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Sample records for prostatic carcinoma dosimetry

  1. Prostate PDT dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We provide a review of the current state of dosimetry in prostate photodynamic therapy (PDT). PDT of the human prostate has been performed with a number of different photosensitizers and with a variety of dosimetry schemes. The simplest clinical light dose prescription is to quantify the total light energy emitted per length (J/cm) of cylindrical diffusing fibers (CDF) for patients treated with a defined photosensitizer injection per body weight. However, this approach does not take into account the light scattering by tissue and usually underestimates the local light fluence rate, and consequently the fluence. Techniques have been developed to characterize tissue optical properties and light fluence rates in vivo using interstitial measurements during prostate PDT. Optical methods have been developed to characterize tissue absorption and scattering spectra, which in turn provide information about tissue oxygenation and drug concentration. Fluorescence techniques can be used to quantify drug concentrations and photobleaching rates of photosensitizers. PMID:25046988

  2. Intra-Operative Dosimetry in Prostate Brachytherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    phantoms and pre-recorded patient data. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate Brachytherapy, X-ray reconstruction, C-arm, TRUS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...prostate brachytherapy system that provides dosimetry analysis (Aim-2), and evaluate the system experimentally on phantoms and pre-recorded patient data...prostate brachytherapy system to enable dosimetry calculation Aim-3: Experimental Validation: Evaluate the performance of the RUF system on phantoms and

  3. Virtual HDR{sup SM} CyberKnife Treatment for Localized Prostatic Carcinoma: Dosimetry Comparison With HDR Brachytherapy and Preliminary Clinical Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Donald B. Naitoh, John; Lee, Charles; Hardy, Steven C.; Jin, Haoran

    2008-04-01

    Background: We tested our ability to approximate the dose (38 Gy), fractionation (four fractions), and distribution of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for prostate cancer with CyberKnife (CK) stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) plans. We also report early clinical observations of CK SBRT treatment. Methods and Materials: Ten patients were treated with CK. For each CK SBRT plan, an HDR plan was designed using common contour sets and simulated HDR catheters. Planning target volume coverage, intraprostatic dose escalation, and urethra, rectum, and bladder exposure were compared. Results: Planning target volume coverage by the prescription dose was similar for CK SBRT and HDR plans, whereas percent of volume of interest receiving 125% of prescribed radiation dose (V125) and V150 values were higher for HDR, reflecting higher doses near HDR source dwell positions. Urethra dose comparisons were lower for CK SBRT in 9 of 10 cases, suggesting that CK SBRT may more effectively limit urethra dose. Bladder maximum point doses were higher with HDR, but bladder dose falloff beyond the maximum dose region was more rapid with HDR. Maximum rectal wall doses were similar, but CK SBRT created sharper rectal dose falloff beyond the maximum dose region. Second CK SBRT plans, constructed by equating urethra radiation dose received by point of maximum exposure of volume of interest to the HDR plan, significantly increased V125 and V150. Clinically, 4-month post-CK SBRT median prostate-specific antigen levels decreased 86% from baseline. Acute toxicity was primarily urologic and returned to baseline by 2 months. Acute rectal morbidity was minimal and transient. Conclusions: It is possible to construct CK SBRT plans that closely recapitulate HDR dosimetry and deliver the plans noninvasively.

  4. Sarcomatoid Carcinoma of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Açıkgöz, Onur; Gazel, Eymen; Zengin, Neslihan İnci; Kasap, Yusuf; Çamtosun, Ahmet; Yazıcıoğlu, Ahmet Hamdi

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the prostate is among the rarest malignant neoplasm types and has been well known for its aggressive clinical course. Patient was admitted with the symptoms of lower urinary tract. Transurethral resection of prostate (TUR-P) was carried out. Revealing Gleason 5 + 3 = 8 prostate adenocarcinoma in TUR-P material. Thereby, a Radical Prostatectomy procedure was planned. In operation, frozen examination revealed adenocarcinoma metastasis to the obturator lymph node. The operation was terminated. In the postoperative 3rd month, the patient was re-admitted with acute urinary system symptoms. A cystoscopy performed and complete resection of the mass was performed. The pathological examination reported that the tumor was compatible with undifferentiated adenocarcinoma owing to presence of poorly differentiated tumoral cells and detection of adenocarcinoma in a relatively small (<1%) focus. 4 month after the operation, the patient underwent another cyctoscopic examination which revealed the prostatic lounge and most of the bladder lumen to be filled with tumoral tissue. The tumoral tissues was resected incompletely. This material was diagnosed to be “Sarcomatoid Malignant Tumor” upon the new evidences of progressive dedifferentiation and predominant sarcomatoid appearance, compared with the former TUR-P materials. Subsequent PET-CT scan depicted multiple metastasis. The patient was referred to oncology department. In conclusion, sarcomatoid carcinoma is a malignant variant that brings along diagnostic and treatment difficulties. PMID:23691427

  5. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Açıkgöz, Onur; Gazel, Eymen; Zengin, Neslihan İnci; Kasap, Yusuf; Camtosun, Ahmet; Yazıcıoğlu, Ahmet Hamdi

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the prostate is among the rarest malignant neoplasm types and has been well known for its aggressive clinical course. Patient was admitted with the symptoms of lower urinary tract. Transurethral resection of prostate (TUR-P) was carried out. Revealing Gleason 5 + 3 = 8 prostate adenocarcinoma in TUR-P material. Thereby, a Radical Prostatectomy procedure was planned. In operation, frozen examination revealed adenocarcinoma metastasis to the obturator lymph node. The operation was terminated. In the postoperative 3rd month, the patient was re-admitted with acute urinary system symptoms. A cystoscopy performed and complete resection of the mass was performed. The pathological examination reported that the tumor was compatible with undifferentiated adenocarcinoma owing to presence of poorly differentiated tumoral cells and detection of adenocarcinoma in a relatively small (<1%) focus. 4 month after the operation, the patient underwent another cyctoscopic examination which revealed the prostatic lounge and most of the bladder lumen to be filled with tumoral tissue. The tumoral tissues was resected incompletely. This material was diagnosed to be "Sarcomatoid Malignant Tumor" upon the new evidences of progressive dedifferentiation and predominant sarcomatoid appearance, compared with the former TUR-P materials. Subsequent PET-CT scan depicted multiple metastasis. The patient was referred to oncology department. In conclusion, sarcomatoid carcinoma is a malignant variant that brings along diagnostic and treatment difficulties.

  6. Intra-Operative Dosimetry in Prostate Brachytherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    4 A INTRODUCTION For several decades, the definitive treatment for low and medium risk prostate cancer was radical prostatectomy or external...with reduced morbidity. In contemporary practice, however, faulty needle and source placement often cause insufficient dose to the cancer and/or...seeds if the pose of a C-arm is known. The algorithm was validated using phantom and clinical patient data. Index Terms— Tomosynthesis, prostate cancer

  7. Prostatic carcinoma in two cats.

    PubMed

    Caney, S M; Holt, P E; Day, M J; Rudorf, H; Gruffydd-Jones, T J

    1998-03-01

    Clinical, radiological and pathological features of two cats with prostatic carcinoma are reported. In both cats the presenting history included signs of lower urinary tract disease with haematuria and dysuria. Prostatomegaly was visible radiographically in one cat; an irregular intraprostatic urethra was seen on retrograde contrast urethrography in both cats. In one of the cats, neoplasia was suspected on the basis of a transurethral catheter biopsy. Following a poor response to palliative treatment in both cases, euthanasia was performed with histological confirmation of the diagnosis.

  8. Intra-Operative Dosimetry in Prostate Brachytherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    phantoms and pre-recorded patient data. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate Brachytherapy, X-ray reconstruction, C-arm, TRUS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...system experimentally on phantoms and pre-recorded patient data (Aim-3). Algorithmic design (Aim-1) and experimental evaluation (Aim-3), will progress...Evaluate the performance of the RUF system on phantoms and pre- recorded patient data. (Neither of which require an IRB approval) B.3 Progress

  9. Basal cell carcinoma of the prostate: unusual subtype of prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Komura, Kazumasa; Inamoto, Teruo; Tsuji, Motomu; Ibuki, Naokazu; Koyama, Kohei; Ubai, Takanobu; Azuma, Haruhito; Katsuoka, Yoji

    2010-12-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the prostate, which has been generally considered to be indolent, is an unusual histological type of prostatic carcinoma and is extremely rare. This tumor has been classified according to the prevalent pattern of growth as adenoid cystic carcinoma or basaloid cell carcinoma (BCC), with the former growth pattern being considered to be the main feature of this entity. A 67-year-old Japanese man was admitted to a general hospital with obstructive urinary symptoms. His prostate was slightly enlarged, stony hard, and with a rough surface on digital rectal examination, while serum prostate-specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase concentrations were within the normal ranges (0.007 and 0.9 ng/mL, respectively). 2-Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) exhibited multiple accumulations suspicious for cancer metastases. Specimens obtained by prostatic needle biopsy showed immunohistochemical reactivity for cytokeratin 34βE12 and P63, findings that were identical to those seen in basal cell carcinoma. Basal cell carcinoma of the prostate is a rare tumor, reported in 56 cases so far, and among all these, the pure form of BCC is extremely rare. Immunohistochemistry is indispensable to distinguish this neoplasm from other unusual histological types of prostatic carcinomas. Our findings reveal that tumors with a basaloid cell-predominant pattern have significant potential for a poor prognosis, in contrast with the conventional understanding regarding this neoplasm.

  10. Prostatic edema in {sup 125}I permanent prostate implants: Dynamical dosimetry taking volume changes into account

    SciTech Connect

    Leclerc, Ghyslain; Lavallee, Marie-Claude; Roy, Rene; Vigneault, Eric; Beaulieu, Luc

    2006-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of edema on the dose delivered to the target volume. An evaluation of the edema characteristics was first made, and then a dynamical dosimetry algorithm was developed and used to compare its results to a standard clinical (static) dosimetry. Source positions and prostate contours extracted from 66 clinical cases on images taken at different points in time (planning, implant day, post-implant evaluation) were used, via the mean interseed distance, to characterize edema [initial increase ({delta}r{sub 0}), half-life ({tau})]. An algorithm was developed to take into account the edema by summing a time series of dose-volume histograms (DVHs) with a weight based on the fraction of the dose delivered during the time interval considered. The algorithm was then used to evaluate the impact of edema on the dosimetry of permanent implants by comparing its results to those of a standard clinical dosimetry. The volumetric study yielded results as follows: the initial prostate volume increase was found to be 1.58 (ranging from 1.15 to 2.48) and the edema half-life, approximately 30 days (range: 3 to 170 days). The dosimetric differences in D{sub 90} observed between the dynamic dosimetry and the clinical one for a single case were up to 15 Gy and depended on the edema half-life and the initial volume increase. The average edema half-life, 30 days, is about 3 times longer than the previously reported 9 days. Dosimetric differences up to 10% of the prescription dose are observed, which can lead to differences in the quality assertion of an implant. The study of individual patient edema resorption with time might be necessary to extract meaningful clinical correlation or biological parameters in permanent implants.

  11. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar; Mason, Josh; Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann; Dickinson, Louise; Ahmed, Hashim U.; Emberton, Mark; Langley, Stephen

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  12. Molecular Profiling of Intraductal Carcinoma of the Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    genomic levels , using a combination of bioinformatics, targeted next generation sequencing and copy number variation analysis. 2. KEYWORDS: Prostatic ...Carcinoma of the Prostate PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Tamara L. Lotan CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Johns Hopkins University...Intraductal Carcinoma of the Prostate 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0271 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Betty Diamond 5d. PROJECT

  13. Secondary Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma of Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Kalyan; Bandyopadhyay, Arghya; Gangopadhyay, Mimi; Chakraborty, Subrata; Bera, Pranati

    2012-01-01

    True metastases to prostate from solid tumors are reported only in 0.2% of all surgical prostatic specimens and 2.9% of all male postmortems. Clinical context, morphological features, and immunohistochemical localization of prostate specific antigen (PSA) are supposed to clarify the differential diagnosis between a secondary and a primary tumor. We report an unusual and rare case of secondary signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) of prostate in which the clinical data and signet ring cell morphology pointed toward the diagnosis of a primary SRCC. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for PSA not only proved the case to be a secondary SRCC but also initiated the process for diagnosis of the occult primary malignancy in the patient′s stomach. PMID:24027389

  14. Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium collaborates on epidemiologic studies to address the high burden of prostate cancer and to understand the causes of etiology and outcomes among men of African ancestry.

  15. Hyaluronan Biosynthesis in Prostate Carcinoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the last several years, metastasis represents the major cause of frustration and failure in the...Malignant progression ultimately culminates in various degrees of visceral invasion and metastasis to lymph nodes and bone. Metastasis to bone is...when tumors become androgen-independent and resume growth. By defining factors that contribute to the growth and metastasis of androgen-independent

  16. Cyclin D1 expression in prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pereira, R A; Ravinal, R C; Costa, R S; Lima, M S; Tucci, S; Muglia, V F; Reis, R B dos; Silva, G E B

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cyclin D1 expression and clinicopathological parameters in patients with prostate carcinoma. We assessed cyclin D1 expression by conventional immunohistochemistry in 85 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma and 10 normal prostate tissue samples retrieved from autopsies. We measured nuclear immunostaining in the entire tumor area and based the results on the percentage of positive tumor cells. The preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 8.68±5.16 ng/mL (mean±SD). Cyclin D1 staining was positive (cyclin D1 expression in >5% of tumor cells) in 64 cases (75.4%) and negative (cyclin D1 expression in ≤5% of tumor cells) in 21 cases (including 15 cases with no immunostaining). Normal prostate tissues were negative for cyclin D1. Among patients with a high-grade Gleason score (≥7), 86% of patients demonstrated cyclin D1 immunostaining of >5% (P<0.05). In the crude analysis of cyclin D1 expression, the high-grade Gleason score group showed a mean expression of 39.6%, compared to 26.9% in the low-grade Gleason score group (P<0.05). Perineural invasion tended to be associated with cyclin D1 expression (P=0.07), whereas cyclin D1 expression was not associated with PSA levels or other parameters. Our results suggest that high cyclin D1 expression could be a potential marker for tumor aggressiveness.

  17. Online dosimetry for temoporfin-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy using the canine prostate as model.

    PubMed

    Swartling, Johannes; Höglund, Odd V; Hansson, Kerstin; Södersten, Fredrik; Axelsson, Johan; Lagerstedt, Anne-Sofie

    2016-02-01

    Online light dosimetry with real-time feedback was applied for temoporfin-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) of dog prostate. The aim was to investigate the performance of online dosimetry by studying the correlation between light dose plans and the tissue response, i.e., extent of induced tissue necrosis and damage to surrounding organs at risk. Light-dose planning software provided dose plans, including light source positions and light doses, based on ultrasound images. A laser instrument provided therapeutic light and dosimetric measurements. The procedure was designed to closely emulate the procedure for whole-prostate PDT in humans with prostate cancer. Nine healthy dogs were subjected to the procedure according to a light-dose escalation plan. About 0.15 mg/kg temoporfin was administered 72 h before the procedure. The results of the procedure were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, and gross pathology and histopathology of excised tissue. Light dose planning and online dosimetry clearly resulted in more focused effect and less damage to surrounding tissue than interstitial PDT without dosimetry. A light energy dose-response relationship was established where the threshold dose to induce prostate gland necrosis was estimated from 20 to 30  J/cm2.

  18. Online dosimetry for temoporfin-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy using the canine prostate as model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartling, Johannes; Höglund, Odd V.; Hansson, Kerstin; Södersten, Fredrik; Axelsson, Johan; Lagerstedt, Anne-Sofie

    2016-02-01

    Online light dosimetry with real-time feedback was applied for temoporfin-mediated interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) of dog prostate. The aim was to investigate the performance of online dosimetry by studying the correlation between light dose plans and the tissue response, i.e., extent of induced tissue necrosis and damage to surrounding organs at risk. Light-dose planning software provided dose plans, including light source positions and light doses, based on ultrasound images. A laser instrument provided therapeutic light and dosimetric measurements. The procedure was designed to closely emulate the procedure for whole-prostate PDT in humans with prostate cancer. Nine healthy dogs were subjected to the procedure according to a light-dose escalation plan. About 0.15 mg/kg temoporfin was administered 72 h before the procedure. The results of the procedure were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, and gross pathology and histopathology of excised tissue. Light dose planning and online dosimetry clearly resulted in more focused effect and less damage to surrounding tissue than interstitial PDT without dosimetry. A light energy dose-response relationship was established where the threshold dose to induce prostate gland necrosis was estimated from 20 to 30 J/cm2.

  19. Comparison of CT and MR-CT Fusion for Prostate Post-Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Maletz, Kristina L.; Ennis, Ronald D.; Ostenson, Jason; Pevsner, Alexander; Kagen, Alexander; Wernick, Iddo

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The use of T2 MR for postimplant dosimetry (PID) after prostate brachytherapy allows more anatomically accurate and precise contouring but does not readily permit seed identification. We developed a reproducible technique for performing MR-CT fusion and compared the resulting dosimetry to standard CT-based PID. Methods and Materials: CT and T1-weighted MR images for 45 patients were fused and aligned based on seed distribution. The T2-weighted MR image was then fused to the aligned T1. Reproducibility of the fusion technique was tested by inter- and intraobserver variability for 13 patients. Dosimetry was computed for the prostate as a whole and for the prostate divided into anterior and posterior sectors of the base, mid-prostate, and apex. Results: Inter- and intraobserver variability for the fusion technique showed less than 1% variation in D90. MR-CT fusion D90 and CT D90 were nearly equivalent for the whole prostate, but differed depending on the identification of superior extent of the base (p = 0.007) and on MR/CT prostate volume ratio (p = 0.03). Sector analysis showed a decrease in MR-CT fusion D90 in the anterior base (ratio 0.93 {+-}0.25, p < 0.05) and an increase in MR-CT fusion D90 in the apex (p < 0.05). The volume of extraprostatic tissue encompassed by the V100 is greater on MR than CT. Factors associated with this difference are the MR/CT volume ratio (p < 0.001) and the difference in identification of the inferior extent of the apex (p = 0.03). Conclusions: We developed a reproducible MR-CT fusion technique that allows MR-based dosimetry. Comparing the resulting postimplant dosimetry with standard CT dosimetry shows several differences, including adequacy of coverage of the base and conformity of the dosimetry around the apex. Given the advantage of MR-based tissue definition, further study of MR-based dosimetry is warranted.

  20. Segmental Urethral Dosimetry and Urinary Toxicity in Patients With No Urinary Symptoms Before Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Carys; Keyes, Mira Liu, Mitchell; Moravan, Veronika

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To determine whether segmental urethral dosimetry is predictive for the degree of urinary morbidity after prostate brachytherapy in patients with no urinary symptoms before prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between May 2000 and November 2005, 1,107 patients underwent iodine-125 monotherapy with urethral sparing techniques. A total of 166 patients fulfilled the selection criteria: baseline (International Prostate Symptom Score) IPSS {<=}5, no androgen deprivation therapy, and prostate ultrasound planning volumes (PUTV) <45 mL. The median follow-up was 44 months. Urinary morbidity was defined by maximum increase in IPSS, time to IPSS resolution, maximum Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score, time to RTOG resolution, and urinary retention. Surrogate deviated urethra was contoured and doses calculated at the base, mid-prostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to evaluate urethral and prostate dosimetry, age, PUTV, and number of needles for their association with urinary morbidity. Results: Urethral dose was fairly constant in all urethra segments except prostate base, where the variation in does was large. On multivariate analysis, higher urethral base D50, V100, and larger PUTV were predictive for higher maximum increase in IPSS. Higher urethral base V100 and larger PUTV predicted for prolonged IPSS resolution. Higher urethral base D50 and larger needle number predicted for longer RTOG resolution. Higher urethral base V100 predicted for RTOG {>=}2 toxicity. Conclusions: Radiation dose to the urethral base, larger PUTV, and needle number, predicted for increased urinary toxicity after prostate brachytherapy. Correlation between urinary morbidity and urethral base dosimetry may reflect a large variation in urethral dose observed at the prostate base.

  1. Results from a multicenter prostate IMRT dosimetry intercomparison for an OCOG-TROG clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, B.; Frantzis, J.; Murry, R.; Martin, J.; Plank, A.; Middleton, M.; Catton, C.; Kron, T.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: A multi-institution dosimetry intercomparison has been undertaken of prostate intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery. The dosimetry intercomparison was incorporated into the quality assurance for site credentialing for the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group Prostate Fractionated Irradiation Trial 08.01 clinical trial.Methods: An anthropomorphic pelvic phantom with realistic anatomy was used along with multiplanar dosimetry tools for the assessment. Nineteen centers across Australia and New Zealand participated in the study.Results: In comparing planned versus measured dose to the target at the isocenter within the phantom, all centers were able to achieve a total delivered dose within 3% of planned dose. In multiplanar analysis with radiochromic film using the gamma analysis method to compare delivered and planned dose, pass rates for a 5%/3 mm criterion were better than 90% for a coronal slice through the isocenter. Pass rates for an off-axis coronal slice were also better than 90% except for one instance with 84% pass rate.Conclusions: Strengths of the dosimetry assessment procedure included the true anthropomorphic nature of the phantom used, the involvement of an expert from the reference center in carrying out the assessment at every site, and the ability of the assessment to detect and resolve dosimetry discrepancies.

  2. System for interstitial photodynamic therapy with online dosimetry: first clinical experiences of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartling, Johannes; Axelsson, Johan; Ahlgren, Göran; Kälkner, Karl Mikael; Nilsson, Sten; Svanberg, Sune; Svanberg, Katarina; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2010-09-01

    The first results from a clinical study for Temoporfin-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) of low-grade (T1c) primary prostate cancer using online dosimetry are presented. Dosimetric feedback in real time was applied, for the first time to our knowledge, in interstitial photodynamic therapy. The dosimetry software IDOSE provided dose plans, including optical fiber positions and light doses based on 3-D tissue models generated from ultrasound images. Tissue optical property measurements were obtained using the same fibers used for light delivery. Measurements were taken before, during, and after the treatment session. On the basis of these real-time measured optical properties, the light-dose plan was recalculated. The aim of the treatment was to ablate the entire prostate while minimizing exposure to surrounding organs. The results indicate that online dosimetry based on real-time tissue optical property measurements enabled the light dose to be adapted and optimized. However, histopathological analysis of tissue biopsies taken six months post-PDT treatment showed there were still residual viable cancer cells present in the prostate tissue sections. The authors propose that the incomplete treatment of the prostate tissue could be due to a too low light threshold dose, which was set to 5 J/cm2.

  3. Photodynamic therapy in prostate cancer: optical dosimetry and response of normal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun; Shetty, Sugandh D.; Heads, Larry; Bolin, Frank; Wilson, Brian C.; Patterson, Michael S.; Sirls, Larry T., II; Schultz, Daniel; Cerny, Joseph C.; Hetzel, Fred W.

    1993-06-01

    The present study explores the possibility of utilizing photodynamic therapy (PDT) in treating localized prostate carcinoma. Optical properties of ex vivo human prostatectomy specimens, and in vivo and ex vivo dog prostate glands were studied. The size of the PDT induced lesion in dog prostate was pathologically evaluated as a biological endpoint. The data indicate that the human normal and carcinoma prostate tissues have similar optical properties. The average effective attenuation depth is less in vivo than that of ex vivo. The PDT treatment generated a lesion size of up to 16 mm in diameter. The data suggest that PDT is a promising modality in prostate cancer treatment. Multiple fiber system may be required for clinical treatment.

  4. Metastatic Prostate Cancer to the Urethra Masquerading as Urothelial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zardawi, Ibrahim; Chong, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Tumors of the urethra, whether primary or metastatic, are very rare. The true nature of urethral neoplasm is not always obvious clinically nor in routine histological sections. Immunostains should be performed on such lesions because of management implications. We present a case of multiple metastases to the urethra from a prostatic carcinoma, masquerading as multiple urothelial carcinomas. Pathologists and urologists should be aware of the possibility of metastasis from the prostate.

  5. Effect of Edema on Postimplant Dosimetry in Prostate Brachytherapy Using CT/MRI Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Osamu Hayashi, Shinya; Matsuo, Masayuki; Nakano, Masahiro; Uno, Hiromi; Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Miyoshi, Toshiharu; Deguchi, Takashi; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the time course of prostatic edema and the effect on the dose-volume histograms of the prostate for patients treated with brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 74 patients with prostate cancer were enrolled in this prospective study. A transrectal ultrasound-based preplan was performed 4 weeks before implantation and computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging fusion-based postimplant dosimetry was performed on the day after implantation (Day 1) and 30 days after implantation (Day 30). The prostate volume, prostate volume covered by 100% of the prescription dose (V{sub 100}), and dose covering 90% of the prostate (D{sub 90}) were evaluated with prostatic edema over time. Results: Prostatic edema was greatest on Day 1, with the mean prostate volume 36% greater than the preplan transrectal ultrasound-based volume; it thereafter decreased over time. It was 9% greater than preplan volume on Day 30. The V{sub 100} increased 5.7% from Day 1 to Day 30, and the D{sub 90} increased 13.1% from Day 1 to Day 30. The edema ratio (postplan/preplan) on Day 1 of low-quality implants with a V{sub 100} of <80% was significantly greater than that of intermediate- to high-quality implants (>80% V{sub 100}; p = 0.0272). The lower V{sub 100} on Day 1 showed a greater increase from Day 1 to Day 30. A V{sub 100} on Day 1 of >92% is unlikely to increase >0% during the interval studied. Conclusion: Low-quality implants on Day 1 were highly associated with edema; however, such a low-quality implant on Day 1, with significant edema, tended to improve by Day 30. If a high-quality implant (V100 >92%) can be obtained on Day 1, a re-examination is no longer necessary.

  6. Real-Time Dosimetry and Optimization of Prostate Photodynamic Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    J R, Freyer J P, Hielscher A H, Eick A A, Shen D and Johnson T M 1998 Mechanisms of light scattering from biological cells relevant to noninvasive...consuming job that requires contours from ultrasonic tomographic images, visualization of 3D volumes (prostate, urethra, and rectum) and their intersections

  7. Resin versus Glass Microspheres for Yttrium-90 Transarterial Radioembolization: Comparing Survival in Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma using Pretreatment Partition Model Dosimetry.

    PubMed

    VAN DER Gucht, Axel; Jreige, Mario; Denys, Alban; Blanc-Durand, Paul; Boubaker, Ariane; Pomoni, Anastasia; Mitsakis, Periklis; Silva-Monteiro, Marina; Gnesin, Silvano; Nicod-Lalonde, Marie; Duran, Rafael; Prior, John; Schaefer, Niklaus

    2017-01-12

    The aim of this study was to compare survival of patients treated for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (uHCC) with Yttrium-90 ((90)Y) transarterial radioembolization (TARE) using pretreatment partition model dosimetry (PMD).

  8. Early Quality of Life in Patients with Localized Prostate Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Eton, David T.; Lepore, Stephen J.; Helgeson, Vicki S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Men with localized prostate carcinoma are faced with important treatment decisions, and quality of life (QoL) information has become a crucial element of decision making. The first objective of this study was to compare the early, health-related QoL (HRQoL) of men with localized prostate carcinoma who were treated with radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, or brachytherapy. A second objective was to identify demographic and psychosocial variables that predict HRQoL. METHODS Two-hundred fifty-six men with localized prostate carcinoma were interviewed within 7 weeks of treatment initiation. The interview included measures of prostate-specific HRQoL (the University of California—Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index), general HRQoL (the SF-36), and psychosocial variables. RESULTS After adjusting for covariates, treatment group differences were found for both prostate specific HRQoL and general HRQoL. Men who underwent prostatectomy reported more urinary and sexual problems and more general physical dysfunction compared with men who were treated with either form of radiation therapy. Men who were treated with brachytherapy reported the fewest problems in sexual function and the least general physical dysfunction. Few treatment group differences were found in mental functioning. Both demographic factors and psychosocial factors predicted HRQoL. Older men and African-American men reported more physical problems than younger men and Caucasian men, respectively. A supportive social environment, high self-efficacy, and high self-esteem were predictive of better HRQoL. CONCLUSIONS Shortly after undergoing treatment for localized prostate carcinoma, men who underwent radical prostatectomy, older men, and African-American men are at heightened risk for experiencing prostate-specific and general deficits in HRQoL. Having psychosocial resources from which to draw may enhance HRQoL. PMID:11745222

  9. Small cell-like change in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductal carcinoma, and invasive prostatic carcinoma: a study of 7 cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephen; Han, Jeong S; Chang, Alex; Ross, Hillary M; Montironi, Rodolfo; Yorukoglu, Kutsal; Lane, Zhaoli; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2013-03-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the prostate is associated with poor prognosis and different treatment from conventional acinar adenocarcinoma. Given the important clinicopathologic implications of a diagnosis of small cell carcinoma, we report 7 cases showing unusual, extensive small cell-like change in intraductal carcinoma and invasive carcinoma. Prostatic biopsies from 3 patients and radical prostatectomy specimens from 4 patients showed variably extensive small cell-like high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and intraductal carcinoma. Five cases were associated with conventional acinar adenocarcinoma (2 cases with Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7; 3 cases with Gleason 3 + 4 = 7). No small cell carcinoma was seen. Small and large ducts with small cell-like change showed solid and cribriform proliferations of atypical cells with abrupt transition between centrally located populations of small cells and more typical large dysplastic cells at the duct periphery. Rosette-like formations were noted within some involved ducts. Small cell-like change was characterized by crowded cells with uniformly bland vesicular nuclei and minimal cytoplasm and no significant mitotic or apoptotic activity. In 3 cases, similar small cell-like morphology was noted focally in invasive carcinoma. The small cell-like areas were negative for synaptophysin and chromogranin, focally positive for TTF-1, and weakly positive for racemase. Ki-67 labeled less than 5% with predominant labeling of the larger atypical cells and minimal reactivity in the small cell-like population. In summary, small cell-like change in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductal carcinoma, and invasive carcinoma is not associated with small cell carcinoma; shows no immunohistochemical evidence of neuroendocrine differentiation; and likely is not an adverse prognostic feature.

  10. Improved dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy using high resolution contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Morancy, Tye; Kaplan, Irving; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Rofksy, Neil M.; Holupka, Edward; Oismueller, Renee; Hawliczek, Robert; Helbich, Thomas H.; Bloch, B. Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess detailed dosimetry data for prostate and clinical relevant intra- and peri-prostatic structures including neurovascular bundles (NVB), urethra, and penile bulb (PB) from postbrachytherapy computed tomography (CT) versus high resolution contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (HR-CEMRI). Material and methods Eleven postbrachytherapy prostate cancer patients underwent HR-CEMRI and CT imaging. Computed tomography and HR-CEMRI images were randomized and 2 independent expert readers created contours of prostate, intra- and peri-prostatic structures on each CT and HR-CEMRI scan for all 11 patients. Dosimetry data including V100, D90, and D100 was calculated from these contours. Results Mean V100 values from CT and HR-CEMRI contours were as follows: prostate (98.5% and 96.2%, p = 0.003), urethra (81.0% and 88.7%, p = 0.027), anterior rectal wall (ARW) (8.9% and 2.8%, p < 0.001), left NVB (77.9% and 51.5%, p = 0.002), right NVB (69.2% and 43.1%, p = 0.001), and PB (0.09% and 11.4%, p = 0.005). Mean D90 (Gy) derived from CT and HR-CEMRI contours were: prostate (167.6 and 150.3, p = 0.012), urethra (81.6 and 109.4, p = 0.041), ARW (2.5 and 0.11, p = 0.003), left NVB (98.2 and 58.6, p = 0.001), right NVB (87.5 and 55.5, p = 0.001), and PB (11.2 and 12.4, p = 0.554). Conclusions Findings of this study suggest that HR-CEMRI facilitates accurate and meaningful dosimetric assessment of prostate and clinically relevant structures, which is not possible with CT. Significant differences were seen between CT and HR-CEMRI, with volume overestimation of CT derived contours compared to HR-CEMRI. PMID:25834576

  11. Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy caused by prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyama, Keiko; Kinoshita, Tatsuya; Nagai, Keisuke; Hongyo, Hidenari; Kishimoto, Kentaro; Inoue, Atsuo; Takamura, Manabu; Choi, Soomi

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy (PTTM) is a fatal malignancy-related condition that involves rapidly progressing hypoxia and pulmonary hypertension. We report a case of PTTM caused by prostate carcinoma, which was diagnosed before autopsy in an 81-year-old man. Computed tomography showed diffuse ground-glass opacities, consolidation, and small nodules in the peripheral regions of the lung. Autopsy showed adenocarcinoma cells embolizing small pulmonary arteries with fibrocellular intimal proliferation, which was consistent with PTTM caused by prostate carcinoma. PMID:27635254

  12. In vivo detection of prostatic carcinoma with antibodies against prostatic acid phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    De Land, F.H.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Serum prostatic acid phosphates (PAP) immunoassay is used to evaluate patients with prostatic carcinoma; however, as with other tumor markers, the enzyme levels do not necessarily reflect the presence or extent of tumor. The authors investigated the use of radiolabeled PAP antibodies for the in vivo detection of prostatic carcinoma by external scintillation imaging. Nine patients with prostatic carcinoma were entered into the study. Each received from 2.0 to 2.5 mCi of I-131 labeled antibody to PAP, administered i.v. The immunogen (PAP) was purified from normal human seminal fluid. Antiserum was prepared in rabbits by injecting the purified PAP. The antibodies were labeled with I-131 by chloramine-T method (10 to 20 Ci/g of IgG). Total body images were obtained at 24 and 48 hrs following administration of the labeled antibody. Nontarget I-131 activity was diminished by computer processing. Tumor sites detected by I-131 antibodies were correlated with other diagnostic procedures. In 7 of 9 patients primary and metastatic sites of cancer were detected by antibody imaging, however, no bone lesions were detected (6 cases). In 3 patients with concomitant pulmonary tumors, one was identified as of prostate origin. The serum PAP was normal in 4 patients; however, the primary tumor was identified in 3 of these. These findings suggest that the localization of prostatic carcinoma by means of in-vivo imaging of labeled antibodies to PAP is feasible and offers diagnostic opportunities based upon the functional characteristics.

  13. A subset of prostatic basal cell carcinomas harbor the MYB rearrangement of adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A; Yonescu, Raluca; Epstein, Jonathan I; Westra, William H

    2015-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a basaloid tumor consisting of myoepithelial and ductal cells typically arranged in a cribriform pattern. Adenoid cystic carcinoma is generally regarded as a form of salivary gland carcinoma, but it can arise from sites unassociated with salivary tissue. A rare form of prostate carcinoma exhibits ACC-like features; it is no longer regarded as a true ACC but rather as prostatic basal cell carcinoma (PBCC) and within the spectrum of basaloid prostatic proliferations. True ACCs often harbor MYB translocations resulting in the MYB-NFIB fusion protein. MYB analysis could clarify the true nature of prostatic carcinomas that exhibit ACC features and thus help refine the classification of prostatic basaloid proliferations. Twelve PBCCs were identified from the pathology consultation files of Johns Hopkins Hospital. The histopathologic features were reviewed, and break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization for MYB was performed. All 12 cases exhibited prominent basaloid histology. Four were purely solid, 7 exhibited a cribriform pattern reminiscent of salivary ACC, and 1 had a mixed pattern. The MYB rearrangement was detected in 2 (29%) of 7 ACC-like carcinomas but in none (0%) of the 5 PBCCs with a prominent solid pattern. True ACCs can arise in the prostate as is evidenced by the presence of the characteristic MYB rearrangement. When dealing with malignant basaloid proliferations in the prostate, recommendations to consolidate ACCs with other tumor types may need to be reassessed, particularly in light of the rapidly advancing field of biologic therapy where the identification of tumor-specific genetic alterations presents novel therapeutic targets.

  14. Monte Carlo modelling of angular radiance in tissue phantoms and human prostate: PDT light dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Barajas, O; Ballangrud, A M; Miller, G G; Moore, R B; Tulip, J

    1997-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising technique for destroying tumours. Photosensitizing drugs presently available are not sufficiently tumour specific; hence, light dosimetry is required in order to control light exposure and thereby restrict cell kill to the target tissue to avoid damage to healthy tissue. Current light dosimetry methods rely on tissue optical characterization by fluence measurements at several points. Fluence-based tissue characterization is impractical for tumours in organs such as prostate where access by optical probes is limited and the tumours are highly optically inhomogeneous. This paper explores the potential of radiance-based light dosimetry as an alternative. Correlation is found between Monte Carlo simulation of radiance in a tissue phantom and radiance measurements made using a new radiance probe. Radiance is sensitive to variations in the tissue optical parameters, absorption coefficient mu(a), scattering coefficient mu(s), and anisotropy factor g, and therefore is potentially useful for tissue characterization. Radiance measurements have several advantages over fluence measurements. Radiance measurements provide more information from a single location, better spatial resolution of the tissue optical parameters, and higher sensitivity in discriminating between different media. However, the Monte Carlo method is too slow to be of practical value for tissue characterization by correlation of measured and simulated radiance. An analytical solution to the transport equation for radiance would be desirable as this would facilitate and increase the speed of tissue characterization.

  15. An unusual cystic presentation of ductal carcinoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    De Gobbi, Alberto; Morlacco, Alessandro; Valotto, Claudio; Vianello, Fabio; Zattoni, Filiberto

    2016-11-18

    A 74-year-old male came to our clinic for rectal tenesmus, lower urinary tract symptoms and a previous episode of acute retention of urine. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of abdomen showed a multiloculated, cystic formation of 12 cm in the pelvic cavity to the left, with compression of the prostate, bladder, sigmoid and rectum, and its extension imprinted the back of the pubis and back bladder. Saturation prostate biopsy was negative for carcinoma. The histology of transurethral resection of bladder formation revealed flogistic tissue. Cistoprostatectomy and ureteroileal pouch with Wallace anastomosis, removal of the rectum and colostomy with Hartmann pouch were performed. The histopatology showed a ductal carcinoma of the prostate.

  16. The role of human papillomavirus infection in prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aghakhani, Arezoo; Hamkar, Rasool; Parvin, Mahmoud; Ghavami, Nastaran; Nadri, Mahsa; Pakfetrat, Attesa; Banifazl, Mohammad; Eslamifar, Ali; Izadi, Nabiollah; Jam, Sara; Ramezani, Amitis

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are associated with benign and malignant lesions of the female and male anogenital tract. Currently the possible role of HPV infections in prostate carcinogenesis is a subject of great controversy. In this study we aimed to investigate the role of HPV infection in prostate carcinoma (PCa). The study included formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 104 primary prostate adenocarcinoma cases and 104 control tissues of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). HPV-DNA was purified and amplified through MY09/MY11 and GP5(+)/GP6(+) primers and subsequently subjected to sequencing. HPV-DNA was found in 13 of 104 (12.5%) PCa and 8 of 104 (7.7%) BPH samples. High-risk HPVs were detected in 10 of 13 (76.9%) PCa and 5 of 8 (62.5%) BPH samples with positive HPV-DNA. Low-risk HPVs were detected in 3 of 13 (23.1%) PCa and 3 of 8 (37.5%) BPH specimens with positive HPV-DNA. There was no significant difference between PCa and BPH specimens regarding HPV-DNA presence or the detection of high-risk and low-risk types of HPV. Our data do not support the role of HPV infection in prostate carcinoma. Further studies are required to elucidate the role of HPV infection in human prostate carcinogenesis.

  17. Deformable registration of x-ray to MRI for post-implant dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seyoun; Song, Danny Y.; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-03-01

    Post-implant dosimetric assessment in prostate brachytherapy is typically performed using CT as the standard imaging modality. However, poor soft tissue contrast in CT causes significant variability in target contouring, resulting in incorrect dose calculations for organs of interest. CT-MR fusion-based approach has been advocated taking advantage of the complementary capabilities of CT (seed identification) and MRI (soft tissue visibility), and has proved to provide more accurate dosimetry calculations. However, seed segmentation in CT requires manual review, and the accuracy is limited by the reconstructed voxel resolution. In addition, CT deposits considerable amount of radiation to the patient. In this paper, we propose an X-ray and MRI based post-implant dosimetry approach. Implanted seeds are localized using three X-ray images by solving a combinatorial optimization problem, and the identified seeds are registered to MR images by an intensity-based points-to-volume registration. We pre-process the MR images using geometric and Gaussian filtering. To accommodate potential soft tissue deformation, our registration is performed in two steps, an initial affine transformation and local deformable registration. An evolutionary optimizer in conjunction with a points-to-volume similarity metric is used for the affine registration. Local prostate deformation and seed migration are then adjusted by the deformable registration step with external and internal force constraints. We tested our algorithm on six patient data sets, achieving registration error of (1.2+/-0.8) mm in < 30 sec. Our proposed approach has the potential to be a fast and cost-effective solution for post-implant dosimetry with equivalent accuracy as the CT-MR fusion-based approach.

  18. Greater Postimplant Swelling in Small-Volume Prostate Glands: Implications for Dosimetry, Treatment Planning, and Operating Room Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Evans, Cheryl; Narayana, Vrinda; McLaughlin, Patrick W.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Postimplant prostatic edema has been implicated in suboptimal permanent implants, and smaller prostates have been reported to have worse dosimetric coverage. In this study we compare the degree of postimplant edema between larger and smaller prostates and examine the effects of prostate size on the dose delivered to 90% of the prostate (D90). Methods and Materials: From September 2003 to February 2006, 105 hormone-naive patients underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy with {sup 125}I Rapid Strand (Oncura Inc., Arlington Heights, IL). All patients underwent pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 3 weeks before implant, transrectal ultrasound at the time of implant, and both computed tomography and MRI 2.5 to 3 weeks after implant. Prostates were divided into 5 subgroups based on preimplant MRI volumes: less than 25 mL, 25 to 35 mL, 35 to 45 mL, 45 to 55 mL, and greater than 55 mL. Prostate swelling was assessed by use of preimplant and postimplant MRI volumes. Postimplant dosimetry was determined by MRI and compared between the subgroups. Results: All prostates showed postimplant swelling on MRI when compared with preimplant MRI, with a mean increase of 31% {+-} 31% (p < 0.0001). The greatest swelling was noted in small prostates (volume less than 25 mL), with a mean increase of 70% {+-} 36%. The degree of swelling in the group with a volume less than 25 mL was significantly larger than the degree of swelling in all other prostate subgroups (p < 0.003). Transrectal ultrasound significantly overestimates the prostate volume when compared with MRI by a mean of 15% {+-} 25% (p = 0.0006) and is more pronounced for smaller prostates. Although prostates with volumes less than 25 mL did not have significantly worse D90 compared with larger prostates, they had the largest percent of suboptimal implants by the standard ratio of D90 divided by the prescription dose. Conclusions: Although small prostates have the greatest postimplant edema, planning

  19. Sequential Comparison of Seed Loss and Prostate Dosimetry of Stranded Seeds With Loose Seeds in {sup 125}I Permanent Implant for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Saibishkumar, Elantholi P.; Borg, Jette; Yeung, Ivan; Cummins-Holder, Cheryl; Landon, Angela; Crook, Juanita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To compare stranded seeds (SSs) with loose seeds (LSs) in terms of prostate edema, dosimetry, and seed loss after {sup 125}I brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts of 20 men participated in an institutional review board-approved protocols to study postimplant prostate edema and its effect on dosimetry. The LS cohort underwent brachytherapy between September 2002 and July 2003 and the SS cohort between April 2006 and January 2007. Both cohorts were evaluated sequentially using computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging fusion-based dosimetry on Days 0, 7, and 30. No hormonal therapy or supplemental beam radiotherapy was used. Results: Prostate edema was less in the SS cohort at all points (p = NS). On Day 0, all the prostate dosimetric factors were greater in the LS group than in the SS group (p = 0.003). However, by Days 7 and 30, the dosimetry was similar between the two cohorts. No seeds migrated to the lung in the SS cohort compared with a total of five seeds in 4 patients in the LS cohort. However, the overall seed loss was greater in the SS cohort (24 seeds in 6 patients; 1.1% of total vs. 0.6% for LSs), with most seeds lost through urine (22 seeds in 5 patients). Conclusion: Despite elimination of venous seed migration, greater seed loss was observed with SSs compared with LSs, with the primary site of loss being the urinary tract. Modification of the technique might be necessary to minimize this. Prostate dosimetry on Days 7 and 30 was similar between the SS and LS cohorts.

  20. Detailed urethral dosimetry in the evaluation of prostate brachytherapy-related urinary morbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Zachariah A.; Merrick, Gregory S. . E-mail: gmerrick@wheelinghospital.com; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Kurko, Brian; Anderson, Richard L.; Murray, Brian C.; Galbreath, Robert W.

    2005-07-15

    blockers and strict adherence to urethral-sparing techniques, detailed urethral dosimetry did not substantially improve the ability to predict urinary morbidity. Neither the average dose to the prostatic urethra nor urethral doses stratified into base, midprostate, apex, or urogenital diaphragm segments predicted for IPSS normalization. Radiation doses of 100%-140% minimum peripheral dose are well tolerated by all segments of the prostatic urethra with resultant tumorcidal doses to foci of periurethral cancer.

  1. High-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy Consistently Results in High Quality Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    White, Evan C.; Kamrava, Mitchell R.; Demarco, John; Park, Sang-June; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kayode, Oluwatosin; Steinberg, Michael L.; Demanes, D. Jeffrey

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: We performed a dosimetry analysis to determine how well the goals for clinical target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, and normal tissue dose constraints were achieved with high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Cumulative dose-volume histograms for 208 consecutively treated HDR prostate brachytherapy implants were analyzed. Planning was based on ultrasound-guided catheter insertion and postoperative CT imaging; the contoured clinical target volume (CTV) was the prostate, a small margin, and the proximal seminal vesicles. Dosimetric parameters analyzed for the CTV were D90, V90, V100, V150, and V200. Dose to the urethra, bladder, bladder balloon, and rectum were evaluated by the dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, and 2 cm{sup 3} of each organ, expressed as a percentage of the prescribed dose. Analysis was stratified according to prostate size. Results: The mean prostate ultrasound volume was 38.7 {+-} 13.4 cm{sup 3} (range: 11.7-108.6 cm{sup 3}). The mean CTV was 75.1 {+-} 20.6 cm{sup 3} (range: 33.4-156.5 cm{sup 3}). The mean D90 was 109.2% {+-} 2.6% (range: 102.3%-118.4%). Ninety-three percent of observed D90 values were between 105 and 115%. The mean V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 99.9% {+-} 0.05%, 99.5% {+-} 0.8%, 25.4% {+-} 4.2%, and 7.8% {+-} 1.4%. The mean dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, and 2 cm{sup 3} for organs at risk were: Urethra: 107.3% {+-} 3.0%, 101.1% {+-} 14.6%, and 47.9% {+-} 34.8%; bladder wall: 79.5% {+-} 5.1%, 69.8% {+-} 4.9%, and 64.3% {+-} 5.0%; bladder balloon: 70.3% {+-} 6.8%, 59.1% {+-} 6.6%, and 52.3% {+-} 6.2%; rectum: 76.3% {+-} 2.5%, 70.2% {+-} 3.3%, and 66.3% {+-} 3.8%. There was no significant difference between D90 and V100 when stratified by prostate size. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy allows the physician to consistently achieve complete prostate target coverage and maintain normal tissue dose constraints for organs at risk over a wide range of target volumes.

  2. Unusual Presentation of Prostate Carcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Anuradha; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in elderly men and it frequently metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and sometimes to bone. Very rarely in some of the cases it also shows involvement of non-regional lymph nodes like supra-diaphragmatic lymph nodes. In our report, we present a 60-year-old male, initially misdiagnosed as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) with cervical lymph node involvement may be due to infective region or inflammatory pathology, which was later found to have prostatic adenocarcinoma metastatic to supraclavicular lymph nodes. Very less case reports are present which have shown similar presentations. So we would like to highlight that prostatic carcinoma can be present in an atypical form also.

  3. Prostate brachytherapy postimplant dosimetry: Seed orientation and the impact of dosimetric anisotropy in stranded implants

    SciTech Connect

    Chng, Nicholas; Spadinger, Ingrid; Rasoda, Rosey; Morris, W. James; Salcudean, Septimiu

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: In postimplant dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy, dose is commonly calculated using the TG-43 1D formalism, because seed orientations are difficult to determine from CT images, the current standard for the procedure. However, the orientation of stranded seeds soon after implantation is predictable, as these seeds tend to maintain their relative spacing, and orient themselves along the implant trajectory. The aim of this study was to develop a method for determining seed orientations from reconstructed strand trajectories, and to use this information to investigate the dosimetric impact of applying the TG-43 2D formalism to clinical postimplant analysis. Methods: Using in-house software, the preplan to postimplant seed correspondence was determined for a cohort of 30 patients during routine day-0 CT-based postimplant dosimetry. All patients were implanted with stranded-seed trains. Spline curves were fit to each set of seeds composing a strand, with the requirement that the distance along the spline between seeds be equal to the seed spacing within the strand. The orientations of the seeds were estimated by the tangents to the spline at each seed centroid. Dose distributions were then determined using the 1D and 2D TG-43 formalisms. These were compared using the TG-137 recommended dose metrics for the prostate, prostatic urethra, and rectum. Results: Seven hundred and sixty one strands were analyzed in total. Defining the z-axis to be cranial-positive and the x-axis to be left-lateral positive in the CT coordinate system, the average seed had an inclination of 21 deg. {+-} 10 deg. and an azimuth of -81 deg. {+-} 57 deg. These values correspond to the average strand rising anteriorly from apex to base, approximately parallel to the midsagittal plane. Clinically minor but statistically significant differences in dose metrics were noted. Compared to the 2D calculation, the 1D calculation underestimated prostate V100 by 1.1% and D90 by 2.3 Gy, while

  4. [Intraoperative and post-implant dosimetry in patients treated with permanent prostate implant brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Herein, András; Ágoston, Péter; Szabó, Zoltán; Jorgo, Kliton; Markgruber, Balázs; Pesznyák, Csilla; Polgár, Csaba; Major, Tibor

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our work was to compare intraoperative and four-week post-implant dosimetry for loose and stranded seed implants for permanent prostate implant brachytherapy. In our institute low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy is performed with encapsulated I-125 isotopes (seeds) using transrectal ultrasound guidance and metal needles. The SPOT PRO 3.1 (Elekta, Sweden) system is used for treatment planning. In this study the first 79 patients were treated with loose seed (LS) technique, the consecutive patients were treated with stranded seed (SS) technique. During intraoperative planning the dose constraints were the same for both techniques. All LSs were placed inside the prostate capsule, while with SS a 2 mm margin around the prostate was allowed for seed positioning. The prescribed dose for the prostate was 145 Gy. This study investigated prostate dose coverage in 30-30 randomly selected patients with LS and SS. Four weeks after the implantation native CT and MRI were done and CT/MRI image fusion was performed. The target was contoured on MRI and the plan was prepared on CT data. To assess the treatment plan dose-volume histograms were used. For the target coverage V100, V90, D90, D100, for the dose inhomogeneity V150, V200, and the dose-homogeneity index (DHI), for dose conformality the conformal index (COIN) were calculated. Intraoperative and postimplant plans were compared. The mean V100 values decreased at four-week plan for SS (97% vs. 84%) and for LS (96% vs. 80%) technique, as well. Decrease was observed for all parameters except for the DHI value. The DHI increased for SS (0.38 vs. 0.41) and for LS (0.38 vs. 0.47) technique, as well. The COIN decreased for both techniques at four-week plan (SS: 0.63 vs. 0.57; LS: 0.67 vs. 0.50). All differences were significant except for the DHI value at SS technique. The percentage changes were not significant, except the COIN value. The dose coverage of the target decreased significantly at four-week plans

  5. Diet, vegetarian food and prostate carcinoma among men in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y C; Chiang, C I; Lin, R S; Pu, Y S; Lai, M K; Sung, F-C

    2005-10-31

    In a case-control study in a veterans hospital in Taiwan, we compared 237 histology-confirmed prostate carcinoma cases with 481 controls, frequency matched by age, for their consumption of vegetarian food, namely soybean products, rice, wheat protein and other vegetables. The multivariable logistic regression analysis showed a significant association with such food (odds ratio (OR)=0.67, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.47, 0.94). This beneficial effect presented for men with body mass index (BMI) < or =25 kg m(-2) (OR=0.50, 95% CI=0.32, 0.76) but not for men with greater BMI. The OR of prostate carcinoma for men with BMI < or =25 kg m(-2) was 1.74 (95% CI=1.21, 2.51), compared with men with higher BMI (>25 kg m(-2)). Other significant risk factors associated with the disease included higher income (OR=2.40, 95% CI=1.07, 5.42), physical activity (OR=1.75, 95% CI=1.08, 2.83), being married (OR=2.49, 95% CI=1.40, 4.43) and coffee consumption (OR=1.88, 95% CI=1.07, 3.30). Stratified analysis also showed that the consumption of fish/shellfish had an adverse association for men with higher BMI. This study suggests that the intake of the low fat local vegetarian food has a protective effect against prostate carcinoma for thin men in this study population.

  6. TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in small cell carcinoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Guo, Charles C; Dancer, Jane Y; Wang, Yan; Aparicio, Ana; Navone, Nora M; Troncoso, Patricia; Czerniak, Bogdan A

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that most prostate cancers carry the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. Here we evaluated the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in small cell carcinoma of the prostate (n = 12) in comparison with small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (n = 12) and lung (n = 11). Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated rearrangement of the ERG gene in 8 cases of prostatic small cell carcinoma (67%), and the rearrangement was associated with deletion of the 5' ERG gene in 7 cases, but rearrangement of the ERG gene was not present in any small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder or lung. Next we evaluated the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in nude mouse xenografts that were derived from 2 prostatic small cell carcinomas carrying the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. Two transcripts encoded by the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing demonstrated that the 2 transcripts were composed of fusions of exon 1 of the TMPRSS2 gene to exon 4 or 5 of the ERG gene. Our study demonstrates the specific presence of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in prostatic small cell carcinoma, which may be helpful in distinguishing small cell carcinoma of prostatic origin from nonprostatic origins. The high prevalence of the TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in prostatic small cell carcinoma as well as adenocarcinoma implies that small cell carcinoma may share a common pathogenic pathway with adenocarcinoma in the prostate.

  7. Transperineal in vivo fluence-rate dosimetry in the canine prostate during SnET2-mediated PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilge, Lothar; Pomerleau-Dalcourt, Natalie; Douplik, Alexander; Selman, Steven H.; Keck, Rick W.; Szkudlarek, Maria; Pestka, Maciej; Jankun, Jerzy

    2004-07-01

    Advances in photodynamic therapy (PDT) treatment for prostate cancer can be achieved either by improving selectivity of the photosensitizer towards prostate gland tissue or improving the dosimetry by means of individualized treatment planning using currently available photosensitizers. The latter approach requires the ability to measure, among other parameters, the fluence rate at different positions within the prostate and the ability to derive the tissue optical properties. Here fibre optic probes are presented capable of measuring the fluence rate throughout large tissue volumes and a method to derive the tissue optical properties for different volumes of the prostate. The responsivity of the sensors is sufficient to detect a fluence rate of 0.1 mW cm-2. The effective attenuation coefficient in the canine prostate at 660 nm is higher at the capsule (2.15 ± 0.19 cm-1) than in proximity of the urethra (1.84 ± 0.36 cm-1). Significant spatial and temporal intra- and inter-canine variability in the tissue optical properties was noted, highlighting the need for individualized monitoring of the fluence rate for improved dosimetry.

  8. Partition Model-Based 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT Predictive Dosimetry Compared with 90Y TOF PET/CT Posttreatment Dosimetry in Radioembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Quantitative Agreement Comparison.

    PubMed

    Gnesin, Silvano; Canetti, Laurent; Adib, Salim; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Silva Monteiro, Marina; Bize, Pierre; Denys, Alban; Prior, John O; Baechler, Sebastien; Boubaker, Ariane

    2016-11-01

    (90)Y-microsphere selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is a valuable treatment in unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Partition-model predictive dosimetry relies on differential tumor-to-nontumor perfusion evaluated on pretreatment (99m)Tc-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) SPECT/CT. The aim of this study was to evaluate agreement between the predictive dosimetry of (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT and posttreatment dosimetry based on (90)Y time-of-flight (TOF) PET/CT.

  9. Testosterone metabolism of fibroblasts grown from prostatic carcinoma, benign prostatic hyperplasia and skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Schweikert, H.U.; Hein, H.J.; Romijn, J.C.; Schroeder, F.H.

    1982-02-01

    The metabolism of (1,2,6,7-3H)testosterone was assessed in fibroblast monolayers derived from tissue of 5 prostates with benign hyperplasia (BPH), 4 prostates with carcinoma (PC), and 3 biopsy samples of skin, 2 nongenital skin (NG) and 1 genital skin. The following metabolites could be identified: androstanedione androstenedione, dihydrotestosterone, androsterone, epiandrosterone, androstane-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol and androstane-3 beta, 17 beta-diol. Testosterone was metabolized much more rapidly in fibroblasts originating from prostatic tissue than in fibroblasts derived from NG. A significantly higher formation of 5 alpha-androstanes and 3 alpha-hydroxysteroids could be observed in fibroblasts from BPH as compared to PC. 17-ketosteroid formation exceeded 5 alpha-androstane formation in BPH, whereas 5 alpha-reduction was the predominant pathway in fibroblasts grown from PC and NG. Since testosterone metabolism in fibroblasts of prostatic origin therefore resembles in many aspects that in whole prostatic tissue, fibroblasts grown from prostatic tissues might be a valuable tool for further investigation of the pathogenesis of human BPH and PC.

  10. Comparison between real-time intra-operative ultrasound-based dosimetry and CT-based dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy using cesium-131.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, B L; Gibbons, E P; Smith, R P; Beriwal, S; Komanduri, K; Benoit, R M

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between real-time intra-operative ultrasound-based dosimetry (USD) and day 0 post-implant CT dosimetry (CTD) (131)Cs permanent prostate brachytherapy. Fifty-two consecutive patients who underwent prostate brachytherapy with (131)Cs were evaluated. Real time operating room planning was performed using VariSeed 7.1 software. Post-needle placement prostate volume was used for real-time planning. Targets for dosimetry were D(90) >110%, V(100) >90%, V(150) <50%, and V(200) <20%. The CT scan for post-operative dosimetry was obtained on day 0. The mean values for USD, CTD, and the linear correlation, respectively, were, for D(90): 114.0%, 105.61%, and 0.15; for V(100): 95.1%, 91.6%, and 0.22; for V(150): 51.5%, 46.4%, and 0.40; and for V(200): 15.8%, 17.9%, and 0.42. The differences between the mean values for USD and CTD for D(90) (p<0.01), V(100) (p<0.01), and V(150) (p<0.05) were statistically significant. For D(90), 30.8% of patients had a >15% difference between USD and CTD and 51.9% of patients had a >10% difference between these values. In contrast, the USD and CTD for V(100) were within 5% in 55.8% of patients and within 10% in 86.5% of patients. This study demonstrates a correlation between the mean intra-operative USD and post-implant day 0 CTD values only for V(200). Significant variation in D(90), V(150), and V(200) values existed for individual patients between USD and CTD. These results suggest that real-time intra-operative USD does not serve as a surrogate for post-operative CTD, and that post-operative CTD is still necessary.

  11. Novel trends in transrectal ultrasound imaging of prostate gland carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Szopiński, Tomasz; Nowicki, Andrzej; Záťura, František; Gołąbek, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr

    2014-09-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate gland is the most common neoplasm in men. Its treatment depends on multiple factors among which local staging plays a significant role. The basic method is transrectal ultrasound imaging. This examination enables imaging of the prostate gland and its abnormalities, but it also allows ultrasound-guided biopsies to be conducted. A conventional gray-scale ultrasound examination enables assessment of the size, echostructure and outlines of the anatomic capsule, but in many cases, neoplastic lesions cannot be observed. For this reason, new sonographic techniques are implemented in order to facilitate detectability of cancer. The usage of contrast agents during transrectal ultrasound examination must be emphasized since, in combination with color Doppler, it facilitates detection of cancerous lesions by visualizing flow which is not observable without contrast enhancement. Elastography, in turn, is a different solution. It uses the differences in tissue elasticity between a neoplastic region and normal prostatic parenchyma that surrounds it. This technique facilitates detection of lesions irrespective of their echogenicity and thereby supplements conventional transrectal examinations. However, the size of the prostate gland and its relatively far location from the transducer may constitute limitations to the effectiveness of elastography. Moreover, the manner of conducting such an examination depends on the examiner and his or her subjective assessment. Another method, which falls within the novel, popular trend of combining imaging methods, is fusion of magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal sonography. The application of multidimensional magnetic resonance imaging, which is currently believed to be the best method for prostate cancer staging, in combination with the availability of a TRUS examination and the possibility of monitoring biopsies in real-time sonography is a promising alternative, but it is associated with higher costs and

  12. Novel trends in transrectal ultrasound imaging of prostate gland carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Andrzej; Záťura, František; Gołąbek, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate gland is the most common neoplasm in men. Its treatment depends on multiple factors among which local staging plays a significant role. The basic method is transrectal ultrasound imaging. This examination enables imaging of the prostate gland and its abnormalities, but it also allows ultrasound-guided biopsies to be conducted. A conventional gray-scale ultrasound examination enables assessment of the size, echostructure and outlines of the anatomic capsule, but in many cases, neoplastic lesions cannot be observed. For this reason, new sonographic techniques are implemented in order to facilitate detectability of cancer. The usage of contrast agents during transrectal ultrasound examination must be emphasized since, in combination with color Doppler, it facilitates detection of cancerous lesions by visualizing flow which is not observable without contrast enhancement. Elastography, in turn, is a different solution. It uses the differences in tissue elasticity between a neoplastic region and normal prostatic parenchyma that surrounds it. This technique facilitates detection of lesions irrespective of their echogenicity and thereby supplements conventional transrectal examinations. However, the size of the prostate gland and its relatively far location from the transducer may constitute limitations to the effectiveness of elastography. Moreover, the manner of conducting such an examination depends on the examiner and his or her subjective assessment. Another method, which falls within the novel, popular trend of combining imaging methods, is fusion of magnetic resonance imaging and transrectal sonography. The application of multidimensional magnetic resonance imaging, which is currently believed to be the best method for prostate cancer staging, in combination with the availability of a TRUS examination and the possibility of monitoring biopsies in real-time sonography is a promising alternative, but it is associated with higher costs and

  13. Adipocyte secreted factors enhance aggressiveness of prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ângela; Pereira, Sofia S; Costa, Madalena; Morais, Tiago; Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Rúben; Monteiro, Mariana P

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased incidence and risk of mortality of prostate cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying this risk association is the change in adipokines expression that could promote the development and progression of the prostate tumor cells. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of preadipocyte and adipocyte secretome in the proliferation, migration and invasion of androgen independent prostate carcinoma cells (RM1) and to assess cell proliferation in the presence of the adiposity signals leptin and insulin. RM1 cells were co-cultured in with preadipocytes, adipocytes or cultured in their respective conditioned medium. Cell proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and XTT viability test. Cell migration was evaluated using a wound healing injury assay of RM1 cells cultured with conditioned media. Cellular invasion of RM1 cells co-cultured with adipocytes and preadipocytes was assessed using matrigel membranes. Preadipocyte conditioned medium was associated with a small increase in RM1 proliferation, while adipocytes conditioned media significantly increased RM1 cell proliferation (p<0.01). Adipocytes also significantly increased the RM1 cells proliferation in co-culture (p <0.01). Cell migration was higher in RM1 cells cultured with preadipocyte and adipocyte conditioned medium. RM1 cell invasion was significantly increased after co-culture with preadipocytes and adipocytes (p <0.05). Insulin also increased significantly the cell proliferation in contrast to leptin, which showed no effect. In conclusion, prostate carcinoma cells seem to be influenced by factors secreted by adipocytes that are able to increase their ability to proliferate, migrate and invade.

  14. Adipocyte Secreted Factors Enhance Aggressiveness of Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ângela; Pereira, Sofia S.; Costa, Madalena; Morais, Tiago; Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Rúben; Monteiro, Mariana P.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased incidence and risk of mortality of prostate cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying this risk association is the change in adipokines expression that could promote the development and progression of the prostate tumor cells. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of preadipocyte and adipocyte secretome in the proliferation, migration and invasion of androgen independent prostate carcinoma cells (RM1) and to assess cell proliferation in the presence of the adiposity signals leptin and insulin. RM1 cells were co-cultured in with preadipocytes, adipocytes or cultured in their respective conditioned medium. Cell proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and XTT viability test. Cell migration was evaluated using a wound healing injury assay of RM1 cells cultured with conditioned media. Cellular invasion of RM1 cells co-cultured with adipocytes and preadipocytes was assessed using matrigel membranes. Preadipocyte conditioned medium was associated with a small increase in RM1 proliferation, while adipocytes conditioned media significantly increased RM1 cell proliferation (p<0.01). Adipocytes also significantly increased the RM1 cells proliferation in co-culture (p <0.01). Cell migration was higher in RM1 cells cultured with preadipocyte and adipocyte conditioned medium. RM1 cell invasion was significantly increased after co-culture with preadipocytes and adipocytes (p <0.05). Insulin also increased significantly the cell proliferation in contrast to leptin, which showed no effect. In conclusion, prostate carcinoma cells seem to be influenced by factors secreted by adipocytes that are able to increase their ability to proliferate, migrate and invade. PMID:25928422

  15. A Vector-Based Short Hairpin RNA Targeting Aurora B Suppresses Human Prostatic Carcinoma Growth.

    PubMed

    Cao, Mei; Qi, Panpan; Chen, Chong; Song, Liju; Wang, Xuege; Li, Ningzhe; Wu, Daoyan; Hu, Guoku; Zhao, Jian

    2017-02-01

    Aurora kinase B, playing a vital, important role in mitosis, is frequently detected to be overexpressed in many cancer cell lines and various tumor tissues, including prostatic carcinoma. Given the essential function of Aurora kinase B in mitosis and its association with tumorigenesis, it might be a drug target for prostatic carcinoma treatment. In our study, short hairpin RNA targeting Aurora kinase B was cloned into a pGPU6 plasmid vector and then transfected into human prostatic carcinoma cells. The expression level of Aurora kinase B was verified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. At the same time, cell apoptosis was detected by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide, fluorescent staining, and flow cytometric analysis. Furthermore, prostate carcinoma cells were injected into mice to establish a tumor xenograft model. Previous studies have shown the effect of pGPU6-shAURKB plasmid on tumor growth in a prostate carcinoma xenogenic implantation model. From the study, we knew that the Aurora kinase B was significantly downregulated in prostate carcinoma cells, and cell apoptosis was also detected higher in treated groups than that in control groups. Moreover, in the prostate carcinoma xenogenic implantation model, compared with the control groups, the tumor growth was inhibited about 78.7% in the pGPU6-shAURKB plasmid-treated group, and cell apoptosis in the experimental group was notably higher than that in control groups. The average duration of tumor-bearing mice was prolonged to about 35 days. The results of experiment indicated that specific knockdown of Aurora kinase B led to prostate carcinoma cells apoptosis and inhibited tumor growth. Our data clearly confirmed that specific knockdown of Aurora kinase B expression by vector-based short hairpin RNA/liposome may be a potential new approach to treat human prostatic carcinoma.

  16. Dynamic dosimetry and edema detection in prostate brachytherapy: a complete system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A.; Deguet, A.; Iordachita, I.; Chintalapani, G.; Blevins, J.; Le, Y.; Armour, E.; Burdette, C.; Song, D.; Fichtinger, G.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy (radioactive seed insertion) has emerged as one of the most effective treatment options for patients with prostate cancer, with the added benefit of a convenient outpatient procedure. The main limitation in contemporary brachytherapy is faulty seed placement, predominantly due to the presence of intra-operative edema (tissue expansion). Though currently not available, the capability to intra-operatively monitor the seed distribution, can make a significant improvement in cancer control. We present such a system here. Methods: Intra-operative measurement of edema in prostate brachytherapy requires localization of inserted radioactive seeds relative to the prostate. Seeds were reconstructed using a typical non-isocentric C-arm, and exported to a commercial brachytherapy delivery system. Technical obstacles for 3D reconstruction on a non-isocentric C-arm include pose-dependent C-arm calibration; distortion correction; pose estimation of C-arm images; seed reconstruction; and C-arm to TRUS registration. Results: In precision-machined hard phantoms with 40-100 seeds and soft tissue phantoms with 45-87 seeds, we correctly reconstructed the seed implant shape with an average 3D precision of 0.35 mm and 0.24 mm, respectively. In a DoD Phase-1 clinical trial on 6 patients with 48-82 planned seeds, we achieved intra-operative monitoring of seed distribution and dosimetry, correcting for dose inhomogeneities by inserting an average of 4.17 (1-9) additional seeds. Additionally, in each patient, the system automatically detected intra-operative seed migration induced due to edema (mean 3.84 mm, STD 2.13 mm, Max 16.19 mm). Conclusions: The proposed system is the first of a kind that makes intra-operative detection of edema (and subsequent re-optimization) possible on any typical non-isocentric C-arm, at negligible additional cost to the existing clinical installation. It achieves a significantly more homogeneous seed distribution, and has the potential to

  17. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the prostate: ductal adenocarcinoma and stromal sarcoma-like appearance: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Parada, David; Peña, Karla B; Riu, Francesc

    2011-01-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma (SC) of prostate gland is a rare biphasic tumour. In about half of cases, initial diagnosis is acinar adenocarcinoma, followed by nonsurgical therapy, with a subsequent diagnosis of SC. The survival rate is lower. We report a case of an 59-years-old man with unusual histopathologic finding of prostate sarcomatoid carcinoma, showing characteristics of ductal prostatic adenocarcinoma and prostatic stromal sarcoma-like appearance. Ductal adenocarcinoma was characterized by tall columnar cells with abundant amphophilic to eosinophil cytoplasm. Pleomorphic sarcoma was characterized to have overall glandular growth pattern, simulating a malignant phyllodes tumour. Estrogen and progesterone receptors showed nuclear immunostaining in mesenchymal multinucleated giant cells. In conclusion, SC of the prostate is an exceedingly rare tumour. Retrospective analyses render prostate SC as one of the most aggressive prostate malignancies. The prognosis is dismal regardless of other histologic or clinical findings.

  18. Evaluation of MENT on primary cell cultures from benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Patricia; Sánchez, Catherine; Contreras, Héctor R; Vergara, Jorge; Acevedo, Cristian; Cabezas, Juan; Huidobro, Christian; Noé, Gabriela; Castellón, Enrique A

    2009-12-01

    7-alpha-Methyl-19-Nortestosterone (MENT) is a synthetic androgen more potent than testosterone (T) and cannot be reduced at 5-alpha position. No important effects of MENT on prostate growth have been reported. However, little is known about the effect of MENT on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) or prostate carcinoma (CaP). We evaluate the effect of MENT, T and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on secretion, proliferation and gene expression of primary cell cultures from human BPH and CaP. Moreover, the effect of these androgens was examined in the presence of finasteride to determine the influence of the 5-alpha reductase (5-AR) activity on the androgenic potency. BPH and CaP primary cultures were treated with 0, 1, 10 and 100 nM of T, MENT or DHT during 24 and 48 h. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was measured by micro particles immunoassay and proliferation rate by spectrophotometric assay (MTT) and by the immunochemical detection of the proliferation marker Ki-67. Gene expression of FGF8b (androgen sensitive gene) was evaluated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Results showed that MENT treatments increased PSA secretion and proliferation rate with a potency ranged between T and DHT. Similar effects of MENT were observed in both BPH and CaP cultures. The studies with finasteride showed that in BPH and CaP cells, the conversion of T into DHT significantly contributes to its effect on the proliferation and PSA secretion, and corroborated the resistance of MENT to the 5-AR. The effect of MENT on the gene expression of FGF8b in CaP cells was similar to T and lower than DHT. It is concluded that MENT increases proliferative and secretory activities and gene expression on pathological prostate cells although in less extent than the active metabolite DHT. Furthermore, the fall of endogenous concentration of T during MENT treatment anticipates that this androgen will be of low impact for the prostate.

  19. Bony expansion in skeletal metastases from carcinoma of the prostate as seen by bone scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Resnik, C.S.; Garver, P.; Resnick, D.

    1984-10-01

    Carcinoma of the prostate often metastasizes to the skeletal system, the usual radiologic pattern being widespread patchy areas of increased density without change in the contour of the involved bones. Radionuclide correlation generally shows multiple foci of increased tracer activity. Less commonly, there is bony sclerosis with expansion of the diameter of the involved bone. Several cases of expansile skeletal metastases from carcinoma of the prostate have appeared in the literature but we know of no published descriptions of the radionuclide findings. We present three patients with carcinoma of the prostate who had skeletal metastases with evidence of bony expansion on both roentgenographic and radionuclide examination. 15 references, 8 figures.

  20. Biodistribution and Radiation Dosimetry for a Probe Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen for Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Ken; Bluemel, Christina; Weineisen, Martina; Schottelius, Margret; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Czernin, Johannes; Eberlein, Uta; Beykan, Seval; Lapa, Constantin; Riedmiller, Hubertus; Krebs, Markus; Kropf, Saskia; Schirbel, Andreas; Buck, Andreas K.; Lassmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a promising target for diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. EuK-Subkff-68Ga-DOTAGA (68Ga-PSMA Imaging & Therapy [PSMA I&T]) is a recently introduced PET tracer for imaging PSMA expression in vivo. Whole-body distribution and radiation dosimetry of this new probe were evaluated. Methods Five patients with a history of prostate cancer were injected intravenously with 91–148 MBq of 68Ga-PSMA I&T (mean ± SD, 128 ± 23 MBq). After an initial series of rapid whole-body scans, 3 static whole-body scans were acquired at 1, 2, and 4 h after tracer injection. Time-dependent changes of the injected activity per organ were determined. Mean organ-absorbed doses and effective doses were calculated using OLINDA/EXM. Results Injection of 150 MBq of 68Ga-PSMA I&T resulted in an effective dose of 3.0 mSv. The kidneys were the critical organ (33 mGy), followed by the urinary bladder wall and spleen (10 mGy each), salivary glands (9 mGy each), and liver (7 mGy). Conclusion 68Ga-PSMA I&T exhibits a favorable dosimetry, delivering organ doses that are comparable to (kidneys) or lower than those delivered by 18F-FDG. PMID:25883128

  1. Modeling the impact of prostate edema on LDR brachytherapy: a Monte Carlo dosimetry study based on a 3D biphasic finite element biomechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountris, K. A.; Bert, J.; Noailly, J.; Rodriguez Aguilera, A.; Valeri, A.; Pradier, O.; Schick, U.; Promayon, E.; Gonzalez Ballester, M. A.; Troccaz, J.; Visvikis, D.

    2017-03-01

    Prostate volume changes due to edema occurrence during transperineal permanent brachytherapy should be taken under consideration to ensure optimal dose delivery. Available edema models, based on prostate volume observations, face several limitations. Therefore, patient-specific models need to be developed to accurately account for the impact of edema. In this study we present a biomechanical model developed to reproduce edema resolution patterns documented in the literature. Using the biphasic mixture theory and finite element analysis, the proposed model takes into consideration the mechanical properties of the pubic area tissues in the evolution of prostate edema. The model’s computed deformations are incorporated in a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate their effect on post-operative dosimetry. The comparison of Day1 and Day30 dosimetry results demonstrates the capability of the proposed model for patient-specific dosimetry improvements, considering the edema dynamics. The proposed model shows excellent ability to reproduce previously described edema resolution patterns and was validated based on previous findings. According to our results, for a prostate volume increase of 10–20% the Day30 urethra D10 dose metric is higher by 4.2%–10.5% compared to the Day1 value. The introduction of the edema dynamics in Day30 dosimetry shows a significant global dose overestimation identified on the conventional static Day30 dosimetry. In conclusion, the proposed edema biomechanical model can improve the treatment planning of transperineal permanent brachytherapy accounting for post-implant dose alterations during the planning procedure.

  2. Dosimetric differences between intraoperative and postoperative plans using Cs-131 in transrectal ultrasound–guided brachytherapy for prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Andrew; Treas, Jared; Yavoich, Brian; Dean, Douglas; Danella, John; Yumen, Omar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the differences between intraoperative and postoperative dosimetry for transrectal ultrasound–guided transperineal prostate implants using cesium-131 ({sup 131}Cs). Between 2006 and 2010, 166 patients implanted with {sup 131}Cs had both intraoperative and postoperative dosimetry studies. All cases were monotherapy and doses of 115 were prescribed to the prostate. The dosimetric properties (D{sub 90}, V{sub 150}, and V{sub 100} for the prostate) of the studies were compared. Two conformity indices were also calculated and compared. Finally, the prostate was automatically sectioned into 6 sectors (anterior and posterior sectors at the base, midgland, and apex) and the intraoperative and postoperative dosimetry was compared in each individual sector. Postoperative dosimetry showed statistically significant changes (p < 0.01) in every dosimetric value except V{sub 150}. In each significant case, the postoperative plans showed lower dose coverage. The conformity indexes also showed a bimodal frequency distribution with the index indicating poorer dose conformity in the postoperative plans. Sector analysis revealed less dose coverage postoperatively in the base and apex sectors with an increase in dose to the posterior midgland sector. Postoperative dosimetry overall and in specific sectors of the prostate differs significantly from intraoperative planning. Care must be taken during the intraoperative planning stage to ensure complete dose coverage of the prostate with the understanding that the final postoperative dosimetry will show less dose coverage.

  3. SU-D-BRF-07: Ultrasound and Fluoroscopy Based Intraoperative Image-Guidance System for Dynamic Dosimetry in Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, N; Le, Y; Deguet, A; Prince, J; Song, D; Lee, J; Dehghan, E; Burdette, E; Fichtinger, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Prostate brachytherapy is a common treatment method for low-risk prostate cancer patients. Intraoperative treatment planning is known to improve the treatment procedure and the outcome. The current limitation of intraoperative treatment planning is the inability to localize the seeds in relation to the prostate. We developed an image-guidance system to fulfill this need to achieve intraoperative dynamic dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy. Methods: Our system is based on standard imaging equipments available in the operating room, including the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and the mobile C-arm. A simple fiducial is added to compute the C-arm pose. Three fluoroscopic images and an ultrasound volume of the seeds and the prostate are acquired and processed by four image processing algorithms: seed segmentation, fiducial detection with pose estimation, seed reconstruction, and seeds-to-TRUS registration. The updated seed positions allow the physician to assess the quality of implantation and dynamically adjust the treatment plan during the course of surgery to achieve improved exit dosimetry. Results: The system was tested on 10 phantoms and 37 patients. Seed segmentation resulted in a 1% false negative and 2% false positive rates. Fiducial detection with pose estimation resulted in a detection rate of 98%. Seed reconstruction had a mean reconstruction error of 0.4 mm. Seeds-to-TRUS registration had a mean registration error of 1.3 mm. The total processing time from image acquisition to registration was approximately 1 minute. Conclusion: We present an image-guidance system for intraoperative dynamic dosimetry in prostate brachytherapy. Using standard imaging equipments and a simple fiducial, our system can be easily adopted in any clinics. Robust image processing algorithms enable accurate and fast computation of the delivered dose. Especially, the system enables detection of possible hot/cold spots during the surgery, allowing the physician to address these

  4. EpCAM Expression in Lymph Node and Bone Metastases of Prostate Carcinoma: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Anna K.; Hoving, Hilde D.; Rosati, Stefano; van Leenders, Geert J. L. H.; de Jong, Igle J.

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new imaging modalities in prostate carcinoma staging. A non-invasive modality that can assess lymph node and bone metastases simultaneously is preferred. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a membranous protein of interest as an imaging target since it is overexpressed in prostatic carcinoma compared with benign prostate epithelium and compared with stroma. However, EpCAM expression in lymph node metastases is sparsely available in the literature and EpCAM expression in bone metastases is yet unknown. The current study evaluates the expression of EpCAM in prostate carcinoma lymph nodes, in matched normal lymph nodes, in prostate carcinoma bone metastases, and in normal bone by immunohistochemistry. EpCAM was expressed in 100% of lymph node metastases (21 out of 21), in 0% of normal lymph nodes (0 out of 21), in 95% of bone metastases (19 out of 20), and in 0% of normal bone (0 out of 14). Based on these results, EpCAM may be a feasible imaging target in prostate carcinoma lymph node and bone metastases. Prospective clinical trials are needed to confirm current results. Preoperative visualization of prostate carcinoma metastases will improve disease staging and will prevent unnecessary invasive surgery. PMID:27690012

  5. Sirolimus, Docetaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-10

    Castration Levels of Testosterone; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; PSA Progression; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  6. Customized Dose Prescription for Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy: Insights From a Multicenter Analysis of Dosimetry Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Nelson N. Potters, Louis; Davis, Brian J.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Roach, Mack; Fearn, Paul A. B.A.; Kattan, Michael W.; Stock, Richard G.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the biochemical control rate in patients undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy as a function of the biologically effective dose (BED) and risk group. Methods and Materials: Six centers provided data on 3,928 permanent brachytherapy patients with postimplant dosimetry results. The mean prostate-specific antigen level was 8.9 ng/mL. {sup 125}I was used in 2,293 (58%), {sup 103}Pd in 1,635, and supplemental external beam radiotherapy in 882 (22.5%) patients. The patients were stratified into low- (n = 2,188), intermediate- (n = 1,188), and high- (n = 552) risk groups and into three BED groups of < 140 Gy (n = 524), 140-200 Gy (n = 2284), and >200 Gy (n = 1,115). Freedom from biochemical disease progression (biochemical freedom from failure [bFFF]) was determined using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology Oncology and Phoenix definitions and calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, with factors compared using the log-rank test. Results: The 10-year prostate-specific antigen bFFF rate for the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology Oncology and Phoenix definitions was 79.2% and 70%, respectively. The corresponding bFFF rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups was 84.1% and 78.1%, 76.8% and 63.6%, and 64.4% and 58.2%, respectively (p < 0.0001). The corresponding bFFF rate for the three BED groups was 56.1% and 41.4%, 80% and 77.9%, and 91.1% and 82.9% (p < 0.0001). The corresponding bFFF rate for the low-risk patients by dose group was 69.8% and 49.8%, 86% and 85.2%, and 88.1% and 88.3% for the low-, intermediate, and high-dose group, respectively (p <0.0001). The corresponding bFFF rate for the intermediate-risk patients by dose group was 52.9% and 23.1%, 74.1% and 77.7%, and 94.3% and 88.8% for the low-, intermediate-, and high-dose group, respectively (p < 0.0001). The corresponding bFFF rate for high-risk patients by dose group was 19.2% and 41.7%, 61.8% and 53.2%, and 90% and 69.6% for the low-, intermediate

  7. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the prostate: a case report of a rare clinical entity

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Tithi; Podder, Tarun; Lepera, Pamela A; Walker, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the prostate is a unique and rare clinicopathological entity with fewer than 100 cases reported in the literature. Because of its rarity, the optimal management is not well known. Here, we report a case of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the prostate which was treated with definitive concurrent chemo-radiotherapy with excellent outcome along with a brief review of the literature. PMID:28031893

  8. Successful treatment of metastatic androgen-independent prostate carcinoma in a transsexual patient.

    PubMed

    Dorff, Tanya B; Shazer, Ronald L; Nepomuceno, Edward M; Tucker, Steven J

    2007-06-01

    The occurrence of prostate carcinoma in transsexual patients has rarely been reported. These cases present a unique challenge in that such patients are effectively receiving androgen deprivation therapy. By definition, their disease is androgen-independent prostate cancer, and the role of local therapy is undefined. We report on a male-to-female transsexual patient with metastatic prostate cancer treated successfully with combination chemotherapy after previous standard therapy failed.

  9. Olaparib With or Without Cediranib in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Castration-Resistant Prostate Carcinoma; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma With Focal Neuroendocrine Differentiation; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Prostate Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Adenocarcinoma

  10. Perturbation of NK cell peripheral homeostasis accelerates prostate carcinoma metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Lu, Shengjun; Wang, Xuanjun; Page, Stephanie T.; Higano, Celestia S.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Greenberg, Norman M.; Sun, Shaoli; Li, Zihai; Wu, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    The activating receptor NK cell group 2 member D (NKG2D) mediates antitumor immunity in experimental animal models. However, whether NKG2D ligands contribute to tumor suppression or progression clinically remains controversial. Here, we have described 2 novel lines of “humanized” bi-transgenic (bi-Tg) mice in which native human NKG2D ligand MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence B (MICB) or the engineered membrane-restricted MICB (MICB.A2) was expressed in the prostate of the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model of spontaneous carcinogenesis. Bi-Tg TRAMP/MICB mice exhibited a markedly increased incidence of progressed carcinomas and metastasis, whereas TRAMP/MICB.A2 mice enjoyed long-term tumor-free survival conferred by sustained NKG2D-mediated antitumor immunity. Mechanistically, we found that cancer progression in TRAMP/MICB mice was associated with loss of the peripheral NK cell pool owing to high serum levels of tumor-derived soluble MICB (sMICB). Prostate cancer patients also displayed reduction of peripheral NK cells and high sMIC levels. Our study has not only provided direct evidence in “humanized” mouse models that soluble and membrane-restricted NKG2D ligands pose opposite impacts on cancer progression, but also uncovered a mechanism of sMIC-induced impairment of NK cell antitumor immunity. Our findings suggest that the impact of soluble NKG2D ligands should be considered in NK cell–based cancer immunotherapy and that our unique mouse models should be valuable for therapy optimization. PMID:24018560

  11. An immunohistochemical assessment of hypoxia in prostate carcinoma using pimonidazole: Implications for radioresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Carnell, Dawn M. . E-mail: peterhoskin@nhs.net; Smith, Rowena E.; Daley, Frances; Saunders, Michele I.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Hoskin, Peter J.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the presence of hypoxia in human prostate carcinoma by using pimonidazole immunohistochemical labeling in radical prostatectomy specimens. Methods and Materials: Forty-three patients (median age, 69 years; range, 49-83 years) with localized prostate adenocarcinoma received 0.5 gm/m{sup 2} i.v. pimonidazole 16-24 h before radical prostatectomy. Hypoxia was detected with a monoclonal antibody directed against pimonidazole and scored in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections. Median and maximal vessel counts were measured with CD34. Results: Thirty-seven patients completed the study. Pimonidazole binding was present in prostate carcinomas in 34 of 37 patients (92%) and in benign prostatic hyperplasia in 35 of 37 patients (95%). A positive correlation of 3+ pimonidazole binding with Gleason score was demonstrated (Spearman's rank, p = 0.044). Vascularity scores did not correlate with hypoxic status or clinical prognostic parameters. Conclusion: Prostate carcinoma and benign prostatic hyperplasia have significant areas of hypoxia; greater hypoxia scores are seen with more aggressive prostate cancer. It is postulated that a hypoxic microenvironment within the prostate might be responsible for the promotion of secondary genetic alterations and angiogenic stimulation, leading to malignant progression, a more aggressive cell phenotype, and greater radioresistance. Modification of radiation regimens to specifically target hypoxia might improve local tumor control.

  12. Unusual Cushing's Syndrome and Hypercalcitoninaemia due to a Small Cell Prostate Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Magnani, Elena; Nuzzo, Fiorella

    2016-01-01

    A 75-year-old man was hospitalized because of severe hypokalaemia due to ACTH dependent Cushing's syndrome. Total body computed tomography (TBCT) and 68 Gallium DOTATATE PET/CT localized a voluminous prostate tumour. A subsequent transurethral prostate biopsy documented a small cell carcinoma positive for ACTH and calcitonin and negative for prostatic specific antigen (PSA) at immunocytochemical study; serum prostatic specific antigen (PSA) was normal. Despite medical treatments, Cushing's syndrome was not controlled and the patient's clinical condition progressively worsened. Surgical resection was excluded; the patient underwent a cycle of chemotherapy followed by febrile neutropenia and fatal intestinal perforation. This case report describes a rare case of Cushing's syndrome and hypercalcitoninaemia due to a small cell carcinoma of the prostate, a rare tumour with very few therapeutic options and negative prognosis. PMID:28044110

  13. Localization of linked {sup 125}I seeds in postimplant TRUS images for prostate brachytherapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Jinyu . E-mail: Jinyu.Xue@mail.tju.edu; Waterman, Frank; Handler, Jay; Gressen, Eric

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that {sup 125}I seeds can be localized in transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images obtained with a high-resolution probe when the implant is performed with linked seeds and spacers. Adequate seed localization is essential to the implementation of TRUS-based intraoperative dosimetry for prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirteen preplanned peripherally loaded prostate implants were performed using {sup 125}I seeds and spacers linked together in linear arrays that prevent seed migration and maintain precise seed spacing. A set of two-dimensional transverse images spaced at 0.50-cm intervals were obtained with a high-resolution TRUS probe at the conclusion of the procedure with the patient still under anesthesia. The image set extended from 1.0 cm superior to the base to 1.0 cm inferior to the apex. The visible echoes along each needle track were first localized and then compared with the known construction of the implanted array. The first step was to define the distal and proximal ends of each array. The visible echoes were then identified as seeds or spacers from the known sequence of the array. The locations of the seeds that did not produce a visible echo were interpolated from their known position in the array. A CT scan was obtained after implantation for comparison with the TRUS images. Results: On average, 93% (range, 86-99%) of the seeds were visible in the TRUS images. However, it was possible to localize 100% of the seeds in each case, because the locations of the missing seeds could be determined from the known construction of the arrays. Two factors complicated the interpretation of the TRUS images. One was that the spacers also produced echoes. Although weak and diffuse, these echoes could be mistaken for seeds. The other was that the number of echoes along a needle track sometimes exceeded the number of seeds and spacers implanted. This was attributed to the overall length of the array, which was approximately 0.5 cm

  14. Radiation, hormonotherapy, survival and local control in prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cellini, N; Luzi, S; Morganti, A G; Smaniotto, D; Niespolo, R M; Valentini, V

    1998-01-01

    The combination of concomitant external beam radiotherapy (ERT) and neoadjuvant hormonotherapy was shown to be able to significantly improve local control and disease-free survival in locally advanced prostatic carcinoma. (RTOG study 8610). Aim of this analysis was to assess the clinical results observed in a population of patients undergoing this combined treatment and, more particularly, to examine the prognostic impact of local control. 84 patients (T2: 47%, T3: 49.4%, T4: 3.6%) underwent concomitant ERT (dose to pelvic volume: 45 Gy; mean dose to prostatic volume: 65 Gy) and neoadjuvant hormonotherapy (flutamide: 250 mg three times/daily for 30 days; LH-RH analogue: 1 oral dose every 28 days starting 2 months prior to radiotherapy and for its whole duration). With a median follow-up of 36 months, 3.6% of patients were deceased; hematogenous metastases and local disease progression were recorded in 16.7% and 4.8% of patients, respectively. Local disease progression was shown to be significantly correlated with the incidence of metastases. In fact, the actuarial incidence of metastases at 5 years was 100% and 27% in patients with and without local recurrence (p = 0.0043) respectively. Overall, metastases-free local and biochemical recurrence-free survival was 89.2%, 66.5%, 85.0% and 41.9% respectively. At univariate analysis (logrank) the clinical stage (T) was shown to be significantly correlated with the incidence of metastases (p = .0004) and local progression (p < .0001). In conclusion, this study has confirmed the low rate of local progression with the combination of hormonotherapy and radiotherapy and the significant correlation of local control with the incidence of hematogenous metastases.

  15. MiRNA regulation of TRAIL expression exerts selective cytotoxicity to prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Huo, Wei; Jin, Ning; Fan, Li; Wang, Weihua

    2014-03-01

    Prostate carcinoma is the most common cancer for men and among the leading cancer-related causes. Many evidences have shown that tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) potently induces apoptosis in cancer cells, and thus, is a promising biologic agent for prostate carcinoma therapy. However, TRAIL expression mediated by the current vectors lacks tumor specificity, thereby exerting cytotoxicity to normal cells. To solve this problem, we inserted miRNA response elements (MREs), miR-143 and miR-145, expression levels of which were reduced in prostate carcinoma, as well as that of miR-122, which is specifically expressed in hepatic cells, into adenoviral vectors to control TRAIL expression (Ad-TRAIL-M3). qPCR data confirmed that miR-143, miR-145, and miR-122 levels were all decreased in prostate carcinoma cell lines and prostate cancer samples from patients. Luciferase assays showed that MREs-regulated luciferase expression was potently suppressed in normal cells, but not in prostate cancer cells. Ad-TRAIL-M3, which expresses TRAIL in a MREs-regulated manner, produced high level of TRAIL and suppressed the survival of prostate cancer cells by inducing apoptosis, while Ad-TRAIL-M3 had no TRAIL expression in normal cells and thus exerted no cytotoxicity to them. The studies on PC-3 tumor xenograft in mice further confirmed that Ad-TRAIL-M3 was able to inhibit the growth of tumors and possessed high biosafety. In conclusion, we successfully generated an adenoviral vector that expresses TRAIL in miRNA-regulated mechanism. This miRNA-based gene therapy may be promising for prostate carcinoma treatment.

  16. Metastatic superscan in prostate carcinoma on gallium-68-prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Tripathi, Madhavi; Kumar, Rajeev; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    We describe the imaging features of a metastatic superscan on gallium-68 Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys-(Ahx)-[Ga-68(HBED-CC)], abbreviated as gallium-68-prostate-specific membrane antigen ((68)Ga-PSMA) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging. (68)Ga-PSMA is novel radiotracer undergoing evaluation for PET/CT imaging of prostate carcinoma. This patient had a superscan of metastases on conventional bone scintigraphy and was referred for (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT to evaluate the feasibility of (177)Lu-PSMA therapy.

  17. Potential impact of prostate edema on the dosimetry of permanent seed implants using the new {sup 131}Cs (model CS-1) seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhe; Deng Jun; Roberts, Kenneth; Nath, Ravinder

    2006-04-15

    Our aim in this work was to study the potential dosimetric effect of prostate edema on the accuracy of conventional pre- and post-implant dosimetry for prostate seed implants using the newly introduced {sup 131}Cs seed, whose radioactive decay half-life ({approx}9.7 days) is directly comparable to the average edema resolution half-life ({approx}10 days) observed previously by Waterman et al. for {sup 125}I implants [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 41, 1069-1077 (1998)]. A systematic calculation of the relative dosimetry effect of prostate edema on the {sup 131}Cs implant was performed by using an analytic solution obtained previously [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 47, 1405-1419 (2000)]. It was found that conventional preimplant dosimetry always overestimates the true delivered dose as it ignores the temporary increase of the interseed distance caused by edema. The overestimation for {sup 131}Cs implants ranged from 1.2% (for a small edema with a magnitude of 10% and a half-life of 2 days) to approximately 45% (for larger degree edema with a magnitude of 100% and a half-life of 25 days). The magnitude of pre- and post-implant dosimetry error for {sup 131}Cs implants was found to be similar to that of {sup 103}Pd implants for typical edema characteristics (magnitude <100%, and half-life <25 days); both of which are worse compared to {sup 125}I implants. The preimplant dosimetry error for {sup 131}Cs implants cannot be compensated effectively without knowing the edema characteristics before the seed implantation. On the other hand, the error resulted from a conventional post-implant dosimetry can be minimized (to within {+-}6%) for {sup 131}Cs implants if the post-implant dosimetry is performed at 10{+-}2 days post seed implantation. This 'optimum' post-implant dosimetry time is shorter than those determined previously for the {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I implants at 16{+-}4 days and 6{+-}1 weeks, respectively.

  18. Real-time in vivo rectal wall dosimetry using plastic scintillation detectors for patients with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, Landon; Kudchadker, Rajat; Lee, Andrew; Beddar, Sam

    2014-01-01

    We designed and constructed an in vivo dosimetry system using plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) to monitor dose to the rectal wall in patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Five patients were enrolled in an Institutional Review Board–approved protocol for twice weekly in vivo dose monitoring with our system, resulting in a total of 142 in vivo dose measurements. PSDs were attached to the surface of endorectal balloons used for prostate immobilization to place the PSDs in contact with the rectal wall. Absorbed dose was measured in real time and the total measured dose was compared with the dose calculated by the treatment planning system on the daily CT image dataset. The mean difference between measured and calculated doses for the entire patient population was −0.4% (standard deviation 2.8%). The mean difference between daily measured and calculated doses for each patient ranged from −3.3% to 3.3% (standard deviation ranged from 5.6% to 7.1% for 4 patients and was 14.0% for the last, for whom optimal positioning of the detector was difficult owing to the patient’s large size). Patients tolerated the detectors well and the treatment workflow was not compromised. Overall, PSDs performed well as in vivo dosimeters, providing excellent accuracy, real-time measurement, and reusability. PMID:24434775

  19. An evaluation of the contouring abilities of medical dosimetry students for the anatomy of a prostate cancer patient

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Kevin S.

    2012-10-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common diseases treated in a radiation oncology department. One of the major predictors of the treatment outcome and patient side effects is the accuracy of the anatomical contours for the treatment plan. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine which anatomical structures are most often contoured correctly and incorrectly by medical dosimetry students. The author also wanted to discover whether a review of the contouring rules would increase contouring accuracy. To achieve this, a male computed tomography dataset consisting of 72 transverse slices was sent to students for contouring. The students were instructed to import this dataset into their treatment planning system and contour the following structures: skin, bladder, rectum, prostate, penile bulb, seminal vesicles, left femoral head, and right femoral head. Upon completion of the contours, the contour file was evaluated against a 'gold standard' contour set using StructSure software (Standard Imaging, Inc). A review of the initial contour results was conducted and then students were instructed to contour the dataset a second time. The results of this study showed significant differences between contouring sessions. These results and the standardization of contouring rules should benefit all individuals who participate in the treatment planning of cancer patients.

  20. Accuracy of dose planning for prostate radiotherapy in the presence of metallic implants evaluated by electron spin resonance dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Alves, G.G.; Kinoshita, A.; de Oliveira, H.F.; Guimarães, F.S.; Amaral, L.L.; Baffa, O.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main approaches to cure prostate cancer, and its success depends on the accuracy of dose planning. A complicating factor is the presence of a metallic prosthesis in the femur and pelvis, which is becoming more common in elderly populations. The goal of this work was to perform dose measurements to check the accuracy of radiotherapy treatment planning under these complicated conditions. To accomplish this, a scale phantom of an adult pelvic region was used with alanine dosimeters inserted in the prostate region. This phantom was irradiated according to the planned treatment under the following three conditions: with two metallic prostheses in the region of the femur head, with only one prosthesis, and without any prostheses. The combined relative standard uncertainty of dose measurement by electron spin resonance (ESR)/alanine was 5.05%, whereas the combined relative standard uncertainty of the applied dose was 3.35%, resulting in a combined relative standard uncertainty of the whole process of 6.06%. The ESR dosimetry indicated that there was no difference (P>0.05, ANOVA) in dosage between the planned dose and treatments. The results are in the range of the planned dose, within the combined relative uncertainty, demonstrating that the treatment-planning system compensates for the effects caused by the presence of femur and hip metal prostheses. PMID:26017344

  1. Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate: a distinct histopathological entity with important prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Henry, P C; Evans, A J

    2009-07-01

    Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate (IDCP) has been described as a lesion associated with poor prognostic features in prostate cancer. Its recognition and reporting in prostate specimens, particularly in needle biopsies, is critical as it carries significant implications for patient management. Recent histological definitions have been proposed to assist in the recognition of IDCP and to help distinguish it from lesions with similar appearance, but different clinical behaviour. In this review, a historical overview of the description of IDCP will be presented followed by a summary of the current histological diagnostic criteria and the recommendations for management and reporting of IDCP.

  2. Lack of detection of human papillomavirus DNA in prostate carcinomas in patients from northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Araujo-Neto, Ari P; Ferreira-Fernandes, Hygor; Amaral, Carolina M M; Santos, Lina G; Freitas, Antônio C; Silva-Neto, Jacinto C; Rey, Juan A; Burbano, Rommel R; Silva, Benedito B da; Yoshioka, France K N; Pinto, Giovanny R

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men in western populations, and despite its high mortality, its etiology remains unknown. Inflammatory processes are related to the etiology of various types of tumors, and prostate inflammation, in particular, has been associated with prostate cancer carcinogenesis and progression. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with benign and malignant lesions in the anogenital tract of both females and males. The possible role of HPV in prostate carcinogenesis is a subject of great controversy. In this study, we aimed to examine the prevalence of HPV infections in prostate carcinomas of patients from northeastern Brazil. This study included 104 tissue samples from primary prostate carcinoma cases. HPV DNA was purified and then amplified using MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+ degenerate primer sets that detect a wide range of HPV types, and with specific PCR primers sets for E6 and E7 HPV regions to detect HPV 16. None of the samples showed amplification products of HPV DNA for primer sets MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+, or the specific primer set for the E6 and E7 HPV regions. HPV infection, thus, does not seem to be one of the causes of prostate cancer in the population studied.

  3. Lack of detection of human papillomavirus DNA in prostate carcinomas in patients from northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Araujo-Neto, Ari P.; Ferreira-Fernandes, Hygor; Amaral, Carolina M.M.; Santos, Lina G.; Freitas, Antônio C.; Silva-Neto, Jacinto C.; Rey, Juan A.; Burbano, Rommel R.; da Silva, Benedito B.; Yoshioka, France K.N.; Pinto, Giovanny R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men in western populations, and despite its high mortality, its etiology remains unknown. Inflammatory processes are related to the etiology of various types of tumors, and prostate inflammation, in particular, has been associated with prostate cancer carcinogenesis and progression. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with benign and malignant lesions in the anogenital tract of both females and males. The possible role of HPV in prostate carcinogenesis is a subject of great controversy. In this study, we aimed to examine the prevalence of HPV infections in prostate carcinomas of patients from northeastern Brazil. This study included 104 tissue samples from primary prostate carcinoma cases. HPV DNA was purified and then amplified using MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+ degenerate primer sets that detect a wide range of HPV types, and with specific PCR primers sets for E6 and E7 HPV regions to detect HPV 16. None of the samples showed amplification products of HPV DNA for primer sets MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+, or the specific primer set for the E6 and E7 HPV regions. HPV infection, thus, does not seem to be one of the causes of prostate cancer in the population studied. PMID:27007894

  4. Investigation of the gold nanoparticles effects on the prostate dose distribution in brachytherapy: gel dosimetry and Monte Carlo method

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Bijan; Rahmani, Faezeh; Ebadi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In this work, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were embedded in the MAGIC-f polymer gel irradiated with the 192Ir brachytherapy sources. Material and methods At the first plexiglas phantom was made as the human pelvis. The GNPs were synthesized with 15 nm in diameter and 0.1 mM (0.0197 mg/ml) in concentration by using a chemical reduction method. Then, the MAGIC-f gel was synthesized. The fabricated gel was poured into the tubes located at the prostate (with and without the GNPs) locations of the phantom. The phantom was irradiated with 192Ir brachytherapy sources for prostate cancer. After 24 hours, the irradiated gels was read by using Siemens 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. Following the brachytherapy practices, the absolute doses at the reference points and isodose curves were extracted and compared by experimental measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Results The mean absorbed doses in the presence of the GNPs in prostate were 14% higher than the corresponding values without the GNPs in the brachytherapy. The gamma index analysis (between gel and MC) using 7%/7 mm was also applied to the data and a high pass rate achieved (91.7% and 86.4% for analysis with/without GNPs, respectively). Conclusions The real three-dimensional analysis shows the comparison of the dose-volume histograms measured for planning volumes and the expected one from the MC calculation. The results indicate that the polymer gel dosimetry method, which developed and used in this study, could be recommended as a reliable method for investigating the dose enhancement factor of GNPs in brachytherapy. PMID:27895684

  5. Evaluation of RET Tyrosine Kinase as a Novel Driver of Prostatic Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    neuroendocrine carcinoma (SCNC) accounts for only 1% of diagnosed prostate cancers prior to aggressive therapy. However, after administration of... aggressive therapy, tumor resistance is inevitable resulting in the acquisition of SCNC tumors in well over 20% of patients. SCNC tumors are highly... aggressive , metastasize readily, and often lead to death of the patient within months after diagnosis. Tyrosine kinases represent an untapped area for

  6. Diagnosis of prostatic neuroendocrine carcinoma: Two cases report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    He, Hai-Qing; Fan, Shu-Feng; Xu, Qiong; Chen, Zhen-Jing; Li, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Two cases of prostatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) imaged by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and literature review are presented. Early enhanced CT, MRI, especially diffusion-weighted image were emphasized, the complementary roles of ultrasound, CT, MRI, clinical and laboratory characteristic’s features in achieving accurate diagnosis were valued in the preoperative diagnosis of PNEC. PMID:26029353

  7. TERE1, a novel gene affecting growth regulation in prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    McGarvey, Terence W; Nguyen, Trang; Puthiyaveettil, Raghunath; Tomaszewski, John E; Malkowicz, S Bruce

    2003-02-01

    Recently, we isolated a ubiquitously expressed gene designated TERE1, which has a significant effect on the growth regulation in bladder cancer. The TERE1 gene maps to chromosome 1p36.11-1p36.33 between the micro-satellite markers D1S2667 and D1S434, a chromosome locus that has been identified by loss of heterozygosity studies as a site of a putative tumor suppressor gene or genes for multiple tumor types including prostate carcinoma. The expression of the TERE1 transcript and protein was examined in a series of thirty microdissected prostate tumors by semi-quantitative RT/PCR and immunohistochemistry. There was a significant 61% decrease in the TERE1 transcript in prostate carcinoma (CaP) and a distinct loss of the TERE1 protein in metstatic prostate. Though a loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 1p36 was found in 25% of these prostate tumors, there appeared to be no TERE1 mutations present in these tumor samples. Induced TERE1 expression after transduction or transfection of TERE1 constructs into two prostate carcinoma (LNCaP and PC-3) cell lines significantly decreased proliferation up to 80% with a significant increase in the number of cells in G1. Serum factors but not DHT (dihydrotestosterone) appear to regulate the amount of TERE1 protein in the androgen responsive LNCaP cell line. Additionally, we have identified by microarray analysis various growth regulatory genes that are down-regulated or up-regulated in TERE1-transduced PC-3 cells. Altogether, these data suggest that TERE1 maybe significant in prostate cancer growth regulation and the down regulation or absence of TERE1 may be an important component of the phenotype of advanced disease.

  8. Associations of Prostate-Specific Antigen, Prostate Carcinoma Tissue Gleason Score, and Androgen Receptor Expression with Bone Metastasis in Patients with Prostate Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yehui; Lin, Yun; Nie, Pin; Jiang, Wen; Liu, Yanqing; Yuan, Runqiang; Li, Miaoyuan; Zhao, Shijia; Lin, Huaxin; Li, Penghui; Zhang, Jinxiang; Hu, Zhiwen; Xu, Jin; Zhu, Xusheng

    2017-04-12

    BACKGROUND Prostate carcinoma (PCa) is often not diagnosed until advanced disease with bone metastasis. Predictive factors for bone metastasis are required to improve patient outcomes. The study aimed to analyze the factors associated with bone metastases in newly diagnosed patients with PCa. MATERIAL AND METHODS This was a retrospective study of 80 patients newly diagnosed with PCa by pathological examination between January 2012 and December 2014. Bone metastases were diagnosed by positron emission computed tomography. Clinical data, serological laboratory results, and pathological examination results were collected. RESULTS Among the 80 patients, 45 (56%) had bone metastases. Age, serum alkaline phosphatase, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), erythrocyte sedimentation rate, PCa tissue Gleason score, androgen receptor (AR) expression, and Ki-67 expression were higher in patients with bone metastasis compared with those without (all P<0.05). Multivariate logistic regression showed that PSA (OR: 1.005; 95%CI: 1.001-1.010; P=0.016), Gleason score (OR: 4.095; 95%CI: 1.592-10.529; P=0.003), and AR expression (OR: 14.023; 95%CI: 3.531-55.6981; P=0.005) were independently associated with bone metastases. Cut-off values for PSA, Gleason score, and AR expression were 67.1 ng/ml (sensitivity: 55.6%; specificity: 97.1%), 7.5 (sensitivity: 75.6%; specificity: 82.9%), and 2.5 (sensitivity: 84.0%; specificity: 91.4%), respectively. CONCLUSIONS PSA, Gleason score, and AR expression in PCa tissues were independently associated with PCa bone metastases. These results could help identifying patients with PCa at high risk of bone metastases.

  9. Influence of source batch S{sub K} dispersion on dosimetry for prostate cancer treatment with permanent implants

    SciTech Connect

    Nuñez-Cumplido, E. Hernandez-Armas, J.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Casares-Magaz, O.

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: In clinical practice, specific air kerma strength (S{sub K}) value is used in treatment planning system (TPS) permanent brachytherapy implant calculations with {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources; in fact, commercial TPS provide only one S{sub K} input value for all implanted sources and the certified shipment average is typically used. However, the value for S{sub K} is dispersed: this dispersion is not only due to the manufacturing process and variation between different source batches but also due to the classification of sources into different classes according to their S{sub K} values. The purpose of this work is to examine the impact of S{sub K} dispersion on typical implant parameters that are used to evaluate the dose volume histogram (DVH) for both planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs). Methods: The authors have developed a new algorithm to compute dose distributions with different S{sub K} values for each source. Three different prostate volumes (20, 30, and 40 cm{sup 3}) were considered and two typical commercial sources of different radionuclides were used. Using a conventional TPS, clinically accepted calculations were made for {sup 125}I sources; for the palladium, typical implants were simulated. To assess the many different possible S{sub K} values for each source belonging to a class, the authors assigned an S{sub K} value to each source in a randomized process 1000 times for each source and volume. All the dose distributions generated for each set of simulations were assessed through the DVH distributions comparing with dose distributions obtained using a uniform S{sub K} value for all the implanted sources. The authors analyzed several dose coverage (V{sub 100} and D{sub 90}) and overdosage parameters for prostate and PTV and also the limiting and overdosage parameters for OARs, urethra and rectum. Results: The parameters analyzed followed a Gaussian distribution for the entire set of computed dosimetries. PTV and

  10. Monte Carlo Simulations for Dosimetry in Prostate Radiotherapy with Different Intravesical Volumes and Planning Target Volume Margins

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei; Yu, Dong; He, Hengda; Liu, Qian

    2016-01-01

    In prostate radiotherapy, the influence of bladder volume variation on the dose absorbed by the target volume and organs at risk is significant and difficult to predict. In addition, the resolution of a typical medical image is insufficient for visualizing the bladder wall, which makes it more difficult to precisely evaluate the dose to the bladder wall. This simulation study aimed to quantitatively investigate the relationship between the dose received by organs at risk and the intravesical volume in prostate radiotherapy. The high-resolution Visible Chinese Human phantom and the finite element method were used to construct 10 pelvic models with specific intravesical volumes ranging from 100 ml to 700 ml to represent bladders of patients with different bladder filling capacities during radiotherapy. This series of models was utilized in six-field coplanar 3D conformal radiotherapy simulations with different planning target volume (PTV) margins. Each organ’s absorbed dose was calculated using the Monte Carlo method. The obtained bladder wall displacements during bladder filling were consistent with reported clinical measurements. The radiotherapy simulation revealed a linear relationship between the dose to non-targeted organs and the intravesical volume and indicated that a 10-mm PTV margin for a large bladder and a 5-mm PTV margin for a small bladder reduce the effective dose to the bladder wall to similar degrees. However, larger bladders were associated with evident protection of the intestines. Detailed dosimetry results can be used by radiation oncologists to create more accurate, individual water preload protocols according to the patient’s anatomy and bladder capacity. PMID:27441944

  11. Pim1 kinase synergizes with c-MYC to induce advanced prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Kim, Jongchan; Roh, Meejeon; Franco, Omar E.; Hayward, Simon W.; Wills, Marcia L.; Abdulkadir, Sarki A.

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic PIM1 kinase has been implicated as a cofactor for c-MYC in prostate carcinogenesis. Here we show that in human prostate tumors, coexpression of c-MYC and PIM1 is associated with higher Gleason grades. Using a tissue recombination model coupled with lentiviral-mediated gene transfer we find that Pim1 is weakly oncogenic in naïve adult mouse prostatic epithelium. However, it cooperates dramatically with c-MYC to induce prostate cancer within 6-weeks. Importantly, c-MYC/Pim1 synergy is critically dependent on Pim1 kinase activity. c-MYC/Pim1 tumors showed increased levels of the active serine-62 (S62) phosphorylated form of c-MYC. Grafts expressing a phosphomimetic c-MYCS62D mutant had higher rates of proliferation than grafts expressing wild type c-MYC but did not form tumors like c-MYC/Pim1 grafts, indicating that Pim1 cooperativity with c-MYC in vivo involves additional mechanisms other than enhancement of c-MYC activity by S62 phosphorylation. c-MYC/Pim1-induced prostate carcinomas demonstrate evidence of neuroendocrine (NE) differentiation. Additional studies, including the identification of tumor cells coexpressing androgen receptor and NE cell markers synaptophysin and Ascl1 suggested that NE tumors arose from adenocarcinoma cells through transdifferentiation. These results directly demonstrate functional cooperativity between c-MYC and PIM1 in prostate tumorigenesis in vivo and support efforts for targeting PIM1 in prostate cancer. PMID:20140016

  12. Semiconductor nanocrystal-aptamer bioconjugate probes for specific prostate carcinoma cell targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Felice; Lavery, Laura; Chu, Chitai T.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Ellington, Andrew D.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2005-04-01

    Cancer of the prostate affects approximately 1 in 11 men. Current early screening for prostate cancer utilizes digital rectal examinations to detect anomalies in the prostate gland and blood test screenings for upregulated levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA). Many of these tests are invasive and can often be inconclusive as PSA levels may be heightened due to benign factors. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), a well-characterized integral membrane protein, is expressed in virtually all prostate cancers and often correlates with cancer aggressiveness. Therefore, it may be used as an indicator of cancer growth and metastases. PSMA-specific antibodies have been identified and conjugated to fluorescent markers for cancer cell targeting; however, both the antibodies and markers possess significant limitations in their pharmaceutical and diagnostic value. Here we report the use of semiconductor nanocrystals bioconjugated to PSMA-specific aptamer recognition molecules for prostate carcinoma cell targeting. The nanocrystal/aptamer bioconjugates are small biocompatible probes with the potential for color-tunability for multicolor imaging. Ongoing in vitro and in vivo research seeks to introduce these nanoparticle bioconjugates into medical diagnostics.

  13. Metastasis in urothelial carcinoma mimicking prostate cancer metastasis in Ga-68 prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography-computed tomography in a case of synchronous malignancy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Manoj; Choudhury, Partha Sarathi; Gupta, Gurudutt; Gandhi, Jatin

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in man. It commonly presents with urinary symptoms, bone pain, or diagnosed with elevated prostate-specific antigen.(PSA) levels. Correct staging and early diagnosis of recurrence by a precise imaging tool are the keys for optimum management. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer with Ga-68 prostate-specific membrane antigen.(PSMA), positron emission tomography-computed tomography.(PET-CT) has recently received significant attention and frequently used with a signature to prostate cancer-specific remark. However, this case will highlight the more cautious use of it. A-72-year-old male treated earlier for synchronous double malignancy.(invasive papillary urothelial carcinoma right ureter and carcinoma prostate) presented with rising PSA.(0.51.ng/ml) and referred for Ga-68 PSMA PET-CT, which showed a positive enlarged left supraclavicular lymph node. Lymph node biopsy microscopic and immunohistochemistry examination revealed metastatic carcinoma favoring urothelial origin. Specificity of PSMA scan to prostate cancer has been seen to be compromised in a certain situation mostly due to neoangiogenesis, and false positives emerged in renal cell cancer, differentiated thyroid cancer, glioblastoma, breast cancer brain metastasis, and paravertebral schwannomas. Understanding the causes of false positive will further enhance the confidence of interpretating PSMA scans.

  14. In vivo dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer--a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Anton, Mathias; Wagner, Daniela; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Hackel, Thomas; Hermann, Robert Michael; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Vorwerk, Hilke

    2009-05-07

    A phantom study for dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer is presented. The measurement method of the secondary standard of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt had to be slightly modified in order to be able to measure inside a Foley catheter. The absorbed dose to water response of the alanine dosimetry system to (192)Ir was determined with a reproducibility of 1.8% relative to (60)Co. The resulting uncertainty for measurements inside the urethra was estimated to be 3.6%, excluding the uncertainty of the dose rate constant Lambda. The applied dose calculated by a treatment planning system is compared to the measured dose for a small series of (192)Ir HDR irradiations in a gel phantom. The differences between the measured and applied dose are well within the limits of uncertainty. Therefore, the method is considered to be suitable for measurements in vivo.

  15. In vivo dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during 192Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer—a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anton, Mathias; Wagner, Daniela; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Hackel, Thomas; Hermann, Robert Michael; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Vorwerk, Hilke

    2009-05-01

    A phantom study for dosimetry in the urethra using alanine/ESR during 192Ir HDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer is presented. The measurement method of the secondary standard of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt had to be slightly modified in order to be able to measure inside a Foley catheter. The absorbed dose to water response of the alanine dosimetry system to 192Ir was determined with a reproducibility of 1.8% relative to 60Co. The resulting uncertainty for measurements inside the urethra was estimated to be 3.6%, excluding the uncertainty of the dose rate constant Λ. The applied dose calculated by a treatment planning system is compared to the measured dose for a small series of 192Ir HDR irradiations in a gel phantom. The differences between the measured and applied dose are well within the limits of uncertainty. Therefore, the method is considered to be suitable for measurements in vivo.

  16. Preclinical Evaluation of 86Y-Labeled Inhibitors of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen for Dosimetry Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Foss, Catherine A.; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Wang, Yuchuan; Srinivasan, Senthamizhchelvan; Hobbs, Robert F.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Mease, Ronnie C.; Sgouros, George; Pomper, Martin G.

    2016-01-01

    86Y (half-life = 14.74 h, 33% β+) is within an emerging class of positron-emitting isotopes with relatively long physical half-lives that enables extended imaging of biologic processes. We report the synthesis and evaluation of 3 low-molecular-weight compounds labeled with 86Y for imaging the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) using PET. Impetus for the study derives from the need to perform dosimetry estimates for the corresponding 90Y-labeled radiotherapeutics. Methods Multistep syntheses were used in preparing 86Y-4–6. PSMA inhibition constants were evaluated by competitive binding assay. In vivo characterization using tumor-bearing male mice was performed by PET/CT for 86Y-4–6 and by biodistribution studies of 86Y-4 and 86Y-6 out to 24 h after injection. Quantitative whole-body PET scans were recorded to measure the kinetics for 14 organs in a male baboon using 86Y-6. Results Compounds 86Y-4–6 were obtained in high radiochemical yield and purity, with specific radioactivities of more than 83.92 GBq/µmol. PET imaging and biodistribution studies using PSMA-positive PC-3 PIP and PSMA-negative PC-3 flu tumor-bearing mice revealed that 86Y-4–6 had high site-specific uptake in PSMA-positive PC-3 PIP tumor starting at 20 min after injection and remained high at 24 h. Compound 86Y-6 demonstrated the highest tumor uptake and retention, with 32.17 ± 7.99 and 15.79 ± 6.44 percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g) at 5 and 24 h, respectively. Low activity concentrations were associated with blood and normal organs, except for the kidneys, a PSMA-expressing tissue. PET imaging in baboons reveals that all organs have a 2-phase (rapid and slow) clearance, with the highest uptake (8 %ID/g) in the kidneys at 25 min. The individual absolute uptake kinetics were used to calculate radiation doses using the OLINDA/EXM software. The highest mean absorbed dose was received by the renal cortex, with 1.9 mGy per MBq of 86Y-6. Conclusion Compound 86Y-6 is a promising

  17. [The 2014 consensus conference of the ISUP on Gleason grading of prostatic carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, G; Egevad, L; Amin, M; Delahunt, B; Srigley, J R; Humphrey, P A; Epstein, J I

    2016-02-01

    In 2005 the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) held a concensus conference on Gleason grading in order to bring this grading system up to the current state of contemporary practice; however, it became clear that further modifications on the grading of prostatic carcinoma were necessary. The International Society of Urological Pathology therefore held a further consensus conference in 2014 to clarify these points. This article presents the essential results of the Chicago grading meeting.

  18. Dosimetry verification on VMAT and IMRT radiotherapy techniques: In the case of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulana, A.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy treatment depends on the accuracy of the dose delivery to patients, the purpose of the study is to verify the dose in IMRT and VMAT technique in prostate cancer cases correspond to TPS dose using phantom base on ICRU No.50. The dose verification of the target and OAR was performed by placing the TLD Rod LiF100 and EBT2 Gafchromic film at slab hole of pelvic part of the Alderson RANDO phantom for prostate cancer simulation. The Exposed TLDs was evaluated using the TLD Reader Harshaw while EBT2 film was scanned using Epson scanner. The point dose measurements were compared between planned dose and measured dose at target volume and OAR. The result is the dose difference at target volume, bladder and rectum for IMRT and VMAT are less than 5%. On the other hand, the dose difference at the Femoral head is more than 5% for both techniques because the location of OAR already in low gradient dose. Furthermore, the difference dose of the target volume for IMRT technique tends to be smaller than VMAT either for TLD and EBT2 film detectors. From the measurement showed that the delivered dose on the phantom simulation match with ICRU No.50 criteria.

  19. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Bladder/Prostate Rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical Outcomes and Dosimetry Compared to Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cotter, Shane E.; Herrup, David A.; Friedmann, Alison; Macdonald, Shannon M.; Pieretti, Raphael V.; Robinson, Gregoire; Adams, Judith; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: In this study, we report the clinical outcomes of 7 children with bladder/prostate rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) treated with proton radiation and compare proton treatment plans with matched intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans, with an emphasis on dose savings to reproductive and skeletal structures. Methods and Materials: Follow-up consisted of scheduled clinic appointments at our institution or direct communication with the treating physicians for referred patients. Each proton radiotherapy plan used for treatment was directly compared to an IMRT plan generated for the study. Clinical target volumes and normal tissue volumes were held constant to facilitate dosimetric comparisons. Each plan was optimized for target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Seven male patients were treated with proton radiotherapy for bladder/prostate RMS at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 2002 and 2008. Median age at treatment was 30 months (11-70 months). Median follow-up was 27 months (10-90 months). Four patients underwent a gross total resection prior to radiation, and all patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Radiation doses ranged from 36 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE) to 50.4 CGE. Five of 7 patients were without evidence of disease and with intact bladders at study completion. Target volume dosimetry was equivalent between the two modalities for all 7 patients. Proton radiotherapy led to a significant decrease in mean organ dose to the bladder (25.1 CGE vs. 33.2 Gy; p = 0.03), testes (0.0 CGE vs. 0.6 Gy; p = 0.016), femoral heads (1.6 CGE vs. 10.6 Gy; p = 0.016), growth plates (21.7 CGE vs. 32.4 Gy; p = 0.016), and pelvic bones (8.8 CGE vs. 13.5 Gy; p = 0.016) compared to IMRT. Conclusions: This study provides evidence of significant dose savings to normal structures with proton radiotherapy compared to IMRT and is well tolerated in this patient population. The long-term impact of these reduced doses can be tested in future studies

  20. Multi-institutional retrospective analysis of learning curves on dosimetry and operation time before and after introduction of intraoperatively built custom-linked seeds in prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Satoh, Takefumi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Saito, Shiro; Kataoka, Masaaki; Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Nakamura, Ryuji; Tanji, Susumu; Masui, Koji; Okihara, Koji; Ohashi, Toshio; Momma, Tetsuo; Aoki, Manabu; Miki, Kenta; Kato, Masako; Morita, Masashi; Katayama, Norihisa; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kawanaka, Takashi; Fukumori, Tomoharu; Ito, Fumitaka; Shiroki, Ryoichi; Baba, Yuji; Inadome, Akito; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Takayama, Hitoshi; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2016-01-01

    This multi-institutional retrospective analysis examined learning curves for dosimetric parameters and operation time after introduction of intraoperatively built custom-linked (IBCL) seeds. Data from consecutive patients treated with seed implantation before and after introduction of IBCL seeds (loose seed, n = 428; IBCL seed, n = 426) were collected from 13 centers. Dose-volume histogram parameters, operation times, and seed migration rates were compared before and after introduction of IBCL seeds. At the 1-month CT analysis, no significant differences were seen in dose to 90% of prostate volume between before and after IBCL seed introduction. No learning curve for dosimetry was seen. Prostate and rectal volume receiving at least 150% of prescription dose (V150 and RV150) were higher in the loose-seed group than in the IBCL-seed group. Operation time was extended by up to 10 min when IBCL seeds were used, although there was a short learning curve of about five patients. The percentage of patients with seed migration in the IBCL-seed group was one-tenth that in the loose-seed group. Our study revealed no dosimetric demerits, no learning curve for dosimetry, and a slightly extended operation time for IBCL seeds. A significant reduction in the rate of seed migration was identified in the IBCL-seed group.

  1. [Mediterranean diet, micronutrients and prostate carcinoma: a rationale approach to primary prevention of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Miano, Lucio

    2003-09-01

    Cancer of the prostate is one of the most commonly diagnosed solid malignancies and the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men living in Italy. With an ageing population, the number of men living with early stages of prostate cancer is expected to increase. There is an impelling need to prevent the onset of the cancer or delay the progression of carcinogenesis in this organ. The chemoprevention of cancer is a relatively new concept defined as the administration of pharmacological agents (drug or diet-derived supplements) to prevent, delay or reverse the carcinogenesis. Epidemiological data showing ethnic and geographic variations in the incidence of, and mortality from, prostate cancer have suggested that the consumption of dietary factors may be protective. There is increasing evidence that diet (particularly dietary fat intake) may play a significant role in early prostate carcinogenesis. Dietary micronutrients and antioxidants are under intense scrutiny. These factors include the vitamin D and E, lycopene, selenium, zinc, poliphenols, isoflavonoids, and phytoestrogens (especially soy products and green tea). The old Mediterranean diet (based on cereals, vegetables, polyunsaturated fats, fruits, fish and low quantities of dairy products and meat) is now sparingly adopted because of the globalisation of the food chain which now involves also our country. Nevertheless, our traditional dietary habits are considered of great value in the prevention of cardiovascular or cancerous diseases and particularly of prostate cancer.

  2. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy can differentiate high grade and low grade prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Werahera, Priya N; Jasion, Edward A; David Crawford, E; Lucia, M Scott; van Bokhoven, Adrie; Sullivan, Holly T; Kim, Fernando J; Maroni, Paul D; David Port, J; Daily, John W; Rosa, Francisco G La; Werahera, Priya N; Jasion, Edward A; Crawford, E David; Lucia, M Scott; van Bokhoven, Adrie; Sullivan, Holly T; Kim, Fernando J; Maroni, Paul D; Port, J David; Daily, John W; La Rosa, Francisco G; Daily, John W; Van Bokhoven, Adrie; Crawford, E David; Port, J David; Werahera, Priya N; Lucia, M Scott; Sullivan, Holly T; Maroni, Paul D; Jasion, Edward A; La Rosa, Francisco G; Kim, Fernando J

    2016-08-01

    Prostate tumors are graded by the revised Gleason Score (GS) which is the sum of the two predominant Gleason grades present ranging from 6-10. GS 6 cancer exclusively with Gleason grade 3 is designated as low grade (LG) and correlates with better clinical prognosis for patients. GS >7 cancer with at least one of the Gleason grades 4 and 5 is designated as HG indicate worse prognosis for patients. Current transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsies often fail to correctly diagnose HG prostate cancer due to sampling errors. Diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) of biological tissue depend on tissue morphology and architecture. Thus, DRS could potentially differentiate between HG and LG prostatic carcinoma. A 15-gauge optical biopsy needle was prototyped to take prostate biopsies after measuring DRS with a laboratory fluorometer. This needle has an optical sensor that utilizes 8×100 μm optical fibers for tissue excitation and a single 200 μm central optical fiber to measure DRS. Tissue biopsy cores were obtained from 20 surgically excised prostates using this needle after measuring DRS at 5 nm intervals between 500-700 nm wavelengths. Tissue within a measurement window was histopathologically classified as either benign, LG, or HG and correlated with DRS. Partial least square analysis of DRS identified principal components (PC) as potential classifiers. Statistically significant PCs (p<;0.05) were tested for their ability to classify biopsy tissue using support vector machine and leave-one-out cross validation method. There were 29 HG and 49 LG cancers among 187 biopsy cores included in the study. Study results show 76% sensitivity, 80% specificity, 93% negative predictive value, and 50% positive predictive value for HG versus benign, and 76%, 73%, 84%, and 63%, for HG versus LG prostate tissue classification. DRS failed to diagnose 7/29 (24%) HG cancers. This study demonstrated that an optical biopsy needle guided by DRS has sufficient accuracy to differentiate HG

  3. SU-E-T-257: Development of a New Endorectal Balloon with An Unfoldable Radiochromic Film for In-Vivo Rectal Dosimetry During Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jeang, E; Lim, Y; Cho, K; Hwang, U; Jeong, J; Kim, H; Kim, S; Lee, S; Shin, D; Park, J; Kim, J; Kwak, J; Choi, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We developed an endorectal balloon for in-vivo rectal dosimetry in two-dimensions, and evaluated its dosimetric properties for the radiation treatment of prostate cancer. Methods: The endorectal balloon for in-vivo rectal dosimetry is equipped with a radiochromic film so that two-dimensional dose distribution can be measured in the rectal wall. The film is unrolled as the balloon is inflated, and it is rolled as the balloon is deflated. The outer diameter of the balloon is about 14 mm before inflating it, but its outer diameter can be increased up to about 50 mm after inflating it with 80 ml distilled water. The size of the film is 80(L) x 64(W) mm2, so large as to measure a dose distribution of an anterior half of the rectal wall. After it was inserted into a fabricated rectal phantom, the phantom was scanned by a CT scanner and 5 Gy was delivered to a target inside the phantom with a 15 MV photon beam in AP direction. Finally, the dose distribution measured in the endorectal balloon was compared with that of the treatment plan. Results: The two dose distributions were compared each other in the parallel and the perpendicular directions along an axis of the balloon. The two dose profiles analyzed from the radiochromic film agreed well with the plan within 3% for 15 MV photon beam. Conclusion: An endorectal balloon for two-dimensional in-vivo rectal dosimetry was developed and its dosimetric effectiveness was evaluated for the radiation treatment of prostate cancer. The measured dose distributions showed good agreement with the plans.

  4. Do HOXB13 and P63 have a role in differentiating poorly differentiated prostatic carcinoma from urothelial high-grade carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Alshenawy, Hanan AlSaeid; Saied, Eman

    2015-09-01

    Poorly differentiated prostatic carcinoma may overlap with high-grade urothelial carcinoma; a distinction is a must as treatments differ. This study aims to evaluate traditional (PSA and HMWCK) and relatively novel (P63 and HOXB13) markers in distinguishing them; and to evaluate their role in the diagnosis of challenging cases. Sections from: diagnosed group includes 65 prostatic and urothelial carcinoma cases were stained with PSA, HMWCK, P63, and HOXB13. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were evaluated. The second group includes 25 challenging cases which were stained first by PSA and HMWCK, then solved the problematic cases with P63 and HOXB13. PSA and HMWCK were sensitive and specific for prostatic and urothelial carcinomas, respectively, but the sensitivity and accuracy were higher for P63 and HOXB13. By using the traditional markers, 17 cases were diagnosed in the second group while the remaining eight cases need the novel markers to be diagnosed. A confident diagnosis can be established in the majority of cases of poorly differentiated carcinoma in either prostatic or urothelial by using a panel of PSA and HMWCK. In some problematic cases, an extended panel including P63 and HOXB13 is helpful in resolving the diagnosis.

  5. Proposal of Gleason-like grading system of canine prostate carcinoma in veterinary pathology practice.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Chiara; Grieco, Valeria

    2015-12-01

    Gleason grading - the most useful predictor of prognosis for prostate cancer in men - was updated at a 2005 consensus conference by the International Society of Urological Pathology. Since Gleason-like growth patterns have been recognised in dogs, this study aimed to apply the modified Gleason grading to 45 canine prostate carcinomas. A single primary growth pattern was observed in 28 cases, a secondary pattern in 11 cases and a tertiary pattern in 6 cases. Cribriform, solid and small acinar/ductal were the most common primary, secondary and tertiary morphological patterns, respectively. The highest Gleason score (GS10) was obtained in 46.7% of cases. Nine of 14 metastasizing cases were classified as GS10. Gleason pattern 5 was present in 33 of cases. This study suggests that the modified Gleason grading, based on specific histological growth patterns existing in canine prostate carcinomas, may be accepted as a grading system for histopathology in the practice settings in order to complete the clinical assessment for the best management of the patient.

  6. Responsiveness of human prostate carcinoma bone tumors to interleukin-2 therapy in a mouse xenograft tumor model.

    PubMed

    Kocheril, S V; Grignon, D J; Wang, C Y; Maughan, R L; Montecillo, E J; Talati, B; Tekyi-Mensah, S; Pontes, J e; Hillman, G G

    1999-01-01

    We have tested an immunotherapy approach for the treatment of metastatic prostate carcinoma using a bone tumor model. Human PC-3 prostate carcinoma tumor cells were heterotransplanted into the femur cavity of athymic Balb/c nude mice. Tumor cells replaced marrow cells in the bone cavity, invaded adjacent bone and muscle tissues, and formed a palpable tumor at the hip joint. PC-3/IF cell lines, generated from bone tumors by serial in vivo passages, grew with faster kinetics in the femur and metastasized to inguinal lymph nodes. Established tumors were treated with systemic interleukin-2 (IL-2) injections. IL-2 significantly inhibited the formation of palpable tumors and prolonged mouse survival at nontoxic low doses. Histologically IL-2 caused vascular damage and infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes in the tumor as well as necrotic areas with apoptotic cells. These findings suggest destruction of tumor cells by systemic IL-2 therapy and IL-2 responsiveness of prostate carcinoma bone tumors.

  7. Simultaneous inactivation of Par-4 and PTEN in vivo leads to synergistic NF-κB activation and invasive prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J.; Abu-Baker, Shadi; Joshi, Jayashree; Galvez, Anita; Castilla, Elias A.; Cañamero, Marta; Collado, Manuel; Saez, Carmen; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Palacios, Jose; Leitges, Michael; Serrano, Manuel; Moscat, Jorge; Diaz-Meco, Maria T.

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common neoplasias in men. The tumor suppressor Par-4 is an important negative regulator of the canonical NF-κB pathway and is highly expressed in prostate. Here we show that Par-4 expression is lost in a high percentage of human prostate carcinomas, and this occurs in association with phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) loss. Par-4 null mice, similar to PTEN-heterozygous mice, only develop benign prostate lesions, but, importantly, concomitant Par-4 ablation and PTEN-heterozygosity lead to invasive prostate carcinoma in mice. This strong tumorigenic cooperation is anticipated in the preneoplastic prostate epithelium by an additive increase in Akt activation and a synergistic stimulation of NF-κB. These results establish the cooperation between Par-4 and PTEN as relevant for the development of prostate cancer and implicate the NF-κB pathway as a critical event in prostate tumorigenesis. PMID:19470463

  8. Differentially methylated genes and androgen receptor re-expression in small cell prostate carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kleb, Brittany; Estécio, Marcos R H; Zhang, Jiexin; Tzelepi, Vassiliki; Chung, Woonbok; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Navone, Nora M; Tahir, Salahaldin; Marquez, Victor E; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Maity, Sankar; Aparicio, Ana

    2016-03-03

    Small cell prostate carcinoma (SCPC) morphology is rare at initial diagnosis but often emerges during prostate cancer progression and portends a dismal prognosis. It does not express androgen receptor (AR) or respond to hormonal therapies. Clinically applicable markers for its early detection and treatment with effective chemotherapy are needed. Our studies in patient tumor-derived xenografts (PDX) revealed that AR-negative SCPC (AR(-)SCPC) expresses neural development genes instead of the prostate luminal epithelial genes characteristic of AR-positive castration-resistant adenocarcinomas (AR(+)ADENO). We hypothesized that the differences in cellular lineage programs are reflected in distinct epigenetic profiles. To address this hypothesis, we compared the DNA methylation profiles of AR(-) and AR(+) PDX using methylated CpG island amplification and microarray (MCAM) analysis and identified a set of differentially methylated promoters, validated in PDX and corresponding donor patient samples. We used the Illumina 450K platform to examine additional regions of the genome and the correlation between the DNA methylation profiles of the PDX and their corresponding patient tumors. Struck by the low frequency of AR promoter methylation in the AR(-)SCPC, we investigated this region's specific histone modification patterns by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We found that the AR promoter was enriched in silencing histone modifications (H3K27me3 and H3K9me2) and that EZH2 inhibition with 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) resulted in AR expression and growth inhibition in AR(-)SCPC cell lines. We conclude that the epigenome of AR(-) is distinct from that of AR(+) castration-resistant prostate carcinomas, and that the AR(-) phenotype can be reversed with epigenetic drugs.

  9. Androgen deprivation therapy and fracture risk in Chinese patients with prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Ho; Huang, Gang; Chan, Pak-Hei; Hai, Jojo; Yeung, Chun-Yip; Fong, Carol Ho-Yi; Woo, Yu-Cho; Ho, Kwan Lun; Yiu, Ming-Kwong; Leung, Frankie; Lau, Tak-Wing; Tse, Hung-Fat; Lam, Karen Siu-Ling; Siu, Chung-Wah

    2017-01-01

    Objective Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) increases fracture risk in men with carcinoma of the prostate, but little is known about the fracture risk for different types of ADT. We studied the fracture risk amongst Chinese patients with carcinoma of the prostate prescribed different ADT regimens. Subjects and methods This was a single-centered observational study that involved 741 patients with carcinoma of the prostate from January 2001 to December 2011. Results After a median follow-up of 5 years, 71.7% of the study cohort received ADT and the incidence rate of fracture was 8.1%. Multivariable Cox regression analysis revealed that use of ADT was significantly associated with risk of incident fracture (Hazard Ratio [HR] 3.60; 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI] 1.41–9.23; p = 0.008), together with aged >75 years and type 2 diabetes. Compared with no ADT, all three types of ADT were independently associated with the risk of incident fracture: anti-androgen monotherapy (HR 4.47; 95% CI 1.47–13.7; p = 0.009), bilateral orchiectomy ± anti-androgens (HR 4.01; 95% CI 1.46–11.1; p = 0.007) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists ± anti-androgens (HR 3.16; 95% CI 1.18–8.43; p = 0.022). However, there was no significant difference in the relative risks among the three types of ADT. Conclusions Fracture risk increases among all types of ADT. Clinicians should take into account the risk-benefit ratio when prescribing ADT, especially in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:28158241

  10. Pathophysiology and Natural History of Anorectal Sequelae Following Radiation Therapy for Carcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric K.; Holloway, Richard H.; Fraser, Robert J.; Botten, Rochelle J.; Di Matteo, Addolorata C.; Butters, Julie

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To characterize the prevalence, pathophysiology, and natural history of chronic radiation proctitis 5 years following radiation therapy (RT) for localized carcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: Studies were performed in 34 patients (median age 68 years; range 54-79) previously randomly assigned to either 64 Gy in 32 fractions over 6.4 weeks or 55 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks RT schedule using 2- and later 3-dimensional treatment technique for localized prostate carcinoma. Each patient underwent evaluations of (1) gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (Modified Late Effects in Normal Tissues Subjective, Objective, Management and Analytic scales including effect on activities of daily living [ADLs]); (2) anorectal motor and sensory function (manometry and graded balloon distension); and (3) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before RT, at 1 month, and annually for 5 years after its completion. Results: Total GI symptom scores increased after RT and remained above baseline levels at 5 years and were associated with reductions in (1) basal anal pressures, (2) responses to squeeze and increased intra-abdominal pressure, (3) rectal compliance and (4) rectal volumes of sensory perception. Anal sphincter morphology was unchanged. At 5 years, 44% and 21% of patients reported urgency of defecation and rectal bleeding, respectively, and 48% impairment of ADLs. GI symptom scores and parameters of anorectal function and anal sphincter morphology did not differ between the 2 RT schedules or treatment techniques. Conclusions: Five years after RT for prostate carcinoma, anorectal symptoms continue to have a significant impact on ADLs of almost 50% of patients. These symptoms are associated with anorectal dysfunction independent of the RT schedules or treatment techniques reported here.

  11. Targeting prostate carcinoma by G3-C12 peptide conjugated N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide copolymers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Li, Lian; Zhou, Zhou; Yang, Qingqing; Liu, Chong; Huang, Yuan

    2014-10-06

    Prostate carcinoma is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Increased expression of membrane-bound galectin-3 by prostate carcinoma cell has been found to correlate with more poorly differentiated and increased metastatic potential. In the present study, different amount of galectin-3-binding peptide, G3-C12 (the sequence ANTPCGPYTHDCPVKR), was attached to N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers as targeting moiety. The results of qPCR and competitive binding test indicated that the expression level of galectin-3 in two metastatic prostate carcinoma cell lines (PC-3 and DU145 cells) could be significantly suppressed by the addition of G3-C12-modified HPMA copolymers (PG1 and PG2), demonstrating the high affinity of PG1 and PG2 to galectin-3. Due to the multivalent effects of moieties, the uptake of copolymers was remarkably enhanced with the increasing amount of conjugated G3-C12 peptide. A higher internalization of PG1 and PG2 occurred in PC-3 cells via caveolin- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis, whereas a clathrin-mediated uptake process was involved in DU145 cells. The in vivo biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of nonmodified ((131)I-pHPMA) and G3-C12-modified ((131)I-PG1 and (131)I-PG2) copolymers were estimated on a well-established mice model bearing PC-3 xenografts by (131)I-SPECT-imaging. Higher tumor accumulation of (131)I-PG1 (1.60 ± 0.08% ID/g, p < 0.05) and (131)I-PG2 (1.54 ± 0.06% ID/g, p < 0.05) was observed compared with (131)I-pHPMA (1.19 ± 0.04% ID/g) at 2 h post-intravenous injection. Although the amount of conjugated G3-C12 peptide performed a remarkable in vitro effect on the affinity and internalization of HPMA copolymers to the galectin-3 overexpressed prostate carcinoma cells, the molecular weight and ligand modification all play important roles on their in vivo tumor accumulation.

  12. Radium-223 chloride: a new treatment option for metastatic castration-resistant prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Alvaro; Cruz, Patricia

    2012-12-01

    In the last few years, the treatment of castration-resistant prostate carcinoma (CRPC) has changed completely. The approval of docetaxel and subsequent investigation in this field have led to development of new agents that have demonstrated an improvement in overall survival in the post-docetaxel setting, such as cabazitaxel and abiraterone. Radium-223 chloride is a radioisotope that has recently shown efficacy after docetaxel and in patients unfit for docetaxel, with improvements in overall survival and the time to the first skeletal-related event, compared with placebo, without increasing toxicity. These findings have made this agent a new option for treatment of these patients in the near future.

  13. Effects of external beam radiotherapy on endocrine function in patients with carcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Grigsby, P.W.; Perez, C.A.

    1986-04-01

    Serum levels of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormones were determined prospectively in 59 patients with carcinoma of the prostate treated curatively with external beam radiotherapy. Hormone levels were determined before the initiation of therapy and up to 2 years following completion of therapy. Testosterone levels remained unchanged but dihydrotestosterone levels decreased slightly. Follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormone levels increased significantly during therapy and remained elevated for up to 2 years after therapy. These findings are consistent with low dose irradiation of the testis.

  14. Effect of Gold Nanoparticles on Prostate Dose Distribution under Ir-192 Internal and 18 MV External Radiotherapy Procedures Using Gel Dosimetry and Monte Carlo Method

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, H.; Hashemi, B.; Mahdavi, S. R.; Hejazi, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gel polymers are considered as new dosimeters for determining radiotherapy dose distribution in three dimensions. Objective The ability of a new formulation of MAGIC-f polymer gel was assessed by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo (MC) method for studying the effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in prostate dose distributions under the internal Ir-192 and external 18MV radiotherapy practices. Method A Plexiglas phantom was made representing human pelvis. The GNP shaving 15 nm in diameter and 0.1 mM concentration were synthesized using chemical reduction method. Then, a new formulation of MAGIC-f gel was synthesized. The fabricated gel was poured in the tubes located at the prostate (with and without the GNPs) and bladder locations of the phantom. The phantom was irradiated to an Ir-192 source and 18 MV beam of a Varian linac separately based on common radiotherapy procedures used for prostate cancer. After 24 hours, the irradiated gels were read using a Siemens 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. The absolute doses at the reference points and isodose curves resulted from the experimental measurement of the gels and MC simulations following the internal and external radiotherapy practices were compared. Results The mean absorbed doses measured with the gel in the presence of the GNPs in prostate were 15% and 8 % higher than the corresponding values without the GNPs under the internal and external radiation therapies, respectively. MC simulations also indicated a dose increase of 14 % and 7 % due to presence of the GNPs, for the same experimental internal and external radiotherapy practices, respectively. Conclusion There was a good agreement between the dose enhancement factors (DEFs) estimated with MC simulations and experiment gel measurements due to the GNPs. The results indicated that the polymer gel dosimetry method as developed and used in this study, can be recommended as a reliable method for investigating the DEF of GNPs in internal and external

  15. SU-E-J-166: Sensitivity of Clinically Relevant Dosimetric Parameters to Contouring Uncertainty During Post Implant Dosimetry of Prostate Permanent Seed Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Mashouf, S; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There is a strong evidence relating post-implant dosimetry for permanent seed prostate brachytherpy to local control rates. The delineation of the prostate on CT images, however, represents a challenge as it is difficult to confidently identify the prostate borders from soft tissue surrounding it. This study aims at quantifying the sensitivity of clinically relevant dosimetric parameters to prostate contouring uncertainty. Methods: The post-implant CT images and plans for a cohort of 43 patients, who have received I–125 permanent prostate seed implant in our centre, were exported to MIM Symphony LDR brachytherapy treatment planning system (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH). The prostate contours in post-implant CT images were expanded/contracted uniformly for margins of ±1.00mm, ±2.00mm, ±3.00mm, ±4.00mm and ±5.00mm (±0.01mm). The values for V100 and D90 were extracted from Dose Volume Histograms for each contour and compared. Results: The mean value of V100 and D90 was obtained as 92.3±8.4% and 108.4±12.3% respectively (Rx=145Gy). V100 was reduced by −3.2±1.5%, −7.2±3.0%, −12.8±4.0%, −19.0±4.8%, − 25.5±5.4% for expanded contours of prostate with margins of +1mm, +2mm, +3mm, +4mm, and +5mm, respectively, while it was increased by 1.6±1.2%, 2.4±2.4%, 2.7±3.2%, 2.9±4.2%, 2.9±5.1% for the contracted contours. D90 was reduced by −6.9±3.5%, −14.5±6.1%, −23.8±7.1%, − 33.6±8.5%, −40.6±8.7% and increased by 4.1±2.6%, 6.1±5.0%, 7.2±5.7%, 8.1±7.3% and 8.1±7.3% for the same set of contours. Conclusion: Systematic expansion errors of more than 1mm may likely render a plan sub-optimal. Conversely contraction errors may Result in labeling a plan likely as optimal. The use of MRI images to contour the prostate should results in better delineation of prostate organ which increases the predictive value of post-op plans. Since observers tend to overestimate the prostate volume on CT, compared with MRI, the impact of the

  16. Perforation of an Occult Carcinoma of the Prostate as a Rare Differential Diagnosis of Subcutaneous Emphysema of the Leg

    PubMed Central

    Hockertz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of subcutaneous emphysema caused by perforation of the rectum due to a carcinoma of the prostate. Although rare, an abdominal cause must always be considered as a rare differential diagnosis of subcutaneous emphysema. As a matter of fact adequate diagnostic with rapid treatment is essential for the outcome. PMID:27597913

  17. Early Response of Prostate Carcinoma Xenografts to Docetaxel Chemotherapy Monitored With Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Dominique; Hatton, B Nicholas; Guo, Jingyu; Galons, Jean-Philippe; Trouard, Theodore P; Raghunand, Natarajan; Marshall, James; Gillies, Robert J

    2002-01-01

    Abstract For many anticancer therapies, it would be desirable to accurately monitor and quantify tumor response early in the treatment regimen. This would allow oncologists to continue effective therapies or discontinue ineffective therapies early in the course of treatment, and hence, reduce morbidity. This is especially true for second-line therapies, which have reduced response rates and increased toxicities. Previous works by others and ourselves have shown that water mobility, measured by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI), increases early in tumors destined to respond to therapies. In the current communication, we further characterize the utility of DW-MRI to predict response of prostate cancer xenografts to docetaxel in SCID mice in a preclinical setting. The current data illustrate that tumor volumes and secreted prostate-specific antigen both respond strongly to docetaxel in a dose-responsive manner, and the apparent diffusion coefficient of water (ADCw) increases significantly by 2 days even at the lowest doses (10 mg/kg). The ADCw data were parsed by histogram analyses. Our results indicate that DW-MRI can be used for early detection of prostate carcinoma xenograft response to docetaxel chemotherapy. PMID:11988845

  18. Matrix protein CCN1 is critical for prostate carcinoma cell proliferation and TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Carrie A; Chen, Chih-Chiun; Todorović, Viktor; Juric, Vladislava; Monzon, Ricardo I; Lau, Lester F

    2009-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) plays an important role in immune surveillance and preferentially induces apoptosis in cancer cells over normal cells, suggesting its potential in cancer therapy. However, the molecular basis for its selective killing of cancer cells is not well understood. Recent studies have identified the CCN family of integrin-binding matricellular proteins as important regulators of cell behavior, including cell adhesion, proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival. We show here that CCN1 (CYR61) supports the adhesion of prostatic carcinoma cells as an adhesion substrate through integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Knockdown of CCN1 expression in PC-3 and DU-145 androgen-independent prostate cancer cells strongly inhibited their proliferation without causing apoptosis, indicating that CCN1 promotes their growth. However, CCN1 also significantly enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through interaction with integrins alphavbeta3 and alpha6beta4 and the cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-4, acting through a protein kinase Calpha-dependent mechanism without requiring de novo protein synthesis. Knockdown of CCN1 expression in PC-3, DU-145, and LNCaP cells severely blunted their sensitivity to TRAIL, an effect that was reversed by exogenously added CCN1 protein. These findings reveal a functional dichotomy for CCN1 in prostate carcinoma cells, because it contributes to both cell proliferation and TRAIL-induced cell death and suggest that CCN1 expression status may be an important parameter in assessing the efficacy of TRAIL-dependent cancer therapy.

  19. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antzack, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J.; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication

  20. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antczak, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J; Guindani, Michele; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication networks

  1. SU-E-J-215: Towards MR-Only Image Guided Identification of Calcifications and Brachytherapy Seeds: Application to Prostate and Breast LDR Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Elzibak, A; Fatemi-Ardekani, A; Soliman, A; Mashouf, S; Safigholi, H; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, WY; Han, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify and analyze the appearance of calcifications and brachytherapy seeds on magnitude and phase MRI images and to investigate whether they can be distinguished from each other on corrected phase images for application to prostate and breast low dose rate (LDR) implant dosimetry. Methods: An agar-based gel phantom containing two LDR brachytherapy seeds (Advantage Pd-103, IsoAid, 0.8mm diameter, 4.5mm length) and two spherical calcifications (large: 7mm diameter and small: 4mm diameter) was constructed and imaged on a 3T Philips MR scanner using a 16-channel head coil and a susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) sequence (2mm slices, 320mm FOV, TR/ TE= 26.5/5.3ms, 15 degree flip angle). The phase images were unwrapped and corrected using a 32×32, 2D Hanning high pass filter to remove background phase noise. Appearance of the seeds and calcifications was assessed visually and quantitatively using Osirix (http://www.osirix-viewer.com/). Results: As expected, calcifications and brachytherapy seeds appeared dark (hypointense) relative to the surrounding gel on the magnitude MRI images. The diameter of each seed without the surrounding artifact was measured to be 0.1 cm on the magnitude image, while diameters of 0.79 and 0.37 cm were measured for the larger and smaller calcifications, respectively. On the corrected phase images, the brachytherapy seeds and the calcifications appeared bright (hyperintense). The diameter of the seeds was larger on the phase images (0.17 cm) likely due to the dipole effect. Conclusion: MRI has the best soft tissue contrast for accurate organ delineation leading to most accurate implant dosimetry. This work demonstrated that phase images can potentially be useful in identifying brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate and breast due to their bright appearance, which helps in their visualization and quantification for accurate dosimetry using MR-only. Future work includes optimizing phase filters to best identify

  2. Genetic polymorphisms of estrogen receptor alpha and catechol-O-methyltransferase genes in Turkish patients with familial prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pazarbasi, Ayfer; Yilmaz, M. Bertan; Alptekin, Davut; Luleyap, Umit; Tansug, Zuhtu; Ozpak, Lutfiye; Izmirli, Muzeyyen; Onatoglu-Arikan, Dilge; Kocaturk-Sel, Sabriye; Erkoc, Mehmet Ali; Turgut, Ozgur; Bereketoglu, Ceyhun; Tunc, Erdal; Akbal, Eylul

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Estrogen is one of the most crucial hormones participating in the proliferation and carcinogenesis of the prostate glands. Genetic polymorphisms in the estrogen metabolism pathway might be involved in the risk of prostate carcinoma development. We evaluated the association between genetic polymorphisms in estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) genes and the risk of developing familial prostate carcinoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this study, 34 cases with prostate carcinoma whose first-degree relatives had prostate carcinoma and 30 healthy age-matched male controls were enrolled. The genotypes of ESR1 and COMT genes were analyzed employing polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. 34 cases with prostate carcinoma, whose first degree relatives had prostate carcinoma and 14 age-matched male controls were enrolled to analyze the genotype of these two genes. RESULTS: Among control patients, the ESR1 PvuII genotypes of C/C, C/T and T/T were observed in 37%, 26% and 37%, respectively, whereas the C/C, C/T and T/T genotypes were observed in 18%, 41% and 41% of case patients, respectively. Among controls, the ESR1 PvuII allele frequencies of C and T were equally observed, whereas the C and T allele frequencies were observed in 38% and 62% of patients, respectively. Among ESR1 PvuII genotypes there were not any significant difference in terms of genotype (P = 0.199) and allele (P = 0.181) frequencies. Among controls, the ESR1 XbaI genotypes of G/G, G/A and A/A were observed in 33%, 37% and 33%, respectively, whereas the G/G, G/A and A/A genotypes were observed in 12%, 47% and 41% of patients, respectively. Among controls, the ESR1 XbaI allele frequencies of A and G were observed equally, respectively, whereas the A and G frequencies were observed in 65% and 35% of patients, respectively. Among ESR1 Χ baI, there was not any significant difference in terms of genotype (P = 0.111) and allele (P = 0

  3. Prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Domingue, Gerald J.; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G.

    1998-01-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of acute bacterial prostatitis is straightforward and easily accomplished in clinical laboratories. Chronic bacterial prostatitis, and especially chronic idiopathic prostatitis (most often referred to as abacterial prostatitis), presents a real challenge to the clinician and clinical microbiologist. Clinically, the diagnosis of chronic idiopathic prostatitis is differentiated from that of acute prostatitis by a lack of prostatic inflammation and no “significant” (controversial) leukocytes or bacteria in the expressed prostatic secretions. Despite these diagnostic criteria, the etiology of chronic idiopathic prostatitis is unknown. While this review covers the entire spectrum of microbially caused acute prostatitis (including common and uncommon bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites) and microbially associated chronic prostatitis, a special focus has been given to chronic idiopathic prostatitis. The idiopathic syndrome is commonly diagnosed in men but is poorly treated. Recent data convincingly suggests a possible bacterial etiology for the condition. Provocative molecular studies have been published reporting the presence of 16S rRNA bacterial sequences in prostate biopsy tissue that is negative for ordinary bacteria by routine culture in men with chronic idiopathic prostatitis. Additionally, special culture methods have indicated that difficult-to-culture coryneforms and coagulase-negative staphylococci are present in expressed prostatic secretions found to be negative by routine culture techniques. Treatment failures are not uncommon in chronic prostatitis. Literature reports suggest that antimicrobial treatment failures in chronic idiopathic prostatitis caused by organisms producing extracellular slime might result from the virulent properties of coagulase-negative staphylococci or other bacteria. While it is difficult to definitively extrapolate from animal models, antibiotic pharmokinetic studies with a murine model have

  4. Biomarkers of Prostatic Cancer: An Attempt to Categorize Patients into Prostatic Carcinoma, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, or Prostatitis Based on Serum Prostate Specific Antigen, Prostatic Acid Phosphatase, Calcium, and Phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Shahana; Nyamath, Parveen; Ishaq, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Prostatitis, BPH, and P.Ca are the most frequent pathologies of the prostate gland that are responsible for morbidity in men. Raised levels of PSA are seen in different pathological conditions involving the prostate. PAP levels are altered in inflammatory or infectious or abnormal growth of the prostate tissue. Serum calcium and phosphorus levels were also found to be altered in prostate cancer and BPH. The present study was carried out to study the levels of PSA, PAP, calcium, and phosphorus in serum of patients with Prostatitis, BPH, or P.Ca and also to evaluate the relationship between them. Males in the age group of 50–85 years with LUTS disease symptoms and with PSA levels more than 4 ng/mL were included. A total of 114 patients were analyzed including 30 controls. Prostatitis in 35.7% of cases, BPH in 35.7% of the cases, and P.Ca in 28.57% of the cases were observed. Thus, the nonmalignant cases constitute a majority. PSA, a marker specific for prostatic conditions, was significantly high in all the diseases compared to controls. A rise in serum PSA and PAP indicates prostatitis or, in combination with these two tests, decreased serum calcium shows advanced disease. PMID:28168057

  5. Biomarkers of Prostatic Cancer: An Attempt to Categorize Patients into Prostatic Carcinoma, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, or Prostatitis Based on Serum Prostate Specific Antigen, Prostatic Acid Phosphatase, Calcium, and Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Shahana; Adil, Mohammed Abdul Majid; Nyamath, Parveen; Ishaq, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Prostatitis, BPH, and P.Ca are the most frequent pathologies of the prostate gland that are responsible for morbidity in men. Raised levels of PSA are seen in different pathological conditions involving the prostate. PAP levels are altered in inflammatory or infectious or abnormal growth of the prostate tissue. Serum calcium and phosphorus levels were also found to be altered in prostate cancer and BPH. The present study was carried out to study the levels of PSA, PAP, calcium, and phosphorus in serum of patients with Prostatitis, BPH, or P.Ca and also to evaluate the relationship between them. Males in the age group of 50-85 years with LUTS disease symptoms and with PSA levels more than 4 ng/mL were included. A total of 114 patients were analyzed including 30 controls. Prostatitis in 35.7% of cases, BPH in 35.7% of the cases, and P.Ca in 28.57% of the cases were observed. Thus, the nonmalignant cases constitute a majority. PSA, a marker specific for prostatic conditions, was significantly high in all the diseases compared to controls. A rise in serum PSA and PAP indicates prostatitis or, in combination with these two tests, decreased serum calcium shows advanced disease.

  6. Extrapulmonary Small Cell Carcinoma of the Seminal Vesicles and Prostate Demonstrated on 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Tabrizipour, Amir Iravani; Shen, Lily; Mansberg, Robert; Chuong, Bui

    2016-02-05

    Extrapulmonary primary small cell carcinomas arising from the urogenital tract is infrequent. It can rarely arise from the prostate and even more rarely from the seminal vesicles. We present a 79-year-old male who was admitted due to acute renal failure with a history of radical radiotherapy for prostate adenocarcinoma 13 years ago. The prostate specific antigen level was not elevated. An abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) scan showed markedly enlarged seminal vesicles causing bilateral ureteral obstruction and a mildly enlarged prostate. Further evaluation with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/CT demonstrated extensive 18F-FDG uptake in the pelvis with diffuse involvement of both seminal vesicles and the prostate without pathologic uptake in the lungs or elsewhere in the body. Core biopsies of the prostate and both seminal vesicles revealed diffuse involvement by small cell carcinoma. Therapy could not be instituted due to a rapid deterioration in the patient's clinical condition.

  7. An Unusual Case of Resistant Hypokalaemia in a Patient with Large Bowel Obstruction Secondary to Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Bagul, A.; Gupta, A.

    2017-01-01

    Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Prostate (NECP) is rare and only few cases have been reported, constituting less than 0.5% of prostatic malignancies. We report a rare case of large bowel obstruction from NECP posing a further challenge in management due to resistant hypokalaemia. A 70-year-old man presented with clinical signs of large bowel obstruction who was known to have prostatic carcinoma three years ago, treated initially with hormone therapy then chemoradiation. The blood profile showed a severe hypokalaemia and CT scan revealed liver and lung metastases apart from confirming large bowel obstruction from local invasion of NECP. Severe hypokalaemia was believed to be caused by paraneoplastic syndrome from tumor burden or by recent administration of Etoposide. Intensive potassium correction through a central venous access in maximal doses of 150 mmol/24 hours under cardiac monitoring finally raised serum potassium to 3.8 mmol/L. This safe period allowed us to perform a trephine colostomy at the left iliac fossa. The postoperative period was relatively uneventful. This first case report is presenting a rare cause of large bowel obstruction from a neuroendocrine carcinoma of prostate and highlights the importance of an early, intensive correction of electrolytes in patients with large tumor burden from NECP. PMID:28386507

  8. Constitutive Activation of NF-kappaB in Prostate Carcinoma Cells Through a Positive Feedback Loop: Implication of Inducible IKK-Related Kinase (IKKi)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    strongly suggests that GR is constitutively active in both normal and hyperplastic prostate glands. In contrast, GR levels were low or below detection... BPH ; (b) PC (Gleason score 7); (c) HGPIN and (d) prostate stroma. Note: Low GR expression in PC (B1) and high GR expression in apparently normal...was increased in human prostate carcinomas in comparison to BPH samples (see progress report for FY02), these recent results suggest an important

  9. miR-96 promotes the growth of prostate carcinoma cells by suppressing MTSS1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Libo; Zhong, Jiateng; Guo, Baofeng; Zhu, Qi; Liang, Hang; Wen, Naiyan; Yun, Wenjing; Zhang, Ling

    2016-09-01

    Prostate carcinoma (PC) is one of the most common cancers for males. However, the molecular mechanisms of PC progression are still to be uncovered. MicroRNA (miRNA) has been shown to be associated with the initiation and progression of prostate cancer. Among the identified tumor-promoting miRNAs, miR-96 has been well established to contribute to PC by reducing FOXO1 expression. This study is aimed to study if miR-96 can promote the progression of PC through other pathways. Our data reinforced the finding that the level of miR-96 was higher in PC samples and cell lines than in non-cancerous tissues and normal prostate epithelial cells. In addition, serum miR-96 abundance was also found to be elevated in PC patients. Decreasing miR-96 expression was able to suppress the proliferation, clonogenicity, and invasion of PC cells. Overexpressing miR-96 led to increased proliferation and colony formation of normal prostate epithelial cells. miR-96 level was found to be inversely associated with the abundance of metastasis suppressor protein 1 (MTSS1) messenger RNA (mRNA), which has been proved to be a tumor suppressor for PC. Predictive analysis indicated that there was a potential miRNA response elements (MREs) located within 3'UTR of MTSS1 mRNA. The changes in miR-96 expression can affect the levels of MTSS1 both at mRNA and protein levels. miR-96 also suppressed the activity of luciferase reporter under the regulation of 3'UTR of MTSS1. Further studies showed that MTSS1 restoration accounted for the effect of miR-96 reduction on PC cells. The overexpression of a recombinant MTSS1 resistant against miRNA regulation was also demonstrated to abolish the transforming effect of miR-96 on prostate epithelial cells. Taken together, we found that miR-96 has a higher abundance in serum samples of PC patients than healthy controls, implying that it may be used as a prognostic marker. MTSS1 is a new authentic target of miR-96 in PC. The above findings suggested that targeting mi

  10. Effects of herbal preparation Equiguard on hormone-responsive and hormone-refractory prostate carcinoma cells: mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tze-Chen; Lu, Xiaohua; Guo, Junqiao; Xiong, Wen; Kunicki, Jan; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Wu, Joseph M

    2002-04-01

    The Equiguard is a dietary supplement comprised of standardized extracts from nine herbs, respectively, Herba epimedium brevicornum Maxim (stem and leaves), Radix morindae officinalis (root), Fructus rosa laevigatae michx (fruit), Rubus chingii Hu (fruit), Schisandra chinensis (Turz.) Baill (fruit), Ligustrum lucidum Ait (fruit), Cuscuta chinensis Lam (seed), Psoralea corylifolia L. (fruit), and Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch.) Bge (root). This proprietary product, formulated according to Chinese traditional medicinal concepts, is aimed at restoring harmony in the of the kidney, an organ which Chinese medicinal principles consider to be vital for invigorating as well as maintaining balance of the entire urological system. As the prostate is an integral component of the urological system, we performed in vitro studies to test the effects of ethanol extracts of Equiguard to modulate prostate growth and gene expression. These studies used prostate cancer cells mimicking the androgen-dependent (AD) and androgen-independent (AI) states of prostate carcinogenesis. Results show that Equiguard significantly reduced cancer cell growth, induced apoptosis, suppressed expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and lowered intracellular and secreted prostate specific antigen (PSA), and almost completely abolished colony forming abilities of prostate cancer cells. These data support the interpretation that this herbal formulation contains ingredients that collectively may be efficacious in preventing or treating AD and AI prostate carcinoma. The anti-prostatic activities of Equiguard may stem from its complex composition capable of targeting multiple signal transduction/metabolic pathways, to effectively correct, counteract or circumvent the impaired or dysfunctional mechanisms accompanying different stages of prostate carcinogenesis.

  11. Good response of an aggressive rare variant of signet ring cell carcinoma of prostate with hormonal therapy.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Deviprasad; Nayak, Brusabhanu; Seth, Amlesh

    2017-03-08

    Primary signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) of the prostate is a rare entity, characterised by its aggressive nature and dismal prognosis. We report a case of an advanced SRCC of the prostate presenting as a large pelvic mass with obstructive uropathy and rectal involvement managed by complete androgen blockade. At 24 months follow-up, the patient has no evidence of progression or metastasis. Aggressive management with multimodality approach combining surgery, radiation and hormonal ablation can result in long disease-free survival in some patients, despite the aggressive nature of this disease.

  12. INITIAL SYMPTOMATIC PITUITARY METASTASIS IN A PATIENT WITH PROSTATE FOAMY GLAND CARCINOMA: TAILORING SAFE AND EFFECTIVE THERAPY.

    PubMed

    Prpić, Marin; Fröbe, Ana; Zadravec, Dijana; Pažanin, Leo; Jakšić, Blanka; Bolanča, Ante; Kusić, Zvonko

    2015-06-01

    Metastases to pituitary gland are unusual and mostly asymptomatic, presenting with local symptoms in one of ten patients, and only 3%-5% of them are of prostate origin. Here we report and evaluate the effectiveness and safety of multimodal treatment in a patient with pituitary metastasis of a prostate foamy gland carcinoma. A 78-year-old male patient presented with blurred vision and headache without a previous history of malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed a large sellar mass, with infiltration of the surrounding structures. Maximal transsphenoidal reduction of pituitary metastasis was performed, with a histologic finding of metastatic prostate foamy gland adenocarcinoma. Evaluation of the prostate specific antigen revealed a very high level (1461 ng/mL) and foamy gland carcinoma was found on prostate needle biopsy. The patient received 3D conformal external beam radiotherapy with 6 MV photons to the sellar and parasellar region with a tumor dose of 44 Gy, followed by androgen deprivation therapy. Follow up magnetic resonance imaging done after radiotherapy showed shrinkage of the tumor process, with rapid prostate specific antigen decline to 0.3 ng/mL. The visual function was fully established and headache resolved. On the last follow up 14 months after the diagnosis, the patient was alive and free from clinical signs of disease. Tailored treatment, including limited radiotherapy in a higher palliative dose, in a patient with foamy gland symptomatic pituitary metastatic disease resulted in good local and systemic control of the disease. In older male patients with clinical and/or radiologic characteristics suggestive of metastatic pituitary disease, the prostate specific antigen test should be included as part of the work-up.

  13. The heterogeneous Gleason 7 carcinoma of the prostate: analyses of low and high grade (risk) carcinomas with criteria of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP).

    PubMed

    Helpap, Burkhard; Ringli, Daniel; Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Wernert, Nicolas; Kristiansen, Glen

    2013-03-01

    Prostate carcinoma (PCa) with Gleason score (GS) 7 has to be examined differentially regarding its prognosis. Using the criteria of ISUP and supplementations, we attempted to analyze the heterogeneity of PCa with GS 7 of biopsy and corresponding specimens of radical prostatectomies (RP). PCa of 530 patients were graded according to Gleason under additional consideration of the state of the nucleoli. Investigating the biopsy specimens, we determined the pattern of Gleason 4 of GS 7, the extension of the tumors in percent, and the number of biopsies containing tumor. In the corresponding specimens of RP, the grading and the state of TNM with margins were assessed. Carcinomas with GS 7 (4+3) in biopsy and RP specimens were unequivocally assigned to the group of high-grade tumors. Carcinomas with GS 7 (3+4) were significantly different from carcinomas with GS 6 when only few and small nucleoli in GS 6 were present (low grade type, p≤0.0001), but were similar to the GS 6 group when nucleoli were prominent (intermediary type, p=0.71). The intermediary group showed an upgrading rate of 36% from GS 6 to GS 7. Furthermore the correlation between organ-confined and non-organ-confined growth showed differences of 63% and 37% in the intermediary group (p=0.0001). The values of grading, staging, margins and metastases indicate that carcinomas of the prostate with the Gleason 3+4 pattern correspond to an intermediary group of carcinomas in contrast to high-grade (high risk) carcinomas with GS 7 and pattern 4+3.

  14. Interphase cytogenetic analysis of prostatic carcinomas by use of nonisotopic in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Baretton, G B; Valina, C; Vogt, T; Schneiderbanger, K; Diebold, J; Löhrs, U

    1994-08-15

    To gain a better understanding of chromosomal aberrations in direct correlation with histology, we studied tumor material from 35 patients (36 regions) with primary prostate carcinoma by nonisotopic in situ hybridization. Nine biotinylated DNA probes were used on serial paraffin sections (centromer-specific probes for X, Y, 1, 7, 8, 10, 17, and 18, and a telomer-specific probe for 1p; ONCOR). Of the 324 hybridized sections, 94% were suitable for evaluation. In 34 of the 35 cases (35 of 36 regions) 1-8 chromosomal aberrations were detected. Chromosome X showed supernumerary centromer copies in 44% of cases. The probes for chromosomes 1, 1p, 10, and 18 demonstrated deletions in 25, 23, 40 and 58% of cases, respectively. Gains as well as deletions were present for Y, 7, 8, and 17 in 31, 25, 36, and 58% of cases, respectively. In 27% of cases discordant copy numbers of the centromer- and the telomer-specific probes for chromosome 1 were observed. No aberration which might be specific for prostate cancer could be established. The rate of aneusomy increased significantly with histological grade. Intratumoral heterogeneity of chromosomal aberrations was revealed in one case. Due to the higher sensitivity of nonisotopic in situ hybridization, aneusomic cases outnumbered cases with cytometrically determined DNA aneuploidy. In view of published results of metaphase preparations, the high frequency of aneusomy and some of the chromosomal aberrations detected by nonisotopic in situ hybridization were unexpected.

  15. Experience with interstitial implantation of iodine 125 in the treatment of prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sogani, P C; Whitmore, W F; Hilaris, B S; Batata, M A

    1980-01-01

    Between February 1970 and April 1977 300 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma were treated with I-125 implantation and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC). 68% had clinical Stage B (T-1 and T-2) and 32% had Stage C (T-3) neoplasms. Pelvic lymph nodes were histologically positive in 38% of the patients. Five-year survival for all patients was 73%. Five-year survival for Stage B disease was 100% and Stage C 65%. Lymph node metastases implied a poor prognosis. While 92% of patients with negative nodes survived five years, only 46% of the patients with positive nodes did so. Supplemental external radiation to pelvic and periaortic region in 28 patients with positive nodes did not improve survival or disease free interval or reduce distal or local recurrence but rather increased the incidence of radiation morbidity. The complications and morbidity as a consequence of I-125 implantation are minimal. The ultimate role of I-125 implantation in the management of localized prostatic cancer is yet to be determined. The early experience with this technique, however, suggests that it may be as effective as alternative modalities for comparable stages in terms of patient survival and may prove superior in terms of the quality of survival.

  16. SU-E-J-214: MR Protocol Development to Visualize Sirius MRI Markers in Prostate Brachytherapy Patients for MR-Based Post-Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, T; Wang, J; Frank, S; Stafford, R; Bruno, T; Bathala, T; Mahmood, U; Pugh, T; Ibbott, G; Kudchadker, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The current CT-based post-implant dosimetry allows precise seed localization but limited anatomical delineation. Switching to MR-based post-implant dosimetry is confounded by imprecise seed localization. One approach is to place positive-contrast markers (Sirius) adjacent to the negative-contrast seeds. This patient study aims to assess the utility of a 3D fast spoiled gradient-recalled echo (FSPGR) sequence to visualize Sirius markers for post-implant dosimetry. Methods: MRI images were acquired in prostate implant patients (n=10) on Day 0 (day-of-implant) and Day 30. The post-implant MR protocol consisted of 3D T2-weighted fast-spin-echo (FSE), T2-weighted 2D-FSE (axial) and T1-weighted 2D-FSE (axial/sagittal/coronal). We incorporated a 3D-FSPGR sequence into the post-implant MR protocol to visualize the Sirius markers. Patients were scanned with different number-of-excitations (6, 8, 10), field-of-view (10cm, 14cm, 18cm), slice thickness (1mm, 0.8mm), flip angle (14 degrees, 20 degrees), bandwidth (122.070 Hz/pixel, 325.508 Hz/pixel, 390.625 Hz/pixel), phase encoding steps (160, 192, 224, 256), frequency-encoding direction (right/left, anterior/posterior), echo-time type (minimum-full, out-of-phase), field strength (1.5T, 3T), contrast (with, without), scanner vendor (Siemens, GE), coil (endorectal-coil only, endorectal-and-torso-coil, torsocoil only), endorectal-coil filling (30cc, 50cc) and endorectal-coil filling type (air, perfluorocarbon [PFC]). For post-implant dosimetric evaluation with greater anatomical detail, 3D-FSE images were fused with 3D-FSPGR images. For comparison with CT-based post-implant dosimetry, CT images were fused with 3D-FSPGR images. Results: The 3D-FSPGR sequence facilitated visualization of markers in patients. Marker visualization helped distinguish signal voids as seeds versus needle tracks for more definitive MR-based post-implant dosimetry. On the CT-MR fused images, the distance between the seed on CT to MR images was 3

  17. TU-AB-201-11: A Novel Theoretical Framework for MRI-Only Image Guided LDR Prostate and Breast Brachytherapy Implant Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Soliman, A; Elzibak, A; Fatemi, A; Safigholi, H; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, W; Han, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a novel framework for accurate model-based dose calculations using only MR images for LDR prostate and breast seed implant brachytherapy. Methods: Model-based dose calculation methodologies recommended by TG-186 require further knowledge about specific tissue composition, which is challenging with MRI. However, relying on MRI-only for implant dosimetry would reduce the soft tissue delineation uncertainty, costs, and uncertainties associated with multi-modality registration and fusion processes. We propose a novel framework to address this problem using quantitative MRI acquisitions and reconstruction techniques. The framework includes three steps: (1) Identify the locations of seeds(2) Identify the presence (or absence) of calcification(s)(3) Quantify the water and fat content in the underlying tissueSteps (1) and (2) consider the sources that limit patient dosimetry, particularly the inter-seed attenuation and the calcified regions; while step (3) targets the quantification of the tissue composition to consider the heterogeneities in the medium. Our preliminary work has shown that the seeds and the calcifications can be identified with MRI using both the magnitude and the phase images. By employing susceptibility-weighted imaging with specific post-processing techniques, the phase images can be further explored to distinguish the seeds from the calcifications. Absolute quantification of tissue, water, and fat content is feasible and was previously demonstrated in phantoms and in-vivo applications, particularly for brain diseases. The approach relies on the proportionality of the MR signal to the number of protons in an image volume. By employing appropriate correction algorithms for T1 - and T2*-related biases, B1 transmit and receive field inhomogeneities, absolute water/fat content can be determined. Results: By considering calcification and interseed attenuation, and through the knowledge of water and fat mass density, accurate patient

  18. Vaccine Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Hormone-Resistant, Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  19. Small cell carcinoma of the prostate presenting with Cushing Syndrome. A narrative review of an uncommon condition.

    PubMed

    Rueda-Camino, José Antonio; Losada-Vila, Beatriz; De Ancos-Aracil, Cristina Lucía; Rodríguez-Lajusticia, Laura; Tardío, Juan Carlos; Zapatero-Gaviria, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the prostate is an uncommon condition; there are very few cases in which presenting symptoms are consistent with Cushing Syndrome (CS). We report a new case in which CS triggers the suspicion of an SCC of the prostate and a review of the published cases of SCC of the prostate presenting with CS. The origin of these neoplasms is still unclear. It may be suspected when laboratory features appear in patients diagnosed with prostatic adenocarcinoma which becomes resistant to specific therapy. SCC usually occurs after the 6th decade. Patients suffering SCC of the prostate presenting with CS usually present symptoms such as hypertension, hyperglycemia, alkalosis or hypokalemia; cushingoid phenotype is less frequent. Cortisol and ACTH levels are often high. Prostatic-specific antigen levels are usually normal. CT scan is the preferred imaging test to localize the lesion, but its performance may be improved by adding other tests, such as FDG-PET scan. All patients have metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Lymph nodes, liver and bone are the most frequent metastases sites. Surgery and Ketokonazole are the preferred treatments for CS. The prognosis is very poor: 2- and 5-year survival rates are 27.5 and 14.3%, respectively. Key messages When a patient presents with ectopic Cushing Syndrome but lungs are normal, an atypical localization should be suspected. We should suspect a prostatic origin if Cushing Syndrome is accompanied by obstructive inferior urinary tract symptoms or in the setting of a prostatic adenocarcinoma with rapid clinical and radiological progression with relatively low PSA levels. Although no imaging test is preferred to localize these tumors, FDG-PET-TC can be very useful. Hormone marker scintigraphy (e.g. somatostatin) could be used too. As Cushing Syndrome is a paraneoplastic phenomenon, treatment of the underlying disease may help control hypercortisolism manifestations. These tumors are usually metastatic by the

  20. A receptor tyrosine kinase, UFO/Axl, and other genes isolated by a modified differential display PCR are overexpressed in metastatic prostatic carcinoma cell line DU145.

    PubMed

    Jacob, A N; Kalapurakal, J; Davidson, W R; Kandpal, G; Dunson, N; Prashar, Y; Kandpal, R P

    1999-01-01

    We have used a modified differential display PCR protocol for isolating 3' restriction fragments of cDNAs specifically expressed or overexpressed in metastatic prostate carcinoma cell line DU145. Several cDNA fragments were identified that matched to milk fat globule protein, UFO/Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase, human homologue of a Xenopus maternal transcript, laminin and laminin receptor, human carcinoma-associated antigen, and some expressed sequence tags. The transcript for milk fat globule protein, a marker protein shown to be overexpressed in breast tumors, was elevated in DU145 cells. The expression of UFO/Axl, a receptor tyrosine kinase, was considerably higher in DU145 cells as compared to normal prostate cells and prostatic carcinoma cell line PC-3. The overexpression of UFO oncogene in DU145 cells is discussed in the context of prostate cancer metastasis.

  1. Co-culturing human prostate carcinoma cells with hepatocytes leads to increased expression of E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Yates, C C; Shepard, C R; Stolz, D B; Wells, A

    2007-01-01

    Metastasis is a multi-step process wherein tumour cells detach from the primary mass, migrate through barrier matrices, gain access to conduits to disseminate, and subsequently survive and proliferate in an ectopic site. During the initial invasion stage, prostate carcinoma cells undergo epithelial–mesenchymal-like transition with gain of autocrine signalling and loss of E-cadherin, hallmarks that appear to enable invasion and dissemination. However, some metastases express E-cadherin, and we found close connections between prostate carcinoma cells and hepatocytes in a liver microtissue bioreactor. We hypothesise that phenotypic plasticity occurs late in prostate cancer progression at the site of ectopic seeding. Immunofluorescence staining for E-cadherin in co-cultures of hepatocytes and DU-145 prostate cancer cells revealed E-cadherin upregulation at peripheral sites of contact by day 2 of co-culture; E-cadherin expression also increased in PC-3 cells in co-culture. These carcinoma cells bound to hepatocytes in an E-cadherin-dependent manner. Although the signals by which the hepatocytes elicited E-cadherin expression remain undetermined, it appeared related to downregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling. Inhibition of autocrine EGFR signalling increased E-cadherin expression and cell–cell heterotypic adhesion; further, expression of a downregulation-resistant EGFR variant prevented E-cadherin upregulation. These findings were supported by finding E-cadherin and catenins but not activated EGFR in human prostate metastases to the liver. We conclude that the term epithelial–mesenchymal transition only summarises the transient downregulation of E-cadherin for invasion with re-expression of E-cadherin being a physiological consequence of metastatic seeding. PMID:17406365

  2. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Prostate in an Elderly Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Dale Alan; Miller, Daniel H.; Jagadesh, Niveditha; Strong, Gerald W.; Hintenlang, Lauren; Schenk, William B.; Broderick, Gregory A.; Tzou, Katherine S.; Buskirk, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy of men in the United States. Small-cell carcinoma (SCC), which typically presents as an aggressive lung malignancy, is a rare diagnosis within the setting of prostate cancer pathology. Due to its limited prevalence, little information regarding the treatment and prognosis of this disease in large populations is available. To date our current knowledge base is largely limited to case reports and retrospective case reviews. The mainstay of treatment for this particular histology most often involves a multimodality approach utilizing chemotherapy in conjunction with radiation therapy, androgen deprivation therapy, or prostatectomy. Here we present the case of an elderly 89-year-old Caucasian male who was diagnosed with SCC of the prostate. Despite proceeding with a course of definitive radiotherapy, the patient experienced rapid progression of disease and ultimately elected to discontinue radiation therapy and receive hospice care. PMID:28191295

  3. Serial lectin affinity chromatography with concavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin demonstrates altered asparagine-linked sugar-chain structures of prostatic acid phosphatase in human prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K I; Honda, M; Arai, K; Hosoya, Y; Moriguchi, H; Sumi, S; Ueda, Y; Kitahara, S

    1997-08-01

    Differences between human prostate carcinoma (PCA, five cases) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, five cases) in asparagine-linked (Asn) sugar-chain structure of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) were investigated using lectin affinity chromatography with concanavalin A (Con A) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). PAP activities were significantly decreased in PCA-derived PAP, while no significant differences between the two PAP preparations were observed in the enzymatic properties (Michaelis-Menten value, optimal pH, thermal stability, and inhibition study). In these PAP preparations, all activities were found only in the fractions which bound strongly to the Con A column and were undetectable in the Con A unbound fractions and in the fractions which bound weakly to the Con A column. The relative amounts of PAP which bound strongly to the Con A column but passed through the WGA column, were significantly greater in BPH-derived PAP than in PCA-derived PAP. In contrast, the relative amounts of PAP which bound strongly to the Con A column and bound to the WGA column, were significantly greater in PCA-derived PAP than in BPH-derived PAP. The findings suggest that Asn-linked sugar-chain structures are altered during oncogenesis in human prostate and also suggest that studies of qualitative differences of sugar-chain structures of PAP might lead to a useful diagnostic tool for PCA.

  4. Thermal dosimetry analysis combined with patient-specific thermal modeling of clinical interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia integrated within HDR brachytherapy for treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Wootton, Jeff; Prakash, Punit; Scott, Serena; Hsu, I. C.; Diederich, Chris J.

    2017-03-01

    This study presents thermal dosimetry analysis from clinical treatments where ultrasound hyperthermia (HT) was administered following high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment for locally advanced prostate cancer as part of a clinical pilot study. HT was administered using ultrasound applicators from within multiple 13-g brachytherapy catheters implanted along the posterior periphery of the prostate. The heating applicators were linear arrays of sectored tubular transducers (˜7 MHz), with independently powered array elements enabling energy deposition with 3D spatial control. Typical heat treatments employed time-averaged peak acoustic intensities of 1 - 3 W/cm2 and lasted for 60 - 70 minutes. Throughout the treatments, temperatures at multiple points were monitored using multi-junction thermocouples, placed within available brachytherapy catheters throughout mid-gland prostate and identified as the hyperthermia target volume (HTV). Clinical constraints allowed placement of 8 - 12 thermocouple sensors in the HTV and patient-specific 3D thermal modeling based on finite element methods (FEM) was used to supplement limited thermometry. Patient anatomy, heating device positions, orientations, and thermometry junction locations were obtained from patient CT scans and HDR and hyperthermia planning software. The numerical models utilized the applied power levels recorded during the treatments. Tissue properties such as perfusion and acoustic absorption were varied within physiological ranges such that squared-errors between measured and simulated temperatures were minimized. This data-fitting was utilized for 6 HT treatments to estimate volumetric temperature distributions achieved in the HTV and surrounding anatomy devoid of thermocouples. For these treatments, the measured and simulated T50 values in the hyperthermia target volume (HTV) were between 40.1 - 43.9 °C and 40.3 - 44.9 °C, respectively. Maximum temperatures between 46.8 - 49.8 °C were measured during

  5. Reduced incidence of bone metastases in irradiated areas after external radiation therapy of prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsson, H.; Naeslund, I. )

    1991-06-01

    Fourteen males, out of 380 patients, treated with radiation to the central pelvis and lumbar spine for poorly differentiated prostatic carcinoma were analyzed in retrospect. The dose of radiation to the bones of the target area was 5,000 cGy. The patients showed no signs of metastases at bone scintigraphy performed in connection with the treatment. In an average of 34 months after finishing radiotherapy, the patients developed metastases at bone scintigraphy. The pattern was similar in all patients. The treated target area appeared as a cold zone surrounded by more or less homogenously and strongly increased activity of the axial skeleton, characteristic of bone metastases. Radiography, which was performed in 11 patients, confirmed widespread metastatic disease sparing the target area. This was interpretated as bone metastasis being precluded by the irradiation. The most probable explanation of this finding is eradication in situ of distant micrometastases already present in the bone marrow at the time of treatment. An alternate explanation is a reduced implantation of later seeded blood-born metastases as an effect of the irradiation. The characteristic pattern of this phenomenon must be recognized at bone scintigraphy.

  6. Disease-related effects of perioperative blood transfusions associated with sup 125 I seed implantation for prostate carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, J.P.; Schellhammer, P.F.; el-Mahdi, A.M. )

    1990-08-01

    In some retrospective studies perioperative transfusions during oncologic surgery have been shown to decrease the time interval between surgery and local and/or distant recurrence of cancer. This study examines the disease-related effect, if any, of perioperative blood transfusions among 108 patients with localized carcinoma of the prostate treated by radioactive iodine-125 seed implantation of the prostate and lymphadenectomy. When all subjects were analyzed, there was no statistical difference of local and distant failure between the transfused and nontransfused groups. Patients with well-differentiated tumors had statistically fewer local recurrences (0% vs 22%, p = 0.036) if they were transfused perioperatively. However, the difference in distant metastases (0% vs 11%) was not statistically significant (p = 0.21). In contrast, patients with moderately and poorly differentiated disease receiving transfusions had more local recurrences and metastases, though this was not statistically significant. Our data suggest that there is no obvious evidence that perioperative blood transfusions have an adverse effect on local recurrence or distant metastases for iodine-125 seed implantation of carcinoma of the prostate.

  7. Geranylgeraniol suppresses the viability of human DU145 prostate carcinoma cells and the level of HMG CoA reductase

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Nicolle V.; Yeganehjoo, Hoda; Katuru, Rajasekhar; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A.; Morris, Lindsey L.; Michon, Renee; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Mo, Huanbiao

    2014-01-01

    The rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase, provides essential intermediates for the prenylation of nuclear lamins and Ras and dolichol-mediated glycosylation of growth factor receptors. The diterpene geranylgeraniol downregulates the level of HMG CoA reductase and suppresses the growth of human liver, lung, ovary, pancreas, colon, stomach, and blood tumors. We evaluated the growth-suppressive activity of geranylgeraniol in human prostate carcinoma cells. Geranylgeraniol induced dose-dependent suppression of the viability of human DU145 prostate carcinoma cells (IC50 = 80 ±18 μmol/L, n =5) following 72-h incubations in 96-well plates. Cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase with a concomitant decrease in cyclin D1 protein. Geranylgeraniol-induced apoptosis was detected by flow cytometric analysis, fluorescence microscopy following acridine orange and ethidium bromide dual staining, and caspase-3 activation. Geranylgeraniol-induced viability suppression was accompanied by concentration-dependent decrease in the level of HMG CoA reductase protein. As a nonsterol molecule that downregulates HMG CoA reductase in the presence of sterols, geranylgeraniol may have potential in the chemoprevention and/or therapy of human prostate cancer. PMID:24006306

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Male Breast Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  9. Computer-Aided Image Analysis and Fractal Synthesis in the Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Aggressiveness in Prostate Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    The subjective evaluation of tumor aggressiveness is a cornerstone of the contemporary tumor pathology. A large intra- and interobserver variability is a known limiting factor of this approach. This fundamental weakness influences the statistical deterministic models of progression risk assessment. It is unlikely that the recent modification of tumor grading according to Gleason criteria for prostate carcinoma will cause a qualitative change and improve significantly the accuracy. The Gleason system does not allow the identification of low aggressive carcinomas by some precise criteria. The ontological dichotomy implies the application of an objective, quantitative approach for the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness as an alternative. That novel approach must be developed and validated in a manner that is independent of the results of any subjective evaluation. For example, computer-aided image analysis can provide information about geometry of the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei. A series of the interrelated complexity measures characterizes unequivocally the complex tumor images. Using those measures, carcinomas can be classified into the classes of equivalence and compared with each other. Furthermore, those measures define the quantitative criteria for the identification of low- and high-aggressive prostate carcinomas, the information that the subjective approach is not able to provide. The co-application of those complexity measures in cluster analysis leads to the conclusion that either the subjective or objective classification of tumor aggressiveness for prostate carcinomas should comprise maximal three grades (or classes). Finally, this set of the global fractal dimensions enables a look into dynamics of the underlying cellular system of interacting cells and the reconstruction of the temporal-spatial attractor based on the Taken's embedding theorem. Both computer-aided image analysis and the subsequent fractal synthesis could be performed

  10. Computer-Aided Image Analysis and Fractal Synthesis in the Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Aggressiveness in Prostate Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    The subjective evaluation of tumor aggressiveness is a cornerstone of the contemporary tumor pathology. A large intra- and interobserver variability is a known limiting factor of this approach. This fundamental weakness influences the statistical deterministic models of progression risk assessment. It is unlikely that the recent modification of tumor grading according to Gleason criteria for prostate carcinoma will cause a qualitative change and improve significantly the accuracy. The Gleason system does not allow the identification of low aggressive carcinomas by some precise criteria. The ontological dichotomy implies the application of an objective, quantitative approach for the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness as an alternative. That novel approach must be developed and validated in a manner that is independent of the results of any subjective evaluation. For example, computer-aided image analysis can provide information about geometry of the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei. A series of the interrelated complexity measures characterizes unequivocally the complex tumor images. Using those measures, carcinomas can be classified into the classes of equivalence and compared with each other. Furthermore, those measures define the quantitative criteria for the identification of low- and high-aggressive prostate carcinomas, the information that the subjective approach is not able to provide. The co-application of those complexity measures in cluster analysis leads to the conclusion that either the subjective or objective classification of tumor aggressiveness for prostate carcinomas should comprise maximal three grades (or classes). Finally, this set of the global fractal dimensions enables a look into dynamics of the underlying cellular system of interacting cells and the reconstruction of the temporal-spatial attractor based on the Taken’s embedding theorem. Both computer-aided image analysis and the subsequent fractal synthesis could be performed

  11. Preventive and therapeutic vaccination with PAP-3, a novel human prostate cancer peptide, inhibits carcinoma development in HLA transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Machlenkin, Arthur; Azriel-Rosenfeld, Ronit; Volovitz, Ilan; Vadai, Ezra; Lev, Avital; Paz, Adrian; Goldberger, Ofir; Reiter, Yoram; Tzehoval, Esther; Benhar, Itai; Eisenbach, Lea

    2007-02-01

    Conventional treatment of recurrent and metastasized prostate cancer (CaP) remains inadequate; this fact mandates development of alternative therapeutic modalities, such as specific active or passive immunotherapy. Previously, we reported the identification of a novel highly immunogenic HLA-A*0201-restricted Prostatic Acid Phosphatase-derived peptide (PAP-3) by a two-step in vivo screening in an HLA-transgenic (HHD) mouse system. In the present study we aimed at elucidating the efficiency of PAP-3-based vaccine upon active antitumor immunization. To this end we established preventive and therapeutic carcinoma models in HHD mice. The 3LL murine Lewis lung carcinoma clone D122 transduced to express HLA-A*0201 and PAP served as a platform for these models. The HLA-A*0201-PAP-3 complex specific recombinant single chain scFV-PAP-3 antibodies were generated and used to confirm an endogenous PAP processing resulting in PAP-3 presentation by HLA-A*0201. PAP-3 based vaccines significantly decreased tumor incidence in a preventive immunization setting. Therapeutic vaccination of HHD mice with PAP-3 led to rejection of early established tumors and to increase of mouse survival. These results strongly support a therapeutic relevance of the identified CTL epitope upon active antitumor immunization. The newly established carcinoma model presented herein might be a useful tool for cancer vaccine design and optimization.

  12. Extended transurethral resection and Nd:YAG laser ablation of the prostate (TURLAP) for carcinoma: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Stacy J.

    1993-05-01

    Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) has been combined with Nd:YAG application for the treatment of prostatic carcinoma for a decade. The inability to deliver the energy at right angles has made the procedure technically difficult, but results have been encouraging. A pilot study was begun in 1991 on ten patients who refused or were not candidates for radical prostatectomy. The protocol consisted of transrectal ultrasound imaging (TRUS) during extended TURP (EXTURP) followed immediately by Nd:YAG energy applied to the prostate bed and capsule. A second laser application under real time TRUS followed in eight weeks and a third (or fourth in one patient) was undertaken eight weeks later. Energy of 30,000- 85,000 Joules was applied during each procedure with the right angle urolase fiber (Bard) at 60 watts. Lesions were created for 30-60 seconds in each area of remaining tissue documented on TRUS. A thermocoupler was used to monitor rectal temperature. Complications include urinary retention, gross hematuria, bladder neck contracture, early incontinence, late incontinence, and probable permanent incontinence. Of the only four potent patients preoperatively, all (100%) are impotent now. TURLAP appears to be a safe and effective method of killing prostate malignant tissue and should be further studied perhaps in combination with interstitial laser irradiation to increase efficacy and lessen complications.

  13. Dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy, administered as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer, with stereotactic body radiation therapy simulated using CyberKnife.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Shoichi; Seo, Yuji; Shiomi, Hiroya; Yamada, Yuji; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Morimoto, Masahiro; Konishi, Koji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with simulated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We selected six consecutive patients treated with HDR-BT monotherapy in 2010, and a CyberKnife SBRT plan was simulated for each patient using computed tomography images and the contouring set used in the HDR-BT plan for the actual treatment, but adding appropriate planning target volume (PTV) margins for SBRT. Then, dosimetric profiles for PTVs of the rectum, bladder and urethra were compared between the two modalities. The SBRT plan was more homogenous and provided lower dose concentration but better coverage for the PTV. The maximum doses in the rectum were higher in the HDR-BT plans. However, the HDR-BT plan provided a sharper dose fall-off around the PTV, resulting in a significant and considerable difference in volume sparing of the rectum with the appropriate PTV margins added for SBRT. While the rectum D5cm(3) for HDR-BT and SBRT was 30.7 and 38.3 Gy (P < 0.01) and V40 was 16.3 and 20.8 cm(3) (P < 0.01), respectively, SBRT was significantly superior in almost all dosimetric profiles for the bladder and urethra. These results suggest that SBRT as an alternative to HDR-BT in hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer might have an advantage for bladder and urethra dose sparing, but for the rectum only when proper PTV margins for SBRT are adopted.

  14. Dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy, administered as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer, with stereotactic body radiation therapy simulated using CyberKnife

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Shoichi; Seo, Yuji; Shiomi, Hiroya; Yamada, Yuji; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Morimoto, Masahiro; Konishi, Koji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform dosimetry analyses comparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with simulated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). We selected six consecutive patients treated with HDR-BT monotherapy in 2010, and a CyberKnife SBRT plan was simulated for each patient using computed tomography images and the contouring set used in the HDR-BT plan for the actual treatment, but adding appropriate planning target volume (PTV) margins for SBRT. Then, dosimetric profiles for PTVs of the rectum, bladder and urethra were compared between the two modalities. The SBRT plan was more homogenous and provided lower dose concentration but better coverage for the PTV. The maximum doses in the rectum were higher in the HDR-BT plans. However, the HDR-BT plan provided a sharper dose fall-off around the PTV, resulting in a significant and considerable difference in volume sparing of the rectum with the appropriate PTV margins added for SBRT. While the rectum D5cm3 for HDR-BT and SBRT was 30.7 and 38.3 Gy (P < 0.01) and V40 was 16.3 and 20.8 cm3 (P < 0.01), respectively, SBRT was significantly superior in almost all dosimetric profiles for the bladder and urethra. These results suggest that SBRT as an alternative to HDR-BT in hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer might have an advantage for bladder and urethra dose sparing, but for the rectum only when proper PTV margins for SBRT are adopted. PMID:24957754

  15. Quantification of activity by alpha-camera imaging and small-scale dosimetry within ovarian carcinoma micrometastases treated with targeted alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Chouin, N; Lindegren, S; Jensen, H; Albertsson, P; Bäck, T

    2012-12-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) a promising treatment for small, residual, and micrometastatic diseases has questionable efficacy against malignant lesions larger than the α-particle range, and likely requires favorable intratumoral activity distribution. Here, we characterized and quantified the activity distribution of an alpha-particle emitter radiolabelled antibody within >100-µm micrometastases in a murine ovarian carcinoma model. Nude mice bearing ovarian micrometastases were injected intra-peritoneally with 211At-MX35 (total injected activity 6 MBq, specific activity 650 MBq/mg). Animals were sacrificed at several time points, and peritoneal samples were excised and prepared for alpha-camera imaging. Spatial and temporal activity distributions within micrometastases were derived and used for small-scale dosimetry. We observed two activity distribution patterns: uniform distribution and high stable uptake (>100% IA/g at all time points) in micrometastases with no visible stromal compartment, and radial distribution (high activity on the edge and poor uptake in the core) in tumor cell lobules surrounded by fibroblasts. Activity distributions over time were characterized by a peak (140% IA/g at 4 h) in the outer tumor layer and a sharp drop beyond a depth of 50 µm. Small-scale dosimetry was performed on a multi-cellular micrometastasis model, using time-integrated activities derived from the experimental data. With injected activity of 400 kBq, tumors exhibiting uniform activity distribution received <25 Gy (EUD=13 Gy), whereas tumors presenting radial activity distribution received mean absorbed doses of <8 Gy (EUD=5 Gy). These results provide new insight into important aspects of TAT, and may explain why micrometastases >100 µm might not be effectively treated by the examined regimen.

  16. Effect of different breathing patterns in the same patient on stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy dosimetry for primary renal cell carcinoma: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Siva, Shankar

    2013-10-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) targets requires motion management strategies to verify dose delivery. This case study highlights the effect of a change in patient breathing amplitude on the dosimetry to organs at risk and target structures. A 73-year-old male patient was planned for receiving 26 Gy of radiation in 1 fraction of SABR for a left primary RCC. The patient was simulated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and the tumor internal target volume (ITV) was delineated using the 4DCT maximum intensity projection. However, the initially planned treatment was abandoned at the radiation oncologist's discretion after pretreatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) motion verification identified a greater than 50% reduction in superior to inferior diaphragm motion as compared with the planning 4DCT. This patient was resimulated with respiratory coaching instructions. To assess the effect of the change in breathing on the dosimetry to the target, each plan was recalculated on the data set representing the change in breathing condition. A change from smaller to larger breathing showed a 46% loss in planning target volume (PTV) coverage, whereas a change from larger breathing to smaller breathing resulted in an 8% decrease in PTV coverage. ITV coverage was similarly reduced by 8% in both scenarios. This case study highlights the importance of tools to verify breathing motion prior to treatment delivery. 4D image guided radiation therapy verification strategies should focus on not only verifying ITV margin coverage but also the effect on the surrounding organs at risk.

  17. Effect of different breathing patterns in the same patient on stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy dosimetry for primary renal cell carcinoma: a case study.

    PubMed

    Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Siva, Shankar

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC) targets requires motion management strategies to verify dose delivery. This case study highlights the effect of a change in patient breathing amplitude on the dosimetry to organs at risk and target structures. A 73-year-old male patient was planned for receiving 26Gy of radiation in 1 fraction of SABR for a left primary RCC. The patient was simulated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and the tumor internal target volume (ITV) was delineated using the 4DCT maximum intensity projection. However, the initially planned treatment was abandoned at the radiation oncologist's discretion after pretreatment cone-beam CT (CBCT) motion verification identified a greater than 50% reduction in superior to inferior diaphragm motion as compared with the planning 4DCT. This patient was resimulated with respiratory coaching instructions. To assess the effect of the change in breathing on the dosimetry to the target, each plan was recalculated on the data set representing the change in breathing condition. A change from smaller to larger breathing showed a 46% loss in planning target volume (PTV) coverage, whereas a change from larger breathing to smaller breathing resulted in an 8% decrease in PTV coverage. ITV coverage was similarly reduced by 8% in both scenarios. This case study highlights the importance of tools to verify breathing motion prior to treatment delivery. 4D image guided radiation therapy verification strategies should focus on not only verifying ITV margin coverage but also the effect on the surrounding organs at risk.

  18. Molecular evidence that invasive adenocarcinoma can mimic prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and intraductal carcinoma through retrograde glandular colonization.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Michael C; Weier, Christopher; Xu, Meng Meng; Vaghasia, Ajay; Gürel, Bora; Gümüşkaya, Berrak; Esopi, David M; Fedor, Helen; Tan, Hsueh-Li; Kulac, Ibrahim; Hicks, Jessica; Isaacs, William B; Lotan, Tamara L; Nelson, William G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer often manifests as morphologically distinct tumour foci and is frequently found adjacent to presumed precursor lesions such as high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). While there is some evidence to suggest that these lesions can be related and exist on a pathological and morphological continuum, the precise clonal and temporal relationships between precursor lesions and invasive cancers within individual tumours remain undefined. Here, we used molecular genetic, cytogenetic, and histological analyses to delineate clonal, temporal, and spatial relationships between HGPIN and cancer lesions with distinct morphological and molecular features. First, while confirming the previous finding that a substantial fraction of HGPIN lesions associated with ERG-positive cancers share rearrangements and overexpression of ERG, we found that a significant subset of such HGPIN glands exhibit only partial positivity for ERG. This suggests that such ERG-positive HGPIN cells either rapidly invade to form adenocarcinoma or represent cancer cells that have partially invaded the ductal and acinar space in a retrograde manner. To clarify these possibilities, we used ERG expression status and TMPRSS2-ERG genomic breakpoints as markers of clonality, and PTEN deletion status to track temporal evolution of clonally related lesions. We confirmed that morphologically distinct HGPIN and nearby invasive cancer lesions are clonally related. Further, we found that a significant fraction of ERG-positive, PTEN-negative HGPIN and intraductal carcinoma (IDC-P) lesions are most likely clonally derived from adjacent PTEN-negative adenocarcinomas, indicating that such PTEN-negative HGPIN and IDC-P lesions arise from, rather than give rise to, the nearby invasive adenocarcinoma. These data suggest that invasive adenocarcinoma can morphologically mimic HGPIN through retrograde colonization of benign glands with cancer cells. Similar clonal relationships were also seen for

  19. Celastrol blocks interleukin-6 gene expression via downregulation of NF-κB in prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Chung, Li-Chuan; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Chen, Wen-Tsung; Chang, Phei-Lang; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a multifunctional cytokine, contributes to proliferation or differentiation of prostate carcinoma cells in a highly cell type-specific manner. Celastrol (3-hydroxy-24-nor-2oxo-1(10),3,5,7-friedelatetrane-29-oic acid), also named as tripterine, is extracted from root of Chinese traditional herb Tripterygiumwilfordii Hook f with potent anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. In this study, we evaluated the molecular mechanisms of celastrol on cell proliferation and IL-6 gene expression in prostate carcinoma cells. 3H-thymidine incorporation and flow cytometric analysis indicated that celastrol treatments arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase, thus attenuating cell proliferation in prostate carcinoma PC-3 cells; moreover, celastrol induced cell apoptosis at higher dosage. Knockdown of IL-6 attenuated the anti-proliferative effect of celastrol on PC-3 cells. Results from ELISA and 5'-deletion transient gene expression assays indicated that celastrol treatment decreased IL-6 secretion and gene expression, and this effect is dependent on the NF-κB response element within IL-6 promoter area since mutation of the NF-κB response element from AAATGTCCCATTTTCCC to AAATGTTACATTTTCCC by site-directed mutagenesis abolished the inhibition of celastrol on the IL-6 promoter activity. Celastrol also attenuated the activation of PMA and TNFα on the gene expression and secretion of IL-6 in PC-3 cells. Immunoblot assays revealed that celastrol treatment downregulated the expressions of IKKα, p50 and p65, supporting the 5'-deletion transient gene expression assay result that celastrol blocked IL-6 expression through the NF-κB pathway in PC-3 cells. For the first time, our results concluded that celastrol attenuates PC-3 cell proliferation via downregulation of IL-6 gene expression through the NF-κB-dependent pathway.

  20. Hormono-radiotherapy in prostatic carcinoma: prognostic factors and implications for combined modality treatment.

    PubMed

    Cellini, Numa; Luzi, Stefano; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Mantini, Giovanna; Valentini, Vincenzo; Racioppi, Marco; Leone, Mariavittoria; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Di Gesù, Cinzia; Giustacchini, Mario; Destito, Antonio; Smaniotto, Daniela; Alcini, Eugenio

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic role of several clinical variables in a patient population undergoing neoadjuvant hormonotherapy (NHT) with external beam radiotherapy (ERT) to identify subsets of patients with an unfavorable prognosis who require intensified therapy. Eighty-four patients (mean age, 68.2 +/- 6.1 years; range, 52-81 years) underwent ERT (45 Gy to pelvic volume; 65 Gy mean dose to prostate volume) and NHT (oral flutamide: 250 mg three times daily for 30 days; LH-RH analogue: one vial every 28 days starting two months before radiotherapy and for its entire duration). The distribution according to clinical stage was T2: 46.4%, T3: 50.0%, T4: 3.6%. The distribution according to the Gleason score was grade 2-4: 17.9%; grade 5-7: 53.6%; grade 8-10: 28.5%. The distribution according to pretreatment PSA levels (in ng/mL) was 0-4: 5.9%; 4-10: 26.2%; 10-20:16.7%; > or = 20: 51.2%. With a median follow-up of 36 months, 3.6% of patients died; hematogenous metastases and local disease progression were found in 16.7% and 6% of patients, respectively. Overall, the incidence of disease progression was 17.9%. 32.9% of patients showed biochemical failure during followup. Overall, metastasis-free, local progression-free and biochemical failure-free actuarial survival at five years was 89.2%, 66.5%, 85.0% and 41.9%, respectively. At univariate analysis (log-rank) clinical stage (cT) was shown to be significantly correlated with the incidence of metastasis (P = 0.0004), local progression (P < 0.0001) and disease-free survival (P = 0.0005). At multivariate analysis (Cox) the correlations between clinical stage and metastasis (P = 0.0175), local progression (P = 0.0200) and disease-free survival (P = 0.0175) were confirmed. Gleason score and pretreatment PSA levels did not show any significant correlation with these endpoints. These results confirm the indications of the recent literature, which, in prostate carcinoma at higher clinical stages, suggest

  1. Biodistribution, Tumor Detection, and Radiation Dosimetry of 18F-DCFBC, a Low-Molecular-Weight Inhibitor of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen, in Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Steve Y.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Mease, Ronnie C.; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Holt, Daniel P.; Jeffrey-Kwanisai, Akimosa; Endres, Christopher J.; Dannals, Robert F.; Sgouros, George; Lodge, Martin; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Rodriguez, Ronald; Carducci, Michael A.; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a type II integral membrane protein expressed on the surface of prostate cancer (PCa) cells, particularly in androgen-independent, advanced, and metastatic disease. Previously, we demonstrated that N-[N-[(S)-1,3-dicarboxypropyl]carbamoyl]-4-18F-fluorobenzyl-Lcysteine (18F-DCFBC) could image an experimental model of PSMA-positive PCa using PET. Here, we describe the initial clinical experience and radiation dosimetry of 18F-DCFBC in men with metastatic PCa. Methods Five patients with radiologic evidence of metastatic PCa were studied after the intravenous administration of 370 MBq (10 mCi) of 18F-DCFBC. Serial PET was performed until 2 h after administration. Time- activity curves were generated for selected normal tissues and metastatic foci. Radiation dose estimates were calculated using OLINDA/EXM 1.1. Results Most vascular organs demonstrated a slow decrease in radioactivity concentration over time consistent with clearance from the blood pool, with primarily urinary radiotracer excretion. Thirty-two PET-positive suspected metastatic sites were identified, with 21 concordant on both PET and conventional imaging for abnormal findings compatible with metastatic disease. Of the 11 PET-positive sites not identified on conventional imaging, most were within the bone and could be considered suggestive for the detection of early bone metastases, although further validation is needed. The highest mean absorbed dose per unit administered radioactivity (µGy/MBq) was in the bladder wall (32.4), and the resultant effective dose was 19.9 ± 1.34 µSv/MBq (mean ± SD). Conclusion Although further studies are needed for validation, our findings demonstrate the potential of 18F-DCFBC as a new positron-emitting imaging agent for the detection of metastatic PCa. This study also provides dose estimates for 18F-DCFBC that are comparable to those of other PET radiopharmaceuticals such as 18F-FDG. PMID:23203246

  2. Effects of oridonin nanosuspension on cell proliferation and apoptosis of human prostatic carcinoma PC-3 cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Xiumei; Xue, Wei; Yangyang, Yuna; Xu, Derong; Zhao, Yunxue; Lou, Haiyan

    2010-10-05

    This study aims to investigate the inhibitory effects of oridonin nanosuspension on human prostatic carcinoma PC-3 cell line in vitro. The PC-3 cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of oridonin solution and nanosuspensions for 12 hours, 24 hours, and 36 hours. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay was performed to measure cellular viability and investigate the effect of oridonin on cell growth of PC-3. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining method was used to determine the effect of oridonin by fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry, respectively. Nanosuspension on early apoptosis of PC-3 cells was also evaluated. Oridonin significantly inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells after 12 hours, 24 hours, and 36 hours of treatment in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). Compared with the same concentration of oridonin solution, oridonin nanosuspension enhanced the inhibition ratio of proliferation. The observation of propidium iodide fluorescence staining confirmed the MTT assay results. The cell proportion of PC-3 at the G2/M phase in the nanosuspension treatment group was upregulated compared with that of the control and oridonin solution groups. Both oridonin solution and nanosuspension promoted the early apoptosis of PC-3 cells. Furthermore, while improving the ratio of early apoptosis, oridonin nanosuspensions also enhanced growth suppression, and induced apoptosis of PC-3 cells. This shows great potential in the treatment of androgen-independent carcinoma of prostate by oridonin nanosuspensions.

  3. Antitumor effect of microbubbles enhanced by low frequency ultrasound cavitation on prostate carcinoma xenografts in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YU; HU, BING; DIAO, XUEHONG; ZHANG, JIZHEN

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antitumor effect induced by low frequency (20 kHz) ultrasound (US) radiation combined with intravenous injection of microbubbles (Mbs) on prostate carcinoma Du145 xenografts in nude mice. Du145 prostate tumors were percutaneously implanted in 40 nude mice, which were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10 each): US+Mbs, US, Mbs and control groups. The mice in the US+Mbs group were treated with 20 kHz, 200 mW/cm2 US radiation and with 0.2 ml Mbs injected intravenously. Mice in the US and Mbs groups were only treated with US radiation and injection of Mbs, respectively. Tumors were measured with sonography, and the ratio of antitumor growth was calculated. The mice were sacrificed 14 days after treatment. Specimens of the tumor tissues were observed pathologically using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Microvessel density and the average optical density of vascular endothelial growth factor were compared among groups by immunohistochemistry. The average gross tumor volume of the US+Mbs group was significantly reduced compared with the other groups following treatment (P<0.05). The ratio of the antitumor growth in the US+Mbs group was significantly greater than that of the US and Mbs group (P<0.05). Histological examination showed signs of tumor cell injury in the US+Mbs group. Examination by electron microscopy revealed vessel injury in the endothelium in the tumors treated with US+Mbs. Microvessel density and the average optical density of vascular endothelial growth factor in the US+Mbs group were significantly less than that of other groups (P<0.05). In conclusion, low frequency US of 20 kHz radiation combined with Mbs may be used to inhibit the growth of human prostate carcinoma xenografts in nude mice, and the effect is likely realized through microvessel destruction caused by cavitation. PMID:22969866

  4. Antitumor effect of microbubbles enhanced by low frequency ultrasound cavitation on prostate carcinoma xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Hu, Bing; Diao, Xuehong; Zhang, Jizhen

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antitumor effect induced by low frequency (20 kHz) ultrasound (US) radiation combined with intravenous injection of microbubbles (Mbs) on prostate carcinoma Du145 xenografts in nude mice. Du145 prostate tumors were percutaneously implanted in 40 nude mice, which were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10 each): US+Mbs, US, Mbs and control groups. The mice in the US+Mbs group were treated with 20 kHz, 200 mW/cm(2) US radiation and with 0.2 ml Mbs injected intravenously. Mice in the US and Mbs groups were only treated with US radiation and injection of Mbs, respectively. Tumors were measured with sonography, and the ratio of antitumor growth was calculated. The mice were sacrificed 14 days after treatment. Specimens of the tumor tissues were observed pathologically using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Microvessel density and the average optical density of vascular endothelial growth factor were compared among groups by immunohistochemistry. The average gross tumor volume of the US+Mbs group was significantly reduced compared with the other groups following treatment (P<0.05). The ratio of the antitumor growth in the US+Mbs group was significantly greater than that of the US and Mbs group (P<0.05). Histological examination showed signs of tumor cell injury in the US+Mbs group. Examination by electron microscopy revealed vessel injury in the endothelium in the tumors treated with US+Mbs. Microvessel density and the average optical density of vascular endothelial growth factor in the US+Mbs group were significantly less than that of other groups (P<0.05). In conclusion, low frequency US of 20 kHz radiation combined with Mbs may be used to inhibit the growth of human prostate carcinoma xenografts in nude mice, and the effect is likely realized through microvessel destruction caused by cavitation.

  5. Dosimetry of a thyroid uptake detected in seed migration survey following a patient's iodine-125 prostate implant and in vitro measurements of intentional seed leakages

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qinsheng; Russell, John L. Jr.; Macklis, Roger R.; Weinhous, Martin S.; Blair, Henry F.

    2006-07-15

    As a quality control procedure, a post-implant seed migration survey has been accomplished on 340 prostate cancer patients since November 2001. Pulmonary seed embolization and intracardiac seed embolization have been detected. A case of thyroid uptake due to leaking iodine-125 (I-125) sources was also seized. In order to determine the dose to the thyroid, a dosimetry method was developed to link in vivo measurements and the cumulated dose to the thyroid. The calculated source leakage half-life in the case was approximately 15 days based on the measurements and the estimated cumulated dose to thyroid was 204 cGy. It is concluded that one seed was leaking. In order to verify the in vivo measurements, intentional in vitro seed leakage tests were performed. A seed was cut open and placed in a sealed glass container filled with a given volume of saline. The I-125 concentration in the saline was subsequently measured over a period of six months. Consistent in vivo and in vitro results were obtained. Recent incidents of seed leaks reported from other centers have drawn practitioners' attention to this problem. In order to make the measurements more useful, the seed leakage tests were expanded to include I-125 seeds from six other vendors. The results show that the leakage half-lives of those seeds varied from nine days to a half-year. Two seed models demonstrated least leakage. Since the measurements lasted for six months, the escape of iodine resulted from oxidation of iodide in the saline was a concern for the measurement accuracy. As a reference, another set of leakage tests were performed by adding sodium thiosulfate salt (Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O) to the saline. Sodium thiosulfate is a reducing agent that prevents the conversion of iodide to iodate so as to minimize I-125 evaporation. As a result, significantly shortened leakage half-lives were observed in this group. Seed agitation was also performed and no significant deviations of the

  6. Computational dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, B.R.L.; Thomas, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a definition of the term ``Computational Dosimetry`` that is interpreted as the sub-discipline of computational physics which is devoted to radiation metrology. It is shown that computational dosimetry is more than a mere collection of computational methods. Computational simulations directed at basic understanding and modelling are important tools provided by computational dosimetry, while another very important application is the support that it can give to the design, optimization and analysis of experiments. However, the primary task of computational dosimetry is to reduce the variance in the determination of absorbed dose (and its related quantities), for example in the disciplines of radiological protection and radiation therapy. In this paper emphasis is given to the discussion of potential pitfalls in the applications of computational dosimetry and recommendations are given for their avoidance. The need for comparison of calculated and experimental data whenever possible is strongly stressed.

  7. Unique G-Rich Oligonucleotides Which Inhibit the Growth of Prostatic Carcinoma Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    Prostate Cancer) MDA-MB-231 (Breast Cancer) HeLa ( Cervical Cancer ) HS27 (Normal Skin) Nuclear nucleolin staining. (A) Phase contrast (upper panel) and...stained nucleoli in normal HS27 cells. Surface nucleolin staining. DU145 (Prostate Cancer) MDA-MB-231 (Breast Cancer) HeLa ( Cervical Cancer ) HS27 (Normal

  8. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of resveratrol and 3,5-dihydroxy-4′-acetoxy-trans-stilbene in the treatment of human prostate carcinoma and melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, Gregory W.; Masko, Elizabeth M.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Freedland, Stephen J.; Pizzo, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Background Resveratrol (RESV) is a naturally occurring compound that may possess anti-cancer capabilities in both prostate carcinoma and melanoma. Methods The in vitro and in vivo cytotoxic activity of RESV and 3,5-dihydroxy-4′-acetoxy-trans-stilbene (4-ACE) was tested using cellular assays and a xenograft model. Five prostate carcinoma cell lines were used for in vitro evaluation. A melanoma cell line (Duke melanoma 738 [DM738]) and the prostate carcinoma line CWR22 were used for in vivo experiments. Mice were randomized to osmotic mini pumps with 200 μL of RESV (250 mg/mL), 4-ACE (335 mg/mL), or vehicle (50% dimethyl sulfoxide, 50% polyethylene glycol). Serum drug and metabolite levels were calculated by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection. Western blots were performed on treated tumors. Results were analyzed using a student’s t-test, analysis of variance, and the Mann–Whitney rank sum test. Results RESV and 4-ACE were cytotoxic in a time- and dose-dependent manner in all prostate carcinoma cell lines tested. Enhanced growth compared with controls was seen at the 24 h time point in four lines treated with RESV and two lines treated with 4-ACE (Ps < 0.048). In vivo, no difference in either tumor growth or postmortem tumor weight was detected in either DM738 (P = 0.555, P = 0.562) or CWR22 (P = 0.166, P = 0.811) xenografts treated with either drug. Serum drug levels did not correlate with tumor growth rates for any treatment group (all Ps > 0.11). Treated tumors demonstrated protein changes by western blot. Conclusion Although in vitro data were promising, RESV and 4-ACE have limited potential as single agents in the treatment of prostate carcinoma and melanoma. PMID:22482756

  9. Incidental Detection of Thyroid Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma Using 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT to Assess Prostate Cancer Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Zacho, Helle D; Nielsen, Julie B; Dettmann, Katja; Haberkorn, Uwe; Petersen, Lars J

    2017-03-01

    Ga-PSMA PET/CT is increasingly used to assess prostate cancer. Avid Ga-PSMA uptake by thyroid cancer and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been reported in few cases. A 75-year-old man who received a diagnosis of RCC in 2006 and prostate cancer in 2009 presented with elevated prostate-specific antigen levels (0.7 ng/mL) following prostatectomy. Ga-PSMA PET/CT showed avid Ga-PSMA uptake in 1 pelvic and 1 retroperitoneal lymph node and focal Ga-PSMA accumulation in the thyroid. Excised retroperitoneal lymph node and thyroid tissues showed metastases from RCC, whereas the pelvic lymph node exhibited metastasis from prostate cancer.

  10. Demonstration of synchrotron x-ray phase contrast imaging computed tomography of infiltrative transitional cell carcinoma of the prostatic urethra in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, James E.; Wesolowski, Michal J.; Wolkowski, Bailey; Chibbar, Rajni; Snead, Elisabeth C. R.; Singh, Jaswant; Pettitt, Murray; Malhi, Pritpal S.; Barboza, Trinita; Adams, Gregg

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Prostatic urethral transitional cell carcinoma with prostatic invasion in a dog was imaged with abdominal radiography and abdominal ultrasonography antemortem. Synchrotron in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging computed tomography (XPCI-CT) was performed on the prostate ex vivo at the Canadian Light Source Synchrotron and compared to histology. XPCI-CT imaging provides greater soft tissue contrast than conventional absorption-based x-ray imaging modalities, permitting visualization of regions of inflammatory cell infiltration, differentiation of invasive versus noninvasive tumor regions, and areas of necrosis and mineralization. This represents the first report of XPCI-CT images of an invasive prostatic urothelial neoplasm in a dog. PMID:27014719

  11. The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer consensus statement on immunotherapy for the treatment of prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    McNeel, Douglas G; Bander, Neil H; Beer, Tomasz M; Drake, Charles G; Fong, Lawrence; Harrelson, Stacey; Kantoff, Philip W; Madan, Ravi A; Oh, William K; Peace, David J; Petrylak, Daniel P; Porterfield, Hank; Sartor, Oliver; Shore, Neal D; Slovin, Susan F; Stein, Mark N; Vieweg, Johannes; Gulley, James L

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy and second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States. In recent years, several new agents, including cancer immunotherapies, have been approved or are currently being investigated in late-stage clinical trials for the management of advanced prostate cancer. Therefore, the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) convened a multidisciplinary panel, including physicians, nurses, and patient advocates, to develop consensus recommendations for the clinical application of immunotherapy for prostate cancer patients. To do so, a systematic literature search was performed to identify high-impact papers from 2006 until 2014 and was further supplemented with literature provided by the panel. Results from the consensus panel voting and discussion as well as the literature review were used to rate supporting evidence and generate recommendations for the use of immunotherapy in prostate cancer patients. Sipuleucel-T, an autologous dendritic cell vaccine, is the first and currently only immunotherapeutic agent approved for the clinical management of metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The consensus panel utilized this model to discuss immunotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer, issues related to patient selection, monitoring of patients during and post treatment, and sequence/combination with other anti-cancer treatments. Potential immunotherapies emerging from late-stage clinical trials are also discussed. As immunotherapy evolves as a therapeutic option for the treatment of prostate cancer, these recommendations will be updated accordingly.

  12. miR-129 predicts prognosis and inhibits cell growth in human prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Song; Yi, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Zheng-Yu; Ge, Jing-Ping; Zhou, Wen-Quan

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, well-conserved, non-coding RNAs that are increasingly identified as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in a number of cancers. Deregulated miR-129 is closely associated with tumorigenesis and cancer progression. However, the potential role of miR-129 in prostate cancer remains largely elusive. The present study investigated the role of miR-129 as a prognostic biomarker for tumor progression and clinical prognosis in prostate cancer patients. The examined prostate cancer tissues exhibited a significant reduction in miR-129 expression compared with the normal tissues (P=0.013). The expression levels of miR-129 were negatively correlated with histological grade (P<0.001), high preoperative prostate-specific antigen serum levels (P<0.001), pathological stage (P<0.001), high Gleason score (P<0.001), lymph node metastasis (P=0.002), angiolymphatic invasion (P=0.018), and biochemical recurrence (BCR; P=0.001). Use of the Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that low miR-129 expression was closely associated with poorer BCR-free survival. Multivariate survival analysis indicated that miR-129 expression may be an independent prognostic marker for BCR-free survival in prostate cancer patients (P<0.001). Overexpression of miR-129 markedly attenuated prostate cancer cell growth by rescuing cell cycle-regulated protein expression. The present study suggests that miR-129 is downregulated in the cancerous tissues of prostate cancer patients, which was associated with poor BCR-free survival. Thus, it may be considered as a novel independent prognostic biomarker for prostate cancer. In addition, downregulation of miR-129 may serve a critical role in the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. PMID:27779679

  13. The Quantitative Criteria Based on the Fractal Dimensions, Entropy, and Lacunarity for the Spatial Distribution of Cancer Cell Nuclei Enable Identification of Low or High Aggressive Prostate Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tumor grading, PSA concentration, and stage determine a risk of prostate cancer patients with accuracy of about 70%. An approach based on the fractal geometrical model was proposed to eliminate subjectivity from the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness and to improve the prediction. This study was undertaken to validate classes of equivalence for the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei in a larger, independent set of prostate carcinomas. Methods: The global fractal capacity D0, information D1 and correlation D2 dimension, the local fractal dimension (LFD) and the local connected fractal dimension (LCFD), Shannon entropy H and lacunarity λ were measured using computer algorithms in digitalized images of both the reference set (n = 60) and the test set (n = 208) of prostate carcinomas. Results: Prostate carcinomas were re-stratified into seven classes of equivalence. The cut-off D0-values 1.5450, 1.5820, 1.6270, 1.6490, 1.6980, 1.7640 defined the classes from C1 to C7, respectively. The other measures but the D1 failed to define the same classes of equivalence. The pairs (D0, LFD), (D0, H), (D0, λ), (D1, LFD), (D1, H), (D1, λ) characterized the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei in each class. The co-application of those measures enabled the subordination of prostate carcinomas to one out of three clusters associated with different tumor aggressiveness. For D0 < 1.5820, LFD < 1.3, LCFD > 1.5, H < 0.7, and λ > 0.8, the class C1 or C2 contains low complexity low aggressive carcinomas exclusively. For D0 > 1.6980, LFD > 1.7644, LCFD > 1.7051, H > 0.9, and λ < 0.7, the class C6 or C7 contains high complexity high aggressive carcinomas. Conclusions: The cut-off D0-values defining the classes of equivalence were validated in this study. The cluster analysis suggested that the number of the subjective Gleason grades and the number of the objective classes of equivalence could be decreased from seven to three without a loss of clinically

  14. Restoration of Transforming Growth Factor Beta Signaling by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors in Human Prostate Carcinoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    prostate cancer LNCaP cells. Specific Aim 2): To determine whether re-expression of TGFβRII by HDACI is associated with the restoration of TGFβ...signaling and contributes to HDACI antitumor activity. We also examined the TGFbRII expression levels in other prostate cancer cell lines – PC3, LAPC4...evaluate the antitumor effect of HDACIs in combination with anti-androgen treatment (androgen ablation). Our initial hypothesis is that HDAC

  15. Utility of PTEN and ERG immunostaining for distinguishing high-grade PIN from intraductal carcinoma of the prostate on needle biopsy.

    PubMed

    Morais, Carlos L; Han, Jeong S; Gordetsky, Jennifer; Nagar, Michael S; Anderson, Ann E; Lee, Stephen; Hicks, Jessica L; Zhou, Ming; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Shah, Rajal B; Epstein, Jonathan I; De Marzo, Angelo M; Lotan, Tamara L

    2015-02-01

    Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) have markedly different implications for patient care but can be difficult to distinguish in needle biopsies. In radical prostatectomies, we demonstrated that PTEN and ERG immunostaining may be helpful to resolve this differential diagnosis. Here, we tested whether these markers are diagnostically useful in the needle biopsy setting. Separate or combined immunostains were applied to biopsies containing morphologically identified intraductal carcinoma, PIN, or borderline intraductal proliferations more concerning than PIN but falling short of morphologic criteria for intraductal carcinoma. Intraductal carcinoma occurring with concurrent invasive tumor showed the highest rate of PTEN loss, with 76% (38/50) lacking PTEN and 58% (29/50) expressing ERG. Of biopsies containing isolated intraductal carcinoma, 61% (20/33) showed PTEN loss and 30% (10/33) expressed ERG. Of the borderline intraductal proliferations, 52% (11/21) showed PTEN loss and 27% (4/15) expressed ERG. Of the borderline cases with PTEN loss, 64% (7/11) had carcinoma in a subsequent needle biopsy specimen, compared with 50% (5/10) of PTEN-intact cases. In contrast, none of the PIN cases showed PTEN loss or ERG expression (0/19). On needle biopsy, PTEN loss is common in morphologically identified intraductal carcinoma yet is very rare in high-grade PIN. Borderline intraductal proliferations, especially those with PTEN loss, have a high rate of carcinoma on resampling. If confirmed in larger prospective studies, these results suggest that PTEN and ERG immunostaining may provide a useful ancillary assay to distinguish intraductal carcinoma from high-grade PIN in this setting.

  16. Non-THC cannabinoids inhibit prostate carcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo: pro-apoptotic effects and underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Ligresti, Alessia; Schiano Moriello, Aniello; Iappelli, Mariagrazia; Verde, Roberta; Stott, Colin G; Cristino, Luigia; Orlando, Pierangelo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Cannabinoid receptor activation induces prostate carcinoma cell (PCC) apoptosis, but cannabinoids other than Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which lack potency at cannabinoid receptors, have not been investigated. Some of these compounds antagonize transient receptor potential melastatin type-8 (TRPM8) channels, the expression of which is necessary for androgen receptor (AR)-dependent PCC survival. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We tested pure cannabinoids and extracts from Cannabis strains enriched in particular cannabinoids (BDS), on AR-positive (LNCaP and 22RV1) and -negative (DU-145 and PC-3) cells, by evaluating cell viability (MTT test), cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction, by FACS scans, caspase 3/7 assays, DNA fragmentation and TUNEL, and size of xenograft tumours induced by LNCaP and DU-145 cells. KEY RESULTS Cannabidiol (CBD) significantly inhibited cell viability. Other compounds became effective in cells deprived of serum for 24 h. Several BDS were more potent than the pure compounds in the presence of serum. CBD-BDS (i.p.) potentiated the effects of bicalutamide and docetaxel against LNCaP and DU-145 xenograft tumours and, given alone, reduced LNCaP xenograft size. CBD (1–10 µM) induced apoptosis and induced markers of intrinsic apoptotic pathways (PUMA and CHOP expression and intracellular Ca2+). In LNCaP cells, the pro-apoptotic effect of CBD was only partly due to TRPM8 antagonism and was accompanied by down-regulation of AR, p53 activation and elevation of reactive oxygen species. LNCaP cells differentiated to androgen-insensitive neuroendocrine-like cells were more sensitive to CBD-induced apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These data support the clinical testing of CBD against prostate carcinoma. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by Pacher et al., pp. 76–78 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.02121.x PMID:22594963

  17. The tolerance to multiple daily fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of prostatic and bladder carcinoma: a feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, K.K.; van der Schueren, E.

    1982-10-01

    A modified fractionation schedule was designed with the purpose of reducing the treatment burden. Three fractions of 2 Gy with four hours interval were given during 5 days. The whole scheme was repeated after a rest period of 4 weeks. This makes it possible to deliver a dose of 60 Gy in 10 treatment days and over a total time of 6 weeks. A total of 30 patients, 22 with prostatic cancer and 8 with invasive bladder carcinoma, have been treated. The feasibility has been found to be very good. Forty-seven percent of the patients had acute morbidity, although it was mild in all patients. One patient had a persistent, another had a transient delayed symptom, and one had a severe late complication. The tolerance to this schedule is better than that observed with conventional fractionation schedules. Together with the drastical reduction of the total treatment days, this multiple daily fractionation (MDF) schedule has already been shown to improve the therapeutic ratio by diminishing the burden on the patients. Longer follow-up is necessary for the assessment of the efficacy of this schedule for local tumor control. However, with a follow-up period of 7 to 16 months no recurrence of the prostate cancer in the pelvis has been observed. These results warrant further exploration of the possible benefits of modifications in time-dose-fractionation schedules.

  18. Interleukin-13 receptors on human prostate carcinoma cell lines represent a novel target for a chimeric protein composed of IL-13 and a mutated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin.

    PubMed

    Maini, A; Hillman, G; Haas, G P; Wang, C Y; Montecillo, E; Hamzavi, F; Pontes, J E; Leland, P; Pastan, I; Debinski, W; Puri, R K

    1997-09-01

    We have discovered a new cell surface protein in the form of interleukin-13 receptor on several solid tumor cells, including human renal cell carcinoma cells (Obiri et al., 1995; Debinski et al., 1995). This study reports that human prostate cancer cell lines also express high affinity IL-13 receptors (Kd = 159 pM). These receptors are functional because IL-13 surprisingly increased proliferation of all three prostate cancer cell lines studied as determined by thymidine uptake and clonogenic assays. IL-13 receptors on prostate cancer cell lines were targeted using a chimeric protein composed of IL-13 and a mutated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE38QQR). This molecule, termed IL13-PE38QQR, has been found cytotoxic to all three prostate cancer cell lines as determined by the inhibition of protein synthesis. The IC50 ranged between 1 nmol/l, to 15 nmol/l. These data were confirmed by clonogenic assays in which IL13-PE38QQR almost completely inhibited colony formation at 10 nmol/l. IL13-PE38QQR was not cytotoxic to cells that express little or no IL-13R. Heat inactivated IL13-PE38QQR was not cytotoxic to prostate cancer cells indicating specificity. IL13-PE38QQR was also cytotoxic to colonies when they were allowed to form first for several days before the addition of toxins. Our data suggest that additional studies should be performed to target IL-13 receptor bearing prostate cancer.

  19. Cisplatin modulates B-cell translocation gene 2 to attenuate cell proliferation of prostate carcinoma cells in both p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Chung, Li-Chuan; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Feng, Tsui-Hsia; Chen, Wen-Tsung; Chang, Phei-Lang; Chiang, Hou-Yu; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2014-07-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used anti-cancer drug. The B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) is involved in the cell cycle transition regulation. We evaluated the cisplatin effects on prostate cancer cell proliferation and the expressions of BTG2, p53, androgen receptor (AR) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) in prostate carcinoma, p53 wild-type LNCaP or p53-null PC-3, cells. Cisplatin treatments attenuated cell prostate cancer cell growth through inducing Go/G1 cell cycle arrest in lower concentration and apoptosis at higher dosage. Cisplatin treatments enhanced p53 and BTG2 expression, repressed AR and PSA expression, and blocked the activation of androgen on the PSA secretion in LNCaP cells. BTG2 knockdown in LNCaP cells attenuated cisplatin-mediated growth inhibition. Cisplatin enhanced BTG2 gene expression dependent on the DNA fragment located within -173 to -82 upstream of BTG2 translation initiation site in prostate cancer cells. Mutation of the p53 response element from GGGCAGAGCCC to GGGCACC or mutation of the NFκB response element from GGAAAGTCC to GGAAAGGAA by site-directed mutagenesis abolished the stimulation of cisplatin on the BTG2 promoter activity in LNCaP or PC-3 cells, respectively. Our results indicated that cisplatin attenuates prostate cancer cell proliferation partly mediated by upregulation of BTG2 through the p53-dependent pathway or p53-independent NFκB pathway.

  20. State-of-the-art radiotherapy in the management of clinically localized prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, R Scott; Izaguirre, Alejandra; Roach, Mack

    2007-02-01

    Four Phase III trials demonstrating higher prostate-specific antigen control rates in prostate cancer patients treated with higher doses of radiation have changed the standard of care. Emerging on-line technologies, improved imaging and computer algorithms, combined with an improved understanding of how best to apply them, have allowed radiation oncologists to move ever closer to the optimal application of curative radiation. This technology allows a higher dose to be delivered to tumor-bearing areas while minimizing the dose delivered to surrounding normal tissues. Real-time adaptive techniques have made each step more accurate, and commercialization has increasingly moved these advances further into the community setting. Phase III trials have also helped to define the role of hormonal therapy in combination with radiation and the benefits of prophylactic pelvic nodal radiotherapy in subsets of patients. We have also learnt how to optimize the use of prostate-specific antigen to better determine success and failure following radiotherapy.

  1. A useful treatment for patients with advanced mixed-type small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the prostate: A case report.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Kei-Ichiro; Nakagawa, Go; Chikui, Katsuaki; Moriya, Fukuko; Nakiri, Makoto; Hayashi, Tokumasa; Suekane, Shigetaka; Matsuoka, Kei

    2013-03-01

    Treating extended prostatic small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (PSCNC) is extremely difficult and no standard treatment has yet been established. We experienced a case of advanced mixed-type PSCNC in which the patient achieved long-term survival and local control following combined therapy. Locally advanced PSCNC causing lower urinary obstruction was detected during androgen-ablation therapy for stage D2 mixed adenocarcinoma PSCNC. The patient was treated with intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy using a reservoir system and external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to the whole pelvis and local tumor. After chemoradiotherapy, the patient's lower urinary obstruction was reduced and did not return during the remaining 40 months of the patient's life. The patient survived for 70 months following the start of the androgen-ablation therapy. The present study reports a useful treatment for advanced mixed-type PSCNC, androgen-ablation therapy and chemoradiotherapy. The present results also suggest that the prognostic factors for advanced mixed-type PSCNC are the sensitivity of the conventional adenocarcinoma to androgen-ablation therapy, degree of metastasis and extent of the small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma component.

  2. ROS signaling by NADPH oxidase 5 modulates the proliferation and survival of prostate carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Höll, Monika; Koziel, Rafal; Schäfer, Georg; Pircher, Haymo; Pauck, Alexander; Hermann, Martin; Klocker, Helmut; Jansen‐Dürr, Pidder

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and second leading cause of male cancer death in Western nations. Thus, new treatment modalities are urgently needed. Elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidase (Nox) enzymes is implicated in tumorigenesis of the prostate and other tissues. However, the identity of the Nox enzyme(s) involved in prostate carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. Analysis of radical prostatectomy tissue samples and benign and malignant prostate epithelial cell lines identified Nox5 as an abundantly expressed Nox isoform. Consistently, immunohistochemical staining of a human PCa tissue microarray revealed distinct Nox5 expression in epithelial cells of benign and malignant prostatic glands. shRNA‐mediated knockdown of Nox5 impaired proliferation of Nox5‐expressing (PC‐3, LNCaP) but not Nox5‐negative (DU145) PCa cell lines. Similar effects were observed upon ROS ablation via the antioxidant N‐acetylcysteine confirming ROS as the mediators. In addition, Nox5 silencing increased apoptosis of PC‐3 cells. Concomitantly, protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ) protein levels and c‐Jun N‐terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation were reduced. Moreover, the effect of Nox5 knockdown on PC‐3 cell proliferation could be mimicked by pharmacological inhibition of JNK. Collectively, these data indicate that Nox5 is expressed at functionally relevant levels in the human prostate and clinical PCa. Moreover, findings herein suggest that Nox5‐derived ROS and subsequent depletion of PKCζ and JNK inactivation play a critical role in modulating intracellular signaling cascades involved in the proliferation and survival of PCa cells. © 2014 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25559363

  3. [Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Bey, P; Beckendorf, V; Stinès, J

    2001-10-01

    Radiation therapy of prostate carcinoma with a curative intent implies to treat the whole prostate at high dose (at least 66 Gy). According to clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason's score, the clinical target volume may include seminal vesicles and less often pelvic lymph nodes. Microscopic extracapsular extension is found in 15 to 60% of T1-T2 operated on, specially in apex tumors. On contrary, cancers developing from the transitional zone may stay limited to the prostate even with a big volume and with a high PSA level. Zonal anatomy of the prostate identifies internal prostate, including the transitional zone (5% of the prostate in young people). External prostate includes central and peripheral zones. The inferior limit of the prostate is not lower than the inferior border of the pubic symphysis. Clinical and radiological examination: ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), CT-scan identify prognostic factors as tumor volume, capsule effraction, seminal vesicles invasion and lymph node extension. The identification of the clinical target volume is now done mainly by CT-Scan which identifies prostate and seminal vesicles. NMR could be helpful to identify more precisely prostate apex. The definition of margins around the clinical target volume has to take in account daily reproducibility and organ motion and of course the maximum tolerable dose for organs at risk.

  4. Long non-coding RNA ATB promotes growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition and predicts poor prognosis in human prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    XU, SONG; YI, XIAO-MING; TANG, CHAO-PENG; GE, JING-PING; ZHANG, ZHENG-YU; ZHOU, WEN-QUAN

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified to be critical mediators in various tumors associated with cancer progression. Long non-coding RNA activated by TGF-β (lncRNA-ATB) is a stimulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and serves as a novel prognostic biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the biological role and clinical significance of lncRNA-ATB in human prostate cancer have yet to be fully elucidated. The present study was designed to explore the expression of lncRNA-ATB in human prostate cancer patients and the role of lncRNA-ATB in prostate cancer cells. We showed that lncRNA-ATB expression was significantly upregulated in tumor tissues in patients with prostate cancer in comparison with adjacent non-tumor tissues. Further analysis indicted that high lncRNA-ATB expression may be an independent prognostic factor for biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free survival in prostate cancer patients. Overexpression of lncRNA-ATB promoted, and knockdown of lncRNA-ATB inhibited the growth of prostate cancer cells via regulations of cell cycle regulatory protein expression levels. In addition, lncRNA-ATB stimulated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with ZEB1 and ZNF217 expression levels via ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. These results indicated that lncRNA-ATB may be considered as a new predictor in the clinical prognosis of patients with prostate cancer. Overexpression of lncRNA-ATB exerts mitogenic and EMT effects of prostate cancer via activation of ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. PMID:27176634

  5. Cadmium, Zinc, and Selenium Levels in Carcinoma of the Human Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    Original contains colored plates: ALL DTIC reproductions will be in black and white. 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this study is to examine...radicals, and therefore hypnotized at the loci of its high deposition to contribute in prostate cancerogenesis. In these experiments, we used

  6. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in low- and intermediate-risk prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hun Jung; Phak, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Woo Chul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) takes advantage of low α/β ratio of prostate cancer to deliver a large dose in few fractions. We examined clinical outcomes of SBRT using CyberKnife for the treatment of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Materials and Methods This study was based on a retrospective analysis of the 33 patients treated with SBRT using CyberKnife for localized prostate cancer (27.3% in low-risk and 72.7% in intermediate-risk). Total dose of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions of 7.25 Gy were administered. The acute and late toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response was monitored. Results Thirty-three patients with a median 51 months (range, 6 to 71 months) follow-up were analyzed. There was no biochemical failure. Median PSA nadir was 0.27 ng/mL at median 33 months and PSA bounce occurred in 30.3% (n = 10) of patients at median at median 10.5 months after SBRT. No grade 3 acute toxicity was noted. The 18.2% of the patients had acute grade 2 genitourinary (GU) toxicities and 21.2% had acute grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities. After follow-up of 2 months, most complications had returned to baseline. There was no grade 3 late GU and GI toxicity. Conclusion Our experience with SBRT using CyberKnife in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer demonstrates favorable efficacy and toxicity. Further studies with more patients and longer follow-up duration are required. PMID:27306777

  7. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Sega, G.A.

    1990-11-06

    The traveler participated in an International Symposium on Trends in Biological Dosimetry and presented an invited paper entitled, Adducts in sperm protamine and DNA vs mutation frequency.'' The purpose of the Symposium was to examine the applicability of new methods to study quantitatively the effects of xenobiotic agents (radiation and chemicals) on molecular, cellular and organ systems, with special emphasis on human biological dosimetry. The general areas covered at the meeting included studies on parent compounds and metabolites; protein adducts; DNA adducts; gene mutations; cytogenetic end-points and reproductive methods.

  8. Calculated organ doses using Monte Carlo simulations in a reference male phantom undergoing HDR brachytherapy applied to localized prostate carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to obtain equivalent doses in radiosensitive organs (aside from the bladder and rectum) when applying high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to a localized prostate carcinoma using {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir sources. These data are compared with results in a water phantom and with expected values in an infinite water medium. A comparison with reported values from proton therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is also provided. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed using a voxelized phantom described in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 110, which reproduces masses and shapes from an adult reference man defined in ICRP Publication 89. Point sources of {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir with photon energy spectra corresponding to those exiting their capsules were placed in the center of the prostate, and equivalent doses per clinical absorbed dose in this target organ were obtained in several radiosensitive organs. Values were corrected to account for clinical circumstances with the source located at various positions with differing dwell times throughout the prostate. This was repeated for a homogeneous water phantom. Results: For the nearest organs considered (bladder, rectum, testes, small intestine, and colon), equivalent doses given by {sup 60}Co source were smaller (8%-19%) than from {sup 192}Ir. However, as the distance increases, the more penetrating gamma rays produced by {sup 60}Co deliver higher organ equivalent doses. The overall result is that effective dose per clinical absorbed dose from a {sup 60}Co source (11.1 mSv/Gy) is lower than from a {sup 192}Ir source (13.2 mSv/Gy). On the other hand, equivalent doses were the same in the tissue and the homogeneous water phantom for those soft tissues closer to the prostate than about 30 cm. As the distance increased, the differences of photoelectric effect in water and soft tissue, and appearance of other materials

  9. Endometase in Androgen-Repressed Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    intraepithelial neoplasia from multiple patients were significantly higher than those in prostatitis, benign prostate hyperplasia, and normal prostate glandular...prostate cancer cell invasion. 3. We showed that the levels of MMP-26 protein in human prostate carcinomas from multiple patients were significantly...inhibitors of MMP-26 block prostate cancer invasion. We have showed that the levels of MMP-26 protein in human prostate carcinomas from multiple patients were

  10. (Biological dosimetry)

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.J.

    1990-12-17

    The traveler attended the 1st International Conference on Biological Dosimetry in Madrid, Spain. This conference was organized to provide information to a general audience of biologists, physicists, radiotherapists, industrial hygiene personnel and individuals from related fields on the current ability of cytogenetic analysis to provide estimates of radiation dose in cases of occupational or environmental exposure. There is a growing interest in Spain in biological dosimetry because of the increased use of radiation sources for medical and occupational uses, and with this the anticipated and actual increase in numbers of overexposure. The traveler delivered the introductory lecture on Biological Dosimetry: Mechanistic Concepts'' that was intended to provide a framework by which the more applied lectures could be interpreted in a mechanistic way. A second component of the trip was to provide advice with regard to several recent cases of overexposure that had been or were being assessed by the Radiopathology and Radiotherapy Department of the Hospital General Gregorio Maranon'' in Madrid. The traveler had provided information on several of these, and had analyzed cells from some exposed or purportedly exposed individuals. The members of the biological dosimetry group were referred to individuals at REACTS at Oak Ridge Associated Universities for advice on follow-up treatment.

  11. Sister Mary Joseph nodule as the presenting sign of disseminated prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Deb, Prabal; Rai, Radhey Shyam; Rai, Rahul; Gupta, Ekawali; Chander, Yogesh

    2009-01-01

    Sister Mary Joseph's nodule is referred to as metastasis of visceral malignancy to the umbilicus. Most common primaries are in the gastrointestinal or genital tract, while other locations are rare. We recently encountered a 76-year-old male who was referred to the surgery clinic with an erythematous nodule in the umbilicus measuring 6 cm in diameter with complaints of painless profuse hematuria. History revealed severe obstructive voiding symptoms of 2-year duration, along with significant loss of weight and difficulty in walking. A detailed examination showed hard nodular hepatomegaly, along with grade IV prostatomegaly. Serum prostate-specific antigen was 3069 ng/ml. A pelvic radiograph displayed multiple osteolytic lesions, while ultrasonography showed multiple iso- and hypoechoic lesions in both lobes of the liver, suggestive of metastasis. Histopathology of a Tru-cut biopsy of the prostate confirmed an adenocarcinoma (Gleason score 9) with umbilical metastasis. The patient was on regular follow-up and died 3 months later.

  12. Prostate Cancer Skeletal Metastases: Pathobiology and Interventions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    in higher levels in prostate carcinoma than in benign prostatic hyperplasia [35, 36], and is found in human metastatic lesions in bone [37]. However...compared to normal controls, benign prostatic hyperplasia , prostatitis, and localized or recurrent disease. In an animal model, prostate tumor cells...Malakouti S, Antar S, Kukreja S. Enhanced expression of parathyroid hormone-related protein in prostate cancer as compared with benign prostatic hyperplasia . Hum

  13. Antiandrogenic mechanisms of pesticides in human LNCaP prostate and H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Christina N; Rivest, Patricia; Sanderson, J Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Several pesticides suspected or known to have endocrine disrupting effects were screened for pro- or antiandrogenic properties by determining their effects on proliferation, prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) secretion and androgen receptor (AR) expression, and AR phosphorylation in androgen-dependent LNCaP human prostate cancer cells, as well as on the expression and catalytic activity of the enzyme CYP17 in H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells, an in vitro model of steroidogenesis. Effects on SRD5A gene expression were determined in both cell lines. Benomyl, vinclozolin, and prochloraz, but not atrazine, concentration dependently (1-30 μM) decreased dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-stimulated proliferation of LNCaP cells. All pesticides except atrazine decreased DHT-stimulated PSA secretion, AR nuclear accumulation, and AR phosphorylation on serines 81 and 213 in LNCaP cells. Benomyl and prochloraz, but not vinclozolin or atrazine, decreased levels of CYP17 gene and protein expression, as well as catalytic activity in H295R cells. In the case of prochloraz, some of these effects corresponded with cytotoxicity. H295R cells expressed AR protein and SRD5A1, but not SRD5A2 transcripts. SRD5A1 gene expression in H295R cells was increased by 10 nM DHT, whereas in LNCaP cells significant induction was observed by 0.1 nM DHT. AR protein expression in H295R cells was not increased by DHT. Vinclozolin decreased DHT-induced SRD5A1 gene expression in LNCaP, but not H295R cells, indicating a functional difference of AR between the cell lines. In conclusion, pesticides may exert antiandrogenic effects through several mechanisms that are cell type-specific, including AR antagonism and down-regulation or catalytic inhibition of androgen biosynthetic enzymes, such as CYP17 and SRD5A1.

  14. Sarcomatoid Carcinoma of the Prostate: Retrospective Review of a Case Series from Johns Hopkins Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Markowski, Mark C.; Eisenberger, Mario; Zahurak, Marianna; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Paller, Channing

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify survival differences in patients with sarcomatoid prostate cancer based on initial staging and treatment regimens. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes of patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of sarcomatoid prostate cancer. The primary statistical objective was to estimate overall survival and assess the survival of patients at different stages treated with either local and/or systemic approaches. Results We identified 70 transurethral resections, needle biopsies or prostatectomy specimens that were reviewed by the Department of Pathology at Johns Hopkins Hospital from 2002–2012 and given the diagnosis of sarcomatoid prostate cancer. Of the 45 patients with available survival data, complete medical histories were obtained on 27 patients who were stratified based on a modified staging system (local disease, local disease with bladder invasion, and metastatic disease). After a median follow-up of 106 months, the median overall survival (OS) of patients in the local disease group was not reached. Notably, five of the 9 patients diagnosed with local disease survived > 5 years and were treated with surgery and/or external beam radiation therapy. The OS hazard was significantly increased in patients with either clinical evidence of bladder invasion (HR: 20.46 [95% CI: 2.43,172]; p = < 0.0001) or metastatic disease (HR: 43.34 [95% CI: 4.39,427.4]; p = < 0.0001), which both demonstrated poor outcomes (median OS: local with bladder invasion – 9 months; metastatic disease – 7.1 months). Conclusions This retrospective analysis suggests that local sarcomatoid prostate cancer can be effectively treated with definitive therapy leading to favorable outcomes. PMID:26126695

  15. Carcinoma of the prostate: the treatment of bone metastases by radioactive phosphorus (TSP)

    SciTech Connect

    Ariel, I.M.; Hassouna, H.

    1985-01-01

    The administration of radioactive phosphorus and testosterone benefitted two-thirds of thirty patients with prostate cancer treated. Subjective relief of bone pain occurred in 73% of cases and measurable objective improvement occurred in 50%. Hematopoietic depression occurred in 30% of the patients necessitating readmission to hospital for transfusion. This method of treatment is advocated for patients with widespread osseous metastasis, especially those with severe pain.

  16. Neutron personnel dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R.V.

    1981-06-16

    The current state-of-the-art in neutron personnel dosimetry is reviewed. Topics covered include dosimetry needs and alternatives, current dosimetry approaches, personnel monitoring devices, calibration strategies, and future developments. (ACR)

  17. Cyclic AMP induces transforming growth factor beta 2 gene expression and growth arrest in the human androgen-independent prostate carcinoma cell line PC-3.

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Y J; Kim, S J; Danielpour, D; O'Reilly, M A; Kim, K Y; Myers, C E; Trepel, J B

    1992-01-01

    The standard therapy for advanced prostate cancer is androgen ablation. Despite transitory responses, hormonally treated patients ultimately relapse with androgen-independent disease that is resistant to further hormonal manipulation and cytotoxic chemotherapy. To develop an additional approach to the treatment of advanced prostate cancer, we have been studying the signal transductions controlling the growth of human androgen-independent prostate carcinoma cell lines. We report here that elevation of intracellular cAMP markedly inhibits the growth of the hormone-refractory cell line PC-3. To examine the mechanism of cAMP action in PC-3 cells, we tested the effect of the cAMP analog dibutyryl cAMP (Bt2-cAMP) on the regulation of the potent negative growth factor transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). Bt2-cAMP selectively induced the secretion of TGF-beta 2 and not TGF-beta 1 by PC-3 cells. This TGF-beta 2 was shown to be bioactive by using the CCL-64 mink lung cell assay. TGF-beta 1 was not activated despite being present at 3-fold higher concentrations than TGF-beta 2. Northern analysis showed that Bt2-cAMP induced an increase in the five characteristic TGF-beta 2 transcripts and had no effect on the level of TGF-beta 1 or TGF-beta 3 transcripts. TGF-beta 2 induction was only weakly enhanced by cycloheximide and was completely inhibited by actinomycin D. These data show that Bt2-cAMP induces the expression of active TGF-beta 2 by PC-3 prostate carcinoma cells, suggesting a new approach to the treatment of prostate cancer and a new molecular mechanism of cAMP action. Images PMID:1373503

  18. Complications associated with preoperative radiation therapy and Iodine-125 brachytherapy for localized prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Flanigan, R.C.; Patterson, J.; Mendiondo, O.A.; Gee, W.F.; Lucas, B.A.; McRoberts, J.W.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-five consecutive patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with 1,050 rad preoperative radiation therapy and Iodine-125 seed brachytherapy are reviewed. Significant long-term postoperative complications included radiation cystitis (12%), radiation proctitis (4%), genital and leg edema (12%), stress incontinence (8%), total incontinence (4%), and impotence (26%). Complications occurred in 75 per cent of patients who received additional postoperative radiation. Improved staging with CT scan, lymphangiography, and Chiba needle biopsy of any possibly abnormal lymph nodes provided excellent preoperative staging with only 1 patient (6%) upstaged at surgery to Stage D1.

  19. Retrospective evaluation of dosimetric quality for prostate carcinomas treated with 3D conformal, intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, Scott B; Kairn, Tanya; Middlebrook, Nigel; Hill, Brendan; Christie, David R H; Knight, Richard T; Kenny, John; Langton, Christian M; Trapp, Jamie V

    2013-12-15

    This study examines and compares the dosimetric quality of radiotherapy treatment plans for prostate carcinoma across a cohort of 163 patients treated across five centres: 83 treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), 33 treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 47 treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Treatment plan quality was evaluated in terms of target dose homogeneity and organs at risk (OAR), through the use of a set of dose metrics. These included the mean, maximum and minimum doses; the homogeneity and conformity indices for the target volumes; and a selection of dose coverage values that were relevant to each OAR. Statistical significance was evaluated using two-tailed Welch's T-tests. The Monte Carlo DICOM ToolKit software was adapted to permit the evaluation of dose metrics from DICOM data exported from a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system. The 3DCRT treatment plans offered greater planning target volume dose homogeneity than the other two treatment modalities. The IMRT and VMAT plans offered greater dose reduction in the OAR: with increased compliance with recommended OAR dose constraints, compared to conventional 3DCRT treatments. When compared to each other, IMRT and VMAT did not provide significantly different treatment plan quality for like-sized tumour volumes. This study indicates that IMRT and VMAT have provided similar dosimetric quality, which is superior to the dosimetric quality achieved with 3DCRT.

  20. Retrospective evaluation of dosimetric quality for prostate carcinomas treated with 3D conformal, intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Scott B; Kairn, Tanya; Middlebrook, Nigel; Hill, Brendan; Christie, David R H; Knight, Richard T; Kenny, John; Langton, Christian M; Trapp, Jamie V

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This study examines and compares the dosimetric quality of radiotherapy treatment plans for prostate carcinoma across a cohort of 163 patients treated across five centres: 83 treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), 33 treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 47 treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods Treatment plan quality was evaluated in terms of target dose homogeneity and organs at risk (OAR), through the use of a set of dose metrics. These included the mean, maximum and minimum doses; the homogeneity and conformity indices for the target volumes; and a selection of dose coverage values that were relevant to each OAR. Statistical significance was evaluated using two-tailed Welch's T-tests. The Monte Carlo DICOM ToolKit software was adapted to permit the evaluation of dose metrics from DICOM data exported from a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system. Results The 3DCRT treatment plans offered greater planning target volume dose homogeneity than the other two treatment modalities. The IMRT and VMAT plans offered greater dose reduction in the OAR: with increased compliance with recommended OAR dose constraints, compared to conventional 3DCRT treatments. When compared to each other, IMRT and VMAT did not provide significantly different treatment plan quality for like-sized tumour volumes. Conclusions This study indicates that IMRT and VMAT have provided similar dosimetric quality, which is superior to the dosimetric quality achieved with 3DCRT. PMID:26229621

  1. Interpersonal sensitivity, partner support, patient-physician communication, and sexual functioning in men recovering from prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Scott D; Molton, Ivan; Penedo, Frank J; Llabre, Maria M; Kinsinger, David P; Traeger, Lara; Schneiderman, Neil; Antoni, Michael H

    2007-12-01

    Prostate carcinoma (PC) is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men. Treatments for localized PC are associated with side effects including sexual dysfunction, which has been linked to decrements in health-related quality of life and elevated distress levels. In this study, we examined the relationship between 2 personality traits, interpersonal sensitivity and lack of sociability, assessed by the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP; Pilkonis, Kim, Proietti, & Barkham, 1996) and recovery of sexual functioning in 121 men (M age = 60.6 years) recently treated with radical prostatectomy. Interpersonal sensitivity refers to the predisposition to perceive and elicit criticism and rejection from others; lack of sociability refers to chronic difficulties taking the initiative in interpersonal situations. After adjusting for relevant covariates, interpersonal sensitivity, but not sociability, was significantly associated with lower levels of sexual functioning. Patient-physician communication and partner perceived social support were explored as mediators of this relationship. Although interpersonal sensitivity was significantly associated with both poorer patient-physician communication and lower levels of partner support, the results did not support mediation. This study provides preliminary evidence that certain IIP-assessed interpersonal styles may complicate the recovery of sexual functioning after surgical treatment for PC.

  2. Presumptive Late-Onset Ankylosing Spondylitis Simulating Osteoblastic Skeletal Metastasis in a Patient With a History of Prostate Carcinoma: A Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Charles P.; Emary, Peter C.; Taylor, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this report is to present a presumptive case of ankylosing spondylitis with late stage progression that simulated osteoblastic metastasis in a patient with a history of prostate carcinoma. Clinical Features A 67-year-old white man presented to a chiropractic clinic complaining of severe and worsening acute low back pain and right foot “numbness.” Further questioning also revealed a history of prostate carcinoma. Intervention and Outcome Imaging examination revealed a sclerotic pedicle and increased uptake of radiopharmaceutical on a nuclear medicine bone scan highly suggestive of osteoblastic skeletal metastasis. Further evaluation, however, revealed that the bone sclerosis was not the result of skeletal metastasis, but more consistent with a seronegative spondyloarthritis such as ankylosing spondylitis. Conclusion This report describes a presumptive case of ankylosing spondylitis simulating skeletal metastasis in a patient with a past medical history of prostate cancer. This atypical presentation illustrates the inherent uncertainty of diagnosis and how that uncertainty can be challenging in clinical practice. It also reinforces that it is critical for healthcare providers to consider a wide spectrum of differential diagnoses to avoid misdiagnoses and inappropriate interventions. PMID:26793037

  3. Radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists. PMID:2040250

  4. Is the in vivo dosimetry with the OneDosePlusTM system able to detect intra-fraction motion? A retrospective analysis of in vivo data from breast and prostate patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The OneDosePlusTM system, based on MOSFET solid-state radiation detectors and a handheld dosimetry reader, has been used to evaluate intra-fraction movements of patients with breast and prostate cancer. Methods An Action Threshold (AT), defined as the maximum acceptable discrepancy between measured dose and dose calculated with the Treatment Planning System (TPS) (for each field) has been determined from phantom data. To investigate the sensitivity of the system to direction of the patient movements, fixed displacements have been simulated in phantom. The AT has been used as an indicator to establish if patients move during a treatment session, after having verified the set-up with 2D and/or 3D images. Phantom tests have been performed matching different linear accelerators and two TPSs (TPS1 and TPS2). Results The ATs have been found to be very similar (5.0% for TPS1 and 4.5% for TPS2). From statistical data analysis, the system has been found not sensitive enough to reveal displacements smaller than 1 cm (within two standard deviations). The ATs applied to in vivo treatments showed that among the twenty five patients treated for breast cancer, only four of them moved during each measurement session. Splitting data into medial and lateral field, two patients have been found to move during all these sessions; the others, instead, moved only in the second part of the treatment. Patients with prostate cancer have behaved better than patients with breast cancer. Only two out of twenty five moved in each measurement session. Conclusions The method described in the paper, easily implemented in the clinical practice, combines all the advantages of in vivo procedures using the OneDosePlusTM system with the possibility of detecting intra-fraction patient movements. PMID:22716260

  5. Intensified Adjuvant Treatment of Prostate Carcinoma: Feasibility Analysis of a Phase I/II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mantini, Giovanna; Fersino, Sergio; Frascino, Vincenzo; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Fionda, Bruno; Luzi, Stefano; Balducci, Mario; De Belvis, Antonio; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To perform a preliminary feasibility acute and late toxicity evaluation of an intensified and modulated adjuvant treatment in prostate cancer (PCa) patients after radical prostatectomy. Material and Methods. A phase I/II has been designed. Eligible patients were 79 years old or younger, with an ECOG of 0–2, previously untreated, histologically proven prostate adenocarcinoma with no distant metastases, pT2–4 N0-1, and with at least one of the following risk factors: capsular perforation, positive surgical margins, and seminal vesicle invasion. All patients received a minimum dose on tumor bed of 64.8 Gy, or higher dose (70.2 Gy; 85.4%), according to the pathological stage, pelvic lymph nodes irradiation (57.7%), and/or hormonal therapy (69.1%). Results. 123 patients were enrolled and completed the planned treatment, with good tolerance. Median follow-up was 50.6 months. Grade 3 acute toxicity was only 2.4% and 3.3% for genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) tract, respectively. No patient had late grade 3 GI toxicity, and the GU grade 3 toxicity incidence was 5.8% at 5 years. 5-year BDSF was 90.2%. Conclusions. A modulated and intensified adjuvant treatment in PCa was feasible in this trial. A further period of observation can provide a complete assessment of late toxicity and confirm the BDSF positive results. PMID:25093169

  6. Polyamine contents in current foods: a basis for polyamine reduced diet and a study of its long term observance and tolerance in prostate carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Cipolla, B G; Havouis, R; Moulinoux, J P

    2007-08-01

    Polyamine contents were assessed by mass spectrometry in 233 current foods and beverages. In order to reduce gut polyamine uptake, a polyamine reduced diet (PRD) and partial intermittent intestinal tract decontamination (PIITD) with neomycin or nifuroxazide was proposed as nutritional therapy to 33 prostate carcinoma patients, 30 of whom with hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). Mean PRD observance was 22 +/- 19 (median: 16; range: 3-72) months. 10, 8 and 3 patients were respectively on PRD for more than 30, 36 and 64 months. No diet toxicity was observed. 8 patients had moderate intestinal intolerance due to PIITD which was interrupted. No significant differences in body weight, blood counts or serum protein levels were observed during the follow-up of patients under PRD. Performance status and pain scores were relatively stable during the trial with improved pain scores at 6 months. A PRD associated with intermittent PIITD is a safe and well observed nutritional regimen and long term observance is possible.

  7. Amiodarone Induced Hyponatremia Masquerading as Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion by Anaplastic Carcinoma of Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Pinaki; Kumar, Santosh; Kakkar, Nandita; Bhansali, Anil; Rotondo, Fabio; Kovacs, Kalman

    2014-01-01

    Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) is one of the most common causes of hyponatremia. The usual causes are malignancies, central nervous system, pulmonary disorders, and drugs. Amiodarone is a broad spectrum antiarrhythmic agent widely used in the management of arrhythmias. The different side effects include thyroid dysfunction, visual disturbances, pulmonary infiltrates, ataxia, cardiac conduction abnormalities, drug interactions, corneal microdeposits, skin rashes, and gastrointestinal disturbances. SIADH is a rare but lethal side effect of amiodarone. We describe a 62-year-old male who was suffering from advanced prostatic malignancy, taking amiodarone for underlying heart disease. He developed SIADH which was initially thought to be paraneoplastic in etiology, but later histopathology refuted that. This case emphasizes the importance of detailed drug history and the role of immunohistochemistry in establishing the diagnosis and management of hyponatremia due to SIADH. PMID:24818037

  8. 125I implantation for carcinoma of prostate. Further follow-up of first 100 cases.

    PubMed

    Grossman, H B; Batata, M; Hilaris, B; Whitmore, W F

    1982-12-01

    Analysis of the first 100 patients at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center with Stage B or C prostatic cancer treated by pelvic lymph node dissection and Iodine-125 implantation and endocrine therapy when specifically indicated revealed five-year survival rates of 87 and 77 per cent, respectively. Tumor stage, tumor grade, and lymph node metastasis each correlated with survival, but the latter was the most significant factor. Although routine follow-up biopsies were not performed, local tumor control as judged by serial digital rectal examination defined a prognostically favored group of patients. In the absence of controls, however, whether the latter response indicates a salutary effect of the treatment which produces an improved survival or merely identifies a group of patients who were predetermined to have a more favorable survival is undetermined.

  9. Contemporary Gleason Grading of Prostatic Carcinoma: An Update With Discussion on Practical Issues to Implement the 2014 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Gleason Grading of Prostatic Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Jonathan I; Amin, Mahul B; Reuter, Victor E; Humphrey, Peter A

    2017-02-07

    The primary proceedings of the 2014 International Society of Urological Pathology Grading Conference were published promptly in 2015 and dealt with: (1) definition of various grading patterns of usual acinar carcinoma, (2) grading of intraductal carcinoma; and (3) support for the previously proposed new Grade Groups. The current manuscript in addition to highlighting practical issues to implement the 2014 recommendations, provides an updated perspective based on numerous studies published after the 2014 meeting. A major new recommendation that came from the 2014 Consensus Conference was to report percent pattern 4 with Gleason score 7 in both needle biopsies and radical prostatectomy (RP) specimens. This manuscript gives the options how to record percentage pattern 4 and under which situations recording this information may not be necessary. Another consensus from the 2014 meeting was to replace the term tertiary-grade pattern with minor high-grade pattern. Minor high-grade indicates that the term tertiary should not merely be just the third most common pattern but that it should be minor or limited in extent. Although a specific cutoff of 5% was not voted on in the 2014 Consensus meeting, the only quantification of minor high-grade pattern that has been used in the literature with evidence-based data correlating with outcome has been the 5% cutoff. At the 2014 Consensus Conference, there was agreement that the grading rule proposed in the 2005 Consensus Conference on needle biopsies be followed, that tertiary be not used, and that the most common and highest grade patterns be summed together as the Gleason score. Therefore, the term tertiary or minor high-grade pattern should only be used in RP specimens when there are 3 grade patterns, such as with 3+4=7 or 4+3=7 with <5% Gleason pattern 5. It was recommended at the 2014 Conference that for the foreseeable future, the new Grade Groups would be reported along with the Gleason system. The minor high-grade patterns

  10. Origin and Properties of Prostatic Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    treating prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . prostate 6 integrin Bcl-2 S tem cell biology and tumorigenesis may be closely linked...In addition to being a source of carcinomas, stem cells may also give rise to benign prostatic hyperplasia (7). The isolation and characterization of...expression may contribute to the etiology of prostatic diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (48), proliferative inflam- matory atrophy, which

  11. Role of Early Proctoscopy in Predicting Late Symptomatic Proctitis After External Radiation Therapy for Prostate Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Campostrini, Franco; Musola, Renato; Marchiaro, Giuseppe; Lonardi, Federico; Verlato, Giuseppe

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether acute radiation-proctitis, diagnosed by proctoscopy after radiation therapy for prostate cancer, can predict late clinical proctitis. Methods and Materials: A prospective study of 130 patients who underwent external radiation therapy (RT) for stage T1 to T4 prostate cancer between 1997 and 2008 was performed. Treatments were conventional (2-dimensional [2D]) in 61 patients and 3D conformal in 69, with a median target dose of 72 Gy (70-74 Gy). Within 1 week after RT, proctoscopy was performed to detect possible acute endoscopic proctitis (AEP). Acute clinical proctitis (ACP) and late clinical proctitis (LCP) were also evaluated. The median follow-up was 84 months (20-180 months). The influence of AEP and ACP on LCP occurrence was studied using the Cox model controlling for age, dose, prostatectomy, RT technique (2D vs 3D), and hormone therapy. Results: AEP was detected in 15 patients (11.5%) and ACP in 67 (51.5%); in 13 cases (10%) AEP and ACP occurred simultaneously. Thirty-five cases of LCP were recorded. The 5-year probability of developing LCP was highest in patients with AEP and ACP (77%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 53%-94%) and lowest in asymptomatic patients (14%, 95% CI 7%-26%; P<.001). Compared to asymptomatic patients, the 5-year probability also was slightly increased in patients with ACP only (26%, 95% CI 16%-40%; P=.052). In multivariable analysis, the combination of AEP and ACP was the main predictor of LCP: compared to asymptomatic patients, the hazard ratio was 5.6 (2.1-15.2) in patients with AEP plus ACP (P=.001) and 2.1 (0.9-4.9) in those with ACP only (P=.103). Conclusions: In patients with AEP and ACP, the risk of LCP was more than 5-fold increased compared to those who were asymptomatic, while a much smaller increase in risk occurred in patients with ACP only. Early proctoscopy can provide valuable information regarding the likelihood of late proctitis.

  12. Argon Plasma Coagulation Therapy Versus Topical Formalin for Intractable Rectal Bleeding and Anorectal Dysfunction After Radiation Therapy for Prostate Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric; Tam, William; Schoeman, Mark; Moore, James; Thomas, Michelle; Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the effect of argon plasma coagulation (APC) and topical formalin for intractable rectal bleeding and anorectal dysfunction associated with chronic radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: Thirty men (median age, 72 years; range, 49-87 years) with intractable rectal bleeding (defined as ≥1× per week and/or requiring blood transfusions) after radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma were randomized to treatment with APC (n=17) or topical formalin (n=13). Each patient underwent evaluations of (1) anorectal symptoms (validated questionnaires, including modified Late Effects in Normal Tissues–Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic and visual analogue scales for rectal bleeding); (2) anorectal motor and sensory function (manometry and graded rectal balloon distension); and (3) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and after the treatment endpoint (defined as reduction in rectal bleeding to 1× per month or better, reduction in visual analogue scales to ≤25 mm, and no longer needing blood transfusions). Results: The treatment endpoint was achieved in 94% of the APC group and 100% of the topical formalin group after a median (range) of 2 (1-5) sessions of either treatment. After a follow-up duration of 111 (29-170) months, only 1 patient in each group needed further treatment. Reductions in rectal compliance and volumes of sensory perception occurred after APC, but no effect on anorectal symptoms other than rectal bleeding was observed. There were no differences between APC and topical formalin for anorectal symptoms and function, nor for anal sphincteric morphology. Conclusions: Argon plasma coagulation and topical formalin had comparable efficacy in the durable control of rectal bleeding associated with chronic radiation proctitis but had no beneficial effect on anorectal dysfunction.

  13. Induction of cyclo-oxygenase-2 mRNA by prostaglandin E2 in human prostatic carcinoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Dahiya, R.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Prostaglandins are synthesized from arachidonic acid by the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase. There are two isoforms of cyclooxygenases: COX-1 (a constitutive form) and COX-2 (an inducible form). COX-2 has recently been categorized as an immediate-early gene and is associated with cellular growth and differentiation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of exogenous dimethylprostaglandin E2 (dmPGE2) on prostate cancer cell growth. Results of these experiments demonstrate that administration of dmPGE2 to growing PC-3 cells significantly increased cellular proliferation (as measured by the cell number), total DNA content and endogenous PGE2 concentration. DmPGE2 also increased the steady-state mRNA levels of its own inducible synthesizing enzyme, COX-2, as well as cellular growth to levels similar to those seen with fetal calf serum and phorbol ester. The same results were observed in other human cancer cell types, such as the androgen-dependent LNCaP cells, breast cancer MDA-MB-134 cells and human colorectal carcinoma DiFi cells. In PC-3 cells, the dmPGE2 regulation of the COX-2 mRNA levels was both time dependent, with maximum stimulation seen 2 h after addition, and dose dependent on dmPGE2 concentration, with maximum stimulation seen at 5 microg ml(-1). The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen (5 microM), in the presence of exogenous dmPGE2, inhibited the up-regulation of COX-2 mRNA and PC-3 cell growth. Taken together, these data suggest that PGE2 has a specific role in the maintenance of human cancer cell growth and that the activation of COX-2 expression depends primarily upon newly synthesized PGE2, perhaps resulting from changes in local cellular PGE2 concentrations.

  14. Cytotoxicity of PP(Arg)(2)- and Hp(Arg)(2)-mediated photodynamic therapy and early stage of apoptosis induction in prostate carcinoma in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Stępniowska, Agata; Wiktorska, Katarzyna; Małecki, Maciej; Romiszewska, Anna; Padzik-Graczyk, Alfreda

    2011-01-01

    Porphyrin photosensitizers tend to localize in mitochondria. The depolarization of mitochondrial membrane is one of the early stages of apoptosis and Laser Scanning Fluorescence Microscopy allows to determine changes in transmembrane mitochondrial potential under influence of PDT depending on the kind of photosensitizer (PP(Arg)(2), Hp(Arg)(2)), the energy dose (5, 10, 30 and 50 J/cm(2)) and time periods (24 and 48 hours after irradiation) in the LNCaP (lymphonodal metastasis of prostate carcinoma, the androgen dependent cell line). Cyototoxicity induced by PP(Arg)(2)- and Hp(Arg)(2)-based PDT depending on energy dose and time after irradiation in prostate carcinoma is determined with MTT. Generally, it was shown that lower energy doses induce greater changes in transmembrane mitochondrial potential. Hp(Arg)(2)-based PDT was more effective causing greater mitochondrial membrane depolarization and cell viability decrease in comparison to PP(Arg)(2)-mediated PDT (in the case of maximal nontoxic photosensitizer doses used).

  15. Protons or megavoltage X-rays as boost therapy for patients irradiated for localized prostatic carcinoma. An early phase I/II comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Duttenhaver, J.R.; Shipley, W.U.; Perrone, T.; Verhey, L.J.; Goitein, M.; Munzenrider, J.E.; Prout, G.R.; Parkhurst, E.C.; Suit, H.D.

    1983-05-01

    A total of 180 patients with carcinoma of the prostate limited to the pelvis were treated with one of two external beam irradiation techniques between 1972 and 1979. One hundred and sixteen patients were treated with conventional pelvic megavoltage x-ray therapy. Sixty-four patients were treated with combined pelvic x-ray therapy plus a perineal proton beam boost to a carefully defined prostatic tumor volume. A 160 MeV proton beam has been modified to irradiate patients with localized tumors by using conventional treatment schedules. This proton beam has the physical advantage over megavoltage x-rays of reducing the dose to normal tissues adjacent to the tumor volume. By using the proton beam boost we have delivered an increased prostatic tumor dose of 500 to 700 cGy without increasing treatment morbidity at all. The two groups are actuarially analyzed for patient survival, disease-free survival and local recurrence-free survival, and thus far, no significant differences have been noted. Because of the minimal complications observed in the proton group despite a 10% increase in dose, a randomized clinical trial comparing these two treatment techniques is studied.

  16. Preclinical pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, radiation dosimetry and toxicity studies required for regulatory approval of a phase I clinical trial with 111In-CP04 in medullary thyroid carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Maina, Theodosia; Konijnenberg, Mark W.; KolencPeitl, Petra; Garnuszek, Piotr; Nock, Berthold A.; Kaloudi, Aikaterini; Kroselj, Marko; Zaletel, Katja; Maecke, Helmut; Mansi, Rosalba; Erba, Paola; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja; Mikolajczak, Renata; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Introduction From a series of radiolabelled cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin analogues, 111In-CP04 (111In-DOTA-(DGlu)6-Ala-Tyr-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2) was selected for further translation as a diagnostic radiopharmaceutical towards a first-in-man study in patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). A freeze-dried kit formulation for multicentre application has been developed. We herein report on biosafety, in vivo stability, biodistribution and dosimetry aspects of 111In-CP04 in animal models, essential for the regulatory approval of the clinical trial. Materials and methods Acute and extended single dose toxicity of CP04 was tested in rodents, while the in vivo stability of 111In-CP04 was assessed by HPLC analysis of mouse blood samples. The biodistribution of 111In-CP04 prepared from a freeze-dried kit was studied in SCID mice bearing double A431-CCK2R(±) xenografts at 1, 4 and 24 h pi. Further 4-h animal groups were either additionally treated with the plasma expander gelofusine or injected with 111In-CP04 prepared by wet-labelling. Pharmacokinetics in healthy mice included the 30 min, 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h time points pi. Dosimetric calculations were based on extrapolation of mice data to humans adopting two scaling models. Results CP04 was well-tolerated by both mice and rats, with an LD50 > 178.5 μg/kg body weight for mice and a NOAEL (no-observed-adverse-effect-level) of 89 μg/kg body weight for rats. After labelling, 111In-CP04 remained >70% intact in peripheral mouse blood at 5 min pi. The uptake of 111In-CP04 prepared from the freeze-dried kit and by wet-labelling were comparable in the A431-CCK2R(+)-xenografts (9.24 ± 1.35%ID/g and 8.49 ± 0.39%ID/g, respectively; P > 0.05). Gelofusine-treated mice exhibited significantly reduced kidneys values (1.69 ± 0.15%ID/g vs. 5.55 ± 0.94%ID/g in controls, P < 0.001). Dosimetry data revealed very comparable effective tumour doses for the two scaling models applied, of 0.045 and 0.044 m

  17. Tuberculous prostatitis: mimicking a cancer.

    PubMed

    Aziz, El Majdoub; Abdelhak, Khallouk; Hassan, Farih Moulay

    2016-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common type of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis . The kidneys, ureter, bladder or genital organs are usually involved. Tuberculosis of the prostate has mainly been described in immune-compromised patients. However, it can exceptionally be found as an isolated lesion in immune-competent patients. Tuberculosis of the prostate may be difficult to differentiate from carcinoma of the prostate and the chronic prostatitis when the prostate is hard and nodular on digital rectal examination and the urine is negative for tuberculosis bacilli. In many cases, a diagnosis of tuberculous prostatitis is made by the pathologist, or the disease is found incidentally after transurethral resection. Therefore, suspicion of tuberculous prostatitis requires a confirmatory biopsy of the prostate. We report the case of 60-year-old man who presented a low urinary tract syndrome. After clinical and biological examination, and imaging, prostate cancer was highly suspected. Transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed and histological examination showed tuberculosis lesions.

  18. The 2014 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Gleason Grading of Prostatic Carcinoma: Definition of Grading Patterns and Proposal for a New Grading System.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Jonathan I; Egevad, Lars; Amin, Mahul B; Delahunt, Brett; Srigley, John R; Humphrey, Peter A

    2016-02-01

    In November, 2014, 65 prostate cancer pathology experts, along with 17 clinicians including urologists, radiation oncologists, and medical oncologists from 19 different countries gathered in a consensus conference to update the grading of prostate cancer, last revised in 2005. The major conclusions were: (1) Cribriform glands should be assigned a Gleason pattern 4, regardless of morphology; (2) Glomeruloid glands should be assigned a Gleason pattern 4, regardless of morphology; (3) Grading of mucinous carcinoma of the prostate should be based on its underlying growth pattern rather than grading them all as pattern 4; and (4) Intraductal carcinoma of the prostate without invasive carcinoma should not be assigned a Gleason grade and a comment as to its invariable association with aggressive prostate cancer should be made. Regarding morphologies of Gleason patterns, there was clear consensus on: (1) Gleason pattern 4 includes cribriform, fused, and poorly formed glands; (2) The term hypernephromatoid cancer should not be used; (3) For a diagnosis of Gleason pattern 4, it needs to be seen at 10x lens magnification; (4) Occasional/seemingly poorly formed or fused glands between well-formed glands is insufficient for a diagnosis of pattern 4; (5) In cases with borderline morphology between Gleason pattern 3 and pattern 4 and crush artifacts, the lower grade should be favored; (6) Branched glands are allowed in Gleason pattern 3; (7) Small solid cylinders represent Gleason pattern 5; (8) Solid medium to large nests with rosette-like spaces should be considered to represent Gleason pattern 5; and (9) Presence of unequivocal comedonecrosis, even if focal is indicative of Gleason pattern 5. It was recognized by both pathologists and clinicians that despite the above changes, there were deficiencies with the Gleason system. The Gleason grading system ranges from 2 to 10, yet 6 is the lowest score currently assigned. When patients are told that they have a Gleason score 6 out

  19. Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic based low cost tissue equivalent phantom for verification dosimetry in IMRT.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Sharma, S D; Deshpande, Sudesh; Ghadi, Yogesh; Shaiju, V S; Amols, H I; Mayya, Y S

    2009-12-17

    A novel IMRT phantom was designed and fabricated using Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic. Physical properties of ABS plastic related to radiation interaction and dosimetry were compared with commonly available phantom materials for dose measurements in radiotherapy. The ABS IMRT phantom has provisions to hold various types of detectors such as ion chambers, radiographic/radiochromic films, TLDs, MOSFETs, and gel dosimeters. The measurements related to pre-treatment dose verification in IMRT of carcinoma prostate were carried out using ABS and Scanditronics-Wellhoffer RW3 IMRT phantoms for five different cases. Point dose data were acquired using ionization chamber and TLD discs while Gafchromic EBT and radiographic EDR2 films were used for generating 2-D dose distributions. Treatment planning system (TPS) calculated and measured doses in ABS plastic and RW3 IMRT phantom were in agreement within +/-2%. The dose values at a point in a given patient acquired using ABS and RW3 phantoms were found comparable within 1%. Fluence maps and dose distributions of these patients generated by TPS and measured in ABS IMRT phantom were also found comparable both numerically and spatially. This study indicates that ABS plastic IMRT phantom is a tissue equivalent phantom and dosimetrically it is similar to solid/plastic water IMRT phantoms. Though this material is demonstrated for IMRT dose verification but it can be used as a tissue equivalent phantom material for other dosimetry purposes in radiotherapy.

  20. sEphB4-HSA Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Bladder Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-06

    Infiltrating Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer

  1. Red marrow and blood dosimetry in 131I treatment of metastatic thyroid carcinoma: pre-treatment versus in-therapy results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giostra, A.; Richetta, E.; Pasquino, M.; Miranti, A.; Cutaia, C.; Brusasco, G.; Pellerito, R. E.; Stasi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Treatment with radioiodine is a standard procedure for patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer, but the main approach to the therapy is still empiric, consisting of the administration of fixed activities. A predictive individualized dosimetric study may represent an important tool for physicians to determine the best activity to prescribe. The aim of this work is to compare red marrow and blood absorbed dose values obtained in the pre-treatment (PT) dosimetry phase with those obtained in the in-treatment (IT) dosimetry phase in order to estimate the predictive power of PT trial doses and to determine if they can be used as a decision-making tool to safely administer higher 131I activity to potentially increase the efficacy of treatment. The PT and IT dosimetry for 50 patients has been evaluated using three different dosimetric approaches. In all three approaches blood and red marrow doses, are calculated as the sum of two components, the dose from 131I activity in the blood and the dose from 131I activity located in the remainder of the body (i.e. the blood and whole-body contributions to the total dose). PT and IT dose values to blood and red marrow appear to be well correlated irrespective of the dosimetric approach used. Linear regression analyses of PT and IT total doses, for blood and red marrow, and the whole-body contribution to these doses, showed consistent best fit slope and correlation coefficient values of approximately 0.9 and 0.6, respectively: analyses of the blood dose contribution to the total doses also yielded similar values for the best fit slope but with correlation coefficient values of approximately 0.4 reflecting the greater variance in these dose estimates. These findings suggest that pre-treatment red marrow dose assessments may represent an important tool to personalize metastatic thyroid cancer treatment, removing the constraints of a fixed activity approach and permitting potentially more effective higher 131I activities to be

  2. Red marrow and blood dosimetry in (131)I treatment of metastatic thyroid carcinoma: pre-treatment versus in-therapy results.

    PubMed

    Giostra, A; Richetta, E; Pasquino, M; Miranti, A; Cutaia, C; Brusasco, G; Pellerito, R E; Stasi, M

    2016-06-07

    Treatment with radioiodine is a standard procedure for patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer, but the main approach to the therapy is still empiric, consisting of the administration of fixed activities. A predictive individualized dosimetric study may represent an important tool for physicians to determine the best activity to prescribe. The aim of this work is to compare red marrow and blood absorbed dose values obtained in the pre-treatment (PT) dosimetry phase with those obtained in the in-treatment (IT) dosimetry phase in order to estimate the predictive power of PT trial doses and to determine if they can be used as a decision-making tool to safely administer higher (131)I activity to potentially increase the efficacy of treatment. The PT and IT dosimetry for 50 patients has been evaluated using three different dosimetric approaches. In all three approaches blood and red marrow doses, are calculated as the sum of two components, the dose from (131)I activity in the blood and the dose from (131)I activity located in the remainder of the body (i.e. the blood and whole-body contributions to the total dose). PT and IT dose values to blood and red marrow appear to be well correlated irrespective of the dosimetric approach used. Linear regression analyses of PT and IT total doses, for blood and red marrow, and the whole-body contribution to these doses, showed consistent best fit slope and correlation coefficient values of approximately 0.9 and 0.6, respectively: analyses of the blood dose contribution to the total doses also yielded similar values for the best fit slope but with correlation coefficient values of approximately 0.4 reflecting the greater variance in these dose estimates. These findings suggest that pre-treatment red marrow dose assessments may represent an important tool to personalize metastatic thyroid cancer treatment, removing the constraints of a fixed activity approach and permitting potentially more effective higher (131)I

  3. Modulation of endogenous β-tubulin isotype expression as a result of human βIII cDNA transfection into prostate carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, S; McCauley, R A; Dexter, D W; Hudes, G R

    2001-01-01

    Increases of individual β tubulin isotypes in antimicrotubule drug resistant cell lines have been reported by several laboratories. We have previously described elevations in βIII and βIVa isotypes in estramustine and paclitaxel resistant human prostate carcinoma cells. To investigate further the function of β tubulin isotypes in antimicrotubule drug response, human prostate carcinoma cells that normally have very low to undetectable levels of βIII were stably transfected with βIII cDNA in pZeoSV system. An 18 bp haemagglutinin (HA) epitope tag was added at the 3′ end prior to cloning into the vector. Cells were transfected with pZeoSV or pZeoSV-βIII plasmids and selected in the presence of Zeocin. Immunofluorescent staining of the transfectant cells have shown significant expression and incorporation of HA-tagged βIII tubulin into cellular microtubules. Quantitation of Western blots revealed the HA-tagged βIII levels to be approximately 7-fold higher than the vector control cells. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the increase at the transcript level and also revealed a collateral increase of βII and βIVb transcripts. Cell viability assays indicated that sensitivity of βIII transfected cells to various antimicrotubule agents was similar to vector transfected cells: IC50 values for estramustine, paclitaxel, colchicine and vinblastine were 4 μM, 4 nM, 22 nM and 2 nM, respectively for both cell lines. Thus, overexpression of βIII isotype in human prostate carcinoma cells by stable transfection failed to confer antimicrotubule drug resistance to these cells. Counterregulatory increases of endogenous βII and βIVb tubulin isotypes in these βIII transfected cells may be a compensatory mechanism used by the cells to overcome the effects of elevated βIII levels on the cellular microtubules. These results highlight the difficulty in isolating the contribution of single tubulin isotypes in drug response studies. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http

  4. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-06

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  5. Prophylactic tamsulosin (Flomax) in patients undergoing prostate {sup 125}I brachytherapy for prostate carcinoma: Final report of a double-blind placebo-controlled randomized study

    SciTech Connect

    Elshaikh, Mohamed A.; Ulchaker, James C.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Angermeier, Kenneth W.; Klein, Eric A.; Chehade, Nabil; Altman, Andrew; Ciezki, Jay P. . E-mail: ciezkj@ccf.org

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of prophylactic tamsulosin (Flomax) in reducing the urinary symptoms in patients undergoing {sup 125}I prostate implantation (PI) for prostate adenocarcinoma. Methods and materials: This is a single-institution, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial for patients undergoing PI for prostate adenocarcinoma comparing prophylactic tamsulosin versus placebo. Eligibility criteria included patients not taking tamsulosin or other {alpha}-blockers treated with PI. The patients were randomly assigned to either tamsulosin (0.8 mg, orally once a day) or matched placebo. All patients started the medication 4 days before PI and continued for 60 days. The American Urologic Association (AUA) symptom index questionnaire was used to assess urinary symptoms. The AUA questionnaire was administered before PI for a baseline score and weekly for 8 weeks after PI. Patients were taken off the study if they developed urinary retention, had intolerable urinary symptoms, or wished to discontinue with the trial. Results: One hundred twenty-six patients were enrolled in this study from November 2001 to January 2003 (118 were evaluable: 58 in the tamsulosin arm and 60 in the placebo group). Pretreatment and treatment characteristics were comparably matched between the two groups. The urinary retention rate was 17% (10 patients) in the placebo group compared with 10% (6 patients) in the tamsulosin group (p = 0.3161). Eighty-eight percent (14 patients) of those who developed urinary retention experienced it within 2 weeks after the PI. Intolerable urinary symptoms were reported equally (10 patients in each group) with 70% occurring in the first 2 weeks after PI. There was a significant difference in mean AUA score in favor of tamsulosin at Week 5 after PI (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Prophylactic tamsulosin (0.8 mg/day) before prostate brachytherapy did not significantly affect urinary retention rates, but had a positive effect on urinary morbidity at

  6. Radiation Dosimetry for (177)Lu-PSMA I&T in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Absorbed Dose in Normal Organs and Tumor Lesions.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Shozo; Thieme, Anne; Allmann, Jakob; D'Alessandria, Calogero; Maurer, Tobias; Retz, Margitta; Tauber, Robert; Heck, Matthias M; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Tamaki, Nagara; Fendler, Wolfgang P; Herrmann, Ken; Pfob, Christian H; Scheidhauer, Klemens; Schwaiger, Markus; Ziegler, Sibylle; Eiber, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted radioligand therapy is increasingly used in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. We aimed to estimate the absorbed doses for normal organs and tumor lesions using (177)Lu-PSMA I&T (I&T is imaging and therapy) in patients undergoing up to 4 cycles of radioligand therapy. Results were compared with pretherapeutic Glu-NH-CO-NH-Lys-(Ahx)-[(68)Ga(HBEDCC)] ((68)Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC) PET. Methods: A total of 34 cycles in 18 patients were analyzed retrospectively. In 15 patients the first, in 9 the second, in 5 the third, and in 5 the fourth cycle was analyzed, respectively. Whole-body scintigraphy was performed at least between 30-120 min, 24 h, and 6-8 d after administration. Regions of interest covering the whole body, organs, and up to 4 tumor lesions were drawn. Organ and tumor masses were derived from pretherapeutic (68)Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT. Absorbed doses for individual cycles were calculated using OLINDA/EXM. SUVs from pretherapeutic PET were compared with absorbed doses and with change of SUV. Results: The mean whole-body effective dose for all cycles was 0.06 ± 0.03 Sv/GBq. The mean absorbed organ doses were 0.72 ± 0.21 Gy/GBq for the kidneys; 0.12 ± 0.06 Gy/GBq for the liver; and 0.55 ± 0.14 Gy/GBq for the parotid, 0.64 ± 0.40 Gy/GBq for the submandibular, and 3.8 ± 1.4 Gy/GBq for the lacrimal glands. Absorbed organ doses were relatively constant among the 4 different cycles. Tumor lesions received a mean absorbed dose per cycle of 3.2 ± 2.6 Gy/GBq (range, 0.22-12 Gy/GBq). Doses to tumor lesions gradually decreased, with 3.5 ± 2.9 Gy/GBq for the first, 3.3 ± 2.5 Gy/GBq for the second, 2.7 ± 2.3 Gy/GBq for the third, and 2.4 ± 2.2 Gy/GBq for the fourth cycle. SUVs of pretherapeutic PET moderately correlated with absorbed dose (r = 0.44, P < 0.001 for SUVmax; r = 0.43, P < 0.001 for SUVmean) and moderately correlated with the change of SUV (r = 0.478, P < 0.001 for SUVmax, and r = 0.50, P < 0

  7. Autoregulated expression of p53 from an adenoviral vector confers superior tumor inhibition in a model of prostate carcinoma gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Rodrigo Esaki; da Silva Soares, Rafael Bento; Costanzi-Strauss, Eugenia; Strauss, Bryan E

    2016-12-01

    Alternative treatments for cancer using gene therapy approaches have shown promising results and some have even reached the marketplace. Even so, additional improvements are needed, such as employing a strategically chosen promoter to drive expression of the transgene in the target cell. Previously, we described viral vectors where high-level transgene expression was achieved using a p53-responsive promoter. Here we present an adenoviral vector (AdPGp53) where p53 is employed to regulate its own expression and which outperforms a traditional vector when tested in a model of gene therapy for prostate cancer. The functionality of AdPGp53 and AdCMVp53 were compared in human prostate carcinoma cell lines. AdPGp53 conferred greatly enhanced levels of p53 protein and induction of the p53 target gene, p21, as well as superior cell killing by a mechanism consistent with apoptosis. DU145 cells were susceptible to induction of death with AdPGp53, yet PC3 cells were quite resistant. Though AdCMVp53 was shown to be reliable, extremely high-level expression of p53 offered by AdPGp53 was necessary for tumor suppressor activity in PC3 and DU145. In situ gene therapy experiments revealed tumor inhibition and increased overall survival in response to AdPGp53, but not AdCMVp53. Upon histologic examination, only AdPGp53 treatment was correlated with the detection of both p53 and TUNEL-positive cells. This study points to the importance of improved vector performance for gene therapy of prostate cancer.

  8. Magnolol suppresses metastasis via inhibition of invasion, migration, and matrix metalloproteinase-2/-9 activities in PC-3 human prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eun-Sun; Park, Kwang-Kyun

    2010-01-01

    Magnolol, a hydroxylated biphenyl compound isolated from the root and stem bark of Magnolia officinalis, has been reported to have anticancer activity, but little is known about its molecular mechanisms of action. Increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a key enzyme in arachidonic acid metabolism, has been identified in many cancer types. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are enzymes involved in various steps of metastasis development. The objective of this study was to study the effects of magnolol on cancer invasion and metastasis using PC-3 human prostate carcinoma cells. Cellular proliferation was determined by MTT colorimetric assay. Magnolol inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. In an invasion assay conducted in Transwell chambers, magnolol showed 33 and 98% inhibition of cancer cell at 10 microM and 20 microM concentrations, respectively, compared to the control. The expression of MMP-2/-9 and COX-1/-2 was assessed by gelatin zymography and Western blot respectively. The protein and mRNA levels of both MMP-2 and MMP-9 were down-regulated by magnolol treatment in a dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrate the antimetastatic properties of magnolol in inhibiting the adhesion, invasion, and migration of PC-3 human prostate cancer cells.

  9. Evaluation of volume change in rectum and bladder during application of image-guided radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, J. A.; Rojas, J. I.

    2016-07-01

    All prostate cancer patients from Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XXI receive Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). This therapy uses image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with the Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). This study compares the planned dose in the reference CT image against the delivered dose recalculate in the CBCT image. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomic changes and related dosimetric effect based on weekly CBCT directly for patients with prostate cancer undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment. The collected data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.

  10. The Influence of Prostate Volume on Outcome After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Alone for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Hien Rojas, Ana; Alonzi, Roberto; Hughes, Robert; Ostler, Peter; Lowe, Gerry; Bryant, Linda; Hoskin, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Objective: To determine whether late genitourinary toxicity, biochemical control of prostate cancer, and dosimetric parameters in patients with large prostate glands is different from those variables in men with smaller glands after treatment with high-dose-rate brachytherapy alone (HDR-BT). Methods: From November 2003 to July 2009, 164 patients with locally advanced prostate carcinoma were sequentially enrolled and treated with 34 or 36 Gy in 4 fractions and 31.5 Gy in 3 fractions of {sup 192}Ir HDR-BT alone. The median follow-up time was 71 months. Gland size was not considered in the selection criteria for this study. Estimates of freedom from biochemical relapse (FFbR) and late morbidity, stratified by median clinical target volume (CTV), were obtained, and differences were compared. Results: The median CTV volume was 60 cc (range, 15-208 cc). Dose–volume parameters D90 and V100 (ie, minimum dose to 90% of the prostate volume and volume receiving 100% of the prescribed isodose) achieved in patients with glands ≥60 cc were not significantly different from those with glands <60 cc (P≥.2). Nonetheless, biochemical control in patients with larger CTV was significantly higher (91% vs 78% at 6 years; P=.004). In univariate and multivariate analysis, CTV was a significant predictor for risk of biochemical relapse. This was not at the expense of an increase in either moderate (P=.6) or severe (P=.3) late genitourinary toxicity. The use of hormonal therapy was 17% lower in the large gland group (P=.01). Conclusions: Prostate gland size does not affect dosimetric parameters in HDR-BT assessed by D90 and V100. In patients with larger glands, a significantly higher biochemical control of disease was observed, with no difference in late toxicity. This improvement cannot be attributed to differences in dosimetry. Gland size should not be considered in the selection of patients for HDR-BT.

  11. Denosumab is really effective in the treatment of osteoporosis secondary to hypogonadism in prostate carcinoma patients? A prospective randomized multicenter international study

    PubMed Central

    Doria, Carlo; Leali, Paolo Tranquilli; Solla, Federico; Maestretti, Gianluca; Balsano, Massimo; Scarpa, Robero Mario

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction Osteoporosis is a complication of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in men with prostate carcinoma. The best defense against osteoporosis in prostate cancer is to identify patients with a high risk for fracture during the first clinical visit, select an effective anti-osteoporosis agent, and advise the patient to change his lifestyle and diet to prevent further bone loss. New agents include denosumab, a human monoclonal antibody that inhibits the RANK ligand (RANKL). RANKL promotes the formation, activity, and survival of osteoclasts and, thus, supports the breakdown of bone. Purpose This is a multicenter, randomized, double-blind prospective study on use of denosumab versus alendronate in the therapy of secondary osteoporosis related to ADT in prostate cancer patients in three European countries (Italy, France, Switzerland). Patients and methods In this 24-month observation study we enrolled 234 patients with diagnosis of osteoporosis underwent ADT for prostate cancer. All patients aged ≥55 years and had a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) T-score <−1.0 (hip or spine, measured within last 2 years) and ≥ 1 fragility fracture. Patients were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive denosumab 60 mg subcutaneously every 6 months or alendronate (70 mg weekly) for 2 years. All patient received supplemental vitamin D (600 IU per day) and supplemental calcium to maintain a calcium intake of 1200 mg per day. Effectiveness of therapy in both groups (denosumab group and alendronate group) was assessed by changes in bone turnover markers (BTMs), Bone Mineral Density (BMD), fracture incidence, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score for back pain, and Short Form-8 (SF-8TM) health survey score for health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Percent changes from baseline in BTMs and BMD were assessed using the paired t test; a P-value 0.05). Mean changes in BMD at final follow-up differed significantly between two groups. BMD changes at the lumbar spine at 24

  12. Clinicopathological Overview of Granulomatous Prostatitis: An Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Dravid, Nandkumar; Nikumbh, Dhiraj; Patil, Ashish; Nagappa, Karibasappa Gundabaktha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Granulomatous prostatitis is a rare inflammatory condition of the prostate. Granulomatous prostatitis is important because, it mimics prostatic carcinoma clinically and hence the diagnosis can be made only by histopathological examination. Aim To study the histomorphological features and to know the prevalence of granulomatous prostatitis. Materials and Methods Histopathological records of 1,203 prostatic specimens received in the Department of the Pathology over a period of five years (June 2009 – June 2014). Seventeen cases of histopathologically, diagnosed granulomatous prostatitis were retrieved and reterospective data was collected from the patient’s records. Results Out of 17 cases of granulomatous prostatitis, we encountered 9 cases of non-specific granulomatous prostatitis, 5 cases of xanthogranulomatous prostatitis and 3 cases of specific tubercular prostatitis. The common age ranged from 51-75 years (mean 63 years) with mean PSA level of 15.8ng/ml. Six patients showed focal hypoechoic areas on TRUS and 11 cases revealed hard and fixed nodule on DRE. Conclusion Non-specific granulomatous prostatitis is the most common type of granulomatous prostatitis. There is no specific pattern of clinical, biochemical and ultrasound findings that allows the diagnosis of granulomatous prostatitis or differentiates it from prostatic carcinoma. Hence, histomorphological diagnosis is the gold standard in differentiating various prostatic lesions. PMID:27014642

  13. Thin film tritium dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Paul R.

    1976-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for tritium dosimetry. A dosimeter comprising a thin film of a material having relatively sensitive RITAC-RITAP dosimetry properties is exposed to radiation from tritium, and after the dosimeter has been removed from the source of the radiation, the low energy electron dose deposited in the thin film is determined by radiation-induced, thermally-activated polarization dosimetry techniques.

  14. Chemotherapy-induced monoamine oxidase expression in prostate carcinoma functions as a cytoprotective resistance enzyme and associates with clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Ryan R; Wu, Mengchu; Huang, Chung-Ying; Harris, William P; Sim, Hong Gee; Lucas, Jared M; Coleman, Ilsa; Higano, Celestia S; Gulati, Roman; True, Lawrence D; Vessella, Robert; Lange, Paul H; Garzotto, Mark; Beer, Tomasz M; Nelson, Peter S

    2014-01-01

    To identify molecular alterations in prostate cancers associating with relapse following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical prostatectomy patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer were enrolled into a phase I-II clinical trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel and mitoxantrone followed by prostatectomy. Pre-treatment prostate tissue was acquired by needle biopsy and post-treatment tissue was acquired by prostatectomy. Prostate cancer gene expression measurements were determined in 31 patients who completed 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We identified 141 genes with significant transcript level alterations following chemotherapy that associated with subsequent biochemical relapse. This group included the transcript encoding monoamine oxidase A (MAOA). In vitro, cytotoxic chemotherapy induced the expression of MAOA and elevated MAOA levels enhanced cell survival following docetaxel exposure. MAOA activity increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and increased the expression and nuclear translocation of HIF1α. The suppression of MAOA activity using the irreversible inhibitor clorgyline augmented the apoptotic responses induced by docetaxel. In summary, we determined that the expression of MAOA is induced by exposure to cytotoxic chemotherapy, increases HIF1α, and contributes to docetaxel resistance. As MAOA inhibitors have been approved for human use, regimens combining MAOA inhibitors with docetaxel may improve clinical outcomes.

  15. Chemotherapy-Induced Monoamine Oxidase Expression in Prostate Carcinoma Functions as a Cytoprotective Resistance Enzyme and Associates with Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chung-Ying; Harris, William P.; Sim, Hong Gee; Lucas, Jared M.; Coleman, Ilsa; Higano, Celestia S.; Gulati, Roman; True, Lawrence D.; Vessella, Robert; Lange, Paul H.; Garzotto, Mark; Beer, Tomasz M.; Nelson, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    To identify molecular alterations in prostate cancers associating with relapse following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radical prostatectomy patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer were enrolled into a phase I-II clinical trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with docetaxel and mitoxantrone followed by prostatectomy. Pre-treatment prostate tissue was acquired by needle biopsy and post-treatment tissue was acquired by prostatectomy. Prostate cancer gene expression measurements were determined in 31 patients who completed 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We identified 141 genes with significant transcript level alterations following chemotherapy that associated with subsequent biochemical relapse. This group included the transcript encoding monoamine oxidase A (MAOA). In vitro, cytotoxic chemotherapy induced the expression of MAOA and elevated MAOA levels enhanced cell survival following docetaxel exposure. MAOA activity increased the levels of reactive oxygen species and increased the expression and nuclear translocation of HIF1α. The suppression of MAOA activity using the irreversible inhibitor clorgyline augmented the apoptotic responses induced by docetaxel. In summary, we determined that the expression of MAOA is induced by exposure to cytotoxic chemotherapy, increases HIF1α, and contributes to docetaxel resistance. As MAOA inhibitors have been approved for human use, regimens combining MAOA inhibitors with docetaxel may improve clinical outcomes. PMID:25198178

  16. Changes of the transverse diameter and volume and dosimetry before the 25th fraction during the course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Haihua; Hu Wei; Ding Weijun; Shan Guoping; Wang Wei; Yu Changhui; Wang Biyun; Shao Minghai; Wang Jianhua; Yang Weifang

    2012-07-01

    To quantify changes of the transverse diameter and volume and dosimetry, and to illustrate the inferiority of non-replanning during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Fifty-three NPC patients who received IMRT in 33 fractions were enrolled in this prospective trial. Before the 25th fraction, a new simulation computed tomography (CT) scan was acquired for all patients. The dose-volume histograms of the phantom plan were compared with the initial plan. Significant reduction of the transverse diameter of the nasopharyngeal, the neck, and 2 parotid glands volume was observed on second CT compared with the first CT (mean reduction 7.48 {+-} 4.45 mm, 6.80 {+-} 15.14 mm, 5.70 {+-} 6.26 mL, and 5.04 {+-} 5.85 mL, respectively; p < 0.01). The maximum dose and V-40 of the spinal cord, mean dose, and V30 of the left and right parotid, and V-50 of the brain stem were increased significantly in the phantom plan compared with the initial plan (mean increase 4.75 {+-} 5.55 Gy, 7.18 {+-} 10.07%, 4.51 {+-} 8.55 Gy, 6.59 {+-} 17.82%, 5.33 {+-} 8.55 Gy, 11.68 {+-} 17.11% and 1.48 {+-} 3.67%, respectively; p < 0.01). On the basis of dose constraint criterion in the RTOG0225 protocol, the dose of the normal critical structures for 52.83% (28/53) of the phantom plans were out of limit compared with 1.89% (1/53) of the initial plans (p < 0.0001). Because of the significant change in anatomy and dose before the 25th fraction during IMRT, replanning should be necessary during IMRT with NPC.

  17. Complimentary role of FDG-PET imaging and skeletal scintigraphy in the evaluation of patients of prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, B P; Jangra, S; Nair, N; Tongaonkar, H B; Basu, S

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignancies of elderly males. Management depends on the accurate estimation of disease both at initial diagnosis and in its subsequent course. In the present study, we evaluated the diagnostic utility of positron emission tomography with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) in patients having prostate cancer. The findings were compared with the results of bone scan (BS) for the detection of bone metastases. Sixteen patients (age range, 55-83 years) with confirmed diagnosis of prostate cancer were included in the prospective study. Three patients had undergone bilateral orchidectomy, 1 had hormonal therapy, 9 had undergone both, and 3 had no therapy. All the patients underwent wholebody BS and FDG-PET within 1 week. Interpretation of BS and FDG-PET were performed qualitatively. Osseous abnormalities detected by both methods were compared. Involvement of the disease in other sites as seen on FDG-PET was also noted. BS detected 197 osseous lesions, whereas FDG-PET could detect 97 (49%) bone lesions. However, in 3 patients without any prior therapeutic intervention, FDG-PET results were superior or equivalent to that of BS. FDG-PET also detected extensive involvement of the disease in the bone marrow in 4 patients, lymph node metastases at various sites in 8, liver metastases in 2, and lung metastases in 1 patient. FDG-PET could demonstrate less number of osseous metastases in comparison with BSs, but the results have to be interpreted in the background of prior treatment administered and the tumor biology of the lesion. It is evident that FDG-PET could detect the unknown soft tissue involvement of the disease with good sensitivity, which might play an important role in the management of prostate cancer. Overall, in the absence of novel PET tracers, both skeletal scintigraphy and FDG-PET imaging can play a complimentary role in the management of prostate cancer.

  18. REVIEW OF DOSIMETRY FIELD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    three, oxalic acid , polyisobutylene, and Mylar film, seem sufficiently promising to warrant further development. Their current states of development...ceric sulfate dosimeters be included in the dosimetry handbook, but that additional work should be done on oxalic acid , polyisobutylene, and Mylar as dosimetry materials. (Author)

  19. Analysis of Argonaute Complex Bound mRNAs in DU145 Prostate Carcinoma Cells Reveals New miRNA Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Volker; Beitzinger, Michaela; Nolte, Elke; Wach, Sven; Hart, Martin; Sapich, Sandra; Wiesehöfer, Marc; Wennemuth, Gunther; Eichner, Norbert; Stempfl, Thomas; Wullich, Bernd; Meister, Gunter

    2017-01-01

    Posttranscriptional gene regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs) contributes to the induction and maintenance of prostate carcinoma (PCa). To identify mRNAs enriched or removed from Ago2-containing RISC complexes, these complexes were immunoprecipitated from normal prostate fibroblasts (PNFs) and the PCa line DU145 and the bound mRNAs were quantified by microarray. The analysis of Ago complexes derived from PNFs or DU145 confirmed the enrichment or depletion of a variety of mRNAs already known from the literature to be deregulated. Novel potential targets were analyzed by luciferase assays with miRNAs known to be deregulated in PCa. We demonstrate that the mRNAs of the death effector domain-containing protein (DEDD), the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 10b protein (TNFRSF10B), the tumor protein p53 inducible nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1), and the secreted protein, acidic, cysteine-rich (SPARC; osteonectin) are regulated by miRNAs miR-148a, miR-20a, miR-24, and miR-29a/b, respectively. Therefore, these miRNAs represent potential targets for therapy. Surprisingly, overexpression of miR-24 induced focus formation and proliferation of DU145 cells, while miR-29b reduced proliferation. The study confirms genes deregulated in PCa by virtue of their presence/absence in the Ago2-complex. In conjunction with the already published miRNA profiles of PCa, the data can be used to identify miRNA-regulated mRNAs. PMID:28163933

  20. Combinatorial Targeting of Prostate Carcinoma Cells and Tumor Associated Pericytes with Antibody-Based Immunotherapy and Metronomic Chemotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    4 ( CSPG4 ). This antigen has a restricted distribution in normal tissues, but has high expression in malignant lesions with limited inter-and intra...mesothelioma, melanoma and sarcoma. Relevant to this proposal AN-2 and CSPG4 are expressed in mouse and human prostate cancer cell lines, respectively...Fig. 1). Furthermore AN-2 and CSPG4 expression is upregulated on activated pericytes in the tumor microenvironment (Fig.2). As to the function of

  1. Cerebellar Metastases From Prostate Cancer on 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mico; Hsiao, Edward; Turner, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    Ga prostate-specific membrane antigen PET/CT is increasingly used to evaluate extent of disease in prostate carcinoma. Parenchymal brain metastases originating from prostate cancer have highly variable imaging appearance. We present a 77-year-old man with cerebellar metastasis from prostate cancer showing focal uptake on prostate-specific membrane antigen PET/CT.

  2. Sequential evaluation of prostate edema after permanent seed prostate brachytherapy using CT-MRI fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Taussky, Daniel; Austen, Lyn; Toi, Ants; Yeung, Ivan; Williams, Theresa; Pearson, Shannon; McLean, Michael; Pond, Gregory; Crook, Juanita . E-mail: juanita.crook@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the extent and time course of prostate edema and its effect on dosimetry after permanent seed prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients scheduled for permanent seed {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy agreed to a prospective study on postimplant edema. Implants were preplanned using transrectal ultrasonography. Postimplant dosimetry was calculated using computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (CT-MRI) fusion on the day of the implant (Day 1) and Days 8 and 30. The prostate was contoured on MRI, and the seeds were located on CT. Factors investigated for an influence on edema were the number of seeds and needles, preimplant prostate volume, transitional zone index (transition zone volume divided by prostate volume), age, and prostate-specific antigen level. Prostate dosimetry was evaluated by the percentage of the prostate volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V{sub 100}) and percentage of prescribed dose received by 90% of the prostate volume (D{sub 90}). Results: Prostate edema was maximal on Day 1, with the median prostate volume 31% greater than preimplant transrectal ultrasound volume (range, 0.93-1.72; p < 0.001) and decreased with time. It was 21% greater than baseline at Day 8 (p = 0.013) and 5% greater on Day 30 (p < 0.001). Three patients still had a prostate volume greater than baseline by Day 30. The extent of edema depended on the transition zone volume (p = 0.016) and the preplan prostate volume (p 0.003). The median V{sub 100} on Day 1 was 93.6% (range, 86.0-98.2%) and was 96.3% (range, 85.7-99.5%) on Day 30 (p = 0.079). Patients with a Day 1 V{sub 100} >93% were less affected by edema resolution, showing a median increase in V{sub 100} of 0.67% on Day 30 compared with 2.77% for patients with a V{sub 100} <93 % on Day 1. Conclusion: Despite the extreme range of postimplant edema, the effect on dosimetry was less than expected. Dose coverage of the prostate was good for all patients during Days 1

  3. Virtual HDR CyberKnife SBRT for Localized Prostatic Carcinoma: 5-Year Disease-Free Survival and Toxicity Observations

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Donald Blake; Naitoh, John; Mardirossian, George

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) may substantially recapitulate the dose distribution of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, representing an externally delivered “Virtual HDR” treatment method. Herein, we present 5-year outcomes from a cohort of consecutively treated virtual HDR SBRT prostate cancer patients. Methods: Seventy-nine patients were treated from 2006 to 2009, 40 low-risk, and 39 intermediate-risk, under IRB-approved clinical trial, to 38 Gy in four fractions. The planning target volume (PTV) included prostate plus a 2-mm volume expansion in all directions, with selective use of a 5-mm prostate-to-PTV expansion and proximal seminal vesicle coverage in intermediate-risk patients, to better cover potential extraprostatic disease; rectal PTV margin reduced to zero in all cases. The prescription dose covered >95% of the PTV (V100 ≥95%), with a minimum 150% PTV dose escalation to create “HDR-like” PTV dose distribution. Results: Median pre-SBRT PSA level of 5.6 ng/mL decreased to 0.05 ng/mL 5 years out and 0.02 ng/mL 6 years out. At least one PSA bounce was seen in 55 patients (70%) but only 3 of them subsequently relapsed, biochemical-relapse-free survival was 100 and 92% for low-risk and intermediate-risk patients, respectively, by ASTRO definition (98 and 92% by Phoenix definition). Local relapse did not occur, distant metastasis-free survival was 100 and 95% by risk-group, and disease-specific survival was 100%. Acute and late grade 2 GU toxicity incidence was 10 and 9%, respectively; with 6% late grade 3 GU toxicity. Acute urinary retention did not occur. Acute and late grade 2 GI toxicity was 0 and 1%, respectively, with no grade 3 or higher toxicity. Of patient’s potent pre-SBRT, 65% remained so at 5 years. Conclusion: Virtual HDR prostate SBRT creates a very low PSA nadir, a high rate of 5-year disease-free survival and an acceptable toxicity incidence, with results closely resembling those reported

  4. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Białek, Waldemar; Rudzki, Sławomir; Iberszer, Paweł; Wronecki, Lech

    2016-12-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin.

  5. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rudzki, Sławomir; Iberszer, Paweł; Wronecki, Lech

    2016-01-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin. PMID:28138411

  6. Cytotoxicity of herbal extracts used for treatment of prostatic disease on head and neck carcinoma cell lines and non-malignant primary mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Marianne; Polednik, Christine; Roller, Jeanette; Hagen, Rudolf

    2013-02-01

    Previously, a growth inhibiting effect of PC-Spes on head and neck carcinoma cell lines had been demonstrated. In order to determine the toxic impact of particular herbs in the mixture, we exposed the head and neck cancer cell lines FADU, HLaC79 and its Paclitaxel-resistant subline HLaC79-Clone1 as well as primary mucosal keratinocytes to increasing concentrations of the herbal mixture Prostaprotect, which has a similar formulation as PC-Spes, as well as its single herbal components Dendranthema morifolium, Ganoderma lucidium, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Isatis indigotica, Panax pseudo-ginseng, Rabdosia rubescens, Scutellaria baicalensis and Pygeum africanum. Growth inhibition was measured using the MTT assay. Expression of P-glycoprotein (P-GP), multidrug resistance protein-1 (MRP-1), multidrug resistance protein-2 (MRP-2), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and androgen receptor (AR) were examined by western blot analysis. Pygeum africanum extract clearly turned out as the main cytotoxic component of the Prostaprotect prescription mixture, and initated apoptosis in sensitive cell lines. All other extracts had only minor toxic effects. Western blot analysis revealed increased expression of P-GP in HLaC79-Clone1 cells, while HLaC79 and FADU cells were negative. All three cell lines were negative for MRP-1 and BCRP but positive for MRP-2. HLaC79 and its descendant HLaC79-Clone1 both expressed AR, as verified by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. Primary mucosal keratinocytes were negative for all multidrug resistance markers as well as for AR. Growth inhibition rates of the single herbal extracts were compared with previously published results in prostate carcinoma cell lines. The relationship between expression levels of AR and multidrug resistance markers in relation to the measured toxicity of herbal extracts in our head and neck cancer cell system is critically discussed.

  7. Enteric-coated, highly standardized cranberry extract reduces risk of UTIs and urinary symptoms during radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bonetta, Alberto; Di Pierro, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) proanthocyanidins can interfere with adhesion of bacteria to uroepithelial cells, potentially preventing lower urinary tract infections (LUTIs). Because LUTIs are a common side effect of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer, we evaluated the clinical efficacy of enteric-coated tablets containing highly standardized V. msacrocarpon (ecVM) in this condition. Methods A total of 370 consecutive patients were entered into this study. All patients received intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer; 184 patients were also treated with ecVM while 186 served as controls. Cranberry extract therapy started on the simulation day, at which time a bladder catheterization was performed. During EBRT (over 6–7 weeks), all patients underwent weekly examination for urinary tract symptoms, including regular urine cultures during the treatment period. Results Compliance was excellent, with no adverse effects or allergic reactions being observed, apart from gastric pain in two patients. In the cranberry cohort (n = 184), 16 LUTIs (8.7%) were observed, while in the control group (n = 186) 45 LUTIs (24.2%) were recorded. This difference was statistically significant. Furthermore, lower rates of nocturia, urgency, micturition frequency, and dysuria were observed in the group that received cranberry extract. Conclusion Cranberry extracts have been reported to reduce the incidence of LUTIs significantly in women and children. Our data extend these results to patients with prostate cancer undergoing irradiation to the pelvis, who had a significant reduction in LUTIs compared with controls. These results were accompanied by a statistically significant reduction in urinary tract symptoms (dysuria, nocturia, urinary frequency, urgency), suggesting a generally protective effect of cranberry extract on the bladder mucosa. PMID:22977312

  8. Anti-3-[18F]FACBC Positron Emission Tomography-Computerized Tomography and 111In-Capromab Pendetide Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography-Computerized Tomography for Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, David M.; Nieh, Peter T.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Amzat, Rianot; Bowman, F. DuBois; Halkar, Raghuveer K.; Master, Viraj A.; Nye, Jonathon A.; Odewole, Oluwaseun A.; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; Savir-Baruch, Bital; Alaei-Taleghani, Pooneh; Goodman, Mark M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We prospectively evaluated the amino acid analogue positron emission tomography radiotracer anti-3-[18F]FACBC compared to ProstaScint® (111In-capromab pendetide) single photon emission computerized tomography-computerized tomography to detect recurrent prostate carcinoma. Materials and Methods A total of 93 patients met study inclusion criteria who underwent anti-3-[18F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography plus 111In-capromab pendetide single photon emission computerized tomography-computerized tomography for suspected recurrent prostate carcinoma within 90 days. Reference standards were applied by a multidisciplinary board. We calculated diagnostic performance for detecting disease. Results In the 91 of 93 patients with sufficient data for a consensus on the presence or absence of prostate/bed disease anti-3-[18F]FACBC had 90.2% sensitivity, 40.0% specificity, 73.6% accuracy, 75.3% positive predictive value and 66.7% negative predictive value compared to 111In-capromab pendetide with 67.2%, 56.7%, 63.7%, 75.9% and 45.9%, respectively. In the 70 of 93 patients with a consensus on the presence or absence of extraprostatic disease anti-3-[18F]FACBC had 55.0% sensitivity, 96.7% specificity, 72.9% accuracy, 95.7% positive predictive value and 61.7% negative predictive value compared to 111In-capromabpendetide with10.0%, 86.7%, 42.9%, 50.0% and 41.9%, respectively. Of 77 index lesions used to prove positivity histological proof was obtained in 74 (96.1%). Anti-3-[18F]FACBC identified 14 more positive prostate bed recurrences (55 vs 41) and 18 more patients with extraprostatic involvement (22 vs 4). Anti-3-[18F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography correctly up-staged 18 of 70 cases (25.7%) in which there was a consensus on the presence or absence of extraprostatic involvement. Conclusions Better diagnostic performance was noted for anti-3-[18F]FACBC positron emission tomography-computerized tomography than for 111In

  9. Internal dosimetry - a review.

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Charles Augustus

    2004-06-01

    The field history and current status of internal dosimetry is reviewed in this article. Elements of the field that are reviewed include standards and models, derivation of dose coefficients and intake retention fractions, bioassay measurements, and intake and dose calculations. In addition, guidance is developed and provided as to the necessity of internal dosimetry for a particular facility or operation and methodology for implementing a program. A discussion of the purposes of internal dosimetry is included as well as recommendations for future development and direction.

  10. Apium graveolens Extract Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Induces Apoptosis in the Human Prostatic Carcinoma Cell Line LNCaP.

    PubMed

    Köken, Tülay; Koca, Buğra; Özkurt, Mete; Erkasap, Nilüfer; Kuş, Gökhan; Karalar, Mustafa

    2016-12-01

    Apium graveolens has been shown to inhibit the growth of a variety of cancer tissues. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effect of A. graveolens on the human prostatic carcinoma cell line LNCaP. LNCaP cells were treated with increasing concentrations of an ethanolic extract of A. graveolens ranging from 1000 to 3000 μg/mL, and viability was determined after 24 and 48 h using the XTT cell proliferation assay. The levels of cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), one of the best biomarkers of apoptosis, were analyzed. Finally, quantitative gene expression analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a critical mediator of angiogenesis, was performed using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. A. graveolens extract inhibited cell viability in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. Data from cleaved PARP assays suggested that A. graveolens caused induction of apoptosis in these cells. Treatment of cells with A. graveolens also resulted in downregulation of VEGF expression. This study showed that the antiproliferative effect exerted by an ethanolic extract of A. graveolens is triggered by induction of apoptosis. We also demonstrated that VEGF expression was downregulated by treatment with A. graveolens extract.

  11. SU-E-T-112: Dose Distribution of Praseodymium-142 Microspheres in Microcapillary Using Radiochromic Film Dosimetry and Applications in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Microsphere Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, M; Rasmussen, K; Jung, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This work verified simulations of beta-minus emitter Praseodymium-142 (Pr-142) for microsphere brachytherapy by performing absolute dose measurements for Pr 142 microspheres in a microcapillary as a simplified model for a single blood vessel for the treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC). Methods: Pr-142 microspheres (mass: 0.169g, average diameter: 29.7±3.9μm) were activated by thermal neutron activation at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. Experimental setup consisted of a microsphere solution (initial activity 36.6mCi in 0.1ml of sterile water) within a glass microcapillary (internal and external diameter: 305μm and 453μm, respectively) placed for 51h in a custom made Gammex Solid Water™ phantom. GAFCHROMIC™ EBT2 film calibrated with a 6MeV electron beam was used to access the dose fall-off of microspheres. The microcapillary was modeled in MCNPX2.6 in order to compare with experiments. Results: The radial dose fall-off on the transverse plane due to scatter and attenuation in the solid water phantom was analyzed using ImageJ for both film and MCNPX2.6 simulations. Isodose analysis showed close agreement among the methods used, i.e. measurements and simulations agree within 3.9% for doses below 1600cGy. Experimental and simulated doses obtained at 0.5 cm radially from the source were 1547cGy and 1610cGy respectively. Discrepancies for points close to the microcapillary surface were observed between MCNPX2.6 and measurements due to film saturation for high doses. Dose due to Pr-142 3.7% gamma emission was below the threshold of detection for the film. Conclusion: A detailed dosimetric study was performed for Pr-142 glass microspheres within a single microcapillary. MCNPX2.6 simulations were verified by means of direct measurement. Based on these results, Pr-142 appears to be a viable choice of radionuclide for treating HCC.

  12. Evaluation of multiple image-based modalities for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate carcinoma: A prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Mayyas, Essa; Chetty, Indrin J.; Chetvertkov, Mikhail; Wen, Ning; Neicu, Toni; Nurushev, Teamor; Ren Lei; Pradhan, Deepak; Movsas, Benjamin; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.; Lu Mei; Stricker, Hans

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Setup errors and prostate intrafraction motion are main sources of localization uncertainty in prostate cancer radiation therapy. This study evaluates four different imaging modalities 3D ultrasound (US), kV planar images, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), and implanted electromagnetic transponders (Calypso/Varian) to assess inter- and intrafraction localization errors during intensity-modulated radiation therapy based treatment of prostate cancer. Methods: Twenty-seven prostate cancer patients were enrolled in a prospective IRB-approved study and treated to a total dose of 75.6 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction). Overall, 1100 fractions were evaluated. For each fraction, treatment targets were localized using US, kV planar images, and CBCT in a sequence defined to determine setup offsets relative to the patient skin tattoos, intermodality differences, and residual errors for each patient and patient cohort. Planning margins, following van Herk's formalism, were estimated based on error distributions. Calypso-based localization was not available for the first eight patients, therefore centroid positions of implanted gold-seed markers imaged prior to and immediately following treatment were used as a motion surrogate during treatment. For the remaining 19 patients, Calypso transponders were used to assess prostate intrafraction motion. Results: The means ({mu}), and standard deviations (SD) of the systematic ({Sigma}) and random errors ({sigma}) of interfraction prostate shifts (relative to initial skin tattoo positioning), as evaluated using CBCT, kV, and US, averaged over all patients and fractions, were: [{mu}{sub CBCT}= (-1.2, 0.2, 1.1) mm, {Sigma}{sub CBCT}= (3.0, 1.4, 2.4) mm, {sigma}{sub CBCT}= (3.2, 2.2, 2.5) mm], [{mu}{sub kV}= (-2.9, -0.4, 0.5) mm, {Sigma}{sub kV}= (3.4, 3.1, 2.6) mm, {sigma}{sub kV}= (2.9, 2.0, 2.4) mm], and [{mu}{sub US}= (-3.6, -1.4, 0.0) mm, {Sigma}{sub US}= (3.3, 3.5, 2.8) mm, {sigma}{sub US}= (4.1, 3.8, 3.6) mm], in the anterior

  13. High expression of prostate-specific membrane antigen in the tumor-associated neo-vasculature is associated with worse prognosis in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Michael C; Laimer, Johannes; Chaux, Alcides; Schäfer, Georg; Obrist, Peter; Brunner, Andrea; Kronberger, Irmgard E; Laimer, Klaus; Gurel, Bora; Koller, Johann-Benedikt; Seifarth, Christof; Zelger, Bettina; Klocker, Helmut; Rasse, Michael; Doppler, Wolfgang; Bander, Neil H

    2012-08-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a transmembrane protein expressed in prostate cancer as well as in the neo-vasculature of nonprostatic solid tumors. Here, we determined the expression pattern of PSMA in the vasculature of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Using a previously validated antibody, PSMA staining distribution and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expression status was evaluated in a cohort of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity (n=96) using immunohistochemistry and was correlated with clinicopathological features as well as outcome. Twenty-four (25%) cases showed no detectable PSMA staining, 48 (50%) demonstrated positive immunoreactivity for PSMA in less than 50% of microvessels and 24 (25%) cases showed strong endothelial PSMA expression in more than 50% of tumor-associated microvessels. High endothelial PSMA expression was associated with greatly reduced survival (18.2 vs 77.3 months; P=0.0001) and maintained prognostic significance after adjusting for grade and stage in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio=2.19, P=0.007). Furthermore, we observed a strong association between endothelial PSMA and cancer cell-specific COX2 expression. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence for the prognostic significance of endothelial PSMA expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma and, suggest a potential interaction between arachidonic acid metabolites and endothelial PSMA expression in the tumor neo-vasculature.

  14. Development of a Phase I/II Clinical Trial Using Sterotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Carcinoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    Therapy (SBRT) for Low and Intermediate Risk Prostate Cancer ELIGIBILITY...Cavanagh W, Butler W. I-125 versus Pd-103 for low- risk prostate cancer : long-term morbidity outcomes fom a prospective randomized multicenter...STEREOTACTIC BODY RADIATION THERAPY (SBRT) FOR LOW AND INTERMEDIATE RISK PROSTATE CANCER This is a clinical trial (a type of research study).

  15. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  16. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study to assess the efficacy of tadalafil (Cialis[reg]) in the treatment of erectile dysfunction following three-dimensional conformal external-beam radiotherapy for prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Incrocci, Luca . E-mail: l.incrocci@erasmusmc.nl; Slagter, Cleo; Slob, A. Koos; Hop, Wim C.J.

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction after three-dimensional conformal external-beam radiotherapy (3DCRT) for prostatic carcinoma is reported in as many as 64% of those patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of the oral drug tadalafil (Cialis (registered) ) in patients with erectile dysfunction after radiotherapy for prostatic carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 358) who completed radiotherapy at least 12 months before the study were approached by mail. All patients had been treated by 3DCRT; 60 patients were included and entered a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study lasting 12 weeks. They received 20 mg of tadalafil or placebo for 6 weeks. Drug or placebo was taken on demand at patient's discretion, with no restrictions regarding the consumption of alcohol or food, at least once a week and no more than once daily. At 6 weeks patients crossed over to the alternative treatment. Data were collected using the Sexual Encounter Profile (SEP) and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaires. Side effects were also recorded. Results: Mean age at study entry was 69 years. All patients completed the study. For almost all questions of the IIEF questionnaire there was a significant increase in mean scores from baseline with tadalafil, but not with placebo. Sixty-seven percent of the patients reported an improvement of erectile function with tadalafil (placebo: 20%), and 48% reported successful intercourse with tadalafil (placebo: 9%) (p < 0.0001). Side effects were mild or moderate. Conclusions: Tadalafil is an effective treatment for erectile dysfunction after 3DCRT for prostatic carcinoma with successful intercourse reported in almost 50% of the patients, and it is well tolerated.

  17. Testosterone-mediated increase in 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone content, nuclear androgen receptor levels, and cell division in an androgen-independent prostate carcinoma of Noble rats.

    PubMed

    Ho, S M; Leav, I; Damassa, D; Kwan, P W; Merk, F B; Seto, H S

    1988-02-01

    An androgen-independent, transplantable prostate carcinoma line (AIT), originally derived from the dorsolateral prostate (DLP) of Noble rat, was implanted into orchiectomized Noble rats and its response to androgen stimulation was studied and compared to that of the regenerating DLP tissue in sexually ablated rats. AIT tumors carried in castrated hosts displayed a high basal level of proliferative activity (mitotic index (MI), 15.0 +/- 0.5) while DLP tissue in untreated castrates exhibited no proliferative activity. Following androgen stimulation by testosterone capsule implantation into host rats, the AIT responded with a marked increase in cell proliferation; MI values doubled to 30.0 +/- 2.9 on Day 5 following androgen stimulation. This androgen-induced increase in MI values was coincident with elevations in nuclear androgen receptor (20-fold increase) and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone content (3-fold increase) in the tumor. However, by Day 10 following androgen treatment, indices of cell proliferation in the AIT declined to pre-androgen-stimulated levels (MI, 14.8 +/- 1.9) despite the continued elevations in nuclear androgen receptor and tissue 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone contents. Parallel changes in MI were also observed in the normal regenerating DLP following androgen stimulation. MI values in this tissue increased from nondetectable levels to 38.1 +/- 4.7 on Day 5 but declined to relatively low levels (4.5 +/- 0.9) by Day 10 following androgen replacement. Taken together these findings led us to conclude that the AIT carried in castrates is capable of responding to testosterone in a manner similar to that observed for androgen-stimulated DLP of sexually ablated rats. Thus, in both the neoplastic and regenerating tissues, the initial response to androgen is characterized by a marked enhancement of cell proliferation which was correlated with an increase in androgen receptor and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone content. However, like its tissue of origin, the AIT

  18. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Carbon Ions for Local Tumor Control of a Radioresistant Prostate Carcinoma in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Peschke, Peter; Karger, Christian P.; Scholz, Michael; Debus, Juergen; Huber, Peter E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To study the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon ion beams relative to X-rays for local tumor control in a syngeneic rat prostate tumor (Dunning subline R3327-AT1). Methods and Materials: A total of 198 animals with tumors in the distal thigh were treated with increasing single and split doses of either {sup 12}C ions or photons using a 20-mm spread-out Bragg peak. Endpoints of the study were local control (no tumor recurrence within 300 days) and volumetric changes after irradiation. The resulting values for D{sub 50} (dose at 50% tumor control probability) were used to determine RBE values. Results: The D{sub 50} values for single doses were 32.9 {+-} 0.9 Gy for {sup 12}C ions and 75.7 {+-} 1.6 Gy for photons. The respective values for split doses were 38.0 {+-} 2.3 Gy and 90.6 {+-} 2.3 Gy. The corresponding RBE values were 2.30 {+-} 0.08 for single and 2.38 {+-} 0.16 for split doses. The most prominent side effects were dry and moist desquamation of the skin, which disappeared within weeks. Conclusion: The study confirmed the effectiveness of carbon ion therapy for severely radioresistant tumors. For 1- and 2-fraction photon and {sup 12}C ion radiation, we have established individual D{sub 50} values for local tumor control as well as related RBE values.

  19. Prostate Cancer Prevention by Sulforaphane, a Novel Dietary Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    prostate cells (PrEC), benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH-1), early stage LNCaP cells ( androgen -dependent prostate cancer cells) and late...stage PC3 ( androgen -independent carcinoma). Treatment with 15 μM SFN caused more that 50% of cell death in prostate cancerous cells, while only...mediates epigenetic alterations and suppresses prostate cancer development in a novel APC-mutant mouse model of prostate carcinogenesis. We noticed

  20. Impact of Prostate Inflammation on Lesion Development in the POET3+Pten+/− Mouse Model of Prostate Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Burcham, Grant N.; Cresswell, Gregory M.; Snyder, Paul W.; Chen, Long; Liu, Xiaoqi; Crist, Scott A.; Henry, Michael D.; Ratliff, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence linking prostatitis and prostate cancer development is contradictory. To study this link, the POET3 mouse, an inducible model of prostatitis, was crossed with a Pten-loss model of prostate cancer (Pten+/−) containing the ROSA26 luciferase allele to monitor prostate size. Prostatitis was induced, and prostate bioluminescence was tracked over 12 months, with lesion development, inflammation, and cytokine expression analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 months and compared with mice without induction of prostatitis. Acute prostatitis led to more proliferative epithelium and enhanced bioluminescence. However, 4 months after initiation of prostatitis, mice with induced inflammation had lower grade pre-neoplastic lesions. A trend existed toward greater development of carcinoma 12 months after induction of inflammation, including one of two mice with carcinoma developing perineural invasion. Two of 18 mice at the later time points developed lesions with similarities to proliferative inflammatory atrophy, including one mouse with associated carcinoma. Pten+/− mice developed spontaneous inflammation, and prostatitis was similar among groups of mice at 8 and 12 months. Analyzed as one cohort, lesion number and grade were positively correlated with prostatitis. Specifically, amounts of CD11b+Gr1+ cells were correlated with lesion development. These results support the hypothesis that myeloid-based inflammation is associated with lesion development in the murine prostate, and previous bouts of CD8-driven prostatitis may promote invasion in the Pten+/− model of cancer. PMID:25455686

  1. Extra-prostatic transgene-associated neoplastic lesions in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice.

    PubMed

    Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Bolon, Brad; Oglesbee, Michael J; Clinton, Steven K; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih; La Perle, Krista M D

    2015-02-01

    Male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice are frequently used in prostate cancer research because their prostates consistently develop a series of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Disease progression in TRAMP mouse prostates culminates in metastatic, poorly differentiated carcinomas with neuroendocrine features. The androgen dependence of the rat probasin promoter largely limits transgene expression to the prostatic epithelium. However, extra-prostatic transgene-positive lesions have been described in TRAMP mice, including renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urethra, and phyllodes-like tumors of the seminal vesicle. Here, we describe the histologic and immunohistochemical features of 2 novel extra-prostatic lesions in TRAMP mice: primary anaplastic tumors of uncertain cell origin in the midbrain and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the submandibular salivary gland. These newly characterized tumors apparently result from transgene expression in extra-prostatic locations rather than representing metastatic prostate neoplasms because lesions were identified in both male and female mice and in male TRAMP mice without histologically apparent prostate tumors. In this article, we also calculate the incidences of the urethral carcinomas and renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, further elucidate the biological behavior of the urethral carcinomas, and demonstrate the critical importance of complete necropsies even when evaluating presumably well characterized phenotypes in genetically engineered mice.

  2. Image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART): Radiobiological and dose escalation considerations for localized carcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Song, William; Schaly, Bryan; Bauman, Glenn; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2005-07-15

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of various image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) techniques to deliver and escalate dose to the prostate in the presence of geometric uncertainties. Five prostate patients with 15-16 treatment CT studies each were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were planned with an 18 MV, six-field conformal technique with a 10 mm margin size and an initial prescription of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. The adaptive strategy employed in this work for patient-specific dose escalation was to increase the prescription dose in 2 Gy-per-fraction increments until the rectum normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) reached a level equal to that of the nominal plan NTCP (i.e., iso-NTCP dose escalation). The various target localization techniques simulated were: (1) daily laser-guided alignment to skin tattoo marks that represents treatment without image-guidance, (2) alignment to bony landmarks with daily portal images, and (3) alignment to the clinical target volume (CTV) with daily CT images. Techniques (1) and (3) were resimulated with a reduced margin size of 5 mm to investigate further dose escalation. When delivering the original clinical prescription dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions, the 'CTV registration' technique yielded the highest tumor control probability (TCP) most frequently, followed by the 'bone registration' and 'tattoo registration' techniques. However, the differences in TCP among the three techniques were minor when the margin size was 10 mm ({<=}1.1%). Reducing the margin size to 5 mm significantly degraded the TCP values of the 'tattoo registration' technique in two of the five patients, where a large difference was found compared to the other techniques ({<=}11.8%). The 'CTV registration' technique, however, did maintain similar TCP values compared to their 10 mm margin counterpart. In terms of normal tissue sparing, the technique producing the lowest NTCP varied from patient to patient. Reducing the

  3. Feasibility of salvage interstitial microwave thermal therapy for prostate carcinoma following failed brachytherapy: studies in a tissue equivalent phantom.

    PubMed

    McCann, Claire; Kumaradas, J Carl; Gertner, Mark R; Davidson, Sean R H; Dolan, Alfred M; Sherar, Michael D

    2003-04-21

    Thermal therapy is an experimental treatment to destroy solid tumours by heating them to temperatures ranging from 55 degrees C to 90 degrees C, inducing thermal coagulation and necrosis of the tumour. We are investigating the feasibility of interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment for prostate cancer patients with local recurrence following failed brachytherapy. Due to the electrical and thermal conductivity of the brachytherapy seeds, we hypothesized that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy and cause unpredictable heating. To investigate this, a 915 MHz helical antenna was inserted into a muscle-equivalent phantom with and without brachytherapy seeds. Following a 10 W, 5 s input to the antenna, the temperature rise was used to calculate absorbed power, also referred to as specific absorption rate (SAR). Plane wave models based on Maxwell's equations were also used to characterize the electromagnetic scattering effect of the seeds. In addition, the phantom was heated with 8 W for 5 min to quantify the effect of the seeds on the temperature distribution during extended heating. SAR measurements indicated that the seeds had no significant effect on the shape and size of the SAR pattern of the antenna. However, the plane wave simulations indicated that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy resulting in hot spots at the seed edges. Lack of experimental evidence of these hot spots was probably due to the complex polarization of the microwaves emitted by the helical antenna. Extended heating experiments also demonstrated that the seeds had no significant effect on the temperature distributions and rates of temperature rise measured in the phantom. The results indicate that brachytherapy seeds are not a technical impediment to interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment following failed brachytherapy.

  4. Feasibility of salvage interstitial microwave thermal therapy for prostate carcinoma following failed brachytherapy: studies in a tissue equivalent phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Claire; Kumaradas, J. Carl; Gertner, Mark R.; Davidson, Sean R. H.; Dolan, Alfred M.; Sherar, Michael D.

    2003-04-01

    Thermal therapy is an experimental treatment to destroy solid tumours by heating them to temperatures ranging from 55 °C to 90 °C, inducing thermal coagulation and necrosis of the tumour. We are investigating the feasibility of interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment for prostate cancer patients with local recurrence following failed brachytherapy. Due to the electrical and thermal conductivity of the brachytherapy seeds, we hypothesized that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy and cause unpredictable heating. To investigate this, a 915 MHz helical antenna was inserted into a muscle-equivalent phantom with and without brachytherapy seeds. Following a 10 W, 5 s input to the antenna, the temperature rise was used to calculate absorbed power, also referred to as specific absorption rate (SAR). Plane wave models based on Maxwell's equations were also used to characterize the electromagnetic scattering effect of the seeds. In addition, the phantom was heated with 8 W for 5 min to quantify the effect of the seeds on the temperature distribution during extended heating. SAR measurements indicated that the seeds had no significant effect on the shape and size of the SAR pattern of the antenna. However, the plane wave simulations indicated that the seeds could scatter the microwave energy resulting in hot spots at the seed edges. Lack of experimental evidence of these hot spots was probably due to the complex polarization of the microwaves emitted by the helical antenna. Extended heating experiments also demonstrated that the seeds had no significant effect on the temperature distributions and rates of temperature rise measured in the phantom. The results indicate that brachytherapy seeds are not a technical impediment to interstitial microwave thermal therapy as a salvage treatment following failed brachytherapy.

  5. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Carbon Ions in a Rat Prostate Carcinoma In Vivo: Comparison of 1, 2, and 6 Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Karger, Christian P.; Peschke, Peter; Scholz, Michael; Huber, Peter E.; Debus, Jürgen

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and the effective α/β ratio for local tumor control of a radioresistant rat prostate tumor (Dunning subline R3327-AT1) after 6 fractions of carbon ions and photons. Methods and Materials: A total of 82 animals with tumors in the distal thigh were treated with 6 fractions of either photons or carbon ions, by use of increasing dose levels and a 2-cm spread-out Bragg peak. Endpoints of the study were local control (no tumor recurrence within 300 days) and volumetric changes after irradiation. The resulting values for dose at 50% tumor control probability were used to determine RBE values. Including data for 1 and 2 fractions from a previous study, we estimated α/β ratios. Results: For 6 fractions, the values for dose at 50% tumor control probability were 116.6 ± 3.0 Gy for photons and 43.7 ± 2.3 Gy for carbon ions and the resulting RBE was 2.67 ± 0.15. The α/β ratio was 84.7 ± 13.8 Gy for photons and 66.0 ± 21.0 Gy for carbon ions. Using these data together with the linear-quadratic model, we estimated the maximum RBE to be 2.88 ± 0.27. Conclusions: The study confirmed the increased effectiveness of carbon ions relative to photons over the whole dose range for a highly radioresistant tumor. The maximum RBE below 3 is in line with other published in vivo data. The RBE values may be used to benchmark RBE models. Hypoxia seems to have a major impact on the radiation response, although this still has to be confirmed by dedicated experiments.

  6. Tuberculous prostatitis: mimicking a cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, El Majdoub; Abdelhak, Khallouk; Hassan, Farih Moulay

    2016-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common type of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis . The kidneys, ureter, bladder or genital organs are usually involved. Tuberculosis of the prostate has mainly been described in immune-compromised patients. However, it can exceptionally be found as an isolated lesion in immune-competent patients. Tuberculosis of the prostate may be difficult to differentiate from carcinoma of the prostate and the chronic prostatitis when the prostate is hard and nodular on digital rectal examination and the urine is negative for tuberculosis bacilli. In many cases, a diagnosis of tuberculous prostatitis is made by the pathologist, or the disease is found incidentally after transurethral resection. Therefore, suspicion of tuberculous prostatitis requires a confirmatory biopsy of the prostate. We report the case of 60-year-old man who presented a low urinary tract syndrome. After clinical and biological examination, and imaging, prostate cancer was highly suspected. Transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed and histological examination showed tuberculosis lesions. PMID:28292092

  7. Angiostatic Therapy: A New Treatment Modality for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    could be a new innovative treatment regimen for hormone-refractory prostate cancer. This was to be achieved with human prostate cancer tissue and...indices, low cell death and a highly invasive phenotype. Using this model we identified surgical castration, COX-2 inhibition and dendritic cell based immunotherapy as effective mono and combined therapies for prostate carcinoma.

  8. Prostatic thermoluminescent dosimeter analysis in a patient treated with 18 MV X rays through a prosthetic hip

    SciTech Connect

    Hazuka, M.B.; Stroud, D.N.; Adams, J.; Ibbott, G.S.; Kinzie, J.J. )

    1993-01-15

    External beam radiation therapy with high energy photon beams through hip protheses has been shown to cause dose inhomogeneities for target volumes in the pelvis. In this work, measurements of dose using thermoluminescent dosimetry were compared with dose calculations from a computerized treatment planning system in a patient with prostatic carcinoma and a cobalt-chromium-molybdenum hip prosthesis. A 39% decrement in dose at isocenter was demonstrated for an 18 MV photon beam passing through the prosthesis. A discrepancy of only 3.1% was shown between measured and calculated dose when the tissue-maximum ratio (TMR) method of heterogeneity correction was used. However, it is recognized that several sources of error are possible when heterogeneity corrections are performed for high density prostheses and these are discussed below. The results of this work stress the importance of accurate data for use with the ratio of TMR's' algorithm in order that accurate treatment planning can be performed.

  9. The Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Prostate Cancer This booklet is about prostate cancer. Learning about medical care for your cancer ... ePub This booklet covers: The anatomy of the prostate and basics about prostate cancer Treatments for prostate ...

  10. ALGEBRA: ALgorithm for the heterogeneous dosimetry based on GEANT4 for BRAchytherapy.

    PubMed

    Afsharpour, H; Landry, G; D'Amours, M; Enger, S; Reniers, B; Poon, E; Carrier, J-F; Verhaegen, F; Beaulieu, L

    2012-06-07

    Task group 43 (TG43)-based dosimetry algorithms are efficient for brachytherapy dose calculation in water. However, human tissues have chemical compositions and densities different than water. Moreover, the mutual shielding effect of seeds on each other (interseed attenuation) is neglected in the TG43-based dosimetry platforms. The scientific community has expressed the need for an accurate dosimetry platform in brachytherapy. The purpose of this paper is to present ALGEBRA, a Monte Carlo platform for dosimetry in brachytherapy which is sufficiently fast and accurate for clinical and research purposes. ALGEBRA is based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code and is capable of handling the DICOM RT standard to recreate a virtual model of the treated site. Here, the performance of ALGEBRA is presented for the special case of LDR brachytherapy in permanent prostate and breast seed implants. However, the algorithm is also capable of handling other treatments such as HDR brachytherapy.

  11. ALGEBRA: ALgorithm for the heterogeneous dosimetry based on GEANT4 for BRAchytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsharpour, H.; Landry, G.; D'Amours, M.; Enger, S.; Reniers, B.; Poon, E.; Carrier, J.-F.; Verhaegen, F.; Beaulieu, L.

    2012-06-01

    Task group 43 (TG43)-based dosimetry algorithms are efficient for brachytherapy dose calculation in water. However, human tissues have chemical compositions and densities different than water. Moreover, the mutual shielding effect of seeds on each other (interseed attenuation) is neglected in the TG43-based dosimetry platforms. The scientific community has expressed the need for an accurate dosimetry platform in brachytherapy. The purpose of this paper is to present ALGEBRA, a Monte Carlo platform for dosimetry in brachytherapy which is sufficiently fast and accurate for clinical and research purposes. ALGEBRA is based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code and is capable of handling the DICOM RT standard to recreate a virtual model of the treated site. Here, the performance of ALGEBRA is presented for the special case of LDR brachytherapy in permanent prostate and breast seed implants. However, the algorithm is also capable of handling other treatments such as HDR brachytherapy.

  12. Ion storage dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, V. K.

    2001-09-01

    The availability of a reliable, accurate and cost-effective real-time personnel dosimetry system is fascinating to radiation workers. Electronic dosimeters are contemplated to meet this demand of active dosimetry. The development of direct ion storage (DIS) dosimeters, a member of the electronic dosimeter family, for personnel dosimetry is also an attempt in this direction. DIS dosimeter is a hybrid of the well-established technology of ion chambers and the latest advances in data storage using metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) analog memory device. This dosimeter is capable of monitoring legal occupational radiation doses of gamma, X-rays, beta and neutron radiation. Similar to an ion chamber, the performance of the dosimeter for a particular application can be optimized through the selection of appropriate wall materials. The use of the floating gate of a MOSFET as one of the electrodes of the ion chamber allows the miniaturization of the device to the size of a dosimetry badge and avoids the use of power supplies during dose accumulation. The concept of the device, underlying physics and the design of the DIS dosimeter are discussed. The results of preliminary testing of the device are also provided.

  13. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  14. Enlarged prostate

    MedlinePlus

    BPH; Benign prostatic hyperplasia (hypertrophy); Prostate - enlarged ... The actual cause of prostate enlargement is unknown. Factors linked to aging and changes in the cells of the testicles may have a role in the growth ...

  15. Dosimetry of two new interstitial brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, Pooneh; Sadeghi, Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    With increased demand for low 103Pd (palladium) seed sources, to treat prostate and eye cancers, new sources have been designed and introduced. This article presents the two new palladium brachytherapy sources, IR03-103Pd and IR04-103Pd that have been developed at Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute. The dosimetry parameters such as the dose rate constant Λ, the radial dose function g(r), and the anisotropy function F(r,θ), around the sources have been characterized using Version 5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code in accordance with the update AAPM Task Group No. 43 report (TG-43U1). The results indicated the dose rate constant of 0.689±0.02 and 0.667±0.02 cGy h-1 U-1 for the IR03-103Pd and IR04-103Pd sources respectively, which are in acceptable agreement with other commercial seeds. The calculated results were compared with published results for those of other source manufacturers. However, they show an acceptable dose distribution, using for clinical applications is pending experimental dosimetry.

  16. Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy in Prostate Glands <20 cm{sup 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Mayadev, Jyoti; Merrick, Gregory S.; Reed, Joshua R.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Wallner, Kent E.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetry, treatment-related morbidity, and biochemical outcomes for brachytherapy in patients with prostate glands <20 cm{sup 3}. Methods and Materials: From November 1996 to October 2006, 104 patients with prostate glands <20 cm{sup 3} underwent brachytherapy. Multiple prostate, urethral, and rectal dosimetric parameters were evaluated. Treatment-related urinary and rectal morbidity were assessed from patient questionnaires. Cause-specific survival, biochemical progression-free survival, and overall survival were recorded. Results: The median patient age, follow up, and pre-treatment ultrasound volume was 64 years, 5.0 years and 17.6cm{sup 3}, respectively. Median day 0 dosimetry was significant for the following: V100 98.5%, D90 126.1% and R100 <0.5% of prescription dose. The mean urethral and maximum urethral doses were 119.6% and 133.8% of prescription. The median time to International Prostate Symptom Score resolution was 4 months. There were no RTOG grade III or IV rectal complications. The cause-specific survival, biochemical progression-free survival, and overall survival rates were 100%, 92.5%, and 77.8% at 9 years. For biochemically disease-free patients, the median most recent postbrachytherapy PSA value was 0.02 ng/mL. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that brachytherapy for small prostate glands is highly effective, with an acceptable morbidity profile, excellent postimplant dosimetry, acceptable treatment-related morbidity, and favorable biochemical outcomes.

  17. Prostatitis: Inflammation of the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... walnut-shaped gland that is part of the male reproductive system. The main function of the prostate is to ... walnut-shaped gland that is part of the male reproductive system. What causes prostatitis? The causes of prostatitis differ ...

  18. Induction of apoptosis in the LNCaP human prostate carcinoma cell line and prostate adenocarcinomas of SV40T antigen transgenic rats by the Bowman-Birk inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Tang, MingXi; Asamoto, Makoto; Ogawa, Kumiko; Naiki-Ito, Aya; Sato, Shinya; Takahashi, Satoru; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2009-11-01

    The soybean-derived serine protease inhibitor, Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI), has been reported as a potent chemoprevention agent against several types of tumors. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of BBI on androgen-sensitive/dependent prostate cancers using a human prostate cancer cell (LNCaP) and the transgenic rats developing adenocarcinoma of the prostate (TRAP) model. Treatment of LNCaP prostate cancer cells with 500 microg/mL BBI resulted in inhibition of viability measured on WST-1 assays, with induction of connexin 43 (Cx43) and cleaved caspase-3 protein expression. Feeding of 3% roughly prepared BBI (BBIC) to TRAP from the age 3 weeks to 13 weeks resulted in significant reduction of the relative epithelial areas within the acinus and multiplicity of the adenocarcinomas in the lateral prostate lobes. Cx43- and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP-biotin end labeling of fragmented DNA (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic cancer cells were more frequently observed in the lateral prostates treated with BBIC than in the controls. These in vivo and in vitro results suggest that BBI possesses chemopreventive activity associated with induction of Cx43 expression and apoptosis.

  19. Tracking Origins of Prostate Cancer: An Innovative in Vivo Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    could express specifically in prostate under PB- Cre4 control, and could label normal, hyperplasic, neoplastic and malignant carcinoma cells . More...propose to develop an innovative and hitherto not attempted in vivo prostate cancer model that will delineate the exact cell of origin through...different stages of prostate cancer development and progression. We propose to study possible cell (s) of origin for prostate cancer by combinatorial

  20. Role of Human Polyomavirus Bkv in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    been surgically removed due to prostate cancer diagnosis . A normal prostate is defined as prostate that has been removed either during autopsy or by...immunosuppressed transplant patients, in whom it is associated with haemorrhagic cystitis and polyomavirus nephropathy (5, 35, 58, 70). BKV transforms rodent cells...cystoprostatectomy specimens from bladder cancer patients with the diagnosis of muscle invasive high grade urothelial carcinoma, with no prostate cancer histology

  1. In vivo dosimetry for IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Vial, Philip

    2011-05-05

    In vivo dosimetry has a well established role in the quality assurance of 2D radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy. The role of in vivo dosimetry for IMRT is not as well established. IMRT introduces a range of technical issues that complicate in vivo dosimetry. The first decade or so of IMRT implementation has largely relied upon pre-treatment phantom based dose verification. During that time, several new devices and techniques for in vivo dosimetry have emerged with the promise of providing the ultimate form of IMRT dose verification. Solid state dosimeters continue to dominate the field of in vivo dosimetry in the IMRT era. In this report we review the literature on in vivo dosimetry for IMRT, with an emphasis on clinical evidence for different detector types. We describe the pros and cons of different detectors and techniques in the IMRT setting and the roles that they are likely to play in the future.

  2. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 and Hydroxychloroquine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, Melanoma, Prostate or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-06

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  3. Dosimetry for Radiopharmaceutical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Hobbs, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) involves the use of radionuclides that are either conjugated to tumor-targeting agents (eg, nanoscale constructs, antibodies, peptides, and small molecules) or concentrated in tissue through natural physiological mechanisms that occur predominantly in neoplastic or otherwise targeted cells (eg, Graves disease). The ability to collect pharmacokinetic data by imaging and use this to perform dosimetry calculations for treatment planning distinguishes RPT from other systemic treatment modalities. Treatment planning has not been widely adopted, in part, because early attempts to relate dosimetry to outcome were not successful. This was partially because a dosimetry methodology appropriate to risk evaluation rather than efficacy and toxicity was being applied to RPT. The weakest links in both diagnostic and therapeutic dosimetry are the accuracy of the input and the reliability of the radiobiological models used to convert dosimetric data to the relevant biologic end points. Dosimetry for RPT places a greater demand on both of these weak links. To date, most dosimetric studies have been retrospective, with a focus on tumor dose-response correlations rather than prospective treatment planning. In this regard, transarterial radioembolization also known as intra-arterial radiation therapy, which uses radiolabeled (90Y) microspheres of glass or resin to treat lesions in the liver holds much promise for more widespread dosimetric treatment planning. The recent interest in RPT with alpha-particle emitters has highlighted the need to adopt a dosimetry methodology that specifically accounts for the unique aspects of alpha particles. The short range of alpha-particle emitters means that in cases in which the distribution of activity is localized to specific functional components or cell types of an organ, the absorbed dose will be equally localized and dosimetric calculations on the scale of organs or even voxels (~5 mm) are no longer sufficient

  4. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Retrospective Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Romanyukha, Alex; Trompier, Francois

    2011-05-05

    Necessity for, principles of, and general concepts of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) retrospective dosimetry are presented. Also presented and given in details are examples of EPR retrospective dosimetry applications in tooth enamel, bone, and fingernails with focus on general approaches for solving technical and methodological problems. Advantages, drawbacks, and possible future developments are discussed and an extensive bibliography on EPR retrospective dosimetry is provided.

  5. Malakoplakia associated with prostatic adenocarcinoma: Report of 4 cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Medlicott, Shaun; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Jimenez, Rafael E; Trpkov, Kiril

    2016-06-01

    Malakoplakia is an inflammatory process that has been rarely reported in the prostate. Malakoplakia in association with prostatic carcinoma is exceedingly rare with only 4 previously reported cases. We describe the clinical features and the associated pathology in 4 patients who demonstrated malakoplakia of the prostate in association with prostatic adenocarcinoma. Prostatic malakoplakia presenting in association with prostatic adenocarcinoma was identified in 4 patients through a search from the records of 3 institutional databases with large in-house and consult uropathology practices. In 2 of the patients the diagnostic needle biopsy contained only prostatic carcinoma; malakoplakia in association with prostatic carcinoma was documented on prostatectomy, performed 15 and 8weeks after the biopsy, respectively. Both patients experienced urinary infections during the interval between the biopsy and the prostatectomy. The third and fourth patient had a long-standing history of "prostatitis", and acute urinary tract infection with urinary retention, respectively. The needle biopsy in both patients showed concomitant malakoplakia and prostatic carcinoma. One of them also had malakoplakia on the initial biopsy containing only atypical glands and on the subsequent one demonstrating carcinoma. One patient was treated conservatively and one with prostatectomy. Although coexistent prostatic carcinoma and malakoplakia are exceedingly rare, malakoplakia can likely occur as an exceptionally rare complication of a prostate needle biopsy, particularly in individuals with long-term or acute urinary tract infections at the time of the biopsy.

  6. Stratified epithelium in prostatic adenocarcinoma: a mimic of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Omar; Humphrey, Peter A

    2006-07-01

    Typically glands of prostatic adenocarcinoma have a single cell lining, although stratification can be seen in invasive carcinomas with a cribriform architecture, including ductal carcinoma. The presence and diagnostic significance of stratified cells within non-cribriform carcinomatous prostatic glands has not been well addressed. The histomorphological features and immunohistochemical profile of cases of non-cribriform prostatic adenocarcinoma with stratified malignant glandular epithelium were analyzed. These cases were identified from needle biopsy cases from the consultation files of one of the authors and from a review of 150 consecutive in-house needle biopsy cases of prostatic adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry was performed utilizing antibodies reactive against high molecular weight cytokeratin (34betaE12), p63 and alpha-methylacyl-coenzyme-A racemase (AMACR). A total of 8 cases were identified, including 2 from the 150 consecutive in-house cases (1.3%). In 4 cases, the focus with glands having stratified epithelium was the sole carcinomatous component in the biopsy, while such a component represented 5-30% of the invasive carcinoma seen elsewhere in the remaining cases. The main attribute in all these foci was the presence of glandular profiles lined by several layers of epithelial cells with cytological and architectural features resembling flat or tufted high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, but lacking basal cells as confirmed by negative 34betaE12 and/or p63 immunostains in all cases. The AMACR staining profile of the stratified foci was variable, with 4 foci showing positivity, and 3 foci being negative, including two cases that displayed AMACR positivity in adjacent non-stratified prostatic adenocarcinoma. Prostatic adenocarcinoma with stratified malignant glandular epithelium can be identified in prostate needle biopsy samples harboring non-cribriform prostatic adenocarcinoma and resembles glands with high-grade prostatic

  7. Hanford External Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, J.J.

    1990-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford External Dosimetry Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include administrating the Hanford personnel dosimeter processing program and ensuring that the related dosimeter data accurately reflect occupational dose received by Hanford personnel or visitors. Specific chapters of this report deal with the following subjects: personnel dosimetry organizations at Hanford and the associated DOE and contractor exposure guidelines; types, characteristics, and procurement of personnel dosimeters used at Hanford; personnel dosimeter identification, acceptance testing, accountability, and exchange; dosimeter processing and data recording practices; standard sources, calibration factors, and calibration processes (including algorithms) used for calibrating Hanford personnel dosimeters; system operating parameters required for assurance of dosimeter processing quality control; special dose evaluation methods applied for individuals under abnormal circumstances (i.e., lost results, etc.); and methods for evaluating personnel doses from nuclear accidents. 1 ref., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro, C.R.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR.

  9. Permanent Breast Seed Implant Dosimetry Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brian M.; Ravi, Ananth; Sankreacha, Raxa; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A permanent breast seed implant is a novel method of accelerated partial breast irradiation for women with early-stage breast cancer. This article presents pre- and post-implant dosimetric data, relates these data to clinical outcomes, and makes recommendations for those interested in starting a program. Methods and Materials: A total of 95 consecutive patients were accrued into one of three clinical trials after breast-conserving surgery: a Phase I/II trial (67 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); a Phase II registry trial (25 patients with infiltrating ductal carcinoma); or a multi-center Phase II trial for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (3 patients). Contouring of the planning target volume (PTV) was done on a Pinnacle workstation and dosimetry calculations, including dose-volume histograms, were done using a Variseed planning computer. Results: The mean pre-implant PTV coverage for the V{sub 90}, V{sub 100}, V{sub 150}, and V{sub 200} were as follows: 98.8% {+-} 1.2% (range, 94.5-100%); 97.3% {+-} 2.1% (range, 90.3-99.9%), 68.8% {+-} 14.3% (range, 32.7-91.5%); and 27.8% {+-} 8.6% (range, 15.1-62.3%). The effect of seed motion was characterized by post-implant dosimetry performed immediately after the implantation (same day) and at 2 months after the implantation. The mean V{sub 100} changed from 85.6% to 88.4% (p = 0.004) and the mean V{sub 200} changed from 36.2% to 48.3% (p < 0.001). Skin toxicity was associated with maximum skin dose (p = 0.014). Conclusions: Preplanning dosimetry should aim for a V{sub 90} of approximately 100%, a V{sub 100} between 95% and 100%, and a V{sub 200} between 20% and 30%, as these numbers are associated with no local recurrences to date and good patient tolerance. In general, the target volume coverage improved over the duration of the seed therapy. The maximum skin dose, defined as the average dose over the hottest 1 Multiplication-Sign 1-cm{sup 2} surface area, should be limited to 90% of the

  10. Metastasis of Prostate Adenocarcinoma to the Testis

    PubMed Central

    Campara, Zoran; Simic, Dejan; Aleksic, Predrag; Spasic, Aleksandar; Milicevic, Snjezana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prostate carcinoma is the most frequently diagnosed carcinoma in the male population. The most typical places of the metastases are pelvic lymphatic glands, bones and lungs, and very rarely it metastasizes into a testis. The prognostic importance of testicular metastasis of prostate cancer is not yet well-known, due to a very few published cases. According to the known facts, it is certain that a metastasis of the prostate carcinoma into a testis is a sign of an advanced disease. Case report: This work presents a 48-year-old patient, to whom an adenocarcinoma of the prostate has been proven by the pathohistological finding of transrectal biopsy, performed due to the elevated level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Nine years after the initial diagnosis, due to a gradual rise of PSA and tumorous enlargement of the left testis, left inguinal orchectomy and right orchectomy were performed. Metastatic dissemination of prostate adenocarcinoma into a testis was determined by a pathohistological analysis of the left testis. Conclusion: The metastasis of the prostate carcinoma into a testis, as a rare localization of the metastatic dissemination, after additionally performed orchectomy along with further oncological therapy, can provide a continuation of a good life quality as well as a control of the disease in a longer time period. PMID:27703299

  11. Comparison of permanent 125I seeds implants with two different techniques in 500 cases of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ricós, Jose Vicente; Tortajada, Maria Isabel; Santos, Miguel Angel; Casanova, Juan; Clemente, Jose; Samper, Josefa; Santamaría, Paula; Arribas, Leoncio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To perform a comparative study of 500 consecutive 125I seeds implants for intracapsular prostate carcinoma with two techniques differing in terms of both strand implantation and planning. Material and methods From 2002 to 2007 we performed 250 implants with fixed stranded seeds (RapidStrand™) and a preplanning system and from 2007 to 2010, 250 with real-time and ProLink™ system. Mean age was 68 and 66, respectively, median PSA (prostate-specific antigen) 7.3 and 7.2, stage T1-T2a in 98% and 94%, and Gleason ≤ 6 in 96% and 86%. Low risk cases were 81% and 71%. The prescribed dose was 145 Gy to the prostate volume, or 108 Gy plus EBRT 46 Gy in some intermediate risk cases. Hormonal treatment was given to 42% and 28%. Results Median follow-up was 48 and 47 months, respectively, 14 patients in the first group and 7 patients in the second developed biochemical failure (BF). Actuarial biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) at 5 years increased from 90.2% to 97.2% (low risk from 91.3% to 97.2%, intermediate risk from 84.2% to 97.1%). Biochemical failure was independent of hormone treatment. Rectal complications were G1-2 in 1.2% and 5.2%, respectively. A urinary catheter was necessary in 6.9% and 9.6%, and urethral resection in 1.9% and 4.4%. Genitourinary toxicity was G1-2 in 4.6% and 12%, G3-4 in 1.9% and 4.8%. An assessment of mean D90 in a sample of patients showed that the dosimetry in postoperative planning based on CT improved from a mean D90 of 143 Gy to 157 Gy. Conclusions The outcome of patients with low risk prostate carcinoma treated with 125I seed is very good with low complications rate. The real-time approach in our hands achieved a more precise seed implantation, better dosimetry, and a statistically non-significant better biochemical control. We have made this our standard technique. PMID:26622228

  12. Clinical radionuclide therapy dosimetry: the quest for the “Holy Gray”

    PubMed Central

    Bodei, L.; Giammarile, F.; Linden, O.; Luster, M.; Oyen, W. J. G.; Tennvall, J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Radionuclide therapy has distinct similarities to, but also profound differences from external radiotherapy. Review This review discusses techniques and results of previously developed dosimetry methods in thyroid carcinoma, neuro-endocrine tumours, solid tumours and lymphoma. In each case, emphasis is placed on the level of evidence and practical applicability. Although dosimetry has been of enormous value in the preclinical phase of radiopharmaceutical development, its clinical use to optimise administered activity on an individual patient basis has been less evident. In phase I and II trials, dosimetry may be considered an inherent part of therapy to establish the maximum tolerated dose and dose–response relationship. To prove that dosimetry-based radionuclide therapy is of additional benefit over fixed dosing or dosing per kilogram body weight, prospective randomised phase III trials with appropriate end points have to be undertaken. Data in the literature which underscore the potential of dosimetry to avoid under- and overdosing and to standardise radionuclide therapy methods internationally are very scarce. Developments In each section, particular developments and insights into these therapies are related to opportunities for dosimetry. The recent developments in PET and PET/CT imaging, including micro-devices for animal research, and molecular medicine provide major challenges for innovative therapy and dosimetry techniques. Furthermore, the increasing scientific interest in the radiobiological features specific to radionuclide therapy will advance our ability to administer this treatment modality optimally. PMID:17268773

  13. Prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  14. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer What Is Prostate Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  15. Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus establishes an efficient spreading infection and exhibits enhanced transcriptional activity in prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jason J; Goff, Stephen P

    2010-03-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a novel human gammaretrovirus discovered in association with human prostate tumors. XMRV was first identified in prostate stromal cells surrounding the tumors of patients carrying a mutation in the HPC1 gene locus. To determine the tropism of XMRV in cell culture, we tested the ability of XMRV to spread and replicate in various prostate and nonprostate cell lines. We found that although the expression of XMRV viral proteins and the spread of infectious virus were minimal in a variety of cell lines, XMRV displayed robust expression and infection in LNCaP prostate tumor cells. The transcriptional activity of the XMRV long terminal repeat (LTR) was found to be higher than the Moloney murine leukemia virus LTRs in both LNCaP and WPMY-1 (simian virus 40-transformed prostate stromal cells). The U3 promoter of XMRV and a glucocorticoid response element (GRE) within the U3 were required for the transcriptional activity in LNCaP cells. Coexpression of the androgen receptor and stimulation with dihydrotestosterone stimulated XMRV-LTR-dependent transcription in 293T cells, and the GRE was required for this activity. These data suggest that XMRV may replicate more efficiently in LNCaP cells in part due to the transcriptional environment in LNCaP cells.

  16. A comparative study on the risk of second primary cancers in out-of-field organs associated with radiotherapy of localized prostate carcinoma using Monte Carlo-based accelerator and patient models

    PubMed Central

    Bednarz, Bryan; Athar, Basit; Xu, X. George

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A physician’s decision regarding an ideal treatment approach (i.e., radiation, surgery, and∕or hormonal) for prostate carcinoma is traditionally based on a variety of metrics. One of these metrics is the risk of radiation-induced second primary cancer following radiation treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the significance of second cancer risks in out-of-field organs from 3D-CRT and IMRT treatments of prostate carcinoma compared to baseline cancer risks in these organs. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were performed using a detailed medical linear accelerator model and an anatomically realistic adult male whole-body phantom. A four-field box treatment, a four-field box treatment plus a six-field boost, and a seven-field IMRT treatment were simulated. Using BEIR VII risk models, the age-dependent lifetime attributable risks to various organs outside the primary beam with a known predilection for cancer were calculated using organ-averaged equivalent doses. Results: The four-field box treatment had the lowest treatment-related second primary cancer risks to organs outside the primary beam ranging from 7.3×10−9 to 2.54×10−5%∕MU depending on the patients age at exposure and second primary cancer site. The risks to organs outside the primary beam from the four-field box and six-field boost and the seven-field IMRT were nearly equivalent. The risks from the four-field box and six-field boost ranged from 1.39×10−8 to 1.80×10−5%∕MU, and from the seven-field IMRT ranged from 1.60×10−9 to 1.35×10−5%∕MU. The second cancer risks in all organs considered from each plan were below the baseline risks. Conclusions: The treatment-related second cancer risks in organs outside the primary beam due to 3D-CRT and IMRT is small. New risk assessment techniques need to be investigated to address the concern of radiation-induced second cancers from prostate treatments, particularly focusing on risks to organs inside the primary beam

  17. Photostimulable Storage Phosphor Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frye, Douglas Mahaffey Danks

    The feasibility of employing alkaline earth sulfide based photostimulable storage phosphors for relative dosimetry in radiation oncology has been investigated. The dosimetric characteristics, radiologic characteristics, and spacial sensitivity of calcium sulfide and strontium sulfide based phosphors were determined. Dosimetric characteristics were explored by cavity theory calculation, Monte Carlo simulation, and physical measurement. Dosimetric characteristics obtained with cavity theory and Monte Carlo simulations agree well. The dose perturbation of the phosphor base materials were comparable to those produced by clinical dosimeter materials over the energy region employed in radiation oncology. Dose perturbation in regions downstream of the phosphor were measured with a variety of clinical dosimeters and compared with simulation results. The results of the measurements and simulations agreed within the uncertainty levels of the simulations and the measurements. Radiological characteristics of sensitivity, fading, dose response, dose rate response, and energy dependence of response were studied with an experimental phosphor output reader. Relative sensitivity was found to be dependent upon the mass thickness of phosphor layer. Fading was quantified for the calcium sulfide phosphor, with a half time of 2300 minutes. The strontium sulfide sample exhibited some fading, however, the regression lines yielded low correlation coefficients. A linear dose response over the range of doses employed in radiation oncology was obtained for both phosphors. No significant dose rate dependence of response was measured for the phosphors. The phosphor's energy dependence of response paralleled the dose perturbation relative to water predicted by cavity theory and simulations. Spatial sensitivity was demonstrated with an experimental phosphor scanner. The phosphors exhibited spatial sensitivity, however, infrared scattering/piping in the transparent substrate appeared to cause

  18. Uranium Dispersion & Dosimetry Model.

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL,; MOMENI, H.

    2002-03-22

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) program provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility such as a uranium mine or mill. Only transport through the air is considered. Exposure results from inhalation, external irradiation from airborne and ground-deposited activity, and ingestion of foodstuffs. Individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. The program was developed for application to uranium mining and milling; however, it may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant.

  19. Fast neutron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report concentrates on two major areas of dosimetry research: measurement of fast neutron kerma factors for several elements for monochromatic and white spectrum neutron fields and determination of the response of thermoluminescent phosphors to various ultra-soft X-ray energies and beta-rays. Dr. Zhixin Zhou from the Shanghai Institute of Radiation Medicine, People's Republic of China brought with him special expertise in the fabrication and use of ultra-thin TLD materials. Such materials are not available in the USA. The rather unique properties of these materials were investigated during this grant period.

  20. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained.

  1. Instrumental carbon monoxide dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Stetter, J R; Rutt, D R

    1980-10-01

    Modern technology for the ambient monitoring of carbon monoxide has been developed to produce a portable electrochemical instrument capable of the personal exposure to carbon monoxide. The performance characteristics of this device have been studied so that the unambiguous interpretation of field data could be performed. A study of the carbon monoxide exposure in a light manufacturing facility illustrate that effective dosimetry can be performed with expectations of accuracy typically better than +/- 15%, and that voluntary carbon monoxide exposures such as smoking were a significant contribution to the individual's exposure. Significant definition of the carbon monoxide exposure profile can be achieved with an instrument approach to the collection of the dosimetric data.

  2. Topical Review: Polymer gel dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Baldock, C; De Deene, Y; Doran, S; Ibbott, G; Jirasek, A; Lepage, M; McAuley, K B; Oldham, M; Schreiner, L J

    2010-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high-linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry is reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry are also presented. PMID:20150687

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW: Polymer gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldock, C.; De Deene, Y.; Doran, S.; Ibbott, G.; Jirasek, A.; Lepage, M.; McAuley, K. B.; Oldham, M.; Schreiner, L. J.

    2010-03-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters are fabricated from radiation sensitive chemicals which, upon irradiation, polymerize as a function of the absorbed radiation dose. These gel dosimeters, with the capacity to uniquely record the radiation dose distribution in three-dimensions (3D), have specific advantages when compared to one-dimensional dosimeters, such as ion chambers, and two-dimensional dosimeters, such as film. These advantages are particularly significant in dosimetry situations where steep dose gradients exist such as in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery. Polymer gel dosimeters also have specific advantages for brachytherapy dosimetry. Potential dosimetry applications include those for low-energy x-rays, high-linear energy transfer (LET) and proton therapy, radionuclide and boron capture neutron therapy dosimetries. These 3D dosimeters are radiologically soft-tissue equivalent with properties that may be modified depending on the application. The 3D radiation dose distribution in polymer gel dosimeters may be imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical-computerized tomography (optical-CT), x-ray CT or ultrasound. The fundamental science underpinning polymer gel dosimetry is reviewed along with the various evaluation techniques. Clinical dosimetry applications of polymer gel dosimetry are also presented.

  4. Clinical implementation and rapid commissioning of an EPID based in-vivo dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Ian M.; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; van Herk, Marcel

    2014-10-01

    Using an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) to perform in-vivo dosimetry is one of the most effective and efficient methods of verifying the safe delivery of complex radiotherapy treatments. Previous work has detailed the development of an EPID based in-vivo dosimetry system that was subsequently used to replace pre-treatment dose verification of IMRT and VMAT plans. Here we show that this system can be readily implemented on a commercial megavoltage imaging platform without modification to EPID hardware and without impacting standard imaging procedures. The accuracy and practicality of the EPID in-vivo dosimetry system was confirmed through a comparison with traditional TLD in-vivo measurements performed on five prostate patients. The commissioning time required for the EPID in-vivo dosimetry system was initially prohibitive at approximately 10 h per linac. Here we present a method of calculating linac specific EPID dosimetry correction factors that allow a single energy specific commissioning model to be applied to EPID data from multiple linacs. Using this method reduced the required per linac commissioning time to approximately 30 min. The validity of this commissioning method has been tested by analysing in-vivo dosimetry results of 1220 patients acquired on seven linacs over a period of 5 years. The average deviation between EPID based isocentre dose and expected isocentre dose for these patients was (-0.7  ±  3.2)%. EPID based in-vivo dosimetry is now the primary in-vivo dosimetry tool used at our centre and has replaced nearly all pre-treatment dose verification of IMRT treatments.

  5. In Vivo 18-FDG/18-Choline-Mediated Cerenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) Multiplexed Optical Imaging for Human Prostate Carcinoma Detection and Staging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    bearing MDA- PCa-2b human prostate cancer xenografts. We have selected peptides from bacteriophage display libraries that target TF and ErbB2/ErbB3. The...peptides that bind human ErbB-2 selected from a bacteriophage display library. J Protein Chem, 21:287-296, 2002. 11. Appendices. None 13

  6. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  7. Prostatitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... through sexual contact can cause prostatitis. These include chlamydia and gonorrhea . Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are more ... 2012:chap 11. Read More Bladder outlet obstruction Chlamydia Enlarged prostate Epididymitis Urethritis Urinary tract infection - adults ...

  8. Prostate brachytherapy

    MedlinePlus

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate; High dose radiation (HDR) ... minutes or more, depending on the type of therapy you have. Before the procedure, you will be ...

  9. State-of-the-art imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Marko, Jamie; Gould, C Frank; Bonavia, Grant H; Wolfman, Darcy J

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Modern medical imaging is intimately involved in the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. Ultrasound is primarily used to guide prostate biopsy to establish the diagnosis of prostate carcinoma. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging uses a multiparametric approach, including anatomic and functional imaging sequences. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging can be used for detection and localization of prostate cancer and to evaluate for disease recurrence. Computed tomography and scintigraphic imaging are primarily used to detect regional lymph node spread and distant metastases. Recent advancements in ultrasound, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphic imaging have the potential to change the way prostate cancer is diagnosed and managed. This article addresses the major imaging modalities involved in the evaluation of prostate cancer and updates the reader on the state of the art for each modality.

  10. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine away from ... and out of the body. A young man's prostate is about the size of a walnut. It ...

  11. Internal dosimetry technical basis manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-20

    The internal dosimetry program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) consists of radiation protection programs and activities used to detect and evaluate intakes of radioactive material by radiation workers. Examples of such programs are: air monitoring; surface contamination monitoring; personal contamination surveys; radiobioassay; and dose assessment. The objectives of the internal dosimetry program are to demonstrate that the workplace is under control and that workers are not being exposed to radioactive material, and to detect and assess inadvertent intakes in the workplace. The Savannah River Site Internal Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual (TBM) is intended to provide a technical and philosophical discussion of the radiobioassay and dose assessment aspects of the internal dosimetry program. Detailed information on air, surface, and personal contamination surveillance programs is not given in this manual except for how these programs interface with routine and special bioassay programs.

  12. Radioembolization Dosimetry: The Road Ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Smits, Maarten L. J. Elschot, Mattijs; Sze, Daniel Y.; Kao, Yung H.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Iagaru, Andre H.; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.

    2015-04-15

    Methods for calculating the activity to be administered during yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE) are largely based on empirical toxicity and efficacy analyses, rather than dosimetry. At the same time, it is recognized that treatment planning based on proper dosimetry is of vital importance for the optimization of the results of RE. The heterogeneous and often clustered intrahepatic biodistribution of millions of point-source radioactive particles poses a challenge for dosimetry. Several studies found a relationship between absorbed doses and treatment outcome, with regard to both toxicity and efficacy. This should ultimately lead to improved patient selection and individualized treatment planning. New calculation methods and imaging techniques and a new generation of microspheres for image-guided RE will all contribute to these improvements. The aim of this review is to give insight into the latest and most important developments in RE dosimetry and to suggest future directions on patient selection, individualized treatment planning, and study designs.

  13. Radioembolization dosimetry: the road ahead.

    PubMed

    Smits, Maarten L J; Elschot, Mattijs; Sze, Daniel Y; Kao, Yung H; Nijsen, Johannes F W; Iagaru, Andre H; de Jong, Hugo W A M; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Lam, Marnix G E H

    2015-04-01

    Methods for calculating the activity to be administered during yttrium-90 radioembolization (RE) are largely based on empirical toxicity and efficacy analyses, rather than dosimetry. At the same time, it is recognized that treatment planning based on proper dosimetry is of vital importance for the optimization of the results of RE. The heterogeneous and often clustered intrahepatic biodistribution of millions of point-source radioactive particles poses a challenge for dosimetry. Several studies found a relationship between absorbed doses and treatment outcome, with regard to both toxicity and efficacy. This should ultimately lead to improved patient selection and individualized treatment planning. New calculation methods and imaging techniques and a new generation of microspheres for image-guided RE will all contribute to these improvements. The aim of this review is to give insight into the latest and most important developments in RE dosimetry and to suggest future directions on patient selection, individualized treatment planning, and study designs.

  14. Fifth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, E.E.; Schlafke-Stelson, A.T.

    1992-05-01

    This meeting was held to exchange information on how to get better estimates of the radiation absorbed dose. There seems to be a high interest of late in patient dosimetry; discussions were held in the light of revised risk estimates for radiation. Topics included: Strategies of Dose Assessment; Dose Estimation for Radioimmunotherapy; Dose Calculation Techniques and Models; Dose Estimation for Positron Emission Tomography (PET); Kinetics for Dose Estimation; and Small Scale Dosimetry and Microdosimetry. (VC)

  15. The International Reactor Dosimetry File.

    SciTech Connect

    DUNFORD, CHARLIE

    2008-08-07

    Version 01 The International Reactor Dosimetry File (IRDF-2002) contains recommended neutron cross-section data to be used for reactor neutron dosimetry by foil activation and subsequent neutron spectrum unfolding. It also contains selected recom�mended values for radiation damage cross-sections and benchmark neutron spectra. Two related programs available from NEADB and RSICC are: SPECTER-ANL (PSR-263) & STAY’SL (PSR-113).

  16. Hanford internal dosimetry program manual

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

    1989-10-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs.

  17. Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine.

    PubMed

    Chu, R Y; Ekeh, S; Basmadjian, G

    1989-01-01

    Dosimetry of iodoantipyrine labeled with radioactive iodine was determined by measuring the biodistribution of 131I-iodoantipyrine in 41 female rabbits. Following administration of the radiopharmaceutical, subjects were killed at 0.5, 6, 12, 17, 24, 36, and 48 h. Organs and samples of tissues and body fluids were assayed. Results were corrected for physical decay. Exponential functions were employed to describe the time-concentration curves; representative value would be the biological half life of 9.96 +/- 0.55 h for blood. Cumulated activity estimates for 123I, 125I and 131I were then computed. Extrapolation to absorbed dose in humans followed the formulation of the Medical International Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. The whole body absorbed doses are 7 mu Gray, 5 mu Gray and 29 mu Gray per MBq of 123I, 125I, and 131I administered respectively.

  18. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-05

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  19. Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Adrie J. J.

    2011-05-01

    The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

  20. Dosimetry considerations in phototherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Profio, A.E.; Doiron, D.R.

    1981-03-01

    Dosimetry in phototherapy involves a determination of the energy absorbed per unit mass of tissue, corrected for the quantum yield in a photochemical reaction. The dose rate in photochemotherapy of cancer with hematoporphyrin derivative and visible light is related to the extinction coefficient, quantum yield for singlet oxygen production, concentration of sensitizer and energy flux density at depth. Data or methods of determining these quantities are presented. Calculations have been performed for the energy flux density at depth, as a function of the total attenuation coefficient and ratio of scattering coefficient to total attenuation coefficient, for isotropic scattering in slab geometry. For small absorption, these depth dose curves exhibit a maximum within the tissue followed by an exponential decrease.

  1. Remote optical fiber dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, A. L.; Justus, B. L.; Falkenstein, P. L.; Miller, R. W.; Ning, H.; Altemus, R.

    2001-09-01

    Optical fibers offer a unique capability for remote monitoring of radiation in difficult-to-access and/or hazardous locations. Optical fiber sensors can be located in radiation hazardous areas and optically interrogated from a safe distance. A variety of remote optical fiber radiation dosimetry methods have been developed. All of the methods take advantage of some form of radiation-induced change in the optical properties of materials such as: radiation-induced darkening due to defect formation in glasses, luminescence from native defects or radiation-induced defects, or population of metastable charge trapping centers. Optical attenuation techniques are used to measure radiation-induced darkening in fibers. Luminescence techniques include the direct measurement of scintillation or optical excitation of radiation-induced luminescent defects. Optical fiber radiation dosimeters have also been constructed using charge trapping materials that exhibit thermoluminescence or optically stimulated luminescence (OSL).

  2. Apigenin inhibits TGF-β-induced VEGF expression in human prostate carcinoma cells via a Smad2/3- and Src-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mirzoeva, Salida; Franzen, Carrie A; Pelling, Jill C

    2014-08-01

    Cancer progression relies on establishment of the blood supply necessary for tumor growth and ultimately metastasis. Prostate cancer mortality is primarily attributed to development of metastases rather than primary, organ-confined disease. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key regulator of angiogenesis in prostate tissue. Our previous studies have demonstrated that the chemopreventive bioflavonoid apigenin inhibited hypoxia-induced elevation of VEGF production at low oxygen conditions characteristic for solid tumors. Low oxygen (hypoxia) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) are two major factors responsible for increased VEGF secretion. In the present study, experiments were performed to investigate the inhibitory effect of apigenin on TGF-β-induced VEGF production and the mechanisms underlying this action. Our results demonstrate that VEGF expression is induced by TGF-β1 in human prostate cancer PC3-M and LNCaP C4-2B cells, and treatment with apigenin markedly decreased VEGF production. Additionally, apigenin inhibited TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad2 and Smad3. Further experiments demonstrated that specific transient knockdown of Smad2 or Smad3 blunted apigenin's effect on VEGF expression. We also found that apigenin inhibited Src, FAK, and Akt phosphorylation in PC3-M and LNCaP C4-2B cells. Furthermore, constitutively active Src reversed the inhibitory effect of apigenin on VEGF expression and Smad2/3 phosphorylation. Taken together, our results suggest that apigenin inhibits prostate carcinogenesis by modulating TGF-β-activated pathways linked to cancer progression and metastases, in particular the Smad2/3 and Src/FAK/Akt pathways. These findings provide new insights into molecular pathways targeted by apigenin, and reveal a novel molecular mechanism underlying the antiangiogenic potential of apigenin.

  3. Constitutive Activation of NF-Kb in Prostate Carcinoma Cells through a Positive Feedback Loop: Implication of Inducible IKK-Related Kinase (Ikki)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    receptor; NFjB; angio- genesis; apoptosis Androgen withdrawal, common treatment for prostate cancer ( PrCa ), frequently leads to androgen independence...oligonucleo- tides, ribozymes, or Hsp90 hampers PrCa expansion.11 At the same time, androgen may halt cell cycle via p27,18 and facilitates differentiation,22...density (MVD) in PrCa marks poor progno- ses and metastases.33 Testosterone stimulates endothelial prolifer- ation and vascular regrowth (angiogenesis

  4. Salvage brachytherapy in combination with interstitial hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate carcinoma following external beam radiation therapy: a prospective phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Strnad, Vratislav; Stauffer, Paul; Dąbrowski, Tomasz; Hetnał, Marcin; Nahajowski, Damian; Walasek, Tomasz; Brandys, Piotr; Matys, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Optimal treatment for patients with only local prostate cancer recurrence after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) failure remains unclear. Possible curative treatments are radical prostatectomy, cryosurgery, and brachytherapy. Several single institution series proved that high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) and pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDRBT) are reasonable options for this group of patients with acceptable levels of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. A standard dose prescription and scheme have not been established yet, and the literature presents a wide range of fractionation protocols. Furthermore, hyperthermia has shown the potential to enhance the efficacy of re-irradiation. Consequently, a prospective trial is urgently needed to attain clear structured prospective data regarding the efficacy of salvage brachytherapy with adjuvant hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this report is to introduce a new prospective phase II trial that would meet this need. The primary aim of this prospective phase II study combining Iridium-192 brachytherapy with interstitial hyperthermia (IHT) is to analyze toxicity of the combined treatment; a secondary aim is to define the efficacy (bNED, DFS, OS) of salvage brachytherapy. The dose prescribed to PTV will be 30 Gy in 3 fractions for HDRBT, and 60 Gy in 2 fractions for PDRBT. During IHT, the prostate will be heated to the range of 40–47°C for 60 minutes prior to brachytherapy dose delivery. The protocol plans for treatment of 77 patients. PMID:26207116

  5. Salvage brachytherapy in combination with interstitial hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate carcinoma following external beam radiation therapy: a prospective phase II study.

    PubMed

    Kukiełka, Andrzej M; Strnad, Vratislav; Stauffer, Paul; Dąbrowski, Tomasz; Hetnał, Marcin; Nahajowski, Damian; Walasek, Tomasz; Brandys, Piotr; Matys, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Optimal treatment for patients with only local prostate cancer recurrence after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) failure remains unclear. Possible curative treatments are radical prostatectomy, cryosurgery, and brachytherapy. Several single institution series proved that high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) and pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDRBT) are reasonable options for this group of patients with acceptable levels of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. A standard dose prescription and scheme have not been established yet, and the literature presents a wide range of fractionation protocols. Furthermore, hyperthermia has shown the potential to enhance the efficacy of re-irradiation. Consequently, a prospective trial is urgently needed to attain clear structured prospective data regarding the efficacy of salvage brachytherapy with adjuvant hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this report is to introduce a new prospective phase II trial that would meet this need. The primary aim of this prospective phase II study combining Iridium-192 brachytherapy with interstitial hyperthermia (IHT) is to analyze toxicity of the combined treatment; a secondary aim is to define the efficacy (bNED, DFS, OS) of salvage brachytherapy. The dose prescribed to PTV will be 30 Gy in 3 fractions for HDRBT, and 60 Gy in 2 fractions for PDRBT. During IHT, the prostate will be heated to the range of 40-47°C for 60 minutes prior to brachytherapy dose delivery. The protocol plans for treatment of 77 patients.

  6. Hyaluronan Tumor Cell Interactions in Prostate Cancer Growth and Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Score (Figure 2B). Elevated levels of both HA (Figure 3A) and Hyal- 1(Figure 3B) were also observed in both BPH and prostate cancer, with a...elevated in BPH , and most strongly elevated in prostate carcinomas (Figure 2B). The intensity of RHAMM staining increased as a function of Gleason...by co-precipitation. Studies are currently underway to test this model in the prostate cancer model. 2. RHAMM expression should enhance the level of

  7. Inhibition Of Prostate Cancer Skeletal Metastases By Targeting Cathepsin K

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Xie W , Fan J, Dai J, Mizokami A, and Zhang J*. Activation of MCP-1/CCR2 axis promotes prostate cancer growth in bone. Clin Exp Metastasis, 26(2):161...CS, Vesselle H, Ellis W , Lange P, and Vessella RL (2003). Phenotypic heterogeneity of end-stage prostate carcinoma metastatic to bone. Hum Pathol. 34...Yao Z, Lu Y, Dougall W , and Keller ET (2003). Soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB Fc diminishes prostate cancer progression in bone

  8. SMAD-Mediated Signaling During Prostate Growth and Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    prostatic hyperplasia and in prostatic carcinoma. This transgenic mouse model is a unique approach to examine gain-of-function outcomes on the developing...cell proliferation then increased levels of Smad 2 should be linked to enlargement of the organ and replicate events that are observed in benign

  9. Optical dosimetry for interstitial photodynamic therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Arnfield, M.R.; Tulip, J.; Chetner, M.; McPhee, M.S. )

    1989-07-01

    An approach to photodynamic treatment of tumors is the interstitial implantation of fiber optic light sources. Dosimetry is critical in identifying regions of low light intensity in the tumor which may prevent tumor cure. We describe a numerical technique for calculating light distributions within tumors, from multiple fiber optic sources. The method was tested using four translucent plastic needles, which were placed in a 0.94 X 0.94 cm grid pattern within excised Dunning R3327-AT rat prostate tumors. A cylindrical diffusing fiber tip, illuminated by 630 nm dye laser light was placed within one needle and a miniature light detector was placed within another. The average penetration depth in the tumor region between the two needles was calculated from the optical power measured by the detector, using a modified diffusion theory. Repeating the procedure for each pair of needles revealed significant variations in penetration depth within individual tumors. Average values of penetration depth, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and mean scattering cosine were 0.282 cm, 0.469 cm-1, 250 cm-1 and 0.964, respectively. Calculated light distributions from four cylindrical sources in tumors gave reasonable agreement with direct light measurements using fiber optic probes.

  10. SU-E-T-397: Include Organ Deformation Into Dose Calculation of Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Y; Shen, D; Chen, R; Wang, A; Lian, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Prostate brachytherapy is an important curative treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer. In brachytherapy, rectal balloon is generally needed to adjust for unfavorable prostate position for seed placement. However, rectal balloon causes prostate deformation, which is not accounted for in dosimetric planning. Therefore, it is possible that brachytherapy dosimetry deviates significantly from initial plan when prostate returns to its non-deformed state (after procedure). The goal of this study is to develop a method to include prostate deformation into the treatment planning of brachytherapy dosimetry. Methods: We prospectively collected ultrasound images of prostate pre- and post- rectal balloon inflation from thirty five consecutive patients undergoing I-125 brachytherapy. Based on the cylinder coordinate systems, we learned the initial coordinate transformation parameters between the manual segmentations of both deformed and non-deformed prostates of each patient in training set. With the nearest-neighbor interpolation, we searched the best transformation between two coordinate systems to maximum the mutual information of deformed and non-deformed images. We then mapped the implanted seeds of five selected patients from the deformed prostate into non-deformed prostate. The seed position is marked on original pre-inflation US image and it is imported into VariSeed software for dose calculation. Results: The accuracy of image registration is 87.5% as quantified by Dice Index. The prostate coverage V100% dropped from 96.5±0.5% of prostate deformed plan to 91.9±2.6% (p<0.05) of non-deformed plan. The rectum V100% decreased from 0.44±0.26 cc to 0.10±0.18 cc (p<0.05). The dosimetry of the urethra showed mild change but not significant: V150% changed from 0.05±0.10 cc to 0.14±0.15 cc (p>0.05) and D1% changed from 212.9±37.3 Gy to 248.4±42.8 Gy (p>0.05). Conclusion: We have developed a deformable image registration method that allows

  11. Initial radiation dosimetry at Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    1983-09-01

    The dosimetry of A-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki is discussed in light of the new dosimetry developed in 1980 by the author. The important changes resulting from the new dosimetry are the ratios of neutron to gamma doses, particularly at Hiroshima. The implications of these changes in terms of epidemiology and radiation protection standards are discussed. (ACR)

  12. 4.2 Methods for Internal Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.2 Methods for Internal Dosimetry' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy' with the contents:

  13. Nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies.

    PubMed

    Sims, C S

    1989-09-01

    Twenty-two nuclear accident dosimetry intercomparison studies utilizing the fast-pulse Health Physics Research Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducted since 1965. These studies have provided a total of 62 different organizations a forum for discussion of criticality accident dosimetry, an opportunity to test their neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry systems under a variety of simulated criticality accident conditions, and the experience of comparing results with reference dose values as well as with the measured results obtained by others making measurements under identical conditions. Sixty-nine nuclear accidents (27 with unmoderated neutron energy spectra and 42 with eight different shielded spectra) have been simulated in the studies. Neutron doses were in the 0.2-8.5 Gy range and gamma doses in the 0.1-2.0 Gy range. A total of 2,289 dose measurements (1,311 neutron, 978 gamma) were made during the intercomparisons. The primary methods of neutron dosimetry were activation foils, thermoluminescent dosimeters, and blood sodium activation. The main methods of gamma dose measurement were thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiophotoluminescent glass, and film. About 68% of the neutron measurements met the accuracy guidelines (+/- 25%) and about 52% of the gamma measurements met the accuracy criterion (+/- 20%) for accident dosimetry.

  14. Molecular Imaging with Quantum Dots Probing EMT and Prostate Cancer Metastasis in Live Animals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    model for prostate cancer . Lab Invest 1998;78(6):i–xv. 9. Greenberg NM. Androgens and growth factors in prostate cancer : A transgenic perspective...16. Zhau HY, Chang SM, Chen BQ, Wang Y, Zhang H, Kao C, Sang QA, Pathak SJ, Chung LW. Androgen -repressed phenotype in human prostate cancer . Proc Natl...CWR22: Androgen -dependent xenograft model derived from a primary human prostatic carcinoma. Cancer Res 1994;54(23): 6049–6052. 18. Corey E, Quinn JE

  15. Quantum-dot-based technology for sensitive and stable detection of prostate stem cell antigen expression in human transitional cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fan; Yu, Weimin; Zhang, Xiaobin; Ruan, Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) as a biological labeling material for medical applications need to be evaluated for the sensitivity and stability of their fluorescence. Comparison of QD-based immunolabeling and commonly used immunohistochemical staining in detecting the expression of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) in bladder tumor tissues revealed that the two methods had similar sensitivity in the differential display of PSCA expression correlated with tumor stage and grade (kappa=0.92, p<0.001). In addition, the intensity of QD fluorescence remained stable for at least 10 days after conjugation to the PSCA protein and nearly 96% of the positive expression in samples lasted for one month.

  16. Studies in Ultrasonic Dosimetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouni, Abderrachid

    The widespread use of ultrasonic devices in both industry and medicine confirms the great importance of ultrasound as a source of nonionizing radiation. The biological effects of this type of radiation are not completely known up to today, and the need for proper dosimetry is evident. Previous work in the field has been limited to the determination of ultrasonic energy deposition by attenuation measurements of traveling sound waves in homogenized specimens. Alternatively, observed effects were correlated to the output of the source. The objective of this work was to correlate the absorption properties of sound absorbing media to their elastic properties and deduce a correlation between the sonic absorption coefficient and the corresponding Young's modulus. Energy deposition measurements were performed in isotropic rubber samples and in anisotropic meat specimens by the use of the thermocouple probe method which measures the absorbed energy directly. Elasticity measurements were performed for the different types of materials used. The Young's modulus for each type was deduced from defletion measurements on rectangular strips when subjected to successive forces of varying magnitude. The final experimental results showed the existence of a linear relationship between the absorption coefficient of a given elastic material and the inverse square root of its Young's modulus.

  17. Reproducibility and Reliability of Anti-3-[18F] FACBC Uptake Measurements in Background Structures and Malignant Lesions on Follow-Up PET-CT in Prostate Carcinoma: an Exploratory Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Odewole, Oluwaseun A.; Oyenuga, Oyeladun A.; Tade, Funmilayo; Savir-Baruch, Bital; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj; Chen, Zhengjia; Wang, Xiaojing; Jani, Ashesh B.; Bellamy, Leah M.; Halkar, Raghuveer K.; Goodman, Mark M.; Schuster, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to examine the reproducibility of anti-1-amino-3-[18F]fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid (anti-3-[18F]FACBC) quantitative measurements in key background structures and untreated malignant lesions. Procedures Retrospective review of 14 patients who underwent follow-up anti-3-[18F]FACBC positron emission tomography-X-ray computed tomography (PET-CT) for prostate carcinoma recurrence. Standard uptake values (SUV) were measured in both original and follow-up scans in key background structures and untreated malignant lesions. Absolute and percent mean difference in SUV between scans and interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were also computed. Results Mean (±SD, range) scan interval was 17.4 months (±7.1, 4–29). %Mean difference in SUVmean was <20 % in background structures with low absolute differences. ICCs were >0.6 except for early-phase blood pool (ICC=0.4). SUVmax in malignant lesions without interim therapy increased or remained stable over time. Conclusions Despite variable time interval between scans, FACBC PET-CT demonstrates acceptable reproducibility in key background structures. Untreated malignant lesions showed stable or increased uptake over time. A formal test-retest study is planned. PMID:25281411

  18. GATA-3 and FOXA1 expression is useful to differentiate breast carcinoma from other carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Davis, Drew G; Siddiqui, Momin T; Oprea-Ilies, Gabriela; Stevens, Keith; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Cohen, Cynthia; Li, Xiaoxian Bill

    2016-01-01

    GATA-3, a member of the GATA family of zinc-finger DNA binding proteins, and FOXA1, a member of the forkhead transcription factor family, are both associated with estrogen receptor expression. Both GATA-3 and FOXA1 are useful markers for breast carcinoma, but their expression in the different breast cancer subtypes and other neoplasms has not been thoroughly evaluated. We examined the expression of GATA-3 and FOXA1 in estrogen receptor-positive, Her2/neu-positive, and triple-negative breast carcinomas as well as in 10 other common carcinomas, including hepatocellular, colonic, pancreatic, gastric, endometrial (endometrioid), lung, prostatic, renal cell, urothelial, and ovarian serous carcinomas. Primary and metastatic melanomas and mesotheliomas were also evaluated. GATA-3 and FOXA1 staining of estrogen receptor-positive breast carcinomas was seen in 96.6% and 96.2%, respectively. In triple-negative breast carcinomas, GATA-3 and FOXA1 staining was seen in 21.6% and 15.9%, respectively. Among the other tumors, GATA-3 staining was only seen in urothelial carcinoma (70.9%) and FOXA1 staining was only seen in prostatic (87.5%), urothelial (5.1%) carcinomas, and mesotheliomas (40.0%). In conclusion, GATA-3 and FOXA1 are excellent breast carcinoma markers; however, their utility is limited in the triple-negative subtype. The utility of FOXA1 in diagnosing prostatic carcinoma and mesothelioma warrants further investigation.

  19. Cryptococcal prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Hinchey, W W; Someren, A

    1981-02-01

    A case of granulomatous prostatitis due to Cryptococcus neoformans is reported. The patient, who had a history of diabetes mellitus and chronic active hepatitis, had symptoms of prostatic hypertrophy. Tissue obtained from surgery showed granulomatous prostatitis, and a cryptococcal organism was identified by special stains. Postoperative cultures grew Cryptococcus neoformans, and the patient was treated successfully with surgery and a short course of amphotericin B. After nine months of follow-up, there is no evidence of systemic infection.

  20. Comparison of dose distribution in IMRT and RapidArc technique in prostate radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Leszczyński, Wojciech; Ślosarek, Krzysztof; Szlag, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim was to provide a dosimetric comparison between IMRT and RapidArc treatment plans with RPI index with simultaneous comparison of the treatment delivery time. Background IMRT and RapidArc provide highly conformal dose distribution with good sparing of normal tissues. However, a complex spatial dosimetry of IMRT and RapidArc plans hampers the evaluation and comparison between plans calculated for the two modalities. RPI was used in this paper for treatment plan comparisons. The duration of the therapeutic session in RapidArc is reported to be shorter in comparison to therapeutic time of the other dynamic techniques. For this reasons, total treatment delivery time in both techniques was compared and discussed. Materials and methods 15 patients with prostate carcinoma were randomly selected for the analysis. Two competitive treatment plans using respectively the IMRT and RapidArc techniques were computed for each patient in Eclipse planning system v. 8.6.15. RPIwin® application was used for RPI calculations for each treatment plan. Additionally, total treatment time was compared between IMRT and RapidArc plans. Total treatment time was a sum of monitor units (MU) for each treated field. Results The mean values of the RPI indices were insignificantly higher for IMRT plans in comparison to rotational therapy. Comparison of the mean numbers of monitor units confirmed that the use of rotational technique instead of conventional static field IMRT can significantly reduce the treatment time. Conclusion Analysis presented in this paper, demonstrated that RapidArc can compete with the IMRT technique in the field of treatment plan dosimetry reducing the time required for dose delivery. PMID:24377036

  1. The stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber electronic portal imaging devices for dosimetry purposes.

    PubMed

    Louwe, R J W; Tielenburg, R; van Ingen, K M; Mijnheer, B J; van Herk, M B

    2004-04-01

    This study was performed to determine the stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber (LiFi-type) electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) for dosimetric purposes. The short- and long-term stability of the response was investigated, as well as the importance of factors influencing the response (e.g., temperature fluctuations, radiation damage, and the performance of the electronic hardware). It was shown that testing the performance of the electronic hardware as well as the short-term stability of the imagers may reveal the cause of a poor long-term stability of the imager response. In addition, the short-term stability was measured to verify the validity of the fitted dose-response curve immediately after beam startup. The long-term stability of these imagers could be considerably improved by correcting for room temperature fluctuations and gradual changes in response due to radiation damage. As a result, the reproducibility was better than 1% (1 SD) over a period of two years. The results of this study were used to formulate recommendations for a quality control program for portal dosimetry. The effect of such a program was assessed by comparing the results of portal dosimetry and in vivo dosimetry using diodes during the treatment of 31 prostate patients. The improvement of the results for portal dosimetry was consistent with the deviations observed with the reproducibility tests in that particular period. After a correction for the variation in response of the imager, the average difference between the measured and prescribed dose during the treatment of prostate patients was -0.7%+/-1.5% (1 SD), and -0.6%+/-1.1% (1 SD) for EPID and diode in vivo dosimetry, respectively. It can be concluded that a high stability of the response can be achieved for this type of EPID by applying a rigorous quality control program.

  2. Laser Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Dosimetric and Thermodynamic Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anvari, Bahman

    1993-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most commonly occurring neoplastic disease in the aging human male. Currently, surgical treatment of BPH is the primary therapeutic method. However, due to surgical complications, less invasive methods of treatment are desirable. In recent years, thermal coagulation of the hyperplastic prostate by a laser has received a considerable amount of attention. Nevertheless, the optimum laser irradiation parameters that lead to a successful and safe treatment of BPH have not been determined. This dissertation studies the physics of laser coagulation of prostate from both basic science and practical perspectives. Optical properties of prostatic tissue are determined over a spectrum of wavelengths. Knowledge of these properties allows for selection of appropriate laser wavelengths and provides a basis for performing dose equivalency studies among various types of lasers. Furthermore, knowledge of optical properties are needed for development of computer simulation models that predict the extent of thermal injury during laser irradiation of prostate. A computer model of transurethral heating of prostate that can be used to guide the clinical studies in determining an optimum dosimetry is then presented. Studies of the effects of non-laser heating devices, optical properties, blood perfusion, surface irrigation, and beam geometry are performed to examine the extent of heat propagation within the prostate. An in vitro model for transurethral laser irradiation of prostate is also presented to examine the effects of an 810 nm diode laser, thermal boundary conditions, and energy deposition rate during Nd:YAG laser irradiation. Results of these studies suggest that in the presence of laminar irrigation, the convective boundary condition is dominated by thermal diffusion as opposed to the bulk motion of the irrigation fluid. Distinct phases of thermal events are also identified during the laser irradiation. The in vivo studies of

  3. Prostatic aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Abbas, F; Kamal, M K; Talati, J

    1995-03-01

    Prostatic aspergillosis is rare with only 3 cases reported previously. We report a case of localized invasive aspergillosis of the prostate in a nonimmunocompromised patient with chronic urinary retention and recurrent urinary tract infections. Transurethral resection followed by open prostatectomy was performed for massive prostatomegaly. No systemic antifungal therapy was required for cure. The literature is reviewed, and diagnostic and management options are discussed.

  4. Prostate cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate cancer screening - PSA; Prostate cancer screening - digital rectal exam; Prostate cancer screening - DRE ... level of PSA could mean you have prostate cancer. But other conditions can also cause a high ...

  5. Prostate Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . The prostate is just below the bladder (the ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  6. Plutonium worker dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Birchall, Alan; Puncher, M; Harrison, J; Riddell, A; Bailey, M R; Khokryakov, V; Romanov, S

    2010-05-01

    Epidemiological studies of the relationship between risk and internal exposure to plutonium are clearly reliant on the dose estimates used. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is currently reviewing the latest scientific information available on biokinetic models and dosimetry, and it is likely that a number of changes to the existing models will be recommended. The effect of certain changes, particularly to the ICRP model of the respiratory tract, has been investigated for inhaled forms of (239)Pu and uncertainties have also been assessed. Notable effects of possible changes to respiratory tract model assumptions are (1) a reduction in the absorbed dose to target cells in the airways, if changes under consideration are made to the slow clearing fraction and (2) a doubling of absorbed dose to the alveolar region for insoluble forms, if evidence of longer retention times is taken into account. An important factor influencing doses for moderately soluble forms of (239)Pu is the extent of binding of dissolved plutonium to lung tissues and assumptions regarding the extent of binding in the airways. Uncertainty analyses have been performed with prior distributions chosen for application in epidemiological studies. The resulting distributions for dose per unit intake were lognormal with geometric standard deviations of 2.3 and 2.6 for nitrates and oxides, respectively. The wide ranges were due largely to consideration of results for a range of experimental data for the solubility of different forms of nitrate and oxides. The medians of these distributions were a factor of three times higher than calculated using current default ICRP parameter values. For nitrates, this was due to the assumption of a bound fraction, and for oxides due mainly to the assumption of slower alveolar clearance. This study highlights areas where more research is needed to reduce biokinetic uncertainties, including more accurate determination of particle transport rates

  7. Changes observed in multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging characteristics correlate with histopathological development of chronic granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin therapy.

    PubMed

    Logan, Jennifer K; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Merino, Maria J; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L; Pinto, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    Administration of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has been shown to cause granulomatous prostatitis, a rare inflammatory process that can be mistaken for prostate cancer. We present a case of a 78-year-old man on active surveillance for prostate cancer with a subsequent diagnosis of high-grade urothelial carcinoma. After intravesical BCG therapy, he developed chronic granulomatous prostatitis. We present serial magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy data demonstrating the time interval between BCG administration and the manifestation of chronic granulomatous prostatitis.

  8. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); Prostate enlargement resources; BPH resources ... organizations provide information on benign prostatic hyperplasia ( prostate enlargement ): National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- www. ...

  9. Dynamics of notch expression during murine prostate development and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Shou, J; Ross, S; Koeppen, H; de Sauvage, F J; Gao, W Q

    2001-10-01

    Notch signaling has been widely demonstrated to be responsible for cell fate determination during normal development and implicated in human T-cell leukemia and mouse mammary carcinomas. Here we show that Notch signaling may be involved in prostatic development and cancer cell growth. In situ hybridization and reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed that Notch1 was expressed in prostate epithelial cells during normal development and in prostate cancer cells. Characterization of Notch1-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice, in which the expression of reporter green fluorescent protein is under the control of the Notch1 promoter, indicated that Notch1-expressing cells were associated with the basal epithelial cell population in the prostate. Examination of the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate showed that expression of Notch1 was elevated in malignant prostatic epithelial cells of primary and metastatic tumors. Expression of Notch ligands, however, was low or undetectable in cultured prostate cancer cells or in malignant prostatic epithelial cells in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate. Furthermore, overexpression of a constitutively active form of Notch1 inhibited the proliferation of various prostate cancer cells, including DU145, LNCaP, and PC3 cells. Taken together, our data indicate for the first time that Notch signaling may play a role in murine prostatic development and tumorigenesis.

  10. Assessment of a 2D electronic portal imaging devices-based dosimetry algorithm for pretreatment and in-vivo midplane dose verification

    PubMed Central

    Jomehzadeh, Ali; Shokrani, Parvaneh; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Amouheidari, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is a method for the dosimetric verification of radiotherapy plans, both pretreatment and in vivo. The aim of this study is to test a 2D EPID-based dosimetry algorithm for dose verification of some plans inside a homogenous and anthropomorphic phantom and in vivo as well. Materials and Methods: Dose distributions were reconstructed from EPID images using a 2D EPID dosimetry algorithm inside a homogenous slab phantom for a simple 10 × 10 cm2 box technique, 3D conformal (prostate, head-and-neck, and lung), and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) prostate plans inside an anthropomorphic (Alderson) phantom and in the patients (one fraction in vivo) for 3D conformal plans (prostate, head-and-neck and lung). Results: The planned and EPID dose difference at the isocenter, on an average, was 1.7% for pretreatment verification and less than 3% for all in vivo plans, except for head-and-neck, which was 3.6%. The mean γ values for a seven-field prostate IMRT plan delivered to the Alderson phantom varied from 0.28 to 0.65. For 3D conformal plans applied for the Alderson phantom, all γ1% values were within the tolerance level for all plans and in both anteroposterior and posteroanterior (AP-PA) beams. Conclusion: The 2D EPID-based dosimetry algorithm provides an accurate method to verify the dose of a simple 10 × 10 cm2 field, in two dimensions, inside a homogenous slab phantom and an IMRT prostate plan, as well as in 3D conformal plans (prostate, head-and-neck, and lung plans) applied using an anthropomorphic phantom and in vivo. However, further investigation to improve the 2D EPID dosimetry algorithm for a head-and-neck case, is necessary. PMID:28028511

  11. Unexplained overexposures on physical dosimetry reported by biological dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Montoro, A; Almonacid, M; Villaescusa, J I; Verdu, G

    2009-01-01

    The Medical Service of the Radiation Protection Service from the University Hospital La Fe (Valencia, Spain), carries out medical examinations of the workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. The Biological Dosimetry Laboratory is developing its activity since 2001. Up to now, the activities have been focused in performing biological dosimetry studies of Interventionists workers from La Fe Hospital. Recently, the Laboratory has been authorized by the Health Authority in the Valencian Community. Unexplained overexposures of workers and patients are also studied. Workers suspected of being overexposed to ionising radiation were referred for investigation by cytogenetic analysis. Two of these were from Hospitals of the Valencian Community and one belonged to an uranium mine from Portugal. Hospital workers had a physical dose by thermoluminiscence dosimeters (TLD) that exceeded the established limit. The worker of the uranium mine received a dose from a lost source of Cesium 137 with an activity of 170 mCi. All three cases showed normal values after the hematological analysis. Finally, the aim of this study consist to determine whether the dose showed by the dosimeter is reliable or not. In the case of workers that wore dosimeter, it is concluded that the doses measured by dosimeter are not corresponding to real doses. Hospital worker with a physical dose of 2.6 Sv and 0.269 Sv had an estimated absorbed dose by biological dosimetry of 0.076 Gy (0-0.165 Gy) and 0 Gy (0-0.089 Gy), respectively. In case of the mine worker an estimated absorbed dose of 0.073 Gy (0-0.159 Gy) was obtained by biological dosimetry. In all cases we used the odds ratio to present the results due to a very low frequency of observed aberrations [1].

  12. Xanthogranulomatous Prostatitis, a Rare Prostatic Entity.

    PubMed

    Noyola, Alejandro; Gil, José Fernando; Lujano, Heriberto; Piñon, Omar; Muñoz, Gabriel; Michel, José Manuel; Garcia, Jorge; Valdez, Jorge; Morales, Omar

    2017-01-01

    There are several benign prostatic pathologies that can clinically mimic a prostate adenocarcinoma. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is a benign inflammatory condition of the prostate and a rare entity. A 47-year old male, with 3 years of lower urinary tract symptoms, with a palpable hypogastric tumor, digital rectal examination: solid prostate, of approximately 60 g. Initial PSA was 0.90 ng/mL. He underwent surgical excision of the lower abdominal nodule and prostatectomy. Histopathology showed xanthogranulomatous prostatitis, without malignancy. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is an extremely rare entity that can simulate prostate adenocarcinoma, therefore having a correct histopathological diagnosis is essential.

  13. Results from 2010 Caliban Criticality Dosimetry Intercomparison

    SciTech Connect

    Veinot, K. G.

    2011-10-12

    The external dosimetry program participated in a criticality dosimetry intercomparison conducted at the Caliban facility in Valduc, France in 2010. Representatives from the dosimetry and instrumentation groups were present during testing which included irradiations of whole-body beta/gamma (HBGT) and neutron thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), a fixed nuclear accident dosimeter (FNAD), electronic alarming dosimeters, and a humanoid phantom filled with reference man concentrations of sodium. This report reviews the testing procedures, preparations, irradiations, and presents results of the tests.

  14. Incidental Detection of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma on 68Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Lawhn-Heath, Courtney; Flavell, Robert R; Glastonbury, Christine; Hope, Thomas A; Behr, Spencer C

    2017-04-01

    We present a case of an incidentally detected squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx on Ga-PSMA-11 PET. A 71-year-old man's condition was diagnosed as prostate carcinoma after a year of rising serum prostate-specific antigen. The staging Ga-PSMA PET/CT demonstrated focal radiotracer uptake in the prostate corresponding to his known primary prostate cancer. However, a PSMA-avid 3.4-cm mass was incidentally found in the right tongue base that was biopsied, confirming squamous cell carcinoma.

  15. Prostatic adenocarcinoma presenting with metastases to the testis and epididymis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIN; DONG, MEI; HU, XIAOLEI; LIU, LIN; LI, SHEN; LI, CHAO; YANG, LIJUN; XIAO, YONGQIANG; PANG, SHUJIAN; WANG, CHUAN

    2016-01-01

    Few cases of testicular metastases from prostate carcinoma have been reported, and asymptomatic metastases of prostate carcinoma to both the testis and epididymis are extremely rare. The current study presents the case of a 69-year-old male with testicular and epididymal metastases from prostate carcinoma. The patient was admitted to The First Hospital of Shijiazhuang with a 2-year history of lower urinary tract symptoms. Digital rectal examination revealed an enlarged multinodular prostate, and the serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was >100 ng/ml. Magnetic resonance imaging showed prostate carcinoma with seminal vesicle involvement. A prostate biopsy showed prostate gland adenocarcinoma. The Gleason score was 3+3. The immunohistochemistry results were as follows: Prostatic acid phosphatase (+++), PSA (+++), P504s (+++), p63 (−) and cytokeratin 34βE12 (−), with a Ki-67 of ~5%. The patient was treated with a bilateral orchiectomy. The testicular pathology showed that the right testis and epididymis were invaded with metastatic adenocarcinoma. The left testis and epididymis were normal. The patient was treated with conventional flutamide endocrine therapy. At present the patient remains in a stable condition after 24 months of follow-up. PMID:26870285

  16. Real-Time Dosimetry and Optimization of Prostate Photodynamic Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Page 13 of 30 The MLu fluorescence measured in the two tissue- simulating phantoms described above is shown in figure 3(a) as function of excitation ...the forward model to simulate the fluence distribution while a coarser mesh (10 by 10) with 14 measurements of absolute 7 fluence rate were used in...a dichroic beamsplitter that delivers 465-nm excitation light provided by a light-emitting diode (LED) to the fiber. The fluorescence excited by

  17. Chronic prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome [CP/CPPS]). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for chronic bacterial prostatitis? What are the effects of treatments for chronic abacterial prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 33 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors, allopurinol, alpha-blockers, biofeedback, local injections of antimicrobial drugs, mepartricin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), oral antimicrobial drugs, pentosan polysulfate, prostatic massage, quercetin, radical prostatectomy, sitz baths, transurethral microwave thermotherapy, and transurethral resection. PMID:21736764

  18. Dosimetry studies in Zaborie village.

    PubMed

    Takada, J; Hoshi, M; Endo, S; Stepanenko, V F; Kondrashov, A E; Petin, D; Skvortsov, V; Ivannikov, A; Tikounov, D; Gavrilin, Y; Snykov, V P

    2000-05-01

    Dosimetry studies in Zaborie, a territory in Russia highly contaminated by the Chernobyl accident, were carried out in July, 1997. Studies on dosimetry for people are important not only for epidemiology but also for recovery of local social activity. The local contamination of the soil was measured to be 1.5-6.3 MBq/m2 of Cs-137 with 0.7-4 microSv/h of dose rate. A case study for a villager presently 40 years old indicates estimations of 72 and 269 mSv as the expected internal and external doses during 50 years starting in 1997 based on data of a whole-body measurement of Cs-137 and environmental dose rates. Mean values of accumulated external and internal doses for the period from the year 1986 till 1996 are also estimated to be 130 mSv and 16 mSv for Zaborie. The estimation of the 1986-1996 accumulated dose on the basis of large scale ESR teeth enamel dosimetry provides for this village, the value of 180 mSv. For a short term visitor from Japan to this area, external and internal dose are estimated to be 0.13 mSv/9d (during visit in 1997) and 0.024 mSv/50y (during 50 years starting from 1997), respectively.

  19. I-124 Imaging and Dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kuker, Russ; Sztejnberg, Manuel; Gulec, Seza

    2016-01-05

    Although radioactive iodine imaging and therapy are one of the earliest applications of theranostics, there still remain a number of unresolved clinical questions as to the optimization of diagnostic techniques and dosimetry protocols. I-124 as a positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer has the potential to improve the current clinical practice in the diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The higher sensitivity and spatial resolution of PET/computed tomography (CT) compared to standard gamma scintigraphy can aid in the detection of recurrent or metastatic disease and provide more accurate measurements of metabolic tumor volumes. However the complex decay schema of I-124 poses challenges to quantitative PET imaging. More prospective studies are needed to define optimal dosimetry protocols and to improve patient-specific treatment planning strategies, taking into account not only the absorbed dose to tumors but also methods to avoid toxicity to normal organs. A historical perspective of I-124 imaging and dosimetry as well as future concepts are discussed.

  20. I-124 Imaging and Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Kuker, Russ; Sztejnberg, Manuel; Gulec, Seza

    2017-01-01

    Although radioactive iodine imaging and therapy are one of the earliest applications of theranostics, there still remain a number of unresolved clinical questions as to the optimization of diagnostic techniques and dosimetry protocols. I-124 as a positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer has the potential to improve the current clinical practice in the diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The higher sensitivity and spatial resolution of PET/computed tomography (CT) compared to standard gamma scintigraphy can aid in the detection of recurrent or metastatic disease and provide more accurate measurements of metabolic tumor volumes. However the complex decay schema of I-124 poses challenges to quantitative PET imaging. More prospective studies are needed to define optimal dosimetry protocols and to improve patient-specific treatment planning strategies, taking into account not only the absorbed dose to tumors but also methods to avoid toxicity to normal organs. A historical perspective of I-124 imaging and dosimetry as well as future concepts are discussed. PMID:28117290

  1. Small fields: Nonequilibrium radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Indra J.; Ding, George X.; Ahnesjoe, Anders

    2008-01-15

    Advances in radiation treatment with beamlet-based intensity modulation, image-guided radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery (including specialized equipments like CyberKnife, Gamma Knife, tomotherapy, and high-resolution multileaf collimating systems) have resulted in the use of reduced treatment fields to a subcentimeter scale. Compared to the traditional radiotherapy with fields {>=}4x4 cm{sup 2}, this can result in significant uncertainty in the accuracy of clinical dosimetry. The dosimetry of small fields is challenging due to nonequilibrium conditions created as a consequence of the secondary electron track lengths and the source size projected through the collimating system that are comparable to the treatment field size. It is further complicated by the prolonged electron tracks in the presence of low-density inhomogeneities. Also, radiation detectors introduced into such fields usually perturb the level of disequilibrium. Hence, the dosimetric accuracy previously achieved for standard radiotherapy applications is at risk for both absolute and relative dose determination. This article summarizes the present knowledge and gives an insight into the future procedures to handle the nonequilibrium radiation dosimetry problems. It is anticipated that new miniature detectors with controlled perturbations and corrections will be available to meet the demand for accurate measurements. It is also expected that the Monte Carlo techniques will increasingly be used in assessing the accuracy, verification, and calculation of dose, and will aid perturbation calculations of detectors used in small and highly conformal radiation beams.

  2. Fourth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Schlafke-Stelson, A.T.; Watson, E.E.

    1986-04-01

    The focus of the Fourth International Radiopharmaceutical Dosimetry Symposium was to explore the impact of current developments in nuclear medicine on absorbed dose calculations. This book contains the proceedings of the meeting including the edited discussion that followed the presentations. Topics that were addressed included the dosimetry associated with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and blood elements, ultrashort-lived radionuclides, and positron emitters. Some specific areas of discussion were variations in absorbed dose as a result of alterations in the kinetics, the influence of radioactive contaminants on dose, dose in children and in the fetus, available instrumentation and techniques for collecting the kinetic data needed for dose calculation, dosimetry requirements for the review and approval of new radiopharmaceuticals, and a comparison of the effect on the thyroid of internal versus external irradiation. New models for the urinary blader, skeleton including the active marrow, and the blood were presented. Several papers dealt with the validity of traditional ''average-organ'' dose estimates to express the dose from particulate radiation that has a short range in tissue. These problems are particularly important in the use of monoclonal antibodies and agents used to measure intracellular functions. These proceedings have been published to provide a resource volume for anyone interested in the calculation of absorbed radiation dose.

  3. Prostate cancer in dogs: comparative and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Bruce E; Northrup, Nicole

    2009-05-01

    The canine prostate gland shares many morphological and functional similarities with the human prostate and dogs are the only other large mammals that commonly develop spontaneous prostate cancer. However, the incidence of prostate cancer is much lower in dogs and the precise cell of origin is not known. Dogs with prostate cancer usually present with advanced disease that does not respond to androgen deprivation therapy. Similar to humans, affected dogs often develop osteoblastic bone metastases in the pelvis and/or lumbar spine with associated pain and neurological deficits. Other clinical signs include weight loss, lethargy, and abnormal urination and/or defecation. Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation have been used to treat dogs with prostate cancer, but success has been limited by the location and aggressive nature of the disease. It is evident that better methods of early detection and more effective therapies are needed for prostate cancer in dogs and advanced prostate carcinoma in men. Dogs with naturally-occurring prostate cancer are relevant models for the disease in humans and pre-clinical studies of new diagnostics and therapies in dogs may benefit both humans and dogs with prostate cancer.

  4. Computer model for photodynamic therapy of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankun, Jerzy; Zaim, Amjad; Jankun-Kelly, Monika; Keck, Rick W.; Selman, Steven H.

    2000-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging minimally invasive treatment that can be employed in many human diseases including prostate cancer. This treatment of human prostate cancer depends on the localization of a drug (photosensitizer) into the prostate. The photosensitizer is activated by high- energy laser light and the active drug destroys cancerous tissue. The success of PDT depends on precise placement of light diffusers in the prostate. Since the prostate is irregular in shape, with different dimensions, a transurethral light delivery that is circular in distribution cannot be used in most cases of carcinoma of the prostate. Sources of light and their spatial distribution must be tailored to each individual patient. More uniform, therapeutic light distribution can be achieved by interstitial light irradiation. In this case, the light is delivered by diffusers placed within the substance of the prostate parallel to the urethra at a distance optimized to deliver adequate levels of light and to create the desired photodynamic effect. For this reason, we are developing a computer program that can calculate the distribution of energy depending on the number of light sources placed in the prostate, their position in the gland, the dimension of the prostate, and the attenuation coefficient. A patient's three-dimensional prostate model is built based on ultrasound images. Then the program is being designated to predict the best set of parameters and position of light diffusers in space, displays them in graphical form or in numerical form. The program is amenable for interfacing with robotic treatment systems.

  5. Measurement of hypoxia-related parameters in three sublines of a rat prostate carcinoma using dynamic 18F-FMISO-Pet-Ct and quantitative histology

    PubMed Central

    Mena-Romano, Pamela; Cheng, Caixia; Glowa, Christin; Peschke, Peter; Pan, Leyun; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Karger, Christian P

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important resistance factor in radiotherapy and measuring its spatial distribution in tumors non-invasively is therefore of major importance. This study characterizes the hypoxic conditions of three tumor sublines (AT1, HI and H) of the Dunning R3327 prostate tumor model, which differ in histology, differentiation degree, volume doubling time and androgenic sensitivity, using dynamic Fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO)-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET-CT) and histology. Measurements were performed for two tumor volumes (average 0.8±0.5 cm3 vs 4.4±2.8 cm3). Data were analyzed according to tumor subline as well as to the shape of the time activity curves (TACs), based on standardized uptake values (SUVs) and a two-tissue compartment model. Quantitative immunohistochemical studies of the hypoxic fraction, vessel density and vessel size were performed using pimonidazole, Hoechst 33342 and CD31 dyes. No significant FMISO uptake was found in small tumors, which had a mean SUV of 0.64±0.36, 0.55±0.10 and 0.45±0.08, for AT1, HI and H sublines respectively. In large tumors, the SUVs were 1.33±0.52, 1.12±0.83 and 0.63±0.16 for AT1, HI and H sublines and the corresponding hypoxic fractions obtained with pimonidazole staining were 0.62±0.23, 0.54±0.24 and 0.07±0.10, respectively. The AT1- was the most and H-tumor was the least hypoxic for both methods (P<0.05). All measurements were able to discriminate different hypoxic conditions, however despite SUV and kinetic parameters correlated with the three identified TAC shapes, most of the histological results did not. These results demonstrate impact and limitations of static and dynamic PET-CT measurements to assess hypoxia non-invasively. PMID:26269773

  6. Prospects for radiofrequency hyperthermia applicator research. I--Pre-optimised prototypes of endocavitary applicators with matching interfaces for prostate hyperplasia and cancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Franconi, Cafiero; Vrba, Jan; Micali, Francesco; Pesce, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Inconsistency is observed in comparing assessment data of applicators for endocavitary hyperthermia (EHT) with microwaves (MW) and radiofrequency (RF) obtained using the standard method of inserting bare applicators in phantom tissues. MW antennae exhibit overall average penetration depths of approximately 6 mm, excluding hot spots. RF radiators exhibit penetration depths of not more than approximately 3 mm, a value too low considering the superior penetration of the RF plane wave radiation. Assuming that a mismatch at the RF radiator-tissue interface is causing the poor energy transfer of RF energy, we developed new RF radiators with controlled dielectric matching interfaces for evaluating the potential of RF radiation in EHT and in interstitial hyperthermia (IHT) treatments. We designed, developed and assessed 27.12 MHz, 8 mm OD inductive and capacitive devices of novel and existing designs, each provided an optimised bi-layer matching interface. The assessment results reveal features such as customisable length and shape, independence of insertion depth, uncritical air gap, longitudinal heating uniformity, outstanding penetration depths (19-20 mm) and high SAR gradients at both radiator ends--i.e. prostatic urethra ends--for added safety. These data clear the way for the development of pre-optimised EHT inductive and capacitive RF applicators. Evidence of positive effects of high near-fields density in cavity microenvironments is given. Such devices show potential for more effective prostatic hyperplasia treatments and for improving the feasibility of more adequate treatment planning and thermal dosimetry of interstitial and transurethral hyperthermia treatments of prostate carcinoma.

  7. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy Units, and Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.630 Dosimetry equipment. (a) Except for low...

  8. Yttrium-90 Radioembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Ryan M; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2016-03-01

    (90)Y radioembolization refers to the selective, transcatheter, and intra-arterial injection of micrometer-sized particles loaded with the radioisotope yttrium-90 for the treatment of primary and metastatic hepatic malignancies. In the treatment of intermediate- and advanced-stage hepatocellular carcinoma, (90)Y radioembolization provides favorable outcomes with minimal side effects, offering an alternative treatment option to other transarterial therapies, such as bland embolization and chemoembolization. This review provides an overview of the use of (90)Y radioembolization in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma, including patient selection criteria, dosimetry, and clinical outcomes.

  9. A review of 3D image-based dosimetry, technical considerations and emerging perspectives in 90Y microsphere therapy

    PubMed Central

    O’ Doherty, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Yttrium-90 radioembolization (90Y-RE) is a well-established therapy for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and also of metastatic liver deposits from other malignancies. Nuclear Medicine and Cath Lab diagnostic imaging takes a pivotal role in the success of the treatment, and in order to fully exploit the efficacy of the technique and provide reliable quantitative dosimetry that are related to clinical endpoints in the era of personalized medicine, technical challenges in imaging need to be overcome. In this paper, the extensive literature of current 90Y-RE techniques and challenges facing it in terms of quantification and dosimetry are reviewed, with a focus on the current generation of 3D dosimetry techniques. Finally, new emerging techniques are reviewed which seek to overcome these challenges, such as high-resolution imaging, novel surgical procedures and the use of other radiopharmaceuticals for therapy and pre-therapeutic planning. PMID:27182449

  10. Stem Cells in Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    disease upon aging, specifically prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . In order to study the cell differentiation lineage associated with...specifically prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . In order to study the cell differentiation lineage associated with normal and diseased prostate

  11. Primary high grade sarcoma of the specialised prostatic stroma: a case report with clinico-pathological considerations.

    PubMed

    Fraggetta, F; Pepe, P; Giunta, M L; Aragona, F

    2008-12-01

    Malignant tumours of the prostate other than carcinomas are rare. One such malignant tumours arising from the specialised stromal tissue of the prostate is stromal prostatic sarcoma (namely low-grade and high-grade). Herein, we report the clinico-pathological features of a high grade stromal sarcoma of the prostate occurring in a 65-year-old man who presented for urinary obstructive symptoms. The clinical picture suggested a benign prostatic hyperplasia, and surgery consisting in a transcapsular adenomectomy was performed. Following a pathological diagnosis of high grade prostatic stromal sarcoma, a radical cystoprostatectomy and bilateral pelvic node dissection was performed showing residual high grade stromal sarcoma of the prostate and incidental in situ urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. No further medical treatments were planned. One year after surgery the patient is well with no evidence of local disease or distant metastases.

  12. Prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, D; Waxman, J

    2002-01-01

    It is a paradigm in cancer treatment that early detection and treatment improves survival. However, although screening measures lead to a higher rate of detection, for small bulk localised prostate cancer it remains unclear whether early detection and early treatment will lead to an overall decrease in mortality. The management options include surveillance, radiotherapy, and radical prostatectomy but there is no evidence base to evaluate the benefits of each approach. Advanced prostate cancer is managed by hormonal therapy. There have been major changes in treatment over the last two decades with the use of more humane treatment and developments in both chemotherapy and radiation. In this article we review the natural history and management of prostate cancer. PMID:12415080

  13. DNA ploidy and proliferation heterogeneity in human prostate cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Shankey, T.V.; Graham, S. |; Dougherty, S.

    1995-09-01

    DNA ploidy determinations have been shown to have clinical application in predicting disease progression, survival, or response to anti-androgen therapies in prostate carcinomas. Since intra-tumor heterogeneity may have a profound effect on DNA measurements, we determined the frequency of DNA ploidy and proliferation (here S-phase fraction) heterogeneity in early prostatic carcinomas, and estimated the potential impact of heterogeneity on predicting disease course, survival, or response to therapy. Using image and flow cytometric analysis of archival, paraffin-embedded prostate tumors, we measured DNA ploidy in individual foci of prostatic carcinoma in stage T1a, T1b and T1c disease. Our results indicate that DNA aneuploid foci of prostate carcinoma are infrequently seen in stage T1a disease (13% of the individuals studied), and that the presence of both DNA diploid and aneuploid foci in the same sample is seen in less than 10% of these individuals. Stage T1b and T1c tumors containing only DNA diploid nuclei are seen, though these are likely most common in low volume, low Gleason grade tumors. By using flow cytometry to compare these results with those using image analysis of the same tumor foci, we demonstrated that the majority (>75%) of these aneuploid tumors are DNA tetraploid. Our data on prostate tumor S-phase fractions indicate that DNA diploid tumors generally have a lower S-phase than DNA aneuploid foci (including comparisons of DNA diploid and aneuploid foci in the same prostate tumor). These results support the model that early prostate tumors are DNA diploid and have a low S-phase, and that these tumors likely evolve to DNA tetraploid tumors with a similar low S-phase fraction. 25 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. An audit of prostate-specific antigen and clinical symptoms in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, S.; Foster, M. C.; Thomas, D. R.; Roalfe, A. K.; Hall, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective was to devise local guidelines for the referral of patients with suspected prostatic carcinoma following evaluation by a retrospective audit of the value of the prostate-specific antigen concentration, together with age, urological symptoms, and digital rectal examination in the diagnosis of carcinoma of the prostate. Relevant details were collected from the notes of 582 patients from general practice and hospital. The significant diagnostic factors were ascertained by stepwise logistic regression. Prostate-specific antigen concentration, digital rectal examination and significant terminal dribbling were the most powerful factors in the diagnosis of carcinoma of the prostate. When prostate-specific antigen concentration was considered in isolation, a value of 6.5 ng/ml appeared appropriate for referral. Age was not significant, perhaps due to the narrow patient age range. The significant diagnostic factors were built into an algorithm calculating the probability of carcinoma of the prostate. This algorithm, together with prostate-specific antigen concentration results and digital rectal examination findings, forms the basis of the referral guidelines and a subsequent prospective study. PMID:9538483

  15. Solid-State Personal Dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2005-01-01

    This document is a web site page, and a data sheet about Personal protection (i.e., space suits) presented to the Radiation and Micrometeoroid Mitigation Technology Focus Group meeting. The website describes the work of the PI to improve solid state personal radiation dosimetry. The data sheet presents work on the active personal radiation detection system that is to provide real-time local radiation exposure information during EVA. Should undue exposure occur, knowledge of the dynamic intensity conditions during the exposure will allow more precise diagnostic assessment of the potential health risk to the exposed individual.

  16. The future of medical dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    The world of health care delivery is becoming increasingly complex. The purpose of this manuscript is to analyze current metrics and analytically predict future practices and principles of medical dosimetry. The results indicate five potential areas precipitating change factors: a) evolutionary and revolutionary thinking processes, b) social factors, c) economic factors, d) political factors, and e) technological factors. Outcomes indicate that significant changes will occur in the job structure and content of being a practicing medical dosimetrist. Discussion indicates potential variables that can occur within each process and change factor and how the predicted outcomes can deviate from normative values. Finally, based on predicted outcomes, future opportunities for medical dosimetrists are given.

  17. The Future of Medical Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Robert D.

    2015-07-01

    The world of health care delivery is becoming increasingly complex. The purpose of this manuscript is to analyze current metrics and analytically predict future practices and principles of medical dosimetry. The results indicate five potential areas precipitating change factors: a) evolutionary and revolutionary thinking processes, b) social factors, c) economic factors, d) political factors, and e) technological factors. Outcomes indicate that significant changes will occur in the job structure and content of being a practicing medical dosimetrist. Discussion indicates potential variables that can occur within each process and change factor and how the predicted outcomes can deviate from normative values. Finally, based on predicted outcomes, future opportunities for medical dosimetrists are given.

  18. The Development of Prostate Palpation Skills through Simulation Training May Impact Early Detection of Prostate Abnormalities and Early Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    PhD, School of Engineering and two co-Is Reba Moyer Childress, MSN, FNP , School of Nursing and Marcus L. Martin, MD, School of Medicine. We have...the support and clinical guidanceofMarcusL.Martin,M.D. (SchoolofMedicine,Universityof Virginia) and Reba Moyer Childress, SN, FNP , APRN-BC (School of...Childress, MSN, FNP -BC; Marcus L. Martin, MD Introduction: Prostate carcinoma (and other prostate irregularities and abnormali- ties) is detected in part

  19. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF? Featured Blue Jacket Fashion Show Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms The conversation about PSA screening really applies ... That’s why screening is such an important topic. Prostate Cancer Basics About the Prostate Risk Factors Prevention Symptoms ...

  20. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  1. About the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer growth or as a result of treatments. Prostate Cancer Basics About the Prostate Risk Factors Prevention Symptoms Early Detection & Screening Living with Prostate Cancer Newly Diagnosed Treatment Options Side Effects Recurrence Advanced ...

  2. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  3. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that ... up part of semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  4. Protective effect of zinc on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and testosterone-induced prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in the dorsolateral prostate of Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Banudevi, Sivanantham; Elumalai, Perumal; Sharmila, Govindaraj; Arunkumar, Ramachandran; Senthilkumar, Kalimuthu; Arunakaran, Jagadeesan

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have suggested that zinc exerts anticarcinogenic and antiproliferative effects against prostate cancer both in vitro and in rat ventral prostate. Zinc accumulation diminishes early in the course of prostate malignancy and it inhibits the growth of several carcinoma cells through induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In this study, we have investigated the influence of zinc on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and testosterone (T)-induced prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in the dorsolateral prostate of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. The results indicate that zinc plays an important role in prostate carcinogenesis. Increased tumor incidence was accompanied by a decrease in prostatic acid phosphatase activity, citrate, zinc, glutathione-S-transferase, reduced glutathione, p53, B-cell lymphoma protein (Bcl-2)-associated X protein and caspase-3 levels in MNU + T-treated rats. On the contrary, significantly increased phase I drug metabolizing enzyme activities, lipid peroxide, hydrogen peroxide, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L) protein levels were observed in the dorsolateral prostate of MNU + T-treated rats. Simultaneous zinc supplementation significantly reversed these effects in MNU + T-treated rats. Signs of dysplasia, a characteristic of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, were evident in the dorsolateral prostatic tissue sections by MNU + T administration. However, zinc supplementation has reversed these effects in the dorsolateral prostatic histoarchitecture. These results suggest that zinc may act as an essential trace element against MNU and testosterone-induced prostatic preneoplastic progression in SD rats.

  5. Androgen regulated genes in human prostate xenografts in mice: relation to BPH and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Love, Harold D; Booton, S Erin; Boone, Braden E; Breyer, Joan P; Koyama, Tatsuki; Revelo, Monica P; Shappell, Scott B; Smith, Jeffrey R; Hayward, Simon W

    2009-12-21

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma (CaP) are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ) human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1) highly expressed in prostate, 2) had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3) encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues.

  6. [The treatment options for localized prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Livne, Pinhas M

    2006-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a very common tumor in men. Today the disease is very often diagnosed early because of an elevated PSA without symptoms and the disease is localized to the prostate. Patients with prostate cancer can be divided into 3 subgroups for the carcinoma: favorable, moderate, and poorly. The grouping depends mainly on the Gleason score of the prostate biopsy. According to the Gleason score, favorable cancer is up to score 6 (3 + 3), moderate score 7, and poor--Gleason score 8-10. The other favorable clinical factors are PSA < 10 ng/ml, and clinical stage by DRE of T1C or T2 (no nodule or palpable nodule not extending beyond the prostatic capsule). The treatment options for cure when the prostate cancer is localized are either radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy (external or brachytherapy or combination). Each of these therapies has side effects and each has advantages and disadvantages. Sometimes the treatment choice is not for cure and the options are hormonal treatment or watchful waiting. Twenty to 30% of the patients treated for cure may fail the treatment and have elevation of PSA without any clinical symptoms, or signs of local recurrence or distant spread. Some of these patients with biochemical failure may be cured by salvage treatment: radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy and salvage radical prostatectomy or cryotherapy following failure of radiotherapy.

  7. Health physics research reactor reference dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, C.S.; Ragan, G.E.

    1987-06-01

    Reference neutron dosimetry is developed for the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) in the new operational configuration directly above its storage pit. This operational change was physically made early in CY 1985. The new reference dosimetry considered in this document is referred to as the 1986 HPRR reference dosimetry and it replaces any and all HPRR reference documents or papers issued prior to 1986. Reference dosimetry is developed for the unshielded HPRR as well as for the reactor with each of five different shield types and configurations. The reference dosimetry is presented in terms of three different dose and six different dose equivalent reporting conventions. These reporting conventions cover most of those in current use by dosimetrists worldwide. In addition to the reference neutron dosimetry, this document contains other useful dosimetry-related data for the HPRR in its new configuration. These data include dose-distance measurements and calculations, gamma dose measurements, neutron-to-gamma ratios, ''9-to-3 inch'' ratios, threshold detector unit measurements, 56-group neutron energy spectra, sulfur fluence measurements, and details concerning HPRR shields. 26 refs., 11 figs., 31 tabs.

  8. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Prostate Diseases Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Tools & Tips ...

  9. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... If the cancer has not spread outside the prostate gland, common treatments include: Surgery ( radical prostatectomy ) Radiation therapy , including brachytherapy and proton therapy If you are older, your doctor may recommend simply monitoring the cancer with PSA tests and biopsies. Hormone therapy is ...

  10. Prostate Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor’s office or a medical facility. A health care professional tests your urine sample at your doctor’s office or ... your doctor’s office or a medical facility. A health care professional sends ... may want to test your blood sample for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). ...

  11. Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer - discharge; Radioactive seed placement - discharge ... You had a procedure called brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Your treatment lasted 30 minutes or more, depending ...

  12. In vitro dosimetry of agglomerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, V.; Kinnear, C.; Rodriguez-Lorenzo, L.; Monnier, C. A.; Rothen-Rutishauser, B.; Balog, S.; Petri-Fink, A.

    2014-06-01

    Agglomeration of nanoparticles in biological fluids is a pervasive phenomenon that leads to difficulty in the interpretation of results from in vitro exposure, primarily due to differing particokinetics of agglomerates to nanoparticles. Therefore, well-defined small agglomerates were designed that possessed different particokinetic profiles, and their cellular uptake was compared to a computational model of dosimetry. The approach used here paves the way for a better understanding of the impact of agglomeration on the nanoparticle-cell interaction.Agglomeration of nanoparticles in biological fluids is a pervasive phenomenon that leads to difficulty in the interpretation of results from in vitro exposure, primarily due to differing particokinetics of agglomerates to nanoparticles. Therefore, well-defined small agglomerates were designed that possessed different particokinetic profiles, and their cellular uptake was compared to a computational model of dosimetry. The approach used here paves the way for a better understanding of the impact of agglomeration on the nanoparticle-cell interaction. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: ITC data for tiopronin/Au-NP interactions, agglomeration kinetics at different pHs for tiopronin-coated Au-NPs, UV-Vis spectra in water, PBS and DMEM and temporal correlation functions for single Au-NPs and corresponding agglomerates, calculation of diffusion and sedimentation parameters, modelling of relative cell uptake based on the ISDD model and cytotoxicity of single Au-NPs and their agglomerates, and synthesis and cell uptake of large spherical Au-NPs. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00460d

  13. An Automated Biological Dosimetry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorch, T.; Bille, J.; Frieben, M.; Stephan, G.

    1986-04-01

    The scoring of structural chromosome aberrations in peripheral human blood lymphocytes can be used in biological dosimetry to estimate the radiation dose which an individual has received. Especially the dicentric chromosome is a rather specific indicator for an exposure to ionizing radiation. For statistical reasons, in the low dose range a great number of cells must be analysed, which is a very tedious task. The resulting high cost of a biological dose estimation limits the application of this method to cases of suspected irradiation for which physical dosimetry is not possible or not sufficient. Therefore an automated system has been designed to do the major part of the routine work. It uses a standard light microscope with motorized scanning stage, a Plumbicon TV-camera, a real-time hardware preprocessor, a binary and a grey level image buffer system. All computations are performed by a very powerful multi-microprocessor-system (POLYP) based on a MIMD-architecture. The task of the automated system can be split in finding the metaphases (see Figure 1) at low microscope magnification and scoring dicentrics at high magnification. The metaphase finding part has been completed and is now in routine use giving good results. The dicentric scoring part is still under development.

  14. Dosimetry in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (12-1402R)

    SciTech Connect

    Minguez, Pablo; Genolla, Jose; Celeiro, Jose Javier; Fombellida, Jose Cruz

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study has been to perform a dosimetric study in the treatments of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) performed in our center in order to find a dose-effect correlation. Methods: Thirty patients treated for DTC with 3700 MBq of {sup 131}I have been included in this study. For reasons of radiological protection all of them spent two nights as inpatients. Dose rate at 1 m from all patients was measured approximately 20 and 44 h after the administration of the radioiodine and a whole body scan in the gamma camera was performed approximately 1 week later. With those measurements and by using a model of two compartments the activities in thyroid bed remnants and in the whole body were calculated as a function of time. The integration of both activities yields the corresponding cumulated activities. Absorbed doses to thyroid bed remnants and to the whole body can be calculated following the MIRDOSE method-that is, by multiplying the corresponding cumulated activities by the corresponding S factors. Results: The absorbed doses to thyroid bed remnants calculated in this study fall into a very wide range (13-1161 Gy) and showed the highest correlation factors with the following parameters: the absorbed dose rate to thyroid bed remnants, the cumulated activity in thyroid bed remnants, and the maximum radioiodine uptake in thyroid bed remnants. The absorbed doses to the whole body range from 0.12 to 0.23 Gy. The ablation was successful in all patients, and in spite of the wide range of absorbed doses to thyroid bed remnants obtained, no dose-effect correlation could be obtained. Conclusions: Facing DTC treatments from a dosimetric viewpoint in which a predosimetry to calculate the activity of {sup 131}I to be administered is performed is a subject difficult to handle. This statement is based on the fact that although a very wide range of absorbed doses to thyroid bed remnants was obtained (including several absorbed doses well below some dose thresholds previously published to achieve ablation of thyroid bed remnants), ablation of thyroid bed remnants was successful for all patients and therefore no dose-effect correlation could be determined.

  15. International intercomparison for criticality dosimetry: the case of biological dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Roy, L; Buard, V; Delbos, M; Durand, V; Paillole, N; Grégoire, E; Voisin, P

    2004-01-01

    The Institute of Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) organized a biological dosimetry international intercomparison with the purpose of comparing (i) dicentrics yield produced in human lymphocytes; (ii) the gamma and neutron dose estimate according to the corresponding laboratory calibration curve. The experimental reactor SILENE was used with different configurations: bare source 4 Gy, lead shield 1 and 2 Gy and a 60Co source 2 Gy. An increasing variation of dicentric yield per cell was observed between participants when there were more damages in the samples. Doses were derived from the observed dicentric rates according to the dose-effect relationship provided by each laboratory. Differences in dicentric rate values are more important than those in the corresponding dose values. The doses obtained by the participants were found to be in agreement with the given physical dose within 20%. The evaluation of the respective gamma and neutron dose was achieved only by four laboratories, with some small variations among them.

  16. Immunohistochemistry of the cytoskeleton of human prostatic epithelium. Evidence for disturbed organization in neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Purnell, D. M.; Heatfield, B. M.; Anthony, R. L.; Trump, B. F.

    1987-01-01

    An indirect immunoperoxidase technique was used to evaluate keratin, actin, tubulin, and calmodulin immunoreactivity in histologic sections of normal, hyperplastic, and neoplastic human prostate. Polyclonal as well as monoclonal keratin antibodies produced equivalent and intense staining of normal epithelium. The immunoreactivity of normal prostate with keratin antibodies was more pronounced than with antibodies to the other components of the cytoskeleton. Variation in staining for components of the cytoskeleton was minimal. The same findings applied to hyperplastic prostate. The immunoreactivity of prostate tumors with antibodies to these cytoskeletal proteins differed markedly from normal prostate. Prostatic carcinomas showed reduced keratin immunoreactivity with a panepithelial antibody, but unaltered or enhanced immunoreactivity with tubulin, actin, and calmodulin antibodies. Many tumors were unreactive with a monoclonal keratin antibody that was strongly reactive with tissues that contained cytokeratin 18 (45-kd) and which intensely stained normal and hyperplastic prostate. In addition, prostate carcinomas often yielded heterogeneous patterns of staining with actin, tubulin, and calmodulin antibodies in contrast to normal and hyperplastic prostate, which showed uniform staining. The results suggest that a disturbance in the organization of the cytoskeleton may accompany neoplastic transformation of human prostate. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2435158

  17. An unusual variant of prostatic adenocarcinoma with metastasis to testis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Anila, K R; Somanathan, T; Mathews, A; Jayasree, K

    2012-07-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate is considered to be a rare variant of prostatic adenocarcinoma when compared to the more common acinar adenocarcinoma. We report here a case of ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate in a 68-year old man who presented with complaints of abdominal pain, retention of urine and hematuria of one month duration. Clinical examination showed prostatomegaly. The serum Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) value was raised to 79ng/mL. Histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation of resected specimen of prostate revealed ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate. The patient was lost to follow up and presented four years after the initial diagnosis with metastasis to the bone and testis. Though prostatic cancers have the ability for wide spread dissemination, metastasis to testis is rare. Immunohistochemical staining with PSA and Prostatic Acid Phosphatase (PAP) can help in establishing prostatic nature of the neoplasm. We are reporting this case because of the rarity of metastasis of prostatic carcinoma to testis and for stressing the need for keeping in mind the possibility of metastatic carcinoma also while dealing with testicular tumors.

  18. Computational methods in radionuclide dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardiès, M.; Myers, M. J.

    1996-10-01

    The various approaches in radionuclide dosimetry depend on the size and spatial relation of the sources and targets considered in conjunction with the emission range of the radionuclide used. We present some of the frequently reported computational techniques on the basis of the source/target size. For whole organs, or for sources or targets bigger than some centimetres, the acknowledged standard was introduced 30 years ago by the MIRD committee and is still being updated. That approach, based on the absorbed fraction concept, is mainly used for radioprotection purposes but has been updated to take into account the dosimetric challenge raised by therapeutic use of vectored radiopharmaceuticals. At this level, the most important computational effort is in the field of photon dosimetry. On the millimetre scale, photons can often be disregarded, and or electron dosimetry is generally reported. Heterogeneities at this level are mainly above the cell level, involving groups of cell or a part of an organ. The dose distribution pattern is often calculated by generalizing a point source dose distribution, but direct calculation by Monte Carlo techniques is also frequently reported because it allows media of inhomogeneous density to be considered. At the cell level, and electron (low-range or Auger) are the predominant emissions examined. Heterogeneities in the dose distribution are taken into account, mainly to determine the mean dose at the nucleus. At the DNA level, Auger electrons or -particles are considered from a microdosimetric point of view. These studies are often connected with radiobiological experiments on radionuclide toxicity.

  19. Prostate Enlargement: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur as a result of alcohol consumption, cold temperatures, or a long period of inactivity. What are ... to heat selected portions of the prostate. The temperature becomes high enough inside the prostate to destroy ...

  20. Emerging technological bases for retrospective dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Straume, T; Anspaugh, L R; Haskell, E H; Lucas, J N; Marchetti, A A; Likhtarev, I A; Chumak, V V; Romanyukha, A A; Khrouch, V T; Gavrilin YuI; Minenko, V F

    1997-01-01

    In this article we discuss examples of challenging problems in retrospective dosimetry and describe some promising solutions. The ability to make measurements by accelerator mass spectrometry and luminescence techniques promises to provide improved dosimetry for regions of Belarus, Ukraine and Russian Federation contaminated by radionuclides from the Chernobyl accident. In addition, it may soon be possible to resolve the large neutron discrepancy in the dosimetry system for Hiroshima through novel measurement techniques that can be used to reconstruct the fast-neutron fluence emitted by the bomb some 51 years ago. Important advances in molecular cytogenetics and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements have produced biodosimeters that show potential in retrospective dosimetry. The most promising of these are the frequency of reciprocal translocations measured in chromosomes of blood lymphocytes using fluorescence in situ hybridization and the electron paramagnetic resonance signal in tooth enamel.

  1. INTERSPECIES DOSIMETRY MODELS FOR PULMONARY PHARMACOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interspecies Dosimetry Models for Pulmonary Pharmacology

    Ted B. Martonen, Jeffry D. Schroeter, and John S. Fleming

    Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  2. Poster — Thur Eve — 77: Implanted Brachythearpy Seed Movement due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D; Usmani, N; Sloboda, R; Meyer, T; Husain, S; Angyalfi, S; Kay, I

    2014-08-15

    The study investigated the movement of implanted brachytherapy seeds upon transrectal US probe removal, providing insight into the underlying prostate deformation and an estimate of the impact on prostate dosimetry. Implanted seed distributions, one obtained with the prostate under probe compression and another with the probe removed, were reconstructed using C-arm fluoroscopy imaging. The prostate, delineated on ultrasound images, was registered to the fluoroscopy images using seeds and needle tracks identified on ultrasound. A deformation tensor and shearing model was developed to correlate probe-induced seed movement with position. Changes in prostate TG-43 dosimetry were calculated. The model was used to infer the underlying prostate deformation and to estimate the location of the prostate surface in the absence of probe compression. Seed movement patterns upon probe removal reflected elastic decompression, lateral shearing, and rectal bending. Elastic decompression was characterized by expansion in the anterior-posterior direction and contraction in the superior-inferior and lateral directions. Lateral shearing resulted in large anterior movement for extra-prostatic seeds in the lateral peripheral region. Whole prostate D90 increased up to 8 Gy, mainly due to the small but systematic seed movement associated with elastic decompression. For selected patients, lateral shearing movement increased prostate D90 by 4 Gy, due to increased dose coverage in the anterior-lateral region at the expense of the posterior-lateral region. The effect of shearing movement on whole prostate D90 was small compared to elastic decompression due to the subset of peripheral seeds involved, but is expected to have greater consequences for local dose coverage.

  3. WE-A-17A-11: Implanted Brachytherapy Seed Movement Due to Transrectal Ultrasound Probe-Induced Prostate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D; Usmani, N; Sloboda, R; Meyer, T; Husain, S; Angyalfi, S; Kay, I

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the movement of implanted brachytherapy seeds due to transrectal ultrasound probe-induced prostate deformation and to estimate the effects on prostate dosimetry. Methods: Implanted probe-in and probe-removed seed distributions were reconstructed for 10 patients using C-arm fluoroscopy imaging. The prostate was delineated on ultrasound and registered to the fluoroscopy seeds using a visible subset of seeds and residual needle tracks. A linear tensor and shearing model correlated the seed movement with position. The seed movement model was used to infer the underlying prostate deformation and to simulate the prostate contour without probe compression. Changes in prostate and surrogate urethra dosimetry were calculated. Results: Seed movement patterns reflecting elastic decompression, lateral shearing, and rectal bending were observed. Elastic decompression was characterized by anterior-posterior expansion and superior-inferior and lateral contractions. For lateral shearing, anterior movement up to 6 mm was observed for extraprostatic seeds in the lateral peripheral region. The average intra-prostatic seed movement was 1.3 mm, and the residual after linear modeling was 0.6 mm. Prostate D90 increased by 4 Gy on average (8 Gy max) and was correlated with elastic decompression. For selected patients, lateral shearing resulted in differential change in D90 of 7 Gy between anterior and posterior quadrants, and increase in whole prostate D90 of 4 Gy. Urethra D10 increased by 4 Gy. Conclusion: Seed movement upon probe removal was characterized. The proposed model captured the linear correlation between seed movement and position. Whole prostate dose coverage increased slightly, due to the small but systematic seed movement associated with elastic decompression. Lateral shearing movement increased dose coverage in the anterior-lateral region, at the expense of the posterior-lateral region. The effect on whole prostate D90 was smaller due to the subset

  4. Post-radiotherapy prostate biopsies reveal heightened apex positivity relative to other prostate regions sampled

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kris T.; Stoyanova, Radka; Walker, Gail; Sandler, Kiri; Studenski, Matthew T.; Dogan, Nesrin; Al-Saleem, Tahseen; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Pollack, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Prostate biopsy positivity after radiotherapy (RT) is a significant determinant of eventual biochemical failure. We mapped pre- and post-treatment tumor locations to determine if residual disease is location-dependent. Materials and methods There were 303 patients treated on a randomized hypofractionation trial. Of these, 125 underwent prostate biopsy 2-years post-RT. Biopsy cores were mapped to a sextant template, and 86 patients with both pre-/post-treatment systematic sextant biopsies were analyzed. Results The pretreatment distribution of positive biopsy cores was not significantly related to prostate region (base, mid, apex; p = 0.723). Whereas all regions post-RT had reduced positive biopsies, the base was reduced to the greatest degree and the apex the least (p = 0.045). In 38 patients who had a positive post-treatment biopsy, there was change in the rate of apical positivity before and after treatment (76 vs. 71%; p = 0.774), while significant reductions were seen in the mid and base. Conclusion In our experience, persistence of prostate tumor cells after RT increases going from the base to apex. MRI was used in planning and image guidance was performed daily during treatment, so geographic miss of the apex is unlikely. Nonetheless, the pattern observed suggests that attention to apex dosimetry is a priority. PMID:25963053

  5. Superficial urothelial cancer in the prostatic urethra.

    PubMed

    Kirkali, Ziya; Canda, A Erdem

    2006-02-28

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is a multifocal disease of the urinary tract that can also involve the prostatic urethra (PU). The exact incidence of superficial involvement of the PU in patients with bladder TCC is not well known. Bladder TCC may involve the prostate in 12-40% of the patients and the degree of involvement can include urethral mucosa, ducts, acini, and stroma of the gland, which has been shown to affect the outcome. Risk factors for superficial urothelial cancer in the PU are high-grade, multifocal bladder TCC and presence of carcinoma in situ (CIS) in the bladder. While visible tumors are easy to detect and resect, controversy still exists regarding the optimal technique to identify prostatic involvement by TCC. Prostatic urethral sampling by a transurethral resection biopsy or a cold-cup biopsy, particularly in the high-risk group of bladder cancer patients, has been recommended for detecting prostatic urethral involvement. Management of superficial prostatic involvement by TCC is also unclear. Currently, there is increasing recognition of the value of conservative treatment options with intravesical agents when there is superficial involvement of the PU. Particularly, intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (BCG) seems to be an effective treatment alternative in the management of superficial involvement of the PU by TCC. Close follow-up by cystoscopy and PU biopsy at 3-month intervals, particularly in intermediate and high-risk patients who respond to intravesical therapy and in whom cystectomy is appropriate, is recommended in order to detect persistent tumor, recurrences, or progression.

  6. Audits for advanced treatment dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibbott, G. S.; Thwaites, D. I.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy has advanced rapidly over the last few decades, progressing from 3D conformal treatment to image-guided intensity modulated therapy of several different flavors, both 3D and 4D and to adaptive radiotherapy. The use of intensity modulation has increased the complexity of quality assurance and essentially eliminated the physicist's ability to judge the validity of a treatment plan, even approximately, on the basis of appearance and experience. Instead, complex QA devices and procedures are required at the institutional level. Similarly, the assessment of treatment quality through remote and on-site audits also requires greater sophistication. The introduction of 3D and 4D dosimetry into external audit systems must follow, to enable quality assurance systems to perform meaningful and thorough audits.

  7. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tanderup, Kari; Beddar, Sam; Andersen, Claus E.; Kertzscher, Gustavo; Cygler, Joanna E.

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and the large range of dose and dose rate. Due to these challenges, the sensitivity and specificity toward error detection has been limited, and IVD has mainly been restricted to detection of gross errors. Given these factors, routine use of IVD is currently limited in many departments. Although the impact of potential errors may be detrimental since treatments are typically administered in large fractions and with high-gradient-dose-distributions, BT is usually delivered without independent verification of the treatment delivery. This Vision 20/20 paper encourages improvements within BT safety by developments of IVD into an effective method of independent treatment verification.

  8. Systemic interleukin 2 therapy for human prostate tumors in a nude mouse model.

    PubMed

    Triest, J A; Grignon, D J; Cher, M L; Kocheril, S V; Montecillo, E J; Talati, B; Tekyi-Mensah, S; Pontes, J E; Hillman, G G

    1998-08-01

    Once the regional lymph nodes become involved in prostate carcinoma, 85% of patients develop distant metastases within 5 years, and metastatic disease is difficult to treat. We have investigated the effect of systemic interleukin 2 (IL-2) treatment on metastatic prostate carcinoma using a xenograft tumor model. Cells from a PC-3/IF cell line, produced by intrafemoral injection of human PC-3 prostate carcinoma cells, were injected in the prostate of Balb/c nude mice. Prostate tumors and para-aortic lymph nodes were resected, and tumor cells were recultured and passaged in the prostate in vivo to produce new cell lines. On day 6 following prostatic injection of these cell lines, mice were treated with i.p. injections of IL-2 at 25,000-50,000 units/ day for 5 consecutive days. The effect of IL-2 on tumor progression was assessed, and histological studies were performed on prostate tumor and lymph node sections. The tumor cell lines generated by serial prostate injection were tumorigenic and metastasized to regional para-aortic lymph nodes. Tumors of 0.4 cm were obtained by day 16 and grew to 1-1.5 cm by day 40 with metastasis to para-aortic lymph nodes. Following two to three weekly courses of 5 days of 25,000-40,000 units/day of IL-2, the growth of prostate tumors was inhibited by 94%. Higher doses of 50,000 units/ day were toxic. Histologically, prostate sections showed vascular damage manifested by multifocal hemorrhages and an influx of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear cells into disintegrating tumors and areas of necrosis containing numerous apoptotic cells. In contrast to control mice, para-aortic lymph nodes were not enlarged in responding mice. These findings suggest that systemic IL-2 therapy can induce an antitumor response in prostate tumors and control their growth and metastasis.

  9. Knockout AR in Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    enlarged ventral prostates, we evaluated fertility. We found that there were no significant differences in litter-size when either WT or pes-ARKO males...prostate (DLP), ventral prostate (VP) all lobes of prostate (Pr), testes (T), glans penis (Pe); *Pɘ.05, ***Pɘ.001. PI: Chang, Chawnshang 7

  10. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis with prostato-rectal fistula: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Liyong; Liu, Zhifei; Deng, Gang; Wang, Huan; Zhu, Yanfeng; Shi, Peng; Huo, Bingyue; Li, Yindong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis (XP) is a rare form of nonspecific granulomatous prostatitis that can clinically mimic high-grade prostatic carcinoma. It is difficult to diagnose it definitely in clinical settings. Methods We report a case of XP with prostate-rectal fistula and review the relevant literatures. Result A 75-year-old man presented with rectal bleeding when he urinated. A locally advanced carcinoma of prostate was suspected initially following the physical, imaging, and hematologic examinations. Subsequently on histopathological and immunohistochemical staining after needle biopsy of the prostate, a diagnosis of XP was made definitely. The patient was catheterized temporarily and treated with tamsulosin and estrogen. The patient underwent uneventful recovery after this conservative therapy. Conclusion Histologic and immunohistochemical analyses are valuable in differentially diagnosing XP from high-grade prostate carcinoma. Treatment strategy of XP in principle is recommended to be the conservative method. Long-term follow-up earns are highly regarded considering the possibility of coexisting prostate cancer. PMID:27695691

  11. DNA Ploidy Measured on Archived Pretreatment Biopsy Material May Correlate With Prostate-Specific Antigen Recurrence After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, Mira; MacAulay, Calum; Hayes, Malcolm; Korbelik, Jagoda; Morris, W. James; Palcic, Branko

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To explore whether DNA ploidy of prostate cancer cells determined from archived transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy specimens correlates with disease-free survival. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven failures and 47 controls were selected from 1006 consecutive low- and intermediate-risk patients treated with prostate {sup 125}I brachytherapy (July 1998-October 2003). Median follow-up was 7.5 years. Ten-year actuarial disease-free survival was 94.1%. Controls were matched using age, initial prostate-specific antigen level, clinical stage, Gleason score, use of hormone therapy, and follow-up (all P nonsignificant). Seventy-eight specimens were successfully processed; 27 control and 20 failure specimens contained more than 100 tumor cells were used for the final analysis. The Feulgen-Thionin stained cytology samples from archived paraffin blocks were used to determine the DNA ploidy of each tumor by measuring integrated optical densities. Results: The samples were divided into diploid and aneuploid tumors. Aneuploid tumors were found in 16 of 20 of the failures (80%) and 8 of 27 controls (30%). Diploid DNA patients had a significantly lower rate of disease recurrence (P=.0086) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.256). On multivariable analysis, patients with aneuploid tumors had a higher prostate-specific antigen failure rate (HR 5.13). Additionally, those with “excellent” dosimetry (V100 >90%; D90 >144 Gy) had a significantly lower recurrence rate (HR 0.25). All patients with aneuploid tumors and dosimetry classified as “nonexcellent” (V100 <90%; D90 <144 Gy) (5 of 5) had disease recurrence, compared with 40% of patients with aneuploid tumors and “excellent” dosimetry (8 of 15). In contrast, dosimetry did not affect the outcome for diploid patients. Conclusions: Using core biopsy material from archived paraffin blocks, DNA ploidy correctly classified the majority of failures and nonfailures in this study. The results suggest that DNA ploidy can be used as a

  12. Malakoplakia of the prostate: a report of two cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed Central

    McClure, J

    1979-01-01

    Two cases of malakoplakia of the prostate are documented, bringing the total described in the world literature to 15. This literature is reviewed, and typical features of the condition are established. The majority of the cases have had proven previous episodes of Escherichia coli infection of the urinary tract, but bacilliform organisms have yet to be demonstrated in the diseased prostatic tissue. Five of the reported cases have also had important additional disease, including three instances of malignant lung tumour. Finally, it is emphasised that recognition of prostatic malakoplakia as an entity will prevent its confusion with prostatic carcinoma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:381332

  13. Uncertainty in 3D gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Deene, Yves; Jirasek, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) gel dosimetry has a unique role to play in safeguarding conformal radiotherapy treatments as the technique can cover the full treatment chain and provides the radiation oncologist with the integrated dose distribution in 3D. It can also be applied to benchmark new treatment strategies such as image guided and tracking radiotherapy techniques. A major obstacle that has hindered the wider dissemination of gel dosimetry in radiotherapy centres is a lack of confidence in the reliability of the measured dose distribution. Uncertainties in 3D dosimeters are attributed to both dosimeter properties and scanning performance. In polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout, discrepancies in dose response of large polymer gel dosimeters versus small calibration phantoms have been reported which can lead to significant inaccuracies in the dose maps. The sources of error in polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout are well understood and it has been demonstrated that with a carefully designed scanning protocol, the overall uncertainty in absolute dose that can currently be obtained falls within 5% on an individual voxel basis, for a minimum voxel size of 5 mm3. However, several research groups have chosen to use polymer gel dosimetry in a relative manner by normalizing the dose distribution towards an internal reference dose within the gel dosimeter phantom. 3D dosimetry with optical scanning has also been mostly applied in a relative way, although in principle absolute calibration is possible. As the optical absorption in 3D dosimeters is less dependent on temperature it can be expected that the achievable accuracy is higher with optical CT. The precision in optical scanning of 3D dosimeters depends to a large extend on the performance of the detector. 3D dosimetry with X-ray CT readout is a low contrast imaging modality for polymer gel dosimetry. Sources of error in x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry (XCT) are currently under investigation and include inherent

  14. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back After Treatment Prostate Cancer Treating Prostate Cancer Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  15. Medical Tests for Prostate Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... than age 50 is inflammation, called prostatitis. Prostate enlargement, or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), is another common ... cannot distinguish between cancerous tumors and noncancerous prostate enlargement. Once a biopsy has confirmed cancer, these imaging ...

  16. Transurethral resection of the prostate

    MedlinePlus

    TURP; Prostate resection - transurethral ... used to remove the inside part of your prostate gland using electricity. ... if you have benign prostatic hyperplasia ( BPH ). The prostate gland often grows larger as men get older. ...

  17. Development of a Gene Therapy Trial for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    used to restrict adenovirus replication in hepatocellular and prostate carcinomas via alpha-fetoprotein and PSA promoters [21, 33]. Gene therapy with...control of PSES to direct adenovirus replication , and HSV-TK gene, a pro-drug enzyme gene, under the control of m6 enhancer to maximize cell-killing

  18. AAPM Task Group 128: Quality assurance tests for prostate brachytherapy ultrasound systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, Douglas; Sutlief, Steven; Feng Wenzheng; Pierce, Heather M.; Kofler, Jim

    2008-12-15

    While ultrasound guided prostate brachytherapy has gained wide acceptance as a primary treatment tool for prostate cancer, quality assurance of the ultrasound guidance system has received very little attention. Task Group 128 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine was created to address quality assurance requirements specific to transrectal ultrasound used for guidance of prostate brachytherapy. Accurate imaging guidance and dosimetry calculation depend upon the quality and accuracy of the ultrasound image. Therefore, a robust quality assurance program for the ultrasound system is essential. A brief review of prostate brachytherapy and ultrasound physics is provided, followed by a recommendation for elements to be included in a comprehensive test phantom. Specific test recommendations are presented, covering grayscale visibility, depth of penetration, axial and lateral resolution, distance measurement, area measurement, volume measurement, needle template/electronic grid alignment, and geometric consistency with the treatment planning computer.

  19. Molecular Evidence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Prostate Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Al-Marhoon, Mohammed S.; Ouhtit, Allal; Al-Abri, Aisha O.; Venkiteswaran, Krishna P.; Al-Busaidi, Qassim; Mathew, Josephkunju; Al-Haddabi, Ibrahim; Shareef, Omar; Aquil, Shahid; Rahman, Khalid; Al-Hashmi, Intisar; Gupta, Ishita; Ganguly, Shyam S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is detectable in both benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa). Epidemiological studies have shown significant associations between infective chronic prostatitis and prostatic carcinoma. Many bacteria have been found in the prostate of patients with chronic prostatitis, BPH, and PCa. Methods One hundred consecutive patients with prostate diseases were enrolled in the study. Detection of H. pylori DNA in prostate tissue from patients with BPH and PCa was performed using both immunohistochemistry and PCR, and the results were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Odds ratios and the Fisher Exact test were used for the analysis of the associations between the variables. Results Among the patients, 78% had BPH and 19% had PCa. While immunohistochemistry showed no positive sample for H. pylori, PCR combined with sequencing detected H. pylori DNA in prostate tissue samples from 5 patients. However, statistical analysis of the data showed that BPH and PCa are not significantly associated with the presence of H. pylori DNA in prostate tissue (odds ratio = 0.94, 95% confidence interval = 0.09–23.34, one-tailed Chi-square value = 0.660, p > 0.05). The limitation of this study was the small number of PCa patients. Conclusions This study provides, for the first time, molecular evidence of the presence of H. pylori DNA in prostatic tissue of patients with BPH and PCa. It paves the way for further comprehensive studies to examine the association of H. pylori infection with BPH and PCa. PMID:26889133

  20. Reducing infection rates after prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Pilatz, Adrian; Waliszewski, Przemyslaw; Weidner, Wolfgang; Johansen, Truls E Bjerklund

    2014-02-01

    Over the years, prostate biopsy has become the gold-standard technique for diagnosing prostate carcinoma. Worldwide, several million prostate biopsies are performed every year, most commonly using the transrectal approach. Preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis with fluoroquinolones has been shown to be effective for reducing infection rates. However, in recent years, an increase in febrile infection rates after transrectal prostate biopsy (from 1% to 4%) has been reported in retrospective and prospective studies. The predominant risk factor for infection seems to be the presence of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria in faeces. Patients at risk of fluoroquinolone resistance should receive carefully selected antibiotics at sufficient concentrations to be effective. Targeted prophylaxis after rectal flora swabbing has been shown to be efficacious compared with empirical antibiotic prophylaxis. Several forms of bowel preparations are under investigation, although none have yet been shown to significantly reduce infection rates. Perineal prostate biopsy is currently being evaluated as a strategy for preventing the inoculation of rectal flora, but limited data support this approach at present.

  1. [PSA variations in persons with latent prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, K; Danciu, M; Karakos, C; Sofras, F

    2008-01-01

    The introduction and common use of serum PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) has been demonstrated a useful index on latent prostate cancer diagnostic but in the same time has increased surgical intervention on histological forms with no eventual future evolution. Benign comportment of latent carcinomas being well known in advance, we correlated in vitro serum PSA from latent tumors, with the samples from a control group (prostates without signs of malignization). Levels of PSA were slightly elevated compared to age norms, mainly in cases with a large coexistent hypertrophy. Our reduced sample does not stand any statistic analysis, but this observation could eventually explain increased diagnostic and hyper-treatment of non-important carcinomas from a clinical point of view.

  2. 5-ALA-assisted photodynamic therapy in canine prostates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Muschter, Rolf; Knuechel, Ruth; Steinbach, Pia; Perlmutter, Aaron P.; Martin, Thomas; Baumgartner, Reinhold

    1996-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and interstitial thermotherapy are well known treatment modalities in urology. The approach of this study is to combine both to achieve a selective treatment procedure for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma. Measurements of thy in-vivo pharmacokinetics of 5-ALA induced porphyrins by means of fiber assisted ratiofluorometry showed a maximum fluorescence intensity at time intervals of 3 - 4 h post administration. Fluorescence microscopy at that time showed bright fluorescence in epithelial cells while in the stroma fluorescence could not be observed. Interstitial PDT using a 635-nm dye laser with an irradiation of 50 J/cm2 resulted in a nonthermic hemorrhagic lesion. The lesion size did not change significantly when an irradiation of 100 J/cm2 was used. The usefulness of PDT for treating BPH as well as prostate carcinoma has to be proven in further studies.

  3. Personnel neutron dosimetry at Department of Energy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Endres, G.W.R.; Selby, J.M.; Vallario, E.J.

    1980-08-01

    This study assesses the state of personnel neutron dosimetry at DOE facilities. A survey of the personnel dosimetry systems in use at major DOE facilities was conducted, a literature search was made to determine recent advances in neutron dosimetry, and several dosimetry experts were interviewed. It was concluded that personnel neutron dosimeters do not meet current needs and that serious problems exist now and will increase in the future if neutron quality factors are increased and/or dose limits are lowered.

  4. Thermoluminescence dosimetry measurements of brachytherapy sources in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Tailor, Ramesh; Tolani, Naresh; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2008-09-15

    Radiation therapy dose measurements are customarily performed in liquid water. The characterization of brachytherapy sources is, however, generally based on measurements made with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs), for which contact with water may lead to erroneous readings. Consequently, most dosimetry parameters reported in the literature have been based on measurements in water-equivalent plastics, such as Solid Water. These previous reports employed a correction factor to transfer the dose measurements from a plastic phantom to liquid water. The correction factor most often was based on Monte Carlo calculations. The process of measuring in a water-equivalent plastic phantom whose exact composition may be different from published specifications, then correcting the results to a water medium leads to increased uncertainty in the results. A system has been designed to enable measurements with TLDs in liquid water. This system, which includes jigs to support water-tight capsules of lithium fluoride in configurations suitable for measuring several dosimetric parameters, was used to determine the correction factor from water-equivalent plastic to water. Measurements of several {sup 125}I and {sup 131}Cs prostate brachytherapy sources in liquid water and in a Solid Water phantom demonstrated a correction factor of 1.039{+-}0.005 at 1 cm distance. These measurements are in good agreement with a published value of this correction factor for an {sup 125}I source.

  5. Visual laser ablation of the prostate (VLAP) with the prostascope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, Stefano; Cremona, M.; Ackaert, K. J.

    1997-12-01

    Introduction: Laser ablation of the prostatic tissue or laser prostatectomy, is used as an alternative method to traditional endoscopic resection of the prostate. The usual side-firing Nd:YAG laser fiber for the treatment of obstructive symptoms has operational difficulties, a high cost and often poor early results. Materials: We describe the laser coagulation of the prostate using a 600-um bare fiber inserted in a modified Albarran bridge which included at the tip, a new gold-plated deflectable reflector. The complete device passes through a 21Fr.rigid cysto- urethroscope. The system and the fiber can be used for several dozen treatments. The dosimetry was 2000 J per 1 cc of prostatic tissue. Methods: VLAP using the prostascope was performed on more than 70 men in one institution, and 150 in a second one, for obstructive symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. The parameter included AUA symptom score, flow rate, residual volume and complications. Data were obtained preoperatively and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment. Discussion: According to our data VLAP with this system is a save, minimal invasive and effective treatment. Results are comparable to other non-contact laser devices. As the gold-plated reflector is inexpensive and the standard bare fiber can be used repeatedly, the cost is less than of an usual side-firing laser fiber.

  6. A Preliminary Analysis of Calcifying Particles in the Serum and Prostates of Patients with Prostatic Inflammation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; Carlson, Grant; Kajander, E. Olavi; Warmflash, David; Taylor, Karen; Ayala, Gustavo; Shoskes, Daniel; Everett, Meg; Feedback, Dan; Ciftcioglu, Neva

    2006-01-01

    Chronic diseases of the prostate such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) & chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) have associated findings of chronic inflammation, despite a lack of causal relationship. Numerous attempts to define an infectious agent responsible for the clinical findings have been inconsistent. The possibility of an infectious agent, that has not been uncovered with routine culturing methods, forms the basis for this study. Serum from 940 healthy Finnish men were compared with serum from 40 Crohn's, 40 path dx prostatitis, & 40 with path dx carcinoma, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA), to detect antigens specific to Nanobacteria(NB) utilizing monoclonal antibodies (Ab) 5/3 and 8D10. This ELISA has not been validated for detecting NB-associated with clinical prostatic disease, yet cross-reactivity with other bacterial species is low. Immunohistochemistry was performed on de-paraffinized prostatic tissue slides, de-calcified with EDTA and stained with the DAKO Catalyzed Signal Amplification kit, employing 8D10 as the primary (target/antigen-detecting) Ab. The mean (plus or minus SD) & median concentrations of NB antigen (U/50 L) were 379.59 (plus or minus 219.28) & 640.00 for patients with prostatitis (BPH) vs 3.31 (plus or minus 3.55) & 2.94 for prostate adenocarcinoma, 1.88 (plus or minus 2.94) & 0.80 for Crohn's disease, & 7.43 (plus or minus 25.57) & 0.00 for patients with no clinical prostatic disease. Unpaired t-tests revealed statistically significant differences between the prostatitis (BPH) sera & each of the other groups with p less than 0.005, but no differences between the other groups themselves. Preliminary studies with immunohistochemistry & 3-D confocal microscopy reveal 16/24 tissue sections + for NB Ag in BPH vs. only 2/22 tissue sections with prostate cancer. The preliminary findings of this serum screening study suggest that NB antigen may be commonly found in the serum of patients with the pathological diagnosis

  7. [Prostate cancers and potential precancerous conditions: DNA cytometric investigations and interphase cytogenetics].

    PubMed

    Baretton, G; Vogt, T; Valina, C; Schneiderbanger, K; Löhrs, U

    1993-01-01

    The topic of this investigation was to compare precancerous lesions of the prostate (prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia -PIN- and atypical hyperplasia -AH-) and invasive carcinomas concerning DNA ploidy (image cytometry/ICM) and morphologically feasible chromosomal aberrations (interphase cytogenetics/NISH). The aim was to find clues to formal pathogenesis of prostatic cancer. Prostatic tissue of 76 patients (76 areas with carcinoma, 71 with PIN, and 12 with AH) was examined by means of ICM. In 44 cases of coincidental PIN and carcinoma, the gradings of PIN and carcinoma correlated. C-values, 2,5c-exceeding-rate, and aneuploidy rate turned out to increase in PIN and carcinoma with increasing grading (P < 0.01). In some of these cases NISH was carried out in serial sections by applying centromer-(X,Y,1,7,8,10,17,18) and telomer-(1p) specific DNA probes. The result of this approach was an increase in the number of chromosomal aberrations and chromosomes involved correlating with the grading. Our conclusion is that PIN 1 could be regarded as the precancerous lesion mainly to higher differentiated carcinomas, whereas PIN 2 and 3 should be considered a preneoplastic condition mainly of moderately and low differentiated carcinomas.

  8. Breast dosimetry in clinical mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevides, Luis Alberto Do Rego

    The objective of this study was show that a clinical dosimetry protocol that utilizes a dosimetric breast phantom series based on population anthropometric measurements can reliably predict the average glandular dose (AGD) imparted to the patient during a routine screening mammogram. In the study, AGD was calculated using entrance skin exposure and dose conversion factors based on fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness, mammography unit parameters and modifying parameters for homogeneous phantom (phantom factor), compressed breast lateral dimensions (volume factor) and anatomical features (anatomical factor). The protocol proposes the use of a fiber-optic coupled (FOCD) or Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter to measure the entrance skin exposure at the time of the mammogram without interfering with diagnostic information of the mammogram. The study showed that FOCD had sensitivity with less than 7% energy dependence, linear in all tube current-time product stations, and was reproducible within 2%. FOCD was superior to MOSFET dosimeter in sensitivity, reusability, and reproducibility. The patient fibroglandular content was evaluated using a calibrated modified breast tissue equivalent homogeneous phantom series (BRTES-MOD) designed from anthropomorphic measurements of a screening mammography population and whose elemental composition was referenced to International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report 44 tissues. The patient fibroglandular content, compressed breast thickness along with unit parameters and spectrum half-value layer were used to derive the currently used dose conversion factor (DgN). The study showed that the use of a homogeneous phantom, patient compressed breast lateral dimensions and patient anatomical features can affect AGD by as much as 12%, 3% and 1%, respectively. The protocol was found to be superior to existing methodologies. In addition, the study population anthropometric

  9. Poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 Protein Expression in Normal and Neoplastic Prostatic Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Salemi, M.; Galia, A.; Fraggetta, F.; La Corte, C.; Pepe, P.; La Vignera, S.; Improta, G.; Bosco, P.; Calogero, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    A genetic background has been implicated in the development of prostate cancer. Protein microarrays have enabled the identification of proteins, some of which associated with apoptosis, that may play a role in the development of such a tumor. Inhibition of apoptosis is a co-factor that contributes to the onset and progression of prostate cancer, though the molecular mechanisms are not entirely understood. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) gene is required for translocation of the apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria to the nucleus. Hence, it is involved in programmed cell death. Different PARP-1 gene expression has been observed in various tumors such as glioblastoma, lung, ovarian, endometrial, and skin cancers. We evaluated the expression of PARP-1 protein in prostatic cancer and normal prostate tissues by immunohistochemistry in 40 men with prostate cancer and in 37 normal men. Positive nuclear PARP-1 staining was found in all samples (normal prostate and prostate cancer tissues). No cytoplasmic staining was observed in any sample. PARP-1-positive cells resulted significantly higher in patients with prostate carcinoma compared with controls (P<0.001). PARP-1 over-expression in prostate cancer tissue compared with normal prostate suggests a greater activity of PARP-1 in these tumors. These findings suggest that PARP-1 expression in prostate cancer is an attempt to trigger apoptosis in this type of tumor similarly to what reported in other cancers. PMID:23807292

  10. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304... Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to... nuclear accident is possible, shall provide nuclear accident dosimetry for those individuals. (b)...

  11. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304... Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to... nuclear accident is possible, shall provide nuclear accident dosimetry for those individuals. (b)...

  12. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304... Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to... nuclear accident is possible, shall provide nuclear accident dosimetry for those individuals. (b)...

  13. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304... Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to... nuclear accident is possible, shall provide nuclear accident dosimetry for those individuals. (b)...

  14. 10 CFR 835.1304 - Nuclear accident dosimetry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Nuclear accident dosimetry. 835.1304 Section 835.1304... Nuclear accident dosimetry. (a) Installations possessing sufficient quantities of fissile material to... nuclear accident is possible, shall provide nuclear accident dosimetry for those individuals. (b)...

  15. MO-A-BRD-00: Current Trends in Y90-Microsphere Therapy: Delivery and Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    Yttrium-90 (Y90) microsphere therapy, a form of radiation therapy, is an increasingly popular option for care of patients with liver metastases or unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. The therapy directly delivers Y90 microspheres via the hepatic artery to disease sites. Following delivery, a vast majority of microspheres preferentially lodge in the capillary vessels due to their embolic size and targeted trans-arterial delivery – depositing up to 90% of its energy in the first 5 mm of tissue. There have been a number of advances in tomographic imaging within both interventional radiology and nuclear medicine that has advanced therapy planning techniques. Quantitative imaging of Y90 microsphere distribution post-therapy has also seen innovations that have led to improvements in tumor dosimetry and characterization of tumor response. A review of current trends and recent innovation in Y90 microsphere therapies will be presented. Learning Objectives: To present the imaging requirements for Y90 microsphere therapy planning To explain the standard dosimetry models used in Y90 microsphere therapy planning To report on advances in imaging for therapy planning and posttherapy assessment of tumor dosimetry and response.

  16. Dosimetry and Risk Assessment: Fundamental Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Darrell R.

    2005-12-29

    Radiation dosimetry is important for characterizing radiation exposures and for risk assessment. In a medical setting, dosimetry is important for evaluating the safety of administered radiopharmaceuticals and for planning the safe administration of therapeutic radionuclides. Environmental dosimetry helps establish the safety of radionuclide releases from electric power production and other human activities. Internal and external dosimetry help us understand the consequences of radiation exposure. The absorbed dose is the fundamental quantity in radiation dosimetry from which all other operational values in radiation protection are obtained. Equivalent dose to tissue and effective dose to the whole body are derivatives of absorbed dose and constructs of risk. Mathematical systems supported by computer software facilitate dose calculations and make it possible to estimate internal dose based on bioassay or other biokinetic data. Risk coefficients for radiation-induced cancer rely primarily on data from animal studies and long-term observations of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bomb survivors. Low-dose research shows that mechanisms of radiation interactions with tissue are dose-dependent, but the resulting biological effects are not necessarily linear with absorbed dose. Thus, the analysis of radiation effects and associated risks must account for the influences of microscopic energy distributions at the cellular level, dose-rate, cellular repair of sub-lethal radiation damage, and modifying factors such as bystander effects, adaptive response, and genomic instability.

  17. Chemical dosimetry system for criticality accidents.

    PubMed

    Miljanić, Saveta; Ilijas, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Ruder Bosković Institute (RBI) criticality dosimetry system consists of a chemical dosimetry system for measuring the total (neutron + gamma) dose, and a thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry system for a separate determination of the gamma ray component. The use of the chemical dosemeter solution chlorobenzene-ethanol-trimethylpentane (CET) is based on the radiolytic formation of hydrochloric acid, which protonates a pH indicator, thymolsulphonphthalein. The high molar absorptivity of its red form at 552 nm is responsible for a high sensitivity of the system: doses in the range 0.2-15 Gy can be measured. The dosemeter has been designed as a glass ampoule filled with the CET solution and inserted into a pen-shaped plastic holder. For dose determinations, a newly constructed optoelectronic reader has been used. The RBI team took part in the International Intercomparison of Criticality Accident Dosimetry Systems at the SILENE Reactor, Valduc, June 2002, with the CET dosimetry system. For gamma ray dose determination TLD-700 TL detectors were used. The results obtained with CET dosemeter show very good agreement with the reference values.

  18. Preclinical acute toxicity, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry and microPET imaging studies of [(18)F]fluorocholine in mice.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Marina B; Ferreira, Soraya M Z M D; Nascimento, Leonardo T C; Costa, Flávia M; Mendes, Bruno M; Ferreira, Andrea V; Malamut, Carlos; Silva, Juliana B; Mamede, Marcelo

    2016-10-01

    [(18)F]Fluorocholine ([(18)F]FCH) has been proven to be effective in prostate cancer. Since [(18)F]FCH is classified as a new radiopharmaceutical in Brazil, preclinical safety and efficacy data are required to support clinical trials and to obtain its approval. The aim of this work was to perform acute toxicity, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, radiation dosimetry and microPET imaging studies of [(18)F]FCH. The results could support its use in nuclear medicine as an important piece of work for regulatory in Brazil.

  19. Monte Carlo validation and optimisation of detector packaging for spectroscopic dosimetry for in vivo urethral dosimetry during low dose rate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Nourbehesht, L K; Cutajar, D L; Guatelli, S; Rosenfeld, A B

    2015-09-01

    The urethral mini-dosimeter, developed by the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, uses spectroscopic dosimetry to provide real time point dose measurements along the urethra during low dose rate prostate brachytherapy. Spectroscopic dosimetry uses the measured spectrum of the treatment isotope to estimate the dose rate at the point of measurement, however, the silicon mini-detectors employed in the urethral mini-dosimeter require water proof encapsulation which must be capable of providing electromagnetic shielding without greatly increasing the size of the probe. The introduction of non-tissue equivalent materials within the encapsulation can change the spectrum of radiation incident on the detector, which may influence the application of spectroscopic dosimetry within the urethral dosimeter. The Monte Carlo code Geant4 was adopted to study the effect of encapsulation on the operation of the urethral mini-dosimeter, as well as to determine whether an appropriate thickness of aluminium shielding was possible for electromagnetic screening. The depth dose response and angular dependence of the urethral mini-dosimeter with three thicknesses of aluminium shielding (20, 50, 100 µm) was compared with the urethral mini-dosimeter without aluminium shielding. The aluminium shielding had the effect of increasing the depth dose response (up to 3% within 30 mm and up to 5% within 50 mm), slightly reduced the azimuth angular dependence and slightly increased the polar angular dependence. The 100 µm thick shielding provided the least azimuth angular dependence (±2 %) and provided a polar angular dependence of ±1.4 % within the angles of -45° to 45°.

  20. Seventh Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.

    1981-12-01

    The Seventh Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted March 31-April 10, 1981, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dosimeters from 34 participating agencies were mounted on anthropomorphic phantoms and exposed to a range of low-level dose equivalents (1.5-15.0mSv neutron and 0.1-2.8 mSv gamma) which could be encountered during routine personnel monitoring in mixed radiation fields. The Health Physics Research Reactor, operating in the steady-state mode, served as the source of radiation for two equivalent sets of six separate exposures. Lucite and concrete shields along with the unshielded reactor provided three different neutron and gamma spectra for five of the exposures in each set. Results reported by the participating agencies showed that no single type of neutron dosimeter exhibited acceptable performance characteristics for all mixed-field environments encountered in this study. Film, TLD, and TLD-albed dosimeters were found to be inadequate for neutron dose equivalent measurements when large numbers of slow neutrons are present unless significant corrections are made to measured results. Track dosimeters indicated the least sensitivity to spectral characteristics, but did not always yield to the most accurate results. Gamma dose measurements showed that TLD-700 dosimeters produced significantly more accurate results than film dosimeters which tend to overestimate gamma doses in mixed radiation fields.

  1. Patient dosimetry in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Sören

    2015-07-01

    In diagnostic nuclear medicine, the biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical (actually of the radionuclide) is determined for a number of representative patients. At therapy, it is essential to determine the patient's individual biokinetics of the radiopharmaceutical in order to calculate the absorbed doses to critical normal organs/tissues and to the target volume(s) with high accuracy. For the diagnostic situations, there is still a lack of quantitative determinations of the organ/tissue contents of radiopharmaceuticals and their variation with time. Planar gamma camera imaging using the conjugate view technique combined with a limited number of SPECT/CT images is the main method for such studies. In a similar way, PET/CT is used for 3D image-based internal dosimetry for PET substances. The transition from stylised reference phantoms to voxel phantoms will lead to improved dose estimates for diagnostic procedures. Examples of dose coefficients and effective doses for diagnostic substances are given. For the therapeutic situation, a pre-therapeutic low activity administration is used for quantitative measurements of organ/tissue distribution data by a gamma camera or a SPECT- or PET-unit. Together with CT and/or MR images this will be the base for individual dose calculations using Monte Carlo technique. Treatments based on administered activity should only be used if biological variations between patients are small or if a pre-therapeutic activity administration is impossible.

  2. Effect of intraprostatic blood flow on laser energy penetration in the canine prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, Robert S., III; Hubbard, Bradley S.; Rawlings, Clarence A.

    1995-05-01

    Visual Laser Ablation of the Prostate has been shown to be an effective treatment for the relief of bladder outlet obstruction secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Dosimetry studies using the potato and live canine model are commonly used to advocate application of the Nd:YAG energy into the prostatic tissue. Questions have been raised as to the accuracy of tissue heat penetration in such models based on the scatter and diffusion caused by variations in blood flow and tissue differences from one prostate to another. Thus a study was done to evaluate differences, it any, in heat energy penetration caused by blood flow in the prostate. Mature canine prostates were lased in the (1) live dog, (2) euthanized dog, and (3) en bloc resected canine prostates immersed in a water bath of 101 degree(s)F. Prostates were lased using 60 watts for 60 seconds in the 2, 4, 8, and 10 o'clock positions. One prostate model was lased in the 8 and 10 o'clock positions while alive and then removed in bloc, immersed in a water bath at 101 degree(s)F and lased at the 2 and 4 o'clock positions. A third prostate, having been completely removed two days prior to lasing and frozen, was immersed in a water bath at 101 degree(s)F and lased. The findings indicate in the resected prostate loss of the ring of thermal damage, however, a zone of coagulative necrosis which is consistent with that seen in the live model. Thus blood flow does not appear to have a significant effect on Nd:YAG depth of penetration.

  3. mTOR pathway activation is a favorable prognostic factor in human prostate adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stelloo, Suzan; Sanders, Joyce; Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; de Jong, Jeroen; Peters, Dennis; van Leenders, Geert J.L.H.; Jenster, Guido; Bergman, Andries M.; Zwart, Wilbert

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer patients with localized disease are treated with curative intent. However, the disease will recur in approximately 30% of patients with a high incidence of morbidity and mortality. Prognostic biomarkers are needed to identify patients with high risk of relapse. mTOR pathway activation is reported in prostate cancer, but clinical trials testing efficacy of mTOR inhibitors were unsuccessful. To explain this clinical observation, we studied the expression and prognostic impact of mTOR-S2448 phosphorylation in localized prostate carcinomas. mTOR-S2448 phosphorylation is indicative for an activated mTOR pathway in prostate cancer. Surprisingly, the mTOR signaling pathway is activated specifically in prostate cancer patients with a favorable outcome. Since tumors from poor-outcome patients have low levels of mTOR-S2448 phosphorylation, this may explain why mTOR inhibitors proved unsuccessful in prostate cancer trials. PMID:27096957

  4. 3-D Imaging Based, Radiobiological Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric; Wahl, Richard; He, Bin; Prideaux, Andrew; Hobbs, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy holds promise as a new treatment against cancer. Advances in imaging are making it possible to evaluate the spatial distribution of radioactivity in tumors and normal organs over time. Matched anatomical imaging such as combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT have also made it possible to obtain tissue density information in conjunction with the radioactivity distribution. Coupled with sophisticated iterative reconstruction algorithims, these advances have made it possible to perform highly patient-specific dosimetry that also incorporates radiobiological modeling. Such sophisticated dosimetry techniques are still in the research investigation phase. Given the attendant logistical and financial costs, a demonstrated improvement in patient care will be a prerequisite for the adoption of such highly-patient specific internal dosimetry methods. PMID:18662554

  5. INTEGRATED OPERATIONAL DOSIMETRY SYSTEM AT CERN.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Gérald; Pedrosa, Fernando Baltasar Dos Santos; Carbonez, Pierre; Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Ninin, Pierre; Fuentes, Eloy Reguero; Roesler, Stefan; Vollaire, Joachim

    2016-11-24

    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, upgraded its operational dosimetry system in March 2013 to be prepared for the first Long Shutdown of CERN's facilities. The new system allows the immediate and automatic checking and recording of the dosimetry data before and after interventions in radiation areas. To facilitate the analysis of the data in context of CERN's approach to As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA), this new system is interfaced to the Intervention Management Planning and Coordination Tool (IMPACT). IMPACT is a web-based application widely used in all CERN's accelerators and their associated technical infrastructures for the planning, the coordination and the approval of interventions (work permit principle). The coupling of the operational dosimetry database with the IMPACT repository allows a direct and almost immediate comparison of the actual dose with the estimations, in addition to enabling the configuration of alarm levels in the dosemeter in function of the intervention to be performed.

  6. Dosimetry procedures for an industrial irradiation plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grahn, Ch.

    Accurate and reliable dosimetry procedures constitute a very important part of process control and quality assurance at a radiation processing plant. γ-Dose measurements were made on the GBS 84 irradiator for food and other products on pallets or in containers. Chemical dosimeters wre exposed in the facility under conditions of the typical plant operation. The choice of the dosimeter systems employed was based on the experience in chemical dosimetry gained over several years. Dose uniformity information was obtained in air, spices, bulbs, feeds, cosmetics, plastics and surgical goods. Most products currently irradiated require dose uniformity which can be efficiently provided by pallet or box irradiators like GBS 84. The radiation performance characteristics and some dosimetry procedures are discussed.

  7. Dosimetry of the Atomic Bomb Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, W.K.; Failla, P.

    1981-12-01

    A brief account of the presentations and discussions at the Late Effects Workshop on Dosimetry of the Atomic Bomb Survivors held in conjunction with the 29th Annual Meeting of the Radiation Reserch Society in Minneapolis, MN, on May 32, 1981 is presented. The following five papers are briefly reviewed: 1)Radiobiological significance of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki data by V.P. Bond; 2)Revised Dose Estimates at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, by W.E. Loewe; 3)Review of dosimetry for the Japanese atomic bomb survivors by G.D. Kerr; 4)Ichiban: numberoriginal studies, by J. Auxier; and 5)NCRP's involvement in the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Dosimetry, by H.O. Wyckoff. (JMT)

  8. Protocol for emergency EPR dosimetry in fingernails.

    PubMed

    Trompier, F; Kornak, L; Calas, C; Romanyukha, A; Leblanc, B; Mitchell, C A; Swartz, H M; Clairand, I

    2007-08-01

    There is an increased need for after-the-fact dosimetry because of the high risk of radiation exposures due to terrorism or accidents. In case of such an event, a method is needed to make measurements of dose in a large number of individuals rapidly and with sufficient accuracy to facilitate effective medical triage. Dosimetry based on EPR measurements of fingernails potentially could be an effective tool for this purpose. This paper presents the first operational protocols for EPR fingernail dosimetry, including guidelines for collection and storage of samples, parameters for EPR measurements, and the method of dose assessment. In a blinded test of this protocol application was carried out on nails freshly sampled and irradiated to 4 and 20 Gy; this protocol gave dose estimates with an error of less than 30%.

  9. Small Field: dosimetry in electron disequilibrium region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Timothy C.

    2010-11-01

    Small fields are more commonly used for radiation therapy because of the development of IMRT, stereotactic radiosurgery, and other special equipments such as Cyberknife and Tomotherapy. The dosimetry in the sub-centimeter field can result in substantial uncertainties because of the presence of electron disequilibrium due to the large dose gradients in the field. It is further complicated by the introduction of various radiation detectors, which usually perturb the conditions of disequilibrium. Hence additional corrections are required to maintain the dosimetric accuracy previously achieved for standard radiation dosimetry. A review of small field dosimetry provides some insights into the methods to characterize the detector convolution kernel and other methods to characterize detector perturbation effect.

  10. Czech results at criticality dosimetry intercomparison 2002.

    PubMed

    Frantisek, Spurný; Jaroslav, Trousil

    2004-01-01

    Two criticality dosimetry systems were tested by Czech participants during the intercomparison held in Valduc, France, June 2002. The first consisted of the thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) (Al-P glasses) and Si-diodes as passive neutron dosemeters. Second, it was studied to what extent the individual dosemeters used in the Czech routine personal dosimetry service can give a reliable estimation of criticality accident exposure. It was found that the first system furnishes quite reliable estimation of accidental doses. For routine individual dosimetry system, no important problems were encountered in the case of photon dosemeters (TLDs, film badge). For etched track detectors in contact with the 232Th or 235U-Al alloy, the track density saturation for the spark counting method limits the upper dose at approximately 1 Gy for neutrons with the energy >1 MeV.

  11. Reactor Dosimetry State of the Art 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorbraak, Wim; Debarberis, Luigi; D'Hondt, Pierre; Wagemans, Jan

    2009-08-01

    Oral session 1: Retrospective dosimetry. Retrospective dosimetry of VVER 440 reactor pressure vessel at the 3rd unit of Dukovany NPP / M. Marek ... [et al.]. Retrospective dosimetry study at the RPV of NPP Greifswald unit 1 / J. Konheiser ... [et al.]. Test of prototype detector for retrospective neutron dosimetry of reactor internals and vessel / K. Hayashi ... [et al.]. Neutron doses to the concrete vessel and tendons of a magnox reactor using retrospective dosimetry / D. A. Allen ... [et al.]. A retrospective dosimetry feasibility study for Atucha I / J. Wagemans ... [et al.]. Retrospective reactor dosimetry with zirconium alloy samples in a PWR / L. R. Greenwood and J. P. Foster -- Oral session 2: Experimental techniques. Characterizing the Time-dependent components of reactor n/y environments / P. J. Griffin, S. M. Luker and A. J. Suo-Anttila. Measurements of the recoil-ion response of silicon carbide detectors to fast neutrons / F. H. Ruddy, J. G. Seidel and F. Franceschini. Measurement of the neutron spectrum of the HB-4 cold source at the high flux isotope reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory / J. L. Robertson and E. B. Iverson. Feasibility of cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy for dose rate monitoring on nuclear reactor / H. Tomita ... [et al.]. Measuring transistor damage factors in a non-stable defect environment / D. B. King ... [et al.]. Neutron-detection based monitoring of void effects in boiling water reactors / J. Loberg ... [et al.] -- Poster session 1: Power reactor surveillance, retrospective dosimetry, benchmarks and inter-comparisons, adjustment methods, experimental techniques, transport calculations. Improved diagnostics for analysis of a reactor pulse radiation environment / S. M. Luker ... [et al.]. Simulation of the response of silicon carbide fast neutron detectors / F. Franceschini, F. H. Ruddy and B. Petrović. NSV A-3: a computer code for least-squares adjustment of neutron spectra and measured dosimeter responses / J. G

  12. Prescription dose in permanent {sup 131}Cs seed prostate implants

    SciTech Connect

    Yue Ning; Heron, Dwight E.; Komanduri, Krishna; Huq, M. Saiful

    2005-08-15

    Recently, {sup 131}Cs seeds have been introduced for prostate permanent seed implants. This type of seed has a relatively short half-life of 9.7 days and has its most prominent emitted photon energy peaks in the 29-34 keV region. Traditionally, 145 and 125 Gy have been prescribed for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seed prostate implants, respectively. Since both the half-life and dosimetry characteristics of {sup 131}Cs seed are quite different from those of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd, the appropriate prescription dose for {sup 131}Cs seed prostate implant may well be different. This study was designed to use a linear quadratic radiobiological model to determine an appropriate dose prescription scheme for permanent {sup 131}Cs seed prostate implants. In this model, prostate edema was taken into consideration. Calculations were also performed for tumors of different doubling times and for other related radiobiological parameters of different values. As expected, the derived prescription dose values were dependent on type of tumors and types of edema. However, for prostate cancers in which tumor cells are relatively slow growing and are reported to have a mean potential doubling time of around 40 days, the appropriate prescription dose for permanent {sup 131}Cs seed prostate implants was determined to be: 127{sub -12}{sup +5}Gy if the experiences of {sup 125}I seed implants were followed and 121{sub -3}{sup +0}Gy if the experiences of {sup 103}Pd seed implants were followed.

  13. A Novel MRI Marker for Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J. Stafford, R. Jason; Bankson, James A.; Li Chun; Swanson, David A.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Martirosyan, Karen S.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the optimal imaging modality for the prostate and surrounding critical organ structures. However, on MRI, the titanium radioactive seeds used for brachytherapy appear as black holes (negative contrast) and cannot be accurately localized. We sought to develop an encapsulated contrast agent marker (ECAM) with high-signal intensity on MRI to permit accurate localization of radioactive seeds with MRI during and after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We investigated several agents with paramagnetic and superparamagnetic properties. The agents were injected into titanium, acrylic, and glass seeds, which were linked together in various combinations and imaged with MRI. The agent with the greatest T1-weighted signal was tested further in a canine prostate and agarose phantom. Studies were performed on a 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner. Results: The cobalt-chloride complex contrast (C4) agent with stoichiometry (CoCl{sub 2}){sub 0.8}(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}NO{sub 2}){sub 0.2} had the greatest T1-weighted signal (positive contrast) with a relaxivity ratio >1 (r{sub 2}/r{sub 1} = 1.21 {+-} 0.29). Acrylic-titanium and glass-titanium seed strands were clearly visualized with the encapsulated contrast agent marker. Conclusion: We have developed a novel ECAM that permits positive identification of the radioactive seeds used for prostate brachytherapy on MRI. Preclinical in vitro phantom studies and in vivo canine studies are needed to further optimize MRI sequencing techniques to facilitate MRI-based dosimetry.

  14. Risk of malignant melanoma in men with prostate cancer: Nationwide, population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Frederik B; Folkvaljon, Yasin; Garmo, Hans; Robinson, David; Loeb, Stacy; Ingvar, Christian; Lambe, Mats; Stattin, Pär

    2016-05-01

    An increased risk of malignant melanoma has been observed in men with prostate cancer. To assess potential shared risk factors and confounding factors, we analysed risk of melanoma in men with prostate cancer including information on tumor characteristics and demographics including socioeconomic status. In The Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden, risk of melanoma was assessed in a cohort of men with prostate cancer and in a comparison cohort of prostate-cancer free men. Data on prostate cancer risk category, melanoma stage, basal cell carcinoma, location of residency, and socioeconomic status were obtained from nationwide registers. Melanoma was diagnosed in 830/108,145 (0.78%) men with prostate cancer and in 3,699/556,792 (0.66%) prostate cancer-free men. In multivariable Cox regression models, men with prostate cancer had a significantly increased risk of melanoma (HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.09-1.27), and so had married men, men with high education and income, and men residing in southern Sweden. The strongest associations were observed for stage 0 melanoma in men with low-risk prostate cancer (HR 1.45, 1.14-1.86), high education (HR 1.87, 1.60-2.18) and top income (HR 1.61, 1.34-1.93), respectively, whereas there was no association between these factors and late-stage melanoma. Men with prostate cancer also had an increased risk of basal cell carcinoma (HR 1.18, 1.15-1.22). In conclusion, men with low-risk prostate cancer, high education, high income and residency in southern Sweden had an increased risk of early-stage melanoma.

  15. Advances in personnel neutron dosimetry: part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Vallario, E.; Faust, L.

    1983-08-01

    A continuation of the advances in personnel neutron dosimetry research programs and technology transfer reviews work on active dosimeters, electronic devices that determine the dose equivalent to a worker during an exposure to neutron radiation. Active dosemeters are routinely used for gamma radiation dosimetry. Experience with neutron-sensitive pocket rem-meters at several DOE laboratories covers three prototypes. Pocket rem-meters work well for detecting neutrons over a wide energy range. They give instantaneous readout of the accumulated neutron dose-equivalent. 1 figure.

  16. Practical neutron dosimetry at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    McCaslin, J.B.; Thomas, R.H.

    1980-10-01

    Dosimetry at high energy particle accelerators is discussed with emphasis on physical measurements which define the radiation environment and provide an immutable basis for the derivation of any quantities subsequently required for risk evaluation. Results of inter-laboratory dosimetric comparisons are reviewed and it is concluded that a well-supported systematic program is needed which would make possible detailed evaluations and inter-comparisons of instruments and techniques in well characterized high energy radiation fields. High-energy dosimetry is so coupled with radiation transport that it is clear their study should proceed concurrently.

  17. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1989-04-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products (/sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 54/Mn, and /sup 59/Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation; and bioassay follow-up treatment. 64 refs., 42 figs., 118 tabs.

  18. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1991-07-01

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products ({sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and {sup 59}Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium,. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation and bioassay follow-up treatment. 78 refs., 35 figs., 115 tabs.

  19. Applicability of Topaz Composites to Electron Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomfim, K. S.; Souza, D. N.

    2010-11-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetric topaz properties have been investigated and the results have shown that this mineral presents characteristics of a good dosimeter mainly in doses evaluation in radiotherapy with photons beams in radiotherapy. Typical applications of thermoluminescent dosimeters in radiotherapy are: in vivo dosimetry on patients (either as a routine quality assurance procedure or for dose monitoring in special cases); verification of treatment techniques; dosimetry audits; and comparisons among hospitals. The mean aim of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of topaz-Teflon pellets as thermoluminescent dosimeters in high-energy electron beams used to radiotherapy. Topaz-Teflon pellets were used as TLD.

  20. SNL RML recommended dosimetry cross section compendium

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.; Luera, T.F.; VanDenburg, J.

    1993-11-01

    A compendium of dosimetry cross sections is presented for use in the characterization of fission reactor spectrum and fluence. The contents of this cross section library are based upon the ENDF/B-VI and IRDF-90 cross section libraries and are recommended as a replacement for the DOSCROS84 multigroup library that is widely used by the dosimetry community. Documentation is provided on the rationale for the choice of the cross sections selected for inclusion in this library and on the uncertainty and variation in cross sections presented by state-of-the-art evaluations.

  1. Recent progresses in tritium radioecology and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Galeriu, D.; Davis, P.; Raskob, W.; Melintescu, A.

    2008-07-15

    In this paper, some aspects of recent progress in tritium radioecology and dosimetry are presented, with emphasis on atmospheric releases to terrestrial ecosystems. The processes involved in tritium transfer through the environment are discussed, together with the current status of environmental tritium models. Topics include the deposition and reemission of HT and HTO, models for the assessment of routine and accidental HTO emissions, a new approach to modeling the dynamics of tritium in mammals, the dose consequences of tritium releases and aspects of human dosimetry. The need for additional experimental data is identified, together with the attributes that would be desirable in the next generation of tritium codes. (authors)

  2. Prostate cancer - treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... well. Proton therapy is another kind of radiation therapy used to treat prostate cancer. Proton beams target the tumor precisely, so there is less damage to the surrounding tissue. This therapy is not widely accepted or used. Prostate Brachytherapy ...

  3. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those ... PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have ...

  4. Enlarged prostate - after care

    MedlinePlus

    BPH - self-care; Benign prostatic hypertrophy - self-care; Benign prostatic hyperplasia - self-care ... Your health care provider may have you take a medicine called alpha-1- blocker. Most people find that these drugs help ...

  5. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000907.htm Cryotherapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing features ... first treatment for prostate cancer. What Happens During Cryotherapy Before the procedure, you will be given medicine ...

  6. PROSTATE REGULATION: MODELING ENDOGENOUS ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ALTERATIONS IN PROSTATE WEIGHT AND HISTOPATHOLOGY ARE OBSERVED FOLLOWING IN UTERO, PUBERTAL AND ADULT EXPOSURES TO ANTIANDROGENS. ALTERATIONS IN PROSTATE WEIGHT AND HISTOPATHOLOGY ARE OBSERVED FOLLOWING IN UTERO, PUBERTAL AND ADULT EXPOSURES TO ANTIANDROGENS.

  7. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  8. Boosting antitumor responses of T lymphocytes infiltrating human prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Kasic, Tihana; Gri, Giorgia; Gallana, Keti; Borsellino, Giovanna; Marigo, Ilaria; Battistini, Luca; Iafrate, Massimo; Prayer-Galetti, Tommaso; Pagano, Francesco; Viola, Antonella

    2005-04-18

    Immunotherapy may provide valid alternative therapy for patients with hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer. However, if the tumor environment exerts a suppressive action on antigen-specific tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), immunotherapy will achieve little, if any, success. In this study, we analyzed the modulation of TIL responses by the tumor environment using collagen gel matrix-supported organ cultures of human prostate carcinomas. Our results indicate that human prostatic adenocarcinomas are infiltrated by terminally differentiated cytotoxic T lymphocytes that are, however, in an unresponsive status. We demonstrate the presence of high levels of nitrotyrosines in prostatic TIL, suggesting a local production of peroxynitrites. By inhibiting the activity of arginase and nitric oxide synthase, key enzymes of L-arginine metabolism that are highly expressed in malignant but not in normal prostates, reduced tyrosine nitration and restoration of TIL responsiveness to tumor were achieved. The metabolic control exerted by the tumor on TIL function was confirmed in a transgenic mouse prostate model, which exhibits similarities with human prostate cancer. These results identify a novel and dominant mechanism by which cancers induce immunosuppression in situ and suggest novel strategies for tumor immunotherapy.

  9. Enlarged Prostate (BPH)

    MedlinePlus

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine out of the body. As men age, their prostate grows bigger. If it gets too large, it ...

  10. The Mayak Worker Dosimetry System (MWDS-2013): Internal Dosimetry Results.

    PubMed

    Vostrotin, Vadim; Birchall, Alan; Zhdanov, Alexey; Puncher, Matthew; Efimov, Alexander; Napier, Bruce; Sokolova, Alexandra; Miller, Scott; Suslova, Klara

    2016-09-24

    The distribution of calculated internal doses has been determined for 8043 Mayak Production Associate (Mayak PA) workers. This is a subset of the entire cohort of 25 757 workers, for whom monitoring data are available. Statistical characteristics of point estimates of accumulated doses to 17 different tissues and organs and the uncertainty ranges were calculated. Under the MWDS-2013 dosimetry system, the mean accumulated lung dose was 185 ± 594 mGy (geometric mean = 28 mGy; geometric standard deviation = 9.32; median value = 31 mGy; maximum value = 8980 mGy). The ranges of relative standard uncertainty were from 40 to 2200% for accumulated lung dose, from 25-90% to 2600-3000% for accumulated dose to different regions of respiratory tract, from 13-22% to 2300-2500% for systemic organs and tissues. The Mayak PA workers accumulated internal plutonium lung dose is shown to be close to log normal. The accumulated internal plutonium dose to systemic organs was close to a log triangle. The dependency of uncertainty of accumulated absorbed lung and liver doses on the dose estimates itself is also shown. The accumulated absorbed doses to lung, alveolar-interstitial region, liver, bone surface cells and red bone marrow calculated both with MWDS-2013 and MWDS-2008 have been compared. In general, the accumulated lung doses increased by a factor of 1.8 in median value, while the accumulated doses to systemic organs decreased by factor of 1.3-1.4 in median value. For the cases with identical initial data, accumulated lung doses increased by a factor of 2.1 in median value, while accumulated doses to systemic organs decreased by 8-13% in median value. For the cases with both identical initial data and all of plutonium activity in urine measurements above the decision threshold, accumulated lung doses increased by a factor of 2.7 in median value, while accumulated doses to systemic organs increased by 6-12% in median value.

  11. Hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, G A

    1999-05-01

    Hepatitis C infection is associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, and progress has been made in a number of areas. Transgenic mice lines expressing the hepatitis C core protein develop hepatic steatosis, adenomas, and hepatocellular carcinomas, with no significant hepatitis or fibrosis. This implies that hepatitis C can lead directly to malignant transformation. A new lesion, irregular regeneration, has been described in chronic hepatitis C infection and is associated with a 15-fold increase in the relative risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma. A minority of patients with hepatitis C-related hepatocellular carcinoma have intense lymphocytic infiltration of the cancer, a feature associated with a better prognosis. Several studies have confirmed the association between large cell dysplasia and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, large cell dysplasia may not be a premalignant lesion and instead may be a marker for premalignant alterations elsewhere in the liver. Oral contraceptives previously have been linked to an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. A large multicenter European case-control study has shown minimal increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma with use of steroidal contraception. Tamoxifen had shown promise in the management of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. However, a randomized placebo-controlled study of 477 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma found no benefit from tamoxifen. In a preliminary study, however, octreotide has shown improved survival and quality of life in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. Finally, interferon treatment continues to be linked to a reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with hepatitis C. These studies generally are not randomized, and a randomized prospective study is required to address this issue.

  12. Altered expression of p53, but not Rb, is involved in canine prostatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pagliarone, Simone; Frattone, Luca; Pirocchi, Valeria; Della Salda, Leonardo; Palmieri, Chiara

    2016-04-01

    Abnormalities in the retinoblastoma (Rb) and p53 tumour suppressor gene have been frequently detected in human and canine cancers, but never investigated in canine prostate cancer, considered a good model for the advanced and aggressive androgen-resistant prostate cancer in men. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of Rb and p53 in 6 normal canine prostates, 15 canine prostates with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 10 prostatic carcinomas (PCs). In all normal samples, p53 was expressed in low number of epithelial cells, while a greater number of positive cells were observed in BPH and PC. The mean number of positive cells was statistically significantly higher in PCs than normal and hyperplastic prostates. A cytoplasmic or nucleo-cytoplasmic staining was observed in 5 out of 10 PCs. Rb protein was expressed in high number of normal, hyperplastic and neoplastic cells without a statistically significant differences. Considering that Rb is frequently lost in human prostate cancer, we suggest that Rb is not involved in canine prostatic carcinogenesis. On the other hand, the increased expression of p53 that corresponds to genetic defects in the p53 gene may be associated with the malignant growth of canine prostate cancer, conferring an apoptosis-resistant phenotype.

  13. Quantitative GSTP1 methylation and the detection of prostate adenocarcinoma in sextant biopsies.

    PubMed

    Harden, Susan V; Sanderson, Harriette; Goodman, Steven N; Partin, Alan A W; Walsh, Patrick C; Epstein, Jonathan I; Sidransky, David

    2003-11-05

    Hypermethylation of the 5' promoter region of the glutathione S-transferase pi gene (GSTP1) occurs at a very high frequency in prostate adenocarcinoma. We compared the results of blinded histologic review of sextant biopsy samples from 72 excised prostates with those obtained using a quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction assay (QMSP) for GSTP1. Formal surgical pathologic review of the resected prostates was used to determine the number of patients with (n = 61) and without (n = 11) prostate cancer. Histology alone detected prostate carcinoma with 64% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI] = 51% to 76%) and 100% specificity (95% CI = 72% to 100%), whereas the combination of histology and GSTP1 QMSP at an assay threshold greater than 10 detected prostate carcinoma with 75% sensitivity (95% CI = 63% to 86%) and 100% specificity (95% CI = 72% to 100%), an 11% improvement (95% CI = 5% to 22%) in sensitivity over histology alone. The combination of histology and GSTP1 QMSP at an assay threshold greater than 5 detected prostate adenocarcinoma with 79% sensitivity (95% CI = 68% to 89%), a 15% improvement (95% CI = 7% to 26%) over histology alone. Thus, GSTP1 QMSP improved the sensitivity of histologic review of random needle biopsies for prostate cancer diagnosis. Further studies should determine whether detection of GSTP1 hypermethylation in a biopsy sample with normal histology indicates the need for an early repeat biopsy at the same site.

  14. Portal dosimetry for VMAT using integrated images obtained during treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, James L. Hanson, Ian M.; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Portal dosimetry provides an accurate and convenient means of verifying dose delivered to the patient. A simple method for carrying out portal dosimetry for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is described, together with phantom measurements demonstrating the validity of the approach. Methods: Portal images were predicted by projecting dose in the isocentric plane through to the portal image plane, with exponential attenuation and convolution with a double-Gaussian scatter function. Appropriate parameters for the projection were selected by fitting the calculation model to portal images measured on an iViewGT portal imager (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) for a variety of phantom thicknesses and field sizes. This model was then used to predict the portal image resulting from each control point of a VMAT arc. Finally, all these control point images were summed to predict the overall integrated portal image for the whole arc. The calculated and measured integrated portal images were compared for three lung and three esophagus plans delivered to a thorax phantom, and three prostate plans delivered to a homogeneous phantom, using a gamma index for 3% and 3 mm. A 0.6 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber was used to verify the planned isocentric dose. The sensitivity of this method to errors in monitor units, field shaping, gantry angle, and phantom position was also evaluated by means of computer simulations. Results: The calculation model for portal dose prediction was able to accurately compute the portal images due to simple square fields delivered to solid water phantoms. The integrated images of VMAT treatments delivered to phantoms were also correctly predicted by the method. The proportion of the images with a gamma index of less than unity was 93.7% ± 3.0% (1SD) and the difference between isocenter dose calculated by the planning system and measured by the ionization chamber was 0.8% ± 1.0%. The method was highly sensitive to errors in monitor units and

  15. Prostate-specific Membrane Antigen-targeted Ligand Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Immunohistochemical Findings in a Patient With Synchronous Metastatic Penile and Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Froehner, Michael; Kuithan, Friederike; Zöphel, Klaus; Heberling, Ulrike; Laniado, Michael; Wirth, Manfred P

    2017-03-01

    A 68-year-old man presented with synchronous metastatic penile and prostate cancer. 68Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen-targeted ligand positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PSMA-PET/CT) revealed tracer uptake in inguinal, pelvic, and retroperitoneal metastases. Lymph node biopsies and immunohistochemical staining revealed that both cancers involved the lymph nodes and expressed PSMA. In the deposits of penile squamous cell carcinoma, PSMA expression was seen in tumor vessels and may explain the PSMA-PET/CT positivity of inguinal nodes involved in squamous cell carcinoma. The interpretation of imaging in synchronous tumors should take this fact into consideration.

  16. Intensity-modulated salvage radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost for local recurrence of prostate carcinoma: a pilot study on the place of PET-choline for guiding target volume delineation

    PubMed Central

    Wahart, Aurélien; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Vallard, Alexis; Geissler, Benjamin; Ben Mrad, Majed; Falk, Alexander T; Prevot, Nathalie; de Laroche, Guy; Rancoule, Chloé; Chargari, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to report the first cases of salvage radiotherapy (RT) using the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) targeted on choline positron emission tomography (PET) uptake in a local recurrent prostate cancer, after a radical prostatectomy. Methods: Four patients received salvage irradiation for biochemical relapse that occurred after the initial radical prostatectomy. The relapse occurred from 10 months to 6 years with PSA levels ranging from 2.35 to 4.86 ng ml−1. For each patient, an 18F-choline PET-CT showed a focal choline uptake in prostatic fossa, with standardized uptake value calculated on the basis of predicted lean body mass (SUL) max of 3.3–6.8. No involved lymph node or distant metastases were diagnosed. IMRT doses were of 62.7 Gy (1.9 Gy/fraction, 33 fractions), with a SIB of 69.3 Gy (2.1 Gy/fraction, 33 fractions) to a PET-guided target volume. Results: Acute toxicities were limited. We observed no gastrointestinal toxicity ≥grade 2 and only one grade 2 genitourinary toxicity. At 1-month follow-up evaluation, no complication and a decrease in PSA level (6.8–43.8% of the pre-therapeutic level) were reported. After 4 months, a decrease in PSA level was obtained for all the patients, ranging from 30% to 70%. At a median follow-up of 15 months, PSA level was controlled for all the patients, but one of them experienced a distant lymph node recurrence. Conclusion: Salvage irradiation to the prostate bed with SIB guided by PET-CT is feasible, with biological efficacy and no major acute toxicity. Advances in knowledge: IMRT with PET-oriented SIB for salvage treatment of prostate cancer is possible, without major acute toxicity. PMID:26648528

  17. A-bomb survivor dosimetry update

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    1982-06-01

    A-bomb survivor data have been generally accepted as applicable. Also, the initial radiations have tended to be accepted as the dominant radiation source for all survivors. There was general acceptance of the essential reliability of both the biological effects data and the causative radiation dose values. There are considerations casting doubt on these acceptances, but very little quantification of th implied uncertainties has been attempted. The exception was A-bomb survivor dosimetry, where free-field kerma values for initial radiations were thought to be accurate to about 30%, and doses to individual survivors were treated as effectively error-free. In 1980, a major challenge to the accepted A-bomb survivor dosimetry was announced, and was quickly followed by a succession of explanations and displays showing the soundness of that challenge. In fact, a complete replacement set of free-field kerma values was provided which was suitable for use in constructing an entire new dosimetry for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The new values showed many changes greater than the accepted 30% uncertainty. An approximate new dosimetry was indeed constructed, and used to convert existing leukemia cause-and-effect data from the old to the new dose values, by way of assessing the impact. (ERB)

  18. Personnel radiation dosimetry symposium: program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    The purpose was to provide applied and research dosimetrists with sufficient information to evaluate the status and direction of their programs relative to the latest guidelines and techniques. A technical program was presented concerning experience, requirements, and advances in gamma, beta, and neutron personnel dosimetry.

  19. Distribution effectiveness for space radiation dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    A simplified risk basis and a theory of hematological response are presented and applied to the problem of dosimetry in the manned space program. Unlike previous studies, the current work incorporates radiation exposure distribution effects into its definition of dose equivalent. The fractional cell lethality model for prediction of hematological response is integral in the analysis.

  20. Computational Techniques of Electromagnetic Dosimetry for Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu

    There has been increasing public concern about the adverse health effects of human exposure to electromagnetic fields. This paper reviews the rationale of international safety guidelines for human protection against electromagnetic fields. Then, this paper also presents computational techniques to conduct dosimetry in anatomically-based human body models. Computational examples and remaining problems are also described briefly.

  1. Development of A-bomb survivor dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    An all important datum in risk assessment is the radiation dose to individual survivors of the bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The first set of dose estimates for survivors was based on a dosimetry system developed in 1957 by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These Tentative 1957 Doses (T57D) were later replaced by a more extensive and refined set of Tentative 1965 Doses (T65D). The T65D system of dose estimation for survivors was also developed at ORNL and served as a basis for risk assessment throughout the 1970s. In the late 1970s, it was suggested that there were serious inadequacies with the T65D system, and these inadequacies were the topic of discussion at two symposia held in 1981. In early 1983, joint US- Japan research programs were established to conduct a thorough review of all aspects of the radiation dosimetry for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors. A number of important contributions to this review were made by ORNL staff members. The review was completed in 1986 and a new Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) was adopted for use. This paper discusses the development of the various systems of A-bomb survivor dosimetry, and the status of the current DS86 system as it is being applied in the medical follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors and their offspring.

  2. Dosimetry implant for treating restenosis and hyperplasia

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh; Gonzales, Gilbert R; Howell, Roger W; Bolch, Wesley E; Adzic, Radoslav

    2014-09-16

    The present invention discloses a method of selectively providing radiation dosimetry to a subject in need of such treatment. The radiation is applied by an implant comprising a body member and .sup.117mSn electroplated at selected locations of the body member, emitting conversion electrons absorbed immediately adjacent selected locations while not affecting surrounding tissue outside of the immediately adjacent area.

  3. From ``micro`` to ``macro`` internal dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1994-06-01

    Radiation dose is the amount of radiation energy deposited per unit mass of absorbing tissue. Internal dosimetry applies to assessments of dose to internal organs from penetrating radiation sources outside the body and from radionuclides taken into the body. Dosimetry is essential for correlating energy deposition with biological effects that are observed when living tissues are irradiated. Dose-response information provides the basis for radiation protection standards and risk assessment. Radiation interactions with living matter takes place on a microscopic scale, and the manifestation of damage may be evident at the cellular, multi-cellular, and even organ levels of biological organization. The relative biological effectiveness of ionization radiation is largely determined by the spatial distribution of energy deposition events within microscopic as well as macroscopic biological targets of interest. The spatial distribution of energy imparted is determined by the spatial distribution of radionuclides and properties of the emitted charged-particle radiation involved. The nonuniformity of energy deposition events in microscopic volumes, particularly from high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, results in large variations in the amount of energy imparted to very small volumes or targets. Microdosimetry is the study of energy deposition events at the cellular level. Macrodosimetry is a term for conventional dose averaging at the tissue or organ level. In between is a level of dosimetry sometimes referred to as multi-cellular dosimetry. The distinction between these terms and their applications in assessment of dose from internally deposited radionuclides is described.

  4. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy... American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The calibration must have been performed within...

  5. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy... American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The calibration must have been performed within...

  6. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy... American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The calibration must have been performed within...

  7. 10 CFR 35.630 - Dosimetry equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dosimetry equipment. 35.630 Section 35.630 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting Remote Afterloader Units, Teletherapy... American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The calibration must have been performed within...

  8. Patient-specific internal radionuclide dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Tsougos, Ioannis; Loudos, George; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Theodorou, Kiki; Kappas, Constantin

    2010-02-01

    The development of patient-specific treatment planning systems is of outmost importance in the development of radionuclide dosimetry, taking into account that quantitative three-dimensional nuclear medical imaging can be used in this regard. At present, the established method for dosimetry is based on the measurement of the biokinetics by serial gamma-camera scans, followed by calculations of the administered activity and the residence times, resulting in the radiation-absorbed doses of critical organs. However, the quantification of the activity in different organs from planar data is hampered by inaccurate attenuation and scatter correction as well as because of background and organ overlay. In contrast, dosimetry based on quantitative three-dimensional data can be more accurate and allows an individualized approach, provided that all effects that degrade the quantitative content of the images have been corrected for. In addition, inhomogeneous organ accumulation of the radionuclide can be detected and possibly taken into account. The aim of this work is to provide adequate information on internal emitter dosimetry and a state-of-the-art review of the current methodology and future trends.

  9. Dosimetry of an Implantable 252 Californium Source

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, G.D. Jr.

    2001-08-29

    The radiation dose from 252 Californium needles designed for use as a source of neutrons for radiotherapy has been measured. The dosimetry information presented in this paper will enable clinical studies of neutron radiotherapy with 252 Californium needles to be planned and begun.

  10. Protocol for emergency EPR dosimetry in fingernails

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is an increased need for after-the fact dosimetry because of the high risk of radiation exposures due to terrorism or accidents. In case of such an event, a method is needed to make measurements of dose in a large number of individuals rapidly and with sufficient accuracy to facilitate effect...

  11. Linking Estrogens, Prostatitis and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    provide the first direct evidence linking phy siologic estr ogen up- regulation an d pr ostate ma lignancy via inflammation. Ellem, Stuart J...inflammation and malignancy in the prostate. The identification of estr ogen as a cause of prostatitis, as well as a fac tor in the development of

  12. Childhood Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Sara O

    2010-09-01

    Carcinoma in children differs from that occurring in adults. It is far rarer and represents only a small fraction of all pediatric cancer diagnoses. Pediatric sarcomas were among the first tumors in which recurrent chromosomal aberrations were discovered. Once defined, these recurrent aberrations, many of them translocations, became incorporated into the pathologist's diagnostic armamentarium. In the past several years, defining chromosomal rearrangements have been identified in pediatric carcinomas as well, and this has become a new frontier in pathologic diagnosis. This article provides an overview of pediatric carcinoma as well as a detailed review of selected types of carcinoma that in particular can present diagnostic difficulty to the practicing pathologist and illustrate new and emerging concepts in pediatric carcinoma.

  13. The molecular taxonomy of primary prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary There is substantial heterogeneity among primary prostate cancers, evident in the spectrum of molecular abnormalities and its variable clinical course. As part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we present a comprehensive molecular analysis of 333 primary prostate carcinomas. Our results revealed a molecular taxonomy in which 74% of these tumors fell into one of seven subtypes defined by specific gene fusions (ERG, ETV1/4, FLI1) or mutations (SPOP, FOXA1, IDH1). Epigenetic profiles showed substantial heterogeneity, including an IDH1-mutant subset with a methylator phenotype. Androgen receptor (AR) activity varied widely and in a subtype-specific manner with SPOP and FOXA1 mutant tumors having the highest levels of AR-induced transcripts. 25% of the prostate cancers had a presumed actionable lesion in the PI3K or MAPK signaling pathways, and DNA repair genes were inactivated in 19%. Our analysis reveals molecular heterogeneity among primary prostate cancers, as well as potentially actionable molecular defects. PMID:26544944

  14. The Molecular Taxonomy of Primary Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    2015-11-05

    There is substantial heterogeneity among primary prostate cancers, evident in the spectrum of molecular abnormalities and its variable clinical course. As part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we present a comprehensive molecular analysis of 333 primary prostate carcinomas. Our results revealed a molecular taxonomy in which 74% of these tumors fell into one of seven subtypes defined by specific gene fusions (ERG, ETV1/4, and FLI1) or mutations (SPOP, FOXA1, and IDH1). Epigenetic profiles showed substantial heterogeneity, including an IDH1 mutant subset with a methylator phenotype. Androgen receptor (AR) activity varied widely and in a subtype-specific manner, with SPOP and FOXA1 mutant tumors having the highest levels of AR-induced transcripts. 25% of the prostate cancers had a presumed actionable lesion in the PI3K or MAPK signaling pathways, and DNA repair genes were inactivated in 19%. Our analysis reveals molecular heterogeneity among primary prostate cancers, as well as potentially actionable molecular defects.

  15. 68Ga PSMA PET/CT in a Rare Case of Metastatic Adenocarcinoma Prostate Presenting as Numb Chin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Pillai, M R A; Gopal, Renuka; Thomas, Boben

    2017-03-01

    A 68-year-old man presented with right-side facial numbness. MRI showed an extra-axial mass infiltrating the right temporal bone. It was debulked surgically, and histopathology revealed metastatic adenocarcinoma. Ga PSMA PET/CT done in view of increased PSA levels and clinically suspicious hard lesion in prostate showed primary lesion in left side of prostate with metastases to the right temporal bone. Primary carcinoma of the prostate and metastases to the right temporal bone were proven histopathologically. Our case highlights the usefulness of Ga PSMA PET/CT in identifying the primary site in suspected prostate cancer and mapping the metastatic sites.

  16. Inhibitory effects of megakaryocytic cells in prostate cancer skeletal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Koh, Amy J; Wang, Zhengyan; Soki, Fabiana N; Park, Serk In; Pienta, Kenneth J; McCauley, Laurie K

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer cells commonly spread through the circulation, but few successfully generate metastatic foci in bone. Osteoclastic cellular activity has been proposed as an initiating event for skeletal metastasis. Megakaryocytes (MKs) inhibit osteoclastogenesis, which could have an impact on tumor establishment in bone. Given the location of mature MKs at vascular sinusoids, they may be the first cells to physically encounter cancer