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  1. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); Prostate enlargement resources; BPH resources ... organizations provide information on benign prostatic hyperplasia ( prostate enlargement ): National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- www. ...

  2. Pharmacotherapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, P; Indudhara, R

    1994-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a benign neoplasm of the prostate seen in men of advancing age. Microscopic evidence of the disorder is seen in about 70% of men by 70 years of age, whereas symptoms requiring some form of surgical intervention occur in 30% of men during their lifetime. Although the exact cause of benign prostatic hyperplasia is not clear, it is well recognized that high levels of intraprostatic androgens are required for the maintenance of prostatic growth. In recent years, extensive surveys of patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate reveal an 18% incidence of morbidity that has essentially not changed in the past 30 years. This procedure is also the second highest reimbursed surgical therapy under Medicare. These findings have resulted in an intensive search for alternative therapies for prostatic hyperplasia. An alternative that has now been well defined is the use of alpha-adrenergic blockers to relax the prostatic urethra. This is based on findings that a major component of benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms is spasm of the prostatic urethra and bladder neck, which is mediated by the alpha-adrenergic nerves. A second approach is to block androgens involved in maintaining prostate growth. Several such drugs are now available for clinical use, and we discuss their side effects and use. We also include the newer recommendations on evaluating benign prostatic hyperplasia that are cost-effective yet comprehensive. Images PMID:7528957

  3. Prostatic Artery Embolization as a Primary Treatment for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Preliminary Results in Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Antunes, Alberto Azoubel; Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Mauricio da; Oliveira Cerri, Luciana Mendes de; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Marcelino, Antonio Sergio Zafred; Freire, Geraldo Campos; Moreira, Airton Mota; Srougi, Miguel; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2010-04-15

    Symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) typically occurs in the sixth and seventh decades, and the most frequent obstructive urinary symptoms are hesitancy, decreased urinary stream, sensation of incomplete emptying, nocturia, frequency, and urgency. Various medications, specifically 5-{alpha}-reductase inhibitors and selective {alpha}-blockers, can decrease the severity of the symptoms secondary to BPH, but prostatectomy is still considered to be the traditional method of management. We report the preliminary results for two patients with acute urinary retention due to BPH, successfully treated by prostate artery embolization (PAE). The patients were investigated using the International Prostate Symptom Score, by digital rectal examination, urodynamic testing, prostate biopsy, transrectal ultrasound (US), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Uroflowmetry and postvoid residual urine volume complemented the investigation at 30, 90, and 180 days after PAE. The procedure was performed under local anesthesia; embolization of the prostate arteries was performed with a microcatheter and 300- to 500-{mu}m microspheres using complete stasis as the end point. One patient was subjected to bilateral PAE and the other to unilateral PAE; they urinated spontaneously after removal of the urethral catheter, 15 and 10 days after the procedure, respectively. At 6-month follow-up, US and MRI revealed a prostate reduction of 39.7% and 47.8%, respectively, for the bilateral PAE and 25.5 and 27.8%, respectively, for the patient submitted to unilateral PAE. The early results, at 6-month follow-up, for the two patients with BPH show a promising potential alternative for treatment with PAE.

  4. Benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, R J

    1997-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of benign prostatic hyperplasia reflects a complex interplay between benign prostatic enlargement, which will affect almost all men by the age of 80, and the resulting outlet obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms. The disease is now known to adversely affect the quality of life of around one man in three over the age of 50. New medical treatments and new surgical interventions are challenging the previous standard treatment of transurethral resection of prostate, which continues to have a morbidity of 17% and some mortality. Primary care will be increasingly involved in shared care with particular emphasis on monitoring of patients on watchful waiting medical therapy- and following operative intervention. PMID:9196969

  5. Medical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia: Results from a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Bishr, Mohamed; Boehm, Katharina; Trudeau, Vincent; Tian, Zhe; Dell’Oglio, Paolo; Schiffmann, Jonas; Jeldres, Claudio; Sun, Maxine; Shariat, Sharokh F.; Graefen, Markus; Saad, Fred; Karakiewicz, Pierre I.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In men with bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), medical treatment usually represents the first line. We examined the patterns of medical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in the Montreal metropolitan area, within the context of a case control study focusing on incident prostate cancer. Methods: Cases were 1933 men with incident prostate cancer. Population controls included 1994 age-matched men. In-person interviews collected sociodemographic characteristics and medical history, including BPH diagnosis, its duration, and type of medical treatment received. Baseline characteristics were compared by the chi-square likelihood test for categorical variables and by the students t-test for continuously coded variables. Results: Overall, 1120 participants had history of BPH; of those 53.7% received medical treatment for BPH. Individuals with medically treated BPH, compared to individuals with medically untreated BPH, were older at index date [mean: 66.9 vs. 64.9 years, p<0.001)] and at diagnosis of BPH [mean: 62.3 vs. 60.3 years, p<0.001]. They also had a longer duration of BPH-history [mean: 4.7 vs. 4.0 years, p=0.02]. Regarding medical treatment, mono-therapy was more often used than combination therapy [87.6% vs. 12.4%, p<0.001]. Alpha-blockers (69.9%) were most commonly used as monotherapy, followed by 5alpha-reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) (26.6%). Alpha-blockers plus 5ARIs were the most common combination therapy (97.3%). Conclusions: Despite evidence from randomized, controlled trials for better efficacy with use of combination therapy, monotherapy consisting of alpha-blockers or 5ARI, in that order, is most frequently used. Additionally, 5ARI use was more common than previously reported (27% vs. 15%). PMID:26977208

  6. Prostatic Stromal Hyperplasia with Atypia

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Ryan C.; Wu, Kevin J.; Cheville, John C.; Thiel, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Prostatic stromal hyperplasia with atypia (PSHA) is a rare histologic finding diagnosed incidentally on prostate biopsies, transurethral resection specimens, and radical prostatectomy specimens. PSHA has a bizarre histologic appearance and these lesions often raise concern for sarcoma; however, their clinical course is indolent and does not include extraprostatic progression. We discuss a case of PHSA discovered on prostate biopsy performed for an abnormal digital rectal examination and review the literature on this rare pathologic finding. PMID:23781384

  7. Prostatic stromal hyperplasia with atypia.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Ryan C; Wu, Kevin J; Cheville, John C; Thiel, David D

    2013-01-01

    Prostatic stromal hyperplasia with atypia (PSHA) is a rare histologic finding diagnosed incidentally on prostate biopsies, transurethral resection specimens, and radical prostatectomy specimens. PSHA has a bizarre histologic appearance and these lesions often raise concern for sarcoma; however, their clinical course is indolent and does not include extraprostatic progression. We discuss a case of PHSA discovered on prostate biopsy performed for an abnormal digital rectal examination and review the literature on this rare pathologic finding. PMID:23781384

  8. Treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Portis, A. J.; Mador, D. R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine current treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia with emphasis on randomized, clinical trials and our current management approach. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Benign prostatic hyperplasia remains difficult to define clinically or measure objectively. As a result, research has been fairly weak. With newer treatments, however, more definitive studies have been reported. MAIN FINDINGS: Transurethral resection of the prostate remains the criterion standard for severe disease. Watchful waiting, medical management, or early surgical intervention are all valid options for moderate disease and should be tailored to the characteristics and desires of individual patients. Recent minimally invasive surgical techniques, such as microwave and laser surgery, have not yet achieved the quality of evidence to be generally recommended. CONCLUSIONS: Management of benign prostatic hyperplasia should be individualized to patients' circumstances and personal choices. PMID:9266125

  9. Peripheral hormone levels in controls and patients with prostatic cancer or benign prostatic hyperplasia: results from the Dutch-Japanese case-control study.

    PubMed

    de Jong, F H; Oishi, K; Hayes, R B; Bogdanowicz, J F; Raatgever, J W; van der Maas, P J; Yoshida, O; Schroeder, F H

    1991-07-01

    The possible relationship between changes in peripheral hormone levels and the occurrence of prostatic pathology was studied in a case-control study, involving estimation of various plasma hormones in 368 Dutch and 258 Japanese men, who were grouped as controls and patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia, focal prostatic carcinoma, or clinically evident prostatic carcinoma. Results of a number of previous, smaller studies concerning interrelationships between hormone levels in elderly men were confirmed within the Dutch and Japanese groups. Plasma levels of testosterone and estradiol were significantly lower in the Japanese men, when compared with those in Dutch men. Probably as a result of this difference in testosterone levels, the ratio between serum levels of testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) was decreased in the Japanese men, while the ratio between the concentrations of dihydrotestosterone and testosterone was increased. These differences were also found when results from Japanese subgroups (controls and patients with prostate pathology) were compared with those from the Dutch subgroups. There were no significant differences in plasma androgen levels between Japanese or Dutch prostate cancer cases and their respective control subgroups. These findings do not support a correlation between the lower plasma testosterone levels and a lower incidence of prostate cancer in the Japanese men. Furthermore, no significant differences were found between salivary levels of testosterone or the ratio between testosterone and SHBG in the various Dutch subgroups. In Japanese benign prostatic hyperplasia patients, the testosterone to SHBG ratio was significantly increased. In conclusion, the results of this retrospective, cross-sectional study do not indicate that hormonal levels play a primary role in the origin or promotion of prostatic abnormalities. The finding of a lower plasma testosterone in the Japanese men, however, remains suggestive

  10. Oxidative stress in prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Udensi, Udensi K; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic hyperplasia (PH) is a common urologic disease that affects mostly elderly men. PH can be classified as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or prostate cancer (PCa) based on its severity. Oxidative stress (OS) is known to influence the activities of inflammatory mediators and other cellular processes involved in the initiation, promotion and progression of human neoplasms including prostate cancer. Scientific evidence also suggests that micronutrient supplementation may restore the antioxidant status and hence improve the clinical outcomes for patients with BPH and PCa. This review highlights the recent studies on prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis, and examines the role of OS on the molecular pathology of prostate cancer progression and treatment. PMID:27609145

  11. [Evalution of benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Desgrandchamps, François

    2005-11-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a disorder of aging men and according to reasons for consultation its incidence is continually increasing in parallel with the constant increase in life expectancy. Recommendations about its management have been made by numerous national and international, scientific authorities and those responsible for public health. However, despite a rationale based on regularly published data, there are many disparities between them and they are only partially followed up in routine practice. The purpose of a working group during the "2nd Interfaces in Urology" was to make a new assessment on this disorder with regard to the most recent data and existing recommendations, in order to offer clinicians a clearer attitude for the prescription of the initial evaluation of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  12. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: from Bench to Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hee Ju

    2012-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a prevalent disease, especially in old men, and often results in lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This chronic disease has important care implications and financial risks to the health care system. LUTS are caused not only by mechanical prostatic obstruction but also by the dynamic component of obstruction. The exact etiology of BPH and its consequences, benign prostatic enlargement and benign prostatic obstruction, are not identified. Various theories concerning the causes of benign prostate enlargement and LUTS, such as metabolic syndrome, inflammation, growth factors, androgen receptor, epithelial-stromal interaction, and lifestyle, are discussed. Incomplete overlap of prostatic enlargement with symptoms and obstruction encourages focus on symptoms rather than prostate enlargement and the shifting from surgery to medicine as the treatment of BPH. Several alpha antagonists, including alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin, and terazosin, have shown excellent efficacy without severe adverse effects. In addition, new alpha antagonists, silodosin and naftopidil, and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors are emerging as BPH treatments. In surgical treatment, laser surgery such as photoselective vaporization of the prostate and holmium laser prostatectomy have been introduced to reduce complications and are used as alternatives to transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and open prostatectomy. The status of TURP as the gold standard treatment of BPH is still evolving. We review several preclinical and clinical studies about the etiology of BPH and treatment options. PMID:22468207

  13. Medical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Stephen S; Fitzpatrick, John M

    2007-01-01

    Pharmaceutical preparations are commonly used for benign prostate hyperplasia. This article reviews the current understanding of the natural history of the condition and the literature regarding medical treatment. PMID:17308208

  14. Steroid hormone receptors in prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Khalid, B A; Nurshireen, A; Rashidah, M; Zainal, B Y; Roslan, B A; Mahamooth, Z

    1990-06-01

    One hundred and six prostatic tissue samples obtained from transurethral resection were analysed for androgen and estrogen receptors. In 62 of these, progesterone and glucocorticoid receptors were also assayed. Steroid receptors were assayed using single saturation dose 3H-labelled ligand assays. Ninety percent of the 97 prostatic hyperplasia tissues and six of the nine prostatic carcinoma tissues were positive for androgen receptors. Estrogen receptors were only present in 19% and 33% respectively. Progesterone receptors were present in 70% of the tissues, but glucocorticoid receptors were present in only 16% of prostatic hyperplasia and none in prostatic carcinoma. PMID:1725553

  15. [Benign prostatic hyperplasia: background and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Gratzke, C; Schlenker, B; Weidlich, P; Seitz, M; Reich, O; Stief, C G

    2007-08-16

    Lower UrinaryTracts Symptoms (LUTS) due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) represent an increasing prevalent condition in ageing men. Patients often seek primarily consultation at their general practitioner. Aetiology and natural history of LUTS due to BPH have not been completely clarified. The development of symptomatic LUTS is age-dependent and determined to varying degrees by the presence of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH), Benign Prostatic Enlargement (BPE) as well as Bladder Outlet Obstruction (BOO). A causal relationship does not always exist. Basis for a specific medical or surgical treatment in the individual patient with LUTS due to BPH is an exact diagnosis by the practising urologist. PMID:17912862

  16. Current Laser Treatments for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hwancheol; Song, Sang Hoon

    2010-01-01

    The latest technical improvements in the surgical armamentarium are remarkable. In particular, advancements in the urologic field are so exceptional that we could observe the flare-up of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer and laser prostatectomy for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) and holmium laser prostatectomy are the most generalized options for laser surgery of BPH, and both modalities have shown good postoperative results. In comparison to transurethral prostatectomy (TURP), they showed similar efficacy and a much lower complication rate in randomized prospective clinical trials. Even in cases of large prostates, laser prostatectomy showed comparable efficacy and safety profiles compared to open prostatectomy. From a technical point of view, PVP is considered to be an easier technique for the urologist to master. Furthermore, patients can be safely followed up in an outpatient clinic. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) mimics open prostatectomy because the adenomatous tissue is peeled off the surgical capsule in both procedures. Therefore, HoLEP shows notable volume reduction of the prostate similar to open prostatectomy with fewer blood transfusions, shorter hospital stay, and cost reduction regardless of prostate size. Outcomes of laser prostatectomy for BPH are encouraging but sometimes are unbalanced because safety and feasibility studies were reported mainly for PVP, whereas long-term data are mostly available for HoLEP. We need longer-term randomized clinical data to identify the reoperation rate of PVP and to determine which procedure is the ideal alternative to TURP and open prostatectomy for each patient. PMID:21165192

  17. Microwave Treatment of Prostate Cancer and Hyperplasia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey; Ngo, Phong; Carl, J. R.; Raffoul, George

    2005-01-01

    Microwave ablation in the form of microwave energy applied to a heart muscle by a coaxial catheter inserted in a vein in the groin area can be used to heat and kill diseased heart cells. A microwave catheter has been developed to provide deep myocardial ablation to treat ventricular tachycardia by restoring appropriate electrical activity within the heart and eliminating irregular heartbeats. The resulting microwave catheter design, which is now being developed for commercial use in treating ventricular tachycardia, can be modified to treat prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Inasmuch as the occurrence of BPH is increasing currently 350,000 operations per year are performed in the United States alone to treat this condition this microwave catheter has significant commercial potential.

  18. Treating benign prostatic hyperplasia with botulinum neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Brisinda, G; Vanella, S; Marniga, G; Crocco, A; Maria, G

    2011-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) has been increasingly used in the interventional treatment of several disorders; the use of this agent has extended to a plethora of conditions including focal dystonia, spasticity, inappropriate contraction in most gastrointestinal sphincters, eye movement disorders, hyperhidrosis, genitourinary disorders and aesthetically undesirable hyperfunctional facial lines. In addition, BoNT is being investigated for the control of pain, and for the management of tension or migraine headaches and myofascial pain syndrome. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition in ageing men; the goal of therapy is to reduce the lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with BPH and to improve the quality of life. However, medical treatment, including drugs that relax smooth muscle within the prostate and drugs that shrink the gland are not totally effective or without complications. The standard surgical treatment for BPH is progressively changing to minimally invasive therapies, but none of them has provided clear results. The use of BoNT-A to inhibit the autonomic efferent effects on prostate growth and contraction, and inhibit the abnormal afferent effects on prostate sensation, might be an alternative treatment for BPH. BoNT injections have several advantages over drugs and surgical therapies in the management of intractable or chronic disease; systemic pharmacologic effects are rare, permanent destruction of tissue does not occur, and graded degrees of relaxation may be achieved by varying the dose injected. In this paper, clinical experience over the last years with BoNT in BPH impaired patients will be illustrated.

  19. New Treatments for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Skepasts, Peter K.; Lee, Laurence M.

    1991-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is the most common of all neoplasms. The most common treatment is prostatectomy, but other available therapies include androgen antagonists, α-adrenergic blockers, anticholinergic agents, prostate dilation with a ballon, and urethral stents. Prostatectomy is likely to remain the standard of care for the foreseeable future because it is safe and much more effective than all other current and experimental forms of therapy. PMID:21229073

  20. Clinical Evaluation of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    McVary, Kevin T

    2003-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common neoplastic condition afflicting men and constitutes a major factor impacting male health. Clinical evaluation to assess the presence and degree of voiding dysfunction and/or the role of BPH in its presence has an increasingly broad spectrum of treatment goals. The goals of the evaluation of such men are to identify the patient’s voiding or, more appropriately, urinary tract problems, both symptomatic and physiologic; to establish the etiologic role of BPH in these problems; to evaluate the necessity for and probability of success and risks of various therapeutic approaches; and to present the results of these assessments to the patient so he can make an informed decision about management recommendations and available alternatives. PMID:16985961

  1. Clinical Evaluation of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    McVary, Kevin T

    2003-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common neoplastic condition afflicting men and constitutes a major factor impacting male health. Clinical evaluation to assess the presence and degree of voiding dysfunction and/or the role of BPH in its presence has an increasingly broad spectrum of treatment goals. The goals of the evaluation of such men are to identify the patient’s voiding or, more appropriately, urinary tract problems, both symptomatic and physiologic; to establish the etiologic role of BPH in these problems; to evaluate the necessity for and probability of success and risks of various therapeutic approaches; and to present the results of these assessments to the patient so he can make an informed decision about management recommendations and available alternatives. PMID:16985968

  2. Testosterone and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Thomas R; Chughtai, Bilal; Kaplan, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    The use of testosterone to treat the symptoms of late-onset hypogonadal men has increased recently due to patient and physician awareness. However, concerns regarding the effect of testosterone on the prostate, in particular any possible effect on the risk of prostate cancer have prompted further research in this regard. Surprisingly, numerous retrospective or small, randomized trials have pointed to a possible improvement in male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients treated with testosterone. The exact mechanism of this improvement is still debated but may have a close relationship to metabolic syndrome. For the clinician, the results of these studies are promising but do not constitute high levels of evidence. A thorough clinical examination (including history, examination and laboratory testing of testosterone) should be undertaken before considering the diagnosis of late-onset hypogonadism or instigating treatment for it. Warnings still remain on the testosterone supplement product labels regarding the risk of urinary retention and worsening LUTS, and these should be explained to patients. PMID:25337845

  3. [Benign prostatic hyperplasia: prostatectomy and alternatives].

    PubMed

    Sulser, T

    1995-06-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a common disease of men and will lead in most cases to micturition difficulties. Up to now 2 or 4 of 10 men in their sixties are operated for BPH. As standard treatment we know the transurethral resection of the prostate and in some cases of very big adenomas the open adenomectomy carried out in a suprapubic or retropubic way. However, in view of a rare, but as a result of these treatments appearing morbidity we have to ask ourselves whether the surgical resection of the obstructive prostatic tissue remains the only way of treatment. For several years now apart from drug therapy there have also been applied less invasive alternatives. Whether these alternatives of little side effect and further complications are equally effective for the treatment of the obstructive BPH is to verify. This paper provides a general view of the possibilities of the surgical interventions as well as of their alternatives. Because of a lack of dates as to the efficiency of particular procedures a final judgement is outstanding in most cases. Where possible we hear of particular alternatives, though fully promoted, being nothing but a passing tendency. This is certainly true of the hyperthermy, the balloon dilatation and the urethral implants. These by now various conspicuous necrotising procedures (transurethral microwave thermotherapy, laser-ablation, high intensity focused ultrasound, transurethral needle-ablation) are by now in prospective random studies still subject to extensive clinical tests. The question whether one of these alternatives will one day be apt to exceed the TURP as "golden standard" of BPH-treatment, that remains as far as now the question to be put. The advantages of the necrotising procedures, at present highly recommended, consist in the first place of a rare intra- and postoperative morbidity with a simultaneous lack of mortality. These procedures can be performed as a outpatient or as a short stationary treatment and sometime

  4. Transurethral microwave thermotherapy for management of benign prostatic hyperplasia: results of the United States Prostatron Cooperative Study.

    PubMed

    Blute, M L; Tomera, K M; Hellerstein, D K; McKiel, C F; Lynch, J H; Regan, J B; Sankey, N E

    1993-11-01

    The primary objective of the study was to determine the safety and efficacy of transurethral microwave thermotherapy for the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. From March to August 1991, 150 patients were entered into a multi-site study and treated with transurethral microwave thermotherapy under a Food and Drug Administration approved protocol. Only patients with symmetrical trilobar or bilobar prostatic hypertrophy, peak flow rate of less than 15 cc per second (on 2 voided volumes of 150 cc or greater) and a total Madsen symptom score of more than 8 were treated. Transurethral microwave thermotherapy was performed with a 20F catheter and 1,296 MHz. microwave antenna for 60 minutes. The mean power achieved for this single session was 32.1 watts, with a mean power at maximum urethral temperature of 41.1 watts. Mean urethral temperature was 44.3C and the mean rectal temperature was 42.2C. The rectal and urethral temperatures were continuously monitored. Mean peak urinary flow rates, Madsen symptom score, post-void residual volume and improvement in motivating symptom to seek treatment were measured at 6 weeks, and 3, 6 and 12 months. Mean peak urinary flow rates improved 33% at 12 months (p < 0.0001). Overall, the mean Madsen symptom score improved 61% (p < 0.0001). The obstructive score and the irritative score improved 67% and 43%, respectively. Of 17 patients 12 (71%) reported improvement in weak stream when that was the motivating symptom to seek treatment. Of 28 men 18 (64%) reported improvement in nocturia, while 11 of 30 (37%) reported improvement in daytime frequency and 12 of 17 (71%) reported improvement in urgency. There was no statistically significant difference in post-void residual volume at 12 months from baseline. The treatment was well tolerated by all patients, and side effects were considered mild and transitory. Our study demonstrates the safety, effectiveness, patient tolerability and durability of transurethral microwave

  5. Prostatic Artery Embolization for Enlarged Prostates Due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. How I Do It

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco C.; Antunes, Alberto A.

    2013-12-15

    Prostatic artery embolization (PAE) has emerged as an alternative to surgical treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Patient selection and refined technique are essential for good results. Urodynamic evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging are very important and technical limitations are related to elderly patients with tortuous and atherosclerotic vessels, anatomical variations, difficulty visualizing and catheterizing small diameter arteries feeding the prostate, and the potential risk of bladder and rectum ischemia. The use of small-diameter hydrophilic microcatheters is mandatory. Patients can be treated safely by PAE with low rates of side effects, reducing prostate volume with clinical symptoms and quality of life improvement without urinary incontinence, ejaculatory disorders, or erectile dysfunction. A multidisciplinary approach with urologists and interventional radiologists is essential to achieve better results.

  6. Effect of Boerhaavia diffusa in experimental prostatic hyperplasia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Bhavin A.; Desai, Niket Y.; Patel, Paras K.; Joshi, Shrikant V.; Shah, Dinesh R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Present investigation was undertaken to study the effectiveness of hydroalcoholic extract of roots of Boerhaavia diffusa in experimental benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in rats using various animal models. Materials and Methods: BPH in rats was induced by subcutaneous injection of testosterone (5 mg/kg) daily for 28 days. Rats were divided in to five groups (six rats each). A negative control group received arachis oil (1 ml/kg s.c.) and four groups were injected testosterone. These four groups were further divided into reference group (finasteride 1 mg/kg), model group (testosterone), study group A (B. diffusa 100 mg/kg), and study group B (B. diffusa 250 mg/kg). On the 29th day, rats were sacrificed and body weight, prostate weight, bladder weight, and serum testosterone level were measured and histological studies were carried out. Further in vitro analysis of B. diffusa extract on contractility of isolated rat vas deferens and prostate gland, produced by exogenously administered agonists were carried out. All results were expressed as mean ± SEM. 0 Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test. Results: B. diffusa (100 mg/kg) treatment for 28 days resulted in significant inhibition of prostate growth (P < 0.05). Drug extract did not have significant change on serum testosterone level. Histopathological analysis of prostate gland supported above results. Results of in vitro experiment suggest that extracts had attenuated the contractile responses of isolated vas deferens and prostate gland to exogenously applied agonists. Conclusion: The results suggested that treatment with B. diffusa may improve symptoms of disease and inhibit the increased prostate size. In vitro study implies that herbal extracts has the machinery to produce beneficial effect on prostatic smooth muscle, which would relieve the urinary symptoms of disease. B. diffusa could be a potential source of new treatment of prostatic hyperplasia. PMID

  7. Management of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Todd J; Manigault, Kendra R; McBurrows, Niesha N; Wray, Tiffany L; Woodard, Laresa M

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), also known as benign prostatic hypertrophy, is a nonmalignant adenomatous overgrowth of the periurethral prostate gland commonly seen in aging men. Historically, it has been assumed that the pathophysiology of lower urinary tract symptoms in men is the result of bladder outlet obstruction associated with prostate enlargement. Symptoms such as urinary hesitancy, incomplete bladder emptying, dribbling or prolonged urination, nocturia, urinary urgency, and/or urge incontinence are common. Understanding the differential diagnosis and ordering appropriate laboratory tests are essential in accurately identifying a BPH diagnosis. Management can be broken down into medical or pharmacological and surgical therapies. This article aims to provide an overview of BPH and its management in older adults. PMID:27535076

  8. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: clinical manifestations and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Santos Dias, José

    2012-12-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a very common condition, related to aging and causing symptoms, called lower urinary tract symptoms. On account of its huge prevalence, it is important for clinicians who are involved in the management of patients with BPH to be aware of the very strict recommendations for BPH evaluation. In this article, we describe the different steps and procedures doctors should follow to evaluate these patients; symptoms and signs of BPH are reviewed, as well as the clinical evaluation steps and examinations available. The basic evaluation of the patients with BPH should include, according to the recommendations of the most relevant international guidelines, lower urinary tract symptoms evaluation with appropriate symptom scores, digital rectal examination, voiding charts, prostate-specific antigen and creatinine measurement, urinalysis, and imaging of the urinary tract.

  9. Reducing the Risk of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Progression

    PubMed Central

    Roehrborn, Claus G

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of benign prostatic hyperplasia increases with age; the probability of progression rises with age at diagnosis and with baseline symptom severity. Although it is not life-threatening, the condition and its complications have a serious impact on quality of life. Acute urinary retention (AUR), though no longer thought an indication for immediate surgery, still requires treatment, often including surgery. Drug therapy with α-adrenergic receptor blockers or 5-α-reductase inhibitors, such as finasteride, reduces the risk for AUR and the need for surgery, as well as symptoms and bother. Finasteride therapy also results in long-term reduction in prostate volume. PMID:16986063

  10. Recent advances in treatment for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    van Rij, Simon; Gilling, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), often identified as a worsening ability of a male to pass urine, is a significant problem for men in our society. In 2015, the use of personalised medicine is tailoring treatment to individual patient needs and to genetic characteristics. Technological advances in surgical treatment are changing the way BPH is treated and are resulting in less morbidity. The future of BPH treatments is exciting, and a number of novel techniques are currently under clinical trial.

  11. Recent advances in treatment for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    van Rij, Simon; Gilling, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), often identified as a worsening ability of a male to pass urine, is a significant problem for men in our society. In 2015, the use of personalised medicine is tailoring treatment to individual patient needs and to genetic characteristics. Technological advances in surgical treatment are changing the way BPH is treated and are resulting in less morbidity. The future of BPH treatments is exciting, and a number of novel techniques are currently under clinical trial. PMID:26918132

  12. Recent advances in treatment for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    van Rij, Simon; Gilling, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), often identified as a worsening ability of a male to pass urine, is a significant problem for men in our society. In 2015, the use of personalised medicine is tailoring treatment to individual patient needs and to genetic characteristics. Technological advances in surgical treatment are changing the way BPH is treated and are resulting in less morbidity. The future of BPH treatments is exciting, and a number of novel techniques are currently under clinical trial. PMID:26918132

  13. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) management in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Anil

    2012-10-01

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) occurs in up to 50% of men by age 50, and the incidence increases with age. This common clinical problem is diagnosed by history, including the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire, and physical examination by digital rectal examination (DRE). Initial management for BPH includes lifestyle modification, and smooth muscle relaxant alpha blocker therapy. Alpha blockers usually take effect quickly within 3-5 days, and have minimal side effects. Current commonly used alpha blockers include the selective alpha blockers tamsulosin (Flomax), alfusosin (Xatral), and silodosin (Rapaflo). For patients with larger prostates, the 5-alpha reductase inhibitor class (finasteride (Proscar) and dutasteride (Avodart)) work effectively to shrink prostate stroma resulting in improved voiding. The 5-ARI class of drugs, in addition to reducing prostate size, also reduce the need for future BPH-related surgery, and reduce the risk of future urinary retention. Drugs from the phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor class may now be considered for treating BPH. Once daily 5 mg tadalafil has been shown to improve BPH-related symptoms and is currently approved to treat patients with BPH. Referral to a urologist can be considered for patients with a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA), especially while on 5-ARI, failure of urinary symptom control despite maximal medical therapy, suspicion of prostate cancer, hematuria, recurrent urinary infections, urinary retention, or renal failure. Currently the primary care physician is armed with multiple treatment options to effectively treat men with symptomatic BPH. PMID:23089343

  14. Flaxseed suppressed prostatic epithelial proliferation in a rat model of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Said, Mahmoud M; Hassan, Nahla S; Schlicht, Michael J; Bosland, Maarten C

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a disease occurring frequently among elderly males, is a slow progressive enlargement of the fibromuscular and epithelial structures of the prostate gland. Dietary factors may influence the prostate and exert an influence on prostatic growth and disease. The current study was undertaken to investigate the protective effect of dietary flaxseed supplementation against testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in male rats. Forty male Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups: (1) untreated control; (2) treatment with testosterone propionate (TP) to induce prostate enlargement; (3) TP-treated group fed a diet containing 5% milled flaxseed; (4) TP-treated group fed a diet containing 10% milled flaxseed; and (5) TP-treated group fed a diet containing 20 ppm finasteride. Treatment with TP significantly increased the absolute and relative weights of different prostatic lobes, serum testosterone (T), and testosterone/estradiol ratio, as well as prostatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, RNA synthesis per cell, and epithelial cell proliferation, detected as Ki67 labeling. Histopathological examination did not reveal marked differences in acinar morphology in ventral prostate, whereas morphometric analysis showed significantly increased epithelial cell height. Co-administration of flaxseed or finasteride with TP significantly reduced prostatic VEFG, epithelial cell proliferation, and RNA/DNA ratio, along with a significant increase in serum T and testosterone/estradiol ratio compared with TP-only-treated rats. Our results indicate that flaxseed, similar to the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride, blocked TP-induced prostate enlargement in a rat model of BPH, likely through suppression of prostatic VEFG and cellular proliferation.

  15. Lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction: are these conditions related to vascular dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Shogo; Tsounapi, Panagiota; Shimizu, Takahiro; Honda, Masashi; Inoue, Keiji; Dimitriadis, Fotios; Saito, Motoaki

    2014-09-01

    Although the pathogenesis of lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction is poorly understood and thought to be multifactorial, it has been traditionally recognized that these conditions increase with age. There is increasing evidence that there is an association between cardiovascular disease and lower urinary tract symptoms as well as benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction in elderly patients. Age might activate systemic vascular risk factors, resulting in disturbed blood flow. Hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis are also linked to the etiology of lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction. In the present review, we discuss the relationship between decreased pelvic blood flow and lower urinary tract symptoms, benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement and erectile dysfunction. Furthermore, we suggest possible common mechanisms underlining these urological conditions.

  16. Phytotherapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia. A minireview.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Ester; Laudato, Massimiliano; Griffo, Michele; Capasso, Raffaele

    2014-07-01

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition affecting older men, with an incidence that is age-dependent. Histological BPH, which typically develops after the age of 40 years, ranges in prevalence from >50% at 60 years to as high as 90% by 85 years of age. Typical symptoms include increased frequency of urination, nocturia, urgency, hesitancy, and weak urine stream. Conventional medicines used for the treatment of BPH include alpha blockers and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors. This articles review the mode of action, the efficacy, and the safety, including herb-drug interactions of the most common botanicals (Serenoa repens, Pygeum africanum, Urtica dioica, and Cucurbita pepo) and nutraceuticals (isoflavones, lycopene, selenium, and β-Sitosterol) in controlling the lower urinary tract symptoms associated to BPH. PMID:25165780

  17. Laser Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Dosimetric and Thermodynamic Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anvari, Bahman

    1993-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most commonly occurring neoplastic disease in the aging human male. Currently, surgical treatment of BPH is the primary therapeutic method. However, due to surgical complications, less invasive methods of treatment are desirable. In recent years, thermal coagulation of the hyperplastic prostate by a laser has received a considerable amount of attention. Nevertheless, the optimum laser irradiation parameters that lead to a successful and safe treatment of BPH have not been determined. This dissertation studies the physics of laser coagulation of prostate from both basic science and practical perspectives. Optical properties of prostatic tissue are determined over a spectrum of wavelengths. Knowledge of these properties allows for selection of appropriate laser wavelengths and provides a basis for performing dose equivalency studies among various types of lasers. Furthermore, knowledge of optical properties are needed for development of computer simulation models that predict the extent of thermal injury during laser irradiation of prostate. A computer model of transurethral heating of prostate that can be used to guide the clinical studies in determining an optimum dosimetry is then presented. Studies of the effects of non-laser heating devices, optical properties, blood perfusion, surface irrigation, and beam geometry are performed to examine the extent of heat propagation within the prostate. An in vitro model for transurethral laser irradiation of prostate is also presented to examine the effects of an 810 nm diode laser, thermal boundary conditions, and energy deposition rate during Nd:YAG laser irradiation. Results of these studies suggest that in the presence of laminar irrigation, the convective boundary condition is dominated by thermal diffusion as opposed to the bulk motion of the irrigation fluid. Distinct phases of thermal events are also identified during the laser irradiation. The in vivo studies of

  18. Smoking habits and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huan; Fu, Shi; Chen, Yanbo; Chen, Qi; Gu, Meng; Wang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have warned against the promoting effects of cigarette smoking on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). In contrast, some have argued that smoking confers a protective effect regarding BPH, while others have observed an aggravated effect. Thus, we performed this meta-analysis to determine whether cigarette use is associated with BPH risk. To identify articles from observational studies of relevance, a search was performed concurrent to March 21, 2016, on PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane, EBSCO, and EMBASE databases. Random-effect model, according to the heterogeneity, was calculated to reveal the relative risks (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Eight articles were included in this meta-analysis, representing data for 44,100 subjects, of which 5221 (11.8%) had BPH as defined according to the criteria. Seven reports are concerned with analysis between nonsmokers and ex-smokers, in which no significant difference was observed (RR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.94–1.05). Another meta-analysis of 7 studies indicated an observable trend, but without significant difference between groups of nonsmokers and current smokers (RR = 1.17, 95% CI 0.98–1.41). Between groups of heavy (6 articles; RR = 1.02, 95% CI 0.84–1.24) and light smokers (5 articles; RR = 0.90, 95% CI 0.71–1.15), again no significant difference appears. Finally, we combined individuals as never-smokers and ever-smokers and still found no significant difference between the 2 groups of patients (RR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.92–1.15). Sensitivity analysis was displayed and confirmed the stability of the present results. Combined evidence from observational studies shows no significant association between cigarette smoking and BPH risk, either for ex-smokers or for current smokers. The trend of elevated BPH risk from smoking was observed only in current smokers compared with nonsmokers, while marginal significance was observed in comparing ever-smokers with

  19. Review of Prostate Anatomy and Embryology and the Etiology of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Aaron, LaTayia; Franco, Omar E; Hayward, Simon W

    2016-08-01

    Prostate development follows a common pattern between species and depends on the actions of androgens to induce and support ductal branching morphogenesis of buds emerging from the urogenital sinus. The human prostate has a compact zonal anatomy immediately surrounding the urethra and below the urinary bladder. Rodents have a lobular prostate with lobes radiating away from the urethra. The human prostate is the site of benign hyperplasia, prostate cancer, and prostatitis. The rodent prostate has little naturally occurring disease. Rodents can be used to model aspects of human benign hyperplasia, but care should be taken in data interpretation and extrapolation to the human condition. PMID:27476121

  20. Androgen- and Estrogen-Receptor Content in Spontaneous and Experimentally Induced Canine Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Trachtenberg, John; Hicks, L. Louise; Walsh, Patrick C.

    1980-01-01

    To gain insight into the mechanism by which steroidal hormones influence the development of canine prostatic hyperplasia, nuclear and cytosolic androgen- and estrogen-receptor content, as measured under exchange conditions by the binding of [3H]R1881 (methyltrienolone) and [3H]estradiol, respectively, were quantitated in the prostates of purebred beagles of known age. In young dogs with spontaneously arising and experimentally induced (androstanediol plus estradiol treatment) prostatic hyperplasia, nuclear, but not cytosolic, prostatic androgen-receptor content was significantly greater than that determined in the normal prostates of age-matched dogs (3,452±222 and 4,035±274 fmol/mg DNA vs. 2,096±364 fmol/mg DNA, respectively). No differences were observed between the androgen-receptor content of the normal prostates of young dogs and the hyperplastic prostates of old dogs. The cytosolic and nuclear estrogen-receptor content of spontaneously arising prostatic hyperplasia in both young and old animals was similar to that found in normal prostates. The administration of estradiol plus androstanediol to castrate dogs significantly increased the prostatic nuclear androgen-receptor content over that found in dogs treated only with androstanediol. This estradiol-associated increase in nuclear androgen-receptor content was accompanied by the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Estradiol treatment of castrate dogs resulted in an increase in prostatic nuclear estrogen-receptor content, in the appearance of a putative prostatic cytosolic progesterone receptor, and in an alteration of the epithelium of the prostate to one characterized by squamous metaplasia. Treatment of castrate dogs with both estradiol and androstanediol resulted in a reduction in prostatic nuclear estrogen-receptor content, disappearance of the progesterone receptor, and loss of squamous metaplasia. An increase in nuclear androgen-receptor content, thus, appears to be an important event in the

  1. [Changes in prostatic circulation in response to laser therapy and magnetic therapy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    The results of preoperative preparation were analysed in 59 patients with prostatic benign hyperplasia (PBH) subjected to TUR. Treatment outcomes were assessed by transrectal ultrasound (color Doppler mapping) in two groups of patients. Group 1 received combined therapy including transrectal laser radiation of the prostate, group 2--transrectal magnetotherapy. The analysis showed that laser radiation reduced insignificantly the size of the prostate and adenomatous node, improved microcirculation and circulation in the prostate. This resulted in relief of inflammation and reduction of the number of postoperative inflammatory complications. Transrectal magnetotherapy has a positive effect on vascularization and hemodynamics of the prostate, local immunity, contamination of the tissues with pathogenic flora. PMID:16419474

  2. Long-term drug treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia - results of a prospective 3-year multicenter study using Sabal extract IDS 89.

    PubMed

    Bach, D; Ebeling, L

    1996-09-01

    A 3-year prospective multicenter study on Sabal extract IDS 89 was carried out to evaluate its potential and limitations as phytotherapy in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The results obtained from 435 patients confirm its sustained therapeutic efficacy. A marked symptomatic improvement, that included a 50% reduction in residual urine and a 6.1 ml/sec increase in peak urinary flow rate due to therapy was observed. Both physicians and patients voted its efficacy as good or very good in over 80% of the cases, and the drug was well tolerated by 98% of the patients. The clinical status of BPH and thus the quality of life of 4 out of 5 patients was markedly improved by long-term IDS 89 therapy. Furthermore, the deterioration rate at the end of the 3-year treatment period was significantly lower than in untreated BPH subjects. It is therefore concluded that long-term IDS 89 therapy can also reduce the incidence of surgery.

  3. Micro and bulk analysis of prostate tissues classified as hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatek, W. M.; Banaś, A.; Banaś, K.; Cinque, G.; Dyduch, G.; Falkenberg, G.; Kisiel, A.; Marcelli, A.; Podgórczyk, M.

    2007-07-01

    BPH (Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia) is the most common benign neoplasm (non cancerous enlargement of the prostate gland), whose prevalence increases with age. The gland, when increased in size, exerts pressure on the urethra, causing obstruction to urine flow. The latter may result in severe urinary tract and kidney conditions. In this work prostate samples from patients diagnosed with BPH were analyzed using synchrotron radiation. Micro-analysis of the hyperplastic samples was carried out on the L-beam line at HASYLAB, DESY (Germany), while bulk analysis on selected samples was performed at the DRX2 beamline at LNF, Frascati (Italy). Microanalysis with a mono-energetic beam 15 μm in diameter confirmed that concentrations of certain elements, such as S, Mn, Cu, Fe and Zn, are good indicators of pathological disorders in prostate tissue that may be considered effective tracers of developing compliant. The concentrations of Mn, Cu, Fe and Zn are higher in hyperplastic tissues, as compared to normal ones, while for sulphur the opposite is observed. Additionally, Fe and S K-edge XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) spectroscopy experiments were carried out in order to determine the chemical speciation of these elements in our samples.

  4. Inhibitory effects of Tripterygium wilfordii multiglycoside on benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hai-Nan; Xu, Yuan; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou; Huang, Xin; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Wang, Tao

    2015-06-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of Tripterygium wilfordii multiglycoside (GTW) against testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in rats. A total of 45 rats were randomly divided into five groups: Group I, vehicle control group (sham-operated and treated with vehicle); Group II, BPH group; Group III, BPH rats treated with finasteride at a dose of 5 mg·kg(-1); and Groups IV and V, BPH rats treated with GTW at dose levels of 10 and 20 mg·kg(-1), respectively. The drugs were administered orally once a day for 14 days. Prostate weight, prostatic index, and the testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels in serum and prostate, and the serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels were measured; prostate tissues were taken for histopathological examination; and serum biochemical analysis was also performed. The BPH rats displayed an increase in prostate weight, prostatic index with increased testosterone and DHT levels in both the serum and prostate, and increased serum PSA levels. GTW treatment at both doses resulted in significant reductions in prostate weight, prostatic index, testosterone and DHT levels in both the serum and prostate, and serum PSA levels, compared with BPH group. Histopathological examination also indicated that GTW treatment at both doses inhibited testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia. Serum biochemical analysis showed that the liver and renal functions were normal. In conclusion, GTW inhibited testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in rats, without host toxicity, providing a basis for the development of GTW as a novel therapy for BPH. PMID:26073338

  5. Serenoa repens extract in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Geavlete, Petrisor; Multescu, Razvan; Geavlete, Bogdan

    2011-08-01

    We are experiencing a revival of interest in phytotherapeutic agents, both in Europe and North America, especially as a consequence of patients' dissatisfaction with the adverse effects of the medical alternatives. One of the most frequently prescribed and studied such agents is Serenoa repens extract, derived from the berry of the dwarf palm tree. We aimed to review the most important published data regarding this type of treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia. A review of the existing articles regarding the use of Serenoa repens extracts for benign prostatic hyperplasia was performed. The articles were analysed with regard to their relevance, scientific value and the size of the evaluated series. Multiple mechanisms of action have been attributed to this extract, including antiandrogenic action, an anti-inflammatory/anti-oedematous effect, prolactin signal modulation, and an antiproliferative effect exerted through the inhibition of growth factors. Regarding efficacy, European Association of Urology guidelines state that Serenoa repens extracts significantly reduce nocturia in comparison with placebo. However, the guideline committee is unable to make specific recommendations about phytotherapy of male lower urinary tract symptoms owing to the heterogeneity of the products and the methodological problems associated with meta-analyses. Most of the published trials regarding Serenoa repens phytotherapy demonstrate a significant improvement of urinary status and a favourable safety profile. Also, some authors have credited it with giving a significant improvement in erectile function and decreasing complications following transurethral resection of the prostate, especially bleeding. The results of phytotherapy with Serenoa repens extracts are very promising. More high-quality, randomized, placebo-controlled studies are required in order to demonstrate without doubt the true therapeutic value of these products. Particular attention must be focused on

  6. Inflammatory mediators in the development and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    De Nunzio, Cosimo; Presicce, Fabrizio; Tubaro, Andrea

    2016-09-30

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common urological disease in elderly men. Epidemiological data suggest a causal link between this condition and prostatic inflammation. The prostate is an immune-competent organ characterized by the presence of a complex immune system. Several stimuli, including infectious agents, urinary reflux, metabolic syndrome, the ageing process, and autoimmune response, have been described as triggers for the dysregulation of the prostatic immune system via different molecular pathways involving the development of inflammatory infiltrates. From a pathophysiological standpoint, subsequent tissue damage and chronic tissue healing could result in the development of BPH nodules.

  7. Inflammatory mediators in the development and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    De Nunzio, Cosimo; Presicce, Fabrizio; Tubaro, Andrea

    2016-09-30

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common urological disease in elderly men. Epidemiological data suggest a causal link between this condition and prostatic inflammation. The prostate is an immune-competent organ characterized by the presence of a complex immune system. Several stimuli, including infectious agents, urinary reflux, metabolic syndrome, the ageing process, and autoimmune response, have been described as triggers for the dysregulation of the prostatic immune system via different molecular pathways involving the development of inflammatory infiltrates. From a pathophysiological standpoint, subsequent tissue damage and chronic tissue healing could result in the development of BPH nodules. PMID:27686153

  8. Convective Water Vapor Energy for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    DeLay, Kenneth Jackson; McVary, Kevin T

    2016-08-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) refers to proliferation of smooth muscle and epithelial cells within the transition zone of the prostate. Half of men over 40 develop histologic BPH. About half of men with BPH develop an enlarged prostate gland, called benign prostatic enlargement; among these, about half develop some degree of bladder outlet obstruction. Bladder outlet obstruction and changes in smooth muscle tone and resistance may result in lower urinary tract symptoms, including storage disturbances (such as daytime urinary urgency, frequency, and nocturia) and voiding disturbances (such as urinary hesitancy, weak urinary stream, straining to void, and prolonged voiding). PMID:27476129

  9. Expression and Localization of Aquaporins in Benign Prostate Hyperplasia and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Insang; Hwang, Eu-Chang; Song, Seung Hee; Lee, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Sun-Ouck; Kang, Taek-Won; Kwon, Dongdeuk; Park, Kwangsung

    2012-01-01

    The aquaporin (AQP) families of water channels are intrinsic membrane proteins that facilitate selective water and small solute movement across the plasma membrane. The purposes of this study were to determine the expression and localization of AQPs in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer. Prostatic tissue was collected from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia or prostate cancer by transurethral resection of the prostate. The expression and cellular localization of the AQPs were determined in the human prostate by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. AQP1, 3, and 9 were expressed in the human prostate. Western blot analysis revealed bands at 28-36 kDa for the AQP1, 3, and 9 proteins. Of these proteins, AQP3 and 9 were expressed in the epithelium. Immunolabeling showed that AQP1 was mainly expressed in the capillaries and venules of the prostate, AQP9 was expressed in the cytoplasm of the epithelium, and AQP3 was mainly associated with the plasma membrane of the prostatic epithelium. Only AQP3 expression was localized in the cell membrane, and expressed AQP3 was translocated to the cytoplasm in prostate cancer. The epithelium in the human prostate expresses AQP3 and 9 proteins, and the capillaries and venules of the prostate express AQP1. Characterizing or modifying the expression of AQP3 may lead to an understanding of the role of the AQPs in human prostatic disease. PMID:23323224

  10. Holmium laser for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: old wine in a new bottle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelius, Thomas; de Riese, Werner T. W.

    2003-06-01

    Urinary tract symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia affect 70% of men older than 70 years. Complications are common problems and a significant cause of morbidity in this population, placing a considerable burden on health services. In the early 1990s laser treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia became widely used after the introduction of the side-firing neodym: YAG laser. However, because of technical limitations and inferior results compared to classical transurethral resection of the prostate many Urologists became desinterested in this device. With the introduction of the holmium: YAG laser a new laser generation became available for use in Urology. Beside several other applications the holmium: YAG laser can be used for incision, ablation, resection, and more recently enucleation of the prostate. In this paper we reviewed the current literature regarding the holmium: YAG laser resection and enucleation of the prostate compared to transurethral resection of the prostate and open prostatectomy. The holmium: YAG laser technique is an effective and durable surgical alternative to standard transurethral resection of the prostate. Interestingly, enucleation of the prostate with this device seems to be a safe and effective procedure for large prostatic adenomas, it may become an attractive alternative to open prostatectomy.

  11. Effect of Phellius linteus water extract on benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Sun; Chun, Sung-Sik; Choi, Jeong-Hwa

    2013-06-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases among elderly men. As the old-age population is increasing recently, it is to our interest to observe the growing BPH within them. In BPH, the dihydrotestosterone (DHT) acts as promotes prostate growth. It inhibits enzyme 5α-reductase that is involved in the conversion of testosterone to the DHT activity which reduces the excessive prostate growth. Through experiments, the effects of Phellius linteus water extract performed on the BPH rats were induced by testosterone treatments. For 12 weeks, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with testosterone for the induction of BPH. Rats were divided into four experimental groups: the not treated group (N), the testosterone injection and D.W treatment group (TN), the testosterone injection and Phellinus linteus treatment group (TP) and testosterone injection and finasteride treatment group (TF). Prostate weight, volume and weight ratio in the TP group and the TF group were significantly lower than the TN group. Testosterone and DHT levels in the TN group were significantly higher than that of the N group. And the TP group was significantly decreased than that of the TN group. While prostates of control rats revealed severe acinar gland atrophy and stromal proliferation; the TP and TF groups showed trophic symptoms and were lined by flattened epithelial cells, thus, the stromal proliferation is relatively low as compared to the TN group. These suggest that Phellinus linteus water extracts may be an useful remedy for treating the benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:23766877

  12. Therapeutic options in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Jaspreet S

    2009-01-01

    Current theraputic options for the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are reviewed. Therapeutic options for mild lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), as defined by the American Urological Association, are generally treated medically. Moderate to severe LUTS can be treated medically or with surgical therapy. Current medical and surgical treatments for LUTS secondary to BPH are reviewed and evolving treatments are explored. PMID:19936164

  13. The role of combination medical therapy in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Greco, K A; McVary, K T

    2008-12-01

    To review key trials of monotherapy and combination therapy of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonists (alpha(1)-ARAs), 5alpha-reductase inhibitors (5alphaRIs) and anti-muscarinic agents in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). To assess the safety and efficacy of combination therapies for LUTS associated with BPH, a search of the MEDLINE and Cochrane databases (1976-2008) was conducted for relevant trials and reviews using the terms benign prostatic hyperplasia, lower urinary tract symptoms, alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonists, 5alpha-reductase inhibitors, anti-muscarinics, anticholinergics, combination therapy, alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin, terazosin, dutasteride, finasteride, tolterodine, flavoxate, propiverine, oxybutynin, erectile dysfunction, sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil. Data from the Medical Therapy of Prostatic Symptoms (MTOPS) study indicated a role for long-term use of alpha(1)-ARAs and 5alphaRIs in combination. In the MTOPS study, combination therapy with the alpha(1)-ARA doxazosin and the 5alphaRI finasteride was significantly more effective than either component alone in reducing symptoms (P=0.006 vs doxazosin monotherapy; P<0.001 vs finasteride monotherapy) and in lowering the rate of clinical progression (P<0.001 vs either monotherapy). These findings were confirmed by the 2-year preliminary results of the Combination of Avodart and Tamsulosin study. In this study, combination therapy of the alpha(1)-ARA tamsulosin and the 5alphaRI dutasteride resulted in a significantly greater decrease in International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) when compared with either monotherapy. Several recent trials have studied the efficacy of combining alpha(1)-ARAs and anti-muscarinic agents in the treatment of BPH. These studies have found this combination to result in statistically significant benefits in quality of life scores, patient satisfaction, urinary frequency, storage

  14. Medical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kane, M M; Fields, D W; Vaughan, E D

    1990-11-01

    Medical management of clinical BPH is a reality. The only effective nonsurgical treatment now recommended is aimed at relieving the dynamic component of clinical BPH. Pharmacologic treatment using alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists may be used appropriately to manage patients with prostatism who are poor surgical risks but who could benefit from reduced sympathetic tone. In addition, alpha blockers are used to relieve acute retention, and to prevent retention when increased sympathetic discharge is expected. Thus far, nonsurgical therapy aimed at reducing the mechanical obstruction associated with BPH by prostatic size reduction has failed to produce consistent objective improvement. However, several drugs are now being investigated and may be effective for reducing prostatic size in patients with BPH. Clinical trials are complicated by a number of factors, especially very variable symptoms. Moreover, reduction in prostatic size induced by drugs is not permanent and regrowth occurs with drug withdrawal, necessitating chronic treatment. Ideally, future research should be aimed at the prevention of BPH at an early age. However, this presupposes a better understanding of the pathogenesis of BPH. BPH may not be a single, variable disease but a family of diseases with a number of predictable clinical courses. In the future, we should pay particular attention to histologic variability, to see if in fact different pathologic forms of BPH follow different clinical patterns. If urologists are to keep their predominant position in managing the patient with BPH, they will have to keep informed of medical treatment trials and of potential alternative treatment strategies to prostatectomy.

  15. New concepts in tissue specificity for prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    De Marzo, A M; Coffey, D S; Nelson, W G

    1999-03-01

    Of the hundreds of species of mammals, all of which have prostate glands, only humans and dogs are known to suffer from benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma. In humans, prostate carcinoma is common, yet carcinomas of other sex accessory tissues are rare. In addition, different anatomic regions within the prostate gland have very different rates of BPH and carcinoma. In this article, we explore ideas and potential mechanisms relating to these paradoxical findings that may help explain the species, organ, and zone specificity of BPH and prostate cancer. We present an evolutionary argument that attempts to relate a high-fat diet, with its potential for generating oxidative DNA damage, to the species selectivity of prostate cancer. In addition, we outline an argument based on our preliminary studies indicating that chronic inflammation and the associated increase in cell turnover in the setting of increased oxidative stress may help to account for the organ selectivity of genitourinary carcinomas.

  16. Inflammatory Responses in a Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Epithelial Cell Line (BPH-1) Infected with Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Su; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Han, Ik-Hwan; Ahn, Myoung-Hee; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2016-04-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Trichomonads have been detected in prostatic tissues from prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate cancer. Chronic prostatic inflammation is known as a risk factor for prostate enlargement, benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms, and acute urinary retention. Our aim was to investigate whether T. vaginalis could induce inflammatory responses in cells of a benign prostatic hyperplasia epithelial cell line (BPH-1). When BPH-1 cells were infected with T. vaginalis, the protein and mRNA of inflammatory cytokines, such as CXCL8, CCL2, IL-1β, and IL-6, were increased. The activities of TLR4, ROS, MAPK, JAK2/STAT3, and NF-κB were also increased, whereas inhibitors of ROS, MAPK, PI3K, NF-κB, and anti-TLR4 antibody decreased the production of the 4 cytokines although the extent of inhibition differed. However, a JAK2 inhibitor inhibited only IL-6 production. Culture supernatants of the BPH-1 cells that had been incubated with live T. vaginalis (trichomonad-conditioned medium, TCM) contained the 4 cytokines and induced the migration of human monocytes (THP-1 cells) and mast cells (HMC-1 cells). TCM conditioned by BPH-1 cells pretreated with NF-κB inhibitor showed decreased levels of cytokines and induced less migration. Therefore, it is suggested that these cytokines are involved in migration of inflammatory cells. These results suggest that T. vaginalis infection of BPH patients may cause inflammation, which may induce lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). PMID:27180569

  17. Inflammatory Responses in a Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Epithelial Cell Line (BPH-1) Infected with Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Su; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Han, Ik-Hwan; Ahn, Myoung-Hee; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Trichomonads have been detected in prostatic tissues from prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate cancer. Chronic prostatic inflammation is known as a risk factor for prostate enlargement, benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms, and acute urinary retention. Our aim was to investigate whether T. vaginalis could induce inflammatory responses in cells of a benign prostatic hyperplasia epithelial cell line (BPH-1). When BPH-1 cells were infected with T. vaginalis, the protein and mRNA of inflammatory cytokines, such as CXCL8, CCL2, IL-1β, and IL-6, were increased. The activities of TLR4, ROS, MAPK, JAK2/STAT3, and NF-κB were also increased, whereas inhibitors of ROS, MAPK, PI3K, NF-κB, and anti-TLR4 antibody decreased the production of the 4 cytokines although the extent of inhibition differed. However, a JAK2 inhibitor inhibited only IL-6 production. Culture supernatants of the BPH-1 cells that had been incubated with live T. vaginalis (trichomonad-conditioned medium, TCM) contained the 4 cytokines and induced the migration of human monocytes (THP-1 cells) and mast cells (HMC-1 cells). TCM conditioned by BPH-1 cells pretreated with NF-κB inhibitor showed decreased levels of cytokines and induced less migration. Therefore, it is suggested that these cytokines are involved in migration of inflammatory cells. These results suggest that T. vaginalis infection of BPH patients may cause inflammation, which may induce lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). PMID:27180569

  18. Giant prostatic hyperplasia: report of a previously asymptomatic man presenting with gross hematuria and hypovolemic shock.

    PubMed

    Wroclawski, Marcelo Langer; Carneiro, Ariê; Tristão, Rodrigo Alves; Sakuramoto, Paulo Kouiti; Youssef, Jorg Daoud Merched; Lopes Neto, Antonio Correa; Santiago, Lucila Heloísa Simardi; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima

    2015-01-01

    Giant prostatic hyperplasia is a rare condition characterized by very high volume benign prostatic enlargement (>500g). Few cases have been reported so far and most of them are associated with severe lower urinary symptoms. We report the first case of asymptomatic giant prostatic hyperplasia in an elderly man who had a 720g prostate adenoma, sudden gross hematuria and hypovolemic shock. The patient was successfully treated with open transvesical prostatectomy and had an uneventful postoperative recovery. PMID:26132361

  19. Giant prostatic hyperplasia: report of a previously asymptomatic man presenting with gross hematuria and hypovolemic shock

    PubMed Central

    Wroclawski, Marcelo Langer; Carneiro, Ariê; Tristão, Rodrigo Alves; Sakuramoto, Paulo Kouiti; Youssef, Jorg Daoud Merched; Lopes, Antonio Correa; Santiago, Lucila Heloísa Simardi; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima

    2015-01-01

    Giant prostatic hyperplasia is a rare condition characterized by very high volume benign prostatic enlargement (>500g). Few cases have been reported so far and most of them are associated with severe lower urinary symptoms. We report the first case of asymptomatic giant prostatic hyperplasia in an elderly man who had a 720g prostate adenoma, sudden gross hematuria and hypovolemic shock. The patient was successfully treated with open transvesical prostatectomy and had an uneventful postoperative recovery. PMID:26132361

  20. Long-Term Followup after Electrocautery Transurethral Resection of the Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kallenberg, F.; Hossack, T. A.; Woo, H. H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. For decades, transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) has been the “gold standard” operation for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) but is based mainly on historic data. The historic data lacks use of validated measures and current TURP differs significantly from that performed 30 years ago. Methods. Men who had undergone TURP between 2001 and 2005 were reviewed. International prostate symptom score (IPSS), quality of life (QOL) and peak urinary flow rate (Qmax⁡), and postvoid residual (PVR) were recorded. Operative details and postoperative complications were documented. Patients were then invited to attend for repeat assessment. Results. 91 patients participated. Mean follow-up time was 70 months. Mean follow-up results were IPSS—7; QoL—1.5; Qmax⁡—23 mL/s; PVR—45 mL. These were an improvement from baseline of 67%, 63%, 187%, and 80%, respectively. Early complication rates were low, with no blood transfusions, TUR syndrome, or deaths occurring. Urethral stricture rate was higher than anticipated at 14%. Conclusion. This study shows modern TURP still produces durable improvement in voiding symptoms which remains comparable with historic studies. This study, however, found a marked drop in early complications but, conversely, a higher than expected incidence of urethral strictures. PMID:22162679

  1. The histological and histometrical effects of Urtica dioica extract on rat's prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Hamid Reza; Erfani Majd, Naeem; Esmaeilzadeh, Saleh; Fatemi Tabatabaei, Sayed Reza

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease in human that gradual overgrowth of the prostate gland leads to impinge on the urethra with impairment in urinary function. Numerous plants improve uncontrolled growth of the prostate gland and improve urinary tract symptoms associated with BPH. In this study, 25 healthy adult male Wistar rats were divided randomly in five groups: G1 (Control group) received ordinary feed without any treatment, G2 received 10 mg kg(-1) testosterone subcutaneously, G3 received 50 mg kg(-1) nettle root extract orally, G4 received 50 mg kg(-1) nettle root extract orally and 10 mg kg(-1) testosterone, G5 received 10 mg kg(-1) almond oil (Almond oil was used as testosterone solvent) subcutaneously. After six weeks, volume and weight of each lobe were measured and samples were taken. The 5 to 6 µm thickness sections were made using paraffin embedding method and stained by hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid-Schiff. The results showed that prostate volume and ratio of prostate to body weight were increased significantly in the testosterone. Histological and histometrical results showed that dorsal and lateral type 1 and 2 lobes were not changed significantly but the ventral and anterior lobes have changed significantly. Over all, the nettle root could prevent from some of prostatic hyperplasia effects, so that percentage of folded alveoli in ventral lobe reduced insignificantly. PMID:25992248

  2. Androgen receptor and immune inflammation in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Kouji; Li, Lei; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-01-01

    Both benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa) are frequent diseases in middle-aged to elderly men worldwide. While both diseases are linked to abnormal growth of the prostate, the epidemiological and pathological features of these two prostate diseases are different. BPH nodules typically arise from the transitional zone, and, in contrast, PCa arises from the peripheral zone. Androgen deprivation therapy alone may not be sufficient to cure these two prostatic diseases due to its undesirable side effects. The alteration of androgen receptor-mediated inflammatory signals from infiltrating immune cells and prostate stromal/epithelial cells may play key roles in those unwanted events. Herein, this review will focus on the roles of androgen/androgen receptor signals in the inflammation-induced progression of BPH and PCa. PMID:26594314

  3. Effect of Silodosin, an Alpha1A-Adrenoceptor Antagonist, on Ventral Prostatic Hyperplasia in the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Shogo; Shimizu, Takahiro; Tsounapi, Panagiota; Higashi, Youichirou; Martin, Darryl T.; Nakamura, Kumiko; Honda, Masashi; Inoue, Keiji; Saito, Motoaki

    2015-01-01

    Background A decreased prostatic blood flow could be one of the risk factors for benign prostatic hyperplasia/benign prostatic enlargement. The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) shows a chronic prostatic ischemia and hyperplastic morphological abnormalities in the ventral prostate. The effect of silodosin, a selective alpha1A-adrenoceptor antagonist, was investigated in the SHR prostate as a prostatic hyperplasia model focusing on prostatic blood flow. Methods Twelve-week-old male SHRs were administered perorally with silodosin (100 μg/kg/day) or vehicle once daily for 6 weeks. Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats were used as normotensive controls and were treated with the vehicle. The effect of silodosin on blood pressure and prostatic blood flow were estimated and then the prostates were removed and weighed. The tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), interleukin-6 (IL-6), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1/cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1 (CXCL1/CINC1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were measured. The histological evaluation was also performed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results There was a significant increase in blood pressure, prostate weight, prostate body weight ratio (PBR), tissue levels of MDA, IL-6, CXCL1/CINC1, TNF-α, TGF-β1, bFGF and α-SMA in the SHR compared to the WKY rat. The ventral prostate in the SHR showed the morphological abnormalities compared to the WKY rat. Prostatic blood flow was decreased in the SHR. However, treatment with silodosin significantly restored the decreased prostatic blood flow in the SHR. Moreover, silodosin normalized tissue levels of MDA, IL-6, CXCL1/CINC1, TNF-α, TGF-β1, bFGF and α-SMA, and it ameliorated ventral prostatic hyperplasia in the SHR excluding blood pressure. Silodosin decreased PBR but not prostate weight in the SHR. Conclusions Silodosin can inhibit the

  4. The Association Between Metabolic Syndrome and Characteristics of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Ye; Fu, Yan-Yan; Kang, De-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the association of metabolic syndrome (MS) with measures of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) including prostate growth rate, prostate volume, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, and maximal flow rate. Medline, Cochrane CENTRAL, EMBASE, CBM, and Google Scholar databases were searched until March 23, 2015 using combinations of the keywords benign prostate hyperplasia/BPH, metabolic syndrome, total prostate volume, prostate growth rate, prostate specific antigen, International Prostate Symptom Score/IPSS, maximal flow rate. Cohort or case–control studies of patients with BPH and MS that reported quantitative outcomes were included. The pooled mean differences of the outcome measures were compared between patients with and without MS. A total of 158 potentially relevant studies were identified, and 8 were included in the meta-analysis. The 8 studies included in the meta-analysis contained a total of 3093 BPH patients, wherein 1241 had MS and 1852 did not have MS. BPH patients with MS had a significantly higher prostate growth rate (pooled mean difference = 0.67 mL/y, P < 0.001) and larger prostate volume (pooled mean difference = 6.8 mL, P = 0.010) than the BPH patients without MS. There was no significant difference in IPSS score (pooled mean difference = 1.58, P = 0.202) or maximal flow rate (pooled mean difference = −1.41 mL/s, P = .345) between BPH patients with and without MS. A borderline nonsignificant difference in PSA (pooled mean difference = 0.24 ng/mL, P = 0.056) was noted between BPH patients with and without MS. The results of this meta-analysis are consistent with literature indicating that BPH patients with MS have a higher prostate growth rate and larger prostate volume than those without MS; however, further study is necessary to determine the association of BPH and metabolic disorder

  5. Prostate brachytherapy in patients with median lobe hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wallner, K; Smathers, S; Sutlief, S; Corman, J; Ellis, W

    2000-06-20

    Our aim was to document the technical and clinical course of prostate brachytherapy patients with radiographic evidence of median lobe hyperplasia (MLH). Eight patients with MLH were identified during our routine brachytherapy practice, representing 9% of the 87 brachytherapy patients treated during a 6-month period. No effort was made to avoid brachytherapy in patients noted to have MLH on diagnostic work-up. Cystoscopic evaluation was not routinely performed. Postimplant axial computed tomographic (CT) images of the prostate were obtained at 0.5 cm intervals. Preimplant urinary obstructive symptoms were quantified by the criteria of the American Urologic Association (AUA). Each patient was contacted during the writing of this report to update postimplant morbidity information. There was no apparent association between the degree of MLH and preimplant prostate volume or AUA score. Intraoperatively, we were able to visualize MLH by transrectal ultrasound and did not notice any particular difficulty placing sources in the MLH tissue or migration of sources out of the tissue. The prescription isodose covered from 81% to 99% of the postimplant CT-defined target volume, achieving adequate dose to the median lobe tissue in all patients. Two of the eight patients developed acute, postimplant urinary retention. The first patient required intermittent self-catheterization for 3 months and then resumed spontaneous urination. MLH does not appear to be a strong contraindication to prostate brachytherapy, and prophylactic resection of hypertrophic tissue in such patients is probably not warranted. Int. J. Cancer (Radiat. Oncol. Invest.) 90, 152-156 (2000). PMID:10900427

  6. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: age-related tissue-remodeling.

    PubMed

    Untergasser, Gerold; Madersbacher, Stephan; Berger, Peter

    2005-03-01

    Aging and androgens are the two established risk factors for the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and benign prostatic enlargement (BPE), which can lead to lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in elderly men. BPH, consisting of a nodular overgrowth of the epithelium and fibromuscular tissue within transition zone and periurethral areas, is first detectable around the fourth decade of life and affects nearly all men by the ninth decade. The pathogenesis of BPH is still largely unresolved, but multiple partially overlapping and complementary theories have been proposed, all of which seem to be operative at least to some extent. In addition to nerve-, endocrine- and immune system, local para- and luminocrine pleiotrope mechanisms/factors are implicated in the prostatic tissue-remodeling process. Prostate tissue-remodeling in the transition zone is characterized by: (i) hypertrophic basal cells, (ii) altered secretions of luminal cells leading to calcification, clogged ducts and inflammation, (iii) lymphocytic infiltration with production of proinflammatory cytokines, (iv) increased radical oxygen species (ROS) production that damages epithelial and stromal cells, (v) increased basic fibroblast (bFGF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta 1) production leading to stromal proliferation, transdifferentiation and extracellular matrix production, (vi) altered autonomous innervation that decreases relaxation and leads to a high adrenergic tonus, (vii) and altered neuroendocine cell function and release of neuroendocrine peptides (NEP). This review summarizes the multifactorial nature of prostate tissue remodeling in elderly men with symptomatic BPH with a particular focus on changes of cell-cell interactions and cell functions in the human aging prostate.

  7. Korean clinical practice guideline for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Jeong Kyun; Choi, Hun; Bae, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jae Heon; Yang, Seong Ok; Oh, Chul Young; Cho, Young Sam; Kim, Kyoung Woo

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, the Korean Urological Association organized the Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Guideline Developing Committee composed of experts in the field of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with the participation of the Korean Academy of Family Medicine and the Korean Continence Society to develop a Korean clinical practice guideline for BPH. The purpose of this clinical practice guideline is to provide current and comprehensive recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of BPH. The committee developed the guideline mainly by adapting existing guidelines and partially by using the de novo method. A comprehensive literature review was carried out primarily from 2009 to 2013 by using medical search engines including data from Korea. Based on the published evidence, recommendations were synthesized, and the level of evidence of the recommendations was determined by using methods adapted from the 2011 Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. Meta-analysis was done for one key question and four recommendations. A draft guideline was reviewed by expert peer reviewers and discussed at an expert consensus meeting until final agreement was achieved. This evidence-based guideline for BPH provides recommendations to primary practitioners and urologists for the diagnosis and treatment of BPH in men older than 40 years. PMID:26966724

  8. An insidious risk factor for cardiovascular disease: benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Karatas, Omer Faruk; Bayrak, Omer; Cimentepe, Ersin; Unal, Dogan

    2010-10-29

    Patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs) have a considerably higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than the general population in old age. Many hypotheses have been created to explain traditional clinical risk factors of CVD, including age, male gender, cigarette smoking, inheritance, high blood pressure (BP), obesity, elevated fasting plasma glucose, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, decreased physical activity and metabolic syndrome; or nontraditional risk factors such as oxidative stress, inflammation, vascular calcification, malnutrition, homocysteine and genetic variation. Although these risk factors are important in CVD pathophysiology and clinical presentation, there is still no single theory sufficient to provide an adequate explanation for all the properties of CVD. We speculate that by causing nocturia-induced sleep disturbances, BP variability, increased sympathetic activity, non-dipping BP variations; BPH may be an insidious risk factor for CVD. Benign prostate hyperplasia may be related to increased BP, coronary ischemic hearth disease or other cardiovascular pathologic conditions. This attention on BPH may produce a new approach to the diagnosis and treatment of CVD. Although the underlying mechanisms are still exactly unclear, further prospective randomized controlled studies are needed to identify if patients with BPH/LUTS is higher risk for CVD. PMID:19359054

  9. Differential expression of androgen, estrogen, and progesterone receptors in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lingmin; Shen, Wenhao; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Qiwu; Wang, Yongquan; Zhou, Zhansong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the differential expression levels of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ), and progesterone receptor (PGR) between normal prostate and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The combination of immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting assay was used to identify the distribution and differential expression of these receptors at the immunoactive biomarker, transcriptional, and protein levels between 5 normal human prostate tissues and 40 BPH tissues. The results were then validated in a rat model of BPH induced by testosterone propionate and estradiol benzoate. In both human and rat prostate tissues, AR was localized mainly to epithelial and stromal cell nuclei; ERα was distributed mainly to stromal cells, but not exclusively; ERβ was interspersed in the basal layer of epithelium, but sporadically in epithelial and stromal cells; PGR was expressed abundantly in cytoplasm of epithelial and stromal cells. There were decreased expression of ERα and increased expression of PGR, but no difference in the expression of ERβ in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of both human and rat. Increased expression of AR in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of human was observed, however, the expression of AR in the rat prostate tissue was decreased. This study identified the activation of AR and PGR and repression of ERα in BPH, which indicate a promoting role of AR and PGR and an inhibitory role of ERα in the pathogenesis of BPH.

  10. Differential expression of androgen, estrogen, and progesterone receptors in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Song, Lingmin; Shen, Wenhao; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Qiwu; Wang, Yongquan; Zhou, Zhansong

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to identify the differential expression levels of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ), and progesterone receptor (PGR) between normal prostate and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The combination of immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting assay was used to identify the distribution and differential expression of these receptors at the immunoactive biomarker, transcriptional, and protein levels between 5 normal human prostate tissues and 40 BPH tissues. The results were then validated in a rat model of BPH induced by testosterone propionate and estradiol benzoate. In both human and rat prostate tissues, AR was localized mainly to epithelial and stromal cell nuclei; ERα was distributed mainly to stromal cells, but not exclusively; ERβ was interspersed in the basal layer of epithelium, but sporadically in epithelial and stromal cells; PGR was expressed abundantly in cytoplasm of epithelial and stromal cells. There were decreased expression of ERα and increased expression of PGR, but no difference in the expression of ERβ in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of both human and rat. Increased expression of AR in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of human was observed, however, the expression of AR in the rat prostate tissue was decreased. This study identified the activation of AR and PGR and repression of ERα in BPH, which indicate a promoting role of AR and PGR and an inhibitory role of ERα in the pathogenesis of BPH. PMID:27483178

  11. Energy Delivery Systems for Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee asked the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) to conduct a health technology assessment on energy delivery systems for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition BPH is a noncancerous enlargement of the prostate gland and the most common benign tumour in aging men. (1) It is the most common cause of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) and is an important cause of diminished quality of life among aging men. (2) The primary goal in the management of BPH for most patients is a subjective improvement in urinary symptoms and quality of life. Until the 1930s, open prostatectomy, though invasive, was the most effective form of surgical treatment for BPH. Today, the benchmark surgical treatment for BPH is transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), which produces significant changes of all subjective and objective outcome parameters. Complications after TURP include hemorrhage during or after the procedure, which often necessitates blood transfusion; transurethral resection (TUR) syndrome; urinary incontinence; bladder neck stricture; and sexual dysfunction. A retrospective review of 4,031 TURP procedures performed by one surgeon between 1979 and 2003 showed that the incidence of complications was 2.4% for blood transfusion, 0.3% for TUR syndrome, 1.5% for hemostatic procedures, 2.8% for bladder neck contracture, and 1% for urinary stricture. However, the incidence of blood transfusion and TUR syndrome decreased as the surgeon’s skills improved. During the 1990s, a variety of endoscopic techniques using a range of energy sources have been developed as alternative treatments for BPH. These techniques include the use of light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser), radiofrequency, microwave, and ultrasound, to heat prostate tissue and cause coagulation or vaporization. In addition

  12. Evolution of the use of the holmium laser for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilling, Peter J.; Cass, Carol B.; Cresswell, Michael D.; Kennett, Katie M.; Mackey, Michael; Fraundorfer, Mark R.; Kabalin, John N.

    1997-05-01

    The holmium laser is becoming an important tool in the urologists' armamentarium. In this manuscript the evolution of laser resection of the prostate using the holmium wavelength is described. This technique represents a significant advance in the surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia and allows even very large prostates to be safely and efficiently managed transurethrally.

  13. Morphogenetic aspects of biomineralization on the background of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Moskalenko, R; Romanyuk, A; Danilchenko, S; Stanislavov, O; Piddubniy, A; Zakorko, I-М; Tkach, G

    2013-01-01

    Despite the considerable spread of pathological prostate inclusions their nature and significance in the development of gland pathology are not established exactly. The work includes histological research of 628 surgical biopsies of benign prostatic hyperplasia, the sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or Congo red, von Kossa methods. Mineral constituent of prostatoliths (5 cases) was studied by infrared spectroscopy (IRS); scanning electron microscopy with X-ray microanalysis (REMMA/EDX), transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction (TEM/ED). The average age of the operated patients was 69,5±0,42 years old. In 88,22±1,67% of cases nodular prostatic hyperplasia was combined with diffuse or focal inflammation, engorgements of prostate gland secretion were observed in 81,76±2,97%. In the lumen of the prostate gland corpora amylacea were detected in 64,72±1,13% of cases, in 27,6±3,48% - concreations. There was a significant strong correlation between inflammation and calculi - r = 0.93 (p<0,05), inflammation and secret engorgement - r=0,95 (p<0,05), engorgement and concreations - r = 0,88 (p <0,05). TEM results show the same morphological type of prostatolith crystals and their small size (tens of nanometers), that indicates their preferential formation by direct sedimentation from the liquid phase, rather than the appearance and maturation of corpora amylacea on the surface. Based on the received data, the dominant mechanism of concrements formation is precipitation by direct sedimentation of prostate secretions, but it's not a dystrophic calcification of the corpora amylacea. Mineral component of prostatic concrements is carbonate bioapatite with a minor inclusion of other chemical elements.

  14. Morphogenetic aspects of biomineralization on the background of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Moskalenko, R; Romanyuk, A; Danilchenko, S; Stanislavov, O; Piddubniy, A; Zakorko, I-М; Tkach, G

    2013-01-01

    Despite the considerable spread of pathological prostate inclusions their nature and significance in the development of gland pathology are not established exactly. The work includes histological research of 628 surgical biopsies of benign prostatic hyperplasia, the sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or Congo red, von Kossa methods. Mineral constituent of prostatoliths (5 cases) was studied by infrared spectroscopy (IRS); scanning electron microscopy with X-ray microanalysis (REMMA/EDX), transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction (TEM/ED). The average age of the operated patients was 69,5±0,42 years old. In 88,22±1,67% of cases nodular prostatic hyperplasia was combined with diffuse or focal inflammation, engorgements of prostate gland secretion were observed in 81,76±2,97%. In the lumen of the prostate gland corpora amylacea were detected in 64,72±1,13% of cases, in 27,6±3,48% - concreations. There was a significant strong correlation between inflammation and calculi - r = 0.93 (p<0,05), inflammation and secret engorgement - r=0,95 (p<0,05), engorgement and concreations - r = 0,88 (p <0,05). TEM results show the same morphological type of prostatolith crystals and their small size (tens of nanometers), that indicates their preferential formation by direct sedimentation from the liquid phase, rather than the appearance and maturation of corpora amylacea on the surface. Based on the received data, the dominant mechanism of concrements formation is precipitation by direct sedimentation of prostate secretions, but it's not a dystrophic calcification of the corpora amylacea. Mineral component of prostatic concrements is carbonate bioapatite with a minor inclusion of other chemical elements. PMID:23388536

  15. [GnRH antagonists and benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Comaru-Schally, d'Ana Maria

    2005-10-01

    Early treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) helps to decrease the need for surgery and thus places the medical treatment at the forefront which implies, optimising its efficacy and tolerance. Alpha-blockers and 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors are the two main classes of currently used drugs. The role in the growth of glandular, muscular and fibroblastic tissues of the prostate of androgens, testosterone and especially intraprostatic dihydrotestosterone was properly established. These physiopathological data prompted to evaluate the efficacy of inhibition of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, by means of LH-RH analogues. The agonists lead to a biological castration associated with a significant improvement of BPH symptoms. Unfortunately clinical relapse is systematic when treatment is discontinued. The antagonists, particulary cetrorelix, improve BPH symptoms, with a persistant benefit after treatment, discontinuation, although the effect on the prostate volume reduction is transitory. It can be suggested that beside the well known hormonal action, there is a direct apoptic effect cells as well as inhibition of the intratissue growth factors. The LH-RH antagonists could thus become an alternative to the current drugs by offering a relatively short treatment with a prolonged benefit.

  16. Role of laser therapy in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Werner T.; Sharpe, Brent A.; Aronoff, David B.; Mittemeyer, Bernhard T.

    2001-05-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease in males older than 50 years of age. 75-80% of this population is considered to have some degree of BPH causing clinical symptoms and requiring urological treatment. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P) is currently the standard surgical treatment modality for BPH. In an attempt to minimize the need for hospitalization and the associated perioperative and postoperative morbidity, alternatives have been sought. Various types of laser techniques such as interstitial laser coagulation and side-firing technology have been proposed. Numerous studies have shown that laser procedures safely and effectively reduce the volume of the prostate. Intra- and postoperative bleeding are nearly unknown complications for laser procedures, whereas this is the most relevant complication for the TUR-P. Due to significant tissue edema after laser treatment, patients commonly show delayed time to void adequately and, therefore, catheter drainage is often necessary for 3 to 21 days. Retrograde ejaculation is reported to occur less (0- 10%) compared to TUR-P (greater than 60%). Urinary tract infections are very common after interstitial laser coagulation. Although not many long-term clinical data are available, various studies have shown that BPH patients improve in symptom score, flow rate and post-void residual up to 3 years after laser treatment. This paper presents a concise review of efficacy, advantages and disadvantages of the most frequently used laser techniques as well as the long-term clinical data compared to TUR-P.

  17. Effects of Melandrium firmum methanolic extract on testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Seo, Chang-Seob; Lee, Nam-Hun; Ha, Hye-Kyung; Son, Jong-Keun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related disease of unknown aetiology characterized by prostatic enlargement coincident with distinct alterations in tissue histomorphology. Instead of therapeutic agents that can cause severe side effects, plant extracts are frequently used to treat BPH. In this study, we investigated whether the Melandrium firmum methanolic extract (MFME) improves BPH, using the testosterone propionate (TP)-induced BPH rat model. Castration was performed via the scrotal route under sodium pentobarbital anaesthesia. BPH in castrated rats was generated via daily subcutaneous injections of TP (3 mg kg−1) dissolved in corn oil, for 4 weeks. MFME was administered daily by oral gavage at a dose of 200 mg kg−1 for 4 weeks, along with the TP injections. The control group received injections of corn oil subcutaneously. At the scheduled termination of the experiment, all rats were killed and their prostates weighed; the relative prostate weight (prostate/body weight ratio) was calculated, and histomorphological changes in the prostate were examined. Additionally, we measured the levels of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the serum and the prostate. Experimentally induced BPH led to marked decreases in the relative prostate weight and the DHT levels in the serum and the prostate. Histologically, BPH was evident in the ventral lobe of the prostate, and MFME treatment suppressed the severity of the lesions. These results indicate that MFME effectively inhibits the development of BPH induced by testosterone in a rat model. Further studies will be needed to identify the compound(s) responsibility for inducing the protective effect against BPH and determine its mechanism of action. PMID:22231294

  18. Depot medroxyprogesterone in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Onu, P E

    1995-01-01

    The effects of depot medroxyprogesterone (DMPA), a 5 alpha-reductase, luteinizing-hormone release and human androgen receptor adhesion inhibitor, were assessed in 80 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Patients were randomized to DMPA 150 mg single-dose intramuscular injection or placebo in a similar fashion. The following changes were seen with DMPA after 3 months (duration of DMPA effect): (1) serum testosterone reached castration levels within 3 days as compared to no changes in the placebo group; (2) the prostate volume was reduced by 25% compared to a 3% decrease with placebo (p < 0.001); (3) maximum urinary-flow rates increased by 3.7 ml/s compared to placebo (p < 0.001); (4) total urinary symptom scores decreased by 4.9 points compared to a nonsignificant decrease with placebo (p < 0.005). There was a 2.5-point decrease in irritative symptoms (urinary frequency, nocturia and urgency) as compared to a nonsignificant decrease with placebo (p < 0.005). After 3 months, the urinary symptoms and urodynamic changes were reversed but significantly greater than the baseline values (p < 0.001). The prostates showed regrowth to the initial sizes within 18-36 weeks. DMPA was better tolerated, except for a higher incidence of impotence, decreased libido and ejaculatory disorders, than in the placebo group. The quality of life is improved with DMPA since it did not produce hot flashes. It was concluded that single-dose DMPA 150 mg is a safe and effective treatment for prostatic obstruction where potency is a secondary consideration.

  19. Economic issues and the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Holtgrewe, H L

    1995-09-01

    Enormous financial resources are expended worldwide on the treatment of the urologic complications and symptoms induced by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Even for its surgical management, where the best data exist, current international accounting of these expenditures remains very poorly documented. On February 8, 1994, the Department of Health and Human Services of the US government released clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and management of BPH. Imaging of the upper urinary tract as a routine diagnostic procedure is not recommended in these guidelines unless a comorbidity indicating its need exists. Diagnostic cystoscopy to assist in the decision of the need to treat is not recommended. Adherence to these two principles along with adherence to the strategies of management presented in the guidelines and discussed herein has the potential of achieving profound financial savings without impairing quality of care worldwide.

  20. Targeting androgen receptor to suppress macrophage-induced EMT and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) development.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tianjing; Lin, Wen-Jye; Izumi, Kouji; Wang, Xiaohai; Xu, Defeng; Fang, Lei-Ya; Li, Lei; Jiang, Qi; Jin, Jie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2012-10-01

    Early studies suggested macrophages might play roles in inflammation-associated benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) development, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we first showed that CD68(+) macrophages were identified in both epithelium and the stromal area of human BPH tissues. We then established an in vitro co-culture model with prostate epithelial and macrophage cell lines to study the potential impacts of infiltrating macrophages in the BPH development and found that co-culturing prostate epithelial cells with macrophages promoted migration of macrophages. In a three-dimensional culture system, the sphere diameter of BPH-1 prostate cells was significantly increased during coculture with THP-1 macrophage cells. Mechanism dissection suggested that expression levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, such as N-cadherin, Snail, and TGF-β2, were increased, and administration of anti-TGF-β2 neutralizing antibody during co-culture suppressed the EMT and THP-1-mediated growth of BPH-1 cells, suggesting THP-1 might go through EMT to influence the BPH development and progression. Importantly, we found that modulation of androgen receptor (AR) in BPH-1 and mPrE cells significantly increased THP-1 and RAW264.7 cell migration, respectively, and enhanced expression levels of EMT markers, suggesting that AR in prostate epithelial cells might play a role in promoting macrophage-mediated EMT in prostate epithelial cells. Silencing AR function via an AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9, decreased the macrophage migration to BPH-1 cells and suppressed EMT marker expression. Together, these results provide the first evidence to demonstrate that prostate epithelial AR function is important for macrophage-mediated EMT and proliferation of prostate epithelial cells, which represents a previously unrecognized role of AR in the cross-talk between macrophages and prostate epithelial cells. These results may provide new insights for a new therapeutic

  1. Computed Tomography of the Prostate Gland in Healthy Intact Dogs and Dogs with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Pasikowska, J; Hebel, M; Niżański, W; Nowak, M

    2015-10-01

    To date, there is only scarce data on the evaluation of the prostate gland in dogs using computed tomography (CT). The aims of our study were to describe CT features of BPH in dogs and to determine the size of the prostate gland in healthy male dogs and dogs with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) through CT. Additionally, we aimed to compare and establish the most useful parameters for CT measurements of the prostate in patients with BPH. The study population consisted of 20 healthy intact male dogs and 20 male intact dogs with confirmed BPH. Pre- and post-contrast CT studies were evaluated. The most common CT features in dogs with recognized BPH were symmetrical prostatomegaly and heterogeneity of the prostatic parenchyma. The mean prostatic density (D) was 56HU (±4.39) in pre-contrast CT images and 84HU (±8) in post-contrast images in dogs with BPH. The mean prostatic length (L) was 43.87 mm (±11), the mean width (W) amounted to 48.95 mm (±8.76) and the mean height (H) reached 44.9 mm (±9.48) in clinically affected patients. The mean ratios were: rL - 2,12 (±0.5); rW - 2.39 (±0.53) and rH - 2.16 (±0.39) in the BPH group. The prostate should be considered to be enlarged when rL exceeds 3.05; rW exceeds 3.38 and rH exceeds 2.94. Our findings indicated that CT is a useful tool in diagnosing prostate disorders, including BPH. The heterogeneity, density and ratios of prostatic length, width and height can be useful parameters in the diagnosis of BPH.

  2. Computed Tomography of the Prostate Gland in Healthy Intact Dogs and Dogs with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Pasikowska, J; Hebel, M; Niżański, W; Nowak, M

    2015-10-01

    To date, there is only scarce data on the evaluation of the prostate gland in dogs using computed tomography (CT). The aims of our study were to describe CT features of BPH in dogs and to determine the size of the prostate gland in healthy male dogs and dogs with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) through CT. Additionally, we aimed to compare and establish the most useful parameters for CT measurements of the prostate in patients with BPH. The study population consisted of 20 healthy intact male dogs and 20 male intact dogs with confirmed BPH. Pre- and post-contrast CT studies were evaluated. The most common CT features in dogs with recognized BPH were symmetrical prostatomegaly and heterogeneity of the prostatic parenchyma. The mean prostatic density (D) was 56HU (±4.39) in pre-contrast CT images and 84HU (±8) in post-contrast images in dogs with BPH. The mean prostatic length (L) was 43.87 mm (±11), the mean width (W) amounted to 48.95 mm (±8.76) and the mean height (H) reached 44.9 mm (±9.48) in clinically affected patients. The mean ratios were: rL - 2,12 (±0.5); rW - 2.39 (±0.53) and rH - 2.16 (±0.39) in the BPH group. The prostate should be considered to be enlarged when rL exceeds 3.05; rW exceeds 3.38 and rH exceeds 2.94. Our findings indicated that CT is a useful tool in diagnosing prostate disorders, including BPH. The heterogeneity, density and ratios of prostatic length, width and height can be useful parameters in the diagnosis of BPH. PMID:26303126

  3. Effects of flavocoxid, a dual inhibitor of COX and 5-lipoxygenase enzymes, on benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Altavilla, D; Minutoli, L; Polito, F; Irrera, N; Arena, S; Magno, C; Rinaldi, M; Burnett, BP; Squadrito, F; Bitto, A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Inflammation plays a key role in the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Eicosanoids derived from the COX and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) pathways are elevated in the enlarging prostate. Flavocoxid is a novel flavonoid–based ‘dual inhibitor’ of the COX and 5-LOX enzymes. This study evaluated the effects of flavocoxid in experimental BPH. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Rats were treated daily with testosterone propionate (3 mg·kg−1 s.c.) or its vehicle for 14 days to induce BPH. Animals receiving testosterone were randomized to receive vehicle (1 mL·kg−1, i.p.) or flavocoxid (20 mg·kg−1, i.p.) for 14 days. Histological changes, eicosanoid content and mRNA and protein levels for apoptosis-related proteins and growth factors were assayed in prostate tissue. The effects of flavocoxid were also tested on human prostate carcinoma PC3 cells. KEY RESULTS Flavocoxid reduced prostate weight and hyperplasia, blunted inducible expression of COX-2 and 5-LOX as well as the increased production of PGE2 and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), enhanced pro-apoptotic Bax and caspase-9 and decreased the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 mRNA. Flavocoxid also reduced EGF and VEGF expression. In PC3 cells, flavocoxid stimulated apoptosis and inhibited growth factor expression. Flavocoxid-mediated induction of apoptosis was inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, in PC3 cells, suggesting an essential role of caspases in flavocoxid-mediated apoptosis during prostatic growth. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Our results show that a ‘dual inhibitor’ of the COX and 5-LOX enzymes, such as flavocoxid, might represent a rational approach to reduce BPH through modulation of eicosanoid production and a caspase-induced apoptotic mechanism. PMID:22471974

  4. Efficacy and safety of finasteride therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia: results of a 2-year randomized controlled trial (the PROSPECT study). PROscar Safety Plus Efficacy Canadian Two year Study.

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, J C; Fradet, Y; Boake, R C; Pommerville, P J; Perreault, J P; Afridi, S K; Elhilali, M M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of 2 years' treatment of moderate benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with finasteride. DESIGN: Double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, multicentre, prospective randomized study. SETTING: Outpatient care in 28 centres across Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Men aged 45 to 80, in good health, with moderate BPH and no evidence of prostate cancer. A total of 613 men were entered into the study; 472 completed the 2 years of treatment. INTERVENTION: After 1 month of receiving a placebo (run-in period), patients were given either finasteride (5 mg/d) or a placebo for 2 years. OUTCOME MEASURES: Efficacy: changes from baseline in BPH symptom scores, maximum urinary flow rates and prostate volume. Safety: onset, course and resolution of all adverse events during the treatment period. RESULTS: In the efficacy analyses the mean BPH symptom scores decreased 2.1 points (from 15.8 to 13.7) in the finasteride group, as compared with a decrease of 0.7 points (from 16.6 to 15.9) in the placebo group (P < or = 0.01). The maximum urinary flow rate increased by a mean of 1.4 mL/s (from 11.1 to 12.5 mL/s) in the finasteride group, as compared with an increase of 0.3 mL/s (from 10.9 to 11.2 mL/s) in the placebo group (p < or = 0.01). The mean prostate volume decreased by 21% (from a mean volume of 44.1 cm3 at baseline) in the treatment group; it increased by 8.4% (from a mean volume of 45.8 cm3 at baseline) in the placebo group (p < or = 0.01). In the safety analysis, the proportion of patients who experienced any adverse event was similar in the two groups (81.0% in the treatment group and 81.2% in the placebo group). However, the incidence of adverse events related to sexual dysfunction were significantly higher in the finasteride group than in the placebo group (ejaculation disorder 7.7% v. 1.7% and impotence 15.8% v. 6.3%; p < or = 0.01 for both parameters). CONCLUSION: Finasteride is a well-tolerated and effective alternative to watchful

  5. Antiproliferative and Antioxidant Effects of Withania coagulans Extract on Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sarbishegi, Maryam; Khani, Mohaddeseh; Salimi, Saeedeh; Valizadeh, Mohharam; Sargolzaei Aval, Fereydoon

    2016-01-01

    Background: Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is a common urological disorder in elderly men. Phytotherapy is frequently used to alleviate the symptoms of this condition. Objectives: The present study investigated the effect of Withania coagulans extract (WCE), which is known to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antihyperglycemic, and anti-cancer properties, on testosterone-induced BPH in rats. Materials and Methods: Forty Wistar rats were divided into five groups (each n = 8): the control group, the untreated BPH group, and three WCE-treated groups (WCE250, 500, and 1000). BPH was induced with 3 mg/kg subcutaneous injections of testosterone propionate for four weeks. WCE was concomitantly administrated by oral gavage. At the end of the induction schedule, the animals were sacrificed and their prostate glands were dissected, weighed, and fixed for histological examination (H&E and proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA] staining). Half of each sample was prepared for measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels in the prostate. Results: The present study revealed that BPH caused elevation of MDA levels, suppression of TAC levels, and increased PCNA expression in the prostate gland. Interestingly, in a dose-dependent manner, WCE caused decreased MDA levels and increased TAC levels in the prostate gland, compared to the untreated BPH group. Histopathological examinations showed a reduction in PCNA expression in the prostate epithelium of the WCE animals. Conclusions: W. coagulans inhibits the development of BPH can be useful for the treatment of this condition. PMID:26981498

  6. Effects of coconut oil on testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    de Lourdes Arruzazabala, María; Molina, Vivian; Más, Rosa; Carbajal, Daisy; Marrero, David; González, Víctor; Rodríguez, Eduardo

    2007-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the benign uncontrolled growth of the prostate gland, leading to difficulty with urination. Saw palmetto lipid extracts (SPLE), used to treat BPH, have been shown to inhibit prostate 5a-reductase, and some major components, such as lauric, myristic and oleic acids also inhibit this enzyme. Coconut oil (CO) is also rich in fatty acids, mainly lauric and myristic acids. We investigated whether CO prevents testosterone-induced prostate hyperplasia (PH) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were distributed into seven groups (10 rats each). A negative control group were injected with soya oil; six groups were injected with testosterone (3 mg kg(-1)) to induce PH: a positive control group, and five groups treated orally with SPLE (400 mg kg(-1)), CO or sunflower oil (SO) (400 and 800 mg kg(-1)). Treatments were given for 14 days. Rats were weighed before treatment and weekly thereafter. Rats were then killed and the prostates were removed and weighed. CO (400 and 800 mg kg(-1)), SPLE (400 mg kg(-1)) and SO at 800 mg kg(-1), but not at 400 mg kg(-1), significantly reduced the increase in prostate weight (PW) and PW:body weight (BW) ratio induced by testosterone (% inhibition 61.5%, 82.0%, 43.8% and 28.2%, respectively). Since CO and SPLE, but not SO, contain appreciable concentrations of lauric and myristic acids, these results could be attributed to this fact. In conclusion, this study shows that CO reduced the increase of both PW and PW:BW ratio, markers of testosterone-induced PH in rats.

  7. Combination pharmacological therapies for the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Seth A; Parsons, J Kellogg

    2012-04-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a highly prevalent condition of older men caused by unregulated growth of the prostate gland. Clinical trials of medical therapy for BPH have consistently demonstrated that combined therapy with an α(1)-adrenergic receptor (AR) antagonist and a 5α-reductase inhibitor is superior to either agent alone. The addition of anticholinergic therapy to a treatment regimen could effectively improve symptoms in men with persistent storage lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) who have not seen a benefit with an α(1)-AR antagonist or 5α-reductase inhibitor. Among α(1)-AR antagonists, doxazosin, terazosin, tamsulosin, and alfuzosin, although with slight differences in adverse event profiles, are equivalent in effectiveness and efficacy. No data in the form of direct comparator trials exist to suggest a difference in clinical efficacy of finasteride and dutasteride, the two 5α-reductase inhibitors currently available. Current American Urological Association guidelines do not recommend phytotherapy or dietary supplements in any combination for the medical management of BPH. The current literature supports the safety and efficacy of the combination of an α(1)-AR antagonist and a 5α-reductase inhibitor in the treatment of symptomatic BPH and, in select patients, the use of an α(1)-AR antagonist and anticholinergic medication in the treatment of LUTS suggestive of BPH. PMID:22428659

  8. Acupuncture for benign prostatic hyperplasia: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, Jinna; Liu, Zhishun; Peng, Weina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a non-malignant enlargement of the prostate commonly encountered in older men. BPH has been treated with acupuncture inside and outside China, but its effects are uncertain. This review aims to assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture therapy for BPH. Methods and analysis Seven databases will be searched from their inception: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Chinese Biomedical Database, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, the VIP Database and Wanfang Database. Randomised controlled clinical trials using acupuncture to treat BPH will be included. Outcome measures included urological symptom scores, urodynamic measures and quality-of-life scales. Adverse events will be assessed and reported for safety evaluation. Study selection and data extraction will be performed by two independent reviewers. Quality assessment (assessment of risk of bias) and data synthesis will be implemented using Review Manager (RevMan) software (V.5.2.3). Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not necessary because this systematic review will not include specific patient data. Updates will be conducted if there is enough new evidence that may cause any change in review conclusions. Trial registration number PROSPERO CRD42014013645. PMID:25838507

  9. Current trends in management of men with lower urinary tract symptoms and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Holtgrewe, H L

    1998-04-01

    Management of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has been central to urology for decades. The urologic community has increasingly come to realize that many men with LUTS do not have prostate enlargement and do not need their prostates debulked surgically. Of all the factors that have emerged to alter the trends associated with management of LUTS and BPH, none has had more impact than the advent of medical therapy. The selective, long-acting, alpha1-blocking agents terazosin, doxazosin, and tamsulosin have become most popular because of their specificity in the urinary tract, reduced side effects, and simplicity of dosage. In addition, finasteride, a 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor, was found to be effective in men with prostates of > or = 40 g. Furthermore, the larger the prostate at baseline, the greater the efficacy of finasteride on symptom relief and flow rate improvement. In addition to medical therapy, an array of device therapies has emerged in the management of LUTS and BPH. Laser prostatectomy is the oldest of the device therapies and includes transurethral vaporization of the prostate (VLAP), transurethral evaporation of the prostate (TUEP), and transurethral interstitial laser prostatectomy (TILP). Studies report beneficial outcomes approaching those achieved with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) with less morbidity and a shorter hospital stay. Common diseases contribute the most to national healthcare expenditures. The management of LUTS and BPH are such disorders and result in the expenditure of vast healthcare resources worldwide. The surgical strategies have an established record of outcomes documenting their potential for symptom relief and the avoidance of future complications. Medical and device therapies, although currently promising and attractive, therefore must prove comparable durability.

  10. Influence of Panax ginseng on Alpha-Adrenergic Receptor of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Kang; Chung, Joo-Ho; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Lee, Sang Won; Lee, Kang Hyo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common prostate problem in older men. The present study aimed to investigate the inhibitory effect of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (P. ginseng) on a rat model of testosterone-induced BPH. Methods The rats were divided into 3 groups (each group, n=10): control, testosterone-induced BPH (20 mg/kg, subcutaneous injection), and P. ginseng (200 mg/kg, orally) groups. After 4 weeks, all animals were sacrificed to examine the blood biochemical profiles, prostate volume, weight, histopathological changes, alpha-1D adrenergic receptor (Adra1d) mRNA expression, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) protein expression. Results The group treated with P. ginseng showed significantly lesser prostate size and weight than the testosterone-induced BPH group. In addition, P. ginseng decreased the mRNA expression of Adra1d as well as the expression of EGFR and BCL2 in prostate tissue. Conclusions These results suggest that P. ginseng may inhibit the alpha-1-adrenergic receptor to suppress the development of BPH. PMID:25558416

  11. Comparison of Photoselective Vaporization versus Holmium Laser Enucleation for Treatment of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia in a Small Prostate Volume

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang Sup; Choi, Jin Bong; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyun Woo; Cho, Su Yeon; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) using GreenLight and Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is an important surgical technique for management of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of PVP using a 120 W GreenLight laser with HoLEP in a small prostate volume. Methods Patients who underwent PVP or HoLEP surgery for BPH at our institutions were reviewed from May 2009 to December 2014 in this retrospective study. Among them, patients with prostate volumes < 40 mL based on preoperative trans-rectal ultrasonography were included in this study. Peri-operative and post-operative parameters—such as International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual urine volume (PVR), and complications—were compared between the groups. Results PVP was performed in 176 patients and HoLEP in162 patients. Preoperative demographic data were similar in both groups, with the exception of PVR. Operative time and catheter duration did not show significant difference. Significant improvements compared to preoperative values were verified at the postoperative evaluation in both groups in terms of IPSS, QoL, Qmax, and PVR. Comparison of the postoperative parameters between the PVP and HoLEP groups demonstrated no significant difference, with the exception of IPSS voiding subscore at 1 month postoperatively (5.9 vs. 3.8, P< 0.001). There was no significant difference in postoperative complications between the two groups. Conclusion Our data suggest that PVP and HoLEP are efficient and safe surgical treatment options for patients with small prostate volume. PMID:27227564

  12. Correlation of transrectal ultrasonographic findings of the prostate with the occurrence of detrusor instability in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Tong, Y C; Lin, Y M; Yang, W H; Tzai, T S; Lin, J S

    1995-01-01

    Forty patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia were evaluated with urodynamics and transrectal ultrasonography. Seventeen patients were found to have detrusor instability while the remaining 23 did not. No significant differences were noted during ultrasonography in the estimated prostatic volume, the presumed circle area ratio and the incidence of finding prostatic calcification between these two groups. However, the incidence of detecting intravesical protrusion of the prostate is significantly higher in patients with instability than in patients with stable bladder (53 vs. 13%, p < 0.01). It is therefore postulated that intravesical protrusion may increase afferent impulses from the prostate and alter the stability status of the urinary bladder.

  13. Various treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia: A current update

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Alankar; Gupta, Vipin B.

    2012-01-01

    In benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) there will be a sudden impact on overall quality of life of patient. This disease occurs normally at the age of 40 or above and also is associated with sexual dysfunction. Thus, there is a need of update on current medications of this disease. The presented review provides information on medications available for BPH. Phytotherapies with some improvements in BPH are also included. Relevant articles were identified through a search of the English-language literature indexed on MEDLINE, PUBMED, Sciencedirect and the proceedings of scientific meetings. The search terms were BPH, medications for BPH, drugs for BPH, combination therapies for BPH, Phytotherapies for BPH, Ayurveda and BPH, BPH treatments in Ayurveda. Medications including watchful waitings, Alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, combination therapies including tamsulosin-dutasteride, doxazosin-finasteride, terazosin-finasteride, tolterodine-tamsulosin and rofecoxib-finasteride were found. Herbal remedies such as Cernilton, Saxifraga stolonifera, Zi-Shen Pill (ZSP), Orbignya speciosa, Phellodendron amurense, Ganoderma lucidum, Serenoa Repens, pumpkin extract and Lepidium meyenii (Red Maca) have some improvements on BPH are included. Other than these discussions on Ayurvedic medications, TURP and minimally invasive therapies (MITs) are also included. Recent advancements in terms of newly synthesized molecules are also discussed. Specific alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin will remain preferred choice of urologists for symptom relief. Medications with combination therapies are still needs more investigation to establish as preference in initial stage for fast symptom relief reduced prostate growth and obviously reduce need for BPH-related surgery. Due to lack of proper evidence Phytotherapies are not gaining much advantage. MITs and TURP are expensive and are rarely supported by healthcare systems. PMID:22923974

  14. Various treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia: A current update.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Alankar; Gupta, Vipin B

    2012-01-01

    In benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) there will be a sudden impact on overall quality of life of patient. This disease occurs normally at the age of 40 or above and also is associated with sexual dysfunction. Thus, there is a need of update on current medications of this disease. The presented review provides information on medications available for BPH. Phytotherapies with some improvements in BPH are also included. Relevant articles were identified through a search of the English-language literature indexed on MEDLINE, PUBMED, Sciencedirect and the proceedings of scientific meetings. The search terms were BPH, medications for BPH, drugs for BPH, combination therapies for BPH, Phytotherapies for BPH, Ayurveda and BPH, BPH treatments in Ayurveda. Medications including watchful waitings, Alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, combination therapies including tamsulosin-dutasteride, doxazosin-finasteride, terazosin-finasteride, tolterodine-tamsulosin and rofecoxib-finasteride were found. Herbal remedies such as Cernilton, Saxifraga stolonifera, Zi-Shen Pill (ZSP), Orbignya speciosa, Phellodendron amurense, Ganoderma lucidum, Serenoa Repens, pumpkin extract and Lepidium meyenii (Red Maca) have some improvements on BPH are included. Other than these discussions on Ayurvedic medications, TURP and minimally invasive therapies (MITs) are also included. Recent advancements in terms of newly synthesized molecules are also discussed. Specific alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin will remain preferred choice of urologists for symptom relief. Medications with combination therapies are still needs more investigation to establish as preference in initial stage for fast symptom relief reduced prostate growth and obviously reduce need for BPH-related surgery. Due to lack of proper evidence Phytotherapies are not gaining much advantage. MITs and TURP are expensive and are rarely supported by healthcare systems. PMID:22923974

  15. What do we know about phytotherapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia?

    PubMed

    Allkanjari, Olta; Vitalone, Annabella

    2015-04-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common urological diseases in aging men. Because of its long latency, BPH is a good target for prevention. The aim of the study has been to review the various options of treatment, currently available, in the field of phytotherapy. Watchful waiting, pharmacological therapy, and surgery are also helpful, depending on the severity of the disease. Although drug therapy (alpha1-blockers, 5alpha-reductase inhibitors) and surgery (prostatectomy, transurethral resection, etc.) seem to be most effective for patients with moderate-severe BPH, herbal medicines (i.e., Serenoa repens, Pygeum africanum, Urtica dioica) are also commonly used in patients with mild-moderate symptoms. On the basis of preclinical studies several mechanisms of action have been postulated, including 5alpha-reductase inhibition, alpha-adrenergic antagonism, dihydrotestosterone and estrogen receptor inhibition. Randomized clinical trials indicate significant efficacy in improving urinary symptoms and mild adverse effects for some phytotherapeutic agents, while further clinical evidence is needed for others (e.g., Epilobium spp., Secale cereale, Roystonea regia). Healthcare professionals should be constantly informed about BPH phytotherapy, taking into account the risk/benefit profile of the use of medicinal plants in the management of BPH. PMID:25703069

  16. Potential efficacy of some african plants in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Russo, Giorgio I; Cimino, Sebastiano; Salamone, Costanza; Madonia, Massimo; Favilla, Vincenzo; Castelli, Tommaso; Morgia, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Traditional medicine is very popular in Africa and it is considered as an alternative form of health care. Plants and vegetables used in folk and traditional medicine have gained wide acceptance as one of the main sources of prophylactic and chemopreventive drug discovery and this is due to the evidence of particular biological and biochemical characteristics of each plants extracts. The role of these compounds in urological field may be explained by the antiinflammatory effect through interference with prostaglandin metabolism, alteration of lipid peroxidation, direct inhibition of prostate growth and moreover through an antiandrogenic or antiestrogenic effect and a decrease of the availability of sex hormone-binding globulin. Since Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Prostate Cancer are two of the most diffuse diseases of aging male and considering that standard medical therapy is accompanied with different side effects, the emerging use of African plants may be justified. This review takes a look at some African plants extracts properties and their relative urological application. Different biomolecular mechanisms of action are promising, suggesting a real application in reducing prostate cells proliferation.

  17. Antagonistic effect of Lepidium meyenii (red maca) on prostatic hyperplasia in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, G F; Gasco, M; Malheiros-Pereira, A; Gonzales-Castañeda, C

    2008-06-01

    The plants from the Lepidium gender have demonstrated to have effect on the size of the prostate. Lepidium meyenii (Maca) is a Peruvian plant that grows exclusively over 4000 m above sea level. The present study was designed to determine the effect of red maca (RM) in the prostate hyperplasia induced with testosterone enanthate (TE) in adult mice. Prostate hyperplasia was induced by administering TE, and then these animals (n = 6, each group) were treated with RM or Finasteride (positive control) for 21 days. There was an additional group without prostate hyperplasia (vehicle). Mice were killed on days 7, 14 and 21 after treatment with RM. Testosterone and oestradiol levels were measured on the last day of treatment. Prostatic stroma, epithelium and acini were measured histologically. RM reduced prostate weight at 21 days of treatment. Weights of seminal vesicles, testis and epididymis were not affected by RM treatment. The reduction in prostate size by RM was 1.59 times. Histological analysis showed that TE increased 2-fold the acinar area, effect prevented in the groups receiving TE + RM for 14 (P < 0.05) and 21 (P < 0.05) days and the group receiving TE + Finasteride for 21 days (P < 0.05). TE increased prostatic stroma area and this effect was prevented by treatment with RM since 7 days of treatment or Finasteride. The reduction in prostatic stroma area by RM was 1.42 times. RM has an anti-hyperplastic effect on the prostate of adult mice when hyperplasia was induced with TE acting first at prostatic stromal level. PMID:18477205

  18. Antagonistic effect of Lepidium meyenii (red maca) on prostatic hyperplasia in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, G F; Gasco, M; Malheiros-Pereira, A; Gonzales-Castañeda, C

    2008-06-01

    The plants from the Lepidium gender have demonstrated to have effect on the size of the prostate. Lepidium meyenii (Maca) is a Peruvian plant that grows exclusively over 4000 m above sea level. The present study was designed to determine the effect of red maca (RM) in the prostate hyperplasia induced with testosterone enanthate (TE) in adult mice. Prostate hyperplasia was induced by administering TE, and then these animals (n = 6, each group) were treated with RM or Finasteride (positive control) for 21 days. There was an additional group without prostate hyperplasia (vehicle). Mice were killed on days 7, 14 and 21 after treatment with RM. Testosterone and oestradiol levels were measured on the last day of treatment. Prostatic stroma, epithelium and acini were measured histologically. RM reduced prostate weight at 21 days of treatment. Weights of seminal vesicles, testis and epididymis were not affected by RM treatment. The reduction in prostate size by RM was 1.59 times. Histological analysis showed that TE increased 2-fold the acinar area, effect prevented in the groups receiving TE + RM for 14 (P < 0.05) and 21 (P < 0.05) days and the group receiving TE + Finasteride for 21 days (P < 0.05). TE increased prostatic stroma area and this effect was prevented by treatment with RM since 7 days of treatment or Finasteride. The reduction in prostatic stroma area by RM was 1.42 times. RM has an anti-hyperplastic effect on the prostate of adult mice when hyperplasia was induced with TE acting first at prostatic stromal level.

  19. A 63 element 1.75 dimensional ultrasound phased array for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Khaldon Y; Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2005-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are very common diseases in older American men, thus having a reliable treatment modality for both diseases is of great importance. The currently used treating options, mainly surgical ones, have numerous complications, which include the many side effects that accompany such procedures, besides the invasive nature of such techniques. Focused ultrasound is a relatively new treating modality that is showing promising results in treating prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Thus this technique is gaining more attention in the past decade as a non-invasive method to treat both diseases. Methods In this paper, the design, construction and evaluation of a 1.75 dimensional ultrasound phased array to be used for treating prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia is presented. With this array, the position of the focus can be controlled by changing the electrical power and phase to the individual elements for electronically focusing and steering in a three dimensional volume. The array was designed with a maximum steering angle of ± 13.5° in the transverse direction and a maximum depth of penetration of 11 cm, which allows the treatment of large prostates. The transducer piezoelectric ceramic, matching layers and cable impedance have been designed for maximum power transfer to tissue. Results To verify the capability of the transducer for focusing and steering, exposimetry was performed and the results correlated well with the calculated field. Ex vivo experiments using bovine tissue were performed with various lesion sizes and indicated the capability of the transducer to ablate tissue using short sonications. Conclusion A 1.75 dimensional array, that overcame the drawbacks associated with one-dimensional arrays, has been designed, built and successfully tested. Design issues, such as cable and ceramic capacitances, were taken into account when designing this array. The final prototype

  20. AB133. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis with benign prostatic hyperplasia: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Anxi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To improve the level of diagnosis and treatment of xanthogranulomatous prostatitis. Methods The clinical data of a case of xanthogranulomatous prostatitis were analyzed retrospectively and discussed with relative literature review. Results A 56-year-old man presented with a 1 month history of difficult urination, which was exacerbated for 10 days. The patient was confirmed with xanthogranulomatous prostatitis with chronic suppurative inflammation and abscess by pathologic diagnosis after plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (PKRP). The patient achieved smooth voiding and was discharged after operation for one week. Urination was normal during two months follow up. Conclusions Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is rare clinical disease, which should be excluded from prostate cancer and can be confirmed by pathobiology. According to the degree of lower urinary tract obstruction, it is treated by medicine or surgical operation. Examination of PSA regularly and long-term follow-up must be performed.

  1. Anti-Proliferation Effects of Garlic (Allium sativum L.) on the Progression of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; Shin, Su-Jin; Lee, Na Young; Cheon, Se-Yun; Park, Wansu; Sun, Seung-Ho; An, Hyo-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a urologic disease that affects most of men over the age 50. But until now there is no such perfect cure without side effects. Because of diverse adverse effects, it is desirable to develop effective and long term-safety-herbal medicines to inhibit the progress of BPH. In spite of garlic's large use and a wide spectrum of studies, including anti-hyperlipidemic, cardio-protective, and anti-inflammatory activities, there was none to prove efficacy for BPH. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of garlic to prove its suppressing effects on BPH. Garlic administration decreased relative prostate weight ratio, suppressed mRNA expression level of AR, DHT serum levels, and the growth of prostatic tissue in BPH-induced rats. Moreover, garlic administration decreased the levels of inflammatory proteins, iNOS, and COX-2 in prostatic tissue. Further investigation showed that garlic induced accumulation of death-inducing signal complex and activation of AMPK and decreased the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins, such as Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and survivin. These results suggest that garlic may have suppressing effects on BPH and it has great potential to be developed as treatment for BPH. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The clinical efficacy and tolerability of doxazosin standard and gastrointestinal therapeutic system for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, John M; Desgrandchamps, François

    2005-03-01

    The therapeutic goal of treating benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) through early detection and effective therapy is to relieve the symptoms, improve patients' quality of life, decrease postvoid residual urine volume, and prevent the associated morbidity when the condition remains untreated. Alpha1-adrenoreceptor antagonists, e.g. doxazosin, terazosin, tamsulosin and alfuzosin, relax the bladder outlet to improve urinary flow, by reducing prostatic smooth muscle tone through the blockade of sympathetic adrenergic receptors. Doxazosin gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) is a controlled-release formulation developed to enhance the pharmacokinetic profile of the drug while simultaneously minimizing possible adverse effects and reducing the need for dose titration. While both doxazosin standard and GITS are indicated for hypertension, they are also useful in the pharmacologically or naturally normotensive patient with BPH. In a cross-over trial comparing doxazosin GITS and tamsulosin, doxazosin gave a significantly greater improvement from baseline in symptoms. Results from recent trials (e.g. Medical Therapy of Prostatic Symptoms, MTOPS) showed that doxazosin was significantly more effective than the 5alpha-reductase inhibitor finasteride in relieving lower urinary tract symptoms, irrespective of prostate volume. The MTOPS trial showed clearly that over the long term, the combination of doxazosin and finasteride was more effective than either agent alone in significantly improving symptoms and reducing the clinical progression of BPH. Both doxazosin standard and GITS are well-tolerated, long-term therapies that are equally effective in younger and older men, and not associated with causing sexual dysfunction.

  3. Anti-Proliferation Effects of Garlic (Allium sativum L.) on the Progression of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; Shin, Su-Jin; Lee, Na Young; Cheon, Se-Yun; Park, Wansu; Sun, Seung-Ho; An, Hyo-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a urologic disease that affects most of men over the age 50. But until now there is no such perfect cure without side effects. Because of diverse adverse effects, it is desirable to develop effective and long term-safety-herbal medicines to inhibit the progress of BPH. In spite of garlic's large use and a wide spectrum of studies, including anti-hyperlipidemic, cardio-protective, and anti-inflammatory activities, there was none to prove efficacy for BPH. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of garlic to prove its suppressing effects on BPH. Garlic administration decreased relative prostate weight ratio, suppressed mRNA expression level of AR, DHT serum levels, and the growth of prostatic tissue in BPH-induced rats. Moreover, garlic administration decreased the levels of inflammatory proteins, iNOS, and COX-2 in prostatic tissue. Further investigation showed that garlic induced accumulation of death-inducing signal complex and activation of AMPK and decreased the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins, such as Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and survivin. These results suggest that garlic may have suppressing effects on BPH and it has great potential to be developed as treatment for BPH. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27191676

  4. Antrodan, a β-glucan obtained from Antrodia cinnamomea mycelia, is beneficial to benign prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chiung-Chi; Lin, Yi-Ting; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Peng, Robert Y

    2015-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), one of the most common disease usually occurring in men in their 50s, has now become an atypical direct cause of mortality. Currently, phytotherapeutic agents are emerging and are frequently used as a complementary alternative treatment of BPH. β-glucan has shown a diversity of bioactivities involving anticancer, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. Antrodia cinnamomea exhibits a diversity of biological activities. Only a few literature references have cited the biomedicinal effects of antrodan, which is a unique β-glucan present in A. cinnamomea mycelia. We hypothesized that antrodan could be beneficial to BPH. Using the Sprague-Dawley rat model, we performed this present experiment. Results indicated that antrodan alleviated most of the pathophysiological manifestations that can be elicited by BPH, by alleviating the prostatic epithelial hyperplasia and collagen deposition, increasing the total cholesterol biosynthesis and conversion into HDL, and suppressing the production of LDL and ROS and the upregulation of IL-1, COX-2 and CD68. Antrodan also effectively suppressed the serum level testosterone and DHT and downregulated aromatase, estradiol and the expression of the androgen receptor. More importantly, antrodan downregulated N-cadherin and vimentin and upregulated E-cadherin, underlying the effective inhibition on the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Conclusively, the β-glucan antrodan present in the A. cinamomea mycelia is beneficial to the BPH therapy.

  5. Nanostructured systems containing babassu (Orbignya speciosa) oil as a potential alternative therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Valeria Pereira; Crean, Joanne; de Almeida Borges, Vinícius Raphael; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Tajber, Lidia; Boylan, Fabio; Cabral, Lucio Mendes

    2013-01-01

    The oil of babassu tree nuts (Orbignya speciosa) is a potential alternative for treatment and prophylaxis of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Improved results can be obtained by drug vectorization to the hyperplastic tissue. The main objective of this work was the preparation and characterization of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticle and clay nanosystems containing babassu oil (BBS). BBS was extracted from the kernels of babassu tree nuts and characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as well as 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance. BBS-clay nanosystems were obtained by adding polyvinylpyrrolidone, Viscogel B8®, and BBS at a 2:1:1 mass ratio and characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and laser diffraction. The PLGA-BBS nanoparticles were prepared by the precipitation-solvent evaporation method. Mean diameter, polydispersity, zeta potential, and scanning electron microscopic images of the nanosystems were analyzed. Thermogravimetric analysis showed successful formation of the nanocomposite. PLGA nanoparticles containing BBS were obtained, with a suitable size that was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Both nanostructured systems showed active incorporation yields exceeding 90%. The two systems obtained represent a new and potentially efficient therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:23990721

  6. Challenging the Inevitability of Prostate Enlargement: Low Levels of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Among Tsimane Forager-Horticulturalists

    PubMed Central

    Stieglitz, Jonathan; Rodriguez, Daniel Eid; Linares, Edhitt Cortez; Kaplan, Hillard S.; Gurven, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Often considered an inevitable part of male aging, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common non-life threatening disease to affect men in Western populations. We examine age-related change in prostate size and BPH risk and related serum biomarkers among the Tsimane Amerindians of the Bolivian Amazon who live a traditional lifestyle of hunting and small-scale horticulture. The Tsimane are a critical case study for understanding the etiology of BPH as they have low levels of obesity and metabolic syndrome, as well as lower levels of testosterone than age matched U.S. males, factors associated with BPH in previous research. Methods. Ultrasounds were conducted on 348 men aged 28–89 years (median age 56 years). Testosterone, prostate specific antigen, sex hormone binding globulin, and glycosylated hemoglobin were examined in relationship to prostate size and BPH. Results. Tsimane have less than half of the BPH prevalence experienced by U.S. men, and prostate volumes 62.6% smaller. While Tsimane have low levels of testosterone and subclinical levels of metabolic syndrome compared to U.S. men, Tsimane with high testosterone were more likely to experience BPH, as were those with higher glycosylated hemoglobin, suggesting targets for clinical interventions to reduce BPH. Conclusions. These results have clinical significance for the growing number of men taking testosterone supplementation; even at low levels the additional testosterone exposure could be placing these men at higher risk of BPH. Overall, these data suggest that BPH may not have been an inevitable part of male aging throughout human evolutionary history. PMID:25922348

  7. Renal capsule xenografting and subcutaneous pellet implantation for the evaluation of prostate carcinogenesis and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tristan M; Uchtmann, Kristen S; Valdez, Conrad D; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Miralem, Tihomir; Ricke, William A

    2013-01-01

    New therapies for two common prostate diseases, prostate cancer (PrCa) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), depend critically on experiments evaluating their hormonal regulation. Sex steroid hormones (notably androgens and estrogens) are important in PrCa and BPH; we probe their respective roles in inducing prostate growth and carcinogenesis in mice with experiments using compressed hormone pellets. Hormone and/or drug pellets are easily manufactured with a pellet press, and surgically implanted into the subcutaneous tissue of the male mouse host. We also describe a protocol for the evaluation of hormonal carcinogenesis by combining subcutaneous hormone pellet implantation with xenografting of prostate cell recombinants under the renal capsule of immunocompromised mice. Moreover, subcutaneous hormone pellet implantation, in combination with renal capsule xenografting of BPH tissue, is useful to better understand hormonal regulation of benign prostate growth, and to test new therapies targeting sex steroid hormone pathways. PMID:24022657

  8. Symptomatic and asymptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia: Molecular differentiation by using microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Kulkarni; Pirozzi, Gregorio; Elashoff, Michael; Munger, William; Waga, Iwao; Dhir, Rajiv; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Getzenberg, Robert H.

    2002-05-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a disease of unknown etiology that significantly affects the quality of life in aging men. Histologic BPH may present itself either as symptomatic or asymptomatic in nature. To elucidate the molecular differences underlying BPH, gene expression profiles from the prostate transition zone tissue have been analyzed by using microarrays. A set of 511 differentially expressed genes distinguished symptomatic and asymptomatic BPH. This genetic signature separates BPH from normal tissue but does not seem to change with age. These data could provide novel approaches for alleviating symptoms and hyperplasia in BPH.

  9. [Peptide geroprotector application for treatment of elderly and senile patients with prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Gomberg, V G; Ryzhak, V G; Liutov, R V

    2013-01-01

    The blind randomized placebo-controlled study of the efficacy of bladder peptide bioregulator Chitomur for the treatment of older age groups of men with benign prostatic hyperplasia was conducted. The effect of the drug on the main urodynamic parameters, symptoms dynamic of the lower urinary tract function disturbances, prostate volume and the quality of life of men with benign prostatic hyperplasia in age from 62 to 83 years was evaluated. It was found that the course application of peptide bioregulator Chitomur in elderly and senile patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia significantly improves the basic parameters of urination. That was accompanied by improved quality of life of the patients. The achieved improvement of urodynamic parameters and quality of life does not reduce during the month following the end of treatment. No adverse effects of the drug were found during the study, which is important for elderly patients and distinguishes it from the conventional drugs used for the treatment of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  10. Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins in experimental benign prostatic hyperplasia: effects of serenoa repens, selenium and lycopene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The apoptosis machinery is a promising target against benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) modulate apoptosis by direct inhibition of caspases. Serenoa Repens (SeR) may be combined with other natural compounds such as Lycopene (Ly) and Selenium (Se) to maximize its therapeutic activity in BPH. We investigated the effects of SeR, Se and Ly, alone or in association, on the expression of four IAPs, cIAP-1, cIAP-2, NAIP and survivin in rats with experimental testosterone-dependent BPH. Moreover, caspase-3, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have been evaluated. Rats were administered, daily, with testosterone propionate (3 mg/kg/sc) or its vehicle for 14 days. Testosterone injected animals (BPH) were randomized to receive vehicle, SeR (25 mg/kg/sc), Se (3 mg/kg/sc), Ly (1 mg/kg/sc) or the SeR-Se-Ly association for 14 days. Animals were sacrificed and prostate removed for analysis. Results BPH animals treated with vehicle showed unchanged expression of cIAP-1 and cIAP-2 and increased expression of NAIP, survivin, caspase-3, IL-6 and PSMA levels when compared with sham animals. Immunofluorescence studies confirmed the enhanced expression of NAIP and survivin with a characteristic pattern of cellular localization. SeR-Se-Ly association showed the highest efficacy in reawakening apoptosis; additionally, this therapeutic cocktail significantly reduced IL-6 and PSMA levels. The administration of SeR, Se and Ly significantly blunted prostate overweight and growth; moreover, the SeR-Se-Ly association was most effective in reducing prostate enlargement and growth by 43.3% in treated animals. Conclusions The results indicate that IAPs may represent interesting targets for drug therapy of BPH. PMID:24606563

  11. Fraction of Macroporous Resin from Smilax china L. Inhibits Testosterone Propionate–Induced Prostatic Hyperplasia in Castrated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Xiong, Chao-Mei; Song, Shan-Shan; Han, Pan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a fraction of macroporous resin (FMR), a bioactive component of Smilax china L., on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in castrated rats induced by testosterone propionate. Rats were randomly divided into five groups: the negative control group (sham-operated), the model group, two FMR-treated groups (at doses of 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg of body weight), and the positive control group (treated with finasteride at the dose of 3 mg/kg). Drugs were administered once a day for three consecutive weeks by gastric gavage. Prostates were weighed, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels in serum were determined, and histopathological examinations were carried out. FMR treatment inhibited prostatic hyperplasia, reducing the DHT level in serum and improving the prostate gland morphology compared with the model group. The overall results of this study suggest that FMR is effective at inhibiting experimentally induced prostate enlargement, and it presents a valuable resource for the treatment of human BPH. PMID:22510101

  12. Fraction of macroporous resin from Smilax china L. inhibits testosterone propionate-induced prostatic hyperplasia in castrated rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Xiong, Chao-Mei; Song, Shan-Shan; Han, Pan; Ruan, Jin-Lan

    2012-07-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a fraction of macroporous resin (FMR), a bioactive component of Smilax china L., on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in castrated rats induced by testosterone propionate. Rats were randomly divided into five groups: the negative control group (sham-operated), the model group, two FMR-treated groups (at doses of 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg of body weight), and the positive control group (treated with finasteride at the dose of 3 mg/kg). Drugs were administered once a day for three consecutive weeks by gastric gavage. Prostates were weighed, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels in serum were determined, and histopathological examinations were carried out. FMR treatment inhibited prostatic hyperplasia, reducing the DHT level in serum and improving the prostate gland morphology compared with the model group. The overall results of this study suggest that FMR is effective at inhibiting experimentally induced prostate enlargement, and it presents a valuable resource for the treatment of human BPH.

  13. Therapeutic effect of D-004, a lipid extract from Roystonea regia fruits, on prostate hyperplasia induced in rats.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, D; Molina, V; Mas, R; Arruzazabala, M L

    2005-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a nonmalignant growth of prostate leading to difficulty in urinating. Drug therapy, phytotherapy included, is frequently used to treat BPH. D-004 is a lipid extract from Roystonea regia fruits, and previous studies have shown that oral treatment with D-004 for 14 days prevented prostate hyperplasia (PH) induced by testosterone in rats. No information is available, however; about the effects of D-004 in reverting already established PH. This study investigated whether D-004 could improve PH after oral dosing with testosterone in rats. Rats were distributed in five groups (10 rats/group). One group was injected with soy oil (negative control) and four groups were injected with testosterone: one was orally treated with the vehicle (positive control), two with D-004 (200 and 400 mg/kg) and the other with Saw palmetto (400 mg/kg). At study completion, the rats were sacrificed and the prostates were removed and weighed. D-004 (200 and 400 mg/kg) significantly and dose-dependently decreased prostate enlargement by 85% and 98%, respectively, versus the positive control. Likewise, Saw palmetto (400 mg/kg) significantly reduced prostate weight by 73% versus the positive control. D-004 (400 mg/kg) was more effective (p < 0.05) than Saw palmetto (400 mg/kg) in lowering prostate enlargement. D-004 and Saw palmetto also decreased the prostate weight to body weight ratio, but did not affect body weight. In conclusion, D-004 (200 and 400 mg/kg) orally administered was effective for reducing PH after testosterone dosing. D-004 (400 mg/kg) was more effective than Saw palmetto (400 mg/kg). Further studies, however, are needed to corroborate the present results.

  14. DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA IN A PIED TAMARIN (SAGUINUS BICOLOR).

    PubMed

    Barbon, Alberto Rodriguez; Ordóñez, Israel Alamilla; Haworth, Peter; Glendewar, Gale; Routh, Andrew; Pocknell, Ann

    2016-06-01

    An intact male pied tamarin (Saguinus bicolor) presented with a hunched posture while moving, dysuria, pollakiuria, and hematuria. After diagnostic imaging assessment and prostate biopsy, benign prostatic hyperplasia was diagnosed. Treatments with delmadinone acetate and osaterone caused clinical signs and hematuria to resolve temporarily for a variable period of time. Because of frequent recurrence, elective surgical castration was performed, leading to resolution of the clinical signs. PMID:27468035

  15. Comparison of outpatient versus inpatient transurethral prostate resection for benign prostatic hyperplasia: Comparative, prospective bi-centre study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Park, Jae Young; Shim, Ji Sung; Lee, Jeong Gu; Moon, Du Geon; Yoo, Jeong woo; Choi, Hoon; Bae, Jae Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We compare the symptomatic relief with urodynamic parameter change and operative safety of the outpatient transurethral resection in saline (TURIS-V) technique with inpatient transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) for the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods: This prospective cohort comparison study enrolled patients who needed BPH surgery. Between January 2010 and June 2011, outpatient TURIS-V was performed at 1 centre and the results of the treatment were compared with inpatient TURP performed at a separate hospital. Preoperative characteristics, including prostate volume, were similar in both groups. Perioperative data and any treatment complications were recorded. The analysis compared postoperative outcomes, including a 6-month postoperative International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), a quality of life (QoL) evaluation and a record of any changes in uroflowmetry findings, between the 2 groups. Results: In the TURIS-V patient group, 75 patients agreed to be in the study. Of these, 69 ultimately complete the study. In the TURP group, 76 patients agreed and 71 of these completed the study. Both study groups were well-matched for age, IPSS, QoL and uroflowmetry findings. The TURIS-V group experienced both shorter operation times (54.6 vs. 74.8 minutes) and shorter catheterization times (2.2 vs. 4.2 days) when compared to the TURP group. There were comparable improvements in the 6-month postoperative IPSS, QoL, and uroflowmetry findings between the 2 groups. There were also equally low incidence rates of procedural complications. Conclusions: Both TURIS-V and TURP relieve lower urinary tract symptoms in a similar way, with great efficacy and safety. Overall, TURIS-V had shorter operative and catheterization times compared to TURP. Notwithstanding the paper’s limitations (non- randomized cohort comparison with possible selection or surgeon bias and small heterogeneous sample size), TURIS-V can be performed safely even in

  16. Safety and efficiency of thulium laser prostate resection for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia in large prostates.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hai-bin; Zhuo, Jian; Sun, Xiao-wen; Pang, Kun; Shao, Yi; Liang, Sheng-jie; Cui, Di; Zhao, Fu-jun; Yu, Jun-jie; Xia, Shu-jie

    2014-05-01

    Thulium laser resection of the prostate-tangerine technique (TmLRP-TT) dissects whole prostatic lobes off the surgical capsule, similar to peeling a tangerine. The present study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of TmLRP-TT for older symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia patients with large prostates during 18 months of follow-up. A prospective analysis of 95 consecutive patients with large prostates (>80 ml) who underwent surgical treatment using TmLRP-TT was carried out. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 1, 6, 12, and 18 months postoperatively by the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), maximum urinary flow rate (Q max), postvoid residual urine volume (PVR), International Index of Erectile Function 5 (IIEF-5), urine analysis, and urine culture. Perioperative complications were recorded and graded by the modified Clavien classification system (CCS). Mean preoperative prostate volume was 106.81 ± 24.79 ml. TmLRP-TT was successfully completed in all patients. The mean operative duration, catheterization time, and hospital stay were 95.36 ± 27.06 min, 2.25 ± 0.9 days, and 5.39 ± 1.18 days, respectively. The decrease in mean hemoglobin level was 1.23 ± 0.72 g/dl, and that in mean serum sodium level was 0.71 ± 2.56 mmol/l. Within the observation period of 18 months, the patients showed an improvement in IPSS (20.01 ± 7.08 vs. 4.96 ± 3.68), QoL (4.10 ± 1.16 vs. 1.23 ± 1.30), Q max (8.14 ± 3.81 ml/s vs. 18.33 ± 2.56 ml/s) and PVR (102.70 ± 70.64 ml vs. 20.28 ± 30.02 ml), compared with baseline values (P < 0.001). IIEF-5 remained stable. Minor complications occurred in 10 (10.52 %) of 95 patients (Clavien grade 1, 9.47 % and grade 2, 1.05 %). There were no severe complications requiring reintervention (Clavien grade 3, 0 % and grade 4, 0 %). TmLRP-TT is a safe and effective surgical endoscopic technique associated with a low complication rate in large prostates as assessed during an 18-month follow

  17. Managing benign prostatic hyperplasia in primary care. Patient-centred approach.

    PubMed Central

    McSherry, J.; Weiss, R.

    2000-01-01

    PROBLEM ADDRESSED: Management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is changing from a surgical approach to a medical approach, and the role of primary care physicians is expanding. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To introduce a patient-centred approach to managing BPH in primary care through a continuing medical education (CME) program. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: A practice-based, small group, peer-led CME program focused on application of the International Prostate Symptom Score and Quality of Life Assessment in four case studies on prostatism, including BPH. At 86 workshops held across Canada, 658 physicians participated in discussions with case materials that included videos and a handbook. A before-after practice behaviour questionnaire was administered at each workshop to evaluate "intent to change." CONCLUSIONS: Participating physicians showed willingness to learn new skills for patient-centred management of BPH. These results suggest that peer-led, small group CME can successfully encourage use of new practice guidelines in primary are and teach physicians practical steps for developing therapeutic alliances with their patients. PMID:10690495

  18. Targeting stromal androgen receptor suppresses prolactin-driven benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

    PubMed

    Lai, Kuo-Pao; Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Fang, Lei-Ya; Izumi, Kouji; Lo, Chi-Wen; Wood, Ronald; Kindblom, Jon; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-10-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction plays a pivotal role to mediate the normal prostate growth, the pathogenesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate cancer development. Until now, the stromal androgen receptor (AR) functions in the BPH development, and the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we used a genetic knockout approach to ablate stromal fibromuscular (fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells) AR in a probasin promoter-driven prolactin transgenic mouse model (Pb-PRL tg mice) that could spontaneously develop prostate hyperplasia to partially mimic human BPH development. We found Pb-PRL tg mice lacking stromal fibromuscular AR developed smaller prostates, with more marked changes in the dorsolateral prostate lobes with less proliferation index. Mechanistically, prolactin mediated hyperplastic prostate growth involved epithelial-stromal interaction through epithelial prolactin/prolactin receptor signals to regulate granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor expression to facilitate stromal cell growth via sustaining signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 activity. Importantly, the stromal fibromuscular AR could modulate such epithelial-stromal interacting signals. Targeting stromal fibromuscular AR with the AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9(®), led to the reduction of prostate size, which could be used in future therapy.

  19. Sexual outcome of patients undergoing thulium laser enucleation of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Carmignani, Luca; Bozzini, Giorgio; Macchi, Alberto; Maruccia, Serena; Picozzi, Stefano; Casellato, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) may affect the quality of sexual function and ejaculation. The effect of new surgical procedures, which are currently available to treat BPH, on erection and ejaculation, has been poorly studied. This study aimed to assess the effect of thulium laser enucleation of the prostate (ThuLEP) on sexual function and retrograde ejaculation in patients with LUTS secondary to BPH. We performed a prospective study in 110 consecutive patients who had undergone ThuLEP to analyze changes in sexual function and urinary symptoms. To evaluate changes in erection and ejaculation, and the effect of urinary symptoms on the quality of life (QoL), five validated questionnaires were used: the ICIQ-MLUTSsex, MSHQ-EjD, International Index of Erectile Function 5, International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) questionnaire, and QoL index of the intraclass correlation coefficients. Patients also underwent IPSS and flowmetry to assess the outcome of flow. Patients were evaluated before surgery and 3–6 months after ThuLEP, whereas those with previous abdominal surgery were excluded. The patients’ mean age was 67.83 years. Postoperative urinary symptoms improved after surgery. No significant differences in erectile function before and after surgery were observed. As compared with other techniques described in the literature, the percentage of patients with conserved ejaculation increased by 52.7% after ThuLEP. ThuLEP positively affects urinary symptoms and their effect on the QoL of patients as assessed by questionnaire scores. While endoscopic management of BPH (e.g. transurethral resection of the prostate) causes retrograde ejaculation in most patients, those who undergo ThuLEP have conserved ejaculation and erectile function. PMID:25652616

  20. Sexual outcome of patients undergoing thulium laser enucleation of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Carmignani, Luca; Bozzini, Giorgio; Macchi, Alberto; Maruccia, Serena; Picozzi, Stefano; Casellato, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) may affect the quality of sexual function and ejaculation. The effect of new surgical procedures, which are currently available to treat BPH, on erection and ejaculation, has been poorly studied. This study aimed to assess the effect of thulium laser enucleation of the prostate (ThuLEP) on sexual function and retrograde ejaculation in patients with LUTS secondary to BPH. We performed a prospective study in 110 consecutive patients who had undergone ThuLEP to analyze changes in sexual function and urinary symptoms. To evaluate changes in erection and ejaculation, and the effect of urinary symptoms on the quality of life (QoL), five validated questionnaires were used: the ICIQ-MLUTSsex, MSHQ-EjD, International Index of Erectile Function 5, International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) questionnaire, and QoL index of the intraclass correlation coefficients. Patients also underwent IPSS and flowmetry to assess the outcome of flow. Patients were evaluated before surgery and 3-6 months after ThuLEP, whereas those with previous abdominal surgery were excluded. The patients' mean age was 67.83 years. Postoperative urinary symptoms improved after surgery. No significant differences in erectile function before and after surgery were observed. As compared with other techniques described in the literature, the percentage of patients with conserved ejaculation increased by 52.7% after ThuLEP. ThuLEP positively affects urinary symptoms and their effect on the QoL of patients as assessed by questionnaire scores. While endoscopic management of BPH (e.g. transurethral resection of the prostate) causes retrograde ejaculation in most patients, those who undergo ThuLEP have conserved ejaculation and erectile function.

  1. Blood and tissue selenium concentrations and glutathione peroxidase activities in patients with prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Zachara, B A; Szewczyk-Golec, K; Tyloch, J; Wolski, Z; Szylberg, T; Stepien, S; Kwiatkowski, S; Bloch-Boguslawska, E; Wasowicz, W

    2005-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in men and a leading cause of cancer death. Prostatic gland accumulates reasonably high amount of selenium (Se), the element that prevents the development of PC. It is hypothesized that some selenoproteins inhibit the transformation of normal prostate epithelium into neoplasm. We studied Se levels in whole blood, plasma and prostate of 32 PC and 40 benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) patients and in the control group composed of 39 healthy subjects. The selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) was also measured in the patients' red cells, plasma and prostate tissue. Se concentration in whole blood and plasma in both groups of patients was lower as compared with controls, while in prostate gland it was significantly higher in PC than in BPH patients and controls. Red cell GSH-Px activity was the same in PC patients and controls but significantly lower in BPH patients. Plasma GSH-Px activity was significantly lower in PC patients than in the control group, and prostate GSH-Px activity was significantly lower in PC patients as compared with BPH patients. Since Se has anticancer properties, it is very likely that its low level in blood may facilitate the development of cancer. A higher level of Se in prostate of PC patients has no influence on GSH-Px activity in the gland. PMID:15875088

  2. Elevated expression of HIF-lα in actively growing prostate tissues is associated with clinical features of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Wang, Hui; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Haihu; Bi, Dongbin; Ding, Kejia; Lu, Jiaju

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases in middle-age or older men. Increasing evidence has shown that BPH is associated with hypoxia microenvironment. Methods We retrospectively collected patient data and tissue samples from fetal prostates(FP), normal prostates(NP), intra-acinar of BPH, peri-acinar of BPH, prostate cancers and sarcomas of prostate. The expression of HIF-1α, as well as VEGF was visualized by immunohistochemistry and statistically analyzed with clinical parameters. Results Expression of HIF-lα was observed in intra-acinar of BPH (69.5%), prostate cancer (85.7%) and all FPs, while NP and peri-acinar of BPH tissues were all stained negative. HIF-lα levels in FPs and the malignant tumors were higher than BPH tissues(p < 0.05), and the expression of HIF-lα in intra-acinar of BPH was higher than NP and peri-acinar of BPH (p < 0.05). The expression of HIF-lα was correlated with the weight of intra-acinar of prostate (p < 0.05). And patients with prostate weight larger that 72.45g were prone to have HIF-lα moderate-positive expression, according to the ROC curve (AUC = 0.734, 95%CI = 0.630-0.838). Moreover, the risk of acute urine retention (AUR) for HIF-lα moderate-positive patients increased significantly (OR=5.517, 95%CI = 2.434-12.504). Conclusions HIF-lα expression is increased in highly proliferative prostate tissues and correlated with the weight of intra-acinar prostate. Moreover, HIF-lα is also an independent risk factor for AUR occurrence in BPH patients. PMID:26919249

  3. Detection of benign prostatic hyperplasia nodules in T2W MR images using fuzzy decision forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Nathan; Freeman, Sabrina; Turkbey, Baris; Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in men MRI has proven useful for detecting prostate cancer, and CAD may further improve detection. One source of false positives in prostate computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) is the presence of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) nodules. These nodules have a distinct appearance with a pseudo-capsule on T2 weighted MR images but can also resemble cancerous lesions in other sequences such as the ADC or high B-value images. Describing their appearance with hand-crafted heuristics (features) that also exclude the appearance of cancerous lesions is challenging. This work develops a method based on fuzzy decision forests to automatically learn discriminative features for the purpose of BPH nodule detection in T2 weighted images for the purpose of improving prostate CAD systems.

  4. Studies on antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of herbal remedies used in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Steenkamp, V; Gouws, M C; Gulumian, M; Elgorashi, E E; van Staden, J

    2006-01-01

    Crude water and ethanolic extracts of five herbal remedies reported in the literature for traditional treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and/or prostatitis were investigated for their effect on hydroxyl scavenging activity, antibacterial activity and their ability to inhibit cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and COX-2) catalysed prostaglandin biosynthesis. Both the water and ethanol extracts of Hypoxis hemerocallidea and Epilobium parviflorum inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli. All 10 extracts scavenged the hydroxyl radical but with various potencies (32-93%). Ethanolic extracts were the most active in inhibiting COX-1 catalysed prostaglandin biosynthesis. The ethanolic extract of Epilobium parviflorum showed inhibitory effects on both the COX-1 and -2 catalysed prostaglandin biosynthesis, inhibited growth of Escherichia coli and exerted antioxidant activity. Although these results support the traditional use of Epilobium parviflorum for treatment of prostatitis and BPH, further investigation is required, for this promising plant. PMID:16122891

  5. Effect of Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy on Prostate Volume and Vascularity in the Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Pilot Study in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Leoci, Raffaella; Aiudi, Giulio; Silvestre, Fabio; Lissner, Elaine; Lacalandra, Giovanni Michele

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a result of urogenital aging. Recent studies suggest that an age-related impairment of the blood supply to the lower urinary tract plays a role in the development of BPH and thus may be a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of BPH. The canine prostate is a model for understanding abnormal growth of the human prostate gland. We studied the efficacy of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMF) in dogs to modify prostate blood flow and evaluated its effect on BPH. METHODS PEMF (5 min, twice a day for 3 weeks) was performed on 20 dogs affected by BPH. Prostatic volume, Doppler assessment by ultrasonography, libido, semen quality, testosterone levels, and seminal plasma volume, composition and pH were evaluated before and after treatment. RESULTS The 3 weeks of PEMF produced a significant reduction in prostatic volume (average 57%) without any interference with semen quality, testosterone levels or libido. Doppler parameters showed a reduction of peripheral resistances and a progressive reduction throughout the trial of the systolic peak velocity, end-diastolic velocity, mean velocity, mean, and peak gradient of the blood flow in the dorsal branch of the prostatic artery. The pulsatility index and the resistance index did not vary significantly over time. CONCLUSIONS The efficacy of PEMF on BPH in dogs, with no side effects, suggests the suitability of this treatment in humans and supports the hypothesis that impairment of blood supply to the lower urinary tract may be a causative factor in the development of BPH. Prostate 74:1132–1141, 2014. © 2014 The Authors. The Prostate published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24913937

  6. New trends in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia and carcinoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Petrovich, Z; Ameye, F; Baert, L; Bichler, K H; Boyd, S D; Brady, L W; Bruskewitz, R C; Dixon, C; Perrin, P; Watson, G M

    1993-06-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a very common condition affecting over 800,000 American males each year. A standard, effective, and well-proven therapy is prostatectomy. This surgical procedure is used to treat, in the United States, approximately 400,000 BPH patients annually. Major treatment benefit is expected in 70% to 80% of patients. Complications are seen in 20% of the surgically treated patients. Due to the advanced age of BPH patients and the presence of other serious coexisting medical problems, surgical therapy may be difficult to utilize. These patients, who present a high risk for surgery, are in need of alternative treatments. Alternative therapy in BPH patients with clinically important symptoms and signs of urinary outflow obstruction include treatment with pharmacological agents, balloon dilatation, laser beam therapy, transurethral thermal therapy, transrectal microwave hyperthermia, and transurethral microwave hyperthermia. These alternative treatment modalities are currently under intensive study. These new treatment modalities ultimately must be compared with the standard treatment, which is prostatectomy. Due to the unpredictable natural history of BPH, it is desirable that each Phase III study should contain a no-treatment observation-only arm. Adenocarcinoma of the prostate (CaP) has become a tumor, which first in frequency, and second in importance in cancer mortality statistics of American males. Local tumor control rates and long-term survivals, with radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy, have been excellent. There was, however, recent concern regarding a high incidence of microscopic local tumor recurrence following a definitive course of irradiation. Deep regional or intracavitary hyperthermia (HT) with phase steering may be of value as an adjuvant treatment to radiotherapy. This HT may increase the incidence of local tumor control obtained with radiotherapy. Phase I-II clinical studies are currently underway.

  7. Apoptotic Pathways Linked to Endocrine System as Potential Therapeutic Targets for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Marini, Herbert; Irrera, Natasha; Crea, Giovanni; Lorenzini, Cesare; Puzzolo, Domenico; Valenti, Andrea; Pisani, Antonina; Adamo, Elena B; Altavilla, Domenica; Squadrito, Francesco; Micali, Antonio

    2016-08-11

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a chronic condition common in older men that can result in bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms. The molecular mechanisms and networks underlying the development and the progression of the disease are still far from being fully understood. BPH results from smooth muscle cell and epithelial cell proliferation, primarily within the transition zone of the prostate. Apoptosis and inflammation play important roles in the control of cell growth and in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Disturbances in molecular mechanisms of apoptosis machinery have been linked to BPH. Increased levels of the glycoprotein Dickkopf-related protein 3 in BPH cause an inhibition of the apoptosis machinery through a reduction in B cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 associated X protein (Bax) expression. Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins influence cell death by direct inhibition of caspases and modulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB. Current pharmacotherapy targets either the static component of BPH, including finasteride and dutasteride, or the dynamic component of BPH, including α-adrenoceptor antagonists such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin. Both these classes of drugs significantly interfere with the apoptosis machinery. Furthermore, phytotherapic supplements and new drugs may also modulate several molecular steps of apoptosis.

  8. Apoptotic Pathways Linked to Endocrine System as Potential Therapeutic Targets for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Minutoli, Letteria; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Marini, Herbert; Irrera, Natasha; Crea, Giovanni; Lorenzini, Cesare; Puzzolo, Domenico; Valenti, Andrea; Pisani, Antonina; Adamo, Elena B.; Altavilla, Domenica; Squadrito, Francesco; Micali, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a chronic condition common in older men that can result in bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms. The molecular mechanisms and networks underlying the development and the progression of the disease are still far from being fully understood. BPH results from smooth muscle cell and epithelial cell proliferation, primarily within the transition zone of the prostate. Apoptosis and inflammation play important roles in the control of cell growth and in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Disturbances in molecular mechanisms of apoptosis machinery have been linked to BPH. Increased levels of the glycoprotein Dickkopf-related protein 3 in BPH cause an inhibition of the apoptosis machinery through a reduction in B cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 associated X protein (Bax) expression. Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins influence cell death by direct inhibition of caspases and modulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB. Current pharmacotherapy targets either the static component of BPH, including finasteride and dutasteride, or the dynamic component of BPH, including α-adrenoceptor antagonists such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin. Both these classes of drugs significantly interfere with the apoptosis machinery. Furthermore, phytotherapic supplements and new drugs may also modulate several molecular steps of apoptosis. PMID:27529214

  9. Apoptotic Pathways Linked to Endocrine System as Potential Therapeutic Targets for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Rinaldi, Mariagrazia; Marini, Herbert; Irrera, Natasha; Crea, Giovanni; Lorenzini, Cesare; Puzzolo, Domenico; Valenti, Andrea; Pisani, Antonina; Adamo, Elena B; Altavilla, Domenica; Squadrito, Francesco; Micali, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a chronic condition common in older men that can result in bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms. The molecular mechanisms and networks underlying the development and the progression of the disease are still far from being fully understood. BPH results from smooth muscle cell and epithelial cell proliferation, primarily within the transition zone of the prostate. Apoptosis and inflammation play important roles in the control of cell growth and in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Disturbances in molecular mechanisms of apoptosis machinery have been linked to BPH. Increased levels of the glycoprotein Dickkopf-related protein 3 in BPH cause an inhibition of the apoptosis machinery through a reduction in B cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 associated X protein (Bax) expression. Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins influence cell death by direct inhibition of caspases and modulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB. Current pharmacotherapy targets either the static component of BPH, including finasteride and dutasteride, or the dynamic component of BPH, including α-adrenoceptor antagonists such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin. Both these classes of drugs significantly interfere with the apoptosis machinery. Furthermore, phytotherapic supplements and new drugs may also modulate several molecular steps of apoptosis. PMID:27529214

  10. Preventive effect of Pueraria mirifica on testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Masrudin, S S; Mohamad, J

    2015-12-01

    Pueraria mirifica (PM) extract contains phytoestrogen daidzein and genistein. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of PM extract, daidzein and genistein on a testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in rats. Testosterone was administered at 3 mg kg(-1) to rats followed by the PM extract, daidzein and genistein for a period of 30 days with finasteride as positive control. The testosterone level was increased, indicating inhibition of 5α-reductase converting testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. This was confirmed by prostate-specific antigen level that significantly decreased when treated with PM extract, daidzein and genistein. The PM extract, daidzein and genistein reduced the increase in the prostate/body weight ratio in testosterone-induced rats. This gives indication that PM extract, daidzein and genistein possessed protective activity for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The analysis of histoarchitechture of the prostate has also shown that there was a significant improvement in prostatic cells of the testosterone-induced rats when treated with PM extract, daidzein and genistein.

  11. Relationship of symptoms of prostatism to commonly used physiological and anatomical measures of the severity of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Barry, M J; Cockett, A T; Holtgrewe, H L; McConnell, J D; Sihelnik, S A; Winfield, H N

    1993-08-01

    In previous studies the severity of symptoms of prostatism in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia have not correlated well with prostate size, degree of bladder trabeculation, uroflowmetry or post-void residual volume. As part of a prospective cohort study of benign prostatic hyperplasia treatment effectiveness in 4 university-based urology practices, we correlated symptom severity and these commonly used measures of disease severity. Symptom severity was quantified using the American Urological Association symptom index. Analyses were based on 198 outpatients completing a standardized evaluation (84 of these men have completed 6 months of followup after treatment with prostatectomy, balloon dilation, terazosin or watchful waiting). At baseline, symptom severity was not correlated with uroflowmetry, post-void residual, prostate size and degree of bladder trabeculation. However, symptom severity was much more strongly related to overall health status than the other measures. Reduction in symptoms with treatment did correlate with improvements in uroflowmetry. This poor baseline correlation with symptoms may reflect unreliability in measurement of the physiological/anatomical variables. Alternatively, these parameters may be measuring different pathophysiological phenomena.

  12. Inhibition of testosterone-induced hyperplasia of the prostate of sprague-dawley rats by pumpkin seed oil.

    PubMed

    Gossell-Williams, M; Davis, A; O'Connor, N

    2006-01-01

    The oil from the pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo) seed is claimed to be useful in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. This investigation seeks to examine the effect of pumpkin seed oil on testosterone-induced hyperplasia of the prostate of rats. Hyperplasia was induced by subcutaneous administration of testosterone (0.3 mg/100 g of body weight) for 20 days. Simultaneous oral administration of either pumpkin seed oil (2.0 and 4.0 mg/100 g of body weight) or corn oil (vehicle) was also given for 20 days. The weights of the rats were recorded weekly, and the influence of testosterone and pumpkin seed oil on the weight gain of the rats was examined. On day 21, rats were sacrificed, and the prostate was removed, cleaned, and weighed. The prostate size ratio (prostate weight/rat body weight) was then calculated. Neither testosterone nor pumpkin seed oil had any significant influence on the weight gain of the rats. Testosterone significantly increased prostate size ratio (P < .05), and this induced increase was inhibited in rats fed with pumpkin seed oil at 2.0 mg/100 g of body weight. The protective effect of pumpkin seed oil was significant at the higher pumpkin seed oil dose (P < .02). We conclude pumpkin seed oil can inhibit testosterone-induced hyperplasia of the prostate and therefore may be beneficial in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  13. Gokshuradi Vati and Dhanyaka-Gokshura Ghrita Matra Basti in the management of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bhalodia, Shreyas G; Bhuyan, Chaturbhuj; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Dudhamal, Tukaram S

    2012-10-01

    Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) is a burning senile problem of elderly men and no definitive conservative cure is available. The present available surgical and minimal invasive methods have their own limitations. Hence, to find out a suitable Ayurvedic approach, an effort has been made towards the management of BPH, In this study, 32 selected patients of Mootraghata at par to BPH were divided into three groups randomly and treated accordingly. In group A, Gokshuradi compound (GC) Vati (GV) 500 mg was given three times a day with luke-warm water after food; while in group B, Dhanyaka-Gokshura Ghrita (DGG) as Matra Basti (MB) of 60 ml, once in a day, just after lunch and combined therapy of both formulations in group C was administered. Out of 32 patients, total 30 patients (10 in each group) were completed the treatment course of 21 days. In results, 54.09% improvement was seen in group C, 45.67% in group A and 47.99% in group B. The size of prostate gland was found reduced highly significant in group C. Hence, it is concluded that combined therapy of GV and DGG MB is beneficial without developing any adverse drug reactions and can be prescribed safely for Mootraghata (BPH). PMID:23723674

  14. Gokshuradi Vati and Dhanyaka-Gokshura Ghrita Matra Basti in the management of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bhalodia, Shreyas G.; Bhuyan, Chaturbhuj; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Dudhamal, Tukaram S.

    2012-01-01

    Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) is a burning senile problem of elderly men and no definitive conservative cure is available. The present available surgical and minimal invasive methods have their own limitations. Hence, to find out a suitable Ayurvedic approach, an effort has been made towards the management of BPH, In this study, 32 selected patients of Mootraghata at par to BPH were divided into three groups randomly and treated accordingly. In group A, Gokshuradi compound (GC) Vati (GV) 500 mg was given three times a day with luke-warm water after food; while in group B, Dhanyaka-Gokshura Ghrita (DGG) as Matra Basti (MB) of 60 ml, once in a day, just after lunch and combined therapy of both formulations in group C was administered. Out of 32 patients, total 30 patients (10 in each group) were completed the treatment course of 21 days. In results, 54.09% improvement was seen in group C, 45.67% in group A and 47.99% in group B. The size of prostate gland was found reduced highly significant in group C. Hence, it is concluded that combined therapy of GV and DGG MB is beneficial without developing any adverse drug reactions and can be prescribed safely for Mootraghata (BPH). PMID:23723674

  15. Bee venom suppresses testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia by regulating the inflammatory response and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyung-Sook; An, Hyo-Jin; Cheon, Se-Yun; Kwon, Ki-Rok

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is a common disorder in aging men, involves inflammation that is associated with an imbalance between cell proliferation and cell death. Because current BPH drug treatments have undesirable side effects, the development of well-tolerated and effective alternative medicines to treat BPH is of interest. Bee venom (BV) has been used in traditional medicine to treat conditions, such as arthritis and rheumatism, and pain. Although inflammation has been associated with BPH and BV has strong anti-inflammatory effects, the effects of BV on BPH are not fully understood. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the efficacy of BV against testosterone-induced BPH in rats. BV decreased prostate weight compared to the untreated group. In addition, BV suppressed serum dihydrotestosterone concentration levels and the levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in the histological analysis. Furthermore, BV significantly decreased the levels of the apoptotic suppressors, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and increased the levels of the proapoptotic factors, Bax and caspase-3 activation. These results suggested that BV suppressed the development of BPH and has good potential as a treatment for BPH. PMID:26085572

  16. Progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia is associated with pro-inflammatory mediators and chronic activation of prostate-infiltrating lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, Berit; Mattsson, Jonas; Henningsohn, Lars; Levitsky, Victor; Uhlin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common chronic non-malignant condition whose prevalence substantially increases with age. Immune cell infiltration and pro-inflammatory mediators have been implicated in the pathogenesis. Here, we characterized 21 extracellular markers on prostate-infiltrating lymphocytes (PILs) and analyzed expression of 26 soluble proteins in prostate tissue obtained from BPH patients (n = 31). These data were correlated with clinical parameters and compared with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) (n = 10). Increased frequencies of T cells expressing co-inhibitory receptors LAG-3, PD-1, TIM-3 or CTLA-4, and co-stimulatory receptors CD28, OX40 or 4-1BB were observed in BPH tissue compared to PBMCs. These findings are consistent with chronic activation and possible functional exhaustion of PILs that may be further augmented by several identified pro-inflammatory factors, such as IL-8 and MCP-1, promoting inflammation and chemotaxis of immune cells to the prostate. Prostate size and plasma prostate-specific antigen levels positively correlated with IL-8 and MCP-1 concentrations, and frequencies of T cells expressing CTLA-4 and TIM-3. It remains to be established whether the link between inflammation and BPH progression supported by our findings reflects a progressive failure of the immune system leading to decreased immune surveillance and development of prostate cancer. PMID:26993768

  17. Progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia is associated with pro-inflammatory mediators and chronic activation of prostate-infiltrating lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Norström, Melissa M; Rådestad, Emelie; Sundberg, Berit; Mattsson, Jonas; Henningsohn, Lars; Levitsky, Victor; Uhlin, Michael

    2016-04-26

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common chronic non-malignant condition whose prevalence substantially increases with age. Immune cell infiltration and pro-inflammatory mediators have been implicated in the pathogenesis. Here, we characterized 21 extracellular markers on prostate-infiltrating lymphocytes (PILs) and analyzed expression of 26 soluble proteins in prostate tissue obtained from BPH patients (n = 31). These data were correlated with clinical parameters and compared with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) (n = 10). Increased frequencies of T cells expressing co-inhibitory receptors LAG-3, PD-1, TIM-3 or CTLA-4, and co-stimulatory receptors CD28, OX40 or 4-1BB were observed in BPH tissue compared to PBMCs. These findings are consistent with chronic activation and possible functional exhaustion of PILs that may be further augmented by several identified pro-inflammatory factors, such as IL-8 and MCP-1, promoting inflammation and chemotaxis of immune cells to the prostate. Prostate size and plasma prostate-specific antigen levels positively correlated with IL-8 and MCP-1 concentrations, and frequencies of T cells expressing CTLA-4 and TIM-3. It remains to be established whether the link between inflammation and BPH progression supported by our findings reflects a progressive failure of the immune system leading to decreased immune surveillance and development of prostate cancer. PMID:26993768

  18. Doxazosin. An update of its clinical pharmacology and therapeutic applications in hypertension and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Fulton, B; Wagstaff, A J; Sorkin, E M

    1995-02-01

    Doxazosin is a long-acting alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist structurally related to prazosin and terazosin. Its antihypertensive effect is produced by a reduction in the smooth muscle tone of peripheral vascular beds resulting in a decrease in total peripheral resistance without significant effect on cardiac output or heart rate. In benign prostatic hyperplasia, doxazosin's effect of relieving bladder outflow obstruction is produced through a reduction in prostatic tone mediated via alpha 1-adrenoceptor blockade. In most comparative trials doxazosin has proven to be equally effective as the comparator drug in the treatment of mild to moderate hypertension. It has been used in a variety of patient populations including the elderly, Blacks, smokers, and patients with concomitant disease states such as renal dysfunction, hypercholesterolaemia, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and respiratory disease. Doxazosin has also been used successfully in combination with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists, diuretics, calcium channel antagonists, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in patients with hypertension that is uncontrolled with monotherapy. Doxazosin has a beneficial effect on some of the risk factors associated with coronary heart disease including elevated serum lipid levels, impaired glucose metabolism, insulin resistance and left ventricular hypertrophy. Modest decreases in total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides are seen with doxazosin therapy while small increases in high density lipoprotein cholesterol and the high density lipoprotein cholesterol/total cholesterol ratio are consistently reported. Some studies have reported an improvement in glucose tolerance although this effect has been more consistently seen in nondiabetic patients than in patients with NIDDM. Additionally, doxazosin produces a similar reduction in left ventricular hypertrophy to other antihypertensive agents. Modelling-based calculations

  19. Sex steroid receptor expression and localization in benign prostatic hyperplasia varies with tissue compartment.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tristan M; Sehgal, Priyanka D; Drew, Sally A; Huang, Wei; Ricke, William A

    2013-01-01

    Androgens and estrogens, acting via their respective receptors, are important in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The goals of this study were to quantitatively characterize the tissue distribution and staining intensity of androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα), and assess cells expressing both AR and ERα, in human BPH compared to normal prostate. A tissue microarray composed of normal prostate and BPH tissue was used and multiplexed immunohistochemistry was performed to detect AR and ERα. We used a multispectral imaging platform for automated scanning, tissue and cell segmentation and marker quantification. BPH specimens had an increased number of epithelial and stromal cells and increased percentage of epithelium. In both stroma and epithelium, the mean nuclear area was decreased in BPH relative to normal prostate. AR expression and staining intensity in epithelial and stromal cells was significantly increased in BPH compared to normal prostate. ERα expression was increased in BPH epithelium. However, stromal ERα expression and staining intensity was decreased in BPH compared to normal prostate. Double positive (AR and ERα) epithelial cells were more prevalent in BPH, and fewer double negative (AR and ERα) stromal and epithelial negative cells were observed in BPH. These data underscore the importance of tissue layer localization and expression of steroid hormone receptors in the prostate. Understanding the tissue-specific hormone action of androgens and estrogens will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of pathogenesis in the prostate and may lead to better treatment for BPH.

  20. Biased α-adrenergic receptor and βarrestin signaling in a cell culture model of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mindy; Daaka, Yehia; Dey, Anindya

    2016-02-26

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease in older men that involves the enlargement of the prostate gland. This occurs in response to signal transduction initiated by α-adrenergic receptors (α-ARs). When bound to ligands, α-ARs stimulate the mitogenic extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK) pathway, ultimately promoting stromal and epithelial cell hyperplasia in the prostate. Current knowledge of how α-ARs promote prostate cell growth remains incomplete, and despite decades of research, there is no cure for BPH. In this study, we aimed to exploit an in vitro model system of BPH in order to better understand the mechanisms of α-AR signaling in prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:26850854

  1. Biased α-adrenergic receptor and βarrestin signaling in a cell culture model of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mindy; Daaka, Yehia; Dey, Anindya

    2016-02-26

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease in older men that involves the enlargement of the prostate gland. This occurs in response to signal transduction initiated by α-adrenergic receptors (α-ARs). When bound to ligands, α-ARs stimulate the mitogenic extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK) pathway, ultimately promoting stromal and epithelial cell hyperplasia in the prostate. Current knowledge of how α-ARs promote prostate cell growth remains incomplete, and despite decades of research, there is no cure for BPH. In this study, we aimed to exploit an in vitro model system of BPH in order to better understand the mechanisms of α-AR signaling in prostatic hyperplasia.

  2. Spontaneous hyperplasia of the ventral lobe of the prostate in aging genetically hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Golomb, E; Rosenzweig, N; Eilam, R; Abramovici, A

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the prostatic autonomic innervation takes part in its homeostasis and growth. Other works showed that spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) show excessive sympathetic activity, accompanied by lower urinary tract symptoms, increased growth capacity of prostatic stromal cells, and increased levels of androgens and their receptors. Furthermore, young SHR were reported to present incipient stages of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The aim of the present study was to examine whether this strain indeed develops spontaneous BPH with age, and can thus serve as a genuine natural model for this disorder. For this purpose, ventral lobes of prostates of one-year-old, male SHR and their normotensive counterparts, Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, were examined histopathologically, and the degree of hyperplasia was evaluated according to a score-chart protocol (histoscore). SHR exhibited severe adenomatous spontaneous BPH, characterized by piling-up of epithelial cells, with papillary formations, accompanied by a mild increase in the amount of fibrocytes and smooth muscle cells in the stroma. This was reflected by histoscore values of 38 +/-2. Thickening of prostatic arterioles also was noted, as well as mild chronic inflammatory exudate. WKY rats did not show any of these features of BPH despite their age (histoscore 17 +/- 3, significantly different from that of SHR). We conclude that SHR can serve as a rodent model for the spontaneous development of BPH with age, most probably due to the excessive neuroendocrine activity characteristic of this rat strain.

  3. Bilateral spontaneous urinary extravasation shown by computed tomography urography in a patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Haopeng; Dang, Xuefei; Yao, Zhenwei; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Guangyao

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous extravasation of urine (SUE) is a rare urologic manifestation. Predisposing conditions of SUE include ureteric calculus, retrograde pyelography, pregnancy, abdominal aorta aneurysm, tumors, or enlargement of the prostate gland. Usually, SUE is a self-limiting condition that mandates differentiaton from other catastrophic conditions of pelviureteric ruptures. Most reported cases of SUE based on urograms are unilateral in presentation. Herein, we report a case of bilateral SUE evident on computed tomography urography in a patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia. We also review the literature briefly. PMID:26649120

  4. Interstitial laser coagulation of benign prostatic hyperplasia: a minimally invasive treatment alternative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordonez, Robert F.; Mittemeyer, Bernhard T.; Aronoff, David R.; de Riese, Werner T. W.

    2003-06-01

    The use of minimally invasive treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) have been introduced into the medical community. Over the last decade several minimally invasive treatment techniques have been approved for use. In particular, interstitial laser coagulation (ILC) has shown pomise as an alternative to the current gold standard, transurethral resection of prostate (TURP). Studies show ILC to have equal efficacy as TURP while causing less side effects. Future technical advances as well as increased physician experience with ILC could lead to the replacement of TURP as the gold standard in trestment of BPH.

  5. [Zinc, calcium and sodium values in secretions of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Romics, I; Bach, D

    1990-12-01

    In two randomized patients groups suffering from benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) two exprimate samples were drawn at a seven-day interval. In the untreated control group no changes in the values of Ca, Na and Zn were found. In the other group the patients have been treated with ERU capsules (Radicis urticae) for 7 days and thereafter a significant decrease of Zn values were found.

  6. [Prostatilen effects on voiding disorders in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Al'-Shukri, S Kh; Gorbachev, A G; Borovets, S Iu; Belousov, V Ia; Kuz'min, I V

    2005-01-01

    The authors review the experience with prostatilen treatment gained in the urological clinic of the St-Petersburg State Medical University and analyze treatment outcomes for 96 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) aged from 51 to 89 years. Prostatilen proved its efficacy in relieving manifestations of infravesical obstruction in BPH, therefore, prostatilen administration in the treatment of patients with initial or moderate subjective and objective symptoms is justified. Dimexide suppositoria containing 30 mg of prostatilen are preferable.

  7. [Optimization of hydrodynamic conditions in transurethral resection of benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Kamalov, A A; Tolstova, S S; Martov, A G; Osmolovskiĭ, E O

    1998-01-01

    Water intoxication remains a serious complication of transurethral resection (TUR) occurring more frequently in patients with large-size benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and in those who was operated for more than 1 hour. An advanced irrigation system employing mechanical valve "Floval" and active aspiration provides controlled irrigation of the bladder preventing spontaneous rise of intravesical pressure in conducting TUR in BPH patients. PMID:9532945

  8. Case study: Transitional care for a patient with benign prostatic hyperplasia and recurrent urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Bradway, Christine; Bixby, M Brian; Hirschman, Karen B; McCauley, Kathleen; Naylor, Mary D

    2013-01-01

    Chronic urologic conditions, including benign prostatic hyperplasia, recurrent urinary tract infections, and urinary incontinence, are common in older adults. This article highlights the urologic and transitional care needs of an elderly, cognitively impaired male during and after an acute hospitalization. Collaboration between the patient, his family, the advanced practice nurse, primary care providers, and outpatient urology office are described. The importance of mutual goal setting and a focused plan for transitional care are discussed.

  9. Design and evaluation of a 63 element 1.75-dimensional ultrasound phased array for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Khaldon Y.; Smith, Nadine B.

    2003-10-01

    Focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) is a clinical method for treating benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in which tissue is noninvasively necrosed by elevating the temperature at the focal point above 60°C using short sonications. With 1.75-dimensional (1.75-D) arrays, the power and phase to the individual elements can be controlled electronically for focusing and steering. This research describes the design, construction and evaluation of a 1.75-D ultrasound phased array to be used in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The array was designed with a steering angle of +/-13.5 deg in the transverse direction, and can move the focus in three parallel planes in the longitudinal direction with a relatively large focus size. A piezoelectric ceramic (PZT-8) was used as the material of the transducer and two matching layers were built for maximum acoustic power transmission to tissue. To verify the capability of the transducer for focusing and steering, exposimetry was performed and the results correlated well with the calculated fields. In vivo experiments were performed to verify the capability of the transducer to ablate tissue using short sonications. [Work supported by the Whitaker Foundation and the Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Medical Prostate Cancer Research Program.

  10. Shrinkage of experimental benign prostatic hyperplasia and reduction of prostatic cell volume by a gastrin-releasing peptide antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Rick, Ferenc G.; Abi-Chaker, Andrew; Szalontay, Luca; Perez, Roberto; Jaszberenyi, Miklos; Jayakumar, Arumugam R.; Shamaladevi, Nagarajarao; Szepeshazi, Karoly; Vidaurre, Irving; Halmos, Gabor; Krishan, Awtar; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrin releasing-peptide (GRP) is a potent growth factor in many malignancies. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a progressive age-related proliferation of glandular and stromal tissues; various growth factors and inflammatory processes are involved in its pathogenesis. We have demonstrated that potent antagonists of GRP inhibit growth of experimental human tumors including prostate cancer, but their effect on models of BPH has not been studied. Here, we evaluated the effects of GRP antagonist RC-3940-II on viability and cell volume of BPH-1 human prostate epithelial cells and WPMY-1 prostate stromal cells in vitro, and in testosterone-induced BPH in Wistar rats in vivo. RC-3940-II inhibited the proliferation of BPH-1 and WPMY-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner and reduced prostatic cell volume in vitro. Shrinkage of prostates was observed after 6 wk of treatment with RC-3940-II: a 15.9% decline with 25 μg/d; and a 18.4% reduction with 50 μg/d (P < 0.05 for all). Significant reduction in levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, NF-κβ/p50, cyclooxygenase-2, and androgen receptor was also seen. Analysis of transcript levels of genes related to growth, inflammatory processes, and signal transduction showed significant changes in the expression of more than 90 genes (P < 0.05). In conclusion, GRP antagonists reduce volume of human prostatic cells and lower prostate weight in experimental BPH through direct inhibitory effects on prostatic GRP receptors. GRP antagonists should be considered for further development as therapy for BPH. PMID:23359692

  11. Prepubertal exposure to bisphenol-A induces ERα upregulation and hyperplasia in adult gerbil female prostate.

    PubMed

    Campos, Mônica S; Galvão, André L V; Rodríguez, Daniel A O; Biancardi, Manoel F; Marques, Mara R; Vilamaior, Patrícia S L; Santos, Fernanda C A; Taboga, Sebastião R

    2015-06-01

    Prostate physiology is highly dependent on oestrogenic and androgenic homeostasis. Interferences in this equilibrium, especially in early periods of life, may disrupt the prostate and increase the susceptibility to the development of diseases with ageing. Taking this into account, and considering the increase of environmental chemicals with endocrine-disrupting potential such as bisphenol-A (BPA), this study aimed to evaluate the prostates of adult female gerbils exposed to BPA and BPA plus testosterone from pubertal to adult periods. Morphological, stereological and chemical analyses revealed that long-term BPA exposure, even in environmental dosages, increases the proliferative status of the prostate, increases the number of ERα-positive stromal cells and elicits the development of prostatic hyperplasia in adult female gerbils. Moreover, we also observed that the association with testosterone did not increase the proliferative status of the gland, which shows that low levels of BPA are enough to cause an oestrogenic disruption of the prostate in young adults. This evidence suggests that this oestrogenic endocrine disruptor may increase the susceptibility to prostatic disorders with ageing. PMID:26098999

  12. Economic Evaluation Study (Cheer Compliant) Laser Prostatectomy for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Outcomes and Cost-effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yu-Chao; Lin, Yu-Hsiang; Chou, Chih-Yuan; Hou, Chen-Pang; Chen, Chien-Lun; Chang, Phei-Lang; Tsui, Ke-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine which surgical treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms, which is suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), is more cost-effective and yields a better patient's preference. Treatment outcome, cost, and perioperative complications to assess the treatment effectiveness of using laser prostatectomy as a treatment for BPH were investigated in this study. This retrospective study included 100 patients who underwent transurethral resection of prostate (TUR-P) and another 100 patients who received high-powered 120 W (GreenLight HPS) laser prostatectomy between 2005 and 2011. International Prostate Symptom Score and uroflow parameters were collected before the surgery and the uroflow and postvoiding residual volumes were evaluated before treatment and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after treatment. The results of 100 treatments after HPS laser prostatectomy were compared with the results of 100 patients who received TUR-P from the same surgeon. Complication rates and admission costs were analyzed. From 2005 to 2011, 200 consecutive patients underwent endoscopic surgery. Study participants were men with BPH with mean age of 71.3 years old. The peak flow rate went from 8.47 to 15.83 mL/s for 3 months after laser prostatectomy. Laser therapy groups showed better improvement in symptom score, shortened length of stay, and quality of life score when compared with those of TUR-P procedures. The estimated cost for laser prostatectomy was high when compared with cost of any other TUR-P procedural option at Chang Gung Hospital (P = 0.001). All admission charges were similar except for the cost of the laser equipment and accessories (mainly the laser fiber) (P = 0.001). Due to this cost of equipment, it increased the total admission charges for the laser group and therefore made the cost for the laser group higher than that of the TUR-P group. Perioperative complications, such as the need for checking for bleeding, urinary retention rate or

  13. Economic Evaluation Study (Cheer Compliant) Laser Prostatectomy for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Outcomes and Cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Chao; Lin, Yu-Hsiang; Chou, Chih-Yuan; Hou, Chen-Pang; Chen, Chien-Lun; Chang, Phei-Lang; Tsui, Ke-Hung

    2016-02-01

    To determine which surgical treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms, which is suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), is more cost-effective and yields a better patient's preference. Treatment outcome, cost, and perioperative complications to assess the treatment effectiveness of using laser prostatectomy as a treatment for BPH were investigated in this study.This retrospective study included 100 patients who underwent transurethral resection of prostate (TUR-P) and another 100 patients who received high-powered 120 W (GreenLight HPS) laser prostatectomy between 2005 and 2011.International Prostate Symptom Score and uroflow parameters were collected before the surgery and the uroflow and postvoiding residual volumes were evaluated before treatment and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after treatment. The results of 100 treatments after HPS laser prostatectomy were compared with the results of 100 patients who received TUR-P from the same surgeon. Complication rates and admission costs were analyzed.From 2005 to 2011, 200 consecutive patients underwent endoscopic surgery. Study participants were men with BPH with mean age of 71.3 years old. The peak flow rate went from 8.47 to 15.83 mL/s for 3 months after laser prostatectomy. Laser therapy groups showed better improvement in symptom score, shortened length of stay, and quality of life score when compared with those of TUR-P procedures. The estimated cost for laser prostatectomy was high when compared with cost of any other TUR-P procedural option at Chang Gung Hospital (P = 0.001). All admission charges were similar except for the cost of the laser equipment and accessories (mainly the laser fiber) (P = 0.001). Due to this cost of equipment, it increased the total admission charges for the laser group and therefore made the cost for the laser group higher than that of the TUR-P group.Perioperative complications, such as the need for checking for bleeding, urinary retention rate or urosepsis rate

  14. Interstitial laser coagulation therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNicholas, Thomas A.; Alsudani, Mohammed

    1996-05-01

    Alternatives to the side-firing laser method include controlled destruction of prostatic adenoma by an atraumatic saline cooled laser fiber introduced endoscopically into the prostate under visual and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) control. Laser light produces intense heating and interstitial laser coagulation (ILC) occurs with characteristic TRUS changes which are used to control the volume of tissue destruction. The prostatic urethral lining is preserved which may reduce laser side effects). Thirty-six men with symptomatic BPH were treated by ILC between April 1994 and September 1995. All were discharged home on the first post-operative day and reviewed periodically to 12 months post-treatment with measurement of IPSS, flow rate (FR), residual volume, complications, potency and TRUS. Seventeen men (47%) voided immediately, 15 (42%) performed intermittent self-catheterization (ISC) for 3.5 days (2 - 5). Four men (11%) required catheterization for 1/52. Thirty-five men tolerated the treatment well, requiring only mild oral analgesia. One man developed dysuria and required early transurethral resection revealing a large volume of coagulative necrosis. Improvement in symptoms and flow rate developed from 1 - 30 days later. There were no significant complications. Hyperechoic and cystic zones developed at the ILC site which persisted to 12 months. This clinical study indicates the feasibility and safety of intense heating by ILC with visible and ultrasound control to coagulate the adenoma while preserving the urethra. Changes are easily seen on TRUS, symptomatic improvement is good and there have been minimal urethral symptoms or complications.

  15. A Study of Molecular Signals Deregulating Mismatch Repair Genes in Prostate Cancer Compared to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sanmitra; Majumder, Subhadipa; Bhowal, Ankur; Ghosh, Alip; Naskar, Sukla; Nandy, Sumit; Mukherjee, Subhabrata; Sinha, Rajan Kumar; Basu, Keya; Karmakar, Dilip; Banerjee, Soma; Sengupta, Sanghamitra

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality among aging males. There is an unmet requirement of clinically useful biomarkers for early detection of prostate cancer to reduce the liabilities of overtreatment and accompanying morbidity. The present population-based study investigates the factors disrupting expression of multiple functionally related genes of DNA mismatch repair pathway in prostate cancer patients to identify molecular attributes distinguishing adenocarcinoma from benign hyperplasia of prostate. Gene expression was compared between tissue samples from prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia using real-time-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Assessment of genotypes of seven single-nucleotide-polymorphisms of three MMR genes was conducted using PCR-coupled RFLP and sequencing. Promoter methylation was interrogated by methylation-specific-PCR and bisulfite-sequencing. Interaction between microRNAs and MMR genes was verified by 3'UTR-based dual luciferase assays. Concurrent reduction of three MMR genes namely hMLH1, hMSH6 and hMSH2 (34-85%, P<0.05) was observed in prostate cancer tissues. hMSH6 polymorphism rs1800932(Pro92Pro) conferred a borderline protection in cancer patients (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.15-0.75). Relative transcript level of hMLH1 was inversely related (r = -0.59, P<0.05) with methylation quotient of its promoter which showed a significantly higher methylation density (P = 0.008, Z = -2.649) in cancer patients. hsa-miR-155, hsa-miR-141 and hsa-miR-21 gene expressions were significantly elevated (66-85%, P<0.05) in tumor specimens and negatively correlated (r = -0.602 to -0.527, P<0.05) with that of MMR genes. hsa-miR-155 & hsa-miR-141 and hsa-miR-155 & hsa-miR-21 were demonstrated to bind to their putative seed sequences in hMLH1 and hMSH6 3’UTRs respectively. Relatively higher expression of DNA methyl-transferases (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) and HIF-1α genes (34-50%, P<0.05) were also detected in tumor tissues

  16. Laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschter, Rolf

    1994-12-01

    Urinary outflow obstruction by prostatic enlargement is usually treated by resection or, recently, less invasively by thermal `ablation' of tissue through the urethra. With the latter technique, the amount of tissue that can be removed is limited by the limited penetration depth of suitable radiation sources, e.g. lasers, or conduction of heat. Interstitial thermotherapy was expected to overcome this problem. Our initial in vitro and animal studies with different light guides for interstitial application of Nd:YAG laser radiation showed small carbonized lesions with bare fibers, but large homogeneous coagulation zones with special `ITT' (interstitial thermotherapy) fibers. Further studies using these applicators resulted in a technique to be apt for clinical routine in the treatment of symptomatic prostatic enlargement. The tip of the light guide was repeatedly inserted into the prostate either transurethrally through a cystoscope under direct vision or percutaneously from the perineum under transrectal ultrasound guidance. The number of fiber placements depended on the size and configuration of the gland. Irradiation was performed either for 10 min with 5 or 7 W or in the advanced `turbo'- mode for 5 or 3 min per fiber placement using automatically stepwise reduced power (20 W for 30 s, 15 W for 30 s, 10 W for 30 s, and 7 W for 210 or 90 s). By optical feedback control the laser was switched off automatically in the case of carbonization to avoid fiber damage. From July 15, 1991 to October 1, 1993 239 patients with BPH and 14 patients with advanced prostate cancer, suffering from severe urinary outflow obstruction, were treated by laser induced interstitial thermotherapy. The results and complications of treatment are reported.

  17. AB070. Comparison of photoselective vaporization versus holmium laser enucleation for treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia in a small prostate volume

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Woong Jin; Bashraheel, Fahad; Choi, Sae Woong; Kim, Su Jin; Yoon, Byung Il; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) using GreenLight and Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) is an important surgical technique for management of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We aimed to compare the effectiveness and safety of PVP using a 120 W GreenLight laser with HoLEP in a small prostate volume. Methods Patients who underwent PVP or HoLEP surgery for BPH at our institutions were reviewed from May 2009 to December 2014 in this retrospective study. Among them, patients with prostate volumes <40 mL based on preoperative trans-rectal ultrasonography were included in this study. Peri-operative and post-operative parameters—such as International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), post-void residual urine volume (PVR), and complications—were compared between the groups. Results PVP was performed in 176 patients and HoLEP in162 patients. Preoperative demographic data were similar in both groups, with the exception of PVR. Operative time and catheter duration did not show significant difference. Significant improvements compared to preoperative values were verified at the postoperative evaluation in both groups in terms of IPSS, QoL, Qmax, and PVR. Comparison of the postoperative parameters between the PVP and HoLEP groups demonstrated no significant difference, with the exception of IPSS voiding subscore at one month postoperatively (5.9 vs. 3.8, P<0.001). There was no significant difference in postoperative complications between the two groups. Conclusions Our data suggest that PVP and HoLEP are efficient and safe surgical treatment options for patients with small prostate volume.

  18. Efficacy of Kanchanara Guggulu and Matra Basti of Dhanyaka Gokshura Ghrita in Mootraghata (benign prostatic hyperplasia)

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Joyal Kumar K.; Dudhamal, Tukaram S.; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Mahanta, Vyasadeva

    2015-01-01

    Background: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a senile disorder affects male of and above 40 years characterized by retention, incomplete voiding, dribbling, hesitancy, and incontinence of urine. This condition is comparable with Mootraghata in Ayurveda. Surgical intervention has been accepted as standard management, but has acute cystitis, acute epididymitis, erectile dysfunction, retrograde ejaculation, etc. as complications. Conservative treatment with modern medicine is also associated with side effects. Hence, to avoid such complications and improve the quality of life in senile age, conservative management with Ayurveda is attempted. Aim: To evaluate clinical efficacy of Kanchanara Guggulu and Dhanyaka Gokshura Ghrita Matra Basti in Mootraghata. Materials and Methods: Total 30 patients having signs and symptoms of BPH were selected from OPD and IPD of Shalya Tantra and enrolled equally into three groups (n = 10). Patients of Group A were administered with Kanchanara Guggulu (500 mg, 3 times a day orally), Group B were with Dhanyaka Gokshura Ghrita Matra Basti, while patients of Group C were administered both the drugs for 21 days. International prostate symptom score (IPSS) was used to assess the efficacy. paired and unpaired “t” test, Chi-square test were applied for significance. Results: In IPSS, Group B had shown the better results (84.27%) than the Group A (72.68%) and Group C (82.10%). In all objective parameters, Group C had shown better effect (23.60%) than Group A (15.70%) and Group B (18.24%). Symptomatic relief was better in Group B than Groups A and C. Comparison between three groups on objective parameters was better in Group C than in Group A and B. Conclusion: Kanchanara Guggulu orally and Dhanyaka Gokshura Ghrita Matra Basti is effective conservative management for symptomatic relief in BPH of senile age. PMID:27011713

  19. Androgens and estrogens in benign prostatic hyperplasia: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Tristan M; Ricke, William A

    2011-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common clinical problems in urology. While the precise molecular etiology remains unclear, sex steroids have been implicated in the development and maintenance of BPH. Sufficient data exists linking androgens and androgen receptor pathways to BPH and use of androgen reducing compounds, such as 5α-reductase inhibitors which block the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone, are a component of the standard of care for men with LUTS attributed to an enlarged prostate. However, BPH is a multifactorial disease and not all men respond well to currently available treatments, suggesting factors other than androgens are involved. Testosterone, the primary circulating androgen in men, can also be metabolized via CYP19/aromatase into the potent estrogen, estradiol-17β. The prostate is an estrogen target tissue and estrogens directly and indirectly affect growth and differentiation of prostate. The precise role of endogenous and exogenous estrogens in directly affecting prostate growth and differentiation in the context of BPH is an understudied area. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been shown to promote or inhibit prostate proliferation signifying potential roles in BPH. Recent research has demonstrated that estrogen receptor signaling pathways may be important in the development and maintenance of BPH and LUTS; however, new models are needed to genetically dissect estrogen regulated molecular mechanisms involved in BPH. More work is needed to identify estrogens and associated signaling pathways in BPH in order to target BPH with dietary and therapeutic SERMs.

  20. Cinnamomi Cortex (Cinnamomum verum) Suppresses Testosterone-induced Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia by Regulating 5α-reductase

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyun-Myung; Jung, Yunu; Park, Jinbong; Kim, Hye-Lin; Youn, Dong-Hyun; Kang, JongWook; Jeong, Mi-Young; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Yang, Woong Mo; Lee, Seok-Geun; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Um, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamomi cortex (dried bark of Cinnamomum verum) is an important drug in Traditional Korean Medicine used to improve blood circulation and Yang Qi. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common chronic disease in aging men. This study was conducted to determine the effect of Cinnamomi cortex water extract (CC) on BPH. BPH was induced by a pre-4-week daily injection of testosterone propionate (TP). Six weeks of further injection with (a) vehicle, (b) TP, (c) TP + CC, (d) TP + finasteride (Fi) was carried on. As a result, the prostate weight and prostatic index of the CC treatment group were reduced. Histological changes including epithelial thickness and lumen area were recovered as normal by CC treatment. The protein expressions of prostate specific antigen, estrogen receptor α (ERα), androgen receptor (AR), 5α-reductase (5AR), and steroid receptor coactivator 1 were suppressed by treatment of CC. Immunohistochemical assays supported the western blot results, as the expressions of AR and ERα were down-regulated by CC treatment as well. Further in vitro experiments showed CC was able to inhibit proliferation of RWPE-1 cells by suppressing 5AR and AR. These results all together suggest CC as a potential treatment for BPH. PMID:27549514

  1. Cinnamomi Cortex (Cinnamomum verum) Suppresses Testosterone-induced Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia by Regulating 5α-reductase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun-Myung; Jung, Yunu; Park, Jinbong; Kim, Hye-Lin; Youn, Dong-Hyun; Kang, JongWook; Jeong, Mi-Young; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Yang, Woong Mo; Lee, Seok-Geun; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Um, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamomi cortex (dried bark of Cinnamomum verum) is an important drug in Traditional Korean Medicine used to improve blood circulation and Yang Qi. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common chronic disease in aging men. This study was conducted to determine the effect of Cinnamomi cortex water extract (CC) on BPH. BPH was induced by a pre-4-week daily injection of testosterone propionate (TP). Six weeks of further injection with (a) vehicle, (b) TP, (c) TP + CC, (d) TP + finasteride (Fi) was carried on. As a result, the prostate weight and prostatic index of the CC treatment group were reduced. Histological changes including epithelial thickness and lumen area were recovered as normal by CC treatment. The protein expressions of prostate specific antigen, estrogen receptor α (ERα), androgen receptor (AR), 5α-reductase (5AR), and steroid receptor coactivator 1 were suppressed by treatment of CC. Immunohistochemical assays supported the western blot results, as the expressions of AR and ERα were down-regulated by CC treatment as well. Further in vitro experiments showed CC was able to inhibit proliferation of RWPE-1 cells by suppressing 5AR and AR. These results all together suggest CC as a potential treatment for BPH. PMID:27549514

  2. The Epidemiology of Acute Urinary Retention in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Roehrborn, Claus G

    2001-01-01

    One of the most important events in the natural history of BPH is acute urinary retention (AUR). Better estimates of AUR incidence are now available from both population-based studies and placebo control groups (patients diagnosed with BPH). Several strong risk factors for AUR have been identified by analytical epidemiology, the most important being serum PSA levels. When counseling patients with BPH who are considering watchful waiting, clinicians should also take into account prostate volume, maximum flow rate, and symptom severity. PMID:16985717

  3. Serum antibodies against genitourinary infectious agents in prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia patients: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infection plays a role in the pathogenesis of many human malignancies. Whether prostate cancer (PCa) - an important health issue in the aging male population in the Western world - belongs to these conditions has been a matter of research since the 1970 s. Persistent serum antibodies are a proof of present or past infection. The aim of this study was to compare serum antibodies against genitourinary infectious agents between PCa patients and controls with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). We hypothesized that elevated serum antibody levels or higher seroprevalence in PCa patients would suggest an association of genitourinary infection in patient history and elevated PCa risk. Methods A total of 434 males who had undergone open prostate surgery in a single institution were included in the study: 329 PCa patients and 105 controls with BPH. The subjects' serum samples were analysed by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, complement fixation test and indirect immunofluorescence for the presence of antibodies against common genitourinary infectious agents: human papillomavirus (HPV) 6, 11, 16, 18, 31 and 33, herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and 2, human cytomegalovirus (CMV), Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Treponema pallidum. Antibody seroprevalence and mean serum antibody levels were compared between cases and controls. Tumour grade and stage were correlated with serological findings. Results PCa patients were more likely to harbour antibodies against Ureaplasma urealyticum (odds ratio (OR) 2.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-4.28). Men with BPH were more often seropositive for HPV 18 and Chlamydia trachomatis (OR 0.23; 95% CI 0.09-0.61 and OR 0.45; 95% CI 0.21-0.99, respectively) and had higher mean serum CMV antibody levels than PCa patients (p = 0.0004). Among PCa patients, antibodies against HPV 6 were associated with a higher Gleason score (p = 0.0305). Conclusions Antibody

  4. Efficacy and safety of the doxazosin gastrointestinal therapeutic system for the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guang-Huan; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Wu, Tony T; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Cheng, Chen-Li; Schou, Manjula

    2010-10-01

    This study was carried out to obtain information on the efficacy and safety of the controlled release formulation of the doxazosin Gastrointestinal Therapeutic System (GITS) in Taiwanese subjects with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Studies of doxazosin in Asian populations for this indication have lacked data particularly from Taiwan. This was an 8-week, post-marketing, open-label, non-comparative study. Eighty male subjects (mean age=64 years) with BPH received doxazosin GITS 4 mg once daily. At week 4, subjects who achieved an increase in maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) of ≥3mL/s and a ≥30% reduction in the total International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) continued on doxazosin GITS 4 mg for the remaining 4 weeks; all other subjects were up-titrated to 8 mg once daily. Change from baseline at weeks 4 and 8 (primary endpoint) in IPSS and Qmax was evaluated using two-sided paired t tests for the intent-to-treat population. Safety was assessed throughout the study. A total of 53 (66.3%) subjects completed the study. Baseline Qmax and IPSS were 10.7+3.4 mL/s and 20.6+5.4, respectively. At week 8, a significant increase from baseline in Qmax of 3.3+4.6 mL/s (95% confidence interval = 2.2-4.4, p< 0.001) and a significant decrease in total IPSS of -8.9 + 7.0 (95% confidence interval=-10.5 to -7.3, p< 0.001) was observed. The most common treatment-related adverse event was dizziness. Doxazosin GITS 4 mg per day (with an 8-mg titration step) effectively improved symptoms of BPH. The results from this study provide further information for clinicians on the use of doxazosin GITS for the treatment of BPH, particularly in Taiwanese patients.

  5. Efficacy and safety of the doxazosin gastrointestinal therapeutic system for the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guang-Huan; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Wu, Tony T; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Cheng, Chen-Li; Schou, Manjula

    2010-10-01

    This study was carried out to obtain information on the efficacy and safety of the controlled release formulation of the doxazosin Gastrointestinal Therapeutic System (GITS) in Taiwanese subjects with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Studies of doxazosin in Asian populations for this indication have lacked data particularly from Taiwan. This was an 8-week, post-marketing, open-label, non-comparative study. Eighty male subjects (mean age=64 years) with BPH received doxazosin GITS 4 mg once daily. At week 4, subjects who achieved an increase in maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) of ≥3mL/s and a ≥30% reduction in the total International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) continued on doxazosin GITS 4 mg for the remaining 4 weeks; all other subjects were up-titrated to 8 mg once daily. Change from baseline at weeks 4 and 8 (primary endpoint) in IPSS and Qmax was evaluated using two-sided paired t tests for the intent-to-treat population. Safety was assessed throughout the study. A total of 53 (66.3%) subjects completed the study. Baseline Qmax and IPSS were 10.7+3.4 mL/s and 20.6+5.4, respectively. At week 8, a significant increase from baseline in Qmax of 3.3+4.6 mL/s (95% confidence interval = 2.2-4.4, p< 0.001) and a significant decrease in total IPSS of -8.9 + 7.0 (95% confidence interval=-10.5 to -7.3, p< 0.001) was observed. The most common treatment-related adverse event was dizziness. Doxazosin GITS 4 mg per day (with an 8-mg titration step) effectively improved symptoms of BPH. The results from this study provide further information for clinicians on the use of doxazosin GITS for the treatment of BPH, particularly in Taiwanese patients. PMID:20950778

  6. Association of a Missense ALDH2 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (Glu504Lys) With Benign Prostate Hyperplasia in a Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Hosik; Yoo, Koo Han; Kim, Young Ock

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a well-known gene involved in alcohol and aldehyde metabolism. Moreover, recent studies have reported associations between ALDH2 and age-related disorders. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related disorder and genetic factors may contribute to its onset. In this study, we investigated the association of a well-studied ALDH2 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs671, with the onset and clinical features of BPH. Methods A total of 222 BPH patients and 214 control subjects were genotyped. The clinical features of the BPH patients (prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen level, and International Prostatic Symptom Score) were analyzed. Results The results show that rs671 was only associated with the volume of BPH in genotype and allele frequencies (P<0.05). Conclusion We propose that rs671 is an Asian-specific SNP in ALDH2 that may affect the disease progression of BPH in the Korean population. PMID:24466463

  7. Combination of tadalafil and finasteride for improving the symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia: critical appraisal and patient focus

    PubMed Central

    Elkelany, Osama O; Owen, Ryan C; Kim, Edward D

    2015-01-01

    The evidence suggests that combination therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)-lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) using an α-blocker and a 5α-reductase inhibitor has become well accepted. The combination of daily tadalafil and an α-blocker has also demonstrated benefit. This paper addresses combination therapy with daily tadalafil and finasteride for the treatment of BPH-LUTS. Our results demonstrate that use of tadalafil and finasteride represents a logical extension of combination therapies. We analyze a landmark study by Casabé et al that demonstrates improved voiding symptoms as assessed by International Prostate Symptom Scores with a combination of tadalafil and finasteride compared with finasteride and placebo. Study patients had moderate to severe LUTS and prostate volumes >30 g. The additional benefit of improved erectile function as assessed by International Index of Erectile Function-erectile function domain scores with the addition of tadalafil was a secondary benefit. We propose that the ideal patient for combination therapy with tadalafil and finasteride has a prostate volume >30 g and desires additional benefit over monotherapy. For these men, improved erectile function without sexual side effects was a secondary benefit. PMID:25848297

  8. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia - An economic assessment of fixed combination therapy based on a literature review.

    PubMed

    Messina, Roberto; Mirone, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    FederAnziani Senior Italia and SIU - Italian Society of Urology - have decided to work together to draft a document focussing on Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH), and to stress the importance of adherence with pharmacological treatment in this setting, from both a scientific and a patient standpoint. Starting from a literature search, the two associations analysed to what extent an increase in treatment adherence amongst these patients influences hospital savings and to what extent therapy persistence levels are affected by monotherapy rather than free drug combinations. These estimates were performed only on patients taking medicinal products belonging to the 5 α-reductase inhibitors (5ARI) class that, although not indispensable, are the compounds that bring the greatest benefits, especially in the elderly and for which we know that every additional 30 days of therapy reduced the likelihood of acute urinary retention (AUR) and surgery by 14% and 11% respectively *. The results show that the use of fixed combination therapy would involve an increase in persistence due to the lower rate of patients abandoning treatment over time. Each 30 day-increment of 5ARI therapy, i.e. for an expenditure of 10.6 million euros extra per year for 5ARI medication, savings of approximately 24.3 million euros in hospital costs could be achieved. PMID:26428637

  9. [Up-to-date on the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Which adenoma to treat and how to do it?].

    PubMed

    Lahlaidi, K; Ariane, M M; Fontaine, E

    2014-03-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a state of the nature rather than a disease. It affects mainly men over 50 years and represents a public health problem. A literature review on the therapeutic management of benign prostatic hyperplasia was carried out from a selection of publications with the highest level of evidence. Medical treatment is based on herbal medicine, alpha-blockers and 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors. Surgical treatment is used in case of complications or failure of medical management. Surgical options are numerous. Transurethral prostate resection and prostate adenomectomy are the most usual procedures. Due to their significant morbidity, other less invasive procedures have recently been developed. The choice of treatment will depend on prostate volume and anatomy and patient's comorbidities.

  10. Thulium laser enucleation of the prostate is a safe and a highly effective modality for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia - Our experience of 236 patients

    PubMed Central

    Ketan, P. Vartak; Prashant, H. Salvi

    2016-01-01

    Context: Thulium LASER is fast emerging as a safe and effective modality for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Still, compared to holmium laser transurethral enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) the number of institutes all over the world using Thulium LASER are limited. This is our effort to bring the statistical facts about the safety and effectivity of Thulium LASER. Aims: To study the efficacy of thulium laser enucleation of the prostate (ThuLEP). Settings and Design: All patients in the stipulated period were documented for all parameters and were evaluated. The results were tabulated. Subjects and Materials: (1) Two hundred and thirty-six patients with symptomatic BPH were treated with ThuLEP between March 2010 and September 2014 at our institute by a single surgeon. (2) The inclusion criteria were maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) <15 ml/s, International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) >15 or acute retention of urine with the failure of catheter trial or Acute retention of urine with prior history of severe bladder outlet obstruction. (3) Patients evaluated by: Digital rectal examination, uroflowmetry, IPSS, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), blood and urine routine tests, abdominal usage with trains rectal ultrasonography (TRUS), TRUS guided biopsies. Statistical Analysis Used: Not used. Results: (1) ThuLEP was a highly effective procedure as compared to all other procedures like HOLEP, TURP in terms of catheterization time, hospital stay, and drop in hemoglobin (Hb). (2) Catheterization time: 25.22 h (224 patients within 24 h and 12 patients within 48 h). (3) Hospital stay: 24–36 h 218 patients (92.3%), 36–48 h 18 patients (7.6%). (4) Drop in Hb: 0.8 ± 0.42 g/dl. (5) Average operative time: 56.91 min. Conclusions: Thulium LASER is a safe and highly effective LASER in terms of blood loss, speed of tissue resection, drop in serum PSA, and versatility of prostatic resection. PMID:26834407

  11. LPS/TLR4 Signaling Enhances TGF-β Response Through Downregulating BAMBI During Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    He, Yao; Ou, Zhenyu; Chen, Xiang; Zu, Xiongbing; Liu, Longfei; Li, Yuan; Cao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Minfeng; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Hequn; Qi, Lin; Wang, Long

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) development involves accumulation of mesenchymal-like cells derived from the prostatic epithelium by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β induces EMT phenotypes with low E-cadherin and high vimentin expression in prostatic epithelial cells. Here we report that LPS/TLR4 signalling induces down-regulation of the bone morphogenic protein and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI), which enhances TGF-β signalling in the EMT process during prostatic hyperplasia. Additionally, we found that the mean TLR4 staining score was significantly higher in BPH tissues with inflammation compared with BPH tissues without inflammation (5.13 ± 1.21 and 2.96 ± 0.73, respectively; P < 0.001). Moreover, patients with inflammatory infiltrate were more likely to have a higher age (P = 0.020), BMI (P = 0.026), prostate volume (P = 0.024), total IPSS score (P = 0.009) and IPSS-S (P < 0.001). Pearson’s correlation coefficient and multiple regression analyses demonstrated that TLR4 mRNA expression level was significantly positively associated with age, BMI, serum PSA levels, urgency and nocturia subscores of IPSS in the inflammatory group. These findings provide new insights into the TLR4-amplified EMT process and the association between TLR4 levels and storage LUTS, suggesting chronic inflammation as vital to the pathogenesis of BPH. PMID:27243216

  12. LPS/TLR4 Signaling Enhances TGF-β Response Through Downregulating BAMBI During Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    He, Yao; Ou, Zhenyu; Chen, Xiang; Zu, Xiongbing; Liu, Longfei; Li, Yuan; Cao, Zhenzhen; Chen, Minfeng; Chen, Zhi; Chen, Hequn; Qi, Lin; Wang, Long

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) development involves accumulation of mesenchymal-like cells derived from the prostatic epithelium by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β induces EMT phenotypes with low E-cadherin and high vimentin expression in prostatic epithelial cells. Here we report that LPS/TLR4 signalling induces down-regulation of the bone morphogenic protein and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI), which enhances TGF-β signalling in the EMT process during prostatic hyperplasia. Additionally, we found that the mean TLR4 staining score was significantly higher in BPH tissues with inflammation compared with BPH tissues without inflammation (5.13 ± 1.21 and 2.96 ± 0.73, respectively; P < 0.001). Moreover, patients with inflammatory infiltrate were more likely to have a higher age (P = 0.020), BMI (P = 0.026), prostate volume (P = 0.024), total IPSS score (P = 0.009) and IPSS-S (P < 0.001). Pearson's correlation coefficient and multiple regression analyses demonstrated that TLR4 mRNA expression level was significantly positively associated with age, BMI, serum PSA levels, urgency and nocturia subscores of IPSS in the inflammatory group. These findings provide new insights into the TLR4-amplified EMT process and the association between TLR4 levels and storage LUTS, suggesting chronic inflammation as vital to the pathogenesis of BPH. PMID:27243216

  13. The medical management of lower urinary tract symptoms and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Holtgrewe, H L

    1998-11-01

    Prostatism is a widely used term assigned to the symptom complex of older men with voiding dysfunction. The cause of the syndrome has routinely been ascribed to an enlarged prostate. More recent thinking recognizes that many men with such symptoms do not, in fact, have prostate enlargement or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and that such symptoms are not a surrogate for BPH. Such recognition is essential if cost effective medical management of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) is to be achieved. Prostate volume has emerged as a key factor in the selection of medical therapy of LUTS and BPH not only regarding symptom relief but also to the newer concept of the prevention of disease progression and the avoidance of future adverse events in those men with true BPH. In the United States, medical management is now first line therapy for LUTS. The proper selection of therapy based on the patient's individual pathophysiologic characteristics is now made possible by many new recent studies within the medical literature.

  14. Postoperative MRI in patients undergoing interstitial laser coagulation thermotherapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Lisse, U.G.; Heuck, A.F.; Scheidler, H.J.; Reiser, M.F.

    1996-03-01

    We conducted MRI of the effects of laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Eighteen patients (average age 64 years) were examined with MRI 24-48 h before and after LITT of BPH. Sagittal and axial T2-weighted FSE MR images were evaluated for signs of coagulation necrosis in the prostate gland and the presence of intra- and extraprostatic edema. Coagulation areas showed as a hypointense central core with a hyperintense rim. Intraprostatic edema led to a volume increase of 18-108% both in the central and in the total gland. Periprostatic edema was severe in preprostatic and prevesical tissue as well as lateral to the prostate, moderate in the presacral space, and mild perirectally and dorsal to the prostate. Follow-up examinations 2 weeks to 6 months after LITT in five patients showed decrease of coagulation necrosis volume, prostate size, and edema. MRI appears to be a reliable method to monitor LITT effects in patients with BPH. 22 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Transurethral photodynamic therapy in benign prostatic hyperplasia : a canine pilot study using benzoporphyrin derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Sugandh D.; Peabody, James O.; Beck, Elsa R.; Cerny, Joseph C.; Amin, Mahul B.; Richter, Anna M.

    1999-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) principles were evaluated in management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in a canine model. Five dogs were injected with benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD) and samples of prostate, bladder, urethra and rectum were taken at 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours and analyzed for BPD. Next, 16 dogs were treated with 100 Joules at 690 nm light form argon dye laser 1 hour after administration of BPD at 0.5 mg/kg using cylindrical diffuser tip fiber passed transurethrally. The prostates were harvested weekly up to 4 weeks and the size of the lesion was measured and the prostates were examined. Prostate had the highest BPD levels. Hemorrhagic lesion of 2.5 cm in diameter was noted at 1 week after PDT. At 3 and 4 weeks there were changes of glandular atrophy in the periurethral region. Minimally invasive technique of transurethral PDT causes glandular and stromal changes in the periurethral zone and has potential in the treatment of BPH.

  16. [The anti-androgen flutamide in the treatment of prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Romics, I; Bach, D

    1992-11-22

    The authors treated 23 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients with antiandrogen flutamide. Half of the patients were treated with 500 mg, the another part with 750 mg flutamide for three months, and after 3 months brake again for 3 months. The decrease of the residual urine and an increase of the flow were observed. The subjective parameters were improved, too. In some patients side effects (gynecomastia, loss of appetite and potency) were observed. There was no different in the effect of the two doses.

  17. Quality of Life and Sexual Function in Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bruskewitz, Reginald C

    2003-01-01

    Incidence of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), one of the most common conditions affecting adult men, increases dramatically after the age of 50. The various symptoms of BPH, which include lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), can adversely affect quality of life (QOL). Many men with BPH and LUTS wait until symptoms become significantly bothersome before seeking medical attention. Evaluating the exact severity and significance of symptoms has been difficult with previous methodology. Over the last decade, assessment tools have become available to quantify the symptoms of BPH and LUTS. This article addresses the impact of BPH, its management, and the overall effects it has on QOL. PMID:16985624

  18. Pharmacologic Therapy in Men's Health: Hypogonadism, Erectile Dysfunction, and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Berkseth, Kathryn E; Thirumalai, Arthi; Amory, John K

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews current pharmacologic treatment options for 3 common men's health concerns: hypogonadism, erectile dysfunction (ED), and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Specific topics addressed include: management of male hypogonadism using testosterone replacement therapy, use of oral phosphodiesterase inhibitors as first-line therapy for men with ED and the utility of intraurethral and intrapenile alprostadil injections for patients who do not respond to oral medications, and the role of alpha1-adrenergic antagonists, 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors, anticholinergic agents, and herbal therapies in the management of BPH. PMID:27235615

  19. Prooxidant-antioxidant balance in the prostate and blood of rats with sulpyride[corrected]-induced prostatic hyperplasia corrected with prostatilen.

    PubMed

    Belostotskaya, L I; Gomon, O N; Nikitchenko, Yu V; Chaika, L A; Bondar, V V; Dzyuba, V N

    2005-03-01

    We studied the effects of 30-day injections of sulpyride and treatment with Prostatilen on the development of prostatic hyperplasia and LPO in rats. Sulpyride induced proliferation of lateral lobes, increased the content of lipid hydroperoxides and glutathione peroxidase activity in the gland; in the blood this preparation increased lipid hydroperoxide concentration and decreased glutathione peroxidase and total antioxidant activity. Prostatilen prevented the development of hyperplasia and normalized the prooxidant-antioxidant balance in tissues, except total antioxidant activity of the blood.

  20. A Review of Laser Treatment for Symptomatic BPH (Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia).

    PubMed

    Nair, Shiva Madhwan; Pimentel, Marie Adrianne; Gilling, Peter John

    2016-06-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the predominant cause of bladder outflow obstruction and is associated with significant morbidity. Surgical removal of adenoma has been a key treatment principle for alleviation of obstruction. Lasers have been used as an alternative to transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), due to the higher complications of the latter procedure, since the early 1990s. Early generations of lasers utilized coagulative and ablative techniques to dis-obstruct the bladder. Ablative techniques have remained popular with the resurgence of 532-nm vaporization (commonly known as GreenLight). Enucleation techniques especially with the holmium laser have shown durable efficacy in randomized controlled trials whilst new modalities such as thulium still require long-term data. This review examines the most common types of laser technology used in BPH surgery, with a focus on efficacy and side effect profile. PMID:27053186

  1. Effect of hypertension on bacteria composition of prostate biopsy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer in PSA grey-zone

    PubMed Central

    NI, XIAOFENG; MENG, HONGZHOU; ZHOU, FENG; YU, HAINING; XIANG, JIANJIAN; SHEN, SHENGRONG

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic prostate cancer (PC) is difficult to diagnose by prostate biopsy, even in patients with markedly elevated PSA levels. Therefore, we aimed to identify a new, better technique to detect PC in a more consistent manner. A variety of steps were employed to validate this proposed method, including DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and DGGE band sequencing. Four transperineal prostate biopsy specimens were obtained from male patients. The patients were under the age of 65 and PSA levels were 4–10 ng/ml. We also investigated the bacteria composition of transperineal prostate biopsy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and PC by PCR-DGGE profiling. Sequences from selected bands 2 and 4 both matched with Sphingomonas, which is present in lower amounts in PC without hypertension as compared to PC with hypertension, while there were no particular differences in the BPH group. Specific bacteria from the prostate biopsy tissues provide further confidence in PC diagnosis based on a PCR approach as a diagnostic tool, while hypertension was found to be a disturbing factor that can affect the diagnosis of BPH and PC in grey-zone. PMID:27284421

  2. Minimally invasive devices for treating lower urinary tract symptoms in benign prostate hyperplasia: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Fouad; Marcelis, Quentin; Roumeguère, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) represents a spectrum of related lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The cost of currently recommended medications and the discontinuation rate due to side effects are significant drawbacks limiting their long-term use in clinical practice. Interventional procedures, considered as the definitive treatment for BPH, carry a significant risk of treatment-related complications in frail patients. These issues have contributed to the emergence of new approaches as alternative options to standard therapies. This paper reviews the recent literature regarding the experimental treatments under investigation and presents the currently available experimental devices and techniques used under local anesthesia for the treatment of LUTS/BPH in the vast majority of cases. Devices for delivery of thermal treatment (microwaves, radiofrequency, high-intensity focused ultrasound, and the Rezum system), mechanical devices (prostatic stent and urethral lift), fractionation of prostatic tissue (histotripsy and aquablation), prostate artery embolization, and intraprostatic drugs are discussed. Evidence for the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of these “minimally invasive procedures” is analyzed. PMID:26317083

  3. Terazosin. A pharmacoeconomic evaluation of its use in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Plosker, G L; Goa, K L

    1997-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disorder in elderly men which carries a substantial economic burden. Urinary symptoms associated with moderate to severe disease can significantly interfere with daily activities and reduce quality of life. Obstruction of urine flow in men with BPH can result from nonmalignant enlargement of the prostate gland (static component of BPH) and from alpha 1 receptor-mediated increased smooth muscle tone of the bladder neck and prostate (dynamic component of BPH). Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) is generally very effective and has traditionally been the standard treatment for men with moderate to severe BPH. However, response to therapy with TURP is not universal and the procedure is associated with a number of potential complications. Moreover, many men prefer to avoid or are not suitable candidates for this invasive procedure. Thus, there is an increasing role for less invasive treatment, including drug therapy, in men with moderate to severe BPH. Terazosin is an alpha 1 receptor antagonist which has been shown in placebo-controlled trials to significantly improve American Urology Association (AUA) symptom and quality-of-life scores and symptom problem index ('bother' score), as well as increase peak urinary flow rate, in men with BPH. In a recent large randomised US trial, treatment for 1 year with terazosin titrated to 10 mg/day improved mean AUA symptom score and peak urinary flow rate to a significantly greater extent than finasteride 5 mg/day in men with moderate to severe BPH. The most frequently reported adverse events associated with terazosin include dizziness, asthenia, postural hypotension, somnolence, headache, peripheral oedema, nasal congestion/rhinitis and syncope. Approximately 5% of men with BPH discontinue terazosin because of adverse events. Results of an economic evaluation of terazosin, in which both clinical and economic data were collected prospectively in a randomised placebo

  4. Management of acute urinary retention: a worldwide survey of 6074 men with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, John M; Desgrandchamps, François; Adjali, Kamel; Guerra, Lauro Gomez; Hong, Sung Joon; Khalid, Salman El; Ratana-Olarn, Krisada

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the management of acute urinary retention (AUR) associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in real-life practice. To identify predictors of successful trial without catheter (TWOC). MATERIALS AND METHODS In all, 6074 men catheterized for painful AUR were enrolled in a prospective, cross-sectional survey conducted in public and private urology practices in France, Asia, Latin America, Algeria and the Middle East. Patient clinical characteristics, type of AUR and its management (type of catheterization, hospitalization, TWOC, use of α1-blockers, immediate or elective surgery) and adverse events observed during the catheterization period were recorded. Predictors of TWOC success were also analysed by multivariate regression analysis with stepwise procedure. RESULTS Of the 6074 men, 4289 (71%) had a spontaneous AUR and 1785 (29%) had a precipitated AUR, mainly as the result of loco-regional/general anaesthesia (28.5%) and excessive alcohol intake (18.2%). Presence of BPH was revealed by AUR in 44% of men. Hospitalization for AUR varied between countries, ranging from 1.7% in Algeria to 100% in France. A urethral catheter was inserted in most cases (89.8%) usually followed by a TWOC (78.0%) after a median of 5 days. Overall TWOC success rate was 61%. Most men (86%) received an α1-blocker (mainly alfuzosin) before catheter removal with consistently higher TWOC success rates, regardless of age and type of AUR. Multivariate regression analysis confirmed that α1-blocker before TWOC doubled the chances of success (odds ratio 1.92, 95% CI 1.52–2.42, P < 0.001). Age ≥70 years, prostate size ≥50 g, severe lower urinary tract symptoms, drained volume at catheterization ≥1000 mL and spontaneous AUR favoured TWOC failure. Catheterization >3 days did not influence TWOC success but was associated with increased morbidity and prolonged hospitalization for adverse events. In the case of TWOC failure, 49% of men were recatheterized and had BPH

  5. Association of Functional Ability and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia With Urinary Incontinence in Older Korean Men

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) and analyze its association with instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in community-dwelling older men in Korea. Methods: This study was a secondary analysis of data from the Actual Living Condition of the Elderly and Welfare Need Survey conducted in the year 2008. Data was subjected to hierarchical logistic regression analysis to examine the association of IADL and BPH with UI in older men, entering IADL and BPH in model 1, and age, body mass index (BMI) and education in model 2, and then comorbidities and walking speed in model 3. Results: Of 6,185 men, 243 (3.9%) had self-reported UI. The prevalence of UI was 1.8% in men aged 60–64 years and 11.7% in those aged 85 years and above, indicating an increase in the prevalence of UI with their age. IADL and BPH remained the only significant factors associated with UI in model 1 (odds ratio [OR], 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44–1.64 and OR, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.47–5.10, respectively), model 2 (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.40–1.61 and OR, 2.68; 95% CI, 1.42–5.07), and model 3 (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.32–1.54 and OR, 2.58; 95% CI, 1.36–4.90). Conclusions: IADL limitations and presence of BPH were associated with UI in older men after controlling for BMI, education, comorbidities, and walking speed. Thus, UI should be assessed in older Korean men with IADL decline and BPH. Gender-sensitive interventions to attenuate IADL limitations and manage BPH should be developed and applied to improve UI in older men. PMID:27377946

  6. Inhibitory effect of rape pollen supercritical CO2 fluid extract against testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bi-Cheng; Jin, Li-Li; Yang, Yi-Fang; Li, Kun; Peng, Dan-Ming

    2014-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) can lead to lower urinary tract symptoms. Rape pollen is an apicultural product that is composed of nutritionally valuable and biologically active substances. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of rape pollen supercritical CO2 fluid extract (SFE-CO2) in BPH development using a testosterone-induced BPH rat model. BPH was induced in the experimental groups by daily subcutaneous injections of testosterone for a period of 30 days. Rape pollen SFE-CO2 was administered daily by oral gavage concurrently with the testosterone injections. Animals were sacrificed at the scheduled termination and the prostates were weighed and subjected to histopathological examination. Testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), 5α-reductase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) levels were also measured. BPH-induced animals exhibited an increase in prostate weight with increased testosterone, DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 expression levels. However, rape pollen SFE-CO2 treatment resulted in significant reductions in the prostate index and testosterone, DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 levels compared with those in BPH-induced animals. Histopathological examination also demonstrated that rape pollen SFE-CO2 treatment suppressed testosterone-induced BPH. These observations indicate that rape pollen SFE-CO2 inhibits the development of BPH in rats and these effects are closely associated with reductions in DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 levels. Therefore, the results of the present study clearly indicate that rape pollen SFE-CO2 extract may be a useful agent in BPH treatment.

  7. Inhibitory effect of rape pollen supercritical CO2 fluid extract against testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats

    PubMed Central

    YANG, BI-CHENG; JIN, LI-LI; YANG, YI-FANG; LI, KUN; PENG, DAN-MING

    2014-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) can lead to lower urinary tract symptoms. Rape pollen is an apicultural product that is composed of nutritionally valuable and biologically active substances. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of rape pollen supercritical CO2 fluid extract (SFE-CO2) in BPH development using a testosterone-induced BPH rat model. BPH was induced in the experimental groups by daily subcutaneous injections of testosterone for a period of 30 days. Rape pollen SFE-CO2 was administered daily by oral gavage concurrently with the testosterone injections. Animals were sacrificed at the scheduled termination and the prostates were weighed and subjected to histopathological examination. Testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), 5α-reductase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) levels were also measured. BPH-induced animals exhibited an increase in prostate weight with increased testosterone, DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 expression levels. However, rape pollen SFE-CO2 treatment resulted in significant reductions in the prostate index and testosterone, DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 levels compared with those in BPH-induced animals. Histopathological examination also demonstrated that rape pollen SFE-CO2 treatment suppressed testosterone-induced BPH. These observations indicate that rape pollen SFE-CO2 inhibits the development of BPH in rats and these effects are closely associated with reductions in DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 levels. Therefore, the results of the present study clearly indicate that rape pollen SFE-CO2 extract may be a useful agent in BPH treatment. PMID:24944593

  8. Common questions about the diagnosis and management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Ryan; Williams, Pamela M

    2014-12-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common condition that increases in prevalence with age. A history should include onset, duration, and severity of lower urinary tract symptoms and medication use to rule out other causes of symptoms. Physical examination includes a digital rectal examination and assessment for bladder distention or neurologic impairment. Recommended tests include serum prostate-specific antigen measurement and urinalysis to help identify infection, genitourinary cancer, or calculi as an alternative cause of lower urinary tract symptoms. BPH severity is assessed using validated, self-administered symptom questionnaires such as the American Urological Association Symptom Index or International Prostate Symptom Score. Mild or nonbothersome symptoms do not require treatment. Bothersome symptoms are managed with lifestyle modifications, medications, and surgery. Alpha blockers are first-line medications for BPH. Surgical referral is indicated if BPH-related complications develop, medical therapy fails, or the patient chooses it. Dietary supplements, such as saw palmetto, pygeum, cernilton, and beta sitosterols, and acupuncture are not recommended for the management of BPH. PMID:25611711

  9. Different lasers in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: a network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingming; Shen, Pengfei; He, Qiying; Yin, Xiaoxue; Chen, Zhibin; Gui, Haojun; Shu, Kunpeng; Tang, Qidun; Yang, Yaojing; Pan, Xiuyi; Wang, Jia; Chen, Ni; Zeng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    All available surgical treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) have their individual advantages or disadvantages. However, the lack of head-to-head studies comparing different surgeries makes it unavailable to conduct direct analysis. To compare the efficacy and safety among different lasers and transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) for BPH, randomized controlled trials were searched in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library, WHO International Clinical Trial Registration Platform, and Clinical Trial.gov by 2015.5; and the effectiveness-, perioperation- and complication-related outcomes were assessed by network meta-analysis. 36 studies involving 3831 patients were included. Holmium laser through resection and enucleation had the best efficacy in maximum flow rate. Thulium laser through vapo-resection was superior in improving international prostate symptom score and holmium laser through enucleation was the best for post-voiding residual volume improvement. Diode laser through vaporization was the rapidest in removing postoperative indwelling catheter, while TURP was the longest. TURP required the longest hospitalization and thulium laser through vapo-resection was relatively shorter. Holmium and thulium lasers seem to be relatively better in surgical efficacy and safety, so that these two lasers might be preferred in selection of optimal laser surgery. Actually, more large-scale and high quality head-to-head RCTs are suggested to validate the conclusions. PMID:27009501

  10. New surgical treatment options in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Werner T. W.; Nelius, Thomas; Aronoff, David R.; Mittemeyer, Bernhard T.

    2003-06-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease in males older than 50 years of age. 75-80% of this population is considered to have some degree of BPH causing clinical symptoms and requiring urological treatment. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P) is currently the standard surgical treatment modality for BPH. In an attempt to minimize the need for hospitalization and the associated perioperative and postoperative morbidity, alternatives have been sought. Various types of Laser techniques such as interstitial Laser cogaulation and side-firing technology have been proposed. Numerous studies have shown that Laser procedures safely and effectively reduce the volume of the prostate. Intra- and postoperative bleeding are nearly unknown complications for Laser procedures, whereas this is the most relevant complication for the TUR-P. Due to significant tissue edema after Laser treatment, patients commonly show delayed time to void adequately, and therefore, catheter drainage is often necessary for 3 to 21 days. Retrograde ejaculation is reported to occur less (0 - 10%) compared to TUR-P (> 60%). Urinary tract infections are very common after interstitial laser coagulation. Although not many long-term clinical data are available, various studies have shown that BPH patients improve in symptom score, flow rate and post-void residual up to 3 years after Laser treatment. This paper presents a concise review of efficacy, advantages and disadvantages of the most frequently used Laser techniques as well as the long-term clinical data compared to TUR-P.

  11. Different lasers in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: a network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingming; Shen, Pengfei; He, Qiying; Yin, Xiaoxue; Chen, Zhibin; Gui, Haojun; Shu, Kunpeng; Tang, Qidun; Yang, Yaojing; Pan, Xiuyi; Wang, Jia; Chen, Ni; Zeng, Hao

    2016-01-01

    All available surgical treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) have their individual advantages or disadvantages. However, the lack of head-to-head studies comparing different surgeries makes it unavailable to conduct direct analysis. To compare the efficacy and safety among different lasers and transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) for BPH, randomized controlled trials were searched in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library, WHO International Clinical Trial Registration Platform, and Clinical Trial.gov by 2015.5; and the effectiveness-, perioperation- and complication-related outcomes were assessed by network meta-analysis. 36 studies involving 3831 patients were included. Holmium laser through resection and enucleation had the best efficacy in maximum flow rate. Thulium laser through vapo-resection was superior in improving international prostate symptom score and holmium laser through enucleation was the best for post-voiding residual volume improvement. Diode laser through vaporization was the rapidest in removing postoperative indwelling catheter, while TURP was the longest. TURP required the longest hospitalization and thulium laser through vapo-resection was relatively shorter. Holmium and thulium lasers seem to be relatively better in surgical efficacy and safety, so that these two lasers might be preferred in selection of optimal laser surgery. Actually, more large-scale and high quality head-to-head RCTs are suggested to validate the conclusions. PMID:27009501

  12. Finasteride in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. A urodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kirby, R S; Bryan, J; Eardley, I; Christmas, T J; Liu, S; Holmes, S A; Vale, J A; Shanmuganathan, K; Webb, J A

    1992-07-01

    A group of 69 men with bladder outflow obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were treated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study with finasteride (Proscar, MK-906), a 5-alpha reductase inhibitor, 5 mg or 10 mg/day or placebo for 3 months; subsequently, 20 patients received finasteride 5 mg/day for a further 9 months in an open extension study. In treated patients dihydrotestosterone declined by over 60%, remaining unchanged with placebo. Symptom scores fell significantly in all 3 groups. Mean maximum flow rates fell slightly in placebo-treated patients but improved by 1.5 ml/s in the 10 mg group and by 3.3 ml/s in the 5 mg group. After 1 year's treatment, the reduction in symptom score and increase in flow rate were well maintained; the mean prostate volume was reduced by 14% and prostatic specific antigen declined by 28%. It was concluded that finasteride shows some efficacy in the treatment of BPH, with minimal toxicity, but 12 months of therapy or longer may be necessary to achieve maximal effect.

  13. Effect of Serenoa Repens on Oxidative Stress, Inflammatory and Growth Factors in Obese Wistar Rats with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Iii Colado-Velázquez, Juventino; Mailloux-Salinas, Patrick; Medina-Contreras, Jml; Cruz-Robles, David; Bravo, Guadalupe

    2015-10-01

    Serenoa repens has been widely used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia and lower urinary tract symptoms; however, most of the studies have been conducted in individuals with normal weight and not obese. In this study, the effects of a lipidic extract of S. repens, in markers of oxidative stress, inflammation, and growth factors, in obese rats with testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia, were investigated. Total nitrites, malondialdehyde, total glutathione, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase activity were measured; in addition, assays for inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and the growth factors basic fibroblast growth factor (FGFb) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were performed. The obese rats had a higher prostate weight compared with controls. S. repens significantly decreased prostate weight, total nitrites, and malondialdehyde; improved total glutathione, SOD, and catalase activity; and significantly reduced inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) and growth factors (VEGF and FGFb). S. repens showed high antioxidant and antiinflammatory activity in obese rats, suggesting that their use could be beneficial in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  14. Monopolar versus bipolar transurethral resection of prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia: Operative outcomes and surgeon preferences, a real-world scenario

    PubMed Central

    Madduri, Vijay Kumar Sarma; Bera, Malay Kumar; Pal, Dilip Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Monopolar transurethral resection of prostate (M-TURP) is considered the gold standard for the management of bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Its newly introduced modification, bipolar TURP (B-TURP), promises to overcome its most prominent shortcomings, namely bleeding and dilutional hyponatremia. Literature is conflicting regarding merits of B-TURP over M-TURP. Aims: To find a difference, if any, in perioperative outcomes between M-TURP and B-TURP in a real-wold setting. Settings and Design: Prospective nonrandomized study. Subjects and Methods: Operative outcomes of patients undergoing M-TURP and B-TURP from February 2014 to October 2015 were compared. Statistical Analysis Used: Categorical data were compared by Fischer exact test and numerical data were compared by independent samples Mann–Whitney U-test. P <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The mean size of prostate operated by bipolar technology was significantly greater than those operated by monopolar technology (38.12 ± 9.59 cc vs. 66.49 ± 22.95 cc; P < 0.001). The mean fall in postoperative serum sodium concentration was 0.99 ± 0.76 mEq/L for the B-TURP group as compared to 3.60 ± 2.89 mEq/L for the M-TURP group (P < 0.001). The mean drop in postoperative hemoglobin concentration (P = 0.28) was statistically insignificant, even though larger glands were operated by B-TURP. There were three instances of the transurethral resection (TUR) syndrome in the M-TURP group whereas no TUR syndrome occurred in the B-TURP group. Conclusions: In spite of various contrary viewpoints in literature, surgeons prefer to operate on larger prostates using bipolar technology. B-TURP definitely reduces the incidence of bleeding and dilutional hyponatremia, making it a contender to replace M-TURP as the new gold standard. PMID:27453650

  15. Examination of CK2α and NF-κB p65 expression in human benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Qaiser, Fatima; Trembley, Janeen H; Sadiq, Sarah; Muhammad, Iqbal; Younis, Rubina; Hashmi, Shoaib Naiyar; Murtaza, Badar; Rector, Thomas S; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Ahmed, Khalil

    2016-09-01

    Protein kinase CK2 plays a critical role in cell growth, proliferation, and suppression of cell death. CK2 is overexpressed, especially in the nuclear compartment, in the majority of cancers, including prostate cancer (PCa). CK2-mediated activation of transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 is a key step in cellular proliferation, resulting in translocation of NF-κB p65 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. As CK2 expression and activity are also elevated in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), we sought to increase the knowledge of CK2 function in benign and malignant prostate by examination of the relationships between nuclear CK2 and nuclear NF-κB p65 protein expression. The expression level and localization of CK2α and NF-κB p65 proteins in PCa and BPH tissue specimens was determined. Nuclear CK2α and NF-κB p65 protein levels are significantly higher in PCa compared with BPH, and these proteins are positively correlated with each other in both diseases. Nuclear NF-κB p65 levels correlated with Ki-67 or with cytoplasmic NF-κB p65 expression in BPH, but not in PCa. The findings provide information that combined analysis of CK2α and NF-κB p65 expression in prostate specimens relates to the disease status. Increased nuclear NF-κB p65 expression levels in PCa specifically related to nuclear CK2α levels, indicating a possible CK2-dependent relationship in malignancy. In contrast, nuclear NF-κB p65 protein levels related to both Ki-67 and cytoplasmic NF-κB p65 levels exclusively in BPH, suggesting a potential separate impact for NF-κB p65 function in proliferation for benign disease as opposed to malignant disease. PMID:27435858

  16. Clinical, Laboratorial, and Urodynamic Findings of Prostatic Artery Embolization for the Treatment of Urinary Retention Related to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. A Prospective Single-Center Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Antunes, Alberto A.; Carnevale, Francisco C. Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim M. da; Yoshinaga, Eduardo M.; Cerri, Luciana M. O.; Baroni, Ronaldo H.; Marcelino, Antonio S. Z.; Cerri, Giovanni G.; Srougi, Miguel

    2013-08-01

    PurposeThis study was designed to describe the clinical, laboratorial, and urodynamic findings of prostatic artery embolization (PAE) in patients with urinary retention due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).MethodsA prospective study of 11 patients with urinary retention due to BPH was conducted. Patients underwent physical examination, prostate specific antigen (PSA) measurement, transrectal ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. International prostate symptom score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), and urodynamic testing were used to assess the outcome before and after 1 year.ResultsClinical success was 91 % (10/11 patients) with a mean follow-up of 22.3 months (range, 12-41 months). At the first year follow-up, the mean IPSS score was 2.8 points (p = 0.04), mean QoL was 0.4 points (p = 0.001), mean PSA decreased from 10.1 to 4.3 ng/mL (p = 0.003), maximum urinary flow (Qmax) improved from 4.2 to 10.8 mL/sec (p = 0.009), and detrusor pressure (Pdet) decreased from 85.7 to 51.5 cm H{sub 2}O (p = 0.007). Before PAE, Bladder Outlet Obstruction Index (BOOI) showed values >40 in 100 % of patients. After PAE, 30 % of patients were >40 (obstructed), 40 % were between 20 and 40 (undetermined), and 30 % were <20 (unobstructed). Patients with a BOOI <20 had higher PSA values at 1-day after PAE.ConclusionsClinical and urodynamic parameters improved significantly after PAE in patients with acute urinary retention due to BPH. Total PSA at day 1 after PAE was higher in patients with unobstructed values in pressure flow studies.

  17. Application of two micron laser vaporesection combined with transurethral resection of the prostate in treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: analysis of 340 cases

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhiyong; Sun, Bin; Zhou, Gaobiao; Yang, Yonghong; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Lanlan; Sheng, Haibo; Guo, Heqing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical efficacy and safety of two micron laser vaporesection combined with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) in treating benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods: In total, 340 BPH patients aged 62-86 years, were treated with two micron laser vaporesection plus TURP. Mean prostatic volume was measured as 38-182 ml. Operative time, intraoperative hemorrhage volume, time of postoperative bladder irrigation, time of indwelling urinary catheter and surgical complications were examined. International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life score (QOL), maximal urinary flow rate (Qmax) and post void residual urine volume (PVR) were analyzed. Results: All cases underwent the surgery successfully. No transurethral resection syndrome was noted. Mean operative time was (72±15) min. Mean intra operative hemorrhage volume was (48.4±13.0) ml. Four patients were transfused with 2 U of suspended red blood cells. Time of postoperative bladder irrigation ranged from 0.5-2.5 d. Time of indwelling urinary catheter was 3-6 d. After removing urinary catheter, mild urinary irritation symptoms were noted in 19 cases. Ten patients developing urinary infection were recovered following anti-infection therapy. One with secondary urethral stenosis was healed after urethral dilatation for three times. Postoperative IPSS, QOL, Qmax and PVR were (6.0±2.0), (2.0±0.2), (18.5±1.6) ml/s and (11.0±4.0) ml, significantly improved compared with preoperative levels (all P<0.05). Fifty eight cases with normal sexual function retained sexual function postoperatively and had no retrograde ejaculation. Conclusions: Two micron laser vaporesection plus TURP is efficacious and safe in treating BPH with mild lower urinary tract symptoms and perioperative complications. PMID:26770585

  18. Anti-proliferative effects of qianliening capsules on prostatic hyperplasia in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    ZHONG, XIAOYONG; LIN, JIUMAO; ZHOU, JIANHENG; XU, WEI; HONG, ZHENFENG

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies by our group showed that Qianliening capsules (QC), a clinically proven effective traditional Chinese formulation that has long been used in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), is capable of inhibiting BPH in vivo and in vitro via the promotion of apoptosis, suppression of the EGFR/STAT3 signaling pathway and regulating the expression of sex hormones as well as their receptors. However, the mechanism of its anti-BPH activity has remained to be fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanism underlying the anti-proliferative effect of QC in vivo and in vitro. Castrated male Sprage-Dawley (SD) rats where subcutaneously injected with testosterone propionate and the WPMY-1 cell line was stimulated with basic fibroblast growth factor in order to generate BPH in vivo and in vitro separately, both of which were then subjected to QC treatment. Finasteride was used as a positive control drug for the in vivo study. In the present study, it was found that treatment with QC or finasteride significantly reduced the prostatic index (PI=prostate wet weight/body weight × 100) in a rat model of BPH (P<0.05). In addition, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses showed that QC or finasteride treatment significantly inhibited model construction-induced upregulation of expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 in prostatic tissues of rats with BPH (P<0.05). The in vitro study further proved that QC exhibited anti-proliferative properties via G1/S cell cycle arrest in the WPMY-1 cell line, as evidenced by colony formation, flow cytometric cell cycle, immunoblot and RT-PCR analyses. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that inhibition of cell proliferation via G1/S cell cycle arrest may be one of the underlying mechanisms of the effect of QC on BPH. PMID:25825141

  19. The natural history of benign prostatic hyperplasia: what have we learned in the last decade?

    PubMed

    Kirby, R S

    2000-11-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) frequently has a significant detrimental impact on a patient's quality of life. If the disease is left untreated, it may progress in severity, leading to recurrent bladder infections, bladder calculi, and acute urinary retention (AUR), necessitating surgical treatment. The Forth Valley, Scotland, study reported that 14% of men aged 40 to 50 years have BPH. This increases to 43% of men >60 years old. BPH has been shown to be nearly as prevalent as hypertension and diabetes among patients seeking treatment for erectile dysfunction. The effects of BPH on quality of life include lack of sleep, anxiety, reduced mobility, interference with leisure activities and usual daily activities, and a compromised sense of well-being. Three symptoms are associated with an increased risk of AUR in men with BPH: a reduction in the force of the urinary stream, a sensation of incomplete bladder emptying, and an enlarged prostate gland on digital rectal examination. Age is a strong independent risk factor for the development of AUR. Transurethral resection of the prostate was more effective than watchful waiting in preventing AUR, as shown in the Veteran's Affairs Cooperative Study. Data from the Olmsted County study revealed that urinary flow decreases and prostate size increases with advanced age. This study also showed that lower urinary tract symptoms have a negative impact on parameters of physical and mental aspects of health. More recently, studies have shown that medical treatment with 5alpha-reductase inhibitors and possibly also alpha-blockers may alter the natural history and progression of BPH.

  20. The natural history of benign prostatic hyperplasia: what have we learned in the last decade?

    PubMed

    Kirby, R S

    2000-11-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) frequently has a significant detrimental impact on a patient's quality of life. If the disease is left untreated, it may progress in severity, leading to recurrent bladder infections, bladder calculi, and acute urinary retention (AUR), necessitating surgical treatment. The Forth Valley, Scotland, study reported that 14% of men aged 40 to 50 years have BPH. This increases to 43% of men >60 years old. BPH has been shown to be nearly as prevalent as hypertension and diabetes among patients seeking treatment for erectile dysfunction. The effects of BPH on quality of life include lack of sleep, anxiety, reduced mobility, interference with leisure activities and usual daily activities, and a compromised sense of well-being. Three symptoms are associated with an increased risk of AUR in men with BPH: a reduction in the force of the urinary stream, a sensation of incomplete bladder emptying, and an enlarged prostate gland on digital rectal examination. Age is a strong independent risk factor for the development of AUR. Transurethral resection of the prostate was more effective than watchful waiting in preventing AUR, as shown in the Veteran's Affairs Cooperative Study. Data from the Olmsted County study revealed that urinary flow decreases and prostate size increases with advanced age. This study also showed that lower urinary tract symptoms have a negative impact on parameters of physical and mental aspects of health. More recently, studies have shown that medical treatment with 5alpha-reductase inhibitors and possibly also alpha-blockers may alter the natural history and progression of BPH. PMID:11074195

  1. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Using Sonablate® Devices for the Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Localized Prostate Cancer: 18-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Toyoaki

    2011-09-01

    From 1993 to 2010, we have treated 156 patients benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 1,052 patients localized prostate cancer high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Four different HIFU devices, SonablateR-200, SonablateR-500, SonablateR-500 version 4 and Sonablate® TCM, have been used for this study. Clinical outcome of HIFU for BPH did not show any superior effects to transurethral resection of the prostate, laser surgery or transurethral vapolization of the prostate. However, HIFU appears to be a safe and minimally invasive therapy for patients with localized prostate cancer, especially low- and intermediate-risk patients. The rate of clinical outcome has significantly improved over the years due to technical improvements in the device.

  2. Dietary supplements for benign prostatic hyperplasia: an overview of systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hun; Lim, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Myung-Sunny; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2012-11-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common chronic condition in older men. The aim of this overview of systematic reviews (SRs) is to summarise the current evidence on the efficacy and adverse effects of dietary supplements for treating BPH with lower urinary tract symptoms. We searched 5 electronic databases and relevant overviews without limitations on language or publication status. Six SRs of 195 articles were included in this overview. Serenoa repens was reviewed in 3 studies and no specific effect on BPH symptoms and urinary flow measures was observed. However, β-sitosterol, Pygeum africannum and Cernilton were reviewed in one study each, and significant improvement was observed for all three. All the included compounds have mild and infrequent adverse effects. SRs on β-sitosterol, Pygeum africannum and Cernilton have not been updated since 2000, thus an update of reviews on these compounds will be necessary in the future.

  3. The Epidemiology of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Associated with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: Prevalence and Incident Rates.

    PubMed

    Egan, Kathryn Brigham

    2016-08-01

    This article assesses the reported prevalence and incidence rates for benign prostatic hyperplasia and lower urinary tract symptoms (BPH/LUTS) by age, symptom severity, and race/ethnicity. BPH/LUTS prevalence and incidence rates increase with increasing age and vary by symptom severity. The BPH/LUTS relationship is complex due to several factors. This contributes to the range of reported estimates and difficulties in drawing epidemiologic comparisons. Cultural, psychosocial, economic, and/or disease awareness and diagnosis factors may influence medical care access, symptom reporting and help-seeking behaviors among men with BPH/LUTS. However, these factors and their epidemiologic association with BPH/LUTS have not been thoroughly investigated. PMID:27476122

  4. The effect of immediate surgical bipolar plasmakinetic transurethral resection of the prostate on prostatic hyperplasia with acute urinary retention

    PubMed Central

    He, Le-Ye; Zhang, Yi-Chuan; He, Jing-Liang; Li, Liu-Xun; Wang, Yong; Tang, Jin; Tan, Jing; Zhong, Kuangbaio; Tang, Yu-Xin; Long, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of immediate surgical bipolar plasmakinetic transurethral resection of the prostate (PK-TURP) for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with acute urinary retention (AUR). We conducted a retrospective analysis of clinical data of BPH patients who received PK-TURP. A total of 1126 BPH patients were divided into AUR (n = 348) and non-AUR groups (n = 778). After the urethral catheters were removed, the urine white blood cell (WBC) count in the AUR group significantly increased compared with the non-AUR group (P < 0.01). However, there was no significant difference in international prostate symptom score, painful urination, and maximal urinary flow rate. The duration of hospitalization of the AUR group was longer than that of the non-AUR group (P < 0.001). A total of 87.1% (303/348) patients in the AUR group and 84.1% (654/778) patients in the non-AUR group completed all of the postoperative follow-up visits. The incidence of urinary tract infection in the AUR group within 3 months after surgery was significantly higher than that in the non-AUR group (P < 0.01). The incidence of temporary urinary incontinence in the AUR group did not exhibit significant difference. During 3–12 months after surgery, there were no significant differences in major complications between the two groups. Multivariate regression analyses showed that age, postvoid residual, maximal urinary flow rate, diabetes, and hypertension, but not the presence of AUR, were independent predictors of IPSS post-PK-TURP. In conclusion, immediate PK-TURP surgery on patients accompanied by AUR was safe and effective. PMID:26178398

  5. Effect of transurethral split of the prostate using a double-columnar balloon catheter for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weiguo; Huang, Zheng; Xiao, Guofeng; Qin, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to evaluate the long-term therapeutic effect of transurethral split of the prostate (TUSP) with a newly improved double-columnar balloon catheter on patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Total 565 BPH patients (mean age 73.6 years, range 46–94 years) who underwent TUSP surgery between January 2006 and January 2015 were included. Patient's baseline characteristics, prostate size, PSA, preoperative and postoperative maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), postvoid residual (PVR), international prostate symptoms score (IPSS) and quality of life (QOL) score, perioperative data and postoperative complications were recorded. The mean preoperative prostates size was 48.6 ± 8.2 mL (range 33–230 mL), and the PSA level was 0.8 to 18.6 ng/mL. The mean duration of TUSP procedure from the catheter localization to the split of capsula prostatica was ∼10 minutes. After surgery, the mean Qmax increased from 5.2 ± 1.4 to 12.8 ± 2.2 mL/s (P < 0.001). Patients had improved mean PVR, QOL score, and IPSS after TUSP (76 ± 8 vs 20 ± 8.5 mL, 4.6 ± 0.2 vs 1.4 ± 0.3, and 20.2 ± 4.4 vs 6.6 ± 1.1, respectively, all P < 0.001). Until September 2014, 328 patients were successfully followed up for a long-term period of 38 to 99 months. There was no other case of recurrence with dysuria despite 2 recurrent cases. The TUSP with a double-columnar balloons catheter was a safe and long-term efficient treatment for BPH, with minimal invasion, short operative time, few postoperative complications, and low recurrence rate. PMID:27749528

  6. Systematic review and meta-analysis of Transurethral Needle Ablation in symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bouza, Carmen; López, Teresa; Magro, Angeles; Navalpotro, Lourdes; Amate, José María

    2006-01-01

    Background Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) constitutes a major clinical problem. Minimally invasive therapies for the treatment of symptomatic BPH include Transurethral Needle Ablation (TUNA), but it is unclear what impact this technique has on the disease and its role among other currently available therapeutic options. The objective of this study is to ascertain the efficacy and safety of TUNA in the treatment of BPH. Methods Systematic review of the literature until January 2005 and meta-analysis of clinical studies assessing TUNA in symptomatic BPH. Studies were critically appraised. Estimates of effect were calculated according to the random-effects model. Results 35 studies (9 comparative, 26 non-comparative) were included. Although evidence was limited by methodological issues, the analysis of relevant outcomes indicates that while TUNA significantly improves BPH parameters with respect to baseline, it does not reach the same level of efficacy as TURP in respect to all subjective and objective variables. Further, its efficacy declines in the long-term with a rate of secondary-treatment significantly higher than of TURP [OR: 7.44 (2.47, 22.43)]. Conversely, TUNA seems to be a relatively safe technique and shows a lower rate of complications than TURP [OR:0.14 (0.05, 0.14)] with differences being particularly noteworthy in terms of postoperative bleeding and sexual disorders. Likewise, TUNA has fewer anesthetic requirements and generates a shorter hospital stay than TURP [WMD: -1.9 days (-2.75, -1.05)]. Scarce data and lack of replication of comparisons hinder the assessment of TUNA vs. other local therapies. No comparisons with medical treatment were found. Conclusion The body of evidence on which TUNA has been introduced into clinical practice is of only moderate-low quality. Available evidence suggest that TUNA is a relatively effective and safe technique that may eventually prove to have a role in selected patients with symptomatic BPH. TUNA

  7. Fixed-dose combination therapy with dutasteride and tamsulosin in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Dimitropoulos, Konstantinos; Gravas, Stavros

    2016-02-01

    Despite their multifactorial etiology, male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) have been traditionally associated with benign prostatic enlargement (BPE) because of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Several pharmaceutical therapies have been used to manage LUTS, with α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists (α1-blockers) and inhibitors of 5α-reductase (5α-RIs) representing the most commonly prescribed agents currently in use for LUTS treatment. Due to their different modes of action, combined use of α1-blockers and 5α-RIs has been proven to offer more optimal control of symptoms and better associated quality of life, even though higher rates of adverse events have been shown. Following previous studies on the separate administration of dutasteride and tamsulosin, a fixed-dose combination capsule of tamsulosin 0.4 mg and dutasteride 0.5 mg has been approved and released for clinical use in men with BPH. The present review aims to discuss the rationale behind the combined use of tamsulosin and dutasteride for treating male LUTS, and to present the available data on the role of combination therapy in the management of BPH-related symptoms in terms of efficacy and safety. Special attention is given to the impact of combination treatment on the prevention of clinical progression of BPH. Cost-effectiveness of fixed-dose combination and patients' adherence to treatment are also discussed. PMID:26834837

  8. Fixed-dose combination therapy with dutasteride and tamsulosin in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Dimitropoulos, Konstantinos; Gravas, Stavros

    2016-02-01

    Despite their multifactorial etiology, male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) have been traditionally associated with benign prostatic enlargement (BPE) because of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Several pharmaceutical therapies have been used to manage LUTS, with α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists (α1-blockers) and inhibitors of 5α-reductase (5α-RIs) representing the most commonly prescribed agents currently in use for LUTS treatment. Due to their different modes of action, combined use of α1-blockers and 5α-RIs has been proven to offer more optimal control of symptoms and better associated quality of life, even though higher rates of adverse events have been shown. Following previous studies on the separate administration of dutasteride and tamsulosin, a fixed-dose combination capsule of tamsulosin 0.4 mg and dutasteride 0.5 mg has been approved and released for clinical use in men with BPH. The present review aims to discuss the rationale behind the combined use of tamsulosin and dutasteride for treating male LUTS, and to present the available data on the role of combination therapy in the management of BPH-related symptoms in terms of efficacy and safety. Special attention is given to the impact of combination treatment on the prevention of clinical progression of BPH. Cost-effectiveness of fixed-dose combination and patients' adherence to treatment are also discussed.

  9. [One-week effects of Tamsulosin on benign prostatic hyperplasia assessed with a daily symptom score].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Masayuki; Egawa, Shin; Ikemoto, Isao; Nakajo, Hiroshi; Hatano, Takashi; Kira, Shinichiro; Mizuo, Toshihiko; Kagami, Yutaka

    2009-04-01

    The early effects of Tamsulosin within one week of administration on lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were investigated. Patients with newly diagnosed BPH were randomized into a Tamsulosin group and a Eviprostat group. Changes in subjective symptoms daily for 7 days after the start of administration and in the 4th week (8 times in total) were evaluated using seven symptoms in the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and the quality of life (QOL) index entered in a self-scoring diary kept by the patients daily. In the Tamsulosin group, the IPSS total score showed significant improvements. Significant improvements were observed in the incomplete emptying and frequency scores from the day after the start of administration, in the intermittence and straining scores from day 2, in the urgency and weak stream scores from day 3 and in the nocturia score from day 5. The QOL index significantly improved on day 7. In comparison with Eviprostat, Tamsulosin showed a stronger improvement tendency in the total IPSS, voiding symptoms score and incomplete emptying score and the difference was significant. The difference between the two groups was especially marked for the intermittence and weak stream scores and Tamsulosin showed significantly better early effects. Tamsulosin also showed significantly better early effects than Eviprostat in the QOL index. In conclusion, it was clear that Tamsulosin caused significant improvement in lower urinary tract symptoms associated with BPH as a whole from a very early stage within one week after administration.

  10. Fixed-dose combination therapy with dutasteride and tamsulosin in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Dimitropoulos, Konstantinos; Gravas, Stavros

    2016-01-01

    Despite their multifactorial etiology, male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) have been traditionally associated with benign prostatic enlargement (BPE) because of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Several pharmaceutical therapies have been used to manage LUTS, with α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists (α1-blockers) and inhibitors of 5α-reductase (5α-RIs) representing the most commonly prescribed agents currently in use for LUTS treatment. Due to their different modes of action, combined use of α1-blockers and 5α-RIs has been proven to offer more optimal control of symptoms and better associated quality of life, even though higher rates of adverse events have been shown. Following previous studies on the separate administration of dutasteride and tamsulosin, a fixed-dose combination capsule of tamsulosin 0.4 mg and dutasteride 0.5 mg has been approved and released for clinical use in men with BPH. The present review aims to discuss the rationale behind the combined use of tamsulosin and dutasteride for treating male LUTS, and to present the available data on the role of combination therapy in the management of BPH-related symptoms in terms of efficacy and safety. Special attention is given to the impact of combination treatment on the prevention of clinical progression of BPH. Cost-effectiveness of fixed-dose combination and patients’ adherence to treatment are also discussed. PMID:26834837

  11. Smoking habits and benign prostatic hyperplasia: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; Fu, Shi; Chen, Yanbo; Chen, Qi; Gu, Meng; Wang, Zhong

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have warned against the promoting effects of cigarette smoking on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). In contrast, some have argued that smoking confers a protective effect regarding BPH, while others have observed an aggravated effect. Thus, we performed this meta-analysis to determine whether cigarette use is associated with BPH risk.To identify articles from observational studies of relevance, a search was performed concurrent to March 21, 2016, on PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane, EBSCO, and EMBASE databases. Random-effect model, according to the heterogeneity, was calculated to reveal the relative risks (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs).Eight articles were included in this meta-analysis, representing data for 44,100 subjects, of which 5221 (11.8%) had BPH as defined according to the criteria. Seven reports are concerned with analysis between nonsmokers and ex-smokers, in which no significant difference was observed (RR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.94-1.05). Another meta-analysis of 7 studies indicated an observable trend, but without significant difference between groups of nonsmokers and current smokers (RR = 1.17, 95% CI 0.98-1.41). Between groups of heavy (6 articles; RR = 1.02, 95% CI 0.84-1.24) and light smokers (5 articles; RR = 0.90, 95% CI 0.71-1.15), again no significant difference appears. Finally, we combined individuals as never-smokers and ever-smokers and still found no significant difference between the 2 groups of patients (RR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.92-1.15). Sensitivity analysis was displayed and confirmed the stability of the present results.Combined evidence from observational studies shows no significant association between cigarette smoking and BPH risk, either for ex-smokers or for current smokers. The trend of elevated BPH risk from smoking was observed only in current smokers compared with nonsmokers, while marginal significance was observed in comparing ever-smokers with never-smokers in

  12. Smoking habits and benign prostatic hyperplasia: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; Fu, Shi; Chen, Yanbo; Chen, Qi; Gu, Meng; Wang, Zhong

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have warned against the promoting effects of cigarette smoking on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). In contrast, some have argued that smoking confers a protective effect regarding BPH, while others have observed an aggravated effect. Thus, we performed this meta-analysis to determine whether cigarette use is associated with BPH risk.To identify articles from observational studies of relevance, a search was performed concurrent to March 21, 2016, on PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane, EBSCO, and EMBASE databases. Random-effect model, according to the heterogeneity, was calculated to reveal the relative risks (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs).Eight articles were included in this meta-analysis, representing data for 44,100 subjects, of which 5221 (11.8%) had BPH as defined according to the criteria. Seven reports are concerned with analysis between nonsmokers and ex-smokers, in which no significant difference was observed (RR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.94-1.05). Another meta-analysis of 7 studies indicated an observable trend, but without significant difference between groups of nonsmokers and current smokers (RR = 1.17, 95% CI 0.98-1.41). Between groups of heavy (6 articles; RR = 1.02, 95% CI 0.84-1.24) and light smokers (5 articles; RR = 0.90, 95% CI 0.71-1.15), again no significant difference appears. Finally, we combined individuals as never-smokers and ever-smokers and still found no significant difference between the 2 groups of patients (RR = 1.03, 95% CI 0.92-1.15). Sensitivity analysis was displayed and confirmed the stability of the present results.Combined evidence from observational studies shows no significant association between cigarette smoking and BPH risk, either for ex-smokers or for current smokers. The trend of elevated BPH risk from smoking was observed only in current smokers compared with nonsmokers, while marginal significance was observed in comparing ever-smokers with never-smokers in

  13. Effect of Mahayavanala Roma Kshara and Dhanyaka Gokshura Ghrita in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Vasava, Yogesh R; Bhuyan, Chaturbhuja; Rajagopala, Manjusha; Gupta, S K; Dudhamal, T S

    2010-07-01

    Vatastheela is a disease of Mutravahasrotasa, one among the 12 types of Mutraghata disorders elaborated by Sushruta in his seminal work, the Sushruta Samhita. Vatastheela, as described in Ayurveda, closely resembles benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) of modern medicine in its signs and symptoms. It is a senile disorder and chiefly affects individuals above the age of 40 years. The symptoms are those of bladder outflow obstruction, with increased frequency of micturition, dribbling, hesitancy, and the features of chronic urinary retention. Surgical management has been accepted as the standard management but is associated with many disadvantages as well as complications, which may not be acceptable at this age. Conservative management with modern medicines is also not free from side effects. So, in this age-group, there is a need for much safer alternative method of management. In this regard, many works have been carried out and shown that the Ayurvedic approach, using natural medicines, is a far better approach. We carried out a comparative study of Mahayavanala Roma Kshara (MRK) and Dhanyaka Gokshura Ghrita (DGG), which are the compounds prescribed for Mutraghata in Ayurvedic literature. The patients were randomly selected from the OPD and IPD of IPGT and RA hospital, Jamnagar, Gujarat, and divided into two groups. In first group, one (500 mg) capsule of MRK was given twice a day with lukewarm water for 45 days; in second group, 10 gm of DGG was given orally twice a day with lukewarm water for 45 days. DGG showed significantly greater relief in the subjective parameters as per International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS) than MRK. However, reduction in the size of the prostate and in the volume of the post-void residual urine was found much better in the MRK group. PMID:22131735

  14. Preventive effects of lignan extract from flax hulls on experimentally induced benign prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Jean-François; Hidalgo, Sophie; Simons, Rudy; Verbruggen, Marian

    2014-06-01

    Consumption of diet rich in lignans may decrease the risk of some chronic hormonal conditions such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This study investigated whether a lignan-rich extract from flaxseed hulls, LinumLife EXTRA (LLE), could prevent BPH using the testosterone propionate (TP)-induced BPH rat model. Male Wistar-Unilever rats were randomly divided into four groups of 12 rats each: a negative control group fed with control diet and receiving daily subcutaneous injections of corn oil without TP, and three groups fed with control diet (positive control), diet containing 0.5% LLE (LLE 0.5) or 1.0% LLE (LLE 1.0) and receiving daily subcutaneous injections of TP in corn oil. Treatments with diets started 2 weeks before the induction of BPH and were carried out for 5 consecutive weeks. The influence of TP and LLE on body weight (BW), food and water consumptions, and enterolactone (ENL) levels in serum and urine of rats was examined at the end of the 5-week treatment period. TP significantly diminished the mean body weight gain (MBWG) of positive control rats and their food and water consumptions while LLE reduced significantly this MBWG reduction in a dose-dependent manner. The lignan-rich extract significantly inhibited TP-induced prostate size ratio (prostate weight/rat BW) increase in comparison with positive controls (P<.001). This effect was dose dependent. Higher serum and urine levels of ENL correlated well with the dose of extract provided to rats. It was concluded that the lignan-rich flaxseed hull extract prevented the TP-induced BPH indicating it might be beneficial in the prevention of BPH.

  15. Investigating the effect of tamsulosin on the measurement of bladder wall thickness and International Prostate Symptom Score in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Eghbali, Kamyar; Shayegan, Mohammad Reza; Kianoush, Sina

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: According to previous studies, aging, gender, bladder volume and pathological states, such as bladder outflow obstruction, affect bladder wall thickness (BWT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between BWT and the International Prostatic Symptom Score (IPSS) in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) before and after tamsulosin treatment. Methods: In this study, 60 BPH patients were included. After obtaining informed consent, data were gathered using questionnaires to determine IPSS. After that, prostate-specific antigen was measured and a clinical examination, including a digital rectal examination, was performed for all patients. BWT was determined by transabdominal ultrasound. Finally, all patients were treated with tamsulosin (0.4 mg/day) for 2 months. After completing treatment, the IPSS and BWT were measured again and compared with the initial findings. Results: In total, 44 patients completed treatment. Patients aged 61.7 ± 9.2 years old. The mean ± standard deviation of IPSS and BWT were 14.6 ± 5.0 and 5.36 ± 1.28 mm before treatment, while they significantly (p < 0.0001) decreased to 8.2 ± 4.7 and 4.69 ± 1.23 mm, respectively, after treatment. Chi-square test showed that the decrease in BWT was significantly correlated with the improvement in IPSS (p = 0.002; r = 0.449). Conclusion: After treatment with tamsulosin, patients experienced a reduction in their BWT which was significantly correlated with improvement in their IPSS. We conclude that transabdominal evaluation of BWT could be included in the follow-up assessment in BPH. PMID:23766833

  16. Experience with the combination of dutasteride and tamsulosin in the long-term management of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chughtai, Bilal; Elterman, Dean S.; Lee, Richard; Te, Alexis E.

    2012-01-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) commonly affect older men. These bothersome symptoms can lead to a decreased quality of life. Currently, two classes of drugs – α-adrenergic blockers and 5α-reductase inhibitors – are prescribed to treat LUTS secondary to BPH. Due to their different mechanisms of action, these medications work in a synergistic manner. Trials of combination therapy have been conducted to assess its effect compared with monotherapy. Current data support combination therapy in men with moderately enlarged prostates and moderate to severe symptoms. PMID:23024707

  17. Effect of D-004, a lipid extract from Cuban royal palm fruit, on histological changes of prostate hyperplasia induced with testosterone in rats.

    PubMed

    Noa, M; Arruzazabala, M L; Carbajal, D; Más, R; Molina, V

    2005-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the nonmalignant, uncontrolled growth of prostate gland cells and stroma leading to difficulty in urinating. Lipid extracts from Saw palmetto (Arecaceae) fruits are used to treat BPH. The Cuban royal palm (Roystonea regia) is a member of this family and D-004, a lipid extract from its fruits, prevents prostate hyperplasia (PH) induced with testosterone, as opposed to dihydrotestosterone, in rodents. This study investigated whether D-004 could prevent the histological features of testosterone-induced PH in rats. Rats were distributed into six groups (10 rats per group): A negative control group receiving subcutaneous injections of soy oil and treated with vehicle, and five groups injected subcutaneously with testosterone and treated with the vehicle (positive control), D-004 (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) or Saw palmetto (400 mg/kg). Treatments were given orally for 14 days. At sacrifice, prostates were removed and processed for light microscopy. The histopathological findings of PH were assessed according to a score-chart protocol. D-004 200 and 400 mg/kg, but not 100 mg/kg, significantly and moderately in a dose-dependent manner prevented prostate enlargement and the testosterone-induced histological changes. Compared with positive controls, D-004 200 and 400 mg/kg inhibited prostate size increases and the histological score up to 56.1% and 60.7%, respectively, while Saw palmetto 400 mg/kg reduced such variables by 45.8% and 49.0%, respectively. The effects of D-004 400 mg/kg on the histological changes, not on prostate size, were greater (p < 0.05) than those of Saw palmetto. D-004 and Saw palmetto did not affect body weight values. In conclusion, D-004 200 and 400 mg/kg administered orally for 14 days prevented the increase of prostate size and the testosterone-induced histological changes in rats, its effects being comparable or mildly better than those of Saw palmetto. These results extend previous data showing preventive

  18. Moxibustion as an adjuvant for benign prostatic hyperplasia with lower urinary tract symptoms: a protocol for a parallel-group, randomised, controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Yoon; Nam, Jong-Kil; Lee, Sang-Don; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Han, Ji-Yeon; Yun, Young-Ju; Lee, Ji-Hye; Park, Hye-lim; Park, Seong-Ha; Kwon, Jung-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to explore the feasibility of using moxibustion as a supplementary intervention and to assess the sample size for verifying the effectiveness and safety of integrative treatment involving moxibustion compared with conventional treatment for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia accompanying moderate to severe lower urinary tract symptoms. Methods and analysis A total of 60 patients diagnosed with benign prostatic hyperplasia by a urologist based on prostate size, prostate-specific antigen and clinical symptoms will participate of their own free will; urologists will monitor the patients and evaluate their symptoms. The patients will be randomised to either a conventional group or an integrative group with a 1:1 allocation according to computer-generated random numbers concealed in opaque, sealed, sequentially numbered envelopes. Watchful waiting or oral medication including α blocker, 5α-reductase inhibitors or antimuscarinic drugs will be offered as conventional treatment. Integrative treatment will include moxibustion therapy in addition to the conventional treatment. The moxibustion therapy will be conducted twice a week for 4 weeks on the bilateral acupoints SP6, LR3 and CV4 by a qualified Korean medical doctor. The primary outcome will be the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) after eight sessions. The secondary outcomes will be the post-void residual urine volume, the maximum urinary flow rate, IPSS, the results of a Short-Form 36-Question Health Survey after 12 weeks, and the patients’ global impression of changes at each visit. Ethics and dissemination Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. This study was approved by the institutional review boards of both Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital and Pusan National University Korean Medicine Hospital. The trial results will be disseminated through open-access journals and conferences. Trial registration number NCT02051036. PMID

  19. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors for treating erectile dysfunction and lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Albert; Jabbour, Michel; Bulbul, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Many men have coexistent erectile dysfunction (ED) and lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH). Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors are effective for treating both of these conditions independently. In this review we summarise the evidence supporting a link between ED and LUTS/BPH, and the results from key clinical studies related to the use of PDE5 inhibitors for treating both conditions. The results from these studies suggest that men who have both ED and LUTS/BPH, and are concerned about their sexual dysfunction, might benefit from single-agent, holistic treatment with a PDE5 inhibitor. PMID:26413339

  20. Anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative activities of date palm pollen (Phoenix dactylifera) on experimentally-induced atypical prostatic hyperplasia in rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Atypical prostatic hyperplasia (APH) is a pseudoneoplastic lesion that can mimic prostate adenocarcinoma because of its cytologic and architectural features. Suspension of date palm pollen (DPP) is an herbal mixture that is widely used in folk medicine for male infertility. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of DPP suspension and extract on APH-induced rats. Methods APH was induced in adult castrated Wistar rats by both s.c. injection of testosterone (0.5 mg/rat/day) and smearing citral on shaved skin once every 3 days for 30 days. Saw palmetto (100mg/kg), DPP suspension (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg), and lyophilized DPP extract (150,300 and 600 mg/kg) were given orally daily for 30 days. All medications were started 7 days after castration and along with testosterone and citral. Results The histopathological feature in APH-induced prostate rats showed evidence of hyperplasia and inflammation. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that the expressions of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, IGF-1 and clusterin were increased, while the expression of TGF-β1 was decreased that correlates with presence of inflammation. Moreover, histopathological examination revealed increased cellular proliferation and reduced apoptosis in ventral prostate. Both saw palmetto and DPP treatment has ameliorated these histopathological and immunohistochemical changes in APH-induced rats. These improvements were not associated with reduction in the prostatic weight that may be attributed to the persistence of edema. Conclusion DPP may have a potential protective effect in APH-induced Wistar rats through modulation of cytokine expression and/or upregulation of their autocrine/paracrine receptors. PMID:22195697

  1. Prostate elastography: preliminary in vivo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, S. K.; Feleppa, E. J.; Kalisz, A.; Ramchandran, S.; Ennis, R. D.; Lizzi, Frederick L.; Wuu, C.-S.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2005-04-01

    We report preliminary results from our investigation of in vivo prostate elastography. Fewer than 50% of all prostate cancers are typically visible in current clinical imaging modalities. Elastography displays a map of strain that results when tissue is externally compressed. Thus, elastography is ideal for imaging prostate cancers because they are generally stiffer than the surrounding tissue and stiffer regions usually exhibit lower strain in elastograms. In our study, digital radio-frequency (RF) ultrasound echo data were acquired from prostate-cancer patients undergoing brachytherapy. Seed placement is guided by a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe, which is held in a mechanical fixture. The probe can be moved in XYZ directions and tilted. The probe face, in contact with the rectal wall, is used to apply a compression force to the immediately adjacent prostate. We also used a water-filled (acoustic) coupling balloon to compress the prostate by increasing the water volume inside the balloon. In each scan plane (transverse), we acquired RF data from successive scans at the scanner frame rate as the deformation force on the rectal wall was continuously increased. We computed strain using 1D RF cross-correlation analysis. The compression method based on fixture displacement produced low-noise elastograms that beautifully displayed the prostate architecture and emphasized stiff areas. Balloon-based compression also produced low-noise elastograms. Initial results demonstrate that elastography may be useful in the detection and evaluation of prostate cancers, occult in conventional imaging modalities.

  2. Age and Obesity Promote Methylation and Suppression of 5-Alpha Reductase 2–Implications for Personalized Therapy in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bechis, Seth K.; Otsetov, Alexander G.; Ge, Rongbin; Wang, Zongwei; Vangel, Mark G.; Wu, Chin-Lee; Tabatabaei, Shahin; Olumi, Aria F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose 5α reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) are a main modality of treatment for men suffering from symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Over 30% of men do not respond to the therapeutic effects of 5ARIs. We have found that 1/3 of adult prostate samples do not express 5AR2 secondary to epigenetic modifications. We sought to evaluate whether 5AR2 expression in BPH specimens of symptomatic men was linked to methylation of the 5AR2 gene promoter and identify associations with age, obesity, cardiac risk factors, and prostate specific antigen (PSA). Materials and Methods Prostate samples from men undergoing transurethral prostate resection were used. 5AR2 protein expression and gene promoter methylation status were determined by common assays. Clinical variables included age, body mass index (BMI), hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, PSA, and prostate volume. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were performed, followed by stepwise logistic regression modeling. Results BMI and age were significantly correlated with methylation of the 5AR2 gene promoter (p<0.05), whereas prostate volume, PSA, or use of BPH medication were not. Methylation was highly correlated with 5AR protein expression (p<0.0001). In a predictive model, both increasing age and BMI significantly predicted methylation status and protein expression (p<0.01). Conclusions Increasing age and BMI correlate with increased 5AR2 gene promoter methylation and decreased protein expression in men with symptomatic BPH. These results highlight the interplay between age, obesity and gene regulation. Our findings suggest the presence of an individualized epigenetic signature for symptomatic BPH, which may be important for choosing appropriate personalized treatment options. PMID:25916673

  3. Safety and efficacy of a novel Prunus domestica extract (Sitoprin, CR002) on testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Swaroop, Anand; Bagchi, Manashi; Kumar, Pawan; Preuss, Harry G; Bagchi, Debasis

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of a novel Prunus domestica bark extract (Sitoprin, CR002) was investigated on testosterone propionate (TP)-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in male Wistar rats. BPH was induced by daily subcutaneous administration of TP (3.0 mg/kg) over a period of 15 days (interim sacrifice group) and for an additional 21 days (terminal sacrifice group). We evaluated the dose-dependent efficacy (0, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight/day) of CR002 and a control group against BPH, and compared with a reference standard Prunus africana extract (CR001). Extensive clinical examinations were carried out on days 1, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 of treatment period to determine the onset, duration and severity of clinical signs. Clinical pathology, hematology, biochemistry and histopathology were performed on days 15 and 35, prior to necropsy. Animals were fasted overnight prior to blood collection. Prostate glands and tissues were examined. On day 36, histopathology of ventral prostrate of control rats demonstrates single layer of columnar mucin secreting epithelial cells along with a lumen occupied with eosinophilic secretion. In contrast, CR002 and CR001 groups (100 and 200 mg/kg/day) exhibited no hyperplasia and proliferation of epithelial cells. Prostate histopathology of these treated groups was comparable with control rats. The hyperplasia and hypertrophy of prostrate was reduced to single-layered cell indicating the efficacy of CR002 and CR001. Overall, results demonstrate that CR002 exhibits therapeutic efficacy/activity in TP-induced BPH in rats, which is comparable to CR001.

  4. [Effect of biologically active substances of animal and plant origin on prooxidant-antioxidant balance in rats with experimental prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Belostotskaia, L I; Nikitchenko, Iu V; Gomon, O N; Chaĭka, L A; Bondar', V V; Dziuba, V N

    2006-01-01

    The effect of biologically active complexes of animal (prostatilen) and plant (permixon) origin on physiological indices of prostate and prooxidant-antioxidant balance in prostate and blood was studied in rats with the hyperprolactinemia-induced prostatic hyperplasia. It was shown that both prostatilen (1 mg of the total peptides per kg) and permixon (100 mg of Serenoa repens extract per kg) prevent increase in the prostate mass and volume, in the content of lipid hydroperoxides, and in the glutathione peroxidase activity in prostate. Prostatilen, in contrast to permixon, normalized the content of lipid hydroperoxides (increased under hyperplazia conditions) and increases glutathione peroxidase activity (reduced under hyperplazia conditions).

  5. The Changes of Psychometric Profiles after Medical Treatment of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Suggestive of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kang Jun; Lee, Nam Suk; Lee, Yong Seok; Jeong, Woon Jin; Suh, Hong Jin; Kim, Joon Chul; Koh, Jun Sung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship of somatization and depression with the degree of lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostate hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH) and changes in psychometric profiles including somatization and depression after treatment of LUTS/BPH. Methods Subjects were evaluated at baseline and at week 12 following routine treatment for LUTS/BPH using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) to measure the severity of LUTS/BPH, the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS) to measure the severity of OAB, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) to assess depression, and the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 (PHQ-15) to evaluate somatization. The correlation of somatization and depression with the degree of LUTS/BPH symptoms at baseline and changes in somatization and depression after LUTS/BPH treatment were assessed using relevant statistical analyses. Results One hundred and twenty patients agreed to participate in this study, and 101 (84.2%) completed the 12-week trial and responded to the study questionnaires. At baseline, total IPSS score was correlated with PHQ-9 (r=0.475, p=0.005) and PHQ-15 (r=0.596, p<0.001) scores. The results after the 12-week treatment clearly show significant improvement in both PHQ-9 (p <0.001) and PHQ-15 (p=0.019) scores, and the PHQ-9 (r=0.509, p=0.048) and PHQ-15 (r=0.541, p=0.016) scores were positively correlated with total IPSS. Conclusion Our preliminary results indicated that severity of LUTS is correlated with severity of somatization and depression. Further, the improvement of LUTS after treatment may have positive impacts on somatization and depression. PMID:26598585

  6. Development of a doxazosin and finasteride transdermal system for combination therapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Pupe, Carolina Gonçalves; Do Carmo, Flávia Almada; De Sousa, Valéria Pereira; Lopes, Marlene; Abrahim-Vieira, Bárbara; Ribeiro, António José; Veiga, Francisco; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Padula, Cristina; Santi, Patrizia; Cabral, Lucio Mendes

    2013-11-01

    The treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia can be accomplished by the use of different drugs including, doxazosin, an α-1 adrenergic antagonist, and finasteride (FIN), a 5-α reductase inhibitor. Traditionally, treatments using these drugs have been administered as either a mono or combination therapy by the oral route. A transdermal delivery system optimized for doxazosin and FIN combination therapy would provide increased patient adherence and facilitate dose adjustment. Doxazosin base (DB) was prepared from doxazosin mesylate and characterized together with FIN, by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The permeation enhancers, azone and lauric acid, and the gelling agents, hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) and Poloxamer 407 (P407), were evaluated to determine their ability to promote in vitro permeation of drugs through the pig ear epidermis. Successful preparation of DB was confirmed by evaluating the XRD, DSC, and NMR patterns and in vitro studies revealed that 3% (w/w) azone was the best permeation enhancer. When P407 gel was compared with HPC gel, it showed reduced lag time and promoted higher permeation of both drugs. This may be because of the interactions of the former with the stratum corneum, which disorganizes the lipid structure and consequently promotes higher drug permeation.

  7. The prevalence of benign prostatic hyperplasia in mainland China: evidence from epidemiological surveys.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenying; Guo, Yuwen; Zhang, Daoxin; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Xiaonan

    2015-08-26

    The epidemiological characteristics of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) in mainland China are not completely understood. We performed this meta-analysis to assess the prevalence of BPH from 1989 through 2014. A total of 14 articles and 19 datasets were included. The pooled overall prevalence of BPH among men aged 40 years and older was 36.6% [95% CI, 32.3-44.8]. The occurrence rate of BPH in the age groups 40-49 years, 50-59 years, 60-69 years, 70-79 years and 80 years and older was 2.9%, 29.0%, 44.7%, 58.1% and 69.2%, respectively. The pooled occurrence rate of BPH was 41.5% [95% CI, 34.5-48.4] in urban areas and 38.6% [95% CI, 22.7-54.6] in rural areas; this difference in prevalence was not statistically significant [OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 0.97-2.36]. BPH is highly prevalent in mainland China, and its prevalence increased with age. The trend in the prevalence of BPH in mainland China was not steady; the prevalence map based on a geographic information system (GIS) showed an unequal geographic distribution. High-quality surveys on BPH with a larger sample size are needed throughout mainland China to confirm these findings.

  8. [PCA3 AND TMPRSS2:ERG GENES EXPRESSION IN BIOPSIES OF BENIGN PROSTATE HYPERPLASIA, INTRAEPITHELIAL NEOPLASIA, AND PROSTATE CANCER].

    PubMed

    Mikhaylenko, D S; Perepechin, D V; Grigoryeva, M V; Zhinzhilo, T A; Safronova, N Yu; Efremov, G D; Sivkov, A V

    2015-01-01

    Morphological analysis of the biopsies for prostate cancer (PCa) often is a difficult task due to heterogeneity and multifocality of tumors. At the same time, a lot of data exist about the potential molecular genetic markers of PCa. The aim of our study is to determine of PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG genes expression in benign hyperplasia (BPH), low and high grade intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), PCa for revealing of diagnostic value of those genes expression in benign and precancerous changes in prostate. Total RNA was isolated from 53 biopsies, reverse transcription was performed, gene expression was determined by real time PCR (RT-PCR) then deltaCt index was determined as Ct(PCA3)--Ct(KLK3). Average deltaCt and its SD in BPH were 8.28 ± 3.13, low PIN--8.56 ± 2.64, high PIN--8.98 ±1.69, PCa--1.08 ± 2.36. We have demonstarted that deltaCt did not differ in patients with BPH, low and high grade PIN, whereas significantly increased in PCa relative to any of the three groups listed above (p < 0.0001). Expression of TMPRSS2:ERG was absent in BPH, PIN, but it was detected in 40% (4/10) of PCa cases. ROC-analysis showed that the AUC (area under ROC-curve with 95% CI, p < 0.0001) was 0.98 ± 0.02 in the analysis of a combination of overexpression of PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG. Thus, the expression analysis of the PCA3 and chimeric oncogene TMPRSS2:ERG in biopsy cannot be used for differential diagnosis of BPH, low and high grade PIN. However, overexpression of PCA3 and expression of TMPRSS2:ERG are characteristic in PCa. Expression analysis of these genes by the proposed RT-PCR modification at the threshold level deltaCt 3,22 has diagnostic accuracy 90% to detect PCa in biopsy specimens. PMID:26859937

  9. Blood oxygenation level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging during carbogen breathing: differentiation between prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia and correlation with vessel maturity

    PubMed Central

    Di, Ningning; Mao, Ning; Cheng, Wenna; Pang, Haopeng; Ren, Yan; Wang, Ning; Liu, Xinjiang; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can evaluate tumor maturity and preoperatively differentiate prostate cancer (PCa) from benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). Patients and methods BOLD MRI based on transverse relaxation time*-weighted echo planar imaging was performed to assess PCa (19) and BPH (22) responses to carbogen (95% O2 and 5% CO2). The average signal values of PCa and BPH before and after carbogen breathing and the relative increased signal values were computed, respectively. The endothelial-cell marker, CD31, and the pericyte marker, α-smooth muscle actin (mature vessels), were detected with immunofluorescence, and were assessed by microvessel density (MVD) and microvessel pericyte density (MPD). The microvessel pericyte coverage index (MPI) was used to evaluate the degree of vascular maturity. The changed signal from BOLD MRI was correlated with MVD, MPD, and MPI. Results After inhaling carbogen, both PCa and BPH showed an increased signal, but a lower slope was found in PCa than that in BPH (P<0.05). PCa had a higher MPD and MVD but a lower MPI than BPH. The increased signal intensity was positively correlated with MPI in PCa and that in BPH (r=0.616, P=0.011; r=0.658, P=0.002); however, there was no correlation between the increased signal intensity and MPD or MVD in PCa than that in BPH (P>0.05). Conclusion Our results confirmed that the increased signal values induced by BOLD MRI well differentiated PCa from BPH and had a positive correlation with vessel maturity in both of them. BOLD MRI can be utilized as a surrogate marker for the noninvasive assessment of the degree of vessel maturity. PMID:27462169

  10. Effect of silodosin on specific urinary symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia: analysis of international prostate symptom scores in 2 phase III clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Gittelman, Marc C; Marks, Leonard S; Hill, Lawrence A; Volinn, Weining; Hoel, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Pooled results from 2 randomized, placebo-controlled, US phase III studies (NCT00224107, NCT00224120) showed that silodosin, a uroselective α-blocker, significantly improved International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) in men with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This analysis evaluated the effect of silodosin on each symptom assessed by IPSS questionnaire. Materials and methods Study participants (N = 923) were men aged ≥50 years with IPSS ≥13 and Qmax 4–15 mL/s. They received silodosin 8 mg or placebo once daily for 12 weeks. Patient responses to 7 IPSS questions were collected at weeks 0 (baseline), 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 12 and scored on a 6-point scale. Efficacy of silodosin versus placebo was assessed by analysis of covariance. Results For each symptom, the 2 treatment groups had similar mean baseline scores. Decrease in score from baseline (mean ± standard deviation) to last observation was significantly greater with silodosin than with placebo for all symptoms (P < 0.005); symptom improvement with silodosin (versus placebo) was greatest for weak stream (silodosin, −1.1 ± 1.4 versus placebo, −0.5 ± 1.2; P < 0.0001) and smallest for nocturia (silodosin, −0.6 ± 1.1 versus placebo, −0.4 ± 1.2; P = 0.0037). Compared with placebo, silodosin significantly improved nocturia within 1 week (silodosin, −0.5 ± 1.07 versus placebo, −0.3 ± 1.05; P = 0.009) and all other symptoms within 3 to 4 days (P < 0.01). Conclusions Silodosin significantly improved all BPH-associated symptoms assessed by IPSS questionnaire within the first week of treatment. All improvements were maintained over the 12-week study period. PMID:24198629

  11. The role of phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors in treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Umul, Mehmet; Serel, Tekin Ahmet

    2013-12-01

    Phosphodiesterase type-5 (PDE-5) inhibitors are approved as the first line of therapy for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. However, different studies have been performed to study the use of these agents in other areas of urology. There are many studies related to the use of PDE-5 inhibitors as a monotherapy or combination therapy with alpha-blockers for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). It has been shown that contractions induced by various agents or electrical field stimulation in organ bath models of prostatic tissue can be reversed by PDE-5 inhibitors. Age, body mass index and the severity of LUTS are important factors for the selection of patients suitable for this treatment. It has also been reported that the use of PDE-5 inhibitors can relieve the chronic pelvic ischemia and endothelial dysfunction associated with metabolic syndrome. Most of the side effects observed with PDE-5 inhibitors are minimal and tolerable. The use of PDE-5 inhibitors is absolutely contraindicated in patients taking nitrate preparations. A significant interaction has not been observed even when a patient is taking several antihypertensive agents concurrently. Co-administration of alpha-blockers and PDE-5 inhibitors may result in orthostatic hypotension; therefore, patients should be stable on α-blocker therapy before the initiation of the combination therapy, and the initial PDE-5 inhibitor dose should be the lowest possible. In this review, our aim was to evaluate the role of PDE-5 inhibitors in the treatment of LUTS associated with BPH by analyzing the current literature. PMID:26328121

  12. Chinese Urologists' Views of Practice Patterns in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Nationwide Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian; Yu, Pulin; Sun, Zhenqiu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess the compliance of Chinese urologists with China's benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) clinical practice guideline and to explore the diagnosis and therapy modalities for geriatric patients with BPH. Methods A cross-sectional survey study was carried out in 33 medical centers in 11 different cities in China. A total of 190 urologists participated in a survey to record their preferences for diagnostic tests and treatment options for BPH outpatients. Diagnostic test results as well as health care demands were collected by surveying 2,027 outpatients aged 60 years and older. Results The survey response rate was 97.4%. The respondents generally used the diagnostic tests recommended in China's BPH clinical practice guideline at varying rates. The used rates for medical history, ultrasonography, and urinalysis were above 90.0%; that for uroflowmetry was 31.2%. In addition, the rate of use of recommended tests was higher among doctors in the north than among those in the south. Combination therapy with α-adrenoceptor antagonists and 5α-reductase inhibitors was the preferred treatment option for BPH, and was increasingly used with worsening lower urinary tract symptoms. Finasteride was the most prescribed medication (48.0%), followed by tamsulosin (22.7%). Conclusions This study assessed the preferences of urologists in the diagnosis and treatment of BPH, which will serve as an important reference for updating and improving China's current BPH clinical practice guideline. PMID:23346486

  13. Evaluation of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio prior to prostate biopsy to predict biopsy histology: Results of 1836 patients

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Mehmet Ilker; Hamidi, Nurullah; Suer, Evren; Tangal, Semih; Huseynov, Adil; Ibiş, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluate the role of NLR prior to prostate biopsy to predict biopsy histology and Gleason score in patients with prostate cancer. Methods: In this retrospective study, we evaluated data of patients underwent prostate biopsy between May 2005 and March 2015. We collected the following data: age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), biopsy histology, Gleason score (GS) in prostate cancer patients, neutrophil counts, and lymphocyte counts. Patients were grouped as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostate cancer, and prostatitis. The Chi square test was used to compare categorical variables and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied for continuous variables. Results: Data of 1836 patients were investigated. The mean age, total PSA and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) of the population were 66.8 ± 8.17 years, 9.38 ± 4.7 ng/dL, and 3.11 ± 1.71, respectively. Patients were divided as follows: 625 in the group with BPH history, 600 in the prostatitis group, and 611 in the prostate cancer histology group. The mean NLR of the prostatitis group was higher compared to the prostate cancer and BPH groups (p = 0.0001). The mean NLR of the prostate cancer group was significantly higher compared to the BPH group (p = 0.002). The GS 8–10 group had a significantly higher mean NLR compared to GS 5–6 (3.64 vs. 2.54, p = 0.0001) and GS 7 (3.64 vs. 2.58, p = 0.0001) patients. Conclusions: NLR was found to differ with regard to histology of prostate biopsy and higher GS was associated with higher NLR in patients with prostate cancer. However prostatitis prevents the use of NLR in predicting prostate cancer before a prostate biopsy. Also, the retrospective nature and lack of multivariate analysis in this study somewhat limits the relevance of these results. PMID:26600880

  14. Three-year outcome analysis of alpha 1-blocker naftopidil for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia in a prospective multicenter study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Masumori, Naoya; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Shibuya, Akihiko; Miyao, Noriomi; Kunishima, Yasuharu; Iwasawa, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our aim was to prospectively analyze the 3-year outcomes of naftopidil treatment for patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), including those who dropped out during follow-up and had retreatment for BPH after termination of the drug within 3 years. Patients and methods Naftopidil, 50 mg/d or 75 mg/d, was given to 117 patients having BPH aged 50 years and older who had international prostate symptom scores (IPSS) ≥8. They were prospectively followed for 3 years with periodic evaluation. If naftopidil was terminated, the reason was determined. For patients with termination, an outcome survey was done to evaluate the status of retreatment for BPH at 3 years. Results Twenty-five patients (21.4%) continued the same medication for 3 years. The total IPSS, quality of life index, BPH problem index, and maximum flow rate were significantly improved during 3 years. Treatment failure defined as symptomatic progression (an increase in the IPSS of ≥4 points compared to the baseline value), development of acute urinary retention, conversion to other α1-blockers, add-on of a 5α-reductase inhibitor, or conversion to surgery was observed in 41 patients (35.0%). In the univariate analysis, age, prostate volume, and serum prostate-specific antigen were predictors of treatment failure. Of the 50 patients who discontinued naftopidil during the follow-up, only 13 (26%) patients reported that they needed retreatment with α1-blockers and/or surgery within 3 years. Conclusion Long-term efficacy of naftopidil was observed, although older age, increased prostate volume, and elevated prostate-specific antigen at baseline were highly likely to result in treatment failure. Even after termination for various reasons, only a small portion of the patients needed retreatment for BPH within 3 years. PMID:27524886

  15. Tadalafil for lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia: a review of clinical data in Asian men and an update on the mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Igawa, Yasuhiko; Takeda, Masayuki; Yamaguchi, Takafumi; Murakami, Masahiro; Viktrup, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, is approved worldwide for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH-LUTS). The purpose of this narrative review is to summarize the clinical data on tadalafil 5 mg once-daily, primarily focusing on Asian men with BPH-LUTS, and to update the current understanding of the mechanism of action underlying PDE5 inhibition. Findings from studies have demonstrated that PDE5 is highly expressed in the lower urinary tract and supporting vasculature, and that PDE5 inhibition potentially decreases smooth muscle cell proliferation in the prostate, relaxes smooth muscle in the prostate, bladder neck and supporting vasculature, increases blood perfusion to the lower urinary tract, and modulates bladder afferent nerve activity. A total of 11 larger, 12-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies of tadalafil, including four Asian studies, have been conducted globally, enrolling >3000 men with BPH-LUTS. In addition, two long-term (42- and 52-week) studies enrolled 394 Japanese and 428 North American men, respectively, with BPH-LUTS. Overall, tadalafil 5 mg once-daily resulted in significant improvements in the change from baseline to endpoint in total International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS), IPSS storage and voiding subscores, and IPSS quality of life index compared with placebo. Tadalafil was well tolerated and had a favorable safety profile. These findings support tadalafil 5 mg once-daily for treating men, including Asian men, with BPH-LUTS. PMID:26425140

  16. [Operative therapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia: enucleation procedures (HoLEP and ThuVEP)].

    PubMed

    Bach, T; Bschleipfer, T; Muschter, R

    2013-03-01

    Open simple prostatectomy is not only the oldest but also the most effective treatment option for benign prostatic obstruction. Laser enucleation has been established as a transurethral minimally invasive alternative especially but not exclusively for large volume prostates. To date two laser systems, holmium:YAG laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) and thulium:YAG laser vapoenucleation of the prostate (ThuVEP) have been established. Both treatment modalities have similarities in terms of wavelength and surgical technique but differ in the type of energy released (pulsed versus continuous wave). The HoLEP and ThuVEP procedures lead to a significant improvement in symptoms, quality of life, urinary flow and post-void residual urine. Surgery-related morbidity, especially bleeding complications is significantly reduced with laser enucleation. For HoLEP the durability of the results was shown for a follow-up interval of up to 10 years while for ThuVEP the follow-up interval reached 18 months due to the shorter time since clinical implementation of this method. PMID:23429881

  17. Does Metabolic Syndrome or its Components Correlate With Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Telli, Onur; Demirbas, Arif; Kabar, Mucahit; Karagoz, Mehmet Ali; Sarici, Hasmet; Resorlu, Berkan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metabolic Syndrome (MS) has become a global public health and has been suggested to be a risk factor for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS). Studies evaluating the association between the rate of the MS and LUTS often showed controversial results. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to reveal the relevance of MS and its components on the frequency and severity of the LUTS that were seen with Benign Prostate Hyperplasia (BPH) in Turkish men or not. Patients and Methods: In this study, 237 patients referred to urology policlinic with BPH were retrospectively scanned between April 2009 and April 2013. Patients with normal digital rectal examination and the Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) level of ≤ 4 ng/mL were evaluated using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and all the data of the patients' body, including Body Mass Index (BMI), lipid parameters, preprandial blood glucose, and waist circumference. Seventy-four patients (31.3%) with mild IPSS (0-7) was group 1; 97 patients (40.9%) with moderate IPSS (8 - 19) group 2 and 66 patients (27.8%) with severe IPSS (20-35) were defined as group 3. group 4 consisted of 117 healthy controls. Three groups and controls were compared about MS and its components. The diagnosis criteria of The Society of Endocrinology and Metabolism of Turkey were used in MS diagnosis. Also, BMI, lipid parameters, preprandial blood glucose, waist circumference, and blood pressure were used as MS parameters. Results: The average age of patients in group 1 was 69.8 ± 7.2; in group 2, 69.1 ± 7.4; 68.3 ± 7.1 in group 3 and 70.2 ± 7.2 in the control group. Metabolic syndrome was determined at 37 patients (50%) in group 1, 45 patients (46.5%) in group 2, 32 patients (48%) in group 3 and 52 patients (44.4%) in controls and no statistically significant correlation was detected between LUTS and MS in BPH (P = 0.113). In the comparison of the four groups in the point of MS parameters, no significant correlation was

  18. Efficacy of a vaporization-resection of the prostate median lobe enlargement and vaporization of the prostate lateral lobe for benign prostatic hyperplasia using a 120-W GreenLight high-performance system laser: the effect on storage symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Sup; Choi, Sae Woong; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Kim, Sae Woong

    2015-05-01

    GreenLight laser photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) was established as a minimally invasive procedure to treat patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, it may be difficult to achieve adequate tissue removal from a large prostate, particularly those with an enlarged median lobe. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility and clinical effect of a 120-W GreenLight high-performance system laser vaporization-resection for an enlarged prostate median lobe compared with those of only vaporization. A total of 126 patients from January 2010 to January 2014 had an enlarged prostate median lobe and were included in this study. Ninety-six patients underwent vaporization only (VP group), and 30 patients underwent vaporization-resection for an enlarged median lobe (VR group). The clinical outcomes were International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS), quality of life (QOL), maximum flow rate (Q max), and post-void residual urine volume (PVR) assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively between the two groups. The parameters were not significantly different preoperatively between the two groups, except for PVR. Operative time and laser time were shorter in the VR group than those in the VP group. (74.1 vs. 61.9 min and 46.7 vs. 37.8 min; P = 0.020 and 0.013, respectively) and used less energy (218.2 vs. 171.8 kJ, P = 0.025). Improved IPSS values, increased Q max, and a reduced PVR were seen in the two groups. In particular, improved storage IPSS values were higher at 1 and 3 months in the VR group than those in the VP group (P = 0.030 and 0.022, respectively). No significant complications were detected in either group. Median lobe tissue vaporization-resection was complete, and good voiding results were achieved. Although changes in urinary symptoms were similar between patients who received the two techniques, shorter operating time and lower energy were superior with the vaporization-resection technique. In

  19. Modeling of intraluminal heating of biological tissue: implications for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Anvari, B; Rastegar, S; Motamedi, M

    1994-09-01

    A computer model for predicting the thermal response of a biological tissue to different intraluminal heating modalities is presented. A practical application of the model is to calculate the temperature distributions during thermal coagulation of prostate by contact heating and radiative heating. The model uses a two-dimensional axisymmetric diffusion approximation method to calculate the light distribution during radiative heating. The traditional Pennes' bio-heat equation is used to calculate the temperatures in the presence of blood flow. An implicit finite difference scheme with nonuniform grid spacings is used to solve the diffusion equation for light distribution and the bio-heat equation. Model results indicate that the radiative heating of prostate by Nd:YAG (1064 mm) and diode (810 mm) lasers can be a more effective and efficient means of coagulating a large volume of prostate, as compared to contact heating of the tissue. Blood perfusion is shown to provide a considerable heat sink as the laser exposure time is increased. Surface cooling by irrigation during the laser irradiation of tissue is shown to be an effective method for delaying tissue explosion and obtaining a large volume of coagulated tissue. The model also shows that the volume of the coagulated tissue is appreciably altered by a change in the rate of energy deposition.

  20. Effects of stinging nettle root extracts and their steroidal components on the Na+,K(+)-ATPase of the benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hirano, T; Homma, M; Oka, K

    1994-02-01

    The effects of organic-solvent extracts of Urtica dioica (Urticaceae) on the Na+,K(+)-ATPase of the tissue of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were investigated. The membrane Na+,K(+)-ATPase fraction was prepared from a patient with BPH by a differential centrifugation of the tissue homogenate. The enzyme activity was inhibited by 10(-4)-10(-5) M of ouabain. The hexane extract, the ether extract, the ethyl acetate extract, and the butanol extract of the roots caused 27.6-81.5% inhibition of the enzyme activity at 0.1 mg/ml. In addition, a column extraction of stinging nettle roots using benzene as an eluent afforded efficient enzyme inhibiting activity. Steroidal components in stinging nettle roots, such as stigmast-4-en-3-one, stigmasterol, and campesterol inhibited the enzyme activity by 23.0-67.0% at concentrations ranging from 10(-3)-10(-6) M. These results suggest that some hydrophobic constituents such as steroids in the stinging nettle roots inhibited the membrane Na+,K(+)-ATPase activity of the prostate, which may subsequently suppress prostate-cell metabolism and growth. PMID:7510891

  1. A 12-week placebo-controlled double-blind study of prazosin in the treatment of prostatic obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Chapple, C R; Stott, M; Abrams, P H; Christmas, T J; Milroy, E J

    1992-09-01

    A series of 93 normotensive patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and maximum urinary flow rates < 15 ml/s, treated at 2 hospital centres using an identical protocol, was randomly assigned to receive a 12-week course of treatment with prazosin or placebo in a double-blind parallel group trial. A total of 75 patients completed the study and were suitable for the final analysis. Prazosin was administered orally in doses of 0.5 mg and then 1 mg twice daily for 4 days and 2 mg twice daily for the remainder of the trial. Patients on treatment with prazosin exhibited a significantly increased maximum urinary flow rate as compared with placebo, with a significant reduction in maximum voiding detrusor pressure. Prazosin therapy did not produce a significant effect on either frequency or standard parameters of detrusor instability. A double-blind overall assessment of drug efficacy and tolerance significantly favoured prazosin therapy. A total of 30 patients receiving prazosin and 28 receiving placebo reported varied adverse effects. Eighteen patients were excluded from the final analysis, 10 being withdrawn because of adverse effects, 7 on treatment with prazosin and 3 in the placebo group. In long-term usage oral prazosin was well tolerated and appeared to improve obstructed voiding in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  2. A randomized, comparative, open-label study of efficacy and tolerability of alfuzosin, tamsulosin and silodosin in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Manjunatha, R.; Pundarikaksha, H. P.; Madhusudhana, H. R.; Amarkumar, J.; Hanumantharaju, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common and progressive disease affecting elderly males, often associated with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). α1-blockers are the mainstay in symptomatic therapy of BPH. Because of their greater uroselectivity and minimal hemodynamic effects, alfuzosin, tamsulosin, and silodosin are generally preferred. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and tolerability of alfuzosin, tamsulosin, and silodosin in patients with BPH and LUTS. Methods: Ninety subjects with BPH and LUTS were randomized into three groups of thirty in each, to receive alfuzosin sustained release (SR) 10 mg, tamsulosin 0.4 mg, or silodosin 8 mg for 12 weeks. The primary outcome measure was a change in the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), and the secondary outcome measures were changes in individual subjective symptom scores, quality of life score (QLS), and peak flow rate (Qmax) from baseline. The treatment response was monitored at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Results: IPSS improved by 88.18%, 72.12%, and 82.23% in alfuzosin SR, tamsulosin and silodosin groups (P < 0.001) at 12 weeks. Improvement in QLS was >75% in all the three groups (P < 0.001). A significant improvement in Qmax was seen with alfuzosin and tamsulosin (P = 0.025 and P < 0.001) but not with silodosin (P = 0.153). However, the intergroup differences in IPSS, QLS, and Qmax were not significant. Ejaculatory dysfunction was more common with silodosin and corrected QT (QTc) prolongation occurred only with alfuzosin (two subjects) and tamsulosin (three subjects). Conclusion: Alfuzosin, tamsulosin, and silodosin showed similar efficacy in improvement of LUTS secondary to BPH, with good tolerability, acceptability, and minimum hemodynamic adverse effects. Alfuzosin, tamsulosin, and silodosin are comparable in efficacy in symptomatic management of BPH. The occurrence of QTc prolongation in three subjects with tamsulosin in the present study is an unexpected adverse

  3. Association of Variants in Genes Related to the Immune Response and Obesity with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in CLUE II

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, David S.; Peskoe, Sarah B.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Hoffman-Bolton, Judy; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Isaacs, William B.; Smith, Michael W.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic inflammation and obesity may contribute to the genesis or progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and BPH-associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The influence of variants in genes related to these states on BPH has not been studied extensively. Thus, we evaluated the association of 17 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in immune response genes (IL1B, IL6, IL8, IL10, TNF, CRP, TLR4, RNASEL) and genes involved in obesity, including insulin regulation (LEP, ADIPOQ, PPARG, TCF7L2), with BPH. METHODS BPH cases (N=568) and age-frequency matched controls (N=568) were selected from among adult male CLUE II cohort participants who responded in 2000 to a mailed questionnaire. BPH was defined as BPH surgery, use of BPH medications, or symptomatic BPH (American Urological Association Symptom Index Score ≥15). Controls were men who had not had BPH surgery, did not use BPH medications, and whose symptom score was ≤7. Age-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression. RESULTS None of the candidate SNPs was statistically significantly associated with BPH. However, we could not rule out possible weak associations for CRP rs1205 (1082C>T), ADIPOQ rs1501299 (276C>A), PPARG rs1801282 (-49C>G), and TCF7L2 rs7903146 (47833T>C). After summing risk alleles, men with ≥4 had an increased BPH risk compared with those with ≤1 (OR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.10-2.89; Ptrend=0.006). CONCLUSION SNPs in genes related to immune response and obesity, especially in combination, may be associated with BPH. PMID:25224558

  4. Associations between metabolic syndrome and clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia in a northern urban Han Chinese population: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Si-Cong; Xia, Ming; Tang, Jian-Chun; Yan, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Biologic rationales exist for the associations between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, epidemiologic studies have yield inconsistent results. The aim of the present study was to prospectively evaluate the associations of MetS with the risk of BPH. The presence of MetS, the number of MetS components, and the individual MetS components were evaluated. After adjusting for potential confounders, MetS was associated with increased risk of BPH (HR: 1.29; 95% CI, 1.08–1.50; p < 0.001). Compared with subjects without any MetS components, the HRs were 0.88 (95% CI, 0.67–1.09; p = 0.86), 1.18 (95% CI, 0.89–1.47; p = 0.29) and 1.37 (95% CI, 1.08–1.66; p = 0.014) for subjects with 1, 2, or ≥3 MetS components, and there was a biologic gradient between the number of MetS components and the risk of BPH (p-trend < 0.001). Central obesity and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were the two main divers of the associations between these two conditions, with HRs of 1.93 (95% CI, 1.14–2.72; p = 0.001) for central obesity, and 1.56 (95% CI, 1.08–2.04; p = 0.012) for low HDL-C. Our findings support the notion that MetS may be an important target for BPH prevention and intervention. PMID:27653367

  5. The Effect of Seoritae Extract in Men with Mild to Moderate Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Suggestive of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bae, Woong Jin; Park, Hyo Jung; Koo, Hye Cheong; Kim, Do Ram; Ha, U-Syn; Kim, Kang Sup; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Hwang, Sung Yeoun; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of Seoritae extract (SE) on mild to moderate lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Seventy-six subjects with mild to moderate LUTS suggestive of BPH were prospectively recruited from the urology outpatient clinic and assigned to either SE (4200 mg or 6 tablets 3 times a day) or matching placebo. The primary outcome variable, the International Prostatic Symptom Score (IPSS), was evaluated at baseline and at 4 and 12 weeks. Postvoid residual volume (PVR), maximum urine flow rate (Q max), and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were evaluated. IPSSs decreased significantly from baseline to 12 weeks within the SE group. Significant improvements in IPSS voiding scores at 4 and 12 weeks were also observed in the SE group compared to the placebo group. IPSS storage and quality of life scores were also significantly decreased at 12 weeks in the SE group. There was no change in Q max or PVR in both groups after 12 weeks. Administration of SE for 12 weeks led to significant improvements in LUTS, and it can be concerned as a reasonable and safe alternative for men with mild to moderate LUTS. PMID:27382404

  6. Plasmakinetic resection technology for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: evidence from a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng; Kwong, Joey S.W.; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Ruan, Xiao-Lan; Liu, Tong-Zu; Weng, Hong; Guo, Yi; Xu, Chang; Yan, Jin-Zhu; Meng, Xiang-Yu; Wang, Xing-Huan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (PKRP) with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in terms of efficacy and safety. Published RCTs were searched from PubMed, Embase, Science Citation Index, and Cochrane Library up to April 10, 2014. After methodological quality assessment and data extraction, meta-analysis was performed using the STATA 12.0 software. 18 reports of 16 RCTs were included in this analysis. Meta-analyses showed that PKRP significantly improved Qmax at 12 months, but no significant difference was found for other efficacy outcomes. In terms of safety, treatment of PKRP was associated with reduced drop in serum sodium, lower TUR syndrome, reduced need of blood transfusion, clot retention, and shorter catheterization time and hospital stay; in contrast, there were no significant differences in the analysis of operative time, postoperative fever, and long-term postoperative complications. In summary, current evidence suggests that, although PKRP and TURP are both effective for BPH, PKRP is associated with additional potential benefits in efficacy and more favorable safety profile. It may be possible that PKRP may replace the TURP in the future and become a new standard surgical procedure. PMID:26156138

  7. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A New Metabolic Disease of the Aging Male and Its Correlation with Sexual Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Giovanni; Vignozzi, Linda; Lotti, Francesco; Cipriani, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a well-recognized cluster of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors including obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycaemia, closely associated with an increased risk of forthcoming cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Emerging evidence indicates that benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and its related lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) represent other clinical conditions frequently observed in subjects with MetS. Several modifiable factors involved in MetS determinism, such as inadequate diet, lack of physical exercise, and smoking and drinking behaviours are emerging as main contributors to the development of BPH. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying the connection between MetS and BPH have not been completely clarified. MetS and its components, hypogonadism, and prostate inflammation probably play an important role in inducing BPH/LUTS. Although historically considered as a “normal” consequence of the aging process, BPH/LUTS should now be faced proactively, as a preventable disorder of the elderly. Type of diet and level of physical activity are now considered important factors affecting prostate health in the aging male. However, whether physical exercise, weight loss, and modifications of dietary habit can really alter the natural history of BPH/LUTS remains to be determined. Further research is advisable to better clarify these points. PMID:24688539

  8. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Benign Prostate Hyperplasia Patients with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: A Single-Blinded, Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jung-Sheng; Shen, Kun-Hung; Chen, Wen-Chi; Her, Jiann-Shyan; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2011-01-01

    We tested the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients. A total of 42 BPH patients with LUTS were randomly assigned to either the EA group (EG), received 2 Hz EA for 20 min twice/week for a total of twelve treatments, or a sham EA group (CG), received sham EA. The increase of voiding volume, average flow rate, and maximal flow rate in the EG were 32.2 ± 104.4 mL, 1.2 ± 1.6 mL/sec, and 2.3 ± 3.7 mL/sec, respectively, from baseline value (before EA) using the measurement of an uroflowmetry. These increases were greater than −37.9 ± 120.4, −0.22 ± 2.7, and −0.3 ± 4.3, respectively, in the CG (P = .038, .026, and .030, resp.). The changes of prostate special antigen and international prostatic symptom score were not significantly different between two groups (P = .573, .175, resp.), suggesting the clinical improvement of 2 Hz EA was quite limited to the LUTS of patients with BPH. PMID:21584227

  9. Solifenacin/tamsulosin fixed-dose combination therapy to treat lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Dimitropoulos, Konstantinos; Gravas, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) has traditionally focused on the management of benign prostatic obstruction, but the contribution of bladder dysfunction has been recently recognized. Therefore, it is well understood that LUTS have multifactorial etiology and often occur in clusters and not in isolation. Voiding LUTS are highly prevalent in men, but storage LUTS have been proved to be more bothersome. α1-Blockers are the most widely used pharmacologic agents for the treatment of symptoms relating to benign prostatic enlargement due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), while antimuscarinics are the drug class of choice for overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of the two drug classes would be a reasonable approach to treat men with both storage and voiding symptoms, and several short-term studies have proved the efficacy and safety of different combinations with an α1-blocker and an antimuscarinic. Following previous studies on the separate administration of solifenacin and tamsulosin, a fixed-dose combination tablet of tamsulosin oral controlled absorption system (OCAS) 0.4 mg and solifenacin succinate 6 mg has been recently introduced, and the current review evaluates the available data on the use of this fixed-dose combination in the treatment of LUTS in men with BPH.

  10. The Effect of Seoritae Extract in Men with Mild to Moderate Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Suggestive of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Woong Jin; Park, Hyo Jung; Koo, Hye Cheong; Kim, Do Ram; Ha, U-Syn; Kim, Kang Sup; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Hwang, Sung Yeoun

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of Seoritae extract (SE) on mild to moderate lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Seventy-six subjects with mild to moderate LUTS suggestive of BPH were prospectively recruited from the urology outpatient clinic and assigned to either SE (4200 mg or 6 tablets 3 times a day) or matching placebo. The primary outcome variable, the International Prostatic Symptom Score (IPSS), was evaluated at baseline and at 4 and 12 weeks. Postvoid residual volume (PVR), maximum urine flow rate (Qmax), and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were evaluated. IPSSs decreased significantly from baseline to 12 weeks within the SE group. Significant improvements in IPSS voiding scores at 4 and 12 weeks were also observed in the SE group compared to the placebo group. IPSS storage and quality of life scores were also significantly decreased at 12 weeks in the SE group. There was no change in Qmax or PVR in both groups after 12 weeks. Administration of SE for 12 weeks led to significant improvements in LUTS, and it can be concerned as a reasonable and safe alternative for men with mild to moderate LUTS. PMID:27382404

  11. Efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal medicine for benign prostatic hyperplasia: systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chun Ho; Lin, Wai Ling; Lui, Sing Leung; Cai, Xun-Yuan; Wong, Vivian Taam; Ziea, Eric; Zhang, Zhang-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Chinese herbal medicine is commonly used as a treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), but its efficacy and safety remain to be examined. To compare the efficacy and adverse events of Chinese herbal medicine alone or used adjuvantly with Western medications for BPH. Two independent reviewers searched the major electronic databases for randomized controlled trials comparing Chinese herbal medicine, either in single or adjuvant use with Western medication, with placebo or Western medication. Relevant journals and grey literature were also hand-searched. The outcome measures included changes in urological symptoms, urodynamic measures, prostate volume and adverse events. The frequency of commonly used herbs was also identified. Out of 13 922 identified citations of publications, 31 studies were included. Eleven studies with a Jadad score ≥3 were selected for meta-analysis. Chinese herbal medicine was superior to Western medication in improving quality of life and reducing prostate volume. The frequency of adverse events in Chinese herbal medicine was similar to that of placebo and less than that of Western medication. The evidence is too weak to support the efficacy of Chinese herbal medicine for BPH due to the poor methodological quality and small number of trials included. The commonly used herbs identified here should provide insights for future clinical practice and research. Larger randomized controlled trials of better quality are needed to truly evaluate the efficacy of Chinese herbal medicine. PMID:23728585

  12. Solifenacin/tamsulosin fixed-dose combination therapy to treat lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Dimitropoulos, Konstantinos; Gravas, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) has traditionally focused on the management of benign prostatic obstruction, but the contribution of bladder dysfunction has been recently recognized. Therefore, it is well understood that LUTS have multifactorial etiology and often occur in clusters and not in isolation. Voiding LUTS are highly prevalent in men, but storage LUTS have been proved to be more bothersome. α1-Blockers are the most widely used pharmacologic agents for the treatment of symptoms relating to benign prostatic enlargement due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), while antimuscarinics are the drug class of choice for overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of the two drug classes would be a reasonable approach to treat men with both storage and voiding symptoms, and several short-term studies have proved the efficacy and safety of different combinations with an α1-blocker and an antimuscarinic. Following previous studies on the separate administration of solifenacin and tamsulosin, a fixed-dose combination tablet of tamsulosin oral controlled absorption system (OCAS) 0.4 mg and solifenacin succinate 6 mg has been recently introduced, and the current review evaluates the available data on the use of this fixed-dose combination in the treatment of LUTS in men with BPH. PMID:25834406

  13. Parathyroid hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    Enlarged parathyroid glands; Osteoporosis - parathyroid hyperplasia; Bone thinning - parathyroid hyperplasia; Osteopenia - parathyroid hyperplasia; High calcium level - parathyroid hyperplasia; Chronic kidney disease - parathyroid hyperplasia; ...

  14. IL-6 signaling by STAT3 participates in the change from hyperplasia to neoplasia in NRP-152 and NRP-154 rat prostatic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Beverly E; Murphy, Thomas F; Adem, Patricia; Watson, Richard A; Irwin, Robert J; Huang, Hosea F

    2001-01-01

    Background STAT3 phosphorylation is associated with the neoplastic state in many types of cancer, including prostate cancer. We investigated the role of IL-6 signaling and phosphorylation of STAT3 in 2 rat prostatic epithelial lines. NRP-152 and NRP-154 cells were derived from the same rat prostate, yet the NRP-152 cells are not tumorigenic while the NRP-154 cells are tumorigenic. These lines are believed to represent 2 of the stages in the development of prostate cancer, hyperplasia and neoplasia. Differences in signaling pathways should play a role in the 2 phenotypes, hyperplastic and neoplastic. Methods We looked at the phosphorylation state of STAT3 by intracellular flow cytometry, using phospho-specific antibodies to STAT3. We used the same method to examine IL-6 production by the cell lines. We also measured apoptosis by binding of fluorescent annexin V to the cells. Results Although both cells lines made IL-6 constitutively, phosphorylated-STAT3 was present in untreated NRP-154 cells, but not in NRP-152 cells. Treatment with dexamethasone inhibited the IL-6 production of NRP-152 cells, but enhanced that of NRP-154 cells. Treatment with the JAK2 inhibitor AG490 induced apoptosis in NRP-152, but not NRP-154 cells. Conclusions We conclude from these experiments that STAT3 activity plays a role in the phenotype of NRP-154 cell, but not NRP-152 cells. The significance of alternative IL-6 signaling pathways in the different phenotypes of the 2 cell lines is discussed. PMID:11710966

  15. The impact of surgical treatments for lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hyperplasia on male erectile function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuo; Chen, Ping; Wang, Jun; Mao, Qi; Xiang, Han; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Xinghuan; Zhang, Xinhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)/benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is common in adult men and can impair erectile function (EF). It was believed surgical treatments for this illness can improve EF due to the relief of LUTS while they were also reported harmed EF as heating or injury effect. Current network meta-analysis aimed to elucidate this discrepancy. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified. Direct comparisons were conducted by STATA and network meta-analysis was conducted by Generate Mixed Treatment Comparison. Random-effects models were used to calculate pooled standard mean difference and 95% confidence intervals and to incorporate variation between studies. Eighteen RCTs with 2433 participants were analyzed. Nine approaches were studied as transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (PKRP), plasmakinetic enucleation of the prostate (PKEP), Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP), Holmium laser resection of the prostate (HoLRP), photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP), Thulium laser, open prostatectomy (OP), and laparoscopic simple prostatectomy (LSP). In direct comparisons, all surgical treatments did not decrease postoperative International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF)-5 score except PVP. Moreover, patients who underwent HoLEP, PKEP, Thulium laser, and TURP had their postoperative EF significantly increased. Network analysis including direct and indirect comparisons ranked LSP at the highest position on the variation of postoperative IIEF-5 score, followed by PKRP, HoLEP, TURP, Thulium laser, PKEP, PVP, HoLRP, and OP. In subgroup analysis, only PVP was found lower postoperative EF in the short term and decreased baseline group, whereas TURP increased postoperative IIEF-5 score only for patients with normal baseline EF. However, HoLEP and PKEP showed pro-erectile effect even for patients with decreased baseline EF and short-term follow-up. Our novel data

  16. Validity of the “Bother Score” in the Evaluation and Treatment of Symptomatic Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Michael P

    2005-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a condition that is common among older men. It causes a variety of clinically significant lower urinary tract signs and symptoms. BPH is rarely life-threatening; the decision to seek treatment is frequently based on the degree to which patients find the symptoms bothersome and disruptive of daily activities. Recently developed reliable and valid outcome measures to evaluate treatments for BPH are clinical tools that urologists can use to determine the extent of bother and make treatment decisions. A single question used to determine the “bother score” provides a widely used and statistically valid measure of the need for treatment of BPH. Validation data support the argument that the bother score is a statistically reliable measure of treatment outcome in patients with BPH who view their symptoms as bothersome. PMID:16985801

  17. Efficacy and safety of the alpha-1 blocker doxazosin in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Analysis of 5 studies. Doxazosin Study Groups.

    PubMed

    Janknegt, R A; Chapple, C R

    1993-01-01

    Controlled clinical studies have demonstrated that blockade of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors relaxes prostatic muscle tone and decreases the symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Doxazosin, a once-daily quinazoline derivative and postsynaptic alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, proven as treatment for hypertension, was evaluated in the treatment of BPH in dosages of 1-16 mg. 456 BPH patients (287 doxazosin-treated and 169 placebo-treated) were evaluated for efficacy and safety in five double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies. Doxazosin treatment resulted in improvements in both urodynamic and symptomatic parameters associated with BPH. Efficacy was only assessed in 1, 2 and 4 mg. Adverse experiences were reported in 127 (44.3%) of the patients treated with doxazosin and in 49 (29%) of the patients treated with placebo. Fifteen (5.2%) doxazosin patients and 4 (2.4%) placebo patients withdrew from the studies due to adverse effects. Results from these five clinical trials demonstrate doxazosin is effective and safe and well tolerated in both normotensive and hypertensive patients with BPH.

  18. Increased Expression of Herpes Virus-Encoded hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H9-5p in Cancer-Containing Prostate Tissue Compared to That in Benign Prostate Hyperplasia Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shinn, Helen Ki; Yan, Chunri; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kim, Sang Tae; Kim, Won Tae; Lee, Ok-Jun; Moon, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Jayoung; Cha, Eun-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Previously, we reported the presence of virus-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) in the urine of prostate cancer (CaP) patients. In this study, we investigated the expression of two herpes virus-encoded miRNAs in prostate tissue. Methods: A total of 175 tissue samples from noncancerous benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), 248 tissue samples from patients with CaP and BPH, and 50 samples from noncancerous surrounding tissues from these same patients were analyzed for the expression of two herpes virus-encoded miRNAs by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunocytochemistry using nanoparticles as molecular beacons. Results: Real-time reverse transcription-PCR results revealed significantly higher expression of hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miRH9- 5p in surrounding noncancerous and CaP tissues than that in BPH tissue (each comparison, P<0.001). Of note, these miRNA were expressed equivalently in the CaP tissues and surrounding noncancerous tissues. Moreover, immunocytochemistry clearly demonstrated a significant enrichment of both hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H9 beacon-labeled cells in CaP and surrounding noncancerous tissue compared to that in BPH tissue (each comparison, P<0.05 for hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2- miR-H9). Conclusions: These results suggest that increased expression of hsv1-miR-H18 and hsv2-miR-H95p might be associated with tumorigenesis in the prostate. Further studies will be required to elucidate the role of these miRNAs with respect to CaP and herpes viral infections. PMID:27377944

  19. Changing patients’ profile presenting for surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia over the past 16 years: A single-centre perspective

    PubMed Central

    Elkoushy, Mohamed A.; Elshal, Ahmed M.; Elhilali, Mostafa M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We assessed the change of patients’ profile presenting for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) over 16 years and its impact on surgical outcomes over this time. Methods: We reviewed a prospectively maintained database of patients treated with laser for symptomatic BPH since March 1998. Patients were divided into 3 consecutive time-based groups: Group 1 for patients who underwent surgery before April 2004; Group 2, between April 2004 and March 2009; and for Group 3 from April 2009 to August 2014. We reviewed demographic and preoperative data, including prostate volume; international prostate symptoms score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), and peak flow rate (Qmax). We also recorded any perioperative and long-term complications. Results: A total of 1835 patients were included in our study, including 542 (29.5%) in Group 1, 614 (33.5%) in Group 2, and 679 (37%) in Group 3. Preoperative prostate volume was positively correlated with age at surgery (r = 0.62, p < 0.001), total energy used (r = 0.47, p < 0.001), and total operative time (r = 0.47, p < 0.001). Patients in Group 3 were significantly older (75.28 ± 8.47 in Group 3 vs. 71.11 ± 8.9 in Group 2 vs. 65.3 ± 9.04 years in Group 1, p <0.001), were more coagulopathic (18.7% Group 3 vs. 12.3% Group 2 vs. 5.9% Group 1, p < 0.001), and had significantly larger prostates (87.96 ± 49.80 in Group 3 vs. 78.44 ± 50.84 in Group 2 vs. 74.50 ± 46.53 Group 1, p < 0.001). Preoperative prostatic medications significantly increased over time (72.6% in Group 1 vs. 85.5% in Group 2, vs. 87.4% Group 3, p < 0.001). IPSS, QoL and Qmax were significantly abnormal in patients in Group 3 (p < 0.001). After a mean follow-up of 3 years, the number of patients who did not require reoperation progressively increased (94.1% Group 1 vs. 96.1% Group 2 vs. 98.3% Group 3). Age (>72 years), prostate volume (>80 cc), operative time (>95 minutes), and preoperative PSA (>6 ng/dL) were significantly associated with

  20. An excessive coronoid hyperplasia with suspected traumatic etiology resulting in mandibular hypomobility.

    PubMed

    Bayar, Gurkan Rasit; Akcam, Timur; Gulses, Aydin; Sencimen, Metin; Gunhan, Omer

    2012-04-01

    There are multiple theories as to the causes of coronoid process hyperplasia of the mandible, including trauma, temporalis muscle hyperactivity, hormonal stimulus, and genetic inheritance. The excess growth of the coronoid process can cause impingement on the zygomatic processes and may result in mandibular hypomobility. A case of an excessive unilateral coronoid hyperplasia with suspected traumatic etiology, which was successfully treated by coronoidectomy and postoperative physiotherapy, is presented. The patient was a 21-year-old man whose maximum mouth opening was 23 mm. The attachments of the temporalis muscle were stripped and the coronoid process was accessed using the Al-Kayat and Bramley approach. The coronoid process was then resected via an intraoral pathway. One week after surgery, physiotherapy was started and the maximum mouth opening had increased to 38 mm. In the case presented, a coronoidectomy with postoperative physiotherapy for treatment of coronoid process hyperplasia produced satisfactory results in the correction of coronoid-malar interference.

  1. Theoretical analysis of transurethral laser-induced thermo-therapy for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Evaluation of a water-cooled applicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturesson, C.; Andersson-Engels, S.

    1996-03-01

    A mathematical model for predicting the temperature rise in transurethral laser-induced thermo-therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia was developed. In the model an optical line source emitting light from an Nd:YAG laser isotropically was placed in the urethra. Water cooling of the urethral epithelium was modelled using a two-tube system. The relationship between the difference in outlet and inlet water temperatures and the highest tissue temperature level reached was theoretically investigated. It was found that the water temperature difference was linearly dependent on the steady-state maximum tissue temperature. The theoretical calculations suggest that the water-cooled applicator can be used to measure the maximum tissue temperature. With temperature control, the prostatic tissue temperature can be prevented from exceeding the boiling point of water, excluding tissue carbonization. The model was also used to evaluate the influence of a number of different parameters on the damaged tissue volume. Increasing the urethral lumen radius by a factor of two by means of inserting different sized tubes was found to augment the tissue volume raised to therapeutic temperatures by up to 50%. The calculations showed that cooling of the urethral epithelium can result in an increase in the damaged volume by 80% as compared to not applying any cooling. The temperature of the cooling water was found to influence the tissue temperature only to a small extent.

  2. [A Crossover Comparison Study on Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms with Overactive Bladder Secondary to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Naftopidil versus Tamsulosin with Solifenacin].

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Noriaki; Matsumoto, Keiyu; Tsunemori, Hiroyuki; Muguruma, Koei; Kawakita, Mutsushi; Kamiyama, Yuki; Kanamaru, Sojun; Ito, Noriyuki; Tsukazaki, Hideki; Shirahase, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    We compared the efficacy of naftopidil monotherapy with combination therapy using tamsulosin hydrochloride and solifenacin succinate in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) with overactive bladder (OAB) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Thirty one patients were enrolled in a randomized crossover study. Fourteen patients were initially prescribed naftopidil 75 mg (N) for 8 weeks, followed by tamsulosin 0.2 mg and solifenacin 5 mg (TS) for 8 weeks (group N) ; another 17 were initially prescribed TS, followed by N (group TS). The efficacy variables were the changes in international prostate symptom score (I-PSS), quality of life (QOL) score, overative bladder symptom score (OABSS), and post-void residual (PVR) urine volume. After the study, a questionnaire survey was carried out about the choice of treatment. After treatment with each agent, total I-PSS, storage symptom score, QOL score and OABSS except for the daytime frequency were significantly improved from baseline. PVR was significantly increased after TS treatment. There were no significant differences between the two treatments except for PVR. As a result of the questionnaire survey, 13 patients chose N and 17 chose TS. In conclusion, N monotherapy can be expected to have an equal effect in the treatment of LUTS with OAB secondary to BPH in comparison with TS combination therapy. PMID:27569351

  3. Expression of leukemia/lymphoma related factor (LRF/Pokemon) in human benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Himanshu; Aggarwal, Anshu; Hunter, William J; Yohannes, Paulos; Khan, Ansar U; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2011-04-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma related factor (LRF), also known as Pokemon, is a protein that belongs to the POK family of transcriptional repressors. It has an oncogenic role in many different solid tumors. In this study, the expression of LRF was evaluated in benign prostate hyperplastic (BPH) and prostate cancer (PC) tissues. The functional expression of LRF was studied using multiple cellular and molecular methods including RT-PCR, western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence. Paraffin-embedded human tissues of BPH and PC were used to examine LRF expression. Histological staining of the BPH and PC tissue sections revealed nuclear expression of LRF with minimal expression in the surrounding stroma. The semi-quantitative RT-PCR and western immunoblot analyses demonstrated significantly higher mRNA transcripts and protein expression in PC than BPH. High expression of LRF suggests that it may have a potential role in the pathogenesis of both BPH and prostate cancer. Further studies will help elucidate the mechanisms and signaling pathways that LRF may follow in the pathogenesis of prostate carcinoma. PMID:21251909

  4. Expression of leukemia/lymphoma related factor (LRF/Pokemon) in human benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Himanshu; Aggarwal, Anshu; Hunter, William J; Yohannes, Paulos; Khan, Ansar U; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2011-04-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma related factor (LRF), also known as Pokemon, is a protein that belongs to the POK family of transcriptional repressors. It has an oncogenic role in many different solid tumors. In this study, the expression of LRF was evaluated in benign prostate hyperplastic (BPH) and prostate cancer (PC) tissues. The functional expression of LRF was studied using multiple cellular and molecular methods including RT-PCR, western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence. Paraffin-embedded human tissues of BPH and PC were used to examine LRF expression. Histological staining of the BPH and PC tissue sections revealed nuclear expression of LRF with minimal expression in the surrounding stroma. The semi-quantitative RT-PCR and western immunoblot analyses demonstrated significantly higher mRNA transcripts and protein expression in PC than BPH. High expression of LRF suggests that it may have a potential role in the pathogenesis of both BPH and prostate cancer. Further studies will help elucidate the mechanisms and signaling pathways that LRF may follow in the pathogenesis of prostate carcinoma.

  5. Disruption of PPARγ signaling results in mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia involving active autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ming; Fernandez, Suzanne; Jerome, W. Gray; He, Yue; Yu, Xiuping; Cai, Hui; Boone, Braden; Yi, Yajun; Magnuson, Mark A.; Roy-Burman, Pradip; Matusik, Robert J.; Shappell, Scott B.; Hayward, Simon W.

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) regulates the interface between cellular lipid metabolism, redox status and organelle differentiation. Conditional prostatic epithelial knockout of PPARγ in mice resulted in focal hyperplasia which developed into mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN). The grade of PIN became more severe with time. Electron microscopy (EM) showed accumulated secondary lysosomes containing cellular organelles and debris suggestive of autophagy. Consistent with this analysis the autophagy marker LC3 was found to be upregulated in areas of PIN in PPARγ KO tissues. We selectively knocked down PPARγ2 isoform in wild-type mouse prostatic epithelial cells and examined the consequences of this in a tissue recombination model. Histopathologically grafted tissues resembled the conditional PPARγ KO mouse prostates. EM studies of PPARγ- and PPARγ2-deficient epithelial cells in vitro were suggestive of autophagy, consistent with the prostatic tissue analysis. This was confirmed by examining expression of beclin-1 and LC3. Gene expression profiling in PPARγ-/γ2-deficient cells indicated a major dysregulation of cell cycle control and metabolic signaling networks related to peroxisomal and lysosomal maturation, lipid oxidation and degradation. The putative autophagic phenotypes of PPARγ-deficient cells could be rescued by re-expression of either γ1 or γ2 isoform. We conclude that disruption of PPARγ signaling results in autophagy and oxidative stress during mPIN pathogenesis. PMID:19834493

  6. Phytopharmaceutical and synthetic agents in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

    PubMed

    Bach, D; Schmitt, M; Ebeling, L

    1997-02-01

    At present, a number of plant extracts and synthetic agents are available for the drug treatment of symptomatic BPH. In Germany, phytotherapeutic agents represent the therapeutic standard in the early stages of BPH. By now, the clinical efficacy of phytopharmaceuticals has been demonstrated in placebo-controlled studies as well as in prospective long-term studies in an extensive patient population. The synthetic 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride, could not achieve a better therapeutic success, it clearly had higher side effect rates. The published study results indicate that the prostate volume is reduced under finasteride treatment; however, a clinically relevant improvement of micturition complaints was only observed in a third of the treated BPH patients and then after six months of treatment, at the earliest. The selective alpha-blockers represent a new, interesting approach to treatment. BPH patients which respond to the treatment with alpha-blockers experience an alleviation of their micturition symptoms in a relatively short time. The problem with this treatment option is the lowering of blood pressure by some preparations and the accompanying side effects induced by alpha-blocker administration. A comparison of the synthetic BPH therapeutic agents with the phytotherapeutic method demonstrates a high benefit-risk ratio for phytotherapy, particularly in the context of the required long-term treatment.

  7. Plasma Levels of hsa-miR-619-5p and hsa-miR-1184 Differ in Prostatic Benign Hyperplasia and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, E N; Fomicheva, K A; Mikhailenko, D S; Nyushko, K M; Samatov, T R; Alekseev, B Ya; Shkurnikov, M Yu

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral blood plasma profiles of circulating microRNA expression were analyzed in patients with prostatic cancer and benign hyperplasia. In prostatic cancer, significant increase in hsa-miR-619-5p and hsa-miR-1184 microRNA expression and significant decrease in hsalet-7b-5p and hsa-let-7c-5p microRNA expression were observed. The role of the relationship between the microRNA expression and the activities and functions of host genes with introns encoding these microRNA is discussed. PMID:27265125

  8. [Clinical experience with oxendolone for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Clinical efficacy and effects on serum lipid and lipoprotein fraction levels].

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, A; Nihira, H; Matsuki, S; Fujii, M; Fujiwara, H; Kitano, T; Kodama, M; Ukai, R; Tado, O; Sagami, K

    1984-04-01

    Forty-three patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia were treated with weekly i.m. injections of 400 mg oxendolone for 12 weeks. The subjective symptoms were improved in 83% of these patients. Residual urine was decreased significantly and Qmax was increased by this treatment. Serum VLDL level was suppressed significantly, whereas the levels of LDL, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were changed little. Atherosclerotic index and the ratio of (total cholesterol--HDL-cholesterol) to (HDL-cholesterol), was not influenced by the treatment. No severe side-effect was found. These findings suggest that oxendolone is the drug of choice for non-surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:6207714

  9. Prostatic Leiomyoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mellas, Soufiane; Bouchikhi, Ahmed Amine; Tazi, Mohammed-Fadl; Khallouk, Abdelhak; Elammari, Jalal-Eddin; El Fassi, Mohammed-Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic enlargement due to benign adenomatous hyperplasia is very common in elderly males. However, benign mesenchymal tumors especially true leiomyoma of the prostate are rare. We describe a 68-year-old male presenting a urinary obstruction lasting more than two years. The patient was referred for an acute urinary retention. The clinical examination was normal. The perrectal examination revealed an enlarged prostate without abnormalities. An endoscopic resection was performed. The histopathological examination revealed a benign smooth muscle tumor with absence of glandular hyperplasia; the result was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Accordingly, the diagnosis of true leiomyoma of the prostate was made. PMID:23198266

  10. Goserelin acetate before transurethral resection of moderately enlarged benign prostatic hyperplasia: Prospective randomised-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Abo El-Enen, Mohamed; Tawfik, Ahmed; El-Abd, Ahmed S.; Ragab, Maged; El-Abd, Sherin; Elrashidy, Mohamed; Elmashad, Nehal; Rasheed, Mohamed; El-Abd, Shawky

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of a luteinising hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist, goserelin acetate (GA), on surgical blood loss during transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), as well as its histopathological effect on prostatic microvessel density (MVD). Patients and methods Patients who underwent TURP due to benign prostatic enlargement (60–100 mL) were randomly subdivided into two equal groups according to whether they received preoperative GA administration (3.6 mg; group A) or not (group B). Evaluation parameters were operative time, weight of resected prostatic tissue, perioperative haematocrit (HCT) changes, estimation of intraoperative blood loss, and suburethral and stromal prostatic MVD. Effects of GA on prostate weight and any possible side-effects were also monitored. Results In all, 35 and 33 patients were included in groups A and B, respectively. Operative time and HCT values’ changes were significantly less in group A (P < 0.05). Also, operative blood loss (both total and adjusted per weight of resected tissue) was lower in group A, at a mean (SD) of 178.13 (77.71) mL and 3.74 (1.52) mL/g vs 371.75 (91.09) mL and 8.59 (2.42) mL/g (P < 0.001). The median MVD in both suburethral [8 vs 11 vessels/high-power field (HPF)] and stromal tissues (9 vs 17 vessels/HPF) were significantly lower in group A (P < 0.001). Side-effects were minimal. Conclusion A single dose of GA, a LHRH agonist, before TURP is safe and effective in reducing surgical blood loss. It significantly reduced MVD in both suburethral and stromal nodular prostatic tissues without regional discrepancy. PMID:26966595

  11. Comparative Effectiveness and Safety of Monodrug Therapies for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Associated With Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jin-Qiu; Mao, Chen; Wong, Samuel Yeung-Shan; Yang, Zu-Yao; Fu, Xiao-Hong; Dai, Xiao-Yu; Tang, Jin-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A wide array of drugs are available for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), but the evidence for the comparative effectiveness is controversial. The objective of this study is to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and safety of monodrug therapies for BPH. Data sources are MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. We included randomized controlled trials that compared α-blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARIs), muscarinic receptor antagonists (MRAs), phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor (PDE5-Is), or placebo for the treatment of BPH. Comparative effectiveness and safety were pooled by both traditional meta-analysis and network meta-analysis. Summary effect size was calculated as mean difference (MD) and relative risk (RR), together with the 95% confidence intervals (CIs). This study included 58,548 participants from 124 trials in total. When compared with placebo, α-blockers, 5ARIs, and PDE5-Is reduced International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) by −1.35 to −3.67 points and increased peak urinary flow rate (PUF) by −0.02 to 1.95 mL/s, with doxazosin (IPSS: MD, −3.67[−4.33 to −3.02]; PUF: MD, 1.95[1.61 to 2.30]) and terazosin (IPSS: MD, −3.37 [−4.24 to −2.50]; PUF: MD, 1.21[0.74 to 1.66]) showing the greatest improvement. The improvement in the IPSS was comparable among tamsulosin, alfuzosin, naftopidil, silodosin, dutasteride, sildenafil, vardenafil, and tadalafil. The incidence of total adverse events and withdraws due to adverse events were generally comparable among various agents. In conclusion, α-blockers, 5ARIs, and PDE5-Is are effective for BPH, with doxazosin and terazosin appearing to be the most effective agents. Drug therapies for BPH are generally safe and well-tolerated, with no major difference regarding the overall safety profile. PMID:26166130

  12. Open suprapubic versus retropubic prostatectomy in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia during resident's learning curve: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Arie; Sakuramoto, Paulo; Wroclawski, Marcelo Langer; Forseto, Pedro Herminio; Julio, Alexandre Den; Bautzer, Carlos Ricardo Doi; Lins, Leonardo Monte Marques; Kataguiri, Andre; Yamada, Fernanda Batistini; Teixeira, Gabriel Kushiyama; Tobias-Machado, Marcos; Pompeo, Antonio Carlos Lima

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: This study compared the suprapubic (SP) versus retropubic (RP) prostatectomy for the treatment of large prostates and evaluated perioperative surgical morbidity and improvement of urinary symptoms. Materials and Methods: In this single centre, prospective, randomised study, 65 consecutive patients with LUTS and surgical indication with prostate volume greater than 75g underwent open prostatectomy to compare the RP (32 patients) versus SP (33 patients) technique. Results: The SP group exhibited a higher incidence of complications (p=0.002). Regarding voiding pattern analysis (IPSS and flowmetry), both were significantly effective compared to pre-treatment baseline. The RP group parameters were significantly better, with higher peak urinary flow (SP: 16.77 versus RP: 23.03mL/s, p=0.008) and a trend of lower IPSS score (SP: 6.67 versus RP 4.14, p=0.06). In a subgroup evaluation of patients with prostate volumes larger than 100g, blood loss was lower in those undergoing SP prostatectomy (p=0.003). Patients with prostates smaller than 100g in the SP group exhibited a higher incidence of low grade late complications (p=0.004). Conclusions: The SP technique was related to a higher incidence of minor complications in the late postoperative period. High volume prostates were associated with increased bleeding when the RP technique was utilized. The RP prostatectomy was associated with higher peak urinary flow and a trend of a lower IPSS Score. PMID:27256183

  13. Protective effects of seahorse extracts in a rat castration and testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia model and mouse oligospermatism model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-Hui; Wang, Li-Hong; Mei, Xue-Ting; Li, Bing-Ji; Lv, Jun-Li; Xu, Shi-Bo

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of seahorse (Hippocampus spp.) extracts in a rat model of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and mouse model of oligospermatism. Compared to the sham operated group, castration and testosterone induced BPH, indicated by increased penile erection latency; decreased penis nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity; reduced serum acid phosphatase (ACP) activity; increased prostate index; and epithelial thickening, increased glandular perimeter, increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) index and upregulation of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in the prostate. Seahorse extracts significantly ameliorated the histopathological changes associated with BPH, reduced the latency of penile erection and increased penile NOS activity. Administration of seahorse extracts also reversed epididymal sperm viability and motility in mice treated with cyclophosphamide (CP). Seahorse extracts have potential as a candidate marine drug for treating BPH without inducing the side effects of erectile dysfunction (ED) or oligospermatism associated with the BPH drug finasteride.

  14. The American Urological Association symptom index for benign prostatic hyperplasia. The Measurement Committee of the American Urological Association.

    PubMed

    Barry, M J; Fowler, F J; O'Leary, M P; Bruskewitz, R C; Holtgrewe, H L; Mebust, W K; Cockett, A T

    1992-11-01

    A symptom index for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) was developed and validated by a multidisciplinary measurement committee of the American Urological Association (AUA). Validation studies were conducted involving a total of 210 BPH patients and 108 control subjects. The final AUA symptom index includes 7 questions covering frequency, nocturia, weak urinary stream, hesitancy, intermittence, incomplete emptying and urgency. On revalidation, the index was internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha = 0.86) and the score generated had excellent test-retest reliability (r = 0.92). Scores were highly correlated with subjects' global ratings of the magnitude of their urinary problem (r = 0.65 to 0.72) and powerfully discriminated between BPH and control subjects (receiver operating characteristic area 0.85). Finally, the index was sensitive to change, with preoperative scores decreasing from a mean of 17.6 to 7.1 by 4 weeks after prostatectomy (p < 0.001). The AUA symptom index is clinically sensible, reliable, valid and responsive. It is practical for use in practice and for inclusion in research protocols.

  15. Action Mechanism of Ginkgo biloba Leaf Extract Intervened by Exercise Therapy in Treatment of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chiung-Chi; Liu, Jia-Hong; Chang, Chi-Huang; Chung, Jin-Yuan; Chen, Kuan-Chou

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), an imbalance between androgen/estrogen, overexpression of stromal, and epithelial growth factors associated with chronic inflammation, has become an atypical direct cause of mortality of aged male diseases. Ginkgo possesses anti-inflammatory, blood flow-enhancing, and free radical scavenging effects. Considering strenuous exercise can reduce BPH risks, we hypothesize Ginkgo + exercise (Ginkgo + Ex) could be beneficial to BPH. To verify this, rat BPH model was induced by s.c. 3.5 mg testosterone (T) and 0.1 mg estradiol (E2) per head per day successively for 8 weeks, using mineral oil as placebo. Cerenin® 8.33 μL/100 g was applied s.c. from the 10th to the 13th week, and simultaneously, Ex was applied (30 m/min, 3 times/week). In BPH, Ginkgo alone had no effect on T, 5α-reductase, and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), but suppressed androgen receptor (AR), aromatase, E2 and estrogen receptor (ER), and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA); Ex alone significantly reduced T, aromatase, E2, ER, AR, and PCNA, but highly raised DHT. While Ginkgo + Ex androgenically downregulated T, aromatase, E2, and ER, but upregulated DHT, AR, and PCNA, implying Ginkgo + Ex tended to worsen BPH. Conclusively, Ginkgo or Ex alone may be more beneficial than Ginkgo + Ex for treatment of BPH. PMID:23690843

  16. A prospective randomized study comparing alfuzosin and tamsulosin in the management of patients suffering from acute urinary retention caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Madhu S.; Yadav, Abhishek; Yadav, Himanshu; Singh, Amit K.; Lavania, Prashant; Jaiman, Richa

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Prospective randomized study to compare the efficacy and safety of alfuzosin and tamsulosin in patients suffering from acute urinary retention caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods: Patients with acute urinary retention (AUR) due to BPH (total 150) were catheterized and randomized into three groups: Group A: alfuzosin 10 mg (50 patients), Group B: tamsulosin 0.4 mg (50 patients), Group C: placebo (50 patients). After three days, catheter was removed, and patients were put on trial without catheter (TWOC). Patients with successful TWOC were followed up for three months, taking into account the prostate symptom score (AUA Score), post-void residual urine volume (PVRV), and peak flow rate (PFR). ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. Results: Both group A (alfuzosin) and group B (tamsulosin) had similar results of TWOC (group A – 66%, group B – 70%), which were significantly superior than group C (placebo) – 36%. In follow up, three (9.1%) patients in group A, three (8.6%) patients in group B and eight (44.4%) patients in group C had retention of urine, requiring recatheterization. These patients were withdrawn from the study. After three months, alfuzosin- or tamsulosin-treated patients showed a significant decrease in AUA score and PVRV; and a significant increase in PFR as compared to placebo. Conclusions: TWOC was more successful in men treated with either alfuzosin or tamsulosin and the subsequent need for recatheterization was also reduced. Tamsulosin was comparable to alfuzosin in all respects, except a small but significant side effect of retrograde ejaculation. PMID:19955671

  17. A Randomized, Open-Label, Comparative Study of Efficacy and Safety of Tolterodine Combined with Tamsulosin or Doxazosin in Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanwei; Wang, Yonghua; Guo, Lei; Yang, Xuecheng; Chen, Tao; Niu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a common disease in men over age 50 years, often causes bladder outlet obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Alpha blockers in combination with muscarinic receptor antagonists may have the potential to improve symptoms. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of doxazosin or tamsulosin combined with tolterodine extend release (ER) in patients with BPH and LUTS. Material/Methods In a prospective, randomized, open-label study (ChiCTR-IPR-15005763), 220 consecutive men with BPH and LUTS were allocated to receive doxazosin 4 mg and tolterodine ER 4 mg per day (doxazosin group) or tamsulosin 0.2 mg and tolterodine ER 4 mg per day (tamsulosin group). Treatment lasted 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was the international prostatic symptom score (IPSS). Secondary endpoints were quality of life (QoL) and maximum flow rate (Qmax), which were evaluated at 0, 6, and 12 weeks, and urodynamic parameters assessed at 0 and 12 weeks. Results A total of 192 patients completed the trial. Baseline measurements showed no differences between the groups. After 6 weeks, IPSS improved in both groups and QoL was significantly better in the doxazosin group (P=0.01). After 12 weeks, Qmax, IPSS, QoL, intravesical pressure (Pves), and bladder compliance (BC) in the doxazosin group were significantly better than in the tamsulosin group (P=0.03, P<0.001, P<0.001, P=0.027, and P=0.044, respectively). Conclusions Administration of alpha blockers combined with muscarinic receptor blocker for 12 weeks improved LUTS in men with BPH. PMID:27260129

  18. A Randomized, Open-Label, Comparative Study of Efficacy and Safety of Tolterodine Combined with Tamsulosin or Doxazosin in Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanwei; Wang, Yonghua; Guo, Lei; Yang, Xuecheng; Chen, Tao; Niu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a common disease in men over age 50 years, often causes bladder outlet obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Alpha blockers in combination with muscarinic receptor antagonists may have the potential to improve symptoms. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of doxazosin or tamsulosin combined with tolterodine extend release (ER) in patients with BPH and LUTS. MATERIAL AND METHODS In a prospective, randomized, open-label study (ChiCTR-IPR-15005763), 220 consecutive men with BPH and LUTS were allocated to receive doxazosin 4 mg and tolterodine ER 4 mg per day (doxazosin group) or tamsulosin 0.2 mg and tolterodine ER 4 mg per day (tamsulosin group). Treatment lasted 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was the international prostatic symptom score (IPSS). Secondary endpoints were quality of life (QoL) and maximum flow rate (Qmax), which were evaluated at 0, 6, and 12 weeks, and urodynamic parameters assessed at 0 and 12 weeks. RESULTS A total of 192 patients completed the trial. Baseline measurements showed no differences between the groups. After 6 weeks, IPSS improved in both groups and QoL was significantly better in the doxazosin group (P=0.01). After 12 weeks, Qmax, IPSS, QoL, intravesical pressure (Pves), and bladder compliance (BC) in the doxazosin group were significantly better than in the tamsulosin group (P=0.03, P<0.001, P<0.001, P=0.027, and P=0.044, respectively). CONCLUSIONS Administration of alpha blockers combined with muscarinic receptor blocker for 12 weeks improved LUTS in men with BPH.

  19. Combined effect of polymorphisms in type III 5-α reductase and androgen receptor gene with the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung Lyul; Lee, Jaegeun; Na, Yong Gil; Song, Ki Hak

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated whether type III 5-alpha reductase (SRD5A3; steroid reductase 5-alpha 3) polymorphism was associated with susceptibility of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and the combined effects in BPH risk between the type of short tandem repeat (STR) in SRD5A3 and the length of trinucleotide (CAG) repeats in androgen receptor (AR) gene. We compared the length of AC repeats in STR region of SRD5A3 gene and a CAG repeat in AR in 188 BPH patients who underwent transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) and 98 controls by polymerase chain reaction-based methods. We defined short type was less than 21 copies of AC repeats. The odds ratio for BPH between the men with at least one of short type and with both large types of STR in SRD5A3 gene was 3.10 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.87–5.16; P=0.000). And BPH was 2.35 times more likely to occur in with less than 23 copies of CAG repeats than men equal or greater than 23 copies in AR gene (95% CI, 1.18–2.36; P=0.016). The men with the large type of STR and ≥23 copies of CAG repeats have 5.3 times BPH risk compared to the reference group with the at least one of the short type of STR and <23 copies (P<0.000). In conclusion, these results suggest that shorter AC repeats of SRD5A3 gene and shorter CAG repeats of AR gene were associated with an increased risk for BPH. However, the interaction between above two factors was not affected in risk of BPH. PMID:27807533

  20. The effect of 5alpha-reductase inhibition with finasteride and dutasteride on bone mineral density in older men with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Mačukat, Indira Radin; Spanjol, Josip; Orlič, Zeljka Crncevič; Butorac, Marta Zuvič; Marinovič, Marin; Ćupič, Dora Fučkar

    2014-09-01

    Testosterone is converted to dihyrotestosterone by two isoenzymes of 5alpha-reductase. Finasteride and dutasteride are 5alpha-reductase inhibitors commonly used in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. We compared indices of bone mineral density in 50 men treated with finasteride, 50 men treated with dutasteride and 50 men as control. Bone mineral density of spine and hip were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bone formation was assessed by measuring serum osteocalcin and bone resorptionby measuring serum C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type 1. In addition serum total testosteron and estradiol were determined. The dutasteride group had significantly higher mean bone min- eral density, mean bone mineral content, mean T score, mean Z score at femoral neck and mean total hip Z score than control. Mean total testosterone and estradiol levels were higher in the dutasteride group. There were no significant dif- ferences between the groups in lumbar spine bone density parameters or bone turnover markers. Our results provide evidence that long-term 5alpha-reductase suppression does not adversely affect bone mineral density. Dutasteride therapy could have beneficial effect on bone density. PMID:25507347

  1. The effect of 5alpha-reductase inhibition with finasteride and dutasteride on bone mineral density in older men with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Mačukat, Indira Radin; Spanjol, Josip; Orlič, Zeljka Crncevič; Butorac, Marta Zuvič; Marinovič, Marin; Ćupič, Dora Fučkar

    2014-09-01

    Testosterone is converted to dihyrotestosterone by two isoenzymes of 5alpha-reductase. Finasteride and dutasteride are 5alpha-reductase inhibitors commonly used in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. We compared indices of bone mineral density in 50 men treated with finasteride, 50 men treated with dutasteride and 50 men as control. Bone mineral density of spine and hip were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bone formation was assessed by measuring serum osteocalcin and bone resorptionby measuring serum C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type 1. In addition serum total testosteron and estradiol were determined. The dutasteride group had significantly higher mean bone min- eral density, mean bone mineral content, mean T score, mean Z score at femoral neck and mean total hip Z score than control. Mean total testosterone and estradiol levels were higher in the dutasteride group. There were no significant dif- ferences between the groups in lumbar spine bone density parameters or bone turnover markers. Our results provide evidence that long-term 5alpha-reductase suppression does not adversely affect bone mineral density. Dutasteride therapy could have beneficial effect on bone density. PMID:25420363

  2. Application of Purified Botulinum Type A Neurotoxin to Treat Experimental Trigeminal Neuropathy in Rats and Patients with Urinary Incontinence and Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Matsuka, Yoshizo; Yokoyama, Teruhiko; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Suzuki, Tomonori; Dwi Fatmawati, Ni Nengah; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Ohyama, Tohru; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Kuboki, Takuo; Nagai, Atsushi; Oguma, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    Type A neurotoxin (NTX) of Clostridium botulinum was purified by a simple procedure using a lactose gel column. The toxicity of this purified toxin preparation was retained for at least 1 year at −30°C by supplementation with either 0.1% albumin or 0.05% albumin plus 1% trehalose. When purified NTX was used to treat 49 patients with urinary incontinence caused by either refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity, 36 patients showed significant improvement in symptoms. These beneficial effects were also observed in cases of prostatic hyperplasia. The results obtained with NTX were similar to that of Botox. The effects of NTX on trigeminal neuralgia induced by infraorbital nerve constriction (IoNC) in rats were also studied. Trigeminal ganglion neurons from ipsilateral to IoNC exhibited significantly faster onset of FM4-64 release than sham-operated contralateral neurons. Intradermal injection of NTX in the area of IoNC alleviated IoNC-induced pain behavior and reduced the exaggerated FM4-64 release in trigeminal ganglion neurons. PMID:22745637

  3. Finasteride Concentrations and Prostate Cancer Risk: Results from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Till, Cathee; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Chen, Xiaohong; Leach, Robin J.; Johnson-Pais, Teresa L.; Hsing, Ann W.; Hoque, Ashraful; Tangen, Catherine M.; Chu, Lisa; Parnes, Howard L.; Schenk, Jeannette M.; Reichardt, Juergen K. V.; Thompson, Ian M.; Figg, William D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), finasteride reduced the risk of prostate cancer by 25%, even though high-grade prostate cancer was more common in the finasteride group. However, it remains to be determined whether finasteride concentrations may affect prostate cancer risk. In this study, we examined the association between serum finasteride concentrations and the risk of prostate cancer in the treatment arm of the PCPT and determined factors involved in modifying drug concentrations. Methods Data for this nested case-control study are from the PCPT. Cases were drawn from men with biopsy-proven prostate cancer and matched controls. Finasteride concentrations were measured using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry validated assay. The association of serum finasteride concentrations with prostate cancer risk was determined by logistic regression. We also examine whether polymorphisms in the enzyme target and metabolism genes of finasteride are related to drug concentrations using linear regression. Results and Conclusions Among men with detectable finasteride concentrations, there was no association between finasteride concentrations and prostate cancer risk, low-grade or high-grade, when finasteride concentration was analyzed as a continuous variable or categorized by cutoff points. Since there was no concentration-dependent effect on prostate cancer, any exposure to finasteride intake may reduce prostate cancer risk. Of the twenty-seven SNPs assessed in the enzyme target and metabolism pathway, five SNPs in two genes, CYP3A4 (rs2242480; rs4646437; rs4986910), and CYP3A5 (rs15524; rs776746) were significantly associated with modifying finasteride concentrations. These results suggest that finasteride exposure may reduce prostate cancer risk and finasteride concentrations are affected by genetic variations in genes responsible for altering its metabolism pathway. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00288106 PMID:25955319

  4. Subcellular concentrations of calcium, zinc, and magnesium in benign nodular hyperplasia of the human prostate: X-ray microanalysis of freeze-dried cryosections

    SciTech Connect

    Tvedt, K.E.; Kopstad, G.; Haugen, O.A.; Halgunset, J.

    1987-01-01

    Biopsies from human prostates were obtained from normal and hyperplastic glands. The intracellular concentrations of calcium, zinc, and magnesium were analyzed using X-ray microanalysis of freeze-dried cryosections. Two prostate biopsies were obtained from kidney donors, ages 19 and 50 years, without any sign of benign nodular hyperplasia. The normal tissues were frozen within 15 min after circulatory arrest. The central part of biopsies from eight elderly men suffering from benign nodular hyperplasia were frozen within 30 s after excision. Adjacent tissue was processed for light microscopy and histopathological diagnosis. All samples were fresh-frozen using liquid nitrogen cooled pliers, without the use of any freeze-protection, fixation, or staining. In both the normal and the hyperplastic prostates high concentrations (up to above 100 mmol/kg dry weight) of zinc were present in electron dense bodies in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells. Together with zinc, about equal concentrations of magnesium were found. Calcium was detected in 4 to 8 times the concentration of zinc. Significant, positive correlation between calcium and zinc as well as between calcium and magnesium in the cytoplasm was a typical finding in both normal and hyperplastic glands. In six of eight patients, older than 60 years of age, high levels of calcium (17.0-38.8 mmol/kg dry weight) were observed in the nuclei of the epithelial cells, while very low values were found in the remaining two. In the two younger cases (19 and 50 years of age), the nuclear calcium level in prostatic epithelium was relatively low (about 10 mmol/kg dry weight). These observations suggest that an increase of intranuclear calcium with advancing age may be of pathogenetic significance to growth disturbances in the prostate.

  5. Inhibitory Effect of Yongdamsagan-Tang Water Extract, a Traditional Herbal Formula, on Testosterone-Induced Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mee-Young; Lee, Nari

    2016-01-01

    Yongdamsagan-tang, a traditional herbal formula, is used widely for the treatment of inflammation and viral diseases. In this study, we investigated whether Yongdamsagan-tang water extract (YSTE) affects testosterone propionate- (TP-) induced benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in a rat model. To induce BPH, rats were injected subcutaneously with 10 mg/kg of TP every day. YSTE was administrated daily by oral gavage at doses of 200 and 500 mg/kg along with the TP injection. After 4 weeks, prostates were collected, weighed, and analyzed. The relative prostrate weight was significantly lower in both YSTE groups (200 and 500 mg/kg/day) compared with the TP-induced BPH group. YSTE administration reduced the expression of proliferation markers PCNA, cyclin D1, and Ki-67 and the histological abnormalities observed in the prostate in TP-induced BPH rats. YSTE attenuated the increase in the TP-induced androgen concentration in the prostate. The YSTE groups also showed decreased lipid peroxidation and increased glutathione reductase activity in the prostate. These findings suggest that YSTE effectively prevented the development of TP-induced BPH in rats through antiproliferative and antioxidative activities and might be useful in the clinical treatment of BPH. PMID:27504137

  6. Inhibitory Effect of Yongdamsagan-Tang Water Extract, a Traditional Herbal Formula, on Testosterone-Induced Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunsook; Lee, Mee-Young; Jeon, Woo-Young; Lee, Nari; Seo, Chang-Seob; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2016-01-01

    Yongdamsagan-tang, a traditional herbal formula, is used widely for the treatment of inflammation and viral diseases. In this study, we investigated whether Yongdamsagan-tang water extract (YSTE) affects testosterone propionate- (TP-) induced benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in a rat model. To induce BPH, rats were injected subcutaneously with 10 mg/kg of TP every day. YSTE was administrated daily by oral gavage at doses of 200 and 500 mg/kg along with the TP injection. After 4 weeks, prostates were collected, weighed, and analyzed. The relative prostrate weight was significantly lower in both YSTE groups (200 and 500 mg/kg/day) compared with the TP-induced BPH group. YSTE administration reduced the expression of proliferation markers PCNA, cyclin D1, and Ki-67 and the histological abnormalities observed in the prostate in TP-induced BPH rats. YSTE attenuated the increase in the TP-induced androgen concentration in the prostate. The YSTE groups also showed decreased lipid peroxidation and increased glutathione reductase activity in the prostate. These findings suggest that YSTE effectively prevented the development of TP-induced BPH in rats through antiproliferative and antioxidative activities and might be useful in the clinical treatment of BPH. PMID:27504137

  7. Measuring disease-specific health status in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Measurement Committee of The American Urological Association.

    PubMed

    Barry, M J; Fowler, F J; O'Leary, M P; Bruskewitz, R C; Holtgrewe, H L; Mebust, W K

    1995-04-01

    In preparation for an outcomes study of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), two measures of disease-specific health status were developed to supplement a symptom score and overall health status measures. The symptom problem index (SPI) captures how troublesome patients find their urinary symptoms. The BPH impact index (BII) measures how much their urinary problems affect various domains of health. A prospective revalidation of the refined instruments (N = 108 BPH patients and 50 controls) documented that both indices had good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.88 and 0.79, respectively) and test-retest (r = 0.88 for both) reliabilities, correlated strongly with symptom scores (r = 0.86 and 0.77), and discriminated between BPH and control subjects (receiver-operating characteristic areas = 0.87 and 0.85, respectively). These indices were nearly as responsive as symptom scores in 50 men actively treated for BPH, and much more responsive than a non-disease-specific General Health Index (GHI), a Mental Health Index (MHI), and an Activity Index (AI). Finally, these measures capture most of the health status significance of BPH symptoms. In linear regression models constructed to predict scores on the GHI, MHI, and AI, symptom scores added little explanatory power to the SPI and, particularly, to the BII. These measures help clarify how BPH affects overall health status and function. Such measures have an important role to play in studies of the outcomes of treatment for BPH, and probably for other conditions that interfere with health status and function.

  8. Potentiometric sensors enabling fast screening of the benign prostatic hyperplasia drug alfuzosin in pharmaceuticals, urine and serum.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinod K; Singh, Ashok K; Gupta, Barkha

    2007-08-01

    The construction and characterization of potentiometric membrane electrodes are described for the quantification of alfuzosin, a drug used in a mono- and combined therapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The membranes of these electrodes consist of alfuzosin hydrochloride-tetraphenyl borate, (Az-TPB), chlorophenyl borate (Az-ClPB), and phosphotungstate (Az(3)-PT) ion associations as molecular recognition reagent dispersed in PVC matrix with dioctylpthalate as plasticizer. The performance characteristics of these electrodes, which were evaluated according to IUPAC recommendations, revealed a fast, stable and liner response for alfuzosin over the concentration ranges of 8.3 x 10(-6) to 1.0 x 10(-2) M, 3.8 x 10(-6) to 1.0 x 10(-2) M, 7.5 x 10(-7) to 1.0 x 10(-2) M AzCl with cationic slopes of 57.0, 56.0 and 58.5 mV/decade, respectively. The solubility product of the ion-pair and the formation constant of the precipitation reaction leading to the ion-pair formation were determined conductometrically. The electrodes, fully characterized in terms of composition, life span and usable pH range, were applied to the potentiometric determination of alfuzosin hydrochloride ion in different pharmaceutical preparations and biological fluids without any interference from excipients or diluents commonly used in drug formulations. The potentiometric method was also used in the determination of alfuzosin hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparations in four batches with different expiration dates. Validation of the method showed suitability of the proposed electrodes for use in the quality control assessment of alfuzosin hydrochloride. This potentiometric method offers the advantages of high-throughput determination, simplicity, accuracy, automation feasibility, and applicability to turbid and colored sample solutions. PMID:17979639

  9. Transurethral diode (810 nm) laser application for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pow-Sang, Mariela; Orihuela, Eduardo; Motamedi, Massoud

    1995-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of diode laser for the treatment of human BPH. The study included 11 patients with significant BPH that were treated with diode laser 15 watts for 180 seconds (Diomed, Inc., Gallium-Aluminum- Arsenide, 810 nm). Mean age was 69 years (range 59 to 84). Mean prostatic volume was 64.5 cc (range 30 to 96). In all cases the procedure was uncomplicated, the blood loss was minimal (< 100 cc) and all patients were discharged within the first 24 hours. On average, patients voided spontaneously after 4 days (range 1 to 11). There were no postoperative complications. At 6 months follow up the mean AUA-7 symptom score decreased from 24.27 to 8.12, the peak flow rate increased from 7.12 cc/sec, to 13.85 cc/sec, and the post void residual diminished from 58.5 cc to 38 cc. Our study suggests that diode laser therapy may offer a safe and effective alternative for the treatment of BPH.

  10. Alpha-blockade therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia: from a nonselective to a more selective alpha1A-adrenergic antagonist.

    PubMed

    Beduschi, M C; Beduschi, R; Oesterling, J E

    1998-06-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is very common in older men, causing symptoms that can markedly impair quality of life. Surgical treatment, typically transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), is highly effective but can be costly and is associated with the risk for significant morbidity. Medical treatments for BPH are targeted toward reducing bladder outlet obstruction either by androgen blockade to reduce prostatic volume or alpha-adrenergic blockade to relax the smooth muscle tone of the prostate. In recent years, understanding of the sympathetic innervation of the prostate has improved. This has been paralleled by the development of alpha-adrenergic blocking agents, from nonselective alpha-antagonists, to selective alpha1-antagonists, to the more selective alpha1A-antagonists. It is anticipated that more specific agents will optimize the therapeutic effectiveness of alpha-adrenergic blockade in the prostate while reducing the side effects associated with alpha-adrenergic blockade in other areas of the body, such as the vascular system. This article reviews the evolution of alpha-blockade therapy in management of BPH, focusing on tamsulosin, an agent targeted toward the alpha1A-adrenoceptor that predominates in the prostate. Clinical trials in Europe and the United States have provided evidence that tamsulosin is effective at doses of 0.4 and 0.8 mg/day. At both doses, tamsulosin is associated with significant improvements in the American Urological Association symptom score and the mean and peak urinary flow rates as compared with placebo. This once-daily alpha1A-adrenergic antagonist is well-tolerated, with a minimal potential for the side effects associated with alphas-blocker therapy.

  11. Medical and Surgical Treatment Modalities for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in the Male Patient Secondary to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Review.

    PubMed

    Macey, Matthew Ryan; Raynor, Mathew C

    2016-09-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) is one of the most common ailments affecting aging men. Symptoms typically associated with BPH include weak stream, hesitancy, urgency, frequency, and nocturia. More serious complications of BPH include urinary retention, gross hematuria, bladder calculi, recurrent urinary tract infection, obstructive uropathy, and renal failure. Evaluation of BPH includes a detailed history, objective assessment of urinary symptoms with validated questionnaires, and measurement of bladder function parameters, including uroflowmetry and postvoid residual. In general, treatment of LUTS associated with BPH is based on the effect of the symptoms on quality of life (QOL) and include medical therapy aimed at reducing outlet obstruction or decreasing the size of the prostate. If medical therapy fails or is contraindicated, various surgical options exist. As the elderly population continues to grow, the management of BPH will become more common and important in maintaining patient's QOL. PMID:27582609

  12. Transurethral resection of the prostate

    MedlinePlus

    TURP; Prostate resection - transurethral ... used to remove the inside part of your prostate gland using electricity. ... if you have benign prostatic hyperplasia ( BPH ). The prostate gland often grows larger as men get older. ...

  13. [Study of the remote results of five cases of unilateral condylar hyperplasia in the adult].

    PubMed

    Rey, P; Choitel, J; Souyris, F

    1984-01-01

    Exceptionally bilateral, condylar hyperplasia result in graduated facial asymmetry . The principal treatment is the condylectomy. (Condylar head and a portion of the neck of the condyle are removed.) Sometimes we must complete this condylectomy by mandibular osteotomy or resection of a segment of body of the mandible. The occlusal relationships of the teeth are affected by this process. That's why surgery treatment must be associated with orthodontics and prosthetic preparations. We use in post-operative immediate an intermaxillary fixation and traction by elastics. This allow to have a better congruence between the dental arches, and spare functional troubles. PMID:6587518

  14. Treatment satisfaction among men with concurrent benign prostatic hyperplasia and erectile dysfunction treated with tadalafil or other phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor combinations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lulu K; Goren, Amir; Boytsov, Natalie N; Donatucci, Craig F; McVary, Kevin T

    2016-01-01

    Objective Erectile dysfunction (ED) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) frequently co-occur in men aged ≥40, along with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to BPH. Given little real-world evidence on treatment use or satisfaction with treatment for concurrent BPH/LUTS and/or ED, this study examined medication regimens and differences in satisfaction and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) across regimens among men with concurrent BPH and ED. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted using an Internet survey of participants recruited through an online panel. Respondents (N=736) included men (aged ≥40) who self-reported a diagnosis of both ED and BPH with prescription treatment in the past 3 months for both conditions. Treatment satisfaction (eg, convenience and ease of planning) and HRQoL (eg, International Prostate Symptom Score, sleep quality) were self-reported. Generalized linear models examined the association of regimen with treatment satisfaction and HRQoL, adjusting for covariates (eg, age and comorbidities). Results Final analyses included participants (N=507) using: tadalafil once-daily monotherapy (22%), tadalafil for ED with an alternate BPH therapy (36%), or another phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor (PDE5-I) combination (41%). These groups represented the major categories of treatment regimens found in the sample, excluded participants with ambiguous regimens, and were aligned with current standard of care for BPH and ED. Overall, patients reported moderate levels of BPH and a moderate-to-severe degree of ED. Tadalafil monotherapy patients had higher treatment satisfaction scores and greater reported ease of treatment planning and convenience than PDE5-I combination patients. No significant intergroup differences were found on HRQoL. Conclusion A majority of patients (59%) took tadalafil alone or in combination for BPH/ED treatment. Tadalafil monotherapy patients reported greater treatment satisfaction than patients taking PDE5

  15. A systematic review of the effects and mechanisms of preoperative 5α-reductase inhibitors on intraoperative haemorrhage during surgery for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Zong, Huan-Tao; Peng, Xiao-Xia; Yang, Chen-Chen; Zhang, Yong

    2011-11-01

    5α-reductase inhibitors (5α-RIs), including finasteride and dutasteride, are commonly used medical therapies for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Many studies reported that preoperative 5α-RI had impact on intraoperative haemorrhage during surgery for BPH, but it was still in controversial. So, we conducted a systematic review of the effects and mechanisms of 5α-RIs on intraoperative bleeding for BPH. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Controlled Trail Register of Controlled Trials and the reference lists of retrieved studies were searched in the analysis. Sixteen publications involving 15 different randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and a total of 1156 patients were used in the analysis, including 10 RCTs for finasteride and five RCTs for dutasteride. We found that preoperative finasteride treatment decreases microvessel density (MVD) in resected prostate specimens. Total blood loss, blood loss per gram of resected prostate tissue and decreases in haemoglobin were all greatly reduced in the finasteride group as compared to controls. Dutasteride appeared to have no effect on bleeding. This meta-analysis shows that preoperative finasteride treatment could decrease intraoperative haemorrhage during surgery for BPH. Preoperative dutasteride had no effect on intraoperative haemorrhage, but further high-quality prospective studies are still needed to confirm this observation. PMID:21892196

  16. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs I can take? Drug treatments are available. Finasteride and dutasteride block a natural hormone that makes ... not help all patients. The side effects of finasteride are rare and mild, but they usually have ...

  17. The impact of surgical treatments for lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hyperplasia on male erectile function: A systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuo; Chen, Ping; Wang, Jun; Mao, Qi; Xiang, Han; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Xinghuan; Zhang, Xinhua

    2016-06-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)/benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is common in adult men and can impair erectile function (EF). It was believed surgical treatments for this illness can improve EF due to the relief of LUTS while they were also reported harmed EF as heating or injury effect. Current network meta-analysis aimed to elucidate this discrepancy.Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified. Direct comparisons were conducted by STATA and network meta-analysis was conducted by Generate Mixed Treatment Comparison. Random-effects models were used to calculate pooled standard mean difference and 95% confidence intervals and to incorporate variation between studies.Eighteen RCTs with 2433 participants were analyzed. Nine approaches were studied as transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), plasmakinetic resection of the prostate (PKRP), plasmakinetic enucleation of the prostate (PKEP), Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP), Holmium laser resection of the prostate (HoLRP), photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP), Thulium laser, open prostatectomy (OP), and laparoscopic simple prostatectomy (LSP). In direct comparisons, all surgical treatments did not decrease postoperative International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF)-5 score except PVP. Moreover, patients who underwent HoLEP, PKEP, Thulium laser, and TURP had their postoperative EF significantly increased. Network analysis including direct and indirect comparisons ranked LSP at the highest position on the variation of postoperative IIEF-5 score, followed by PKRP, HoLEP, TURP, Thulium laser, PKEP, PVP, HoLRP, and OP. In subgroup analysis, only PVP was found lower postoperative EF in the short term and decreased baseline group, whereas TURP increased postoperative IIEF-5 score only for patients with normal baseline EF. However, HoLEP and PKEP showed pro-erectile effect even for patients with decreased baseline EF and short-term follow-up. Our novel data demonstrating

  18. High fat diet promotes prostatic basal-to-luminal differentiation and accelerates initiation of prostate epithelial hyperplasia originated from basal cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh-Joon; Zhang, Boyu; Zhang, Li; Xin, Li

    2016-05-01

    Recent lineage tracing studies showed that the prostate basal and luminal cells in adult mice are two independent lineages under the physiological condition, but basal cells are capable of generating luminal progenies during bacterial infection-induced prostatitis. Because acute bacterial infection in human prostate tissues is relatively rare, the disease relevance of the bacterial infection-induced basal-to-luminal differentiation is uncertain. Herein we employ a high fat diet-induced sterile prostate inflammation model to determine whether basal-to-luminal differentiation can be induced by inflammation irrespective of the underlying etiologies. A K14-CreER model and a fluorescent report line are utilized to specifically label basal cells with the green fluorescent protein. We show that high fat diet promotes immune cell infiltration into the prostate tissues and basal-to-luminal differentiation. Increased cell proliferation accompanies basal-to-luminal differentiation, suggesting a concurrent regulation of basal cell proliferation and differentiation. This study demonstrates that basal-to-luminal differentiation can be induced by different types of prostate inflammation evolved with distinct etiologies. Finally, high fat diet also accelerates initiation and progression of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia that are originated from basal cells with loss-of-function of the tumor suppressor Pten. Because prostate cancer originated from basal cells tends to be invasive, our study also provides an alternative explanation for the association between obesity and aggressive prostate cancer.

  19. Effects of hexanic extract of serenoa repens (permixon® 160 mg) on inflammation biomarkers in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pétrissans, Marie‐Thérèse; Rouquet, Jérôme; Robert, Grégoire; de la Taille, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic prostatic inflammation (CPI) could be a cause of symptomatic or complicated benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). In previous in vitro and in vivo studies, Hexanic Extract of Serenoa repens (HESr) namely Permixon® has demonstrated potent anti‐inflammatory properties. With the aim to provide new insight onto HESr anti‐inflammatory properties in human we explore its effect on CPI biomarkers in men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) related to BPH using a non‐invasive method and investigate links between biomarkers and clinical symptoms. Methods An international, randomized, double‐blind, parallel‐group, tamsulosin‐controlled study was carried out in 206 men with BPH‐related LUTS. Patients received oral daily HESr 320mg or tamsulosin 0.4 mg during 3 months. The first urine stream after digital rectal examination (DRE) was collected at Day 1 and Day 90 and mRNA was extracted from prostatic epithelial cells desquaming in the lumen of the glands and seminal plasma fluid after DRE. mRNA quantification of the 29 most significant published inflammation markers in BPH and protein detection in urine was performed. Results At D90, a decrease in mean gene expression was observed for 65.4% of the markers detected in the HESr group versus 46.2% in the tamsulosin group. In the 15 most frequently expressed genes, this difference was higher (80% vs. 33% respectively). Three proteins (MCP‐1/CCL2, IP‐10/CXCL10, and MIF) were detected. At D90, a decrease in the number of patients who expressed MCP‐1/CCL2 and IP‐10/CXCL10 was observed only in the HESr group. Moreover, MIF expression was significantly reduced by HESr compared with tamsulosin (P = 0.007). Finally, in contrast to tamsulosin, the subgroup of patients treated by HESr and who over expressed MIF at baseline, had a higher response to the International Prostate Symptom Score (I‐PSS) than those who did not over express this protein (mean I‐PSS change: −6.4 vs. −4

  20. Selective estrogen receptor modulators regulate stromal proliferation in human benign prostatic hyperplasia by multiple beneficial mechanisms--action of two new agents.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Verma, Vikas; Sarswat, Amit; Maikhuri, J P; Jain, Ashish; Jain, Rajeev K; Sharma, V L; Dalela, Diwakar; Gupta, Gopal

    2012-04-01

    The existing drugs for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are partially effective with undesirable side-effects; hence new agents acting by different mechanism(s) are required as supplements. Modulation of estrogen receptor signaling using selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) offers an alternative approach for BPH management. Using human BPH-derived stromal cells and tissue explants in culture we evaluated two SERMs, DL-2-[4-(2-piperidinoethoxy)phenyl]-3-phenyl-2 H-1-benzopyran (BP) and Ormeloxifene (Orm) in comparison to Tamoxifen (Tam) and 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT). BP, OHT and Tam were more effective than Orm in reducing stromal cell proliferation of human BPH. BP was either equipotent or more effective than OHT and Tam in increasing estrogen receptor(ER)-ß, TGFß1, Fas and FasL, and in decreasing ER-α, AR, EGF-R and IGF-I expressions in BPH stromal cells. BP, Tam and Orm (1.0 mg/Kg) reduced rat prostate weights by almost same extent as Finasteride (Fin, 5.0 mg/Kg); however combination treatment (SERM+Fin) was more effective. BP was exceptionally efficient in reducing IGF-1 and cleaving PARP while combination treatments more effectively increased bax:bcl-2 ratio. Fin reduced acinar diameter and prostatic DHT level but increased testosterone, estradiol (E(2)) and E(2)/T+DHT ratio. SERMs, especially BP, reduced epithelial cell height drastically without significantly altering steroid hormone levels and E(2)/T+DHT ratio. Combination treatment reduced both acinar diameter and epithelial cell height with modest increase in E(2), T and E(2)/T+DHT. The study reveals the potential of SERMs per se for BPH management, and more effectively in combination with a 5α-reductase inhibitor. BP appears promising for further evaluation as a drug candidate for BPH and prostate cancer.

  1. The use of a single daily dose of tadalafil to treat signs and symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia and erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gacci, Mauro; Salvi, Matteo; Sebastianelli, Arcangelo; Vignozzi, Linda; Corona, Giovanni; McVary, Kevin T; Kaplan, Steven A; Maggi, Mario; Carini, Marco; Oelke, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    A strong and independent association between lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH) and erectile dysfunction (ED) has been widely evidenced in several clinical epidemiologic studies. Preclinical animal models have provided a great deal of information on potential common pathogenic mechanisms underlying these two clinical identities. Although the efficacy of the most commonly used treatments for LUTS/BPH is well defined, the negative impact of these treatments on sexual function – in particular, on ED – has triggered the search for new treatment options. In this regard, a new role for phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors in the treatment of LUTS/BPH and ED has been claimed. Tadalafil is one of the most extensively investigated phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors for this new indication. All evidence reported to date suggests that tadalafil 5 mg once daily is a safe and effective treatment option for both LUTS/BPH and ED. PMID:24400241

  2. Basal cell hyperplasia and basal cell carcinoma of the prostate: a comprehensive review and discussion of a case with c-erbB-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Montironi, R; Mazzucchelli, R; Stramazzotti, D; Scarpelli, M; López Beltran, A; Bostwick, D G

    2005-01-01

    Prostatic basal cell proliferations range from ordinary basal cell hyperplasia (BCH) to florid basal cell hyperplasia to basal cell carcinoma. The distinction between these forms of BCH, including the variant with prominent nucleoli (formerly called atypical BCH), and basal cell carcinoma depends on morphological and immunohistochemical criteria and, in particular, on the degree of cell proliferation. In florid BCH, the proliferation index is intermediate between ordinary BCH and basal cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry is also useful for identifying the cell composition of the basal cell proliferations, including the basal cell nature of the cells, their myoepithelial differentiation, and c-erbB-2 oncoprotein expression. Based on the information derived from the literature and on the appearance and follow up of the case presented here, florid BCH might represent a lesion with an intermediate position between ordinary BCH and basal cell carcinoma. However, criteria useful for the identification of those cases with a true precursor nature are not available. In general, basal cell carcinoma is seen as a low grade carcinoma. The immunohistochemical expression of the c-erbB-2 oncoprotein, similar to that seen in breast cancer, might have therapeutic importance. PMID:15735163

  3. Preliminary results on diode-laser assisted vaporization of prostate tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Seitz, Michael; Reich, Oliver; Bachmann, Alexander; Steinbrecher, Verena; Ackermann, Alexander; Stief, Christian

    2007-07-01

    Introduction and objectives: The aim was to identify the capability and the laser parameter of under water tissue vaporisation by means of a diode laser (1470 nm). Afterwards the feasibility and postoperative clinical outcome of vaporization of the prostate was investigated. Method: After acquiring suitable laser parameters in in-vitro experiments using a perfused tissue model patients (n=10) suffering from bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were treated by diode laser. Their clinical outcome, in terms of acceptance and post-operatively voiding were evaluated. The diode laser emitted light of the wavelength of 1470 nm at 50 W (Biolitec GmbH) and delivered to the tissue by means of a side-fire fibre introduced through a 24F continuous-flow cystoscope. Normal saline was used for irrigation with an additive of 1% ethanol. The prostatic lobes (volume range 35-80ml) were vaporized within the prostatic capsular using sweeping and push and pull technique. The mean time of laser application was 2400 sec (1220-4000 sec) resulting in applied energies of 121 kJ in the mean (range: 61-200kJ). Results: During laser treatment none of the 10 patients showed any significant blood loss or any fluid absorption (no ethanol uptake). Foley catheters were removed between 18 and 168 hours postoperatively (mean: 49.8h+/-46h). After removal of the catheter the mean peak urine flow rate increased from 8.9ml/s +/- 2.9ml/s pre-operatively in comparison to 15.7ml/s +/- 5 ml/s (p=0.049) post-operatively. 8/10 patients were satisfied with their voiding outcome. None of the patients showed appearance of urgency, dysuria, hematuria, or incontinence but two patients required re-catheterization. After a follow-up of 1month, 8/10 patients showed evidence of good results and are satisfied with the outcome. Two patients required consecutive TUR-P. After a follow-up of 6-month the 8 patients are still satisfied. Conclusions: This very early and limited experience using

  4. Laser bladder perforation from photoselective vaporization of prostate resulting in rhabdomyolysis induced acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Farag, E; Baccala, A A; Doutt, R F; Ulchaker, J; O'Hara, J

    2008-06-01

    Hyponatremia and its related comorbidities remain a concern after traditional transurethral resection of the prostrate (TURP). Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) laser coagulation therapy is a new, relatively bloodless procedure for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Perceived benefits with PVP laser TURP include excellent visualization of the operative field during urethral prostatic tissue vaporization and the reduced incidence of laser penetration through the prostatic capsular fibers once the capsule is reached. Theoretically, this would provide a low risk method of perforation during laser TURP. After literature review, we report this as the first case of laser bladder perforation as a complication arising from PVP therapy. This case report discusses the management of acute hyponatremic induced rhabdomyolysis with acute renal failure (ARF) and the recommendation to use sodium chloride vs. sterile water for bladder irrigation during PVP TURP procedures. PMID:18327155

  5. Efficacy and Safety of Silodosin and Dutasteride Combination Therapy in Acute Urinary Retention due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Single-Arm Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Kazuhisa; Koie, Takuya; Iwamura, Hiromichi; Imai, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ohyama, Chikara

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of combination therapy with dutasteride and silodosin in patients with acute urinary retention (AUR) caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Eighty consecutive patients with a first episode of AUR were enrolled in this study. All patients received silodosin 8 mg and dutasteride 0.5 mg daily. Trial without catheter (TWOC) was attempted every 2 weeks until 12 weeks after the initiation of medication. The primary endpoint was the rate of catheter-free status at 12 weeks. Voided volume (VV), postvoid residual urine (PVR), uroflowmetry, International Prostatic Symptoms Score (IPSS), and quality of life due to urinary symptoms (IPSS-QOL) were also measured. All patients were followed up for more than 12 weeks and were included in this analysis. The success rate of TWOC at 12 weeks was 88.8%. VV and maximum urinary flow rate were significantly higher at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks compared with the time of AUR (P < 0.001). IPSS and IPSS-QOL were significantly lower at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks compared with the time of AUR (P < 0.001). In conclusion, a combination of dutasteride and silodosin therapy may be effective and safe for patients with AUR due to BPH. PMID:27195288

  6. Efficacy and Safety of Silodosin and Dutasteride Combination Therapy in Acute Urinary Retention due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Single-Arm Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Kazuhisa; Koie, Takuya; Iwamura, Hiromichi; Imai, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ohyama, Chikara

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the efficacy of combination therapy with dutasteride and silodosin in patients with acute urinary retention (AUR) caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Eighty consecutive patients with a first episode of AUR were enrolled in this study. All patients received silodosin 8 mg and dutasteride 0.5 mg daily. Trial without catheter (TWOC) was attempted every 2 weeks until 12 weeks after the initiation of medication. The primary endpoint was the rate of catheter-free status at 12 weeks. Voided volume (VV), postvoid residual urine (PVR), uroflowmetry, International Prostatic Symptoms Score (IPSS), and quality of life due to urinary symptoms (IPSS-QOL) were also measured. All patients were followed up for more than 12 weeks and were included in this analysis. The success rate of TWOC at 12 weeks was 88.8%. VV and maximum urinary flow rate were significantly higher at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks compared with the time of AUR (P < 0.001). IPSS and IPSS-QOL were significantly lower at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks compared with the time of AUR (P < 0.001). In conclusion, a combination of dutasteride and silodosin therapy may be effective and safe for patients with AUR due to BPH. PMID:27195288

  7. [Correction of erectile dysfunction in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia using daily administration of tadalafil 5 mg against the background of combined drug therapy].

    PubMed

    Volkov, A A; Petrichko, M I; Budnik, N V

    2013-01-01

    The study included 59 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and erectile dysfunction (ED), inhibited inflammation in the prostate gland and with normal or medically normalized levels of total testosterone. All the patients underwent conservative therapy using dutasteride and tamsulosin, 21 of them (group 2) additionally received tadalafil 5 mg daily. Efficacy of treatment was assessed by self-assessment questionnaire of patients before treatment and 12 weeks after therapy. In group 1 of patients, the dynamics of the erectile function, sexual satisfaction and quality of life for patients was not revealed. In the group 2, improvement in erectile function in an average of 19 points was shown (IIEF-5 questionnaire). According to the AMS questionnaire, improvement in sexual function was demonstrated; in patients with compensated androgen deficiency, however, response to the treatment with tadalafil was less pronounced. According to BSFI score after 3 months of therapy with tadalafil, indicator of overall satisfaction of sexual life improved to 2.4 points (p < 0.002). According to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, anxiety in patients was reduced to the permissible values (p < 0.0002), the level of depression was decreased by almost 2-fold (p < 0.0002). The total IPSS score decreased from 13 to 9 points in average. The inclusion of tadalafil in complex of combined conservative therapy of patients with BPH not only improves sexual function but has a positive effect on symptoms of the disease and the psychological state of the patient. PMID:24437241

  8. Comparative Effectiveness of Oral Drug Therapies for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheng; Meng, Zhe; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are common in elder men and a number of drugs alone or combined are clinically used for this disorder. But available studies investigating the comparative effects of different drug therapies are limited. This study was aimed to compare the efficacy of different drug therapies for LUTS/BPH with network meta-analysis. Materials and Methods An electronic search of PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase was performed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing different drug therapies for LUTS/BPH within 24 weeks. Comparative effects were calculated using Aggregate Data Drug Information System. Consistency models of network meta-analysis were created and cumulative probability was used to rank different therapies. Results A total 66 RCTs covering seven different therapies with 29384 participants were included. We found that α-blockers (ABs) plus phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5-Is) ranked highest in the test of IPSS total score, storage subscore and voiding subscore. The combination therapy of ABs plus 5α-reductase inhibitors was the best for increasing maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax) with a mean difference (MD) of 1.98 (95% CI, 1.12 to 2.86) as compared to placebo. ABs plus muscarinic receptor antagonists (MRAs) ranked secondly on the reduction of IPSS storage subscore, although monotherapies including MRAs showed no effect on this aspect. Additionally, PDE5-Is alone showed great effectiveness for LUTS/BPH except Qmax. Conclusions Based on our novel findings, combination therapy, especially ABs plus PDE5-Is, is recommended for short-term treatment for LUTS/BPH. There was also evidence that PDE5-Is used alone was efficacious except on Qmax. Additionally, it should be cautious when using MRAs. However, further clinical studies are required for longer duration which considers more treatment outcomes such as disease progression, as well as basic research

  9. Can simple tests performed in the primary care setting provide accurate and efficient diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia? Rationale and design of the Diagnosis Improvement in Primary Care Trial.

    PubMed

    Carballido, J; Fourcade, R; Pagliarulo, A; Cricelli, C; Brenes, F; Pedromingo-Marino, A; Castro, R

    2009-08-01

    Effective treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) improves lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and patient quality of life, and reduces the risk of complications arising from disease progression. However, treatment can only be initiated when men with BPH are identified by accurate diagnostic tests. Current evidence suggests that diagnostic procedures employed by primary care physicians vary widely across Europe. The expected increases in BPH prevalence accompanying the gradual aging of the population, coupled with greater use of medical therapy, mean that general practitioners (GPs) are likely to have an increasingly important role in managing the condition. The GP/primary care clinic is therefore an attractive target location for strategies designed to improve the accuracy of BPH diagnosis. The Diagnosis Improvement in Primary Care Trial (D-IMPACT) is a prospective, multicentre, epidemiological study that aims to identify the optimal subset of simple tests applied by GPs in the primary care setting to diagnose BPH in men who spontaneously report obstructive (voiding) and/or irritative (storage) LUTS. These tests comprise medical history, symptom assessment with the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire, urinalysis, measurement of serum levels of prostate-specific antigen and subjective GP diagnosis after completing all tests including digital rectal examination. GP diagnoses and all other tests will be compared with gold-standard diagnoses provided by specialist urologists following completion of additional diagnostic tests. D-IMPACT will establish the diagnostic performance using a non-subjective and reproducible algorithm. An adjusted and multivariate analysis of the results of D-IMPACT will allow identification of the most efficient combination of tests that facilitate accurate BPH diagnosis in the primary care setting. In addition, D-IMPACT will estimate the prevalence of BPH in patients who present spontaneously to GPs with LUTS. PMID

  10. Enlarged prostate - after care

    MedlinePlus

    BPH - self-care; Benign prostatic hypertrophy - self-care; Benign prostatic hyperplasia - self-care ... Your health care provider may have you take a medicine called alpha-1- blocker. Most people find that these drugs help ...

  11. Transurethral Procedures for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Resulting From Benign Prostatic Enlargement: A Quality and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Wook; Choi, Jong Bo; Lee, Kyu-Sung; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Son, Hwancheol; Jung, Tae Young; Oh, Seung-June; Jeong, Hee Jong; Bae, Jae Hyun; Lee, Young-Suk

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Thanks to advancements in surgical techniques and instruments, many surgical modalities have been developed to replace transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). However, TURP remains the gold standard for the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). We conducted a meta-analysis on the efficacy and safety of minimally invasive surgical therapies for BPH compared with TURP. Methods This meta-analysis used a Medline search assessing the period from 1997 to 2011. A total of 784 randomized controlled trials were identified in an electronic search. Among the 784 articles, 36 randomized controlled trials that provided the highest level of evidence (level 1b) were included in the meta-analysis. We also conducted a quality analysis of selected articles. Results Only 2 articles (5.56%) were assessed as having a low risk of bias by use of the Cochrane collaboration risk of bias tool. On the other hand, by use of the Jadad scale, there were 26 high-quality articles (72.22%). Furthermore, 28 articles (77.78%) were assessed as high-quality articles by use of the van Tulder scale. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP) showed the highest reduction of the International Prostate Symptom Score compared with TURP (P<0.0001). Bipolar TURP, bipolar transurethral vaporization of the prostate, HoLEP, and open prostatectomy showed superior outcome in postvoid residual urine volume and maximum flow rate. The intraoperative complications of the minimally invasive surgeries had no statistically significant inferior outcomes compared with TURP. Also, there were no statistically significant differences in any of the modalities compared with TURP. Conclusions The selection of an appropriate surgical modality for BPH should be assessed by fully understanding each patient's clinical conditions. PMID:23869269

  12. Conformal external radiotherapy of prostatic carcinoma: requirements and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Troccaz, J; Menguy, Y; Bolla, M; Cinquin, P; Vassal, P; Laieb, N; Desbat, L; Dusserre, A; Dal Soglio, S

    1993-11-01

    The aim of conformal radiotherapy is to deliver, with high precision, a specific dose (which may be a high dose) to a planning target volume, concurrently with irradiating as little as possible healthy tissue and organs at risk. Radiation therapy may suffer from a number of problems that result in both over- or under-sizing the irradiation fields, making over-rough simplifications of the irradiation ballistics and delivering an insufficient tumoral dose (to spare critical organs and reduce toxicity). One of these problems lies in the accurate positioning of the planning target volume with respect to the irradiation system, thence in the correct execution of the ballistics. In this paper, we describe a system aiming at achieving a higher overall accuracy in the delivery of prostatic boost for carcinoma of the prostate. The system is based on the use of ultrasonic images for measuring the actual position of the prostate just before irradiation. Since these images are registered with pre-operative (CT or MR) images, the position and orientation of the planning target volume is computed with respect to the irradiation system, and can be corrected accordingly. First experiments have been performed on dummies, and the results are discussed.

  13. Comparative Effectiveness and Safety of Monodrug Therapies for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Associated With Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: A Network Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jin-Qiu; Mao, Chen; Wong, Samuel Yeung-Shan; Yang, Zu-Yao; Fu, Xiao-Hong; Dai, Xiao-Yu; Tang, Jin-Ling

    2015-07-01

    A wide array of drugs are available for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), but the evidence for the comparative effectiveness is controversial.The objective of this study is to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and safety of monodrug therapies for BPH.Data sources are MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library.We included randomized controlled trials that compared α-blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARIs), muscarinic receptor antagonists (MRAs), phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor (PDE5-Is), or placebo for the treatment of BPH.Comparative effectiveness and safety were pooled by both traditional meta-analysis and network meta-analysis. Summary effect size was calculated as mean difference (MD) and relative risk (RR), together with the 95% confidence intervals (CIs).This study included 58,548 participants from 124 trials in total. When compared with placebo, α-blockers, 5ARIs, and PDE5-Is reduced International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) by -1.35 to -3.67 points and increased peak urinary flow rate (PUF) by -0.02 to 1.95 mL/s, with doxazosin (IPSS: MD, -3.67[-4.33 to -3.02]; PUF: MD, 1.95[1.61 to 2.30]) and terazosin (IPSS: MD, -3.37 [-4.24 to -2.50]; PUF: MD, 1.21[0.74 to 1.66]) showing the greatest improvement. The improvement in the IPSS was comparable among tamsulosin, alfuzosin, naftopidil, silodosin, dutasteride, sildenafil, vardenafil, and tadalafil. The incidence of total adverse events and withdraws due to adverse events were generally comparable among various agents.In conclusion, α-blockers, 5ARIs, and PDE5-Is are effective for BPH, with doxazosin and terazosin appearing to be the most effective agents. Drug therapies for BPH are generally safe and well-tolerated, with no major difference regarding the overall safety profile. PMID:26166130

  14. Predictors of Individual Response to Placebo or Tadalafil 5mg among Men with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Secondary to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: An Integrated Clinical Data Mining Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Ferdinando; D’Anzeo, Gianluca; Henneges, Carsten; Rossi, Andrea; Büttner, Hartwig; Nickel, J. Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Background A significant percentage of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) achieve clinically meaningful improvement when receiving placebo or tadalafil 5mg once daily. However, individual patient characteristics associated with treatment response are unknown. Methods This integrated clinical data mining analysis was designed to identify factors associated with a clinically meaningful response to placebo or tadalafil 5mg once daily in an individual patient with LUTS-BPH. Analyses were performed on pooled data from four randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, clinical studies, including about 1,500 patients, from which 107 baseline characteristics were selected and 8 response criteria. The split set evaluation method (1,000 repeats) was used to estimate prediction accuracy, with the database randomly split into training and test subsets. Logistic Regression (LR), Decision Tree (DT), Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Random Forest (RF) models were then generated on the training subset and used to predict response in the test subset. Prediction models were generated for placebo and tadalafil 5mg once daily Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) analysis was used to select optimal prediction models lying on the ROC surface. Findings International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) baseline group (mild/moderate vs. severe) for active treatment and placebo achieved the highest combined sensitivity and specificity of 70% and ~50% for all analyses, respectively. This was below the sensitivity and specificity threshold of 80% that would enable reliable allocation of an individual patient to either the responder or non-responder group Conclusions This extensive clinical data mining study in LUTS-BPH did not identify baseline clinical or demographic characteristics that were sufficiently predictive of an individual patient response to placebo or once daily tadalafil 5mg. However, the study reaffirms the efficacy of

  15. Botanical derivatives for the prostate.

    PubMed

    Cristoni, A; Di Pierro, F; Bombardelli, E

    2000-08-01

    The prostate, after the age of 45 years, may undergo benign hyperplasia (BPH). Its etiology has not yet been completely explained, but different factors play a major role in its occurrence, among them, the sexual hormones (with a fundamental role of 5 alpha reductase). The 5-alpha reductase activity and inflammatory aspects in the prostate tissue can be effectively controlled with the use of highly standardized plant extracts (Pygeum africanum, Serenoa repens, etc.), which yield excellent results in the prophylaxis and treatment of the symptoms linked to prostate hypertrophy. The prostate tissue is not affected only by benign diseases but may also be subject to neoplastic transformation. From an epidemiological point of view, a vegetable derivative, lycopene, was linked with a lower occurrence of prostate carcinoma. A recent clinical study demonstrated that lycopene might not only prevent prostate cancer but also have therapeutic effects.

  16. Evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms related to uncomplicated benign prostatic hyperplasia in Italy: updated summary from AURO.it

    PubMed Central

    Casarico, Antonio; Fandella, Andrea; Galetti, Caterina; Hurle, Rodolfo; Mazzini, Elisa; Niro, Ciro; Perachino, Massimo; Sanseverino, Roberto; Pappagallo, Giovanni Luigi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The first Italian national guidelines were developed by the Italian Association of Urologists and published in 2007. Since then, a number of new drugs or classes of drugs have emerged for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) related to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), new data have emerged on medical therapy (monotherapies and combination therapies), new surgical techniques have come into practice, and our understanding of disease pathogenesis has increased. Consequently, a new update of the guidelines has become necessary. Methods: A structured literature review was conducted to identify relevant papers published between 1 August 2006 and 12 December 2010. Publications before or after this timeframe were considered only if they were recognised as important milestones in the field or if the literature search did not identify publications within this timeframe. The quality of evidence and strength of recommendations were determined according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation framework. Main findings: Decisions on therapeutic intervention should be based on the impact of symptoms on quality of life (QoL) rather than the severity of symptoms (International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) score). A threshold for intervention was therefore based on the IPSS Q8, with intervention recommended for patients with a score of at least 4. Several differences in clinical recommendations have emerged. For example, combination therapy with a 5α-reductase inhibitor plus α blocker is now the recommended option for the treatment of patients at risk of BPH progression. Other differences include the warning of potential worsening of cognitive disturbances with use of anticholinergics in older patients, the distinction between Serenoa repens preparations (according to the method of extraction), and the clearly defined threshold of prostate size for performing open surgery (>80 g). While the recommendations included in

  17. Treating Enlarged Prostate (BPH): Which Drugs Work Best

    MedlinePlus

    ... the prostate gets larger. This is called prostate enlargement, or BPH (benign prostatic hyperplasia). Why should I ... alpha-blocker doxazosin for a first treatment. Prostate enlargement affects millions of men, including about half of ...

  18. An open, comparative, multicentre clinical study of combined oral therapy with sildenafil and doxazosin GITS for treating Chinese patients with erectile dysfunction and lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhe; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Ji-Hong; Lu, Jun; Tang, Yu-Xin; Sun, Xiang-Zhou; Song, Wei-Dong; Gao, Bing; Guo, Ying-Lu; Xin, Zhong-Cheng

    2011-07-01

    This study sought to investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of combined oral therapy with sildenafil and doxazosin GITS compared to sildenafil monotherapy in treating Chinese patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) and lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH/LUTS). The trial was conducted in hospitals in Beijing, Shanghai, Changsha, Wuhan and Guangzhou, five major cities in China. A total of 250 patients diagnosed with ED and BPH/LUTS aged 50-75 years, and who had International Index of Erection Function-5 (IIEF-5) scores ≤21 and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) ≥10 points, were enrolled and randomly divided into Group A (168 cases; doxazosin GITS 4 mg once daily plus sildenafil 25-100 mg on demand) and Group B (82 cases; sildenafil 25-100 mg on demand). Efficacies were evaluated by IIEF-5 and IPSS scores and a quality of life (QoL) questionnaire, and adverse effects were evaluated during the treatment period. There were no statistically significant differences in mean age, and IIEF-5, IPSS and QoL scores pre-treatment between the two groups. After treatment, IIEF-5, IPSS and QoL scores were significantly improved in Group A, while only IIEF-5 scores were significantly improved in Group B compared with pre-treatment. There were no significant differences in side effects between the two groups. The results indicated that combined therapy with sildenafil and doxazosin GITS for the treatment of ED and BPH/LUTS is safe and effective compared to sildenafil monotherapy.

  19. Benign prostatic hyperplasia and new treatment options – a critical appraisal of the UroLift system

    PubMed Central

    McNicholas, Thomas Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The prostatic urethral lift procedure, more commonly known as UroLift, has been designed to improve male lower urinary tract symptoms while avoiding the complications and disadvantages of existing drug and surgical therapies. In particular, UroLift does not damage ejaculatory function or affect orgasmic sensation. It appears an option for men who wish to avoid long-term drug therapy, the side effects of drugs or surgery and who do not need or will not accept traditional surgical treatments. UroLift was introduced following a series of planned studies that led to US Food and Drug Administration approval in September 2013. UroLift has recently been approved by the UK National Institute for Clinical and Health Excellence (September 2015) as effective and safe and cost-effective for use in the UK health system. This review describes the device and the procedure and the evidence base that has led to those approvals. PMID:27274321

  20. The use of PDE-5 inhibitors in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Lythgoe, Casey; McVary, Kevin T

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to BPH and ED has recently been the subject of significant research due to the prevalence of both conditions concomitantly existing in older men. Many large-scale studies have demonstrated an association between erectile dysfunction and lower urinary tract symptoms. Although the mechanisms underlying the relationship between LUTS and ED are not fully elucidated, several theories are currently proposed in literature: the nitric oxide/cGMP pathway, RhoA/Rho-kinase signaling, pelvic atherosclerosis associated with chronic hypoxia, and autonomic adrenergic hyperactivity. The mechanisms by which these pathways affect the bladder, prostate, pelvic vasculature and spinal cord are also the subject of current research. In this chapter, we examine the randomized, placebo-controlled trials that have evaluated the use of PDE-5Is in LUTS, as well as randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) researching combination PDE-5Is and alpha blockers. PMID:24136683

  1. Cyclin D2 Overexpression in Transgenic Mice Induces Thymic and Epidermal Hyperplasia whereas Cyclin D3 Expression Results Only in Epidermal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.; LaCava, Margaret; Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; Jorcano, Jose L.; Richie, Ellen R.; Conti, Claudio J.

    2000-01-01

    In a previous report, we described the effects of cyclin D1 expression in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice. To study the involvement of D-type cyclins (D1, D2, and D3) in epithelial growth and differentiation and their putative role as oncogenes in skin, transgenic mice were developed which carry cyclin D2 or D3 genes driven by a keratin 5 promoter. As expected, both transgenic lines showed expression of these proteins in most of the squamous tissues analyzed. Epidermal proliferation increased in transgenic animals and basal cell hyperplasia was observed. All of the animals also had a minor thickening of the epidermis. The pattern of expression of keratin 1 and keratin 5 indicated that epidermal differentiation was not affected. Transgenic K5D2 mice developed mild thymic hyperplasia that reversed at 4 months of age. On the other hand, high expression of cyclin D3 in the thymus did not produce hyperplasia. This model provides in vivo evidence of the action of cyclin D2 and cyclin D3 as mediators of proliferation in squamous epithelial cells. A direct comparison among the three D-type cyclin transgenic mice suggests that cyclin D1 and cyclin D2 have similar roles in epithelial thymus cells. However, overexpression of each D-type cyclin produces a distinct phenotype in thymic epithelial cells. PMID:10980142

  2. Transurethral radio frequency ablation of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalin, John N.

    1996-05-01

    Since 1993, radiofrequency ablation of the prostate has been studied as a potential treatment for symptomatic bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two transurethral radiofrequency delivery systems have been developed to the point of undergoing initial human clinical trials. The TUNATM system involves focal interstitial radiofrequency energy application, while the TURAPYTM system involves a circumferential application of radiofrequency energy to the prostatic urethra via a simple delivery catheter. Experimental studies in animal models and human prostate tissue have demonstrated the nature of radiofrequency induced tissue heating and thermal injury. Observed thermal effects are relatively focused, with steep temperature gradients occurring over a few millimeters from the radiofrequency emission source. This allows precise and focused tissue treatment with little or no danger of injury to surrounding structures. Early human clinical experience in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia has demonstrated efficacy in the relief of voiding symptoms and safety and minimal morbidity associated with this technology. The existing operative approaches are relatively simple. Ongoing development of more versatile delivery systems for radiofrequency ablation of the prostate is expected. Results from larger clinical trials with longer term followup will eventually allow adequate assessment of the role of radiofrequency ablation in the surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  3. A prospective longitudinal survey of erectile function status in symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia patients treated with dutasteride.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Eiji; Hasegawa, Masanori; Ando, Toshiyuki; Matsushima, Masashi; Yuge, Kazuyuki; Ito, Yujiro; Miyajima, Akira; Oya, Mototsugu

    2016-06-01

    We prospectively evaluated erectile function (EF) using the Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) and the erectile hardness score (EHS) as well as urinary statuses using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS) before and 3, 6, and 12 months after a daily treatment with 0.5 mg dutasteride (DUT). Significant improvements were observed in IPSS and OABSS in 98 patients with the DUT treatment, and the effects were similar between 28 patients with potency with baseline SHIM of 8 or greater and 70 severe erectile dysfunction (ED) patients at baseline. In the 28 patients with potency, significant decreases were observed in SHIM and EHS after 3, 6, and 12 months of the DUT treatment, with the severity of ED according to SHIM deteriorating in half of these patients after 12 months of the DUT treatment. Eighteen out of 28 patients (64.3%) with potency at baseline had awareness of the occurrence of ED before the DUT treatment, were younger, and had higher SHIM and EHS just before the DUT treatment than their counterparts. Regular assessments of EF may be needed, especially in younger patients and those with higher levels of EF before the administration of DUT. PMID:26964647

  4. α-Blockers, 5-α-Reductase Inhibitors, Acetylcholine, β3 Agonists, and Phosphodiesterase-5s in Medical Management of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: How Much Do the Different Formulations Actually Matter in the Classes?

    PubMed

    Chughtai, Bilal; Thomas, Dominique; Kaplan, Steven

    2016-08-01

    Many monotherapies are currently available to clinically treat and alleviate symptoms of lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia: α-blockers, 5ARIs, PDE5Is, β-3-andrenoceptor agonists, and anticholinergic agents. Current studies have evaluated the effective of these treatments in comparison to other groups or in combination therapies. The current review evaluates the effectiveness of class formulations. Based on the findings, α-blockers, specifically doxazosin and terazosin, were most effective in reducing IPSS scores and peak urinary flow rate, while being most cost-effective. However, further clinical investigations are required to evaluate the clinical implications of different formulations. PMID:27476127

  5. Management of low risk and low PSA prostate cancer: long term results from the prostate cancer intervention versus observation trial.

    PubMed

    Wilt, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Management of localized prostate cancer is controversial due in part to the lack of randomized controlled trial information in men diagnosed with prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing. Men with low risk or low PSA (<10 ng/ml) prostate cancer comprise up to 70 % of men currently diagnosed. Evidence suggests an excellent long-term prognosis with observation though nearly 90 % are treated with surgery (radical prostatectomy), external beam radiation, or brachytherapy. Results from the Prostate cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial (PIVOT) provide high quality Level 1 evidence that observation compared to surgery results in similar long-term overall and prostate cancer survival, prevention of bone metastases and avoidance of surgery related harms. Combined with emerging evidence from screening, natural history, decision analysis and cost-effectiveness modeling studies, these data demonstrate that observation is the preferred treatment option for men with low risk and possibly low PSA prostate cancer. Recommending against PSA testing or, in men who still desire testing, raising thresholds of PSA values used to define abnormal, lengthening intervals between PSA tests and discontinuing testing in men with a life expectancy less than 15 years will reduce diagnostic and treatment related harms without adversely impacting overall or disease specific mortality and morbidity. PMID:24531789

  6. Application of the Modified Clavien Classification System to 120W Greenlight High-Performance System Photoselective Vaporization of the Prostate for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Is It Useful for Less-Invasive Procedures?

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ohseong; Park, Sohyun; Jeong, Min Young; Cho, Sung Yong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the accuracy and applicability of the modified Clavien classification system (CCS) in evaluating complications following photoselective vaporization of the prostate by use of the 120W GreenLight high-performance system (HPS-PVP). Materials and Methods The medical records of 342 men who underwent HPS-PVP were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were older than 40 years and had a prostate volume >30 mL and an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) ≥8. Patients with prostatic malignancy, neurogenic bladder, urethral stricture, large postvoid residual volume (>250 mL), previous prostatic surgery, or urinary tract infection were excluded. All operations were done by a single surgeon, and patients were followed up for uroflowmetry and IPSS postoperatively. All complications were recorded and classified according to the modified CCS, and methods of management were also recorded. Results The patients' mean age was 71.6±7.3 years; mean prostate volume was 50.0±17.0 mL, and 95 cases (27.7%) had volumes greater than 70 mL. The mean total IPSS was 21.7±7.9 preoperatively and 12.3±8.1 at the first month postoperatively. A total of 59 patients (17.3%) experienced postoperative complications until the first month after the surgery. Among them, 49 patients (14.3%) showed grade I complications, 9 patients (2.6%) showed grade II complications, and 1 patient (0.3%) showed a grade IIIb complication. No patients had complications graded higher than IIIb. Conclusions Although the modified CCS is a useful tool for communication among clinicians in allowing comparison of surgical outcomes, this classification should be revised to gain higher accuracy and applicability in the evaluation of postoperative complications of HPS-PVP. PMID:23614060

  7. Posttraumatic condylar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Lineaweaver, W; Vargervik, K; Tomer, B S; Ousterhout, D K

    1989-02-01

    Posttraumatic condylar hyperplasia can result in complex facial asymmetry composed of degrees of condylar and ramus overgrowth, malocclusion, and complementary maxillary deformity. Three patients with unilateral condylar hyperplasia are described to illustrate the scope of surgical and orthodontic treatment required to restore facial symmetry. Condylar hyperplasia with facial asymmetry should be recognized as a possible consequence of condylar injury, and further delineation of the onset and natural history of this deformity could lead to investigations or intervention before the establishment of all the components of the deformity. PMID:2735713

  8. Dutasteride plus Tamsulosin fixed-dose combination first-line therapy versus Tamsulosin Monotherapy in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia: a budget impact analysis in the Greek healthcare setting

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore the budget impact of dutasteride plus tamsulosin fixed-dose combination (DUT + TAM FDC) versus tamsulosin monotherapy, in the treatment of patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) from the perspective of the Greek healthcare insurance system. Methods A Microsoft Excel-based model was developed to estimate the financial consequences of adopting DUT + TAM FDC within the Greek healthcare setting. The model, compared six mutually exclusive health states in two alternative treatment options: current standard of care and the introduction of DUT + TAM FDC in the market. The model used clinical inputs from the CombAT study; data on resource use associated with the management of BPH in Greece were derived from expert panel, and unit cost data were derived from official reimbursement tariffs. A payer perspective was taken into account. As patient distribution data between public and private sectors are not available in Greece two scenarios were investigated, considering the whole eligible population in each scenario. A 4 year time horizon was taken into account and included treatment costs, number of transurethral resections of the prostate (TURPs) and acute urinary retention (AUR) episodes avoided. Results The clinical benefit from the market adoption of DUT + TAM FDC in Greece was 1,758 TURPs and 972 episodes of AUR avoided cumulatively in a four year period. The increase in total costs from the gradual introduction of DUT + TAM FDC to the Greek healthcare system ranges from €1.3 million in the first year to €5.8 million in the fourth year, for the public sector, and €1.2 million to €4.0 million, for the private sector. This represents an increase of 1.91% to 7.94% for the public sector and 1.10% 3.29% in the private sector, during the 4-year time horizon. Conclusions Budget impact analysis (BIA) results indicated that the gradual introduction of DUT + TAM FDC, would increase the overall

  9. Prostate Cryotherapy Monitoring Using Vibroacoustography: Preliminary Results of an Ex Vivo Study and Technical Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brian J.; Alizad, Azra; Greenleaf, James F.; Wilson, Torrence M.; Mynderse, Lance A.; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this research is to prospectively evaluate the feasibility of vibroacoustography (VA) imaging in monitoring prostate cryotherapy in an ex vivo model. Baseline scanning of an excised human prostate is accomplished by a VA system apparatus in a tank of degassed water. Alcohol and dry ice mixture are used to freeze two prostate tissue samples. The frozen prostates are subsequently placed within the water tank at 27°C and rescanned. VA images were acquired at prescribed time intervals to characterize the acoustic properties of the partially frozen tissue. The frozen prostate tissue appears in the images as hypoemitting signal. Once the tissue thaws, previously frozen regions show coarser texture than prior to freezing. The margin of the frozen tissue is delineated with a well-defined rim. The thawed cryolesions show a different contrast compared with normal unfrozen prostate. In conclusion, this pilot study shows that VA produces clear images of a frozen prostate at different temperature stages. The frozen tissue appears as a uniform region with well-defined borders that are readily identified. These characteristic images should allow safer and more efficient application of prostatic cryosurgery. These results provide substantial motivation to further investigate VA as a potential modality to monitor prostate cryotherapy intraoperatively. PMID:18990628

  10. Multicenter, prospective, comparative cohort study evaluating the efficacy and safety of alfuzosin 10 mg with regard to blood pressure in men with lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia with or without antihypertensive medications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li Tao; Lee, Sung Won; Park, Kwangsung; Chung, Woo Sik; Kim, Sae Woong; Hyun, Jae Seog; Moon, Doo Geon; Yang, Sang-Kuk; Ryu, Ji Kan; Yang, Dae Yul; Moon, Ki Hak; Min, Kweon Sik; Park, Jong Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of alfuzosin 10 mg monotherapy or combined antihypertensive medication on blood pressure (BP) in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH/LUTS) with or without antihypertensive medication. Methods This was a 3-month, multicenter, randomized, open-label study in 335 patients aged ≥45 years with a clinical diagnosis of BPH/LUTS by medical history and clinical examination, a total International Prostatic Symptom Score (IPSS) ≥8 points, a maximum flow rate >5 mL/sec and ≤15 mL/sec, and a voided volume ≥120 mL. Eligible subjects were randomized to receive alfuzosin 10 mg as monotherapy (group 1) or alfuzosin 10 mg + antihypertensive combination therapy (group 2). Based on baseline BP and hypertensive history with or without antihypertensive medications at first medical examination, group 1 was divided into two subgroups of normotensive and untreated hypertensive patients, and group 2 into two subgroups of controlled hypertensive and uncontrolled hypertensive patients. The primary study outcomes were change in IPSS, BP, and heart rate from baseline. Secondary outcomes were change in IPSS-quality of life score, maximum flow rate, average flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided volume. Results The overall BP change was not significantly different between groups 1 and 2 (systolic BP, P=0.825; diastolic BP, P>0.999). In patients with uncontrolled or untreated hypertension, alfuzosin 10 mg alone or combined with antihypertensive therapy significantly decreased systolic and diastolic BP. The mean difference in total IPSS and IPSS-quality of life scores from baseline between groups 1 and 2 was 0.45 (95% CI: −1.26, 2.16) and 0.12 (95% CI: −0.21, 0.45), respectively (both P>0.05). Maximum flow rate, average flow rate, voided volume, and post-voided volume at endpoint were numerically, but not significantly, changed from baseline (all P>0

  11. Prepubertal exposure to elevated manganese results in estradiol regulated mammary gland ductal differentiation and hyperplasia in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Dearth, Robert K; Hiney, Jill K; Srivastava, Vinod K; Hamilton, Alina M; Dees, William L

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that environmental substances regulating estrogenic pathways during puberty may be detrimental to the developing mammary gland (MG). Manganese (Mn) is a trace mineral required for normal physiological processes. Prepubertal exposure to Mn induces precocious puberty in rats, an event associated with early elevations in puberty-related hormones, including estradiol (E2). However, until now the effect of Mn-induced precocious MG development has not been determined. Therefore, we assessed the ability of prepubertal Mn exposure to advance normal MG development and alter E2 driven pathways involved in tumorigenesis. Sprague Dawley female rats were gavaged daily with either 10 mg/kg manganese chloride (MnCl2) or saline (control) from postnatal day (PND) 12 through PND 30. Blood and MGs were collected on PNDs 30 and 120. Compared to controls, serum E2 levels on PND 30 were elevated (p<0.05) in the Mn-treated group. Mn exposure significantly increased differentiated MG terminal ductal structures and the percentage of MG epithelial cells that stained positive for the proliferative marker, Ki67, at PND 30 (p<0.001) and PND 120 (p < 0.001). Levels of Mn (ppm) were not elevated in these MGs. Mn-treated animals (40%) exhibited reactive stroma and intra-luminal focal hyperplasia in hemotoxylin and eosin stained MGs at PND 120. Furthermore, Mn exposure resulted in elevated protein expression levels of estrogen receptor α, activator protein 2α, phosphorylated (p)-Akt, and p53 in MGs on PND 120, but not on PND 30. Collectively, these data show that exposure to a supplemental dose of Mn causes accelerated pubertal MG growth which can progress to adult hyperplasia; thus, providing evidence that early life Mn exposure may increase susceptibility to breast cancer. PMID:24845367

  12. [Additional administration of dutasteride in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia who did not respond sufficiently to α1-adrenoceptor antagonist : investigation of clinical factors affecting the therapeutic effect of dutasteride].

    PubMed

    Masuda, Mitsunobu; Murai, Tetsuo; Osada, Yutaka; Kawai, Masaki; Kasuga, Jun; Yokomizo, Yumiko; Kuroda, Shinnosuke; Nakamura, Mami; Noguchi, Go

    2014-02-01

    We performed additional administration of dutasteride in patients who did not respond sufficiently to α1-adrenoceptor antagonist treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) (LUTS/BPH). Among 76 registered patients, efficacy was analyzed in 58 patients. International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), subscores for voiding and storage symptoms and quality of life (QOL) on the IPSS, and Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS) were all significantly improved from the third month of administration compared to the time of initiating additional administration of dutasteride. Additional administration of dutasteride also significantly reduced prostate volume, and residual urine with the exception of the sixth month after administration. Age at initiation of administration and voiding symptom subscore on the IPSS were clinical factors affecting the therapeutic effects of dutasteride. The rate of improvement with treatment decreased with increasing age at initiation of dutasteride administration, and increased as voiding symptom subscore on the IPSS increased. Therefore, additional administration of dutasteride appears useful for cases of LUTS/BPH in which a sufficient response is not achieved with α1-adrenoceptor antagonist treatment. Because patients who have severe voiding symptoms or begin dutasteride at an early age may be expected to respond particularly well to dutasteride in terms of clinical efficacy, they were considered to be suitable targets for additional administration. PMID:24755815

  13. Danish Prostate Cancer Registry – methodology and early results from a novel national database

    PubMed Central

    Helgstrand, JT; Klemann, N; Røder, MA; Toft, BG; Brasso, K; Vainer, B; Iversen, P

    2016-01-01

    Background Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED) codes are computer-processable medical terms used to describe histopathological evaluations. SNOMED codes are not readily usable for analysis. We invented an algorithm that converts prostate SNOMED codes into an analyzable format. We present the methodology and early results from a new national Danish prostate database containing clinical data from all males who had evaluation of prostate tissue from 1995 to 2011. Materials and methods SNOMED codes were retrieved from the Danish Pathology Register. A total of 26,295 combinations of SNOMED codes were identified. A computer algorithm was developed to transcode SNOMED codes into an analyzable format including procedure (eg, biopsy, transurethral resection, etc), diagnosis, and date of diagnosis. For validation, ~55,000 pathological reports were manually reviewed. Prostate-specific antigen, vital status, causes of death, and tumor-node-metastasis classification were integrated from national registries. Results Of the 161,525 specimens from 113,801 males identified, 83,379 (51.6%) were sets of prostate biopsies, 56,118 (34.7%) were transurethral/transvesical resections of the prostate (TUR-Ps), and the remaining 22,028 (13.6%) specimens were derived from radical prostatectomies, bladder interventions, etc. A total of 48,078 (42.2%) males had histopathologically verified prostate cancer, and of these, 78.8% and 16.8% were diagnosed on prostate biopsies and TUR-Ps, respectively. Future perspectives A validated algorithm was successfully developed to convert complex prostate SNOMED codes into clinical useful data. A unique database, including males with both normal and cancerous histopathological data, was created to form the most comprehensive national prostate database to date. Potentially, our algorithm can be used for conversion of other SNOMED data and is available upon request. PMID:27729813

  14. [Benign prostatic hyperplasia: medical therapy].

    PubMed

    Schlenker, B; Gratzke, C; Weidlich, P; Seitz, M; Reich, O; Stief, C G

    2007-08-16

    Primary aims of the medical therapy for BPH are improvement of subjective symptoms and quality of life as well as the prevention of long-term complications such as acute urinary retention and renal failure. Secondary goal is inhibition of disease progression. The medical therapy should be tailored to each patient according to the individual complaints and risk of progression. Plant extracts, alpha-blockers and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors represent the most common prescribed substances. Recent data suggest beneficial effects for the use of antimuscarinic agents and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. PMID:17912863

  15. Smoking Is Associated with Acute and Chronic Prostatic Inflammation: Results from the REDUCE Study.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Daniel M; Nickel, J Curtis; Gerber, Leah; Muller, Roberto L; Andriole, Gerald L; Castro-Santamaria, Ramiro; Freedland, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Both anti- and proinflammatory effects of cigarette smoking have been described. As prostate inflammation is common, we hypothesized smoking could contribute to prostate inflammation. Thus, we evaluated the association of smoking status with acute and chronic inflammation within the prostate of men undergoing prostate biopsy. We retrospectively analyzed 8,190 men ages 50 to 75 years with PSA levels between 2.5 and 10 ng/mL enrolled in the Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events study. Smoking status was self-defined as never, former, or current. Prostate inflammation was assessed by systematic central review blinded to smoking status. The association of smoking with inflammation in the baseline, 2-year, and 4-year biopsies was evaluated with univariable and multivariable logistic regressions. At study enrollment, 1,233 (15%), 3,203 (39%), and 3,754 (46%) men were current, former, and never smokers, respectively. Current smokers were significantly younger and had smaller prostates than former and never smokers (all P < 0.05). Former smokers were significantly heavier than current and never smokers (P < 0.001). Acute and chronic prostate inflammations were identified in 1,261 (15%) and 6,352 (78%) baseline biopsies, respectively. In univariable analysis, current smokers were more likely to have acute inflammation than former (OR, 1.35; P, 0.001) and never smokers (OR, 1.36; P, 0.001). The results were unchanged at 2- and 4-year biopsies. In contrast, current smoking was linked with chronic inflammation in the baseline biopsy, but not at 2- and 4-year biopsies. In conclusion, among men undergoing prostate biopsy, current smoking was independently associated with acute and possibly chronic prostate inflammations. PMID:25644151

  16. Prostate Enlargement: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Griffin Rodgers, Director of the NIDDK Clinical Trials Current research studies and how you can volunteer Community Outreach and Health Fairs Science-based information and tips for planning an outreach effort or community event For Health Care Professionals Patient and provider resources ...

  17. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into normal rabbit arteries results in prolonged vascular cell activation, inflammation, and neointimal hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, K D; Dunn, P F; Owens, J W; Schulick, A H; Virmani, R; Sukhova, G; Libby, P; Dichek, D A

    1995-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are capable of high efficiency in vivo arterial gene transfer, and are currently in use as therapeutic agents in animal models of vascular disease. However, despite substantial data on the ability of viruses to cause vascular inflammation and proliferation, and the presence in current adenovirus vectors of viral open reading frames that are translated in vivo, no study has examined the effect of adenovirus vectors alone on the arterial phenotype. In a rabbit model of gene transfer into a normal artery, we examined potential vascular cell activation, inflammation, and neointimal proliferation resulting from exposure to replication-defective adenovirus. Exposure of normal arteries to adenovirus vectors resulted in: (a) pronounced infiltration of T cells throughout the artery wall; (b) upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in arterial smooth muscle cells; (c) neointimal hyperplasia. These findings were present both 10 and 30 d after gene transfer, with no evidence of a decline in severity over time. Adenovirus vectors have pleiotropic effects on the arterial wall and cause significant pathology. Interpretation of experimental protocols that use adenovirus vectors to address either biological or therapeutic issues should take these observations into account. These observations should also prompt the design of more inert gene transfer vectors. Images PMID:8675667

  18. Initial results of a positron tomograph for prostate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.S.; Choong, W.S.; Moses, W.W.; Qi, J.; Hu, J.; Wang,G.C.; Wilson, D.; Oh, S.; Huesman, R.H.; Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    2004-11-29

    We present the status and initial images of a positrontomograph for prostate imaging that centers a patient between a pair ofexternal curved detector banks (ellipse: 45 cm minor, 70 cm major axis).The distance between detector banks adjusts to allow patient access andto position the detectors as closely as possible for maximum sensitivitywith patients of various sizes. Each bank is composed of two axial rowsof 20 CTI PET Systems HR+ block detectors for a total of 80 modules inthe camera. Compared to an ECAT HR PET system operating in 3D mode, ourcamera uses about one-quarter the number of detectors and hasapproximately the same sensitivity for a central point source, becauseour detectors are close to the patient. The individual detectors areangled in the plane to point towards the prostate to minimize resolutiondegradation in that region. The detectors are read out by modified CTIdata acquisition electronics. We have completed construction of thegantry and electronics, have developed detector calibration and dataacquisition software, and are taking coincidence data. We demonstratethat we can clearly visualize a "prostate" in a simple phantom.Reconstructed images of two phantoms are shown.

  19. Transgenic Expression of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4 Results in Epidermal Hyperplasia, Hypertrophy, and Severe Dermal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; Gimenez-Conti, Irma B.; LaCava, Margaret; Martinez, Luis A.; Conti, Claudio J.; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.

    2001-01-01

    In a previous report we have described the effects of expression of D-type cyclins in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice. To study the involvement of the D-type cyclin partner cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) in epithelial growth and differentiation, transgenic mice were generated carrying the CDK4 gene under the control of a keratin 5 promoter. As expected, transgenic mice showed expression of CDK4 in the epidermal basal-cell layer. Epidermal proliferation increased dramatically and basal cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy were observed. The hyperproliferative phenotype of these transgenic mice was independent of D-type cyclin expression because no overexpression of these proteins was detected. CDK4 and CDK2 kinase activities increased in transgenic animals and were associated with elevated binding of p27Kip1 to CDK4. Expression of CDK4 in the epidermis results in an increased spinous layer compared with normal epidermis, and a mild hyperkeratosis in the cornified layer. In addition to epidermal changes, severe dermal fibrosis was observed and part of the subcutaneous adipose tissue was replaced by connective tissue. Also, abnormal expression of keratin 6 associated with the hyperproliferative phenotype was observed in transgenic epidermis. This model provides in vivo evidence for the role of CDK4 as a mediator of proliferation in epithelial cells independent of D-type cyclin expression. PMID:11438484

  20. Fibre Diffraction Analysis of Skin Offers a Very Early and Extremely Accurate Diagnostic Test for Prostate Cancer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    James, Veronica J.; O’Malley Ford, Judith M.

    2014-01-01

    Double blind analysis of a batch of thirty skin tissue samples from potential prostate cancer sufferers correctly identified all “control” patients, patients with high and low grade prostate cancers, the presence of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), perineural invasions, and the one lymphatic invasion. Identification was by analysis of fibre diffraction patterns interpreted using a schema developed from observations in nine previous studies. The method, schema, and specific experiment results are reported in this paper, with some implications then drawn.

  1. Condylar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Uma; Chandra, Subhash; Raju, B H V Rama Krishnam; Anitha, G; Srikanth, K Venkata; Laheji, Afshan

    2012-01-01

    Condylar hyperplasia (CH), as the name suggests, affects mandibular condyle producing overgrowth of condyle, which is characterized by a slowly progressive, usually unilateral enlargement of the mandible, facial asymmetry and deviation of chin to the unaffected side. The condition is known to be self-limiting, usually begins around puberty, but may not be recognized until later in life. This paper reports a case of severe facial asymmetry secondary to CH, which was successfully treated by high condylectomy only. PMID:23404027

  2. Focal degeneration of basal cells and the resultant auto-immunoreactions: a novel mechanism for prostate tumor progression and invasion.

    PubMed

    Man, Yan-Gao; Gardner, William A

    2008-01-01

    The development of human prostate cancer is believed to be a multistep process, progressing sequentially from normal, to hyperplasia, to prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and to invasive and metastatic lesions. High grade PIN has been generally considered as the direct precursor of invasive lesions, and the progression of PIN is believed to be triggered primarily, if not solely, by the overproduction of proteolytic enzymes predominately by cancer cells, which result in the degradation of the basement membrane. These theories, however, are hard to reconcile with two main facts: (1) only about 30% untreated PIN progress to invasive stage, while none of the current approaches could accurately identify the specific PIN or individuals at greater risk for progression, and (2) results from recent world-wide clinical trials with a wide variety of proteolytic enzyme inhibitors have been very disappointing, casting doubt on the validity of the proteolytic enzyme theory. Since over 90% of prostate cancer-related deaths result from invasion-related illness and the incidence of PIN could be up to 16.5-25% in routine or ultrasound guided prostate biopsy, there is an urgent need to uncover the intrinsic mechanism of prostate tumor invasion. Promoted by the facts that the basal cell population is the source of several tumor suppressors and the absence of the basal cell layer is the most distinct feature of invasive lesions, our recent studies have intended to identify the early alterations of basal cell layers and their impact on tumor invasion using multidisciplinary approaches. Our studies revealed that a subset of pre-invasive tumors contained focal disruptions (the absence of basal cells resulting in a gap greater than the combined size of at least three epithelial cells) in surrounding basal cell layers. Compared to their non-disrupted counterparts, focally disrupted basal cell layers had several unique features: (1) significantly lower proliferation; (2

  3. Bioenergetic theory of prostate malignancy.

    PubMed

    Costello, L C; Franklin, R B

    1994-09-01

    Normal and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) prostate is characterized by the presence of extraordinarily high levels of citrate. Presumably, this results from the inability of the prostate epithelial cells to oxidize citrate due to a limiting mitochondrial (m-) aconitase. In contrast, prostate carcinoma (CA) is not characterized by high citrate levels. Malignant prostate epithelial cells apparently undergo a metabolic transformation from citrate-producing to citrate-oxidizing cells. A consequence of citrate production in normal and BPH cells is an inefficient and low level of ATP production. It is proposed that the process of malignancy necessitates an energy production that cannot be provided by citrate-producing cells. Consequently, the transformation of prostate epithelial cells to citrate-oxidizing cells which increases the energy production capability is essential to the process of malignancy and metastasis. The metabolic transformation likely occurs as a premalignant or early malignant stage. This bioenergetic theory of prostate malignancy, if correct, will provide new approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of CA. PMID:7520580

  4. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease.

  5. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease. PMID:27453073

  6. Castration Therapy of Prostate Cancer Results in Downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ubaidi, Firas L.T.; Schultz, Niklas; Egevad, Lars; Granfors, Torvald; Helleday, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Background and Purpose: Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation in combination with radiotherapy of prostate cancer is used to improve radioresponsiveness and local tumor control. Currently, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Because hypoxia causes resistance to radiotherapy, we wanted to test whether castration affects the degree of hypoxia in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In 14 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, six to 12 prostatic needle core biopsy specimens were taken prior to castration therapy. Bilateral orchidectomy was performed in 7 patients, and 7 were treated with a GnRH-agonist (leuprorelin). After castrationm two to four prostatic core biopsy specimens were taken, and the level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in cancer was determined by immunofluorescence. Results: Among biopsy specimens taken before castration, strong HIF-1{alpha} expression (mean intensity above 30) was shown in 5 patients, weak expression (mean intensity 10-30) in 3 patients, and background levels of HIF-1{alpha} (mean intensity 0-10) in 6 patients. Downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} expression after castration was observed in all 5 patients with strong HIF-1{alpha} precastration expression. HIF-1{alpha} expression was also reduced in 2 of 3 patients with weak HIF-1{alpha} precastration expression. Conclusions: Our data suggest that neoadjuvant castration decreases tumor cell hypoxia in prostate cancer, which may explain increased radiosensitivity after castration.

  7. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Interim Results of a Prospective Phase II Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Pawlicki, Todd; Cotrutz, Cristian; Presti, Joseph C.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: The radiobiology of prostate cancer favors a hypofractionated dose regimen. We report results of a prospective Phase II clinical trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-one low-risk prostate cancer patients with 6 months' minimum follow-up received 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy with image-guided SBRT alone using the CyberKnife. The early (<3 months) and late (>6 months) urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using validated quality of life questionnaires (International Prostate Symptom Score, Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite) and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity criteria. Patterns of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response are analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 33 months. There were no RTOG Grade 4 acute or late rectal/urinary complications. There were 2 patients with RTOG Grade 3 late urinary toxicity and none with RTOG Grade 3 rectal complications. A reduced rate of severe rectal toxicities was observed with every-other-day vs. 5 consecutive days treatment regimen (0% vs. 38%, p = 0.0035). A benign PSA bounce (median, 0.4 ng/mL) was observed in 12 patients (29%) occurring at 18 months (median) after treatment. At last follow-up, no patient has had a PSA failure regardless of biochemical failure definition. Of 32 patients with 12 months minimum follow-up, 25 patients (78%) achieved a PSA nadir {<=}0.4 ng/mL. A PSA decline to progressively lower nadirs up to 3 years after treatment was observed. Conclusions: The early and late toxicity profile and PSA response for prostate SBRT are highly encouraging. Continued accrual and follow-up will be necessary to confirm durable biochemical control rates and low toxicity profiles.

  8. QUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF PROSTATIC SECRETION

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Charles; Clark, Philip Johnson

    1940-01-01

    Cystic hyperplasia of the prostate occurs spontaneously in senile dogs only when they possess physiologically effective amounts of androgenic hormone. The cysts are closely grouped and radially arranged in a conical manner with the base of the cone at the periphery of the gland. Flattened and columnar epithelium, varying from about 5 to 25µ are seen in each cyst. The cysts communicate with the urethra by way of ducts. Both normal and cystic prostates undergo marked atrophy when the testes are removed, the chief difference 3 months after orchiectomy being the persistence of slightly dilated clefts and spaces at the site of the former cysts in the senile state. In the castrate dog whose prostate gland is being reconstructed as result of the influence of daily injections of androgen, certain doses of estrogen prevent increase of secretion and still larger doses greatly depress the output of the gland. In dogs so treated by daily injections of testosterone propionate, 10 mg., the amount of secretion is maintained from day to day at a level by daily injections of stilbestrol, 0.4 to 0.6 mg. and greatly depressed by doses of 1 to 1.5 mg. When the larger amounts of estrogen are used, together with androgen, squamous metaplasia occurs in the posterior lobe of the prostate while the epithelium of the acini decreases in height to cuboidal or low columnar form; these histological signs of activity of both androgen and estrogen on the prostate show that inhibition of the male hormone by stilbestrol is incomplete at these ratios. In dogs with either normal or cystic prostate glands, the prostate decreases in size when estrogen is injected in amounts to depress prostatic secretion profoundly. The gland is maintained in an atrophic state and overdosage avoided by controlled periodic injections of stilbestrol until secretion is reduced to the minimum, followed by free intervals, the estrogen being again administered when secretion measurably increases. The shrinkage is related to

  9. The use of 5-alpha reductase inhibitors for the prevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Eun-mi; El-Ayass, Walid; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B

    2010-07-01

    The use of 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors has been studied not only in benign prostatic hyperplasia, but as a chemopreventive strategy in prostate cancer. Both finasteride and dutasteride, 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors (5ARI), have been shown to decrease the risk of prostate cancer. The results of the REDUCE trial using the dual alpha-reductase isoenzyme inhibitor dutasteride, has recently been published by Andriole et al. in the New England Journal of Medicine. Certain considerations regarding its use and applicability to men with high risk of developing prostate cancer are herein discussed. PMID:20574153

  10. [Initial results in man of immunolymphoscintigraphy of cancer of the prostate].

    PubMed

    Teillac, P; Leroy, M; Rain, J D; Bruneau, J; Cheval, E; Ketels, F; Rabaud, B; Saccavini, J C; Najean, Y; Le Duc, A

    1989-01-01

    The loco-regional investigation of carcinoma of the prostate usually comprises ilio-obturator lymphadenectomy. This procedure carries a significant morbidity. Immunolymphoscintigraphy may provide a non-invasive alternative to this operation. Monoclonal (MAB) 227 A anti-prostatic acid phosphatase antibodies have been produced and selected for their affinity and specificity. This MAB was fragmented to its F (ab')2 form and marked with Iodine 123. Fifteen patients with prostate cancer were given 100 to 400 micrograms of the MAB by periprostatic perineal injection. The region was scanned 1 hr, 3 hrs, 6 hrs and 24 hrs after the injection. The results of the immunolymphoscintigraphy were compared with the histology of the ganglia removed at surgery or needle biopsy guided by CT scanning. In 13 cases the results were concordant for the two techniques (10 negatives and 3 positives). Two patients showed extra-prostatic fixation whilst the histology remained negative. Immunolymphoscintigraphy may therefore provide a simple method of detecting local metastases of carcinoma of the prostate if these initial results are confirmed.

  11. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET/CT: False-Positive Results due to Sarcoidosis?

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Robert M.; Djannatian, Manoutschehr; Czech, Norbert; Nitsche, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 72-year-old male patient who developed sarcoidosis of the mediastinal lymph nodes, the liver, and the prostate 11 years ago. Seven years later, he underwent transurethral resection of the prostate by laser due to hematuria. Pathology of the resected chips showed a ‘granulomatous prostatitis with epitheloid cells’. Malignancy was histologically excluded at that time. Four years later, he was diagnosed with an undifferentiated prostate carcinoma, with a Gleason score of 5 + 4 = 9. After initiation of antihormonal therapy, he underwent radical prostatectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy, which revealed a pT3b pN1 carcinoma with infiltrated resection margins. Three months later, the prostate-specific antigen level was 1.4 ng/ml, and a local recurrence was suspected by ultrasound; consequently, a 68Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT was performed. This examination seemed to confirm the local recurrence, a right pelvic lymph node metastasis, and a hepatic metastasis. However, ultrasound with contrast medium could not confirm the metastatic spread to the liver. In palliative intention, radiotherapy of the pelvis was done. After 50 Gy, the supposed recurrence had markedly shrunk, and an additional boost dose with 16.2 Gy was applied. Two years later, the patient is still free of disease. Due to this clinical development, we doubt the diagnosis of a fulminant progression of the prostate cancer as suspected by PSMA-PET/CT. Instead, we suspect a recurrence of the previously proven sarcoidosis leading to false-positive results. Our focus in this report is on the interaction between PSMA-PET/CT and sarcoidosis. Another report on a case of sarcoidosis of the spleen seems to confirm this possibility [Kobe et al: Clin Nucl Med 2015;40: 897–898]. PMID:27721768

  12. Urethral Strictures and Stenoses Caused by Prostate Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mang L.; Correa, Andres F.; Santucci, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia is on the rise. As a result, the volume of prostate treatment and treatment-related complications is also increasing. Urethral strictures and stenoses are relatively common complications that require individualized management based on the length and location of the obstruction, and the patient’s overall health, and goals of care. In general, less invasive options such as dilation and urethrotomy are preferred as first-line therapy, followed by more invasive substitution, flap, and anastomotic urethroplasty. PMID:27601967

  13. Urethral Strictures and Stenoses Caused by Prostate Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mang L.; Correa, Andres F.; Santucci, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia is on the rise. As a result, the volume of prostate treatment and treatment-related complications is also increasing. Urethral strictures and stenoses are relatively common complications that require individualized management based on the length and location of the obstruction, and the patient’s overall health, and goals of care. In general, less invasive options such as dilation and urethrotomy are preferred as first-line therapy, followed by more invasive substitution, flap, and anastomotic urethroplasty.

  14. Urethral Strictures and Stenoses Caused by Prostate Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mang L; Correa, Andres F; Santucci, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia is on the rise. As a result, the volume of prostate treatment and treatment-related complications is also increasing. Urethral strictures and stenoses are relatively common complications that require individualized management based on the length and location of the obstruction, and the patient's overall health, and goals of care. In general, less invasive options such as dilation and urethrotomy are preferred as first-line therapy, followed by more invasive substitution, flap, and anastomotic urethroplasty. PMID:27601967

  15. Antioxidant Treatment Promotes Prostate Epithelial Proliferation in Nkx3.1 Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Erin E.; Anderson, Philip D.; Logan, Monica; Abdulkadir, Sarki A.

    2012-01-01

    Discordant results in preclinical and clinical trials have raised questions over the effectiveness of antioxidants in prostate cancer chemoprevention. Results from the large-scale Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) showed that antioxidants failed to prevent, and in some cases promoted, prostate cancer formation in men without a history of the disease. One possible explanation for these alarming results is the notion that the effects of antioxidant treatment on the prostate are modified by specific, intrinsic genetic risk factors, causing some men to respond negatively to antioxidant treatment. Loss of expression of the homeobox transcription factor NKX3.1 in the prostate is frequently associated with human prostate cancer. Nkx3.1 mutant mice display prostatic hyperplasia and dysplasia and are used as a model of the early stages of prostate cancer initiation. While the mechanisms by which Nkx3.1 loss promotes prostate tumorigenicity are not completely understood, published data have suggested that elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with Nkx3.1 loss may be a causative factor. Here we have tested this hypothesis by treating Nkx3.1 mutant mice with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) for 13 weeks post-weaning. Surprisingly, while NAC treatment decreased ROS levels in Nkx3.1 mutant mouse prostates, it failed to reduce prostatic epithelial hyperplasia/dysplasia. Rather, NAC treatment increased epithelial cell proliferation and promoted the expression of a pro-proliferative gene signature. These results show that ROS do not promote proliferation in the Nkx3.1-null prostate, but instead inhibit proliferation, suggesting that antioxidant treatment may encourage prostate epithelial cell proliferation early in prostate tumorigenesis. Our findings provide new insight that may help explain the increased prostate cancer risk observed with vitamin E treatment in the SELECT trial and emphasize the need for preclinical studies using accurate

  16. Comparative analysis of prostate-specific antigen free survival outcomes for patients with low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer treatment by radical therapy. Results from the Prostate Cancer Results Study Group.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Peter; Billiet, Ignace; Bostwick, David; Dicker, Adam P; Frank, Steven; Immerzeel, Jos; Keyes, Mira; Kupelian, Patrick; Lee, W Robert; Machtens, Stefan; Mayadev, Jyoti; Moran, Brian J; Merrick, Gregory; Millar, Jeremy; Roach, Mack; Stock, Richard; Shinohara, Katsuto; Scholz, Mark; Weber, Ed; Zietman, Anthony; Zelefsky, Michael; Wong, Jason; Wentworth, Stacy; Vera, Robyn; Langley, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Very few comparative studies to date evaluate the results of treatment options for prostate cancer using the most sensitive measurement tools. PSA has been identified as the most sensitive tool for measuring treatment effectiveness. To date, comprehensive unbiased reviews of all the current literature are limited for prostate cancer. This is the first large scale comprehensive review of the literature comparing risk stratified patients by treatment option and with long-term follow-up. The results of the studies are weighted, respecting the impact of larger studies on overall results. The study identified a lack of uniformity in reporting results amongst institutions and centres. A large number of studies have been conducted on the primary therapy of prostate cancer but very few randomized controlled trials have been conducted. The comparison of outcomes from individual studies involving surgery (radical prostatectomy or robotic radical prostatectomy), external beam radiation (EBRT) (conformal, intensity modulated radiotherapy, protons), brachytherapy, cryotherapy or high intensity focused ultrasound remains problematic due to the non-uniformity of reporting results and the use of varied disease outcome endpoints. Technical advances in these treatments have also made long-term comparisons difficult. The Prostate Cancer Results Study Group was formed to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of prostate cancer treatments. This international group conducted a comprehensive literature review to identify all studies involving treatment of localized prostate cancer published during 2000-2010. Over 18,000 papers were identified and a further selection was made based on the following key criteria: minimum/median follow-up of 5 years; stratification into low-, intermediate- and high-risk groups; clinical and pathological staging; accepted standard definitions for prostate-specific antigen failure; minimum patient

  17. Widespread telomere instability in prostatic lesions.

    PubMed

    Tu, LiRen; Huda, Nazmul; Grimes, Brenda R; Slee, Roger B; Bates, Alison M; Cheng, Liang; Gilley, David

    2016-05-01

    A critical function of the telomere is to disguise chromosome ends from cellular recognition as double strand breaks, thereby preventing aberrant chromosome fusion events. Such chromosome end-to-end fusions are known to initiate genomic instability via breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. Telomere dysfunction and other forms of genomic assault likely result in misregulation of genes involved in growth control, cell death, and senescence pathways, lowering the threshold to malignancy and likely drive disease progression. Shortened telomeres and anaphase bridges have been reported in a wide variety of early precursor and malignant cancer lesions including those of the prostate. These findings are being extended using methods for the analysis of telomere fusions (decisive genetic markers for telomere dysfunction) specifically within human tissue DNA. Here we report that benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and prostate cancer (PCa) prostate lesions all contain similarly high frequencies of telomere fusions and anaphase bridges. Tumor-adjacent, histologically normal prostate tissue generally did not contain telomere fusions or anaphase bridges as compared to matched PCa tissues. However, we found relatively high levels of telomerase activity in this histologically normal tumor-adjacent tissue that was reduced but closely correlated with telomerase levels in corresponding PCa samples. Thus, we present evidence of high levels of telomere dysfunction in BPH, an established early precursor (PIN) and prostate cancer lesions but not generally in tumor adjacent normal tissue. Our results suggest that telomere dysfunction may be a common gateway event leading to genomic instability in prostate tumorigenesis. .

  18. Results of a first demonstrator prototype of a Compton prostate probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llosá, G.; Bernabeu, J.; Burdette, D.; Chesi, E.; Cindro, V.; Clinthorne, N. H.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Lacasta, C.; Mikuž, M.; Modesto, P.; Rogers, W. L.; Steinberg, J.; Studen, A.; Weilhammer, P.; Zhang, L.; Žontar, D.

    2006-12-01

    A prostate probe based on the Compton imaging technique can outperform the methods currently employed for prostate imaging, improving early tumour detection, determination of its extent and follow-up of the response to treatment. Although nuclear imaging techniques have proven extremely valuable for this task in a wide variety of non-urologic cancers, present instrumentation is not adequate for prostate imaging. Compton imaging overcomes the resolution-efficiency tradeoff imposed by mechanical collimators, allowing both to improve simultaneously. A first Compton probe prototype has been developed, employing thick silicon sensors as scatter detectors, and its performance has been optimized. A series of measurements have been performed with 57Co and 133Ba sources. The results confirm the correct functioning of the prototype and the improvement of the spatial resolution with photon energy, low scattering angles and distance from the first to the second detector.

  19. Selenium level in benign and cancerous prostate.

    PubMed

    Zachara, Bronislaw A; Szewczyk-Golec, Karolina; Wolski, Zbigniew; Tyloch, Janusz; Skok, Zdzislaw; Bloch-Boguslawska, Elzbieta; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2005-03-01

    The dietary microelement selenium (Se) has been proposed as a potential chemopreventive agent for prostate cancer. This element is present in various amounts in all tissues. Little information is available on Se level in patients with prostate gland disorders. The levels of Se in prostatic gland of patients with prostate cancer, benign prostate hyperplasia, and healthy controls were examined. The Se level for benign prostate hyperplasia (156 +/- 30.6 ng/g) was the same as in the control group (157 +/- 26.0 ng/g), but in the gland of prostate cancer patients (182 +/- 34.1 ng/g wet weight), the Se level was significantly (p < 0.01) higher than in both healthy controls and benign prostate hyperplasia. Thus, the Se level in human healthy controls is lower than in kidney and liver but higher compared with other tissues. PMID:15784953

  20. Laparoscopic versus open radical prostatectomy in high prostate volume cases: impact on oncological and functional results

    PubMed Central

    Alessandro, Sciarra; Alessandro, Gentilucci; Susanna, Cattarino; Michele, Innocenzi; Francesca, Di Quilio; Andrea, Fasulo; heland, Magnus Von; Vincenzo, Gentile; Stefano, Salciccia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and objective: To prospectively compare the laparoscopic versus open approach to RP in cases with high prostate volume and to evaluate a possible different impact of prostate volume. Materials and Methods: From March 2007 to March 2013 a total of 120 cases with clinically localized prostate cancer (PC) and a prostate volume>70cc identified for radical prostatectomy (RP), were prospectively analyzed in our institute. Patients were offered as surgical technique either an open retropubic or an intraperitoneal laparoscopic (LP) approach. In our population, 54 cases were submitted to LP and 66 to open RP. We analyzed the association of the surgical technique with perioperative, oncological and postoperative functional parameters. Results: In those high prostate volume cases, the surgical technique (laparoscopic versus open) does not represent a significant independent factor able to influence positive surgical margins rates and characteristics (p=0.4974). No significant differences (p>0.05) in the overall rates of positive margins was found, and also no differences following stratification according to the pathological stage and nerve sparing (NS) procedure. The surgical technique was able to significantly and independently influence the hospital stay, time of operation and blood loss (p<0.001). On the contrary, in our population, the surgical technique was not a significant factor influencing all pathological and 1-year oncological or functional outcomes (p>0.05). Conclusions: In our prospective non randomized analysis on high prostate volumes, the laparoscopic approach to RP is able to guarantee the same oncological and functional results of an open approach, maintaining the advantages in terms of perioperative outcomes. PMID:27256175

  1. EVALUATING THE PROSTATE CANCER PREVENTION TRIAL HIGH GRADE PROSTATE CANCER RISK CALCULATOR IN TEN INTERNATIONAL BIOSY COHORTS: RESULTS FROM THE PROSTATE BIOPSY COLLABORATIVE GROUP

    PubMed Central

    Ankerst, Donna P.; Boeck, Andreas; Freedland, Stephen J.; Jones, J. Stephen; Cronin, Angel M.; Roobol, Monique J.; Hugosson, Jonas; Kattan, Michael W.; Klein, Eric A.; Hamdy, Freddie; Neal, David; Donovan, Jenny; Parekh, Dipen J.; Klocker, Helmut; Horninger, Wolfgang; Benchikh, Amine; Salama, Gilles; Villers, Arnauld; Moreira, Daniel M.; Schröder, Fritz H.; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew J.; Thompson, Ian M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To assess the applicability of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial High Grade (Gleason grade ≥ 7) Risk Calculator (PCPTHG) in ten international cohorts, representing a range of populations. METHODS 25,512 biopsies from 10 cohorts (6 European, 1 UK, and 3 US) were included; 4 implemented 6-core biopsies and the remaining had 10- or higher schemes; 8 were screening cohorts and 2 were clinical. PCPTHG risks were calculated using prostate-specific antigen (PSA), digital rectal examination, age, African origin and history of prior biopsy and evaluated in terms of calibration plots, areas underneath the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and net benefit curves. RESULTS The median AUC of the PCPTHG for high grade disease detection in the 10- and higher-core cohorts was 73.5% (range 63.9% to 76.7%) compared to a median of 78.1 (range = 72.0 to 87.6) among the four 6-core cohorts. Only the 10-core Cleveland Clinic cohort showed clear evidence of under-prediction by the PCPTHG, and this was restricted to risk ranges less than 15%. The PCPTHG demonstrated higher clinical net benefit in higher- compared to six-core biopsy cohorts, and among the former, there were no notable differences observed between clinical and screening cohorts, nor between European and US cohorts. CONCLUSIONS The PCPTHG requires minimal patient information and can be applied across a range of populations. PCPTHG risk thresholds ranging from 5 to 20%, depending on patient risk averseness, are recommended for clinical prostate biopsy decision-making. PMID:22527674

  2. Kilovoltage Intrafraction Monitoring for Prostate Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy: First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Jin Aun; Booth, Jeremy T.; Poulsen, Per R.; Fledelius, Walther; Worm, Esben Schjodt; Eade, Thomas; Hegi, Fiona; Kneebone, Andrew; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Most linear accelerators purchased today are equipped with a gantry-mounted kilovoltage X-ray imager which is typically used for patient imaging prior to therapy. A novel application of the X-ray system is kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM), in which the 3-dimensional (3D) tumor position is determined during treatment. In this paper, we report on the first use of KIM in a prospective clinical study of prostate cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with implanted fiducial markers undergoing conventionally fractionated IMAT (RapidArc) were enrolled in an ethics-approved study of KIM. KIM involves acquiring kV images as the gantry rotates around the patient during treatment. Post-treatment, markers in these images were segmented to obtain 2D positions. From the 2D positions, a maximum likelihood estimation of a probability density function was used to obtain 3D prostate trajectories. The trajectories were analyzed to determine the motion type and the percentage of time the prostate was displaced {>=}3, 5, 7, and 10 mm. Independent verification of KIM positional accuracy was performed using kV/MV triangulation. Results: KIM was performed for 268 fractions. Various prostate trajectories were observed (ie, continuous target drift, transient excursion, stable target position, persistent excursion, high-frequency excursions, and erratic behavior). For all patients, 3D displacements of {>=}3, 5, 7, and 10 mm were observed 5.6%, 2.2%, 0.7% and 0.4% of the time, respectively. The average systematic accuracy of KIM was measured at 0.46 mm. Conclusions: KIM for prostate IMAT was successfully implemented clinically for the first time. Key advantages of this method are (1) submillimeter accuracy, (2) widespread applicability, and (3) a low barrier to clinical implementation. A disadvantage is that KIM delivers additional imaging dose to the patient.

  3. Somatotroph Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Thorner, M. O.; Perryman, R. L.; Cronin, M. J.; Rogol, A. D.; Draznin, M.; Johanson, A.; Vale, W.; Horvath, E.; Kovacs, K.

    1982-01-01

    A 21-yr-old woman with Turner's syndrome presented with signs and symptoms of acromegaly. The serum growth hormone (GH) (95±9.4 ng/ml; mean±SEM) and somatomedin C (11 U/ml) levels were elevated, and an increase in GH levels after glucose instead of normal suppression, increase after thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) administration instead of no change, and decrease after dopamine administration instead of stimulation were observed. The pituitary fossa volume was greater than normal (1,440 mm3) and the presence of a pituitary tumor was assumed. After tissue removal at transsphenoidal surgery, histological study revealed somatotroph hyperplasia rather than a discrete adenoma. Postoperatively, she remained clinically acromegalic and continued to show increased GH and somatomedin levels. A search was made for ectopic source of a growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF). Computer tomographic scan revealed a 5-cm Diam tumor in the tail of the pancreas. Following removal of this tumor, serum GH fell from 70 to 3 ng/ml over 2 h, and remained low for the subsequent 5 mo. Serum somatomedin C levels fell from 7.2 to normal by 6 wk postoperatively. There were no longer paradoxical GH responses to glucose, TRH, and dopamine. Both the medium that held the tumor cells at surgery and extracts of the tumor contained a peptide with GRF activity. The GRF contained in the tumor extract coeluted on Sephadex G-50 chromatography with rat hypothalamic GH-releasing activity. Stimulation of GH from rat somatotrophs in vitro was achieved at the nanomolar range, using the tumor extract. The patient's course demonstrates the importance of careful interpretation of pituitary histology. Elevated serum GH and somatomedin C levels in a patient with an enlarged sella turcica and the characteristic responses seen in acromegaly to TRH, dopamine, and glucose do not occur exclusively in patients with discrete pituitary tumors and acromegaly. This condition can also occur with somatotroph hyperplasia

  4. Coagulation of human prostate volumes with MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy: Results in gel phantoms

    PubMed Central

    N’Djin, William Apoutou; Burtnyk, Mathieu; Kobelevskiy, Ilya; Hadjis, Stefan; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The feasibility and safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy were demonstrated recently in a preliminary human study in which a small subvolume of prostate tissue was treated prior to radical prostatectomy. Translation of this technology to full clinical use, however, requires the capability to generate thermal coagulation in a volume up to that of the prostate gland itself. The aim of this study was to investigate the parameters required to treat a full 3D human prostate accurately with a multi-element transurethral applicator and multiplanar MR temperature control. Methods: The approach was a combination of simulations (to select appropriate parameters) followed by experimental confirmation in tissue-mimicking phantoms. A ten-channel, MRI-compatible transurethral ultrasound therapy system was evaluated using six human prostate models (average volume: 36 cm3) obtained from the preliminary human feasibility study. Real-time multiplanar MR thermometry at 3 T was used to control the spatial heating pattern in up to nine planes simultaneously. Treatment strategies incorporated both single (4.6 or 8.1 MHz) and dual (4.6 and 14.4 MHz) frequencies, as well as maximum acoustic surface powers of 10 or 20 W cm−2. Results: Treatments at 4.6 MHz were capable of coagulating a volume equivalent to 97% of the prostate. Increasing power from 10 to 20 W cm−2 reduced treatment times by approximately 50% with full treatments taking 26 ± 3 min at a coagulation rate of 1.8 ± 0.4 cm3 min−1. A dual-frequency 4.6/14.4 MHz treatment strategy was shown to be the most effective configuration for achieving full human prostate treatment while maintaining good treatment accuracy for small treatment radii. The dual-frequency approach reduced overtreatment close to the prostate base and apex, confirming the simulations. Conclusions: This study reinforces the capability of MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy to treat

  5. Rapid increase of health care utilization and cost due to benign prostatic hyperplasia in Korean men: retrospective population-based analysis using the Health Insurance Review and Assessment service data.

    PubMed

    Son, Hwancheol; Park, Juhyun; Song, Sang Hoon; Kang, Jung Yoon; Hong, Sung Kyu; Lee, Hyun Moo; Kim, Sun-Hee; Park, Byung-Joo; Lee, Hyung-Lae; Lee, Kyung Seop

    2015-02-01

    Using the Korean public health insurance database, we analyzed patients diagnosed as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) from 2004 to 2008. Age and year-specific amount and seasonal variation of hospital visits (HV), duration of treatment (DT), the total and per capita amount of insurance payment (TAIP, PCIP) were evaluated. A total of 12,088,995 HV were studied. Total HV increased 1.7 times and DT almost doubled in 2008 compared to those in 2004. HV, DT, and TAIP showed linearly increasing patterns year by year. In a time series analysis, HV increased in winter and demonstrated seasonality in a 12-month cycle. In a Poisson regression analysis, the annual variations of HV, DT, TAIP, and PCIP were different by age groups. In patients older than 40 yr, HV significantly increased 1.10-1.16 times compared to that of the previous year. DT markedly increased in their 60s and 80s patients. The rate of increase in PCIP was steeper in patients 50 yr and older than in the others.Health care utilization due to BPH was rapidly increasing in Korea and it was remarkable in the elderly population. Seasonal variation of HV demonstrated that health care utilization increased in winter.

  6. Common genetic variants in prostate cancer risk prediction – Results from the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Sara; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Cox, David; Travis, Ruth C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Andriole, Gerald; Berndt, Sonja I.; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Crawford, E. David; Diver, W. Ryan; Ganziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Giovannucci, Edward; Gonzalez, Carlos A.; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J.; Johansson, Mattias; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Ma, Jing; Le Marchand, Loic; Pala, Valeria; Stampfer, Meir; Stram, Daniel O.; Thun, Michael J.; Tjonneland, Anne; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Willett, Walter C.; Yeager, Meredith; Hayes, Richard B.; Severi, Gianluca; Haiman, Christopher A.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Kraft, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the goals of personalized medicine is to generate individual risk profiles that could identify individuals in the population that exhibit high risk. The discovery of more than two-dozen independent SNP markers in prostate cancer has raised the possibility for such risk stratification. In this study, we evaluated the discriminative and predictive ability for prostate cancer risk models incorporating 25 common prostate cancer genetic markers, family history of prostate cancer and age. Methods We fit a series of risk models and estimated their performance in 7,509 prostate cancer cases and 7,652 controls within the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). We also calculated absolute risks based on SEER incidence data. Results The best risk model (C-statistic=0.642) included individual genetic markers and family history of prostate cancer. We observed a decreasing trend in discriminative ability with advancing age (P=0.009), with highest accuracy in men younger than 60 years (C-statistic=0.679). The absolute ten-year risk for 50-year old men with a family history ranged from 1.6% (10th percentile of genetic risk) to 6.7% (90th percentile of genetic risk). For men without family history, the risk ranged from 0.8% (10th percentile) to 3.4% (90th percentile). Conclusions Our results indicate that incorporating genetic information and family history in prostate cancer risk models can be particularly useful for identifying younger men that might benefit from PSA screening. Impact Although adding genetic risk markers improves model performance, the clinical utility of these genetic risk models is limited. PMID:22237985

  7. Age-Adjusted PSA Levels in Prostate Cancer Prediction: Updated Results of the Tyrol Prostate Cancer Early Detection Program

    PubMed Central

    Heidegger, Isabel; Fritz, Josef; Klocker, Helmut; Pichler, Renate

    2015-01-01

    Objective To reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies in patients with benign prostatic disease, however, without missing significant PCa the present study re-evaluates the age-dependent PSA cut-offs in the Tyrol Prostate Cancer (PCa) early detection program. Patients and Methods The study population included 2225 patients who underwent prostate biopsy due to elevated PSA levels at our department. We divided our patient collective into four age groups: ≤49 years (n = 178), 50-59 years (n = 597), 60-69 years (n = 962) and ≥70 years (n = 488). We simulated different scenarios for PSA cut-off values between 1.25 and 6 ng/mL and fPSA% between 15 and 21% for all four age groups and calculated sensitivity, specificity, confidence intervals and predictive values. Results PCa was detected in 1218 men (54.7%). We found that in combination with free PSA ≤21% the following PSA cut-offs had the best cancer specificity: 1.75 ng/ml for men ≤49 years and 50-59 years, 2.25 ng/ml for men aged 60-69 years and 3.25 ng/ml for men ≥70 years. Using these adjusted PSA cut-off values all significant tumors are recognized in all age groups, yet the number of biopsies is reduced. Overall, one biopsy is avoided in 13 to 14 men (number needed to screen = 13.3, reduction of biopsies = 7.5%) when decision regarding biopsy is done according to the “new” cut-off values instead of the “old” ones. For the different age groups the number needed to screen to avoid one biopsy varied between 9.2 (≤49 years) and 17.4 (50-59 years). Conclusion With “new”, fine-tuned PSA cut-offs we detect all relevant PCa with a significant reduction of biopsies compared to the “old” cut-off values. Optimization of age-specific PSA cut-offs is one step towards a smarter strategy in the Tyrol PCa Early Detection Program. PMID:26218594

  8. Expansion of prostate epithelial progenitor cells after inflammation of the mouse prostate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Zoetemelk, Marloes; Chitteti, Brahmananda R.; Ratliff, Timothy L.; Myers, Jason D.; Srour, Edward F.; Broxmeyer, Hal

    2015-01-01

    Prostatic inflammation is a nearly ubiquitous pathological feature observed in specimens from benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer patients. The microenvironment of the inflamed prostate is highly reactive, and epithelial hyperplasia is a hallmark feature of inflamed prostates. How inflammation orchestrates epithelial proliferation as part of its repair and recovery action is not well understood. Here, we report that a novel epithelial progenitor cell population is induced to expand during inflammation. We used sphere culture assays, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometry to show that this population is increased in bacterially induced inflamed mouse prostates relative to naïve control prostates. We confirmed from previous reports that this population exclusively possesses the ability to regrow entire prostatic structures from single cell culture using renal grafts. In addition, putative progenitor cells harvested from inflamed animals have greater aggregation capacity than those isolated from naïve control prostates. Expansion of this critical cell population requires IL-1 signaling, as IL-1 receptor 1-null mice exhibit inflammation similar to wild-type inflamed animals but exhibit significantly reduced progenitor cell proliferation and hyperplasia. These data demonstrate that inflammation promotes hyperplasia in the mouse prostatic epithelium by inducing the expansion of a selected epithelial progenitor cell population in an IL-1 receptor-dependent manner. These findings may have significant impact on our understanding of how inflammation promotes proliferative diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer, both of which depend on expansion of cells that exhibit a progenitor-like nature. PMID:25925259

  9. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Using Kilovoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Nijkamp, Jasper; Pos, Floris J. Nuver, Tonnis T.; Jong, Rianne de; Remeijer, Peter; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the first clinical results of an off-line adaptive radiotherapy (ART) protocol for prostate cancer using kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in combination with a diet and mild laxatives. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients began treatment with a planning target volume (PTV) margin of 10 mm. The CBCT scans acquired during the first six fractions were used to generate an average prostate clinical target volume (AV-CTV), and average rectum (AV-Rect). Using these structures, a new treatment plan was generated with a 7-mm PTV margin. Weekly CBCT scans were used to monitor the CTV coverage. A diet and mild laxatives were introduced to improve image quality and reduce prostate motion. Results: Twenty patients were treated with conform ART protocol. For these patients, 91% of the CBCT scans could be used to calculate the AV-CTV and AV-Rect. In 96% of the follow-up CBCT scans, the CTV was located within the average PTV. In the remaining 4%, the prostate extended the PTV by a maximum of 1 mm. Systematic and random errors for organ motion were reduced by a factor of two compared with historical data without diet and laxatives. An average PTV reduction of 29% was achieved. The volume of the AV-Rect that received >65 Gy was reduced by 19%. The mean dose to the anal wall was reduced on average by 4.8 Gy. Conclusions: We safely reduced the high-dose region by 29%. The reduction in irradiated volume led to a significant reduction in the dose to the rectum. The diet and laxatives improved the image quality and tended to reduce prostate motion.

  10. Conventional Versus Automated Implantation of Loose Seeds in Prostate Brachytherapy: Analysis of Dosimetric and Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Genebes, Caroline; Filleron, Thomas; Graff, Pierre; Jonca, Frédéric; Huyghe, Eric; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Soulie, Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Aziza, Richard; Brun, Thomas; Delannes, Martine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To review the clinical outcome of I-125 permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and to compare 2 techniques of loose-seed implantation. Methods and Materials: 574 consecutive patients underwent I-125 PPB for low-risk and intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2000 and 2008. Two successive techniques were used: conventional implantation from 2000 to 2004 and automated implantation (Nucletron, FIRST system) from 2004 to 2008. Dosimetric and biochemical recurrence-free (bNED) survival results were reported and compared for the 2 techniques. Univariate and multivariate analysis researched independent predictors for bNED survival. Results: 419 (73%) and 155 (27%) patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease, respectively, were treated (median follow-up time, 69.3 months). The 60-month bNED survival rates were 95.2% and 85.7%, respectively, for patients with low-risk and intermediate-risk disease (P=.04). In univariate analysis, patients treated with automated implantation had worse bNED survival rates than did those treated with conventional implantation (P<.0001). By day 30, patients treated with automated implantation showed lower values of dose delivered to 90% of prostate volume (D90) and volume of prostate receiving 100% of prescribed dose (V100). In multivariate analysis, implantation technique, Gleason score, and V100 on day 30 were independent predictors of recurrence-free status. Grade 3 urethritis and urinary incontinence were observed in 2.6% and 1.6% of the cohort, respectively, with no significant differences between the 2 techniques. No grade 3 proctitis was observed. Conclusion: Satisfactory 60-month bNED survival rates (93.1%) and acceptable toxicity (grade 3 urethritis <3%) were achieved by loose-seed implantation. Automated implantation was associated with worse dosimetric and bNED survival outcomes.

  11. Association of serum EPCA-2 level with prostate cancer in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Ma, Ling; Wang, Xinli; Li, Bing; Guo, Shan; Qiao, Qingdong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early prostate cancer antigen 2 (EPCA-2), a kind of nuclear matrix protein, may relate to prostate cancer. However, the association of EPCA-2 level in serum with prostate diseases has not been clarified in Chinese Han population. Methods: EPCA-2 and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in serum were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in 116 patients with prostate cancer (PCa), 342 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and 174 healthy controls (Control) in Chinese population. Associations of serum EPCA-2 and PSA level with prostate diseases were analyzed by ANOVA. Comparison of diagnostic effect for prostate cancer between EPCA-2 and PSA was evaluated by Receiver Operator Curve, Chi-square test, and others. Results: Serum EPCA-2 and PSA levels in PCa group were significantly higher than BPH and Control group (EPCA-2: F=200.05, P<0.01; PSA: F=210.65, P<0.01). However, EPCA-2 levels in the prostate cancers with different pathological grade were no significant difference. Furthermore, for detection of prostate cancer, EPCA-2 had a sensitivity of 81.9% and a specificity of 87.6%. Conclusions: Serum EPCA-2 could be used as a potential serological marker to diagnose prostate cancer in Chinese Han population, which was more specific than PSA and did not associate with pathological grades of prostate cancer. PMID:26464694

  12. α–blockade, apoptosis, and prostate shrinkage: how are they related?

    PubMed Central

    Chłosta, Piotr; Kaplan, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The α1–adrenoreceptor antagonists, such as terazosin and doxazosin, induce prostate programmed cell death (apoptosis) within prostate epithelial and stromal cells in vitro. This treatment should cause prostate volume decrease, However, this has never been observed in clinical conditions. The aim of this paper is to review the disconnect between these two processes. Methods PubMed and DOAJ were searched for papers related to prostate, apoptosis, and stem cell death. The following key words were used: prostate, benign prostate hyperplasia, programmed cell death, apoptosis, cell death, α1–adrenoreceptor antagonist, α–blockade, prostate epithelium, prostate stroma, stem cells, progenitors, and in vitro models. Results We have shown how discoveries related to stem cells can influence our understanding of α–blockade treatment for BPH patients. Prostate epithelial and mesenchymal compartments have stem (progenitors) and differentiating cells. These compartments are described in relation to experimental in vitro and in vivo settings. Conclusions Apoptosis is observed within prostate tissue, but this effect has no clinical significance and cannot lead to prostate shrinkage. In part, this is due to stem cells that are responsible for prostate tissue regeneration and are resistant to apoptosis triggered by α1–receptor antagonists. PMID:24579025

  13. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus and RNase L R462Q Variants in Iranian Patients With Sporadic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Farhad; Ahmadi, Ali; Rezaei, Farhad; Jalilvand, Somayeh; Ghavami, Nastaran; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Abiri, Ramin; Kondori, Nasim; Nategh, Rakhshande; Mokhtari Azad, Talat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although several studies have confirmed the association of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) and prostate cancer, this association is still controversial, as most studies did not detect XMRV in prostate tissue samples. Furthermore, some genetic and epidemiological studies have highlighted a role for RNase L polymorphisms, particularly R462Q, in the progression of prostate cancer. Objectives: The focus of this study was on the association of XMRV and RNase L R462Q variants with the risk of prostate cancer in Iranian patients. Patients and Methods: In this case-control study, 40 and 80 individuals with sporadic prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia, respectively, were included. The presence of XMRV was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of integrase and nested-PCR for the gag genes. The RNase L R462Q polymorphism analysis was carried out by PCR and sequencing. Results: In a total of 40 sporadic prostate cancer and 80 benign prostatic hyperplasia cases, no XMRV was detected by real-time PCR and nested-PCR. RNase L R462Q polymorphism analysis reveals that although there was an increase in the risk of prostate cancer correlated with the Q/Q allele of RNase L at position 462, the frequencies of the RNase L R462Q alleles were not statistically significant between the prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia groups (OR = 2.75 (95% CI = 0.67 - 11.3), P = 0.29). Conclusions: These results did not support the presence of XMRV in the samples with prostate cancer and showed that RNase L R462Q variants had relatively little or no impact on the risk of prostate cancer in Iranian population. PMID:26744630

  14. [Long-term outcomes of the use of α-blockers tamsulosin in men with lower urinary tract symptoms and benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Krivoborodov, G G; Tur, E I

    2014-01-01

    The retrospective evaluation of efficacy and safety of tamsulosin omnik (0.4 mg once a day) for 8 years in 17 patients with BPH and LUTS was performed. At the time of appointment of tamsulosin, mean age of patients was 61.9 years (range, 51 to 69 years). Efficacy of tamsulosin was evaluated based on the change of obstructive and irritative symptoms according to items of I-PSS scale, maximum urinary flow rate, residual urine volume and prostate volume. The study found that factors for favorable prognosis against the background of use of tamsulosin include moderate LUTS, small- or medium-sized BPH, maximum urinary flow rate of not less than 9 ml/s, and residual urine volume not more than 100 ml.

  15. Novel role of zinc in the regulation of prostate citrate metabolism and its implications in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Costello, L C; Franklin, R B

    1998-06-01

    The prostate gland of humans and many other animals has the major function of accumulating and secreting extraordinarily high levels of citrate. This specialized metabolic process of "net citrate production" is the result of unique metabolic capabilities of the secretory epithelial cells. Most importantly, in prostate cancer (Pca) the capability for net citrate production is lost. In addition to citrate, the normal and BPH (benign prostatic hyperplasia) prostate also accumulates the highest levels of zinc in the body. As with citrate, in Pca the ability for high zinc accumulation is diminished. These and other correlations between zinc and citrate in the prostate have been indicative of an important role of zinc in the regulation of citrate metabolism in normal and malignant prostate epithelial cells. The link between zinc and citrate metabolism has now been established. The intramitochondrial accumulation of high zinc levels inhibits mitochondrial (m-) aconitase activity, which inhibits citrate oxidation. This essentially truncates the Krebs cycle and markedly decreases the cellular energy (ATP) production normally coupled to citrate oxidation. It is also clear that zinc accumulation in citrate-producing prostate epithelial cells is regulated by testosterone and by prolactin. These relationships form the basis for a new concept of the role of zinc and citrate-related energy metabolism in prostate malignancy. The inability of malignant prostate cells to accumulate high zinc levels results in increased citrate oxidation and the coupled ATP production essential for the progression of malignancy. The concept offers new approaches to the treatment of Pca. PMID:9609552

  16. Prostate biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate biopsy; Fine needle biopsy of the prostate; Core biopsy of the prostate; Targeted prostate biopsy; Prostate biopsy - transrectal ultrasound (TRUS); Stereotactic transperineal prostate biopsy (STPB)

  17. Does an asymmetric lobe in digital rectal examination include any risk for prostate cancer? results of 1495 biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Ömer; Kurul, Özgür; Ates, Ferhat; Soydan, Hasan; Aktas, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Despite the well-known findings related to malignity in DRE such as nodule and induration, asymmetry of prostatic lobes, seen relatively, were investigated in a few studies as a predictor of prostate cancer so that there is no universally expected conclusion about asymmetry. We aimed to compare cancer detection rate of normal, asymmetric or suspicious findings in DRE by using biopsy results. Materials and Methods: Data of 1495 patients underwent prostate biopsy between 2006-2014 were searched retrospectively. Biopsy indications were abnormal DRE and or elevated PSA level(>4ng/mL). DRE findings were recorded as Group 1: Benign DRE, Group 2: Asymmetry and Group 3: Nodule/induration. Age, prostatic volume, biopsy results and PSA levels were recorded. Results: Mean age, prostate volume and PSA level were 66.72, 55.98 cc and 18.61ng/ mL respectively. Overall cancer detection rate was 38.66 % (575 of 1495). PSA levels were similar in group 1 and 2 but significantly higher in group 3. Prostatic volume was similar in group 1 and 2 and significantly lower in Group 3. Malignity detection rate of group 1,2 and 3 were 28.93%, 34.89% and 55.99% respectively. Group 1 and 2 were similar (p=0.105) but 3 had more chance for cancer detection. Conclusion: Nodule is the most important finding in DRE for cancer detection. Only an asymmetric prostate itself does not mean malignity. PMID:27564280

  18. [Salvage radical prostatectomy after external radiotherapy for prostate cancer: indications, morbidity and results. Review from CCAFU prostate section].

    PubMed

    Paparel, P; Soulie, M; Mongiat-Artus, P; Cornud, F; Borgogno, C

    2010-05-01

    Local recurrence after external radiotherapy for prostate cancer occurs in 30 to 50 % and is often diagnosed by a rising PSA. The absence of local control after radiotherapy is a risk factor of metastases and specific mortality. There are several therapeutic options to treat these patients: surveillance, hormonotherapy and salvage therapies (radical prostatectomy, cystoprostatectomy, brachytherapy, high intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU] and cryotherapy). Hormonotherapy is not a curative treatment and after a couple of years, the disease will progress again. Local salvage therapies are the only treatment to have the potential to cure these patients with the condition of very strict inclusion criteria. Among these therapies, only radical prostatectomy demonstrated his efficacity with a follow-up of 10 years on specific survival and survival without biological progression respectively from 70 to 77 % and from 30 to 43 %. During last decade, morbidity of RP has strongly decreased with a percentage of rectal and ureteral injury at 3 %. Nevertheless, percentage of urinary incontinence remains high from 29 to 50 %. Salvage mini-invasive therapies (cryotherapy, HIFU and cryotherapy) are under constant evolution due to progress of technology. Functional and oncological results are better with last generation devices but need to be evaluated and compared with radical prostatectomy.

  19. Hypofractionated Versus Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: Final Results of Phase III Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric E.; Botten, Rochelle J.; Butters, Julie; Di Matteo, Addolorata C.; Holloway, Richard H.; Fowler, Jack

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated (55 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks) vs. a conventionally fractionated (64 Gy in 32 fractions within 6.5 weeks) dose schedule for radiotherapy (RT) for localized carcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: A total of 217 patients were randomized to either the hypofractionated (n = 108) or the conventional (n = 109) dose schedule. Most patients (n = 156) underwent RT planning and RT using a two-dimensional computed tomography method. Efficacy using the clinical, radiologic, and prostate-specific antigen data in each patient was evaluated before RT and at predetermined intervals after RT until death. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity using the modified Late Effect in Normal Tissue - Subjective Objective Management Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scales was also evaluated before and at intervals after RT to 60 months. Results: The whole group has now been followed for a median of 90 months (range, 3-138). Of the 217 patients, 85 developed biochemical relapse (nadir prostate-specific antigen level + 2 {mu}g/L), 36 in the hypofractionated and 49 in the conventional group. The biochemical relapse-free, but not overall, survival at 90 months was significantly better with the hypofractionated (53%) than with the conventional (34%) schedule. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity persisted 60 months after RT and did not differ between the two dose schedules. Multivariate analyses revealed that the conventional schedule was of independent prognostic significance, not only for biochemical failure, but also for an increased risk of worse genitourinary symptoms at 4 years. Conclusions: A therapeutic advantage of the hypofractionated compared with the conventional dose schedule for RT of prostate cancer was evident at 90 months in the present study.

  20. Usefulness of Total PSA Value in Prostate Diseases Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Prcic, Alden; Begic, Edin; Hiros, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Analysis of total value of prostate specific antigen (PSAT), with the unavoidable digital rectal examination (DRE) is the basis of prostate cancer detection. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the specificity and sensitivity of the total value of PSAT in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. The aim was also to determine the significance of PSAT in diagnosis of benign prostate hyperplasia, precancerous conditions and inflammatory and atrophic changes of the prostate. Material and methods: Data were collected from the “Register of PH biopsy” of Clinic of Urology, CCU Sarajevo. Results: Analysis of correlation between the diagnosis and the PSAT value shows statistically significant negative correlation (r =-0,186; p = 0.006) in the sense that the value of the PSAT is highest in cancer patients, and the lowest in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. PSAT increases with age (r = 0.152; p = 0.025). For prostate cancer optimal sensitivity and specificity for PSAT value occurs at cut off value of> 8.6 ng /mL. Values lower than 2 ng/mL and higher than 10 ng/mL are most specific, and PPV increases with increasing value of PSAT. PSAT at values of <2 ng/mL and > 10 ng/mL are at high levels of specificity, and value > 10 ng / mL is also of high sensitivity in the detection of prostate cancer, and in this moment these values represent the optimal mode for the subsequent treatment. Conclusion: PSAT has a relative significance in the detection of prostate cancer, and should not be used as a guideline without DRE. PMID:27482127

  1. Hypoxic Prostate/Muscle PO{sub 2} Ratio Predicts for Outcome in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Turaka, Aruna; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Movsas, Benjamin

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To correlate tumor oxygenation status with long-term biochemical outcome after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Custom-made Eppendorf PO{sub 2} microelectrodes were used to obtain PO{sub 2} measurements from the prostate (P), focused on positive biopsy locations, and normal muscle tissue (M), as a control. A total of 11,516 measurements were obtained in 57 men with localized prostate cancer immediately before prostate brachytherapy was given. The Eppendorf histograms provided the median PO{sub 2}, mean PO{sub 2}, and % <5 mm Hg or <10 mm Hg. Biochemical failure (BF) was defined using both the former American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) (three consecutive raises) and the current Phoenix (prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2 ng/mL) definitions. A Cox proportional hazards regression model evaluated the influence of hypoxia using the P/M mean PO{sub 2} ratio on BF. Results: With a median follow-up time of 8 years, 12 men had ASTRO BF and 8 had Phoenix BF. On multivariate analysis, P/M PO{sub 2} ratio <0.10 emerged as the only significant predictor of ASTRO BF (p = 0.043). Hormonal therapy (p = 0.015) and P/M PO{sub 2} ratio <0.10 (p = 0.046) emerged as the only independent predictors of the Phoenix BF. Kaplan-Meier freedom from BF for P/M ratio <0.10 vs. {>=}0.10 at 8 years for ASTRO BF was 46% vs. 78% (p = 0.03) and for the Phoenix BF was 66% vs. 83% (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Hypoxia in prostate cancer (low mean P/M PO{sub 2} ratio) significantly predicts for poor long-term biochemical outcome, suggesting that novel hypoxic strategies should be investigated.

  2. Long-Term Trial Results Show No Mortality Benefit from Annual Prostate Cancer Screening

    Cancer.gov

    Thirteen year follow-up data from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) cancer screening trial show higher incidence but similar mortality among men screened annually with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test and digital rectal examination

  3. Symptom Management Strategies for Men with Early-Stage Prostate Cancer: Results from the Prostate Cancer Patient Education Program (PCPEP)

    PubMed Central

    Vij, Alok; Kowalkowski, Marc A.; Hart, Tae; Goltz, Heather Honoré; Hoffman, David J.; Knight, Sara J.; Caroll, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    While the literature on prostate cancer health-related quality of life has grown extensively, little is known about symptom management strategies used by men to manage treatment-related side effects and the effectiveness of those strategies. We collected 628 symptom management reports from 98 men treated for localized prostate cancer. Participants were recruited from email lists and a prostate cancer clinic in Northern California. Data were collected using the Critical Incident Technique. Symptom management reports were assigned to categories of urinary, sexual, bowel, mental health, systemic, or “other.” We calculated descriptive statistics by symptom type and management strategy effectiveness. The most common symptoms were urinary (26 %) and sexual (23 %). Participants’ symptom management strategies varied widely, from medical and surgical interventions (20 %) to behavioral strategies (11 %) to diet and lifestyle interventions (12 %). The effectiveness of symptom management strategies varied, with sexual symptoms being managed effectively only 47 % of the time to mental health symptom management strategies considered effective 89 % of the time. Doing nothing was a commonly reported (15 %) response to symptoms and was effective only 14 % of the time. Men report the least effectiveness in symptom management for sexual dysfunction after prostate cancer treatment. Including men’s experience with managing treatment side effects may be an important way to improve survivorship programs and make them more acceptable to men. More work is needed to find out why men frequently do nothing in response to symptoms when effective solutions exist and how providers can successfully engage such men. PMID:23996206

  4. Androgen Regulated Genes in Human Prostate Xenografts in Mice: Relation to BPH and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Love, Harold D.; Booton, S. Erin; Boone, Braden E.; Breyer, Joan P.; Koyama, Tatsuki; Revelo, Monica P.; Shappell, Scott B.; Smith, Jeffrey R.; Hayward, Simon W.

    2009-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma (CaP) are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ) human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1) highly expressed in prostate, 2) had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3) encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues. PMID:20027305

  5. Detection of antibodies directed at M. hyorhinis p37 in the serum of men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and molecular studies suggest infection and inflammation initiate certain cancers, including cancers of the prostate. Over the past several years, our group has been studying how mycoplasmas could possibly initiate and propagate cancers of the prostate. Specifically, Mycoplasma hyorhinis encoded protein p37 was found to promote invasion of prostate cancer cells and cause changes in growth, morphology and gene expression of these cells to a more aggressive phenotype. Moreover, we found that chronic exposure of benign human prostate cells to M. hyorhinis resulted in significant phenotypic and karyotypic changes that ultimately resulted in the malignant transformation of the benign cells. In this study, we set out to investigate another potential link between mycoplasma and human prostate cancer. Methods We report the incidence of men with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) being seropositive for M. hyorhinis. Antibodies to M. hyorhinis were surveyed by a novel indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in serum samples collected from men presenting to an outpatient Urology clinic for BPH (N = 105) or prostate cancer (N = 114) from 2006-2009. Results A seropositive rate of 36% in men with BPH and 52% in men with prostate cancer was reported, thus leading us to speculate a possible connection between M. hyorhinis exposure with prostate cancer. Conclusions These results further support a potential exacerbating role for mycoplasma in the development of prostate cancer. PMID:21663671

  6. Holmium laser applications of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Lori B; Tyson, Mark D

    2009-11-01

    The high-powered holmium laser is an excellent tool for the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. This article discusses the background of holmium use in the prostate and describes the surgical techniques of holmium laser ablation of the prostate and holmium laser enucleation of the prostate. Operative challenges are reviewed with suggestions as to how to avoid these problems or deal with them when they arise. Surgical outcomes and a thorough literature review are both presented.

  7. [Referral criteria for benign prostatic hyperplasia in primary care.Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina General, Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria, Asociación Española de Urología].

    PubMed

    Castiñeiras Fernández, J; Cozar Olmo, J M; Fernández-Pro, A; Martín, J A; Brenes Bermúdez, F J; Naval Pulido, E; Molero, J M; Pérez Morales, D

    2010-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a high prevalence condition in men over 50 years that requires continued assistance between primary care and urology. Therefore, consensus around common referral criteria was needed to guide and support both levels. Medical history, symptom assessment with International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire, digital rectal examination and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurement are diagnostic tests available for general practitioners that allow setting a correct BPH diagnose. Patients with an IPSS<8 should be monitored by evaluating them annually. Treatment with alpha-blockers and an evaluation at the first and third month is recommended in patients with an IPSS 8-20 and if the prostate is small, if the prostate size is large treatment with alpha-blockers or 5alpha-reductase inhibitors and evaluation at the third and six month is recommended, and in patients with a large prostate and a PSA >1.5 ng/ ml combined treatment and evaluation at the first and sixth month is recommended. Some clear criteria for referral to urology are established in this document, which help in the management of these patients. Those patients with BPH who do not show any improvement at the third month of treatment with alpha-blockers, or the sixth month with 5alpha-reductase inhibitors, will be referred to urology. Patients will also be referred to urology if they have lower urinary tract symptoms, a pathological finding during rectal examination, IPSS>20, PSA>10 ng/ml or PSA>4 ng/ml and free PSA<20% or if they are <50 years with suspected BHP, or if they have any urological complication.

  8. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with transurethral resection before implantation in prostate cancer. Long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Prada, Pedro J.; Anchuelo, Javier; Blanco, Ana García; Payá, Gema; Cardenal, Juan; Acuña, Enrique; Ferri, María; Vázquez, Andrés; Pacheco, Maite; Sanchez, Jesica

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives We analyzed the long-term oncologic outcome for patients with prostate cancer and transurethral resection who were treated using low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials From January 2001 to December 2005, 57 consecutive patients were treated with clinically localized prostate cancer. No patients received external beam radiation. All of them underwent LDR prostate brachytherapy. Biochemical failure was defined according to the “Phoenix consensus”. Patients were stratified as low and intermediate risk based on The Memorial Sloan Kettering group definition. Results The median follow-up time for these 57 patients was 104 months. The overall survival according to Kaplan-Meier estimates was 88% (±6%) at 5 years and 77% (±6%) at 12 years. The 5 and 10 years for failure in tumour-free survival (TFS) was 96% and respectively (±2%), whereas for biochemical control was 94% and respectively (±3%) at 5 and 10 years, 98% (±1%) of patients being free of local recurrence. A patient reported incontinence after treatment (1.7%). The chronic genitourinary complains grade I were 7% and grade II, 10%. At six months 94% of patients reported no change in bowel function. Conclusions The excellent long-term results and low morbidity presented, as well as the many advantages of prostate brachytherapy over other treatments, demonstrates that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for patients with transurethral resection and clinical organ-confined prostate cancer. PMID:27136466

  9. Sexual Function After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegner, Ellen A.; King, Christopher R.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To study the sexual quality of life for prostate cancer patients after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC)-validated quality-of-life questionnaire, the sexual function of 32 consecutive patients who received prostate SBRT in a prospective Phase II clinical trial were analyzed at baseline, and at median times of 4, 12, 20, and 50 months after treatment. SBRT consisted of 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy using the Cyberknife. No androgen deprivation therapy was given. The use of erectile dysfunction (ED) medications was monitored. A comprehensive literature review for radiotherapy-alone modalities based on patient self-reported questionnaires served as historical comparison. Results: Median age at treatment was 67.5 years, and median follow-up was 35.5 months (minimum 12 months). The mean EPIC sexual domain summary score, sexual function score, and sexual bother score decreased by 45%, 49%, and 25% respectively at 50 months follow-up. These differences reached clinical relevance by 20 months after treatment. Baseline ED rate was 38% and increased to 71% after treatment (p = 0.024). Use of ED medications was 3% at baseline and progressed to 25%. For patients aged <70 years at follow-up, 60% maintained satisfactory erectile function after treatment compared with only 12% aged {>=}70 years (p = 0.008). Penile bulb dose was not associated with ED. Conclusions: The rates of ED after treatment appear comparable to those reported for other modalities of radiotherapy. Given the modest size of this study and the uncertainties in the physiology of radiotherapy-related ED, these results merit further investigations.

  10. The REDUCE trial: chemoprevention in prostate cancer using a dual 5alpha-reductase inhibitor, dutasteride.

    PubMed

    Musquera, Mireia; Fleshner, Neil E; Finelli, Antonio; Zlotta, Alexandre R

    2008-07-01

    Dutasteride, a dual 5alpha-reductase inhibitor, is used in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). It reduces serum prostate-specific antigen levels by approximately 50% at 6 months and total prostate volume by 25% after 2 years. Randomized placebo-controlled trials in BPH patients have shown the efficacy of dutasteride in symptomatic relief, improvements in quality of life and peak urinary flow rate. Side effects occurring with dutasteride are decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, ejaculation disorders and gynecomastia. Preliminary data from placebo-controlled BPH trials have shown a decrease in the detection of prostate cancer in patients treated with dutasteride, although these studies were not designed to look at this issue. Dutasteride differs from finasteride in that it inhibits both isoenzymes of 5alpha-reductase, type I and type II. The landmark Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial at the end of the 7-year study demonstrated a 24.8% reduction in the incidence of prostate cancer in the finasteride group compared with placebo. However, a 25.5% increase in the prevalence of high-grade Gleason tumors has been observed, the clinical significance of which has been debated. Preliminary data suggest a decrease in prostate cancer incidence in dutasteride-treated patients and demonstrate type I alphareductase enzyme expression in prostate cancer. As a result, dutasteride is being investigated for prostate cancer prevention in the ongoing Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) trial, which is discussed here. PMID:18588452

  11. Molecular Evidence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Prostate Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Al-Marhoon, Mohammed S.; Ouhtit, Allal; Al-Abri, Aisha O.; Venkiteswaran, Krishna P.; Al-Busaidi, Qassim; Mathew, Josephkunju; Al-Haddabi, Ibrahim; Shareef, Omar; Aquil, Shahid; Rahman, Khalid; Al-Hashmi, Intisar; Gupta, Ishita; Ganguly, Shyam S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is detectable in both benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa). Epidemiological studies have shown significant associations between infective chronic prostatitis and prostatic carcinoma. Many bacteria have been found in the prostate of patients with chronic prostatitis, BPH, and PCa. Methods One hundred consecutive patients with prostate diseases were enrolled in the study. Detection of H. pylori DNA in prostate tissue from patients with BPH and PCa was performed using both immunohistochemistry and PCR, and the results were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Odds ratios and the Fisher Exact test were used for the analysis of the associations between the variables. Results Among the patients, 78% had BPH and 19% had PCa. While immunohistochemistry showed no positive sample for H. pylori, PCR combined with sequencing detected H. pylori DNA in prostate tissue samples from 5 patients. However, statistical analysis of the data showed that BPH and PCa are not significantly associated with the presence of H. pylori DNA in prostate tissue (odds ratio = 0.94, 95% confidence interval = 0.09–23.34, one-tailed Chi-square value = 0.660, p > 0.05). The limitation of this study was the small number of PCa patients. Conclusions This study provides, for the first time, molecular evidence of the presence of H. pylori DNA in prostatic tissue of patients with BPH and PCa. It paves the way for further comprehensive studies to examine the association of H. pylori infection with BPH and PCa. PMID:26889133

  12. 5alpha-Reductase inhibitor treatment of prostatic diseases: background and practical implications.

    PubMed

    Dörsam, J; Altwein, J

    2009-01-01

    This literature review discusses the theoretical background of 5alpha-reductase inhibitor (5ARI) treatment and the resulting clinical implications. A Medline-based search for peer-reviewed articles addressing 5ARIs, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer was performed. The 5ARIs Finasteride and Dutasteride, which specifically inhibit the production of dihydrotestosterone by acting as competitive inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase, are clinically well tolerated and represent an effective treatment option for benign prostatic obstruction. Finasteride is the first compound which has a proven efficacy in chemoprevention of prostate cancer. The aim of this review was to elucidate, if there are sufficient data available to point out clinically relevant differences between the drugs. Both compounds achieve a significant reduction of prostate volume, an improvement of symptoms and a lower risk of acute urinary retention. Whether the different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of Finasteride and Dutasteride are of clinical importance cannot be judged at this time. PMID:19030020

  13. Vitamin K: the missing link to prostate health.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Michael S

    2015-03-01

    Though age-related prostate enlargement is very common in Western societies, and the causes of benign prostate hyperplasia, BPH, have been diligently sought after, there is no biological, mechanistic explanation dealing with the root causes and progression of this very common disorder among men. All treatments to date are based on symptomatic relief, not a fundamental understanding of the cause of the disease. However, recent advances have shown that even subclinical varicoceles, which are more common than generally realized, cause retrograde blood flow from the testes past the prostate gland causing over a 130-fold increase in free testosterone in the veins near the prostate. By treating the varicoceles via embolization of the internal spermatic vein and its communicating and connected vessels the prostate enlargement can be reversed with corresponding symptomatic relief. So, varicose veins in the pampiniform venous plexus, varicoceles, are the direct cause of BPH. But what causes varicoceles? Recent research has uncovered the role of vitamin K in the calcification of varicose veins as well as a role in the proliferation of smooth muscle cells in the media layer of the vein wall. Vitamin K is intimately involved in the formation of varicose veins. The hypothesis is that poor prostate health is essentially a vitamin K insufficiency disorder. By providing vitamin K in the right form and quantity, along with other supporting nutrients and phytochemicals, it is likely that excellent prostate health can be extended much longer, and perhaps poor prostate health can be reversed. A protective role for vitamin K with respect to advanced prostate cancer was already found in the Heidelberg cohort of the EPIC study. This hypothesis can be further evaluated in studies examining the connection between vitamin K and varicoceles, and also by examining the connection between varicoceles and benign prostate hyperplasia. If this hypothesis is found to be true, management of prostate

  14. Prostate cancer biomarkers: an update.

    PubMed

    Romero Otero, Javier; Garcia Gomez, Borja; Campos Juanatey, Felix; Touijer, Karim A

    2014-04-01

    Many aspects of prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment could be greatly advanced with new, effective biomarkers. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has multiple weaknesses as a biomarker, such as not distinguishing well between cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia or between indolent and aggressive cancers, thus leading to overtreatment, especially unnecessary biopsies. PSA also often fails to indicate accurately which patients are responding to a given treatment. Yet PSA is the only prostate cancer biomarker routinely used by urologists. Here, we provide updated information on the most relevant of the other biomarkers currently in use or in development for prostate cancer. Recent research shows improvement over using PSA alone by comparing total PSA (tPSA) or free PSA (fPSA) with new, related markers, such as prostate cancer antigen (PCA) 3, the individual molecular forms of PSA (proPSA, benign PSA, and intact PSA), and kallikreins other than PSA. Promising results have also been seen with the use of the fusion gene TMPRSS2:ERG and with various forms of the urokinase plasminogen activation receptor. Initially, there were high hopes for early PCA, but those data were not reproducible and thus research on early PCA has been abandoned. Much work remains to be done before any of these biomarkers are fully validated and accepted. Currently, the only markers discussed in this paper with Food and Drug Administration-approved tests are PCA 3 and an isoform of proPSA, [-2]proPSA. Assays are in development for most of the other biomarkers described in this paper. While the biomarker validation process can be long and filled with obstacles, the rewards will be great-in terms of both patient care and costs to the health care system.

  15. Impact of Cosmetic Result on Selection of Surgical Treatment in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Salamanca, Juan Ignacio; Maestro, Mario Alvarez; Galarza, Ignacio Sola; Rodriguez, Joaquin Carballido

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the effect of cosmetic outcome as an isolated variable in patients undergoing surgical treatment based on the incision used in the 3 variants of radical prostatectomy: open (infraumbilical incision and Pfannestiel incision) and laparoscopic, or robotic (6 ports) surgery. Patients and methods: 612 male patients 40 to 70 years of age with a negative history of prostate disease were invited to participate. Each patient was evaluated by questionnaire accompanied by a set of 6 photographs showing the cosmetic appearance of the 3 approaches, with and without undergarments. Participants ranked the approaches according to preference, on the basis of cosmesis. We also recorded demographic variables: age, body mass index, marital status, education level, and physical activity. Results: Of the 577 patients who completed the questionnaries, the 6-port minimally invasive approach represents the option preferred by 52% of the participants, followed by the Pfannestiel incision (46%), and the infraumbilical incision (11%), respectively. The univariate and multivariate analyses did not show statistically significant differences when comparing the approach preferred by the patients and the sub-analyses for demographic variables, except for patients who exercised who preferred the Pfannestiel incision (58%) instead of minimally invasive approach (42%) with statistically significant differences. Conclusion: The minimally invasive approach was the approach of choice for the majority of patients in the treatment of prostate cancer. The Pfannestiel incision represents an acceptable alternative. More research and investment may be necesary to improve cosmetic outcomes. PMID:25516703

  16. Histotripsy of the Prostate for the Treatment of BPH: Chronic Results From a Canine Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Timothy L.; Hempel, Chris R.; Lake, Alison M.; Kieran, Kathy; Ives, Kim; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.; Roberts, William W.

    2009-04-01

    Histotripsy was evaluated as a non-invasive BPH treatment. The prostates of 21 canine subjects were targeted with one of three histotripsy doses. Prostates were harvested immediately, 7 days, or 28 days after treatment and assessed for changes. Lower treatment doses were found to produced scattered cellular disruption and hemorrhage that was sometimes reversible. Higher doses perforated the urethra and produced cavities in the glandular prostate that healed to leave an enlarged urinary channel.

  17. Histotripsy of the Prostate for the Treatment of BPH: Chronic Results From a Canine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Timothy L.; Hempel, Chris R.; Lake, Alison M.; Kieran, Kathy; Ives, Kim; Cain, Charles A.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Roberts, William W.

    2009-04-14

    Histotripsy was evaluated as a non-invasive BPH treatment. The prostates of 21 canine subjects were targeted with one of three histotripsy doses. Prostates were harvested immediately, 7 days, or 28 days after treatment and assessed for changes. Lower treatment doses were found to produced scattered cellular disruption and hemorrhage that was sometimes reversible. Higher doses perforated the urethra and produced cavities in the glandular prostate that healed to leave an enlarged urinary channel.

  18. Does length of prostate biopsy cores have an impact on diagnosis of prostate cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Ergün, Müslüm; İslamoğlu, Ekrem; Yalçınkaya, Soner; Tokgöz, Hüsnü; Savaş, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether core length is a significant biopsy parameter in the detection of prostate cancer. Material and methods We retrospectively analyzed pathology reports of the specimens of 188 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer who had undergone initial transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy, and compared biopsy core lengths of the patients with, and without prostate cancer. The biopsy specimens of prostate cancer patients were divided into 3 groups according to core length, and the data obtained were compared (Group 1; total core length <10 mm, Group 2; total core length 10 mm–19 mm, and Group 3; total core length >20 mm). Biopsy core lengths of the patients diagnosed as prostate cancer, and benign prostatic hyperplasia were compared, and a certain cut-off value for core length with optimal diagnostic sensitivity and specificity for prostate cancer was calculated. Results Mean age, PSA and total length of cores were 65.08±7.41 years, 9.82±6.34 ng/mL and 11.2±0.2 mm, respectively. Assessment of biopsy core lengths showed that cores with cancer (n=993, median length 12.5 mm) were significantly longer than benign cores (n=1185, median length=11.3 mm) (p<0.001). Core length analysis yielded 12 mm cores have an optimal sensitivity (41.9%) and specificity (62%) for detection of cancer (odds ratio: 1.08). Conclusion Biopsy core length is one of the most important parameter that determines the quality of biopsy and detection of prostate cancer. A median sample length of 12 mm is ideal lower limit for cancer detection, and biopsy procedures which yield shorter biopsy cores should be repeated. PMID:27635285

  19. Decision-Making Processes among Prostate Cancer Survivors with Rising PSA Levels: Results from a Qualitative Analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Megan Johnson; Nelson, Christian J.; Peters, Ellen; Slovin, Susan F.; Hall, Simon J.; Hall, Matt; Herrera, Phapichaya Chaoprang; Leventhal, Elaine A.; Leventhal, Howard; Diefenbach, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer survivors with a rising prostate specific antigen (PSA) level have few treatment options, experience a heightened state of uncertainty about their disease trajectory that might include the possibility of cancer metastasis and death, and often experience elevated levels of distress as they have to deal with a disease they thought they had conquered. Guided by self-regulation theory, the present study examined the cognitive and affective processes involved in shared decision making between physician and patients who experience a rising PSA after definitive treatment for prostate cancer. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with 34 prostate cancer survivors who had been diagnosed with a rising PSA (i.e., biochemical failure) within the past 12 months. Survivors were asked about their experiences and affective responses after being diagnosed with a rising PSA and while weighing potential treatment options. In addition, patients were asked about their decision-making process for the initial prostate cancer treatment. Results Compared to the initial diagnosis, survivors with a rising PSA reported increased negative affect following their diagnosis, concern about the treatability of their disease, increased planning and health behavior change, heightened levels of worry preceding doctor’s appointments (especially prior to the discussion of PSA testing results), and a strong reliance on physicians’ treatment recommendations. Conclusions Prostate cancer survivors’ decision-making processes for the treatment of a rising PSA are markedly different from those of the initial diagnosis of prostate cancer. Because patients experience heightened distress and rely more heavily on their physicians’ recommendations with a rising PSA, interactions with the health care provider provide an excellent opportunity to address and assist patients with managing the uncertainty and distress inherent with rising PSA levels. PMID:25385751

  20. Magnetic Resonance Sentinel Lymph Node Imaging of the Prostate with Gadofosveset trisodium-albumin: Preliminary results in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Turkbey, Baris; Hoyt, Robert F.; Agarwal, Harsh K.; Bernardo, Marcelino; Sankineni, Sandeep; Johnson, Linda; Grant, Kinzya B.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Wood, Bradford J.; Pinto, Peter A.; Griffiths, Gary L.; Choyke, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if intraprostatic injection of gadofosveset trisodium mixed with human serum albumin (HSA) can identify sentinel lymph nodes draining the prostate on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a canine model. Material-Methods Three male canines weighing between 25.7 and 41.3 kg were anesthetized, placed in a 3T MRI and a needle was placed transrectally into one side of the prostate using a commercially available intrarectal needle guide. Gadofosveset trisodium premixed with 10% HSA was then administered at doses ranging from 0.1 to 2.5ml. T1W MRI was performed immediately after injection and two readers evaluated images for visualization of LNs draining the prostate. Results Intraprostatic injection of 0.2 ml gadofosveset trisodium premixed with HSA identified the draining periprostatic lymph nodes in all cases. Delayed images demonstrated upper echelon nodes in the pelvis and abdomen. Higher volume injections resulted in excessive periprostatic extravasation whereas lower volume injections resulted in suboptimal visualization of LNs. Conclusion We demonstrate that gadofosveset trisodium (premixed with 10% HSA) injected intraprostatically at 0.2ml visualized lymph nodes draining the prostate. This approach can be readily adapted for clinical applications such as sentinel lymph node imaging in prostate cancer patients prior to surgery. PMID:25683498

  1. Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Deshingkar, S A; Barpande, S R; Bhavthankar, J D

    2011-07-01

    Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia (CHH) is a rare congenital malformation characterized by marked unilateral overdevelopment of hard and soft tissues of the face. Asymmetry in CHH is usually evident at birth and accentuated with age, especially at puberty. The affected side grows at a rate proportional to the nonaffected side so that the disproportion is maintained thr oughout the life. Multisystem involvement has resulted in etiological heterogeneity including heredity, chromosomal abnormalities, atypical forms of twinning, altered intrauterine environment, and endocrine dysfunctions; however, no single theory explains the etiology adequately. Deformities of all tissues of face, including teeth and their related tissues in the jaw, are key findings for correct diagnosis of CHH. Here an attempt has been made to present a case of CHH with its archetypal features and to supplement existing clinical knowledge. PMID:22090778

  2. Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Deshingkar, S. A.; Barpande, S. R.; Bhavthankar, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia (CHH) is a rare congenital malformation characterized by marked unilateral overdevelopment of hard and soft tissues of the face. Asymmetry in CHH is usually evident at birth and accentuated with age, especially at puberty. The affected side grows at a rate proportional to the nonaffected side so that the disproportion is maintained thr oughout the life. Multisystem involvement has resulted in etiological heterogeneity including heredity, chromosomal abnormalities, atypical forms of twinning, altered intrauterine environment, and endocrine dysfunctions; however, no single theory explains the etiology adequately. Deformities of all tissues of face, including teeth and their related tissues in the jaw, are key findings for correct diagnosis of CHH. Here an attempt has been made to present a case of CHH with its archetypal features and to supplement existing clinical knowledge. PMID:22090778

  3. [Results of active surveillance in low and intermediate risk prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Llorente, Carlos; Diaz Goizueta, Francisco Javier; Hernandez, Virginia; de la Morena, Jose Manuel; de la Peña, Enrique

    2014-06-01

    In this article we review the most significant published papers on active surveillance in prostate cancer and present the results of our case series. We used as main response variables the percentage of patients remaining in surveillance and the oncological results presented as global, cancer specific and metastasis free survivals. Globally, in published series 71.2% of patients included in active surveillance programs, 10-year overall survival is 68% in the series with longer follow up, and cancer-specific survival varies from 97% to 100%. In our series of 144 patients with median follow up of 3.2 years, 76.3% of the patients continue on surveillance. 24 patients (15.9%) stopped surveillance due to histological progression. 5 patients (21.3%) out of the 23 undergoing surgery presented unfavorable pathological criteria on prostatectomy specimen. No patient has died or developed metastases.

  4. Prostate cancer detection using multiparametric 3 – tesla MRI and fusion biopsy: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Mussi, Thais Caldara; Garcia, Rodrigo Gobbo; de Queiroz, Marcos Roberto Gomes; Lemos, Gustavo Caserta; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of transrectal ultrasonography (US) biopsy with imaging fusion using multiparametric (mp) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa), with an emphasis on clinically significant tumors according to histological criteria. Materials and Methods: A total of 189 consecutive US/MRI fusion biopsies were performed obtaining systematic and guided samples of suspicious areas on mpMRI using a 3 Tesla magnet without endorectal coil. Clinical significance for prostate cancer was established based on Epstein criteria. Results: In our casuistic, the average Gleason score was 7 and the average PSA was 5.0ng/mL. Of the 189 patients that received US/MRI biopsies, 110 (58.2%) were positive for PCa. Of those cases, 88 (80%) were clinically significant, accounting for 46.6% of all patients. We divided the MRI findings into 5 Likert scales of probability of having clinically significant PCa. The positivity of US/MRI biopsy for clinically significant PCa was 0%, 17.6% 23.5%, 53.4% and 84.4% for Likert scores 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in terms of biopsy results between different levels of suspicion on mpMRI and also when biopsy results were divided into groups of clinically non-significant versus clinically significant between different levels of suspicion on mpMRI (p-value <0.05 in both analyzes). Conclusion: We found that there is a significant difference in cancer detection using US/MRI fusion biopsy between low-probability and intermediate/high probability Likert scores using mpMRI. PMID:27532112

  5. Results of a study to correlate serum prostate specific antigen and reproductive hormone levels in patients with localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, S.; Quadri, S. F.; Dong, L.; Ignacio, L.; Kathuria, I. N.; Sutton, H.; Halpern, H.

    1995-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was undertaken to determine whether serum hormones (free testosterone, androstenedione, luteinizing hormone, or prolactin) have any influence on serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels in patients with stage A-C prostate cancer. Blood samples were collected prior to any treatment in 36 patients; in 19 (group 1), three blood samples were collected 10 minutes apart between 9:00 AM and 9:30 AM for each patient and pooled together to avoid diurnal and episodic variation in serum testosterone values. In the remaining patients, only one sample could be collected (group 2). Free testosterone, androstenedione, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, and PSA levels were determined with appropriate radioimmunoassay techniques. Statistical analyses were performed separately for groups 1 and 2, and then with pooled data. None of the hormones in any of the analyses showed any association to serum PSA values except for prolactin for the pooled data and for group 2. This statistical significance for prolactin disappeared on multivariate analysis. There were 21 African-American men and 15 whites in the study; no racial differences in hormonal levels were found except for lower luteinizing hormone levels in African Americans in group 2 and pooled data. No differences were found between group 1 and group 2 in the mean serum prolactin and luteinizing hormone values. Serum free testosterone, androstenedione, and luteinizing hormone appeared to have no influence on serum PSA values in nonmetastatic cancer patients. Serum prolactin values were inversely associated with PSA values in univariate analysis for the pooled data; this disappeared in multivariate analysis. Unlike other studies that found higher serum testosterone levels in African-American college students than whites, no such differences were seen in this age group. Luteinizing hormone was lower in African-American men than in whites in the pooled study population. Further studies are needed to clarify

  6. Interstitial photodynamic therapy for the prostate: a canine feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Sugandh D.; Sirls, Larry T.; Chen, Qun; Hetzel, Fred W.; Cerny, Joseph C.

    1996-05-01

    Prior to a possible clinical application of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for prostatic diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer, optical properties of the prostate gland need to be studied. The specific objectives of this study were (1) to determine the light penetration depth, (2) to document the photosensitizer levels in the prostate, and (3) to document the lesion size after PDT. Sixteen dogs were injected with Photofrin II (1, 3 and 5 mg/kg) 24 hrs prior to laser application. After laparotomy and exposure of prostate, monochromatic light (630 nm, via an argon pumped dye laser) was applied through an isotropic fiber at 100 mw for a total dose of 400 joules. Continuous light fluence and temperature were documented. Prostates were harvested at 1 week and examined histologically for the lesion size. Four sham dogs were treated without Photofrin II. At Photofrin doses of 1, 3 and 5 mg/kg the mean prostatic Photofrin levels were 1.78 plus or minus 0.33, 1.47 plus or minus 0.08 and 1.95 plus or minus 0.44 (mu) gm/ml. The mean light penetration depths were 2.08, 1.37 and 1.64 mm respectively. Photofrin dose escalation (1, 3 and 5 mg/kg) increased the lesion size to radius of 4.1 plus or minus 0.9 mm, 4.4 plus or minus 0.8 mm and 6.3 plus or minus 0.9 mm. There were no lesions seen in sham dogs. These results demonstrate that light penetration in prostate is consistent and therapeutic levels of photosensitizer are achieved in prostatic tissue. Moreover, increasing size of the lesions were documented with dose escalation.

  7. Implementing intensity modulated radiotherapy to the prostate bed: Dosimetric study and early clinical results

    SciTech Connect

    Riou, Olivier; Laliberté, Benoit; Azria, David; Menkarios, Cathy; Llacer Moscardo, Carmen; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Aillères, Norbert; Fenoglietto, Pascal

    2013-07-01

    Salvage intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to the prostate bed has hardly been studied so far. We present here a feasibility study and early clinical results for 10 patients. These patients were selected on the basis of having either a biochemical relapse or high risk histology after prostatectomy. They were treated using “sliding-window” IMRT to 68 Gy in 34 fractions. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plans were generated using the same planning computed tomography data set. Dose coverage of planning target volumes (PTVs) and of organs-at-risk (OAR, namely: rectum, bladder, and femoral heads) were compared. Acute toxicity and chronic toxicity were measured using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 scale. IMRT significantly reduces the dose above the prescription dose given to the PTV1 (mean dose: IMRT 67.2 Gy vs 3D-CRT 67.7 Gy (p = 0.0137)), without altering dose coverage for PTV2 (mean dose: IMRT 68.1 Gy vs 3D-CRT 68.0 Gy (p = 0.3750)). Doses to OAR were lower with IMRT and differences were statistically significant (mean dose: IMRT 51.4 Gy vs 3D-CRT 56.6 Gy for rectum (p = 0.002), IMRT 45.1 Gy vs 3D-CRT 53.1 Gy for bladder (p = 0.002), and IMRT 26.1 Gy vs 3D-CRT 28.4 Gy for femoral heads (p = 0.0059)). There was no acute or chronic genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity >1 with a median follow-up of 38 months. IMRT to the prostatic fossa is feasible and reduces dose to OAR, with consequential limited toxicity.

  8. 10-Year Experience With I-125 Prostate Brachytherapy at the Princess Margaret Hospital: Results for 1,100 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita; Borg, Jette; Evans, Andrew; Toi, Ants; Saibishkumar, E.P.; Fung, Sharon; Ma, Clement

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes for 1,111 men treated with iodine-125 brachytherapy (BT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: A total of 1,111 men (median age, 63) were treated with iodine-125 prostate BT for low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer between March 1999 and November 2008. Median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 5.4 ng/ml (range, 0.9-26.1). T stage was T1c in 66% and T2 in 34% of patients. Gleason score was 6 in 90.1% and 7 or 8 in 9.9% of patients. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (2-6 months course) was used in 10.1% of patients and combined external radiotherapy (45 Gy) with BT (110 Gy) in 4.1% (n = 46) of patients. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards were used to determine predictors of failure. Results: Median follow-up was 42 months (range, 6-114), but for biochemical freedom from relapse, a minimum PSA test follow-up of 30 months was required (median 54; n = 776). There were 27 failures, yielding an actuarial 7-year disease-free survival rate of 95.2% (96 at risk beyond 84 months). All failures underwent repeat 12-core transrectal ultrasound -guided biopsies, confirming 8 local failures. On multivariate analysis, Gleason score was the only independent predictor of failure (p = 0.001; hazard ratio, 4.8 (1.9-12.4). Median International Prostate Symptom score from 12 to 108 months ranged between 3 and 9. Of the men reporting baseline potency, 82.8% retained satisfactory erectile function beyond 5 years. Conclusion: Iodine-125 prostate BT is a highly effective treatment option for favorable- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer and is associated with maintenance of good urinary and erectile functions.

  9. Innovation in laser treatment results in the ambulatory resection of prostatic adenomas and carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotz, Manfred; Aeikens, B.

    1997-12-01

    For the treatment of prostate anew instrumentation set is built. This allows an ambulant resection of the prostate by using a combination method of laser and radio frequency (RF). Both instrumentations were combined in a new laser RF resectoscope which consists of a shaft and two working elements; one for the laser fiber and one for the RF loop. The treatment first coagulates the prostate tissue with laser by using a simple bare fiber that irradiates lateral. Since the fiber can be moved manually in axial direction by means of the laser fiber carrier all sections of the prostatic tissue can be systematically covered by the laser beam. Thus substitutes costly and sophisticated systems, i.e. side firing fibers. Further benefits are given; so the instrumentation can also be used for bladder tumors, urethral strictures and bladder neck incisions.

  10. A review of thulium laser vapo-enucleation of the prostate: A novel laser-based strategy for benign prostate enlargement.

    PubMed

    Jones, Patrick; Rai, Bhavan Prasad; Somani, Bhaskar K; Aboumarzouk, Omar M

    2015-09-01

    Thulium laser vapo-enucleation of the prostate is the latest addition to the arsenal of minimally invasive therapies available for the surgical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostate hyperplasia. The potential advantages include smoother vaporisation, a clearer visual field and the option of both continuous-wave and pulsed modes, which also potentiate the haemostatic properties of this endoscopic method. Short-term results show that it yields significant improvements in both subjective and objective outcomes, with a strong safety profile. Large-scale randomised studies with a longer follow-up are warranted to determine the durability of this laser procedure. PMID:26413349

  11. A review of thulium laser vapo-enucleation of the prostate: A novel laser-based strategy for benign prostate enlargement

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Patrick; Rai, Bhavan Prasad; Somani, Bhaskar K.; Aboumarzouk, Omar M.

    2015-01-01

    Thulium laser vapo-enucleation of the prostate is the latest addition to the arsenal of minimally invasive therapies available for the surgical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostate hyperplasia. The potential advantages include smoother vaporisation, a clearer visual field and the option of both continuous-wave and pulsed modes, which also potentiate the haemostatic properties of this endoscopic method. Short-term results show that it yields significant improvements in both subjective and objective outcomes, with a strong safety profile. Large-scale randomised studies with a longer follow-up are warranted to determine the durability of this laser procedure. PMID:26413349

  12. A review of thulium laser vapo-enucleation of the prostate: A novel laser-based strategy for benign prostate enlargement.

    PubMed

    Jones, Patrick; Rai, Bhavan Prasad; Somani, Bhaskar K; Aboumarzouk, Omar M

    2015-09-01

    Thulium laser vapo-enucleation of the prostate is the latest addition to the arsenal of minimally invasive therapies available for the surgical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostate hyperplasia. The potential advantages include smoother vaporisation, a clearer visual field and the option of both continuous-wave and pulsed modes, which also potentiate the haemostatic properties of this endoscopic method. Short-term results show that it yields significant improvements in both subjective and objective outcomes, with a strong safety profile. Large-scale randomised studies with a longer follow-up are warranted to determine the durability of this laser procedure.

  13. Metformin use and risk of prostate cancer: results from the REDUCE study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tom; Sun, Xizi; Howard, Lauren E; Vidal, Adriana C; Gaines, Alexis R; Moreira, Daniel M; Castro-Santamaria, Ramiro; Andriole, Gerald L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2015-11-01

    The role of metformin in prostate cancer chemoprevention remains unclear. REDUCE, which followed biopsy-negative men with protocol-dictated PSA-independent biopsies at 2- and 4-years, provides an opportunity to evaluate the link between metformin use and prostate cancer diagnosis with minimal confounding from screening biases. In diabetic men from REDUCE, we tested the association between metformin use, use of other antidiabetic medications, versus no antidiabetic medication use, and prostate cancer diagnosis as well as prostate cancer grade (low-grade Gleason 4-6 and high-grade Gleason 7-10) using logistic regression. Of the 540 diabetic men with complete data, 205 (38%) did not report use of any antidiabetic medications, 141 (26%) reported use of at least one antidiabetic medication other than metformin, and 194 (36%) reported use of metformin. During the 4-year study, 122 men (23%) were diagnosed with prostate cancer. After adjusting for various clinical and demographic characteristics, we found that metformin use was not significantly associated with total (OR, 1.19; P = 0.50), low- (OR, 1.01; P = 0.96), or high-grade (OR, 1.83; P = 0.19) prostate cancer diagnosis. Likewise, there was no significant association between the use of non-metformin antidiabetic medications and prostate cancer risk in both crude (OR, 1.02; P = 0.95) and multivariable analysis (OR, 0.85; P = 0.56). Furthermore, the interactions between antidiabetic medication use and BMI, geographic location, coronary artery disease, smoking, and treatment group were not significant (all P > 0.05). Among diabetic men with a negative prestudy biopsy who all underwent biopsies largely independent of PSA, metformin use was not associated with reduced risk of prostate cancer diagnosis.

  14. 5-ALA-assisted photodynamic therapy in canine prostates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Muschter, Rolf; Knuechel, Ruth; Steinbach, Pia; Perlmutter, Aaron P.; Martin, Thomas; Baumgartner, Reinhold

    1996-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and interstitial thermotherapy are well known treatment modalities in urology. The approach of this study is to combine both to achieve a selective treatment procedure for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma. Measurements of thy in-vivo pharmacokinetics of 5-ALA induced porphyrins by means of fiber assisted ratiofluorometry showed a maximum fluorescence intensity at time intervals of 3 - 4 h post administration. Fluorescence microscopy at that time showed bright fluorescence in epithelial cells while in the stroma fluorescence could not be observed. Interstitial PDT using a 635-nm dye laser with an irradiation of 50 J/cm2 resulted in a nonthermic hemorrhagic lesion. The lesion size did not change significantly when an irradiation of 100 J/cm2 was used. The usefulness of PDT for treating BPH as well as prostate carcinoma has to be proven in further studies.

  15. Folic acid and risk of prostate cancer: results from a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Jane C; Grau, Maria V; Haile, Robert W; Sandler, Robert S; Summers, Robert W; Bresalier, Robert S; Burke, Carol A; McKeown-Eyssen, Gail E; Baron, John A

    2009-03-18

    Data regarding the association between folate status and risk of prostate cancer are sparse and conflicting. We studied prostate cancer occurrence in the Aspirin/Folate Polyp Prevention Study, a placebo-controlled randomized trial of aspirin and folic acid supplementation for the chemoprevention of colorectal adenomas conducted between July 6, 1994, and December 31, 2006. Participants were followed for up to 10.8 (median = 7.0, interquartile range = 6.0-7.8) years and asked periodically to report all illnesses and hospitalizations. Aspirin alone had no statistically significant effect on prostate cancer incidence, but there were marked differences according to folic acid treatment. Among the 643 men who were randomly assigned to placebo or supplementation with folic acid, the estimated probability of being diagnosed with prostate cancer over a 10-year period was 9.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.5% to 14.5%) in the folic acid group and 3.3% (95% CI = 1.7% to 6.4%) in the placebo group (age-adjusted hazard ratio = 2.63, 95% CI = 1.23 to 5.65, Wald test P = .01). In contrast, baseline dietary folate intake and plasma folate in nonmultivitamin users were inversely associated with risk of prostate cancer, although these associations did not attain statistical significance in adjusted analyses. These findings highlight the potential complex role of folate in prostate cancer and the possibly different effects of folic acid-containing supplements vs natural sources of folate.

  16. Serum testosterone as a biomarker for second prostatic biopsy in men with negative first biopsy for prostatic cancer and PSA>4ng/mL, or with PIN biopsy result

    PubMed Central

    Fiamegos, Alexandros; Varkarakis, John; Kontraros, Michael; Karagiannis, Andreas; Chrisofos, Michael; Barbalias, Dimitrios; Deliveliotis, Charalampos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Data from animal, clinical and prevention studies support the role of androgens in prostate cancer growth, proliferation and progression. Results of serum based epidemiologic studies in humans, however, have been inconclusive. The present study aims to define whether serum testosterone can be used as a predictor of a positive second biopsy in males considered for re-biopsy. Material and Methods: The study included 320 men who underwent a prostatic biopsy in our department from October 2011 until June 2012. Total testosterone, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone and prostate pathology were evaluated in all cases. Patients undergoing a second biopsy were identified and biopsy results were statistically analyzed. Results: Forty men (12.5%) were assessed with a second biopsy. The diagnosis of the second biopsy was High Grade Intraepithelial Neoplasia in 14 patients (35%) and Prostate Cancer in 12 patients (30%). The comparison of prostatic volume, total testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone and albumin showed that patients with cancer of the prostate had significantly greater levels of free testosterone (p=0.043) and bioavailable T (p=0.049). Conclusion: In our study, higher free testosterone and bioavailable testosterone levels were associated with a cancer diagnosis at re-biopsy. Our results indicate a possible role for free and bioavailable testosterone in predicting the presence of prostate cancer in patients considered for re-biopsy. PMID:27532110

  17. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) as a method for identifying benign and malignant prostate biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunhui; Guan, Guangying; Ling, Yuting; Lang, Stephen; Wang, Ruikang K.; Huang, Zhihong; Nabi, Ghulam

    2015-03-01

    Objectives. Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in men. Digital rectal examination (DRE) - a known clinical tool based on alteration in the mechanical properties of tissues due to cancer has traditionally been used for screening prostate cancer. Essentially, DRE estimates relative stiffness of cancerous and normal prostate tissue. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) are new optical imaging techniques capable of providing cross-sectional imaging of tissue microstructure as well as elastogram in vivo and in real time. In this preliminary study, OCE was used in the setting of the human prostate biopsies ex vivo, and the images acquired were compared with those obtained using standard histopathologic methods. Methods. 120 prostate biopsies were obtained by TRUS guided needle biopsy procedures from 9 patients with clinically suspected cancer of the prostate. The biopsies were approximately 0.8mm in diameter and 12mm in length, and prepared in Formalin solution. Quantitative assessment of biopsy samples using OCE was obtained in kilopascals (kPa) before histopathologic evaluation. The results obtained from OCE and standard histopathologic evaluation were compared provided the cross-validation. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for OCE (histopathology was a reference standard). Results. OCE could provide quantitative elasticity properties of prostate biopsies within benign prostate tissue, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical hyperplasia and malignant prostate cancer. Data analysed showed that the sensitivity and specificity of OCE for PCa detection were 1 and 0.91, respectively. PCa had significantly higher stiffness values compared to benign tissues, with a trend of increasing in stiffness with increasing of malignancy. Conclusions. Using OCE, microscopic resolution elastogram is promising in diagnosis of human prostatic diseases. Further studies using this technique to improve the

  18. Internal fiducial markers can assist dose escalation in treatment of prostate cancer: result of organ motion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Moiseenko, V.; Liu, M.; Craig, T.

    2006-01-01

    Use of internal fiducial markers and electronic portal imaging (EPI) to realign patients has been shown to significantly reduce positioning uncertainties in prostate radiation treatment. This creates the possibility of improving the treatment by decreasing the planning target volume (PTV) margin added to the clinical target volume (CTV), which in turn may allow dose escalation. Conformal treatment plans for three prostate cancer patients were evaluated by using different PTV margins with dose prescription of 70 Gy/35 fr initially. Two beam arrangements, 4-field-box (4FB) and 4-field-oblique (4FO), were used. Then, two dose escalation schemes, 74 Gy and 78 Gy, with tighter PTV margins, were chosen from the first simulation and were tested. A Monte Carlo model was developed to simulate the daily geometric uncertainty and calculate the dose to each organ. After the whole treatment, dose-volume histograms were produced and tumour control probability, prostate equivalent uniform dose and the effective dose to critical organs were calculated. By comparing these radiobiological metrics, optimized dose escalation schemes were found. The results show that using internal fiducial markers and EPI, the prescription dose can be escalated to 78 Gy/39 fr with a 4 mm PTV margin. Based on the available dose-response data for intermediate risk prostate patients, this is estimated to result in a 20% increase of local control and significantly reduced rectal complications.

  19. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Consumption and Prostate Cancer: A Review of Exposure Measures and Results of Epidemiological Studies.

    PubMed

    Dinwiddie, Michael T; Terry, Paul D; Whelan, Jay; Patzer, Rachel E

    2016-07-01

    Animal studies have shown that dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3) may play a role in the development of prostate cancer, but the results of epidemiologic studies have been equivocal. Associations in humans may vary depending on study design, measurement methodology of fatty acid intake, intake ranges, and stage of cancer development. To address this, we identified 36 published studies through PubMed (Medline) from 1993 through 2013 on long-chain n-3s and prostate cancer. Exposure measurements included dietary assessment and biomarker levels. Associations for total, early, and late stage prostate cancer were examined by subgroup of study design and exposure measure type and by using forest plots to illustrate the relative strength of associations within each subgroup. We also tested for potential threshold effects by considering studies that included measurement cut-points that met intake levels recommended by the American Heart Association. We found no consistent evidence supporting a role of n-3s in either the causation or prevention of prostate cancer at any stage or grade. Results did not vary appreciably by study design, exposure measurement, intake level, or stage of cancer development.

  20. Predicting Prostate Biopsy Results Using a Panel of Plasma and Urine Biomarkers Combined in a Scoring System

    PubMed Central

    Albitar, Maher; Ma, Wanlong; Lund, Lars; Albitar, Ferras; Diep, Kevin; Fritsche, Herbert A.; Shore, Neal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Determining the need for prostate biopsy is frequently difficult and more objective criteria are needed to predict the presence of high grade prostate cancer (PCa). To reduce the rate of unnecessary biopsies, we explored the potential of using biomarkers in urine and plasma to develop a scoring system to predict prostate biopsy results and the presence of high grade PCa. Methods: Urine and plasma specimens were collected from 319 patients recommended for prostate biopsies. We measured the gene expression levels of UAP1, PDLIM5, IMPDH2, HSPD1, PCA3, PSA, TMPRSS2, ERG, GAPDH, B2M, AR, and PTEN in plasma and urine. Patient age, serum prostate-specific antigen (sPSA) level, and biomarkers data were used to develop two independent algorithms, one for predicting the presence of PCa and the other for predicting high-grade PCa (Gleason score [GS] ≥7). Results: Using training and validation data sets, a model for predicting the outcome of PCa biopsy was developed with an area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of 0.87. The positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were 87% and 63%, respectively. We then developed a second algorithm to identify patients with high-grade PCa (GS ≥7). This algorithm's AUROC was 0.80, and had a PPV and NPV of 56% and 77%, respectively. Patients who demonstrated concordant results using both algorithms showed a sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 93% for predicting high-grade aggressive PCa. Thus, the use of both algorithms resulted in a PPV of 90% and NPV of 89% for predicting high-grade PCa with toleration of some low-grade PCa (GS <7) being detected. Conclusions: This model of a biomarker panel with algorithmic interpretation can be used as a “liquid biopsy” to reduce the need for unnecessary tissue biopsies, and help to guide appropriate treatment decisions. PMID:26918043

  1. 70 Gy Versus 80 Gy in Localized Prostate Cancer: 5-Year Results of GETUG 06 Randomized Trial;Prostate cancer; Dose escalation; Conformal radiotherapy; Randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Beckendorf, Veronique; Guerif, Stephane; Le Prise, Elisabeth; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Bougnoux, Agnes; Chauvet, Bruno; Salem, Naji; Chapet, Olivier; Bourdain, Sylvain; Bachaud, Jean-Marc; Maingon, Philippe; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Malissard, Luc; Simon, Jean-Marc; Pommier, Pascal; Hay, Men; Dubray, Bernard; Lagrange, Jean-Leon; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Bey, Pierre

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To perform a randomized trial comparing 70 and 80 Gy radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 306 patients with localized prostate cancer were randomized. No androgen deprivation was allowed. The primary endpoint was biochemical relapse according to the modified 1997-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and Phoenix definitions. Toxicity was graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 1991 criteria and the late effects on normal tissues-subjective, objective, management, analytic scales (LENT-SOMA) scales. The patients' quality of life was scored using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 30-item cancer-specific and 25-item prostate-specific modules. Results: The median follow-up was 61 months. According to the 1997-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, the 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 39% and 28% in the 70- and 80-Gy arms, respectively (p = .036). Using the Phoenix definition, the 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 32% and 23.5%, respectively (p = .09). The subgroup analysis showed a better biochemical outcome for the higher dose group with an initial prostate-specific antigen level >15 ng/mL. At the last follow-up date, 26 patients had died, 10 of their disease and none of toxicity, with no differences between the two arms. According to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, the Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicity rate was 14% and 19.5% for the 70- and 80-Gy arms (p = .22), respectively. The Grade 2 or greater urinary toxicity was 10% at 70 Gy and 17.5% at 80 Gy (p = .046). Similar results were observed using the LENT-SOMA scale. Bladder toxicity was more frequent at 80 Gy than at 70 Gy (p = .039). The quality-of-life questionnaire results before and 5 years after treatment were available for 103 patients with no differences found between the 70- and 80-Gy arms. Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy provided a

  2. Effect of Benincasa hispida fruits on testosterone-induced prostatic hypertrophy in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Nandecha, Chetan; Nahata, Alok; Dixit, Vinod Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Background: Benincasa hispida Cogn. has been used traditionally in India for the management of urinary disorders. The fruit of B hispida is used as a diuretic and the seeds have been reported to possess antiangiogenic effects in prostate cells. Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of petroleum ether extract, ethanolic extract, and B hispida seed oil on hyperplasia of the prostate induced by the subcutaneous administration of testosterone in rats. Methods: In vitro studies were performed to determine the 5α-reductase inhibitory potential of the extracts. The results of those studies paved the way for the pharmacologic screening of the extracts to assess their potential against testosterone-induced hyperplasia in rats. Nine groups containing 10 rats per group were created for this study. Hyperplasia was induced by administration of testosterone (3 mg/kg SC) for 14 days in all the groups except the vehicle-treated group. Simultaneous administration of petroleum ether extract (100 or 200 mg/kg PO), ethanolic extract (100 or 200 mg/kg PO), and B hispida seed oil (20 or 40 mg/kg PO) was conducted. A standard 5α-reductase inhibitor (ie, finasteride) was used as a positive control. The weight of the rats was recorded on day 0 (ie, day 1 of the study) and on day 14, and the influence of testosterone and test extracts on the weight of the rats was determined. On day 14, rats were euthanized; prostates were dissected out, and weighed. The rats' prostate/body weight (P/BW) ratio was then determined. Histologic examinations were performed on prostates from each group. Results: The petroleum ether extract as well as B hispida seed oil exhibited inhibition of 5α-reductase activity in in vitro studies. Ethanolic extract did not exhibit significant inhibitory potential in vitro. Further in vivo study found that testosterone treatment significantly increased the rats' P/BW ratio in all the groups except the vehicle-treated rats, and this increase in

  3. Obesity and prostate cancer: gene expression signature of human periprostatic adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Periprostatic (PP) adipose tissue surrounds the prostate, an organ with a high predisposition to become malignant. Frequently, growing prostatic tumor cells extend beyond the prostatic organ towards this fat depot. This study aimed to determine the genome-wide expression of genes in PP adipose tissue in obesity/overweight (OB/OW) and prostate cancer patients. Methods Differentially expressed genes in human PP adipose tissue were identified using microarrays. Analyses were conducted according to the donors' body mass index characteristics (OB/OW versus lean) and prostate disease (extra prostatic cancer versus organ confined prostate cancer versus benign prostatic hyperplasia). Selected genes with altered expression were validated by real-time PCR. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was used to investigate gene ontology, canonical pathways and functional networks. Results In the PP adipose tissue of OB/OW subjects, we found altered expression of genes encoding molecules involved in adipogenic/anti-lipolytic, proliferative/anti-apoptotic, and mild immunoinflammatory processes (for example, FADS1, down-regulated, and LEP and ANGPT1, both up-regulated). Conversely, in the PP adipose tissue of subjects with prostate cancer, altered genes were related to adipose tissue cellular activity (increased cell proliferation/differentiation, cell cycle activation and anti-apoptosis), whereas a downward impact on immunity and inflammation was also observed, mostly related to the complement (down-regulation of CFH). Interestingly, we found that the microRNA MIRLET7A2 was overexpressed in the PP adipose tissue of prostate cancer patients. Conclusions Obesity and excess adiposity modified the expression of PP adipose tissue genes to ultimately foster fat mass growth. In patients with prostate cancer the expression profile of PP adipose tissue accounted for hypercellularity and reduced immunosurveillance. Both findings may be liable to promote a favorable environment for

  4. The Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial: VA/NCI/AHRQ Cooperative Studies Program #407 (PIVOT): design and baseline results of a randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with watchful waiting for men with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilt, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    categorizations incorporating PSA levels, Gleason histologic grade, and tumor stage, it was found that approximately 40% had low-risk, 34% had medium-risk, and 21% had high-risk prostate cancer based on local histopathology. Comparison to our national sample of eligible men declining PIVOT participation as well as to men enrolled in the Scandinavian trial indicated that PIVOT enrollees are representative of men being diagnosed and treated in the United States and quite different from men in the Scandinavian trial. PIVOT enrolled an ethnically diverse population representative of men diagnosed with prostate cancer in the United States. Results will yield important information regarding the relative effectiveness and harms of surgery compared with WW for men with predominately PSA-detected clinically localized prostate cancer.

  5. The Prostate Cancer Intervention Versus Observation Trial: VA/NCI/AHRQ Cooperative Studies Program #407 (PIVOT): design and baseline results of a randomized controlled trial comparing radical prostatectomy with watchful waiting for men with clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilt, Timothy J

    2012-12-01

    categorizations incorporating PSA levels, Gleason histologic grade, and tumor stage, it was found that approximately 40% had low-risk, 34% had medium-risk, and 21% had high-risk prostate cancer based on local histopathology. Comparison to our national sample of eligible men declining PIVOT participation as well as to men enrolled in the Scandinavian trial indicated that PIVOT enrollees are representative of men being diagnosed and treated in the United States and quite different from men in the Scandinavian trial. PIVOT enrolled an ethnically diverse population representative of men diagnosed with prostate cancer in the United States. Results will yield important information regarding the relative effectiveness and harms of surgery compared with WW for men with predominately PSA-detected clinically localized prostate cancer. PMID:23271771

  6. Spectrum of mitochondrial genomic variation and associated clinical presentation of prostate cancer in South African men

    PubMed Central

    McCrow, John P.; Petersen, Desiree C.; Louw, Melanie; Chan, Eva K. F.; Harmeyer, Katherine; Vecchiarelli, Stefano; Lyons, Ruth J.; Bornman, M. S. Riana

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates are significantly increased in African–American men, but limited studies have been performed within Sub–Saharan African populations. As mitochondria control energy metabolism and apoptosis we speculate that somatic mutations within mitochondrial genomes are candidate drivers of aggressive prostate carcinogenesis. METHODS We used matched blood and prostate tissue samples from 87 South African men (77 with African ancestry) to perform deep sequencing of complete mitochondrial genomes. Clinical presentation was biased toward aggressive disease (Gleason score >7, 64%), and compared with men without prostate cancer either with or without benign prostatic hyperplasia. RESULTS We identified 144 somatic mtDNA single nucleotide variants (SNVs), of which 80 were observed in 39 men presenting with aggressive disease. Both the number and frequency of somatic mtDNA SNVs were associated with higher pathological stage. CONCLUSIONS Besides doubling the total number of somatic PCa‐associated mitochondrial genome mutations identified to date, we associate mutational load with aggressive prostate cancer status in men of African ancestry. Prostate 76:349–358, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. The Prostate published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26660354

  7. Fluorescence of prostate-specific antigen as measured with a portable 1D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeong C.; Jeong, Jin H.; Jeong, Dong S.; Kim, Young M.; Oh, Sang W.; Choi, Eui Y.; Kim, Jae H.; Nahm, Kie B.

    2005-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an androgen-dependent glycoprotein protease (M.W. 33 kDa) and a member of kallikrein super-family of serine protease, and has chymotrypsin-like enzymatic activity. It is synthesized by the prostate epithelial cells and found in the prostate gland and seminal plasma as a major protein. It is widely used as a clinical marker for diagnosis, screening, monitoring and prognosis of prostate cancer. In normal male adults, the concentration of PSA in the blood is below 4 ng/ml and this value increases in patients with the prostate cancer or the benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) due to its leakage into the circulatory system. As such, systematic monitoring of the PSA level in the blood can provide critical information about the progress of the prostatic disease. We have developed a compact integral system that can quantitatively measure the concentration of total PSA in human blood. This system utilizes the fluorescence emitted from the dye molecules attached to PSA molecules after appropriate immunoassay-based processing. Developed for the purpose of providing an affordable means of fast point-of-care testing of the prostate cancer, this system proved to be able to detect the presence of the PSA at the level of 0.18 ng/ml in less than 12 minutes, with the actual measurement taking less than 2 minutes. The design concept for this system is presented together with the result for a few representative samples.

  8. PSA, PSA derivatives, proPSA and prostate health index in the diagnosis of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ayyıldız, Sema Nur; Ayyıldız, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Currently, prostate- specific antigen (PSA) is the most common oncological marker used for prostate cancer screening. However, high levels of PSA in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis decrease the specificity of PSA as a cancer marker. To increase the specificity of PSA, PSA derivatives and PSA kinetics have been used. However, these new techniques were not able to increase the diagnostic specificity for prostate cancer. Therefore, the search for new molecules and derivatives of PSA continues. With the aim of increasing the specificity of prostate cancer diagnosis, proPSA and the Prostate Health Index have been introduced. In this review, the roles of PSA, PSA derivatives, proPSA and the Prostate Health Index in Prostate Cancer diagnosis are examined. PMID:26328156

  9. Prostate extracellular vesicles in patient plasma as a liquid biopsy platform for prostate cancer using nanoscale flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zahrani, Ali A.; Pardhan, Siddika; Brett, Sabine I.; Guo, Qiu Q.; Yang, Jun; Wolf, Philipp; Power, Nicholas E.; Durfee, Paul N.; MacMillan, Connor D.; Townson, Jason L.; Brinker, Jeffrey C.; Fleshner, Neil E.; Izawa, Jonathan I.; Chambers, Ann F.; Chin, Joseph L.; Leong, Hon S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles released by prostate cancer present in seminal fluid, urine, and blood may represent a non-invasive means to identify and prioritize patients with intermediate risk and high risk of prostate cancer. We hypothesize that enumeration of circulating prostate microparticles (PMPs), a type of extracellular vesicle (EV), can identify patients with Gleason Score≥4+4 prostate cancer (PCa) in a manner independent of PSA. Patients and Methods Plasmas from healthy volunteers, benign prostatic hyperplasia patients, and PCa patients with various Gleason score patterns were analyzed for PMPs. We used nanoscale flow cytometry to enumerate PMPs which were defined as submicron events (100-1000nm) immunoreactive to anti-PSMA mAb when compared to isotype control labeled samples. Levels of PMPs (counts/μL of plasma) were also compared to CellSearch CTC Subclasses in various PCa metastatic disease subtypes (treatment naïve, castration resistant prostate cancer) and in serially collected plasma sets from patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Results PMP levels in plasma as enumerated by nanoscale flow cytometry are effective in distinguishing PCa patients with Gleason Score≥8 disease, a high-risk prognostic factor, from patients with Gleason Score≤7 PCa, which carries an intermediate risk of PCa recurrence. PMP levels were independent of PSA and significantly decreased after surgical resection of the prostate, demonstrating its prognostic potential for clinical follow-up. CTC subclasses did not decrease after prostatectomy and were not effective in distinguishing localized PCa patients from metastatic PCa patients. Conclusions PMP enumeration was able to identify patients with Gleason Score ≥8 PCa but not patients with Gleason Score 4+3 PCa, but offers greater confidence than CTC counts in identifying patients with metastatic prostate cancer. CTC Subclass analysis was also not effective for post-prostatectomy follow up and for

  10. Use of Local {sup 111}In-Capromab Pendetide Scan Results to Predict Outcome After Salvage Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, Bridget F. Mouraviev, Vladimir; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Mayes, Janice; Chen, Stephanie H.; Wong, Terence Z.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Sun, Leon; Moul, Judd; Polascik, Thomas J.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan (ProstaScint; Cytogen Corp., Princeton NJ) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration to evaluate increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels after radical prostatectomy. This study evaluated the role of prostate bed {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan findings to predict response to salvage radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Forty patients who had PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy and a {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan immediately before salvage prostate bed RT (median, 66 Gy) were identified from the Duke Prostate Center database. Patients with distant uptake of capromab pendetide or long-term androgen deprivation therapy were excluded. Median follow-up after salvage RT was 2.7 years. Patient demographic, clinical, and pathologic characteristics; PSA values; and {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan results were retrospectively analyzed. A PSA failure after salvage RT was defined as PSA level greater than 0.2 ng/ml. Data were combined with other published results in a secondary pooled analysis of 106 patients. Results: {sup 111}In-Capromab pendetide findings included 20 patients with negative scan results and 20 with locally positive scan results. Two-year progression-free survival rates were 60% for patients with a negative scan result and 74% for those with a locally positive scan result (p = 0.49). Combined analysis did not show a difference in outcome based on local {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan result. Conclusion: For patients without distant signal detected by using {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan, patients with locally positive scan findings did not have statistically different progression-free survival than those with a negative scan result, suggesting that salvage RT may be successful in patients with either a locally positive or negative {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan result.

  11. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia associated with deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase is the most common inborn error in adrenal function and the most common cause of adrenal insufficiency in the pediatric age group. As patients now survive into adulthood, adult health-care providers must also be familiar with this condition. Over the past several years, F1000 has published numerous commentaries updating research and practical guidelines for this condition. The purposes of this review are to summarize basic information defining congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to highlight current knowledge and controversies in management. PMID:26339484

  12. A Possible Association between Melanoma and Prostate Cancer. Results from a Case-Control-Study

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Alina; Jiang, Shang I. Brian; Cohen, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma and prostate cancer are the fifth and first most common cancers in men within the United States, respectively. The association between the two cancers lies in the mutual androgen-dependence. However, the relationship between prostate cancer history and melanoma development remains to be further elucidated. We aim to determine the odds of history of prostate cancer among men with melanoma as compared to time-frame, clinic, and provider-matched controls without melanoma within a single academic surgical center. We present a case-control study comparing men treated for melanoma and non-melanoma cancer by a single provider between 2010 and 2014 within an academic dermatologic surgical center. Overall, there were nine cases of prostate cancer among the melanoma group and two cases amongst the controls—a statistically significant difference in both uni- and multivariable analyses (p = 0.057 [95% CI 1, 23.5], p = 0.042 [95% CI 1.1, 129], respectively). Body mass index, alcohol use, and skin type II were significant risk factors for melanoma (p = 0.011 [95% CI 1, 1.3], 0.005 [95% CI 1.4, 7], 0.025 [95% CI 1.1, 3.3], respectively). There were more immunosuppressed controls (p = 0.002); however, the melanoma patients had a significantly longer duration of immunosuppression (11.6 vs. 1.9 years, p < 0.001 [95% CI 0.03, 0.5]). Melanoma screenings for men should include questions on prostate cancer history. Prostate cancer patients may benefit from more frequent and comprehensive melanoma screening. PMID:25884238

  13. Hemimandibular hyperplasia treated by early high condylectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, F; Bianchi, B; De Riu, G; Di Blasio, A; Sesenna, E

    2001-01-01

    A case of hemimandibular hyperplasia in a young patient treated 12 years ago is presented. Clinical and radiographic findings were consistent with a diagnosis of right hemimandibular hyperplasia. An early high condylectomy was performed. In our opinion, the esthetic and functional results after this long-term follow-up are fairly satisfactory. We present a brief review of the literature to make a differentiation between condylar hyperplasia and hemimandibular hyperplasia and to stress the importance of early condylectomy to correct this disease. PMID:12387615

  14. Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J.; Lilja, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Two groundbreaking trials have this year reported conflicting results as to the benefit of screening for prostate cancer. Careful interpretation in the light of contemporary data might, however, reveal the true value of this intervention. PMID:19498406

  15. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or inappropriately). Congenital adrenal hyperplasia can affect both boys and girls. About 1 in 10,000 to 18,000 ... penis but normal testes Well-developed muscles Both boys and girls will be tall as children, but much shorter ...

  16. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bassioukas, K; Danielides, V; Georgiou, I; Photos, E; Zagorianakou, P; Skevas, A

    2000-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) or Heck disease, is a rare viral infection of the oral mucosa caused by HPV 13 or HPV 32. In Caucasians there have been only a few cases reported. We present the first case in Greece in a young Caucasian girl in which HPV 13 was detected with PCR analysis. The patient was successfully treated with CO2 laser.

  17. Epithelial hyperplasia

    Cancer.gov

    Increase in number of cuboidal, columnar, ciliated or mucous cells without atypia. Cells maintain normal architecture of bronchioles and alveoli. The main distinctive features of regenerative hyperplasia are absence of direct link to tumor progression, and presence of inflammation and necrosis due to the inflicting toxic agent.

  18. Mitomycin C in combination with orchiectomy for newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer: preliminary results on a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Van Poppel, H; van den Broucke, F; Derluyn, J; Popelier, G; Casselman, J; Billiet, I; van Uytsel, L; Paridaens, R; Baert, L

    1993-06-01

    The preliminary results of a randomized trial comparing orchiectomy versus orchiectomy and mitomycin C in 119 newly diagnosed metastatic prostate cancer patients are presented. Of 109 evaluable patients 57 were treated with orchiectomy alone and 52 received adjuvant intravenous mitomycin C. Mean interval to progression was 13 months in the orchiectomy group versus 11 months in the mitomycin C group. Preliminary analysis did not demonstrate a favorable effect of the combination with this chemotherapeutic agent compared to orchiectomy alone (p = 0.3).

  19. The results of transperineal versus transrectal prostate biopsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Peng-Fei; Zhu, Yu-Chun; Wei, Wu-Ran; Li, Yong-Zhong; Yang, Jie; Li, Yu-Tao; Li, Ding-Ming; Wang, Jia; Zeng, Hao

    2012-01-01

    This systematic review was performed to compare the efficacy and complications of transperineal (TP) vs. transrectal (TR) prostate biopsy. A systematic research of PUBMED, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library was performed to identify all clinical controlled trials on prostate cancer (PCa) detection rate and complications achieved by TP and TR biopsies. Prostate biopsies included sextant, extensive and saturation biopsy procedures. All patients were assigned to a TR group and a TP group. Subgroup analysis was performed according to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and digital rectal examination (DRE) findings. The Cochrane Collaboration's RevMan 5.1 software was used for the meta-analysis. A total of seven trials, including three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and four case–control studies (CCS), met our inclusion criteria. There was no significant difference in the cancer detection rate between the sextant TR and TP groups (risk difference (RD), −0.02; 95% confidence interval (CI), −0.08–0.03; P=0.34). Meta-analysis for RCTs combined with CCS showed that there was no difference in the cancer detection rate between the extensive TR and TP group (RD, −0.01; 95% CI, −0.05–0.04; P=0.81). There was no significant difference in PCa detection rate between the saturation TR and TP approaches (31.4% vs. 25.7%, respectively; P=0.3). There were also no significant differences in cancer detection between the TR and TP groups in each subgroup. Although the data on complications were not pooled for the meta-analysis, no significant difference was found when comparing TR and TP studies. TR and TP biopsies were equivalent in terms of efficiency and related complications. TP prostate biopsy should be an available and alternative procedure for use by urologists. PMID:22101942

  20. Results from a prostate cancer admixture mapping study in African-American men.

    PubMed

    Bock, Cathryn Hufford; Schwartz, Ann G; Ruterbusch, Julie J; Levin, Albert M; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Land, Susan J; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Reich, David; McKeigue, Paul; Chen, Wei; Heath, Elisabeth I; Powell, Isaac J; Kittles, Rick A; Rybicki, Benjamin A

    2009-11-01

    There are considerable racial disparities in prostate cancer risk, with a 60% higher incidence rate among African-American (AA) men compared with European-American (EA) men, and a 2.4-fold higher mortality rate in AA men than in EA men. Recently, studies have implicated several African-ancestry associated prostate cancer susceptibility loci on chromosome 8q24. In the current study, we performed admixture mapping in AA men from two independent case-control studies of prostate cancer to confirm the 8q24 ancestry association and also identify other genomic regions that may harbor prostate cancer susceptibility genes. A total of 482 cases and 261 controls were genotyped for 1,509 ancestry informative markers across the genome. The mean estimated individual admixture proportions were 20% European and 80% African. The most significant observed increase in European ancestry occurred at rs2141360 on chromosome 7q31 in both the case-only (P = 0.0000035) and case-control analyses. The most significant observed increase in African ancestry across the genome occurred at a locus on chromosome 5q35 identified by SNPs rs7729084 (case-only analysis P = 0.002), and rs12474977 (case-control analysis P = 0.004), which are separated by 646 kb and were adjacent to one another on the panel. On chromosome 8, rs4367565 was associated with the greatest excess African ancestry in both the case-only and case-control analyses (case-only and case-control P = 0.02), confirming previously reported African-ancestry associations with chromosome 8q24. In conclusion, we confirmed ancestry associations on 8q24, and identified additional ancestry-associated regions potentially harboring prostate cancer susceptibility loci.

  1. Febrile Infection in Post-Prostate Biopsy: Results of a Ten-Year Single-Institution Study in South Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yuh-Shyan; Chen, Chia-Hong; Jou, Yeong-Chin; Yang, Wen-Horng; Chang, Chien-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Post-biopsy infection is one of the major concerns of urologists and patients for prostate biopsy. Many efforts have been made to reduce the infection rate. We conducted a study at a single institution with the goal of describing the bacteriology and incidence trends of febrile infections following trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy of the prostate. Materials and Methods: From January 1998 to December 2002 (Period 1 of the study), January 2003 to August 2005 (Period 2), September 2005 to October 2007 (Period 3), and November 2007 to December 2009 (Period 4), 1,406 patients underwent prostate biopsy at our hospital. All biopsies were conducted under TRUS guidance without preparation by enemas. Several steps were taken to reduce infectious complications following biopsy, including a shift to levofloxacin prophylaxis starting from Period 3 of our study and thorough instructions in post-biopsy self-care starting from the beginning of Period 4. The incidence and bacteriology of urinary tract infection (UTI) following the prostate biopsies were reviewed from chart records. Results: Twenty-eight of 514 (5.4%), 13 of 276 (4.7%) nine of 274 (3.2%), and three of 342 (0.9%) patients had post-biopsy febrile infections during the four periods of the study, respectively. Fifteen of 28 (53.5%), four of 13 (30.8%), five of nine (55.6%), and zero of three patients, respectively, had positive cultures of blood, urine, or both during the four study periods. Escherichia coli was the pathogen isolated most commonly and ampicillin- and fluoroquinolone-resistant strains of this organism were identified at a high frequency. The times to onset of fever after biopsy in the four study periods were 1.5±1.3 d, 3.7±2.7 d, 2.2±1.6 d, and 2.5±0.9 d, respectively. Conclusions: Ampicillin- and fluoroquinolone-resistant strains of E. coli were the uropathogenic bacteria identified most commonly after prostate biopsy at our hospital. The incidence of UTI

  2. Cabozantinib in Patients With Advanced Prostate Cancer: Results of a Phase II Randomized Discontinuation Trial

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David C.; Smith, Matthew R.; Sweeney, Christopher; Elfiky, Aymen A.; Logothetis, Christopher; Corn, Paul G.; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Small, Eric J.; Harzstark, Andrea L.; Gordon, Michael S.; Vaishampayan, Ulka N.; Haas, Naomi B.; Spira, Alexander I.; Lara, Primo N.; Lin, Chia-Chi; Srinivas, Sandy; Sella, Avishay; Schöffski, Patrick; Scheffold, Christian; Weitzman, Aaron L.; Hussain, Maha

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cabozantinib (XL184) is an orally bioavailable tyrosine kinase inhibitor with activity against MET and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We evaluated the activity of cabozantinib in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in a phase II randomized discontinuation trial with an expansion cohort. Patients and Methods Patients received 100 mg of cabozantinib daily. Those with stable disease per RECIST at 12 weeks were randomly assigned to cabozantinib or placebo. Primary end points were objective response rate at 12 weeks and progression-free survival (PFS) after random assignment. Results One hundred seventy-one men with CRPC were enrolled. Random assignment was halted early based on the observed activity of cabozantinib. Seventy-two percent of patients had regression in soft tissue lesions, whereas 68% of evaluable patients had improvement on bone scan, including complete resolution in 12%. The objective response rate at 12 weeks was 5%, with stable disease in 75% of patients. Thirty-one patients with stable disease at week 12 were randomly assigned. Median PFS was 23.9 weeks (95% CI, 10.7 to 62.4 weeks) with cabozantinib and 5.9 weeks (95% CI, 5.4 to 6.6 weeks) with placebo (hazard ratio, 0.12; P < .001). Serum total alkaline phosphatase and plasma cross-linked C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen were reduced by ≥ 50% in 57% of evaluable patients. On retrospective review, bone pain improved in 67% of evaluable patients, with a decrease in narcotic use in 56%. The most common grade 3 adverse events were fatigue (16%), hypertension (12%), and hand-foot syndrome (8%). Conclusion Cabozantinib has clinical activity in men with CRPC, including reduction of soft tissue lesions, improvement in PFS, resolution of bone scans, and reductions in bone turnover markers, pain, and narcotic use. PMID:23169517

  3. Low LKB1 Expression Results in Unfavorable Prognosis in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianlei; Sun, Peng; Sun, Beibei; Wang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to compare the expression of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) in prostate cancer (PCa) tissues and the paired adjacent tissues, then to evaluate the statistical relationship between LKB1 expression and prognosis of PCa patients. Material/Methods The relative expression of LKB1 at mRNA level was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The expression of LKB1 at protein level was measured by immunohistochemistry (IHC) method. The relationship between LKB1 expression and clinicopathologic characteristics was estimated by chi-square test. Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze the overall survival of PCa patients with different LKB1 expression. Cox regression analysis was performed to estimate the significance of LKB1 expression and clinicopathologic characteristics in the prognosis of PCa patients. Results The relative expression of LKB1 at mRNA level was significantly lower in PCa tissues than in the normal tissues (P<0.001). The LKB1 expression was proved to be affected by clinical stage (P=0.019) and PSA concentration (P=0.031) of PCa patients. Moreover, patients with negative LKB1 expression had shorter survival than those with positive expression. Cox regression analysis confirmed that LKB1 could be regarded as a prognostic biomarker for PCa patients (P=0.001, HR=3.981, 95% CI=1.698–9.336). Conclusions The expression of LKB1 was lower in PCa tissues and might be a predictor for the prognosis of PCa patients. PMID:26616116

  4. CyberKnife-based prostate cancer patient radioablation – early results of irradiation in 200 patients

    PubMed Central

    Napieralska, Aleksandra; Namysł-Kaletka, Agnieszka; Głowacki, Grzegorz; Grabińska, Kinga; Woźniak, Grzegorz; Stąpór-Fudzińska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prostrate cancer (PC) is one of the most common malignancies and is frequently treated with an 8-week course of radiotherapy. CyberKnife (CK) based radioablation enables completion of therapy within 5-9 days. The aim of this study is an evaluation of the effectiveness and tolerance of CyberKnife-based radioablation in prostate cancer patients. Material and methods 200 PC patients (94 low risk [LR], 106 intermediate risk [IR]) underwent CK irradiation every other day (fraction dose [fd] 7.25 Gy, total dose [TD] 36.25 Gy, time 9 days). PSA varied from 1.1 to 19.5 (median 7.7) and T stage from T1c to T2c. The percentage of patients with Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT), GI (gastrointestinal) and GU (genitourinary) toxicity (EORTC/RTOG scale), and PSA were checked at 1, 4 and 8 months, and thereafter every 6 months – up to a total of 26 months – post-treatment. Results The percentage of patients without ADT increased from 47.5% to 94.1% after 26 months. The maximum percentage of acute G3 adverse effects was 0.6% for GI, 1% for GU and G2 – 2.1% for GI and 8.5% for GU. No late G3 toxicity was observed. The maximum percentage of late G2 toxicity was 0.7% for GI and 3.4% for GU. Median PSA decreased from 7.7 to 0.1 ng/ml during FU. One patient relapsed and was treated with salvage brachytherapy. Conclusions We conclude that CK-based radioablation in low and intermediate risk PC patients is an effective treatment modality enabling OTT reduction and presents a very low percentage of adverse effects. PMID:26568868

  5. Evolution and success of holmium laser enucleation of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Krambeck, Amy E.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of this article is to review the development of instruments, current technique, and expected outcomes for holmium laser enucleation of the prostate (HoLEP). Materials and Methods: A review of published, peer-reviewed articles focusing on HoLEP was performed using the MEDLINE database. Results: Historically, the gold-standard management for symptomatic obstructing benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has been transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). With the development of new laser technology minimally invasive surgical procedures have been introduced in an attempt to decrease the morbidity experienced with standard TURP. Laser treatment of BPH has evolved from coagulation to complete adenoma enucleation. The holmium laser was initially utilized for prostate ablation and soon evolved into holmium laser tissue resection, but was limited by difficulties with extracting the prostate tissue from the bladder. With the development of a compatible tissue morcellator whole prostate lobes could be enucleated similar to an open prostate enucleation and the HoLEP procedure was developed. Currently HoLEP is the only procedure to demonstrate superior outcomes to TURP on urodynamic studies and long-term studies demonstrate its durability up to 7 years post procedure. Changes in enucleation technique have also increased the efficiency of the HoLEP procedure, such that any sized prostate can be treated. Conclusions: HoLEP is a safe and effective surgical treatment for symptomatic BPH, dependent on a high powered laser and morcellation system. The procedure continues to gain acceptance due to excellent short and long-term results, its wide application, and further simplification of technique. PMID:21116363

  6. Chronic toxic and carcinogenic effects of oral cadmium in the Noble (NBL/Cr) rat: induction of neoplastic and proliferative lesions of the adrenal, kidney, prostate, and testes.

    PubMed

    Waalkes, M P; Anver, M R; Diwan, B A

    1999-10-29

    cell), although few in number, showed a positive correlation with cadmium dose, as did pelvic transitional epithelial hyperplasia. Renal lesions were not associated with any cadmium-induced changes in age-related chronic nephropathy. The incidence of pheochromocytomas of the adrenal was increased by cadmium but only at the 50 ppm dose. Inflammatory lesions of the liver and spleen were common at higher doses and showed strong trends based on dose. These results indicate that oral cadmium can induce proliferative lesions in the prostate and kidney of the Noble rat. The finding of proliferative lesions of dorsolateral prostate in rats has presumed relevance to human prostate cancers. PMID:10591488

  7. [Application of saw palmetto fruit extract in the treatment of prostate diseases].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xu-xin; Shang, Xue-jun; Huang, Yu-feng

    2015-09-01

    Saw palmetto fruit extract (SPE), as a herbal product, is widely used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Recent studies show that SPE also has some therapeutic effects on chronic prostatitis, prostate cancer, sexual dysfunction, and so on. This article presents an overview on the application of SPE in the treatment of BPH, prostate cancer, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, with a discussion on its action mechanisms. PMID:26552220

  8. [Application of saw palmetto fruit extract in the treatment of prostate diseases].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xu-xin; Shang, Xue-jun; Huang, Yu-feng

    2015-09-01

    Saw palmetto fruit extract (SPE), as a herbal product, is widely used for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Recent studies show that SPE also has some therapeutic effects on chronic prostatitis, prostate cancer, sexual dysfunction, and so on. This article presents an overview on the application of SPE in the treatment of BPH, prostate cancer, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, with a discussion on its action mechanisms.

  9. Locus-specific gene repositioning in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leshner, Marc; Devine, Michelle; Roloff, Gregory W.; True, Lawrence D.; Misteli, Tom; Meaburn, Karen J.

    2016-01-01

    Genes occupy preferred spatial positions within interphase cell nuclei. However, positioning patterns are not an innate feature of a locus, and genes can alter their localization in response to physiological and pathological changes. Here we screen the radial positioning patterns of 40 genes in normal, hyperplasic, and malignant human prostate tissues. We find that the overall spatial organization of the genome in prostate tissue is largely conserved among individuals. We identify three genes whose nuclear positions are robustly altered in neoplastic prostate tissues. FLI1 and MMP9 position differently in prostate cancer than in normal tissue and prostate hyperplasia, whereas MMP2 is repositioned in both prostate cancer and hyperplasia. Our data point to locus-specific reorganization of the genome during prostate disease. PMID:26564800

  10. Studies on the three-dimensional temperature transients in the canine prostate during transurethral microwave thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Zhu, L; Xu, L X

    2000-08-01

    Thermal therapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia requires accurate prediction of the temperature distribution induced by the heating within the prostatic tissue. In this study, the Pennes bioheat transfer equation was used to model the transient heat transfer inside the canine prostate during transurethral microwave thermal therapy. Incorporating the specific absorption rate of microwave energy in tissue, a closed-form analytical solution was obtained. Good agreement was found between the theoretical predictions and in-vivo experimental results. Effects of blood perfusion and the cooling at the urethral wall on the temperature rise were investigated within the prostate during heating. The peak intraprostatic temperatures attained by application of 5, 10, or 15 W microwave power were predicted to be 38 degrees C, 41 degrees C, and 44 degrees C. Results from this study will help optimize the thermal dose that can be applied to target tissue during the therapy.

  11. Intraprostatic Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A Injection for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia—A Spotlight in Reality

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yu-Chao; Wang, Hung-Jen; Chuang, Yao-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. It inhibits the release of acetylcholine and other neurotransmitters from the nerve terminal. Botulinum toxin, specifically toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been used since the 1970s to reduce the muscular hypercontraction disorders. The application of BoNT-A in urology field started from intra-bladder injection for overactive bladder, which has been recognized as third line therapy in many countries. Since prostate gland as well as bladder is under the influence of autonomic innervation, theorectically, injection of BoNT-A into the prostate induces chemo-denervation and modulation of prostate function, and reduces lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This article reviews the application of BoNT-A in patients with LUTS/ benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) from mechanisms of action to clinical results. BoNT-A has been shown to induce prostate apoptosis, downregulation of alpha 1A receptors, and reduce contractile function of prostate in animal studies. Open studies of intraprostate BoNT-A injection have demonstrated promising results of reducing LUTS and improvement of voiding function in human LUTS/BPH, however, intraprostatic BoNT-A injection did not perform better than the placebo group in recent publications of placebo controlled studies. We suggested that BoNT-A prostate injection might benefit selected population of BPH/LUTS, but it is unlikely to be an effective therapy for general population of male LUTS/BPH. PMID:27128942

  12. Associations of serum organohalogen levels and prostate cancer risk: Results from a case-control study in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Pi, Na; Chia, Sin Eng; Ong, Choon Nam; Kelly, Barry C

    2016-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that elevated exposure to organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) may lead to an increased risk of prostate cancer. As part of a hospital-based case-control study of the Singaporean male population, we investigated associations between organohalogen exposure and risk of prostate cancer. Trace residue concentrations of 74 organohalogen contaminants, including several PCBs, OCPs and halogenated flame retardants (HFRs), were determined in serum samples (n = 120) using gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). A variety of OCPs, PCBs and HFRs were detected in samples of both patients and controls. Mean concentrations of p,p' DDT, p,p' DDE, PCB 118, PCB 138, PCB 153 and PCB 187 were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in serum of patients. p,p' DDE measured in serum of patients was relatively high (mean:13,700 ng/g lipid, 95% CI:7000-26,800). Odds ratios (ORs) of OCPs and PCBs in many cases exceeded 1. ORs for p,p' DDE and PCB-153 at the highest tertile (>67th) were 5.67 (95% CI, 2.37-13.54) and 2.14 (95% CI, 0.99 to 4.66), respectively. The results suggest that exposure to DDTs and PCBs may be associated with prostate cancer risk in Singaporean males. No such association was observed for the organohalogen flame retardants studied, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The study provides novel information regarding the occurrence, levels and potential associations with prostate cancer risk for several organohalogen contaminants in the Singapore population. However, further investigation and analyses should be conducted to confirm these findings.

  13. Brachytherapy versus prostatectomy in localized prostate cancer: Results of a French multicenter prospective medico-economic study

    SciTech Connect

    Buron, Catherine; Le Vu, Beatrice; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Peiffert, Didier; Delannes, Martine; Flam, Thierry; Guerif, Stephane; Salem, Naji; Chauveinc, Laurent; Livartowski, Alain . E-mail: alain.livartowski@curie.net

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare health-related quality of life (HRQOL), patient-reported treatment-related symptoms, and costs of iodine-125 permanent implant interstitial brachytherapy (IB) with those of radical prostatectomy (RP) during the first 2 years after these treatments for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 435 men with localized low-risk prostate cancer, from 11 French hospitals, treated with IB (308) or RP (127), were offered to complete the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core Quality of Life Questionnaire QLQ-C30 version 3 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the prostate cancer specific EORTC QLQ-PR25 module before and at the end of treatment, 2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after treatment. Repeated measures analysis of variance and analysis of covariance were conducted on HRQOL changes. Comparative cost analysis covered initial treatment, hospital follow-up, outpatient and production loss costs. Results: Just after treatment, the decrease of global HRQOL was less pronounced in the IB than in the RP group, with a 13.5 points difference (p < 0.0001). A difference slightly in favor of RP was observed 6 months after treatment (-7.5 points, p = 0.0164) and was maintained at 24 months (-8.2 points, p = 0.0379). Impotence and urinary incontinence were more pronounced after RP, whereas urinary frequency, urgency, and urination pain were more frequent after IB. Mean societal costs did not differ between IB ( Euro 8,019 at T24) and RP ( Euro 8,715 at T24, p = 0.0843) regardless of the period. Conclusions: This study suggests a similar cost profile in France for IB and RP but with different HRQOL and side effect profiles. Those findings may be used to tailor localized prostate cancer treatments to suit individual patients' needs.

  14. Evaluating The PCPT Risk Calculator in Ten International Biopsy Cohorts: Results from the Prostate Biopsy Collaborative Group

    PubMed Central

    Ankerst, Donna P.; Boeck, Andreas; Freedland, Stephen J.; Thompson, Ian M.; Cronin, Angel M.; Roobol, Monique J.; Hugosson, Jonas; Jones, J. Stephen; Kattan, Michael W.; Klein, Eric A.; Hamdy, Freddie; Neal, David; Donovan, Jenny; Parekh, Dipen J.; Klocker, Helmut; Horninger, Wolfgang; Benchikh, Amine; Salama, Gilles; Villers, Arnauld; Moreira, Daniel M.; Schröder, Fritz H.; Lilja, Hans; Vickers, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the discrimination, calibration and net benefit performance of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial Risk Calculator (PCPTRC) across five European Randomized study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC), 1 United Kingdom, 1 Austrian and 3 US biopsy cohorts. Methods PCPTRC risks were calculated for 25,733 biopsies using prostate-specific antigen (PSA), digital rectal examination, family history and history of prior biopsy, and single imputation for missing covariates. Predictions were evaluated using the areas underneath the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC), discrimination slopes, chi-square tests of goodness of fit, and net benefit decision curves. Results AUCs of the PCPTRC ranged from a low of 56% in the ERSPC Goeteborg Rounds 2-6 cohort to a high of 72% in the ERSPC Goeteborg Round 1 cohort, and were statistically significantly higher than that of PSA in 6 out of the 10 cohorts. The PCPTRC was well-calibrated in the SABOR, Tyrol and Durham cohorts. There was limited to no net benefit to using the PCPTRC for biopsy referral compared to biopsying all or no men in all five ERSPC cohorts and benefit within a limited range of risk thresholds in all other cohorts. Conclusions External validation of the PCPTRC across ten cohorts revealed varying degree of success highly dependent on the cohort, most likely due to different criteria for and work-up before biopsy. Future validation studies of new calculators for prostate cancer should acknowledge the potential impact of the specific cohort studied when reporting successful versus failed validation. PMID:22210512

  15. Access to information and expectations of treatment decisions for prostate cancer patients--results of a European survey.

    PubMed

    Tombal, B; Baskin-Bey, E; Schulman, C

    2013-03-01

    We surveyed patients in France, Germany, Italy, Spain and Poland to examine information requirements and expectations of patients with prostate cancer. Patients were identified via their healthcare teams or via existing databases and interviewed by telephone, or in face-to-face interviews (Italy). Survey questions were either multiple choice or rank-based, and additional information was available to assist patient comprehension. Overall, 80% of patients received information about prostate cancer at diagnosis and 76% rated their physician as the most useful information source. However, around a third of French and German patients did not receive any information about their condition at diagnosis, compared with 8%, 12% and 10% of Spanish, Italian and Polish patients, respectively. Most patients rated the information they received as 'very informative', but there were regional variations, with German patients being the least satisfied with the quality of information received. Despite receiving the least amount of information at diagnosis, more patients from France and Germany preferred to be involved in treatment decisions than patients from Spain, Italy and Poland. Results from this survey highlight important gaps in information provision for patients with prostate cancer in terms of information supplied and patient expectations regarding treatment decisions.

  16. Comparative study of serum zinc concentrations in benign and malignant prostate disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiang; Wu, Qingjiang; Hu, Xiaoyan; Dong, Xingyou; Wang, Liang; Liu, Qian; Long, Zhou; Li, Longkun

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the relationship between serum zinc concentration and prostatic disease, but have shown inconsistent results. Hence, we performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis to assess the correlation between serum zinc concentration and prostate disease. Systematic literature searches were conducted with PubMed, EMBASE, Science Direct/Elsevier, MEDLINE, CNKI and the Cochrane Library up to June 2015 for studies that involved the relationship between serum zinc concentration and prostate disease. Fourteen studies were identified from the databases. Our results illustrated that the serum zinc concentrations in prostate cancer patients were significantly lower than those in Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients and normal controls (SMD (95% CI), −0.94 [−1.57, −0.32]; −1.18 [−1.90, −0.45]). However, the serum zinc concentrations in BPH patients were significantly higher than those in normal controls (SMD (95% CI) 1.77 [0.15, 3.39]). The present study showed that different levels of serum zinc concentrations are correlated with different prostatic disease. Serum zinc concentration may be used as a tool for the diagnosis and screening of prostate disease. But, further studies with well-designed larger sample studies are needed in this field to further clarify the correlation between serum zinc concentration and prostate disease. PMID:27170414

  17. Comparative study of serum zinc concentrations in benign and malignant prostate disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiang; Wu, Qingjiang; Hu, Xiaoyan; Dong, Xingyou; Wang, Liang; Liu, Qian; Long, Zhou; Li, Longkun

    2016-05-12

    Many studies have investigated the relationship between serum zinc concentration and prostatic disease, but have shown inconsistent results. Hence, we performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis to assess the correlation between serum zinc concentration and prostate disease. Systematic literature searches were conducted with PubMed, EMBASE, Science Direct/Elsevier, MEDLINE, CNKI and the Cochrane Library up to June 2015 for studies that involved the relationship between serum zinc concentration and prostate disease. Fourteen studies were identified from the databases. Our results illustrated that the serum zinc concentrations in prostate cancer patients were significantly lower than those in Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients and normal controls (SMD (95% CI), -0.94 [-1.57, -0.32]; -1.18 [-1.90, -0.45]). However, the serum zinc concentrations in BPH patients were significantly higher than those in normal controls (SMD (95% CI) 1.77 [0.15, 3.39]). The present study showed that different levels of serum zinc concentrations are correlated with different prostatic disease. Serum zinc concentration may be used as a tool for the diagnosis and screening of prostate disease. But, further studies with well-designed larger sample studies are needed in this field to further clarify the correlation between serum zinc concentration and prostate disease.

  18. [Follow up of patients with prostatic cancer after radical prostatectomy: results, late complication, survival rate].

    PubMed

    Romics, I; Bach, D; Würtz, U

    1995-02-19

    The authors performed radical prostatectomy on 35 prostate cancer patients between 1986 and 1991. At the end of 1993 the authors were informed about 25 patients. The mean follow-up was 4.4. years. Two patients have died in tumour related diseases, one in intercurrent diseases. In six patients progression was observed. Five patients had to operated because of anastomosis stricture. One patient was operated because of total incontinence another one uses penis clamp.

  19. Further Developments in Microwave Ablation of Prostate Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey; Ngo, Phong

    2005-01-01

    A report presents additional information about the subject matter of Microwave Treatment of Prostate Cancer and Hyperplasia (MSC-23049), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 6 (June 2005), page 62. To recapitulate: the basic idea is to use microwaves to heat and thereby kill small volumes of unhealthy prostate tissue. The prostate is irradiated with microwaves from one or more antennas positioned near the prostate by means of catheters inserted in the