumbago zeylanica root extract was explored as a potential natural drug against prostate cancer. Size and morphology analysis by DLS, SEM and AFM revealed the average size of nanoparticles prepared was 100±50nm. In vitro cytotoxicity showed concentration and time dependent toxicity on prostate cancer cells. However, plumbagin crude extract found to be highly toxic to normal cells when compared to plumbagin nanoformulation, thus confirming nano plumbagin cytocompatibility with normal cells and dose dependent toxicity to prostate cells. In vitro hemolysis assay confirmed the blood biocompatibility of the plumbagin nanoparticles. In wound healing assay, plumbagin nanoparticles provided clues that it might play an important role in the anti-migration of prostate cancer cells. DNA fragmentation revealed that partial apoptosis induction by plumbagin nanoparticles could be expected as a potent anti-cancer effect towards prostate cancer.

  5. Studying circulating prostate cancer cells by in-vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2011-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. We have measured the depletion kinetics of cancer cells with different metastatic potential. Interestingly, more invasive PC-3 prostate cancer cells are depleted faster from the circulation than LNCaP cells.

  6. Studying circulating prostate cancer cells by in-vivo flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. We have measured the depletion kinetics of cancer cells with different metastatic potential. Interestingly, more invasive PC-3 prostate cancer cells are depleted faster from the circulation than LNCaP cells.

  7. Inflammatory response of a prostate stromal cell line induced by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Im, S J; Han, I H; Kim, J H; Gu, N Y; Seo, M Y; Chung, Y H; Ryu, J S

    2016-04-01

    While Trichomonas vaginalis, a cause of sexually transmitted infection, is known as a surface-dwelling protozoa, trichomonads have been detected in prostatic tissue from benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis by immunoperoxidase assay or PCR. However, the immune response of prostate stromal cells infected with T. vaginalis has not been investigated. Our objective was to investigate whether T. vaginalis could induce an inflammatory response in prostate stromal cells. Incubation of a human prostate stromal myofibroblast cells (WPMY-1) with live T. vaginalis T016 increased expression of the inflammatory chemokines CXCL8 and CCL2. In addition, TLR4, ROS, MAPK and NF-κB expression increased, while inhibitors of TLR4, ROS, MAPKs and NF-κB reduced CXCL8 and CCL2 production. Medium conditioned by incubation of WPMY-1 cells with T. vaginalis stimulated the migration of human neutrophils and monocytes (THP-1 cells). We conclude that T. vaginalis increases CXCL8 and CCL2 production by human prostate stromal cells by activating TLR4, ROS, MAPKs and NF-κB, and this in turn attracts neutrophils and monocytes and leads to an inflammatory response. This study is the first attempt to demonstrate an inflammatory reaction in prostate stromal cells caused by T. vaginalis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Bicalutamide inhibits androgen-mediated adhesion of prostate cancer cells exposed to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Alavian, Michael R.; Goel, Hira Lal; Languino, Lucia R.; FitzGerald, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cell adhesion plays an important role in proliferation, metastasis, and tumor growth and may represent a potential vulnerability in treatment of prostate cancer patients. Bicalutamide (Casodex) has been used as an anti-androgen agent for prostate cancer patients during hormone ablation therapy. This study focuses on the effect of Bicalutamide on cell adhesion to fibronectin in prostate cancer cells. Methods LNCaP prostate cancer cells were stimulated with androgen before being irradiated with doses of 0, 5, 10 or 15 Gy. Cell adhesion to fibronectin was then measured to ascertain androgen's role in integrin mediated prostate cancer cell adhesion. Flow cytometry was used to analyze surface expression of integrin subtypes in LNCaP cells upon androgen stimulation and 15 Gy ionizing radiation. Results LNCaP cell adhesion to fibronectin (FN) was significantly increased by stimulation with androgen when treated with 10 or 15 Gy ionizing radiations but not at 0 or 5 Gy. This increase was inhibited by treatment with Bicalutamide. LNCaP cells exposed to high dose radiation showed an increased expression of αV and β1 integrins in response to androgen treatment while Bicalutamide abolished this effect. Conclusions Our data show that Bicalutamide inhibits the effect of androgen on cell adhesion to FN through changes of integrin subtypes in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells given high dose radiation. This suggests new molecular targets and possible treatment strategies for prostate cancer patients to improve the outcome during hormone ablation therapy and radiation therapy. PMID:18729104

  9. Osteonectin promotes prostate cancer cell migration and invasion: a possible mechanism for metastasis to bone.

    PubMed

    Jacob, K; Webber, M; Benayahu, D; Kleinman, H K

    1999-09-01

    The mechanism underlying the "organ-specific" metastasis of prostate cancer cells to the bone is still poorly understood. It is not clear whether the cells only invade the bone and proliferate there or whether they invade many tissues but survive mainly in the bone ("seed and soil"). Extracts from various organs were used as chemoattractants in the in vitro chemotaxis and invasion assays. Results show that, in comparison with extracts of other tissues, bone extracts promote a 2- to 4-fold increase in chemotaxis by human prostate epithelial cells and a 4-fold increase in the invasive ability of human prostate carcinoma cells. The purified active factor from bone and from marrow stromal-cell-conditioned medium is a low glycosylated osteonectin that specifically promotes the invasive ability of bone-metastasizing prostate (and breast) cancer cells but not that of non-bone-metastasizing tumor cells. It does not stimulate the growth of prostate cancer cells in vitro or in vivo. Because osteonectin specifically enhances matrix metalloprotease activity in prostate and breast cancer cells (and not in other tumor cell types), we conclude that prostate cancer cell metastasis to the bone is, in part, mediated by the ability of osteonectin to promote migration, protease activity, and invasion.

  10. Targeting Cancer Stem Cells in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yun, Eun-Jin; Zhou, Jiancheng; Lin, Chun-Jung; Hernandez, Elizabeth; Fazli, Ladan; Gleave, Martin; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong

    2016-02-01

    Clinical evidence suggests increased cancer stem cells (CSCs) in a tumor mass may contribute to the failure of conventional therapies because CSCs seem to be more resistant than differentiated tumor cells. Thus, unveiling the mechanism regulating CSCs and candidate target molecules will provide new strategy to cure the patients. The stem-like cell properties were determined by a prostasphere assay and dye exclusion assay. To find critical stem cell marker and reveal regulation mechanism, basic biochemical and molecular biologic methods, such as quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot, reporter gene assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, were used. In addition, to determine the effect of combination therapy targeting both CSCs and its progeny, in vitro MTT assay and in vivo xenograft model was used. We demonstrate immortalized normal human prostate epithelial cells, appeared nontumorigenic in vivo, become tumorigenic, and acquire stem cell phenotype after knocking down a tumor suppressor gene. Also, those stem-like cells increase chemoresistance to conventional anticancer reagent. Mechanistically, we unveil that Wnt signaling is a key pathway regulating well-known stem cell marker CD44 by directly interacting to the promoter. Thus, by targeting CSCs using Wnt inhibitors synergistically enhances the efficacy of conventional drugs. Furthermore, the in vivo mouse model bearing xenografts showed a robust inhibition of tumor growth after combination therapy. Overall, this study provides strong evidence of CSC in castration-resistant prostate cancer. This new combination therapy strategy targeting CSC could significantly enhance therapeutic efficacy of current chemotherapy regimen only targeting non-CSC cells. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Characterization of vitamin D insensitive prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Alagbala, Adebusola A.; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.; Foster, Barbara A.

    2007-01-01

    The antitumor effects of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) are being exploited for prevention and treatment of prostate cancer (CaP). These studies examined antitumor effects of calcitriol in primary cell cultures derived from transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice chronically treated with calcitriol (20μg/kg) or vehicle 3x/week (MWF) from 4 weeks-of-age until palpable tumors developed. This is a report on the response of 2 representative control (vitamin D naïve, naïve) and calcitriol-treated (vitamin D insensitive, VDI) cells to calcitriol. VDI cells were less sensitive to calcitriol based on less cell growth inhibition and less inhibition of DNA synthesis as measured by MTT and BrdU incorporation assays. Similarly, VDI cells were also less sensitive to growth inhibition by the vitamin analog, 19-nor-1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 (paricalcitol). There was no change in apoptosis following treatment of naïve and VDI cells with calcitriol. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression was up-regulated by calcitriol in both naïve and VDI cells. Calcitriol induced the vitamin D metabolizing enzyme, 24-hydroxylase (cyp24) mRNA and enzyme activity similarly in naïve and VDI cells as measured by RT-PCR and HPLC respectively. In summary, VDI cells are less responsive to the antiproliferative effects of calcitriol. Understanding vitamin D insensitivity will further clinical development of vitamin D compounds for prevention and treatment of CaP. PMID:17280828

  12. Hypoxia and the metabolic phenotype of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Higgins, L H; Withers, H G; Garbens, A; Love, H D; Magnoni, L; Hayward, S W; Moyes, C D

    2009-12-01

    Many cancer cells have an unusual ability to grow in hypoxia, but the origins of this metabolic phenotype remain unclear. We compared the metabolic phenotypes of three common prostate cancer cell models (LNCaP, DU145, PC3), assessing energy metabolism, metabolic gene expression, and the response to various culture contexts (in vitro and xenografts). LNCaP cells had a more oxidative phenotype than PC3 and DU145 cells based upon respiration, lactate production, [ATP], metabolic gene expression, and sensitivity of these parameters to hypoxia. PC3 and DU145 cells possessed similar Complex II and mtDNA levels, but lower Complex III and IV activities, and were unresponsive to dinitrophenol or dichloroacetate, suggesting that their glycolytic phenotype is due to mitochondrial dysfunction rather than regulation. High passage under normoxia converted LNCaP from oxidative to glycolytic cells (based on respiration and lactate production), and altered metabolic gene expression. Though LNCaP-derived cells differed from the parental line in mitochondrial enzyme activities, none differed in mitochondrial content (assessed as cardiolipin levels). When LNCaP-derived cells were grown as xenografts in immunodeficient mice, there were elements of a hypoxic response (e.g., elevated VEGF mRNA) but line-specific changes in expression of select glycolytic, mitochondrial and fatty acid metabolic genes. Low oxygen in vitro did not influence the mRNA levels of SREBP axis, nor did it significantly alter triglyceride production in any of the cell lines suggesting that the pathway of de novo fatty acid synthesis is not directly upregulated by hypoxic conditions. Collectively, these studies demonstrate important differences in the metabolism of these prostate cancer models. Such metabolic differences would have important ramifications for therapeutic strategies involving metabolic targets.

  13. PTEN Loss Antagonizes Calcitriol-Mediated Growth Inhibition in Prostate Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 1-alpha, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) elicits antiproliferative effects in a variety of cancer cell types...with inhibition of PI3K/AKT for the treatment of prostate cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Vitamin D3 , AKT inhibition, synergism, prostate cancer 16...clinical prostate cancer may be associated with vitamin D3 deficiency (2, 3). Vitamin D is a hormone that can be obtained from the diet or

  14. Effect of AQP9 Expression in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cell PC3

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiwei; Zhu, Liang; Zheng, Bo; Wang, Jinliang; Song, Xishuang; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Lina; Yang, Deyong; Wang, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    It is known that aquaporin 9 (AQP9) in the prostate was strictly upregulated by androgen and may represent a novel therapeutic target for several cancers, but whether AQP9 plays a role in the regulation of androgen-independent prostate cancer still remains unclear. In the present study, AQP9 was determined in prostate cancer and adjacent cancer tissues; AQP9-siRNA was applied to silencing AQP9 in androgen-independent prostate cancer cell PC3 cell line. Western blot and flow cytometry analysis were employed to detect changes in related-function of control and AQP9-siRNA groups. The results showed that AQP9 is significantly induced in cancer tissues than that in adjacent cancer tissues. Moreover, knockdown of AQP9 in PC3 androgen-independent prostate cancer cell prostate cancer cells increased inhibition rates of proliferation. In addition, knockdown of AQP9 resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of the Bcl-2 and with a notable increase in the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase 3, indicated that AQP9 knockdown promoted apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. From wound healing assay and matrigel invasion, we suggested that AQP9 expression affects the motility and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells. Moreover, In order to explore the pathway may be involved in AQP9-mediated motility and invasion of prostate cancer cells, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was significant suppressed in AQP9 siRNA-transfected cells compared with that in control cells, suggesting that AQP9 is involved in the activation of the ERK pathway in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. PMID:27187384

  15. Impact of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe (Jay); Roberts, Kenneth; Decker, Roy; Pathare, Pradip; Rockwell, Sara; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the procedure-induced prostate edema during permanent interstitial brachytherapy (PIB) can cause significant variations in the dose delivered to the prostate gland. Because the clinical impact of edema-induced dose variations depends strongly on the magnitude of the edema, the temporal pattern of its resolution and its interplay with the decay of radioactivity and the underlying biological processes of tumor cells (such as tumor potential doubling time), we investigated the impact of edema-induced dose variations on the tumor cell survival and tumor control probability after PIB with the 131Cs, 125I and 103Pd sources used in current clinical practice. The exponential edema resolution model reported by Waterman et al. (Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41, 1069–1077–1998) was used to characterize the edema evolutions observed previously during clinical PIB for prostate cancer. The concept of biologically effective dose (BED), taking into account tumor cell proliferation and sublethal damage repair during dose delivery, was used to characterize the effects of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control probability. Our calculation indicated that prostate edema, if not taken into account appropriately, can increase the cell survival and decrease the probability of local control of PIB. The edema-induced increase in cell survival increased with increasing edema severity, decreasing half-life for radioactive decay and decreasing energy of the photons energy emitted by the source. At the doses currently prescribed for PIB and for prostate cancer cells characterized by nominal radiobiology parameters recommended by AAPM TG-137, PIB using 125I sources was less affected by edema than PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd sources due to the long radioactive decay half-life of 125I. The effect of edema on PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd was similar. The effect of edema on 103Pd PIB was slightly greater, even though the decay half-life of 103Pd (17 days

  16. The impact of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control after permanent interstitial brachytherapy for early stage prostate cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    (Jay Chen, Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth; Decker, Roy; Pathare, Pradip; Rockwell, Sara; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that procedure-induced prostate edema during permanent interstitial brachytherapy (PIB) can cause significant variations in the dose delivered to the prostate gland. Because the clinical impact of edema-induced dose variations strongly depends on the magnitude of the edema, the temporal pattern of its resolution and its interplay with the decay of radioactivity and the underlying biological processes of tumor cells (such as tumor potential doubling time), we investigated the impact of edema-induced dose variations on the tumor cell survival and tumor control probability after PIB with the 131Cs, 125I and 103Pd sources used in current clinical practice. The exponential edema resolution model reported by Waterman et al (1998 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41 1069-77) was used to characterize the edema evolutions previously observed during clinical PIB for prostate cancer. The concept of biologically effective dose, taking into account tumor cell proliferation and sublethal damage repair during dose delivery, was used to characterize the effects of prostate edema on cell survival and tumor control probability. Our calculation indicated that prostate edema, if not appropriately taken into account, can increase the cell survival and decrease the probability of local control of PIB. The magnitude of an edema-induced increase in cell survival increased with increasing edema severity, decreasing half-life of radioactive decay and decreasing photon energy emitted by the source. At the doses currently prescribed for PIB and for prostate cancer cells characterized by nominal radiobiology parameters recommended by AAPM TG-137, PIB using 125I sources was less affected by edema than PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd sources due to the long radioactive decay half-life of 125I. The effect of edema on PIB using 131Cs or 103Pd was similar. The effect of edema on 103Pd PIB was slightly greater, even though the decay half-life of 103Pd (17 days) is longer than

  17. Effect of gyromagnetic fields on human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hongen; Xu, Yongde; Guan, Ruili; Li, Meng; Hui, Yu; Gao, Zhezhu; Yang, Bicheng; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the biological effect of gyromagnetic fields (GMFs) on cell proliferation and apoptosis of human prostatic adenocarcinoma cells and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods PC-3 cells were grouped into normal control (NC) and GMF treatment groups. Cell proliferation was analyzed with kit-8 and Ki67 immunofluorescence staining, while cell apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry double staining of Annexin V-PE/7-AAD. The Akt and p38 MAPK/Caspase signaling pathways were analyzed by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining, and cell polarization was analyzed with PARD3. Results Cell proliferation and activity of the Akt pathway were significantly decreased by the GMF, while cell apoptosis, activity of p38 MAPK, and PARD3-positive cell number were significantly increased in the GMF group compared to the NC group. Conclusion GMFs inhibit cell proliferation, induce apoptosis, and regulate tumor cell polarity conditions, potentially through down-regulating Akt, activating the p38 MAPK/Caspase pathway, and promoting PARD3 expression in PC-3 cells. PMID:26648740

  18. Cellular Adhesion Promotes Prostate Cancer Cells Escape from Dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Ruppender, Nazanin; Larson, Sandy; Lakely, Bryce; Kollath, Lori; Brown, Lisha; Coleman, Ilsa; Coleman, Roger; Nguyen, Holly; Nelson, Peter S.; Corey, Eva; Snyder, Linda A.; Vessella, Robert L.; Morrissey, Colm; Lam, Hung-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Dissemination of prostate cancer (PCa) cells to the bone marrow is an early event in the disease process. In some patients, disseminated tumor cells (DTC) proliferate to form active metastases after a prolonged period of undetectable disease known as tumor dormancy. Identifying mechanisms of PCa dormancy and reactivation remain a challenge partly due to the lack of in vitro models. Here, we characterized in vitro PCa dormancy-reactivation by inducing cells from three patient-derived xenograft (PDX) lines to proliferate through tumor cell contact with each other and with bone marrow stroma. Proliferating PCa cells demonstrated tumor cell-cell contact and integrin clustering by immunofluorescence. Global gene expression analyses on proliferating cells cultured on bone marrow stroma revealed a downregulation of TGFB2 in all of the three proliferating PCa PDX lines when compared to their non-proliferating counterparts. Furthermore, constitutive activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), a downstream effector of integrin-beta1 and TGF-beta2, in non-proliferating cells promoted cell proliferation. This cell proliferation was associated with an upregulation of CDK6 and a downregulation of E2F4. Taken together, our data provide the first clinically relevant in vitro model to support cellular adhesion and downregulation of TGFB2 as a potential mechanism by which PCa cells may escape from dormancy. Targeting the TGF-beta2-associated mechanism could provide novel opportunities to prevent lethal PCa metastasis. PMID:26090669

  19. Functional Erythropoietin Receptors Expressed by Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    carcinoma cell line (PC-3). Invest Urol, 1979. 17(1): p. 16-23. 11. Yoshimura, A., A.D. D’Andrea, and H.F. Lodish , Friend spleen focus-forming virus...receptor expression in human prostate cancer. Mod Pathol, 2004. 13. Socolovsky, M., A.E. Fallon, S. Wang, C. Brugnara, and H.F. Lodish , Fetal anemia and...Socolovsky, M., H. Nam, M.D. Fleming, V.H. Haase, C. Brugnara, and H.F. Lodish , Ineffective erythropoiesis in Stat5a(-/-)5b(-/-) mice due to decreased

  20. Inhibition of Granzyme B by PI-9 protects prostate cancer cells from apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Manisha; Hostetter, Daniel R.; Loeb, Carly RK; Simko, Jeffry; Craik, Charles S.

    2012-01-01

    Background In order for tumors to grow and proliferate, they must avoid recognition by immune cells and subsequent death by apoptosis. Granzyme B, a protease located in natural killer cells, initiates apoptosis in target cells. Inhibition of Granzyme B by PI-9, its natural inhibitor, can prevent apoptosis. Here we investigate whether PI-9 protects prostate cancer cells from apoptosis. Methods The expression of PI-9 was quantified by qPCR in several prostate cancer cell lines, and Granzyme B activity was tested in each cell line. PI-9 was overexpressed in LNCaP cells, which lack endogenous PI-9. Apoptosis was induced by natural killer cells in LNCaP cells that either contained or lacked PI-9, and the percent cell death in was quantified. Lastly, PI-9 levels were examined by qPCR and immunohistochemistry in prostate tumor tissue. Results Prostate cancer cell lines that expressed PI-9 could inhibit Granzyme B. Overexpression of PI-9 protected LNCaP cells from natural killer cell-mediated apoptosis. Examination of the levels of PI-9 in tissue from prostate tumors showed that PI-9 could be upregulated in low grade tumors and stochastically dysregulated in high grade tumors. Additionally, PI-9 is found consistently in high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and atrophic lesions. Conclusions These results indicate that overexpression of PI-9 can protect prostate cancer cells from apoptosis, and this effect may occur in human prostate tumors. These findings imply that early prostatic inflammation may trigger this increase in PI-9. This suggests that PI-9 upregulation is needed early in tumor progression, before additional protective mechanisms are in place. PMID:21919028

  1. Transient receptor potential melastatin 4 channel contributes to migration of androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kilch, Tatiana; Jochum, Marcus Martin; Urban, Sabine Katharina; Jung, Volker; Stöckle, Michael; Rother, Karen; Greiner, Markus; Peinelt, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Impaired Ca2+ signaling in prostate cancer contributes to several cancer hallmarks, such as enhanced proliferation and migration and a decreased ability to induce apoptosis. Na+ influx via transient receptor potential melastatin 4 channel (TRPM4) can reduce store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) by decreasing the driving force for Ca2+. In patients with prostate cancer, gene expression of TRPM4 is elevated. Recently, TRPM4 was identified as a cancer driver gene in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer. We investigated TRPM4 protein expression in cancer tissue samples from 20 patients with prostate cancer. We found elevated TRPM4 protein levels in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostate cancer tissue compared to healthy tissue. In primary human prostate epithelial cells (hPEC) from healthy tissue and in the androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3, TRPM4 mediated large Na+ currents. We demonstrated significantly increased SOCE after siRNA targeting of TRPM4 in hPEC and DU145 cells. In addition, knockdown of TRPM4 reduced migration but not proliferation of DU145 and PC3 cells. Taken together, our data identify TRPM4 as a regulator of SOCE in hPEC and DU145 cells, demonstrate a role for TRPM4 in cancer cell migration and suggest that TRPM4 is a promising potential therapeutic target. PMID:26496025

  2. Specific detection of prostate cancer cells in urine by multiplex immunofluorescence cytology.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kazutoshi; Pavlovich, Christian P; Netto, George J; Konishi, Yuko; Isaacs, William B; Ali, Syed; De Marzo, Angelo; Meeker, Alan K

    2009-07-01

    Prostate cancer biomarkers are enriched in urine after prostatic manipulation, suggesting that whole cells might also be detectable for diagnosis. We tested multiplex staining of urinary sediments as a minimally invasive method to detect prostate cancer. Urine samples were collected from 35 men who had prostatic massage (attentive digital rectal examination) in a urology clinic and from 15 control men without urologic disease and without massage, for a total of 50 specimens (27 cancer-positive cases and 23 cancer-negative cases). LNCaP prostate cancer cells spiked into urine were used for initial marker optimization. Urine sediments were cytospun onto glass slides and stained. Multiplex urine cytology was compared with conventional urine cytology for cancer detection; anti-alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase antibody was used as a marker of prostate cancer cells, anti-Nkx3.1 as a marker of prostate epithelial cells, anti-nucleolin as a marker of nucleoli, and 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole to highlight nuclei. Prostate cancer cells were successfully visualized by combined staining for alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase, Nkx3.1, and nucleolin. Of the 25 informative cases with biopsy-proven prostate cancer, 9 were diagnosed as suspicious or positive by multiplex immunofluorescence urine cytology, but only 4 were similarly judged by conventional cytology. All cases without cancer were read as negative by both methods. The multiplex cytology sensitivity for cancer detection in informative cases was 36% (9/25), and specificity was 100% (8/8). In conclusion, we have successfully achieved multiple staining for alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase, Nkx3.1, nucleolin, and 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole to detect prostate cancer cells in urine. Further refinements in marker selection and technique may increase sensitivity and applicability for prostate cancer diagnosis.

  3. The Novel Gamma Secretase Inhibitor RO4929097 Reduces the Tumor Initiating Potential of Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Miguel F.; Medicherla, Ratna; Haimovic, Adele; Menendez, Silvia; Shang, Shulian; Pavlick, Anna; Shao, Yongzhao; Darvishian, Farbod; Boylan, John F.; Osman, Iman; Hernando, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Several reports have demonstrated a role for aberrant NOTCH signaling in melanoma genesis and progression, prompting us to explore if targeting this pathway is a valid therapeutic approach against melanoma. We targeted NOTCH signaling using RO4929097, a novel inhibitor of gamma secretase, which is a key component of the enzymatic complex that cleaves and activates NOTCH. The effects of RO4929097 on the oncogenic and stem cell properties of a panel of melanoma cell lines were tested both in vitro and in vivo, using xenograft models. In human primary melanoma cell lines, RO4929097 decreased the levels of NOTCH transcriptional target HES1. This was accompanied by reduced proliferation and impaired ability to form colonies in soft agar and to organize in tridimensional spheres. Moreover, RO4929097 affected the growth of human primary melanoma xenograft in NOD/SCID/IL2gammaR-/- mice and inhibited subsequent tumor formation in a serial xenotransplantation model, suggesting that inhibition of NOTCH signaling suppresses the tumor initiating potential of melanoma cells. In addition, RO4929097 decreased tumor volume and blocked the invasive growth pattern of metastatic melanoma cell lines in vivo. Finally, increased gene expression of NOTCH signaling components correlated with shorter post recurrence survival in metastatic melanoma cases. Our data support NOTCH inhibition as a promising therapeutic strategy against melanoma. PMID:21980408

  4. Large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of prostate: a clinicopathologic summary of 7 cases of a rare manifestation of advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew J; Humphrey, Peter A; Belani, Jay; van der Kwast, Theodorus H; Srigley, John R

    2006-06-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) differentiation in prostate cancer is typically detected by immunohistochemistry as single cells in conventional adenocarcinoma. Prostatic NE tumors, such as carcinoid or small cell carcinoma, are rare and large cell NE carcinoma (LCNEC) is described only in case reports. We identified 7 cases of LCNEC and compiled their clinicopathologic characteristics. In 6 cases, there was a history of adenocarcinoma treated with hormone therapy for a mean of 2.4 years (range: 2 to 3 y). The remaining case was de novo LCNEC. LCNEC was incidentally diagnosed in palliative transurethral resection specimens in 5 cases. The mean patient age at diagnosis with LCNEC was 67 years (range: 43 to 81 y). LCNEC comprised solid sheets and ribbons of cells with abundant pale to amphophilic cytoplasm, large nuclei with coarse chromatin and prominent nucleoli along with brisk mitotic activity and foci of necrosis. In 6 cases, there were foci of admixed adenocarcinoma, 4 of which showed hormone therapy effects. LCNEC was strongly positive for CD56, CD57, chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and P504S/alpha methylacyl CoA racemase. There was strong bcl-2 overexpression, expression of MIB1, and p53 in >50% of nuclei, focally positive staining for prostate specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase and negative androgen receptor staining. Follow-up was available for 6 patients, all of who died with metastatic disease at mean of 7 months (range: 3 to 12 mo) after platinum-based chemotherapy. LCNEC of prostate is a distinct clinicopathologic entity that typically manifests after long-term hormonal therapy for prostatic adenocarcinoma and likely arises through clonal progression under the selection pressure of therapy.

  5. Basal cell induced differentiation of noncancerous prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1) by glycitein.

    PubMed

    Clubbs, Elizabeth A; Bomser, Joshua A

    2009-01-01

    Increased consumption of soy and soy isoflavones is associated with a reduced risk for prostate cancer (PCa). PCa progression is characterized, in part, by a loss of luminal/basal epithelial differentiation; however, the effects of soy isoflavones on cellular differentiation in the prostate are unknown. The present study examined the effects of the soy isoflavone glycitein on cellular differentiation in prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1, WPE1-NB14, and RWPE-2). Glycitein significantly inhibited RWPE-1 cellular proliferation at concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 50 microM. Expression of the luminal epithelial cell marker cytokeratin 18 was not affected by glycitein treatment in the WPE1-NB14 and RWPE-2 cell lines. However, expression of cytokeratin 18 and prostate specific antigen (PSA) was decreased in the RWPE-1 cell line in response to glycitein treatment, whereas the expression of the basal epithelial cell markers p63 and cytokeratin 5 remained unchanged. These data suggest that glycitein may induce basal cell differentiation in the RWPE-1 cell line.

  6. ASC-J9(®), and not Casodex or Enzalutamide, suppresses prostate cancer stem/progenitor cell invasion via altering the EZH2-STAT3 signals.

    PubMed

    Wen, Simeng; Tian, Jing; Niu, Yuanjie; Li, Lei; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-07-01

    Early studies suggested that prostate cancer (PCa) stem/progenitor (S/P) cells might play key roles to promote the tumor initiation and metastasis. Yet their linkage to the failure of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), however, remains unclear. Here we demonstrated that the ADT with anti-androgens Casodex (also known as Bicalutamide) and Enzalutamide (also known as MDV3100), but not the newly identified AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9(®), increased PCa S/P population, which might then lead to enhance the PCa cell invasion. Targeting AR with ASC-J9(®), and not targeting androgens with Casodex or Enzalutamide, led to suppress PCa S/P cell invasion. Mechanism dissection revealed ASC-J9(®) could suppress S/P cell invasion via altering the EZH2/STAT3 and/or AKT/EZH2/STAT3 signals. Together, these results suggest that targeting PCa S/P cells with ASC-J9(®) or inhibitors to interrupt the EZH2/STAT3 and/or Akt/EZH2/STAT3 signals may become a new therapy to overcome the unwanted side effects of Casodex or Enzalutamide to further suppress the PCa metastasis.

  7. Targeting Stromal Recruitment by Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    Dr. Philip Beachy. Cells were plated in 10% FBS at 90% confluence in Primaria multiwell plates and attached overnight. Media was replaced with 1...FCS (as described for MEF isolation) for 48 h. They were then trypsinized and plated in Multiwell Primaria ™ 24 well plates (Falcon, Franklin Lakes

  8. Radiosensitization of Prostate Cells by Prenyltransferase Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    response. 16th CERRO meeting of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. , Les Menuires, France. March 5, 2001 Farnesyltransferases...and Samid, D. Increased useful adjuvants for radiotherapy. radioresistance of Ebras-transformed human osteosarcoma cells and its modulation by thus...Radiation Research Society 1997-present Associate Member European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology 1998-present Member American Association

  9. Molecular pathogenesis of human prostate basal cell hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Henry, Gervaise; Malewska, Alicia; Mauck, Ryan; Gahan, Jeffrey; Hutchinson, Ryan; Torrealba, Jose; Francis, Franto; Roehrborn, Claus; Strand, Douglas

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the molecular pathogenesis of distinct phenotypes in human benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is essential to improving therapeutic intervention. Current therapies target smooth muscle and luminal epithelia for relief of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to BPH, but basal cell hyperplasia (BCH) remains untargeted. The incidence of has been reported at 8-10%, but a molecular and cellular characterization has not been performed on this phenotype. Using freshly digested tissue from surgical specimens, we performed RNA-seq analysis of flow cytometry-purified basal epithelia from 3 patients with and 4 patients without a majority BCH phenotype. qPCR was performed on 28 genes identified as significant from 13 non-BCH and 7 BCH specimens to confirm transcriptomic analysis. IHC was performed on several non-BCH and BCH specimens for 3 proteins identified as significant by transcriptomic analysis. A total of 141 human BPH specimens were analyzed for the presence of BCH. Clinical characteristics of non-BCH and BCH cohorts revealed no significant differences in age, PSA, prostate volume, medical treatment, or comorbidities. Quantitation of cellular subsets by flow cytometry in 11 BCH patients vs. 11 non-BCH patients demonstrated a significant increase in the ratio of basal to luminal epithelia in patients with BCH (P <0.05), but no significant differences in the total number of leukocytes. RNA-seq data from flow cytometry isolated basal epithelia from patients with and without BCH were subjected to gene set enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes, which revealed increased expression of members of the epidermal differentiation complex. Transcriptomic data were complemented by immunohistochemistry for members of the epidermal differentiation complex, revealing a morphological similarity to other stratified squamous epithelial layers. Increased expression of epidermal differentiation complex members and altered epithelial stratification resembles