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Sample records for protease activated receptor

  1. Plant cysteine proteases that evoke itch activate protease-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, V.B.; Lerner, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bromelain, ficin and papain are cysteine proteases from plants that produce itch upon injection into skin. Their mechanism of action has not been considered previously. Objectives To determine the mechanism by which these proteases function. Methods The ability of these proteases to activate protease-activated receptors was determined by ratiometric calcium imaging. Results We show here that bromelain, ficin and papain activate protease-activated receptors 2 and 4. Conclusions Bromelain, ficin and papain function as signalling molecules and activate protease-activated receptors. Activation of these receptors is the likely mechanism by which these proteases evoke itch. PMID:20491769

  2. Tissue Factor, Protease Activated Receptors and Pathologic Heart Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Silvio; Sparkenbaugh, Erica; Pawlinski, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    Tissue factor is the primary initiator of coagulation cascade and plays an essential role in hemostasis and thrombosis. In addition, tissue factor and coagulation proteases contribute to the many cellular responses via activation of protease activated receptors. Heart is the organ demonstrating high levels of constitutive tissue factor expression. This review focuses on the role of tissue factor, coagulation proteases and protease activated receptors in heart hemostasis and the pathological heart remodeling associated with myocardial infarction, viral myocarditis and hypertension. PMID:25104210

  3. Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors: roles in synaptic function and behavior.

    PubMed

    Almonte, Antoine G; Sweatt, J David

    2011-08-17

    Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors have been intensively investigated in the periphery and their roles in a wide range of processes-coagulation, inflammation, and digestion, for example-have been well characterized (see Coughlin, 2000; Macfarlane et al., 2001; Molinari et al., 2003; Wang et al., 2008; Di Cera, 2009 for reviews). A growing number of studies demonstrate that these protein systems are widely expressed in many cell types and regions in mammalian brains. Accumulating lines of evidence suggest that the brain has co-opted the activities of these interesting proteins to regulate various processes underlying synaptic activity and behavior. In this review, we discuss emerging roles for serine proteases in the regulation of mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and memory formation.

  4. Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors: roles in synaptic function and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Almonte, Antoine G.; Sweatt, J. David

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors have been intensively investigated in the periphery and their roles in a wide range of processes—coagulation, inflammation, and digestion, for example—have been well characterized (see Coughlin, 2000; Macfarlane et al., 2001; Molinari et al., 2003; Wang et al., 2008; Di Cera, 2009 for reviews). A growing number of studies demonstrate that these protein systems are widely expressed in many cell types and regions in mammalian brains. Accumulating lines of evidence suggest that the brain has co-opted the activities of these interesting proteins to regulate various processes underlying synaptic activity and behavior. In this review, we discuss emerging roles for serine proteases in the regulation of mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and memory formation. PMID:21782155

  5. Protease and protease-activated receptor-2 signaling in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Lee, Seung Hun

    2010-11-01

    Proteases in the skin are essential to epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. In addition to their direct proteolytic effects, certain proteases signal to cells by activating protease-activated receptors (PARs), the G-protein-coupled receptors. The expression of functional PAR-2 on human skin and its role in inflammation, pruritus, and skin barrier homeostasis have been demonstrated. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease characterized by genetic barrier defects and allergic inflammation, which is sustained by gene-environmental interactions. Recent studies have revealed aberrant expression and activation of serine proteases and PAR-2 in the lesional skin of AD patients. The imbalance between proteases and protease inhibitors associated with genetic defects in the protease/protease inhibitor encoding genes, increase in skin surface pH, and exposure to proteolytically active allergens contribute to this aberrant protease/ PAR-2 signaling in AD. The increased protease activity in AD leads to abnormal desquamation, degradation of lipid-processing enzymes and antimicrobial peptides, and activation of primary cytokines, thereby leading to permeability barrier dysfunction, inflammation, and defects in the antimicrobial barrier. Moreover, up-regulated proteases stimulate PAR-2 in lesional skin of AD and lead to the production of cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation and immune responses, itching sensation, and sustained epidermal barrier perturbation with easier allergen penetration. In addition, PAR-2 is an important sensor for exogenous danger molecules, such as exogenous proteases from various allergens, and plays an important role in AD pathogenesis. Together, these findings suggest that protease activity or PAR-2 may be a future target for therapeutic intervention for the treatment of AD.

  6. Protease and Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Signaling in the Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo

    2010-01-01

    Proteases in the skin are essential to epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. In addition to their direct proteolytic effects, certain proteases signal to cells by activating protease-activated receptors (PARs), the G-protein-coupled receptors. The expression of functional PAR-2 on human skin and its role in inflammation, pruritus, and skin barrier homeostasis have been demonstrated. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease characterized by genetic barrier defects and allergic inflammation, which is sustained by gene-environmental interactions. Recent studies have revealed aberrant expression and activation of serine proteases and PAR-2 in the lesional skin of AD patients. The imbalance between proteases and protease inhibitors associated with genetic defects in the protease/protease inhibitor encoding genes, increase in skin surface pH, and exposure to proteolytically active allergens contribute to this aberrant protease/PAR-2 signaling in AD. The increased protease activity in AD leads to abnormal desquamation, degradation of lipid-processing enzymes and antimicrobial peptides, and activation of primary cytokines, thereby leading to permeability barrier dysfunction, inflammation, and defects in the antimicrobial barrier. Moreover, up-regulated proteases stimulate PAR-2 in lesional skin of AD and lead to the production of cytokines and chemokines involved in inflammation and immune responses, itching sensation, and sustained epidermal barrier perturbation with easier allergen penetration. In addition, PAR-2 is an important sensor for exogenous danger molecules, such as exogenous proteases from various allergens, and plays an important role in AD pathogenesis. Together, these findings suggest that protease activity or PAR-2 may be a future target for therapeutic intervention for the treatment of AD. PMID:20879045

  7. Acanthamoeba protease activity promotes allergic airway inflammation via protease-activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Kang, Shin Ae; Park, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2014-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba commonly present in the environment and often found in human airway cavities. Acanthamoeba possesses strong proteases that can elicit allergic airway inflammation. To our knowledge, the aeroallergenicity of Acanthamoeba has not been reported. We repeatedly inoculated mice with Acanthamoeba trophozoites or excretory-secretory (ES) proteins intra-nasally and evaluated symptoms and airway immune responses. Acanthamoeba trophozoites or ES proteins elicited immune responses in mice that resembled allergic airway inflammation. ES proteins had strong protease activity and activated the expression of several chemokine genes (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, TSLP, and IL-25) in mouse lung epithelial cells. The serine protease inhibitor phenyl-methane-sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) inhibited ES protein activity. ES proteins also stimulated dendritic cells and enhanced the differentiation of naive T cells into IL-4-secreting T cells. After repeated inoculation of the protease-activated receptor 2 knockout mouse with ES proteins, airway inflammation and Th2 immune responses were markedly reduced, but not to basal levels. Furthermore, asthma patients had higher Acanthamoeba-specific IgE titers than healthy controls and we found Acanthamoeba specific antigen from house dust in typical living room. Our findings suggest that Acanthamoeba elicits allergic airway symptoms in mice via a protease allergen. In addition, it is possible that Acanthamoeba may be one of the triggers human airway allergic disease.

  8. Redefining the concept of protease-activated receptors: cathepsin S evokes itch via activation of Mrgprs

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Vemuri B.; Sun, Shuohao; Azimi, Ehsan; Elmariah, Sarina B.; Dong, Xinzhong; Lerner, Ethan A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory neurons expressing Mas-related G protein coupled receptors (Mrgprs) mediate histamine-independent itch. We show that the cysteine protease cathepsin S activates MrgprC11 and evokes receptor-dependent scratching in mice. In contrast to its activation of conventional protease-activated receptors, cathepsin S mediated activation of MrgprC11 did not involve the generation of a tethered ligand. We demonstrate further that different cysteine proteases selectively activate specific mouse and human Mrgpr family members. This expansion of our understanding by which proteases interact with GPCRs redefines the concept of what constitutes a protease-activated receptor. The findings also implicate proteases as ligands to members of this orphan receptor family while providing new insights into how cysteine proteases contribute to itch. PMID:26216096

  9. Protease-activated receptors in kidney disease progression.

    PubMed

    Palygin, Oleg; Ilatovskaya, Daria V; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are members of a well-known family of transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Four PARs have been identified to date, of which PAR1 and PAR2 are the most abundant receptors, and have been shown to be expressed in the kidney vascular and tubular cells. PAR signaling is mediated by an N-terminus tethered ligand that can be unmasked by serine protease cleavage. The receptors are activated by endogenous serine proteases, such as thrombin (acts on PARs 1, 3, and 4) and trypsin (PAR2). PARs can be involved in glomerular, microvascular, and inflammatory regulation of renal function in both normal and pathological conditions. As an example, it was shown that human glomerular epithelial and mesangial cells express PARs, and these receptors are involved in the pathogenesis of crescentic glomerulonephritis, glomerular fibrin deposition, and macrophage infiltration. Activation of these receptors in the kidney also modulates renal hemodynamics and glomerular filtration rate. Clinical studies further demonstrated that the concentration of urinary thrombin is associated with glomerulonephritis and type 2 diabetic nephropathy; thus, molecular and functional mechanisms of PARs activation can be directly involved in renal disease progression. We briefly discuss here the recent literature related to activation of PAR signaling in glomeruli and the kidney in general and provide some examples of PAR1 signaling in glomeruli podocytes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Luminal Cathepsin G and Protease-Activated Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Dabek, Marta; Ferrier, Laurent; Roka, Richard; Gecse, Krisztina; Annahazi, Anita; Moreau, Jacques; Escourrou, Jean; Cartier, Christel; Chaumaz, Gilles; Leveque, Mathilde; Ait-Belgnaoui, Afifa; Wittmann, Tibor; Theodorou, Vassilia; Bueno, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    Impairment of the colonic epithelial barrier and neutrophil infiltration are common features of inflammatory bowel disease. Luminal proteases affect colonic permeability through protease-activated receptors (PARs). We evaluated: (i) whether fecal supernatants from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) trigger alterations of colonic paracellular permeability and inflammation, and (ii) the roles of cathepsin G (Cat-G), a neutrophil serine protease, and its selective receptor, PAR4, in these processes. Expression levels of both PAR4 and Cat-G were determined in colonic biopsies from UC and healthy subjects. The effects of UC fecal supernatants on colonic paracellular permeability were measured in murine colonic strips. Involvement of Cat-G and PAR4 was evaluated using pepducin P4pal-10 and specific Cat-G inhibitor (SCGI), respectively. In addition, the effect of PAR4-activating peptide was assessed. UC fecal supernatants, either untreated or pretreated with SCGI, were infused into mice, and myeloperoxidase activity was determined. PAR4 was found to be overexpressed in UC colonic biopsies. Increased colonic paracellular permeability that was triggered by UC fecal supernatants was blocked by both SCGI (77%) and P4pal-10 (85%). Intracolonic infusion of UC fecal supernatants into mice increased myeloperoxidase activity. This effect was abolished by SCGI. These observations support that both Cat-G and PAR4 play key roles in generating and/or amplifying relapses in UC and provide a rationale for the development of new therapeutic agents in the treatment of this disease. PMID:19528350

  11. Protease induced plasticity: matrix metalloproteinase-1 promotes neurostructural changes through activation of protease activated receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Megan; Ghosh, Suhasini; Ahern, Gerard P.; Villapol, Sonia; Maguire-Zeiss, Kathleen A.; Conant, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of secreted endopeptidases expressed by neurons and glia. Regulated MMP activity contributes to physiological synaptic plasticity, while dysregulated activity can stimulate injury. Disentangling the role individual MMPs play in synaptic plasticity is difficult due to overlapping structure and function as well as cell-type specific expression. Here, we develop a novel system to investigate the selective overexpression of a single MMP driven by GFAP expressing cells in vivo. We show that MMP-1 induces cellular and behavioral phenotypes consistent with enhanced signaling through the G-protein coupled protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1). Application of exogenous MMP-1, in vitro, stimulates PAR1 dependent increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration and dendritic arborization. Overexpression of MMP-1, in vivo, increases dendritic complexity and induces biochemical and behavioral endpoints consistent with increased GPCR signaling. These data are exciting because we demonstrate that an astrocyte-derived protease can influence neuronal plasticity through an extracellular matrix independent mechanism. PMID:27762280

  12. Evolution of the protease-activated receptor family in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    JIN, MIN; YANG, HAI-WEI; TAO, AI-LIN; WEI, JI-FU

    2016-01-01

    Belonging to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPcr) family, the protease-activated receptors (Pars) consist of 4 members, PAR1-4. PARs mediate the activation of cells via thrombin, serine and other proteases. Such protease-triggered signaling events are thought to be critical for hemostasis, thrombosis and other normal pathological processes. In the present study, we examined the evolution of PARs by analyzing phylogenetic trees, chromosome location, selective pressure and functional divergence based on the 169 functional gene alignment sequences from 57 vertebrate gene sequences. We found that the 4 PARs originated from 4 invertebrate ancestors by phylogenetic trees analysis. The selective pressure results revealed that only PAR1 appeared by positive selection during its evolution, while the other PAR members did not. In addition, we noticed that although these PARs evolved separately, the results of functional divergence indicated that their evolutional rates were similar and their functions did not significantly diverge. The findings of our study provide valuable insight into the evolutionary history of the vertebrate PAR family. PMID:26820116

  13. Protease-activated receptors and prostaglandins in inflammatory lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Terence; Henry, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a novel family of G protein-coupled receptors. Signalling through PARs typically involves the cleavage of an extracellular region of the receptor by endogenous or exogenous proteases, which reveals a tethered ligand sequence capable of auto-activating the receptor. A considerable body of evidence has emerged over the past 20 years supporting a prominent role for PARs in a variety of human physiological and pathophysiological processes, and thus substantial attention has been directed towards developing drug-like molecules that activate or block PARs via non-proteolytic pathways. PARs are widely expressed within the respiratory tract, and their activation appears to exert significant modulatory influences on the level of bronchomotor tone, as well as on the inflammatory processes associated with a range of respiratory tract disorders. Nevertheless, there is debate as to whether the principal response to PAR activation is an augmentation or attenuation of airways inflammation. In this context, an important action of PAR activators may be to promote the generation and release of prostanoids, such as prostglandin E2, which have well-established anti-inflammatory effects in the lung. In this review, we primarily focus on the relationship between PARs, prostaglandins and inflammatory processes in the lung, and highlight their potential role in selected respiratory tract disorders, including pulmonary fibrosis, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article is part of a themed issue on Mediators and Receptors in the Resolution of Inflammation. To view this issue visit http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:19845685

  14. Expression pattern of protease activated receptors in lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    López, Mercedes L; Soriano-Sarabia, Natalia; Bruges, Gustavo; Marquez, María Elena; Preissner, Klaus T; Schmitz, M Lienhard; Hackstein, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a subfamily of four G-protein-coupled receptors mediating multiple functions. PARs expression was studied in subpopulations of human lymphocytes. Our results indicate that natural killer cells expressed mRNA for PAR₁, PAR₂ and PAR₃, CD4+ T cells expressed PAR₁ and PAR₂, while γδ and CD8+ T cells only expressed PAR₁. PAR₄ was absent at mRNA level and B cells did not express any PAR. Analyses of the cell surface PARs expression by flow cytometry were consistent with the mRNA data and also between different donors. PAR₁ is the most abundant member of the PAR family present in lymphocytes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Biased signaling by peptide agonists of protease activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhong; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Kok, W Mei; Lim, Junxian; Wu, Kai-Chen; Liu, Ligong; Hill, Timothy A; Suen, Jacky Y; Fairlie, David P

    2017-02-07

    Protease activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is associated with metabolism, obesity, inflammatory, respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders, pain, cancer and other diseases. The extracellular N-terminus of PAR2 is a common target for multiple proteases, which cleave it at different sites to generate different N-termini that activate different PAR2-mediated intracellular signaling pathways. There are no synthetic PAR2 ligands that reproduce the same signaling profiles and potencies as proteases. Structure-activity relationships here for 26 compounds spanned a signaling bias over 3 log units, culminating in three small ligands as biased agonist tools for interrogating PAR2 functions. DF253 (2f-LAAAAI-NH2) triggered PAR2-mediated calcium release (EC50 2 μM) but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation (EC50 > 100 μM) in CHO cells transfected with hPAR2. AY77 (Isox-Cha-Chg-NH2) was a more potent calcium-biased agonist (EC50 40 nM, Ca2+; EC50 2 μM, ERK1/2), while its analogue AY254 (Isox-Cha-Chg-A-R-NH2) was an ERK-biased agonist (EC50 2 nM, ERK1/2; EC50 80 nM, Ca2+). Signaling bias led to different functional responses in human colorectal carcinoma cells (HT29). AY254, but not AY77 or DF253, attenuated cytokine-induced caspase 3/8 activation, promoted scratch-wound healing and induced IL-8 secretion, all via PAR2-ERK1/2 signaling. Different ligand components were responsible for different PAR2 signaling and functions, clues that can potentially lead to drugs that modulate different pathway-selective cellular and physiological responses.

  16. German cockroach frass proteases modulate the innate immune response via activation of protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Day, Scottie B; Zhou, Ping; Ledford, John R; Page, Kristen

    2010-01-01

    Allergen exposure can induce an early innate immune response; however, the mechanism by which this occurs has not been addressed. In this report, we demonstrate a role for the active serine proteases in German cockroach (GC) feces (frass) and protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 in modulating the innate immune response. A single exposure of GC frass induced inflammatory cytokine production and cellular infiltration in the airways of mice. In comparison, exposure to protease-depleted GC frass resulted in diminution of inflammatory cytokine production and airway neutrophilia, but had no effect on macrophage infiltration. Selective activation of PAR-2 confirmed that PAR-2 was sufficient to induce airway inflammation. Exposure of GC frass to PAR-2-deficient mice led to decreased immune responses to GC frass compared to wild-type mice. Using the macrophage as an early marker of the innate immune response, we found that GC frass induced significant release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha from primary alveolar macrophages. This effect was dependent on the intrinsic proteases in GC frass. We confirmed GC frass-induced cytokine expression was mediated by activation of NF-kappaB and ERK in a macrophage cell line. Collectively, these data suggest a central role for GC frass protease-PAR-2 activation in regulating the innate immune response through the activation of alveolar macrophages. Understanding the potential role of protease-PAR-2 activation as a danger signal or adjuvant could yield attractive therapeutic targets.

  17. Botulinum neurotoxin devoid of receptor binding domain translocates active protease.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Audrey; Mushrush, Darren J; Lacy, D Borden; Montal, Mauricio

    2008-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) causes flaccid paralysis by disabling synaptic exocytosis. Intoxication requires the tri-modular protein to undergo conformational changes in response to pH and redox gradients across endosomes, leading to the formation of a protein-conducting channel. The approximately 50 kDa light chain (LC) protease is translocated into the cytosol by the approximately 100 kDa heavy chain (HC), which consists of two modules: the N-terminal translocation domain (TD) and the C-terminal Receptor Binding Domain (RBD). Here we exploited the BoNT modular design to identify the minimal requirements for channel activity and LC translocation in neurons. Using the combined detection of substrate proteolysis and single-channel currents, we showed that a di-modular protein consisting only of LC and TD was sufficient to translocate active protease into the cytosol of target cells. The RBD is dispensable for cell entry, channel activity, or LC translocation; however, it determined a pH threshold for channel formation. These findings indicate that, in addition to its individual functions, each module acts as a chaperone for the others, working in concert to achieve productive intoxication.

  18. Botulinum Neurotoxin Devoid of Receptor Binding Domain Translocates Active Protease

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Audrey; Mushrush, Darren J.; Lacy, D. Borden; Montal, Mauricio

    2008-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) causes flaccid paralysis by disabling synaptic exocytosis. Intoxication requires the tri-modular protein to undergo conformational changes in response to pH and redox gradients across endosomes, leading to the formation of a protein-conducting channel. The ∼50 kDa light chain (LC) protease is translocated into the cytosol by the ∼100 kDa heavy chain (HC), which consists of two modules: the N-terminal translocation domain (TD) and the C-terminal Receptor Binding Domain (RBD). Here we exploited the BoNT modular design to identify the minimal requirements for channel activity and LC translocation in neurons. Using the combined detection of substrate proteolysis and single-channel currents, we showed that a di-modular protein consisting only of LC and TD was sufficient to translocate active protease into the cytosol of target cells. The RBD is dispensable for cell entry, channel activity, or LC translocation; however, it determined a pH threshold for channel formation. These findings indicate that, in addition to its individual functions, each module acts as a chaperone for the others, working in concert to achieve productive intoxication. PMID:19096517

  19. Thrombin stimulates insulin secretion via protease-activated receptor-3.

    PubMed

    Hänzelmann, Sonja; Wang, Jinling; Güney, Emre; Tang, Yunzhao; Zhang, Enming; Axelsson, Annika S; Nenonen, Hannah; Salehi, Albert S; Wollheim, Claes B; Zetterberg, Eva; Berntorp, Erik; Costa, Ivan G; Castelo, Robert; Rosengren, Anders H

    2015-01-01

    The disease mechanisms underlying type 2 diabetes (T2D) remain poorly defined. Here we aimed to explore the pathophysiology of T2D by analyzing gene co-expression networks in human islets. Using partial correlation networks we identified a group of co-expressed genes ('module') including F2RL2 that was associated with glycated hemoglobin. F2Rl2 is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that encodes protease-activated receptor-3 (PAR3). PAR3 is cleaved by thrombin, which exposes a 6-amino acid sequence that acts as a 'tethered ligand' to regulate cellular signaling. We have characterized the effect of PAR3 activation on insulin secretion by static insulin secretion measurements, capacitance measurements, studies of diabetic animal models and patient samples. We demonstrate that thrombin stimulates insulin secretion, an effect that was prevented by an antibody that blocks the thrombin cleavage site of PAR3. Treatment with a peptide corresponding to the PAR3 tethered ligand stimulated islet insulin secretion and single β-cell exocytosis by a mechanism that involves activation of phospholipase C and Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. Moreover, we observed that the expression of tissue factor, which regulates thrombin generation, was increased in human islets from T2D donors and associated with enhanced β-cell exocytosis. Finally, we demonstrate that thrombin generation potential in patients with T2D was associated with increased fasting insulin and insulinogenic index. The findings provide a previously unrecognized link between hypercoagulability and hyperinsulinemia and suggest that reducing thrombin activity or blocking PAR3 cleavage could potentially counteract the exaggerated insulin secretion that drives insulin resistance and β-cell exhaustion in T2D.

  20. Protease-Activated Receptors and other G-Protein-Coupled Receptors: the Melanoma Connection.

    PubMed

    Rosero, Rebecca A; Villares, Gabriel J; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2016-01-01

    The vast array of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play crucial roles in both physiological and pathological processes, including vision, coagulation, inflammation, autophagy, and cell proliferation. GPCRs also affect processes that augment cell proliferation and metastases in many cancers including melanoma. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet limited therapeutic modalities are available to patients with metastatic melanoma. Studies have found that both chemokine receptors and protease-activated receptors, both of which are GPCRs, are central to the metastatic melanoma phenotype and may serve as potential targets in novel therapies against melanoma and other cancers.

  1. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) in cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Mariarosaria; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Cirino, Giuseppe

    2005-10-01

    Vascular system is constituted by a complex and articulate network, e.g. arteries, arterioles, venules and veins, that requires a high degree of coordination between different elemental cell types. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) constitute a recent described family of 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors that are activated by proteolysis. In recent years several evidence have been accumulated for an involvement of this receptor in the response to endothelial injury in vitro and in vivo experimental settings suggesting a role for PAR2 in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular system. This review will deal with the role of PAR2 receptor in the cardiovascular system analyzing both in vivo and in vitro published data. In particular this review will deal with the role of this receptor in vascular reactivity, ischemia/reperfusion injury, coronary atherosclerotic lesions and angiogenesis.

  2. Evaluation on Potential Contributions of Protease Activated Receptors Related Mediators in Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiyun; Zeng, Xiaoning; He, Shaoheng

    2014-01-01

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) have been recognized as a distinctive four-member family of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can be cleaved by certain serine proteases. In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the role of PARs in allergic inflammation, the fundamental pathologic changes of allergy, but the potential roles of PARs in allergy remain obscure. Since many of these proteases are produced and actively involved in the pathologic process of inflammation including exudation of plasma components, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tissue damage and repair, PARs appear to make important contribution to allergy. The aim of the present review is to summarize the expression of PARs in inflammatory and structural cells, the influence of agonists or antagonists of PARs on cell behavior, and the involvement of PARs in allergic disorders, which will help us to better understand the roles of serine proteases and PARs in allergy. PMID:24876677

  3. Learning and memory deficits in mice lacking protease activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Almonte, Antoine G; Hamill, Cecily E; Chhatwal, Jasmeer P; Wingo, Thomas S; Barber, Jeremy A; Lyuboslavsky, Polina N; David Sweatt, J; Ressler, Kerry J; White, David A; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2007-10-01

    The roles of serine proteases and protease activated receptors have been extensively studied in coagulation, wound healing, inflammation, and neurodegeneration. More recently, serine proteases have been suggested to influence synaptic plasticity. In this context, we examined the role of protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1), which is activated following proteolytic cleavage by thrombin and plasmin, in emotionally motivated learning. We were particularly interested in PAR1 because its activation enhances the function of NMDA receptors, which are required for some forms of synaptic plasticity. We examined several baseline behavioral measures, including locomotor activity, expression of anxiety-like behavior, motor task acquisition, nociceptive responses, and startle responses in C57Bl/6 mice in which the PAR1 receptor has been genetically deleted. In addition, we evaluated learning and memory in these mice using two memory tasks, passive avoidance and cued fear-conditioning. Whereas locomotion, pain response, startle, and measures of baseline anxiety were largely unaffected by PAR1 removal, PAR1-/- animals showed significant deficits in a passive avoidance task and in cued fear conditioning. These data suggest that PAR1 may play an important role in emotionally motivated learning.

  4. Learning and memory deficits in mice lacking protease activated receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Almonte, Antoine G.; Hamill, Cecily E.; Chhatwal, Jasmeer P.; Wingo, Thomas S.; Barber, Jeremy A.; Lyuboslavsky, Polina N.; Sweatt, J. David; Ressler, Kerry J.; White, David A.; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2007-01-01

    The roles of serine proteases and protease activated receptors have been extensively studied in coagulation, wound healing, inflammation, and neurodegeneration. More recently, serine proteases have been suggested to influence synaptic plasticity. In this context, we examined the role of protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1), which is activated following proteolytic cleavage by thrombin and plasmin, in emotionally-motivated learning. We were particularly interested in PAR1 because its activation enhances the function of NMDA receptors, which are required for some forms of synaptic plasticity. We examined several baseline behavioral measures, including locomotor activity, expression of anxiety-like behavior, motor task acquisition, nociceptive responses, and startle responses in C57Bl/6 mice in which the PAR1 receptor has been genetically deleted. In addition, we evaluated learning and memory in these mice using two memory tasks, passive avoidance and cued fear-conditioning. Whereas locomotion, pain response, startle, and measures of baseline anxiety were largely unaffected by PAR1 removal, PAR1−/− animals showed significant deficits in a passive avoidance task and in cued fear conditioning. These data suggest that PAR1 may play an important role in emotionally-motivated learning. PMID:17544303

  5. Expression of protease-activated receptor 1 and 2 and anti-tubulogenic activity of protease-activated receptor 1 in human endothelial colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Fortunato, Tiago M; Vara, Dina S; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P; Pula, Giordano

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are obtained from the culture of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (hPBMNC) fractions and are characterised by high proliferative and pro-vasculogenic potential, which makes them of great interest for cell therapy. Here, we describe the detection of protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and 2 amongst the surface proteins expressed in ECFCs. Both receptors are functionally coupled to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1 and 2, which become activated and phosphorylated in response to selective PAR1- or PAR2-activating peptides. Specific stimulation of PAR1, but not PAR2, significantly inhibits capillary-like tube formation by ECFCs in vitro, suggesting that tubulogenesis is negatively regulated by proteases able to stimulate PAR1 (e.g. thrombin). The activation of ERKs is not involved in the regulation of tubulogenesis in vitro, as suggested by use of the MEK inhibitor PD98059 and by the fact that PAR2 stimulation activates ERKs without affecting capillary tube formation. Both qPCR and immunoblotting showed a significant downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor 2 (VEGFR2) in response to PAR1 stimulation. Moreover, the addition of VEGF (50-100 ng/ml) but not basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) (25-100 ng/ml) rescued tube formation by ECFCs treated with PAR1-activating peptide. Therefore, we propose that reduction of VEGF responsiveness resulting from down-regulation of VEGFR2 is underlying the anti-tubulogenic effect of PAR1 activation. Although the role of PAR2 remains elusive, this study sheds new light on the regulation of the vasculogenic activity of ECFCs and suggests a potential link between adult vasculogenesis and the coagulation cascade.

  6. Discovery of novel protease activated receptors 1 antagonists with potent antithrombotic activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Perez, Michel; Lamothe, Marie; Maraval, Catherine; Mirabel, Etienne; Loubat, Chantal; Planty, Bruno; Horn, Clemens; Michaux, Julien; Marrot, Sebastien; Letienne, Robert; Pignier, Christophe; Bocquet, Arnaud; Nadal-Wollbold, Florence; Cussac, Didier; de Vries, Luc; Le Grand, Bruno

    2009-10-08

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) or thrombin receptors constitute a class of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) implicated in the activation of many physiological mechanisms. Thus, thrombin activates many cell types such as vascular smooth muscle cells, leukocytes, endothelial cells, and platelets via activation of these receptors. In humans, thrombin-induced platelet aggregation is mediated by one subtype of these receptors, termed PAR1. This article describes the discovery of new antagonists of these receptors and more specifically two compounds: 2-[5-oxo-5-(4-pyridin-2-ylpiperazin-1-yl)penta-1,3-dienyl]benzonitrile 36 (F 16618) and 3-(2-chlorophenyl)-1-[4-(4-fluorobenzyl)piperazin-1-yl]propenone 39 (F 16357), obtained after optimization. Both compounds are able to inhibit SFLLR-induced human platelet aggregation and display antithrombotic activity in an arteriovenous shunt model in the rat after iv or oral administration. Furthermore, these compounds are devoid of bleeding side effects often observed with other types of antiplatelet drugs, which constitutes a promising advantage for this new class of antithrombotic agents.

  7. Role of enteric nerves in immune-mediated changes in protease activated receptor 2 effects on gut function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) are expressed on structural cells and immune cells. Control of the initiation, duration, and magnitude of the PAR effects are linked to the level of receptor expression, the availability of proteases, and the intracellular signal transduction machinery. We inve...

  8. Activity of Protease-Activated Receptors in Primary Cultured Human Myenteric Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kugler, Eva M.; Mazzuoli, Gemma; Demir, Ihsan E.; Ceyhan, Güralp O.; Zeller, Florian; Schemann, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Activity of the four known protease-activated receptors (PARs) has been well studied in rodent enteric nervous system and results in animal models established an important role for neuronal PAR2. We recently demonstrated that, unlike in rodents, PAR1 is the dominant neuronal protease receptor in the human submucous plexus. With this study we investigated whether this also applies to the human myenteric plexus. We used voltage sensitive dye recordings to detect action potential discharge in primary cultures of human myenteric neurons in response to PAR activating peptides (APs). Application of the PAR1-AP (TFLLR) or PAR4-AP (GYPGQV) evoked spike discharge in 79 or 23% of myenteric neurons, respectively. The PAR1-AP response was mimicked by the endogenous PAR1 activator thrombin and blocked by the PAR1 antagonists SCH79797. Human myenteric neurons did not respond to PAR2-AP. This was not due to culture conditions because all three PAR-APs evoked action potentials in cultured guinea pig myenteric neurons. Consecutive application of PAR-APs revealed coexpression (relative to the population responding to PAR-APs) of PAR1/PAR2 in 51%, PAR1/PAR4 in 43%, and of PAR2/PAR4 in 29% of guinea pig myenteric neurons. Our study provided further evidence for the prominent role of neuronal PAR1 in the human enteric nervous system. PMID:22988431

  9. Periodontal Treatment Downregulates Protease-Activated Receptor 2 in Human Gingival Crevicular Fluid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Euzebio Alves, Vanessa Tubero; Bueno da Silva, Henrique Aparecido; de França, Bruno Nunes; Eichler, Rosangela Santos; Saraiva, Luciana; de Carvalho, Maria Helena Catelli

    2013-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases, including periodontitis; it can be activated by gingipain and produced by Porphyromonas gingivalis and by neutrophil protease 3 (P3). PAR2 activation plays a relevant role in inflammatory processes by inducing the release of important inflammatory mediators associated with periodontal breakdown. The effects of periodontal treatment on PAR2 expression and its association with levels of proinflammatory mediators and activating proteases were investigated in chronic periodontitis patients. Positive staining for PAR2 was observed in gingival crevicular fluid cells and was reflective of tissue destruction. Overexpression of PAR2 was positively associated with inflammatory clinical parameters and with the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha, matrix metalloprotease 2 (MMP-2), MMP-8, hepatocyte growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor. Elevated levels of gingipain and P3 and decreased levels of dentilisin and the protease inhibitors secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor and elafin were also associated with PAR2 overexpression. Healthy periodontal sites from individuals with chronic periodontitis showed diminished expression of PAR2 mRNA and the PAR2 protein (P < 0.05). Furthermore, periodontal treatment resulted in decreased PAR2 expression and correlated with decreased expression of inflammatory mediators and activating proteases. We concluded that periodontal treatment resulted in decreased levels of proteases and that proinflammatory mediators are associated with decreased PAR2 expression, suggesting that PAR2 expression is influenced by the presence of periodontal infection and is not a constitutive characteristic favoring periodontal inflammation. PMID:24042113

  10. Essential role of platelet activation via protease activated receptor 4 in tissue factor-initiated inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Busso, Nathalie; Chobaz-Péclat, Veronique; Hamilton, Justin; Spee, Pieter; Wagtmann, Nicolai; So, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tissue factor (TF) activation of the coagulation proteases enhances inflammation in animal models of arthritis and endotoxemia, but the mechanism of this effect is not yet fully understood – in particular, whether this is primarily due to fibrin formation or through activation of protease activated receptors (PARs). Methods We induced extravascular inflammation by injection of recombinant soluble murine TF (sTF1–219) in the hind paw. The effects of thrombin inhibition, fibrinogen and platelet depletion were evaluated, as well as the effects of PAR deficiency using knockout mice deficient for each of the PARs. Results Injection of soluble TF provoked a rapid onset of paw swelling. Inflammation was confirmed histologically and by increased serum IL-6 levels. Inflammation was significantly reduced by depletion of fibrinogen (P < 0.05) or platelets (P = 0.015), and by treatment with hirudin (P = 0.04) or an inhibitor of activated factor VII (P < 0.001) compared with controls. PAR-4-deficient mice exhibited significantly reduced paw swelling (P = 0.003). In contrast, a deficiency in either PAR-1, PAR-2 or PAR-3 did not affect the inflammatory response to soluble TF injection. Conclusion Our results show that soluble TF induces acute inflammation through a thrombin-dependent pathway and both fibrin deposition and platelet activation are essential steps in this process. The activation of PAR-4 on platelets is crucial and the other PARs do not play a major role in soluble TF-induced inflammation. PMID:18412955

  11. Activation of protease activated receptor 1 increases the excitability of the dentate granule neurons of hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Protease activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is expressed in multiple cell types in the CNS, with the most prominent expression in glial cells. PAR1 activation enhances excitatory synaptic transmission secondary to the release of glutamate from astrocytes following activation of astrocytically-expressed PAR1. In addition, PAR1 activation exacerbates neuronal damage in multiple in vivo models of brain injury in a manner that is dependent on NMDA receptors. In the hippocampal formation, PAR1 mRNA appears to be expressed by a subset of neurons, including granule cells in the dentate gyrus. In this study we investigate the role of PAR activation in controlling neuronal excitability of dentate granule cells. We confirm that PAR1 protein is expressed in neurons of the dentate cell body layer as well as in astrocytes throughout the dentate. Activation of PAR1 receptors by the selective peptide agonist TFLLR increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in a subset of acutely dissociated dentate neurons as well as non-neuronal cells. Bath application of TFLLR in acute hippocampal slices depolarized the dentate gyrus, including the hilar region in wild type but not in the PAR1-/- mice. PAR1 activation increased the frequency of action potential generation in a subset of dentate granule neurons; cells in which PAR1 activation triggered action potentials showed a significant depolarization. The activation of PAR1 by thrombin increased the amplitude of NMDA receptor-mediated component of EPSPs. These data suggest that activation of PAR1 during normal function or pathological conditions, such as during ischemia or hemorrhage, can increase the excitability of dentate granule cells. PMID:21827709

  12. Synthesis of Arylpiperazine Derivatives As Protease Activated Receptor 1 Antagonists And Their Evaluation As Antiproliferative Agents.

    PubMed

    Zotti, Andrea Ilaria; Di Gennaro, Elena; Corvino, Angela; Frecentese, Francesco; Magli, Elisa; Perissutti, Elisa; Cirino, Giuseppe; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Terranova-Barberio, Manuela; Iannelli, Federica; Caliendo, Giuseppe; Santagada, Vincenzo; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Budillon, Alfredo; Severino, Beatrice

    2016-09-26

    Protease activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G-coupled receptor activated by α-thrombin and other proteases. Several reports demonstrate PAR1 involvement in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. In order to investigate on potential use of PAR1 antagonists as antiproliferative agents, we have identified a series of arylpiperazine derivatives acting as PAR1 antagonists; the selected molecules have been evaluated for their antiproliferative properties. All the compounds inhibited the growth of a panel of cell lines expressing PAR1; two of them, compounds 13 and 15, were able to inhibit, in a dose dependent manner, the growth of the selected cell lines with the lowest IC50 values, and were further characterized to define the mechanism responsible for the observed antiproliferative effect. This study directed us to the identification of two interesting leads that may help to further validate PAR1 as an important therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

  13. The Role of Protease-Activated Receptors for the Development of Myocarditis: Possible Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Weithauser, Alice; Witkowski, Marco; Rauch, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a unique group of four G-protein coupled receptors. They are widely expressed within the cardiovascular system and the heart. PARs are activated via cleavage by serine proteases. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that the activation of PAR1 and PAR2 plays a crucial role in virus induced inflammatory diseases. The receptors enable cells to recognize pathogen-derived changes in the extracellular environment. An infection with Coxsackie-virus B3 (CVB3) can cause myocarditis. Recent studies have been shown that PAR1 signaling enhanced the antiviral innate immune response via interferon β (IFNβ) and thus limited the virus replication and cardiac damage. In contrast, PAR2 signaling decreased the antiviral innate immune response via IFNβ und thus increased the virus replication, which caused severe myocarditis. Along with CVB3 other viruses such as influenza A virus (IAV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) can induce myocarditis. The role of PAR signaling in IAV infections is contrarily discussed. During HSV infections PARs facilitate the virus infection of the host cell. These studies show that PARs might be interesting drug targets for the treatment of virus infections and inflammatory heart diseases. First studies with PAR agonists, antagonists, and serine protease inhibitors have been conducted in mice. The inhibition of thrombin the main PAR1 activating protease decreased the IFNβ response and increased the virus replication in CVB3-induced myocarditis. This indicates that further studies with direct PAR agonists and antagonists are needed to determine whether PARs are useful drug targets for the therapy of virus-induced heart diseases.

  14. Oral administration of protease inhibits enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli receptor activity in piglet small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Mynott, T L; Luke, R K; Chandler, D S

    1996-01-01

    The virulence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is attributed to their ability to adhere via fimbrial adhesins to specific receptors located on the intestinal mucosa. A novel approach to preventing ETEC induced diarrhoea would be to prevent attachment of ETEC to intestine by proteolytically modifying the receptor attachment sites. This study aimed to examine the effect of bromelain, a proteolytic extract obtained from pineapple stems, on ETEC receptor activity in porcine small intestine. Bromelain was administered orally to piglets and K88+ ETEC attachment to small intestine was measured at 50 cm intervals using an enzyme immunoassay. K88+ ETEC attachment to intestinal sections that were not treated with bromelain varied appreciably between sampling sites. Variability in receptor activity along the intestinal surface is though to be caused by the localised effects of endogenous proteases. Oral administration of exogenous protease inhibited K88+ ETEC attachment to pig small intestine in a dose dependent manner (p < 0.05). Attachment of K88+ ETEC was negligible after treatment, resembling the levels of attachment of K88 to piglets of the genetically determined non-adhesive phenotype, which are resistant to K88+ ETEC infection. Serum biochemical analysis and histopathological examination of treated piglets showed no adverse effects of the bromelain treatment. It is concluded that administration of bromelain can inhibit ETEC receptor activity in vivo and may therefore be useful for prevention of K88+ ETEC induced diarrhoea. PMID:8566855

  15. Role of protease-activated receptors 2 (PAR2) in ocular infections and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Trivendra; Alizadeh, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) belong to a unique family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are cleaved at an activation site within the N-terminal exodomain by a variety of proteinases, essentially of the serine (Ser) proteinase family. After cleavage, the new N-terminal sequence functions as a tethered ligand, which binds intramolecularly to activate the receptor and initiate signaling. Cell signals induced through the activation of PARs appear to play a significant role in innate and adoptive immune responses of the cornea, which is constantly exposed to proteinases under physiological or pathophysiological conditions. Activation of PARs interferes with all aspects of the corneal physiology such as barrier function, transports, innate and adoptive immune responses, and functions of corneal nerves. It is not known whether the proteinase released from the microorganism can activate PARs and triggers the inflammatory responses. The role of PAR2 expressed by the corneal epithelial cells and activation by serine protease released from microorganism is discussed here. Recent evidences suggest that activation of PAR2, by the serine proteinases, play an important role in innate and inflammatory responses of the corneal infection. PMID:26078987

  16. Protease-activated receptors and their biological role - focused on skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Florian; Melzig, Matthias F

    2015-12-01

    For several years, protease-activated receptors (PARs) are targets of science regarding to various diseases and platelet aggregation. In the past, a number of publications related to PARs have been published, which refer to a variety of aspects. An important point of view is the inflammation of the skin, which has not been reported in detail yet. This review will provide an overview of the current knowledge on PARs, and in particular, on the involvement of PARs in terms of skin inflammation. Wound healing is an important step after skin injury and is connected with involvement of PARs and inflammation. An important point in skin inflammation is the coagulation-dependent skin inflammation. PARs are a special kind of receptors, being activated by proteolytic cleavage or chemical agonists. They may play an important role in various physiological processes. It is shown that the proteases are involved in many diseases for example Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. The fact, that proteases regulate the coagulation, and are involved in interleukin and cytokine release leads to the conclusion that they are involved in inflammation processes. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  17. Protease-activated receptor-1 modulates hippocampal memory formation and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Almonte, Antoine G; Qadri, Laura H; Sultan, Faraz A; Watson, Jennifer A; Mount, Daniel J; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Sweatt, J David

    2013-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is an unusual G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that is activated through proteolytic cleavage by extracellular serine proteases. Although previous work has shown that inhibiting PAR1 activation is neuroprotective in models of ischemia, traumatic injury, and neurotoxicity, surprisingly little is known about PAR1's contribution to normal brain function. Here, we used PAR1-/- mice to investigate the contribution of PAR1 function to memory formation and synaptic function. We demonstrate that PAR1-/- mice have deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory. We also show that while PAR1-/- mice have normal baseline synaptic transmission at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, they exhibit severe deficits in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP). Mounting evidence indicates that activation of PAR1 leads to potentiation of NMDAR-mediated responses in CA1 pyramidal cells. Taken together, this evidence and our data suggest an important role for PAR1 function in NMDAR-dependent processes subserving memory formation and synaptic plasticity.

  18. Protease-activated receptor-1 modulates hippocampal memory formation and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Almonte, Antoine G.; Qadri, Laura H.; Sultan, Faraz A.; Watson, Jennifer A.; Mount, Daniel J.; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Sweatt, J. David

    2012-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is an unusual G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that is activated through proteolytic cleavage by extracellular serine proteases. While previous work has shown that inhibiting PAR1 activation is neuroprotective in models of ischemia, traumatic injury, and neurotoxicity, surprisingly little is known about PAR1’s contribution to normal brain function. Here we used PAR1 −/− mice to investigate the contribution of PAR1 function to memory formation and synaptic function. We demonstrate that PAR1 −/− mice have deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory. We also show that while PAR1 −/− mice have normal baseline synaptic transmission at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses, they exhibit severe deficits in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP). Mounting evidence indicates that activation of PAR1 leads to potentiation of NMDAR-mediated responses in CA1 pyramidal cells. Taken together, this evidence and our data suggest an important role for PAR1 function in NMDAR-dependent processes subserving memory formation and synaptic plasticity. PMID:23113835

  19. Trypsin-protease activated receptor-2 signaling contributes to pancreatic cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiao; Miao, Xue-Rong; Tao, Kun-Ming; Zhu, Hai; Liu, Zhi-Yun; Yu, Da-Wei; Chen, Qian-Bo; Qiu, Hai-Bo; Lu, Zhi-Jie

    2017-01-01

    Pain treatment is a critical aspect of pancreatic cancer patient clinical care. This study investigated the role of trypsin-protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) in pancreatic cancer pain. Pancreatic tissue samples were collected from pancreatic cancer (n=22) and control patients (n=22). Immunofluorescence analyses confirmed colocalization of PAR-2 and neuronal markers in pancreatic cancer tissues. Trypsin levels and protease activities were higher in pancreatic cancer tissue specimens than in the controls. Supernatants from cultured human pancreatic cancer tissues (PC supernatants) induced substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide release in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, and FS-NH2, a selective PAR-2 antagonist, inhibited this effect. A BALB/c nude mouse orthotopic tumor model was used to confirm the role of PAR-2 signaling in pancreatic cancer visceral pain, and male Sprague-Dawley rats were used to assess ambulatory pain. FS-NH2 treatment decreased hunch scores, mechanical hyperalgesia, and visceromotor reflex responses in tumor-bearing mice. In rats, subcutaneous injection of PC supernatant induced pain behavior, which was alleviated by treatment with FS-NH2 or FUT-175, a broad-spectrum serine protease inhibitor. Our findings suggest that trypsin-PAR-2 signaling contributes to pancreatic cancer pain in vivo. Treatment strategies targeting PAR-2 or its downstream signaling molecules might effectively relieve pancreatic cancer pain. PMID:28977906

  20. N-Linked Glycosylation of Protease-activated Receptor-1 Second Extracellular Loop

    PubMed Central

    Soto, Antonio G.; Trejo, JoAnn

    2010-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) contains five N-linked glycosylation consensus sites as follows: three residing in the N terminus and two localized on the surface of the second extracellular loop (ECL2). To study the effect of N-linked glycosylation in the regulation of PAR1 signaling and trafficking, we generated mutants in which the critical asparagines of the consensus sites were mutated. Here, we report that both the PAR1 N terminus and ECL2 serve as sites for N-linked glycosylation but have different functions in the regulation of receptor signaling and trafficking. N-Linked glycosylation of the PAR1 N terminus is important for transport to the cell surface, whereas the PAR1 mutant lacking glycosylation at ECL2 (NA ECL2) trafficked to the cell surface like the wild-type receptor. However, activated PAR1 NA ECL2 mutant internalization was impaired compared with wild-type receptor, whereas constitutive internalization of unactivated receptor remained intact. Remarkably, thrombin-activated PAR1 NA ECL2 mutant displayed an enhanced maximal signaling response compared with wild-type receptor. The increased PAR1 NA ECL2 mutant signaling was not due to defects in the ability of thrombin to cleave the receptor or signal termination mechanisms. Rather, the PAR1 NA ECL2 mutant displayed a greater efficacy in thrombin-stimulated G protein signaling. Thus, N-linked glycosylation of the PAR1 extracellular surface likely influences ligand docking interactions and the stability of the active receptor conformation. Together, these studies strongly suggest that N-linked glycosylation of PAR1 at the N terminus versus the surface of ECL2 serves distinct functions critical for proper regulation of receptor trafficking and the fidelity of thrombin signaling. PMID:20368337

  1. Activation of Protease Activated Receptor 2 by Exogenous Agonist Exacerbates Early Radiation Injury in Rat Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Boerma, Marjan; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR{sub 2}) is highly expressed throughout the gut and regulates the inflammatory, mitogenic, fibroproliferative, and nociceptive responses to injury. PAR{sub 2} is strikingly upregulated and exhibits increased activation in response to intestinal irradiation. We examined the mechanistic significance of radiation enteropathy development by assessing the effect of exogenous PAR{sub 2} activation. Methods and Materials: Rat small bowel was exposed to localized single-dose radiation (16.5 Gy). The PAR{sub 2} agonist (2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH{sub 2}) or vehicle was injected intraperitoneally daily for 3 days before irradiation (before), for 7 days after irradiation (after), or both 3 days before and 7 days after irradiation (before-after). Early and delayed radiation enteropathy was assessed at 2 and 26 weeks after irradiation using quantitative histologic examination, morphometry, and immunohistochemical analysis. Results: The PAR{sub 2} agonist did not elicit changes in the unirradiated (shielded) intestine. In contrast, in the irradiated intestine procured 2 weeks after irradiation, administration of the PAR{sub 2} agonist was associated with more severe mucosal injury and increased intestinal wall thickness in all three treatment groups (p <.05) compared with the vehicle-treated controls. The PAR{sub 2} agonist also exacerbated the radiation injury score, serosal thickening, and mucosal inflammation (p <.05) in the before and before-after groups. The short-term exogenous activation of PAR{sub 2} did not affect radiation-induced intestinal injury at 26 weeks. Conclusion: The results of the present study support a role for PAR{sub 2} activation in the pathogenesis of early radiation-induced intestinal injury. Pharmacologic PAR{sub 2} antagonists might have the potential to reduce the intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and/or as countermeasures in radiologic accidents or terrorism scenarios.

  2. Regulation of epithelial cell tight junctions by protease-activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Enjoji, Shuhei; Ohama, Takashi; Sato, Koichi

    2014-09-01

    A layer of epithelial cells prevents the invasion of bacteria and the entry of foreign substances into the underlying tissue. The disruption of epithelial tight junctions initiates and exacerbates inflammation. However, the precise mechanism underlying the disruption of the epithelial tight junction remains unclear. The activation of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) by serine proteases produced by some bacteria and mast cells contributes to inflammation in many tissues. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that PAR2 activation affects the structure and function of tight junctions in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Although the application of a PAR2-activating peptide, PAR2-AP, from the apical side of MDCK cells failed to modify the transepithelial resistance (TER), its application from the basal side markedly suppressed the TER. In 3-dimensional cultures of MDCK cells expressing the mCherry-tagged PAR2, a lateral localization of PAR2 was observed. The application of PAR2-AP from the basal side changed the localization of the tight junctional protein, zonula occludin-1. Furthermore, PAR2-AP induced the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. A p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, SB202190, inhibited PAR2-AP-induced changes in TER. Our results suggest that the activation of PAR2 leads to the disruption of tight junctions and increases the barrier permeability through the activation of p38 MAPK, which may cause the initiation and exacerbation of inflammation.

  3. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis induces cytokine secretion in epithelial cells in a protease-activated receptor-dependent (PAR) manner.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Priscila; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Tanaka, Aparecida Sadae; Carmona, Adriana Karaoglanovic; Dos Santos, Saara Maria Batista; de Barros, Bianca Carla Silva Campitelli; Maza, Paloma Korehisa; Puccia, Rosana; Suzuki, Erika

    2017-04-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is one of the etiological agents of the human systemic mycosis paracoccidioidomycosis. Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are expressed in many cell types and comprise a family of G protein-coupled receptors (PAR-1, PAR-2, and PAR-4), which may be activated by proteases secreted by several pathogens. In the present study, we showed that the pathogenic fungus P. brasiliensis secretes components that promote interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 secretion by the lung epithelial cell line A549. Cytokine secretion was reduced by antagonistic peptides for PAR-1 and PAR-2, but not for PAR-4. P. brasiliensis proteases were isolated from fungal culture supernatants in a p-aminomethylbenzamidine-Sepharose column. The obtained fractions were tested for enzymatic activity against fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptides derived from sequences that spanned the activation sites of human PARs. The eluted fraction, termed PbP, contained protease activities that were able to hydrolyze the FRET peptides. PbP also induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion in A549 epithelial cells, which was reduced upon heat inactivation of PbP, incubation with antagonistic peptides for PAR-1 and PAR-2, and the protease inhibitors aprotinin, leupeptin, and E-64. Together, these results show for the first time that P. brasiliensis yeasts secrete proteases that activate PARs in lung epithelial cells, leading to cytokine secretion.

  4. Tissue factor- and factor X-dependent activation of protease-activated receptor 2 by factor VIIa

    PubMed Central

    Camerer, Eric; Huang, Wei; Coughlin, Shaun R.

    2000-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is expressed by vascular endothelial cells and other cells in which its function and physiological activator(s) are unknown. Unlike PAR1, PAR3, and PAR4, PAR2 is not activatable by thrombin. Coagulation factors VIIa (FVIIa) and Xa (FXa) are proteases that act upstream of thrombin in the coagulation cascade and require cofactors to interact with their substrates. These proteases elicit cellular responses, but their receptor(s) have not been identified. We asked whether FVIIa and FXa might activate PARs if presented by their cofactors. Co-expression of tissue factor (TF), the cellular cofactor for FVIIa, together with PAR1, PAR2, PAR3, or PAR4 conferred TF-dependent FVIIa activation of PAR2 and, to lesser degree, PAR1. Responses to FXa were also observed but were independent of exogenous cofactor. The TF/FVIIa complex converts the inactive zymogen Factor X (FX) to FXa. Strikingly, when FX was present, low picomolar concentrations of FVIIa caused robust signaling in cells expressing TF and PAR2. Responses in keratinocytes and cytokine-treated endothelial cells suggested that PAR2 may be activated directly by TF/FVIIa and indirectly by TF/FVIIa-generated FXa at naturally occurring expression levels of TF and PAR2. These results suggest that PAR2, although not activatable by thrombin, may nonetheless function as a sensor for coagulation proteases and contribute to endothelial activation in the setting of injury and inflammation. More generally, these findings highlight the potential importance of cofactors in regulating PAR function and specificity. PMID:10805786

  5. Signalling pathways induced by protease-activated receptors and integrins in T cells.

    PubMed

    Bar-Shavit, Rachel; Maoz, Miriam; Yongjun, Yin; Groysman, Maya; Dekel, Idit; Katzav, Shulamit

    2002-01-01

    Recent characterization of the thrombin receptor indicates that it plays a role in T-cell signalling pathways. However, little is known regarding the signalling events following stimulation of additional members of the protease-activated receptor (PAR) family, i.e. PAR2 and PAR3. Most of the postligand cascades are largely unknown. Here, we illustrate that in Jurkat T-leukaemic cells, activation of PAR1, PAR2 and PAR3 induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav1. This response was impaired in Jurkat T cells deficient in p56lck (JCaM1.6). Activation of PARs also led to an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of ZAP-70 and SLP-76, two key proteins in T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling. We also demonstrated that p56lck is meaningful for integrin signalling. Thus, JCaM1.6 cells exhibited a marked reduction in their adherence to fibronectin-coated plates, as compared to the level of adherence of Jurkat T cells. While the phosphorylation of Vav1 in T cells is augmented following adhesion, no additional increase was noted following treatment of the adhered cells with PARs. Altogether, we have identified key components in the postligand-signalling cascade of PARs and integrins. Furthermore, we have identified Lck as a critical and possibly upstream component of PAR-induced Vav1 phosphorylation, as well as integrin activation, in Jurkat T cells.

  6. Cathepsin S Cleavage of Protease-Activated Receptor-2 on Endothelial Cells Promotes Microvascular Diabetes Complications

    PubMed Central

    Kumar VR, Santhosh; Darisipudi, Murthy N.; Steiger, Stefanie; Devarapu, Satish Kumar; Tato, Maia; Kukarni, Onkar P.; Mulay, Shrikant R.; Thomasova, Dana; Popper, Bastian; Demleitner, Jana; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Reichel, Christoph; Cohen, Clemens D.; Lindenmeyer, Maja T.; Liapis, Helen; Moll, Solange; Reid, Emma; Stitt, Alan W.; Schott, Brigitte; Gruner, Sabine; Haap, Wolfgang; Ebeling, Martin; Hartmann, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a central pathomechanism in diabetes-associated complications. We hypothesized a pathogenic role in this dysfunction of cathepsin S (Cat-S), a cysteine protease that degrades elastic fibers and activates the protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) on endothelial cells. We found that injection of mice with recombinant Cat-S induced albuminuria and glomerular endothelial cell injury in a PAR2-dependent manner. In vivo microscopy confirmed a role for intrinsic Cat-S/PAR2 in ischemia–induced microvascular permeability. In vitro transcriptome analysis and experiments using siRNA or specific Cat-S and PAR2 antagonists revealed that Cat-S specifically impaired the integrity and barrier function of glomerular endothelial cells selectively through PAR2. In human and mouse type 2 diabetic nephropathy, only CD68+ intrarenal monocytes expressed Cat-S mRNA, whereas Cat-S protein was present along endothelial cells and inside proximal tubular epithelial cells also. In contrast, the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C was expressed only in tubules. Delayed treatment of type 2 diabetic db/db mice with Cat-S or PAR2 inhibitors attenuated albuminuria and glomerulosclerosis (indicators of diabetic nephropathy) and attenuated albumin leakage into the retina and other structural markers of diabetic retinopathy. These data identify Cat-S as a monocyte/macrophage–derived circulating PAR2 agonist and mediator of endothelial dysfunction–related microvascular diabetes complications. Thus, Cat-S or PAR2 inhibition might be a novel strategy to prevent microvascular disease in diabetes and other diseases. PMID:26567242

  7. Protease-activated receptor-2 induces proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine gene expression in canine keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Shingo; Maeda, Sadatoshi; Ohno, Koichi; Kaji, Noriyuki; Hori, Masatoshi; Fujino, Yasuhito; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2013-05-15

    Although the molecular basis of the allergenicity remains to be fully elucidated, the ability of allergens to elicit allergic responses is at least partly attributed to their proteolytic activity. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by site-specific proteolysis by serine proteases and is known to mediate inflammatory processes in various tissues. In this study, we investigated the effects of trypsin, a major serine protease, and a human PAR-2 agonist peptide (SLIGKV-NH2) on proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine gene expression in the canine keratinocyte cell line CPEK. The expression of PAR-2 mRNA and protein in CPEK cells was detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The localization of PAR-2 in CPEK was examined by immunofluorescence. The mRNA expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines were quantified by real-time RT-PCR. The free intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was measured using the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dye. CPEK cells constitutively expressed PAR-2 mRNA and protein. Stimulation of CPEK cells with trypsin induced significant upregulation of the mRNA expression levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, P<0.05), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, P<0.01), thymus and activation regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17, P<0.01), and interleukin 8 (IL-8/CXCL8, P<0.01). Similarly, the PAR-2 agonist peptide increased the mRNA expression levels of TNF-α (P<0.05), GM-CSF (P<0.05), TARC/CCL17 (P<0.05), and IL-8/CXCL8 (P<0.05) in CPEK cells. Both trypsin and the PAR-2 agonist peptide increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and PAR-2 internalization. These results suggest that PAR-2 activation can augment inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression in canine keratinocytes, and it may initiate allergic inflammation through the proteolytic activity of allergens in canine atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Protease-Activated Receptor 4 Deficiency Offers Cardioprotection after Acute Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kolpakov, Mikhail A.; Rafiq, Khadija; Guo, Xinji; Hooshdaran, Bahman; Wang, Tao; Vlasenko, Liudmila; Bashkirova, Yulia V.; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Xiongwen; Iftikhar, Sahar; Libonati, Joseph R.; Kunapuli, Satya P.; Sabri, Abdelkarim

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor (PAR)4 is a low affinity thrombin receptor with less understood function relative to PAR1. PAR4 is involved in platelet activation and hemostasis, but its specific actions on myocyte growth and cardiac function remain unknown. This study examined the role of PAR4 deficiency on cardioprotection after myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in mice. When challenged by in vivo or ex vivo IR, PAR4 knockout (KO) mice exhibited increased tolerance to injury, which was manifest as reduced infarct size and a more robust functional recovery compared to wild-type mice. PAR4 KO mice also showed reduced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and putative signaling shifts in survival pathways in response to IR. Inhibition of PAR4 expression in isolated cardiomyocytes by shRNA offered protection against thrombin and PAR4-agonist peptide-induced apoptosis, while overexpression of wild-type PAR4 significantly enhanced the susceptibility of cardiomyocytes to apoptosis, even under low thrombin concentrations. Further studies implicate Src- and epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent activation of JNK on the proapoptotic effect of PAR4 in cardiomyocytes. These findings reveal a pivotal role for PAR4 as a regulator of cardiomyocyte survival and point to PAR4 inhibition as a therapeutic target offering cardioprotection after acute IR injury. PMID:26643815

  9. Pulmonary hypertension in smoking mice over-expressing protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    De Cunto, G; Cardini, S; Cirino, G; Geppetti, P; Lungarella, G; Lucattelli, M

    2011-04-01

    The mechanism(s) involved in the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in COPD is still the object of investigation. Cigarette smoke (CS) may lead to remodelling of intrapulmonary vessels and dynamic changes in vascular function, at least in some smokers. A role for proteases in PH has been recently put forward. We investigated, in smoking mice, the role of protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 in the pathogenesis of PH associated with emphysema. We demonstrated that CS exposure can modulate PAR-2 expression in mouse lung. Acute CS exposure induces in wildtype (WT) and in transgenic mice over-expressing PAR-2 (FVB(PAR-2-TgN)) a similar degree of neutrophil influx in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. After chronic CS exposure WT and FVB(PAR-2-TgN) mice show emphysema, but only transgenic mice develop muscularisation of small intrapulmonary vessels that precedes the development of PH (~45% increase) and right ventricular hypertrophy. Smoking in FVB(PAR-2-TgN) mice results in an imbalance between vasoconstrictors (especially endothelin-1) and vasodilators (i.e. vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelial nitric oxide synthase and inducible nitric oxide synthase) and enhanced production of growth factors involved both in fibroblast-smooth muscle cell transaction (i.e. platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor β) and vascular cell proliferation (PDGF). PAR-2 signalling can influence the production and release of many factors, which may play a role in the development of PH in smokers.

  10. Comparison of the activation peptide regions of protease-activated receptors (PAR) in members of the Family Felidae.

    PubMed

    Boudreaux, Mary K; Barnes, Sara Madison

    2016-09-01

    There is limited information regarding the nucleotides encoding or the predicted amino acid composition of protease-activated receptors (PAR) in cats. The purpose of the study was to determine the nucleotide sequence and predicted amino acid composition of the activation peptide regions of protease-activated receptors PAR1, PAR3, and PAR4 in Felidae family members. Genomic DNA isolated from whole blood samples collected from 10 domestic cats and 45 big cats representing 11 species was subjected to PCR using primers flanking the coding regions for the activation peptides of PAR1, PAR3, and PAR4. PCR products were isolated from agarose gels and submitted for sequencing. Nucleotide sequence data was used to predict the amino acid composition of the activation peptide and flanking regions of the 3 receptors. Predicted amino acid sequences were compared between Felidae members and to human beings. Variations in the predicted amino acid composition of the activation peptides and flanking regions of the various PAR were observed when comparing Felidae family members to each other and to human beings. While the activation peptide regions of the various PAR tend to be conserved, there are differences that may impact the ability of some agonists to mediate biased signaling events documented to occur in human platelets. © 2016 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  11. Lanthanide labeling of a potent protease activated receptor-2 agonist for time-resolved fluorescence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Justin; Flynn, Andrea N.; Tillu, Dipti V.; Zhang, Zhenyu; Patek, Renata; Price, Theodore J.; Vagner, Josef; Boitano, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Protease activated receptor-2 (PAR2) is one of four G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that can be activated by exogenous or endogenous proteases, which cleave the extracellular amino-terminus to expose a tethered ligand and subsequent G-protein signaling. Alternatively, PAR2 can be activated by peptide or peptidomimetic ligands derived from the sequence of the natural tethered ligand. Screening of novel ligands that directly bind to PAR2 to agonize or antagonize the receptor has been hindered by the lack of a sensitive, high-throughput, affinity binding assay. In this report we describe the synthesis and use of a modified PAR2 peptidomimetic agonist, 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-(diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid)-NH2 (2-f-LIGRLO-dtpa), designed for lanthanide-based time resolved fluorescence screening. We first demonstrate that 2-f-LIGRLO-dtpa is a potent and specific PAR2 agonist across a full spectrum of in vitro assays. We then show that 2-f-LIGRLO-dtpa can be utilized in an affinity binding assay to evaluate the ligand-receptor interactions between known high potency peptidomimetic agonists (2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2, 2-f-LIGRLO; 2-aminothiazol-4-yl-LIGRL-NH2, 2-at-LIGRL and; 6-aminonicotinyl-LIGRL-NH2, 6-an-LIGRL) and PAR2. A separate N-terminal peptidomimetic modification (3-indoleacetyl-LIGRL-NH2, 3-ia-LIGRL) that does not activate PAR2 signaling was used as a negative control. All three peptidomimetic agonists demonstrated sigmoidal competitive binding curves, with the more potent agonists (2-f-LIGRLO and 2-at-LIGRL) displaying increased competition. In contrast, the control peptide (3-ia-LIGRL) displayed limited competition for PAR2 binding. In summary, we have developed a Europium-containing PAR2 agonist that can be used in a highly sensitive affinity binding assay to screen novel PAR2 ligands in a high-throughput format. This ligand can serve as a critical tool in the screening and development of PAR2 ligands. PMID:22994402

  12. Regulation of acid signaling in rat pulmonary sensory neurons by protease-activated receptor-2

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Airway acidification has been consistently observed in airway inflammatory conditions and is known to cause cardiorespiratory symptoms that are, at least in part, mediated through the activation of bronchopulmonary C fibers and the subsequent reflexes. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) is expressed in a variety of cells in the lung and airways and is believed to play a role in airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of PAR2 activation on the acid signaling in rat bronchopulmonary C-fiber sensory neurons. Our RT-PCR results revealed the expression of mRNAs for transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) and four functional acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) subunits 1a, 1b, 2a, and 3 in these sensory neurons. Preincubation of SLIGRL-NH2, a specific PAR2-activating peptide, markedly enhanced the Ca2+ transient evoked by extracellular acidification. Pretreatment with PAR2 agonists significantly potentiated both acid-evoked ASIC- and TRPV1-like whole cell inward currents. Activation of PAR2 also potentiated the excitability of these neurons to acid, but not electrical stimulation. In addition, the potentiation of acid-evoked responses was not prevented by inhibiting either PLC or PKC nor was mimicked by activation of PKC. In conclusion, activation of PAR2 modulates the acid signaling in pulmonary sensory neurons, and the interaction may play a role in the pathogenesis of airway inflammatory conditions, where airway acidification and PAR2 activation can occur simultaneously. PMID:20044436

  13. Protease-activated receptors (PARs)--biology and role in cancer invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wojtukiewicz, Marek Z; Hempel, Dominika; Sierko, Ewa; Tucker, Stephanie C; Honn, Kenneth V

    2015-12-01

    Although many studies have demonstrated that components of the hemostatic system may be involved in signaling leading to cancer progression, the potential mechanisms by which they contribute to cancer dissemination are not yet precisely understood. Among known coagulant factors, tissue factor (TF) and thrombin play a pivotal role in cancer invasion. They may be generated in the tumor microenvironment independently of blood coagulation and can induce cell signaling through activation of protease-activated receptors (PARs). PARs are transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated by a unique proteolytic mechanism. They play important roles in vascular physiology, neural tube closure, hemostasis, and inflammation. All of these agents (TF, thrombin, PARs-mainly PAR-1 and PAR-2) are thought to promote cancer invasion and metastasis at least in part by facilitating tumor cell migration, angiogenesis, and interactions with host vascular cells, including platelets, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells lining blood vessels. Here, we discuss the role of PARs and their activators in cancer progression, focusing on TF- and thrombin-mediated actions. Therapeutic options tailored specifically to inhibit PAR-induced signaling in cancer patients are presented as well.

  14. Protease-activated receptor 4: from structure to function and back again.

    PubMed

    French, Shauna L; Hamilton, Justin R

    2016-10-01

    Protease-activated receptors are a family of four GPCRs (PAR1-PAR4) with a number of unique attributes. Nearly two and a half decades after the discovery of the first PAR, an antagonist targeting this receptor has been approved for human use. The first-in-class PAR1 antagonist, vorapaxar, was approved for use in the USA in 2014 for the prevention of thrombotic cardiovascular events in patients with a history of myocardial infarction or with peripheral arterial disease. These recent developments indicate the clinical potential of manipulating PAR function. While much work has been aimed at uncovering the function of PAR1 and, to a lesser extent, PAR2, comparatively little is known regarding the pharmacology and physiology of PAR3 and PAR4. Recent studies have begun to develop the pharmacological and genetic tools required to study PAR4 function in detail, and there is now emerging evidence for the function of PAR4 in disease settings. In this review, we detail the discovery, structure, pharmacology, physiological significance and therapeutic potential of PAR4. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v173.20/issuetoc. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Effects of protease-activated receptor 1 inhibition on anxiety and fear following status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Bogovyk, Ruslan; Lunko, Oleksii; Fedoriuk, Mihail; Isaev, Dmytro; Krishtal, Oleg; Holmes, Gregory L; Isaeva, Elena

    2017-02-01

    Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of a variety of brain disorders associated with a risk of epilepsy development. Using the lithium-pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), we recently showed that inhibition of this receptor during the first ten days after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) results in substantial anti-epileptogenic and neuroprotective effects. As PAR1 is expressed in the central nervous system regions of importance for processing emotional reactions, including amygdala and hippocampus, and TLE is frequently associated with a chronic alteration of the functions of these regions, we tested the hypothesis that PAR1 inhibition could modulate emotionally driven behavioral responses of rats experiencing SE. We showed that SE induces a chronic decrease in the animals' anxiety-related behavior and an increase of locomotor activity. PAR1 inhibition after SE abolished the alteration of the anxiety level but does not affect the increase of locomotor activity in the open field and elevated plus maze tests. Moreover, while PAR1 inhibition produces an impairment of memory recall in the context fear conditioning paradigm in the control group, it substantially improves contextual and cued fear learning in rats experiencing SE. These data suggest that PAR1-dependent signaling is involved in the mechanisms underlying emotional disorders in epilepsy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Role of Protease-Activated Receptor-1 in Bone Healing

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shu Jun; Pagel, Charles N.; Campbell, Therese M.; Pike, Robert N.; Mackie, Eleanor J.

    2005-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1, a G-protein-coupled receptor activated by thrombin, mediates thrombin-induced proliferation of osteoblasts. The current study was undertaken to define the role of PAR-1 in bone repair. Holes were drilled transversely through the diaphysis of both tibiae of PAR-1-null and wild-type mice. Three days later, fewer cells had invaded the drill site from adjacent bone marrow in PAR-1-null mice than in wild-type mice, and a lower percentage of cells were labeled with [3H]thymidine in PAR-1-null drill sites. More osteoclasts were also observed in the drill site of PAR-1-null mice than in wild-type mice 7 days after drilling. New mineralized bone area was less in the drill site and on the adjacent periosteal surface in PAR-1-null mice than in wild-type mice at day 9. From day 14, no obvious differences could be seen between PAR-1-null and wild-type tibiae. In vitro thrombin caused a dose-dependent increase in proliferation of bone marrow stromal cells isolated from wild-type mice but not PAR-1-null mice. Thrombin stimulated survival of bone marrow stromal cells from both wild-type and PAR-1-null mice, but it did not affect bone marrow stromal cell migration in either wild-type or PAR-1-null cells. The results indicate that PAR-1 plays an early role in bone repair. PMID:15743797

  17. Tryptase and Protease-Activated Receptor 2 Expression Levels in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wen-Jing; Zhang, Guo; Luo, He-Sheng; Liang, Lie-Xin; Huang, Dan; Zhang, Fa-Can

    2016-05-23

    Previous studies have revealed that mast cells (MCs) may activate the protease-activated receptors and release of neuropeptides involved in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The levels of proteaseactivated receptor 2 (PAR-2) and tryptase can contribute to understanding the pathogenesis of IBS. Colonoscopic biopsies were performed of 38 subjects (20 with IBSdiarrhea [IBS-D], eight with IBS-constipation [IBS-C], and 10 healthy volunteers). The mRNA and protein levels of tryptase and PAR-2 were assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. The levels of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), substance P (SP), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) were measured by immunohistochemistry, and MCs were counted by toluidine blue staining. Significant increases in the mRNA expression of tryptase (p<0.05, IBS-D, IBS-C vs control) and PAR-2 (p<0.05, IBS-D, IBS-C vs control) and in the tryptase protein level (p<0.05, IBS-D, IBS-C vs control) were detected in IBS. Elevations of MCs, CGRP, VIP and SP (p<0.05, IBS-D vs control) were observed for IBS-D only. Tryptase levels may upregulate the function of PAR- 2, resulting in the release of neuropeptide and they were correlated with clinical symptoms associated with IBS.

  18. Mechanisms of protease-activated receptor 2-evoked hyperexcitability of nociceptive neurons innervating the mouse colon

    PubMed Central

    Kayssi, Ahmed; Amadesi, Silvia; Bautista, Francisco; Bunnett, Nigel W; Vanner, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Agonists of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) evoke hyperexcitability of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons by unknown mechanisms. We examined the cellular mechanisms underlying PAR2-evoked hyperexcitability of mouse colonic DRG neurons to determine their potential role in pain syndromes such as visceral hyperalgesia. Colonic DRG neurons were identified by injecting Fast Blue and DiI retrograde tracers into the mouse colon. Using immunofluorescence, we found that DiI-labelled neurons contained PAR2 immunoreactivity, confirming the presence of receptors on colonic neurons. Whole-cell current-clamp recordings of acutely dissociated neurons demonstrated that PAR2 activation with a brief application (3 min) of PAR2 agonists, SLIGRL-NH2 and trypsin, evoked sustained depolarizations (up to 60 min) which were associated with increased input resistance and a marked reduction in rheobase (50% at 30 min). In voltage clamp, SLIGRL-NH2 markedly suppressed delayed rectifier IK currents (55% at 10 min), but had no effect on the transient IA current or TTX-resistant Na+ currents. In whole-cell current-clamp recordings, the sustained excitability evoked by PAR2 activation was blocked by the PKC inhibitor, calphostin, and the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059. Studies of ERK1/2 phosphorylation using confocal microscopy demonstrated that SLIGRL-NH2 increased levels of immunoreactive pERK1/2 in DRG neurons, particularly in proximity to the plasma membrane. Thus, activation of PAR2 receptors on colonic nociceptive neurons causes sustained hyperexcitability that is related, at least in part, to suppression of delayed rectifier IK currents. Both PKC and ERK1/2 mediate the PAR2-induced hyperexcitability. These studies describe a novel mechanism of sensitization of colonic nociceptive neurons that may be implicated in conditions of visceral hyperalgesia such as irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:17289784

  19. Protease-activated receptor 2 modulates proliferation and invasion of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Eryani, Kamal; Cheng, Jun; Abé, Tatsuya; Maruyama, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Manabu; Babkair, Hamzah; Essa, Ahmed; Saku, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Based on our previous finding that protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) regulates hemophagocytosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells, which induces their heme oxygenase 1-dependent keratinization, we have formulated a hypothesis that PAR-2 functions in wider activities of SCC cells. To confirm this hypothesis, we investigated immunohistochemical profiles of PAR-2 in oral SCC tissues and its functional roles in cell proliferation and invasion in SCC cells in culture. The PAR-2 expression modes were determined in 48 surgical tissue specimens of oral SCC. Using oral SCC-derived cell systems, we determined both gene and protein expression levels of PAR-2. SCC cell proliferation and invasive properties were also examined in conditions in which PAR-2 was activated by the synthetic peptide SLIGRL. PAR-2 was immunolocalized in oral SCC and carcinoma in situ cells, especially in those on the periphery of carcinoma cell foci (100% of cases), but not in normal oral epithelia. Its expression at both gene and protein levels was confirmed in 3 oral SCC cell lines including ZK-1. Activation of PAR-2 induced ZK-1 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. PAR-2-activated ZK-1 cells invaded faster than nonactivated ones. The expression of PAR-2 is specific to oral malignancies, and PAR-2 regulates the growth and invasion of oral SCC cells.

  20. Airborne allergens induce protease activated receptor-2-mediated production of inflammatory cytokines in human gingival epithelium.

    PubMed

    Son, Ga-Yeon; Son, Aran; Yang, Yu-Mi; Park, Wonse; Chang, Inik; Lee, Jae-Ho; Shin, Dong Min

    2016-01-01

    In reaching the airways inhaled allergens pass through and contact with the oral mucosa. Although they are often responsible for initiating asthmatic attacks, it is unknown whether airborne allergens can also trigger chronic inflammation of gingival epithelial cells leading to chronic periodontitis. In this study, we investigated the inflammatory responses of human gingival epithelial cells (HGECs) to airborne allergens, particularly German cockroach extract (GCE) with a focus on calcium signaling. HGECs isolated from healthy donors were stimulated with GCE. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was measured with Fura-2-acetoxymethyl ester (Fura-2/AM) staining. Expression of inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, IL-6, and NOD-like receptor family, pyridine domain-containing (NLRP) 3 was analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). GCE promoted increase in the [Ca(2+)]i in a dose-dependent manner. Depletion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) by the ER Ca(2+) ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin (Tg) but not the depletion of extracellular Ca(2+) abolished the GCE-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i. Treatment of phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor (U73122) or 1,4,5-trisinositolphosphate (IP3) receptor inhibitor (2-APB) also prevented GCE-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i. Protease activated receptor (PAR)-2 activation mainly mediated the GCE-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i and enhanced the expression of IL-8, NLRP3, IL-1β, and IL-6 in HGECs. GCE activates PAR-2, which can induce PLC/IP3-dependent Ca(2+) signaling pathway, ultimately triggering inflammation via the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and NLRP 3 in HGECs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Regulation of protease-activated receptor-1 expression in human buccal fibroblasts stimulated with arecoline.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Hung; Lee, Shiuan-Shinn; Huang, Fu-Mei; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the major thrombin receptor protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) expression in normal human buccal mucosa and oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) specimens and further explore the potential mechanisms that may lead to induce PAR-1 expression. Thirty OSF and 10 normal buccal mucosa specimens were examined by immunohistochemistry. Buccal mucosal fibroblasts (BMFs) were challenged with arecoline by using Western blot analysis. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), LY294002, herbimycin A, NS-398, and PD98059 were added to find the possible regulatory mechanisms. PAR-1 expression was significantly higher in OSF specimens (p < .05). Arecoline was found to elevate PAR-1 expression in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner (p < .05). The addition of NAC, LY294002, herbimycin A, NS398, and PD98059 markedly inhibited the arecoline-induced PAR-1 expression (p < .05). PAR-1 expression is significantly upregulated in areca quid chewing-associated OSF. Arecoline-induced PAR-1 expression was downregulated by NAC, LY294002, herbimycin A, NS398, and PD98059. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  3. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  4. Cyclic strain increases protease-activated receptor-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Frye, S. R.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic strain regulates many vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functions through changing gene expression. This study investigated the effects of cyclic strain on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) expression in VSMCs and the possible signaling pathways involved, on the basis of the hypothesis that cyclic strain would enhance PAR-1 expression, reflecting increased thrombin activity. Uniaxial cyclic strain (1 Hz, 20%) of cells cultured on elastic membranes induced a 2-fold increase in both PAR-1 mRNA and protein levels. Functional activity of PAR-1, as assessed by cell proliferation in response to thrombin, was also increased by cyclic strain. In addition, treatment of cells with antioxidants or an NADPH oxidase inhibitor blocked strain-induced PAR-1 expression. Preincubation of cells with protein kinase inhibitors (staurosporine or Ro 31-8220) enhanced strain-increased PAR-1 expression, whereas inhibitors of NO synthase, tyrosine kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases had no effect. Cyclic strain in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor induced PAR-1 mRNA levels beyond the effect of cyclic strain alone, whereas no additive effect was observed between cyclic strain and platelet-derived growth factor-AB. Our findings that cyclic strain upregulates PAR-1 mRNA expression but that shear stress downregulates this gene in VSMCs provide an opportunity to elucidate signaling differences by which VSMCs respond to different mechanical forces.

  5. Metalloproteinase-9 contributes to endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis via protease activated receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Florence, Jon M.; Booshehri, Laela M.; Allen, Timothy C.; Kurdowska, Anna K.

    2017-01-01

    The atherosclerotic process begins when vascular endothelial cells undergo pro-inflammatory changes such as aberrant activation to dysfunctional phenotypes and apoptosis, leading to loss of vascular integrity. Our laboratory has demonstrated that exposure of mice to second hand smoke triggers an increase in expression of metalloproteinase-9. Further, metalloproteinase-9 released by second hand smoke—activated leukocytes may propagate pro-atherogenic alterations in endothelial cells. We have shown that levels of metalloproteinase-9 were increased in the plasma from apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE-/-) mice exposed to second hand smoke relative to non-exposed controls. Moreover, we have collected data from two different, but complementary, treatments of second hand smoke exposed atherosclerotic mice. Animals received either cell specific metalloproteinase-9 directed siRNA to minimize metalloproteinase-9 expression in neutrophils and endothelial cells, or a pharmacological inhibitor of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase which indirectly limits metalloproteinase-9 production in neutrophils. These treatments reduced atherosclerotic changes in mice and improved overall vascular health. We also demonstrated that metalloproteinase-9 could activate endothelial cells and induce their apoptosis via cleavage of protease activated receptor-1. In summary, better understanding of metalloproteinase-9’s pathogenic capabilities as well as novel signaling pathways involved may lead to development of treatments which may provide additional benefits to atherosclerosis patients with a history of second hand smoke exposure. PMID:28166283

  6. Protease-activated receptor-1 deficiency protects against streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Waasdorp, Maaike; Duitman, JanWillem; Florquin, Sandrine; Spek, C. Arnold

    2016-01-01

    Endogenously administered activated protein C ameliorates diabetic nephropathy (DN) in a protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1)-dependent manner, suggesting that PAR-1 activation limits the progression of DN. Activation of PAR-1 in fibroblast-like cells, however, induces proliferation and extracellular matrix production, thereby driving fibrotic disease. Considering the key role of mesangial proliferation and extracellular matrix production during DN, PAR-1 may in fact potentiate diabetes-induced kidney injury. To determine the net effect of PAR-1 in DN, streptozotocin-induced DN was studied in wild type and PAR-1 deficient mice. Subsequent mechanistic insight was obtained by assessing profibrotic responses of mesangial and tubular epithelial cells in vitro, following PAR-1 stimulation and inhibition. Despite having similar glucose levels, PAR-1 deficient mice developed less kidney damage after induction of diabetes, as evidenced by diminished proteinuria, plasma cystatin C levels, expansion of the mesangial area, and tubular atrophy. In vitro, PAR-1 signaling in mesangial cells led to increased proliferation and expression of matrix proteins fibronectin and collagen IV. Conversely, a reduction in both proliferation and fibronectin deposition was observed in diabetic PAR-1 deficient mice. Overall, we show that PAR-1 plays an important role in the development of DN and PAR-1 might therefore be an attractive therapeutic target to pursue in DN. PMID:27618774

  7. Skin Barrier Recovery by Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Antagonist Lobaric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Yeon Ah; Chung, Hyunjin; Yoon, Sohyun; Park, Jong Il; Lee, Ji Eun; Myung, Cheol Hwan; Hwang, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) results from gene and environment interactions that lead to a range of immunological abnormalities and breakdown of the skin barrier. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) belongs to a family of G-protein coupled receptors and is expressed in suprabasal layers of the epidermis. PAR2 is activated by both trypsin and a specific agonist peptide, SLIGKV-NH2 and is involved in both epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis and epithelial inflammation. In this study, we investigated the effect of lobaric acid on inflammation, keratinocyte differentiation, and recovery of the skin barrier in hairless mice. Lobaric acid blocked trypsin-induced and SLIGKV-NH2-induced PAR2 activation resulting in decreased mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid reduced expression of interleukin-8 induced by SLIGKV-NH2 and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (TARC) induced by tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) and IFN-γ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid also blocked SLIGKV-NH2-induced activation of ERK, which is a downstream signal of PAR2 in normal human keratinocytes (NHEKs). Treatment with SLIGKV-NH2 downregulated expression of involucrin, a differentiation marker protein in HaCaT keratinocytes, and upregulated expression of involucrin, transglutamase1 and filaggrin in NHEKs. However, lobaric acid antagonized the effect of SLIGKV-NH2 in HaCaT keratinocytes and NHEKs. Topical application of lobaric acid accelerated barrier recovery kinetics in a SKH-1 hairless mouse model. These results suggested that lobaric acid is a PAR2 antagonist and could be a possible therapeutic agent for atopic dermatitis. PMID:27169822

  8. Platelets and protease-activated receptor-4 contribute to acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Kazuhisa; Joshi, Nikita; Sullivan, Bradley P.; Albee, Ryan; Brandenberger, Christina; Jaeschke, Hartmut; McGill, Mitchell R.; Scott, Michael A.; Ganey, Patricia E.; Luyendyk, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury in humans is associated with robust coagulation cascade activation and thrombocytopenia. However, it is not known whether coagulation-driven platelet activation participates in APAP hepatotoxicity. Here, we found that APAP overdose in mice caused liver damage accompanied by significant thrombocytopenia and accumulation of platelets in the liver. These changes were attenuated by administration of the direct thrombin inhibitor lepirudin. Platelet depletion with an anti-CD41 antibody also significantly reduced APAP-mediated liver injury and thrombin generation, indicated by the concentration of thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complexes in plasma. Compared with APAP-treated wild-type mice, biomarkers of hepatocellular and endothelial damage, plasma TAT concentration, and hepatic platelet accumulation were reduced in mice lacking protease-activated receptor (PAR)-4, which mediates thrombin signaling in mouse platelets. However, selective hematopoietic cell PAR-4 deficiency did not affect APAP-induced liver injury or plasma TAT levels. These results suggest that interconnections between coagulation and hepatic platelet accumulation promote APAP-induced liver injury, independent of platelet PAR-4 signaling. Moreover, the results highlight a potential contribution of nonhematopoietic cell PAR-4 signaling to APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:26179083

  9. Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Activation Contributes to House Dust Mite-Induced IgE Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Post, Sijranke; Heijink, Irene H.; Petersen, Arjen H.; de Bruin, Harold G.; van Oosterhout, Antoon J. M.; Nawijn, Martijn C.

    2014-01-01

    Aeroallergens such as house dust mite (HDM), cockroach, and grass or tree pollen are innocuous substances that can induce allergic sensitization upon inhalation. The serine proteases present in these allergens are thought to activate the protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2, on the airway epithelium, thereby potentially inducing allergic sensitization at the expense of inhalation tolerance. We hypothesized that the proteolytic activity of allergens may play an important factor in the allergenicity to house dust mite and is essential to overcome airway tolerance. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of PAR-2 activation in allergic sensitization and HDM-induced allergic airway inflammation. In our study, Par-2 deficient mice were treated with two different HDM extracts containing high and low serine protease activities twice a week for a period of 5 weeks. We determined airway inflammation through quantification of percentages of mononuclear cells, eosinophils and neutrophils in the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid and measured total IgE and HDM-specific IgE and IgG1 levels in serum. Furthermore, Th2 and pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-5, IL-13, Eotaxin-1, IL-17, KC, Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 17 (CCL17) and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), were measured in lung tissue homogenates. We observed that independent of the serine protease content, HDM was able to induce elevated levels of eosinophils and neutrophils in the airways of both wild-type (WT) and Par-2 deficient mice. Furthermore, we show that induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines by HDM exposure is independent of Par-2 activation. In contrast, serine protease activity of HDM does contribute to enhanced levels of total IgE, but not HDM-specific IgE. We conclude that, while Par-2 activation contributes to the development of IgE responses, it is largely dispensable for the HDM-induced induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and airway inflammation in an experimental mouse model of HDM

  10. Anticoagulant and antithrombotic properties of intracellular protease-activated receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wielders, S J H; Bennaghmouch, A; Reutelingsperger, C P M; Bevers, E M; Lindhout, T

    2007-03-01

    Blockade of the thrombin receptors protease-activated receptor (PAR)1 and PAR4 with pepducins, cell-penetrating lipopeptides based on the third intracellular loop of PAR1 and PAR4, effectively inhibits platelet aggregation. We have previously shown that PAR1 pepducin also exerts an anticoagulant activity by partial inhibition of the thrombin plus collagen-induced externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) at the platelet plasma membrane. In the present study we examined the effects of PAR1 and PAR4 pepducins on tissue factor (TF)-initiated thrombin generation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and the interaction between PAR4 pepducin-loaded mouse platelets and a growing thrombus to confirm the relevance of the in vitro data. Localization of pepducins at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane was confirmed with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. Both the PAR1 pepducin, P1pal12, and the PAR4 pepducin, P4pal10, inhibited TF-initiated thrombin generation in PRP. Concentrations of P1pal12 and P4pal10, which blocked the thrombin-induced influx of extracellular calcium ions and inhibited platelet aggregation, reduced the rate of thrombin generation during the propagation phase by 38% and 36%, respectively. Whether this anticoagulant effect is relevant in inhibiting in vivo arterial thrombin growth is uncertain because P4pal10 prevented the incorporation of platelets in a growing thrombus. Our findings suggest that in spite of their potential anticoagulant activities the in vivo antithrombotic effect of intracellular PAR pepducins is mainly based on inhibiting platelet-platelet interactions.

  11. Inhibition of Protease-activated Receptor 1 Ameliorates Intestinal Radiation Mucositis in a Preclinical Rat Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Junru; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Chintala, Madhu; Fink, Louis M.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, using a specific small-molecule inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signaling, whether the beneficial effect of thrombin inhibition on radiation enteropathy development is due to inhibition of blood clotting or to cellular (PAR1-mediated) thrombin effects. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent fractionated X-irradiation (5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 9) of a 4-cm small-bowel segment. Early radiation toxicity was evaluated in rats receiving PAR1 inhibitor (SCH602539, 0, 10, or 15 mg/kg/d) from 1 day before to 2 weeks after the end of irradiation. The effect of PAR1 inhibition on development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis was evaluated in animals receiving SCH602539 (0, 15, or 30 mg/kg/d) until 2 weeks after irradiation, or continuously until termination of the experiment 26 weeks after irradiation. Results: Blockade of PAR1 ameliorated early intestinal toxicity, with reduced overall intestinal radiation injury (P=.002), number of myeloperoxidase-positive (P=.03) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive (P=.04) cells, and collagen III accumulation (P=.005). In contrast, there was no difference in delayed radiation enteropathy in either the 2- or 26-week administration groups. Conclusion: Pharmacological blockade of PAR1 seems to reduce early radiation mucositis but does not affect the level of delayed intestinal radiation fibrosis. Early radiation enteropathy is related to activation of cellular thrombin receptors, whereas platelet activation or fibrin formation may play a greater role in the development of delayed toxicity. Because of the favorable side-effect profile, PAR1 blockade should be further explored as a method to ameliorate acute intestinal radiation toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer and to protect first responders and rescue personnel in radiologic/nuclear emergencies.

  12. Protease-Activated Receptor 2 Mediates Mucus Secretion in the Airway Submucosal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jae; Yang, Yu-Mi; Kim, Kyubo; Shin, Dong Min; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Cho, Hyung-Ju; Choi, Jae Young

    2012-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2), a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in airway epithelia and smooth muscle, plays an important role in airway inflammation. In this study, we demonstrated that activation of PAR2 induces mucus secretion from the human airway gland and examined the underlying mechanism using the porcine and murine airway glands. The mucosa with underlying submucosal glands were dissected from the cartilage of tissues, pinned with the mucosal side up at the gas/bath solution interface of a physiological chamber, and covered with oil so that secretions from individual glands could be visualized as spherical bubbles in the oil. Secretion rates were determined by optical monitoring of the bubble diameter. The Ca2+-sensitive dye Fura2-AM was used to determine intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) by means of spectrofluorometry. Stimulation of human tracheal mucosa with PAR2-activating peptide (PAR2-AP) elevated intracellular Ca2+ and induced glandular secretion equal to approximately 30% of the carbachol response in the human airway. Porcine gland tissue was more sensitive to PAR2-AP, and this response was dependent on Ca2+ and anion secretion. When the mouse trachea were exposed to PAR2-AP, large amounts of secretion were observed in both wild type and ΔF508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutant mice but there is no secretion from PAR-2 knock out mice. In conclusion, PAR2-AP is an agonist for mucus secretion from the airway gland that is Ca2+-dependent and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-independent. PMID:22916223

  13. Role of Fibrinogen and Protease-Activated Receptors in Acute Xenobiotic-Induced Cholestatic Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Luyendyk, James P.; Mackman, Nigel; Sullivan, Bradley P.

    2011-01-01

    Alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)–induced cholestatic liver injury causes tissue factor (TF)–dependent coagulation in mice, and TF deficiency reduces ANIT-induced liver injury. However, the mechanism whereby TF contributes to hepatotoxicity in this model is not known. Utilizing pharmacological and genetic strategies, we evaluated the contribution of fibrinogen and two distinct receptors for thrombin, protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and PAR-4, in a model of acute ANIT hepatotoxicity. ANIT administration (60 mg/kg, po) caused a marked induction of the genes encoding the three fibrinogen chains (α, β, and γ) in liver, an increase in plasma fibrinogen, and concurrent deposition of thrombin-cleaved fibrin in liver. Partial depletion of circulating fibrinogen with ancrod did not impact ANIT hepatotoxicity. However, complete fibrin(ogen) deficiency significantly reduced serum alanine aminotransferase activity and hepatocellular necrosis in ANIT-treated mice. ANIT-induced hepatocellular necrosis was similar in PAR-1−/− mice compared with PAR-1+/+ mice. Interestingly, the progression of ANIT-induced hepatocellular necrosis was significantly reduced in PAR-4−/− mice and by administration of an inhibitory PAR-4 pepducin (P4Pal-10, 0.5 mg/kg, sc) to wild-type mice 8 h after ANIT treatment. Interestingly, a distinct lesion, parenchymal-type peliosis, was also observed in PAR-4−/− mice treated with ANIT and in mice that were given P4Pal-10 prior to ANIT administration. The results suggest that fibrin(ogen), but not PAR-1, contributes to the progression of ANIT hepatotoxicity in mice. Moreover, the data suggest a dual role for PAR-4 in ANIT hepatotoxicity, both mediating an early protection against peliosis and contributing to the progression of hepatocellular necrosis. PMID:20974703

  14. The differential expression of protease activated receptors contributes to functional differences between dark and fair keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Meilang; Lin, Haiyan; Zhao, Ruilong; Liang, Hai Po Helena; Jackson, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    Dark skin has different properties in comparison to fair skin. Melanocytes have been shown to partly contribute to these differences, however, the involvement of keratinocytes from dark or fair skin is not well demonstrated. This study investigated the proliferation and barrier function of dark keratinocytes (DK) and fair keratinocytes (FK), and the role of protease activated receptor (PAR)1 and PAR2. DK and FK were isolated from human neonatal foreskins. Cells were treated with PAR1/PAR2 agonists or antagonists, proliferation was measured by BrdU assay; permeability by the flux of FITC-dextran; protein expression by immunostaining or western blot. When compared to FK, DK proliferated significantly slower; had higher cell permeability; expressed less phosphorylated (P)-ERK/ERK, caspase-14, E-cadherin, tissue growth factor (TGF)-β3 and PAR1; and expressed more PAR2, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. Activation of PAR1 or inhibition of PAR2 stimulated cell proliferation and ERK activation, and in concordance inhibition of PAR1 or activation of PAR2 suppressed cell proliferation and ERK activation in both DK and FK. Inhibition of PAR2 decreased and inhibition of PAR1 increased cell permeability. In foreskin sections, the epidermis of dark foreskin expressed less caspase-14 and the same level but different distribution of E-cadherin, when compared to fair foreskin. These data highlight functional differences in proliferation and barrier integrity between HK and FK that are partly associated with their differential expression of PAR1 and PAR2. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Enzyme specificity and effects of gyroxin, a serine protease from the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, on protease-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Yonamine, Camila M; Kondo, Marcia Y; Nering, Marcela B; Gouvêa, Iuri E; Okamoto, Débora; Andrade, Douglas; da Silva, José Alberto A; Prieto da Silva, Alvaro R B; Yamane, Tetsuo; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Lapa, Antônio J; Hayashi, Mirian A F; Lima-Landman, Maria Teresa R

    2014-03-01

    Gyroxin is a serine protease displaying a thrombin-like activity found in the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. Typically, intravenous injection of purified gyroxin induces a barrel rotation syndrome in mice. The serine protease thrombin activates platelets aggregation by cleaving and releasing a tethered N-terminus peptide from the G-protein-coupled receptors, known as protease-activated receptors (PARs). Gyroxin also presents pro-coagulant activity suggested to be dependent of PARs activation. In the present work, the effects of these serine proteases, namely gyroxin and thrombin, on PARs were comparatively studied by characterizing the hydrolytic specificity and kinetics using PARs-mimetic FRET peptides. We show for the first time that the short (sh) and long (lg) peptides mimetizing the PAR-1, -2, -3, and -4 activation sites are all hydrolyzed by gyroxin exclusively after the Arg residues. Thrombin also hydrolyzes PAR-1 and -4 after the Arg residue, but hydrolyzes sh and lg PAR-3 after the Lys residue. The kcat/KM values determined for gyroxin using sh and lg PAR-4 mimetic peptides were at least 2150 and 400 times smaller than those determined for thrombin, respectively. For the sh and lg PAR-2 mimetic peptides the kcat/KM values determined for gyroxin were at least 6500 and 2919 times smaller than those determined for trypsin, respectively. The kcat/KM values for gyroxin using the PAR-1 and -3 mimetic peptides could not be determined due to the extreme low hydrolysis velocity. Moreover, the functional studies of the effects of gyroxin on PARs were conducted in living cells using cultured astrocytes, which express all PARs. Despite the ability to cleavage the PAR-1, -2, -3, and -4 peptides, gyroxin was unable to activate the PARs expressed in astrocytes as determined by evaluating the cytosolic calcium mobilization. On the other hand, we also showed that gyroxin is able to interfere with the activation of PAR-1 by thrombin or

  16. CONTRIBUTION OF PROTEASE-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR 1 IN STATUS EPILEPTICUS-INDUCED EPILEPTOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Isaev, D.; Lushnikova, I.; Lunko, O.; Zapukhliak, O.; Maximyuk, O.; Romanov, A.; Skibo, G.G.; Tian, C.; Holmes, G.L.; Isaeva, E.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical observations and studies on different animal models of acquired epilepsy consistently demonstrate that blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage can be an important risk factor for developing recurrent seizures. However, the involved signaling pathways remain largely unclear. Given the important role of thrombin and its major receptor in the brain, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), in the pathophysiology of neurological injury, we hypothesized that PAR1 may contribute to status epilepticus (SE)-induced epileptogenesis and that its inhibition shortly after SE will have neuroprotective and antiepileptogenic effects. Adult rats subjected to lithium-pilocarpine SE were administrated SCH79797 (a PAR1 selective antagonist) after SE termination. Thrombin and PAR1 levels and neuronal cell survival were evaluated 48 hr following SE. The effect of PAR1 inhibition on animal survival, interictal spikes (IIS) and electrographic seizures during the first two weeks after SE and behavioral seizures during the chronic period were evaluated. SE resulted in a high mortality rate and incidence of IIS and seizures in the surviving animals. There was a marked increase in thrombin, decrease in PAR1 immunoreactivity and hippocampal cell loss in the SE-treated rats. Inhibition of PAR1 following SE resulted in a decrease in mortality and morbidity, increase in neuronal cell survival in the hippocampus and suppression of IIS, electrographic and behavioral seizures following SE. These data suggest that the PAR1 signaling pathway contributes to epileptogenesis following SE. Because breakdown of the BBB occurs frequently in brain injuries, PAR1 inhibition may have beneficial effects in a variety of acquired injuries leading to epilepsy. PMID:25843668

  17. Plasma Kallikrein Promotes Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation and Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle through Direct Activation of Protease-activated Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Rany T.; Keum, Joo-Seob; Lee, Mi-Hye; Wang, Bing; Gooz, Monika; Luttrell, Deirdre K.; Luttrell, Louis M.; Jaffa, Ayad A.

    2010-01-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system, along with the interlocking renin-angiotensin system, is a key regulator of vascular contractility and injury response. The principal effectors of the kallikrein-kinin system are plasma and tissue kallikreins, proteases that cleave high molecular weight kininogen to produce bradykinin. Most of the cellular actions of kallikrein (KK) are thought to be mediated by bradykinin, which acts via G protein-coupled B1 and B2 bradykinin receptors on VSMCs and endothelial cells. Here, we find that primary aortic vascular smooth muscle but not endothelial cells possess the ability to activate plasma prekallikrein. Surprisingly, exposing VSMCs to prekallikrein leads to activation of the ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade via a mechanism that requires kallikrein activity but does not involve bradykinin receptors. In transfected HEK293 cells, we find that plasma kallikrein directly activates G protein-coupled protease-activated receptors (PARs) 1 and 2, which possess consensus kallikrein cleavage sites, but not PAR4. In vascular smooth muscles, KK stimulates ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) 17 activity via a PAR1/2 receptor-dependent mechanism, leading sequentially to release of the endogenous ADAM17 substrates, amphiregulin and tumor necrosis factor-α, metalloprotease-dependent transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors, and metalloprotease and epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent ERK1/2 activation. These results suggest a novel mechanism of bradykinin-independent kallikrein action that may contribute to the regulation of vascular responses in pathophysiologic states, such as diabetes mellitus. PMID:20826789

  18. Neutrophil Elastase Activates Protease-activated Receptor-2 (PAR2) and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) to Cause Inflammation and Pain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peishen; Lieu, TinaMarie; Barlow, Nicholas; Sostegni, Silvia; Haerteis, Silke; Korbmacher, Christoph; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Jimenez-Vargas, Nestor N; Vanner, Stephen J; Bunnett, Nigel W

    2015-05-29

    Proteases that cleave protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) at Arg(36)↓Ser(37) reveal a tethered ligand that binds to the cleaved receptor. PAR(2) activates transient receptor potential (TRP) channels of nociceptive neurons to induce neurogenic inflammation and pain. Although proteases that cleave PAR(2) at non-canonical sites can trigger distinct signaling cascades, the functional importance of the PAR(2)-biased agonism is uncertain. We investigated whether neutrophil elastase, a biased agonist of PAR(2), causes inflammation and pain by activating PAR2 and TRP vanilloid 4 (TRPV4). Elastase cleaved human PAR(2) at Ala(66)↓Ser(67) and Ser(67)↓Val(68). Elastase stimulated PAR(2)-dependent cAMP accumulation and ERK1/2 activation, but not Ca(2+) mobilization, in KNRK cells. Elastase induced PAR(2) coupling to Gαs but not Gαq in HEK293 cells. Although elastase did not promote recruitment of G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK(2)) or β-arrestin to PAR(2), consistent with its inability to promote receptor endocytosis, elastase did stimulate GRK6 recruitment. Elastase caused PAR(2)-dependent sensitization of TRPV4 currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes by adenylyl cyclase- and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent mechanisms. Elastase stimulated PAR(2)-dependent cAMP formation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and a PAR(2)- and TRPV4-mediated influx of extracellular Ca(2+) in mouse nociceptors. Adenylyl cyclase and PKA-mediated elastase-induced activation of TRPV4 and hyperexcitability of nociceptors. Intraplantar injection of elastase to mice caused edema and mechanical hyperalgesia by PAR(2)- and TRPV4-mediated mechanisms. Thus, the elastase-biased agonism of PAR(2) causes Gαs-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase and PKA, which activates TRPV4 and sensitizes nociceptors to cause inflammation and pain. Our results identify a novel mechanism of elastase-induced activation of TRPV4 and expand the role of PAR(2) as a mediator of protease-driven inflammation and pain.

  19. Derivation of rat embryonic stem cells and generation of protease-activated receptor-2 knockout rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Nakata, Mitsugu; Sasada, Reiko; Ooshima, Yuki; Yano, Takashi; Shinozawa, Tadahiro; Tsukimi, Yasuhiro; Takeyama, Michiyasu; Matsumoto, Yoshio; Hashimoto, Tadatoshi

    2012-08-01

    One of the remarkable achievements in knockout (KO) rat production reported during the period 2008-2010 is the derivation of authentic embryonic stem (ES) cells from rat blastocysts using a novel culture medium containing glycogen synthase kinase 3 and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitors (2i medium). Here, we report gene-targeting technology via homologous recombination in rat ES cells, demonstrating its use through production of a protease-activated receptor-2 gene (Par-2) KO rat. We began by generating germline-competent ES cells from Dark Agouti rats using 2i medium. These ES cells, which differentiate into cardiomyocytes in vitro, can produce chimeras with high ES cell contribution when injected into blastocysts. We then introduced a targeting vector with a neomycin-resistant gene driven by the CAG promoter to disrupt Par-2. After a 7-day drug selection, 489 neomycin-resistant colonies were obtained. Following screening by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) genotyping and quantitative PCR analysis, we confirmed three homologous recombinant clones, resulting in chimeras that transmitted the Par-2 targeted allele to offspring. Par-2 KO rats showed a loss of Par-2 messenger RNA expression in their stomach cells and a lack of PAR-2 mediated smooth muscle relaxation in the aorta as indicated by pharmacological testing. Compared with mice, rats offer many advantages in biomedical research, including a larger body size; consequently, they are widely used in scientific investigation. Thus, the establishment of a gene-targeting technology using rat ES cells will be a valuable tool in human disease model production and drug discovery.

  20. Macelignan inhibits melanosome transfer mediated by protease-activated receptor-2 in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Jung; Kang, Young-Gyu; Kim, Jaekyung; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Skin pigmentation is the result of melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is a key mediator of melanosome transfer, which occurs as the melanocyte extends its dendrite toward surrounding keratinocytes that take up melanosomes by phagocytosis. We investigated the effects of macelignan isolated from Myristica fragrans HOUTT. (nutmeg) on melanosome transfer and the regulation of PAR-2 in human keratinocytes (HaCaT). HaCaT cells stimulated by the PAR-2-activating peptide Ser-Leu-Ile-Gly-Arg-Leu-NH₂ (SLIGRL) were treated with macelignan; PAR-2 expression was then determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot, and immunocytochemistry. We evaluated the effects of macelignan on calcium mobilization and keratinocyte phagocytosis. In addition, B16F10 melanoma cells and keratinocytes were co-cultured to assess the effects of macelignan on prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) secretion and subsequent dendrite formation. Macelignan decreased HaCaT PAR-2 mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, macelignan markedly reduced intracellular calcium mobilization and significantly downregulated keratinocyte phagocytosis, as shown by decreased ingestion of Escherichia coli bioparticles and fluorescent microspheres. In co-culture experiments, macelignan reduced keratinocyte PGE₂ secretion, thereby preventing dendrite formation in B16F10 melanoma cells compared with SLIGRL-treated controls. Macelignan inhibits melanosome transfer by downregulating PAR-2, thereby reducing keratinocyte phagocytosis and PGE₂ secretion, which in turn inhibits dendrite formation in B16F10 melanoma cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that macelignan could be used as a natural depigmenting agent to ameliorate hyperpigmentation.

  1. Protease-activated receptor-2 stimulates intestinal epithelial chloride transport through activation of PLC and selective PKC isoforms.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Jacques Q; Moreau, France; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2009-06-01

    Serine proteases play important physiological roles through their activity at G protein-coupled protease-activated receptors (PARs). We examined the roles that specific phospholipase (PL) C and protein kinase (PK) C (PKC) isoforms play in the regulation of PAR(2)-stimulated chloride secretion in intestinal epithelial cells. Confluent SCBN epithelial monolayers were grown on Snapwell supports and mounted in modified Ussing chambers. Short-circuit current (I(sc)) responses to basolateral application of the selective PAR(2) activating peptide, SLIGRL-NH(2), were monitored as a measure of net electrogenic ion transport caused by PAR(2) activation. SLIGRL-NH(2) induced a transient I(sc) response that was significantly reduced by inhibitors of PLC (U73122), phosphoinositol-PLC (ET-18), phosphatidylcholine-PLC (D609), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K; LY294002). Immunoblot analysis revealed the phosphorylation of both PLCbeta and PLCgamma following PAR(2) activation. Pretreatment of the cells with inhibitors of PKC (GF 109203X), PKCalpha/betaI (Gö6976), and PKCdelta (rottlerin), but not PKCzeta (selective pseudosubstrate inhibitor), also attenuated this response. Cellular fractionation and immunoblot analysis, as well as confocal immunocytochemistry, revealed increases of PKCbetaI, PKCdelta, and PKCepsilon, but not PKCalpha or PKCzeta, in membrane fractions following PAR(2) activation. Pretreatment of the cells with U73122, ET-18, or D609 inhibited PKC activation. Inhibition of PI3K activity only prevented PKCdelta translocation. Immunoblots revealed that PAR(2) activation induced phosphorylation of both cRaf and ERK1/2 via PKCdelta. Inhibition of PKCbetaI and PI3K had only a partial effect on this response. We conclude that basolateral PAR(2)-induced chloride secretion involves activation of PKCbetaI and PKCdelta via a PLC-dependent mechanism resulting in the stimulation of cRaf and ERK1/2 signaling.

  2. Plasmin induces in vivo monocyte recruitment through protease-activated receptor-1-, MEK/ERK-, and CCR2-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Aline A F; Costa, Bruno R C; Vago, Juliana P; de Oliveira, Leonardo C; Tavares, Luciana P; Nogueira, Camila R C; Ribeiro, Ana Luíza C; Garcia, Cristiana C; Barbosa, Alan S; Brasil, Bruno S A F; Dusse, Luci M; Barcelos, Lucíola S; Bonjardim, Cláudio A; Teixeira, Mauro M; Sousa, Lirlândia P

    2014-10-01

    The plasminogen (Plg)/plasmin (Pla) system is associated with a variety of biological activities beyond the classical dissolution of fibrin clots, including cell migration, tissue repair, and inflammation. Although the capacity of Plg/Pla to induce cell migration is well defined, the mechanism underlying this process in vivo is elusive. In this study, we show that Pla induces in vitro migration of murine fibroblasts and macrophages (RAW 264.7) dependent on the MEK/ERK pathway and by requiring its proteolytic activity and lysine binding sites. Plasmin injection into the pleural cavity of BALB/c mice induced a time-dependent influx of mononuclear cells that was associated with augmented ERK1/2 and IκB-α phosphorylation and increased levels of CCL2 and IL-6 in pleural exudates. The inhibition of protease activity by using a serine protease inhibitor leupeptin or two structurally different protease-activated receptor-1 antagonists (SCH79797 and RWJ56110) abolished Pla-induced mononuclear recruitment and ERK1/2 and IκB-α phosphorylation. Interestingly, inhibition of the MEK/ERK pathway abolished Pla-induced CCL2 upregulation and mononuclear cell influx. In agreement with a requirement for the CCL2/CCR2 axis to Pla-induced cell migration, the use of a CCR2 antagonist (RS504393) prevented the Plg/Pla-induced recruitment of mononuclear cells to the pleural cavity and migration of macrophages at transwell plates. Therefore, Pla-induced mononuclear cell recruitment in vivo was dependent on protease-activated receptor-1 activation of the MEK/ERK/NF-κB pathway, which led to the release of CCL2 and activation of CCR2.

  3. The Role of Palmitoylation in Signalling, Cellular Trafficking and Plasma Membrane Localization of Protease-Activated Receptor-2

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Mark N.; Christensen, Melinda E.; He, Yaowu; Waterhouse, Nigel J.; Hooper, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by proteolytic cleavage of its amino terminal domain by trypsin-like serine proteases. This irreversible activation mechanism leads to rapid receptor desensitization by internalisation and degradation. We have explored the role of palmitoylation, the post-translational addition of palmitate, in PAR2 signalling, trafficking, cell surface expression and desensitization. Experiments using the palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate indicated that palmitate addition is important in trafficking of PAR2 endogenously expressed by prostate cancer cell lines. This was supported by palmitate labelling using two approaches, which showed that PAR2 stably expressed by CHO-K1 cells is palmitoylated and that palmitoylation occurs on cysteine 361. Palmitoylation is required for optimal PAR2 signalling as Ca2+ flux assays indicated that in response to trypsin agonism, palmitoylation deficient PAR2 is ∼9 fold less potent than wildtype receptor with a reduction of about 33% in the maximum signal induced via the mutant receptor. Confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and cell surface biotinylation analyses demonstrated that palmitoylation is required for efficient cell surface expression of PAR2. We also show that receptor palmitoylation occurs within the Golgi apparatus and is required for efficient agonist-induced rab11a-mediated trafficking of PAR2 to the cell surface. Palmitoylation is also required for receptor desensitization, as agonist-induced β-arrestin recruitment and receptor endocytosis and degradation were markedly reduced in CHO-PAR2-C361A cells compared with CHO-PAR2 cells. These data provide new insights on the life cycle of PAR2 and demonstrate that palmitoylation is critical for efficient signalling, trafficking, cell surface localization and degradation of this receptor. PMID:22140500

  4. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru; Motley, Evangeline D

    2016-03-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca(2+)-dependent using the Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  5. N-linked glycosylation of protease-activated receptor-1 at extracellular loop 2 regulates G-protein signaling bias.

    PubMed

    Soto, Antonio G; Smith, Thomas H; Chen, Buxin; Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Cordova, Isabel Canto; Kenakin, Terry; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Trejo, JoAnn

    2015-07-07

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for the coagulant protease thrombin. Similar to other GPCRs, PAR1 is promiscuous and couples to multiple heterotrimeric G-protein subtypes in the same cell and promotes diverse cellular responses. The molecular mechanism by which activation of a given GPCR with the same ligand permits coupling to multiple G-protein subtypes is unclear. Here, we report that N-linked glycosylation of PAR1 at extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) controls G12/13 versus Gq coupling specificity in response to thrombin stimulation. A PAR1 mutant deficient in glycosylation at ECL2 was more effective at stimulating Gq-mediated phosphoinositide signaling compared with glycosylated wildtype receptor. In contrast, wildtype PAR1 displayed a greater efficacy at G12/13-dependent RhoA activation compared with mutant receptor lacking glycosylation at ECL2. Endogenous PAR1 rendered deficient in glycosylation using tunicamycin, a glycoprotein synthesis inhibitor, also exhibited increased PI signaling and diminished RhoA activation opposite to native receptor. Remarkably, PAR1 wildtype and glycosylation-deficient mutant were equally effective at coupling to Gi and β-arrestin-1. Consistent with preferential G12/13 coupling, thrombin-stimulated PAR1 wildtype strongly induced RhoA-mediated stress fiber formation compared with mutant receptor. In striking contrast, glycosylation-deficient PAR1 was more effective at increasing cellular proliferation, associated with Gq signaling, than wildtype receptor. These studies suggest that N-linked glycosylation at ECL2 contributes to the stabilization of an active PAR1 state that preferentially couples to G12/13 versus Gq and defines a previously unidentified function for N-linked glycosylation of GPCRs in regulating G-protein signaling bias.

  6. Differential expression of protease-activated receptors-1 and -2 in stromal fibroblasts of normal, benign, and malignant human tissues.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, M R; Derian, C K; Santulli, R J; Andrade-Gordon, P

    2001-06-01

    The serine proteases thrombin and trypsin are among many factors that malignant cells secrete into the extracellular space to mediate metastatic processes such as cellular invasion, extracellular matrix degradation, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling. The degree of protease secretion from malignant cells has been correlated to their metastatic potential. Protease activated receptors (PAR)-1 and -2, which are activated by thrombin and trypsin respectively, have not been extensively characterized in human tumors in situ. We investigated the presence of PAR-1 and PAR-2 in human normal, benign and malignant tissues using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Our results demonstrate PAR-1 and PAR-2 expression in the tumor cells, mast cells, macrophages, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells of the metastatic tumor microenvironment. Most notably, an up-regulation of PAR-1 and PAR-2 observed in proliferating, smooth muscle actin (SMA)-positive stromal fibroblasts surrounding the carcinoma cells was not observed in normal or benign conditions. Furthermore, in vitro studies using proliferating, SMA-positive, human dermal fibroblasts, and scrape-wounded human dermal fibroblasts demonstrated the presence of PAR-1 and PAR-2 not detected in quiescent, SMA-negative cultures. PAR-1 and PAR-2 in the cells forming the tumor microenvironment suggest that these receptors mediate the signaling of secreted thrombin and trypsin in the processes of cellular metastasis.

  7. Protease-activated receptors modulate excitability of murine colonic smooth muscles by differential effects on interstitial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Tae Sik; Kim, Heung Up; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Lu, Hongli; Sanders, Kenton M; Koh, Sang Don

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are G protein-coupled receptors activated by proteolytic cleavage at their amino termini by serine proteases. PAR activation contributes to the inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and alters GI motility, but little is known about the specific cells within the tunica muscularis that express PARs and the mechanisms leading to contractile responses. Using real time PCR, we found PARs to be expressed in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α positive (PDGFRα+) cells. The latter cell-type showed dominant expression of F2r (encodes PAR1) and F2rl1 (encodes PAR2). Contractile and intracellular electrical activities were measured to characterize the integrated responses to PAR activation in whole muscles. Cells were isolated and ICC and PDGFRα+ cells were identified by constitutive expression of fluorescent reporters. Thrombin (PAR1 agonist) and trypsin (PAR2 agonist) caused biphasic responses in colonic muscles: transient hyperpolarization and relaxation followed by repolarization and excitation. The inhibitory phase was blocked by apamin, revealing a distinct excitatory component. Patch clamp studies showed that the inhibitory response was mediated by activation of small conductance calcium-activated K+ channels in PDGFRα+ cells, and the excitatory response was mediated by activation of a Cl− conductance in ICC. SMCs contributed little to PAR responses in colonic muscles. In summary, PARs regulate the excitability of colonic muscles; different conductances are activated in each cell type of the SMC–ICC–PDGFRα+ cell (SIP) syncytium. Motor responses to PAR agonists are integrated responses of the SIP syncytium. Key points Activation of protease-activated receptors (PAR) regulates gastrointestinal (GI) motility but little is known about the cells and mechanisms in GI muscles responsible for PAR responses. Using mouse cells, we

  8. [Development of agonists/antagonists for protease-activated receptors (PARs) and the possible therapeutic application to gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Fumiko

    2005-06-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs), a family of G-protein-coupled seven-transmembrane-domain receptors, are activated by proteolytic unmasking of the N-terminal cryptic tethered ligand by certain serine proteases. Among four PAR family members cloned to date, PAR-1, PAR-2, and PAR-4 can also be activated through a non-enzymatic mechanism, which is achieved by direct binding of exogenously applied synthetic peptides based on the tethered ligand sequence, known as PARs-activating peptides, to the body of the receptor. Various peptide mimetics have been synthesized as agonists for PARs with improved potency, selectivity, and stability. Some peptide mimetics and/or nonpeptide compounds have also been developed as antagonists for PAR-1 and PAR-4. PARs are widely distributed in the mammalian body, especially throughout the alimentary systems, and play various roles in physiological/pathophysiological conditions, i.e., modulation of salivary, gastric, or pancreatic glandular exocrine secretion, gastrointestinal smooth muscle motility, gastric mucosal cytoprotection, suppression/facilitation of visceral pain and inflammation, etc. Thus PARs are now considered novel therapeutic targets, and development of selective agonists and/or antagonists for PARs might provide a novel strategy for the treatment of various diseases that are resistant to current therapeutics.

  9. Protease-activated receptor 1 and 2 contribute to angiotensin II-induced activation of adventitial fibroblasts from rat aorta

    SciTech Connect

    He, Rui-Qing; Tang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Bao-Li; Li, Xiao-Dong; Hong, Mo-Na; Chen, Qi-Zhi; Han, Wei-Qing; Gao, Ping-Jin

    2016-04-29

    Adventitial fibroblasts (AFs) can be activated by angiotensin II (Ang II) and exert pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory effects in vascular remodeling. Protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and 2 play a significant role in fibrogenic and inflammatory diseases. The present study hypothesized that PAR1 and PAR2 are involved in Ang II-induced AF activation and contribute to adventitial remodeling. We found that direct activation of PAR1 and PAR2 with PAR1-AP and PAR2-AP led to AF activation, including proliferation and differentiation of AFs, extracellular matrix synthesis, as well as production of pro-fibrotic cytokine TGF-β and pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and MCP-1. Furthermore, PAR1 and PAR2 mediated Ang II-induced AF activation, since both PAR1 and PAR2 antagonists inhibited Ang II-induced proliferation, migration, differentiation, extracellular matrix synthesis and production of pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory cytokines in AFs. Finally, mechanistic study showed that Ang II, via Ang II type I receptor (AT1R), upregulated both PAR1 and PAR2 expression, and transactivated PAR1 and PAR2, as denoted by internalization of both proteins. In conclusion, our results suggest that PAR1 and PAR2 play a critical role in Ang II-induced AF activation, and this may contribute to adventitia-related pathological changes. - Highlights: • Direct activation of PAR1 and PAR2 led to adventitial fibroblast (AF) activation. • PAR1 and PAR2 antagonists attenuated Ang II-induced AF activation. • Ang II induced the upregulation and transactivation of PAR1/PAR2 in AFs.

  10. A murine monoclonal antibody that binds N-terminal extracellular segment of human protease-activated receptor-4.

    PubMed

    Sangawa, Takeshi; Nogi, Terukazu; Takagi, Junichi

    2008-10-01

    Abstract A monoclonal antibody that recognizes native G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) is generally difficult to obtain. Protease-activated receptor-4 (PAR4) is a GPCR that plays an important role in platelet activation as a low-affinity thrombin receptor. By immunizing peptide corresponding to the N-terminal segment of human PAR4, we obtained a monoclonal antibody that recognizes cell surface expressed PAR4. Epitope mapping using a series of artificial fusion proteins that carry PAR4-derived peptide revealed that the recognition motif is fully contained within the 6-residue portion adjacent to the thrombin cleavage site. The antibody blocked PAR4 peptide cleavage by thrombin, suggesting its utility in the functional study of PAR4 signaling.

  11. Protease-Activated Receptor-1 Supports Locomotor Recovery by Biased Agonist Activated Protein C after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Whetstone, William D.; Walker, Breset; Trivedi, Alpa; Lee, Sangmi; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.; Hsu, Jung-Yu C.

    2017-01-01

    Thrombin-induced secondary injury is mediated through its receptor, protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), by "biased agonism." Activated protein C (APC) acts through the same PAR-1 receptor but functions as an anti-coagulant and anti-inflammatory protein, which counteracts many of the effects of thrombin. Although the working mechanism of PAR-1 is becoming clear, the functional role of PAR-1 and its correlation with APC in the injured spinal cord remains to be elucidated. Here we investigated if PAR-1 and APC are determinants of long-term functional recovery after a spinal cord contusive injury using PAR-1 null and wild-type mice. We found that neutrophil infiltration and disruption of the blood-spinal cord barrier were significantly reduced in spinal cord injured PAR-1 null mice relative to the wild-type group. Both locomotor recovery and ability to descend an inclined grid were significantly improved in the PAR-1 null group 42 days after injury and this improvement was associated with greater long-term sparing of white matter and a reduction in glial scarring. Wild-type mice treated with APC acutely after injury showed a similar level of improved locomotor recovery to that of PAR-1 null mice. However, improvement of APC-treated PAR-1 null mice was indistinguishable from that of vehicle-treated PAR-1 null mice, suggesting that APC acts through PAR-1. Collectively, our findings define a detrimental role of thrombin-activated PAR-1 in wound healing and further validate APC, also acting through the PAR-1 by biased agonism, as a promising therapeutic target for spinal cord injury. PMID:28122028

  12. HCV NS3 protease enhances liver fibrosis via binding to and activating TGF-β type I receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Kotaro; Hara, Mitsuko; Terada, Takaho; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Takaya, Daisuke; Yaguchi, So-Ichi; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Matsuura, Tomokazu; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Yamaguchi, Tokio; Miyazawa, Keiji; Aizaki, Hideki; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji; Imoto, Masaya; Kojima, Soichi

    2013-11-01

    Viruses sometimes mimic host proteins and hijack the host cell machinery. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes liver fibrosis, a process largely mediated by the overexpression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and collagen, although the precise underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we report that HCV non-structural protein 3 (NS3) protease affects the antigenicity and bioactivity of TGF-β2 in (CAGA)9-Luc CCL64 cells and in human hepatic cell lines via binding to TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI). Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α facilitates this mechanism by increasing the colocalization of TβRI with NS3 protease on the surface of HCV-infected cells. An anti-NS3 antibody against computationally predicted binding sites for TβRI blocked the TGF-β mimetic activities of NS3 in vitro and attenuated liver fibrosis in HCV-infected chimeric mice. These data suggest that HCV NS3 protease mimics TGF-β2 and functions, at least in part, via directly binding to and activating TβRI, thereby enhancing liver fibrosis.

  13. Protease-activated receptors modulate excitability of murine colonic smooth muscles by differential effects on interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Sung, Tae Sik; Kim, Heung Up; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Lu, Hongli; Sanders, Kenton M; Koh, Sang Don

    2015-03-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are G protein-coupled receptors activated by proteolytic cleavage at their amino termini by serine proteases. PAR activation contributes to the inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and alters GI motility, but little is known about the specific cells within the tunica muscularis that express PARs and the mechanisms leading to contractile responses. Using real time PCR, we found PARs to be expressed in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α positive (PDGFRα(+)) cells. The latter cell-type showed dominant expression of F2r (encodes PAR1) and F2rl1 (encodes PAR2). Contractile and intracellular electrical activities were measured to characterize the integrated responses to PAR activation in whole muscles. Cells were isolated and ICC and PDGFRα(+) cells were identified by constitutive expression of fluorescent reporters. Thrombin (PAR1 agonist) and trypsin (PAR2 agonist) caused biphasic responses in colonic muscles: transient hyperpolarization and relaxation followed by repolarization and excitation. The inhibitory phase was blocked by apamin, revealing a distinct excitatory component. Patch clamp studies showed that the inhibitory response was mediated by activation of small conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels in PDGFRα(+) cells, and the excitatory response was mediated by activation of a Cl(-) conductance in ICC. SMCs contributed little to PAR responses in colonic muscles. In summary, PARs regulate the excitability of colonic muscles; different conductances are activated in each cell type of the SMC-ICC-PDGFRα(+) cell (SIP) syncytium. Motor responses to PAR agonists are integrated responses of the SIP syncytium.

  14. Protease activated receptor 4 limits bacterial growth and lung pathology during late stage Streptococcus pneumoniae induced pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, S F; Van't Veer, C; van den Boogaard, F E; Nieuwland, R; Hoogendijk, A J; de Boer, O J; Roelofs, J J T H; van der Poll, T

    2013-09-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common causative pathogen of pneumonia and sepsis. Pneumonia and sepsis are associated with enhanced activation of coagulation, resulting in the production of several host-derived proteases at the primary site of infection and in the circulation. Serine proteases cleave protease activated receptors (PARs), which form a molecular link between coagulation and inflammation. PAR4 is one of four subtypes of PARs and is widely expressed by multiple cell types in the respiratory tract implicated in pulmonary inflammation, by immune cells and by platelets. In mice, mouse (m)PAR4 is the only thrombin receptor expressed by platelets. We here sought to determine the contribution of mPAR4 to the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. Pneumonia was induced by intranasal inoculation with S. pneumoniae in mPAR4-deficient (par4-/-) and wild-type mice. Mice were sacrificed after 6, 24 or 48 hours (h). Blood, lungs, liver and spleen were collected for analyses. Ex vivo stimulation assays were performed with S. pneumoniae and mPAR4 activating peptides. At 48 h after infection, higher bacterial loads were found in the lungs and blood of par4-/- mice (p < 0.05), accompanied by higher histopathology scores and increased cytokine levels (p < 0.05) in the lungs. Ex vivo, co-stimulation with mPAR4 activating peptide enhanced the whole blood cytokine response to S. pneumoniae. Thrombin inhibition resulted in decreased cytokine release after S. pneumoniae stimulation in human whole blood. Our findings suggest that mPAR4 contributes to antibacterial defence during murine pneumococcal pneumonia.

  15. Protease-activated receptor-1 activation by granzyme B causes neurotoxicity that is augmented by interleukin-1β.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul R; Johnson, Tory P; Gnanapavan, Sharmilee; Giovannoni, Gavin; Wang, Tongguang; Steiner, Joseph P; Medynets, Marie; Vaal, Mark J; Gartner, Valerie; Nath, Avindra

    2017-06-27

    The cause of neurodegeneration in progressive forms of multiple sclerosis is unknown. We investigated the impact of specific neuroinflammatory markers on human neurons to identify potential therapeutic targets for neuroprotection against chronic inflammation. Surface immunocytochemistry directly visualized protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptors on neurons in human postmortem cortex in patients with and without neuroinflammatory lesions. Viability of cultured neurons was determined after exposure to cerebrospinal fluid from patients with progressive multiple sclerosis or purified granzyme B and IL-1β. Inhibitors of PAR1 activation and of PAR1-associated second messenger signaling were used to elucidate a mechanism of neurotoxicity. Immunohistochemistry of human post-mortem brain tissue demonstrated cells expressing higher amounts of PAR1 near and within subcortical lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis compared to control tissue. Human cerebrospinal fluid samples containing granzyme B and IL-1β were toxic to human neuronal cultures. Granzyme B was neurotoxic through activation of PAR1 and subsequently the phospholipase Cβ-IP3 second messenger system. Inhibition of PAR1 or IP3 prevented granzyme B toxicity. IL-1β enhanced granzyme B-mediated neurotoxicity by increasing PAR1 expression. Neurons within the inflamed central nervous system are imperiled because they express more PAR1 and are exposed to a neurotoxic combination of both granzyme B and IL-1β. The effects of these inflammatory mediators may be a contributing factor in the progressive brain atrophy associated with neuroinflammatory diseases. Knowledge of how exposure to IL-1β and granzyme B act synergistically to cause neuronal death yields potential novel neuroprotective treatments for neuroinflammatory diseases.

  16. Crosstalk between Protease-activated Receptor 1 and Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Regulates Melanoma Cell Adhesion Molecule (MCAM/MUC18) Expression and Melanoma Metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    Melnikova, Vladislava O.; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Villares, Gabriel J.; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Zigler, Maya; Wang, Hua; Petersson, Frederik; Price, Janet E.; Schroit, Alan; Prieto, Victor G.; Hung, Mien-Chie; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2009-01-01

    The cellular and molecular pathways that regulate platelet activation, blood coagulation, and inflammation are emerging as critical players in cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate a novel signaling mechanism whereby protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) mediates expression of melanoma cell adhesion molecule MCAM/MUC18 (MUC18), a critical marker of melanoma metastasis, via activation of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). We found that PAR1 silencing with small hairpin RNA inhibits MUC18 expression in metastatic melanoma cells by inhibiting CREB phosphorylation, activity, and binding to the MUC18 promoter. We further demonstrate that the PAF/PAFR pathway mediates MUC18 expression downstream of PAR1. Indeed, PAR1 silencing down-regulates PAFR expression and PAF production, PAFR silencing blocks MUC18 expression, and re-expression of PAFR in PAR1-silenced cells rescues MUC18 expression. We further demonstrate that the PAR1-PAFR-MUC18 pathway mediates melanoma cell adhesion to microvascular endothelial cells, transendothelial migration, and metastatic retention in the lungs. Rescuing PAFR expression in PAR1-silenced cells fully restores metastatic phenotype of melanoma, indicating that PAFR plays critical role in the molecular mechanism of PAR1 action. Our results link the two pro-inflammatory G-protein-coupled receptors, PAR1 and PAFR, with the metastatic dissemination of melanoma and suggest that PAR1, PAFR, and MUC18 are attractive therapeutic targets for preventing melanoma metastasis. PMID:19703903

  17. Protease-activated receptor-2 expression in IgA nephropathy: a potential role in the pathogenesis of interstitial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Grandaliano, Giuseppe; Pontrelli, Paola; Cerullo, Giuseppina; Monno, Raffaella; Ranieri, Elena; Ursi, Michele; Loverre, Antonella; Gesualdo, Loreto; Schena, Francesco P

    2003-08-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests that proteases may play a key role in the pathogenesis of tissue fibrosis. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is cleaved and activated by trypsin-like proteolytic enzymes, including tryptase and activated coagulation factor X (FXa). Both these soluble mediators have been demonstrated, directly or indirectly, at the interstitial level in progressive renal diseases, including IgA nephropathy (IgAN). PAR-2 mRNA and protein levels were investigated by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively, in 17 biopsies from IgAN patients and 10 normal kidneys. PAR-2 expression was also evaluated, by RT-PCR and western blotting, in cultured human mesangial and proximal tubular cells. Finally, gene expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and TGF-beta, two powerful fibrogenic factors, was evaluated in FXa-, trypsin-, and PAR-2 activating peptide-stimulated human proximal tubular cells by Northern blot. In normal kidneys, PAR-2 gene expression was barely detectable, whereas in IgAN biopsies the mRNA levels for this protease receptor were strikingly increased and directly correlated with the extent of interstitial fibrosis. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that PAR-2 protein expression in IgAN biopsies was mainly localized in the proximal tubuli and within the interstitial infiltrate. Proximal tubular cells in culture expressed PAR-2. Activation of this receptor by FXa in tubular cells induced a striking increase in intracellular calcium concentration. In addition, incubation of both cell lines with trypsin, FXa, or PAR-2 activating peptide caused a marked upregulation of PAI-1 gene expression that was not counterbalanced by an increased expression of plasminogen activators. Finally, PAR-2 activation induced a significant upregulation of TGF-beta gene and protein expression in both mesangial and tubular cells. On the basis of our data, we can suggest that PAR-2 expressed by renal resident cells and activated by

  18. The expression of protease-activated receptor 2 and 4 in the colon of irritable bowel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ju-hui; Dong, Lei; Shi, Hai-tao; Wang, Zong-yan; Shi, Hong-yang; Ding, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) pathophysiology has not been fully understood. Abnormalities of serine proteases have been identified in IBS patients. In addition, protease-activated receptors (PAR) activation interferes with several components of the pathogenesis of IBS, so, evaluating the PAR expression in IBS patients may contribute to understanding the pathogenesis of the disease. This study aimed to investigate whether the expression of PAR4 and PAR2 in the colon was changed in IBS patients and was associated with IBS. Colon mucosal biopsies of 34 IBS patients (16 constipation- and 18 diarrhea-predominant) and 18 control subjects were collected. Gene transcripts of PAR2, PAR4, tryptase, and trypsin were quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the expression of PAR2 and PAR4 receptors was also measured by immunohistology and image analysis. In IBS patients, the mRNA expression of tryptase and trypsin normalized against β-actin gene was higher compared to control subjects (P < 0.001). No difference was observed in the PAR2 mRNA level or protein level between control subjects on the one hand and IBS patients or subgroups on the other. In IBS or IBS subgroups patients, the expression of PAR4 in the mRNA level or protein level was lower than the control subjects. This study, for the first time, indicated the PAR4 expression in IBS patients. Decreased PAR4 expression may help us to understand the pathogenesis of IBS.

  19. Molecular cloning of canine protease-activated receptor-2 and its expression in normal dog tissues and atopic skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Shingo; Maeda, Sadatoshi; Shibata, Sanae; Chimura, Naoki; Fukata, Tsuneo

    2009-05-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) belongs to a new G protein-coupled receptor subfamily and is activated by serine proteases. PAR-2 has been demonstrated to play an important role in inflammation and immune response in allergic diseases. In this study, we cloned canine PAR-2 cDNA from the canine kidney by RT-PCR. The canine PAR-2 clone contained a full-length open reading frame encoding 397 amino acids that had 84% and 80% homology with human and mouse homologues, respectively. Canine PAR-2 mRNA was detected in the heart, lung, liver, pancreas, stomach, small intestine, colon, kidney, adrenal gland, spleen, thyroid gland, thymus, skeletal muscle, lymph node, fat and skin of three healthy dogs. The expression pattern of PAR-2 mRNA in canine tissues was similar to that in humans. The expression level of PAR-2 mRNA in skin was not different between the atopic dermatitis (AD) and healthy dogs, suggesting that the level of PAR-2 mRNA transcription may not be associated with development of canine AD. The canine PAR-2 cDNA clone obtained in this study will be useful for further investigation of the immunopathogenesis of canine allergic diseases.

  20. Characterization of a New Peptide Agonist of the Protease-activated Receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yingying; Jin, Jianguo; Kunapuli, Satya P.

    2008-01-01

    A new peptide (TFRRRLSRATR), from the c-terminal of human platelet P2Y1 receptor, was synthesized and its biological function was evaluated. This peptide activated platelets in a concentration-dependent manner, causing shape change, aggregation, secretion and calcium mobilization. Of the several receptor antagonists tested, only BMS200261, a PAR-1 specific antagonist, totally abolished the peptide-induced platelet aggregation, secretion and calcium mobilization. The TFRRR-peptide-pretreated washed platelets failed to aggregate in response to SFLLRN (10 μM) but not to AYPGKF (500 μM). In addition, in mouse platelets, peptide concentrations up to 600 μM failed to cause platelet activation, indicating that the TFRRR- peptide activated platelets through the PAR-1 receptor rather than through the PAR-4 receptor. The shape change induced by 10 μM peptide was totally abolished by Y-27632, an inhibitor of p160ROCK which is the downstream signal of G12/13 pathways. The TFRRR-peptide, YFLLRNP, and the physiological agonist thrombin selectively activated G12/13 pathways at low concentrations and began to activate both Gq and G12/13 pathways with increased concentrations. Similar to SFLLRN, the TFRRR-peptide caused phosphorylation of Akt and Erk in a P2Y12 receptor-dependent manner, and p-38 MAP kinase activation in a P2Y12-independent manner. The effects of this peptide are elicited by the first six amino acids (TFRRRL) whereas the remaining peptide (LSRATR), TFERRN, or TFEERN had no effects on platelets. We conclude that TFRRRL activates human platelets through the PAR-1 receptors. PMID:17950254

  1. Protection of protease-activated receptor 2 mediated vasodilatation against angiotensin II-induced vascular dysfunction in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Under conditions of cardiovascular dysfunction, protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) agonists maintain vasodilatation activity, which has been attributed to increased cyclooxygenase-2, nitric oxide synthase and calcium-activated potassium channel (SK3.1) activities. Protease-activated receptor 2 agonist mediated vasodilatation is unknown under conditions of dysfunction caused by angiotensin II. The main purpose of our study was to determine whether PAR2-induced vasodilatation of resistance arteries was attenuated by prolonged angiotensin II treatment in mice. We compared the vasodilatation of resistance-type arteries (mesenteric) from angiotensin II-treated PAR2 wild-type mice (WT) induced by PAR2 agonist 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-amide (2fly) to the responses obtained in controls (saline treatment). We also investigated arterial vasodilatation in angiotensin II-treated PAR2 deficient (PAR2-/-) mice. Results 2fly-induced relaxations of untreated arteries from angiotensin II-treated WT were not different than saline-treated WT. Treatment of arteries with nitric oxide synthase inhibitor and SK3.1 inhibitor (L-NAME + TRAM-34) blocked 2fly in angiotensin II-treated WT. Protein and mRNA expression of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 were increased, and cyclooxygenase activity increased the sensitivity of arteries to 2fly in only angiotensin II-treated WT. These protective vasodilatation mechanisms were selective for 2fly compared with acetylcholine- and nitroprusside-induced relaxations which were attenuated by angiotensin II; PAR2-/- were protected against this attenuation of nitroprusside. Conclusions PAR2-mediated vasodilatation of resistance type arteries is protected against the negative effects of angiotensin II-induced vascular dysfunction in mice. In conditions of endothelial dysfunction, angiotensin II induction of cyclooxygenases increases sensitivity to PAR2 agonist and the preserved vasodilatation mechanism involves activation of SK3.1. PMID:21955547

  2. Increased Expression of Cathelicidin by Direct Activation of Protease-Activated Receptor 2: Possible Implications on the Pathogenesis of Rosacea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Yoon Jee; Lim, Beom Jin; Sohn, Hyo Jung; Shin, Dongyun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Recent findings of increased cathelicidin protein and its proteolytic fragments in rosacea suggest a pathogenic role for cathelicidin in this disease. The relationship between cathelicidin and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) is therefore of interest, as PAR-2, expressed principally in keratinocytes, regulates pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between expression of PAR-2 and cathelicidin in rosacea and to test the effect of direct PAR-2 activation on cathelicidin expression in keratinocytes. Materials and Methods Samples from 40 patients with clinicopathologic diagnosis of rosacea and facial skin tissue samples from 20 patients with no specific findings or milium without inflammation were retrieved. Intensities of immunohistochemical staining for PAR-2 and cathelicidin were compared between normal and rosacea-affected skin tissues. Additionally, correlations between PAR-2 and cathelicidin staining intensities within rosacea patients were analyzed. In cultured keratinocytes, changes in PAR-2, cathelicidin, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and protein were analyzed after treatment with PAR-2 activating peptide (AP). Results Cathelicidin expression was significantly higher in rosacea skin tissues than in normal tissues (p<0.001), while PAR-2 expression was not significantly higher in rosacea tissues than in normal skin tissues. A positive correlation between PAR-2 and cathelicidin within rosacea samples was observed (R=0.330, p=0.037). After treatment of PAR-2 AP, both mRNA and protein levels for PAR-2, cathelicidin, and VEGF significantly increased in cultured keratinocytes, compared with PAR-2 control peptide treatment. Conclusion PAR-2 may participate in the pathogenesis of rosacea through activation of cathelicidin LL-37, a mediator of innate immune responses in the skin. PMID:25323904

  3. Increased expression of cathelicidin by direct activation of protease-activated receptor 2: possible implications on the pathogenesis of rosacea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Yoon Jee; Lim, Beom Jin; Sohn, Hyo Jung; Shin, Dongyun; Oh, Sang Ho

    2014-11-01

    Recent findings of increased cathelicidin protein and its proteolytic fragments in rosacea suggest a pathogenic role for cathelicidin in this disease. The relationship between cathelicidin and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) is therefore of interest, as PAR-2, expressed principally in keratinocytes, regulates pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the skin. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between expression of PAR-2 and cathelicidin in rosacea and to test the effect of direct PAR-2 activation on cathelicidin expression in keratinocytes. Samples from 40 patients with clinicopathologic diagnosis of rosacea and facial skin tissue samples from 20 patients with no specific findings or milium without inflammation were retrieved. Intensities of immunohistochemical staining for PAR-2 and cathelicidin were compared between normal and rosacea-affected skin tissues. Additionally, correlations between PAR-2 and cathelicidin staining intensities within rosacea patients were analyzed. In cultured keratinocytes, changes in PAR-2, cathelicidin, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and protein were analyzed after treatment with PAR-2 activating peptide (AP). Cathelicidin expression was significantly higher in rosacea skin tissues than in normal tissues (p<0.001), while PAR-2 expression was not significantly higher in rosacea tissues than in normal skin tissues. A positive correlation between PAR-2 and cathelicidin within rosacea samples was observed (R=0.330, p=0.037). After treatment of PAR-2 AP, both mRNA and protein levels for PAR-2, cathelicidin, and VEGF significantly increased in cultured keratinocytes, compared with PAR-2 control peptide treatment. PAR-2 may participate in the pathogenesis of rosacea through activation of cathelicidin LL-37, a mediator of innate immune responses in the skin.

  4. Progesterone promotes focal adhesion formation and migration in breast cancer cells through induction of protease-activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Jorge; Aranda, Evelyn; Henriquez, Soledad; Quezada, Marisol; Espinoza, Estefanía; Bravo, Maria Loreto; Oliva, Bárbara; Lange, Soledad; Villalon, Manuel; Jones, Marius; Brosens, Jan J; Kato, Sumie; Cuello, Mauricio A; Knutson, Todd P; Lange, Carol A; Leyton, Lisette; Owen, Gareth I

    2012-08-01

    Progesterone and progestins have been demonstrated to enhance breast cancer cell migration, although the mechanisms are still not fully understood. The protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a family of membrane receptors that are activated by serine proteases in the blood coagulation cascade. PAR1 (F2R) has been reported to be involved in cancer cell migration and overexpressed in breast cancer. We herein demonstrate that PAR1 mRNA and protein are upregulated by progesterone treatment of the breast cancer cell lines ZR-75 and T47D. This regulation is dependent on the progesterone receptor (PR) but does not require PR phosphorylation at serine 294 or the PR proline-rich region mPRO. The increase in PAR1 mRNA was transient, being present at 3  h and returning to basal levels at 18  h. The addition of a PAR1-activating peptide (aPAR1) to cells treated with progesterone resulted in an increase in focal adhesion (FA) formation as measured by the cellular levels of phosphorylated FA kinase. The combined but not individual treatment of progesterone and aPAR1 also markedly increased stress fiber formation and the migratory capacity of breast cancer cells. In agreement with in vitro findings, data mining from the Oncomine platform revealed that PAR1 expression was significantly upregulated in PR-positive breast tumors. Our observation that PAR1 expression and signal transduction are modulated by progesterone provides new insight into how the progestin component in hormone therapies increases the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

  5. In vitro inhibition of protease-activated receptors 1, 2 and 4 demonstrates that these receptors are not involved in an Acanthamoeba castellanii keratitis isolate-mediated disruption of the human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Junaid; Naeem, Komal; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-11-01

    Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis is a rare but serious human disease leading almost always to death. The pathophysiology of amoebic encephalitis is better understood, while events leading to the constitution of brain infection are largely unknown. Traversal of the blood-brain barrier is a key step in amoebae invasion of the central nervous system and facilitated by amoebic extracellular proteases. By using specific inhibitors of protease-activated receptors 1, 2 and 4, here we studied the role of these host receptors in Acanthamoeba castellanii-mediated damage to human brain microvasculature endothelial cells (HBMEC), which constitute the blood-brain barrier. The primary HBMEC were incubated with A. castellanii-conditioned medium in the presence or absence of FR-171113 (selective inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 1), FSLLRY-NH2 (inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 2), and tcY-NH2 (inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 4). The HBMEC monolayer disruptions were assessed by microscopy using Eosin staining, while host cell cytotoxicity was determined by measuring the release of cytoplasmic lactate dehydrogenase. Zymographic assays were performed to determine the effects of inhibitors of protease-activated receptors on the extracellular proteolytic activities of A. castellanii. A. castellanii-conditioned medium produced severe HBMEC monolayer disruptions within 60 min. The selective inhibitors of protease-activated receptors tested did not affect HBMEC monolayer disruptions. On the contrary, pre-treatment of A. castellanii-conditioned medium with phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, a serine protease inhibitor, or heating for 10 min at 95°C abolished HBMEC monolayer disruptions. Additionally, inhibitors of protease-activated receptors tested, failed to block A. castellanii-mediated HBMEC cytotoxicity and did not affect extracellular proteolytic activities of A. castellanii. Protease-activated receptors 1, 2 and 4 do not appear to play a role in A. castellanii

  6. Protease-activated receptor 2 activation is sufficient to induce the transition to a chronic pain state.

    PubMed

    Tillu, Dipti V; Hassler, Shayne N; Burgos-Vega, Carolina C; Quinn, Tammie L; Sorge, Robert E; Dussor, Gregory; Boitano, Scott; Vagner, Josef; Price, Theodore J

    2015-05-01

    Protease-activated receptor type 2 (PAR2) is known to play an important role in inflammatory, visceral, and cancer-evoked pain based on studies using PAR2 knockout (PAR2(-/-)) mice. We have tested the hypothesis that specific activation of PAR2 is sufficient to induce a chronic pain state through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling to protein synthesis machinery. We have further tested whether the maintenance of this chronic pain state involves a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB)/atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) signaling axis. We observed that intraplantar injection of the novel highly specific PAR2 agonist, 2-aminothiazol-4-yl-LIGRL-NH2 (2-at), evokes a long-lasting acute mechanical hypersensitivity (median effective dose ∼12 pmoles), facial grimacing, and causes robust hyperalgesic priming as revealed by a subsequent mechanical hypersensitivity and facial grimacing to prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) injection. The promechanical hypersensitivity effect of 2-at is completely absent in PAR2(-/-) mice as is hyperalgesic priming. Intraplantar injection of the upstream ERK inhibitor, U0126, and the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4F complex inhibitor, 4EGI-1, prevented the development of acute mechanical hypersensitivity and hyperalgesic priming after 2-at injection. Systemic injection of the trkB antagonist ANA-12 similarly inhibited PAR2-mediated mechanical hypersensitivity, grimacing, and hyperalgesic priming. Inhibition of aPKC (intrathecal delivery of ZIP) or trkB (systemic administration of ANA-12) after the resolution of 2-at-induced mechanical hypersensitivity reversed the maintenance of hyperalgesic priming. Hence, PAR2 activation is sufficient to induce neuronal plasticity leading to a chronic pain state, the maintenance of which is dependent on a BDNF/trkB/aPKC signaling axis.

  7. The induction of the collagen capsule synthesis by Trichinella spiralis is closely related to protease-activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi Kyung; Cho, Min Kyoung; Kang, Shin Ae; Kim, Bo Young; Yu, Hak Sun

    2016-10-30

    The muscle-stage larvae of the parasite Trichinella spiralis have the ability to survive within host muscle tissue by virtue of the formation a nurse cell-parasite complex, which is surrounded by collagen. The formation of the complex is initiated by excretory-secretory (ES) proteins produced by the parasite. To determine the mechanisms underlying collagen capsule formation, we investigated the expression levels of several types of collagen genes and TGF-βI signaling-related genes (Smad2 and Smad3) in muscle cells. Synthesis of type I, IV, and VI collagen, which are major constituents of the collagen capsule, significantly increased during T. spiralis infection. In addition, we found that expression of the protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) gene was significantly increased during this period. Expression levels of the collagen genes and TGF-βI, Smad2, and Smad3 were induced by ES proteins and a PAR2 agonist, whereas their enhanced expression levels were reduced by a PAR2 antagonist and serine protease inhibitors. To evaluate the involvement of PAR2 during T. spiralis infection in vivo, we infected wild-type and PAR2 knockout (KO) mice with T. spiralis. Expression levels of type I, IV, and VI collagen genes and TGF-βI signaling-related genes (Smad2 and Smad3) were also decreased in the PAR2 KO mice. Phosphorylation of Smad2/3, which was increased by T. spiralis infection, was significantly diminished in the PAR2 KO mice. In conclusion, ES proteins containing serine protease most likely activate collagen synthesis via PAR2 and TGF-βI signaling, and this event could influence collagen capsule formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Activation of protease-activated receptor-2 disrupts vaginal epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Feng, Chong; Wei, Xing; Zhang, Jiyuan; Zan, Ronghua; Zheng, Guizhi; Yang, Xiaoying; Zhai, Jianjun

    2014-11-01

    The epithelial cell barrier function is a critical factor in the maintenance of the homeostasis of the vaginal mucosa. This study elucidates one of the mast cell-derived chemical mediators, tryptase, on compromising the vaginal epithelial barrier function. The results showed that human vaginal cell line, VK2, express PAR2. Activation of PAR2 increases the expression of ADAM10 in VK2 cells, interferes with the endosome/lysosome fusion, and compromises the epithelial barrier function. We conclude that the activation of PAR2 on VK2 cells increases the expression of ADAM10, and compromises the VK2 monolayer barrier function. © 2014 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  9. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; P<0.05) at all examined time points (2 to 24 hours). mRNA half-life studies showed that this response was not due to increased mRNA instability. tPA mRNA expression was decreased (to 10% of stationary control; P<0.05) by low shear stress after 12 hours of exposure and was increased (to 250% of stationary control; P<0.05) after 24 hours at high shear stress. The same trends in PAR-1 mRNA levels were observed in rat smooth muscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  10. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; P<0.05) at all examined time points (2 to 24 hours). mRNA half-life studies showed that this response was not due to increased mRNA instability. tPA mRNA expression was decreased (to 10% of stationary control; P<0.05) by low shear stress after 12 hours of exposure and was increased (to 250% of stationary control; P<0.05) after 24 hours at high shear stress. The same trends in PAR-1 mRNA levels were observed in rat smooth muscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  11. Protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and PAR4 differentially regulate factor V expression from human platelets.

    PubMed

    Duvernay, Matthew; Young, Summer; Gailani, David; Schoenecker, Jonathan; Hamm, Heidi E; Hamm, Heidi

    2013-04-01

    With the recent interest of protease-activated receptors (PAR) 1 and PAR4 as possible targets for the treatment of thrombotic disorders, we compared the efficacy of protease-activated receptor (PAR)1 and PAR4 in the generation of procoagulant phenotypes on platelet membranes. PAR4-activating peptide (AP)-stimulated platelets promoted thrombin generation in plasma up to 5 minutes earlier than PAR1-AP-stimulated platelets. PAR4-AP-mediated factor V (FV) association with the platelet surface was 1.6-fold greater than for PAR1-AP. Moreover, PAR4 stimulation resulted in a 3-fold greater release of microparticles, compared with PAR1 stimulation. More robust FV secretion and microparticle generation with PAR4-AP was attributable to stronger and more sustained phosphorylation of myosin light chain at serine 19 and threonine 18. Inhibition of Rho-kinase reduced PAR4-AP-mediated FV secretion and microparticle generation to PAR1-AP-mediated levels. Thrombin generation assays measuring prothrombinase complex activity demonstrated 1.5-fold higher peak thrombin levels on PAR4-AP-stimulated platelets, compared with PAR1-AP-stimulated platelets. Rho-kinase inhibition reduced PAR4-AP-mediated peak thrombin generation by 25% but had no significant effect on PAR1-AP-mediated thrombin generation. In conclusion, stimulation of PAR4 on platelets leads to faster and more robust thrombin generation, compared with PAR1 stimulation. The greater procoagulant potential is related to more efficient FV release from intracellular stores and microparticle production driven by stronger and more sustained myosin light chain phosphorylation. These data have implications about the role of PAR4 during hemostasis and are clinically relevant in light of recent efforts to develop PAR antagonists to treat thrombotic disorders.

  12. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2): structure-function study of receptor activation by diverse peptides related to tethered-ligand epitopes.

    PubMed

    Maryanoff, B E; Santulli, R J; McComsey, D F; Hoekstra, W J; Hoey, K; Smith, C E; Addo, M; Darrow, A L; Andrade-Gordon, P

    2001-02-15

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) is a tethered-ligand, G-protein-coupled receptor that is activated by proteolytic cleavage or by small peptides derived from its cleaved N-terminal sequence, such as SLIGRL-NH2. To assess specific PAR activity, we developed an immortalized murine PAR-1 (-/-) cell line transfected with either human PAR-2 or PAR-1. A "directed" library of more than 100 PAR agonist peptide analogues was synthesized and evaluated for PAR-2 and PAR-1 activity to establish an in-depth structure-function profile for specific action on PAR-2. The most potent agonist peptides (EC50 = 2-4 microM) had Lys at position 6, Ala at position 4, and pFPhe at position 2; however, these also exhibited potent PAR-1 activity (EC50 = 0.05-0.35 microM). We identified SLIARK-NH2 and SL-Cha-ARL-NH2 as relatively potent, highly selective PAR-2 agonists with EC50 values of 4 microM. Position 1 did not tolerate basic, acidic, or large hydrophobic amino acids. N-Terminal capping by acetyl eliminated PAR-2 activity, although removal of the amino group reduced potency by just 4-fold. At position 2, substitution of Leu by Cha or Phe gave equivalent PAR-2 potency, but this modification also activated PAR-1, whereas Ala, Asp, Lys, or Gln abolished PAR-2 activity; at position 3, Ile and Cha were optimal, although various amino acids were tolerated; at position 4, Ala or Cha increased PAR-2 potency 2-fold, although Cha introduced PAR-1 activity; at position 5, Arg or Lys could be replaced successfully by large hydrophobic amino acids. These results with hexapeptide C-terminal amides that mimic the native PAR-2 ligand indicate structural modes for obtaining optimal PAR-2 activity, which could be useful for the design of PAR-2 antagonists.

  13. Protease-activated receptor-2 deficient mice have reduced house dust mite-evoked allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J Daan; Van't Veer, Cornelis; Stroo, Ingrid; van der Meer, Anne J; de Vos, Alex F; van der Zee, Jaring S; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-08-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) is abundantly expressed in the pulmonary compartment. House dust mite (HDM) is a common cause of allergic asthma and contains multiple PAR2 agonistic proteases. The aim of this study was to determine the role of PAR2 in HDM-induced allergic lung inflammation. For this, the extent of allergic lung inflammation was studied in wild type (Wt) and PAR2 knockout (KO) mice after repeated airway exposure to HDM. HDM exposure of Wt mice resulted in a profound influx of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and accumulation of eosinophils in lung tissue, which both were strongly reduced in PAR2 KO mice. PAR2 KO mice demonstrated attenuated lung pathology and protein leak in the bronchoalveolar space, accompanied by lower BALF levels of the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. This study reveals, for the first time, an important role for PAR2 in allergic lung inflammation induced by the clinically relevant allergens contained in HDM.

  14. Protease-activated Receptor 2 (PAR2) Protein and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) Protein Coupling Is Required for Sustained Inflammatory Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Daniel P.; Amadesi, Silvia; Veldhuis, Nicholas A.; Abogadie, Fe C.; Lieu, TinaMarie; Darby, William; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Lew, Michael J.; McIntyre, Peter; Bunnett, Nigel W.

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors of nociceptive neurons can sensitize transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels, which amplify neurogenic inflammation and pain. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2), a receptor for inflammatory proteases, is a major mediator of neurogenic inflammation and pain. We investigated the signaling mechanisms by which PAR2 regulates TRPV4 and determined the importance of tyrosine phosphorylation in this process. Human TRPV4 was expressed in HEK293 cells under control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter, allowing controlled and graded channel expression. In cells lacking TRPV4, the PAR2 agonist stimulated a transient increase in [Ca2+]i. TRPV4 expression led to a markedly sustained increase in [Ca2+]i. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ and treatment with the TRPV4 antagonists Ruthenium Red or HC067047 prevented the sustained response. Inhibitors of phospholipase A2 and cytochrome P450 epoxygenase attenuated the sustained response, suggesting that PAR2 generates arachidonic acid-derived lipid mediators, such as 5′,6′-EET, that activate TRPV4. Src inhibitor 1 suppressed PAR2-induced activation of TRPV4, indicating the importance of tyrosine phosphorylation. The TRPV4 tyrosine mutants Y110F, Y805F, and Y110F/Y805F were expressed normally at the cell surface. However, PAR2 was unable to activate TRPV4 with the Y110F mutation. TRPV4 antagonism suppressed PAR2 signaling to primary nociceptive neurons, and TRPV4 deletion attenuated PAR2-stimulated neurogenic inflammation. Thus, PAR2 activation generates a signal that induces sustained activation of TRPV4, which requires a key tyrosine residue (TRPV4-Tyr-110). This mechanism partly mediates the proinflammatory actions of PAR2. PMID:23288842

  15. Genetic targeting of protease activated receptor 2 reduces inflammatory astrogliosis and improves recovery of function after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Radulovic, Maja; Yoon, Hyesook; Wu, Jianmin; Mustafa, Karim; Fehlings, Michael G; Scarisbrick, Isobel A

    2015-11-01

    Inflammatory-astrogliosis exacerbates damage in the injured spinal cord and limits repair. Here we identify Protease Activated Receptor 2 (PAR2) as an essential regulator of these events with mice lacking the PAR2 gene showing greater improvements in motor coordination and strength after compression-spinal cord injury (SCI) compared to wild type littermates. Molecular profiling of the injury epicenter, and spinal segments above and below, demonstrated that mice lacking PAR2 had significantly attenuated elevations in key hallmarks of astrogliosis (glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), vimentin and neurocan) and in expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)). SCI in PAR2-/- mice was also accompanied by improved preservation of protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ)-immunopositive corticospinal axons and reductions in GFAP-immunoreactivity, expression of the pro-apoptotic marker BCL2-interacting mediator of cell death (BIM), and in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). The potential mechanistic link between PAR2, STAT3 and astrogliosis was further investigated in primary astrocytes to reveal that the SCI-related serine protease, neurosin (kallikrein 6) promotes IL-6 secretion in a PAR2 and STAT3-dependent manner. Data point to a signaling circuit in primary astrocytes in which neurosin signaling at PAR2 promotes IL-6 secretion and canonical STAT3 signaling. IL-6 promotes expression of GFAP, vimentin, additional IL-6 and robust increases in both neurosin and PAR2, thereby driving the PAR2-signaling circuit forward. Given the significant reductions in astrogliosis and inflammation as well as superior neuromotor recovery observed in PAR2 knockout mice after SCI, we suggest that this receptor and its agonists represent new drug targets to foster neuromotor recovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. House dust mite potentiates capsaicin-evoked Ca2+ transients in mouse pulmonary sensory neurons via activation of protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qihai; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2012-04-01

    House dust mite (HDM) is a major source of allergen in house dust and has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of asthma. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether HDM can modulate the sensitivity of pulmonary sensory neurons and, if so, to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Fura-2-based ratiometric Ca(2+) imaging was carried out to determine the effect of HDM extract on the capsaicin-evoked Ca(2+) transient in mouse vagal pulmonary sensory neurons. Pretreatment with HDM (50 μg ml(-1), 5 min) significantly enhanced the Ca(2+) transient evoked by capsaicin in these neurons isolated from wild-type mice. This potentiating effect of HDM was not antagonized by E-64, a selective cysteine protease inhibitor, but was completely prevented by AEBSF, a specific serine protease inhibitor. In addition, the potentiating effect of HDM on capsaicin-evoked Ca(2+) transient was absent in the pulmonary sensory neurons isolated from protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) knockout mice. Furthermore, the sensitizing effect of HDM was completely abolished by U73122, a phosholipase C inhibitor, or chelerythrine, a protein kinase C inhibitor. In summary, our results demonstrate that HDM, mainly through its serine protease activity, potentiates capsaicin-evoked Ca(2+) transient in mouse pulmonary sensory neurons via the activation of PAR(2) and the phosholipase C-protein kinase C intracellular transduction cascade.

  17. Protein Kinase D and Gβγ Subunits Mediate Agonist-evoked Translocation of Protease-activated Receptor-2 from the Golgi Apparatus to the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Dane D; Zhao, Peishen; Jimenez-Vargas, Nestor N; Lieu, TinaMarie; Gerges, Marina; Yeatman, Holly R; Canals, Meritxell; Vanner, Stephen J; Poole, Daniel P; Bunnett, Nigel W

    2016-05-20

    Agonist-evoked endocytosis of G protein-coupled receptors has been extensively studied. The mechanisms by which agonists stimulate mobilization and plasma membrane translocation of G protein-coupled receptors from intracellular stores are unexplored. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) traffics to lysosomes, and sustained protease signaling requires mobilization and plasma membrane trafficking of PAR2 from Golgi stores. We evaluated the contribution of protein kinase D (PKD) and Gβγ to this process. In HEK293 and KNRK cells, the PAR2 agonists trypsin and 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH2 activated PKD in the Golgi apparatus, where PKD regulates protein trafficking. PAR2 activation induced translocation of Gβγ, a PKD activator, to the Golgi apparatus, determined by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer between Gγ-Venus and giantin-Rluc8. Inhibitors of PKD (CRT0066101) and Gβγ (gallein) prevented PAR2-stimulated activation of PKD. CRT0066101, PKD1 siRNA, and gallein all inhibited recovery of PAR2-evoked Ca(2+) signaling. PAR2 with a photoconvertible Kaede tag was expressed in KNRK cells to examine receptor translocation from the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane. Irradiation of the Golgi region (405 nm) induced green-red photo-conversion of PAR2-Kaede. Trypsin depleted PAR2-Kaede from the Golgi apparatus and repleted PAR2-Kaede at the plasma membrane. CRT0066101 inhibited PAR2-Kaede translocation to the plasma membrane. CRT0066101 also inhibited sustained protease signaling to colonocytes and nociceptive neurons that naturally express PAR2 and mediate protease-evoked inflammation and nociception. Our results reveal a major role for PKD and Gβγ in agonist-evoked mobilization of intracellular PAR2 stores that is required for sustained signaling by extracellular proteases.

  18. Protease Activated Receptor 2 (PAR2) Induces Long-Term Depression in the Hippocampus through Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4)

    PubMed Central

    Shavit-Stein, Efrat; Artan-Furman, Avital; Feingold, Ekaterina; Ben Shimon, Marina; Itzekson-Hayosh, Zeev; Chapman, Joab; Vlachos, Andreas; Maggio, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Protease activated receptors (PARs) are involved in regulating synaptic transmission and plasticity in the brain. While it is well-accepted that PAR1 mediates long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory synaptic strength, the role of PAR2 in synaptic plasticity remains not well-understood. In this study, we assessed the role of PAR2-signaling in plasticity at hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses. Using field potential recordings, we report that PAR2-activation leads to long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission through a protein kinase A -dependent, Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 -mediated mechanism, which requires the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. These results demonstrate that the effects of PAR2 on synaptic plasticity are distinct from what is observed upon PAR1-activation. Thus, we propose that the activation of different classes of PARs, i.e., PAR1 and PAR2, may set the threshold of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampal network by balancing LTP and LTD. PMID:28303089

  19. Gingival crevicular fluid levels of protease-activated receptors type 1 and type 2 in diabetic patients with periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Abreu, I S; Euzebio Alves, V T; Benedete, A P S; Bueno da Silva, H A; França, B N; Saraiva, L; Lima, L A; Carvalho, M H; Holzhausen, M

    2016-10-01

    Protease activated receptor type 1 (PAR1 ) seems to play a role in periodontal repair, while PAR2 is associated with periodontal inflammation. As diabetes is a known risk factor for periodontal disease, the aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of type 2 diabetes on PAR1 and PAR2 mRNA expression in the gingival crevicular fluid of patients with chronic periodontitis before and after non-surgical periodontal treatment. Gingival crevicular fluid samples and clinical parameters consisting of measuring probing depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing and plaque index were collected from systemically healthy patients and patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis, at baseline and after non-surgical periodontal therapy. PAR1 and PAR2 , as well as the presence of the proteases RgpB gingipain and neutrophil proteinase-3 were assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in the gingival crevicular fluid. The periodontal clinical parameters significantly improved after periodontal therapy (p < 0.01). Diabetes led to increased expression of PAR1 in gingival crevicular fluid, and in the presence of chronic periodontitis, it significantly decreased the expression of PAR1 and PAR2 (p < 0.05). Moreover, non-surgical periodontal treatment in diabetics resulted in increased expression of PAR1 and PAR2 (p < 0.05), and decreased expression of RgpB gingipain and proteinase-3 (p < 0.05). The present data demonstrated that diabetes was associated with an altered expression of PAR1 and PAR2 in the gingival crevicular fluid cells of subjects with chronic periodontitis. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the effects of PAR1 upregulation in periodontally healthy sites and PAR2 downregulation in chronic periodontitis sites on the increased susceptibility and severity of periodontitis in diabetes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Pharmacophore-based virtual screening, biological evaluation and binding mode analysis of a novel protease-activated receptor 2 antagonist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Nam-Chul; Seo, Seoung-Hwan; Kim, Dohee; Shin, Ji-Sun; Ju, Jeongmin; Seong, Jihye; Seo, Seon Hee; Lee, Iiyoun; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Yun Kyung; No, Kyoung Tai; Pae, Ae Nim

    2016-08-01

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is a G protein-coupled receptor, mediating inflammation and pain signaling in neurons, thus it is considered to be a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases. In this study, we performed a ligand-based virtual screening of 1.6 million compounds by employing a common-feature pharmacophore model and two-dimensional similarity search to identify a new PAR2 antagonist. The common-feature pharmacophore model was established based on the biological screening results of our in-house library. The initial virtual screening yielded a total number of 47 hits, and additional biological activity tests including PAR2 antagonism and anti-inflammatory effects resulted in a promising candidate, compound 43, which demonstrated an IC50 value of 8.22 µM against PAR2. In next step, a PAR2 homology model was constructed using the crystal structure of the PAR1 as a template to explore the binding mode of the identified ligands. A molecular docking method was optimized by comparing the binding modes of a known PAR2 agonist GB110 and antagonist GB83, and applied to predict the binding mode of our hit compound 43. In-depth docking analyses revealed that the hydrophobic interaction with Phe2435.39 is crucial for PAR2 ligands to exert antagonistic activity. MD simulation results supported the predicted docking poses that PAR2 antagonist blocked a conformational rearrangement of Na+ allosteric site in contrast to PAR2 agonist that showed Na+ relocation upon GPCR activation. In conclusion, we identified new a PAR2 antagonist together with its binding mode, which provides useful insights for the design and development of PAR2 ligands.

  1. [Peptide-agonist of protease-activated receptor (PAR 1), similar to activated protein C, promotes proliferation in keratinocytes and wound healing of epithelial layer].

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, E V; Sidorova, M V; Gorbacheva, L R; Strukova, S M

    2014-01-01

    Activated protein C (APC) is serine protease hemostasis, independent of its anticoagulant activity, exhibits anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties that determine the possibility of the protective effects of APC in different diseases, including sepsis and chronic wound healing. APC, binding of endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) and specifically cleaving PAR1 receptor and releasing peptide agonist PAR1 stabilizes not only endothelial cells, but also many others, including epidermal keratinocytes of the skin. We develop the hypothesis that the cytoprotective effect of APC on the cells, involved in wound healing, seem to imitate peptide - analogous of PAR1 "tethered ligand" that activate PAR1. In our work, we synthesized a peptide (AP9) - analogue of PAR1 tethered ligand, released by APC, and firstly showed that peptide AP9 (0.1-10 мM), like to APC (0.01-100 nM), stimulates the proliferative activity of human primary keratinocytes. Using a model of the formation of epithelial wounds in vitro we found that peptide AP9, as well as protease APC, accelerates wound healing. Using specific antibodies to the receptor PAR1 and EPCR was studied the receptor mechanism of AP9 action in wound healing compared with the action of APС. The necessity of both receptors - PAR1 and EPСR, for proliferative activity of agonists was revealed. Identified in our work imitation by peptide AP9 - PAR1 ligand, APC acts on keratinocytes suggests the possibility of using a peptide AP9 to stimulate tissue repair.

  2. Protease-activated receptor-2 regulates the innate immune response to viral infection in a coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Weithauser, Alice; Bobbert, Peter; Antoniak, Silvio; Böhm, Andreas; Rauch, Bernhard H; Klingel, Karin; Savvatis, Konstantinos; Kroemer, Heyo K; Tschope, Carsten; Stroux, Andrea; Zeichhardt, Heinz; Poller, Wolfgang; Mackman, Nigel; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Rauch, Ursula

    2013-11-05

    This study sought to evaluate the role of protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) in coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-induced myocarditis. An infection with CVB3 leads to myocarditis. PAR2 modulates the innate immune response. Toll-like receptor-3 (TLR3) is crucial for the innate immune response by inducing the expression of the antiviral cytokine interferon-beta (IFNβ). To induce myocarditis, wild-type (wt) and PAR2 knockout (ko) mice were infected with 10(5) plaque-forming units CVB3. Mice underwent hemodynamic measurements with a 1.2-F microconductance catheter. Wt and PAR2ko hearts and cardiac cells were analyzed for viral replication and immune response with plaque assay, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Compared with wt mice, PAR2ko mice and cardiomyocytes exhibited a reduced viral load and developed no myocarditis after infection with CVB3. Hearts and cardiac fibroblasts from PAR2ko mice expressed higher basal levels of IFNβ than wt mice did. Treatment with CVB3 and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid led to higher IFNβ expression in PAR2ko than in wt fibroblasts and reduced virus replication in PAR2ko fibroblasts was abrogated by neutralizing IFNβ antibody. Overexpression of PAR2 reduced the basal IFNβ expression. Moreover, a direct interaction between PAR2 and Toll-like receptor 3 was observed. PAR2 expression in endomyocardial biopsies of patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy was positively correlated with myocardial inflammation and negatively with IFNβ expression and left ventricular ejection fraction. PAR2 negatively regulates the innate immune response to CVB3 infection and contributes to myocardial dysfunction. The antagonism of PAR2 is of therapeutic interest to strengthen the antiviral response after an infection with a cardiotropic virus. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Matrix Metalloproteinase 1 Causes Vasoconstriction and Enhances Vessel Reactivity to Angiotensin II via Protease-Activated Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Nugent, William H; Mishra, Nikita; Strauss, Jerome F; Walsh, Scott W

    2016-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) is an activator of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1), which is known to mediate the release of endothelin 1 (ET-1) in endothelial cells and activate the RhoA kinase (ROCK) pathway. Recently, we reported increased serum and vascular MMP-1 in women with preeclampsia and hypothesized that the action of MMP-1 on PAR-1 might have vasoconstrictive effects. Resistance-sized omental arteries obtained from normal pregnant women were mounted on a myograph system and perfused with MMP-1 in a dose range of 0.025 to 25 ng/mL or with angiotensin II (Ang II) in a dose range of 0.001 to 10 µmol/L in the presence of intraluminal MMP-1 (2.5 ng/mL) perfusion. Angiotensin II dose response was also performed with omental arteries from women with preeclampsia. Matrix metalloproteinase 1 caused dose-dependent vasoconstriction in endothelium-intact, but not in endothelium-denuded, vessels from normal pregnant women, which was blocked by inhibitors of PAR-1 and ET-1 type A receptor blocker. Intraluminal perfusion with a constant amount of MMP-1 enhanced vessel reactivity to Ang II, which was blocked by inhibitors of PAR-1, ROCK, and ET-1. Enhanced vascular reactivity to Ang II was observed in endothelium-intact, but not in endothelium-denuded, arteries of women with preeclampsia. Inhibitors of PAR-1, ROCK, and ET-1 blocked enhanced vascular reactivity to Ang II in endothelium-intact preeclamptic arteries. These data demonstrate that MMP-1 has potent vasoconstrictor effects and the ability to enhance vascular reactivity to vasoconstrictor hormones, which are mediated by an endothelial PAR-1, ROCK, and ET-1 pathway. Increased circulating levels of MMP-1 and its increased expression in systemic vessels of women with preeclampsia may contribute to the development of maternal hypertension. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Calcium and adenosine triphosphate control of cellular pathology: asparaginase-induced pancreatitis elicited via protease-activated receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shuang; Gerasimenko, Julia V.; Tsugorka, Tatiana; Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Samarasinghe, Sujith; Gerasimenko, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Exocytotic secretion of digestive enzymes from pancreatic acinar cells is elicited by physiological cytosolic Ca2+ signals, occurring as repetitive short-lasting spikes largely confined to the secretory granule region, that stimulate mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. By contrast, sustained global cytosolic Ca2+ elevations decrease ATP levels and cause necrosis, leading to the disease acute pancreatitis (AP). Toxic Ca2+ signals can be evoked by products of alcohol and fatty acids as well as bile acids. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which l-asparaginase evokes AP. Asparaginase is an essential element in the successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the most common type of cancer affecting children, but AP is a side-effect occurring in about 5–10% of cases. Like other pancreatitis-inducing agents, asparaginase evoked intracellular Ca2+ release followed by Ca2+ entry and also substantially reduced Ca2+ extrusion because of decreased intracellular ATP levels. The toxic Ca2+ signals caused extensive necrosis. The asparaginase-induced pathology depended on protease-activated receptor 2 and its inhibition prevented the toxic Ca2+ signals and necrosis. We tested the effects of inhibiting the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ entry by the Ca2+ channel inhibitor GSK-7975A. This markedly reduced asparaginase-induced Ca2+ entry and also protected effectively against the development of necrosis. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377732

  5. Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Deficiency Attenuates Atherosclerotic Lesion Progression and Instability in Apolipoprotein E-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Pengfei; Zuo, Zhi; Zheng, Yueyue; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Qianxing; Chen, Long; Ma, Genshan

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory mechanisms are involved in the process of atherosclerotic plaque formation and rupture. Accumulating evidence suggests that protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 contributes to the pathophysiology of chronic inflammation on the vasculature. To directly examine the role of PAR-2 in atherosclerosis, we generated apolipoprotein E/PAR-2 double-deficient mice. Mice were fed with high-fat diet for 12 weeks starting at ages of 6 weeks. PAR-2 deficiency attenuated atherosclerotic lesion progression with reduced total lesion area, reduced percentage of stenosis and reduced total necrotic core area. PAR-2 deficiency increased fibrous cap thickness and collagen content of plaque. Moreover, PAR-2 deficiency decreased smooth muscle cell content, macrophage accumulation, matrix metallopeptidase-9 expression and neovascularization in plaque. Relative quantitative PCR assay using thoracic aorta revealed that PAR-2 deficiency reduced mRNA expression of inflammatory molecules, such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. In vitro experiment, we found that PAR-2 deficiency reduced mRNA expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-6, TNF-α and MCP-1 in macrophage under unstimulated and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated conditions. These results suggest that PAR-2 deficiency attenuates the progression and instability of atherosclerotic plaque.

  6. Protease-Activated Receptor-1 is Upregulated in Reactive Stroma of Primary Prostate Cancer and Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaotun; Wang, Wenbin; True, Lawrence D.; Vessella, Robert L.; Takayama, Thomas K.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate cancer progression is partly facilitated by tumor-stroma interactions. We recently reported that protease-activated receptors (PAR-1 and PAR-2) are overexpressed in prostate cancer, and PAR-1 expression in peritumoral stroma is associated with biochemical recurrence. However, the nature of PAR expression in prostate tumor microenvironment is not fully understood. We therefore evaluated PAR-1 and PAR-2 expression in primary prostate cancer and bone metastasis. METHODS PAR-1 and PAR-2 expression in normal, primary prostate cancer and the corresponding bone metastatic tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry, and double-label immunohistochemistry with the use of additional markers. RESULTS PAR-1 was expressed in peritumoral stroma in the majority of primary cancer tissues (83%). Serial sections and double-label immunohistochemistry determined that these PAR-1 expressing stromal cells were predominantly myofibroblasts, the primary cell type in reactive stroma. Analysis of cancer glands revealed that PAR-1 expression was significantly increased in the reactive stroma around higher Gleason grade cancers. PAR-2 was predominantly expressed in the primary cancer cells as well as smooth muscle cells but not in reactive stroma. In bone metastasis, PAR-1 expression in cancer cells was elevated compared to the primary site from the same patient. In the bone reactive stroma, PAR-1 was present in vascular endothelial cells and fibroblasts, while both PAR-1 and PAR-2 were expressed in osteoblasts and osteoclasts. CONCLUSIONS In primary prostate cancer and bone metastasis, PAR-1 is upregulated in reactive stroma and PAR-2 is uniformly overexpressed in carcinoma cells, suggesting these receptors may play potentially different roles in prostate cancer development and metastasis. PMID:19170048

  7. Alternaria Fungus Induces the Production of GM-CSF, Interleukin-6 and Interleukin-8 and Calcium Signaling in Human Airway Epithelium through Protease-Activated Receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Wada, Kota; White, Thomas; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Kita, Hirohito

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Recent studies suggest that host immune responses to environmental fungi may play an important role in the development of allergic diseases, such as human asthma. Epithelium is considered an active participant in allergic inflammation. We previously reported that aspartate protease from Alternaria induces the activation and degranulation of human eosinophils that are mediated through protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2). However, our current knowledge on the innate immune responses of epithelium to environmental fungi is very limited. We investigated the responses of epithelium to fungi and the mechanisms of these responses. Methods Human airway epithelial cell line BEAS-2B and Calu-3 (both from American Type Culture Collection) were incubated with PAR-2 peptides and extracts of various fungi. The cellular responses, including GM-CSF, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, eotaxin, eotaxin-2 and RANTES production as well as increases in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), were examined. To characterize the proteases involved in these responses, protease inhibitors such as pepstatin A and alkalo-thermophilic Bacillus inhibitor (ATBI), HIV protease inhibitors and 4-amidinophenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride were used. To investigate the role of PAR-2, PAR-2-agonistic and PAR-2-antagonistic peptides were used. Results PAR-2-activating peptide, but not the control peptide, induced GM-CSF, IL-6 and IL-8 production; these cellular responses were accompanied by a quick and marked increase in [Ca2+]i. Among 7 common environmental fungi, only Alternaria induced GM-CSF, IL-6 and IL-8 production and increased [Ca2+]i response. Both cytokine production and increased [Ca2+]i were significantly inhibited by PAR-2 antagonist peptide and by aspartate protease inhibitors (pepstatin A, ritonavir, nelfinavir and ATBI), but not by the PAR-2 control peptide or by other protease inhibitors. Conclusions Aspartate proteases from Alternaria induce cytokine production and

  8. Protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) enhances Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of NMDA receptor in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhen-Zhen; Zhang, Feng; Li, Feng-Ying; Luan, Yi-Fei; Guo, Peng; Li, Yi-Hang; Liu, Yong; Qi, Su-Hua

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that Src could modulate NMDA receptor, and PAR1 could also affect NMDAR signaling. However, whether PAR1 could regulate NMDAR through Src under ICH has not yet been investigated. In this study, we demonstrated the role of Src-PSD95-GluN2A signaling cascades in rat ICH model and in vitro thrombin challenged model. Using the PAR1 agonist SFLLR, antagonist RLLFS and Src inhibitor PP2, electrophysiological analysis showed that PAR1 regulated NMDA-induced whole-cell currents (INMDA) though Src in primary cultured neurons. Both in vivo and in vitro results showed the elevated phosphorylation of tyrosine in Src and GluN2A and enhanced interaction of the Src-PSD95-GluN2A under model conditions. Treatment with the PAR1 antagonist RLLFS, AS-PSD95 (Antisense oligonucleotide against PSD95) and Src inhibitor PP2 inhibited the interaction among Src-PSD95-GluN2A, and p-Src, p-GluN2A. Co-application of SFLLR and AS-PSD95, PP2, or MK801 (NMDAR inhibitor) abolished the effect of SF. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that activated thrombin receptor PAR1 induced Src activation, enhanced the interaction among Src-PSD95-GluN2A signaling modules, and up-regulated GluN2A phosphorylation after ICH injury. Elucidation of such signaling cascades would possibly provide novel targets for ICH treatment. PMID:27385592

  9. Protease-Activated Receptor 2 (PAR2) Is Upregulated by Acanthamoeba Plasminogen Activator (aPA) and Induces Proinflammatory Cytokine in Human Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Trivendra; Abdi, Mahshid; Alizadeh, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Acanthamoeba plasminogen activator (aPA) is a serine protease elaborated by Acanthamoeba trophozoites that facilitates the invasion of trophozoites to the host and contributes to the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). The aim of this study was to explore if aPA stimulates proinflammatory cytokine in human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells via the protease-activated receptors (PARs) pathway. Methods. Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites were grown in peptone-yeast extract glucose for 7 days, and the supernatants were collected and centrifuged. The aPA was purified using the fast protein liquid chromatography system, and aPA activity was determined by zymography assays. Human corneal epithelial cells were incubated with or without aPA (100 μg/mL), PAR1 agonists (thrombin, 10 μM; TRAP-6, 10 μM), and PAR2 agonists (SLIGRL-NH2, 100 μM; AC 55541, 10 μM) for 24 and 48 hours. Inhibition of PAR1 and PAR2 involved preincubating the HCE cells for 1 hour with the antagonist of PAR1 (SCH 79797, 60 μM) and PAR2 (FSLLRY-NH2, 100 μM) with or without aPA. Human corneal epithelial cells also were preincubated with PAR1 and PAR2 antagonists and then incubated with or without PAR1 agonists (thrombin and TRAP-6) and PAR2 agonists (SLIGRL-NH2 and AC 55541). Expression of PAR1 and PAR2 was examined by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), flow cytometry, and immunocytochemistry. Interleukin-8 expression was quantified by qRT-PCR and ELISA. Results. Human corneal epithelial cells constitutively expressed PAR1 and PAR2 mRNA. Acanthamoeba plasminogen activator and PAR2 agonists significantly upregulated PAR2 mRNA expression (1- and 2-fold, respectively) (P < 0.05). Protease-activated receptor 2 antagonist significantly inhibited aPA, and PAR2 agonists induced PAR2 mRNA expression in HCE cells (P < 0.05). Protease-activated receptor 1 agonists, but not aPA, significantly upregulated PAR1 mRNA expression, which was significantly inhibited by PAR1 antagonist in HCE cells

  10. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is upregulated by Acanthamoeba plasminogen activator (aPA) and induces proinflammatory cytokine in human corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Trivendra; Abdi, Mahshid; Alizadeh, Hassan

    2014-05-29

    Acanthamoeba plasminogen activator (aPA) is a serine protease elaborated by Acanthamoeba trophozoites that facilitates the invasion of trophozoites to the host and contributes to the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). The aim of this study was to explore if aPA stimulates proinflammatory cytokine in human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells via the protease-activated receptors (PARs) pathway. Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoites were grown in peptone-yeast extract glucose for 7 days, and the supernatants were collected and centrifuged. The aPA was purified using the fast protein liquid chromatography system, and aPA activity was determined by zymography assays. Human corneal epithelial cells were incubated with or without aPA (100 μg/mL), PAR1 agonists (thrombin, 10 μM; TRAP-6, 10 μM), and PAR2 agonists (SLIGRL-NH2, 100 μM; AC 55541, 10 μM) for 24 and 48 hours. Inhibition of PAR1 and PAR2 involved preincubating the HCE cells for 1 hour with the antagonist of PAR1 (SCH 79797, 60 μM) and PAR2 (FSLLRY-NH2, 100 μM) with or without aPA. Human corneal epithelial cells also were preincubated with PAR1 and PAR2 antagonists and then incubated with or without PAR1 agonists (thrombin and TRAP-6) and PAR2 agonists (SLIGRL-NH2 and AC 55541). Expression of PAR1 and PAR2 was examined by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), flow cytometry, and immunocytochemistry. Interleukin-8 expression was quantified by qRT-PCR and ELISA. Human corneal epithelial cells constitutively expressed PAR1 and PAR2 mRNA. Acanthamoeba plasminogen activator and PAR2 agonists significantly upregulated PAR2 mRNA expression (1- and 2-fold, respectively) (P < 0.05). Protease-activated receptor 2 antagonist significantly inhibited aPA, and PAR2 agonists induced PAR2 mRNA expression in HCE cells (P < 0.05). Protease-activated receptor 1 agonists, but not aPA, significantly upregulated PAR1 mRNA expression, which was significantly inhibited by PAR1 antagonist in HCE cells. Acanthamoeba plasminogen

  11. Protease-Activated Receptor 2 Promotes Pro-Atherogenic Effects through Transactivation of the VEGF Receptor 2 in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Indrakusuma, Ira; Romacho, Tania; Eckel, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Obesity is associated with impaired vascular function. In the cardiovascular system, protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) exerts multiple functions such as the control of the vascular tone. In pathological conditions, PAR2 is related to vascular inflammation. However, little is known about the impact of obesity on PAR2 in the vasculature. Therefore, we explored the role of PAR2 as a potential link between obesity and cardiovascular diseases. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were fed with either a chow or a 60% high fat diet for 24 weeks prior to isolation of aortas. Furthermore, human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) and human coronary smooth muscle cells (HCSMC) were treated with conditioned medium obtained from in vitro differentiated primary human adipocytes. To investigate receptor interaction vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) was blocked by exposure to calcium dobesilate and a VEGFR2 neutralization antibody, before treatment with PAR2 activating peptide. Student's t-test or one-way were used to determine statistical significance. Results: Both, high fat diet and exposure to conditioned medium increased PAR2 expression in aortas and human vascular cells, respectively. In HCSMC, conditioned medium elicited proliferation as well as cyclooxygenase 2 induction, which was suppressed by the PAR2 antagonist GB83. Specific activation of PAR2 by the PAR2 activating peptide induced proliferation and cyclooxygenase 2 expression which were abolished by blocking the VEGFR2. Additionally, treatment of HCSMC with the PAR2 activating peptide triggered VEGFR2 phosphorylation. Conclusion: Under obesogenic conditions, where circulating levels of pro-inflammatory adipokines are elevated, PAR2 arises as an important player linking obesity-related adipose tissue inflammation to atherogenesis. We show for the first time that the underlying mechanisms of these pro-atherogenic effects involve a potential transactivation of the VEGFR2 by PAR2. PMID

  12. Inhibition of Protease-Activated Receptor 1 Does not Affect Dendritic Homeostasis of Cultured Mouse Dentate Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schuldt, Gerlind; Galanis, Christos; Strehl, Andreas; Hick, Meike; Schiener, Sabine; Lenz, Maximilian; Deller, Thomas; Maggio, Nicola; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). While a firm link between PAR1-activation and functional synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties exists, studies on the role of PAR1 in neural structural plasticity are scarce. The physiological function of PAR1 in the brain remains not well understood. We here sought to determine whether prolonged pharmacologic PAR1-inhibition affects dendritic morphologies of hippocampal neurons. To address this question we employed live-cell microscopy of mouse dentate granule cell dendrites in 3-week old entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures prepared from Thy1-GFP mice. A subset of cultures were treated with the PAR1-inhibitor SCH79797 (1 μM; up to 3 weeks). No major effects of PAR1-inhibition on static and dynamic parameters of dentate granule cell dendrites were detected under control conditions. Granule cells of PAR1-deficient slice cultures showed unaltered dendritic morphologies, dendritic spine densities and excitatory synaptic strength. Furthermore, we report that PAR1-inhibition does not prevent dendritic retraction following partial deafferentation in vitro. Consistent with this finding, no major changes in PAR1-mRNA levels were detected in the denervated dentate gyrus (DG). We conclude that neural PAR1 is not involved in regulating the steady-state dynamics or deafferentation-induced adaptive changes of cultured dentate granule cell dendrites. These results indicate that drugs targeting neural PAR1-signals may not affect the stability and structural integrity of neuronal networks in healthy brain regions. PMID:27378862

  13. Protease-activated Receptor-2 (PAR-2)-mediated Nf-κB Activation Suppresses Inflammation-associated Tumor Suppressor MicroRNAs in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeff J; Miller, Daniel L; Jiang, Rong; Liu, Yueying; Shi, Zonggao; Tarwater, Laura; Williams, Russell; Balsara, Rashna; Sauter, Edward R; Stack, M Sharon

    2016-03-25

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common cause of death from cancer with an estimated 400,000 deaths worldwide and a low (50%) 5-year survival rate. The most common form of oral cancer is oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). OSCC is highly inflammatory and invasive, and the degree of inflammation correlates with tumor aggressiveness. The G protein-coupled receptor protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) plays a key role in inflammation. PAR-2 is activated via proteolytic cleavage by trypsin-like serine proteases, including kallikrein-5 (KLK5), or by treatment with activating peptides. PAR-2 activation induces G protein-α-mediated signaling, mobilizing intracellular calcium and Nf-κB signaling, leading to the increased expression of pro-inflammatory mRNAs. Little is known, however, about PAR-2 regulation of inflammation-related microRNAs. Here, we assess PAR-2 expression and function in OSCC cell lines and tissues. Stimulation of PAR-2 activates Nf-κB signaling, resulting in RelA nuclear translocation and enhanced expression of pro-inflammatory mRNAs. Concomitantly, suppression of the anti-inflammatory tumor suppressor microRNAs let-7d, miR-23b, and miR-200c was observed following PAR-2 stimulation. Analysis of orthotopic oral tumors generated by cells with reduced KLK5 expression showed smaller, less aggressive lesions with reduced inflammatory infiltrate relative to tumors generated by KLK5-expressing control cells. Together, these data support a model wherein KLK5-mediated PAR-2 activation regulates the expression of inflammation-associated mRNAs and microRNAs, thereby modulating progression of oral tumors.

  14. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor primes interleukin-13 production by macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Ono, Tomomichi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is often linked to the presence of type 2-polarized macrophages, which are induced by the T helper type 2 cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13). IL-13 is a key mediator of tissue fibrosis caused by T helper type 2-based inflammation. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study investigated the priming effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on IL-13 expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. Expression of IL-13 mRNA and protein by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages was investigated after stimulation with HNE, using the polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GM-CSF had a priming effect on IL-13 mRNA and protein expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE, while this effect was not observed for various other cytokines. GM-CSF-dependent macrophages showed a significant increase in the expression of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) mRNA and protein. The response of IL-13 mRNA to HNE was significantly decreased by pretreatment with alpha1-antitrypsin, a PAR-2 antibody (SAM11), or a PAR-2 antagonist (ENMD-1068). These findings suggest that stimulation with HNE can induce IL-13 production by macrophages, especially GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. Accordingly, neutrophil elastase may have a key role in fibrosis associated with chronic inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Transient ECM protease activity promotes synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Magnowska, Marta; Gorkiewicz, Tomasz; Suska, Anna; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Wlodarczyk, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent proteolysis at a synapse has been recognized as a pivotal factor in controlling dynamic changes in dendritic spine shape and function; however, excessive proteolytic activity is detrimental to the cells. The exact mechanism of control of these seemingly contradictory outcomes of protease activity remains unknown. Here, we reveal that dendritic spine maturation is strictly controlled by the proteolytic activity, and its inhibition by the endogenous inhibitor (Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 – TIMP-1). Excessive proteolytic activity impairs long-term potentiation of the synaptic efficacy (LTP), and this impairment could be rescued by inhibition of protease activity. Moreover LTP is altered persistently when the ability of TIMP-1 to inhibit protease activity is abrogated, further demonstrating the role of such inhibition in the promotion of synaptic plasticity under well-defined conditions. We also show that dendritic spine maturation involves an intermediate formation of elongated spines, followed by their conversion into mushroom shape. The formation of mushroom-shaped spines is accompanied by increase in AMPA/NMDA ratio of glutamate receptors. Altogether, our results identify inhibition of protease activity as a critical regulatory mechanism for dendritic spines maturation. PMID:27282248

  16. Alterations in serotonin, transient receptor potential channels and protease-activated receptors in rats with irritable bowel syndrome attenuated by Shugan decoction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hai-Lian; Liu, Chu-Hsuan; Ding, Li-Li; Zheng, Yu; Fei, Xiao-Yan; Lu, Lu; Zhou, Xue-Ming; Yuan, Jian-Ye; Xie, Jian-Qun

    2015-04-28

    To determine the molecular mechanisms of Shugan decoction (SGD) in the regulation of colonic motility and visceral hyperalgesia (VHL) in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The chemical compounds contained in SGD were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. A rat model of IBS was induced by chronic water avoidance stress (WAS). The number of fecal pellets was counted after WAS and the pain pressure threshold was measured by colorectal distension. Morphological changes in colonic mucosa were detected by hematoxylin-eosin staining. The contents of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in colonic tissue and calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) in serum were measured by ELISA. The protein expression of serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamide (5-HT)], serotonin transporter (SERT), chromogranin A (CgA) and CGRP in colon tissue was measured by immunohistochemistry. SGD inhibited colonic motility dysfunction and VHL in rats with IBS. Blockers of transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) (Ruthenium Red) and TRP ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) (HC-030031) and activator of protease-activated receptor (PAR)4 increased the pain pressure threshold, whereas activators of PAR2 and TRPV4 decreased the pain pressure threshold in rats with IBS. The effect of SGD on pain pressure threshold in these rats was abolished by activators of TRPV1 (capsaicin), TRPV4 (RN1747), TRPA1 (Polygodial) and PAR2 (AC55541). In addition, CGRP levels in serum and colonic tissue were both increased in these rats. TNF-α level in colonic tissue was also significantly upregulated. However, the levels of 5-HT, SERT and CgA in colonic tissue were decreased. All these pathological changes in rats with IBS were attenuated by SGD. SGD alleviated VHL and attenuated colon motility in IBS, partly by regulating TRPV1, TRPV4, TRPA1, PAR2, 5-HT, CgA and SERT, and reducing CGRP and TNF-α level.

  17. Alterations in serotonin, transient receptor potential channels and protease-activated receptors in rats with irritable bowel syndrome attenuated by Shugan decoction

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hai-Lian; Liu, Chu-Hsuan; Ding, Li-Li; Zheng, Yu; Fei, Xiao-Yan; Lu, Lu; Zhou, Xue-Ming; Yuan, Jian-Ye; Xie, Jian-Qun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the molecular mechanisms of Shugan decoction (SGD) in the regulation of colonic motility and visceral hyperalgesia (VHL) in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: The chemical compounds contained in SGD were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. A rat model of IBS was induced by chronic water avoidance stress (WAS). The number of fecal pellets was counted after WAS and the pain pressure threshold was measured by colorectal distension. Morphological changes in colonic mucosa were detected by hematoxylin-eosin staining. The contents of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in colonic tissue and calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) in serum were measured by ELISA. The protein expression of serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamide (5-HT)], serotonin transporter (SERT), chromogranin A (CgA) and CGRP in colon tissue was measured by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: SGD inhibited colonic motility dysfunction and VHL in rats with IBS. Blockers of transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) (Ruthenium Red) and TRP ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) (HC-030031) and activator of protease-activated receptor (PAR)4 increased the pain pressure threshold, whereas activators of PAR2 and TRPV4 decreased the pain pressure threshold in rats with IBS. The effect of SGD on pain pressure threshold in these rats was abolished by activators of TRPV1 (capsaicin), TRPV4 (RN1747), TRPA1 (Polygodial) and PAR2 (AC55541). In addition, CGRP levels in serum and colonic tissue were both increased in these rats. TNF-α level in colonic tissue was also significantly upregulated. However, the levels of 5-HT, SERT and CgA in colonic tissue were decreased. All these pathological changes in rats with IBS were attenuated by SGD. CONCLUSION: SGD alleviated VHL and attenuated colon motility in IBS, partly by regulating TRPV1, TRPV4, TRPA1, PAR2, 5-HT, CgA and SERT, and reducing CGRP and TNF-α level. PMID:25944998

  18. Stimulation of protease-activated receptor-2 inhibits airway eosinophilia, hyperresponsiveness and bronchoconstriction in a murine model of allergic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    De Campo, Benjamin A; Henry, Peter J

    2005-01-01

    An emerging body of evidence indicates that PGE2 has a privileged anti-inflammatory role within the airways. Stimulants of protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) inhibit airway smooth muscle tone in vitro and in vivo predominantly via cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent generation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Thus, the current study tested the hypothesis that PAR2-induced generation of PGE2 inhibits the development of allergic airways inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid recovered from ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitised and -challenged (allergic) mice contained elevated numbers of eosinophils, which peaked at 48 h postchallenge. Intranasal (i.n.) administration of a PAR2-activating peptide (PAR2-AP) SLIGRL (25 mg kg−1, at the time of OVA challenge) caused a 70% reduction in the numbers of BAL eosinophils (compared to the scrambled peptide LSIGRL, 25 mg kg−1). Pretreatment of allergic mice with either indomethacin (1 mg kg−1, dual COX inhibitor) or nimesulide (3 mg kg−1, COX-2-selective inhibitor) blocked SLIGRL-induced reductions in BAL eosinophils. I.n. SLIGRL, but not LSIGRL, inhibited the development of antigen-induced airways hyperresponsiveness. The inhibitory effect of SLIGRL was blocked by indomethacin. Exposure of isolated tracheal preparations from allergic mice to 100 μM SLIGRL was associated with a 5.0-fold increase in PGE2 levels (P<0.05, compared to 100 μM LSIGRL). SLIGRL induced similar increases in PGE2 levels in control mice (OVA-sensitised, saline-challenged). I.n. administration of PGE2 (0.15 mg kg−1) to allergic mice significantly inhibited eosinophilia and airways hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. In anaesthetised, ventilated allergic mice, SLIGRL (5 mg kg−1, i.v.) inhibited methacholine-induced increases in airways resistance. Consistent with this bronchodilator effect, SLIGRL induced pronounced relaxation responses in isolated tracheal preparations obtained from allergic mice

  19. Age-related changes to vascular protease-activated receptor 2 in metabolic syndrome: a relationship between oxidative stress, receptor expression, and endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kana; Kagota, Satomi; McGuire, John J; Wakuda, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Noriko; Nakamura, Kazuki; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

    2017-04-01

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is expressed in vascular endothelium. Nitric oxide (NO) - cyclic GMP-mediated vasodilation in response to 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-amide (2fLIGRLO), a PAR2-activating peptide, is impaired in aortas from aged SHRSP.Z-Lepr(fa)/IzmDmcr (SHRSP.ZF) rats with metabolic syndrome. Here we investigated mechanisms linking PAR2's vascular effects to phenotypic characteristics of male SHRSP.ZF rats at 10, 20, and 30 weeks of age. We found vasodilation responses to either 2fLIGRLO or enzyme-mediated PAR2 activation by trypsin were sustained until 20 weeks and lessened at 30 weeks. PAR2 protein and mRNA levels were lower in aortas at 30 weeks than at 10 and 20 weeks. PAR2-mediated responses positively correlated with PAR2 protein and mRNA levels. Decreased cGMP accumulation in the presence of 2fLIGRLO paralleled the decreased relaxations elicited by nitroprusside and the cGMP analog 8-pCPT-cGMP, and the less soluble guanylyl cyclase protein at 30 weeks. 2fLIGRLO-induced relaxation was negatively correlated with serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, an index of oxidative stress, which increased with age. Forward stepwise data regression supported a model of age-related decreases in PAR2 function resulting from decreased PAR2 mRNA and increased oxidative stress. We conclude that decreased responsiveness of aortic smooth muscle to NO and downregulation of receptor expression impair PAR2 functions at later stages of metabolic syndrome in SHRSP.ZF rats.

  20. Recycling and Endosomal Sorting of Protease-activated Receptor-1 Is Distinctly Regulated by Rab11A and Rab11B Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Grimsey, Neil J.; Coronel, Luisa J.; Cordova, Isabel Canto; Trejo, JoAnn

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that undergoes proteolytic irreversible activation by coagulant and anti-coagulant proteases. Given the irreversible activation of PAR1, signaling by the receptor is tightly regulated through desensitization and intracellular trafficking. PAR1 displays both constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of PAR1 is important for generating an internal pool of naïve receptors that replenish the cell surface and facilitate resensitization, whereas agonist-induced internalization of PAR1 is critical for terminating G protein signaling. We showed that PAR1 constitutive internalization is mediated by the adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), whereas AP-2 and epsin control agonist-induced PAR1 internalization. However, the mechanisms that regulate PAR1 recycling are not known. In the present study we screened a siRNA library of 140 different membrane trafficking proteins to identify key regulators of PAR1 intracellular trafficking. In addition to known mediators of PAR1 endocytosis, we identified Rab11B as a critical regulator of PAR1 trafficking. We found that siRNA-mediated depletion of Rab11B and not Rab11A blocks PAR1 recycling, which enhanced receptor lysosomal degradation. Although Rab11A is not required for PAR1 recycling, depletion of Rab11A resulted in intracellular accumulation of PAR1 through disruption of basal lysosomal degradation of the receptor. Moreover, enhanced degradation of PAR1 observed in Rab11B-deficient cells is blocked by depletion of Rab11A and the autophagy related-5 protein, suggesting that PAR1 is shuttled to an autophagic degradation pathway in the absence of Rab11B recycling. Together these findings suggest that Rab11A and Rab11B differentially regulate intracellular trafficking of PAR1 through distinct endosomal sorting mechanisms. PMID:26635365

  1. Serine Protease Activity of Calnuc

    PubMed Central

    Kanuru, Madhavi; Raman, Rajeev; Aradhyam, Gopala Krishna

    2013-01-01

    The functions of calnuc, a novel Ca2+-binding protein with multiple structural domains and diverse interacting partners, are yet unknown. We demonstrate unknown facets of calnuc, which is a serine protease in which Ser-378 of GXSXG motif, Asp-328 of DTG motif, and His-339 form the “catalytic triad,” locating the enzyme active site in the C-terminal region. Analogous to the active site of Zn2+ carboxypeptidases, calnuc has two high affinity (Kd ∼ 20 nm), well conserved Zn2+-binding sites near its N terminus, although it is inactive as a peptidase. Zn2+ binding allosterically and negatively regulates the serine protease activity of calnuc, inhibition being caused by an “open to close” change in its conformation not seen upon Ca2+ binding. Most strikingly, interaction with G protein α subunit completely inhibits the enzymatic activity of calnuc. We thus illustrate that G proteins and Zn2+ act as two “keys” that control enzymatic activity of calnuc, arresting it in “locked” state. Calnuc, therefore, exists dynamically in two different forms, (i) as a Ca2+-binding protein in Zn2+-bound form and (ii) as a protease in Zn2+-free form, commissioning it to perform multiple functions. PMID:23195954

  2. Four different types of protease-activated receptors are widely expressed in the brain and are up-regulated in hippocampus by severe ischemia.

    PubMed

    Striggow, F; Riek-Burchardt, M; Kiesel, A; Schmidt, W; Henrich-Noack, P; Breder, J; Krug, M; Reymann, K G; Reiser, G

    2001-08-01

    A variety of extracellular serine proteases are expressed in the central nervous system or might permeate the blood-brain barrier under pathological conditions. However, their intracerebral targets and physiological functions are largely unknown. Here, we show that four distinct subtypes of protease-activated receptors (PARs) are abundantly expressed in the adult rat brain and in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. PAR-1 expression was significant in the hippocampus, cortex and amygdala. Highest densities of PAR-2 and PAR-3 were observed in hippocampus, cortex, amygdala, thalamus, hypothalamus and striatum. Apart from the striatum, a similar localization was found for PAR-4. Within the hippocampal formation, each PAR subtype was predominantly localized in the pyramidal cell layers. Additionally, we identified PAR-2 in mossy fibers between dentate gyrus and CA3, PAR-3 in the subiculum and PAR-4 in CA3 and in mossy fibres as well as in the stratum lacunosum moleculare. After exposing hippocampal slice cultures to a severe experimental ischemia (oxygen-glucose deprivation), the expression of PARs 1-3 was up-regulated with subtype-specific kinetics. The localization of PARs in brain regions particularly vulnerable to ischemic insults as well as distinct alterations in the expression pattern after experimental ischemia support the notion of an important role of extracellular serine proteases and PARs in cerebral ischemia.

  3. Thrombin-induced reactive oxygen species generation in platelets: A novel role for protease-activated receptor 4 and GPIbα.

    PubMed

    Carrim, Naadiya; Arthur, Jane F; Hamilton, Justin R; Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K; Moran, Niamh; Berndt, Michael C; Metharom, Pat

    2015-12-01

    Platelets are essential for maintaining haemostasis and play a key role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Upon ligation of platelet receptors through subendothelial matrix proteins, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated, further amplifying the platelet activation response. Thrombin, a potent platelet activator, can signal through GPIbα and protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and PAR4 on human platelets, and recently has been implicated in the generation of ROS. While ROS are known to have key roles in intra-platelet signalling and subsequent platelet activation, the precise receptors and signalling pathways involved in thrombin-induced ROS generation have yet to be fully elucidated. To investigate the relative contribution of platelet GPIbα and PARs to thrombin-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Highly specific antagonists targeting PAR1 and PAR4, and the GPIbα-cleaving enzyme, Naja kaouthia (Nk) protease, were used in quantitative flow cytometry assays of thrombin-induced ROS production. Antagonists of PAR4 but not PAR1, inhibited thrombin-derived ROS generation. Removal of the GPIbα ligand binding region attenuated PAR4-induced and completely inhibited thrombin-induced ROS formation. Similarly, PAR4 deficiency in mice abolished thrombin-induced ROS generation. Additionally, GPIbα and PAR4-dependent ROS formation were shown to be mediated through focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1) proteins. Both GPIbα and PAR4 are required for thrombin-induced ROS formation, suggesting a novel functional cooperation between GPIbα and PAR4. Our study identifies a novel role for PAR4 in mediating thrombin-induced ROS production that was not shared by PAR1. This suggests an independent signalling pathway in platelet activation that may be targeted therapeutically. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A highly potent agonist to protease-activated receptor-2 reveals apical activation of the airway epithelium resulting in Ca2+-regulated ion conductance.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Cara L; Daines, Michael O; Price, Theodore J; Vagner, Josef; Boitano, Scott

    2014-10-15

    The airway epithelium provides a barrier that separates inhaled air and its various particulates from the underlying tissues. It provides key physiological functions in both sensing the environment and initiating appropriate innate immune defenses to protect the lung. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) is expressed both apically and basolaterally throughout the airway epithelium. One consequence of basolateral PAR2 activation is the rapid, Ca(2+)-dependent ion flux that favors secretion in the normally absorptive airway epithelium. However, roles for apically expressed PAR2 activation have not been demonstrated, in part due to the lack of specific, high-potency PAR2 ligands. In the present study, we used the newly developed PAR2 ligand 2at-LIGRLO(PEG3-Pam)-NH2 in combination with well-differentiated, primary cultured airway epithelial cells from wild-type and PAR2 (-/-) mice to examine the physiological role of PAR2 in the conducting airway after apical activation. Using digital imaging microscopy of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration changes, we verified ligand potency on PAR2 in primary cultured airway cells. Examination of airway epithelial tissue in an Ussing chamber showed that apical activation of PAR2 by 2at-LIGRLO(PEG3-Pam)-NH2 resulted in a transient decrease in transepithelial resistance that was due to increased apical ion efflux. We determined pharmacologically that this increase in ion conductance was through Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) and large-conductance K(+) channels that were blocked with a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel inhibitor and clotrimazole, respectively. Stimulation of Cl(-) efflux via PAR2 activation at the airway epithelial surface can increase airway surface liquid that would aid in clearing the airway of noxious inhaled agents. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  5. A highly potent agonist to protease-activated receptor-2 reveals apical activation of the airway epithelium resulting in Ca2+-regulated ion conductance

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Cara L.; Daines, Michael O.; Price, Theodore J.; Vagner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    The airway epithelium provides a barrier that separates inhaled air and its various particulates from the underlying tissues. It provides key physiological functions in both sensing the environment and initiating appropriate innate immune defenses to protect the lung. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) is expressed both apically and basolaterally throughout the airway epithelium. One consequence of basolateral PAR2 activation is the rapid, Ca2+-dependent ion flux that favors secretion in the normally absorptive airway epithelium. However, roles for apically expressed PAR2 activation have not been demonstrated, in part due to the lack of specific, high-potency PAR2 ligands. In the present study, we used the newly developed PAR2 ligand 2at-LIGRLO(PEG3-Pam)-NH2 in combination with well-differentiated, primary cultured airway epithelial cells from wild-type and PAR2−/− mice to examine the physiological role of PAR2 in the conducting airway after apical activation. Using digital imaging microscopy of intracellular Ca2+ concentration changes, we verified ligand potency on PAR2 in primary cultured airway cells. Examination of airway epithelial tissue in an Ussing chamber showed that apical activation of PAR2 by 2at-LIGRLO(PEG3-Pam)-NH2 resulted in a transient decrease in transepithelial resistance that was due to increased apical ion efflux. We determined pharmacologically that this increase in ion conductance was through Ca2+-activated Cl− and large-conductance K+ channels that were blocked with a Ca2+-activated Cl− channel inhibitor and clotrimazole, respectively. Stimulation of Cl− efflux via PAR2 activation at the airway epithelial surface can increase airway surface liquid that would aid in clearing the airway of noxious inhaled agents. PMID:25143347

  6. A novel protein C-factor VII chimera provides new insights into the structural requirements for cytoprotective protease-activated receptor 1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, E M; McDonnell, C J; Soule, E E; Willis Fox, O; Rushe, H; Rehill, A; Smith, O P; O'Donnell, J S; Preston, R J S

    2017-08-20

    Essentials The basis of cytoprotective protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signaling is not fully understood. Activated protein C chimera (APC(FVII-82) ) was used to identify requirements for PAR1 signaling. APC(FVII-82) did not initiate PAR1 signaling, but conferred monocyte anti-inflammatory activity. APC-specific light chain residues are required for cytoprotective PAR1 signaling. Background Activated protein C (APC) cell signaling is largely reliant upon its ability to mediate protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 proteolysis when bound to the endothelial cell (EC) protein C (PC) receptor (EPCR). Furthermore, EPCR-bound PC modulates PAR1 signaling by thrombin to induce APC-like EC cytoprotection. Objective The molecular determinants of EPCR-dependent cytoprotective PAR1 signaling remain poorly defined. To address this, a PC-factor VII chimera (PC(FVII)(-82) ) possessing FVII N-terminal domains and conserved EPCR binding was characterized. Methods Activated PC-FVII chimera (APC(FVII)(-82) ) anticoagulant activity was measured with calibrated automated thrombography and activated FV degradation assays. APC(FVII)(-82) signaling activity was characterized by the use of reporter assays of PAR1 proteolysis and EC barrier integrity. APC(FVII)(-82) anti-inflammatory activity was assessed according to its inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and cytokine secretion from monocytes. Results PC(FVII)(-82) was activated normally by thrombin on ECs, but was unable to inhibit plasma thrombin generation. Surprisingly, APC(FVII)(-82) did not mediate EPCR-dependent PAR1 proteolysis, confer PAR1-dependent protection of thrombin-induced EC barrier disruption, or limit PAR1-dependent attenuation of interleukin-6 release from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. Interestingly, EPCR occupation by active site-blocked APC(FVII)(-82) was, like FVII, unable to mimic EC barrier stabilization induced by PC upon PAR1 proteolysis by thrombin. APC(FVII)(-82) did

  7. Protease activated receptor 1-induced glutamate release in cultured astrocytes is mediated by Bestrophin-1 channel but not by vesicular exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Glutamate is the major transmitter that mediates the principal form of excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain. It has been well established that glutamate is released via Ca2+-dependent exocytosis of glutamate-containing vesicles in neurons. However, whether astrocytes exocytose to release glutamate under physiological condition is still unclear. Findings We report a novel form of glutamate release in astrocytes via the recently characterized Ca2+-activated anion channel, Bestrophin-1 (Best1) by Ca2+ dependent mechanism through the channel pore. We demonstrate that upon activation of protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1), an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration leads to an opening of Best1 channels and subsequent release of glutamate in cultured astrocytes. Conclusions These results provide strong molecular evidence for potential astrocyte-neuron interaction via Best1-mediated glutamate release. PMID:23062602

  8. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Swati; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2013-01-01

    The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C) and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes) have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review. PMID:24832807

  9. Palmitoylation of protease-activated receptor-1 regulates adaptor protein complex-2 and -3 interaction with tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting.

    PubMed

    Canto, Isabel; Trejo, JoAnn

    2013-05-31

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor for the coagulant protease thrombin. Thrombin binds to and cleaves the N terminus of PAR1, generating a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand that cannot diffuse away. In addition to rapid desensitization, PAR1 trafficking is critical for the regulation of cellular responses. PAR1 displays constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of unactivated PAR1 is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), which binds to a distal tyrosine-based motif localized within the C-terminal tail (C-tail) domain. Once internalized, PAR1 is sorted from endosomes to lysosomes via AP-3 interaction with a second C-tail tyrosine motif proximal to the transmembrane domain. However, the regulatory processes that control adaptor protein recognition of PAR1 C-tail tyrosine-based motifs are not known. Here, we report that palmitoylation of PAR1 is critical for regulating proper utilization of tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting. We show that PAR1 is basally palmitoylated at highly conserved C-tail cysteines. A palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 mutant is competent to signal and exhibits a marked increase in constitutive internalization and lysosomal degradation compared with wild type receptor. Intriguingly, enhanced constitutive internalization of PAR1 is mediated by AP-2 and requires the proximal tyrosine-based motif rather than the distal tyrosine motif used by wild type receptor. Moreover, palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 displays increased degradation that is mediated by AP-3. These findings suggest that palmitoylation of PAR1 regulates appropriate utilization of tyrosine-based motifs by adaptor proteins and endocytic trafficking, processes that are critical for maintaining appropriate expression of PAR1 at the cell surface.

  10. Structural determinants of MALT1 protease activity.

    PubMed

    Wiesmann, Christian; Leder, Lukas; Blank, Jutta; Bernardi, Anna; Melkko, Samu; Decock, Arnaud; D'Arcy, Allan; Villard, Frederic; Erbel, Paulus; Hughes, Nicola; Freuler, Felix; Nikolay, Rainer; Alves, Juliano; Bornancin, Frederic; Renatus, Martin

    2012-05-25

    The formation of the CBM (CARD11-BCL10-MALT1) complex is pivotal for antigen-receptor-mediated activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. Signaling is dependent on MALT1 (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1), which not only acts as a scaffolding protein but also possesses proteolytic activity mediated by its caspase-like domain. It remained unclear how the CBM activates MALT1. Here, we provide biochemical and structural evidence that MALT1 activation is dependent on its dimerization and show that mutations at the dimer interface abrogate activity in cells. The unliganded protease presents itself in a dimeric yet inactive state and undergoes substantial conformational changes upon substrate binding. These structural changes also affect the conformation of the C-terminal Ig-like domain, a domain that is required for MALT1 activity. Binding to the active site is coupled to a relative movement of caspase and Ig-like domains. MALT1 binding partners thus may have the potential of tuning MALT1 protease activity without binding directly to the caspase domain.

  11. Galectin-3 Facilitates Cell Motility in Gastric Cancer by Up-Regulating Protease-Activated Receptor-1(PAR-1) and Matrix Metalloproteinase-1(MMP-1)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Jun; Shin, Ji-Young; Lee, Kang-Duck; Bae, Young-Ki; Choi, Il-Ju; Park, Seok Hee; Chun, Kyung-Hee

    2011-01-01

    Background Galectin-3 is known to regulate cancer metastasis. However, the underlying mechanism has not been defined. Through the DNA microarray studies after galectin-3 silencing, we demonstrated here that galectin-3 plays a key role in up-regulating the expressions of protease-activated receptor-1(PAR-1) and matrix metalloproteinase-1(MMP-1) PAR-1 thereby promoting gastric cancer metastasis. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the expression levels of Galectin-3, PAR-1, and MMP-1 in gastric cancer patient tissues and also the effects of silencing these proteins with specific siRNAs and of over-expressing them using specific lenti-viral constructs. We also employed zebrafish embryo model for analysis of in vivo gastric cancer cell invasion. These studies demonstrated that: a) galectin-3 silencing decreases the expression of PAR-1. b) galectin-3 over-expression increases cell migration and invasion and this increase can be reversed by PAR-1 silencing, indicating that galectin-3 increases cell migration and invasion via PAR-1 up-regulation. c) galectin-3 directly interacts with AP-1 transcriptional factor, and this complex binds to PAR-1 promoter and drives PAR-1 transcription. d) galectin-3 also amplifies phospho-paxillin, a PAR-1 downstream target, by increasing MMP-1 expression. MMP-1 silencing blocks phospho-paxillin amplification and cell invasion caused by galectin-3 over-expression. e) Silencing of either galectin-3, PAR-1 or MMP-1 significantly reduced cell migration into the vessels in zebrafish embryo model. f) Galectin-3, PAR-1, and MMP-1 are highly expressed and co-localized in malignant tissues from gastric cancer patients. Conclusions/Significance Galectin-3 plays the key role of activating cell surface receptor through production of protease and boosts gastric cancer metastasis. Galectin-3 has the potential to serve as a useful pharmacological target for prevention of gastric cancer metastasis. PMID:21966428

  12. Administration of a potent antagonist of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) attenuates vascular restenosis following balloon angioplasty in rats.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Gordon, P; Derian, C K; Maryanoff, B E; Zhang, H C; Addo, M F; Cheung Wm; Damiano, B P; D'Andrea, M R; Darrow, A L; de Garavilla, L; Eckardt, A J; Giardino, E C; Haertlein, B J; McComsey, D F

    2001-07-01

    Human platelets possess two distinct thrombin-activated receptors, PAR-1 (protease-activated receptor-1) and PAR-4, whereas human vascular smooth muscle cells possess only PAR-1. Although such thrombin receptors have been studied extensively in vitro, their physiological roles are still rather ill-defined. We have now employed a potent, selective PAR-1 antagonist, RWJ-58259, to probe the in vivo significance of PAR-1 in thrombosis and vascular injury. RWJ-58259 was examined in two thrombosis models in guinea pigs: the arteriovenous (A-V) shunt assay (monitoring thrombus weight) and the Rose Bengal intravascular photoactivation assay (monitoring time to occlusion). Administration of RWJ-58259 (10 mg/kg, total i.v. dose) did not inhibit thrombus formation in either thrombosis model, although local, intrashunt delivery in the A-V shunt model did elicit a modest antithrombotic effect (thrombus weight reduction from 35 +/- 2 to 24 +/- 4 mg). These results are consistent with the presence of more than one thrombin-sensitive receptor on guinea pig platelets, in analogy with human platelets. Indeed, we were able to establish that guinea pig platelets express three thrombin receptors, PAR-1, PAR-3, and PAR-4. We also examined RWJ-58259 in a vascular restenosis model involving balloon angioplasty in rats. Perivascular administration of RWJ-58259 (10 mg) significantly reduced neointimal thickness (77 +/- 5 microm to 45 +/- 5 microm, P < 0.05), clearly demonstrating an important role for PAR-1 in vascular injury. From these results, it is evident that a PAR-1 antagonist is not especially effective for treating platelet-dependent thrombosis; however, it could well be beneficial for treating restenosis attendant to arterial injury.

  13. Enhanced Nitric Oxide Synthase Activation via Protease-Activated Receptor 2 Is Involved in the Preserved Vasodilation in Aortas from Metabolic Syndrome Rats.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kana; Kagota, Satomi; McGuire, John J; Wakuda, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Noriko; Nakamura, Kazuki; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium-dependent vasodilation via protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is preserved in mesenteric arteries from SHRSP.Z-Leprfa/IzmDmcr rats (SHRSP.ZF) with metabolic syndrome even though nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation is attenuated. Therefore, we examined the PAR2 mechanisms underlying metabolic syndrome-resistant vasodilation in SHRSP.ZF aortas with ageing. In isolated aortas, the PAR2 agonist 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-amide (2fly) caused vasodilation that was sustained in male SHRSP.ZF until 18 weeks of age, but was attenuated afterwards compared with age-matched Wistar-Kyoto rats (controls) at 23 weeks. In contrast, acetylcholine-induced vasodilation was impaired in SHRSP.ZF already at 18 weeks of age. Treatments of aortas with inhibitors of NO synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase abolished the sustained 2fly- and residual acetylcholine-induced vasodilation in SHRSP.ZF at 18 weeks of age. In the aortas of SHRSP.ZF, 8-bromo-cGMP-induced vasodilation, NO production and cGMP accumulation elicited by 2fly were not different from in the controls. PAR2 agonist increased phospho-Ser1177-eNOS protein content only in SHRSP.ZF aortas. These results indicate that vasodilation mediated by PAR2 is sustained even though NO-dependent relaxation is attenuated with ageing/exposure to metabolic disorders in large-caliber arteries from SHRSP.ZF. PAR2 stimulation of NO production via an additional pathway that targets phosphorylation of Ser1177-eNOS suggests a regulatory mechanism for sustaining agonist-mediated vasodilation in metabolic syndrome.

  14. Characterization and Functions of Protease-Activated Receptor 2 in Obesity, Diabetes, and Metabolic Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kagota, Satomi; Maruyama, Kana; McGuire, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is a cell surface receptor activated by serine proteinases or specific synthetic compounds. Interest in PAR2 as a pharmaceutical target for various diseases is increasing. Here we asked two questions relevant to endothelial dysfunction and diabetes: How is PAR2 function affected in blood vessels? What role does PAR2 have in promoting obesity, diabetes, and/or metabolic syndrome, specifically via the endothelium and adipose tissues? We conducted a systematic review of the published literature in PubMed and Scopus (July 2015; search terms: par2, par-2, f2lr1, adipose, obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome). Seven studies focused on PAR2 and vascular function. The obesity, diabetes, or metabolic syndrome animal models differed amongst studies, but each reported that PAR2-mediated vasodilator actions were preserved in the face of endothelial dysfunction. The remaining studies focused on nonvascular functions and provided evidence supporting the concept that PAR2 activation promoted obesity. Key studies showed that PAR2 activation regulated cellular metabolism, and PAR2 antagonists inhibited adipose gain and metabolic dysfunction in rats. We conclude that PAR2 antagonists for treatment of obesity indeed show early promise as a therapeutic strategy; however, endothelial-specific PAR2 functions, which may offset mechanisms that produce vascular dysfunction in diabetes, warrant additional study. PMID:27006943

  15. Proteases.

    PubMed

    Barrett, A J

    2001-05-01

    The processes of growth and remodeling of cells and tissues in multicellular organisms require the breakdown of old protein molecules, in concert with the synthesis of new ones. For example, many newly-synthesized molecules require proteolytic processing to convert them to biologically active forms. Proteolysis can terminate the activity of a protein--e.g., capsases mediate apoptosis, which is a vital step in the life cycle of the cell. Proteolysis contributes to defense systems too, as the recognition of peptide fragments of foreign proteins triggers the immune response. Proteases are the class of enzymes involved in these important reactions. This unit discusses the general categories of proteases, and sets the stage for addition of overview units on cysteine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases, as well as protocol units featuring techniques for analyzing mammalian and yeast proteasomes and protease inhibitors, among other topics.

  16. The C-terminus of murine S100A9 protein inhibits hyperalgesia induced by the agonist peptide of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2)

    PubMed Central

    Dale, C S; Cenac, N; Britto, L R G; Juliano, M A; Juliano, L; Vergnolle, N; Giorgi, R

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: S100A9 protein induces anti-nociception in rodents, in different experimental models of inflammatory pain. Herein, we investigated the effects of a fragment of the C-terminus of S100A9 (mS100A9p), on the hyperalgesia induced by serine proteases, through the activation of protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2). Experimental approach: Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia induced by PAR2 agonists (SLIGRL-NH2 and trypsin) was measured in rats submitted to the paw pressure or plantar tests, and Egr-1 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in rat spinal cord dorsal horn. Calcium flux in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK), which naturally express PAR2, in Kirsten virus-transformed kidney cells, transfected (KNRK-PAR2) or not (KNRK) with PAR2, and in mouse dorsal root ganglia neurons (DRG) was measured by fluorimetric methods. Key results: mS100A9p inhibited mechanical hyperalgesia induced by trypsin, without modifying its enzymatic activity. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia induced by SLIGRL-NH2 were inhibited by mS100A9p. SLIGRL-NH2 enhanced Egr-1 expression, a marker of nociceptor activation, and this effect was inhibited by concomitant treatment with mS100A9p. mS100A9p inhibited calcium mobilization in DRG neurons in response to the PAR2 agonists trypsin and SLIGRL-NH2, but also in response to capsaicin and bradykinin, suggesting a direct effect of mS100A9 on sensory neurons. No effect on the calcium flux induced by trypsin or SLIGRL in HEK cells or KNRK-PAR2 cells was observed. Conclusions and implications: These data demonstrate that mS100A9p interferes with mechanisms involved in nociception and hyperalgesia and modulates, possibly directly on sensory neurons, the PAR2-induced nociceptive signal. PMID:16967049

  17. The activation of the cannabinoid receptor type 2 reduces neutrophilic protease-mediated vulnerability in atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; da Silva, Rafaela F.; Vuilleumier, Nicolas; Capettini, Luciano; Lenglet, Sébastien; Pagano, Sabrina; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Quintao, Silvia; Bertolotto, Maria; Pelli, Graziano; Galan, Katia; Pilet, Lucie; Kuzmanovic, Kristina; Burger, Fabienne; Pane, Bianca; Spinella, Giovanni; Braunersreuther, Vincent; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Pende, Aldo; Viviani, Giorgio Luciano; Palombo, Domenico; Dallegri, Franco; Roux-Lombard, Pascale; Santos, Robson A.S.; Stergiopulos, Nikos; Steffens, Sabine; Mach, François

    2012-01-01

    Aims The activation of cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2)-mediated pathways might represent a promising anti-atherosclerotic treatment. Here, we investigated the expression of the endocannabinoid system in human carotid plaques and the impact of CB2 pharmacological activation on markers of plaque vulnerability in vivo and in vitro. Methods and results The study was conducted using all available residual human carotid tissues (upstream and downstream the blood flow) from our cohort of patients symptomatic (n = 13) or asymptomatic (n = 27) for ischaemic stroke. Intraplaque levels of 2-arachidonoylglycerol, anandamide N-arachidonoylethanolamine, N-palmitoylethanolamine, N-oleoylethanolamine, and their degrading enzymes (fatty acid amide hydrolase and monoacylglycerol lipase) were not different in human plaque portions. In the majority of human samples, CB1 (both mRNA and protein levels) was undetectable. In downstream symptomatic plaques, CB2 protein expression was reduced when compared with asymptomatic patients. In these portions, CB2 levels were inversely correlated (r = −0.4008, P = 0.0170) with matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9 content and positively (r = 0.3997, P = 0.0174) with collagen. In mouse plaques, CB2 co-localized with neutrophils and MMP-9. Treatment with the selective CB2 agonist JWH-133 was associated with the reduction in MMP-9 content in aortic root and carotid plaques. In vitro, pre-incubation with JWH-133 reduced tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α-mediated release of MMP-9. This effect was associated with the reduction in TNF-α-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in human neutrophils. Conclusion Cannabinoid receptor type 2 receptor is down-regulated in unstable human carotid plaques. Since CB2 activation prevents neutrophil release of MMP-9 in vivo and in vitro, this treatment strategy might selectively reduce carotid vulnerability in humans. PMID:22112961

  18. The activation of the cannabinoid receptor type 2 reduces neutrophilic protease-mediated vulnerability in atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; da Silva, Rafaela F; Vuilleumier, Nicolas; Capettini, Luciano; Lenglet, Sébastien; Pagano, Sabrina; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Quintao, Silvia; Bertolotto, Maria; Pelli, Graziano; Galan, Katia; Pilet, Lucie; Kuzmanovic, Kristina; Burger, Fabienne; Pane, Bianca; Spinella, Giovanni; Braunersreuther, Vincent; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Pende, Aldo; Viviani, Giorgio Luciano; Palombo, Domenico; Dallegri, Franco; Roux-Lombard, Pascale; Santos, Robson A S; Stergiopulos, Nikos; Steffens, Sabine; Mach, François

    2012-04-01

    The activation of cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB(2))-mediated pathways might represent a promising anti-atherosclerotic treatment. Here, we investigated the expression of the endocannabinoid system in human carotid plaques and the impact of CB(2) pharmacological activation on markers of plaque vulnerability in vivo and in vitro. The study was conducted using all available residual human carotid tissues (upstream and downstream the blood flow) from our cohort of patients symptomatic (n = 13) or asymptomatic (n = 27) for ischaemic stroke. Intraplaque levels of 2-arachidonoylglycerol, anandamide N-arachidonoylethanolamine, N-palmitoylethanolamine, N-oleoylethanolamine, and their degrading enzymes (fatty acid amide hydrolase and monoacylglycerol lipase) were not different in human plaque portions. In the majority of human samples, CB(1) (both mRNA and protein levels) was undetectable. In downstream symptomatic plaques, CB(2) protein expression was reduced when compared with asymptomatic patients. In these portions, CB(2) levels were inversely correlated (r = -0.4008, P = 0.0170) with matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9 content and positively (r = 0.3997, P = 0.0174) with collagen. In mouse plaques, CB(2) co-localized with neutrophils and MMP-9. Treatment with the selective CB(2) agonist JWH-133 was associated with the reduction in MMP-9 content in aortic root and carotid plaques. In vitro, pre-incubation with JWH-133 reduced tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α-mediated release of MMP-9. This effect was associated with the reduction in TNF-α-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in human neutrophils. Cannabinoid receptor type 2 receptor is down-regulated in unstable human carotid plaques. Since CB(2) activation prevents neutrophil release of MMP-9 in vivo and in vitro, this treatment strategy might selectively reduce carotid vulnerability in humans.

  19. Cell surface protease activation during RAS transformation: Critical role of the plasminogen receptor, S100A10

    PubMed Central

    Madureira, Patricia A.; Bharadwaj, Alamelu G.; Bydoun, Moamen; Garant, Katy; O'Connell, Paul; Lee, Patrick; Waisman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The link between oncogenic RAS expression and the acquisition of the invasive phenotype has been attributed to alterations in cellular activities that control degradation of the extracellular matrix. Oncogenic RAS-mediated upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), MMP-9 and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is critical for invasion through the basement membrane and extracellular matrix. The uPA converts cell surface-bound plasminogen to plasmin, a process that is regulated by the binding of plasminogen to specific receptors on the cell surface, however, the identity of the plasminogen receptors that function in this capacity is unclear. We have observed that transformation of cancer cells with oncogenic forms of RAS increases plasmin proteolytic activity by 2- to 4-fold concomitant with a 3-fold increase in cell invasion. Plasminogen receptor profiling revealed RAS-dependent increases in both S100A10 and cytokeratin 8. Oncogenic RAS expression increased S100A10 gene expression which resulted in an increase in S100A10 protein levels. Analysis with the RAS effector-loop mutants that interact specifically with Raf, Ral GDS pathways highlighted the importance of the RalGDS pathways in the regulation of S100A10 gene expression. Depletion of S100A10 from RAS-transformed cells resulted in a loss of both cellular plasmin generation and invasiveness. These results strongly suggest that increases in cell surface levels of S100A10, by oncogenic RAS, plays a critical role in RAS-stimulated plasmin generation, and subsequently, in the invasiveness of oncogenic RAS expressing cancer cells. PMID:27351226

  20. Protease-Activated Receptor 1 and Hematopoietic Cell Tissue Factor Are Required for Hepatic Steatosis in Mice Fed a Western Diet

    PubMed Central

    Kassel, Karen M.; Owens, A. Phillip; Rockwell, Cheryl E.; Sullivan, Bradley P.; Wang, Ruipeng; Tawfik, Ossama; Li, Guodong; Guo, Grace L.; Mackman, Nigel; Luyendyk, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the hepatic manifestation of obesity and metabolic syndrome and contributes to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and liver-related morbidity and mortality. Indeed, obese patients with metabolic syndrome generate greater amounts of thrombin, an indication of coagulation cascade activation. However, the role of the coagulation cascade in Western diet–induced NAFLD has not been investigated. Using an established mouse model of Western diet–induced NAFLD, we tested whether the thrombin receptor protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) and hematopoietic cell–derived tissue factor (TF) contribute to hepatic steatosis. In association with hepatic steatosis, plasma thrombin-antithrombin levels and hepatic fibrin deposition increased significantly in C57Bl/6J mice fed a Western diet for 3 months. PAR-1 deficiency reduced hepatic inflammation, particularly monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression and macrophage accumulation. In addition, PAR-1 deficiency was associated with reduced steatosis in mice fed a Western diet, including reduced liver triglyceride accumulation and CD36 expression. Similar to PAR-1 deficiency, hematopoietic cell TF deficiency was associated with reduced inflammation and reduced steatosis in livers of low-density lipoprotein receptor–deficient mice fed a Western diet. Moreover, hematopoietic cell TF deficiency reduced hepatic fibrin deposition. These studies indicate that PAR-1 and hematopoietic cell TF are required for liver inflammation and steatosis in mice fed a Western diet. PMID:21907177

  1. Diallylsulfide attenuates excessive collagen production and apoptosis in a rat model of bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis through the involvement of protease activated receptor-2

    SciTech Connect

    Kalayarasan, Srinivasan Sriram, Narayanan; Soumyakrishnan, Syamala; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) can be a devastating lung disease. It is primarily caused by inflammation leading to severe damage of the alveolar epithelial cells. The pathophysiology of PF is not yet been clearly defined, but studying lung parenchymal injury by involving reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the activation of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) may provide promising results. PAR-2 is a G-protein coupled receptor is known to play an important role in the development of PF. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory role of diallylsulfide (DAS) against ROS mediated activation of PAR-2 and collagen production accompanied by epithelial cell apoptosis. Bleomycin induced ROS levels may prompt to induce the expression of PAR-2 as well as extracellular matrix proteins (ECM), such as MMP 2 and 9, collagen specific proteins HSP-47, α-SMA, and cytokines IL-6, and IL-8RA. Importantly DAS treatment effectively decreased the expression of all these proteins. The inhibitory effect of DAS on profibrotic molecules is mediated by blocking the ROS level. To identify apoptotic signaling as a mediator of PF induction, we performed apoptotic protein expression, DNA fragmentation analysis and ultrastructural details of the lung tissue were performed. DAS treatment restored all these changes to near normalcy. In conclusion, treatment of PF bearing rats with DAS results in amelioration of the ROS production, PAR-2 activation, ECM production, collagen synthesis and alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis during bleomycin induction. We attained the first evidence that treatment of DAS decreases the ROS levels and may provide a potential therapeutic effect attenuating bleomycin induced PF. - Highlights: • DAS inhibits PAR-2 activity; bleomycin stimulates PAR-2 activity. • Increase in PAR-2 activity is correlated with pulmonary fibrosis • DAS reduces pro-inflammatory activity linked to facilitating pulmonary fibrosis. • DAS inhibits apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells.

  2. Mechanism of interleukin-13 production by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) promotes classically activated M1 macrophages. GM-CSF upregulates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) protein expression and activation of PAR-2 by human neutrophil elastase (HNE) regulates cytokine production. This study investigated the mechanism of PAR-2-mediated interleukin (IL)-13 production by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. After stimulation with HNE to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathway, IL-13 mRNA and protein levels were assessed by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. PAR-2 protein was detected in GM-CSF-dependent macrophages by Western blotting. Unexpectedly, PD98059 (an ERK1 inhibitor) increased IL-13 production, even at higher concentrations. Interestingly, U0126 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) reduced IL-13 production in a concentration-dependent manner. Neither SB203580 (a p38alpha/p38beta inhibitor) nor BIRB796 (a p38gamma/p38delta inhibitor) affected IL-13 production, while TMB-8 (a calcium chelator) diminished IL-13 production. Stimulation with HNE promoted the production of IL-13 (a Th2 cytokine) by GM-CSF-dependent M1 macrophages. PAR-2-mediated IL-13 production may be dependent on the Ca(2+)/ERK2 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Downregulation of protease-activated receptor-1 in human lung fibroblasts is specifically mediated by the prostaglandin E receptor EP2 through cAMP elevation and protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Elena; Hartig, Roland; Reiser, Georg

    2008-07-01

    Many cellular functions of lung fibroblasts are controlled by protease-activated receptors (PARs). In fibrotic diseases, PAR-1 plays a major role in controlling fibroproliferative and inflammatory responses. Therefore, in these diseases, regulation of PAR-1 expression plays an important role. Using the selective prostaglandin EP2 receptor agonist butaprost and cAMP-elevating agents, we show here that prostaglandin (PG)E(2), via the prostanoid receptor EP2 and subsequent cAMP elevation, downregulates mRNA and protein levels of PAR-1 in human lung fibroblasts. Under these conditions, the functional response of PAR-1 in fibroblasts is reduced. These effects are specific for PGE(2). Activation of other receptors coupled to cAMP elevation, such as beta-adrenergic and adenosine receptors, does not reproduce the effects of PGE(2). PGE(2)-mediated downregulation of PAR-1 depends mainly on protein kinase A activity, but does not depend on another cAMP effector, the exchange protein activated by cAMP. PGE(2)-induced reduction of PAR-1 level is not due to a decrease of PAR-1 mRNA stability, but rather to transcriptional regulation. The present results provide further insights into the therapeutic potential of PGE(2) to specifically control fibroblast function in fibrotic diseases.

  4. Motor neuron cell death in wobbler mutant mice follows overexpression of the G-protein-coupled, protease-activated receptor for thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Festoff, B. W.; D'Andrea, M. R.; Citron, B. A.; Salcedo, R. M.; Smirnova, I. V.; Andrade-Gordon, P.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration are actively sought for new therapeutic strategies. Transgenic, knockout and genetic mouse models greatly aid our understanding of the mechanisms for neuronal cell death. A naturally occurring, autosomal recessive mutant, known as wobbler, and mice transgenic for familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) superoxide dismutase (SOD)1 mutations are available, but the molecular mechanisms remain equally unknown. Both phenotypes are detectable after birth. Wobbler is detectable in the third week of life, when homozygotes (wr/wr) exhibit prominent gliosis and significant motor neuron loss in the cervical, but not in lumbar, spinal cord segments. To address molecular mechanisms, we evaluated "death signals" associated with the multifunctional serine protease, thrombin, which leads to apoptotic motor neuronal cell death in culture by cleavage of a G-protein coupled, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thrombin activities were determined with chromogenic substrate assays, Western immunoblots and immunohistochemistry were performed with anti-PAR-1 to observe localizations of the receptor and anti-GFAP staining was used to monitor astrocytosis. PAR-1 mRNA levels and locations were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in situ hybridizations. Cell death was monitored with in situ DNA fragmentation assays. RESULTS: In preliminary studies we found a 5-fold increase in PAR-1 mRNA in cervical spinal cords from wr/wr, compared with wild-type (wt) littermates. Our current studies suggested that reactive astrocytosis and motor neuron cell death were causally linked with alterations in thrombin signaling. PAR-1 protein expression was increased, as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and confirmed with in situ hybridization, in phenotypic wr/wr motor neurons, compared with wt, but not in astrocytes. This increase was much greater in cervical, compared with lumbar

  5. Development and Evaluation of Small Peptidomimetic Ligands to Protease-Activated Receptor-2 (PAR2) through the Use of Lipid Tethering

    PubMed Central

    Boitano, Scott; Hoffman, Justin; Tillu, Dipti V.; Asiedu, Marina N.; Zhang, Zhenyu; Sherwood, Cara L.; Wang, Yan; Dong, Xinzhong; Price, Theodore J.; Vagner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) is a G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR) activated by proteolytic cleavage to expose an attached, tethered ligand (SLIGRL). We evaluated the ability for lipid-tethered-peptidomimetics to activate PAR2 with in vitro physiological and Ca2+ signaling assays to determine minimal components necessary for potent, specific and full PAR2 activation. A known PAR2 activating compound containing a hexadecyl (Hdc) lipid via three polyethylene glycol (PEG) linkers (2at-LIGRL-PEG3-Hdc) provided a potent agonist starting point (physiological EC50 = 1.4 nM; 95% CI: 1.2–2.3 nM). In a set of truncated analogs, 2at-LIGR-PEG3-Hdc retained potency (EC50 = 2.1 nM; 1.3–3.4 nM) with improved selectivity for PAR2 over Mas1 related G-protein coupled receptor type C11, a GPCR that can be activated by the PAR2 peptide agonist, SLIGRL-NH2. 2at-LIG-PEG3-Hdc was the smallest full PAR2 agonist, albeit with a reduced EC50 (46 nM; 20–100 nM). 2at-LI-PEG3-Hdc retained specific activity for PAR2 with reduced EC50 (310 nM; 260–360 nM) but displayed partial PAR2 activation in both physiological and Ca2+ signaling assays. Further truncation (2at-L-PEG3-Hdc and 2at-PEG3-Hdc) eliminated in vitro activity. When used in vivo, full and partial PAR2 in vitro agonists evoked mechanical hypersensitivity at a 15 pmole dose while 2at-L-PEG3-Hdc lacked efficacy. Minimum peptidomimetic PAR2 agonists were developed with known heterocycle substitutes for Ser1 (isoxazole or aminothiazoyl) and cyclohexylalanine (Cha) as a substitute for Leu2. Both heterocycle-tetrapeptide and heterocycle-dipeptides displayed PAR2 specificity, however, only the heterocycle-tetrapeptides displayed full PAR2 agonism. Using the lipid-tethered-peptidomimetic approach we have developed novel structure activity relationships for PAR2 that allows for selective probing of PAR2 function across a broad range of physiological systems. PMID:24927179

  6. Neuroinflammation-Induced Interactions between Protease-Activated Receptor 1 and Proprotein Convertases in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, WooJin; Zekas, Erin; Lodge, Robert; Susan-Resiga, Delia; Marcinkiewicz, Edwidge; Essalmani, Rachid; Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Asahchop, Eugene; Gelman, Benjamin; Cohen, Éric A.; Power, Christopher; Hollenberg, Morley D.

    2015-01-01

    The proprotein convertases (PCs) furin, PC5, PACE4, and PC7 cleave secretory proteins after basic residues, including the HIV envelope glycoprotein (gp160) and Vpr. We evaluated the abundance of PC mRNAs in postmortem brains of individuals exhibiting HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), likely driven by neuroinflammation and neurotoxic HIV proteins (e.g., envelope and Vpr). Concomitant with increased inflammation-related gene expression (interleukin-1β [IL-1β]), the mRNA levels of the above PCs are significantly increased, together with those of the proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), an inflammation-associated receptor that is cleaved by thrombin at ProArg41↓ (where the down arrow indicates the cleavage location), and potentially by PCs at Arg41XXXXArg46↓. The latter motif in PAR1, but not its R46A mutant, drives its interactions with PCs. Indeed, PAR1 upregulation leads to the inhibition of membrane-bound furin, PC5B, and PC7 and inhibits gp160 processing and HIV infectivity. Additionally, a proximity ligation assay revealed that furin and PC7 interact with PAR1. Reciprocally, increased furin expression reduces the plasma membrane abundance of PAR1 by trapping it in the trans-Golgi network. Furthermore, soluble PC5A/PACE4 can target/disarm cell surface PAR1 through cleavage at Arg46↓. PACE4/PC5A decreased calcium mobilization induced by thrombin stimulation. Our data reveal a new PC-PAR1-interaction pathway, which offsets the effects of HIV-induced neuroinflammation, viral infection, and potentially the development of HAND. PMID:26283733

  7. Neuroinflammation-Induced Interactions between Protease-Activated Receptor 1 and Proprotein Convertases in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Kim, WooJin; Zekas, Erin; Lodge, Robert; Susan-Resiga, Delia; Marcinkiewicz, Edwidge; Essalmani, Rachid; Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Asahchop, Eugene; Gelman, Benjamin; Cohen, Éric A; Power, Christopher; Hollenberg, Morley D; Seidah, Nabil G

    2015-11-01

    The proprotein convertases (PCs) furin, PC5, PACE4, and PC7 cleave secretory proteins after basic residues, including the HIV envelope glycoprotein (gp160) and Vpr. We evaluated the abundance of PC mRNAs in postmortem brains of individuals exhibiting HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), likely driven by neuroinflammation and neurotoxic HIV proteins (e.g., envelope and Vpr). Concomitant with increased inflammation-related gene expression (interleukin-1β [IL-1β]), the mRNA levels of the above PCs are significantly increased, together with those of the proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR1), an inflammation-associated receptor that is cleaved by thrombin at ProArg41↓ (where the down arrow indicates the cleavage location), and potentially by PCs at Arg41XXXXArg46↓. The latter motif in PAR1, but not its R46A mutant, drives its interactions with PCs. Indeed, PAR1 upregulation leads to the inhibition of membrane-bound furin, PC5B, and PC7 and inhibits gp160 processing and HIV infectivity. Additionally, a proximity ligation assay revealed that furin and PC7 interact with PAR1. Reciprocally, increased furin expression reduces the plasma membrane abundance of PAR1 by trapping it in the trans-Golgi network. Furthermore, soluble PC5A/PACE4 can target/disarm cell surface PAR1 through cleavage at Arg46↓. PACE4/PC5A decreased calcium mobilization induced by thrombin stimulation. Our data reveal a new PC-PAR1-interaction pathway, which offsets the effects of HIV-induced neuroinflammation, viral infection, and potentially the development of HAND.

  8. Interference with protease-activated receptor 1 does not reduce damage to subventricular zone cells of immature rodent brain following exposure to blood or blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoyan; Del Bigio, Marc R

    2015-02-04

    Prior work showed that whole blood, plasma, and serum injections are damaging to the neonatal rodent brain in a model of intracerebral/periventricular hemorrhage. Thrombin alone is also damaging. In adult animal models of hemorrhagic stroke, the protease-activated (thrombin) receptor PAR1 mediates some of the brain damage. We hypothesized that PAR1 interference will reduce the adverse effects of blood products on immature rodent brain and cells. Cultured oligodendrocyte precursor cells from rats and mice were exposed to blood plasma with and without the PAR1 antagonists SCH-79797 or BMS-200261. In concentrations previously shown to have activity on brain cells, neither drug showed evidence of protection against the toxicity of blood plasma. Newborn mice (wild type, heterozygous, and PAR1 knockout) were subjected to intracerebral injection of autologous whole blood into the periventricular region of the frontal lobe. Cell proliferation, measured by Ki67 immunoreactivity in the subventricular zone, was suppressed at 1 and 2 days, and was not normalized in the knockout mice. Cell apoptosis, measured by activated caspase 3 immunoreactivity, was not apparent in the subventricular zone. Increased apoptosis in periventricular striatal cells was not normalized in the knockout mice. Interference with the thrombin-PAR1 system does not reduce the adverse effects of blood on germinal cells of the immature rodent brain. PAR1 interference is unlikely to be a useful treatment for reducing the brain damage that accompanies periventricular (germinal matrix) hemorrhage, a common complication of premature birth.

  9. Protective role of Kalpaamruthaa in type II diabetes mellitus-induced cardiovascular disease through the modulation of protease-activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Latha, Raja; Shanthi, Palanivelu; Sachdanandam, Panchanadham

    2015-05-01

    Kalpaamruthaa (KA) is a formulatory herbal preparation has beneficial antioxidant, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory properties against cardiovascular damage (CVD). The present study was undertaken to investigate the protective role of KA in type II diabetes mellitus-induced CVD through the modulation of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1). CVD was developed in 8 weeks after type II diabetes mellitus induction with high fat diet (2 weeks) and low dose of streptozotocin (2 × 35 mg/kg b.w. i.p. in 24 h interval). CVD-induced rats treated with KA (200 mg/kg b.w. in 0.5 ml of olive oil) orally for 4 weeks. KA increased the activities of enzymatic antioxidants and the levels of non-enzymatic antioxidants in pancreas of CVD-induced rats. KA effectively reduced the lipid peroxides and carbonyl content in the pancreas of CVD-induced rats. KA reduced cellular damage by ameliorating the activities of marker enzymes in plasma, heart and liver. The protective nature of KA was further evidenced by histological observation in pancreas. Further, KA reduced CVD by decreasing the expression of PAR1 in heart. This study exhibits the defending role of KA in type II diabetes mellitus-induced CVD through altering PAR1.

  10. Temporal dependence of cysteine protease activation following excitotoxic hippocampal injury.

    PubMed

    Berry, J N; Sharrett-Field, L J; Butler, T R; Prendergast, M A

    2012-10-11

    Excitotoxic insults can lead to intracellular signaling cascades that contribute to cell death, in part by activation of proteases, phospholipases, and endonucleases. Cysteine proteases, such as calpains, are calcium (Ca(2+))-activated enzymes which degrade cytoskeletal proteins, including microtubule-associated proteins, tubulin, and spectrin, among others. The current study used the organotypic hippocampal slice culture model to examine whether pharmacologic inhibition of cysteine protease activity inhibits N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA-) induced excitotoxic (20 μM NMDA) cell death and changes in synaptophysin immunoreactivity. Significant NMDA-induced cytotoxicity (as measured by propidium iodide [PI] uptake) was found in the CA1 region of the hippocampus at all timepoints examined (24, 72, 120 h), an effect significantly attenuated by co-exposure to the selective NMDA receptor antagonist DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), but not MDL-28170, a potent cysteine protease inhibitor. Results indicated sparing of NMDA-induced loss of the synaptic vesicular protein synaptophysin in all regions of the hippocampus by MDL-28170, though only at early timepoints after injury. These results suggest Ca(2+)-dependent recruitment of cysteine proteases within 24h of excitotoxic insult, but activation of alternative cellular degrading mechanisms after 24h. Further, these data suggest that synaptophysin may be a substrate for calpains and related proteases.

  11. Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Regulates the Innate Immune Response to Viral Infection in a Coxsackievirus B3–Induced Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Weithauser, Alice; Bobbert, Peter; Antoniak, Silvio; Böhm, Andreas; Rauch, Bernhard H.; Klingel, Karin; Savvatis, Konstantinos; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Tschope, Carsten; Stroux, Andrea; Zeichhardt, Heinz; Poller, Wolfgang; Mackman, Nigel; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Rauch, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to evaluate the role of protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) in coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)–induced myocarditis. Background An infection with CVB3 leads to myocarditis. PAR2 modulates the innate immune response. Toll-like receptor-3 (TLR3) is crucial for the innate immune response by inducing the expression of the antiviral cytokine interferon-beta (IFNβ). Methods To induce myocarditis, wild-type (wt) and PAR2 knockout (ko) mice were infected with 105 plaque-forming units CVB3. Mice underwent hemodynamic measurements with a 1.2-F microconductance catheter. Wt and PAR2ko hearts and cardiac cells were analyzed for viral replication and immune response with plaque assay, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Results Compared with wt mice, PAR2ko mice and cardiomyocytes exhibited a reduced viral load and developed no myocarditis after infection with CVB3. Hearts and cardiac fibroblasts from PAR2ko mice expressed higher basal levels of IFNβ than wt mice did. Treatment with CVB3 and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid led to higher IFNβ expression in PAR2ko than in wt fibroblasts and reduced virus replication in PAR2ko fibroblasts was abrogated by neutralizing IFNβ antibody. Overexpression of PAR2 reduced the basal IFNβ expression. Moreover, a direct interaction between PAR2 and Toll-like receptor 3 was observed. PAR2 expression in endomyocardial biopsies of patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy was positively correlated with myocardial inflammation and negatively with IFNβ expression and left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions PAR2 negatively regulates the innate immune response to CVB3 infection and contributes to myocardial dysfunction. The antagonism of PAR2 is of therapeutic interest to strengthen the antiviral response after an infection with a cardiotropic virus. PMID:23871888

  12. Inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines by SCH79797, a selective protease-activated receptor 1 antagonist, protects rat kidney against ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    El Eter, Eman Abdelazeem; Aldrees, Abdulmajeed

    2012-06-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (I/R) is the most common cause of acute renal failure. It is partially mediated by thrombin as it is attenuated by thrombin inhibition or deletion of its receptor protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1). However, the role of PAR1 in renal I/R injury needs to be further elucidated. The present study investigated the effect of PAR1 antagonist, SCH79797 (SCH), on renal protection and downstream effectors involved. Male Wistar rats were pretreated with SCH (25 μg/kg i.p.) or vehicle, 15 min before 45 min of clamping of left renal pedicle after right nephrectomy. To investigate the involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, a group of rats was subjected to pretreatment with an inhibitor of PI3K/Akt (LY 29004, 3 mg/kg i.p.) before renal ischemia and SCH treatment. A sham-operated group served as control and received saline. All rats were killed 24 h after reperfusion or sham operation, and blood samples collected and kidney tissues processed either for immunostaining and histological assessment or for biochemical analysis. SCH79797 markedly attenuated kidney damage histologically and by improving serum creatinine. Both plasma and protein expression of P selectin were markedly reduced as well as neutrophil infiltration, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1, and tumor necrosis factor α. These protective effects of blocking PAR1 receptor were abolished by preadministration of LY29004. These results suggest that PAR1 mediates renal I/R injury and that blocking PAR1 using SCH limits renal injury by an anti-inflammatory effect possibly signaling via PI3K/Akt.

  13. A protease-activated receptor 1 antagonist protects against global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury after asphyxial cardiac arrest in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing-ning; Chen, Jun; Xiao, Min

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury is partially mediated by thrombin, which causes brain damage through protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1). However, the role and mechanisms underlying the effects of PAR1 activation require further elucidation. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of the PAR1 antagonist SCH79797 in a rabbit model of global cerebral ischemia induced by cardiac arrest. SCH79797 was intravenously administered 10 minutes after the model was established. Forty-eight hours later, compared with those administered saline, rabbits receiving SCH79797 showed markedly decreased neuronal damage as assessed by serum neuron specific enolase levels and less neurological dysfunction as determined using cerebral performance category scores. Additionally, in the hippocampus, cell apoptosis, polymorphonuclear cell infiltration, and c-Jun levels were decreased, whereas extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation levels were increased. All of these changes were inhibited by the intravenous administration of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway inhibitor LY29004 (3 mg/kg) 10 minutes before the SCH79797 intervention. These findings suggest that SCH79797 mitigates brain injury via anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects, possibly by modulating the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase/c-Jun and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathways. PMID:28400806

  14. siRNA-mediated silence of protease-activated receptor-1 minimizes ischemic injury of cerebral cortex through HSP70 and MAP2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Xudong; Lv, Manhua; Feng, Honglin

    2012-09-15

    Cerebral ischemic stroke is a prevalent disease in senior individuals. The anticoagulation and thrombolysis to recover blood supply as well as the diminution of neural excitotoxicity to protect brain cells have not shown to fully improve stroke patients. The comprehensive mechanisms and medication specificity remain to be addressed. The silence of specific mRNAs by RNA interference provides revenues for such goals. We examined whether the silence of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) by siRNA protects brain tissues from ischemic injury. In three groups of Wistar rats, their lateral ventricles received the injections of lentiviral vectors carrying siRNA for PAR1, small RNA in mismatching PAR1 or saline. A week after the injections, these rats were treated by one side of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The scores of neurological deficits, the volume of ischemic infarction and the expressions of PAR-1, HSP-70 and MAP-2 were measured in 24h of MCAO. Our results show that the silence of PAR-1 significantly reduces neurological deficits and infarction volume, as well as elevates HSP-70 and MAP-2 expressions. Thus, the knock-down of PAR1 minimizes the ischemic impairments of cerebral cortex via HSP70 and MAP-2 pathways. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Disturbance of vasodilation via protease-activated receptor 2 in SHRSP.Z-Lepr fa/IzmDmcr rats with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kagota, Satomi; Maruyama, Kana; Wakuda, Hirokazu; McGuire, John J; Yoshikawa, Noriko; Nakamura, Kazuki; Shinozuka, Kazumasa

    2014-10-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) activation causes vascular inflammation and vasodilation, but its role in metabolic syndrome (MetS) remains uncertain. Therefore, we examined whether the PAR2-induced vasodilation of SHRSP.Z-Lepr(fa)/IzmDmcr rats (SHRSP.ZF) is impaired and if so, whether administering telmisartan is protective. PAR2-activating peptide, 2-furoyl-LIGRLO-amide (2fly), relaxed the isolated superior and first-order branches of mesenteric arteries (MAs) from Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) and SHRSP.ZF. Superior-MA relaxation by 2fly was less in SHRSP.ZF than in WKY. Relaxation of first-order MAs by 2fly was the same in SHRSP.ZF and WKY. NO synthase inhibitor partially reduced 2fly-induced relaxation of superior and first-order MAs in SHRSP.ZF and WKY; inhibition of relaxation was proportionately larger in SHRSP.ZF. In SHRSP.ZF, nitroprusside-induced relaxation and the expression of soluble guanylyl cyclase decreased. In SHRSP.ZF, telmisartan reversed these abnormalities, and decreased blood pressure and serum levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, an index of oxidative stress. Vasodilation via PAR2 activation was preserved in small-caliber MAs, in contrast to large-caliber MAs, even when MetS reduced NO-dependent relaxation mechanisms. NO and non-NO relaxing factor(s) contributed to PAR2-mediated relaxation in MAs, and the balance between factors may be altered to preserve vasodilation in MetS. Telmisartan prevented vascular dysfunction in MetS by protecting arteries against oxidative stress.

  16. Engagement of signaling pathways of protease-activated receptor 2 and μ-opioid receptor in bone cancer pain and morphine tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yanju; Gao, Yebo; Hou, Wei; Yang, Liping; Kong, Xiangying; Zheng, Honggang; Li, Conghuang; Hua, Baojin

    2015-09-15

    Pain is one of the most common and distressing symptoms suffered by patients with progression of cancer. Using a rat model of bone cancer, recent findings suggest that proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) signaling pathways contribute to neuropathic pain and blocking PAR2 amplifies antinociceptive effects of systemic morphine. The purpose of our study was to examine the underlying mechanisms responsible for the role of PAR2 in regulating bone cancer-evoked pain and the tolerance of systemic morphine. Breast sarcocarcinoma Walker 256 cells were implanted into the tibia bone cavity of rats and this evoked significant mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Our results showed that the protein expression of PAR2 and its downstream pathways (protein kinases namely, PKCε and PKA) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) were amplified in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of bone cancer rats compared to control rats. Blocking spinal PAR2 by using FSLLRY-NH2 significantly attenuated the activities of PKCε/PKA signaling pathways and TRPV1 expression as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Also, inhibition of PKCε/PKA and TRPV1 significantly diminished the hyperalgesia observed in bone cancer rats. Additionally, blocking PAR2 enhanced the attenuations of PKCε/PKA and cyclic adenosine monophosphate induced by morphine and further extended analgesia of morphine via μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Our data revealed specific signaling pathways, leading to bone cancer pain, including the activation of PAR2, downstream PKCε/PKA, TRPV1 and resultant sensitization of MOR. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of bone cancer pain often observed in clinics.

  17. MALT1 Protease Activity Is Required for Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jong W; Hoffman, Sandy; Beal, Allison M; Dykon, Angela; Ringenberg, Michael A; Hughes, Anna C; Dare, Lauren; Anderson, Amber D; Finger, Joshua; Kasparcova, Viera; Rickard, David; Berger, Scott B; Ramanjulu, Joshi; Emery, John G; Gough, Peter J; Bertin, John; Foley, Kevin P

    2015-01-01

    CARMA-BCL10-MALT1 signalosomes play important roles in antigen receptor signaling and other pathways. Previous studies have suggested that as part of this complex, MALT1 functions as both a scaffolding protein to activate NF-κB through recruitment of ubiquitin ligases, and as a protease to cleave and inactivate downstream inhibitory signaling proteins. However, our understanding of the relative importance of these two distinct MALT1 activities has been hampered by a lack of selective MALT1 protease inhibitors with suitable pharmacologic properties. To fully investigate the role of MALT1 protease activity, we generated mice homozygous for a protease-dead mutation in MALT1. We found that some, but not all, MALT1 functions in immune cells were dependent upon its protease activity. Protease-dead mice had defects in the generation of splenic marginal zone and peritoneal B1 B cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells displayed decreased T cell receptor-stimulated proliferation and IL-2 production while B cell receptor-stimulated proliferation was partially dependent on protease activity. In dendritic cells, stimulation of cytokine production through the Dectin-1, Dectin-2, and Mincle C-type lectin receptors was also found to be partially dependent upon protease activity. In vivo, protease-dead mice had reduced basal immunoglobulin levels, and showed defective responses to immunization with T-dependent and T-independent antigens. Surprisingly, despite these decreased responses, MALT1 protease-dead mice, but not MALT1 null mice, developed mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates in multiple organs, suggesting MALT1 protease activity plays a role in immune homeostasis. These findings highlight the importance of MALT1 protease activity in multiple immune cell types, and in integrating immune responses in vivo.

  18. Protease-activated receptor-2 promotes kidney tubular epithelial inflammation by inhibiting autophagy via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Du, Chunyang; Zhang, Tao; Xiao, Xia; Shi, Yonghong; Duan, Huijun; Ren, Yunzhuo

    2017-08-02

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2), which belongs to a specific class of the G-protein-coupled receptors, is central to several inflammation processes. However, the precise molecular mechanism involved remains undefined. Autophagy has been previously shown to affect inflammation. In the present study, we examine the effect of PAR2 on kidney tubular epithelial autophagy and on autophagy-related inflammation and reveal the underlying mechanism involved. Autophagic activity and levels of autophagic marker LC3 were examined in human kidney tubular epithelial cells with PAR2 knockdown or overexpression. We administered the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor (rapamycin) or activator (MHY1485) to investigate the function of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mTOR pathway. We also used transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced HK-2 cell inflammation models to investigate the role of PAR2-associated autophagy in kidney tubular epithelial inflammation. PAR2 antagonist and rapamycin were administered to mice after unilateral ureteral obstruction to detect the correlations between PAR2, autophagy, and inflammation. Our results show that PAR2 overexpression in HK-2 cells led to a greater reduction in autophagy via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway activation and induces autophagy-related inflammation. Meanwhile, a knockdown of PAR2 via PAR2 RNAi transfection greatly increased autophagy and alleviated autophagy-associated inflammation. In unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) kidneys, PAR2 antagonist treatment greatly attenuated renal inflammation and interstitial injury by enhancing autophagy. Moreover, inhibition of mTOR, rapa, markedly increased autophagy and inhibited the UUO-induced inflammation. We conclude that PAR2 induces kidney tubular epithelial inflammation by inhibiting autophagy via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway. Our results are suggestive that PAR2 inhibition may play a role in the treatment of diseases with increased inflammatory

  19. Regional Differences in Chronic Stress-induced Alterations in Mast Cell and Protease-activated Receptor-2-positive Cell Numbers in the Colon of Ws/Ws Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Sung; Lee, Moon Young; Ryu, Han Seung; Choi, Eul-Sig; Oh, Jung Taek; Yun, Ki Jung; Choi, Suck Chei

    2014-01-01

    There have been no reports on the effect of chronic psychological stress on colonic immune cells or the regional differences. We aimed to investigate the effect of chronic psychological stress on the number of mast cells and protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2-positive cells in the rat colonic mucosa. Six-week-old and 14-week-old Ws/Ws rats, which lack mast cells after 10 weeks, were used as control and mast cell-deficient groups, respectively. The rats were divided into stress and sham-treated groups. Rats in the stressed group were exposed to water avoidance stress (WAS, 1 hour/day) for 13 days. Fecal pellet output and the number of mast cells and PAR-2-positive cells in colonic mucosa were compared between the WAS and sham groups. In 6-week-old rats, the WAS group showed a significantly higher number of mast cells compared to the sham group. In 14-week-old rats, mast cells were nearly absent in the colonic mucosa. WAS significantly increased PAR-2-positive cells in 14-week-old rats, but not in 6-week-old rats. Indirect estimation of PAR-2-positive mast cells in 6-week-old rats suggested that the majority of increased mast cells following WAS did not express PAR-2. WAS increased mast cells and PAR-2-positive cells mainly in the proximal colon. Fecal pellet output was continuously higher in the WAS group than in the sham group, and the difference was significant for both 6-week-old and 14-week-old rats. Chronic psychological stress increased the number of mast cells and PAR-2-positive cells in rat colonic mucosa, and these increases were more prominent in the proximal colon.

  20. Neuroprotective effect of ginsenoside-Rg1 on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats by downregulating protease-activated receptor-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Xie, Cheng-Long; Li, Ji-Huang; Wang, Wen-Wen; Zheng, Guo-Qing; Wang, Liang-Xing

    2015-01-15

    Ginsenoside-Rg1 (G-Rg1), a saponin that is a primary component of ginseng, is very useful and important in traditional Chinese medicine for stroke. The objective of this study was to explore the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of G-Rg1 on focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Neurological examinations were performed by using Longa's 5-point scale. The brain infarct volume was determined by the 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. The permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was evaluated by Evans blue dye. Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR were used to assess protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) expression. After G-Rg1 treatment, there was a significant decrease in the neurobehavioral function score compared with normal saline (NS) treatment after ischemia/reperfusion (P<0.05). G-Rg1 significantly reduced the infarct volume compared with NS treatment after ischemia/reperfusion (P<0.001). The permeability of the BBB was significantly decreased in the G-Rg1 group compared with the NS group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Western blot and quantitative real time RT-PCR indicated that G-Rg1 administration down-regulated the expression of PAR-1 in the ischemic hemisphere compared with NS administration (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). The level of PAR-1 expression strongly correlated with BBB permeability in both the G-Rg1- and NS-treated rats (r=0.856 and r=0.908, respectively, P<0.01). G-Rg1 may ameliorate the neurological injury, the brain infarct volume and the BBB permeability induced by focal cerebral ischemia in rats and its neuroprotective mechanism is related to the down-regulation of PAR-1 expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Role of Aspergillus fumigatus in Triggering Protease-Activated Receptor-2 in Airway Epithelial Cells and Skewing the Cells toward a T-helper 2 Bias

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Tetsuya; Kato, Atsushi; Bhushan, Bharat; Norton, James E.; Suh, Lydia A.; Carter, Roderick G.; Gupta, Dave S.

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus (AF) infection and sensitization are common and promote Th2 disease in individuals with asthma. Innate immune responses of bronchial epithelial cells are now known to play a key role in determination of T cell responses upon encounter with inhaled pathogens. We have recently shown that extracts of AF suppress JAK-STAT signaling in epithelial cells and thus may promote Th2 bias. To elucidate the impact of AF on human bronchial epithelial cells, we tested the hypothesis that AF can modulate the response of airway epithelial cells to favor a Th2 response and explored the molecular mechanism of the effect. Primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were treated with AF extract or fractionated AF extract before stimulation with poly I:C or infection with human rhinovirus serotype 16 (HRV16). Expression of CXCL10 mRNA (real-time RT-PCR) and protein (ELISA) were measured as markers of IFN-mediated epithelial Th1–biased responses. Western blot was performed to evaluate expression of IFN regulatory factor-3 (IRF-3), NF-κB, and tyrosine-protein phosphatase nonreceptor type 11 (PTPN11), which are other markers of Th1 skewing. Knockdown experiments for protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) and PTPN11 were performed to analyze the role of PAR-2 in the mechanism of suppression by AF. AF and a high-molecular-weight fraction of AF extract (HMW-AF; > 50 kD) profoundly suppressed poly I:C– and HRV16-induced expression of both CXCL10 mRNA and protein from NHBE cells via a mechanism that relied upon PAR-2 activation. Both AF extract and a specific PAR-2 activator (AC-55541) suppressed the poly I:C activation of phospho–IRF-3 without affecting activation of NF-κB. Furthermore, HMW-AF extract enhanced the expression of PTPN11, a phosphatase known to inhibit IFN signaling, and concurrently suppressed poly I:C–induced expression of both CXCL10 mRNA and protein from NHBE cells. These results show that exposure of bronchial epithelial cells to AF

  2. Gastrointestinal absorption and biological activities of serine and cysteine proteases of animal and plant origin: review on absorption of serine and cysteine proteases

    PubMed Central

    Lorkowski, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Research has confirmed that peptides and larger protein molecules pass through the mucosal barrier of the gastrointestinal tract. Orally administered serine and cysteine proteases of plant and animal origin also reach blood and lymph as intact, high molecular weight and physiologically active protein molecules. Their absorption may be supported by a self-enhanced paracellular transport mechanism resulting in sub-nanomolar concentration of transiently free protease molecules or, in a complex with anti-proteases, at higher concentrations. Data from pharmacokinetic investigations reveals dose linearity for maximum plasma levels of free proteases not unusual for body proteases and a high inter-individual variability. There is no interference with each other after oral administration of protease combinations, and absorption follows an unusual invasion and elimination kinetic due to slow velocity of absorption and a fast 100% protein binding to anti-proteases. Oral application of proteases leads to increased proteolytic serum activity and increased plasma concentrations of the corresponding anti-proteases. Their biological activity is determined by their proteolytic activity as free proteases on soluble peptides/proteins or cell surface receptors (e.g. protease activated receptors) and their activity in the complex formed with their specific and/or unspecific anti-proteases. The anti-protease-complexes, during immune reaction and injuries often loaded with different cytokines, are cleared from body fluids and tissue by receptor mediated endocytosis on hepatocytes and/or blood cells. Oral administration of enteric coated tablets containing proteolytic enzymes of plant and animal origin may be a safe method to stabilize, positively influence or enhance physiological and immunological processes during disease processes and in healthy consumers. PMID:22461953

  3. Gastrointestinal absorption and biological activities of serine and cysteine proteases of animal and plant origin: review on absorption of serine and cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Lorkowski, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Research has confirmed that peptides and larger protein molecules pass through the mucosal barrier of the gastrointestinal tract. Orally administered serine and cysteine proteases of plant and animal origin also reach blood and lymph as intact, high molecular weight and physiologically active protein molecules. Their absorption may be supported by a self-enhanced paracellular transport mechanism resulting in sub-nanomolar concentration of transiently free protease molecules or, in a complex with anti-proteases, at higher concentrations. Data from pharmacokinetic investigations reveals dose linearity for maximum plasma levels of free proteases not unusual for body proteases and a high inter-individual variability. There is no interference with each other after oral administration of protease combinations, and absorption follows an unusual invasion and elimination kinetic due to slow velocity of absorption and a fast 100% protein binding to anti-proteases. Oral application of proteases leads to increased proteolytic serum activity and increased plasma concentrations of the corresponding anti-proteases. Their biological activity is determined by their proteolytic activity as free proteases on soluble peptides/proteins or cell surface receptors (e.g. protease activated receptors) and their activity in the complex formed with their specific and/or unspecific anti-proteases. The anti-protease-complexes, during immune reaction and injuries often loaded with different cytokines, are cleared from body fluids and tissue by receptor mediated endocytosis on hepatocytes and/or blood cells. Oral administration of enteric coated tablets containing proteolytic enzymes of plant and animal origin may be a safe method to stabilize, positively influence or enhance physiological and immunological processes during disease processes and in healthy consumers.

  4. Induction of Mast Cell Accumulation by Tryptase via a Protease Activated Receptor-2 and ICAM-1 Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Junling; Zhang, Huiyun; Zhan, Mengmeng; Chen, Hanqiu; Fang, Zeman; Xu, Chiyan; Chen, Huifang; He, Shaoheng

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are primary effector cells of allergy, and recruitment of mast cells in involved tissue is one of the key events in allergic inflammation. Tryptase is the most abundant secretory product of mast cells, but little is known of its influence on mast cell accumulation. Using mouse peritoneal model, cell migration assay, and flow cytometry analysis, we investigated role of tryptase in recruiting mast cells. The results showed that tryptase induced up to 6.7-fold increase in mast cell numbers in mouse peritoneum following injection. Inhibitors of tryptase, an antagonist of PAR-2 FSLLRY-NH2, and pretreatment of mice with anti-ICAM-1, anti-CD11a, and anti-CD18 antibodies dramatically diminished tryptase induced mast cell accumulation. On the other hand, PAR-2 agonist peptides SLIGRL-NH2 and tc-LIGRLO-NH2 provoked mast cell accumulation following injection. These implicate that tryptase induced mast cell accumulation is dependent on its enzymatic activity, activation of PAR-2, and interaction between ICAM-1 and LFA-1. Moreover, induction of trans-endothelium migration of mast cells in vitro indicates that tryptase acts as a chemoattractant. In conclusion, provocation of mast cell accumulation by mast cell tryptase suggests a novel self-amplification mechanism of mast cell accumulation. Mast cell stabilizers as well as PAR-2 antagonist agents may be useful for treatment of allergic reactions. PMID:27378825

  5. The protease activity of the paracaspase MALT1 is controlled by monoubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Christiane; Cabalzar, Katrin; Wolf, Annette; Gonzalez, Montserrat; Lenz, Georg; Thome, Margot

    2013-04-01

    The protease activity of the paracaspase MALT1 is central to lymphocyte activation and lymphomagenesis, but how this activity is controlled remains unknown. Here we identify a monoubiquitination of MALT1 on Lys644 that activated the protease function of MALT1. Monoubiquitinated MALT1 had enhanced protease activity, whereas a ubiquitination-deficient MALT1 mutant with replacement of that lysine with arginine (MALT1(K644R)) had less protease activity, which correlated with impaired induction of interleukin 2 (IL-2) via the T cell antigen receptor in activated T cells. Expression of MALT1(K644R) diminished the survival of cells derived from diffuse large B cell lymphoma of the activated B cell-like subtype (ABC DLBCL), which require constitutive protease activity of MALT1 for survival. Thus, monoubiquitination of MALT1 is essential for its catalytic activation and is therefore a potential target for the treatment of ABC-DLBCL and for immunomodulation.

  6. trans-Protease Activity and Structural Insights into the Active Form of the Alphavirus Capsid Protease

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Megha; Dhindwal, Sonali; Kumar, Pravindra; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The alphavirus capsid protein (CP) is a serine protease that possesses cis-proteolytic activity essential for its release from the nascent structural polyprotein. The released CP further participates in viral genome encapsidation and nucleocapsid core formation, followed by its attachment to glycoproteins and virus budding. Thus, protease activity of the alphavirus capsid is a potential antialphaviral target to arrest capsid release, maturation, and structural polyprotein processing. However, the discovery of capsid protease inhibitors has been hampered due to the lack of a suitable screening assay and of the crystal structure in its active form. Here, we report the development of a trans-proteolytic activity assay for Aura virus capsid protease (AVCP) based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for screening protease inhibitors. Kinetic parameters using fluorogenic peptide substrates were estimated, and the Km value was found to be 2.63 ± 0.62 μM while the kcat/Km value was 4.97 × 104 M−1 min−1. Also, the crystal structure of the trans-active form of AVCP has been determined to 1.81-Å resolution. Structural comparisons of the active form with the crystal structures of available substrate-bound mutant and inactive blocked forms of the capsid protease identify conformational changes in the active site, the oxyanion hole, and the substrate specificity pocket residues, which could be critical for rational drug design. IMPORTANCE The alphavirus capsid protease is an attractive antiviral therapeutic target. In this study, we have described the formerly unappreciated trans-proteolytic activity of the enzyme and for the first time have developed a FRET-based protease assay for screening capsid protease inhibitors. Our structural studies unveil the structural features of the trans-active protease, which has been previously proposed to exist in the natively unfolded form (M. Morillas, H. Eberl, F. H. Allain, R. Glockshuber, and E. Kuennemann, J

  7. Role of mast cells, stem cell factor and protease-activated receptor-2 in tubulointerstitial lesions in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Liu, Fuyou; Peng, Youming; Liu, Yinghong; Li, Lingyan; Tu, Xiwen; Cheng, Meichu; Xu, Xiangqing; Chen, Xing; Ling, Guanghui; Sun, Lin

    2010-07-01

    To elucidate the role of mast cells (MCs) in the pathogenesis of tubulointerstitial lesions in IgA nephropathy (IgAN), we investigated the number of MCs, serum stem cell factor (SCF), protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) and alpha-smooth-muscle actin (alpha-SMA) in the kidney and the correlation between MC number, SCF, PAR-2, alpha-SMA and tubulointerstitial lesions in biopsy specimens and serum creatinine levels, urinary protein excretion in patients with IgA nephropathy. Thirty-five patients with IgA nephropathy were enrolled in this study. Clinical parameters, such as serum creatinine and urinary protein excretion, were obtained from each patient at the time of biopsy. Paraffin-embedded sections were used for immunohistochemical staining. Monoclonal antibodies to human tryptase, alpha-SMA, and SCF and polyclonal antibody to PAR-2 were used as primary antibodies. Ten cortical interstitial fields were randomly selected and assessed using a computer-assisted color image analyzer. Tubulointerstitial fibrosis was assessed as the percentage of the area stained with Masson trichrome in ten cortical interstitial fields. In all of the control subjects, few tryptase-positive MCs were observed in the glomeruli and interstitium. In contrast, sparse MCs were observed in the interstitium, but not in the glomeruli of diseased kidneys. The number of interstitial MCs in the tubulointerstitial lesions, the expression of SCF, PAR-2 and alpha-SMA were positively correlated with the degree of interstitial fibrosis. A close correlation between MCs, alpha-SMA, PAR-2 and SCF was found (r = 0.887 for alpha-SMA, r = 0.844 for PAR-2, r = 0.853 for SCF, P < 0.01). Also a close correlation between alpha-SMA, PAR-2 and SCF was found (r = 0.874 for PAR-2, r = 0.862 for SCF, P < 0.01). PAR-2 was correlated with SCF (r = 0.893, P < 0.01). Moreover, a significant positive correlation was observed between the number of interstitial MCs, the expression of SCF, PAR-2 and alpha-SMA and the serum

  8. Protease and protease inhibitory activity in pregnant and postpartum involuting uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Milwidsky, A.; Beller, U.; Palti, Z.; Mayer, M.

    1982-08-15

    The presence of two distinct proteolytic activities in the rat uterus was confirmed with /sup 14/C-labeled globin used as a sensitive protein substrate and following release of label into the trichloroacetic acid-soluble supernatant fraction. Protease I is a cytoplasmic acid protease while protease II is associated with the pellet fraction, can be extracted by 0.6 M sodium chloride, and is active at pH 7.0. Protease I activity is low during pregnancy and markedly increases at term achieving maximal activity at day 3 post partum with a subsequent decline to preterm activity values. Lactation did not affect the uterine protease I activity. Protease II activity is not significantly different during pregnancy, at term, and post partum. The presence of an inhibitor of protease I was suggested by a decrease in enzyme activity with an increased cytosolic protein concentration. The inhibitor also lessened bovine trypsin activity but had no effect on protease II. Although its inhibitory potency on trypsin fluctuated during the various uterine physiologic stages, these changes appeared to be statistically insignificant. Human uterine samples were also found to contain the two protease activities with similar changes in protease I post partum. It is suggested that, both in the rat and in man, uterine involution post partum is associated with a marked increase in activity of acid cytosolic protease, while a particulate neutral protease and a soluble inhibitor of trypsin, which are also present in uterine cells, do not appear to play a significant role in the dissolution of uterine tissues after parturition.

  9. Protease activities of rumen protozoa.

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, C W; Lovelock, L K; Krumholz, L; Buchanan-Smith, J G

    1984-01-01

    Intact, metabolically active rumen protozoa prepared by gravity sedimentation and washing in a mineral solution at 10 to 15 degrees C had comparatively low proteolytic activity on azocasein and low endogenous proteolytic activity. Protozoa washed in 0.1 M potassium phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) at 4 degrees C and stored on ice autolysed when they were warmed to 39 degrees C. They also exhibited low proteolytic activity on azocasein, but they had a high endogenous proteolytic activity with a pH optimum of 5.8. The endogenous proteolytic activity was inhibited by cysteine proteinase inhibitors, for example, iodoacetate (63.1%) and the aspartic proteinase inhibitor, pepstatin (43.9%). Inhibitors specific for serine proteinases and metalloproteinases were without effect. The serine and cysteine proteinase inhibitors of microbial origin, including antipain, chymostatin, and leupeptin, caused up to 67% inhibition of endogenous proteolysis. Hydrolysis of casein by protozoa autolysates was also inhibited by cysteine proteinase inhibitors. Some of the inhibitors decreased endogenous deamination, in particular, phosphoramidon, which had little inhibitory effect on proteolysis. Protozoal and bacterial preparations exhibited low hydrolytic activities on synthetic proteinase and carboxypeptidase substrates, although the protozoa had 10 to 78 times greater hydrolytic activity (per milligram of protein) than bacteria on the synthetic aminopeptidase substrates L-leucine-p-nitroanilide, L-leucine-beta-naphthylamide, and L-leucinamide. The aminopeptidase activity was partially inhibited by bestatin. It was concluded that cysteine proteinases and, to a lesser extent, aspartic proteinases are primarily responsible for proteolysis in autolysates of rumen protozoa. The protozoal autolysates had high aminopeptidase activity; low deaminase activity was observed on endogenous amino acids. PMID:6364968

  10. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  11. Pathogen-secreted proteases activate a novel plant immune pathway.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhenyu; Li, Jian-Feng; Niu, Yajie; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Woody, Owen Z; Xiong, Yan; Djonović, Slavica; Millet, Yves; Bush, Jenifer; McConkey, Brendan J; Sheen, Jen; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2015-05-14

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades play central roles in innate immune signalling networks in plants and animals. In plants, however, the molecular mechanisms of how signal perception is transduced to MAPK activation remain elusive. Here we report that pathogen-secreted proteases activate a previously unknown signalling pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana involving the Gα, Gβ, and Gγ subunits of heterotrimeric G-protein complexes, which function upstream of an MAPK cascade. In this pathway, receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) functions as a novel scaffold that binds to the Gβ subunit as well as to all three tiers of the MAPK cascade, thereby linking upstream G-protein signalling to downstream activation of an MAPK cascade. The protease-G-protein-RACK1-MAPK cascade modules identified in these studies are distinct from previously described plant immune signalling pathways such as that elicited by bacterial flagellin, in which G proteins function downstream of or in parallel to an MAPK cascade without the involvement of the RACK1 scaffolding protein. The discovery of the new protease-mediated immune signalling pathway described here was facilitated by the use of the broad host range, opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The ability of P. aeruginosa to infect both plants and animals makes it an excellent model to identify novel immunoregulatory strategies that account for its niche adaptation to diverse host tissues and immune systems.

  12. Gene expression and activity of digestive proteases in Daphnia: effects of cyanobacterial protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The frequency of cyanobacterial blooms has increased worldwide, and these blooms have been claimed to be a major factor leading to the decline of the most important freshwater herbivores, i.e. representatives of the genus Daphnia. This suppression of Daphnia is partly attributed to the presence of biologically active secondary metabolites in cyanobacteria. Among these metabolites, protease inhibitors are found in almost every natural cyanobacterial bloom and have been shown to specifically inhibit Daphnia's digestive proteases in vitro, but to date no physiological responses of these serine proteases to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors in Daphnia have been reported in situ at the protein and genetic levels. Results Nine digestive proteases were detected in D. magna using activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Subsequent analyses by LC-MS/MS and database search led to the identification of respective protease genes. D. magna responded to dietary protease inhibitors by up-regulation of the expression of these respective proteases at the RNA-level and by the induction of new and less sensitive protease isoforms at the protein level. The up-regulation in response to dietary trypsin- and chymotrypsin-inhibitors ranged from 1.4-fold to 25.6-fold. These physiological responses of Daphnia, i.e. up-regulation of protease expression and the induction of isoforms, took place even after feeding on 20% cyanobacterial food for only 24 h. These physiological responses proved to be independent from microcystin effects. Conclusion Here for the first time it was shown in situ that a D. magna clone responds physiologically to dietary cyanobacterial protease inhibitors by phenotypic plasticity of the targets of these specific inhibitors, i.e. Daphnia gut proteases. These regulatory responses are adaptive for D. magna, as they increase the capacity for protein digestion in the presence of dietary protease inhibitors. The type and extent of these responses in protease expression might

  13. The membrane-anchored serine protease, TMPRSS2, activates PAR-2 in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    TMPRSS2 is a type II transmembrane-bound serine protease that has gained interest owing to its highly localized expression in the prostate and its overexpression in neoplastic prostate epithelium. Once activated, the serine protease domain of TMPRSS2 is released from the cell surface into the extracellular space. PAR (protease-activated receptor)-2 belongs to a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (PAR-1–4) that are activated by specific serine proteases, which are expressed in many normal and malignant cell types. Previous in vitro studies on prostate cancer cells suggest a role for PAR-2 in prostate cancer metastasis. A polyclonal anti-human TMPRSS2 antibody was generated against the TMPRSS2 serine protease domain. The antibody showed specific reactivity with recombinant expressed TMPRSS2, and so was used to extract and purify the cleaved active TMPRSS2 protease from prostate cancer cells. Reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blot analysis were used to show the expression of both TMPRSS2 and PAR-2 in the androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. Treatment of LNCaP cells with the cellular immunopurified TMPRSS2 protease induced a transient increase in intracellular calcium, which is indicative of G-protein-coupled-receptor activation. This calcium mobilization was inhibited by cellular pre-treatment with a specific PAR-2 antagonist, but not with a PAR-1 antagonist; inhibition of the protease activity also failed to mobilize calcium, suggesting that TMPRSS2 is capable of cleaving and thereby activating the PAR-2 receptor. The calcium mobilization was also inhibited by cellular pre-treatment with suramin or 2-APB (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate), indicating that a G-protein pathway is involved and that subsequent calcium release is mainly from intracellular stores. The present study describes how TMPRSS2 may contribute to prostate tumour metastasis via the activation of PAR-2. PMID:15537383

  14. The membrane-anchored serine protease, TMPRSS2, activates PAR-2 in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Susan; Greer, Brett; Hooper, John; Zijlstra, Andries; Walker, Brian; Quigley, James; Hawthorne, Susan

    2005-06-15

    TMPRSS2 is a type II transmembrane-bound serine protease that has gained interest owing to its highly localized expression in the prostate and its overexpression in neoplastic prostate epithelium. Once activated, the serine protease domain of TMPRSS2 is released from the cell surface into the extracellular space. PAR (protease-activated receptor)-2 belongs to a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (PAR-1-4) that are activated by specific serine proteases, which are expressed in many normal and malignant cell types. Previous in vitro studies on prostate cancer cells suggest a role for PAR-2 in prostate cancer metastasis. A polyclonal anti-human TMPRSS2 antibody was generated against the TMPRSS2 serine protease domain. The antibody showed specific reactivity with recombinant expressed TMPRSS2, and so was used to extract and purify the cleaved active TMPRSS2 protease from prostate cancer cells. Reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blot analysis were used to show the expression of both TMPRSS2 and PAR-2 in the androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. Treatment of LNCaP cells with the cellular immunopurified TMPRSS2 protease induced a transient increase in intracellular calcium, which is indicative of G-protein-coupled-receptor activation. This calcium mobilization was inhibited by cellular pre-treatment with a specific PAR-2 antagonist, but not with a PAR-1 antagonist; inhibition of the protease activity also failed to mobilize calcium, suggesting that TMPRSS2 is capable of cleaving and thereby activating the PAR-2 receptor. The calcium mobilization was also inhibited by cellular pre-treatment with suramin or 2-APB (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate), indicating that a G-protein pathway is involved and that subsequent calcium release is mainly from intracellular stores. The present study describes how TMPRSS2 may contribute to prostate tumour metastasis via the activation of PAR-2.

  15. Activation of influenza viruses by proteases from host cells and bacteria in the human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Böttcher-Friebertshäuser, Eva; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Garten, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Influenza is an acute infection of the respiratory tract, which affects each year millions of people. Influenza virus infection is initiated by the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) through receptor binding and fusion of viral and endosomal membranes. HA is synthesized as a precursor protein and requires cleavage by host cell proteases to gain its fusion capacity. Although cleavage of HA is crucial for virus infectivity, little was known about relevant proteases in the human airways for a long time. Recent progress in the identification and characterization of HA-activating host cell proteases has been considerable however and supports the idea of targeting HA cleavage as a novel approach for influenza treatment. Interestingly, certain bacteria have been demonstrated to support HA activation either by secreting proteases that cleave HA or due to activation of cellular proteases and thereby may contribute to virus spread and enhanced pathogenicity. In this review, we give an overview on activation of influenza viruses by proteases from host cells and bacteria with the main focus on recent progress on HA cleavage by proteases HAT and TMPRSS2 in the human airway epithelium. In addition, we outline investigations of HA-activating proteases as potential drug targets for influenza treatment.

  16. Fibrin(ogen)olytic activity of bumblebee venom serine protease

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Yuling; Choo, Young Moo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jia Jingming; Cui Zheng; Wang Dong; Kim, Doh Hoon; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2011-09-01

    Bee venom is a rich source of pharmacologically active components; it has been used as an immunotherapy to treat bee venom hypersensitivity, and venom therapy has been applied as an alternative medicine. Here, we present evidence that the serine protease found in bumblebee venom exhibits fibrin(ogen)olytic activity. Compared to honeybee venom, bumblebee venom contains a higher content of serine protease, which is one of its major components. Venom serine proteases from bumblebees did not cross-react with antibodies against the honeybee venom serine protease. We provide functional evidence indicating that bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) acts as a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. Bt-VSP activates prothrombin and directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. However, Bt-VSP is not a plasminogen activator, and its fibrinolytic activity is less than that of plasmin. Taken together, our results define roles for Bt-VSP as a prothrombin activator, a thrombin-like protease, and a plasmin-like protease. These findings offer significant insight into the allergic reaction sequence that is initiated by bee venom serine protease and its potential usefulness as a clinical agent in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Bumblebee venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) is a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. > Bt-VSP activates prothrombin. > Bt-VSP directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. > Bt-VSP is a hemostatically active protein that is a potent clinical agent.

  17. Serine protease activity in developmental stages of Eimeria tenella.

    PubMed

    Fetterer, R H; Miska, K B; Lillehoj, H; Barfield, R C

    2007-04-01

    A number of complex processes are involved in Eimeria spp. survival, including control of sporulation, intracellular invasion, evasion of host immune responses, successful reproduction, and nutrition. Proteases have been implicated in many of these processes, but the occurrence and functions of serine proteases have not been characterized. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that the Eimeria tenella genome contains several serine proteases that lack homology to trypsin. Using RT-PCR, a gene encoding a subtilisin-like and a rhomboid protease-like serine protease was shown to be developmentally regulated, both being poorly expressed in sporozoites (SZ) and merozoites (MZ). Casein substrate gel electrophoresis of oocyst extracts during sporulation demonstrated bands of proteolytic activity with relative molecular weights (Mr) of 18, 25, and 45 kDa that were eliminated by coincubation with serine protease inhibitors. A protease with Mr of 25 kDa was purified from extracts of unsporulated oocysts by a combination of affinity and anion exchange chromatography. Extracts of SZ contained only a single band of inhibitor-sensitive proteolytic activity at 25 kDa, while the pattern of proteases from extracts of MZ was similar to that of oocysts except for the occurrence of a 90 kDa protease, resistant to protease inhibitors. Excretory-secretory products (ESP) from MZ contained AEBSF (4-[2-Aminoethyl] benzenesulphonyl fluoride)-sensitive protease activity with a specific activity about 10 times greater than that observed in MZ extracts. No protease activity was observed in the ESP from SZ. Pretreatment of SZ with AEBSF significantly reduced SZ invasion and the release of the microneme protein, MIC2. The current results suggest that serine proteases are present in all the developmental stages examined.

  18. Detection of protease and protease activity using a single nanocrescent SERS probe

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gang L.; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lee, Luke P.; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2015-09-29

    This invention pertains to the in vitro detection of proteases using a single peptide-conjugate nanocrescent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes with at least nanomolar sensitivity. The probe enables detection of proteolytic activity in extremely small volume and at low concentration. In certain embodiments the probes comprise an indicator for the detection of an active protease, where the indicator comprises a nanocrescent attached to a peptide, where said peptide comprises a recognition site for the protease and a Raman tag attached to the peptide.

  19. Detection of protease and protease activity using a single nanoscrescent SERS probe

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gang L.; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lee, Luke P.; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2013-01-29

    This invention pertains to the in vitro detection of proteases using a single peptide-conjugate nanocrescent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes with at least nanomolar sensitivity. The probe enables detection of proteolytic activity in extremely small volume and at low concentration. In certain embodiments the probes comprise an indicator for the detection of an active protease, where the indicator comprises a nanocrescent attached to a peptide, where said peptide comprises a recognition site for the protease and a Raman tag attached to the peptide.

  20. A protease-activated receptor 2 agonist (AC-264613) suppresses interferon regulatory factor 5 and decreases interleukin-12p40 production by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages: Role of p53.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has a key role in the production of interleukin (IL)-12 by macrophages. IRF5 is also a central mediator of toll-like receptor signaling and is a direct target of p53. Activation of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) upregulates p53 and suppresses apoptosis. This study investigated the influence of human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and PAR-2 agonists on expression of IRF5 and IL-12p40 by macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-dependent macrophages showed upregulation of IRF5 expression, while HNE reduced expression of p53 and IRF5 in a concentration-dependent manner. HNE also caused a concentration-dependent decrease of IRF5 in macrophages transfected with small interfering RNA to silence p53, while silencing of β-arrestin 2 blunted the reduction of p53 or IRF5 by HNE. Incubation of macrophages with a PAR-2 agonist, AC-264613, caused a decrease of IRF5 expression and also significantly reduced p53 protein expression. HNE upregulated the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and caused transactivation of TLR4, while AC-264613 did not promote TLR4 transactivation. In conclusion, the PAR-2 agonist AC-264613 attenuated IRF5-associated IL-12p40 production by macrophages.

  1. Coagulation factor VIIa-mediated protease-activated receptor 2 activation leads to β-catenin accumulation via the AKT/GSK3β pathway and contributes to breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Roy, Abhishek; Ansari, Shabbir A; Das, Kaushik; Prasad, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Anindita; Mallik, Suman; Mukherjee, Ashis; Sen, Prosenjit

    2017-08-18

    Cell migration and invasion are very characteristic features of cancer cells that promote metastasis, which is one of the most common causes of mortality among cancer patients. Emerging evidence has shown that coagulation factors can directly mediate cancer-associated complications either by enhancing thrombus formation or by initiating various signaling events leading to metastatic cancer progression. It is well established that, apart from its distinct role in blood coagulation, coagulation factor FVIIa enhances aggressive behaviors of breast cancer cells, but the underlying signaling mechanisms still remain elusive. To this end, we investigated FVIIa's role in the migration and invasiveness of the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Consistent with previous observations, we observed that FVIIa increased the migratory and invasive potential of these cells. We also provide molecular evidence that protease-activated receptor 2 activation followed by PI3K-AKT activation and GSK3β inactivation is involved in these processes and that β-catenin, a well known tumor-regulatory protein, contributes to this signaling pathway. The pivotal role of β-catenin was further indicated by the up-regulation of its downstream targets cyclin D1, c-Myc, COX-2, MMP-7, MMP-14, and Claudin-1. β-Catenin knockdown almost completely attenuated the FVIIa-induced enhancement of breast cancer migration and invasion. These findings provide a new perspective to counteract the invasive behavior of breast cancer, indicating that blocking PI3K-AKT pathway-dependent β-catenin accumulation may represent a potential therapeutic approach to control breast cancer. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. A novel protease activity assay using a protease-responsive chaperone protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sao, Kentaro; Murata, Masaharu; Fujisaki, Yuri; Umezaki, Kaori; Mori, Takeshi; Niidome, Takuro; Katayama, Yoshiki; Hashizume, Makoto

    2009-06-05

    Protease activity assays are important for elucidating protease function and for developing new therapeutic agents. In this study, a novel turbidimetric method for determining the protease activity using a protease-responsive chaperone protein is described. For this purpose, a recombinant small heat-shock protein (sHSP) with an introduced Factor Xa protease recognition site was synthesized in bacteria. This recombinant mutant, FXa-HSP, exhibited chaperone-like activity at high temperatures in cell lysates. However, the chaperone-like activity of FXa-HSP decreased dramatically following treatment with Factor Xa. Protein precipitation was subsequently observed in the cell lysates. The reaction was Factor Xa concentration-dependent and was quantitatively suppressed by a specific inhibitor for Factor Xa. Protein aggregation was detected by a simple method based on turbidimetry. The results clearly demonstrate that this assay is an effective, easy-to-use method for determining protease activities without the requirement of labeling procedures and the use of radioisotopes.

  3. The dimer interfaces of protease and extra-protease domains influence the activation of protease and the specificity of GagPol cleavage.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Steven C; Gulnik, Sergei; Everitt, Lori; Kaplan, Andrew H

    2003-01-01

    Activation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease is an essential step in viral replication. As is the case for all retroviral proteases, enzyme activation requires the formation of protease homodimers. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which retroviral proteases become active within their precursors. Using an in vitro expression system, we have examined the determinants of activation efficiency and the order of cleavage site processing for the protease of HIV-1 within the full-length GagPol precursor. Following activation, initial cleavage occurs between the viral p2 and nucleocapsid proteins. This is followed by cleavage of a novel site located in the transframe domain. Mutational analysis of the dimer interface of the protease produced differential effects on activation and specificity. A subset of mutations produced enhanced cleavage at the amino terminus of the protease, suggesting that, in the wild-type precursor, cleavages that liberate the protease are a relatively late event. Replacement of the proline residue at position 1 of the protease dimer interface resulted in altered cleavage of distal sites and suggests that this residue functions as a cis-directed specificity determinant. In summary, our studies indicate that interactions within the protease dimer interface help determine the order of precursor cleavage and contribute to the formation of extended-protease intermediates. Assembly domains within GagPol outside the protease domain also influence enzyme activation.

  4. Oviductal estrogen receptor α signaling prevents protease-mediated embryo death

    PubMed Central

    Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Bernhardt, Miranda L; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; Myers, Page H; Edin, Matthew L; Lih, Fred B; Hewitt, Sylvia C; Korach, Kenneth S; Williams, Carmen J

    2015-01-01

    Development of uterine endometrial receptivity for implantation is orchestrated by cyclic steroid hormone-mediated signals. It is unknown if these signals are necessary for oviduct function in supporting fertilization and preimplantation development. Here we show that conditional knockout (cKO) mice lacking estrogen receptor α (ERα) in oviduct and uterine epithelial cells have impaired fertilization due to a dramatic reduction in sperm migration. In addition, all successfully fertilized eggs die before the 2-cell stage due to persistence of secreted innate immune mediators including proteases. Elevated protease activity in cKO oviducts causes premature degradation of the zona pellucida and embryo lysis, and wild-type embryos transferred into cKO oviducts fail to develop normally unless rescued by concomitant transfer of protease inhibitors. Thus, suppression of oviductal protease activity mediated by estrogen-epithelial ERα signaling is required for fertilization and preimplantation embryo development. These findings have implications for human infertility and post-coital contraception. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10453.001 PMID:26623518

  5. Fluoride Does Not Inhibit Enamel Protease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tye, C.E.; Antone, J.V.; Bartlett, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorosed enamel can be porous, mottled, discolored, hypomineralized, and protein-rich if the enamel matrix is not completely removed. Proteolytic processing by matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP20) and kallikrein-4 (KLK4) is critical for enamel formation, and homozygous mutation of either protease results in hypomineralized, protein-rich enamel. Herein, we demonstrate that the lysosomal proteinase cathepsin K is expressed in the enamel organ in a developmentally defined manner that suggests a role for cathepsin K in degrading re-absorbed enamel matrix proteins. We therefore asked if fluoride directly inhibits the activity of MMP20, KLK4, dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) (an in vitro activator of KLK4), or cathepsin K. Enzyme kinetics were studied with quenched fluorescent peptides with purified enzyme in the presence of 0–10 mM NaF, and data were fit to Michaelis-Menten curves. Increasing concentrations of known inhibitors showed decreases in enzyme activity. However, concentrations of up to 10 mM NaF had no effect on KLK4, MMP20, DPPI, or cathepsin K activity. Our results show that fluoride does not directly inhibit enamel proteolytic activity. PMID:21118795

  6. Protease-activated nanomaterials for targeted cancer theranostics.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yung-Chieh; Hsiao, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Cancer metastasis accompanies irreversible proteolysis. Malignant cells that abnormally express extracellular proteases usually lead to a poor outcome during cancer progression. The development of protease-activated drugs is an important goal. Moreover, the specific proteolytic mechanism can be used as a diagnostic strategy. Currently, nanotechnology for use in medication has been extensively developed to exploit the physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles. For example, to improve the efficacy of cancer therapy drugs, targeted delivery has been attempted by combining a targeting ligand with a nanoparticle. Multifunctional nanoparticles have been prepared for cancer therapy and diagnosis because of their advantages such as stable physical properties, drug carrying ability and potential specific targeting ability. In this review, we present reports on protease-activated nanoparticle design for cancer theranostics. We further describe recent protease-activated metalloprotease-based and cathepsin-based nanomaterials used in cancer nanotheranostics. Innovative protease-activated nanomaterials have significant potential for designing personalized treatment.

  7. A serine protease zymogen functions as a pattern-recognition receptor for lipopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Ariki, Shigeru; Koori, Kumiko; Osaki, Tsukasa; Motoyama, Kiyohito; Inamori, Kei-ichiro; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced exocytosis of granular hemocytes is a key component of the horseshoe crab's innate immunity to infectious microorganisms; stimulation by LPS induces the secretion of various defense molecules from the granular hemocytes. Using a previously uncharacterized assay for exocytosis, we clearly show that hemocytes respond only to LPS and not to other pathogen-associated molecular patterns, such as β-1,3-glucans and peptidoglycans. Furthermore, we show that a granular protein called factor C, an LPS-recognizing serine protease zymogen that initiates the hemolymph coagulation cascade, also exists on the hemocyte surface as a biosensor for LPS. Our data demonstrate that the proteolytic activity of factor C is both necessary and sufficient to trigger exocytosis through a heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein-mediating signaling pathway. Exocytosis of hemocytes was not induced by thrombin, but it was induced by hexapeptides corresponding to the tethered ligands of protease-activated G protein-coupled receptors (PARs). This finding suggested the presence of a PAR-like receptor on the hemocyte surface. We conclude that the serine protease zymogen on the hemocyte surface functions as a pattern-recognition protein for LPS. PMID:14722355

  8. Spatially dependent activation of the patterning protease, Easter.

    PubMed

    LeMosy, Ellen K

    2006-04-17

    The dorsoventral axis of the Drosophila embryo is established by the activating cleavage of a signaling ligand by a serine protease, Easter, only on the ventral side of the embryo. Easter is the final protease in a serine protease cascade in which initial reaction steps appear not to be ventrally restricted, but where Easter activity is promoted ventrally through the action of a spatial cue at an unknown step in the pathway. Here, biochemical studies demonstrate that this spatial control occurs at or above the level of Easter zymogen activation, rather than through direct promotion of Easter's catalytic activity against the signaling ligand.

  9. Serine protease activities in Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi promastigotes.

    PubMed

    da Silva-López, Raquel Elisa; dos Santos, Tatiana Resende; Morgado-Díaz, José Andrés; Tanaka, Marcelo Neves; de Simone, Salvatore Giovanni

    2010-10-01

    The present work reports the isolation, biochemical characterization, and subcellular location of serine proteases from aqueous, detergent soluble, and culture supernatant of Leishmania chagasi promastigote extracts, respectively, LCSII, LCSI, and LCSIII. The active enzyme molecular masses of LCSII were about 105, 66, and 60 kDa; of LCSI, 60 and 58 kDa; and of LCSIII, approximately 76 and 68 kDa. Optimal pH for the enzymes was 7.0 for LCSI and LCSIII and 8.5 for LCSII, and the optimal temperature for all enzymes was 37°C, using α-N-ρ-tosyl-L: -arginine methyl ester as substrate. Assay of thermal stability indicated that LCSIII is the more stable enzyme. Hemoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and ovalbumin were hydrolyzed by LCSII and LCSI but not by LCSIII. Inhibition studies suggested that enzymes belong to the serine protease class modulated by divalent cations. Rabbit antiserum against 56-kDa serine protease of Leishmania amazonensis identified proteins in all extracts of L. chagasi. Furthermore, immunocytochemistry demonstrated that serine proteases are located in flagellar pocket region and cytoplasmic vesicles of L. chagasi promastigotes. These findings indicate that L. chagasi serine proteases differ from L. amazonensis proteases and all known flagellate proteases, but display some similarities with serine proteases from other Leishmania species, suggesting a conservation of this enzymatic activity in the genus.

  10. Protease activity, localization and inhibition in the human hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Bhogal, R K; Mouser, P E; Higgins, C A; Turner, G A

    2014-02-01

    In humans, the process of hair shedding, referred to as exogen, is believed to occur independently of the other hair cycle phases. Although the actual mechanisms involved in hair shedding are not fully known, it has been hypothesized that the processes leading to the final step of hair shedding may be driven by proteases and/or protease inhibitor activity. In this study, we investigated the presence of proteases and protease activity in naturally shed human hairs and assessed enzyme inhibition activity of test materials. We measured enzyme activity using a fluorescence-based assay and protein localization by indirect immunohistochemistry (IHC). We also developed an ex vivo skin model for measuring the force required to pull hair fibres from skin. Our data demonstrate the presence of protease activity in the tissue material surrounding club roots. We also demonstrated the localization of specific serine protease protein expression in human hair follicle by IHC. These data provide evidence demonstrating the presence of proteases around the hair club roots, which may play a role during exogen. We further tested the hypothesis that a novel protease inhibitor system (combination of Trichogen) and climbazole) could inhibit protease activity in hair fibre club root extracts collected from a range of ethnic groups (U.K., Brazil, China, first-generation Mexicans in the U.S.A., Thailand and Turkey) in both males and females. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this combination is capable of increasing the force required to remove hair in an ex vivo skin model system. These studies indicate the presence of proteolytic activity in the tissue surrounding the human hair club root and show that it is possible to inhibit this activity with a combination of Trichogen and climbazole. This technology may have potential to reduce excessive hair shedding. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  11. Photoactivated Spatiotemporally-Responsive Nanosensors of in Vivo Protease Activity.

    PubMed

    Dudani, Jaideep S; Jain, Piyush K; Kwong, Gabriel A; Stevens, Kelly R; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2015-12-22

    Proteases play diverse and important roles in physiology and disease, including influencing critical processes in development, immune responses, and malignancies. Both the abundance and activity of these enzymes are tightly regulated and highly contextual; thus, in order to elucidate their specific impact on disease progression, better tools are needed to precisely monitor in situ protease activity. Current strategies for detecting protease activity are focused on functionalizing synthetic peptide substrates with reporters that emit detection signals following peptide cleavage. However, these activity-based probes lack the capacity to be turned on at sites of interest and, therefore, are subject to off-target activation. Here we report a strategy that uses light to precisely control both the location and time of activity-based sensing. We develop photocaged activity-based sensors by conjugating photolabile molecules directly onto peptide substrates, thereby blocking protease cleavage by steric hindrance. At sites of disease, exposure to ultraviolet light unveils the nanosensors to allow proteases to cleave and release a reporter fragment that can be detected remotely. We apply this spatiotemporally controlled system to probe secreted protease activity in vitro and tumor protease activity in vivo. In vitro, we demonstrate the ability to dynamically and spatially measure metalloproteinase activity in a 3D model of colorectal cancer. In vivo, veiled nanosensors are selectively activated at the primary tumor site in colorectal cancer xenografts to capture the tumor microenvironment-enriched protease activity. The ability to remotely control activity-based sensors may offer a valuable complement to existing tools for measuring biological activity.

  12. Pseudo-active sites of protease domains: HGF/Met and Sonic hedgehog signaling in cancer.

    PubMed

    Maun, Henry R; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Lazarus, Robert A

    2010-08-01

    Proteases represent a large class of enzymes with crucial biological functions. Although targeting various relevant proteases for therapeutic intervention has been widely investigated, structurally related proteins lacking proteolytic activity (pseudo-proteases) have received relatively little attention. Two distinct clinically relevant cancer pathways that contain signaling proteins with pseudo-protease domains include the Met and Hedgehog (Hh) pathways. The receptor tyrosine kinase Met pathway is driven by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a plasminogen-related ligand that binds Met and activates intracellular pathways resulting in cell proliferation, angiogenesis, motility and survival. HGF is a disulfide-linked alpha/beta-heterodimer having a trypsin serine protease-like beta-chain. The Hh pathway is driven by Sonic hedgehog (Shh), which has a Zn(2+) metalloprotease fold and binds Patched1 (Ptc1), which de-represses Smoothened and ultimately activates Gli-dependent transcription. Although HGF and Shh differ in structure and function, the pseudo-catalytic sites of both HGF and Shh are crucial for signal transduction. For HGF, this region binds the Met beta-propeller domain, which leads to Met dimerization and signaling. For Hh, this region binds to the antagonist receptor Hedgehog-interacting protein (Hhip) and most probably to Ptc1 as well. Thus, for both HGF and Hh pathways, targeting ligand pseudo-active sites represents a new strategy for regulation.

  13. Effects of detergents on the West Nile virus protease activity.

    PubMed

    Ezgimen, Manolya D; Mueller, Niklaus H; Teramoto, Tadahisa; Padmanabhan, R

    2009-05-01

    Detergents such as Triton X-100 are often used in drug discovery research to weed out small molecule promiscuous and non-specific inhibitors which act by aggregation in solution and undesirable precipitation in aqueous assay buffers. We evaluated the effects of commonly used detergents, Triton X-100, Tween-20, Nonidet-40 (NP-40), Brij-35, and CHAPS, on the enzymatic activity of West Nile virus (WNV) protease. Unexpectedly, Triton X-100, Tween-20, and NP-40 showed an enhancement of in vitro WNV protease activity from 2 to 2.5-fold depending on the detergent and its concentration. On the other hand, Brij-35, at 0.001% enhanced the protease activity by 1.5-fold and CHAPS had the least enhancing effect. The kinetic analysis showed that the increase in protease activity by Triton X-100 was dose-dependent. Furthermore, at Triton X-100 and Tween-20 concentrations higher than 0.001%, the inhibition of compound B, one of the lead compounds against WNV protease identified in a high throughput screen (IC(50) value of 5.7+/-2.5 microM), was reversed. However, in the presence of CHAPS, compound B still showed good inhibition of WNV protease. Our results, taken together, indicate that nonionic detergents, Triton X-100, Tween, and NP-40 are unsuitable for the purpose of discrimination of true versus promiscuous inhibitors of WNV protease in high throughput assays.

  14. Mast cells positive to tryptase, endothelial cells positive to protease-activated receptor-2, and microvascular density correlate among themselves in hepatocellular carcinoma patients who have undergone surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ammendola, Michele; Sacco, Rosario; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Piardi, Tullio; Zuccalà, Valeria; Patruno, Rosa; Zullo, Alessandra; Zizzo, Nicola; Nardo, Bruno; Marech, Ilaria; Crovace, Alberto; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Pessaux, Patrick; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2016-01-01

    Background Mast cells (MCs) can stimulate angiogenesis, releasing several proangiogenic cytokines stored in their cytoplasm. In particular MCs can release tryptase, a potent in vivo and in vitro proangiogenic factor via proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) activation and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. Nevertheless, no data are available concerning the relationship between MC density positive to tryptase (MCDPT), endothelial cells positive to PAR-2 forming microvascular density (PAR-2-MVD), and classical MVD (C-MVD) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) angiogenesis. This study analyzed the correlation between MCDPT, PAR-2-MVD, and C-MVD, each correlated to the others and to the main clinicopathological features, in early HCC patients who underwent surgery. Methods A series of 53 HCC patients with early stage (stage 0 according to the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer Staging Classification) were selected and then underwent surgery. Tumor tissue samples were evaluated by means of immunohistochemistry and image analysis methods in terms of number of MCDPT, PAR-2-MVD, and C-MVD. Results A significant correlation between MCDPT, PAR-2-MVD, and C-MVD groups, each correlated to the others, was found by Pearson t-test analysis (r ranged from 0.67 to 0.81; P-value ranged from 0.01 to 0.03). No other significant correlation was found. Conclusion Our in vivo pilot data suggest that MCDPT and PAR-2-MVD may play a role in HCC angiogenesis and could be further evaluated as a target of antiangiogenic therapy. PMID:27499640

  15. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macro­globulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group. PMID:26143919

  16. Synergism of Selective Tumor Vascular Thrombosis and Protease Activated Prodrug

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Such a cytotoxin can be aldesleukin, 5- aminolevulinic acid, bleomycin sulfate, camptothecin, carboplatin, carmustine, cisplatin, cladribine, lyophilized... aminolevulinic acid, protoporphyrin IX, taxol or paclitaxel. In one embodiment, the prodrug is activated by asparaginyl proteases (e.g., legumain) and

  17. Active Site Characterization of Proteases Sequences from Different Species of Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Morya, V K; Yadav, Virendra K; Yadav, Sangeeta; Yadav, Dinesh

    2016-09-01

    A total of 129 proteases sequences comprising 43 serine proteases, 36 aspartic proteases, 24 cysteine protease, 21 metalloproteases, and 05 neutral proteases from different Aspergillus species were analyzed for the catalytically active site residues using MEROPS database and various bioinformatics tools. Different proteases have predominance of variable active site residues. In case of 24 cysteine proteases of Aspergilli, the predominant active site residues observed were Gln193, Cys199, His364, Asn384 while for 43 serine proteases, the active site residues namely Asp164, His193, Asn284, Ser349 and Asp325, His357, Asn454, Ser519 were frequently observed. The analysis of 21 metalloproteases of Aspergilli revealed Glu298 and Glu388, Tyr476 as predominant active site residues. In general, Aspergilli species-specific active site residues were observed for different types of protease sequences analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis of these 129 proteases sequences revealed 14 different clans representing different types of proteases with diverse active site residues.

  18. MALT1 Protease Activity Controls the Expression of Inflammatory Genes in Keratinocytes upon Zymosan Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Anja; Grondona, Paula; Maier, Tabea; Brändle, Marc; Schönfeld, Caroline; Jäger, Günter; Kosnopfel, Corinna; Eberle, Franziska C; Schittek, Birgit; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Yazdi, Amir S; Hailfinger, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    The protease activity of the paracaspase mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) plays an important role in antigen receptor-mediated lymphocyte activation by controlling the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB and is thus essential for the expression of inflammatory target genes. MALT1 is not only present in cells of the hematopoietic lineage, but is ubiquitously expressed. Here we report that stimulation with zymosan or Staphylococcus aureus induced MALT1 protease activity in human primary keratinocytes. Inhibition of the Src family of kinases or novel protein kinase C isoforms as well as silencing of CARMA2 or BCL10 interfered with activation of MALT1 protease. Silencing or inhibition of MALT1 protease strongly decreased the expression of important inflammatory genes such as TNFα, IL-17C, CXCL8 and HBD-2. MALT1-inhibited cells were unable to mount an antimicrobial response upon zymosan stimulation or phorbolester/ionomycin treatment, demonstrating a central role of MALT1 protease activity in keratinocyte immunity and suggesting MALT1 as a potential target in inflammatory skin diseases.

  19. Characterization of the protease activity of detergents: laboratory practicals for studying the protease profile and activity of various commercial detergents.

    PubMed

    Valls, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2011-07-01

    Detergent enzymes account for about 30% of the total worldwide production of enzymes and are one of the largest and most successful applications of modern industrial biotechnology. Proteases can improve the wash performance of household, industrial, and institutional laundry detergents used to remove protein-based stains such as blood, grass, body fluids, and food soils. This article describes two easy and cheap laboratory exercises to study the presence, profile, and basic enzymology of detergent proteases. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the detergent protease activity of various commercial detergents using the N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-prolyl-L-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide method and the bovine serum albumin degradation capacity. Students are also required to elucidate the enzymatic subtype of detergent proteases by studying the inhibitory potential of several types of protease inhibitors revealed by the same experimental methodology. Additionally, the results of the exercises can be used to provide additional insights on elementary enzymology by studying the influence of several important parameters on protease activity such as temperature (in this article) and the influence of pH and effects of surfactants and oxidizers (proposed). Students also develop laboratory skills, problem-solving capacities, and the ability to write a laboratory report. The exercises are mainly designed for an advanced undergraduate project in the biochemistry and biotechnology sciences. Globally, these laboratory practicals show students the biotechnological applications of proteases in the detergent industry and also reinforce important enzymology concepts.

  20. Ubiquitin-specific Protease 20 Regulates the Reciprocal Functions of β-Arrestin2 in Toll-like Receptor 4-promoted Nuclear Factor κB (NFκB) Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Jean-Charles, Pierre-Yves; Zhang, Lisheng; Wu, Jiao-Hui; Han, Sang-oh; Brian, Leigh; Freedman, Neil J.; Shenoy, Sudha K.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) promotes vascular inflammatory disorders such as neointimal hyperplasia and atherosclerosis. TLR4 triggers NFκB signaling through the ubiquitin ligase TRAF6 (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6). TRAF6 activity can be impeded by deubiquitinating enzymes like ubiquitin-specific protease 20 (USP20), which can reverse TRAF6 autoubiquitination, and by association with the multifunctional adaptor protein β-arrestin2. Although β-arrestin2 effects on TRAF6 suggest an anti-inflammatory role, physiologic β-arrestin2 promotes inflammation in atherosclerosis and neointimal hyperplasia. We hypothesized that anti- and proinflammatory dimensions of β-arrestin2 activity could be dictated by β-arrestin2's ubiquitination status, which has been linked with its ability to scaffold and localize activated ERK1/2 to signalosomes. With purified proteins and in intact cells, our protein interaction studies showed that TRAF6/USP20 association and subsequent USP20-mediated TRAF6 deubiquitination were β-arrestin2-dependent. Generation of transgenic mice with smooth muscle cell-specific expression of either USP20 or its catalytically inactive mutant revealed anti-inflammatory effects of USP20 in vivo and in vitro. Carotid endothelial denudation showed that antagonizing smooth muscle cell USP20 activity increased NFκB activation and neointimal hyperplasia. We found that β-arrestin2 ubiquitination was promoted by TLR4 and reversed by USP20. The association of USP20 with β-arrestin2 was augmented when β-arrestin2 ubiquitination was prevented and reduced when β-arrestin2 ubiquitination was rendered constitutive. Constitutive β-arrestin2 ubiquitination also augmented NFκB activation. We infer that pro- and anti-inflammatory activities of β-arrestin2 are determined by β-arrestin2 ubiquitination and that changes in USP20 expression and/or activity can therefore regulate inflammatory responses, at least in part, by defining the ubiquitination

  1. Hydrophobic core flexibility modulates enzyme activity in HIV-1 protease

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.; Bolon, Daniel N. A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity. PMID:22295904

  2. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  3. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  4. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  5. A Tunable, Modular Approach to Fluorescent Protease-Activated Reporters

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Nicholls, Samantha B.; Hardy, Jeanne A.

    2013-01-01

    Proteases are one of the most important and historically utilized classes of drug targets. To effectively interrogate this class of proteins, which encodes nearly 2% of the human proteome, it is necessary to develop effective and cost-efficient methods that report on their activity both in vitro and in vivo. We have developed a robust reporter of caspase proteolytic activity, called caspase-activatable green fluorescent protein (CA-GFP). The caspases play central roles in homeostatic regulation, as they execute programmed cell death, and in drug design, as caspases are involved in diseases ranging from cancer to neurodegeneration. CA-GFP is a genetically encoded dark-to-bright fluorescent reporter of caspase activity in in vitro, cell-based, and animal systems. Based on the CA-GFP platform, we developed reporters that can discriminate the activities of caspase-6 and -7, two highly related proteases. A second series of reporters, activated by human rhinovirus 3C protease, demonstrated that we could alter the specificity of the reporter by reengineering the protease recognition sequence. Finally, we took advantage of the spectrum of known fluorescent proteins to generate green, yellow, cyan, and red reporters, paving the way for multiplex protease monitoring. PMID:23561537

  6. Structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin reveals a putative mechanism of conformational activation for protease entrapment

    SciTech Connect

    Fyfe, Cameron D.; Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Wall, Daniel M.; Burchmore, Richard J. S.; Byron, Olwyn; Walker, Daniel

    2015-06-30

    The X-ray structure of protease-cleaved E. coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. Bacterial α-2-macroglobulins have been suggested to function in defence as broad-spectrum inhibitors of host proteases that breach the outer membrane. Here, the X-ray structure of protease-cleaved Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin is described, which reveals a putative mechanism of activation and conformational change essential for protease inhibition. In this competitive mechanism, protease cleavage of the bait-region domain results in the untethering of an intrinsically disordered region of this domain which disrupts native interdomain interactions that maintain E. coli α-2-macroglobulin in the inactivated form. The resulting global conformational change results in entrapment of the protease and activation of the thioester bond that covalently links to the attacking protease. Owing to the similarity in structure and domain architecture of Escherichia coli α-2-macroglobulin and human α-2-macroglobulin, this protease-activation mechanism is likely to operate across the diverse members of this group.

  7. Humanizing the Protease-Activated Receptor (PAR) Expression Profile in Mouse Platelets by Knocking PAR1 into the Par3 Locus Reveals PAR1 Expression Is Not Tolerated in Mouse Platelets

    PubMed Central

    French, Shauna L.; Paramitha, Antonia C.; Moon, Mitchell J.; Dickins, Ross A.; Hamilton, Justin R.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-platelet drugs are the mainstay of pharmacotherapy for heart attack and stroke prevention, yet improvements are continually sought. Thrombin is the most potent activator of platelets and targeting platelet thrombin receptors (protease-activated receptors; PARs) is an emerging anti-thrombotic approach. Humans express two PARs on their platelets–PAR1 and PAR4. The first PAR1 antagonist was recently approved for clinical use and PAR4 antagonists are in early clinical development. However, pre-clinical studies examining platelet PAR function are challenging because the platelets of non-primates do not accurately reflect the PAR expression profile of human platelets. Mice, for example, express Par3 and Par4. To address this limitation, we aimed to develop a genetically modified mouse that would express the same repertoire of platelet PARs as humans. Here, human PAR1 preceded by a lox-stop-lox was knocked into the mouse Par3 locus, and then expressed in a platelet-specific manner (hPAR1-KI mice). Despite correct targeting and the predicted loss of Par3 expression and function in platelets from hPAR1-KI mice, no PAR1 expression or function was detected. Specifically, PAR1 was not detected on the platelet surface nor internally by flow cytometry nor in whole cell lysates by Western blot, while a PAR1-activating peptide failed to induce platelet activation assessed by either aggregation or surface P-selectin expression. Platelets from hPAR1-KI mice did display significantly diminished responsiveness to thrombin stimulation in both assays, consistent with a Par3-/- phenotype. In contrast to the observations in hPAR1-KI mouse platelets, the PAR1 construct used here was successfully expressed in HEK293T cells. Together, these data suggest ectopic PAR1 expression is not tolerated in mouse platelets and indicate a different approach is required to develop a small animal model for the purpose of any future preclinical testing of PAR antagonists as anti-platelet drugs. PMID

  8. Increased activity of unlinked Zika virus NS2B/NS3 protease compared to linked Zika virus protease.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Benjamin D; Slater, Kristin; Spellmon, Nicholas; Holcomb, Joshua; Medapureddy, Prasanna; Muzzarelli, Kendall M; Yang, Zhe; Ovadia, Reuben; Amblard, Franck; Kovari, Iulia A; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kovari, Ladislau C

    2017-03-22

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus spread by daytime-active Aedes spp. mosquitoes such as A. aegypti and A. albopictus. Previously thought to be a mild infection, the latest ZIKV outbreak in the Americas is causally associated with more severe symptoms as well as severe birth defects, such as microcephaly. Currently no vaccine or antiviral exists. However, recent progress has demonstrated the viral NS2B/NS3 protease may be a suitable target for the development of small-molecule antiviral agents. To better understand the ZIKV protease, we expressed, purified, and characterized unlinked and linked NS2B/NS3 protease corresponding to an isolate from the recent outbreak in Puerto Rico. Unlinked ZIKV protease is more active and binds substrate with greater affinity than linked ZIKV protease. Therefore, we propose that unlinked ZIKV protease be used when evaluating or designing ZIKV protease inhibitors. Additionally, potent inhibitors of related viral proteases, like West Nile Virus and Dengue virus, may serve as advanced starting points to identify and develop ZIKV protease inhibitors.

  9. Interference with Protease-activated Receptor 1 Alleviates Neuronal Cell Death Induced by Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Microglial Cells through the PI3K/Akt Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuxin; Yang, Wuyang; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Wang, Baocheng; Xu, Shujun; Zhu, Weijie; Yu, Feng; Yuan, Shaoji; Lu, Peigang

    2016-01-01

    Excessive microglial cells activation in response to inflammatory stimuli leads to synaptic loss, dysfunction, and neuronal cell death. Activated microglia are involved in the pathogenesis of neurological conditions and frequently contribute to several complications. Accumulating evidence suggests that signaling through PAR-1 is involved in inflammation, however, its function has yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we have demonstrated that the suppression of PAR-1 leads to down-regulation of inflammatory factors including IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, NO, as well as the prevention of activation of NF-κB in BV2 cells. In addition, we found that a PAR-1 antagonist, SCH, prevented LPS-induced excessive microglial activation in a dose-dependent manner. As a result of SCH treatment, neuronal cell death via up-regulation of Akt-mediated pathways was reduced. Our results demonstrate that the beneficial effects of SCH are linked to its ability to block an inflammatory response. Further, we found that SCH inhibited the death of PC12 neurons from the cytotoxicity of activated BV2 cells via activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. These neuro-protective effects appear to be related to inhibition of PAR-1, and represents a novel neuroprotective strategy that could has potential for use in therapeutic interventions of neuroinflammatory disease. PMID:27910893

  10. Inhibition of human natural killer cell activity by Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease and elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, B K; Kharazmi, A

    1987-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease (AP) and elastase (Ela) on human natural killer (NK) cell activity in vitro. AP and Ela were found to inhibit NK cell function. Addition of alpha interferon and interleukin-2 did not abolish this inhibition of NK cell activity. Adhesion of effector to target cells was studied in a single-cell agarose assay of monocyte-depleted NK-cell-enriched cell populations. AP and Ela were shown to inhibit effector/target cell conjugate formation. Furthermore, AP and Ela inhibited the binding of the monoclonal antibody Leu-11, which reacts with the Fc receptor of NK cells. The inhibition of NK cell binding to the target cell by P. aeruginosa proteases is most likely due to proteolytic cleavage of the surface receptors involved in the binding of the effector cell to the target cell. PMID:3030937

  11. Unbalanced expression of protease-activated receptors-1 and -2 in the colon of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Bian, Zhao Xiang; Li, Zhi; Huang, Zhi Xin; Zhang, Man; Chen, Hong Li; Xu, Hong Xi; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether a changed expression ratio of PAR-1 and PAR-2 in the colon is associated with diarrhea-predominant IBS patients. PAR-1, -2, thrombin, mast cell tryptase, tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), and chromgranin A (ChrA) in colonic biopsy samples from 10 diarrhea-predominant IBS patients and 13 healthy control subjects were semiquantified with immunofluorescence and image analysis. Serotonin concentrations in biopsy samples were evaluated by capillary electrophoresis. Significantly lower expression of PAR-1 and higher expression of mast cell tryptase was detected in the colons of patients, with statistically unchanged expression of PAR-2. Thrombin-, TPH-, and ChrA-positive cells were markedly increased in IBS patients, but no significant difference in serotonin concentration existed in the colons between two groups. The ratio of PAR-1/PAR-2 expression was significantly decreased in patients (0.33+/-0.19 versus 0.66+/-0.22, P=0.001) and negatively correlated to ChrA-positive cells. Changed expression ratio of PAR-1 to PAR-2 in the colon is connected with diarrhea-predominant IBS patients. Methods to restore an appropriate balance of PAR-1 and PAR-2 activation in the colon may offer a promising future therapeutic strategy for IBS patients.

  12. Cysteine protease antigens cleave CD123, the α subunit of murine IL-3 receptor, on basophils and suppress IL-3-mediated basophil expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikado, Hideto; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2015-05-01

    Th2 type immune responses are essential for protective immunity against parasites and play crucial roles in allergic disorders. Helminth parasites secrete a variety of proteases for their infectious cycles including for host entry, tissue migration, and suppression of host immune effector cell function. Furthermore, a number of pathogen-derived antigens, as well as allergens such as papain, belong to the family of cysteine proteases. Although the link between protease activity and Th2 type immunity is well documented, the mechanisms by which proteases regulate host immune responses are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the cysteine proteases papain and bromelain selectively cleave the α subunit of the IL-3 receptor (IL-3Rα/CD123) on the surface of murine basophils. The decrease in CD123 expression on the cell surface, and the degradation of the extracellular domain of recombinant CD123 were dependent on the protease activity of papain and bromelain. Pre-treatment of murine basophils with papain resulted in inhibition of IL-3-IL-3R signaling and suppressed IL-3- but not thymic stromal lymphopoietin-induced expansion of basophils in vitro. Our unexpected findings illuminate a novel mechanism for the regulation of basophil functions by protease antigens. Because IL-3 plays pivotal roles in the activation and proliferation of basophils and in protective immunity against helminth parasites, pathogen-derived proteases might contribute to the pathogenesis of infections by regulating IL-3-mediated functions in basophils. - Highlights: • We identified the murine IL3R as a novel target of papain-family cysteine proteases. • Papain-family cysteine proteases cleaved IL3Rα/CD123 on murine basophils. • Papain suppressed IL3- but not TSLP-induced expansion of murine basophils. • The inactivation of IL3R might be a strategy for pathogens to suppress host immunity.

  13. Cockroach protease allergen induces allergic airway inflammation via epithelial cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Sagar L.; Agrawal, Komal; Gaur, Shailendra Nath; Arora, Naveen

    2017-01-01

    Protease allergens are known to enhance allergic inflammation but their exact role in initiation of allergic reactions at mucosal surfaces still remains elusive. This study was aimed at deciphering the role of serine protease activity of Per a 10, a major cockroach allergen in initiation of allergic inflammation at mucosal surfaces. We demonstrate that Per a 10 increases epithelial permeability by disruption of tight junction proteins, ZO-1 and occludin, and enhances the migration of Monocyte derived dendritic cell precursors towards epithelial layer as exhibited by trans-well studies. Per a 10 exposure also leads to secretion of IL-33, TSLP and intracellular Ca2+ dependent increase in ATP levels. Further, in vivo experiments revealed that Per a 10 administration in mice elevated allergic inflammatory parameters along with high levels of IL-33, TSLP, IL-1α and uric acid in the mice lungs. We next demonstrated that Per a 10 cleaves CD23 (low affinity IgE receptor) from the surface of PBMCs and purified B cells and CD25 (IL-2 receptor) from the surface of PBMCs and purified T cells in an activity dependent manner, which might favour Th2 responses. In conclusion, protease activity of Per a 10 plays a significant role in initiation of allergic airway inflammation at the mucosal surfaces. PMID:28198394

  14. Protease activity in cockroach and basidiomycete allergen extracts.

    PubMed

    Wongtim, S; Lehrer, S B; Salvaggio, J E; Horner, W E

    1993-01-01

    Inherent proteolytic activity was estimated in cockroach and basidiomycete extracts by quantifying acid soluble peptides that were released by incubating extracts with 1% bovine serum albumin as measured by Lowry (Sigma). Reference proteases released 740 (Proteinase K, 0.1 U), 248 (Trypsin, 1.0 U), and 533 micrograms/ml (Pronase, 0.5 U) of soluble peptides. American whole body cockroach extract (0.1 mg dry weight) released 330 micrograms/ml of soluble peptides, representing 13 trypsin equivalent units (TEU)/mg. Extracts from spores of the mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus released 230 micrograms/ml (0.9 TEU/mg) and Pleurotus cap extract released 112 micrograms/ml (0.5 TEU/mg). Mycelium of Pleurotus and the mushroom Psilocybe cubensis and spores of Psilocybe and the puffball Calvatia cyathiformis showed negligible amounts of proteolytic activity. The protease inhibitor phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride reduced the proteolytic activity of American whole body cockroach extract by 80% (@1 mM) and the inhibitor ethylene diaminetetraacetic acid inhibited the proteolytic activity of Pleurotus spores by 95% (@1 mM). Loss of allergen activity as determined by RAST inhibition and immunoprinting correlated with protease activity. Thus, in the preparation and handling of allergen extracts, one should employ conditions that minimize proteolysis.

  15. Zebra chip disease decreases tuber (Solanum tuberosum L.) protein content by attenuating protease inhibitor levels and increasing protease activities.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G N Mohan; Knowles, Lisa O; Knowles, N Richard

    2015-11-01

    Zebra chip disease of potato decreases protease inhibitor levels resulting in enhanced serine-type protease activity, decreased protein content and altered protein profiles of fully mature tubers. Zebra-chip (ZC), caused by Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso), is a relatively new disease of potato that negatively affects growth, yield, propagation potential, and fresh and process qualities of tubers. Diseased plants produce tubers with characteristic brown discoloration of vascular tissue accompanied by elevated levels of free amino acids and reducing sugars. Here we demonstrate that ZC disease induces selective protein catabolism in tubers through modulating protease inhibitor levels. Soluble protein content of tubers from CLso-infected plants was 33% lower than from non-infected plants and electrophoretic analyses revealed substantial reductions in major tuber proteins. Patatin (~40 kDa) and ser-, asp- (22 kDa) and cys-type (85 kDa) protease inhibitors were either absent or greatly reduced in ZC-afflicted tubers. In contrast to healthy (non-infected) tubers, the proteolytic activity in CLso infected tubers was high and the ability of extracts from infected tubers to inhibit trypsin (ser-type) and papain (cys-type) proteases greatly attenuated. Moreover, extracts from CLso-infected tubers rapidly catabolized proteins purified from healthy tubers (40 kDa patatin, 22 kDa protease inhibitors, 85 kDa potato multicystatin) when subjected to proteolysis individually. In contrast, crude extracts from non-infected tubers effectively inhibited the proteolytic activity from ZC-afflicted tubers. These results suggest that the altered protein profile of ZC afflicted tubers is largely due to loss of ser- and cys-type protease inhibitors. Further analysis revealed a novel PMSF-sensitive (ser) protease (ca. 80-120 kDa) in CLso infected tubers. PMSF abolished the proteolytic activities responsible for degrading patatin, the 22 kDa protease inhibitor(s) and potato

  16. Staphylococcus aureus Induces Increased Serine Protease Activity in Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael R; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Sanford, James A; Vrbanac, Alison F; Gallo, Richard L

    2017-02-01

    Bacteria that reside on the skin can influence the behavior of the cutaneous immune system, but the mechanisms responsible for these effects are incompletely understood. Colonization of the skin by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is increased in atopic dermatitis and can result in increased severity of the disease. In this study, we show that S. aureus stimulates human keratinocytes to increase their endogenous protease activity, including specific increases in trypsin activity. This increased protease activity coincided with increased expression of mRNA for kallikreins (KLKs), with KLK6, 13, and 14 showing the greatest induction after exposure to S. aureus. Suppression of mRNA for these KLKs in keratinocytes by targeted small interfering RNA silencing before S. aureus exposure blocked the increase in protease activity. Keratinocytes exposed to S. aureus showed enhanced degradation of desmoglein-1 and filaggrin, whereas small interfering RNA for KLK6, KLK13, and KLK14 partially blocked this degradation. These data illustrate how S. aureus directly influences the skin barrier integrity by stimulating endogenous proteolytic activity and defines a previously unknown mechanism by which S. aureus may influence skin diseases. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Evolutionary Selection on Barrier Activity: Bar1 Is an Aspartyl Protease with Novel Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephen K.; Clarke, Starlynn C.; Craik, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Peptide-based pheromones are used throughout the fungal kingdom for coordinating sexual responses between mating partners. Here, we address the properties and function of Bar1, an aspartyl protease that acts as a “barrier” and antagonist to pheromone signaling in multiple species. Candida albicans Bar1 was purified and shown to exhibit preferential cleavage of native α pheromone over pheromones from related fungal species. This result establishes that protease substrate specificity coevolved along with changes in its pheromone target. Pheromone cleavage by Bar1 occurred between residues Thr-5 and Asn-6 in the middle of the tridecapeptide sequence. Surprisingly, proteolytic activity was independent of the amino acid residues present at the scissile bond and instead relied on residues at the C terminus of α pheromone. Unlike most aspartyl proteases, Bar1 also exhibited a near-neutral pH optimum and was resistant to the class-wide inhibitor pepstatin A. In addition, genetic analysis was performed on C. albicans BAR1 and demonstrated that the protease not only regulates endogenous pheromone signaling but also can limit interspecies pheromone signaling. We discuss these findings and propose that the unusual substrate specificity of Bar1 is a consequence of its coevolution with the α pheromone receptor Ste2 for their shared peptide target. PMID:26604258

  18. Tooth bleaching increases dentinal protease activity.

    PubMed

    Sato, C; Rodrigues, F A; Garcia, D M; Vidal, C M P; Pashley, D H; Tjäderhane, L; Carrilho, M R; Nascimento, F D; Tersariol, I L S

    2013-02-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an oxidative agent commonly used for dental bleaching procedures. The structural and biochemical responses of enamel, dentin, and pulp tissues to the in vivo bleaching of human (n = 20) premolars were investigated in this study. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to observe enamel nanostructure. The chemical composition of enamel and dentin was analyzed by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The enzymatic activities of dental cathepsin B and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were monitored with fluorogenic substrates. The amount of collagen in dentin was measured by emission of collagen autofluorescence with confocal fluorescence microscopy. The presence of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in the pulp was evaluated with a fluorogenic 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) probe. Vital bleaching of teeth significantly altered all tested parameters: AFM images revealed a corrosion of surface enamel nanostructure; FTIR analysis showed a loss of carbonate and proteins from enamel and dentin, along with an increase in the proteolytic activity of cathepsin-B and MMPs; and there was a reduction in the autofluorescence of collagen and an increase in both cathepsin-B activity and ROS in pulp tissues. Together, these results indicate that 35% hydrogen peroxide used in clinical bleaching protocols dramatically alters the structural and biochemical properties of dental hard and soft pulp tissue.

  19. Cleavage and Activation of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Protein by Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Stephanie; Glowacka, Ilona; Müller, Marcel A.; Lavender, Hayley; Gnirss, Kerstin; Nehlmeier, Inga; Niemeyer, Daniela; He, Yuxian; Simmons, Graham; Drosten, Christian; Soilleux, Elizabeth J.; Jahn, Olaf; Steffen, Imke; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) poses a constant threat to human health. The viral spike protein (SARS-S) mediates host cell entry and is a potential target for antiviral intervention. Activation of SARS-S by host cell proteases is essential for SARS-CoV infectivity but remains incompletely understood. Here, we analyzed the role of the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) human airway trypsin-like protease (HAT) and transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2), in SARS-S activation. We found that HAT activates SARS-S in the context of surrogate systems and authentic SARS-CoV infection and is coexpressed with the viral receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in bronchial epithelial cells and pneumocytes. HAT cleaved SARS-S at R667, as determined by mutagenesis and mass spectrometry, and activated SARS-S for cell-cell fusion in cis and trans, while the related pulmonary protease TMPRSS2 cleaved SARS-S at multiple sites and activated SARS-S only in trans. However, TMPRSS2 but not HAT expression rendered SARS-S-driven virus-cell fusion independent of cathepsin activity, indicating that HAT and TMPRSS2 activate SARS-S differentially. Collectively, our results show that HAT cleaves and activates SARS-S and might support viral spread in patients. PMID:21994442

  20. STUDIES ON THE ACTIVATION OF SERUM PROTEASE BY AN ANTIGEN-ANTIBODY SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Jemski, Joseph V.; Flick, John A.; Stinebring, Warren R.

    1953-01-01

    The results obtained in this study indicate that serum protease is not activated by either a rabbit or guinea pig antiovalbumin-ovalbumin system, in vitro. A precipitin reaction occurring in the presence of a serum protease precursor of three species (human, rabbit, and guinea pig) failed to activate the protease precursor. Furthermore, particulate material as preformed precipitates could not be shown to activate the protease of either human or rabbit serum or their euglobulin fractions. The material presented seems to be further evidence against the postulated role of serum protease in immunologic systems. PMID:13052811

  1. Cytokeratin 8 is an epithelial cell receptor for Pet, a cytotoxic serine protease autotransporter of Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Nava-Acosta, Raul; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2013-12-10

    The group of proteins known as serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE) is a growing family of serine proteases secreted to the external milieu by the type V secretion system. Pet toxin and some other SPATE belong to the class 1 cytotoxic SPATE, which have comparable protease strength on fodrin. Pet is internalized and is directed to its intracellular substrate by retrograde transport. However, the epithelial cell receptor for Pet has yet to be identified. We show that Pet has affinity for the epithelial cell surface until the saturation of the binding sites at 100 nM Pet. Affinity column assays and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis identified a cytokeratin (CK8) which directly binds to Pet, and both proteins colocalized on the cell surface. Interestingly, CK8 is not present in kidney cell lines, which are not susceptible to Pet. Inhibition experiments by using anti-CK8 and ck8 small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked the cytotoxic effect induced by Pet, while exogenous CK8 expression in kidney cells made them susceptible to Pet intoxication. Recombinant CK8 showed a Pet-binding pattern similar to that seen by using fixed cells. Remarkably, Pet colocalized with CK8 and clathrin at early times (receptor-mediated endocytosis), and subsequently, Pet colocalized with CK8 and Rab5b in the early endosomes. These data support the idea that CK8 is an important receptor for Pet on epithelial cells for starting its cytotoxic effects. These data suggest that therapeutics that block Pet-CK8 interaction may improve outcome of diseases caused by Pet-secreting Enterobacteriaceae such as enteroaggregative Escherichia coli. Receptor-ligand binding is one mechanism by which cells sense and respond to external cues. Receptors may also be utilized by toxins to mediate their own internalization. Pet toxin is secreted by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli, an organism that causes persistent diarrhea in children, traveler

  2. Antigen receptor-induced B lymphocyte apoptosis mediated via a protease of the caspase family.

    PubMed

    Andjelic, S; Liou, H C

    1998-02-01

    An extensive body of data, in a variety of systems, denoted the caspase family of proteases as a key player in the execution of programmed cell death. This family consists of cysteine proteases that cleave after asparagine-containing motifs. It is well established that the caspases are essential for the apoptosis mediated by Fas (CD95) and TNF receptor p55, molecules that contain the "death domain" in the cytoplasmic tail. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the antigen receptor-mediated cell death in B lymphocytes, a process instrumental in negative selection of potentially autoreactive B cells. Here, we investigated the involvement of caspases in cell death triggered via the antigen receptor in B lymphocytes (BCR) by using specific inhibitors. Initially, we used a well-established cell line, CH31, which is a model of B cell tolerance, to demonstrate that these proteases indeed participate in the BCR-induced apoptotic pathway. Next, we confirmed the physiological relevance of the caspase-mediated cell death pathway in splenic B cell populations isolated ex vivo that were induced to undergo apoptosis by extensive cross-linking of their BCR. Most interestingly, our data demonstrated that caspases regulate not only the nuclear DNA fragmentation, but also the surface membrane phosphatidylserine translocation as well as the degradation of a specific nuclear substrate. Taken together, this report supports the hypothesis that regulation of the caspase family is crucial in controlling the life/death decision in B lymphocytes mediated by the antigen receptor signal transduction.

  3. Synthetic substrates for measuring activity of autophagy proteases

    PubMed Central

    Bekes, Miklos; Zhai, Dayong

    2010-01-01

    Atg4 cysteine proteases (autophagins) play crucial roles in autophagy by proteolytic activation of Atg8 paralogs for targeting to autophagic vesicles by lipid conjugation, as well as in subsequent deconjugation reactions. However, the means to measure the activity of autophagins is limited. Herein, we describe two novel substrates for autophagins suitable for a diversity of in vitro assays, including (i) fluorogenic tetrapeptide acetyl-Gly-L-Thr-L-Phe-Gly-AFC (Ac-GTFG-AFC) and (ii) a fusion protein comprised of the natural substrate LC3B appended to the N-terminus of phospholipase A2 (LC3B-PLA2), which upon cleavage releases active PLA2 for fluorogenic assay. To generate the synthetic tetrapeptide substrate, the preferred tetrapeptide sequence recognized by autophagin-1/Atg4B was determined using a positional scanning combinatorial fluorogenic tetrapeptide library. With the LC3B-PLA2 substrate, we show that mutation of the glycine proximal to the scissile bond in LC3B abolishes activity. Both substrates showed high specificity for recombinant purified autophagin-1/Atg4B compared to closely related proteases and the LC3B-PLA2 substrate afforded substantially higher catalytic rates (kcat/Km 5.26 × 105 M−1/sec−1) than Ac-GTFG-AFC peptide (0.92 M−1/sec−1), consistent with substrate-induced activation. Studies of autophagin-1 mutants were also performed, including the protease lacking a predicted autoinhibitory domain at residues 1 to 24 and lacking a regulatory loop at residues 259 to 262. The peptide and fusion protein substrates were also employed for measuring autophagin activity in cell lysates, showing a decrease in cells treated with autophagin-1/Atg4B siRNA or transfected with a plasmid encoding Atg4B (Cys74Ala) dominant-negative. Therefore, the synthetic substrates for autophagins reported here provide new research tools for studying autophagy. PMID:20818167

  4. [Chromatographic separation of activated proteases from human plasma].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, B; Taucher, M; Kühne, H; Scheuch, D W

    1988-01-01

    After separation of aceton and dextran sulfate activated human plasma by column chromatography on DEAE-cellulose three esterolytically and amidolytically active fractions, respectively, were obtained, which were assigned to the following species: plasma kallikrein (PK), PK.alpha-macroglobulin.HMW-Kininogen. Their percentage in the whole activity is variable. The proportion of free PK is low (0.11). For characterization of the products we studied inhibition by different polyvalent inhibitors. The Michaelis constant (Km) with p-toluene-sulfonyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME) were determined. For simulation of in vivo conditions dextran sulfate activated plasma was inactivated at 37 degrees C. The residual activity and the spontaneous activity in plasma from patients with shock are produced by different active protease inhibitor complexes.

  5. Effects of eye rubbing on the levels of protease, protease activity and cytokines in tears: relevance in keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sivaraman A; Pye, David C; Willcox, Mark D P

    2013-03-01

    Proteases, protease activity and inflammatory molecules in tears have been found to be relevant in the pathogenesis of keratoconus. We sought to determine the influence of eye rubbing on protease expression, protease activity and concentration of inflammatory molecules in tears. Basal tears were collected from normal volunteers before and after 60 seconds of experimental eye rubbing. The total amount of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and inflammatory molecules interleukin (IL)-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the tear samples were measured using specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Tear collagenase activity was investigated using a specific activity assay. The concentrations of MMP-13 (51.9 ± 34.3 versus 63 ± 36.8 pg/ml, p = 0.006), IL-6 (1.24 ± 0.98 versus 2.02 ± 1.52 pg/ml, p = 0.004) and TNF-α (1.16 ± 0.74 versus 1.44 ± 0.66 pg/ml, p = 0.003) were significantly increased in normal subjects after eye rubbing. The experimental eye rub did not alter significantly the collagenase activity (5.02 ± 3 versus 7.50 ± 3.90 fluorescent intensity units, p = 0.14) of tears. Eye rubbing for 60 seconds increased the level of tear MMP-13, IL-6 and TNF-α in normal study subjects. This increase in protease, protease activity and inflammatory mediators in tears after eye rubbing may be exacerbated even further during persistent and forceful eye rubbing seen in people with keratoconus and this in turn may contribute to the progression of the disease. © 2013 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2013 Optometrists Association Australia.

  6. Protease inhibitors activity in lepromatous leprosy and lepra reaction.

    PubMed

    Yemul, V L; Sengupta, S R; Dhole, T N

    1983-01-01

    Serum alpha one antitrypsin levels were measured in 50 healthy age and sex matched controls with 45 lepromatous leprosy cases and 5 cases of lepra reaction. It was noted that the mean level in healthy controls was 281.00 mg%, while the mean levels in LL patients was 421.00 mg% and in LR 570.00 mg%. The elevation of Alpha one antitrypsin was statistically significant in LL patients. It is possible that the rise is a reaction to release of proteases and or higher complement activity, which are the results of a high bacillary loading to formation of immune complexes.

  7. Cloning, expression and activity analysis of a novel fibrinolytic serine protease from Arenicola cristata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunling; Ju, Jiyu

    2015-06-01

    The full-length cDNA of a protease gene from a marine annelid Arenicola cristata was amplified through rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique and sequenced. The size of the cDNA was 936 bp in length, including an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 270 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequnce consisted of pro- and mature sequences. The protease belonged to the serine protease family because it contained the highly conserved sequence GDSGGP. This protease was novel as it showed a low amino acid sequence similarity (< 40%) to other serine proteases. The gene encoding the active form of A. cristata serine protease was cloned and expressed in E. coli. Purified recombinant protease in a supernatant could dissolve an artificial fibrin plate with plasminogen-rich fibrin, whereas the plasminogen-free fibrin showed no clear zone caused by hydrolysis. This result suggested that the recombinant protease showed an indirect fibrinolytic activity of dissolving fibrin, and was probably a plasminogen activator. A rat model with venous thrombosis was established to demonstrate that the recombinant protease could also hydrolyze blood clot in vivo. Therefore, this recombinant protease may be used as a thrombolytic agent for thrombosis treatment. To our knowledge, this study is the first of reporting the fibrinolytic serine protease gene in A. cristata.

  8. Protease activity, localization and inhibition in the human hair follicle

    PubMed Central

    Bhogal, R K; Mouser, P E; Higgins, C A; Turner, G A

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Objective In humans, the process of hair shedding, referred to as exogen, is believed to occur independently of the other hair cycle phases. Although the actual mechanisms involved in hair shedding are not fully known, it has been hypothesized that the processes leading to the final step of hair shedding may be driven by proteases and/or protease inhibitor activity. In this study, we investigated the presence of proteases and protease activity in naturally shed human hairs and assessed enzyme inhibition activity of test materials. Methods We measured enzyme activity using a fluorescence-based assay and protein localization by indirect immunohistochemistry (IHC). We also developed an ex vivo skin model for measuring the force required to pull hair fibres from skin. Results Our data demonstrate the presence of protease activity in the tissue material surrounding club roots. We also demonstrated the localization of specific serine protease protein expression in human hair follicle by IHC. These data provide evidence demonstrating the presence of proteases around the hair club roots, which may play a role during exogen. We further tested the hypothesis that a novel protease inhibitor system (combination of Trichogen® and climbazole) could inhibit protease activity in hair fibre club root extracts collected from a range of ethnic groups (UK, Brazil, China, first-generation Mexicans in the USA, Thailand and Turkey) in both males and females. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this combination is capable of increasing the force required to remove hair in an ex vivo skin model system. Conclusion These studies indicate the presence of proteolytic activity in the tissue surrounding the human hair club root and show that it is possible to inhibit this activity with a combination of Trichogen® and climbazole. This technology may have potential to reduce excessive hair shedding. Résumé Objectif Chez l'homme, le processus de perte de cheveux, désigné comme exog

  9. MOFzyme: Intrinsic protease-like activity of Cu-MOF

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Chen, Daomei; Wang, Jiaqiang; Yan, Zhiying; Jiang, Liang; Deliang Duan; He, Jiao; Luo, Zhongrui; Zhang, Jinping; Yuan, Fagui

    2014-01-01

    The construction of efficient enzyme mimetics for the hydrolysis of peptide bonds in proteins is challenging due to the high stability of peptide bonds and the importance of proteases in biology and industry. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) consisting of infinite crystalline lattices with metal clusters and organic linkers may provide opportunities for protease mimic which has remained unknown. Herein, we report that Cu2(C9H3O6)4/3 MOF (which is well known as HKUST-1 and denoted as Cu-MOF here), possesses an intrinsic enzyme mimicking activity similar to that found in natural trypsin to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and casein. The Michaelis constant (Km) of Cu-MOF is about 26,000-fold smaller than that of free trypsin indicating a much higher affinity of BSA for Cu-MOF surface. Cu-MOF also exhibited significantly higher catalytic efficiency than homogeneous artificial metalloprotease Cu(II) complexes and could be reused for ten times without losing in its activity. Moreover, Cu-MOF was successfully used to simulate trypsinization in cell culture since it dissociated cells in culture even without EDTA. PMID:25342169

  10. MOFzyme: Intrinsic protease-like activity of Cu-MOF.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Chen, Daomei; Wang, Jiaqiang; Yan, Zhiying; Jiang, Liang; Deliang Duan; He, Jiao; Luo, Zhongrui; Zhang, Jinping; Yuan, Fagui

    2014-10-24

    The construction of efficient enzyme mimetics for the hydrolysis of peptide bonds in proteins is challenging due to the high stability of peptide bonds and the importance of proteases in biology and industry. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) consisting of infinite crystalline lattices with metal clusters and organic linkers may provide opportunities for protease mimic which has remained unknown. Herein, we report that Cu₂(C₉H₃O₆)₄/₃ MOF (which is well known as HKUST-1 and denoted as Cu-MOF here), possesses an intrinsic enzyme mimicking activity similar to that found in natural trypsin to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and casein. The Michaelis constant (Km) of Cu-MOF is about 26,000-fold smaller than that of free trypsin indicating a much higher affinity of BSA for Cu-MOF surface. Cu-MOF also exhibited significantly higher catalytic efficiency than homogeneous artificial metalloprotease Cu(II) complexes and could be reused for ten times without losing in its activity. Moreover, Cu-MOF was successfully used to simulate trypsinization in cell culture since it dissociated cells in culture even without EDTA.

  11. Protease activation in glycerol-based deep eutectic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A.; Holmes, Shaletha

    2011-01-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) consisting of mixtures of a choline salt (chloride or acetate form) and glycerol are prepared as easily accessible, biodegradable, and inexpensive alternatives to conventional aprotic cation-anion paired ionic liquids. These DES systems display excellent fluidity coupled with thermal stability to nearly 200 °C. In this work, the transesterification activities of cross-linked proteases (subtilisin and α-chymotrypsin), immobilized on chitosan, were individually examined in these novel DESs. In the 1:2 molar ratio mixture of choline chloride/glycerol containing 3% (v/v) water, cross-linked subtilisin exhibited an excellent activity (2.9 μmo l min−1 g−1) in conjunction with a selectivity of 98% in the transesterification reaction of N-acetyl-L-phenylalanine ethyl ester with 1-propanol. These highly encouraging results advocate more extensive exploration of DESs in protease-mediated biotransformations of additional polar substrates and use of DESs in biocatalysis more generally. PMID:21909232

  12. Antimalarial activity of HIV-1 protease inhibitor in chromone series.

    PubMed

    Lerdsirisuk, Pradith; Maicheen, Chirattikan; Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn

    2014-12-01

    Increasing parasite resistance to nearly all available antimalarial drugs becomes a serious problem to human health and necessitates the need to continue the search for new effective drugs. Recent studies have shown that clinically utilized HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) inhibitors can inhibit the in vitro and in vivo growth of Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, a series of chromone derivatives possessing HIV-1 PR inhibitory activity has been tested for antimalarial activity against P. falciparum (K1 multi-drug resistant strain). Chromone 15, the potent HIV-1 PR inhibitor (IC50=0.65μM), was found to be the most potent antimalarial compound with IC50=0.95μM while primaquine and tafenoquine showed IC50=2.41 and 1.95μM, respectively. Molecular docking study of chromone compounds against plasmepsin II, an aspartic protease enzyme important in hemoglobin degradation, revealed that chromone 15 exhibited the higher binding affinity (binding energy=-13.24kcal/mol) than the known PM II inhibitors. Thus, HIV-1 PR inhibitor in chromone series has the potential to be a new class of antimalarial agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MOFzyme: Intrinsic protease-like activity of Cu-MOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Chen, Daomei; Wang, Jiaqiang; Yan, Zhiying; Jiang, Liang; Deliang Duan; He, Jiao; Luo, Zhongrui; Zhang, Jinping; Yuan, Fagui

    2014-10-01

    The construction of efficient enzyme mimetics for the hydrolysis of peptide bonds in proteins is challenging due to the high stability of peptide bonds and the importance of proteases in biology and industry. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) consisting of infinite crystalline lattices with metal clusters and organic linkers may provide opportunities for protease mimic which has remained unknown. Herein, we report that Cu2(C9H3O6)4/3 MOF (which is well known as HKUST-1 and denoted as Cu-MOF here), possesses an intrinsic enzyme mimicking activity similar to that found in natural trypsin to bovine serum albumin (BSA) and casein. The Michaelis constant (Km) of Cu-MOF is about 26,000-fold smaller than that of free trypsin indicating a much higher affinity of BSA for Cu-MOF surface. Cu-MOF also exhibited significantly higher catalytic efficiency than homogeneous artificial metalloprotease Cu(II) complexes and could be reused for ten times without losing in its activity. Moreover, Cu-MOF was successfully used to simulate trypsinization in cell culture since it dissociated cells in culture even without EDTA.

  14. Conformational transition of the lid helix covering the protease active site is essential for the ATP-dependent protease activity of FtsH.

    PubMed

    Suno, Ryoji; Shimoyama, Masakazu; Abe, Akiko; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Shimodate, Natsuka; Watanabe, Yo-hei; Akiyama, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Masasuke

    2012-09-21

    When bound to ADP, ATP-dependent protease FtsH subunits adopt either an "open" or "closed" conformation. In the open state, the protease catalytic site is located in a narrow space covered by a lidlike helix. This space disappears in the closed form because the lid helix bends at Gly448. Here, we replaced Gly448 with various residues that stabilize helices. Most mutants retained low ATPase activity and bound to the substrate protein, but lost protease activity. However, a mutant proline substitution lost both activities. Our study shows that the conformational transition of the lid helix is essential for the function of FtsH.

  15. Recent developments in production and biotechnological applications of cold-active microbial proteases.

    PubMed

    Kuddus, Mohammed; Ramteke, Pramod W

    2012-11-01

    Microbial proteases that occupy a pivotal position with respect to their commercial applications are most important hydrolytic enzymes and have been studied extensively since the advent of enzymology. Cold-adapted microorganisms are potential source of cold-active proteases and they have been isolated from the cold regions. Although there are many microbial sources available for producing proteases, only few are recognized as commercial producer. Cold-active proteases along with their producing microbes are of commercial value and find multiple applications in various industrial and biotechnological sectors such as additives in detergents, additives in food industries, environmental bioremediations, biotransformation and molecular biology applications. Therefore, cold-active proteases are the enzymes of choice for many biotechnologists, microbiologists, biochemists, environmentalists and biochemical engineers. In the present review, we discuss some novel sources along with recent developments in production and biotechnological applications of cold-active microbial proteases.

  16. A protease-independent function for SPPL3 in NFAT activation.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Stefanie L; Wang, Zhaoquan; Pomerantz, Joel L

    2015-01-01

    The signal peptide peptidase (SPP)-related intramembrane aspartyl proteases are a homologous group of polytopic membrane proteins, some of which function in innate or adaptive immunity by cleaving proteins involved in antigen presentation or intracellular signaling. Signal peptide peptidase-like 3 (SPPL3) is a poorly characterized endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized member of this family, with no validated cellular substrates. We report here the isolation of SPPL3 in a screen for activators of NFAT, a transcription factor that controls lymphocyte development and function. We find that SPPL3 is required downstream of T cell receptor engagement for maximal Ca(2+) influx and NFAT activation. Surprisingly, the proteolytic activity of SPPL3 is not required for its role in this pathway. SPPL3 enhances the signal-induced association of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) and Orai1 and is even required for the full activity of constitutively active STIM1 variants that bind Orai1 independently of ER Ca(2+) release. SPPL3 associates with STIM1 through at least two independent domains, the transmembrane region and the CRAC activation domain (CAD), and can promote the association of the STIM1 CAD with Orai1. Our results assign a function in lymphocyte signaling to SPPL3 and highlight the emerging importance of nonproteolytic functions for members of the intramembrane aspartyl protease family. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Cryogenic changes in proteases and antiprotease activities of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and cattle (Bos taurus) semen.

    PubMed

    Gurupriya, Vijayasaraswathy S; Divyashree, Bannur C; Roy, Sudhir C

    2014-02-01

    The postthaw motility and fertility of buffalo and cattle semen is reduced when they are cryopreserved for artificial insemination. In the present study, an attempt was made to characterize the cryogenic changes in proteases and antiprotease activities (APA) of buffalo and cattle semen because these proteolysis regulators have been reported to be associated with sperm motility and fertility. Buffalo sperm demonstrated at least two major proteases of 45 and 42 kDa and three minor proteases of 95, 52, and 33 kDa. Similarly, cattle sperm demonstrated three major proteases of 62, 45, and 42 kDa and two minor proteases of 85 and 78 kDa. Buffalo seminal plasma demonstrated at least three major proteases of 78, 68, and 62 kDa and one minor protease of 98 kDa and cattle seminal plasma demonstrated one major protease of 68 kDa and two minor proteases of 78 and 75 kDa. Except for the 45 kDa protease, most of the previously mentioned proteases were found to be metalloproteinases. Compared with fresh sperm, cryopreserved buffalo and cattle sperm demonstrated a major protease band of 52/49 kDa and the activity of this protease reduced progressively with the duration of cryopreservation. On the contrary, compared with the fresh seminal plasma, cryopreserved buffalo and cattle semen extenders displayed the presence of a new protease band of 45 kDa and demonstrated that this protease activity was leaked from buffalo and cattle cryopreserved spermatozoa. Buffalo and cattle seminal plasmas displayed at least two major APA of 86 and 26 kDa. Compared with buffalo, cattle seminal plasma demonstrated significantly greater APA. Thus, the present study demonstrated the presence of an array of proteases and APA in buffalo and cattle semen and the activities of which changed during cryopreservation. The leakage of the specific protease activity and changes in the proteases and APA might be attributed to reduced motility and fertility of cryopreserved semen in these species. Copyright

  18. A Novel Apoptotic Protease Activated in Human Breast Cancer Cells After Poisoning Topoisomerase I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    tocopherol, N- acetyl -L- cysteine ( NAC ) or pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC)) did not significantly affect lethality caused by B-lap exposure (data not...will be required for the cloning of this novel noncaspase cysteine protease. The new hypothesis being tested is that B- lap activates calpain, which...caspase cysteine protease was activated within 4-8 hours, concomitant with the appearance of DNA fragmentation, measured by TUNEL assays; (e) protease

  19. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  20. Cleavage and activation of human factor IX by serine proteases

    SciTech Connect

    Enfield, D.L.; Thompson, A.R.

    1984-10-01

    Human factor IX circulates as a single-chain glycoprotein. Upon activation in vitro, it is cleaved into disulfide-linked light and heavy chains and an activation peptide. After reduction of activated /sup 125/I-factor IX, the heavy and light chains are readily identified by gel electrophoresis. A direct, immunoradiometric assay for factor IXa was developed to assess activation of factor IX for proteases that cleaved it. The assay utilized radiolabeled antithrombin III with heparin to identify the active site and antibodies to distinguish factor IX. After cleavage of factor IX by factor XIa, factor VIIa-tissue thromboplastin complex, or the factor X-activating enzyme from Russell's viper venom, antithrombin III bound readily to factor IXa. Cleavage of /sup 125/I-factor IX by trypsin, chymotrypsin, and granulocyte elastase in the presence of calcium yielded major polypeptide fragments of the sizes of the factor XIa-generated light and heavy chains. When the immunoradiometric assay was used to assess trypsin-cleaved factor IX, the product bound antithrombin III, but not maximally. After digesting with insolubilized trypsin, clotting activity confirmed activation. In evaluating activation of factor IX, physical evidence of activation cleavages does not necessarily correlate with generation of an active site.

  1. Zingipain, a ginger protease with acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Rungsaeng, Porlin; Sangvanich, Polkit; Karnchanatat, Aphichart

    2013-06-01

    In order to search for new acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs), 15 Zingiberaceae plants were tested for AChEI activity in rhizome extracts. The crude homogenate and ammonium sulfate cut fraction of Zingiber officinale contained a significant AChEI activity. Eighty percent saturation ammonium sulfate precipitation and diethylaminoethyl cellulose ion exchange chromatography (unbound fraction) enriched the protein to a single band on nondenaturing and reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (approximately 33.5 kDa). Gelatin-degrading zymography showed that the AChEI-containing band also contained cysteine protease activity. The AChEI activity was largely stable between -20 and 60 °C (at least over 120 min) and over a broad pH range (2-12). The AChEI activity was stimulated strongly by Mn(2+) and Cu(2+) at 1-10 mM and weakly by Ca(2+), Fe(2+), Mg(2+), and Zn(2+) at 1 mM, but was inhibited at 10 mM. In contrast, Hg(2+) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid were very and moderately strongly inhibitory, respectively. In-gel tryptic digestion with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy resolution revealed two heterogeneous peptides, a 16-amino-acid-long fragment with 100 % similarity to zingipain-1, which is a cysteine protease from Z. officinale, and a 9-amino-acid-long fragment that was 100 % identical to actinidin Act 2a, suggesting that the preparation was heterogeneous. AChEI exhibited noncompetitive inhibition of AChE for the hydrolysis of acetylthiocholine iodide with a K(i) value of 9.31 mg/ml.

  2. Comparative analysis on the distribution of protease activities among fruits and vegetable resources.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qian; Zhang, Bin; Yan, Qiao-Juan; Jiang, Zheng-Qiang

    2016-12-15

    In this study, a comparative analysis on the distribution of protease activities among 90 plant resources, including fruits and vegetables, has been performed. Protease activities of plant extracts were assayed at different pH values (pH 3.0, pH 7.5 and pH 10.5) using casein as a substrate. Ten fruits and thirteen vegetables show protease activities above 10U/g. Pineapple, fig and papaya, which are used for commercial protease production, exhibited high protease activities. Additionally, high protease activities were detected in kiwifruit (28.8U/g), broccoli (16.9U/g), ginger (16.6U/g), leek (32.7U/g) and red pepper (15.8U/g) at different pH values. SDS-PAGE and zymograms confirmed that various types of proteases existed in the five plant extracts and might be explored. Furthermore, five plant extracts were treated by different protease inhibitors. These results show that there are still many plant resources unexplored, which may be promising candidates for plant-derived protease production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Distinct contribution of Toxoplasma gondii rhomboid proteases 4 and 5 to micronemal protein protease 1 activity during invasion.

    PubMed

    Rugarabamu, George; Marq, Jean-Baptiste; Guérin, Amandine; Lebrun, Maryse; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2015-07-01

    Host cell entry by the Apicomplexa is associated with the sequential secretion of invasion factors from specialized apical organelles. Secretion of micronemal proteins (MICs) complexes by Toxoplasma gondii facilitates parasite gliding motility, host cell attachment and entry, as well as egress from infected cells. The shedding of MICs during these steps is mediated by micronemal protein proteases MPP1, MPP2 and MPP3. The constitutive activity of MPP1 leads to the cleavage of transmembrane MICs and is linked to the surface rhomboid protease 4 (ROM4) and possibly to rhomboid protease 5 (ROM5). To determine their importance and respective contribution to MPP1 activity, in this study ROM4 and ROM5 genes were abrogated using Cre-recombinase and CRISPR-Cas9 nuclease, respectively, and shown to be dispensable for parasite survival. Parasites lacking ROM4 predominantly engage in twirling motility and exhibit enhanced attachment and impaired invasion, whereas intracellular growth and egress is not affected. The substrates MIC2 and MIC6 are not cleaved in rom4-ko parasites, in contrast, intramembrane cleavage of AMA1 is reduced but not completely abolished. Shedding of MICs and invasion are not altered in the absence of ROM5; however, this protease responsible for the residual cleavage of AMA1 is able to cleave other AMA family members and exhibits a detectable contribution to invasion in the absence of ROM4.

  4. Activation of specific apoptotic caspases with an engineered small-molecule-activated protease.

    PubMed

    Gray, Daniel C; Mahrus, Sami; Wells, James A

    2010-08-20

    Apoptosis is a conserved cellular pathway that results in the activation of cysteine-aspartyl proteases, or caspases. To dissect the nonredundant roles of the executioner caspase-3, -6, and -7 in orchestrating apoptosis, we have developed an orthogonal protease to selectively activate each isoform in human cells. Our approach uses a split-tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease under small-molecule control, which we call the SNIPer, with caspase alleles containing genetically encoded TEV cleavage sites. These studies reveal that all three caspases are transiently activated but only activation of caspase-3 or -7 is sufficient to induce apoptosis. Proteomic analysis shown here and from others reveals that 20 of the 33 subunits of the 26S proteasome can be cut by caspases, and we demonstrate synergy between proteasome inhibition and dose-dependent caspase activation. We propose a model of proteolytic reciprocal negative regulation with mechanistic implications for the combined clinical use of proteasome inhibitors and proapoptotic drugs.

  5. Cytokeratin 8 Is an Epithelial Cell Receptor for Pet, a Cytotoxic Serine Protease Autotransporter of Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Nava-Acosta, Raul; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The group of proteins known as serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE) is a growing family of serine proteases secreted to the external milieu by the type V secretion system. Pet toxin and some other SPATE belong to the class 1 cytotoxic SPATE, which have comparable protease strength on fodrin. Pet is internalized and is directed to its intracellular substrate by retrograde transport. However, the epithelial cell receptor for Pet has yet to be identified. We show that Pet has affinity for the epithelial cell surface until the saturation of the binding sites at 100 nM Pet. Affinity column assays and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis identified a cytokeratin (CK8) which directly binds to Pet, and both proteins colocalized on the cell surface. Interestingly, CK8 is not present in kidney cell lines, which are not susceptible to Pet. Inhibition experiments by using anti-CK8 and ck8 small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked the cytotoxic effect induced by Pet, while exogenous CK8 expression in kidney cells made them susceptible to Pet intoxication. Recombinant CK8 showed a Pet-binding pattern similar to that seen by using fixed cells. Remarkably, Pet colocalized with CK8 and clathrin at early times (receptor-mediated endocytosis), and subsequently, Pet colocalized with CK8 and Rab5b in the early endosomes. These data support the idea that CK8 is an important receptor for Pet on epithelial cells for starting its cytotoxic effects. These data suggest that therapeutics that block Pet-CK8 interaction may improve outcome of diseases caused by Pet-secreting Enterobacteriaceae such as enteroaggregative Escherichia coli. PMID:24327340

  6. Development of activity-based probes for trypsin-family serine proteases.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhengying; Jeffery, Douglas A; Chehade, Kareem; Beltman, Jerlyn; Clark, James M; Grothaus, Paul; Bogyo, Matthew; Baruch, Amos

    2006-06-01

    A series of diphenylphosphonate-based probes were developed for the trypsin-like serine proteases. These probes selectively target serine proteases rather than general serine hydrolases that are targets for fluorophosphonate-based probes. This increased selectivity allows detection of low abundance serine proteases in complex proteomes using simple SDS-PAGE methods. We present here the application of multiple probes in enzyme activity profiling of intact mast cells, a type of inflammatory cell implicated in allergy and autoimmune diseases.

  7. The Prc and RseP proteases control bacterial cell-surface signalling activity.

    PubMed

    Bastiaansen, Karlijn C; Ibañez, Aurelia; Ramos, Juan L; Bitter, Wilbert; Llamas, María A

    2014-08-01

    Extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors play a key role in the regulation of vital functions in the bacterial response to the environment. In Gram-negative bacteria, activity of these sigma factors is often controlled by cell-surface signalling (CSS), a regulatory system that also involves an outer membrane receptor and a transmembrane anti-sigma factor. To get more insight into the molecular mechanism behind CSS regulation, we have focused on the unique Iut system of Pseudomonas putida. This system contains a hybrid protein containing both a cytoplasmic ECF sigma domain and a periplasmic anti-sigma domain, apparently leading to a permanent interaction between the sigma and anti-sigma factor. We show that the Iut ECF sigma factor regulates the response to aerobactin under iron deficiency conditions and is activated by a proteolytic pathway that involves the sequential action of two proteases: Prc, which removes the periplasmic anti-sigma domain, and RseP, which subsequently removes the transmembrane domain and thereby generates the ECF active transcriptional form. We furthermore demonstrate the role of these proteases in the regulation of classical CSS systems in which the sigma and anti-sigma factors are two different proteins.

  8. Proteinaceous protease inhibitor from Lawsonia inermis: purification, characterization and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Dabhade, Arvind; Patel, Priti; Pati, Ulhas

    2013-10-01

    A thermo-stable, proteinaceous protease inhibitor (LPI) from Lawsonia inermis is reported. The LPI was purified from Lawsonia inermis seeds by subsequent ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange chromatography (DEAE-Cellulose) and gel permeation chromatography (Sephadex-50). The purified protease inhibitor is effective against a wide range of proteases viz. papain, trypsin, pepsin and metallo-protease. The apparent molecular weight of the protease inhibitor is 19 kDa, determined by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. The protease inhibitor was found to be stable at 70 degrees C for 30 min. It was also examined for antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 7926 and Staphylococcus aureus NCIM 2079; the IC50 values of the purified LPI were 11.4 microg/mL and 16.6 microg/mL respectively.

  9. The threonine protease activity of testes-specific protease 50 (TSP50) is essential for its function in cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Yin; Bao, Yong-Li; Song, Zhen-Bo; Sun, Lu-Guo; Wu, Ping; Zhang, Yu; Fan, Cong; Huang, Yan-Xin; Wu, Yin; Yu, Chun-Lei; Sun, Ying; Zheng, Li-Hua; Wang, Guan-Nan; Li, Yu-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Testes-specific protease 50 (TSP50), a newly discovered threonine enzyme, has similar amino acid sequences and enzymatic structures to those of many serine proteases. It may be an oncogene. TSP50 is up-regulated in breast cancer epithelial cells, and ectopic expression of TSP50 in TSP50-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has been found to promote cell proliferation. However, the mechanisms by which TSP50 exerts its growth-promoting effects are not yet fully understood. To delineate whether the threonine protease activity of TSP50 is essential to its function in cell proliferation, we constructed and characterized a mutant TSP50, called TSP50 T310A, which was identified as a protease-dead mutant of TSP50. By a series of proliferation analyses, colony formation assays and apoptosis analyses, we showed that T310A mutation significantly depresses TSP50-induced cell proliferation in vitro. Next, the CHO stable cell line expressing either wild-type or T310A mutant TSP50 was injected subcutaneously into nude mice. We found that the T310A mutation could abolish the tumorigenicity of TSP50 in vivo. A mechanism investigation revealed that the T310A mutation prevented interaction between TSP50 and the NF-κBIκBα complex, which is necessary for TSP50 to perform its function in cell proliferation. Our data highlight the importance of threonine 310, the most critical protease catalytic site in TSP50, to TSP50-induced cell proliferation and tumor formation.

  10. An efficient method to eliminate the protease activity contaminating commercial bovine pancreatic DNase I.

    PubMed

    Le, Tien; Lee, Hak Jin; Jin, Hyung Jong

    2015-08-15

    A method was developed to eliminate the proteases contaminating commercial DNase I, which can cause degradation of target protein during the purification process. Bio Basic DNase stock solution (in Tris-HCl buffer [pH 8.0] containing 5mM CaCl2) was first incubated at 50 °C to generate autolysis of proteases and zymogens, leading to a significant reduction in protease activity while preserving DNase activity. The residual protease activity was completely inhibited by further incubation with 2mM PMSF (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride) or 2× S8830 inhibitor cocktail. This approach could be readily applicable to eliminate the protease activity in any DNase products or during the preparation of commercial DNase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A novel serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities from edible basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes.

    PubMed

    Iketani, Aya; Nakamura, Mayumi; Suzuki, Yuya; Awai, Koichiro; Shioi, Yuzo

    2013-03-01

    A serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities from basidiocarps of the edible basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes was characterized. The protease was purified to near homogeneity by three steps of chromatography using acetyl-Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide (Ac-YVAD-MCA) as a substrate. The enzyme was termed FvSerP (F. velutipes serine protease). This enzyme activity was completely inhibited by the caspase-specific inhibitor, Ac-YVAD-CHO, as well as moderately inhibited by serine protease inhibitors. Based on the N-terminal sequence, the cDNA of FvSerP was identified. The deduced protease sequence was a peptide composed of 325 amino acids with a molecular mass of 34.5 kDa. The amino acid sequence of FvSerP showed similarity to neither caspases nor to the plant subtilisin-like serine protease with caspase-like activity called saspase. FvSerP shared identity to the functionally unknown genes from class of Agaricomycetes, with similarity to the peptidase S41 domain of a serine protease. It was thus concluded that this enzyme is likely a novel serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities belonging to the peptidase S41 family and distributed in the class Agaricomycetes. This enzyme possibly functions in autolysis, a type of programmed cell death that occurs in the later stages of development of basidiocarps with reference to their enzymatic functions.

  12. Deficiency of filaggrin regulates endogenous cysteine protease activity, leading to impaired skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Wang, X W; Wang, J J; Gutowska-Owsiak, D; Salimi, M; Selvakumar, T A; Gwela, A; Chen, L Y; Wang, Y J; Giannoulatou, E; Ogg, G

    2017-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disorder, characterized by skin barrier defects and enhanced allergen priming. Null mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are strongly associated with moderate to severe AD, but the pathways linking barrier dysfunction and cutaneous inflammation are still largely unknown. To assess alteration of endogenous cysteine protease activity in FLG-deficient keratinocytes, and to determine whether the alteration in cysteine protease activity affects epidermal barrier function and associated gene and protein expression. We established a stable FLG knockdown cell line, and reconstructed epidermal equivalents in vitro. Barrier function of the reconstructed epidermis, the barrier-associated genes and proteins, and the activity of endogenous cysteine proteases were tested. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases were used to further evaluate the role of endogenous cysteine proteases in epidermal barrier function. FLG knockdown induced impaired epidermal barrier function. Microarray, western blotting and fluorescence staining showed reduced expression of K10, ZO-1, E-cadherin, claudin-1 and occludin in FLG knockdown keratinocytes. Compared with cysteine protease activity in control cells, protease activity was dramatically enhanced in FLG knockdown keratinocytes. Furthermore, administration of cysteine protease inhibitors significantly recovered expression of K10 and tight junction proteins, and the barrier defect induced by FLG deficiency. This is the first observation of elevated endogenous cysteine protease activity in FLG-deficient keratinocytes, which may play an important role in impaired barrier function in AD skin. Modulation of cysteine protease activity might be a novel therapeutic approach for AD treatment. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  13. Amplified fluorescence sensing of protease activity with conjugated polyelectrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Mauricio R.; Schanze, Kirk S.

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescent conjugated polyelectrolytes with pendant ionic sulfonate and carboxylate groups are used to sense protease activity. Inclusion of the fluorescent conjugated polyelectrolyte into the assay scheme leads to amplification of the sensory response. The sensing mechanism relies on an electrostatic interaction between the conjugated polyelectrolyte and a peptide substrate that is labeled with a fluorescence quencher. Enzyme activity and hydrolysis kinetics are measured in real time by using fluorescence spectroscopy. Two approaches are presented. In the first approach, a fluorescence turn-on sensor was developed that is based on the use of p-nitroanilide-labeled peptide substrates. In this system enzyme-catalyzed peptide hydrolysis is signaled by an increase in the fluorescence from the conjugated polyelectrolyte. The turn-on system was used to sense peptidase and thrombin activity when the concentrations of the enzyme and substrate are in the nanomolar regime. Kinetic parameters were recovered from real-time assays. In the second approach, a fluorescence turn-off sensor was developed that relies on a peptide-derivatized rhodamine substrate. In the turn-off system enzyme-catalyzed peptide hydrolysis is signaled by a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of the conjugated polyelectrolyte. PMID:15136727

  14. Amplified fluorescence sensing of protease activity with conjugated polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Mauricio R.; Schanze, Kirk S.

    2004-05-01

    Fluorescent conjugated polyelectrolytes with pendant ionic sulfonate and carboxylate groups are used to sense protease activity. Inclusion of the fluorescent conjugated polyelectrolyte into the assay scheme leads to amplification of the sensory response. The sensing mechanism relies on an electrostatic interaction between the conjugated polyelectrolyte and a peptide substrate that is labeled with a fluorescence quencher. Enzyme activity and hydrolysis kinetics are measured in real time by using fluorescence spectroscopy. Two approaches are presented. In the first approach, a fluorescence turn-on sensor was developed that is based on the use of p-nitroanilide-labeled peptide substrates. In this system enzyme-catalyzed peptide hydrolysis is signaled by an increase in the fluorescence from the conjugated polyelectrolyte. The turn-on system was used to sense peptidase and thrombin activity when the concentrations of the enzyme and substrate are in the nanomolar regime. Kinetic parameters were recovered from real-time assays. In the second approach, a fluorescence turn-off sensor was developed that relies on a peptide-derivatized rhodamine substrate. In the turn-off system enzyme-catalyzed peptide hydrolysis is signaled by a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of the conjugated polyelectrolyte.

  15. Protease inhibitor in scorpion (Mesobuthus eupeus) venom prolongs the biological activities of the crude venom.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hakim; Xiao-Peng, Tang; Yang, Shi-Long; Lu, Qiu-Min; Lai, Ren

    2016-08-01

    It is hypothesized that protease inhibitors play an essential role in survival of venomous animals through protecting peptide/protein toxins from degradation by proteases in their prey or predators. However, the biological function of protease inhibitors in scorpion venoms remains unknown. In the present study, a trypsin inhibitor was purified and characterized from the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which enhanced the biological activities of crude venom components in mice when injected in combination with crude venom. This protease inhibitor, named MeKTT-1, belonged to Kunitz-type toxins subfamily. Native MeKTT-1 selectively inhibited trypsin with a Kivalue of 130 nmol·L(-1). Furthermore, MeKTT-1 was shown to be a thermo-stable peptide. In animal behavioral tests, MeKTT-1 prolonged the pain behavior induced by scorpion crude venom, suggesting that protease inhibitors in scorpion venom inhibited proteases and protect the functionally important peptide/protein toxins from degradation, consequently keeping them active longer. In conclusion, this was the first experimental evidence about the natural existence of serine protease inhibitor in the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which preserved the activity of venom components, suggests that scorpions may use protease inhibitors for survival. Copyright © 2016 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Inactivation of chemotactic activity of C5a by the serratial 56-kilodalton protease.

    PubMed Central

    Oda, T; Kojima, Y; Akaike, T; Ijiri, S; Molla, A; Maeda, H

    1990-01-01

    The effects of the 56-kilodalton protease (56K protease) from Serratia marcescens on complement-derived chemotactic activity were examined. Fresh human serum was incubated with zymosan to produce C5a. This activated serum was then incubated with various concentrations of 56K protease, and the chemotactic activity of mouse peritoneal exudate polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and macrophages was evaluated. A significant dose-dependent decrease of chemotactic activity was observed after protease treatment. Furthermore, treatment of human recombinant C5a with 56K protease at a dose of 1.0 microgram/ml resulted in a complete loss of chemotactic activity. When the living bacteria of the virulent strain, which produced about 10 times more protease than did the less virulent strain, were injected intraperitoneally into mice, the magnitude of infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes into the peritoneal cavity was much lower than that caused by the less virulent strain. Because complement-dependent chemotactic activity is an initial response to bacterial infection, these results suggest indirect pathogenic functions of serratial proteases that suppress chemotactic activity. PMID:1691142

  17. Identification of inhibitors using a cell based assay for monitoring golgi-resident protease activity

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Julia M.; Hamilton, Christin A.; Bhojani, Mahaveer S.; Larsen, Martha J.; Ross, Brian D.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2007-01-01

    Non-invasive real time quantification of cellular protease activity allows monitoring of enzymatic activity and identification of activity modulators within the protease’s natural milieu. We developed a protease-activity assay based on differential localization of a recombinant reporter consisting of a Golgi retention signal and a protease cleavage sequence fused to alkaline phosphatase (AP). When expressed in mammalian cells, this protein localizes to Golgi bodies and, upon protease mediated cleavage, AP translocates to the extracellular medium where its activity is measured. We used this system to monitor the Golgi-associated protease furin, a pluripotent enzyme with a key role in tumorigenesis, viral propagation of avian influenza, ebola, and HIV, and in activation of anthrax, pseudomonas, and diphtheria toxins. This technology was adapted for high throughput screening of 30,000 compound small molecule libraries, leading to identification of furin inhibitors. Further, this strategy was utilized to identify inhibitors of another Golgi protease, the β-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE). BACE cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein leads to formation of the Aβ peptide, a key event that leads to Alzheimer’s disease. In conclusion, we describe a customizable, non-invasive technology for real time assessment of Golgi protease activity used to identify inhibitors of furin and BACE. PMID:17316541

  18. Inhibition of activity of the protease from bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Ménard, A; Leonard, R; Llido, S; Geoffre, S; Picard, P; Berteau, F; Precigoux, G; Hospital, M; Guillemain, B

    1994-06-13

    In view of the close similarity between bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) we investigated the possibility of developing specific inhibitors of the proteases of these retroviruses using the purified enzyme from BLV. We tested the ability of this protease to specifically cleave various short oligopeptide substrates containing cleavage sites of BLV and HTLV-I proteases, as well as a recombinant BLV Gag precursor. The best substrate, a synthetic decapeptide bearing the natural cleavage site between the matrix and the capsid proteins of BLV Gag precursor polyprotein, was used to develop an inhibition assay. We determined the relative inhibitory effect of synthetic Gag precursor-like peptides in which the cleavable site was replaced by a non-hydrolyzable moiety. The encouraging inhibitory effect of these compounds indicates that potent non-peptidic inhibitors for retroviral proteases are not unattainable.

  19. [Identification of Target Extracellular Proteases--Activators of Proteins of Haemostasis System Produced by Micromycetes Aspergillus ochraceus and Aspergillus terreus].

    PubMed

    Zvonareva, E S; Osmolovskiy, A A; Kreyer, V G; Baranova, N A; Kotova, I B; Egorov, N S

    2015-01-01

    Effects of extracellular proteases of Aspergillus ochraceus and Aspergillus terreus on plasma hemostasis proteins, consist of initiating the activation of prothrombin complex proteins, was detected. Was discovered, that A. ochraceus proteases have a direct influence on protein C and coagulation factor X, and A. terreus proteases causes their activation indirectly through kallikrein system stimulation. The ability of extracellular proteases of micromycetes activate prekallikrein in human blood plasma on the example of A. terreus was first demonstrated.

  20. Protease activation of the entomocidal protoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki.

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, R E; Bibilos, M M; Bulla, L A

    1985-01-01

    Two isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki were examined which produced different levels of intracellular proteases. Although the crystals from both strains had comparable toxicity, one of the strains, LB1, had a strong polypeptide band at 68,000 molecular weight in the protein from the crystal; in the other, HD251, no such band was evident. When the intracellular proteases in both strains were measured, strain HD251 produced less than 10% of the proteolytic activity found in LB1. These proteases were primarily neutral metalloproteases, although low levels of other proteases were detected. In LB1, the synthesis of protease increased as the cells began to sporulate; however, in HD251, protease activity appeared much later in the sporulation cycle. The protease activity in strain LB1 was very high when the cells were making crystal toxin, whereas in HD251 reduced proteolytic activity was present during crystal toxin synthesis. The insecticidal toxin (molecular weight, 68,000) from both strains could be prepared by cleaving the protoxin (molecular weight, 135,000) with trypsin, followed by ion-exchange chromatography. The procedure described gave quantitative recovery of toxic activity, and approximately half of the total protein was recovered. Calculations show that these results correspond to stoichiometric conversion of protoxin to insecticidal toxin. The toxicities of whole crystals, soluble crystal protein, and purified toxin from both strains were comparable. Images PMID:3909962

  1. Protease activation of the entomocidal protoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki.

    PubMed

    Andrews, R E; Bibilos, M M; Bulla, L A

    1985-10-01

    Two isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki were examined which produced different levels of intracellular proteases. Although the crystals from both strains had comparable toxicity, one of the strains, LB1, had a strong polypeptide band at 68,000 molecular weight in the protein from the crystal; in the other, HD251, no such band was evident. When the intracellular proteases in both strains were measured, strain HD251 produced less than 10% of the proteolytic activity found in LB1. These proteases were primarily neutral metalloproteases, although low levels of other proteases were detected. In LB1, the synthesis of protease increased as the cells began to sporulate; however, in HD251, protease activity appeared much later in the sporulation cycle. The protease activity in strain LB1 was very high when the cells were making crystal toxin, whereas in HD251 reduced proteolytic activity was present during crystal toxin synthesis. The insecticidal toxin (molecular weight, 68,000) from both strains could be prepared by cleaving the protoxin (molecular weight, 135,000) with trypsin, followed by ion-exchange chromatography. The procedure described gave quantitative recovery of toxic activity, and approximately half of the total protein was recovered. Calculations show that these results correspond to stoichiometric conversion of protoxin to insecticidal toxin. The toxicities of whole crystals, soluble crystal protein, and purified toxin from both strains were comparable.

  2. The uncoupling of protease trans-cleavage and helicase activities in the pestivirus NS3.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fengwei; Lu, Guoliang; Li, Ling; Gong, Peng; Pan, Zishu

    2017-08-23

    The nonstructural protein NS3 from the Flaviviridae family is a multi-functional protein that contains an N-terminal protease and a C-terminal helicase, playing essential roles in viral polyprotein processing and genome replication. Here we report a full-length crystal structure of the Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) NS3 in complex with its NS4A protease cofactor segment (PCS) at 2.35 Å resolution. The structure reveals a previously unidentified ∼2200-Å(2) intra-molecular protease-helicase interface comprising three clusters of interactions, representing a "closed" global conformation related to the NS3-NS4A cis-cleavage event. Although this conformation is incompatible with protease trans-cleavage, it appears to be functionally important and beneficial to the helicase activity, as the mutations designed to perturb this conformation impaired both the helicase activities in vitro and virus production in vivo Collectively, our work reveals important features of protease-helicase coordination in pestivirus NS3, and provides a key basis for how different conformational states may explicitly contribute to certain functions of this natural protease-helicase fusion protein.IMPORTANCE Many RNA viruses encode helicases to aid their RNA genome replication and transcription by unwinding structured RNA. Being naturally fused to a protease participating in viral polyprotein processing, the NS3 helicases encoded by the Flaviviridae family viruses are quite unique. Therefore, how these two enzyme modules coordinate in a single polypeptide is of particular interest. Here we report a previously unidentified conformation of pestivirus NS3 in complex with its NS4A protease cofactor segment (PCS). This conformational state is related to the protease cis-cleavage event and is optimal for the function of helicase. This work provides an important basis to understand how different enzymatic activities of NS3 may be achieved by the coordination between the protease and helicase

  3. Enterovirus 68 3C Protease Cleaves TRIF To Attenuate Antiviral Responses Mediated by Toll-Like Receptor 3

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zichun; Li, Linlin; Lei, Xiaobo; Zhou, Hongli; Zhou, Zhuo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human enterovirus 68 (EV68) is a member of the EV-D species, which belongs to the EV genus of the Picornaviridae family. Over the past several years, there have been increasingly documented outbreaks of respiratory disease associated with EV68. As a globally emerging pathogen, EV68 infects both adults and children. However, the molecular basis of EV68 pathogenesis is unknown. Here we report that EV68 inhibits Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3)-mediated innate immune responses by targeting the TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing beta interferon (TRIF). In infected HeLa cells, EV68 inhibits poly(I·C)-induced interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) activation and beta interferon (IFN-β) expression. Further investigations revealed that TRIF, a critical adaptor downstream of TLR3, is targeted by EV68. When expressed alone, 3Cpro, an EV68-encoded protease, cleaves TRIF. 3Cpro mediates TRIF cleavage at Q312 and Q653, which are sites in the amino- and carboxyl-terminal domains, respectively. This cleavage relies on 3Cpro's cysteine protease activity. Cleavage of TRIF abolishes the capacity of TRIF to activate NF-κB and IFN-β signaling. These results suggest that control of TRIF by 3Cpro may be a mechanism by which EV68 subverts host innate immune responses. IMPORTANCE EV68 is a globally emerging pathogen, but the molecular basis of EV68 pathogenesis is unclear. Here we report that EV68 inhibits TLR3-mediated innate immune responses by targeting TRIF. Further investigations revealed that TRIF is cleaved by 3Cpro. These results suggest that control of TRIF by 3Cpro may be a mechanism by which EV68 impairs type I IFN production in response to TLR3 activation. PMID:24672048

  4. Single Cell Analysis of Leukocyte Protease Activity Using Integrated Continuous-Flow Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Jing, Tengyang; Lai, Zhangxing; Wu, Lidan; Han, Jongyoon; Lim, Chwee Teck; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2016-12-06

    Leukocytes are the essential cells of the immune system that protect the human body against bacteria, viruses, and other foreign invaders. Secretory products of individual leukocytes, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAMs), are critical for regulating the inflammatory response and mediating host defense. Conventional single cell analytical methods, such as flow cytometry for cellular surface biomarker studies, are insufficient for performing functional assays of the protease activity of individual leukocytes. Here, an integrated continuous-flow microfluidic assay is developed to effectively detect secretory protease activity of individual viable leukocytes. Leukocytes in blood are first washed on-chip with defined buffer to remove background activity, followed by encapsulating individual leukocytes with protease sensors in water-in-oil droplets and incubating for 1 h to measure protease secretion. With this design, single leukocyte protease profiles under naive and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated conditions are reliably measured. It is found that PMA treatment not only elevates the average protease activity level but also reduces the cellular heterogeneity in protease secretion, which is important in understanding immune capability and the disease condition of individual patients.

  5. Determination of the protease cleavage site repertoire—The RNase H but not the RT domain is essential for foamy viral protease activity

    SciTech Connect

    Spannaus, Ralf; Bodem, Jochen

    2014-04-15

    In contrast to orthoretroviruses, the foamy virus protease is only active as a protease-reverse transcriptase fusion protein and requires viral RNA for activation. Maturation of foamy viral proteins seems to be restricted to a single cleavage site in Gag and Pol. We provide evidence that unprocessed Gag is required for optimal infectivity, which is unique among retroviruses. Analyses of the cleavage site sequences of the Gag and Pol cleavage sites revealed a high similarity compared to those of Lentiviruses. We show that positions P2' and P2 are invariant and that Gag and Pol cleavage sites are processed with similar efficiencies. The RNase H domain is essential for protease activity, but can functionally be substituted by RNase H domains of other retroviruses. Thus, the RNase H domain might be involved in the stabilization of the protease dimer, while the RT domain is essential for RNA dependent protease activation. - Highlights: • Unprocessed Gag is required for optimal infectivity of foamy viruses. • Positions P2 and P2' are invariant in the foamy viral cleavage sites. • The RNaseH domain is essential for protease activity. • The RNaseH domains of other retroviruses support foamy viral protease activity.

  6. Hyaluronidase and protease activities from Indian snake venoms: neutralization by Mimosa pudica root extract.

    PubMed

    Girish, K S; Mohanakumari, H P; Nagaraju, S; Vishwanath, B S; Kemparaju, K

    2004-06-01

    The aqueous root extract of Mimosa pudica dose dependently inhibited the hyaluronidase and protease activities of Indian snakes (Naja naja, Vipera russelii and Echis carinatus) venom. Copyright 2004 Elsevier B.V.

  7. [Effect of gamma-radiation and mitochondrial apoptogenic factors on nuclear protease activity].

    PubMed

    Kutsyĭ, M P; Kuznetsova, E A; Gluiaeva, N A; Gaziev, A I

    2002-01-01

    An increase in protease activity was shown in thymus nuclei of rats exposed to gamma-radiation. The activation of histone-specific proteases depended on the duration of postradiation period. Also, it was revealed that incubation of thymus nuclear with the intermembrane fraction of liver mitochondria caused degradation of histones and nonhistone nuclear proteins, as well as internucleosomal fragmentation of DNA. Simultaneously, nuclear proteases tightly bound to histones and specifically cleaving histones were observed to be activated by apoptogenic factors of the mitochondrial intermembrane fraction. Probably, the apoptogenic action of gamma-radiation involves not only a direct DNA damage that induces activation of DNA-dependent proteases but also an indirect component: destructive alterations in mitochondria leading to the exit of apoptogenic factors from the intermembrane space.

  8. Activity-based probes for rhomboid proteases discovered in a mass spectrometry-based assay

    PubMed Central

    Vosyka, Oliver; Vinothkumar, Kutti R.; Wolf, Eliane V.; Brouwer, Arwin J.; Liskamp, Rob M. J.; Verhelst, Steven H. L.

    2013-01-01

    Rhomboid proteases are evolutionary conserved intramembrane serine proteases. Because of their emerging role in many important biological pathways, rhomboids are potential drug targets. Unfortunately, few chemical tools are available for their study. Here, we describe a mass spectrometry-based assay to measure rhomboid substrate cleavage and inhibition. We have identified isocoumarin inhibitors and developed activity-based probes for rhomboid proteases. The probes can distinguish between active and inactive rhomboids due to covalent, reversible binding of the active-site serine and stable modification of a histidine residue. Finally, the structure of an isocoumarin-based inhibitor with Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG uncovers an unusual mode of binding at the active site and suggests that the interactions between the 3-substituent on the isocoumarin inhibitor and hydrophobic residues on the protease reflect S′ subsite binding. Overall, these probes represent valuable tools for rhomboid study, and the structural insights may facilitate future inhibitor design. PMID:23359682

  9. Hormonal Regulation of the Development of Protease and Carboxypeptidase Activities in Barley Aleurone Layers 1

    PubMed Central

    Hammerton, Rachel W.; Ho, Tuan-Hua David

    1986-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase and protease activities of hormone-treated barley (Hordeum vulgare cv Himalaya) aleurone layers were investigated using the substrates N-carbobenzoxy-Ala-Phe and hemoglobin. A differential effect of gibberellic acid (GA3) on these activities was observed. The carboxypeptidase activity develops in the aleurone layers during imbibition without the addition of hormone, while the release of this enzyme to the incubation medium is enhanced by GA3. In contrast, GA3 is required for both the production of protease activity in the aleurone layer and its secretion. The time course for development of protease activity in response to GA3 is similar to that observed for α-amylase. Treating aleurone layers with both GA3 and abscisic acid prevents all the GA3 effects described above. Carboxypeptidase activity is maximal between pH 5 and 6, and is inhibited by diisopropylfluorophosphate and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. We have observed three protease activities against hemoglobin which differ in charge but are all 37 kilodaltons in size on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. The activity of the proteases can be inhibited by sulfhydryl protease inhibitors, such as bromate and leupeptin, yet is enhanced by 2-fold with 2-mercaptoethanol. In addition, these enzymes appear to be active against the wheat and barley storage proteins, gliadin and hordein, respectively. On the basis of these characteristics and the time course of GA3 response, it is concluded that the proteases represent the GA3-induced, de novo synthesized proteases that are mainly responsible for the degradation of endosperm storage proteins. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16664686

  10. The prototype foamy virus protease is active independently of the integrase domain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently, contradictory results on foamy virus protease activity were published. While our own results indicated that protease activity is regulated by the viral RNA, others suggested that the integrase is involved in the regulation of the protease. Results To solve this discrepancy we performed additional experiments showing that the protease-reverse transcriptase (PR-RT) exhibits protease activity in vitro and in vivo, which is independent of the integrase domain. In contrast, Pol incorporation, and therefore PR activity in the viral context, is dependent on the integrase domain. To further analyse the regulation of the protease, we incorporated Pol in viruses by expressing a GagPol fusion protein, which supported near wild-type like infectivity. A GagPR-RT fusion, lacking the integrase domain, also resulted in wild-type like Gag processing, indicating that the integrase is dispensable for viral Gag maturation. Furthermore, we demonstrate with a trans-complementation assays that the PR in the context of the PR-RT protein supports in trans both, viral maturation and infectivity. Conclusion We provide evidence that the FV integrase is required for Pol encapsidation and that the FV PR activity is integrase independent. We show that an active PR can be encapsidated in trans as a GagPR-RT fusion protein. PMID:22574974

  11. Characterization of senescence-associated protease activities involved in the efficient protein remobilization during leaf senescence of winter oilseed rape.

    PubMed

    Poret, Marine; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Avice, Jean-Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) is a crop plant characterized by a poor nitrogen (N) use efficiency that is mainly due to low N remobilization efficiency during the sequential leaf senescence of the vegetative stage. As a high leaf N remobilization efficiency was strongly linked to a high remobilization of proteins during leaf senescence of rapeseed, our objective was to identify senescence-associated protease activities implicated in the protein degradation. To reach this goal, leaf senescence processes and protease activities were investigated in a mature leaf becoming senescent in plants subjected to ample or low nitrate supply. The characterization of protease activities was performed by using in vitro analysis of RuBisCO degradation with or without inhibitors of specific protease classes followed by a protease activity profiling using activity-dependent probes. As expected, the mature leaf became senescent regardless of the nitrate treatment, and nitrate limitation enhanced the senescence processes associated with an enhanced degradation of soluble proteins. The characterization of protease activities revealed that: (i) aspartic proteases and the proteasome were active during senescence regardless of nitrate supply, and (ii) the activities of serine proteases and particularly cysteine proteases (Papain-like Cys proteases and vacuolar processing enzymes) increased when protein remobilization associated with senescence was accelerated by nitrate limitation. Short statement: Serine and particularly cysteine proteases (both PLCPs and VPEs) seem to play a crucial role in the efficient protein remobilization when leaf senescence of oilseed rape was accelerated by nitrate limitation.

  12. Design, synthesis, and activity of nanocellulosic protease sensors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Here we contrast the molecular assembly, and biochemical utility of nanocellulosic materials prepared from cotton and wood as protease sensors. The cotton-based nanocellulosic substrates were prepared in a variety of ways to produce nanocrystals, films and aerogels, which were derivatized with eithe...

  13. Purification and characterization of a prothrombin-activating protease from Nephila clavata.

    PubMed

    Joo, Han-Seung; Park, Gun-Chun; Cho, Woo Ri; Tak, Eunsik; Paik, Seung R; Chang, Chung-Soon

    2002-03-01

    We report upon the purification and characterization of a novel prothrombin-activating enzyme from the body fluid (total homogenates of isolated digestive tract without eggs, spinnerets and silk glands) of the spider, Nephila clavata by a combination of acetone fractionation, ion exchange, and Soybean trypsin inhibitor-Sepharose chromatography. Analysis of the purified enzyme with SDS-PAGE and gel filtration revealed a single polypeptide chain with an apparent molecular weight of 24kDa. The proteolytic activity of the enzyme was stable up to 50 degrees C, however, it became unstable over 55 degrees C. The enzyme had an optimum pH of 8, and Ca(2+) was not required for the enzyme activity. According to inhibition profiles obtained with several serine protease inhibitors such as PMSF and benzamidine, the purified protease is a member of the serine proteases. Bz-Ile-Glu(gamma-OR)- Gly-Arg-pNA and Z-Arg-Gly-Arg-pNA which are known as substrates for factor Xa, were hydrolyzed favorably by the enzyme. And the Nephila protease could produce thrombin from prothrombin at nM range, and form the turbid ring using fibrinogen-agarose plate. The results obtained confirmed that the purified protease is a potent prothrombin-activating activity belonging to the family of serine protease.

  14. Enhancement of the aspartame precursor synthetic activity of an organic solvent-stable protease.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hiroyasu; Tsuchiyama, Shotaro; Yasuda, Masahiro; Doukyu, Noriyuki

    2010-03-01

    The PST-01 protease is highly stable and catalyzes the synthesis of the aspartame precursor with high reaction yields in the presence of organic solvents. However, the synthesis rate using the PST-01 protease was slower than that observed when thermolysin was used. Structural comparison of both enzymes showed particular amino acid differences near the active center. These few residue differences in the PST-01 protease were mutated to match those amino acid types found in thermolysin. The mutated PST-01 proteases at the 114th residue from tyrosine to phenylalanine showed enhancement of synthetic activity. This activity was found to be similar to thermolysin. In addition, mutating the residue in the PST-01 protease with arginine and serine showed more improvement of the activity. The mutant PST-01 protease should be more useful than thermolysin for the synthesis of the aspartame precursor, because this enzyme has higher stability and activity in the presence of organic solvents. The results show the potential of organic solvent-stable enzymes as industrial catalysts.

  15. Localization and enzymatic activity profiles of the proteases responsible for tachykinin-directed oocyte growth in the protochordate, Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Masato; Kawada, Tsuyoshi; Satake, Honoo

    2012-03-01

    We previously substantiated that Ci-TK, a tachykinin of the protochordate, Ciona intestinalis (Ci), triggered oocyte growth from the vitellogenic stage (stage II) to the post-vitellogenic stage (stage III) via up-regulation of the gene expression and enzymatic activity of the proteases: cathepsin D, carboxypeptidase B1, and chymotrypsin. In the present study, we have elucidated the localization, gene expression and activation profile of these proteases. In situ hybridization showed that the Ci-cathepsin D mRNA was present exclusively in test cells of the stage II oocytes, whereas the Ci-carboxypeptidase B1 and Ci-chymotrypsin mRNAs were detected in follicular cells of the stage II and stage III oocytes. Double-immunostaining demonstrated that the immunoreactivity of Ci-cathepsin D was largely colocalized with that of the receptor of Ci-TK, Ci-TK-R, in test cells of the stage II oocytes. Ci-cathepsin D gene expression was detected at 2h after treatment with Ci-TK, and elevated for up to 5h, and then slightly decreased. Gene expression of Ci-carboxypeptidase B1 and Ci-chymotrypsin was observed at 5h after treatment with Ci-TK, and then decreased. The enzymatic activities of Ci-cathepsin D, Ci-carboxypeptidase B1, and Ci-chymotrypsin showed similar alterations with 1-h lags. These gene expression and protease activity profiles verified that Ci-cathepsin D is initially activated, which is followed by the activation of Ci-carboxypeptidase B1 and Ci-chymotrypsin. Collectively, the present data suggest that Ci-TK directly induces Ci-cahtepsin D in test cells expressing Ci-TK receptor, leading to the secondary activation of Ci-chymotrypsin and Ci-carboxypeptidase B1 in the follicle in the tachykininergic oocyte growth pathway.

  16. Central domain of IL-33 is cleaved by mast cell proteases for potent activation of group-2 innate lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Lefrançais, Emma; Duval, Anais; Mirey, Emilie; Roga, Stéphane; Espinosa, Eric; Cayrol, Corinne; Girard, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is an alarmin cytokine from the IL-1 family. IL-33 activates many immune cell types expressing the interleukin 1 receptor-like 1 (IL1RL1) receptor ST2, including group-2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s, natural helper cells, nuocytes), the major producers of IL-5 and IL-13 during type-2 innate immune responses and allergic airway inflammation. IL-33 is likely to play a critical role in asthma because the IL33 and ST2/IL1RL1 genes have been reproducibly identified as major susceptibility loci in large-scale genome-wide association studies. A better understanding of the mechanisms regulating IL-33 activity is thus urgently needed. Here, we investigated the role of mast cells, critical effector cells in allergic disorders, known to interact with ILC2s in vivo. We found that serine proteases secreted by activated mast cells (chymase and tryptase) generate mature forms of IL-33 with potent activity on ILC2s. The major forms produced by mast cell proteases, IL-3395–270, IL-33107–270, and IL-33109–270, were 30-fold more potent than full-length human IL-331–270 for activation of ILC2s ex vivo. They induced a strong expansion of ILC2s and eosinophils in vivo, associated with elevated concentrations of IL-5 and IL-13. Murine IL-33 is also cleaved by mast cell tryptase, and a tryptase inhibitor reduced IL-33–dependent allergic airway inflammation in vivo. Our study identifies the central cleavage/activation domain of IL-33 (amino acids 66–111) as an important functional domain of the protein and suggests that interference with IL-33 cleavage and activation by mast cell and other inflammatory proteases could be useful to reduce IL-33–mediated responses in allergic asthma and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:25313073

  17. Proteolytic Activity Matrix Analysis (PrAMA) for Simultaneous Determination of Multiple Protease Activities

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Miles A.; Barkal, Layla; Jeng, Karen; Herrlich, Andreas; Griffith, Linda G.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are two related protease families that play key roles in matrix remodeling and growth factor ligand shedding. Directly ascertaining the proteolytic activities of particular MMPs and ADAMs in physiological environments in a non-invasive, real-time, multiplex manner remains a challenge. This work describes Proteolytic Activity Matrix Analysis (PrAMA), an integrated experimental measurement and mathematical analysis framework for simultaneously determining the activities of particular enzymes in complex mixtures of MMPs and ADAMs. The PrAMA method interprets dynamic signals from panels of moderately specific FRET-based polypeptide protease substrates to deduce a profile of specific MMP and ADAM proteolytic activities. Deconvolution of signals from complex mixtures of proteases is accomplished using prior data on individual MMP/ADAM cleavage signatures for the substrate panel measured with purified enzymes. We first validate PrAMA inference using a compendium of roughly 4000 measurements involving known mixtures of purified enzymes and substrates, and then demonstrate application to the live-cell response of wildtype, ADAM10−/−, and ADAM17−/− fibroblasts to phorbol ester stimulation. Results indicate PrAMA can distinguish closely related enzymes from each other with high accuracy, even in the presence of unknown background proteolytic activity. PrAMA offers a valuable tool for applications ranging from live-cell in vitro assays to high-throughput inhibitor screening with complex enzyme mixtures. Moreover, our approach may extend to other families of proteases, such as caspases and cathepsins, that also can lack highly-specific substrates. PMID:21180771

  18. The circadian Clock gene regulates acrosin activity of sperm through serine protease inhibitor A3K

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shuting; Liang, Xin; Wang, Yuhui; Jiang, Zhou; Liu, Yanyou; Hou, Wang; Li, Shiping; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study found that CLOCK knockdown in the testes of male mice led to a reduced fertility, which might be associated with the lower acrosin activity. In this present study, we examined the differential expression in proteins of CLOCK knockdown sperm. Clock gene expression was knocked down in cells to confirm those differentially expressions and serine protease inhibitor SERPINA3K was identified as a potential target. The up-regulated SERPINA3K revealed an inverse relationship with Clock knockdown. Direct treatment of normal sperm with recombinant SERPINA3K protein inhibited the acrosin activity and reduced in vitro fertilization rate. The luciferase reporter gene assay showed that the down-regulated of Clock gene could activate the Serpina3k promoter, but this activation was not affected by the mutation of E-box core sequence. Co-IP demonstrated a natural interaction between SERPIAN3K and RORs (α and β). Taken together, these results demonstrated that SERPINA3K is involved in the Clock gene-mediated male fertility by regulating acrosin activity and provide the first evidence that SERPINA3K could be regulated by Clock gene via retinoic acid-related orphan receptor response elements. PMID:26264441

  19. Properties of a cold-active protease from psychrotrophic Flavobacterium balustinum P104.

    PubMed

    Morita, Y; Hasan, Q; Sakaguchi, T; Murakami, Y; Yokoyama, K; Tamiya, E

    1998-12-01

    Protease activity was detected in the culture medium of Flavobacterium balustinum P104 grown at 10 degrees C, which was isolated from salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) intestine. The enzyme, designated as CP-70 protease, was purified to homogeneity from the culture broth by ion exchange and gel filtration chromatographyies. The molecular mass of the protease was 70 kDa, and its isoelectric point was close to 3.5. Maximal activity toward azocasein was observed at 40 degrees C and from pH 7.0 to 9.0. The activity was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, suggesting that the enzyme is a serine protease. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was Asp-Thr-Arg-Gln-Leu-Leu-Asn-Ala-Asn-Ser-Asp-Leu-Leu- Asn-Thr-Thr-Gly-Asn-Val-Thr-Gly-Leu-Thr-Gly-Ala-Phe-Asn-Gly-Gly-Asn. A search through the database for sequence homology yielded no significant match. The initial cleavage sites for oxidized insulin B-chain were found to be the Glu13-Ala14 and Phe24-Phe25 bonds. The result of the cleavage pattern of oxidized insulin B-chain suggests that CP-70 protease has a broader specificity than the other cold-active proteases against the peptide substrate.

  20. Four plasmepsins are active in the Plasmodium falciparum food vacuole, including a protease with an active-site histidine

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ritu; Liu, Jun; Beatty, Wandy; Pelosof, Lorraine; Klemba, Michael; Goldberg, Daniel E.

    2002-01-01

    Hemoglobin degradation is a metabolic process that is central to the growth and maturation of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Two aspartic proteases that initiate degradation, plasmepsins (PMs) I and II, have been identified and extensively characterized. Eight additional PM genes are present in the P. falciparum genome. To better understand the enzymology of hemoglobin degradation, it is necessary to determine which of these genes are expressed when hemoglobin degradation is occurring, which encode active enzymes, and which gene products are found in the food vacuole where catabolism takes place. Our genome-wide analysis reveals that PM I, II, and IV and histo-aspartic protease encode hemoglobin-degrading food vacuole proteases. Despite having a histidine in place of one of the catalytic aspartic acids conserved in other aspartic proteases, histo-aspartic protease is an active hydrolase. PMID:11782538

  1. Ginkgolic acid inhibits HIV protease activity and HIV infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lü, Jian-Ming; Yan, Shaoyu; Jamaluddin, Saha; Weakley, Sarah M.; Liang, Zhengdong; Siwak, Edward B.; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Several HIV protease mutations, which are resistant to clinical HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), have been identified. There is a great need for second-generation PIs with different chemical structures and/or with an alternative mode of inhibition. Ginkgolic acid is a natural herbal substance and a major component of the lipid fraction in the nutshells of the Ginkgo biloba tree. The objective of this study was to determine whether ginkgolic acid could inhibit HIV protease activity in a cell free system and HIV infection in human cells. Material/Methods Purified ginkgolic acid and recombinant HIV-1 HXB2 KIIA protease were used for the HIV protease activity assay. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used for HIV infection (HIV-1SF162 virus), determined by a p24gag ELISA. Cytotoxicity was also determined. Results Ginkgolic acid (31.2 μg/ml) inhibited HIV protease activity by 60%, compared with the negative control, and the effect was concentration-dependent. In addition, ginkgolic acid treatment (50 and 100 μg/ml) effectively inhibited the HIV infection at day 7 in a concentration-dependent manner. Ginkgolic acid at a concentration of up to 150 μg/ml demonstrated very limited cytotoxicity. Conclusions Ginkgolic acid effectively inhibits HIV protease activity in a cell free system and HIV infection in PBMCs without significant cytotoxicity. Ginkgolic acid may inhibit HIV protease through different mechanisms than current FDA-approved HIV PI drugs. These properties of ginkgolic acid make it a promising therapy for HIV infection, especially as the clinical problem of viral resistance to HIV PIs continues to grow. PMID:22847190

  2. Characterization of the Protease Activity of Detergents: Laboratory Practicals for Studying the Protease Profile and Activity of Various Commercial Detergents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valls, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2011-01-01

    Detergent enzymes account for about 30% of the total worldwide production of enzymes and are one of the largest and most successful applications of modern industrial biotechnology. Proteases can improve the wash performance of household, industrial, and institutional laundry detergents used to remove protein-based stains such as blood, grass, body…

  3. Characterization of the Protease Activity of Detergents: Laboratory Practicals for Studying the Protease Profile and Activity of Various Commercial Detergents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valls, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2011-01-01

    Detergent enzymes account for about 30% of the total worldwide production of enzymes and are one of the largest and most successful applications of modern industrial biotechnology. Proteases can improve the wash performance of household, industrial, and institutional laundry detergents used to remove protein-based stains such as blood, grass, body…

  4. Proteases as Insecticidal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Robert L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2010-01-01

    Proteases from a variety of sources (viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects) have toxicity towards insects. Some of these insecticidal proteases evolved as venom components, herbivore resistance factors, or microbial pathogenicity factors, while other proteases play roles in insect development or digestion, but exert an insecticidal effect when over-expressed from genetically engineered plants or microbial pathogens. Many of these proteases are cysteine proteases, although insect-toxic metalloproteases and serine proteases have also been examined. The sites of protease toxic activity range from the insect midgut to the hemocoel (body cavity) to the cuticle. This review discusses these insecticidal proteases along with their evaluation and use as potential pesticides. PMID:22069618

  5. Approaches for the generation of active papain-like cysteine proteases from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chunfang; Zhang, Junyan; Lin, Deqiu; Tao, Ailin

    2015-05-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases are widely expressed, fulfill specific functions in extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation and processing events, and may represent viable drug targets for major diseases. In depth and rigorous studies of the potential for these proteins to be targets for drug development require sufficient amounts of protease protein that can be used for both experimental and therapeutic purposes. Escherichia coli was widely used to express papain-like cysteine proteases, but most of those proteases are produced in insoluble inclusion bodies that need solubilizing, refolding, purifying and activating. Refolding is the most critical step in the process of generating active cysteine proteases and the current approaches to refolding include dialysis, dilution and chromatography. Purification is mainly achieved by various column chromatography. Finally, the attained refolded proteases are examined regarding their protease structures and activities.

  6. Multiplex Detection of Protease Activity with Quantum Dot Nanosensors Prepared by Intein-Mediated Specific Bioconjugation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zuyong; Xing, Yun; So, Min-Kyung; Koh, Ai Leen; Sinclair, Robert; Rao, Jianghong

    2009-01-01

    We report here a protease sensing nanoplatform based on semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (QD-BRET) to detect the protease activity in complex biological samples. These nanosensors consist of bioluminescent proteins as the BRET donor, quantum dots as the BRET acceptor, and protease substrates sandwiched between the two as a sensing group. An intein-mediated conjugation strategy was developed for site-specific conjugation of proteins to QDs in preparing these QD nanosensors. In this traceless ligation, the intein itself is spliced out and excluded from the final conjugation product. With this method, we have synthesized a series of QD nanosensors for highly sensitive detection of an important class of protease matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. We demonstrated that these nanosensors can detect the MMP activity in buffers and in mouse serum with the sensitivity to a few ng/ml, and secreted proteases by tumor cells. The suitability of these nanosensors for a multiplex protease assay has also been shown. PMID:18922019

  7. Effects of Glycosylation on the Enzymatic Activity and Mechanisms of Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Goettig, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications are an important feature of most proteases in higher organisms, such as the conversion of inactive zymogens into active proteases. To date, little information is available on the role of glycosylation and functional implications for secreted proteases. Besides a stabilizing effect and protection against proteolysis, several proteases show a significant influence of glycosylation on the catalytic activity. Glycans can alter the substrate recognition, the specificity and binding affinity, as well as the turnover rates. However, there is currently no known general pattern, since glycosylation can have both stimulating and inhibiting effects on activity. Thus, a comparative analysis of individual cases with sufficient enzyme kinetic and structural data is a first approach to describe mechanistic principles that govern the effects of glycosylation on the function of proteases. The understanding of glycan functions becomes highly significant in proteomic and glycomic studies, which demonstrated that cancer-associated proteases, such as kallikrein-related peptidase 3, exhibit strongly altered glycosylation patterns in pathological cases. Such findings can contribute to a variety of future biomedical applications. PMID:27898009

  8. Localized serine protease activity and the establishment of Drosophila embryonic dorsoventral polarity

    PubMed Central

    Stein, David; Cho, Yong Suk; Stevens, Leslie M

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila embryo dorsoventral polarity is established by a maternally encoded signal transduction pathway in which three sequentially acting serine proteases, Gastrulation Defective, Snake and Easter, generate the ligand that activates the Toll receptor on the ventral side of the embryo. The spatial regulation of this pathway depends upon ventrally restricted expression of the Pipe sulfotransferase in the ovarian follicle during egg formation. Several recent observations have advanced our understanding of the mechanism regulating the spatially restricted activation of Toll. First, several protein components of the vitelline membrane layer of the eggshell have been determined to be targets of Pipe-mediated sulfation. Second, the processing of Easter by Snake has been identified as the first Pipe-dependent, ventrally-restricted processing event in the pathway. Finally, Gastrulation Defective has been shown to undergo Pipe-dependent, ventral localization within the perivitelline space and to facilitate Snake-mediated processing of Easter. Together, these observations suggest that Gastrulation Defective, localized on the interior ventral surface of the eggshell in association with Pipe-sulfated eggshell proteins, recruits and mediates an interaction between Snake and Easter. This event leads to ventrally-restricted processing and activation of Easter and consequently, localized formation of the Toll ligand, and Toll activation. PMID:24047959

  9. Localized serine protease activity and the establishment of Drosophila embryonic dorsoventral polarity.

    PubMed

    Stein, David; Cho, Yong Suk; Stevens, Leslie M

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila embryo dorsoventral polarity is established by a maternally encoded signal transduction pathway in which three sequentially acting serine proteases, Gastrulation Defective, Snake and Easter, generate the ligand that activates the Toll receptor on the ventral side of the embryo. The spatial regulation of this pathway depends upon ventrally restricted expression of the Pipe sulfotransferase in the ovarian follicle during egg formation. Several recent observations have advanced our understanding of the mechanism regulating the spatially restricted activation of Toll. First, several protein components of the vitelline membrane layer of the eggshell have been determined to be targets of Pipe-mediated sulfation. Second, the processing of Easter by Snake has been identified as the first Pipe-dependent, ventrally-restricted processing event in the pathway. Finally, Gastrulation Defective has been shown to undergo Pipe-dependent, ventral localization within the perivitelline space and to facilitate Snake-mediated processing of Easter. Together, these observations suggest that Gastrulation Defective, localized on the interior ventral surface of the eggshell in association with Pipe-sulfated eggshell proteins, recruits and mediates an interaction between Snake and Easter. This event leads to ventrally-restricted processing and activation of Easter and consequently, localized formation of the Toll ligand, and Toll activation.

  10. Chemiluminescent probe for the in vitro detection of protease activity.

    PubMed

    Richard, Jean-Alexandre; Jean, Ludovic; Romieu, Anthony; Massonneau, Marc; Noack-Fraissignes, Pauline; Renard, Pierre-Yves

    2007-11-08

    A strategy involving the use of a self-immolative linker has been investigated for the chemiluminescent sensing of proteases. The reactive linker enabled the release of a 1,2-dioxetane light precursor. As a proof of principle, caspase-3, a key peptidase involved in apoptosis has been targeted. An in vitro assay has been carried out and proved the decomposition of the linker and the selectivity for caspase-3.

  11. Lectin Activation in Giardia lamblia by Host Protease: A Novel Host-Parasite Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Boaz; Ward, Honorine; Keusch, Gerald T.; Pereira, Miercio E. A.

    1986-04-01

    A lectin in Giardia lamblia was activated by secretions from the human duodenum, the environment where the parasite lives. Incubation of the secretions with trypsin inhibitors prevented the appearance of lectin activity, implicating proteases as the activating agent. Accordingly, lectin activation was also produced by crystalline trypsin and Pronase; other proteases tested were ineffective. When activated, the lectin agglutinated intestinal cells to which the parasite adheres in vivo. The lectin was most specific to mannose-6-phosphate and apparently was bound to the plasma membrane. Activation of a parasite lectin by a host protease represents a novel mechanism of hostparasite interaction and may contribute to the affinity of Giardia lamblia to the infection site.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of a 48-kDa protease (AMP48) from Artocarpus heterophyllus latex.

    PubMed

    Siritapetawee, J; Thammasirirak, S; Samosornsuk, W

    2012-01-01

    Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) is a latex producing plant. Plant latex is produced from secretory cells and contains many intergradients. It also has been used in folk medicine. This study aimed to purify and characterize the biological activities of a protease from jackfruit latex. A protease was isolated and purified from crude latex of a jackfruit tree by acid precipitation and ion exchange chromatography. The proteolytic activities of protein were tested using gelatin- and casein-zymography. The molecular weight and isoelectric point (pl) of protein were analysed by SDS/12.5% PAGE and 2D-PAGE, respectively. Antimicrobial activity of protein was analysed by broth microdilution method. In addition, the antibacterial activity of protein against Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 was observed and measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. The purified protein contained protease activity by digesting gelatin- and casein-substrates. The protease was designated as antimicrobial protease-48 kDa or AMP48 due to its molecular mass on SDS-PAGE was approximately 48 kDa. The isoelectric point (pl) of AMP48 was approximately 4.2. In addition, AMP48 contained antimicrobial activities by it could inhibit the growths of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and clinical isolated Candida albicans at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 2.2 mg/ml and Minimum microbicidal concentration (MMC) 8.8 mg/ml. AFM image also supported the antimicrobial activities of AMP48 by the treated bacterial morphology and size were altered from normal.

  13. Differential cleavage of the norovirus polyprotein precursor by two active forms of the viral protease.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Ulrike; Rudolph, Wolfram; Gebhardt, Julia; Rohayem, Jacques

    2007-07-01

    Protein translation in noroviruses requires translational processing of a polyprotein precursor by the viral protease. So far, the molecular mechanisms of catalytic cleavage by the viral protease are poorly understood. In this study, the catalytic activities and substrate specificities of the viral protease were examined in vitro by using synthetic peptides (11-15 residues) corresponding to the cleavage sites of the norovirus polyprotein. Both predicted forms of the viral protease, the 3C-like protease (3C(pro)) and the 3CD-like protease polymerase protein (3CD(propol)), displayed a specific trans cleavage activity of peptides bearing Gln-Gly at the scissile bond. In contrast, peptides bearing Glu-Gly at the scissile bond (p20/VPg and 3C(pro)/3D(pol) junctions) were resistant to trans-cleavage by 3C(pro) and 3CD(propol). Interestingly, the VPg/3C(pro) scissile bond (Glu-Ala) was cleaved only by 3CD(propol), and examination of relative cleavage efficiencies revealed significant differences in processing of peptides, indicating differential cleavage patterns for 3C(pro) and 3CD(propol).

  14. Serine Protease Activation Essential for Endothelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Vascular Calcification.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiayi; Guihard, Pierre J; Blazquez-Medela, Ana M; Guo, Yina; Moon, Jeremiah H; Jumabay, Medet; Boström, Kristina I; Yao, Yucheng

    2015-10-09

    Endothelial cells have the ability to undergo endothelial-mesenchymal transitions (EndMTs), by which they acquire a mesenchymal phenotype and stem cell-like characteristics. We previously found that EndMTs occurred in the endothelium deficient in matrix γ-carboxyglutamic acid protein enabling endothelial cells to contribute cells to vascular calcification. However, the mechanism responsible for initiating EndMTs is not fully understood. To determine the role of specific serine proteases and sex determining region Y-box 2 (Sox2) in the initiation of EndMTs. In this study, we used in vivo and in vitro models of vascular calcification to demonstrate that serine proteases and Sox2 are essential for the initiation of EndMTs in matrix γ-carboxyglutamic acid protein-deficient endothelium. We showed that expression of a group of specific serine proteases was highly induced in endothelial cells at sites of vascular calcification in Mgp null aortas. Treatment with serine protease inhibitors decreased both stem cell marker expression and vascular calcification. In human aortic endothelial cells, this group of serine proteases also induced EndMTs, and the activation of proteases was mediated by Sox2. Knockdown of the serine proteases or Sox2 diminished EndMTs and calcification. Endothelial-specific deletion of Sox2 decreased expression of stem cell markers and aortic calcification in matrix γ-carboxyglutamic acid protein-deficient mice. Our results suggest that Sox2-mediated activation of specific serine proteases is essential for initiating EndMTs, and thus, may provide new therapeutic targets for treating vascular calcification. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Production, characterization, gene cloning, and nematocidal activity of the extracellular protease from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia N4.

    PubMed

    Jankiewicz, Urszula; Larkowska, Ewa; Swiontek Brzezinska, Maria

    2016-06-01

    A rhizosphere strain of the bacterium Stenotrophomonas maltophilia N4 secretes the serine protease PN4, whose molecular mass is approximately 42 kDa. The optimal temperature for the enzyme activity of the 11-fold purified protein was 50°C and the optimal pH was 10.5. The activity of the enzyme was strongly inhibited by specific serine protease inhibitors, which allowed for its classification as an alkaline serine protease family. Ca(2+) ions stimulated the activity of the protease PN4, while Mg(2+) ions stabilized its activity, and Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) ions strongly inhibited its activity. The enzyme has broad substrate specificity. For example, it is able to hydrolyse casein, keratin, albumin, haemoglobin, and gelatin, as well as the insoluble modified substrates azure keratin and azocoll. The gene that encodes the 1740 bp precursor form of the enzyme (accession number: LC031815) was cloned. We then deduced that its amino acid sequence includes the region of the conserved domain of the S8 family of peptidases as well as the catalytic triad Asp/His/Ser. The bacterial culture fluid as well as the purified protease PN4 demonstrated biocidal activity with regard to the nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans and Panagrellus spp. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Supermarket Proteases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagar, William G.; Bullerwell, Lornie D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory activity on enzymes. Uses common items found in the supermarket that contain protease enzymes, such as contact lens cleaner and meat tenderizer. Demonstrates the digestion of gelatin proteins as part of enzymatic reactions. (Author/SOE)

  17. Supermarket Proteases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagar, William G.; Bullerwell, Lornie D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory activity on enzymes. Uses common items found in the supermarket that contain protease enzymes, such as contact lens cleaner and meat tenderizer. Demonstrates the digestion of gelatin proteins as part of enzymatic reactions. (Author/SOE)

  18. Quantum dot-based concentric FRET configuration for the parallel detection of protease activity and concentration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Miao; Petryayeva, Eleonora; Algar, W Russ

    2014-11-18

    Protease expression, activity, and inhibition play crucial roles in a multitude of biological processes; however, these three aspects of their function are difficult for any one bioanalytical probe to measure. To help address this challenge, we report a multifunctional concentric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) configuration that combines two modes of biorecognition using aptamers and peptide substrates coassembled to a central semiconductor quantum dot (QD). The aptamer is sensitive to the concentration of protease and the peptide is sensitive to its hydrolytic activity. The role of the QD is to serve as a nanoscale scaffold and initial donor for energy transfer with both Cyanine 3 (Cy3) and Alexa Fluor 647 (A647) fluorescent dyes associated with the aptamer and peptide, respectively. Using thrombin as a model protease, we show that a ratiometric analysis of the emission from the QD, Cy3, and A647 permits discrimination between thrombin and thrombin-like activity, and distinguishes between active, reversibly inhibited, and irreversibly inhibited thrombin. Reliable quantitative results were obtained from a kinetic analysis of the changes in FRET. This concentric FRET format, which capitalizes on both the physical and optical properties of QDs, should be adaptable to other protease targets for which both peptide substrates and binding aptamers are known. It is thus expected to become valuable a tool for the real-time analysis of protease activity and regulation.

  19. A cysteine-activated protease isolated from Todarodes pacificus squid degrades collagen below its denaturation temperature.

    PubMed

    Miura-Yokota, Yohko; Matsubara, Youco; Ebihara, Tetsuya; Hattori, Shunji; Irie, Shinkichi

    2004-01-01

    Collagen purified from the mantle muscle of the Japanese common squid, Todarodes pacificus, showed autodegradation during incubation under acidic conditions at 25 degrees C, without the addition of exogenous enzymes. This suggests that the collagenolytic proteases bind to collagen tightly through the steps of collagen preparation. Collagenolytic activity also was detected in a crude extract of mantle muscle, and leupeptin and E-64 were observed to inhibit collagenolytic activity within the collagen fraction and muscle extract. We purified these collagenolytic cysteine proteases by leupeptin column chromatography and cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis. Optimal enzymatic activity was observed at pH 3.5, and collagenolytic activity was completely suppressed at neutral or alkaline pH. The purified enzymes were 28 kDa and 25 kDa in size, and both had gelatinolytic activity, as detected by gelatin zymography, and cut the specific site of denatured collagen alpha chain. The purified enzymes degraded squid collagen at 25 degrees C, which is 2.5 degrees lower than the temperature at which squid collagen normally denatures; however, the proteases were ineffective at 20 degrees C. Interestingly, the isolated proteases were capable of digesting both squid and bovine gelatin. In this article, we describe collagenolytic cysteine proteases that bind to the collagen of Todarodes pacificus, thereby digesting it by attacking microunfolding regions generated by incubation 2-3 degrees C below the denaturation temperature.

  20. Yeast extracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Ogrydziak, D M

    1993-01-01

    Many species of yeast secrete significant amounts of protease(s). In this article, results of numerous surveys of yeast extracellular protease production have been compiled and inconsistencies in the data and limitations of the methodology have been examined. Regulation, purification, characterization, and processing of yeast extracellular proteases are reviewed. Results obtained from the sequences of cloned genes, especially the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bar protease, the Candida albicans acid protease, and the Yarrowia lipolytica alkaline protease, have been emphasized. Biotechnological applications and the medical relevance of yeast extracellular proteases are covered. Yeast extracellular proteases have potential in beer and wine stabilization, and they probably contribute to pathogenicity of Candida spp. Yeast extracellular protease genes also provide secretion and processing signals for yeast expression systems designed for secretion of heterologous proteins. Coverage of the secretion of foreign proteases such as prochymosin, urokinase, and tissue plasminogen activator by yeast in included.

  1. Pathomimetic cancer avatars for live-cell imaging of protease activity.

    PubMed

    Ji, Kyungmin; Heyza, Joshua; Cavallo-Medved, Dora; Sloane, Bonnie F

    2016-03-01

    Proteases are essential for normal physiology as well as multiple diseases, e.g., playing a causative role in cancer progression, including in tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Identification of dynamic alterations in protease activity may allow us to detect early stage cancers and to assess the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies. Despite the clinical importance of proteases in cancer progression, their functional roles individually and within the context of complex protease networks have not yet been well defined. These gaps in our understanding might be addressed with: 1) accurate and sensitive tools and methods to directly identify changes in protease activities in live cells, and 2) pathomimetic avatars for cancer that recapitulate in vitro the tumor in the context of its cellular and non-cellular microenvironment. Such avatars should be designed to facilitate mechanistic studies that can be translated to animal models and ultimately the clinic. Here, we will describe basic principles and recent applications of live-cell imaging for identification of active proteases. The avatars optimized by our laboratory are three-dimensional (3D) human breast cancer models in a matrix of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM). They are designated mammary architecture and microenvironment engineering (MAME) models as they have been designed to mimic the structural and functional interactions among cell types in the normal and cancerous human breast. We have demonstrated the usefulness of these pathomimetic avatars for following dynamic and temporal changes in cell:cell interactions and quantifying changes in protease activity associated with these interactions in real-time (4D). We also briefly describe adaptation of the avatars to custom-designed and fabricated tissue architecture and microenvironment engineering (TAME) chambers that enhance our ability to analyze concomitant changes in the malignant phenotype and the associated tumor microenvironment.

  2. Rapid Detection of Thrombin and Other Protease Activity Directly in Whole Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Johnson Chung Sing

    Thrombin is a serine protease that plays a key role in the clotting cascade to promote hemostasis following injury to the endothelium. From a clinical diagnostic perspective, in-vivo thrombin activity is linked to various blood clotting disorders, as well as cardiovascular disease (DVT, arteriosclerosis, etc). Thus, the ability to rapidly measure protease activity directly in whole blood will provide important new diagnostics, and clinical researchers with a powerful tool to further elucidate the relationship between circulating protease levels and disease. The ultimate goal is to design novel point of care (POC) diagnostic devices that are capable of monitoring protease activities directly in whole blood and biological sample. A charge-changing substrate specific to the thrombin enzyme was engineered and its functionality was confirmed by a series of experiments. This led to the preliminary design, construction, and testing of two device platforms deemed fully functional for the electrophoretic separation and focusing of charged peptide fragments. The concept of using the existing charge-changing substrate platform for bacterial protease detection was also investigated. Certain strains of E coli are associated with severe symptoms such as abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhea, and vomiting. The OmpT protease is expressed on the outer membrane of E coli and plays a role in the cleavage of antimicrobial peptides, the degradation of recombinant heterologous proteins, and the activation of plasminogen in the host. Thus, a synthetic peptide substrate specific to the OmpT protease was designed and modeled for the purpose of detecting E coli in biological sample.

  3. Cadmium-induced changes of gypsy moth larval mass and protease activity.

    PubMed

    Vlahović, Milena; Ilijin, Larisa; Lazarević, Jelica; Mrdaković, Marija; Gavrilović, Anja; Matić, Dragana; Mataruga, Vesna Perić

    2014-03-01

    Cadmium uptake takes place mainly through food. Lymantria dispar larvae were exposed to dietary cadmium in concentrations of 10 and 30μg Cd/g dry food (NOEC, no-observed-effect and LOEC, lowest-observed-effect concentration, respectively) for acute and chronic treatment and recovery. We established that metal contamination decreased mass only during the chronic treatment at 30μg Cd/dry food with no recovery on removal of cadmium for 3days. Significant reduction of protease activity was detected at LOEC after the acute and chronic treatments. Protease showed enhanced plasticity with regard to the fitness trait (mass) during environmental stress and the higher cadmium load, when it changed. The statistically significant higher index of phenotypic plasticity for protease correlated with lower variability. Protease isoforms at the same cadmium treatments differed between genotypes, while some protease isoforms from one egg-mass differed between cadmium treatments. Owing to the low sensitivity and plasticity of mass change during exposure to cadmium, as well as its small influence, we concluded that larval mass is not a good indicator of cadmium presence in food. We suggest that proteases, with further research, might be a suitable indicator of dietary cadmium contamination, as well as nutriment utilization during heavy metal stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cyt2Ba of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis: activation by putative endogenous protease.

    PubMed

    Nisnevitch, Marina; Cohen, Shmuel; Ben-Dov, Eitan; Zaritsky, Arieh; Sofer, Yossef; Cahan, Rivka

    2006-05-26

    The gene cyt2Ba of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis was cloned for expression, together with p20, in an acrystalliferous strain. The large hexagonal crystals formed were composed of Cyt2Ba, which facilitated its purification. Crystal solubilization in the presence of endogenous proteases (with spores and cell debris) enabled quick and simple procedure to obtain rather pure and active toxin species by cleavage between amino acid residues 34 and 35, most likely by a camelysin-like protease that was discovered in association with activated Cyt2Ba. The product of this cleavage displayed haemolytic activity comparable to that of exogenously activated Cyt2Ba. The sequence of this putative protease shares high homology with the cell envelope-bound metalloprotease (camelysin) of the closely related species Bacillus cereus.

  5. A potential Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor involves in kinetics of protease inhibition and bacteriostatic activity.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Harikrishnan, Ramaswamy; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2015-02-01

    Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor (KSPI) is a pancreatic secretary trypsin inhibitor which involves in various cellular component regulations including development and defense process. In this study, we have characterized a KSPI cDNA sequence of freshwater striped murrel fish Channa striatus (Cs) at molecular level. Cellular location analysis predicted that the CsKSPI was an extracellular protein. The domain analysis showed that the CsKSPI contains a Kazal domain at 47-103 along with its family signature between 61 and 83. Phylogenetically, CsKSPI is closely related to KSPI from Maylandia zebra and formed a sister group with mammals. The 2D structure of CsKSPI showed three α-helical regions which are connected with random coils, one helix at signal sequence and two at the Kazal domain region. The relative gene expression showed that the CsKSPI was highly expressed in gills and its expression was induced upon fungus (Aphanomyces invadans), bacteria (Aeromonas hydrophila) and poly I:C (a viral analogue) challenge. The CsKSPI recombinant protein was produced to characterize and study the CsKSPI gene specific functions. The recombinant CsKSPI strongly inhibited trypsin compared to other tested proteases. The results of the kinetic activity of CsKSPI against trypsin was V(max)s = 1.62 nmol/min, K(M)s = 0.21 mM and K(i)s = 15.37 nM. Moreover, the recombinant CsKSPI inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria A. hydrophila at 20 μM and Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis at the MIC50 of 15 μM. Overall, the study indicated that the CsKSPI was a potential trypsin inhibitor which involves in antimicrobial activity.

  6. Transcriptional activation of the human cytotoxic serine protease gene CSP-B in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R D; Ley, T J

    1990-01-01

    The cytotoxic serine protease B (CSP-B) gene is activated during cytotoxic T-lymphocyte maturation. In this report, we demonstrate that the PEER T-cell line (bearing gamma/delta T-cell receptors) accumulates CSP-B mRNA following exposure to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and N6-2'-O-dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (bt2cAMP) because of transcriptional activation of the CSP-B gene. TPA and bt2cAMP act synergistically to induce CSP-B expression, since neither agent alone causes activation of CSP-B transcription or mRNA accumulation. Chromatin upstream from the CSP-B gene is resistant to DNase I digestion in untreated PEER cells, but becomes sensitive following TPA-bt2cAMP treatment. Upon activation of PEER cells, a DNase I-hypersensitive site forms upstream from the CSP-B gene within a region that is highly conserved in the mouse. Transient transfection of CSP-B promoter constructs identified two regulatory regions in the CSP-B 5'-flanking sequence, located at positions -609 to -202 and positions -202 to -80. The region from -615 to -63 is sufficient to activate a heterologous promoter in activated PEER cells, but activation is orientation specific, suggesting that this region behaves as an upstream promoter element rather than a classical enhancer. Consensus AP-1, AP-2, and cAMP response elements are found upstream from the CSP-B gene (as are several T-cell-specific consensus elements), but the roles of these elements in CSP-B gene activation have yet to be determined. Images PMID:2233710

  7. Activation of Bacteroides fragilis toxin by a novel bacterial protease contributes to anaerobic sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Vivian M.; Herrou, Julien; Hecht, Aaron L.; Teoh, Wei Ping; Turner, Jerrold R.; Crosson, Sean; Wardenburg, Juliane Bubeck

    2016-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis is the leading cause of anaerobic bacteremia and sepsis 1. Enterotoxigenic strains producing B. fragilis toxin (BFT, fragilysin) contribute to colitis 2 and intestinal malignancy 3, yet are also isolated in bloodstream infection 4,5. It is not known whether these strains harbor unique genetic determinants that confer virulence in extra-intestinal disease. We demonstrate that BFT contributes to sepsis and identify a B. fragilis protease, fragipain (Fpn), which is required for endogenous activation of BFT through removal of its auto-inhibitory prodomain. Structural analysis of Fpn reveals a His-Cys catalytic dyad characteristic of C11 family cysteine proteases that are conserved in multiple pathogenic Bacteroides spp and Clostridium spp. Fpn-deficient enterotoxigenic B. fragilis is attenuated in its ability to induce sepsis, however Fpn is dispensable in B. fragilis colitis wherein host proteases mediate BFT activation. Our findings define a role for B. fragilis enterotoxin and its activating protease in the pathogenesis of bloodstream infection, indicating a greater complexity of cellular targeting and action of BFT than previously appreciated. The expression of fpn by both toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains suggests this protease may contribute to anaerobic sepsis beyond its role in toxin activation, potentially serving as a target for disease modification. PMID:27089515

  8. Proteases from Canavalia ensiformis: Active and Thermostable Enzymes with Potential of Application in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Rayane Natshe; Gozzini Barbosa, Suellen Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Extracts of leaves, seeds, roots, and stem from a tropical legume, C. ensiformis, were prepared employing buffers and detergent in aqueous solution. Leaf extracts had the highest protein content and the most pronounced peptidase activity with optimal pH in the neutral to alkaline range. All extracts exhibited peaks of activity at various pH values, suggesting the presence of distinctive classes of proteases. N-α-Tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester hydrolysis was maximal at 30°C to 60°C and peptidase activity from all extracts presented very good thermal stability after 24 h incubation at 70°C. C. ensiformis proteases exhibited molecular masses of about 200–57, 40–37, and 20–15 kDa by SDS-PAGE analysis. These enzymes cleaved hemoglobin, bovine serum albumin, casein, and gelatin at different levels. Serine and metalloproteases are the major proteases in C. ensiformis extracts, modulated by divalent cations, stable at 1% of surfactant Triton X-100 and at different concentrations of the reducing agent β-mercaptoethanol. Thus, C. ensiformis expresses a particular set of proteases in distinctive organs with high activity and stability, making this legume an important source of proteases with biotechnological potential. PMID:27630776

  9. Regulation of Foamy Virus Protease Activity by Viral RNA: a Novel and Unique Mechanism among Retroviruses▿†

    PubMed Central

    Hartl, Maximilian J.; Bodem, Jochen; Jochheim, Fabian; Rethwilm, Axel; Rösch, Paul; Wöhrl, Birgitta M.

    2011-01-01

    Foamy viruses (FVs) synthesize the Pol precursor protein from a specific transcript. Thus, in contrast to what was found for orthoretroviruses, e.g., human immunodeficiency virus, no Gag-Pol precursor protein is synthesized. Foamy viral Pol consists of a protease (PR) domain, a reverse transcriptase domain, and an integrase domain and is processed into a mature protease-reverse transcriptase (PR-RT) fusion protein and the integrase. Protease activity has to be strictly regulated in order to avoid premature Gag and Pol processing before virus assembly. We have demonstrated recently that FV protease is an inactive monomer with a very weak dimerization tendency and postulated protease activation through dimerization. Here, we identify a specific protease-activating RNA motif (PARM) located in the pol region of viral RNA which stimulates PR activity in vitro and in vivo, revealing a novel and unique mechanism of retroviral protease activation. This mechanism is strikingly different to that of orthoretroviruses, where the protease can be activated even in the absence of viral RNA during the assembly of virus-like particles. Although it has been shown that the integrase domain is important for Pol uptake, activation of the foamy virus protease is integrase independent. We show that at least two foamy virus PR-RT molecules bind to the PARM and only RNAs containing the PARM result in significant activation of the protease. DNA harboring the PARM is not capable of protease activation. Structure determination of the PARM by selective 2′ hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) revealed a distinct RNA folding, important for protease activation and thus virus maturation. PMID:21325405

  10. Reactive Carbonyl Species Activate Caspase-3-Like Protease to Initiate Programmed Cell Death in Plants.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Md Sanaullah; Mano, Jun'ichi

    2016-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-triggered programmed cell death (PCD) is a typical plant response to biotic and abiotic stressors. We have recently shown that lipid peroxide-derived reactive carbonyl species (RCS), downstream products of ROS, mediate oxidative signal to initiate PCD. Here we investigated the mechanism by which RCS initiate PCD. Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cultured cells were treated with acrolein, one of the most potent RCS. Acrolein at 0.2 mM caused PCD in 5 h (i.e. lethal), but at 0.1 mM it did not (sublethal). Specifically, these two doses caused critically different effects on the cells. Both lethal and sublethal doses of acrolein exhausted the cellular glutathione pool in 30 min, while the lethal dose only caused a significant ascorbate decrease and ROS increase in 1-2 h. Prior to such redox changes, we found that acrolein caused significant increases in the activities of caspase-1-like protease (C1LP) and caspase-3-like protease (C3LP), the proteases which trigger PCD. The lethal dose of acrolein increased the C3LP activity 2-fold more than did the sublethal dose. In contrast, C1LP activity increments caused by the two doses were not different. Acrolein and 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal, another RCS, activated both proteases in a cell-free extract from untreated cells. H2O2 at 1 mM added to the cells increased C1LP and C3LP activities and caused PCD, and the RCS scavenger carnosine suppressed their activation and PCD. However, H2O2 did not activate the proteases in a cell-free extract. Thus the activation of caspase-like proteases, particularly C3LP, by RCS is an initial biochemical event in oxidative signal-stimulated PCD in plants.

  11. Conformational Lability in Serine Protease Active Sites: Structures of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Activator (HGFA) Alone and with the Inhibitory Domain from HGFA Inhibitor-1B

    SciTech Connect

    Shia, Steven; Stamos, Jennifer; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Fan, Bin; Wu, Judy; Corpuz, Raquel T.; Santell, Lydia; Lazarus, Robert A.; Eigenbrot, Charles

    2010-07-20

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) is a serine protease that converts hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) into its active form. When activated HGF binds its cognate receptor Met, cellular signals lead to cell growth, differentiation, and migration, activities which promote tissue regeneration in liver, kidney and skin. Intervention in the conversion of HGF to its active form has the potential to provide therapeutic benefit where HGF/Met activity is associated with tumorigenesis. To help identify ways to moderate HGF/Met effects, we have determined the molecular structure of the protease domain of HGFA. The structure we determined, at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, with no pseudo-substrate or inhibitor bound is characterized by an unconventional conformation of key residues in the enzyme active site. In order to find whether this apparently non-enzymatically competent arrangement would persist in the presence of a strongly-interacting inhibitor, we also have determined, at 2.6 {angstrom} resolution, the X-ray structure of HGFA complexed with the first Kunitz domain (KD1) from the physiological inhibitor hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 1B (HAI-1B). In this complex we observe a rearranged substrate binding cleft that closely mirrors the cleft of other serine proteases, suggesting an extreme conformational dynamism. We also characterize the inhibition of 16 serine proteases by KD1, finding that the previously reported enzyme specificity of the intact extracellular region of HAI-1B resides in KD1 alone. We find that HGFA, matriptase, hepsin, plasma kallikrein and trypsin are potently inhibited, and use the complex structure to rationalize the structural basis of these results.

  12. Loss of hippocampal serine protease BSP1/neuropsin predisposes to global seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Davies, B; Kearns, I R; Ure, J; Davies, C H; Lathe, R

    2001-09-15

    Serine proteases in the adult CNS contribute both to activity-dependent structural changes accompanying learning and to the regulation of excitotoxic cell death. Brain serine protease 1 (BSP1)/neuropsin is a trypsin-like serine protease exclusively expressed, within the CNS, in the hippocampus and associated limbic structures. To explore the role of this enzyme, we have used gene targeting to disrupt this gene in mice. Mutant mice were viable and overtly normal; they displayed normal hippocampal long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) and exhibited no deficits in spatial navigation (water maze). Nevertheless, electrophysiological studies revealed that the hippocampus of mice lacking this specifically expressed protease possessed an increased susceptibility for hyperexcitability (polyspiking) in response to repetitive afferent stimulation. Furthermore, seizure activity on kainic acid administration was markedly increased in mutant mice and was accompanied by heightened immediate early gene (c-fos) expression throughout the brain. In view of the regional selectivity of BSP1/neuropsin brain expression, the observed phenotype may selectively reflect limbic function, further implicating the hippocampus and amygdala in controlling cortical activation. Within the hippocampus, our data suggest that BSP1/neuropsin, unlike other serine proteases, has little effect on physiological synaptic remodeling and instead plays a role in limiting neuronal hyperexcitability induced by epileptogenic insult.

  13. The role of AAA+ proteases in mitochondrial protein biogenesis, homeostasis and activity control.

    PubMed

    Voos, Wolfgang; Ward, Linda A; Truscott, Kaye N

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are specialised organelles that are structurally and functionally integrated into cells in the vast majority of eukaryotes. They are the site of numerous enzymatic reactions, some of which are essential for life. The double lipid membrane of the mitochondrion, that spatially defines the organelle and is necessary for some functions, also creates a physical but semi-permeable barrier to the rest of the cell. Thus to ensure the biogenesis, regulation and maintenance of a functional population of proteins, an autonomous protein handling network within mitochondria is required. This includes resident mitochondrial protein translocation machinery, processing peptidases, molecular chaperones and proteases. This review highlights the contribution of proteases of the AAA+ superfamily to protein quality and activity control within the mitochondrion. Here they are responsible for the degradation of unfolded, unassembled and oxidatively damaged proteins as well as the activity control of some enzymes. Since most knowledge about these proteases has been gained from studies in the eukaryotic microorganism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, much of the discussion here centres on their role in this organism. However, reference is made to mitochondrial AAA+ proteases in other organisms, particularly in cases where they play a unique role such as the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. As these proteases influence mitochondrial function in both health and disease in humans, an understanding of their regulation and diverse activities is necessary.

  14. Full length and protease domain activity of chikungunya virus nsP2 differ from other alphavirus nsP2 proteases in recognition of small peptide substrates

    PubMed Central

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Sillapee, Pornpan; Sinsirimongkol, Kwanhathai; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Alphavirus nsP2 proteins are multifunctional and essential for viral replication. The protease role of nsP2 is critical for virus replication as only the virus protease activity is used for processing of the viral non-structural polypeptide. Chikungunya virus is an emerging disease problem that is becoming a world-wide health issue. We have generated purified recombinant chikungunya virus nsP2 proteins, both full length and a truncated protease domain from the C-terminus of the nsP2 protein. Enzyme characterization shows that the protease domain alone has different properties compared with the full length nsP2 protease. We also show chikungunya nsP2 protease possesses different substrate specificity to the canonical alphavirus nsP2 polyprotein cleavage specificity. Moreover, the chikungunya nsP2 also appears to differ from other alphavirus nsP2 in its distinctive ability to recognize small peptide substrates. PMID:26182358

  15. Full length and protease domain activity of chikungunya virus nsP2 differ from other alphavirus nsP2 proteases in recognition of small peptide substrates.

    PubMed

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Sillapee, Pornpan; Sinsirimongkol, Kwanhathai; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-04-22

    Alphavirus nsP2 proteins are multifunctional and essential for viral replication. The protease role of nsP2 is critical for virus replication as only the virus protease activity is used for processing of the viral non-structural polypeptide. Chikungunya virus is an emerging disease problem that is becoming a world-wide health issue. We have generated purified recombinant chikungunya virus nsP2 proteins, both full length and a truncated protease domain from the C-terminus of the nsP2 protein. Enzyme characterization shows that the protease domain alone has different properties compared with the full length nsP2 protease. We also show chikungunya nsP2 protease possesses different substrate specificity to the canonical alphavirus nsP2 polyprotein cleavage specificity. Moreover, the chikungunya nsP2 also appears to differ from other alphavirus nsP2 in its distinctive ability to recognize small peptide substrates.

  16. Peptide code-on-a-microplate for protease activity analysis via MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric quantitation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junjie; Liu, Fei; Ju, Huangxian

    2015-04-21

    A peptide-encoded microplate was proposed for MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric (MS) analysis of protease activity. The peptide codes were designed to contain a coding region and the substrate of protease for enzymatic cleavage, respectively, and an internal standard method was proposed for the MS quantitation of the cleavage products of these peptide codes. Upon the cleavage reaction in the presence of target proteases, the coding regions were released from the microplate, which were directly quantitated by using corresponding peptides with one-amino acid difference as the internal standards. The coding region could be used as the unique "Protease ID" for the identification of corresponding protease, and the amount of the cleavage product was used for protease activity analysis. Using trypsin and chymotrypsin as the model proteases to verify the multiplex protease assay, the designed "Trypsin ID" and "Chymotrypsin ID" occurred at m/z 761.6 and 711.6. The logarithm value of the intensity ratio of "Protease ID" to internal standard was proportional to trypsin and chymotrypsin concentration in a range from 5.0 to 500 and 10 to 500 nM, respectively. The detection limits for trypsin and chymotrypsin were 2.3 and 5.2 nM, respectively. The peptide-encoded microplate showed good selectivity. This proposed method provided a powerful tool for convenient identification and activity analysis of multiplex proteases.

  17. Protease modulation of the activity of the epithelial sodium channel expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Chraïbi, A; Vallet, V; Firsov, D; Hess, S K; Horisberger, J D

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of extracellular proteases on the amiloride-sensitive Na+ current (INa) in Xenopus oocytes expressing the three subunits alpha, beta, and gamma of the rat or Xenopus epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC). Low concentrations of trypsin (2 microg/ml) induced a large increase of INa within a few minutes, an effect that was fully prevented by soybean trypsin inhibitor, but not by amiloride. A similar effect was observed with chymotrypsin, but not with kallikrein. The trypsin-induced increase of INa was observed with Xenopus and rat ENaC, and was very large (approximately 20-fold) with the channel obtained by coexpression of the alpha subunit of Xenopus ENaC with the beta and gamma subunits of rat ENaC. The effect of trypsin was selective for ENaC, as shown by the absence of effect on the current due to expression of the K+ channel ROMK2. The effect of trypsin was not prevented by intracellular injection of EGTA nor by pretreatment with GTP-gammaS, suggesting that this effect was not mediated by G proteins. Measurement of the channel protein expression at the oocyte surface by antibody binding to a FLAG epitope showed that the effect of trypsin was not accompanied by an increase in the channel protein density, indicating that proteolysis modified the activity of the channel present at the oocyte surface rather than the cell surface expression. At the single channel level, in the cell-attached mode, more active channels were observed in the patch when trypsin was present in the pipette, while no change in channel activity could be detected when trypsin was added to the bath solution around the patch pipette. We conclude that extracellular proteases are able to increase the open probability of the epithelial sodium channel by an effect that does not occur through activation of a G protein-coupled receptor, but rather through proteolysis of a protein that is either a constitutive part of the channel itself or closely associated with it.

  18. Inhibition of MALT1 protease activity is selectively toxic for activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ferch, Uta; Kloo, Bernhard; Gewies, Andreas; Pfänder, Vera; Düwel, Michael; Peschel, Christian; Krappmann, Daniel; Ruland, Jürgen

    2009-10-26

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of lymphoma in humans. The aggressive activated B cell-like (ABC) subtype of DLBCL is characterized by constitutive NF-kappaB activity and requires signals from CARD11, BCL10, and the paracaspase MALT1 for survival. CARD11, BCL10, and MALT1 are scaffold proteins that normally associate upon antigen receptor ligation. Signal-induced CARD11-BCL10-MALT1 (CBM) complexes couple upstream events to IkappaB kinase (IKK)/NF-kappaB activation. MALT1 also possesses a recently recognized proteolytic activity that cleaves and inactivates the negative NF-kappaB regulator A20 and BCL10 upon antigen receptor ligation. Yet, the relevance of MALT1 proteolytic activity for malignant cell growth is unknown. Here, we demonstrate preassembled CBM complexes and constitutive proteolysis of the two known MALT1 substrates in ABC-DLBCL, but not in germinal center B cell-like (GCB) DLBCL. ABC-DLBCL cell treatment with a MALT1 protease inhibitor blocks A20 and BCL10 cleavage, reduces NF-kappaB activity, and decreases the expression of NF-kappaB targets genes. Finally, MALT1 paracaspase inhibition results in death and growth retardation selectively in ABC-DLBCL cells. Thus, our results indicate a growth-promoting role for MALT1 paracaspase activity in ABC-DLBCL and suggest that a pharmacological MALT1 protease inhibition could be a promising approach for lymphoma treatment.

  19. Cysteine protease gene expression and proteolytic activity during senescence of Alstroemeria petals.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Carol; Leverentz, Michael K; Griffiths, Gareth; Thomas, Brian; Chanasut, Usawadee; Stead, Anthony D; Rogers, Hilary J

    2002-02-01

    The functional life of the flower is terminated by senescence and/or abscission. Multiple processes contribute to produce the visible signs of petal wilting and inrolling that typify senescence, but one of the most important is that of protein degradation and remobilization. This is mediated in many species through protein ubiquitination and the action of specific protease enzymes. This paper reports the changes in protein and protease activity during development and senescence of Alstroemeria flowers, a Liliaceous species that shows very little sensitivity to ethylene during senescence and which shows perianth abscission 8-10 d after flower opening. Partial cDNAs of ubiquitin (ALSUQ1) and a putative cysteine protease (ALSCYP1) were cloned from Alstroemeria using degenerate PCR primers and the expression pattern of these genes was determined semi-quantitatively by RT-PCR. While the levels of ALSUQ1 only fluctuated slightly during floral development and senescence, there was a dramatic increase in the expression of ALSCYP1 indicating that this gene may encode an important enzyme for the proteolytic process in this species. Three papain class cysteine protease enzymes showing different patterns of activity during flower development were identified on zymograms, one of which showed a similar expression pattern to the cysteine protease cDNA.

  20. Vibrio cholerae hemagglutinin(HA)/protease: an extracellular metalloprotease with multiple pathogenic activities

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Jorge A.; Silva, Anisia J.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae of serogroup O1 and O139, the etiological agent of the diarrheal disease cholera, expresses the extracellular Zn-dependent metalloprotease hemagglutinin (HA)/protease also reported as vibriolysin. This enzyme is also produced by non-O1/O139 (non-cholera) strains that cause mild, sporadic illness (i.e. gastroenteritis, wound or ear infections). Orthologs of HA/protease are present in other members of the Vibrionaceae family pathogenic to humans and fish. HA/protease belongs to the M4 neutral peptidase family and displays significant amino acid sequence homology to Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (LasB) and Bacillus thermoproteolyticus thermolysin. It exhibits a broad range of potentially pathogenic activities in cell culture and animal models. These activities range from the covalent modification of other toxins, the degradation of the protective mucus barrier and disruption of intestinal tight junctions. Here we review (i) the structure and regulation of HA/protease expression, (ii) its interaction with other toxins and the intestinal mucosa and (iii) discuss the possible role(s) of HA/protease in the pathogenesis of cholera. PMID:26952544

  1. Anti-trypanosomal activity of non-peptidic nitrile-based cysteine protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Burtoloso, Antonio C B; de Albuquerque, Sérgio; Furber, Mark; Gomes, Juliana C; Gonçalez, Cristiana; Kenny, Peter W; Leitão, Andrei; Montanari, Carlos A; Quilles, José Carlos; Ribeiro, Jean F R; Rocha, Josmar R

    2017-02-01

    The cysteine protease cruzipain is considered to be a validated target for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of Chagas disease. Anti-trypanosomal activity against the CL Brener strain of T. cruzi was observed in the 0.1 μM to 1 μM range for three nitrile-based cysteine protease inhibitors based on two scaffolds known to be associated with cathepsin K inhibition. The two compounds showing the greatest potency against the trypanosome were characterized by EC50 values (0.12 μM and 0.25 μM) that were an order of magnitude lower than the corresponding Ki values measured against cruzain, a recombinant form of cruzipain, in an enzyme inhibition assay. This implies that the anti-trypanosomal activity of these two compounds may not be explained only by the inhibition of the cruzain enzyme, thereby triggering a putative polypharmacological profile towards cysteine proteases.

  2. Anti-trypanosomal activity of non-peptidic nitrile-based cysteine protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Burtoloso, Antonio C. B.; de Albuquerque, Sérgio; Furber, Mark; Gomes, Juliana C.; Gonçalez, Cristiana; Kenny, Peter W.; Leitão, Andrei; Quilles, José Carlos; Ribeiro, Jean F. R.; Rocha, Josmar R.

    2017-01-01

    The cysteine protease cruzipain is considered to be a validated target for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of Chagas disease. Anti-trypanosomal activity against the CL Brener strain of T. cruzi was observed in the 0.1 μM to 1 μM range for three nitrile-based cysteine protease inhibitors based on two scaffolds known to be associated with cathepsin K inhibition. The two compounds showing the greatest potency against the trypanosome were characterized by EC50 values (0.12 μM and 0.25 μM) that were an order of magnitude lower than the corresponding Ki values measured against cruzain, a recombinant form of cruzipain, in an enzyme inhibition assay. This implies that the anti-trypanosomal activity of these two compounds may not be explained only by the inhibition of the cruzain enzyme, thereby triggering a putative polypharmacological profile towards cysteine proteases. PMID:28222138

  3. Relationship between free radicals produced by entamoeba histolytica and its proteases complex activity.

    PubMed

    Crisóstomo-Vázquez, M P; Cervantes-Cervantes, M P; Jiménez-Cardoso, E; Muñoz-Sánchez, J L

    2002-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a parasite which causes health problems and there has been many approaches to know what is the factor causing its pathogenicity. In the present work, we assayed if the production of free radicals by the amoeba, has a relationship with the proteases activity. When we test the DMSO action (free radicals quenching activity) the specific activity of the proteases complex of the parasite were affected also. At 33.3% (V/V) concentration of DMSO it was present a maximal decrease of the initial activity (about 46% decrease), for to a higher concentrations existing a trend to recuperate the original activity, suggesting that the free radicals are an important factor for the hydrolysis grade of the protein substrate. All the differences except those between 46.7 and 66.6%, were significantly different compared with the control without any addition. The effects of Probucol and Probucol plus DMSO, compared to those caused by Metronidazol (MZ). We can observe that the quenchers caused a decrease on proteases activity similar to that of MZ (which is an antiparasite drug) and it was of c.a. 58% of activity decrease. These data suggest that the action of both, free radicals and proteases complex of Entamoeba histolytica, can account for the pathogenicity of the parasite.

  4. Trypanosomatid cysteine protease activity may be enhanced by a kininogen-like moiety from host serum.

    PubMed Central

    Lonsdale-Eccles, J D; Mpimbaza, G W; Nkhungulu, Z R; Olobo, J; Smith, L; Tosomba, O M; Grab, D J

    1995-01-01

    African trypanosomes contain cysteine proteases (trypanopains) the activity of which can be measured by in vitro digestion of fibrinogen, after electrophoresis in fibrinogen-containing SDS/polyacrylamide gels. When assessed by this procedure, trypanopain from Trypanosoma brucei (trypanopain-Tb) is estimated to have a molecular mass of 28 kDa. However, two additional bands of trypanopain activity (87 kDa and 105 kDa) are observed if serum is added to the trypanopain before electrophoresis. Formation of the 87 and 105 kDa bands is frequently accompanied by a reduction in the intensity of the 28 kDa activity which suggests that the extra bands are complexes of the 28 kDa trypanopain-Tb and a molecule from rat serum called rat trypanopain moledulator (rTM). The rTM-induced activation of cysteine proteases is not restricted to T. brucei as it is also observed with proteases from other protozoan parasites such as bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma congolense and the mammalian-infective in vitro-derived promastigote forms of Leishmania donovani and Leishmania major. The physical properties of rTM resemble those of the kininogen family of cysteine protease inhibitors. rTM is an acidic (pI 4.7) heat-stable 68 kDa glycoprotein with 15 kDa protease-susceptible domains. This resemblance between rTM and kininogens was confirmed by the positive, albeit weak, immunoreactivity between anti-(human low-molecular-mass kininogen) antibody and rTM as well as anti-rTM antibody and human low-molecular-mass kininogen. Furthermore, commercial preparations of human-low-molecular-mass kininogen and chicken egg white cystatin mimicked rTM by forming extra bands of proteolytic activity in the presence of trypanopain-Tb. In some instances, low-molecular-mass kininogen was also observed to increase the rate of hydrolysis of 7-(benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanyl-arginyl-amido)-4- methylcoumarin by live T. brucei. Although this effect was rather erratic, in no instance was significant inhibition

  5. Silver-stained fibrin zymography: separation of proteases and activity detection using a single substrate-containing gel.

    PubMed

    Chung, Dong-Min; Kim, Ki Eun; Ahn, Keug-Hyun; Park, Chan-Sun; Kim, Dong-Ho; Koh, Hong Bum; Chun, Hyo Kon; Yoon, Byung-Dae; Kim, Hong Jib; Kim, Min-Soo; Choi, Nack-Shick

    2011-08-01

    A new zymogram method, silver-stained fibrin zymography, for separation of protease bands and activity detection using a single substrate gel, was developed. The method takes advantage of the nanoscale sensitivity of both zymography and silver staining. After SDS-PAGE in a gel containing fibrin, the gel was incubated in enzyme reaction buffer and the zymogram was silver-stained. Bands with protease activity were stained with silver in clear areas where the protein substrate had been degraded. The molecular sizes of proteases were accurately determined. Furthermore, proteases of high molecular weight were clearly and sharply resolved.

  6. Activity of calcium activated protease in skeletal muscles and its changes in atrophy and stretch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.; Nagainis, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    The reduction of protein content in skeletal muscle undergoing disuse-induced atrophy is correlated with accelerated rates of protein degradation and reduced rates of protein synthesis (Goldspink, 1977). It is not known in what manner myofibers are partially disassembled during disuse atrophy to fibers of smaller diameter; nor is it known which proteases are responsible for this morphological change in contractile protein mass. Dayton and colleagues (1975) have suggested that the Ca(2+)-activated protease (CaP) may initiate myofibril degradation. The discovery of a form of CaP that is activatable by nano-molar concentrations of Ca(2+) indicates that CaP activity may be regulated by physiological concentrations of Ca(2+) (Mellgren, 1980). The enhancement of proteolysis by the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187, reported by Etlinger (1979), is consistent with a significant role for CaP in protein degradation. It was of interest, therefore, to measure the levels of CaP activity and the CaP inhibitor in extracts obtained from skeletal muscles of rat and chicken limbs undergoing disuse atrophy or stretch hypertrophy, respectively.

  7. Activity of calcium activated protease in skeletal muscles and its changes in atrophy and stretch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.; Nagainis, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    The reduction of protein content in skeletal muscle undergoing disuse-induced atrophy is correlated with accelerated rates of protein degradation and reduced rates of protein synthesis (Goldspink, 1977). It is not known in what manner myofibers are partially disassembled during disuse atrophy to fibers of smaller diameter; nor is it known which proteases are responsible for this morphological change in contractile protein mass. Dayton and colleagues (1975) have suggested that the Ca(2+)-activated protease (CaP) may initiate myofibril degradation. The discovery of a form of CaP that is activatable by nano-molar concentrations of Ca(2+) indicates that CaP activity may be regulated by physiological concentrations of Ca(2+) (Mellgren, 1980). The enhancement of proteolysis by the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187, reported by Etlinger (1979), is consistent with a significant role for CaP in protein degradation. It was of interest, therefore, to measure the levels of CaP activity and the CaP inhibitor in extracts obtained from skeletal muscles of rat and chicken limbs undergoing disuse atrophy or stretch hypertrophy, respectively.

  8. Purification and characterization of an extracellular protease from Penicillium chrysogenum Pg222 active against meat proteins.

    PubMed

    Benito, María J; Rodríguez, Mar; Núñez, Félix; Asensio, Miguel A; Bermúdez, María E; Córdoba, Juan J

    2002-07-01

    An extracellular protease from Penicillium chrysogenum (Pg222) isolated from dry-cured ham has been purified. The purification procedure involved several steps: ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography, filtration, and separation by high-performance liquid chromatography. Based on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis and gel filtration, the purified fraction showed a molecular mass of about 35 kDa. The hydrolytic properties of the purified enzyme (EPg222) on extracted pork myofibrillar proteins under several conditions were evaluated by SDS-PAGE. EPg222 showed activity in the range of 10 to 60 degrees C in temperature, 0 to 3 M NaCl, and pH 5 to 7, with maximum activity at pH 6, 45 degrees C, and 0.25 M NaCl. Under these conditions the enzyme was most active against tropomyosin, actin, and myosin. EPg222 showed collagenolytic activity but did not hydrolyze myoglobin. EPg222 showed higher activity than other proteolytic enzymes like papain, trypsin, and Aspergillus oryzae protease. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined and was found to be Glu-Asn-Pro-Leu-Gln-Pro-Asn-Ala-Pro-Ser-Trp. This partial amino acid sequence revealed a 55% homology with serine proteases from Penicillium citrinum. The activity of this novel protease may be of interest in ripening and generating the flavor of dry-cured meat products.

  9. Purification and Characterization of an Extracellular Protease from Penicillium chrysogenum Pg222 Active against Meat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Benito, María J.; Rodríguez, Mar; Núñez, Félix; Asensio, Miguel A.; Bermúdez, María E.; Córdoba, Juan J.

    2002-01-01

    An extracellular protease from Penicillium chrysogenum (Pg222) isolated from dry-cured ham has been purified. The purification procedure involved several steps: ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography, filtration, and separation by high-performance liquid chromatography. Based on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis and gel filtration, the purified fraction showed a molecular mass of about 35 kDa. The hydrolytic properties of the purified enzyme (EPg222) on extracted pork myofibrillar proteins under several conditions were evaluated by SDS-PAGE. EPg222 showed activity in the range of 10 to 60°C in temperature, 0 to 3 M NaCl, and pH 5 to 7, with maximum activity at pH 6, 45°C, and 0.25 M NaCl. Under these conditions the enzyme was most active against tropomyosin, actin, and myosin. EPg222 showed collagenolytic activity but did not hydrolyze myoglobin. EPg222 showed higher activity than other proteolytic enzymes like papain, trypsin, and Aspergillus oryzae protease. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined and was found to be Glu-Asn-Pro-Leu-Gln-Pro-Asn-Ala-Pro-Ser-Trp. This partial amino acid sequence revealed a 55% homology with serine proteases from Penicillium citrinum. The activity of this novel protease may be of interest in ripening and generating the flavor of dry-cured meat products. PMID:12089038

  10. Comparative analysis of procoagulant and fibrinogenolytic activity of crude protease fractions of turmeric species.

    PubMed

    Shivalingu, B R; Vivek, H K; Nafeesa, Zohara; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2015-08-22

    Turmeric rhizome is a traditional herbal medicine, which has been widely used as a remedy to stop bleeding on fresh cuts and for wound healing by the rural and tribal population of India. To validate scientific and therapeutic application of turmeric rhizomes to stop bleeding on fresh cuts and its role in wound healing process. The water extracts of thoroughly scrubbed and washed turmeric rhizomes viz., Curcuma aromatica Salisb., Curcuma longa L., Curcuma caesia Roxb., Curcuma amada Roxb. and Curcuma zedoria (Christm.) Roscoe. were subjected to salting out and dialysis. The dialyzed crude enzyme fractions (CEFs) were assessed for proteolytic activity using casein as substrate and were also confirmed by caseinolytic zymography. Its coagulant activity and fibrinogenolytic activity were assessed using human citrated plasma and fibrinogen, respectively. The type of protease(s) in CEFs was confirmed by inhibition studies using specific protease inhibitors. The CEFs of C. aromatica, C. longa and C. caesia showed 1.89, 1.21 and 1.07 folds higher proteolytic activity, respectively, compared to papain. In contrast to these, C. amada and C. zedoria exhibited moderate proteolytic activity. CEFs showed low proteolytic activities compared to trypsin. The proteolytic activities of CEFs were confirmed by caseinolytic zymography. The CEFs of C. aromatica, C. longa and C. caesia showed complete hydrolysis of Aα, Bβ and γ subunits of human fibrinogen, while C. amada and C. zedoria showed partial hydrolysis. The CEFs viz., C. aromatica, C. longa, C. caesia, C. amada and C. zedoria exhibited strong procoagulant activity by reducing the human plasma clotting time from 172s (Control) to 66s, 84s 88s, 78s and 90s, respectively. The proteolytic activity of C. aromatica, C. longa, C. caesia and C. amada was inhibited (>82%) by PMSF, suggesting the possible presence of a serine protease(s). However, C. zedoria showed significant inhibition (60%) against IAA and moderate inhibition (30

  11. Engineering an auto-activated R protein that is in vivo activated by a viral protease.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phu-Tri; Widyasari, Kristin; Park, Jee Yoon; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2017-10-01

    Autonomous hypersensitive responses (self-HRs) are caused by constitutively active R proteins. In this study, we identified an auto-activated form of the R gene Pvr9 (autoPvr9); the auto-activation results from an amino acid substitution between its NBS and LRR domains. Self-HR was strongly reduced or completely inhibited by fusion of an extra peptide to the autoPvr9 N-terminal or C-terminal, respectively. When an NIa recognition site was placed between autoPvr9 and the extra peptide, the fusion construct could trigger an NIa-dependent HR. Several C-terminal fusions were tested, but only those that maintained detectable protein expression were capable of an NIa-dependent HR. Our results suggest the potential for transforming malfunctioning and auto-activated R proteins into a new construct targeting potyviral NIa proteases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulation of factor XIa activity by platelets and alpha 1-protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, P N; Sinha, D; Kueppers, F; Seaman, F S; Blankstein, K B

    1987-01-01

    We have studied the complex interrelationships between platelets, Factor XIa, alpha 1-protease inhibitor and Factor IX activation. Platelets were shown to secrete an inhibitor of Factor XIa, and to protect Factor XIa from inactivation in the presence of alpha 1-protease inhibitor and the secreted platelet inhibitor. This protection of Factor XIa did not arise from the binding of Factor XIa to platelets, the presence of high molecular weight kininogen, or the inactivation of alpha 1-protease inhibitor by platelets. The formation of a complex between alpha 1-protease inhibitor and the active-site-containing light chain of Factor XIa was inhibited by activated platelets and by platelet releasates, but not by high molecular weight kininogen. These results support the hypothesis that platelets can regulate Factor XIa-catalyzed Factor IX activation by secreting an inhibitor of Factor XIa that may act primarily outside the platelet microenvironment and by protecting Factor XIa from inhibition, thereby localizing Factor IX activation to the platelet plug. Images PMID:3500185

  13. A novel serine protease with human fibrino(geno)lytic activities from Artocarpus heterophyllus latex.

    PubMed

    Siritapetawee, Jaruwan; Thumanu, Kanjana; Sojikul, Punchapat; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2012-07-01

    A protease was isolated and purified from Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) latex and designated as a 48-kDa antimicrobial protease (AMP48) in a previous publication. In this work, the enzyme was characterized for more biochemical and medicinal properties. Enzyme activity of AMP48 was strongly inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and soybean trypsin inhibitor, indicating that the enzyme was a plant serine protease. The N-terminal amino acid sequences (A-Q-E-G-G-K-D-D-D-G-G) of AMP48 had no sequence similarity matches with any sequence databases of BLAST search and other plant serine protease. The secondary structure of this enzyme was composed of high α-helix (51%) and low β-sheet (9%). AMP48 had fibrinogenolytic activity with maximal activity between 55 and 60°C at pH 8. The enzyme efficiently hydrolyzed α followed by partially hydrolyzed β and γ subunits of human fibrinogen. In addition, the fibrinolytic activity was observed through the degradation products by SDS-PAGE and emphasized its activity by monitoring the alteration of secondary structure of fibrin clot after enzyme digestion using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. This study presented the potential role to use AMP48 as antithrombotic for treatment thromboembolic disorders such as strokes, pulmonary emboli and deep vein thrombosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Role for protease activity in visceral pain in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cenac, Nicolas; Andrews, Christopher N.; Holzhausen, Marinella; Chapman, Kevin; Cottrell, Graeme; Andrade-Gordon, Patricia; Steinhoff, Martin; Barbara, Giovanni; Beck, Paul; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Sharkey, Keith A.; Ferraz, Jose Geraldo P.; Shaffer, Eldon; Vergnolle, Nathalie

    2007-01-01

    Mediators involved in the generation of symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are poorly understood. Here we show that colonic biopsy samples from IBS patients release increased levels of proteolytic activity (arginine cleavage) compared to asymptomatic controls. This was dependent on the activation of NF-κB. In addition, increased proteolytic activity was measured in vivo, in colonic washes from IBS compared with control patients. Trypsin and tryptase expression and release were increased in colonic biopsies from IBS patients compared with control subjects. Biopsies from IBS patients (but not controls) released mediators that sensitized murine sensory neurons in culture. Sensitization was prevented by a serine protease inhibitor and was absent in neurons lacking functional protease-activated receptor–2 (PAR2). Supernatants from colonic biopsies of IBS patients, but not controls, also caused somatic and visceral hyperalgesia and allodynia in mice, when administered into the colon. These pronociceptive effects were inhibited by serine protease inhibitors and a PAR2 antagonist and were absent in PAR2-deficient mice. Our study establishes that proteases are released in IBS and that they can directly stimulate sensory neurons and generate hypersensitivity symptoms through the activation of PAR2. PMID:17304351

  15. Pressure-enhanced activity and stability of a hyperthermophilic protease from a deep-sea methanogen.

    PubMed

    Michels, P C; Clark, D S

    1997-10-01

    We describe the properties of a hyperthermophilic, barophilic protease from Methanococcus jannaschii, an extremely thermophilic deep-sea methanogen. This enzyme is the first protease to be isolated from an organism adapted to a high-pressure-high-temperature environment. The partially purified enzyme has a molecular mass of 29 kDa and a narrow substrate specificity with strong preference for leucine at the P1 site of polypeptide substrates. Enzyme activity increased up to 116(deg)C and was measured up to 130(deg)C, one of the highest temperatures reported for the function of any enzyme. In addition, enzyme activity and thermostability increased with pressure: raising the pressure to 500 atm increased the reaction rate at 125(deg)C 3.4-fold and the thermostability 2.7-fold. Spin labeling of the active-site serine revealed that the active-site geometry of the M. jannaschii protease is not grossly different from that of several mesophilic proteases; however, the active-site structure may be relatively rigid at moderate temperatures. The barophilic and thermophilic behavior of the enzyme is consistent with the barophilic growth of M. jannaschii observed previously (J. F. Miller et al., Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 54:3039-3042, 1988).

  16. Protease activity at invadopodial focal digestive areas is dependent on NHE1-driven acidic pHe.

    PubMed

    Greco, Maria Raffaella; Antelmi, Ester; Busco, Giovanni; Guerra, Lorenzo; Rubino, Rosa; Casavola, Valeria; Reshkin, Stephan Joel; Cardone, Rosa Angela

    2014-02-01

    Degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical step of tumor cell invasion and requires protease-dependent proteolysis focalized at the invadopodia where the proteolysis of the ECM occurs. Most of the extracellular proteases belong to serine- or metallo-proteases and the invadopodia is where protease activity is regulated. While recent data looking at global protease activity in the growth medium reported that their activity and role in invasion is dependent on Na+/H+ exchanger 1 (NHE1)-driven extracellular acidification, there is no data on this aspect at the invadopodia, and an open question remains whether this acid extracellular pH (pHe) activation of proteases in tumor cells occurs preferentially at invadopodia. We previously reported that the NHE1 is expressed in breast cancer invadopodia and that the NHE1‑dependent acidification of the peri-invadopodial space is critical for ECM proteolysis. In the present study, using, for the first time, in situ zymography analysis, we demonstrated a concordance between NHE1 activity, extracellular acidification and protease activity at invadopodia to finely regulate ECM digestion. We demonstrated that: (i) ECM proteolysis taking place at invadopodia is driven by acidification of the peri-invadopodia microenvironment; (ii) that the proteases have a functional pHe optimum that is acidic; (iii) more than one protease is functioning to digest the ECM at these invadopodial sites of ECM proteolysis; and (iv) lowering pHe or inhibiting the NHE1 increases protease secretion while blocking protease activity changes NHE1 expression at the invadopodia.

  17. Multiple receptor conformation docking and dock pose clustering as tool for CoMFA and CoMSIA analysis - a case study on HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2012-02-01

    Multiple receptors conformation docking (MRCD) and clustering of dock poses allows seamless incorporation of receptor binding conformation of the molecules on wide range of ligands with varied structural scaffold. The accuracy of the approach was tested on a set of 120 cyclic urea molecules having HIV-1 protease inhibitory activity using 12 high resolution X-ray crystal structures and one NMR resolved conformation of HIV-1 protease extracted from protein data bank. A cross validation was performed on 25 non-cyclic urea HIV-1 protease inhibitor having varied structures. The comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) models were generated using 60 molecules in the training set by applying leave one out cross validation method, r (loo) (2) values of 0.598 and 0.674 for CoMFA and CoMSIA respectively and non-cross validated regression coefficient r(2) values of 0.983 and 0.985 were obtained for CoMFA and CoMSIA respectively. The predictive ability of these models was determined using a test set of 60 cyclic urea molecules that gave predictive correlation (r (pred) (2) ) of 0.684 and 0.64 respectively for CoMFA and CoMSIA indicating good internal predictive ability. Based on this information 25 non-cyclic urea molecules were taken as a test set to check the external predictive ability of these models. This gave remarkable out come with r (pred) (2) of 0.61 and 0.53 for CoMFA and CoMSIA respectively. The results invariably show that this method is useful for performing 3D QSAR analysis on molecules having different structural motifs.

  18. Isolation of Mucorales from processed maize (Zea mays L.) and screening for protease activity

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo Santiago, André Luiz Cabral Monteiro; de Souza Motta, Cristina Maria

    2008-01-01

    Mucorales were isolated from maize flour, corn meal and cooked cornflakes using surface and depth plate methods. Rhizopus oryzae, Circinella muscae, Mucor subtilissimus, Mucor hiemalis f. hiemalis, Syncephalastrum racemosum, Rhizopus microsporus var. chinensis and Absidia cylindrospora showed protease activity. PMID:24031292

  19. Antiretroviral activities of protease inhibitors against murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Black, P L; Downs, M B; Lewis, M G; Ussery, M A; Dreyer, G B; Petteway, S R; Lambert, D M

    1993-01-01

    Rationally designed synthetic inhibitors of retroviral proteases inhibit the processing of viral polyproteins in cultures of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected T lymphocytes and, as a result, inhibit the infectivity of HIV-1 for such cultures. The ability of HIV-1 protease inhibitors to suppress replication of the C-type retrovirus Rauscher murine leukemia virus (R-MuLV) and the HIV-related lentivirus simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) was examined in plaque reduction assays and syncytium reduction assays, respectively. Three of seven compounds examined blocked production of infectious R-MuLV, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of < or = 1 microM. Little or no cellular cytotoxicity was detectable at concentrations up to 100 microM. The same compounds which inhibited the infectivity of HIV-1 also produced activity against SIV and R-MuLV. Electron microscopic examination revealed the presence of many virions with atypical morphologies in cultures treated with the active compounds. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that the active compounds reduced the number of membrane-associated virus particles. These results demonstrate that synthetic peptide analog inhibitors of retroviral proteases significantly inhibit proteolytic processing of the gag polyproteins of R-MuLV and SIV and inhibit the replication of these retroviruses. These results are similar to those for inhibition of HIV-1 infectivity by these compounds, and thus, R-MuLV and SIV might be suitable models for the in vivo evaluation of the antiretroviral activities of these protease inhibitors.

  20. Antiretroviral activities of protease inhibitors against murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus in tissue culture.

    PubMed Central

    Black, P L; Downs, M B; Lewis, M G; Ussery, M A; Dreyer, G B; Petteway, S R; Lambert, D M

    1993-01-01

    Rationally designed synthetic inhibitors of retroviral proteases inhibit the processing of viral polyproteins in cultures of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected T lymphocytes and, as a result, inhibit the infectivity of HIV-1 for such cultures. The ability of HIV-1 protease inhibitors to suppress replication of the C-type retrovirus Rauscher murine leukemia virus (R-MuLV) and the HIV-related lentivirus simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) was examined in plaque reduction assays and syncytium reduction assays, respectively. Three of seven compounds examined blocked production of infectious R-MuLV, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of < or = 1 microM. Little or no cellular cytotoxicity was detectable at concentrations up to 100 microM. The same compounds which inhibited the infectivity of HIV-1 also produced activity against SIV and R-MuLV. Electron microscopic examination revealed the presence of many virions with atypical morphologies in cultures treated with the active compounds. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that the active compounds reduced the number of membrane-associated virus particles. These results demonstrate that synthetic peptide analog inhibitors of retroviral proteases significantly inhibit proteolytic processing of the gag polyproteins of R-MuLV and SIV and inhibit the replication of these retroviruses. These results are similar to those for inhibition of HIV-1 infectivity by these compounds, and thus, R-MuLV and SIV might be suitable models for the in vivo evaluation of the antiretroviral activities of these protease inhibitors. Images PMID:8381640

  1. Nepenthesin protease activity indicates digestive fluid dynamics in carnivorous nepenthes plants.

    PubMed

    Buch, Franziska; Kaman, Wendy E; Bikker, Floris J; Yilamujiang, Ayufu; Mithöfer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Carnivorous plants use different morphological features to attract, trap and digest prey, mainly insects. Plants from the genus Nepenthes possess specialized leaves called pitchers that function as pitfall-traps. These pitchers are filled with a digestive fluid that is generated by the plants themselves. In order to digest caught prey in their pitchers, Nepenthes plants produce various hydrolytic enzymes including aspartic proteases, nepenthesins (Nep). Knowledge about the generation and induction of these proteases is limited. Here, by employing a FRET (fluorescent resonance energy transfer)-based technique that uses a synthetic fluorescent substrate an easy and rapid detection of protease activities in the digestive fluids of various Nepenthes species was feasible. Biochemical studies and the heterologously expressed Nep II from Nepenthes mirabilis proved that the proteolytic activity relied on aspartic proteases, however an acid-mediated auto-activation mechanism was necessary. Employing the FRET-based approach, the induction and dynamics of nepenthesin in the digestive pitcher fluid of various Nepenthes plants could be studied directly with insect (Drosophila melanogaster) prey or plant material. Moreover, we observed that proteolytic activity was induced by the phytohormone jasmonic acid but not by salicylic acid suggesting that jasmonate-dependent signaling pathways are involved in plant carnivory.

  2. Nepenthesin Protease Activity Indicates Digestive Fluid Dynamics in Carnivorous Nepenthes Plants

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Franziska; Kaman, Wendy E.; Bikker, Floris J.; Yilamujiang, Ayufu; Mithöfer, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Carnivorous plants use different morphological features to attract, trap and digest prey, mainly insects. Plants from the genus Nepenthes possess specialized leaves called pitchers that function as pitfall-traps. These pitchers are filled with a digestive fluid that is generated by the plants themselves. In order to digest caught prey in their pitchers, Nepenthes plants produce various hydrolytic enzymes including aspartic proteases, nepenthesins (Nep). Knowledge about the generation and induction of these proteases is limited. Here, by employing a FRET (fluorescent resonance energy transfer)-based technique that uses a synthetic fluorescent substrate an easy and rapid detection of protease activities in the digestive fluids of various Nepenthes species was feasible. Biochemical studies and the heterologously expressed Nep II from Nepenthes mirabilis proved that the proteolytic activity relied on aspartic proteases, however an acid-mediated auto-activation mechanism was necessary. Employing the FRET-based approach, the induction and dynamics of nepenthesin in the digestive pitcher fluid of various Nepenthes plants could be studied directly with insect (Drosophila melanogaster) prey or plant material. Moreover, we observed that proteolytic activity was induced by the phytohormone jasmonic acid but not by salicylic acid suggesting that jasmonate-dependent signaling pathways are involved in plant carnivory. PMID:25750992

  3. Cathelicidin, kallikrein 5, and serine protease activity is inhibited during treatment of rosacea with azelaic acid 15% gel.

    PubMed

    Coda, Alvin B; Hata, Tissa; Miller, Jeremiah; Audish, David; Kotol, Paul; Two, Aimee; Shafiq, Faiza; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Harper, Julie C; Del Rosso, James Q; Gallo, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    Excess cathelicidin and kallikrein 5 (KLK5) have been hypothesized to play a role in the pathophysiology of rosacea. We sought to evaluate the effects of azelaic acid (AzA) on these elements of the innate immune system. Gene expression and protease activity were measured in laboratory models and patients with rosacea during a 16-week multicenter, prospective, open-label study of 15% AzA gel. AzA directly inhibited KLK5 in cultured keratinocytes and gene expression of KLK5, Toll-like receptor-2, and cathelicidin in mouse skin. Patients with rosacea showed reduction in cathelicidin and KLK5 messenger RNA after treatment with AzA gel. Subjects without rosacea had lower serine protease activity (SPA) than patients with rosacea. Distinct subsets of patients with rosacea who had high and low baseline SPA were identified, and patients with high baseline exhibited a statistically significant reduction of SPA with 15% AzA gel treatment. Study size was insufficient to predict clinical efficacy based on the innate immune response to AzA. These results show that cathelicidin and KLK5 decrease in association with AZA exposure. Our observations suggest a new mechanism of action for AzA and that SPA may be a useful biomarker for disease activity. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cathelicidin, kallikrein 5, and serine protease activity is inhibited during treatment of rosacea with azelaic acid 15% gel

    PubMed Central

    Coda, Alvin B.; Hata, Tissa; Miller, Jeremiah; Audish, David; Kotol, Paul; Two, Aimee; Shafiq, Faiza; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Harper, Julie C.; Del Rosso, James Q.; Gallo, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Excess cathelicidin and kallikrein 5 (KLK5) have been hypothesized to play a role in the pathophysiology of rosacea. Objective We sought to evaluate the effects of azelaic acid (AzA) on these elements of the innate immune system. Methods Gene expression and protease activity were measured in laboratory models and patients with rosacea during a 16-week multicenter, prospective, open-label study of 15% AzA gel. Results AzA directly inhibited KLK5 in cultured keratinocytes and gene expression of KLK5, Toll-like receptor-2, and cathelicidin in mouse skin. Patients with rosacea showed reduction in cathelicidin and KLK5 messenger RNA after treatment with AzA gel. Subjects without rosacea had lower serine protease activity (SPA) than patients with rosacea. Distinct subsets of patients with rosacea who had high and low baseline SPA were identified, and patients with high baseline exhibited a statistically significant reduction of SPA with 15% AzA gel treatment. Limitations Study size was insufficient to predict clinical efficacy based on the innate immune response to AzA. Conclusions These results show that cathelicidin and KLK5 decrease in association with AZA exposure. Our observations suggest a new mechanism of action for AzA and that SPA may be a useful biomarker for disease activity. PMID:23871720

  5. Topical treatments of Saussurea costus root and Thuja orientalis L. synergistically alleviate atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions by inhibiting protease-activated receptor-2 and NF-κB signaling in HaCaT cells and Nc/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hye Jeong; Kim, Min Jung; Kang, Suna; Moon, Na Rang; Kim, Da Sol; Lee, Na Ra; Kim, Kang Sung; Park, Sunmin

    2017-03-06

    The root of Saussurea costus (Aucklandia lappa Decne, Aucklandiae Radix, SC) and Thuja orientalis L. (TOL) have been traditionally used as anti-inflammatory agents in Korea. However, they have not been studied for the efficacy of atopic dermatitis (AD) treatment, a chronic inflammatory skin disease. We investigated the efficacy of topical applications with 1,3-butyleneglycol extracts of SC and TOL to alleviate the symptoms of AD. HaCaT cells and the dorsal skin of Nc/Nga mice had a local exposure of house mite extracts and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), respectively. After lesions developed, we topically applied 1,3-butylen glycol (vehicle; control), SC (30%), TOL (30%), or SC (15%)+TOL (15%) to the skin lesions for 5 weeks. The normal-control was not exposed to DNCB. The skin thickness, mast cell infiltration, serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) and IgG1 and gene expressions of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-13, and IFN-γ in the dorsal skin and HaCaT cells were measured. Chlorogenic acid (129.6±10.2μg/g) for SC and catechin and apigenin (93.4±13.2 and 16.9±1.3μg/g, respectively) for TOL were used as indicator compounds for the strength of the extracts. SC+TOL decreased the expression of protease-activated receptor-2 and ICAM-1 and the release of TNF-α and IL-6 in HaCaT cells activated by 3μg/mL house mite extracts in comparison to either of SC or TOL alone. In Nc/Nga mice challenged with DNCB, SC+TOL synergistically attenuated clinical symptoms of AD such as erythema, hemorrhage, edema, excoriation and dryness in the dorsal skin better than either SC or TOL alone. Histological analysis of the dorsal skin also showed that SC+TOL treatment significantly and additively decreased the inflammatory cellular infiltrate, including mast cells and eosinophils in comparison to either of SC or TOL. SC+TOL also decreased serum IgE and IgG1 levels and the expression of IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-13 mRNA in dorsal skin in DNCB-treated Nc/Nga mice. SC+TOL relieved the symptoms of AD by

  6. Effect of a plant polyphenol-rich extract on the lung protease activities of influenza-virus-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Serkedjieva, Julia; Toshkova, Reneta; Antonova-Nikolova, Stefka; Stefanova, Tsvetanka; Teodosieva, Ani; Ivanova, Iskra

    2007-01-01

    Influenza infection was induced in white mice by intranasal inoculation of the virus A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2). The lung protease and the protease-inhibitory activities were followed for 9 days after infection. The intranasal application of a polyphenol-rich extract (PC) isolated from Geranium sanguineum L. induced a continuous rise in the anti-protease activity but did not cause substantial changes in the lung protease activity of healthy mice. Influenza virus infection triggered a slight reduction in protease activity in the lungs at 5 and 48 h post infection (p.i.) and a marked increase at 24 h and 6 day p.i.. Protease inhibition in the lungs was reduced at 24 and 48 h p.i. and an increase was observed at 5 h and 6 and 9 days p.i.. PC treatment brought both activities to normal levels. The restoration of the examined parameters was consistent with a prolongation of mean survival time and reduction of mortality rate, infectious virus titre and lung consolidation. PC reinstated superoxide production by alveolar macrophages and increased their number in virus-infected mice. The favourable effect on the protease and the protease-inhibitory activities in the lungs of influenza-virus-infected mice apparently contributes to the overall protective effect of PC in the murine experimental influenza A/Aichi infection. The antiviral effect of the individual constituents was evaluated.

  7. Discrimination of differentially inhibited cysteine proteases by activity-based profiling using cystatin variants with tailored specificities.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Frank; Rhéaume, Ann-Julie; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Vorster, Juan; Michaud, Dominique

    2012-12-07

    Recent research has shown the possibility of tailoring the inhibitory specificity of plant cystatins toward cysteine (Cys) proteases by single mutations at positively selected amino acid sites. Here we devised a cystatin activity-based profiling approach to assess the impact of such mutations at the proteome scale using single variants of tomato cystatin SlCYS8 and digestive Cys proteases of the herbivorous insect, Colorado potato beetle, as a model. Biotinylated forms of SlCYS8 and SlCYS8 variants were used to capture susceptible Cys proteases in insect midgut protein extracts by biotin immobilization on avidin-embedded beads. A quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis of the captured proteins was performed to compare the inhibitory profile of different SlCYS8 variants. The approach confirmed the relevance of phylogenetic inferences categorizing the insect digestive Cys proteases into six functionally distinct families. It also revealed significant variation in protease family profiles captured with N-terminal variants of SlCYS8, in line with in silico structural models for Cys protease-SlCYS8 interactions suggesting a functional role for the N-terminal region. Our data confirm overall the usefulness of cystatin activity-based protease profiling for the monitoring of Cys protease-inhibitor interactions in complex biological systems. They also illustrate the potential of biotinylated cystatins to identify recombinant cystatin candidates for the inactivation of specific Cys protease targets.

  8. Protease Gene Duplication and Proteolytic Activity in Drosophila Female Reproductive Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Erin S.; Pennington, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Secreted proteases play integral roles in sexual reproduction in a broad range of taxa. In the genetic model Drosophila melanogaster, these molecules are thought to process peptides and activate enzymes inside female reproductive tracts, mediating critical postmating responses. A recent study of female reproductive tract proteins in the cactophilic fruit fly Drosophila arizonae, identified pervasive, lineage-specific gene duplication amongst secreted proteases. Here, we compare the evolutionary dynamics, biochemical nature, and physiological significance of secreted female reproductive serine endoproteases between D. arizonae and its congener D. melanogaster. We show that D. arizonae lower female reproductive tract (LFRT) proteins are significantly enriched for recently duplicated secreted proteases, particularly serine endoproteases, relative to D. melanogaster. Isolated lumen from D. arizonae LFRTs, furthermore, exhibits significant trypsin-like and elastase-like serine endoprotease acitivity, whereas no such activity is seen in D. melanogaster. Finally, trypsin- and elastase-like activity in D. arizonae female reproductive tracts is negatively regulated by mating. We propose that the intense proteolytic environment of the D. arizonae female reproductive tract relates to the extraordinary reproductive physiology of this species and that ongoing gene duplication amongst these proteases is an evolutionary consequence of sexual conflict. PMID:19546158

  9. The Race against Protease Activation Defines the Role of ESCRTs in HIV Budding.

    PubMed

    Bendjennat, Mourad; Saffarian, Saveez

    2016-06-01

    HIV virions assemble on the plasma membrane and bud out of infected cells using interactions with endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs). HIV protease activation is essential for maturation and infectivity of progeny virions, however, the precise timing of protease activation and its relationship to budding has not been well defined. We show that compromised interactions with ESCRTs result in delayed budding of virions from host cells. Specifically, we show that Gag mutants with compromised interactions with ALIX and Tsg101, two early ESCRT factors, have an average budding delay of ~75 minutes and ~10 hours, respectively. Virions with inactive proteases incorporated the full Gag-Pol and had ~60 minutes delay in budding. We demonstrate that during budding delay, activated proteases release critical HIV enzymes back to host cytosol leading to production of non-infectious progeny virions. To explain the molecular mechanism of the observed budding delay, we modulated the Pol size artificially and show that virion release delays are size-dependent and also show size-dependency in requirements for Tsg101 and ALIX. We highlight the sensitivity of HIV to budding "on-time" and suggest that budding delay is a potent mechanism for inhibition of infectious retroviral release.

  10. The Race against Protease Activation Defines the Role of ESCRTs in HIV Budding

    PubMed Central

    Bendjennat, Mourad; Saffarian, Saveez

    2016-01-01

    HIV virions assemble on the plasma membrane and bud out of infected cells using interactions with endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs). HIV protease activation is essential for maturation and infectivity of progeny virions, however, the precise timing of protease activation and its relationship to budding has not been well defined. We show that compromised interactions with ESCRTs result in delayed budding of virions from host cells. Specifically, we show that Gag mutants with compromised interactions with ALIX and Tsg101, two early ESCRT factors, have an average budding delay of ~75 minutes and ~10 hours, respectively. Virions with inactive proteases incorporated the full Gag-Pol and had ~60 minutes delay in budding. We demonstrate that during budding delay, activated proteases release critical HIV enzymes back to host cytosol leading to production of non-infectious progeny virions. To explain the molecular mechanism of the observed budding delay, we modulated the Pol size artificially and show that virion release delays are size-dependent and also show size-dependency in requirements for Tsg101 and ALIX. We highlight the sensitivity of HIV to budding “on-time” and suggest that budding delay is a potent mechanism for inhibition of infectious retroviral release. PMID:27280284

  11. Proteolytic activity of Plasmodium falciparum subtilisin-like protease 3 on parasite profilin, a multifunctional protein.

    PubMed

    Alam, Asrar; Bhatnagar, Raj K; Relan, Udbhav; Mukherjee, Paushali; Chauhan, Virander S

    2013-10-01

    Subtilisin-like proteases of malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfSUB1, 2 and 3) are expressed at late asexual blood stages. PfSUB1 and 2 are considered important drug targets due to their essentiality for parasite blood stages and role in merozoite egress and invasion of erythrocytes. We have earlier shown the in vitro serine protease activity of PfSUB3 and its localization at asexual blood stages. In this study, we attempted to identify the biological substrate(s) of PfSUB3 and found parasite profilin (PfPRF) as a substrate of the protease. Eukaryotic profilins are multifunctional proteins with primary role in regulation of actin filament assembly. PfPRF possesses biochemical features of eukaryotic profilins and its rodent ortholog is essential in blood stages. Profilin from related apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii (TgPRF) is known to be involved in parasite motility, host cell invasion, active egress from host cell, immune evasion and virulence in mice. In this study, mature PfSUB3 proteolysed recombinant PfPRF in a dose-dependent manner in in vitro assays. Recombinant PfPRF was assessed for its proinflammatory activity and found to induce high level of TNF-α and low but significant level of IL-12 from mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Proteolysis of PfPRF by PfSUB3 is suggestive of the probable role of the protease in the processes of motility, virulence and immune evasion.

  12. Cysteine-protease activity elicited by Ca2+ stimulus in Plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Farias, Shirley L; Gazarini, Marcos L; Melo, Robson L; Hirata, Izaura Y; Juliano, Maria A; Juliano, Luiz; Garcia, Célia R S

    2005-05-01

    Bloodstage malaria parasites require proteolytic activity for key processes as invasion, hemoglobin degradation and merozoite escape from red blood cells (RBCs). We investigated by confocal microscopy the presence of cysteine-protease activity elicited by calcium stimulus in Plasmodium chabaudi and Plasmodium falciparum in free trophozoites or for the later parasite within RBC using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) peptides. Peptide probes access, to either free or intraerythrocytic parasites, was also tested by selecting a range of fluorescent peptides (653-3146 Da molecular mass) labeled with Abz or FITC. In the present work we show that Ca2+ stimulus elicited by treatment with either melatonin, thapsigargin, ionomicin or nigericin, promotes an increase of substrate hydrolysis, which was blocked by the specific cysteine-protease inhibitor E-64 and the intracellular Ca2+ chelator, BAPTA. When parasites were treated with cytoplasmic Ca2+ releasing compounds, a cysteine-protease was labeled in the parasite cytoplasm by the fluorescent specific irreversible inhibitor, Ethyl-Eps-Leu-Tyr-Cap-Lys(Abz)-NH2, where Ethyl-Eps is Ethyl-(2S,3S)-oxirane-2,3-dicarboxylate. In summary, we demonstrate that P. chabaudi and P. falciparum have a cytoplasmic dependent cysteine-protease activity elicited by Ca2+.

  13. Activity, specificity, and probe design for the smallpox virus protease K7L.

    PubMed

    Aleshin, Alexander E; Drag, Marcin; Gombosuren, Naran; Wei, Ge; Mikolajczyk, Jowita; Satterthwait, Arnold C; Strongin, Alex Y; Liddington, Robert C; Salvesen, Guy S

    2012-11-16

    The K7L gene product of the smallpox virus is a protease implicated in the maturation of viral proteins. K7L belongs to protease Clan CE, which includes distantly related cysteine proteases from eukaryotes, pathogenic bacteria, and viruses. Here, we describe its recombinant high level expression, biochemical mechanism, substrate preference, and regulation. Earlier studies inferred that the orthologous I7L vaccinia protease cleaves at an AG-X motif in six viral proteins. Our data for K7L suggest that the AG-X motif is necessary but not sufficient for optimal cleavage activity. Thus, K7L requires peptides extended into the P7 and P8 positions for efficient substrate cleavage. Catalytic activity of K7L is substantially enhanced by homodimerization, by the substrate protein P25K as well as by glycerol. RNA and DNA also enhance cleavage of the P25K protein but not of synthetic peptides, suggesting that nucleic acids augment the interaction of K7L with its protein substrate. Library-based peptide preference analyses enabled us to design an activity-based probe that covalently and selectively labels K7L in lysates of transfected and infected cells. Our study thus provides proof-of-concept for the design of inhibitors and probes that may contribute both to a better understanding of the role of K7L in the virus life cycle and the design of novel anti-virals.

  14. Characterization of a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor from Solanum tuberosum having lectin activity.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kunal R; Patel, Dhaval K; Pappachan, Anju; Prabha, C Ratna; Singh, Desh Deepak

    2016-02-01

    Plant lectins and protease inhibitors constitute a class of proteins which plays a crucial role in plant defense. In our continuing investigations on lectins from plants, we have isolated, purified and characterized a protein of about 20 kDa, named PotHg, showing hemagglutination activity from tubers of Indian potato, Solanum tuberosum. De novo sequencing and MS/MS analysis confirmed that the purified protein was a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor having two chains (15 kDa and 5 kDa). SDS and native PAGE analysis showed that the protein was glycosylated and was a heterodimer of about 15 and 5 kDa subunits. PotHg agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes with specific activity of 640 H.U./mg which was inhibited by complex sugars like fetuin. PotHg retained hemagglutination activity over a pH range 4-9 and up to 80°C. Mannose and galactose interacted with the PotHg with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.5×10(-3) M and 2.8×10(-3) M, respectively as determined through fluorescence studies. Fluorescence studies suggested the involvement of a tryptophan in sugar binding which was further confirmed through modification of tryptophan residues using N-bromosuccinimide. Circular dichroism (CD) studies showed that PotHg contains mostly β sheets (∼45%) and loops which is in line with previously characterized protease inhibitors and modeling studies. There are previous reports of Kunitz-type protease inhibitors showing lectin like activity from Peltophorum dubium and Labramia bojeri. This is the first report of a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor showing lectin like activity from a major crop plant and this makes PotHg an interesting candidate for further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Methods of increasing the activity of extracellular esterase, beta-fructofuranosidase and proteases of wine yeast].

    PubMed

    Abdurazakova, S Kh; Salomov, Kh T

    1975-01-01

    Upon regular fermentation changes in the activity of the enzymes esterase, beta-fructofuranosidase and protease of the yeast Saccharomyces mini of the Parkent I race were examined. The maximum activity of the enzymes occurred in the stationary phase of the yeast growth. An increase in the activity of the above enzymes was shown possible during a prolonged stabilization of the stationary conditions in the process of a continuous chemostat cultivation of wine yeast.

  16. Nitrated Fatty Acids Reverse Cigarette Smoke-Induced Alveolar Macrophage Activation and Inhibit Protease Activity via Electrophilic S-Alkylation.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Aravind T; Lakshmi, Sowmya P; Muchumarri, Ramamohan R; Reddy, Raju C

    2016-01-01

    Nitrated fatty acids (NFAs), endogenous products of nonenzymatic reactions of NO-derived reactive nitrogen species with unsaturated fatty acids, exhibit substantial anti-inflammatory activities. They are both reversible electrophiles and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists, but the physiological implications of their electrophilic activity are poorly understood. We tested their effects on inflammatory and emphysema-related biomarkers in alveolar macrophages (AMs) of smoke-exposed mice. NFA (10-nitro-oleic acid or 12-nitrolinoleic acid) treatment downregulated expression and activity of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB while upregulating those of PPARγ. It also downregulated production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and of the protease cathepsin S (Cat S), a key mediator of emphysematous septal destruction. Cat S downregulation was accompanied by decreased AM elastolytic activity, a major mechanism of septal destruction. NFAs downregulated both Cat S expression and activity in AMs of wild-type mice, but only inhibited its activity in AMs of PPARγ knockout mice, pointing to a PPARγ-independent mechanism of enzyme inhibition. We hypothesized that this mechanism was electrophilic S-alkylation of target Cat S cysteines, and found that NFAs bind directly to Cat S following treatment of intact AMs and, as suggested by in silico modeling and calculation of relevant parameters, elicit S-alkylation of Cys25 when incubated with purified Cat S. These results demonstrate that NFAs' electrophilic activity, in addition to their role as PPARγ agonists, underlies their protective effects in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and support their therapeutic potential in this disease.

  17. Protease and lipase activities of fungal and bacterial strains derived from an artisanal raw ewe's milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Ozturkoglu-Budak, Sebnem; Wiebenga, Ad; Bron, Peter A; de Vries, Ronald P

    2016-11-21

    We previously identified the microbiota present during cheese ripening and observed high protease and lipase activity in Divle Cave cheese. To determine the contribution of individual isolates to enzyme activities, we investigated a range of species representing this microbiota for their proteolytic and lipolytic ability. In total, 17 fungal, 5 yeast and 18 bacterial strains, previously isolated from Divle Cave cheese, were assessed. Qualitative protease and lipase activities were performed on skim-milk agar and spirit-blue lipase agar, respectively, and resulted in a selection of strains for quantitative assays. For the quantitative assays, the strains were grown on minimal medium containing irradiated Divle Cave cheese, obtained from the first day of ripening. Out of 16 selected filamentous fungi, Penicillium brevicompactum, Penicillium cavernicola and Penicillium olsonii showed the highest protease activity, while Mucor racemosus was the best lipase producer. Yarrowia lipolytica was the best performing yeast with respect to protease and lipase activity. From the 18 bacterial strains, 14 and 11 strains, respectively showed protease and lipase activity in agar plates. Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus stratosphericus, Brevibacterium antiquum, Psychrobacter glacincola and Pseudomonas proteolytica displayed the highest protease and lipase activity. The proteases of yeast and filamentous fungi were identified as mainly aspartic protease by specific inhibition with Pepstatin A, whereas inhibition by PMSF (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride) indicated that most bacterial enzymes belong to serine type protease. Our results demonstrate that aspartic proteases, which usually have high milk clotting activity, are predominantly derived from fungal strains, and therefore fungal enzymes appear to be more suitable for use in the cheese industry. Microbial enzymes studied in this research might be alternatives for rennin (chymosin) from animal source because of their low cost and stable

  18. Molecular docking and 3D-quantitative structure activity relationship analyses of peptidyl vinyl sulfones: Plasmodium Falciparum cysteine proteases inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Cátia; Gomes, José R. B.; Couesnon, Thierry; Gomes, Paula

    2011-08-01

    Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) based on three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies were conducted on a series (39 molecules) of peptidyl vinyl sulfone derivatives as potential Plasmodium Falciparum cysteine proteases inhibitors. Two different methods of alignment were employed: (i) a receptor-docked alignment derived from the structure-based docking algorithm GOLD and (ii) a ligand-based alignment using the structure of one of the ligands derived from a crystal structure from the PDB databank. The best predictions were obtained for the receptor-docked alignment with a CoMFA standard model ( q 2 = 0.696 and r 2 = 0.980) and with CoMSIA combined electrostatic, and hydrophobic fields ( q 2 = 0.711 and r 2 = 0.992). Both models were validated by a test set of nine compounds and gave satisfactory predictive r 2 pred values of 0.76 and 0.74, respectively. CoMFA and CoMSIA contour maps were used to identify critical regions where any change in the steric, electrostatic, and hydrophobic fields may affect the inhibitory activity, and to highlight the key structural features required for biological activity. Moreover, the results obtained from 3D-QSAR analyses were superimposed on the Plasmodium Falciparum cysteine proteases active site and the main interactions were studied. The present work provides extremely useful guidelines for future structural modifications of this class of compounds towards the development of superior antimalarials.

  19. Soybean P34 Probable Thiol Protease Probably Has Proteolytic Activity on Oleosins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Luping; Kong, Xiangzhen; Zhang, Caimeng; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Yeming

    2017-07-19

    P34 probable thiol protease (P34) and Gly m Bd 30K (30K) show high relationship with the protease of 24 kDa oleosin of soybean oil bodies. In this study, 9 day germinated soybean was used to separate bioprocessed P34 (P32) from bioprocessed 30K (28K). Interestingly, P32 existed as dimer, whereas 28K existed as monomer; a P32-rich sample had proteolytic activity and high cleavage site specificity (Lys-Thr of 24 kDa oleosin), whereas a 28K-rich sample showed low proteolytic activity; the P32-rich sample contained one thiol protease. After mixing with purified oil bodies, all P32 dimers were dissociated and bound to 24 kDa oleosins to form P32-24 kDa oleosin complexes. By incubation, 24 kDa oleosin was preferentially hydrolyzed, and two hydrolyzed products (HPs; 17 and 7 kDa) were confirmed. After most of 24 kDa oleosin was hydrolyzed, some P32 existed as dimer, and the other as P32-17 kDa HP. It was suggested that P32 was the protease.

  20. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. PMID:27093053

  1. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Raheem; Shah, Majid Ali; Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications.

  2. Investigations with Protease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents two simple and reliable ways for measuring protease activity that can be used for a variety of investigations in a range of biology class levels. The investigations use protease from a variety of sources. (DDR)

  3. Investigations with Protease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents two simple and reliable ways for measuring protease activity that can be used for a variety of investigations in a range of biology class levels. The investigations use protease from a variety of sources. (DDR)

  4. Collagenolytic activity related to metalloproteases (and serine proteases) in the fish parasite Hysterothylacium aduncum (Nematoda: Anisakidae).

    PubMed

    Malagón, David; Adroher, Francisco Javier; Díaz-López, Manuel; Benítez, Rocío

    2010-06-11

    Proteases play a vital role in both the life cycle of parasites and the parasite-host relationship and are considered important virulence factors. In the present study, the presence of proteases with collagenolytic activity was investigated in the fish nematode Hysterothylacium aduncum during in vitro development. Collagenolytic activity was found in all studied developmental stages of the nematode (third [L3] and fourth [L4] larval stages and adults). In L3, the activity was maximum at pH 6.5 and, in the other stages, at 7.0. Pepsin is known to favour in vitro development of the worm, but, in this study, collagenolytic activity was shown to be significantly greater when no pepsin was added to the culture medium (at pH 6.5, p = 0.011). At pH 7.0, most activity was observed in the immature adult, after the final moult, suggesting that the collagenolytic activity may be involved in remodelling of the cuticle and in sexual maturity. On the other hand, at pH 6.5, activity may be related to tissue migration by L3 within the host. Using specific inhibitors, it was demonstrated that most of the collagenolytic activity detected in all the developmental stages was due to metalloproteases (40 to 100%), although serine proteases were also detected in L4 and adults (10 to 30%).

  5. Salicylic acid induced cysteine protease activity during programmed cell death in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Szepesi, Ágnes; Tari, Irma

    2016-06-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR), a type of programmed cell death (PCD) during biotic stress is mediated by salicylic acid (SA). The aim of this work was to reveal the role of proteolysis and cysteine proteases in the execution of PCD in response of SA. Tomato plants were treated with sublethal (0.1 mM) and lethal (1 mM) SA concentrations through the root system. Treatment with 1 mM SA increased the electrolyte leakage and proteolytic activity and reduced the total protein content of roots after 6 h, while the proteolytic activity did not change in the leaves and in plants exposed to 0.1 mM SA. The expression of the papain-type cysteine protease SlCYP1, the vacuolar processing enzyme SlVPE1 and the tomato metacaspase SlMCA1 was induced within the first three hours in the leaves and after 0.5 h in the roots in the presence of 1 mM SA but the transcript levels did not increase significantly at sublethal SA. The Bax inhibitor-1 (SlBI-1), an antiapoptotic gene was over-expressed in the roots after SA treatments and it proved to be transient in the presence of sublethal SA. Protease inhibitors, SlPI2 and SlLTC were upregulated in the roots by sublethal SA but their expression remained low at 1 mM SA concentration. It is concluded that in contrast to leaves the SA-induced PCD is associated with increased proteolytic activity in the root tissues resulting from a fast up-regulation of specific cysteine proteases and down-regulation of protease inhibitors.

  6. Expression and characterization of alkaline protease from the metagenomic library of tannery activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Devi, Selvaraju Gayathri; Fathima, Anwar Aliya; Sanitha, Mary; Iyappan, Sellamuthu; Curtis, Wayne R; Ramya, Mohandass

    2016-12-01

    Metagenomics has the potential to facilitate the discovery of novel enzymes; however, to date, only a few alkaline proteases have been characterized from environmentally-sourced DNA. We report the identification and characterization of an alkaline serine protease designated as Prt1A from the metagenomic library of tannery activated sludge. Sequence analysis revealed that Prt1A is closely related to S8A family subtilisins with a catalytic triad of Asp143, His173, and Ser326. The putative protease gene (prt-1A) was subcloned in pET 28a (+) vector and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)pLysS cells. This 38.8 KDa recombinant protease was purified to homogeneity by nickel affinity chromatography and exhibited optimal enzyme activity at elevated pH (11.0) and temperature (55°C). The enzyme activity was enhanced by the addition of 5 mM Ca(2+) ions, and was stable in the presence of anionic detergent, oxidizing agent and various organic solvents. The enzyme displayed high affinity and catalytic efficiency for casein under standard assay conditions (Vmax = 279 U/mg/min, Km = 1.70 mg/mL) and was also compatible with commercial detergents. These results suggest that Prt1A protease could act as an efficient enzyme in various industrial applications. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In vitro and in vivo anticandidal activity of human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cassone, A; De Bernardis, F; Torosantucci, A; Tacconelli, E; Tumbarello, M; Cauda, R

    1999-08-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy that includes human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) aspartyl protease inhibitors (PIs) causes a decline in the incidence of some opportunistic infections in AIDS, and this decline is currently attributed to the restoration of specific immunity. The effect of two PIs (indinavir and ritonavir) on the enzymatic activity of a secretory aspartyl protease (Sap) of Candida albicans (a major agent of mucosal disease in HIV-infected subjects) and on growth and experimental pathogenicity of this fungus was evaluated. Both PIs strongly (>/=90%) and dose dependently (0.1-10 microM) inhibited Sap activity and production. They also significantly reduced Candida growth in a nitrogen-limited, Sap expression-dependent growth medium and exerted a therapeutic effect in an experimental model of vaginal candidiasis, with an efficacy comparable to that of fluconazole. Thus, besides the expected immunorestoration, patients receiving PI therapy may benefit from a direct anticandidal activity of these drugs.

  8. [Effects of Tagetes erecta extracts on glutathione S-transferase and protease activities and protein content in Tetranychus viennensis].

    PubMed

    Shi, Guang-lu; Wang, You-nian; Wang, Hong-lei; Zhao, Li-lin; Liu, Su-qi; Cao, Hui; Yu, Tong-quan; Lu, Ping

    2007-02-01

    With in vivo and in vitro Tagetes erecta roots under light and dark as test materials, this paper studied the effects of their extracts on the glutathione S-transferase and protease activities and protein content in Tetranychus viennensis. The results showed that the chloroform extract of T. erecta roots had the highest light-activated activity, followed by water extract, and methanol extract. After treated with chloroform extract, the glutathione S-transferase and protease activities in T. viennensis increased markedly, while its protein content decreased obviously. The variation degree of T. viennensis protease activity and protein content was significantly higher when the chloroform extract came from the T. erecta roots under light, suggesting that there existed active matters in the extract, which could promote the activation of protease, and thus, the decomposition of protein in T. viennensis. The bioactivity of T. erecta metabolites was mainly of light-activated one.

  9. Influenza and SARS-Coronavirus Activating Proteases TMPRSS2 and HAT Are Expressed at Multiple Sites in Human Respiratory and Gastrointestinal Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Gierer, Stefanie; Danisch, Simon; Perin, Paula; Lucas, Jared M.; Nelson, Peter S.; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Soilleux, Elizabeth J.

    2012-01-01

    The type II transmembrane serine proteases TMPRSS2 and HAT activate influenza viruses and the SARS-coronavirus (TMPRSS2) in cell culture and may play an important role in viral spread and pathogenesis in the infected host. However, it is at present largely unclear to what extent these proteases are expressed in viral target cells in human tissues. Here, we show that both HAT and TMPRSS2 are coexpressed with 2,6-linked sialic acids, the major receptor determinant of human influenza viruses, throughout the human respiratory tract. Similarly, coexpression of ACE2, the SARS-coronavirus receptor, and TMPRSS2 was frequently found in the upper and lower aerodigestive tract, with the exception of the vocal folds, epiglottis and trachea. Finally, activation of influenza virus was conserved between human, avian and porcine TMPRSS2, suggesting that this protease might activate influenza virus in reservoir-, intermediate- and human hosts. In sum, our results show that TMPRSS2 and HAT are expressed by important influenza and SARS-coronavirus target cells and could thus support viral spread in the human host. PMID:22558251

  10. DNA-induced conformational changes in cyclic AMP receptor protein: detection and mapping by a protein footprinting technique using multiple chemical proteases.

    PubMed

    Baichoo, N; Heyduk, T

    1999-07-02

    Cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) is a regulator of transcription in Escherichia coli which mediates its activity by binding specific DNA sequences in a cyclic AMP-dependent manner. The interaction of CRP with specific DNA was probed by a protein footprinting technique using chemical proteases of different charge, size, and hydrophobicity. The experimental data were compared with known crystal structures of cAMP-CRP and cAMP-CRP-DNA complexes to determine a correlation between the structure of the complexes, the nature of the chemical protease and protein cleavage patterns. In addition, such comparison allowed us to determine if DNA binding in solution induced conformational changes in the protein not apparent in the crystal structure. In the cAMP-CRP-DNA complex, both the protections and the enhancements of proteolytic cleavage were observed outside of the known CRP-DNA interface, suggesting that CRP undergoes a conformational change upon binding DNA. Among the observed changes, the most interesting were those around the B alpha-helix and beta-strand 8, since this region overlaps with the activation region 2 which CRP uses for protein-protein interactions with RNA polymerase. DNA-induced changes were observed also in the region involved in CRP-CytR interaction and in CRP intersubunit contact regions. These data suggest that binding of DNA in solution induces conformational changes in CRP which can be transmitted via intersubunit contacts to regions of the protein involved in interactions with other members of transcriptional machinery.

  11. Comparison of protease activities in different Bacillus licheniformis strains using wastewater sludge and synthetic soy medium as raw material.

    PubMed

    Bezawada, J; Yan, S; Tyagia, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2010-01-01

    The production of extracellular protease by different Bacillus licheniformis strains (ATCC 21415, ATCC 21417 and ATCC 21424) was tested in wastewater sludge as a raw material as well as in synthetic soy medium to compare the capacity of protease production by different strains and to compare the capacity of the medium to provide nutrients for enzyme synthesis. All of the strains showed similar activities in both media. The protease activity was very high in the fermentor in both of the media compared with the shake flask. Results from microbial selection indicated that ATCC 21424 had high potential for protease production using sludge as a growth medium. The observation from this study suggested that wastewater sludge could be used as a raw material (nutrient source) to produce protease for industrial applications.

  12. UV activation of receptor tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Coffer, P J; Burgering, B M; Peppelenbosch, M P; Bos, J L; Kruijer, W

    1995-08-03

    The exposure of mammalian cells to ultraviolet radiation (UV) may lead to DNA damage resulting in mutation and thus possibly cancer, while irradiation can further act as a potent tumor promoter. In addition UV induces p21ras-mediated signalling leading to activation of transcription factors such as AP-1 and NF-kappa B, as well as activation of the Src tyrosine kinase. This 'UV-response' has been well studied in mammalian cells and furthermore is conserved in yeast, however the most upstream components of this signal transduction pathway have remained elusive. Here we show that UV rapidly activates both the EGF receptor and insulin receptor, as shown by tyrosine phosphorylation of these receptors. We demonstrate that this activation is due to autophosphorylation as it only occurs in cells containing receptors with a functional kinase domain. We have further analysed the propagation of the UV-induced signal to downstream events such as, IRS-1 and Shc tyrosine phosphorylation, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation, leukotriene synthesis, MAP kinase activation and gene induction all of which are activated by UV irradiation. Importantly, we demonstrate that in cells expressing a 'kinase-dead' receptor mutant the UV-response is inhibited, blocking leukotriene synthesis, MAP kinase activation and transcriptional induction. Furthermore, prior-stimulation of cells with UV appears to reduce further responsiveness to addition of growth factor suggesting a common signaling pathway. These data demonstrate a critical role for receptor-mediated events in regulating the response mammalian cells to UV exposure.

  13. Oxidative stress is required for mechanical ventilation-induced protease activation in the diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Smuder, Ashley J.; Wu, Min; Hudson, Matthew B.; Nelson, W. Bradley; Powers, Scott K.

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV) results in diaphragmatic weakness due to fiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Recent work reveals that activation of the proteases calpain and caspase-3 is required for MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction. However, the mechanism(s) responsible for activation of these proteases remains unknown. To address this issue, we tested the hypothesis that oxidative stress is essential for the activation of calpain and caspase-3 in the diaphragm during MV. Cause-and-effect was established by prevention of MV-induced diaphragmatic oxidative stress using the antioxidant Trolox. Treatment of animals with Trolox prevented MV-induced protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation in the diaphragm. Importantly, the Trolox-mediated protection from MV-induced oxidative stress prevented the activation of calpain and caspase-3 in the diaphragm during MV. Furthermore, the avoidance of MV-induced oxidative stress not only averted the activation of these proteases but also rescued the diaphragm from MV-induced diaphragmatic myofiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Collectively, these findings support the prediction that oxidative stress is required for MV-induced activation of calpain and caspase-3 in the diaphragm and are consistent with the concept that antioxidant therapy can retard MV-induced diaphragmatic weakness. PMID:20203072

  14. A novel TMPRSS6 mutation that prevents protease auto-activation causes IRIDA.

    PubMed

    Altamura, Sandro; D'Alessio, Flavia; Selle, Barbara; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2010-11-01

    IRIDA (iron-refractory iron-deficiency anaemia) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder hallmarked by hypochromic microcytic anaemia, low transferrin saturation and high levels of the iron-regulated hormone hepcidin. The disease is caused by mutations in the transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS6 (transmembrane protease serine 6) that prevent inactivation of HJV (haemojuvelin), an activator of hepcidin transcription. In the present paper, we describe a patient with IRIDA who carries a novel mutation (Y141C) in the SEA domain of the TMPRSS6 gene. Functional characterization of the TMPRSS6(Y141C) mutant protein in cultured cells showed that it localizes to similar subcellular compartments as wild-type TMPRSS6 and binds HJV, but fails to auto-catalytically activate itself. As a consequence, hepcidin mRNA expression is increased, causing the clinical symptoms observed in this IRIDA patient. The present study provides important mechanistic insight into how TMPRSS6 is activated.

  15. A novel TMPRSS6 mutation that prevents protease auto-activation causes IRIDA

    PubMed Central

    Altamura, Sandro; D'Alessio, Flavia; Selle, Barbara; Muckenthaler, Martina U.

    2010-01-01

    IRIDA (iron-refractory iron-deficiency anaemia) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder hallmarked by hypochromic microcytic anaemia, low transferrin saturation and high levels of the iron-regulated hormone hepcidin. The disease is caused by mutations in the transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS6 (transmembrane protease serine 6) that prevent inactivation of HJV (haemojuvelin), an activator of hepcidin transcription. In the present paper, we describe a patient with IRIDA who carries a novel mutation (Y141C) in the SEA domain of the TMPRSS6 gene. Functional characterization of the TMPRSS6(Y141C) mutant protein in cultured cells showed that it localizes to similar subcellular compartments as wild-type TMPRSS6 and binds HJV, but fails to auto-catalytically activate itself. As a consequence, hepcidin mRNA expression is increased, causing the clinical symptoms observed in this IRIDA patient. The present study provides important mechanistic insight into how TMPRSS6 is activated. PMID:20704562

  16. Differential Expression of Extracellular Lipase and Protease Activities of Mycelial and Yeast Forms in Malassezia furfur.

    PubMed

    Juntachai, Weerapong; Kajiwara, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    Malassezia furfur is a dimorphic yeast that is part of the human skin microflora. This fungus is a pathogen of a certain skin diseases, such as pityriasis versicolor, and in rare cases causes systemic infection in neonates. However, the role of dimorphism in the pathogenicity remains unclear. A modified induction medium (IM) was successfully able to induce mycelial growth of M. furfur under both solid and liquid condition. Filamentous elements with branching hyphae were observed when cultured in the IM. Furthermore, addition of bovine fetus serum into the liquid IM did not promote hyphal formation; on the contrary, it retrograded hyphae to the yeast form. Plate-washing assay showed that M. furfur hyphae did not possess the ability of invasive growth. Secretory proteins from both yeast and hyphal forms were isolated, and lipase and protease activities were analyzed. Intriguingly, the hyphal form showed higher activities than those of the yeast form, particularly the protease activity.

  17. Selection of suitable detergents for obtaining an active dengue protease in its natural form from E. coli.

    PubMed

    Liew, Lynette Sin Yee; Lee, Michelle Yueqi; Wong, Ying Lei; Cheng, Jinting; Li, Qingxin; Kang, CongBao

    2016-05-01

    Dengue protease is a two-component enzyme and is an important drug target against dengue virus. The protease activity and protein stability of dengue nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) require a co-factor region from a four-span membrane protein NS2B. A natural form of dengue protease containing full-length NS2B and NS3 protease domain NS2BFL-NS3pro will be useful for dengue drug discovery. In current study, detergents that can be used for protease purification were tested. Using a water soluble protease construct, 39 detergents were selected for both NS2B and NS2BFL-NS3pro purification. The results showed that 18 detergents were able to sustain the activity of the natural dengue protease and 11 detergents could be used for NS2B purification. The results obtained in this study will be useful for biochemical and biophysical studies on dengue protease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Crystal structure of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin protease in a product-bound state: Evidence for noncanonical zinc protease activity.

    PubMed

    Segelke, Brent; Knapp, Mark; Kadkhodayan, Saloumeh; Balhorn, Rod; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-05-04

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the most potent toxins known, disrupt neurotransmission through proteolysis of proteins involved in neuroexocytosis. The light chains of BoNTs are unique zinc proteases that have stringent substrate specificity and require exceptionally long substrates. We have determined the crystal structure of the protease domain from BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A). The structure reveals a homodimer in a product-bound state, with loop F242-V257 from each monomer deeply buried in its partner's catalytic site. The loop, which acts as a substrate, is oriented in reverse of the canonical direction for other zinc proteases. The Y249-Y250 peptide bond of the substrate loop is hydrolyzed, leaving the Y249 product carboxylate coordinated to the catalytic zinc. From the crystal structure of the BoNT/A protease, detailed models of noncanonical binding and proteolysis can be derived which we propose are also consistent with BoNT/A binding and proteolysis of natural substrate synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25). The proposed BoNT/A substrate-binding mode and catalytic mechanism are markedly different from those previously proposed for the BoNT serotype B.

  19. The Androgen-Regulated Protease TMPRSS2 Activates aProteolytic Cascade Involving Components of the Tumor Microenvironment and Promotes Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Jared M.; Heinlein, Cynthia; Kim, Tom; Hernandez, Susana A.; Malik, Muzdah S.; True, Lawrence D.; Morrissey, Colm; Corey, Eva; Montgomery, Bruce; Mostaghel, Elahe; Clegg, Nigel; Coleman, Ilsa; Brown, Christopher M.; Schneider, Eric L.; Craik, Charles; Simon, Julian; Bedalov, Tony; Nelson, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    TMPRSS2 is an androgen-regulated cell surface serine protease expressed predominantly in prostate epithelium. TMPRSS2 is expressed highly in localized high-grade prostate cancers and in the majority of human prostate cancer metastasis. Through the generation of mouse models with a targeted deletion of Tmprss2, we demonstrate that the activity of this protease regulates cancer cell invasion and metastasis to distant organs. By screening combinatorial peptide libraries we identified a spectrum of TMPRSS2 substrates that include pro-hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). HGF activated by TMPRSS2 promoted c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, and initiated a pro-invasive EMT phenotype. Chemical library screens identified a potent bioavailable TMPRSS2 inhibitor that suppressed prostate cancer metastasis in vivo. Together, these findings provide a mechanistic link between androgen-regulated signaling programs and prostate cancer metastasis that operate via context-dependent interactions with extracellular constituents of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25122198

  20. Delivery of a Protease-Activated Cytolytic Peptide Prodrug by Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jallouk, Andrew P; Palekar, Rohun U; Marsh, Jon N; Pan, Hua; Pham, Christine T N; Schlesinger, Paul H; Wickline, Samuel A

    2015-08-19

    Melittin is a cytolytic peptide derived from bee venom that inserts into lipid membranes and oligomerizes to form membrane pores. Although this peptide is an attractive candidate for treatment of cancers and infectious processes, its nonspecific cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity have limited its therapeutic applications. Several groups have reported the development of cytolytic peptide prodrugs that only exhibit cytotoxicity following activation by site-specific proteases. However, systemic administration of these constructs has proven difficult because of their poor pharmacokinetic properties. Here, we present a platform for the design of protease-activated melittin derivatives that may be used in conjunction with a perfluorocarbon nanoparticle delivery system. Although native melittin was substantially hemolytic (HD50: 1.9 μM) and cytotoxic (IC50: 2.4 μM), the prodrug exhibited 2 orders of magnitude less hemolytic activity (HD50: > 100 μM) and cytotoxicity (IC50: > 100 μM). Incubation with matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) led to cleavage of the prodrug at the expected site and restoration of hemolytic activity (HD50: 3.4 μM) and cytotoxicity (IC50: 8.1 μM). Incubation of the prodrug with perfluorocarbon nanoparticles led to stable loading of 10,250 peptides per nanoparticle. Nanoparticle-bound prodrug was also cleaved and activated by MMP-9, albeit at a fourfold slower rate. Intravenous administration of prodrug-loaded nanoparticles in a mouse model of melanoma significantly decreased tumor growth rate (p = 0.01). Because MMPs and other proteases play a key role in cancer invasion and metastasis, this platform holds promise for the development of personalized cancer therapies directed toward a patient's individual protease expression profile.

  1. Purification and characterization of a cold active alkaline protease from Stenotrophomonas sp., isolated from Kashmir, India.

    PubMed

    Saba, Iram; Qazi, Parvaiz H; Rather, Shabir A; Dar, Refaz A; Qadri, Qurrat A; Ahmad, Nasier; Johri, Sarojini; Taneja, Subash C; Shawl, Sami

    2012-03-01

    A Psychrotolerant alkaline protease producing bacterium IIIM-ST045 was isolated from a soil sample collected from the Thajiwas glacier of Kashmir, India and identified as Stenotrophomonas sp. on the basis of its biochemical properties and 16S ribosomal gene sequencing. The strain could grow well within a temperature range of 4-37°C however, showed optimum growth at 15°C. The strain was found to over-produce proteases when it was grown in media containing lactose as carbon source (157.50 U mg(-1)). The maximum specific enzyme activity (398 U mg(-1)) was obtained using soya oil as nitrogen source, however, the inorganic nitrogen sources urea, ammonium chloride and ammonium sulphate showed the lowest production of 38.9, 62.2 and 57.9 U mg(-1). The enzyme was purified to 18.45 folds and the molecular weight of the partially purified protease was estimated to be ~55 kDa by SDS-PAGE analysis. The protease activity increased as the increase in enzyme concentration while as the optimum enzyme activity was found when casein (1% w/v) was used as substrate. The enzyme was highly active over a wide range of pH from 6.5 to 12.0 showing optimum activity at pH 10.0. The optimum temperature for the enzyme was 15°C. Proteolytic activity reduced gradually with higher temperatures with a decrease of 56% at 40°C. The purified enzyme was checked for the removal of protein containing tea stains using a silk cloth within a temperature range of 10-60°C. The best washing efficiency results obtained at low temperatures indicate that the enzyme may be used for cold washing purposes of delicate fabrics that otherwise are vulnerable to high temperatures.

  2. Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles as Delivery Vehicles for Melittin and Its Protease-Activated Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jallouk, Andrew Philip

    Melittin is a cytolytic peptide derived from honeybee venom which inserts into lipid membranes and oligomerizes to form membrane pores. While this peptide is an attractive candidate for treatment of cancers and infectious processes, its nonspecific cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity have limited its therapeutic applications. The goal of this dissertation was to enhance the specificity of melittin therapy through the use of perfluorocarbon nanoparticles to minimize nonspecific cytotoxicity and the development of melittin prodrugs which only exhibit cytolytic activity following activation by site-specific proteases. Although previous studies have characterized the biological effects of melittin-loaded nanoparticles following intravenous administration, we first investigated their use as topical agents for prevention of HIV infection. We found that incorporation of native melittin onto perfluorocarbon nanoparticles maintained antiviral activity while substantially reducing contact toxicity to sperm and vaginal epithelium. These results demonstrated the potential utility of melittin-loaded nanoparticles as a topical vaginal virucide. To further enhance melittin specificity, we developed melittin derivatives which could be activated by matrix metalloproteinase-9, a protease which is overexpressed in many tumors and which plays a critical role in cancer invasion and metastasis. We then characterized the interactions of these peptides with perfluorocarbon nanoparticles and demonstrated the safety and efficacy of intravenous prodrug-loaded nanoparticle therapy in a mouse model of melanoma. The versatility of this platform could facilitate development of personalized cancer therapies directed towards a patient's individual protease expression profile.

  3. Antimicrobial activity of protease inhibitor from leaves of Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt.

    PubMed

    Satheesh, L Shilpa; Murugan, K

    2011-05-01

    Antimicrobial activity of protease inhibitor isolated from Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt. has been reported. A 14.3 kDa protease inhibitor (PI) was isolated and purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation (20-85% saturation), sephadex G-75, DEAE sepharose column and trypsin-sepharose affinity chromatography from the leaves of C. grandis. The purity was checked by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. PI exhibited marked growth inhibitory effects on colon cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. PI was thermostable and showed antimicrobial activity without hemolytic activity. PI strongly inhibited pathogenic microbial strains, including Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Eschershia coli, Bacillus subtilis and pathogenic fungus Candida albicans, Mucor indicus, Penicillium notatum, Aspergillus flavus and Cryptococcus neoformans. Examination by bright field microscopy showed inhibition of mycelial growth and sporulation. Morphologically, PI treated fungus showed a significant shrinkage of hyphal tips. Reduced PI completely lost its activity indicating that disulfide bridge is essential for its protease inhibitory and antifungal activity. Results reported in this study suggested that PI may be an excellent candidate for development of novel oral or other anti-infective agents.

  4. Thalidomide combined with irradiation alters the activity of two proteases.

    PubMed

    Şimşek, Ece; Aydemir, Esra; Korcum, Aylin Fidan; Fişkın, Kayahan

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of thalidomide, a drug known for its anti‑angiogenic and antitumor properties, at its cytotoxic dose previously determined as 40 µg/ml (according to four cytotoxic test results). The effect of the drug alone and in combination with radiotherapy using Cobalt 60 (60Co) at 45 Gy on the enzymatic activity of substance‑P degrading A disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)10 and neprilysin (NEP) was investigated in the mouse breast cancer cell lines 4T1 and 4T1 heart metastases post‑capsaicin (4THMpc). Thalidomide (40 µg/ml) exerted differing effects on the activities of ADAM10 and NEP enzymes. In 4T1 cells, 40 µg/ml thalidomide alone did not alter ADAM10 enzyme activity. 60Co irradiation at 45 Gy alone caused a 42% inhibition in ADAM10 activity, however, the inhibition increased to 89% when combined therapy was used. By contrast, in the 4THMpc cell line, 40 µg/ml thalidomide alone induced a 66.6% increase in ADAM10 enzyme activity. Radiotherapy alone and thalidomide with 60Co combined therapy caused a 33.3 and 40% inhibition of ADAM10 activity, respectively. In 4T1 cells, thalidomide alone caused a 40.9% increase in NEP activity. Radiation therapy alone or in combination with the drug caused a 40.7% increase in NEP activity. In more aggressive 4THMpc cells, thalidomide alone caused a 26.6% increase in NEP activity. Radiotherapy alone and combined therapy caused a 33.3 and 37% increase in enzyme activity, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that thalidomide alone or in combination with radiotherapy exhibits significant cytotoxic effects on 4T1 and 4THMpc mouse breast cancer cell lines indicating that this drug affects the enzymatic activity of ADAM10 and NEP in vitro.

  5. Tobacco etch virus protease retains its activity in various buffers and in the presence of diverse additives.

    PubMed

    Sun, Changsheng; Liang, Jiongqiu; Shi, Rui; Gao, Xuna; Zhang, Ruijuan; Hong, Fulin; Yuan, Qihang; Wang, Shengbin

    2012-03-01

    Tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease is widely used to remove tags from recombinant fusion proteins because of its stringent sequence specificity. It is generally accepted that the high concentrations of salts or other special agents in most protein affinity chromatography buffers can affect enzyme activity, including that of TEV protease. Consequently, tedious desalination or the substitution of standard TEV reaction buffer for elution buffer are often needed to ensure TEV protease activity when removing fusion tags after purifying target proteins using affinity chromatography. To address this issue, we used SOE PCR technology to synthesize a TEV protease gene with a codon pattern adapted to the codon usage bias of Escherichia coli, recovered the purified recombinant TEV protease, and examined its activity in various elution buffers commonly used in affinity chromatography as well as the effects of selected additives on its activity. Our results showed that the rTEV protease maintained high activity in all affinity chromatography elution buffers tested and tolerated high concentrations of additives commonly used in protein purification procedures, such as ethylene glycol, EGTA, Triton X-100, Tween-20, NP-40, CHAPS, urea, SDS, guanidine hydrochloride and β-mercaptoethanol. These results will facilitate the use of rTEV protease in removing tags from fusion proteins.

  6. Hemoglobinase Activity of the Lysine Gingipain Protease (Kgp) of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Janina P.; Dawson, Janet A.; Hannis, James C.; Muddiman, David; Macrina, Francis L.

    1999-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important periodontal disease pathogen, forms black-pigmented colonies on blood agar. Pigmentation is believed to result from accumulation of iron protoporphyrin IX (FePPIX) derived from erythrocytic hemoglobin. The Lys-X (Lys-gingipain) and Arg-X (Arg-gingipain) cysteine proteases of P. gingivalis bind and degrade erythrocytes. We have observed that mutations abolishing activity of the Lys-X-specific cysteine protease, Kgp, resulted in loss of black pigmentation of P. gingivalis W83. Because the hemagglutinating and hemolytic potentials of mutant strains were reduced but not eliminated, we hypothesized that this protease played a role in acquisition of FePPIX from hemoglobin. In contrast to Arg-gingipain, Lys-gingipain was not inhibited by hemin, suggesting that this protease played a role near the cell surface where high concentrations of hemin confer the black pigmentation. Human hemoglobin contains 11 Lys residues in the α chain and 10 Lys residues in the β chain. In contrast, there are only three Arg residues in each of the α and β chains. These observations are consistent with human hemoglobin being a preferred substrate for Lys-gingipain but not Arg-gingipain. The ability of the Lys-gingipain to cleave human hemoglobin at Lys residues was confirmed by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry of hemoglobin fragments resulting from digestion with the purified protease. We were able to detect several of the predicted hemoglobin fragments rendered by digestion with purified Lys-gingipain. Thus, we postulate that the Lys-gingipain of P. gingivalis is a hemoglobinase which plays a role in heme and iron uptake by effecting the accumulation of FePPIX on the bacterial cell surface. PMID:10438761

  7. Hemoglobinase activity of the lysine gingipain protease (Kgp) of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J P; Dawson, J A; Hannis, J C; Muddiman, D; Macrina, F L

    1999-08-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, an important periodontal disease pathogen, forms black-pigmented colonies on blood agar. Pigmentation is believed to result from accumulation of iron protoporphyrin IX (FePPIX) derived from erythrocytic hemoglobin. The Lys-X (Lys-gingipain) and Arg-X (Arg-gingipain) cysteine proteases of P. gingivalis bind and degrade erythrocytes. We have observed that mutations abolishing activity of the Lys-X-specific cysteine protease, Kgp, resulted in loss of black pigmentation of P. gingivalis W83. Because the hemagglutinating and hemolytic potentials of mutant strains were reduced but not eliminated, we hypothesized that this protease played a role in acquisition of FePPIX from hemoglobin. In contrast to Arg-gingipain, Lys-gingipain was not inhibited by hemin, suggesting that this protease played a role near the cell surface where high concentrations of hemin confer the black pigmentation. Human hemoglobin contains 11 Lys residues in the alpha chain and 10 Lys residues in the beta chain. In contrast, there are only three Arg residues in each of the alpha and beta chains. These observations are consistent with human hemoglobin being a preferred substrate for Lys-gingipain but not Arg-gingipain. The ability of the Lys-gingipain to cleave human hemoglobin at Lys residues was confirmed by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry of hemoglobin fragments resulting from digestion with the purified protease. We were able to detect several of the predicted hemoglobin fragments rendered by digestion with purified Lys-gingipain. Thus, we postulate that the Lys-gingipain of P. gingivalis is a hemoglobinase which plays a role in heme and iron uptake by effecting the accumulation of FePPIX on the bacterial cell surface.

  8. Protease activity of MALT1: a mystery unravelled.

    PubMed

    Kirchhofer, Daniel; Vucic, Domagoj

    2012-06-01

    Constitutive NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) activation in B-cell lymphomas relies greatly on the CARMA1 [CARD (caspase recruitment domain)-containing MAGUK (membrane-associated guanylate kinase) 1]-Bcl10-MALT1 (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue translocation gene 1) signalling complex. Within this protein complex, MALT1 possesses a rather unique enzymatic activity, which allows it to cleave Bcl10, RelB and CYLD, among other substrates. The catalytic activity of MALT1 promotes activation of canonical and non-canonical NF-κB as well as other signalling pathways. However, even after a decade of intense research on MALT1, many mechanistic aspects of its enzymatic activity remain elusive. A recent article by Hachmann, Snipas, van Raam, Cancino, Houlihan, Poreba, Kasperkiewicz, Drag and Salvesen [(2012) Biochem. J. 443, 287-295] provides novel insight into the activation mechanism and the substrate specificity of MALT1. These intriguing findings convincingly demonstrate the importance of MALT1 dimerization for its catalytic activity and pave the way for novel therapeutic approaches that target this crucial regulator of lymphoma survival and proliferation.

  9. Sclerotiamide: The First Non-Peptide-Based Natural Product Activator of Bacterial Caseinolytic Protease P.

    PubMed

    Lavey, Nathan P; Coker, Jesse A; Ruben, Eliza A; Duerfeldt, Adam S

    2016-04-22

    Caseinolytic protease P (ClpP) maintains essential roles in bacterial homeostasis. As such, both the inhibition and activation of this enzyme result in bactericidal activity, making ClpP a promising target for antibacterial drug development. Herein, we report the results of a fluorescence-based screen of ∼450 structurally diverse fungal and bacterial secondary metabolites. Sclerotiamide (1), a paraherquamide-related indolinone, was identified as the first non-peptide-based natural product activator of ClpP. Structure-activity relationships arising from the initial screen, preliminary biochemical evaluation of 1, and rationale for the exploitation of this chemotype to develop novel ClpP activators are presented.

  10. Peptide-Modulated Activity Enhancement of Acidic Protease Cathepsin E at Neutral pH

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Masayuki; Biyani, Madhu; Ghimire Gautam, Sunita; Nishigaki, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes are regulated by their activation and inhibition. Enzyme activators can often be effective tools for scientific and medical purposes, although they are more difficult to obtain than inhibitors. Here, using the paired peptide method, we report on protease-cathepsin-E-activating peptides that are obtained at neutral pH. These selected peptides also underwent molecular evolution, after which their cathepsin E activation capability improved. Thus, the activators we obtained could enhance cathepsin-E-induced cancer cell apoptosis, which indicated their potential as cancer drug precursors. PMID:23365585

  11. Influence of skin penetration enhancers on skin barrier function and skin protease activity.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Diar; Hirata, Kazumasa; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2014-01-23

    In order to overcome the skin's excellent barrier function formulation scientists often employ skin penetration enhancers (SPEs) in topical and transdermal formulations. The effects of these compounds on skin health is still not well understood at the molecular level. The aim of the present work was to probe the effects of some common SPEs on desquamatory protease activity in healthy skin. The SPEs studied were isopropyl myristate (IPM), propylene glycol, (PG), propylene glycol laurate (PGL) and Transcutol™ (TC). Occluded infinite doses of each SPE were applied to human volunteers for 24 h. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements were taken before and after application of SPEs. Tape strips were collected from the treated sites to determine protein content and the activity of two desquamatory proteases kallikrein 5 (KLK5) and kallikrein 7 (KLK7). TEWL values were also measured after tape stripping. PG was found to elevate both TEWL values and KLK7 activity to a significant extent (p<0.05). No significant effects were observed for the other SPEs. The ability of PG to alter the skin barrier at the macroscopic level and the influence of the molecule on protease activity reported here may have implications for its use in topical formulations used for the management of impaired skin barrier function such as atopic eczema or psoriasis.

  12. Single-site substitutions improve cold activity and increase thermostability of the dehairing alkaline protease (DHAP).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Yan; Wu, Li-Ying; Liu, Gang; Feng, Hong

    2016-12-01

    To engineer dehairing alkaline protease (DHAP) variants to improve cold activity and increase thermostability so these variants are suitable for the leather processing industry. Based on previous studies with bacterial alkaline proteases, double-site mutations (W106K/V149I and W106K/M124L) were introduced into the DHAP from Bacillus pumilus. Compared with the wild-type DHAP hydrolytic activity, the double-site variant W106K/V149I showed an increase in specific hydrolytic activity at 15 °C by 2.3-fold toward casein in terms of hydrolytic rate and 2.7-fold toward the synthetic peptide AAPF-pN by means of kcat/Km value. The thermostability of the variant (W106K/V149I) was improved with the half-life at 60 and 70 °C increased by 2.7- and 5.0-fold, respectively, when compared with the thermostability of the wild-type DHAP. Conclusively, an increase in the cold activity and thermostability of a bacterial alkaline protease was achieved by protein engineering.

  13. The fibrinolytic activity of a novel protease derived from a tempeh producing fungus, Fusarium sp. BLB.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Satoshi; Fujii, Tadashi; Morimiya, Tatsuo; Johdo, Osamu; Nakamura, Takumi

    2007-09-01

    Tempeh is a traditional Indonesian soybean-fermented food produced by filamentous fungi, Rhizopus sp. and Fusarium sp. We isolated and sequenced the genomic gene and a cDNA clone encoding a novel protease (FP) from Fusarium sp. BLB. The genomic gene was 856 bp in length and contained two introns. An isolated cDNA clone encoded a protein of 250 amino acids. The predicted amino acid sequence of FP showed highest homology, of 76%, with that of trypsin from Fusarium oxysporum. The hydrolysis activity of FP toward synthetic peptide was higher than that of any other protease tested, including Nattokinases. Furthermore, the thrombolytic activity of FP was about 2.1-fold higher than that of Nattokinase when the concentration of plasminogen was 24 units/ml. These results suggest that FP is superior to Nattokinases in dissolving fibrin when absorbed into the blood.

  14. Small Molecule-Induced Allosteric Activation of the Vibrio Cholerae RTX Cysteine Protease Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lupardus, P.J.; Shen, A.; Bogyo, M.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-19

    Vibrio cholerae RTX (repeats in toxin) is an actin-disrupting toxin that is autoprocessed by an internal cysteine protease domain (CPD). The RTX CPD is efficiently activated by the eukaryote-specific small molecule inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP{sub 6}), and we present the 2.1 angstrom structure of the RTX CPD in complex with InsP{sub 6}. InsP{sub 6} binds to a conserved basic cleft that is distant from the protease active site. Biochemical and kinetic analyses of CPD mutants indicate that InsP{sub 6} binding induces an allosteric switch that leads to the autoprocessing and intracellular release of toxin-effector domains.

  15. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of a Library of Thiocarbazates and their Activity as Cysteine Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhuqing; Myers, Michael C.; Shah, Parag P.; Beavers, Mary Pat; Benedetti, Phillip A.; Diamond, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we identified a novel class of potent cathepsin L inhibitors, characterized by a thiocarbazate warhead. Given the potential of these compounds to inhibit other cysteine proteases, we designed and synthesized a library of thiocarbazates containing diversity elements at three positions. Biological characterization of this library for activity against a panel proteases indicated a significant preference for members of the papain family of cysteine proteases over serine, metallo-, and certain classes of cysteine proteases, such as caspases. Several very potent inhibitors of Cathepsin L and S were identified. The SAR data was employed in docking studies in an effort to understand the structural elements required for Cathepsin S inhibition. This study provides the basis for the design of highly potent and selective inhibitors of the papain family of cysteine proteases. PMID:20438448

  16. The Zinc-Dependent Protease Activity of the Botulinum Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Lebeda, Frank J.; Cer, Regina Z.; Mudunuri, Uma; Stephens, Robert; Singh, Bal Ram; Adler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT, serotypes A-G) are some of the most toxic proteins known and are the causative agents of botulism. Following exposure, the neurotoxin binds and enters peripheral cholinergic nerve endings and specifically and selectively cleaves one or more SNARE proteins to produce flaccid paralysis. This review centers on the kinetics of the Zn-dependent proteolytic activities of these neurotoxins, and briefly describes inhibitors, activators and factors underlying persistence of toxin action. Some of the structural, enzymatic and inhibitor data that are discussed here are available at the botulinum neurotoxin resource, BotDB (http://botdb.abcc.ncifcrf.gov). PMID:22069621