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Sample records for proteasomal dub poh1

  1. Regulation of ErbB2 Receptor Status by the Proteasomal DUB POH1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han; Buus, Richard; Clague, Michael J.; Urbé, Sylvie

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the factors, which control ErbB2 and EGF receptor (EGFR) status in cells is likely to inform future therapeutic approaches directed at these potent oncogenes. ErbB2 is resistant to stimulus-induced degradation and high levels of over-expression can inhibit EGF receptor down-regulation. We now show that for HeLa cells expressing similar numbers of EGFR and ErbB2, EGFR down-regulation is efficient and insensitive to reduction of ErbB2 levels. Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) may extend protein half-lives by rescuing ubiquitinated substrates from proteasomal degradation or from ubiquitin-dependent lysosomal sorting. Using a siRNA library directed at the full complement of human DUBs, we identified POH1 (also known as Rpn11 or PSMD14), a component of the proteasome lid, as a critical DUB controlling the apparent ErbB2 levels. Moreover, the effects on ErbB2 levels can be reproduced by administration of proteasomal inhibitors such as epoxomicin used at maximally tolerated doses. However, the extent of this apparent loss and specificity for ErbB2 versus EGFR could not be accounted for by changes in transcription or degradation rate. Further investigation revealed that cell surface ErbB2 levels are only mildly affected by POH1 knock-down and that the apparent loss can at least partially be explained by the accumulation of higher molecular weight ubiquitinated forms of ErbB2 that are detectable with an extracellular but not intracellular domain directed antibody. We propose that POH1 may deubiquitinate ErbB2 and that this activity is not necessarily coupled to proteasomal degradation. PMID:19436748

  2. The 19S proteasomal lid subunit POH1 enhances the transcriptional activation by Mitf in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Toni; Sohn, Chee; Kaiser, Bria; Jensen, Eric D; Mansky, Kim C

    2010-04-01

    The microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf) regulates gene expression required for osteoclast differentiation. Genes regulated by Mitf have been previously identified. However, proteins that interact and regulate Mitf's activity in osteoclasts are not well known. Here, we report that POH1, a subunit of the 19S proteasome lid is a regulator of Mitf. We show that POH1 and Mitf interact in osteoclasts and that this interaction is dependent on RANKL signaling. Overexpression of POH1 increased Mitf's activation of 5XGal4-TK and Acp5 promoters. The amino terminus of POH1 mediates the binding to Mitf and is sufficient to increase Mitf's transcriptional activity. Finally, we show that mutations in the JAMM motif of POH1 reduced Mitf activation of promoters. In summary, our results identify a novel mechanism of Mitf regulation in osteoclasts by POH1.

  3. The JAMM motif of human deubiquitinase Poh1 is essential for cell viability.

    PubMed

    Gallery, Melissa; Blank, Jonathan L; Lin, Yinghui; Gutierrez, Juan A; Pulido, Jacqueline C; Rappoli, David; Badola, Sunita; Rolfe, Mark; Macbeth, Kyle J

    2007-01-01

    Poh1 deubiquitinase activity is required for proteolytic processing of polyubiquitinated substrates by the 26S proteasome, linking deubiquitination to complete substrate degradation. Poh1 RNA interference (RNAi) in HeLa cells resulted in a reduction in cell viability and an increase in polyubiquitinated protein levels, supporting the link between Poh1 and the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. To more specifically test for any requirement of the zinc metalloproteinase motif of Poh1 to support cell viability and proteasome function, we developed a RNAi complementation strategy. Effects on cell viability and proteasome activity were assessed in cells with RNAi of endogenous Poh1 and induced expression of wild-type Poh1 or a mutant form of Poh1, in which two conserved histidines of the proposed catalytic site were replaced with alanines. We show that an intact zinc metalloproteinase motif is essential for cell viability and 26S proteasome function. As a required enzymatic component of the proteasome, Poh1 is an intriguing therapeutic drug target for cancer.

  4. Small-Molecule RA-9 Inhibits Proteasome-Associated DUBs and Ovarian Cancer in Vitro and in Vivo Via Exacerbating Unfolded Protein Responses

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, Kathleen; Anchoori, Ravi; Iizuka, Yoshie; Meints, Joyce; MacNeill, Lauren; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Lee, Michael K.; Roden, Richard BS; Bazzaro, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of the gynecological malignancies. Carcinogenic progression is accompanied by up-regulation of ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation machinery as a mechanism to compensate with elevated endogenous proteotoxic stress. Recent studies support the notion that deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are essential factors in proteolytic degradation and that their aberrant activity is linked to cancer progression and chemoresistance. Thus, DUBs are an attractive therapeutic target for ovarian cancer. Experimental Design The potency and selectivity of RA-9 inhibitor for proteasome-associated DUBs was determined in ovarian cancer cell lines and primary cells. The anticancer activity of RA-9 and its mechanism of action was evaluated in multiple cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo in immunodeficient mice bearing an intra-peritoneal ES-2 xenograft model of human ovarian cancer. Results Here we report the characterization of RA-9 as a small-molecule inhibitor of proteasome-associated DUBs. Treatment with RA-9 selectively induces onset of apoptosis, in ovarian cancer cell lines and primary cultures derived from donors. Loss of cell viability following RA-9 exposure is associated with an Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) as mechanism to compensate for unsustainable levels of proteotoxic stress. In vivo treatment with RA-9 retards tumor growth, increases overall survival and was well tolerated by the host. Conclusions Our preclinical studies support further evaluation of RA-9 as an ovarian cancer therapeutic. PMID:24727327

  5. Deubiquitinases (DUBs) and DUB inhibitors: a patent review

    PubMed Central

    Nwankwo, Joseph O.; Arkwright, Richard T.; Cvek, Boris; Liu, Jinbao; Dou, Q. Ping

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Deubiquitinating-enzymes (DUBs) are key components of the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS). The fundamental role of DUBs is specific removal of ubiquitin from substrates. DUBs contribute to activation/deactivation, recycling and localization of numerous regulatory-proteins, thus playing major roles in diverse cellular-processes. Altered DUB activity is associated with multitudes of pathologies including cancer. Therefore, DUBs represent novel candidates for target-directed drug development. Areas covered The article is a thorough review/accounting of patented compounds targeting DUBs stratifying/classifying the patented compounds based on: chemical-structures, nucleic-acid compositions, modes-of-action and targeting-sites. The review provides a brief background on the UPS and DUBs involvement. Furthermore, methods for assessing efficacy and potential pharmacological utility of DUB inhibitor (DUBi) are discussed. Expert opinion The FDA’s approval of the 20S proteasome inhibitors: bortezomib and carfilzomib for treatment of hematological malignancies established the UPS as an anti-cancer target. Unfortunately, many patients are inherently resistant or develop resistance to proteasome inhibitors (PIs). One potential strategy to combat PI resistance is targeting upstream components of the UPS such as DUBs. DUBs represent a promising potential therapeutic target due to their critical roles in various cellular processes including protein-turnover, localization and cellular homeostasis. While considerable efforts have been undertaken to develop DUB modulators, significant advancement is necessary move DUB inhibitors into the clinic. PMID:26077642

  6. Factors in Dubbing Television Comedy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabalbeascoa, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    Advocates a greater awareness of the factors involved with dubbing television comedies. Considers the translation of jokes and provides an outline of the various kinds of jokes in television shows. Calls for more research on comedy dubbing and television translation in general. (HB)

  7. Ubiquitin hydrolase Dub3 promotes oncogenic transformation by stabilizing Cdc25A.

    PubMed

    Pereg, Yaron; Liu, Bob Y; O'Rourke, Karen M; Sagolla, Meredith; Dey, Anwesha; Komuves, Laszlo; French, Dorothy M; Dixit, Vishva M

    2010-04-01

    The dual specificity (Tyr/Thr) phosphatase Cdc25A activates cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) to promote cell-cycle progression and has significant oncogenic potential. Cdc25A protein levels are regulated tightly in normal tissues, but many human cancers overexpress Cdc25A. The underlying mechanism for overexpression has been enigmatic. Here we show that Cdc25A is stabilized by the ubiquitin hydrolase Dub3. Upon binding Cdc25A, Dub3 removes the polyubiquitin modifications that mark Cdc25A for proteasomal degradation. Dub3 knockdown in cells increased Cdc25A ubiquitylation and degradation, resulting in reduced Cdk/Cyclin activity and arrest at G1/S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. In contrast, acute Dub3 overexpression produced a signature response to oncogene induction: cells accumulated in S and G2 because of replication stress, and activated a DNA damage response. Dub3 also transformed NIH-3T3 cells and cooperated with activated H-Ras to promote growth in soft agar. Importantly, we show that Dub3 overexpression is responsible for an abnormally high level of Cdc25A in a subset of human breast cancers. Moreover, Dub3 knockdown significantly retarded the growth of breast tumour xenografts in nude mice. As a major regulator of Cdc25A, Dub3 is an example of a transforming ubiquitin hydrolase that subverts a key component of the cell cycle machinery.

  8. Proteasome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Enenkel, Cordula

    2014-01-01

    Proteasomes are highly conserved multisubunit protease complexes and occur in the cyto- and nucleoplasm of eukaryotic cells. In dividing cells proteasomes exist as holoenzymes and primarily localize in the nucleus. During quiescence they dissociate into proteolytic core and regulatory complexes and are sequestered into motile cytosolic clusters. Proteasome clusters rapidly clear upon the exit from quiescence, where proteasome core and regulatory complexes reassemble and localize to the nucleus again. The mechanisms underlying proteasome transport and assembly are not yet understood. Here, I summarize our present knowledge about nuclear transport and assembly of proteasomes in yeast and project our studies in this eukaryotic model organism to the mammalian cell system. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Ubiquitin-Proteasome System. Guest Editors: Thomas Sommer and Dieter H. Wolf.

  9. Simultaneous inhibition of deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) and autophagy synergistically kills breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Coughlin, Kathleen; Scotti, Alessandra; Iizuka, Yoshie; Anchoori, Ravi; Roden, Richard B. S.; Marastoni, Mauro; Bazzaro, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death among women in the United States. Patients expressing the estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER and PR) and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER-2) tumor markers have favorable prognosis and efficacious therapeutic options. In contrast, tumors that are negative for these markers (triple-negative) have a disproportionate share of morbidity and mortality due to lack of a validated molecular target. Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are a critical component of ubiquitin-proteasome-system degradation and have been shown to be differentially expressed and activated in a number of cancers, including breast, with their aberrant activity linked to cancer prognosis and clinical outcome. We evaluated the effect of the DUB inhibitors b-AP15 and RA-9 alone and in combination with early- and late-stage lysosomal inhibitors on cell viability in a panel of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines. Our results indicate small-molecule DUB inhibitors have a profound effect on TNBC viability and lead to activation of autophagy as a cellular mechanism to compensate for ubiquitin-proteasome-system stress. Treatment with sub-optimal doses of DUB and lysosome inhibitors synergistically kills TNBC cells. This supports the evaluation of DUB inhibition, in combination with lysosomal inhibition, as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of TNBC. PMID:25784654

  10. Synthetic Uncleavable Ubiquitinated Proteins Dissect Proteasome Deubiquitination and Degradation, and Highlight Distinctive Fate of Tetraubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sumeet K; Sahu, Indrajit; Mali, Sachitanand M; Hemantha, Hosahalli P; Kleifeld, Oded; Glickman, Michael H; Brik, Ashraf

    2016-12-14

    Various hypotheses have been proposed regarding how chain length, linkage type, position on substrate, and susceptibility to deubiquitinases (DUBs) affect processing of different substrates by proteasome. Here we report a new strategy for the chemical synthesis of ubiquitinated proteins to generate a set of well-defined conjugates bearing an oxime bond between the chain and the substrate. We confirmed that this isopeptide replacement is resistant to DUBs and to shaving by proteasome. Analyzing products generated by proteasomes ranked how chain length governed degradation outcome. Our results support that (1) the cleavage of the proximal isopeptide bond is not a prerequisite for proteasomal degradation, (2) by overcoming trimming at the proteasome, tetraUb is a fundamentally different signal than shorter chains, and (3) the tetra-ubiquitin chain can be degraded with the substrate. Together these results highlight the usefulness of chemistry to dissect the contribution of proteasome-associated DUBs and the complexity of the degradation process.

  11. Airbag Trail Dubbed 'Magic Carpet'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Airbag Trail Dubbed 'Magic Carpet' (QTVR)

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Magic Carpet Close-upMagic Carpet Close-up HD

    This section of the first color image from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has been further processed to produce a sharper look at a trail left by the one of rover's airbags. The drag mark was made after the rover landed and its airbags were deflated and retracted. Scientists have dubbed the region the 'Magic Carpet' after a crumpled portion of the soil that appears to have been peeled away (lower left side of the drag mark). Rocks were also dragged by the airbags, leaving impressions and 'bow waves' in the soil. The mission team plans to drive the rover over to this site to look for additional clues about the composition of the martian soil. This image was taken by Spirit's panoramic camera.

    This extreme close-up image (see insets above) highlights the martian feature that scientists have named 'Magic Carpet' because of its resemblance to a crumpled carpet fold. Scientists think the soil here may have detached from its underlying layer, possibly due to interaction with the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's airbag after landing. This image was taken on Mars by the rover's panoramic camera.

  12. Airbag Trail Dubbed 'Magic Carpet'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Airbag Trail Dubbed 'Magic Carpet' (QTVR)

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Magic Carpet Close-upMagic Carpet Close-up HD

    This section of the first color image from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has been further processed to produce a sharper look at a trail left by the one of rover's airbags. The drag mark was made after the rover landed and its airbags were deflated and retracted. Scientists have dubbed the region the 'Magic Carpet' after a crumpled portion of the soil that appears to have been peeled away (lower left side of the drag mark). Rocks were also dragged by the airbags, leaving impressions and 'bow waves' in the soil. The mission team plans to drive the rover over to this site to look for additional clues about the composition of the martian soil. This image was taken by Spirit's panoramic camera.

    This extreme close-up image (see insets above) highlights the martian feature that scientists have named 'Magic Carpet' because of its resemblance to a crumpled carpet fold. Scientists think the soil here may have detached from its underlying layer, possibly due to interaction with the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's airbag after landing. This image was taken on Mars by the rover's panoramic camera.

  13. Synthesis and Evaluation of Derivatives of the Proteasome Deubiquitinase Inhibitor b-AP15

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; D'Arcy, Pádraig; Caulfield, Thomas R.; Paulus, Aneel; Chitta, Kasyapa; Mohanty, Chitralekha; Gullbo, Joachim; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Linder, Stig

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) is increasingly recognized as a therapeutic target for the development of anticancer therapies. The success of the 20S proteasome core particle (20S CP) inhibitor bortezomib in the clinical management of multiple myeloma has raised the possibility of identifying other UPS components for therapeutic intervention. We previously identified the small molecule b-AP15 as an inhibitor of 19S proteasome deubiquitinase (DUB) activity. Building upon our previous data, we performed a structure–activity relationship (SAR) study on b-AP15 and identified VLX1570 as an analog with promising properties, including enhanced potency and improved solubility in aqueous solution. In silico modeling was consistent with interaction of VLX1570 with key cysteine residues located at the active sites of the proteasome DUBs USP14 and UCHL5. VLX1570 was found to inhibit proteasome deubiquitinase activity in vitro in a manner consistent with competitive inhibition. Furthermore, using active-site-directed probes, VLX1570 also inhibited proteasome DUB activity in exposed cells. Importantly, VLX1570 did not show inhibitory activity on a panel of recombinant non-proteasome DUBs, on recombinant kinases, or on caspase-3 activity, suggesting that VLX1570 is not an overtly reactive general enzyme inhibitor. Taken together, our data shows the chemical and biological properties of VLX1570 as an optimized proteasome DUB inhibitor. PMID:25854145

  14. Clinically used antirheumatic agent auranofin is a proteasomal deubiquitinase inhibitor and inhibits tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenbin; Lu, Xiaoyu; Lan, Xiaoying; Chen, Xin; Yi, Songgang; Xu, Li; Jiang, Lili; Zhao, Canguo; Dong, Xiaoxian; Zhou, Ping; Li, Shujue; Wang, Shunqing; Shi, Xianping; Dou, Ping Q.; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2014-01-01

    Proteasomes are attractive emerging targets for anti-cancer therapies. Auranofin (Aur), a gold-containing compound clinically used to treat rheumatic arthritis, was recently approved by US Food and Drug Administration for Phase II clinical trial to treat cancer but its anti-cancer mechanism is poorly understood. Here we report that (i) Aur shows proteasome-inhibitory effect that is comparable to that of bortezomib/Velcade (Vel); (ii) different from bortezomib, Aur inhibits proteasome-associated deubiquitinases (DUBs) UCHL5 and USP14 rather than the 20S proteasome; (iii) inhibition of the proteasome-associated DUBs is required for Aur-induced cytotoxicity; and (iv) Aur selectively inhibits tumor growth in vivo and induces cytotoxicity in cancer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients. This study provides important novel insight into understanding the proteasome-inhibiting property of metal-containing compounds. Although several DUB inhibitors were reported, this study uncovers the first drug already used in clinic that can inhibit proteasome-associated DUBs with promising anti-tumor effects. PMID:24977961

  15. DUB3 and USP7 de-ubiquitinating enzymes control replication inhibitor Geminin: molecular characterization and associations with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pérez, S; Cabrera, E; Salido, E; Lim, M; Reid, L; Lakhani, S R; Khanna, K K; Saunus, J M; Freire, R

    2017-08-17

    Correct control of DNA replication is crucial to maintain genomic stability in dividing cells. Inappropriate re-licensing of replicated origins is associated with chromosomal instability (CIN), a hallmark of cancer progression that at the same time provides potential opportunities for therapeutic intervention. Geminin is a critical inhibitor of the DNA replication licensing factor Cdt1. To properly achieve its functions, Geminin levels are tightly regulated through the cell cycle by ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation, but the de-ubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) involved had not been identified. Here we report that DUB3 and USP7 control human Geminin. Overexpression of either DUB3 or USP7 increases Geminin levels through reduced ubiquitination. Conversely, depletion of DUB3 or USP7 reduces Geminin levels, and DUB3 knockdown increases re-replication events, analogous to the effect of Geminin depletion. In exploring potential clinical implications, we found that USP7 and Geminin are strongly correlated in a cohort of invasive breast cancers (P<1.01E-08). As expected, Geminin expression is highly prognostic. Interestingly, we found a non-monotonic relationship between USP7 and breast cancer-specific survival, with both very low or high levels of USP7 associated with poor outcome, independent of estrogen receptor status. Altogether, our data identify DUB3 and USP7 as factors that regulate DNA replication by controlling Geminin protein stability, and suggest that USP7 may be involved in Geminin dysregulation during breast cancer progression.

  16. Inhibition of 19S proteasome-associated deubiquitinases by metal-containing compounds

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ningning; Huang, Hongbiao; Ping Dou, Q.; Liu, Jinbao

    2015-01-01

    Copper and gold complexes have clinical activity in several diseases including cancer. Recently, we have reported that the anti-cancer activity of copper (II) pyrithione CuPT and gold (I) complex auranofin is associated with targeting the 19S proteasome-associated deubiquitinases (DUBs), UCHL5 and USP14. Here we discuss metal DUB inhibitors in treating cancer and other diseases. (from Editor). Several copper and gold complexes have clinical activity in treating some human diseases including cancer. Recently, we have reported that the anti-cancer activity of copper (II) pyrithione CuPT and gold (I) complex auranofin is tightly associated with their ability to target and inhibit the 19S proteasome-associated deubiquitinases (DUBs), UCHL5 and USP14. In this article we review small molecule inhibitors of DUBs and 19S proteasome-associated DUBs. We then describe and discuss the ubique nature of CuPT and auranofin, which is inhibition of 19S proteasome-associated UCHL5 and USP14. We finally suggest the potential to develop novel, specific metal-based DUB inhibitors for treating cancer and other diseases PMID:26097878

  17. DUBs, the regulation of cell identity and disease.

    PubMed

    Heideker, Johanna; Wertz, Ingrid E

    2015-01-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins with ubiquitin represents a complex signalling system that co-ordinates essential cellular functions, including proteolysis, DNA repair, receptor signalling and cell communication. DUBs (deubiquitinases), the enzymes that disassemble ubiquitin chains and remove ubiquitin from proteins, are central to this system. Reflecting the complexity and versatility of ubiquitin signalling, DUB activity is controlled in multiple ways. Although several lines of evidence indicate that aberrant DUB function may promote human disease, the underlying molecular mechanisms are often unclear. Notwithstanding, considerable interest in DUBs as potential drug targets has emerged over the past years. The future success of DUB-based therapy development will require connecting the basic science of DUB function and enzymology with drug discovery. In the present review, we discuss new insights into DUB activity regulation and their links to disease, focusing on the role of DUBs as regulators of cell identity and differentiation, and discuss their potential as emerging drug targets.

  18. Phosphorylation regulates mycobacterial proteasome.

    PubMed

    Anandan, Tripti; Han, Jaeil; Baun, Heather; Nyayapathy, Seeta; Brown, Jacob T; Dial, Rebekah L; Moltalvo, Juan A; Kim, Min-Seon; Yang, Seung Hwan; Ronning, Donald R; Husson, Robert N; Suh, Joowon; Kang, Choong-Min

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses a proteasome system that is required for the microbe to resist elimination by the host immune system. Despite the importance of the proteasome in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, the molecular mechanisms by which proteasome activity is controlled remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the α-subunit (PrcA) of the M. tuberculosis proteasome is phosphorylated by the PknB kinase at three threonine residues (T84, T202, and T178) in a sequential manner. Furthermore, the proteasome with phosphorylated PrcA enhances the degradation of Ino1, a known proteasomal substrate, suggesting that PknB regulates the proteolytic activity of the proteasome. Previous studies showed that depletion of the proteasome and the proteasome-associated proteins decreases resistance to reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs) but increases resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here we show that PknA phosphorylation of unprocessed proteasome β-subunit (pre-PrcB) and α-subunit reduces the assembly of the proteasome complex and thereby enhances the mycobacterial resistance to H2O2 and that H2O2 stress diminishes the formation of the proteasome complex in a PknA-dependent manner. These findings indicate that phosphorylation of the M. tuberculosis proteasome not only modulates proteolytic activity of the proteasome, but also affects the proteasome complex formation contributing to the survival of M. tuberculosis under oxidative stress conditions.

  19. Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nishant; Sunwoo, Bernie Y; Kotloff, Robert M

    2016-09-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the Folliculin gene and is characterized by the formation of fibrofolliculomas, early onset renal cancers, pulmonary cysts, and spontaneous pneumothoraces. The exact pathogenesis of tumor and lung cyst formation in BHD remains unclear. There is great phenotypic variability in the clinical features of BHD, and patients can present with any combination of skin, pulmonary, or renal findings. More than 80% of adult patients with BHD have pulmonary cysts on high-resolution computed tomography scan of the chest.

  20. Homogeneous, bioluminescent proteasome assays.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Martha A; Moravec, Richard A; Riss, Terry L; Bulleit, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Protein degradation is mediated predominantly through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The importance of the proteasome in regulating degradation of proteins involved in cell-cycle control, apoptosis, and angiogenesis led to the recognition of the proteasome as a therapeutic target for cancer. The proteasome is also essential for degrading misfolded and aberrant proteins, and impaired proteasome function has been implicated in neurodegerative and cardiovascular diseases. Robust, sensitive assays are essential for monitoring proteasome activity and for developing inhibitors of the proteasome. Peptide-conjugated fluorophores are widely used as substrates for monitoring proteasome activity, but fluorogenic substrates can exhibit significant background and can be problematic for screening because of cellular autofluorescence or interference from fluorescent library compounds. Furthermore, fluorescent proteasome assays require column-purified 20S or 26S proteasome (typically obtained from erythrocytes), or proteasome extracts from whole cells, as their samples. To provide assays more amenable to high-throughput screening, we developed a homogeneous, bioluminescent method that combines peptide-conjugated aminoluciferin substrates and a stabilized luciferase. Using substrates for the chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like proteasome activities in combination with a selective membrane permeabilization step, we developed single-step, cell-based assays to measure each of the proteasome catalytic activities. The homogeneous method eliminates the need to prepare individual cell extracts as samples and has adequate sensitivity for 96- and 384-well plates. The simple "add and read" format enables sensitive and rapid proteasome assays ideal for inhibitor screening.

  1. Disassembly of Lys11 and Mixed Linkage Polyubiquitin Conjugates Provides Insights into Function of Proteasomal Deubiquitinases Rpn11 and Ubp6*

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Wissam; Nakasone, Mark A.; von Delbrück, Maximilian; Yu, Zanlin; Krutauz, Daria; Reis, Noa; Kleifeld, Oded; Sommer, Thomas; Fushman, David; Glickman, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis is largely dependent on proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Diverse polyubiquitin modifications are reported to target cellular proteins to the proteasome. At the proteasome, deubiquitination is an essential preprocessing event that contributes to degradation efficiency. We characterized the specificities of two proteasome-associated deubiquitinases (DUBs), Rpn11 and Ubp6, and explored their impact on overall proteasome DUB activity. This was accomplished by constructing a panel of well defined ubiquitin (Ub) conjugates, including homogeneous linkages of varying lengths as well as a heterogeneously modified target. Rpn11 and Ubp6 processed Lys11 and Lys63 linkages with comparable efficiencies that increased with chain length. In contrast, processing of Lys48 linkages by proteasome was inversely correlated to chain length. Fluorescently labeled tetra-Ub chains revealed endo-chain preference for Ubp6 acting on Lys48 and random action for Rpn11. Proteasomes were more efficient at deconjugating identical substrates than their constituent DUBs by roughly 2 orders of magnitude. Incorporation into proteasomes significantly enhanced enzymatic efficiency of Rpn11, due in part to alleviation of the autoinhibitory role of its C terminus. The broad specificity of Rpn11 could explain how proteasomes were more effective at disassembling a heterogeneously modified conjugate compared with homogeneous Lys48-linked chains. The reduced ability to disassemble homogeneous Lys48-linked chains longer than 4 Ub units may prolong residency time on the proteasome. PMID:25389291

  2. DUBs, New Members in the Hypoxia Signaling clUb

    PubMed Central

    Schober, Amelie S.; Berra, Edurne

    2016-01-01

    Cellular protein homeostasis is tightly regulated by ubiquitination. Responsible for target protein ubiquitination is a class of enzymes, the so-called ubiquitin E3 ligases. They are opposed to a second class of enzymes, called deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), which can remove polyubiquitin chains from their specific target proteins. The coaction of the two sets of enzymes allows the cell to adapt its overall protein content and the abundance of particular proteins to a variety of cellular and environmental stresses, including hypoxia. In recent years, DUBs have been highlighted to play major roles in many diseases, including cancer, both as tumor suppressors and oncogenes. Therefore, DUBs are emerging as promising targets for cancer-cell specific treatment. Here, we will review the current understanding of DUBs implicated in the control of hypoxia-inducible factor, the regulation of DUBs by hypoxia, and the use of DUB-specific drugs to target tumor hypoxia-signaling. PMID:27014628

  3. Video Dubbing Projects in the Foreign Language Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burston, Jack

    2005-01-01

    The dubbing of muted video clips offers an excellent opportunity to develop the skills of foreign language learners at all linguistic levels. In addition to its motivational value, soundtrack dubbing provides a rich source of activities in all language skill areas: listening, reading, writing, speaking. With advanced students, it also lends itself…

  4. Video Dubbing Projects in the Foreign Language Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burston, Jack

    2005-01-01

    The dubbing of muted video clips offers an excellent opportunity to develop the skills of foreign language learners at all linguistic levels. In addition to its motivational value, soundtrack dubbing provides a rich source of activities in all language skill areas: listening, reading, writing, speaking. With advanced students, it also lends itself…

  5. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome and intracranial vascular pathologies.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Rahul; Evins, Alexander I; Steitieh, Diala; Bernardo, Antonio; Stieg, Philip E

    2015-12-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, first described in 1977, is a rare autosomal dominant condition that commonly presents with skin lesions, including fibrofolliculomas and trichodiscomas; pulmonary cysts; spontaneous pneumothoraces; and renal cancer. We present the only known cases of intracranial vascular pathologies in patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome. We present three cases (three female; age range 18-50) of intracranial vascular lesions in Birt-Hogg-Dubé patients, including two aneurysms and one arteriovenous malformation, and review one previously reported case of carotid aplasia. Due to the rarity of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome and significant variations in its clinical presentation, it is difficult to assess whether or not Birt-Hogg-Dubé patients are predisposed to intracranial vascular pathologies. We hypothesize that increased transcription of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha, resulting from a mutated form of the protein folliculin transcribed by the Birt-Hogg-Dubé gene, may be associated with vascular pathogenesis in Birt-Hogg-Dubé patients and thus provide a possible molecular basis for a link between these two conditions.

  6. Genetics of Proteasome Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2013-01-01

    The proteasome is a large, multiple subunit complex that is capable of degrading most intracellular proteins. Polymorphisms in proteasome subunits are associated with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurological diseases, and cancer. One polymorphism in the proteasome gene PSMA6 (−8C/G) is associated with three different diseases: type 2 diabetes, myocardial infarction, and coronary artery disease. One type of proteasome, the immunoproteasome, which contains inducible catalytic subunits, is adapted to generate peptides for antigen presentation. It has recently been shown that mutations and polymorphisms in the immunoproteasome catalytic subunit PSMB8 are associated with several inflammatory and autoinflammatory diseases including Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, CANDLE syndrome, and intestinal M. tuberculosis infection. This comprehensive review describes the disease-related polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with human diseases and the physiological modulation of proteasome function by these polymorphisms. Given the large number of subunits and the central importance of the proteasome in human physiology as well as the fast pace of detection of proteasome polymorphisms associated with human diseases, it is likely that other polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with diseases will be detected in the near future. While disease-associated polymorphisms are now readily discovered, the challenge will be to use this genetic information for clinical benefit. PMID:24490108

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nickerson ML, Weirich G, Matrosova V, Toro JR, Turner ML, Duray P, Merino M, Hewitt S, Pavlovich CP, Glenn G, Greenberg CR, Linehan WM, Zbar B. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, a genodermatosis associated with spontaneous pneumothorax and kidney ...

  8. The proteasome assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Madura, Kiran

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of the proteasome — the cellular machine that eliminates unwanted proteins — is a carefully choreographed affair, involving a complex sequence of steps overseen by dedicated protein chaperones. PMID:19516331

  9. Inhibition of Proteasome Activity Induces Formation of Alternative Proteasome Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Welk, Vanessa; Coux, Olivier; Kleene, Vera; Abeza, Claire; Trümbach, Dietrich; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is an intracellular protease complex consisting of the 20S catalytic core and its associated regulators, including the 19S complex, PA28αβ, PA28γ, PA200, and PI31. Inhibition of the proteasome induces autoregulatory de novo formation of 20S and 26S proteasome complexes. Formation of alternative proteasome complexes, however, has not been investigated so far. We here show that catalytic proteasome inhibition results in fast recruitment of PA28γ and PA200 to 20S and 26S proteasomes within 2–6 h. Rapid formation of alternative proteasome complexes did not involve transcriptional activation of PA28γ and PA200 but rather recruitment of preexisting activators to 20S and 26S proteasome complexes. Recruitment of proteasomal activators depended on the extent of active site inhibition of the proteasome with inhibition of β5 active sites being sufficient for inducing recruitment. Moreover, specific inhibition of 26S proteasome activity via siRNA-mediated knockdown of the 19S subunit RPN6 induced recruitment of only PA200 to 20S proteasomes, whereas PA28γ was not mobilized. Here, formation of alternative PA200 complexes involved transcriptional activation of the activator. Alternative proteasome complexes persisted when cells had regained proteasome activity after pulse exposure to proteasome inhibitors. Knockdown of PA28γ sensitized cells to proteasome inhibitor-mediated growth arrest. Thus, formation of alternative proteasome complexes appears to be a formerly unrecognized but integral part of the cellular response to impaired proteasome function and altered proteostasis. PMID:27129254

  10. Repurposing an antidandruff agent to treating cancer: zinc pyrithione inhibits tumor growth via targeting proteasome-associated deubiquitinases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chong; Chen, Xin; Yang, Changshan; Zang, Dan; Lan, Xiaoying; Liao, Siyan; Zhang, Peiquan; Wu, Jinjie; Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Ningning; Liao, Yuning; Huang, Hongbiao; Shi, Xianping; Jiang, Lili; Liu, Xiuhua; Dou, Q Ping; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2017-01-10

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a central role in various cellular processes through selectively degrading proteins involved in critical cellular functions. Targeting UPS has been validated as a novel strategy for treating human cancer, as inhibitors of the 20S proteasome catalytic activity are currently in clinical use for treatment of multiple myeloma and other cancers, and the deubiquitinase activity associated with the proteasome is also a valid target for anticancer agents. Recent studies suggested that zinc pyrithione, an FDA-approved antidandruff agent, may have antitumor activity, but the detailed molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report that zinc pyrithione (ZnPT) targets the proteasome-associated DUBs (USP14 and UCHL5) and inhibits their activities, resulting in a rapid accumulation of protein-ubiquitin conjugates, but without inhibiting the proteolytic activities of 20S proteasomes. Furthermore, ZnPT exhibits cytotoxic effects against various cancer cell lines in vitro, selectively kills bone marrow cells from leukemia patients ex vivo, and efficiently inhibits the growth of lung adenocarcinoma cancer cell xenografts in nude mice. This study has identified zinc pyrithione, an FDA-approved pharmacological agent with potential antitumor properties as a proteasomal DUB inhibitor.

  11. A Mutation in a Novel Yeast Proteasomal Gene, RPN11/MPR1, Produces a Cell Cycle Arrest, Overreplication of Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA, and an Altered Mitochondrial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Teresa; Ricci, Carlo; Porro, Danilo; Bolotin-Fukuhara, Monique; Frontali, Laura

    1998-01-01

    We report here the functional characterization of an essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, MPR1, coding for a regulatory proteasomal subunit for which the name Rpn11p has been proposed. For this study we made use of the mpr1-1 mutation that causes the following pleiotropic defects. At 24°C growth is delayed on glucose and impaired on glycerol, whereas no growth is seen at 36°C on either carbon source. Microscopic observation of cells growing on glucose at 24°C shows that most of them bear a large bud, whereas mitochondrial morphology is profoundly altered. A shift to the nonpermissive temperature produces aberrant elongated cell morphologies, whereas the nucleus fails to divide. Flow cytometry profiles after the shift to the nonpermissive temperature indicate overreplication of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Consistently with the identification of Mpr1p with a proteasomal subunit, the mutation is complemented by the human POH1 proteasomal gene. Moreover, the mpr1-1 mutant grown to stationary phase accumulates ubiquitinated proteins. Localization of the Rpn11p/Mpr1p protein has been studied by green fluorescent protein fusion, and the fusion protein has been found to be mainly associated to cytoplasmic structures. For the first time, a proteasomal mutation has also revealed an associated mitochondrial phenotype. We actually showed, by the use of [rho°] cells derived from the mutant, that the increase in DNA content per cell is due in part to an increase in the amount of mitochondrial DNA. Moreover, microscopy of mpr1-1 cells grown on glucose showed that multiple punctate mitochondrial structures were present in place of the tubular network found in the wild-type strain. These data strongly suggest that mpr1-1 is a valuable tool with which to study the possible roles of proteasomal function in mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:9763452

  12. Dub3 expression correlates with tumor progression and poor prognosis in human epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Shu, Bin; Xi, Tao; Su, Ning; Liu, Jing

    2015-03-01

    Dub3 is a deubiquitinating enzyme. It is highly expressed in tumor-derived cell lines and has an established role in tumor proliferation. However, the role of Dub3 in human ovarian cancer remains unclear. Expression of Dub3 was evaluated in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. The relationship between Dub3 expression and clinicopathological characteristics was analyzed. Using RNA interference, the effects of Dub3 on cell proliferation and apoptosis were investigated in ovarian cancer cell line. All normal ovary tissues exhibited very little or no Dub3 immunoreactivity. High levels of Dub3 expression were examined by immunohistochemical analysis in 13.3% of cystadenomas, in 30.0% of borderline tumors, and in 58.9% of ovarian carcinomas, respectively. Dub3 expression was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and clinical staging (P<0.05). Multivariate survival analysis indicated that Dub3 expression was an independent prognostic indicator of the survival of patients with ovarian cancer. Furthermore, the expression of Cdc25A was closely correlated with that of Dub3 in cancer cells and tissues. Knockdown of Dub3 could inhibit the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells and increase cell apoptosis. These data indicate that the Dub3 might be a valuable biomarker for the prediction of ovarian cancer prognosis and Dub3 inhibition might be a potential strategy for ovarian cancer treatment.

  13. Screening of DUB activity and specificity by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ritorto, Maria Stella; Ewan, Richard; Perez-Oliva, Ana B.; Knebel, Axel; Buhrlage, Sara J.; Wightman, Melanie; Kelly, Sharon M.; Wood, Nicola T.; Virdee, Satpal; Gray, Nathanael S.; Morrice, Nicholas A.; Alessi, Dario R.; Trost, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Deubiquitylases (DUBs) are key regulators of the ubiquitin system which cleave ubiquitin moieties from proteins and polyubiquitin chains. Several DUBs have been implicated in various diseases and are attractive drug targets. We have developed a sensitive and fast assay to quantify in vitro DUB enzyme activity using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Unlike other current assays, this method uses unmodified substrates, such as diubiquitin topoisomers. By analysing 42 human DUBs against all diubiquitin topoisomers we provide an extensive characterization of DUB activity and specificity. Our results confirm the high specificity of many members of the OTU and JAB/MPN/Mov34 metalloenzyme DUB families and highlight that all USPs tested display low linkage selectivity. We also demonstrate that this assay can be deployed to assess the potency and specificity of DUB inhibitors by profiling 11 compounds against a panel of 32 DUBs. PMID:25159004

  14. Ubiquitin recognition by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Yasushi

    2017-02-01

    The 26S proteasome is a 2.5-MDa complex responsible for the selective, ATP-dependent degradation of ubiquitylated proteins in eukaryotic cells. Substrates in hundreds cellular pathways are timely ubiquitylated and converged to the proteasome by direct recognition or by multiple shuttle factors. Engagement of substrate protein triggers conformational changes of the proteasome, which drive substrate unfolding, deubiquitylation and translocation of substrates to proteolytic sites. Recent studies have challenged the previous paradigm that Lys48-linked tetraubiquitin is a minimal degradation signal: in addition, monoubiquitylation or multiple short ubiquitylations can serve as the targeting signal for proteasomal degradation. In this review, I highlight recent advances in our understanding of the proteasome structure, the ubiquitin topology in proteasome targeting, and the cellular factors that regulate proteasomal degradation. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Yeast Deubiquitinase Ubp3 Interacts with the 26 S Proteasome to Facilitate Rad4 Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Peng; Smerdon, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) function in a variety of cellular processes by removing ubiquitin moieties from substrates, but their role in DNA repair has not been elucidated. Yeast Rad4-Rad23 heterodimer is responsible for recognizing DNA damage in nucleotide excision repair (NER). Rad4 binds to UV damage directly while Rad23 stabilizes Rad4 from proteasomal degradation. Here, we show that disruption of yeast deubiquitinase UBP3 leads to enhanced UV resistance, increased repair of UV damage and Rad4 levels in rad23Δ cells, and elevated Rad4 stability. A catalytically inactive Ubp3 (Ubp3-C469A), however, is unable to affect NER or Rad4. Consistent with its role in down-regulating Rad4, Ubp3 physically interacts with Rad4 and the proteasome, both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that Ubp3 associates with the proteasome to facilitate Rad4 degradation and thus suppresses NER. PMID:20876584

  16. Dub3 controls DNA damage signalling by direct deubiquitination of H2AX.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Díaz, M Rocío; Martín, Yusé; Berg, Anna; Freire, Raimundo; Smits, Veronique A J

    2014-07-01

    A crucial event in the DNA damage response is the phosphorylation and subsequent ubiquitination of H2AX, required for the recruitment of proteins involved in DNA repair. Here we identify a novel regulator of this process, the ubiquitin hydrolase Dub3. Overexpression of wild type, but not catalytic inactive, Dub3 decreases the DNA damage-induced mono-ubiquitination of H2A(X) whereas downregulation of Dub3 has the opposite effect. Dub3 overexpression abrogates focus formation of 53BP1 and BRCA1 in response to genotoxic stress. However, focus formation of MDC1 and γH2AX, earlier events in this response, are unaffected by Dub3 overexpression. We show that Dub3 counteracts H2AX E3 ligases RNF8 and RNF168. Moreover, Dub3 and H2AX interact and Dub3 deubiquitinates H2AX in vitro. Importantly, overexpression of Dub3 delays H2AX dephosphorylation and recovery of MDC1 focus formation at later time points after DNA damage, whereas H2AX dephosphorylation at later time points is faster after Dub3 depletion. Altogether these results show that Dub3 regulates a correct DNA damage response by controlling H2AX ubiquitination.

  17. Dub3 inhibition suppresses breast cancer invasion and metastasis by promoting Snail1 degradation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yadi; Wang, Yu; Lin, Yiwei; Liu, Yajuan; Wang, Yifan; Jia, Jianhang; Singh, Puja; Chi, Young-In; Wang, Chi; Dong, Chenfang; Li, Wei; Tao, Min; Napier, Dana; Shi, Qiuying; Deng, Jiong; Mark Evers, B; Zhou, Binhua P

    2017-02-15

    Snail1, a key transcription factor of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), is subjected to ubiquitination and degradation, but the mechanism by which Snail1 is stabilized in tumours remains unclear. We identify Dub3 as a bona fide Snail1 deubiquitinase, which interacts with and stabilizes Snail1. Dub3 is overexpressed in breast cancer; knockdown of Dub3 resulted in Snail1 destabilization, suppressed EMT and decreased tumour cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. These effects are rescued by ectopic Snail1 expression. IL-6 also stabilizes Snail1 by inducing Dub3 expression, the specific inhibitor WP1130 binds to Dub3 and inhibits the Dub3-mediating Snail1 stabilization in vitro and in vivo. Our study reveals a critical Dub3-Snail1 signalling axis in EMT and metastasis, and provides an effective therapeutic approach against breast cancer.

  18. Dub3 inhibition suppresses breast cancer invasion and metastasis by promoting Snail1 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yadi; Wang, Yu; Lin, Yiwei; Liu, Yajuan; Wang, Yifan; Jia, Jianhang; Singh, Puja; Chi, Young-In; Wang, Chi; Dong, Chenfang; Li, Wei; Tao, Min; Napier, Dana; Shi, Qiuying; Deng, Jiong; Mark Evers, B; Zhou, Binhua P.

    2017-01-01

    Snail1, a key transcription factor of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), is subjected to ubiquitination and degradation, but the mechanism by which Snail1 is stabilized in tumours remains unclear. We identify Dub3 as a bona fide Snail1 deubiquitinase, which interacts with and stabilizes Snail1. Dub3 is overexpressed in breast cancer; knockdown of Dub3 resulted in Snail1 destabilization, suppressed EMT and decreased tumour cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. These effects are rescued by ectopic Snail1 expression. IL-6 also stabilizes Snail1 by inducing Dub3 expression, the specific inhibitor WP1130 binds to Dub3 and inhibits the Dub3-mediating Snail1 stabilization in vitro and in vivo. Our study reveals a critical Dub3–Snail1 signalling axis in EMT and metastasis, and provides an effective therapeutic approach against breast cancer. PMID:28198361

  19. [Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: an update].

    PubMed

    López, V; Jordá, E; Monteagudo, C

    2012-04-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis that is characterized by the presence of fibrofolliculomas and/or trichodiscomas, pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, and renal tumors. The most common histological types found in renal tumors from patients with the syndrome are oncocytoma-chromophobe carcinoma hybrids and pure forms of chromophobe carcinoma, oncocytic carcinoma, and clear cell or papillary cell carcinoma. The syndrome is linked to mutations in the FLCN gene, which encodes folliculin and is preferentially expressed in the skin, kidney, and lung. The syndrome can exhibit a high degree of clinical variability, and the skin lesions that are a warning sign for dermatologists may be absent in up to 70% of cases. Consequently, although skin lesions and mutations in FLCN are the main diagnostic criteria for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, a diagnosis can be made based on noncutaneous manifestations, with or without known family history of the syndrome, even in the absence of histological confirmation of fibrofolliculomas or trichodiscomas.

  20. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway and Proteasome Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jayhyuk; Kim, Kyung Bo

    2008-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has emerged as a central player in the regulation of several diverse cellular processes. Here, we describe the important components of this complex biochemical machinery as well as several important cellular substrates targeted by this pathway and examples of human diseases resulting from defects in various components of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In addition, this review covers the chemistry of synthetic and natural proteasome inhibitors, emphasizing their mode of actions toward the 20S proteasome. Given the importance of proteasome-mediated protein degradation in various intracellular processes, inhibitors of this pathway will continue to serve as both molecular probes of major cellular networks as well as potential therapeutic agents for various human diseases. PMID:11410931

  1. Identification of 4-arylidene curcumin analogues as novel proteasome inhibitors for potential anticancer agents targeting 19S regulatory particle associated deubiquitinase.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xin; Zuo, Yinglin; Ke, Hongpeng; Luo, Jiaming; Lou, Lanlan; Qin, Wenjing; Wang, Youqiao; Liu, Ziyi; Chen, Daoyuan; Sun, Haixia; Zheng, Weichao; Zhu, Cuige; Wang, Ruimin; Wen, Gesi; Du, Jun; Zhou, Binhua; Bu, Xianzhang

    2017-08-01

    The proteasomal 19S regulatory particle (RP) associated deubiquitinases (DUBs) have attracted much attention owing to their potential as a therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Identification of new entities against 19S RP associated DUBs and illustration of the underlying mechanisms is crucial for discovery of novel proteasome blockers. In this study, a series of 4-arylidene curcumin analogues were identified as potent proteasome inhibitor by preferentially blocking deubiquitinase function of proteasomal 19S RP with moderate 20S CP inhibition. The most active compound 33 exhibited a major inhibitory effect on 19S RP-associated ubiquitin-specific proteases 14, along with a minor effect on ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 5, which resulted in dysfunction of proteasome, and subsequently accumulated ubiquitinated proteins (such as IκB) in several cancer cells. Remarkably, though both 19S RP and 20S CP inhibition induced significantly endoplasmic reticulum stress and triggered caspase-12/9 pathway activation to promote cancer cell apoptosis, the 19S RP inhibition by 33 avoided slow onset time, Bcl-2 overexpression, and PERK-phosphorylation, which contribute to the deficiencies of clinical drug Bortezomib. These systematic studies provided insights in the development of novel proteasome inhibitors for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ubiquitinated Proteins Activate the Proteasomal ATPases by Binding to Usp14 or Uch37 Homologs*

    PubMed Central

    Peth, Andreas; Kukushkin, Nikolay; Bossé, Marc; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of ubiquitinated proteins by 26 S proteasomes requires ATP hydrolysis, but it is unclear how the proteasomal ATPases are regulated and how proteolysis, substrate deubiquitination, degradation, and ATP hydrolysis are coordinated. Polyubiquitinated proteins were shown to stimulate ATP hydrolysis by purified proteasomes, but only if the proteins contain a loosely folded domain. If they were not ubiquitinated, such proteins did not increase ATPase activity. However, they did so upon addition of ubiquitin aldehyde, which mimics the ubiquitin chain and binds to 26 S-associated deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs): in yeast to Ubp6, which is essential for the ATPase activation, and in mammalian 26 S to the Ubp6 homolog, Usp14, and Uch37. Occupancy of either DUB by a ubiquitin conjugate leads to ATPase stimulation, thereby coupling deubiquitination and ATP hydrolysis. Thus, ubiquitinated loosely folded proteins, after becoming bound to the 26 S, interact with Ubp6/Usp14 or Uch37 to activate ATP hydrolysis and enhance their own destruction. PMID:23341450

  3. A Degenerate Cohort of Yeast Membrane Trafficking DUBs Mediates Cell Polarity and Survival*

    PubMed Central

    Beckley, Janel R.; Chen, Jun-Song; Yang, Yanling; Peng, Junmin; Gould, Kathleen L.

    2015-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), cysteine or metallo- proteases that cleave ubiquitin chains or protein conjugates, are present in nearly every cellular compartment, with overlapping protein domain structure, localization, and functions. We discovered a cohort of DUBs that are involved in membrane trafficking (ubp4, ubp5, ubp9, ubp15, and sst2) and found that loss of all five of these DUBs but not loss of any combination of four, significantly impacted cell viability in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (1). Here, we delineate the collective and individual functions and activities of these five conserved DUBs using comparative proteomics, biochemistry, and microscopy. We find these five DUBs are degenerate rather than redundant at the levels of cell morphology, substrate selectivity, ubiquitin chain specificity, and cell viability under stress. These studies reveal the complexity of interplay among these enzymes, providing a foundation for understanding DUB biology and providing another example of how cells utilize degeneracy to improve survival. PMID:26412298

  4. Cystic lung disease in birt-hogg-dubé syndrome: a case series of three patients.

    PubMed

    Kilincer, Abidin; Ariyurek, Orhan Macit; Karabulut, Nevzat

    2014-06-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is characterized by clinical manifestations such as hamartomas of the skin, renal tumors and lung cysts with spontaneous pneumothoraces. Patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome may present with only multiple lung cysts. We report the chest computerized tomography (CT) features of three patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome. Each patient had multiple lung cysts of various sizes according to chest CT evaluation, most of which were located in lower lobes and related to pleura. The identification of unique characteristics in the chest CT of patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome may provide an efficient mechanism for diagnosis.

  5. Proteasomal and Autophagic Degradation Systems.

    PubMed

    Dikic, Ivan

    2017-06-20

    Autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome system are the two major quality control pathways responsible for cellular homeostasis. As such, they provide protection against age-associated changes and a plethora of human diseases. Ubiquitination is utilized as a degradation signal by both systems, albeit in different ways, to mark cargoes for proteasomal and lysosomal degradation. Both systems intersect and communicate at multiple points to coordinate their actions in proteostasis and organelle homeostasis. This review summarizes molecular details of how proteasome and autophagy pathways are functionally interconnected in cells and indicates common principles and nodes of communication that can be therapeutically exploited.

  6. Proteasomes: Isolation and Activity Assays

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanjie; Tomko, Robert J.; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, damaged or unneeded proteins are typically degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. In this system, the protein substrate is often first covalently modified with a chain of ubiquitin polypeptides. This chain serves as a signal for delivery to the 26S proteasome, a 2.5 MDa, ATP-dependent multisubunit protease complex. The proteasome consists of a barrel-shaped 20S core particle (CP) that is capped on one or both of its ends by a 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP is responsible for recognizing the substrate, unfolding it, and translocating it into the CP for destruction. Here we describe simple, one-step purifications scheme for isolating the 26S proteasome and its 19S RP and 20S CP subcomplexes from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as assays for measuring ubiquitin-dependent and ubiquitin-independent proteolytic activity in vitro. PMID:26061243

  7. "They Don't Speak Proper English": A New Look at the Dubbing and Subtitling Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilborn, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Compares dubbing and subtitling as alternative language conversion methods for audiovisual media. European television experiences are reviewed and the two methods are contrasted economically, technically, aesthetically, and in terms of audience response. The development of dubbing and subtitling traditions in various countries is also explored and…

  8. Proteasome inhibitor patents (2010 - present).

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Rainer; Scott, Latanya M; Daniel, Kenyon G; Dou, Q Ping

    2014-04-01

    Over the past 3 years, numerous patents and patent applications have been submitted and published involving compounds designed to inhibit the proteasome. Proteasome inhibition has been of great interest in cancer research since disruption of proteolysis leads to a significant buildup of cytotoxic proteins and activation of apoptotic pathways, particularly in rapidly proliferating cells. The current standards in proteasome inhibition are the only FDA-approved inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib. Although these drugs are quite effective in treating multiple myeloma and other blood tumors, there are shortcomings, including toxicities and resistance. Most of the current patents attempt to improve on existing compounds, by increasing bioavailability and selectivity, while attempting to reduce toxicity. A general categorization of similar compounds was employed to evaluate and compare drug design strategies. This review focuses on novel compounds and subsequent analogs developed for proteasome inhibition, used in preventing and treating human cancers. A comprehensive description and categorization of patents related to each type of compound and its derivatives, as well as their uses and efficacies as anticancer agents is included. A review of combination therapy patents has also been included. Although there are many diverse chemical scaffolds being published, there are few patented proteasome inhibitors whose method of inhibition is genuinely novel. Most patents utilize a destructive chemical warhead to attack the catalytic threonine residue of the proteasome active sites. Few patents try to depart from this, emphasizing the need for developing new mechanisms of action and specific targeting.

  9. Proteasome Activation by Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Leestemaker, Yves; de Jong, Annemieke; Witting, Katharina F; Penning, Renske; Schuurman, Karianne; Rodenko, Boris; Zaal, Esther A; van de Kooij, Bert; Laufer, Stefan; Heck, Albert J R; Borst, Jannie; Scheper, Wiep; Berkers, Celia R; Ovaa, Huib

    2017-06-22

    Drugs that increase 26S proteasome activity have potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. A chemical genetics screen of over 2,750 compounds using a proteasome activity probe as a readout in a high-throughput live-cell fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based assay revealed more than ten compounds that increase proteasome activity, with the p38 MAPK inhibitor PD169316 being one of the most potent ones. Genetic and chemical inhibition of either p38 MAPK, its upstream regulators, ASK1 and MKK6, and downstream target, MK2, enhance proteasome activity. Chemical activation of the 26S proteasome increases PROTAC-mediated and ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation and decreases the levels of both overexpressed and endogenous α-synuclein, without affecting the overall protein turnover. In addition, survival of cells overexpressing toxic α-synuclein assemblies is increased in the presence of p38 MAPK inhibitors. These findings highlight the potential of activation of 26S proteasome activity and that this can be achieved through multiple mechanisms by distinct molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The capture proteasome assay (CAPA) to evaluate subtype-specific proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vigneron, Nathalie; Abi Habib, Joanna; Van den Eynde, Benoît J

    2015-09-01

    We recently developed a new assay to measure proteasome activity in vitro (CAPA for capture proteasome assay) [1], based on proteasome capture on an antibody-coated plate. When used with lysates originating from cells expressing either standard proteasome, immunoproteasome or intermediate proteasomes β5i or β1i-β5i, this assay allows the individual monitoring of the chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like and caspase-like activities of the corresponding proteasome subtypes. The efficiency and specificity of four proteasome inhibitors were studied using the CAPA assay, demonstrating the potential of this assay for the development of subtype-specific proteasome inhibitors.

  11. The murine DUB-1 gene is specifically induced by the betac subunit of interleukin-3 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Y; Pless, M; Inhorn, R; Mathey-Prevot, B; D'Andrea, A D

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines regulate cell growth and differentiation by inducing the expression of specific target genes. We have recently isolated a cytokine-inducible, immediate-early cDNA, DUB-1, that encodes a deubiquitinating enzyme. The DUB-1 mRNA was specifically induced by the receptors for interleukin-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and interleukin-5, suggesting a role for the beta common (betac subunit known to be shared by these receptors. In order to identify the mechanism of cytokine induction, we isolated a murine genomic clone for DUB-1 containing a functional promoter region. The DUB-1 gene contains two exons, and the nucleotide sequence of its coding region is identical to the sequence of DUB-1 cDNA. Various regions of the 5' flanking region of the DUB-1 gene were assayed for cytokine-inducible activity. An enhancer region that retains the beta c-specific inducible activity of the DUB-1 gene was identified. Enhancer activity was localized to a 112-bp fragment located 1.4 kb upstream from the ATG start codon. Gel mobility shift assays revealed two specific protein complexes that bound to this minimal enhancer region. One complex was induced by betac signaling, while the other was noninducible. Finally, the membrane-proximal region of human betac was required for DUB-1 induction. In conclusion, DUB-1 is the first example of an immediate-early gene that is induced by a specific subunit of a cytokine receptor. Further analysis of the DUB-1 enhancer element may reveal specific determinants of a betac-specific signaling pathway. PMID:8756639

  12. JAK2 is required for induction of the murine DUB-1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Jaster, R; Zhu, Y; Pless, M; Bhattacharya, S; Mathey-Prevot, B; D'Andrea, A D

    1997-01-01

    Cytokine receptors activate multiple signal transduction pathways, resulting in the induction of specific target genes. We have recently identified a hematopoietic cell-specific immediate-early gene, DUB-1, that encodes a growth-regulatory deubiquitinating enzyme. The DUB-1 gene contains a 112-bp enhancer element that is specifically induced by the beta c subunit of the interleukin-3 (IL-3) receptor. To investigate the mechanism of DUB-1 induction, we examined the effects of dominant-negative forms of JAK kinases, STAT transcription factors, and Raf-1 in transient transfection assays. In Ba/F3 cells, IL-3 induced a dose-dependent activation of DUB-1-luciferase (luc) and GAS-luc reporter constructs. A dominant-negative form of JAK2 (truncated at amino acid 829) inhibited the induction of DUB-1-luc and GAS-luc by IL-3. A dominant-negative form of STAT5 (truncated at amino acid 650) inhibited the induction of GAS-luc but not DUB-1-luc. A dominant-negative form of Raf-1 inhibited the induction of DUB-1-luc but had no effect on the induction of GAS-luc by IL-3. The requirement for JAK2 in the stimulation of the DUB-1 enhancer was further supported by the suppression of DUB-1 induction in Ba/F3 cells stably expressing the dominant-negative JAK2 polypeptide. We hypothesize that IL-3 activates a JAK2/Raf-1 signaling pathway that is required for DUB-1 induction and is independent of STAT5. PMID:9154835

  13. Measuring activity in the ubiquitin-proteasome system: From large scale discoveries to single cells analysis

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Adam T.; Woss, Gregery S.; Park, Jessica H.; Waters, Marcey L.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is the primary pathway responsible for the recognition and degradation of misfolded, damaged, or tightly regulated proteins in addition to performing essential roles in DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, cell migration, and the immune response. While traditional biochemical techniques have proven useful in the identification of key proteins involved in this pathway, the implementation of novel reporters responsible for measuring enzymatic activity of the UPS have provided valuable insight into the effectiveness of therapeutics and role of the UPS in various human diseases such as multiple myeloma and Huntington’s disease. These reporters, usually consisting of a recognition sequences fused to an analytical handle, are designed to specifically evaluate enzymatic activity of certain members of the UPS including the proteasome, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs). This review highlights the more commonly used reporters employed in a variety of scenarios ranging from high-throughput screening of novel inhibitors to single cell microscopy techniques measuring E3 ligase or proteasome activity. Finally, recent work is presented highlighting the development of novel degron-based substrate designed to overcome the limitations of current reporting techniques in measuring E3 ligase and proteasome activity in patient samples. PMID:23686610

  14. Novel strategies to target the ubiquitin proteasome system in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Lub, Susanne; Maes, Ken; Menu, Eline; De Bruyne, Elke; Vanderkerken, Karin; Van Valckenborgh, Els

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy characterized by the accumulation of plasma cells in the bone marrow (BM). The success of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in the treatment of MM highlights the importance of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) in this particular cancer. Despite the prolonged survival of MM patients, a significant amount of patients relapse or become resistant to therapy. This underlines the importance of the development and investigation of novel targets to improve MM therapy. The UPS plays an important role in different cellular processes by targeted destruction of proteins. The ubiquitination process consists of enzymes that transfer ubiquitin to proteins targeting them for proteasomal degradation. An emerging and promising approach is to target more disease specific components of the UPS to reduce side effects and overcome resistance. In this review, we will focus on different components of the UPS such as the ubiquitin activating enzyme E1, the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme E2, the E3 ubiquitin ligases, the deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) and the proteasome. We will discuss their role in MM and the implications in drug discovery for the treatment of MM. PMID:26695547

  15. Reversible phosphorylation of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xing; Huang, Xiuliang; Chen, Mark J

    2017-04-01

    The 26S proteasome at the center of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is essential for virtually all cellular processes of eukaryotes. A common misconception about the proteasome is that, once made, it remains as a static and uniform complex with spontaneous and constitutive activity for protein degradation. Recent discoveries have provided compelling evidence to support the exact opposite insomuch as the 26S proteasome undergoes dynamic and reversible phosphorylation under a variety of physiopathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the history and current understanding of proteasome phosphorylation, and advocate the idea of targeting proteasome kinases/phosphatases as a new strategy for clinical interventions of several human diseases.

  16. A Colliding Galaxy Dubbed the 'Tadpole' (UGC 10214)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This picture of the galaxy UGC 10214 was was taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), which was installed aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in March 2002 during HST Servicing Mission 3B (STS-109 mission). Dubbed the 'Tadpole,' this spiral galaxy is unlike the textbook images of stately galaxies. Its distorted shape was caused by a small interloper, a very blue, compact galaxy visible in the upper left corner of the more massive Tadpole. The Tadpole resides about 420 million light-years away in the constellation Draco. Seen shining through the Tadpole's disk, the tiny intruder is likely a hit-and-run galaxy that is now leaving the scene of the accident. Strong gravitational forces from the interaction created the long tail of debris, consisting of stars and gas that stretch our more than 280,000 light-years. The galactic carnage and torrent of star birth are playing out against a spectacular backdrop: a 'wallpaper pattern' of 6,000 galaxies. These galaxies represent twice the number of those discovered in the legendary Hubble Deep Field, the orbiting observatory's 'deepest' view of the heavens, taken in 1995 by the Wide Field and planetary camera 2. The ACS picture, however, was taken in one-twelfth of the time it took to observe the original HST Deep Field. In blue light, ACS sees even fainter objects than were seen in the 'deep field.' The galaxies in the ACS picture, like those in the deep field, stretch back to nearly the begirning of time. Credit: NASA, H. Ford (JHU), G. Illingworth (USCS/LO), M. Clampin (STScI), G. Hartig (STScI), the ACS Science Team, and ESA.

  17. Role of proteasomes in disease

    PubMed Central

    Dahlmann, Burkhardt

    2007-01-01

    A functional ubiquitin proteasome system is essential for all eukaryotic cells and therefore any alteration to its components has potential pathological consequences. Though the exact underlying mechanism is unclear, an age-related decrease in proteasome activity weakens cellular capacity to remove oxidatively modified proteins and favours the development of neurodegenerative and cardiac diseases. Up-regulation of proteasome activity is characteristic of muscle wasting conditions including sepsis, cachexia and uraemia, but may not be rate limiting. Meanwhile, enhanced presence of immunoproteasomes in aging brain and muscle tissue could reflect a persistent inflammatory defence and anti-stress mechanism, whereas in cancer cells, their down-regulation reflects a means by which to escape immune surveillance. Hence, induction of apoptosis by synthetic proteasome inhibitors is a potential treatment strategy for cancer, whereas for other diseases such as neurodegeneration, the use of proteasome-activating or -modulating compounds could be more effective. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; ). PMID:18047740

  18. Dubbing Projects for the Language Learner: A Framework for Integrating Audiovisual Translation into Task-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danan, Martine

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a series of exploratory L1 to L2 dubbing projects for which students translated and used editing software to dub short American film and TV clips into their target language. Translating and dubbing into the target language involve students in multifaceted, high-level language production tasks that lead to enhanced vocabulary…

  19. Dubbing Projects for the Language Learner: A Framework for Integrating Audiovisual Translation into Task-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danan, Martine

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a series of exploratory L1 to L2 dubbing projects for which students translated and used editing software to dub short American film and TV clips into their target language. Translating and dubbing into the target language involve students in multifaceted, high-level language production tasks that lead to enhanced vocabulary…

  20. Functions of the Proteasome on Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Tyler S.; Tansey, William P.

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome is a large self-compartmentalized protease complex that recognizes, unfolds, and destroys ubiquitylated substrates. Proteasome activities are required for a host of cellular functions, and it has become clear in recent years that one set of critical actions of the proteasome occur on chromatin. In this review, we discuss some of the ways in which proteasomes directly regulate the structure and function of chromatin and chromatin regulatory proteins, and how this influences gene transcription. We discuss lingering controversies in the field, the relative importance of proteolytic versus non-proteolytic proteasome activities in this process, and highlight areas that require further investigation. Our intention is to show that proteasomes are involved in major steps controlling the expression of the genetic information, that proteasomes use both proteolytic mechanisms and ATP-dependent protein remodeling to accomplish this task, and that much is yet to be learned about the full spectrum of ways that proteasomes influence the genome. PMID:25422899

  1. A rare cause of cystic lung disease - Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    PubMed

    Minnis, P; Riddell, P; Keane, M P

    2016-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, initially described in 1977, is an autosomal dominant inherited condition characterised by basal pulmonary cysts often resulting in pneumothorax, renal tumours and cutaneous involvement. Lung cysts have been described in up to 90% of patients with a corresponding risk of pneumothorax of 50 times greater than the normal population. We describe here a case of Birt-Hogg-Dubé diagnosed in the 9th decade of life and discuss the radiological findings and clinical implications.

  2. Targeting Tumor Proteasome with Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huanjie; Liu, Jinbao; Dou, Q. Ping

    2012-01-01

    The proteasome is a multicatalytic protease complex whose activity is required for the growth of normal or tumor cells. It has been shown that human cancer cells are more sensitive to proteasome inhibition than normal cells, indicating that the proteasome could be a target of chemotherapy. Studies suggest that traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is an effective approach for cancer treatment. Here we reviewed several TCMs for their potential in treatment of cancer. This short review focuses mainly on the TCMs that potentially target the tumor cellular proteasome and NF-κB pathway whose activation is dependent on the proteasome activity. PMID:20156140

  3. Development and Characterization of Proteasome Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Bo; Fonseca, Fabiana N.; Crews, Craig M.

    2008-01-01

    Although many proteasome inhibitors have been either synthesized or identified from natural sources, the development of more sophisticated, selective proteasome inhibitors is important for a detailed understanding of proteasome function. We have found that antitumor natural product epoxomicin and eponemycin, both of which are linear peptides containing a α,β-epoxyketone pharmacophore, target proteasome for their antitumor activity. Structural studies of the proteasome–epoxomicin complex revealed that the unique specificity of the natural product toward proteasome is due to the α,β-epoxyketone pharmacophore, which forms an unusual six-membered morpholino ring with the amino terminal catalytic Thr-1 of the 20S proteasome. Thus, we believe that a facile synthetic approach for α,β-epoxyketone linear peptides provides a unique opportunity to develop proteasome inhibitors with novel activities. In this chapter, we discuss the detailed synthetic procedure of the α′,β′-epoxyketone natural product epoxomicin and its derivatives. PMID:16338383

  4. The capture proteasome assay: A method to measure proteasome activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vigneron, Nathalie; Abi Habib, Joanna; Van den Eynde, Benoît J

    2015-08-01

    Because of its crucial role in various cellular processes, the proteasome is the focus of intensive research for the development of proteasome inhibitors to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases. Here, we describe a new and easy assay to measure the different proteasome activities in vitro (chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like) based on proteasome capture on antibody-coated plates, namely the capture proteasome assay (CAPA). Applying the CAPA to lysates from cells expressing standard proteasome, immunoproteasome, or intermediate proteasomes β5i or β1i-β5i, we can monitor the activity of the four proteasome subtypes. The CAPA provided similar results as the standard whole-cell proteasome-Glo assay without the problem of contaminating proteases requiring inhibitors. However, the profile of trypsin-like activity differed between the two assays. This could be partly explained by the presence of MgSO4 in the proteasome-Glo buffer, which inhibits the trypsin-like activity of the proteasome. The CAPA does not need MgSO4 and, therefore, provides a more precise measurement of the trypsin-like activity. The CAPA provides a quick and accurate method to measure proteasome activity in vitro in a very specific manner and should be useful for the development of proteasome inhibitors.

  5. Ubiquitin and Proteasomes in Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Fuqiang; Wenzel, Sabine; Tansey, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of gene transcription is vitally important for the maintenance of normal cellular homeostasis. Failure to correctly regulate gene expression, or to deal with problems that arise during the transcription process, can lead to cellular catastrophe and disease. One of the ways cells cope with the challenges of transcription is by making extensive use of the proteolytic and nonproteolytic activities of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Here, we review recent evidence showing deep mechanistic connections between the transcription and ubiquitin-proteasome systems. Our goal is to leave the reader with a sense that just about every step in transcription—from transcription initiation through to export of mRNA from the nucleus—is influenced by the UPS and that all major arms of the system—from the first step in ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation through to the proteasome—are recruited into transcriptional processes to provide regulation, directionality, and deconstructive power. PMID:22404630

  6. High Dub3 expression in mouse ESCs couples the G1/S checkpoint to pluripotency.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, Siem; Tsanov, Nikolay; Crozet, Carole; Maiorano, Domenico

    2013-11-07

    The molecular mechanism underlying G1/S checkpoint bypass in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains unknown. DNA damage blocks S phase entry by inhibiting the CDK2 kinase through destruction of its activator, the Cdc25A phosphatase. We observed high Cdc25A levels in G1 that persist even after DNA damage in mouse ESCs. We also found higher expression of Dub3, a deubiquitylase that controls Cdc25A protein abundance. Moreover, we demonstrate that the Dub3 gene is a direct target of Esrrb, a key transcription factor of the self-renewal machinery. We show that Dub3 expression is strongly downregulated during neural conversion and precedes Cdc25A destabilization, while forced Dub3 expression in ESCs becomes lethal upon differentiation, concomitant to cell-cycle remodeling and lineage commitment. Finally, knockdown of either Dub3 or Cdc25A induced spontaneous differentiation of ESCs. Altogether, these findings couple the self-renewal machinery to cell-cycle control through a deubiquitylase in ESCs.

  7. CDK4/6-dependent activation of DUB3 regulates cancer metastasis through SNAIL1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongzheng; Yu, Jia; Deng, Min; Yin, Yujiao; Zhang, Haoxing; Luo, Kuntian; Qin, Bo; Li, Yunhui; Wu, Chenming; Ren, Tao; Han, Yang; Yin, Peng; Kim, JungJin; Lee, SeungBaek; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Lizhi; Zhang, Jun; Nowsheen, Somaira; Wang, Liewei; Boughey, Judy; Goetz, Matthew P; Yuan, Jian; Lou, Zhenkun

    2017-01-09

    Tumour metastasis, the spread of cancer cells from the original tumour site followed by growth of secondary tumours at distant organs, is the primary cause of cancer-related deaths and remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that inhibition of CDK4/6 blocks breast tumour metastasis in the triple-negative breast cancer model, without affecting tumour growth. Mechanistically, we identify a deubiquitinase, DUB3, as a target of CDK4/6; CDK4/6-mediated activation of DUB3 is essential to deubiquitinate and stabilize SNAIL1, a key factor promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition and breast cancer metastasis. Overall, our study establishes the CDK4/6-DUB3 axis as an important regulatory mechanism of breast cancer metastasis and provides a rationale for potential therapeutic interventions in the treatment of breast cancer metastasis.

  8. CDK4/6-dependent activation of DUB3 regulates cancer metastasis through SNAIL1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tongzheng; Yu, Jia; Deng, Min; Yin, Yujiao; Zhang, Haoxing; Luo, Kuntian; Qin, Bo; Li, Yunhui; Wu, Chenming; Ren, Tao; Han, Yang; Yin, Peng; Kim, JungJin; Lee, SeungBaek; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Lizhi; Zhang, Jun; Nowsheen, Somaira; Wang, Liewei; Boughey, Judy; Goetz, Matthew P.; Yuan, Jian; Lou, Zhenkun

    2017-01-01

    Tumour metastasis, the spread of cancer cells from the original tumour site followed by growth of secondary tumours at distant organs, is the primary cause of cancer-related deaths and remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that inhibition of CDK4/6 blocks breast tumour metastasis in the triple-negative breast cancer model, without affecting tumour growth. Mechanistically, we identify a deubiquitinase, DUB3, as a target of CDK4/6; CDK4/6-mediated activation of DUB3 is essential to deubiquitinate and stabilize SNAIL1, a key factor promoting epithelial–mesenchymal transition and breast cancer metastasis. Overall, our study establishes the CDK4/6–DUB3 axis as an important regulatory mechanism of breast cancer metastasis and provides a rationale for potential therapeutic interventions in the treatment of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:28067227

  9. Proteasome stress responses in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Renato Graciano; de Magalhães Ornelas, Alice Maria; Morais, Enyara Rezende; de Souza Gomes, Matheus; de Paula Aguiar, Daniela; Magalhães, Lizandra Guidi; Rodrigues, Vanderlei

    2015-05-01

    The proteasome proteolytic system is the major ATP-dependent protease in eukaryotic cells responsible for intracellular protein turnover. Schistosoma mansoni has been reported to contain an ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway, and many studies have suggested a biological role of proteasomes in the development of this parasite. Additionally, evidence has suggested diversity in proteasome composition under several cellular conditions, and this might contribute to the regulation of its function in this parasite. The proteasomal system has been considered important to support the protein homeostasis during cellular stress. In this study, we described in vitro effects of oxidative stress, heat shock, and chemical stress on S. mansoni adults. Our findings showed that chemical stress induced with curcumin, IBMX, and MG132 modified the gene expression of the proteasomal enzymes SmHul5 and SmUbp6. Likewise, the expression of these genes was upregulated during oxidative stress and heat shock. Analyses of the S. mansoni life cycle showed differential gene expression in sporocysts, schistosomulae, and miracidia. These results suggested that proteasome accessory proteins participate in stress response during the parasite development. The expression level of SmHul5 and SmUbp6 was decreased by 16-fold and 9-fold, respectively, by the chemical stress induced with IBMX, which suggests proteasome disassembly. On the other hand, curcumin, MG132, oxidative stress, and heat shock increased the expression of these genes. Furthermore, the gene expression of maturation proteasome protein (SmPOMP) was increased in stress conditions induced by curcumin, MG132, and H₂O₂, which could be related to the synthesis of new proteasomes. S. mansoni adult worms were found to utilize similar mechanisms to respond to different conditions of stress. Our results demonstrated that oxidative stress, heat shock, and chemical stress modified the expression profile of genes related to the ubiquitin-proteasome

  10. Transgenic pig carrying green fluorescent proteasomes.

    PubMed

    Miles, Edward L; O'Gorman, Chad; Zhao, Jianguo; Samuel, Melissa; Walters, Eric; Yi, Young-Joo; Sutovsky, Miriam; Prather, Randall S; Wells, Kevin D; Sutovsky, Peter

    2013-04-16

    Among its many functions, the ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates substrate-specific proteolysis during the cell cycle, apoptosis, and fertilization and in pathologies such as Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and liver cirrhosis. Proteasomes are present in human and boar spermatozoa, but little is known about the interactions of proteasomal subunits with other sperm proteins or structures. We have created a transgenic boar with green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged 20S proteasomal core subunit α-type 1 (PSMA1-GFP), hypothesizing that the PSMA1-GFP fusion protein will be incorporated into functional sperm proteasomes. Using direct epifluorescence imaging and indirect immunofluorescence detection, we have confirmed the presence of PSMA1-GFP in the sperm acrosome. Western blotting revealed a protein band corresponding to the predicted mass of PSMA1-GFP fusion protein (57 kDa) in transgenic spermatozoa. Transgenic boar fertility was confirmed by in vitro fertilization, resulting in transgenic blastocysts, and by mating, resulting in healthy transgenic offspring. Immunoprecipitation and proteomic analysis revealed that PSMA1-GFP copurifies with several acrosomal membrane-associated proteins (e.g., lactadherin/milk fat globule E8 and spermadhesin alanine-tryptophan-asparagine). The interaction of MFGE8 with PSMA1-GFP was confirmed through cross-immunoprecipitation. The identified proteasome-interacting proteins may regulate sperm proteasomal activity during fertilization or may be the substrates of proteasomal proteolysis during fertilization. Proteomic analysis also confirmed the interaction/coimmunoprecipitation of PSMA1-GFP with 13/14 proteasomal core subunits. These results demonstrate that the PSMA1-GFP was incorporated in the assembled sperm proteasomes. This mammal carrying green fluorescent proteasomes will be useful for studies of fertilization and wherever the ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a role in cellular function or pathology.

  11. Transgenic pig carrying green fluorescent proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Edward L.; O’Gorman, Chad; Zhao, Jianguo; Samuel, Melissa; Walters, Eric; Yi, Young-Joo; Prather, Randall S.; Wells, Kevin D.; Sutovsky, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Among its many functions, the ubiquitin–proteasome system regulates substrate-specific proteolysis during the cell cycle, apoptosis, and fertilization and in pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, and liver cirrhosis. Proteasomes are present in human and boar spermatozoa, but little is known about the interactions of proteasomal subunits with other sperm proteins or structures. We have created a transgenic boar with green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged 20S proteasomal core subunit α-type 1 (PSMA1-GFP), hypothesizing that the PSMA1-GFP fusion protein will be incorporated into functional sperm proteasomes. Using direct epifluorescence imaging and indirect immunofluorescence detection, we have confirmed the presence of PSMA1-GFP in the sperm acrosome. Western blotting revealed a protein band corresponding to the predicted mass of PSMA1-GFP fusion protein (57 kDa) in transgenic spermatozoa. Transgenic boar fertility was confirmed by in vitro fertilization, resulting in transgenic blastocysts, and by mating, resulting in healthy transgenic offspring. Immunoprecipitation and proteomic analysis revealed that PSMA1-GFP copurifies with several acrosomal membrane-associated proteins (e.g., lactadherin/milk fat globule E8 and spermadhesin alanine-tryptophan-asparagine). The interaction of MFGE8 with PSMA1-GFP was confirmed through cross-immunoprecipitation. The identified proteasome-interacting proteins may regulate sperm proteasomal activity during fertilization or may be the substrates of proteasomal proteolysis during fertilization. Proteomic analysis also confirmed the interaction/coimmunoprecipitation of PSMA1-GFP with 13/14 proteasomal core subunits. These results demonstrate that the PSMA1-GFP was incorporated in the assembled sperm proteasomes. This mammal carrying green fluorescent proteasomes will be useful for studies of fertilization and wherever the ubiquitin–proteasome system plays a role in cellular function or pathology. PMID:23550158

  12. An evolutionarily conserved pathway controls proteasome homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Adrien; Bertolotti, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is essential for the selective degradation of most cellular proteins but how cells maintain adequate amounts of proteasome is unclear. Here we found an evolutionarily conserved signalling pathway controlling proteasome homeostasis. Central to this pathway is TORC1 whose inhibition induced all known yeast 19S regulatory particle assembly-chaperones (RACs) as well as proteasome subunits. Downstream of TORC1 inhibition, the yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase, Mpk1, ensured that the supply of RACs and proteasome subunits increased under challenging conditions to maintain proteasomal degradation and cell viability. This adaptive pathway was evolutionarily conserved, with mTOR and Erk5 controlling the levels of the four mammalian RACs and proteasome abundance. Thus, the central growth and stress controllers, TORC1 and Mpk1/Erk5, endow cells with a rapid and vital adaptive response to adjust proteasome abundance to the rising needs. Enhancing this pathway may be a useful therapeutic approach for diseases resulting from impaired proteasomal degradation. PMID:27462806

  13. Modeling proteasome dynamics in Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneppen, Kim; Lizana, Ludvig; Jensen, Mogens H.; Pigolotti, Simone; Otzen, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there is evidence that α-synuclein (αSN) aggregation is coupled to dysfunctional or overburdened protein quality control systems, in particular the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here, we develop a simple dynamical model for the on-going conflict between αSN aggregation and the maintenance of a functional proteasome in the healthy cell, based on the premise that proteasomal activity can be titrated out by mature αSN fibrils and their protofilament precursors. In the presence of excess proteasomes the cell easily maintains homeostasis. However, when the ratio between the available proteasome and the αSN protofilaments is reduced below a threshold level, we predict a collapse of homeostasis and onset of oscillations in the proteasome concentration. Depleted proteasome opens for accumulation of oligomers. Our analysis suggests that the onset of PD is associated with a proteasome population that becomes occupied in periodic degradation of aggregates. This behavior is found to be the general state of a proteasome/chaperone system under pressure, and suggests new interpretations of other diseases where protein aggregation could stress elements of the protein quality control system.

  14. Proteasome Modulates Mitochondrial Function During Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Claudio A.; Perez, Viviana I.

    2009-01-01

    Proteasome plays fundamental roles in the removal of oxidized proteins and in the normal degradation of short-lived proteins. Previously we have provided evidences that the impairment in proteasome observed during the replicative senescence of human fibroblasts has significant effects on MAPK signaling, proliferation, life span, senescent phenotype and protein oxidative status. These studies have demonstrated that proteasome inhibition and replicative senescence caused accumulation of intracellular protein carbonyl content. In this study, we have investigated the mechanisms by which proteasome dysfunction modulates protein oxidation during cellular senescence. The results indicate that proteasome inhibition during replicative senescence have significant effects on the intra and extracellular ROS production in vitro. The data also show that ROS impaired the proteasome function, which is partially reversible by antioxidants. Increases in ROS after proteasome inhibition correlated with a significant negative effect on the activity of most mitochondrial electron transporters. We propose that failures in proteasome during cellular senescence lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production and oxidative stress. Furthermore, it is likely that changes in proteasome dynamics could generate a pro-oxidative condition at the immediate extracellular microenvironment that could cause tissue injury during aging, in vivo. PMID:17976388

  15. Molecular shredders: how proteasomes fulfill their role.

    PubMed

    Groll, Michael; Clausen, Tim

    2003-12-01

    The 20S proteasome is a large, cylinder-shaped protease that is found in all domains of life and plays a crucial role in cellular protein turnover. It has multiple catalytic centers located within the hollow cavity of a molecular cage. This architecture prevents unwanted degradation of endogenous proteins and promotes processive degradation of substrates by restricting the dissociation of partially digested polypeptides. Although this kind of self-compartmentalization is generally conserved, the proteasomes of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes show many differences in architecture, subunit composition and regulation. The structure of the 20S proteasome and its inherent role in the regulation of proteasome function are gradually being elucidated.

  16. An evolutionarily conserved pathway controls proteasome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Adrien; Bertolotti, Anne

    2016-08-11

    The proteasome is essential for the selective degradation of most cellular proteins, but how cells maintain adequate amounts of proteasome is unclear. Here we show that there is an evolutionarily conserved signalling pathway controlling proteasome homeostasis. Central to this pathway is TORC1, the inhibition of which induced all known yeast 19S regulatory particle assembly-chaperones (RACs), as well as proteasome subunits. Downstream of TORC1 inhibition, the yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase, Mpk1, acts to increase the supply of RACs and proteasome subunits under challenging conditions in order to maintain proteasomal degradation and cell viability. This adaptive pathway was evolutionarily conserved, with mTOR and ERK5 controlling the levels of the four mammalian RACs and proteasome abundance. Thus, the central growth and stress controllers, TORC1 and Mpk1/ERK5, endow cells with a rapid and vital adaptive response to adjust proteasome abundance in response to the rising needs of cells. Enhancing this pathway may be a useful therapeutic approach for diseases resulting from impaired proteasomal degradation.

  17. The Logic of the 26S Proteasome.

    PubMed

    Collins, Galen Andrew; Goldberg, Alfred L

    2017-05-18

    The ubiquitin proteasome pathway is responsible for most of the protein degradation in mammalian cells. Rates of degradation by this pathway have generally been assumed to be determined by rates of ubiquitylation. However, recent studies indicate that proteasome function is also tightly regulated and determines whether a ubiquitylated protein is destroyed or deubiquitylated and survives longer. This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of the proteasome's multistep ATP-dependent mechanism, its biochemical and structural features that ensure efficient proteolysis and ubiquitin recycling while preventing nonselective proteolysis, and the regulation of proteasome activity by interacting proteins and subunit modifications, especially phosphorylation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A proteasome inhibitor confers cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Lüss, Hartmut; Schmitz, Wilhelm; Neumann, Joachim

    2002-04-01

    In several cell types, proteasome inhibitors like carbobenzoxyl-leucinyl-leucinyl-leucinal (MG132) induce the 72 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp72) and exert cell protective effects. However, data in cardiomyocytes are currently lacking. We investigated the effects of MG132 in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. MG132 time- and concentration-dependently induced Hsp72 and Hsp32 at mRNA and protein levels. Although Hsp60 mRNA was induced, Hsp60 protein levels were not altered. MG132 activated p38 MAP kinase already after 0.5 h. Hsp mRNA induction started after 2 h of MG132 treatment. Subsequently, Hsp72 and Hsp32 protein levels were increased after 4 h. SB202190, an inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase, concentration-dependently attenuated MG132-induced Hsp72-and Hsp32-elevations (by 59% and 41%, respectively, at 1 microM SB202190). In contrast, herbimycin A, a known inductor of Hsp72 in cardiomyocytes, enhanced the MG132-induced Hsp72 and Hsp32 expression even further: additionally applied 2 microM herbimycin A induced Hsp72 and Hsp32 about 2-fold higher than 1 microM MG132 alone. MG132 (1 microM) decreased the hyperthermia- or hydrogen peroxide-induced release of lactate dehydrogenase by 45% and by 35%, respectively (P<0.05, n=5). MG132 (1 microM) prolonged the spontaneous beating time of cardiomyocytes at 46 degrees C from 5+/-2 min (control hyperthermia) to 28+/-5 min (P<0.05, n=4). Thus, inhibition of the proteasome function by MG132 protects cardiomyocytes against hyperthermic or oxidative injury. This protective effect and Hsp induction were abolished by 1 microM SB202190. Proteasome inhibition results in p38 MAP kinase-dependent induction of Hsp72 and Hsp32 and might be a novel cardioprotective modality.

  19. New cyclic peptide proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Baldisserotto, Anna; Marastoni, Mauro; Gavioli, Riccardo; Tomatis, Roberto

    2009-04-01

    Here we report the study of a new series of vinyl ester cyclopeptide analogues synthesized on the basis of our previous development of a class of cyclopeptides derived from our linear prototype inhibitors. In these compounds, the exocyclic pharmacophoric unit Leu-VE was linked to the gamma-carboxyl group of the glutamic acid residue at the C-terminal. The best analogues of the series have been shown to inhibit the caspase-like activity of the proteasome at nanomolar concentrations and have also demonstrated good resistance to proteolysis and a capacity to permeate the cell membrane.

  20. Examining Proteasome Assembly with Recombinant Archaeal Proteasomes and Nondenaturing PAGE: The Case for a Combined Approach.

    PubMed

    Panfair, Dilrajkaur; Kusmierczyk, Andrew R

    2016-12-17

    Proteasomes are found in all domains of life. They provide the major route of intracellular protein degradation in eukaryotes, though their assembly is not completely understood. All proteasomes contain a structurally conserved core particle (CP), or 20S proteasome, containing two heptameric β subunit rings sandwiched between two heptameric α subunit rings. Archaeal 20S proteasomes are compositionally simpler compared to their eukaryotic counterparts, yet they both share a common assembly mechanism. Consequently, archaeal 20S proteasomes continue to be important models for eukaryotic proteasome assembly. Specifically, recombinant expression of archaeal 20S proteasomes coupled with nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) has yielded many important insights into proteasome biogenesis. Here, we discuss a means to improve upon the usual strategy of coexpression of archaeal proteasome α and β subunits prior to nondenaturing PAGE. We demonstrate that although rapid and efficient, a coexpression approach alone can miss key assembly intermediates. In the case of the proteasome, coexpression may not allow detection of the half-proteasome, an intermediate containing one complete α-ring and one complete β-ring. However, this intermediate is readily detected via lysate mixing. We suggest that combining coexpression with lysate mixing yields an approach that is more thorough in analyzing assembly, yet remains labor nonintensive. This approach may be useful for the study of other recombinant multiprotein complexes.

  1. Structural basis for histone H2B deubiquitination by the SAGA DUB module

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Michael T.; Haj-Yahya, Mahmood; Ringel, Alison E.; Bandi, Prasanthi; Brik, Ashraf; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2016-02-12

    Monoubiquitinated histone H2B plays multiple roles in transcription activation. H2B is deubiquitinated by the Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) coactivator, which contains a four-protein subcomplex known as the deubiquitinating (DUB) module. In this paper, the crystal structure of the Ubp8/Sgf11/Sus1/Sgf73 DUB module bound to a ubiquitinated nucleosome reveals that the DUB module primarily contacts H2A/H2B, with an arginine cluster on the Sgf11 zinc finger domain docking on the conserved H2A/H2B acidic patch. The Ubp8 catalytic domain mediates additional contacts with H2B, as well as with the conjugated ubiquitin. Finally, we find that the DUB module deubiquitinates H2B both in the context of the nucleosome and in H2A/H2B dimers complexed with the histone chaperone, FACT, suggesting that SAGA could target H2B at multiple stages of nucleosome disassembly and reassembly during transcription.

  2. Introduction to a Dubbing Activity for a College First-Year Japanese Language Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koyama, Nobuko

    2016-01-01

    This case study presents a description and outline of a dubbing activity in which students utilized their basic linguistic skills holistically. Authentic materials such as television dramas and feature films are "a rich repository of various speech acts, lexicon and linguistic emotivity" (Koyama, 2009) and as such have the potential to…

  3. Structural basis for histone H2B deubiquitination by the SAGA DUB module

    DOE PAGES

    Morgan, Michael T.; Haj-Yahya, Mahmood; Ringel, Alison E.; ...

    2016-02-12

    Monoubiquitinated histone H2B plays multiple roles in transcription activation. H2B is deubiquitinated by the Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) coactivator, which contains a four-protein subcomplex known as the deubiquitinating (DUB) module. In this paper, the crystal structure of the Ubp8/Sgf11/Sus1/Sgf73 DUB module bound to a ubiquitinated nucleosome reveals that the DUB module primarily contacts H2A/H2B, with an arginine cluster on the Sgf11 zinc finger domain docking on the conserved H2A/H2B acidic patch. The Ubp8 catalytic domain mediates additional contacts with H2B, as well as with the conjugated ubiquitin. Finally, we find that the DUB module deubiquitinates H2B both in the context ofmore » the nucleosome and in H2A/H2B dimers complexed with the histone chaperone, FACT, suggesting that SAGA could target H2B at multiple stages of nucleosome disassembly and reassembly during transcription.« less

  4. The Semantics and Pragmatics of Translating Culture-Bound References in Film Dubbing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bendus, Maryana

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with a number of issues relating to the multifaceted phenomenon of audiovisual translation. The primary concern of the dissertation is with the evaluation of translation strategies of extralinguistic culture-bound references, in particular, in films dubbed from English (as the source language) into Ukrainian (as the target…

  5. Lung cysts as indicator for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    PubMed

    Johannesma, P C; Thunnissen, E; Postmus, P E

    2014-02-01

    In this case, we describe a patient with a history of recurrent pneumothorax. Based on CT-thorax and histopathology of the lung tissue, the Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome was suspected and confirmed after genetic testing. Recognizing this syndrome by pulmonologists and radiologists is very important, because the risk on developing of renal cell cancer is high.

  6. The Semantics and Pragmatics of Translating Culture-Bound References in Film Dubbing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bendus, Maryana

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with a number of issues relating to the multifaceted phenomenon of audiovisual translation. The primary concern of the dissertation is with the evaluation of translation strategies of extralinguistic culture-bound references, in particular, in films dubbed from English (as the source language) into Ukrainian (as the target…

  7. Introduction to a Dubbing Activity for a College First-Year Japanese Language Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koyama, Nobuko

    2016-01-01

    This case study presents a description and outline of a dubbing activity in which students utilized their basic linguistic skills holistically. Authentic materials such as television dramas and feature films are "a rich repository of various speech acts, lexicon and linguistic emotivity" (Koyama, 2009) and as such have the potential to…

  8. Proteasome function is required for platelet production

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dallas S.; Smith, Matthew C.P.; Campbell, Robert A.; Zimmerman, Patrick W.; Franks, Zechariah B.; Kraemer, Bjorn F.; Machlus, Kellie R.; Ling, Jing; Kamba, Patrick; Schwertz, Hansjörg; Rowley, Jesse W.; Miles, Rodney R.; Liu, Zhi-Jian; Sola-Visner, Martha; Italiano, Joseph E.; Christensen, Hilary; Kahr, Walter H.A.; Li, Dean Y.; Weyrich, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome inhibiter bortezomib has been successfully used to treat patients with relapsed multiple myeloma; however, many of these patients become thrombocytopenic, and it is not clear how the proteasome influences platelet production. Here we determined that pharmacologic inhibition of proteasome activity blocks proplatelet formation in human and mouse megakaryocytes. We also found that megakaryocytes isolated from mice deficient for PSMC1, an essential subunit of the 26S proteasome, fail to produce proplatelets. Consistent with decreased proplatelet formation, mice lacking PSMC1 in platelets (Psmc1fl/fl Pf4-Cre mice) exhibited severe thrombocytopenia and died shortly after birth. The failure to produce proplatelets in proteasome-inhibited megakaryocytes was due to upregulation and hyperactivation of the small GTPase, RhoA, rather than NF-κB, as has been previously suggested. Inhibition of RhoA or its downstream target, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), restored megakaryocyte proplatelet formation in the setting of proteasome inhibition in vitro. Similarly, fasudil, a ROCK inhibitor used clinically to treat cerebral vasospasm, restored platelet counts in adult mice that were made thrombocytopenic by tamoxifen-induced suppression of proteasome activity in megakaryocytes and platelets (Psmc1fl/fl Pdgf-Cre-ER mice). These results indicate that proteasome function is critical for thrombopoiesis, and suggest inhibition of RhoA signaling as a potential strategy to treat thrombocytopenia in bortezomib-treated multiple myeloma patients. PMID:25061876

  9. Molecular mechanisms of proteasome plasticity in aging.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Karl A; Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel A

    2010-02-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays a crucial role in regulation of intracellular protein turnover. Proteasome, the central protease of the pathway, encompasses multi-subunit assemblies sharing a common catalytic core supplemented by regulatory modules and localizing to different subcellular compartments. To better comprehend age-related functions of the proteasome we surveyed content, composition and catalytic properties of the enzyme in cytosolic, microsomal and nuclear fractions obtained from mouse livers subjected to organismal aging. We found that during aging subunit composition and subcellular distribution of proteasomes changed without substantial alterations in the total level of core complexes. We observed that the general decline in proteasomes functions was limited to nuclear and cytosolic compartments. Surprisingly, the observed changes in activity and specificity were linked to the amount of the activator module and distinct composition of the catalytic subunits. In contrast, activity, specificity and composition of the microsomal-associated proteasomes remained mostly unaffected by aging; however their relative contribution to the total activity was substantially elevated. Unexpectedly, the nuclear proteasomes were affected most profoundly by aging possibly triggering significant changes in cellular signaling and transcription. Collectively, the data indicate an age-related refocusing of proteasome from the compartment-specific functions towards general protein maintenance.

  10. p53 mutations promote proteasomal activity.

    PubMed

    Oren, Moshe; Kotler, Eran

    2016-07-27

    p53 mutations occur very frequently in human cancer. Besides abrogating the tumour suppressive functions of wild-type p53, many of those mutations also acquire oncogenic gain-of-function activities. Augmentation of proteasome activity is now reported as a common gain-of-function mechanism shared by different p53 mutants, which promotes cancer resistance to proteasome inhibitors.

  11. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: Clinical and molecular aspects of recently identified kidney cancer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hasumi, Hisashi; Baba, Masaya; Hasumi, Yukiko; Furuya, Mitsuko; Yao, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease that predisposes patients to develop fibrofolliculoma, lung cysts and bilateral multifocal renal tumors, histologically hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumors, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma, oncocytoma, papillary renal cell carcinoma and clear cell renal cell carcinoma. The predominant forms of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome-associated renal tumors, hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumors and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma are typically less aggressive, and a therapeutic principle for these tumors is a surgical removal with nephron-sparing. The timing of surgery is the most critical element for postoperative renal function, which is one of the important prognostic factors for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome patients. The folliculin gene (FLCN) that is responsible for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome was isolated as a novel tumor suppressor for kidney cancer. Recent studies using murine models for FLCN, a protein encoded by the FLCN gene, and its two binding partners, folliculin-interacting protein 1 (FNIP1) and folliculin-interacting protein 2 (FNIP2), have uncovered important roles for FLCN, FNIP1 and FNIP2 in cell metabolism, which include AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated energy sensing, Ppargc1a-driven mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and mTORC1-dependent cell proliferation. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is a hereditary hamartoma syndrome, which is triggered by metabolic alterations under a functional loss of FLCN/FNIP1/FNIP2 complex, a critical regulator of kidney cell proliferation rate; a mechanistic insight into the FLCN/FNIP1/FNIP2 pathway could provide us a basis for developing new therapeutics for kidney cancer.

  12. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome with a renal angiomyolipoma: further evidence of a relationship between Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome and tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Marguerite; Mallipeddi, Raj; Pichert, Gabriella; Whittaker, Sean

    2012-05-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) is an autosomal dominant condition caused by mutations in the gene which codes for folliculin (FLCN). It is characterised clinically by fibrofolliculomas, trichodiscomas, pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothoraces and renal cancers. This case illustrates a patient with BHDS and a renal angiomyolipoma. Angiomyolipomas are not described as a feature of BHDS, but rather they can occur sporadically or in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Recent studies suggest that clinical similarities between BHDS and TSC may be explained by FLCN and TSC proteins functioning on a common pathway, mammalian target of rapamycin. This case adds to the literature of cases with clinical similarities.

  13. Stabilization of an unusual salt bridge in ubiquitin by the extra C-terminal domain of the proteasome-associated deubiquitinase UCH37 as a mechanism of its exo specificity.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Marie E; Kim, Myung-Il; Ronau, Judith A; Sheedlo, Michael J; White, Rhiannon R; Chaney, Joseph; Paul, Lake N; Lill, Markus A; Artavanis-Tsakonas, Katerina; Das, Chittaranjan

    2013-05-21

    Ubiquitination is countered by a group of enzymes collectively called deubiquitinases (DUBs); ∼100 of them can be found in the human genome. One of the most interesting aspects of these enzymes is the ability of some members to selectively recognize specific linkage types between ubiquitin in polyubiquitin chains and their endo and exo specificity. The structural basis of exo-specific deubiquitination catalyzed by a DUB is poorly understood. UCH37, a cysteine DUB conserved from fungi to humans, is a proteasome-associated factor that regulates the proteasome by sequentially cleaving polyubiquitin chains from their distal ends, i.e., by exo-specific deubiquitination. In addition to the catalytic domain, the DUB features a functionally uncharacterized UCH37-like domain (ULD), presumed to keep the enzyme in an inhibited state in its proteasome-free form. Herein we report the crystal structure of two constructs of UCH37 from Trichinella spiralis in complex with a ubiquitin-based suicide inhibitor, ubiquitin vinyl methyl ester (UbVME). These structures show that the ULD makes direct contact with ubiquitin stabilizing a highly unusual intramolecular salt bridge between Lys48 and Glu51 of ubiquitin, an interaction that would be favored only with the distal ubiquitin but not with the internal ones in a Lys48-linked polyubiquitin chain. An inspection of 39 DUB-ubiquitin structures in the Protein Data Bank reveals the uniqueness of the salt bridge in ubiquitin bound to UCH37, an interaction that disappears when the ULD is deleted, as revealed in the structure of the catalytic domain alone bound to UbVME. The structural data are consistent with previously reported mutational data on the mammalian enzyme, which, together with the fact that the ULD residues that bind to ubiquitin are conserved, points to a similar mechanism behind the exo specificity of the human enzyme. To the best of our knowledge, these data provide the only structural example so far of how the exo

  14. Caspase activation inhibits proteasome function during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Ming; Butterworth, Michael; MacFarlane, Marion; Dubiel, Wolfgang; Ciechanover, Aaron; Cohen, Gerald M

    2004-04-09

    The ubiquitin/proteasome system regulates protein turnover by degrading polyubiquitinated proteins. To date, all studies on the relationship of apoptosis and the proteasome have emphasized the key role of the proteasome in the regulation of apoptosis, by virtue of its ability to degrade regulatory molecules involved in apoptosis. We now demonstrate how induction of apoptosis may regulate the activity of the proteasome. During apoptosis, caspase activation results in the cleavage of three specific subunits of the 19S regulatory complex of the proteasome: S6' (Rpt5) and S5a (Rpn10), whose role is to recognize polyubiquitinated substrates of the proteasome, and S1 (Rpn2), which with S5a and S2 (Rpn1) holds together the lid and base of the 19S regulatory complex. This caspase-mediated cleavage inhibits the proteasomal degradation of ubiquitin-dependent and -independent cellular substrates, including proapoptotic molecules such as Smac, so facilitating the execution of the apoptotic program by providing a feed-forward amplification loop.

  15. Proteasome functional insufficiency in cardiac pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Zheng, Hanqiao; Su, Huabo; Powell, Saul R.

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the degradation of most cellular proteins. Alterations in cardiac UPS, including changes in the degradation of regulatory proteins and proteasome functional insufficiency, are observed in many forms of heart disease and have been shown to play an important role in cardiac pathogenesis. In the past several years, remarkable progress in understanding the mechanisms that regulate UPS-mediated protein degradation has been achieved. A transgenic mouse model of benign enhancement of cardiac proteasome proteolytic function has been created. This has led to the first demonstration of the necessity of proteasome functional insufficiency in the genesis of important pathological processes. Cardiomyocyte-restricted enhancement of proteasome proteolytic function by overexpression of proteasome activator 28α protects against cardiac proteinopathy and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Additionally, exciting advances have recently been achieved in the search for a pharmacological agent to activate the proteasome. These breakthroughs are expected to serve as an impetus to further investigation into the involvement of UPS dysfunction in molecular pathogenesis and to the development of new therapeutic strategies for combating heart disease. An interplay between the UPS and macroautophagy is increasingly suggested in noncardiac systems but is not well understood in the cardiac system. Further investigations into the interplay are expected to provide a more comprehensive picture of cardiac protein quality control and degradation. PMID:21949118

  16. Characterizing the Dynamics of Proteasome Complexes by Proteomics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Kaake, Robyn M.; Kao, Athit; Yu, Clinton

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The proteasome is the degradation machine of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, which is critical in controlling many essential biological processes. Aberrant regulation of proteasome-dependent protein degradation can lead to various human diseases, and general proteasome inhibitors have shown efficacy for cancer treatments. Though clinically effective, current proteasome inhibitors have detrimental side effects and, thus, better therapeutic strategies targeting proteasomes are needed. Therefore, a comprehensive characterization of proteasome complexes will provide the molecular details that are essential for developing new and improved drugs. Recent Advances: New mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approaches have been developed to study protein interaction networks and structural topologies of proteasome complexes. The results have helped define the dynamic proteomes of proteasome complexes, thus providing new insights into the mechanisms underlying proteasome function and regulation. Critical Issues: The proteasome exists as heterogeneous populations in tissues/cells, and its proteome is highly dynamic and complex. In addition, proteasome complexes are regulated by various mechanisms under different physiological conditions. Consequently, complete proteomic profiling of proteasome complexes remains a major challenge for the field. Future Directions: We expect that proteomic methodologies enabling full characterization of proteasome complexes will continue to evolve. Further advances in MS instrumentation and protein separation techniques will be needed to facilitate the detailed proteomic analysis of low-abundance components and subpopulations of proteasome complexes. The results will help us understand proteasome biology as well as provide new therapeutic targets for disease diagnostics and treatment. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2444–2456. PMID:24423446

  17. Compromising the 19S proteasome complex protects cells from reduced flux through the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Peter; Mendillo, Marc L; Zhao, Jinghui; Carette, Jan E; Merrill, Parker H; Cikes, Domagoj; Varadarajan, Malini; van Diemen, Ferdy R; Penninger, Josef M; Goldberg, Alfred L; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Santagata, Sandro; Lindquist, Susan

    2015-09-01

    Proteasomes are central regulators of protein homeostasis in eukaryotes. Proteasome function is vulnerable to environmental insults, cellular protein imbalance and targeted pharmaceuticals. Yet, mechanisms that cells deploy to counteract inhibition of this central regulator are little understood. To find such mechanisms, we reduced flux through the proteasome to the point of toxicity with specific inhibitors and performed genome-wide screens for mutations that allowed cells to survive. Counter to expectation, reducing expression of individual subunits of the proteasome's 19S regulatory complex increased survival. Strong 19S reduction was cytotoxic but modest reduction protected cells from inhibitors. Protection was accompanied by an increased ratio of 20S to 26S proteasomes, preservation of protein degradation capacity and reduced proteotoxic stress. While compromise of 19S function can have a fitness cost under basal conditions, it provided a powerful survival advantage when proteasome function was impaired. This means of rebalancing proteostasis is conserved from yeast to humans.

  18. Characterization of the 26S proteasome network in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihui; Delahunty, Claire; Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Rahlfs, Stefan; Helena Prieto, Judith; Yates, John R; Becker, Katja

    2015-12-07

    In eukaryotic cells, the ubiquitin-proteasome system as a key regulator of protein quality control is an excellent drug target. We therefore aimed to analyze the 26S proteasome complex in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, which still threatens almost half of the world's population. First, we established an affinity purification protocol allowing for the isolation of functional 26S proteasome complexes from the parasite. Subunit composition of the proteasome and component stoichiometry were studied and physiologic interacting partners were identified via in situ protein crosslinking. Furthermore, intrinsic ubiquitin receptors of the plasmodial proteasome were determined and their roles in proteasomal substrate recognition were analyzed. Notably, PfUSP14 was characterized as a proteasome-associated deubiquitinase resulting in the concept that targeting proteasomal deubiquitinating activity in P. falciparum may represent a promising antimalarial strategy. The data provide insights into a profound network orchestrated by the plasmodial proteasome and identified novel drug target candidates in the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  19. Autoregulation of the 26S proteasome by in situ ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Andrew D.; MacFadden, Andrea; Wu, Zhiping; Peng, Junmin; Liu, Chang-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome degrades ubiquitinated proteins, and proteasomal degradation controls various cellular events. Here we report that the human 26S proteasome is ubiquitinated, by which the ubiquitin receptors Adrm1 and S5a, the ATPase subunit Rpt5, and the deubiquitinating enzyme Uch37 are ubiquitinated in situ by proteasome-associating ubiquitination enzymes. Ubiquitination of these subunits significantly impairs the 26S proteasome's ability to bind, deubiquitinate, and degrade ubiquitinated proteins. Moreover, ubiquitination of the 26S proteasome can be antagonized by proteasome-residing deubiquitinating enzymes, by the binding of polyubiquitin chains, and by certain cellular stress, indicating that proteasome ubiquitination is dynamic and regulated in cells. We propose that in situ ubiquitination of the 26S proteasome regulates its activity, which could function to adjust proteasomal activity in response to the alteration of cellular ubiquitination levels. PMID:24743594

  20. The pathogenesis of pneumothorax in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Johannesma, Paul Christiaan; Houweling, Arjan C; van Waesberghe, Jan-Hein T M; van Moorselaar, R J Jeroen A; Starink, Theo M; Menko, Fred H; Postmus, Pieter E

    2014-11-01

    The development and natural course of lung cysts in patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) is still unclear, and the relationship between lung cysts and pneumothorax is not fully clarified. Based on the follow-up results of thoracic imaging in six patients with BHD, we hypothesize that decreased potential for stretching of the cysts' wall and extensive contact with the visceral pleura are probably responsible for rupture of the cyst wall resulting in increased risk for pneumothorax.

  1. Cereblon inhibits proteasome activity by binding to the 20S core proteasome subunit beta type 4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Min; Lee, Jongwon; Park, Chul-Seung

    2012-10-26

    In humans, mutations in the gene encoding cereblon (CRBN) are associated with mental retardation. Although CRBN has been investigated in several cellular contexts, its function remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CRBN plays a role in regulating the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Heterologous expression of CRBN inhibited proteasome activity in a human neuroblastoma cell line. Furthermore, proteasome subunit beta type 4 (PSMB4), the β7 subunit of the 20S core complex, was identified as a direct binding partner of CRBN. These findings suggest that CRBN may modulate proteasome activity by directly interacting with the β7 subunit.

  2. Hornstein-Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: a renaming and reconsideration.

    PubMed

    Happle, Rudolf

    2012-06-01

    The so-called Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, an autosomal dominant trait characterized by multiple fibrofolliculomas and extracutaneous cancer proneness, was not first recognized by Birt, Hogg, and Dubé. Hence, the presently used eponymic designation reflects a historical error. In fact, the disorder was discovered in the following way. In 1975, Hornstein and Knickenberg described a "distinct nosological entity" in two sibs with multiple perifollicular fibromas, multiple skin tags, and polyps of the colon with a tendency to malignancy. The father had similar skin lesions and "bilateral kidney cysts" and unilateral lung cysts. In 1976, Hornstein et al. informed, in two additional articles, both geneticists and gastroenterologists about the new autosomal dominant trait. When Birt et al. presented their report in 1977, they knew of Hornstein's first publication but were convinced that they had discovered "a previously unrecognized hereditary pilar hamartoma." This was a misconception because what they called "fibrofolliculoma" has turned out to be identical with "perifollicular fibroma" as described by Hornstein et al. Moreover, Birt et al. failed to mention any associated extracutaneous cancer proneness, whereas Hornstein et al. had delineated the complete syndrome. For all of these reasons, the new term "Hornstein-Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome" appears to be appropriate.

  3. DUBbing Cancer: Deubiquitylating Enzymes Involved in Epigenetics, DNA Damage and the Cell Cycle As Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Fernandez, Adan; Kessler, Benedikt M.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling cell proliferation is one of the hallmarks of cancer. A number of critical checkpoints ascertain progression through the different stages of the cell cycle, which can be aborted when perturbed, for instance by errors in DNA replication and repair. These molecular checkpoints are regulated by a number of proteins that need to be present at the right time and quantity. The ubiquitin system has emerged as a central player controlling the fate and function of such molecules such as cyclins, oncogenes and components of the DNA repair machinery. In particular, proteases that cleave ubiquitin chains, referred to as deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs), have attracted recent attention due to their accessibility to modulation by small molecules. In this review, we describe recent evidence of the critical role of DUBs in aspects of cell cycle checkpoint control, associated DNA repair mechanisms and regulation of transcription, representing pathways altered in cancer. Therefore, DUBs involved in these processes emerge as potentially critical targets for the treatment of not only hematological, but potentially also solid tumors. PMID:27516771

  4. Proteasomal dysfunction in sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    McNaught, Kevin St P; Jackson, Tehone; JnoBaptiste, Ruth; Kapustin, Alexander; Olanow, C Warren

    2006-05-23

    The cause and mechanism of neuronal death in sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) continue to elude investigators. Recently, alterations in proteasomal function have been detected in the brain of patients with the illness. The biochemical basis of the defect and its relevance to the disease process are now being studied. The available results suggest that proteasomal dysfunction could underlie protein accumulation, Lewy body formation, and neuron death in PD. The cause of proteasomal dysfunction is unknown at present, but this could relate to gene mutations, oxidative damage, ATP depletion, or the actions of environmental toxins. It remains to be established if proteasomal dysfunction plays a primary or a secondary role in the initiation or progression of the neurodegenerative process in PD.

  5. Recognition of Client Proteins by the Proteasome.

    PubMed

    Yu, Houqing; Matouschek, Andreas

    2017-05-22

    The ubiquitin proteasome system controls the concentrations of regulatory proteins and removes damaged and misfolded proteins from cells. Proteins are targeted to the protease at the center of this system, the proteasome, by ubiquitin tags, but ubiquitin is also used as a signal in other cellular processes. Specificity is conferred by the size and structure of the ubiquitin tags, which are recognized by receptors associated with the different cellular processes. However, the ubiquitin code remains ambiguous, and the same ubiquitin tag can target different proteins to different fates. After binding substrate protein at the ubiquitin tag, the proteasome initiates degradation at a disordered region in the substrate. The proteasome has pronounced preferences for the initiation site, and its recognition represents a second component of the degradation signal.

  6. The role of the proteasome in AML

    PubMed Central

    Csizmar, C M; Kim, D-H; Sachs, Z

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is deadly hematologic malignancy. Despite a well-characterized genetic and molecular landscape, targeted therapies for AML have failed to significantly improve clinical outcomes. Over the past decade, proteasome inhibition has been demonstrated to be an effective therapeutic strategy in several hematologic malignancies. Proteasome inhibitors, such as bortezomib and carfilzomib, have become mainstays of treatment for multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. In light of this success, there has been a surge of literature exploring both the role of the proteasome and the effects of proteasome inhibition in AML. Pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that proteasome inhibition disrupts proliferative cell signaling pathways, exhibits cytotoxic synergism with other chemotherapeutics and induces autophagy of cancer-related proteins. Meanwhile, clinical trials incorporating bortezomib into combination chemotherapy regimens have reported a range of responses in AML patients, with complete remission rates >80% in some cases. Taken together, this preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that inhibition of the proteasome may be efficacious in this disease. In an effort to focus further investigation into this area, these recent studies and their findings are reviewed here. PMID:27911437

  7. Inhibitors Selective for Mycobacterial Versus Human Proteasomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G.; Li, D; Sorio de Carvalho, L; Deng, H; Tao, H; Vogt, G; Wu, K; Schneider, J; Chidawanyika, T; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Many anti-infectives inhibit the synthesis of bacterial proteins, but none selectively inhibits their degradation. Most anti-infectives kill replicating pathogens, but few preferentially kill pathogens that have been forced into a non-replicating state by conditions in the host. To explore these alternative approaches we sought selective inhibitors of the proteasome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Given that the proteasome structure is extensively conserved, it is not surprising that inhibitors of all chemical classes tested have blocked both eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteasomes, and no inhibitor has proved substantially more potent on proteasomes of pathogens than of their hosts. Here we show that certain oxathiazol-2-one compounds kill non-replicating M.?tuberculosis and act as selective suicide-substrate inhibitors of the M.?tuberculosis proteasome by cyclocarbonylating its active site threonine. Major conformational changes protect the inhibitor-enzyme intermediate from hydrolysis, allowing formation of an oxazolidin-2-one and preventing regeneration of active protease. Residues outside the active site whose hydrogen bonds stabilize the critical loop before and after it moves are extensively non-conserved. This may account for the ability of oxathiazol-2-one compounds to inhibit the mycobacterial proteasome potently and irreversibly while largely sparing the human homologue.

  8. Precise assembly and regulation of 26S proteasome and correlation between proteasome dysfunction and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eunju; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) often involve the formation of abnormal and toxic protein aggregates, which are thought to be the primary factor in ND occurrence and progression. Aged neurons exhibit marked increases in aggregated protein levels, which can lead to increased cell death in specific brain regions. As no specific drugs/therapies for treating the symptoms or/and progression of NDs are available, obtaining a complete understanding of the mechanism underlying the formation of protein aggregates is needed for designing a novel and efficient removal strategy. Intracellular proteolysis generally involves either the lysosomal or ubiquitin-proteasome system. In this review, we focus on the structure and assembly of the proteasome, proteasome-mediated protein degradation, and the multiple dynamic regulatory mechanisms governing proteasome activity. We also discuss the plausibility of the correlation between changes in proteasome activity and the occurrence of NDs. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 459-473] PMID:27312603

  9. SANS investigation of assembly state of proteasome activator 28 and the 20S proteasome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Masaaki; Kurimoto, Eiji; Sahashi, Hiroki; Sakata, Eri; Morimoto, Yukio; Itoh, Keiji; Mori, Kazuhiro; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Minami, Yasufumi; Kato, Koichi

    2010-10-01

    The state of proteasome activator 28 (PA28) and the formation of the proteasomal complex in an aqueous solution are investigated with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The most appropriate state of PA28, which well reproduces the observed SANS profile, is the dissociation equilibrium between dimer and monomer with dissociation degree of 0.5. In addition, it is revealed that the packing of PA28 in the dimer is same as that in a crystal. It is also revealed that the proteasomal complex in which two PA28s connects to both basal planes of the 20S proteasome is spontaneously formed in the mixture solution of PA28 and the 20S proteasome.

  10. Precise assembly and regulation of 26S proteasome and correlation between proteasome dysfunction and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Im, Eunju; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2016-09-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) often involve the formation of abnormal and toxic protein aggregates, which are thought to be the primary factor in ND occurrence and progression. Aged neurons exhibit marked increases in aggregated protein levels, which can lead to increased cell death in specific brain regions. As no specific drugs/therapies for treating the symptoms or/and progression of NDs are available, obtaining a complete understanding of the mechanism underlying the formation of protein aggregates is needed for designing a novel and efficient removal strategy. Intracellular proteolysis generally involves either the lysosomal or ubiquitin-proteasome system. In this review, we focus on the structure and assembly of the proteasome, proteasome-mediated protein degradation, and the multiple dynamic regulatory mechanisms governing proteasome activity. We also discuss the plausibility of the correlation between changes in proteasome activity and the occurrence of NDs. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 459-473].

  11. Higher-Order Assembly of BRCC36–KIAA0157 Is Required for DUB Activity and Biological Function

    DOE PAGES

    Zeqiraj, Elton; Tian, Lei; Piggott, Christopher  A.; ...

    2015-09-03

    BRCC36 is a Zn2+-dependent deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) that hydrolyzes lysine-63-linked ubiquitin chains as part of distinct macromolecular complexes that participate in either interferon signaling or DNA-damage recognition. The MPN+ domain protein BRCC36 associates with pseudo DUB MPN– proteins KIAA0157 or Abraxas, which are essential for BRCC36 enzymatic activity. Here, to understand the basis for BRCC36 regulation, we have solved the structure of an active BRCC36-KIAA0157 heterodimer and an inactive BRCC36 homodimer. Structural and functional characterizations show how BRCC36 is switched to an active conformation by contacts with KIAA0157. Higher-order association of BRCC36 and KIAA0157 into a dimer of heterodimers (supermore » dimers) was required for DUB activity and interaction with targeting proteins SHMT2 and RAP80. Lastly, these data provide an explanation of how an inactive pseudo DUB allosterically activates a cognate DUB partner and implicates super dimerization as a new regulatory mechanism underlying BRCC36 DUB activity, subcellular localization, and biological function.« less

  12. Antioxidants block proteasome inhibitor function in endometrial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Llobet, David; Eritja, Nuria; Encinas, Mario; Sorolla, Anabel; Yeramian, Andree; Schoenenberger, Joan Antoni; Llombart-Cussac, Antonio; Marti, Rosa M; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dolcet, Xavier

    2008-02-01

    We have recently demonstrated that proteasome inhibitors can be effective in inducing apoptotic cell death in endometrial carcinoma cell lines and primary culture explants. Increasing evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species are responsible for proteasome inhibitor-induced cell killing. Antioxidants can thus block apoptosis (cell death) triggered by proteasome inhibition. Here, we have evaluated the effects of different antioxidants (edaravone and tiron) on endometrial carcinoma cells treated with aldehyde proteasome inhibitors (MG-132 or ALLN), the boronic acid-based proteasome inhibitor (bortezomib) and the epoxyketone, epoxomicin. We show that tiron specifically inhibited the cytotoxic effects of bortezomib, whereas edaravone inhibited cell death caused by aldehyde-based proteasome inhibitors. We have, however, found that edaravone completely inhibited accumulation of ubiquitin and proteasome activity decrease caused by MG-132 or ALLN, but not by bortezomib. Conversely, tiron inhibited the ubiquitin accumulation and proteasome activity decrease caused by bortezomib. These results suggest that edaravone and tiron rescue cells of proteasome inhibitors from cell death, by inhibiting blockade of proteasome caused by MG-132 and ALLN or bortezomib, respectively. We also tested other antioxidants, and we found that vitamin C inhibited bortezomib-induced cell death. Similar to tiron, vitamin C inhibited cell death by blocking the ability of bortezomib to inhibit the proteasome. Until now, all the antioxidants that blocked proteasome inhibitor-induced cell death also blocked the proteasome inhibitor mechanism of action.

  13. Evolution of Proteasome Regulators in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Fort, Philippe; Kajava, Andrey V.; Delsuc, Fredéric; Coux, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    All living organisms require protein degradation to terminate biological processes and remove damaged proteins. One such machine is the 20S proteasome, a specialized barrel-shaped and compartmentalized multicatalytic protease. The activity of the 20S proteasome generally requires the binding of regulators/proteasome activators (PAs), which control the entrance of substrates. These include the PA700 (19S complex), which assembles with the 20S and forms the 26S proteasome and allows the efficient degradation of proteins usually labeled by ubiquitin tags, PA200 and PA28, which are involved in proteolysis through ubiquitin-independent mechanisms and PI31, which was initially identified as a 20S inhibitor in vitro. Unlike 20S proteasome, shown to be present in all Eukaryotes and Archaea, the evolutionary history of PAs remained fragmentary. Here, we made a comprehensive survey and phylogenetic analyses of the four types of regulators in 17 clades covering most of the eukaryotic supergroups. We found remarkable conservation of each PA700 subunit in all eukaryotes, indicating that the current complex PA700 structure was already set up in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Also present in LECA, PA200, PA28, and PI31 showed a more contrasted evolutionary picture, because many lineages have subsequently lost one or two of them. The paramount conservation of PA700 composition in all eukaryotes and the dynamic evolution of PA200, PA28, and PI31 are discussed in the light of current knowledge on their physiological roles. PMID:25943340

  14. Ubiquitin-proteasome system and hereditary cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Schlossarek, Saskia; Frey, Norbert; Carrier, Lucie

    2014-06-01

    Adequate protein turnover is essential for cardiac homeostasis. Different protein quality controls are involved in the maintenance of protein homeostasis, including molecular chaperones and co-chaperones, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). In the last decade, a series of evidence has underlined a major function of the UPS in cardiac physiology and disease. Particularly, recent studies have shown that dysfunctional proteasomal function leads to cardiac disorders. Hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies are the two most prevalent inherited cardiomyopathies. Both are primarily transmitted as an autosomal-dominant trait and mainly caused by mutations in genes encoding components of the cardiac sarcomere, including a relevant striated muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase. A growing body of evidence indicates impairment of the UPS in inherited cardiomyopathies as determined by measurement of the level of ubiquitinated proteins, the activities of the proteasome and/or the use of fluorescent UPS reporter substrates. The present review will propose mechanisms of UPS impairment in inherited cardiomyopathies, summarize the potential consequences of UPS impairment, including activation of the unfolded protein response, and underline some therapeutic options available to restore proteasome function and therefore cardiac homeostasis and function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Protein Quality Control, the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, and Autophagy". Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Evolution of proteasome regulators in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Fort, Philippe; Kajava, Andrey V; Delsuc, Fredéric; Coux, Olivier

    2015-05-04

    All living organisms require protein degradation to terminate biological processes and remove damaged proteins. One such machine is the 20S proteasome, a specialized barrel-shaped and compartmentalized multicatalytic protease. The activity of the 20S proteasome generally requires the binding of regulators/proteasome activators (PAs), which control the entrance of substrates. These include the PA700 (19S complex), which assembles with the 20S and forms the 26S proteasome and allows the efficient degradation of proteins usually labeled by ubiquitin tags, PA200 and PA28, which are involved in proteolysis through ubiquitin-independent mechanisms and PI31, which was initially identified as a 20S inhibitor in vitro. Unlike 20S proteasome, shown to be present in all Eukaryotes and Archaea, the evolutionary history of PAs remained fragmentary. Here, we made a comprehensive survey and phylogenetic analyses of the four types of regulators in 17 clades covering most of the eukaryotic supergroups. We found remarkable conservation of each PA700 subunit in all eukaryotes, indicating that the current complex PA700 structure was already set up in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Also present in LECA, PA200, PA28, and PI31 showed a more contrasted evolutionary picture, because many lineages have subsequently lost one or two of them. The paramount conservation of PA700 composition in all eukaryotes and the dynamic evolution of PA200, PA28, and PI31 are discussed in the light of current knowledge on their physiological roles.

  16. Crystal structure of human proteasome assembly chaperone PAC4 involved in proteasome formation.

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, Eiji; Satoh, Tadashi; Ito, Yuri; Ishihara, Eri; Okamoto, Kenta; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Tanaka, Keiji; Kato, Koichi

    2017-05-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large protein complex, responsible for degradation of ubiquinated proteins in eukaryotic cells. Eukaryotic proteasome formation is a highly ordered process that is assisted by several assembly chaperones. The assembly of its catalytic 20S core particle depends on at least five proteasome-specific chaperones, i.e., proteasome-assembling chaperons 1-4 (PAC1-4) and proteasome maturation protein (POMP). The orthologues of yeast assembly chaperones have been structurally characterized, whereas most mammalian assembly chaperones are not. In the present study, we determined a crystal structure of human PAC4 at 1.90-Å resolution. Our crystallographic data identify a hydrophobic surface that is surrounded by charged residues. The hydrophobic surface is complementary to that of its binding partner, PAC3. The surface also exhibits charge complementarity with the proteasomal α4-5 subunits. This will provide insights into human proteasome-assembling chaperones as potential anticancer drug targets. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  17. The proteasome deubiquitinase inhibitor VLX1570 shows selectivity for ubiquitin-specific protease-14 and induces apoptosis of multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Mazurkiewicz, Magdalena; Hillert, Ellin-Kristina; Olofsson, Maria Hägg; Pierrou, Stefan; Hillertz, Per; Gullbo, Joachim; Selvaraju, Karthik; Paulus, Aneel; Akhtar, Sharoon; Bossler, Felicitas; Khan, Asher Chanan; Linder, Stig; D’Arcy, Padraig

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of deubiquitinase (DUB) activity is a promising strategy for cancer therapy. VLX1570 is an inhibitor of proteasome DUB activity currently in clinical trials for relapsed multiple myeloma. Here we show that VLX1570 binds to and inhibits the activity of ubiquitin-specific protease-14 (USP14) in vitro, with comparatively weaker inhibitory activity towards UCHL5 (ubiquitin-C-terminal hydrolase-5). Exposure of multiple myeloma cells to VLX1570 resulted in thermostabilization of USP14 at therapeutically relevant concentrations. Transient knockdown of USP14 or UCHL5 expression by electroporation of siRNA reduced the viability of multiple myeloma cells. Treatment of multiple myeloma cells with VLX1570 induced the accumulation of proteasome-bound high molecular weight polyubiquitin conjugates and an apoptotic response. Sensitivity to VLX1570 was moderately affected by altered drug uptake, but was unaffected by overexpression of BCL2-family proteins or inhibitors of caspase activity. Finally, treatment with VLX1570 was found to lead to extended survival in xenograft models of multiple myeloma. Our findings demonstrate promising antiproliferative activity of VLX1570 in multiple myeloma, primarily associated with inhibition of USP14 activity. PMID:27264969

  18. Proteasome Inhibitors Block Development of Plasmodium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Gantt, Soren M.; Myung, Joon Mo; Briones, Marcelo R. S.; Li, Wei Dong; Corey, E. J.; Omura, Satoshi; Nussenzweig, Victor; Sinnis, Photini

    1998-01-01

    Proteasomes degrade most of the proteins inside eukaryotic cells, including transcription factors and regulators of cell cycle progression. Here we show that nanomolar concentrations of lactacystin, a specific irreversible inhibitor of the 20S proteasome, inhibit development of the exoerythrocytic and erythrocytic stages of the malaria parasite. Although lactacystin-treated Plasmodium berghei sporozoites are still invasive, their development into exoerythrocytic forms (EEF) is inhibited in vitro and in vivo. Erythrocytic schizogony of P. falciparum in vitro is also profoundly inhibited when drug treatment of the synchronized parasites is prior, but not subsequent, to the initiation of DNA synthesis, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of lactacystin is cell cycle specific. Lactacystin reduces P. berghei parasitemia in rats, but the therapeutic index is very low. Along with other studies showing that lactacystin inhibits stage-specific transformation in Trypanosoma and Entamoeba spp., these findings highlight the potential of proteasome inhibitors as drugs for the treatment of diseases caused by protozoan parasites. PMID:9756786

  19. Trial Watch: Proteasomal inhibitors for anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Obrist, Florine; Manic, Gwenola; Kroemer, Guido; Vitale, Ilio; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The so-called “ubiquitin-proteasome system” (UPS) is a multicomponent molecular apparatus that catalyzes the covalent attachment of several copies of the small protein ubiquitin to other proteins that are generally (but not always) destined to proteasomal degradation. This enzymatic cascade is crucial for the maintenance of intracellular protein homeostasis (both in physiological conditions and in the course of adaptive stress responses), and regulates a wide array of signaling pathways. In line with this notion, defects in the UPS have been associated with aging as well as with several pathological conditions including cardiac, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic disorders. As transformed cells often experience a constant state of stress (as a result of the hyperactivation of oncogenic signaling pathways and/or adverse microenvironmental conditions), their survival and proliferation are highly dependent on the integrity of the UPS. This rationale has driven an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation culminating in 2003 with the approval of the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in multiple myeloma patients. Another proteasomal inhibitor, carfilzomib, is now licensed by international regulatory agencies for use in multiple myeloma patients, and the approved indications for bortezomib have been extended to mantle cell lymphoma. This said, the clinical activity of bortezomib and carfilzomib is often limited by off-target effects, innate/acquired resistance, and the absence of validated predictive biomarkers. Moreover, the antineoplastic activity of proteasome inhibitors against solid tumors is poor. In this Trial Watch we discuss the contribution of the UPS to oncogenesis and tumor progression and summarize the design and/or results of recent clinical studies evaluating the therapeutic profile of proteasome inhibitors in cancer patients. PMID:27308423

  20. Oxidative challenge enhances REGγ-proteasome-dependent protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Shuang; Zuo, Qiuhong; Wu, Lin; Ji, Lei; Zhai, Wanli; Xiao, Jianru; Chen, Jiwu; Li, Xiaotao

    2015-05-01

    Elimination of oxidized proteins is important to cells as accumulation of damaged proteins causes cellular dysfunction, disease, and aging. Abundant evidence shows that the 20S proteasome is largely responsible for degradation of oxidative proteins in both ubiquitin-dependent and ubiquitin-independent pathways. However, the role of the REGγ-proteasome in degrading oxidative proteins remains unclear. Here, we focus on two of the well-known REGγ-proteasome substrates, p21(Waf1/Cip1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein, to analyze the impact of oxidative stress on REGγ-proteasome functions. We demonstrate that REGγ-proteasome is essential for oxidative stress-induced rapid degradation of p21 and HCV proteins. Silencing REGγ abrogated this response in multiple cell lines. Furthermore, pretreatment with proteasome inhibitor MG132 completely blunted oxidant-induced p21 degradation, indicating a proteasome-dependent action. Cellular oxidation promoted REGγ-proteasome-dependent trypsin-like activity by enhancing the interaction between REGγ and 20S proteasome. Antioxidant could counteract oxidation-induced protein degradation, indicating that REGγ-proteasome activity may be regulated by redox state. This study provides further insights into the actions of a unique proteasome pathway in response to an oxidative stress environment, implying a novel molecular basis for REGγ-proteasome functions in antioxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The ubiquitin proteasome system and myocardial ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Calise, Justine

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) has been the subject of intensive research over the past 20 years to define its role in normal physiology and in pathophysiology. Many of these studies have focused in on the cardiovascular system and have determined that the UPS becomes dysfunctional in several pathologies such as familial and idiopathic cardiomyopathies, atherosclerosis, and myocardial ischemia. This review presents a synopsis of the literature as it relates to the role of the UPS in myocardial ischemia. Studies have shown that the UPS is dysfunctional during myocardial ischemia, and recent studies have shed some light on possible mechanisms. Other studies have defined a role for the UPS in ischemic preconditioning which is best associated with myocardial ischemia and is thus presented here. Very recent studies have started to define roles for specific proteasome subunits and components of the ubiquitination machinery in various aspects of myocardial ischemia. Lastly, despite the evidence linking myocardial ischemia and proteasome dysfunction, there are continuing suggestions that proteasome inhibitors may be useful to mitigate ischemic injury. This review presents the rationale behind this and discusses both supportive and nonsupportive studies and presents possible future directions that may help in clarifying this controversy. PMID:23220331

  2. Assembly of the 20S Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Kunjappu, Mary J.; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The proteasome is a cellular protease responsible for the selective degradation of the majority of the intracellular proteome. It recognizes, unfolds, and cleaves proteins that are destined for removal, usually by prior attachment to polymers of ubiquitin. This macromolecular machine is composed of two subcomplexes, the 19S regulatory particle (RP) and the 20S core particle (CP), which together contain at least 33 different and precisely positioned subunits. How these subunits assemble into functional complexes is an area of active exploration. Here we describe the current status of studies on the assembly of the 20S proteasome (CP). The 28-subunit CP is found in all three domains of life and its cylindrical stack of four heptameric rings is well conserved. Though several CP subunits possess self-assembly properties, a consistent theme in recent years has been the need for dedicated assembly chaperones that promote on-pathway assembly. To date, a minimum of three accessory factors have been implicated in aiding the construction of the 20S proteasome. These chaperones interact with different assembling proteasomal precursors and usher subunits into specific slots in the growing structure. This review will focus largely on chaperone-dependent CP assembly and its regulation. PMID:23507199

  3. D1 dopamine receptor stimulation impairs striatal proteasome activity in Parkinsonism through 26S proteasome disassembly.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Thiolat, Marie-Laure; Bido, Simone; Martinez, Audrey; Doudnikoff, Evelyne; Baufreton, Jérôme; Bourdenx, Mathieu; Bloch, Bertrand; Bezard, Erwan; Martin-Negrier, Marie-Laure

    2015-06-01

    Among the mechanisms underlying the development of L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson's disease, complex alterations in dopamine signaling in D1 receptor (D1R)-expressing medium spiny striatal neurons have been unraveled such as, but not limited to, dysregulation of D1R expression, lateral diffusion, intraneuronal trafficking, subcellular localization and desensitization, leading to a pathological anchorage of D1R at the plasma membrane. Such anchorage is partly due to a decreased proteasomal activity that is specific of the L-dopa-exposed dopamine-depleted striatum, results from D1R activation and feeds-back the D1R exaggerated cell surface abundance. The precise mechanisms by which L-dopa affects striatal proteasome activity remained however unknown. We here show, in a series of in vitro ex vivo and in vivo models, that such rapid modulation of striatal proteasome activity intervenes through D1R-mediated disassembly of the 26S proteasome rather than change in transcription or translation of proteasome or proteasome subunits intraneuronal relocalization.

  4. Compromising the 19S proteasome complex protects cells from reduced flux through the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Tsvetkov, Peter; Mendillo, Marc L; Zhao, Jinghui; Carette, Jan E; Merrill, Parker H; Cikes, Domagoj; Varadarajan, Malini; van Diemen, Ferdy R; Penninger, Josef M; Goldberg, Alfred L; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Santagata, Sandro; Lindquist, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are central regulators of protein homeostasis in eukaryotes. Proteasome function is vulnerable to environmental insults, cellular protein imbalance and targeted pharmaceuticals. Yet, mechanisms that cells deploy to counteract inhibition of this central regulator are little understood. To find such mechanisms, we reduced flux through the proteasome to the point of toxicity with specific inhibitors and performed genome-wide screens for mutations that allowed cells to survive. Counter to expectation, reducing expression of individual subunits of the proteasome's 19S regulatory complex increased survival. Strong 19S reduction was cytotoxic but modest reduction protected cells from inhibitors. Protection was accompanied by an increased ratio of 20S to 26S proteasomes, preservation of protein degradation capacity and reduced proteotoxic stress. While compromise of 19S function can have a fitness cost under basal conditions, it provided a powerful survival advantage when proteasome function was impaired. This means of rebalancing proteostasis is conserved from yeast to humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08467.001 PMID:26327695

  5. DUB3 Deubiquitylating Enzymes Regulate Hippo Pathway Activity by Regulating the Stability of ITCH, LATS and AMOT Proteins.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hung Thanh; Kugler, Jan-Michael; Cohen, Stephen M

    2017-01-01

    The YAP and TAZ transcriptional coactivators promote oncogenic transformation. Elevated YAP/TAZ activity has been documented in human tumors. YAP and TAZ are negatively regulated by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. The activity and stability of several Hippo pathway components, including YAP/TAZ, is regulated by ubiquitin mediated protein turnover and several ubiquitin ligase complexes have been implicated in human cancer. However, little is known about the deubiquitylating enzymes that counteract these ubiquitin ligases in regulation of the Hippo pathway. Here we identify the DUB3 family deubiquitylating enzymes as regulators of Hippo pathway activity. We provide evidence that DUB3 proteins regulate YAP/TAZ activity by controlling the stability of the E3 ligase ITCH, the LATS kinases and the AMOT family proteins. As a novel Hippo pathway regulator, DUB3 has the potential to act a tumor suppressor by limiting YAP activity.

  6. DUB3 Deubiquitylating Enzymes Regulate Hippo Pathway Activity by Regulating the Stability of ITCH, LATS and AMOT Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The YAP and TAZ transcriptional coactivators promote oncogenic transformation. Elevated YAP/TAZ activity has been documented in human tumors. YAP and TAZ are negatively regulated by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. The activity and stability of several Hippo pathway components, including YAP/TAZ, is regulated by ubiquitin mediated protein turnover and several ubiquitin ligase complexes have been implicated in human cancer. However, little is known about the deubiquitylating enzymes that counteract these ubiquitin ligases in regulation of the Hippo pathway. Here we identify the DUB3 family deubiquitylating enzymes as regulators of Hippo pathway activity. We provide evidence that DUB3 proteins regulate YAP/TAZ activity by controlling the stability of the E3 ligase ITCH, the LATS kinases and the AMOT family proteins. As a novel Hippo pathway regulator, DUB3 has the potential to act a tumor suppressor by limiting YAP activity. PMID:28061504

  7. Proteasome Regulation of ULBP1 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Butler, James E.; Moore, Mikel B.; Presnell, Steven R.; Chan, Huei-Wei; Chalupny, N. Jan; Lutz, Charles T.

    2009-01-01

    Killer lymphocytes recognize stress-activated NKG2D ligands on tumors. We examined NKG2D ligand expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells and other cell lines. HNSCC cells typically expressed MHC class I chain-related gene A (MICA), MICB, UL16-binding protein (ULBP)2, and ULBP3, but they were uniformly negative for cell surface ULBP1 and ULBP4. We then studied how cancer treatments affected NKG2D ligand expression. NKG2D ligand expression was not changed by most cancer-relevant treatments. However, bortezomib and other proteasome inhibitor drugs with distinct mechanisms of action dramatically and specifically up-regulated HNSCC ULBP1 mRNA and cell surface protein. Proteasome inhibition also increased RNA for ULBP1 and other NKG2D ligands in nontransformed human keratinocytes. Proteasome inhibitor drugs increased ULBP1 transcription by acting at a site in the 522-bp ULBP1 promoter. Although the DNA damage response pathways mediated by ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) and ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) signaling had been reported to up-regulate NKG2D ligand expression, we found that ULBP1 up-regulation was not inhibited by caffeine and wortmannin, inhibitors of ATM/ATR signaling. ULBP1 expression in HNSCC cells was not increased by several ATM/ATR activating treatments, including bleomycin, cisplatin, aphidicolin, and hydroxyurea. Ionizing radiation caused ATM activation in HNSCC cells, but high-level ULBP1 expression was not induced by gamma radiation or UV radiation. Thus, ATM/ATR signaling was neither necessary nor sufficient for high-level ULBP1 expression in human HNSCC cell lines and could not account for the proteasome effect. The selective induction of ULBP1 expression by proteasome inhibitor drugs, along with variable NKG2D ligand expression by human tumor cells, indicates that NKG2D ligand genes are independently regulated. PMID:19414815

  8. Functional asymmetries of proteasome translocase pore.

    PubMed

    Erales, Jenny; Hoyt, Martin A; Troll, Fabian; Coffino, Philip

    2012-05-25

    Degradation by proteasomes involves coupled translocation and unfolding of its protein substrates. Six distinct but paralogous proteasome ATPase proteins, Rpt1 to -6, form a heterohexameric ring that acts on substrates. An axially positioned loop (Ar-Φ loop) moves in concert with ATP hydrolysis, engages substrate, and propels it into a proteolytic chamber. The aromatic (Ar) residue of the Ar-Φ loop in all six Rpts of S. cerevisiae is tyrosine; this amino acid is thought to have important functional contacts with substrate. Six yeast strains were constructed and characterized in which Tyr was individually mutated to Ala. The mutant cells were viable and had distinct phenotypes. rpt3, rpt4, and rpt5 Tyr/Ala mutants, which cluster on one side of the ATPase hexamer, were substantially impaired in their capacity to degrade substrates. In contrast, rpt1, rpt2, and rpt6 mutants equaled or exceeded wild type in degradation activity. However, rpt1 and rpt6 mutants had defects that limited cell growth or viability under conditions that stressed the ubiquitin proteasome system. In contrast, the rpt3 mutant grew faster than wild type and to a smaller size, a defect that has previously been associated with misregulation of G1 cyclins. This rpt3 phenotype probably results from altered degradation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. Finally, mutation of five of the Rpt subunits increased proteasome ATPase activity, implying bidirectional coupling between the Ar-Φ loop and the ATP hydrolysis site. The present observations assign specific functions to individual Rpt proteins and provide insights into the diverse roles of the axial loops of individual proteasome ATPases.

  9. Redox control of 20S proteasome gating.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gustavo M; Netto, Luis E S; Simões, Vanessa; Santos, Luiz F A; Gozzo, Fabio C; Demasi, Marcos A A; Oliveira, Cristiano L P; Bicev, Renata N; Klitzke, Clécio F; Sogayar, Mari C; Demasi, Marilene

    2012-06-01

    The proteasome is the primary contributor in intracellular proteolysis. Oxidized or unstructured proteins can be degraded via a ubiquitin- and ATP-independent process by the free 20S proteasome (20SPT). The mechanism by which these proteins enter the catalytic chamber is not understood thus far, although the 20SPT gating conformation is considered to be an important barrier to allowing proteins free entrance. We have previously shown that S-glutathiolation of the 20SPT is a post-translational modification affecting the proteasomal activities. The goal of this work was to investigate the mechanism that regulates 20SPT activity, which includes the identification of the Cys residues prone to S-glutathiolation. Modulation of 20SPT activity by proteasome gating is at least partially due to the S-glutathiolation of specific Cys residues. The gate was open when the 20SPT was S-glutathiolated, whereas following treatment with high concentrations of dithiothreitol, the gate was closed. S-glutathiolated 20SPT was more effective at degrading both oxidized and partially unfolded proteins than its reduced form. Only 2 out of 28 Cys were observed to be S-glutathiolated in the proteasomal α5 subunit of yeast cells grown to the stationary phase in glucose-containing medium. We demonstrate a redox post-translational regulatory mechanism controlling 20SPT activity. S-glutathiolation is a post-translational modification that triggers gate opening and thereby activates the proteolytic activities of free 20SPT. This process appears to be an important regulatory mechanism to intensify the removal of oxidized or unstructured proteins in stressful situations by a process independent of ubiquitination and ATP consumption. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1183-1194.

  10. Redox Control of 20S Proteasome Gating

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Gustavo M.; Simões, Vanessa; Santos, Luiz F.A.; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Demasi, Marcos A.A.; Oliveira, Cristiano L.P.; Bicev, Renata N.; Klitzke, Clécio F.; Sogayar, Mari C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The proteasome is the primary contributor in intracellular proteolysis. Oxidized or unstructured proteins can be degraded via a ubiquitin- and ATP-independent process by the free 20S proteasome (20SPT). The mechanism by which these proteins enter the catalytic chamber is not understood thus far, although the 20SPT gating conformation is considered to be an important barrier to allowing proteins free entrance. We have previously shown that S-glutathiolation of the 20SPT is a post-translational modification affecting the proteasomal activities. Aims: The goal of this work was to investigate the mechanism that regulates 20SPT activity, which includes the identification of the Cys residues prone to S-glutathiolation. Results: Modulation of 20SPT activity by proteasome gating is at least partially due to the S-glutathiolation of specific Cys residues. The gate was open when the 20SPT was S-glutathiolated, whereas following treatment with high concentrations of dithiothreitol, the gate was closed. S-glutathiolated 20SPT was more effective at degrading both oxidized and partially unfolded proteins than its reduced form. Only 2 out of 28 Cys were observed to be S-glutathiolated in the proteasomal α5 subunit of yeast cells grown to the stationary phase in glucose-containing medium. Innovation: We demonstrate a redox post-translational regulatory mechanism controlling 20SPT activity. Conclusion: S-glutathiolation is a post-translational modification that triggers gate opening and thereby activates the proteolytic activities of free 20SPT. This process appears to be an important regulatory mechanism to intensify the removal of oxidized or unstructured proteins in stressful situations by a process independent of ubiquitination and ATP consumption. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1183–1194. PMID:22229461

  11. Proteasome as a Molecular Target of Microcystin-LR

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhu; Zhang, Li; Shi, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Proteasome degrades proteins in eukaryotic cells. As such, the proteasome is crucial in cell cycle and function. This study proved that microcystin-LR (MC-LR), which is a toxic by-product of algal bloom, can target cellular proteasome and selectively inhibit proteasome trypsin-like (TL) activity. MC-LR at 1 nM can inhibit up to 54% of the purified 20S proteasome TL activity and 43% of the proteasome TL activity in the liver of the cyprinid rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus). Protein degradation was retarded in GFP-CL1-transfected PC-3 cells because MC-LR inhibited the proteasome TL activity. Docking studies indicated that MC-LR blocked the active site of the proteasome β2 subunit; thus, the proteasome TL activity was inhibited. In conclusion, MC-LR can target proteasome, selectively inhibit proteasome TL activity, and retard protein degradation. This study may be used as a reference of future research on the toxic mechanism of MC-LR. PMID:26090622

  12. Dynamic recruitment of active proteasomes into polyglutamine initiated inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Schipper-Krom, Sabine; Juenemann, Katrin; Jansen, Anne H; Wiemhoefer, Anne; van den Nieuwendijk, Rianne; Smith, Donna L; Hink, Mark A; Bates, Gillian P; Overkleeft, Hermen; Ovaa, Huib; Reits, Eric

    2014-01-03

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease are hallmarked by neuronal intracellular inclusion body formation. Whether proteasomes are irreversibly recruited into inclusion bodies in these protein misfolding disorders is a controversial subject. In addition, it has been proposed that the proteasomes may become clogged by the aggregated protein fragments, leading to impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here, we show by fluorescence pulse-chase experiments in living cells that proteasomes are dynamically and reversibly recruited into inclusion bodies. As these recruited proteasomes remain catalytically active and accessible to substrates, our results challenge the concept of proteasome sequestration and impairment in Huntington's disease, and support the reported absence of proteasome impairment in mouse models of Huntington's disease. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. All rights reserved.

  13. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome in an Indonesian patient with folliculin gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Wiyono, Wiwien Heru; Nurwidya, Fariz; Baskoro, Hario; Putra, Andika Chandra

    2016-11-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder that affects the skin, kidney, and lungs. Affected individuals have an increased risk of developing multiple cysts in the lungs and a spontaneous pneumothorax. Germline mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene have been confirmed as the aetiology of BHD syndrome. A 51-year-old Indonesian female presented with recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax, multiple cysts in both lungs, and a renal cyst on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Blood sampling was performed to extract genomic DNA from peripheral blood leucocytes. We identified an aberrant band in the DNA fragment derived from FLCN exon 6. Moreover, direct sequencing of FLCN exon 6 by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) showed a pathogenic mutation, which caused premature termination of folliculin protein translation. This is the first reported case of BHD syndrome in an Indonesian patient confirmed by detection of a FLCN exon 6 mutation.

  14. Pleural Covering Application for Recurrent Pneumothorax in a Patient with Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ebana, Hiroki; Otsuji, Mizuto; Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Kurihara, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Seyama, Kuniaki

    2016-06-20

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) is a rare hereditary disease that presents with multiple lung cysts and recurrent pneumothorax. These cysts occupy predominantly the lower-medial zone of the lung field adjacent to the interlobar fissure, and some of them abut peripheral pulmonary vessels. For the surgical management of pneumothorax with BHDS, the conventional approach of resecting all subpleural cysts and bullae is not feasible. Thus, after handling several bullae by using a stapler or performing ligation as a standardized treatment, we applied to a pleural covering technique to thicken the affected visceral pleura and then to prevent recurrence of pneumothorax. We herein report the successful application of a pleural covering technique via thoracoscopic surgery to treat the recurrent pneumothorax of a 30-year-old man with BHDS. This technique is promising for the management of intractable pneumothorax secondary to BHDS.

  15. Bacterial Proteasome Activator Bpa (Rv3780) Is a Novel Ring-Shaped Interactor of the Mycobacterial Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Delley, Cyrille L.; Laederach, Juerg; Ziemski, Michal; Bolten, Marcel; Boehringer, Daniel; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of the proteasome in bacteria is limited to the phylum of actinobacteria, where it is maintained in parallel to the usual bacterial compartmentalizing proteases. The role it plays in these organisms is still not fully understood, but in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) the proteasome supports persistence in the host. In complex with the ring-shaped ATPase Mpa (called ARC in other actinobacteria), the proteasome can degrade proteins that have been post-translationally modified with the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup. Unlike for the eukaryotic proteasome core particle, no other bacterial proteasome interactors have been identified to date. Here we describe and characterize a novel bacterial proteasome activator of Mycobacterium tuberculosis we termed Bpa (Rv3780), using a combination of biochemical and biophysical methods. Bpa features a canonical C-terminal proteasome interaction motif referred to as the HbYX motif, and its orthologs are only found in those actinobacteria encoding the proteasomal subunits. Bpa can inhibit degradation of Pup-tagged substrates in vitro by competing with Mpa for association with the proteasome. Using negative-stain electron microscopy, we show that Bpa forms a ring-shaped homooligomer that can bind coaxially to the face of the proteasome cylinder. Interestingly, Bpa can stimulate the proteasomal degradation of the model substrate β-casein, which suggests it could play a role in the removal of non-native or damaged proteins. PMID:25469515

  16. Activity-based imaging probes of the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Carmony, Kimberly Cornish; Kim, Kyung Bo

    2013-09-01

    Over the years, the proteasome has been extensively investigated due to its crucial roles in many important signaling pathways and its implications in diseases. Two proteasome inhibitors--bortezomib and carfilzomib--have received FDA approval for the treatment of multiple myeloma, thereby validating the proteasome as a chemotherapeutic target. As a result, further research efforts have been focused on dissecting the complex biology of the proteasome to gain the insight required for developing next-generation proteasome inhibitors. It is clear that chemical probes have made significant contributions to these efforts, mostly by functioning as inhibitors that selectively block the catalytic activity of proteasomes. Analogues of these inhibitors are now providing additional tools for visualization of catalytically active proteasome subunits, several of which allow real-time monitoring of proteasome activity in living cells as well as in in vivo settings. These imaging probes will provide powerful tools for assessing the efficacy of proteasome inhibitors in clinical settings. In this review, we will focus on the recent efforts towards developing imaging probes of proteasomes, including the latest developments in immunoproteasome-selective imaging probes.

  17. Identification of substrates of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Michael J; Arora, Pooja; Festa, Richard A; Butler-Wu, Susan M; Gokhale, Rajesh S; Darwin, K Heran

    2006-01-01

    The putative proteasome-associated proteins Mpa (Mycobaterium proteasomal ATPase) and PafA (proteasome accessory factor A) of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) are essential for virulence and resistance to nitric oxide. However, a direct link between the proteasome protease and Mpa or PafA has never been demonstrated. Furthermore, protein degradation by bacterial proteasomes in vitro has not been accomplished, possibly due to the failure to find natural degradation substrates or other necessary proteasome co-factors. In this work, we identify the first bacterial proteasome substrates, malonyl Co-A acyl carrier protein transacylase and ketopantoate hydroxymethyltransferase, enzymes that are required for the biosynthesis of fatty acids and polyketides that are essential for the pathogenesis of Mtb. Maintenance of the physiological levels of these enzymes required Mpa and PafA in addition to proteasome protease activity. Mpa levels were also regulated in a proteasome-dependent manner. Finally, we found that a conserved tyrosine of Mpa was essential for function. Thus, these results suggest that Mpa, PafA, and the Mtb proteasome degrade bacterial proteins that are important for virulence in mice. PMID:17082771

  18. Immunoaffinity purification of the functional 20S proteasome from human cells via transient overexpression of specific proteasome subunits.

    PubMed

    Livinskaya, Veronika A; Barlev, Nickolai A; Nikiforov, Andrey A

    2014-05-01

    The proteasome is a multi-subunit proteolytic complex that plays a central role in protein degradation in all eukaryotic cells. It regulates many vital cellular processes therefore its dysfunction can lead to various pathologies including cancer and neurodegeneration. Isolation of enzymatically active proteasomes is a key step to the successful study of the proteasome regulation and functions. Here we describe a simple and efficient protocol for immunoaffinity purification of the functional 20S proteasomes from human HEK 293T cells after transient overexpression of specific proteasome subunits tagged with 3xFLAG. To construct 3xFLAG-fusion proteins, DNA sequences encoding the 20S proteasome subunits PSMB5, PSMA5, and PSMA3 were cloned into mammalian expression vector pIRES-hrGFP-1a. The corresponding recombinant proteins PSMB5-3xFLAG, PSMA5-3xFLAG, or PSMA3-3xFLAG were transiently overexpressed in human HEK 293T cells and were shown to be partially incorporated into the intact proteasome complexes. 20S proteasomes were immunoprecipitated from HEK 293T cell extracts under mild conditions using antibodies against FLAG peptide. Isolation of highly purified 20S proteasomes were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting using antibodies against different proteasome subunits. Affinity purified 20S proteasomes were shown to possess chymotrypsin- and trypsin-like peptidase activities confirming their functionality. This simple single-step affinity method of the 20S proteasome purification can be instrumental to subsequent functional studies of proteasomes in human cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Renal cell tumour characteristics in patients with the Birt-Hogg-Dubé cancer susceptibility syndrome: a retrospective, multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Benusiglio, Patrick R; Giraud, Sophie; Deveaux, Sophie; Méjean, Arnaud; Correas, Jean-Michel; Joly, Dominique; Timsit, Marc-Olivier; Ferlicot, Sophie; Verkarre, Virginie; Abadie, Caroline; Chauveau, Dominique; Leroux, Dominique; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Cordier, Jean-François; Richard, Stéphane

    2014-10-29

    The Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is a rare cancer susceptibility syndrome characterised by renal tumours, lung cysts and pneumothoraces, and fibrofolliculomas. It is caused by dominantly inherited mutations in FLCN. Our objective was to report renal tumour characteristics in a large series of patients with the Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome. We studied French Birt-Hogg-Dubé patients with a history of renal tumour. We included 33 patients with 21 distinct germline FLCN mutations. Median age at diagnosis of first renal tumour was 46, and age varied from 20 to 83. Twenty cases had one renal tumour, the remainder had two or more tumours. Most cases (23/33, 70%) had oncocytoma or renal cell carcinoma of the chromophobe or hybrid chromophobe-oncocytoma type, three had clear cell carcinoma (9%), and the other seven had carcinoma of papillary, undifferentiated or undetermined histology. Four cases had metastatic disease, although none died of it. Age at renal tumour diagnosis was highly variable, highlighting the need for regular surveillance from young adulthood to old age. Most cases had tumour types classically associated with Birt-Hogg-Dubé, i.e. oncocytoma or renal cell carcinoma of the chromophobe or hybrid type. Nevertheless, 9% had clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Geneticists, urologists and oncologists should therefore be alert to the possibility of Birt-Hogg-Dubé in patients with renal cell carcinoma of clear cell histology, especially if there are associated manifestations. Finally, the behaviour of metastatic carcinoma seemed more indolent than in sporadic renal cancers.

  20. Involvement of proteasomal subunits zeta and iota in RNA degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Petit, F; Jarrousse, A S; Dahlmann, B; Sobek, A; Hendil, K B; Buri, J; Briand, Y; Schmid, H P

    1997-01-01

    We have identified two distinct subunits of 20 S proteasomes that are associated with RNase activity. Proteasome subunits zeta and iota, eluted from two-dimensional Western blots, hydrolysed tobacco mosaic virus RNA, whereas none of the other subunits degraded this substrate under the same conditions. Additionally, proteasomes were dissociated by 6 M urea, and subunit zeta, containing the highest RNase activity, was isolated by anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Purified subunit zeta migrated as a single spot on two-dimensional PAGE with a molecular mass of approx. 28 kDa. Addition of anti-(subunit zeta) antibodies led to the co-precipitation of this proteasome subunit and nuclease activity. This is the first evidence that proteasomal alpha-type subunits are associated with an enzymic activity, and our results provide further evidence that proteasomes may be involved in cellular RNA metabolism. PMID:9337855

  1. Towards quantitative prediction of proteasomal digestion patterns of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldobin, Denis S.; Zaikin, Alexey

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the problem of proteasomal degradation of proteins. Though proteasomes are important for all aspects of cellular metabolism, some details of the physical mechanism of the process remain unknown. We introduce a stochastic model of the proteasomal degradation of proteins, which accounts for the protein translocation and the topology of the positioning of cleavage centers of a proteasome from first principles. For this model we develop a mathematical description based on a master equation and techniques for reconstruction of the cleavage specificity inherent to proteins and the proteasomal translocation rates, which are a property of the proteasome species, from mass spectroscopy data on digestion patterns. With these properties determined, one can quantitatively predict digestion patterns for new experimental set-ups. Additionally we design an experimental set-up for a synthetic polypeptide with a periodic sequence of amino acids, which enables especially reliable determination of translocation rates.

  2. Regulating the 20S Proteasome Ubiquitin-Independent Degradation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Nissan, Gili; Sharon, Michal

    2014-01-01

    For many years, the ubiquitin-26S proteasome degradation pathway was considered the primary route for proteasomal degradation. However, it is now becoming clear that proteins can also be targeted for degradation by the core 20S proteasome itself. Degradation by the 20S proteasome does not require ubiquitin tagging or the presence of the 19S regulatory particle; rather, it relies on the inherent structural disorder of the protein being degraded. Thus, proteins that contain unstructured regions due to oxidation, mutation, or aging, as well as naturally, intrinsically unfolded proteins, are susceptible to 20S degradation. Unlike the extensive knowledge acquired over the years concerning degradation by the 26S proteasome, relatively little is known about the means by which 20S-mediated proteolysis is controlled. Here, we describe our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that coordinate 20S proteasome-mediated degradation, and highlight the gaps in knowledge that remain to be bridged. PMID:25250704

  3. The recognition of ubiquitinated proteins by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Grice, Guinevere L; Nathan, James A

    2016-09-01

    The ability of ubiquitin to form up to eight different polyubiquitin chain linkages generates complexity within the ubiquitin proteasome system, and accounts for the diverse roles of ubiquitination within the cell. Understanding how each type of ubiquitin linkage is correctly interpreted by ubiquitin binding proteins provides important insights into the link between chain recognition and cellular fate. A major function of ubiquitination is to signal degradation of intracellular proteins by the 26S proteasome. Lysine-48 (K48) linked polyubiquitin chains are well established as the canonical signal for proteasomal degradation, but recent studies show a role for other ubiquitin linked chains in facilitating degradation by the 26S proteasome. Here, we review how different types of polyubiquitin linkage bind to ubiquitin receptors on the 26S proteasome, how they signal degradation and discuss the implications of ubiquitin chain linkage in regulating protein breakdown by the proteasome.

  4. Regulation of proteasome activity in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Marion; Finley, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is the primary selective degradation system in the nuclei and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, required for the turnover of myriad soluble proteins. The hundreds of factors that comprise the UPS include an enzymatic cascade that tags proteins for degradation via the covalent attachment of a poly-ubiquitin chain, and a large multimeric enzyme that degrades ubiquitinated proteins, the proteasome. Protein degradation by the UPS regulates many pathways and is a crucial component of the cellular proteostasis network. Dysfunction of the ubiquitination machinery or the proteolytic activity of the proteasome is associated with numerous human diseases. In this review we discuss the contributions of the proteasome to human pathology, describe mechanisms that regulate the proteolytic capacity of the proteasome, and discuss strategies to modulate proteasome function as a therapeutic approach to ameliorate diseases associated with altered UPS function. PMID:23994620

  5. It's all about talking: two-way communication between proteasomal and lysosomal degradation pathways via ubiquitin

    PubMed Central

    Liebl, Martina P.

    2016-01-01

    Selective degradation of proteins requires a fine-tuned coordination of the two major proteolytic pathways, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy. Substrate selection and proteolytic activity are defined by a plethora of regulatory cofactors influencing each other. Both proteolytic pathways are initiated by ubiquitylation to mark substrate proteins for degradation, although the size and/or topology of the modification are different. In this context E3 ubiquitin ligases, ensuring the covalent attachment of activated ubiquitin to the substrate, are of special importance. The regulation of E3 ligase activity, competition between different E3 ligases for binding E2 conjugation enzymes and substrates, as well as their interplay with deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) represent key events in the cross talk between the UPS and autophagy. The coordination between both degradation routes is further influenced by heat shock factors and ubiquitin-binding proteins (UBPs) such as p97, p62, or optineurin. Mutations in enzymes and ubiquitin-binding proteins or a general decline of both proteolytic systems during aging result in accumulation of damaged and aggregated proteins. Thus further mechanistic understanding of how UPS and autophagy communicate might allow therapeutic intervention especially against age-related diseases. PMID:27225656

  6. Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven R Schwarze...SUBTITLE Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Proteasome Inhibition 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0392 5c...proteasome inhibition can act as an anti-neoplastic agent in vivo by sensitizing cancer cells to cell death ligands in the tumor microenvironment

  7. Isolation and purification of proteasomes from primary cells.

    PubMed

    Steers, Nicholas J; Peachman, Kristina K; Alving, Carl R; Rao, Mangala

    2014-11-03

    Proteasomes play an important role in cell homeostasis and in orchestrating the immune response by systematically degrading foreign proteins and misfolded or damaged host cell proteins. We describe a protocol to purify functionally active proteasomes from human CD4(+) T cells and dendritic cells derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The purification is a three-step process involving ion-exchange chromatography, ammonium sulfate precipitation, and sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. This method can be easily adapted to purify proteasomes from cell lines or from organs. Methods to characterize and visualize the purified proteasomes are also described.

  8. Proteasomes and protein conjugation across domains of life.

    PubMed

    Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    2011-12-19

    Like other energy-dependent proteases, proteasomes, which are found across the three domains of life, are self-compartmentalized and important in the early steps of proteolysis. Proteasomes degrade improperly synthesized, damaged or misfolded proteins and hydrolyse regulatory proteins that must be specifically removed or cleaved for cell signalling. In eukaryotes, proteins are typically targeted for proteasome-mediated destruction through polyubiquitylation, although ubiquitin-independent pathways also exist. Interestingly, actinobacteria and archaea also covalently attach small proteins (prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup) and small archaeal modifier proteins (Samps), respectively) to certain proteins, and this may serve to target the modified proteins for degradation by proteasomes.

  9. Cell-line-specific high background in the Proteasome-Glo assay of proteasome trypsin-like activity.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Owen M; Downey, Sondra L; Weyburne, Emily S; Williams, David A; Mirabella, Anne C; Overkleeft, Herman S; Kisselev, Alexei F

    2014-04-15

    Proteasome-Glo is a homogeneous cell-based assay of proteasomal chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like activities using luminogenic substrates, commercially available from Promega. Here we report that the background activity from cleavage of the substrate of the trypsin-like sites by nonproteasomal proteases in multiple breast and lung cancer cell lines exceeds the activity of the proteasome. We also observed substantial background chymotrypsin-like activity in some cell lines. Thus, Proteasome-Glo assay must be used with caution, and it is necessary to include a specific proteasome inhibitor to determine the background for each proteasome activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The proteasome and the degradation of oxidized proteins: Part III—Redox regulation of the proteasomal system

    PubMed Central

    Höhn, Tobias Jung Annika; Grune, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Here, we review shortly the current knowledge on the regulation of the proteasomal system during and after oxidative stress. After addressing the components of the proteasomal system and the degradation of oxidatively damaged proteins in part I and II of this series, we address here which changes in activity undergo the proteasome and the ubiquitin-proteasomal system itself under oxidative conditions. While several components of the proteasomal system undergo direct oxidative modification, a number of redox-regulated events are modulating the proteasomal activity in a way it can address the major tasks in an oxidative stress situation: the removal of oxidized proteins and the adaptation of the cellular metabolism to the stress situation. PMID:24563857

  11. Molecular Genetics and Clinical Features of Birt-Hogg-Dubé-Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Laura S.; Linehan, W. Marston

    2016-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an inherited renal cancer syndrome in which affected individuals are at risk to develop benign, cutaneous fibrofolliculomas, bilateral pulmonary cysts and spontaneous pneumothoraces, and kidney tumors. Bilateral multifocal renal tumors that develop in BHD syndrome are most frequently hybrid oncocytic tumors and chromophobe renal carcinoma, but may present with other histologies. Germline mutations in the FLCN gene on chromosome 17 are responsible for BHD syndrome. BHD-associated renal tumors show inactivation of the wild-type FLCN allele by somatic mutation or chromosomal loss, confirming that FLCN is a tumor suppressor gene that fits the classic two-hit model. FLCN interacts with two novel proteins, FNIP1 and FNIP2, and with AMPK, a negative regulator of mTOR. Studies with FLCN-deficient cell and animal models support a role for FLCN in modulating the AKT-mTOR pathway. Emerging evidence links FLCN with a number of other molecular pathways and cellular processes important for cell homeostasis that are frequently deregulated in cancer, including regulation of TFE3/TFEB transcriptional activity, amino acid-dependent mTOR activation through Rag GTPases, TGF-β signaling, PGC1α-driven mitochondrial biogenesis, and autophagy. Currently, surgical intervention is the only therapy available for BHD-associated renal tumors. Further understanding of the FLCN pathway will hopefully lead to the development of effective forms of therapy for this disease. PMID:26334087

  12. Multiple angiomatous nodules: a novel skin tumor in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidou, C; Moscarella, E; Longo, C; Rosato, S; Cavazza, A; Piana, S

    2016-12-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS), first described in 1977, is a rare autosomal dominant disorder, linked to germline mutations in the FLCN (folliculin) gene. Patients may present with different skin tumors, pulmonary cysts with recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax, and renal cancers, but it has also been estimated that about 25% of carriers older than 20 years do not show skin involvement. So far, besides the triad of skin lesions of the original description (fibrofolliculomas, trichodischomas and acrochordons), a wide range of neoplastic and non-neoplastic skin conditions have been reported, i.e. melanomas, trichoblastoma, neural- and connective tissue tumors, lipomas, angiolipomas and focal cutaneous mucinosis. We describe a patient with BHDS developing multiple skin angiomatous lesions with prominent signet-ring features, an association never reported so far. As renal carcinomas represent the most threatening complication in BHDS and the identification of the patients with BHDS is mainly based on the clinical and histopathologic identification of the diagnostic skin lesions, the role of the dermatologist can be crucial in the prevention and early detection of a potentially aggressive renal cancer.

  13. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: a case report and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Dea Kejlberg; Villumsen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Madsen, Mia Gebauer; Sommerlund, Mette; Bendstrup, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Background: Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited syndrome caused by mutations in the folliculin coding gene (FLCN). The clinical manifestations of the syndrome involve the skin, lungs, and kidneys. Because of the rarity of the syndrome, guidelines for diagnosis and management of the patients with BHDS are lacking. Objective: To present a case story and a review of the literature on BHDS in order to give an update on genetics, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and follow-up strategies. Design: Literature review and case story. Results: A PubMed and Embase search identified 330 papers. BHDS is characterized by small benign tumors in the skin, spontaneous pneumothoraces caused by cysts in the lungs and a seven-fold increased risk of renal cancer. A case story of a young female patient presenting with pneumothorax and a family history of recurrent pneumothoraces in many relatives illustrates how the history and the diagnostic work up resulted in a diagnosis of BHDS. Conclusion: BHDS is a rare inherited disorder. In patients with spontaneous pneumothorax or cystic lung disease without any obvious explanation, BHDS should be considered. Concomitant skin manifestations, a family history of familiar pneumothorax, renal cancers and skin manifestations supports the suspicion of BHDS. Early diagnosis is important in order to subject patients to systematic screening for renal cancers. A radiological surveillance strategy for renal cancer is proposed.

  14. Immunohistochemical characterization of renal tumors in patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iribe, Yasuhiro; Kuroda, Naoto; Nagashima, Yoji; Yao, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reiko; Gotoda, Hiroko; Kawakami, Fumi; Imamura, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Yasushi; Ando, Midori; Araki, Akinobu; Matsushima, Jun; Nakatani, Yukio; Furuya, Mitsuko

    2015-03-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with a germline mutation of folliculin (FLCN). The affected families are at a high risk for developing multiple renal cell carcinomas (RCC). Little is known about the immunostaining patterns of mutant FLCN-associated RCCs. We investigated 32 RCCs obtained from 17 BHD patients. The studied tumors included chromophobe RCCs (n = 15), hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumors (HOCT) (n = 14) and clear cell RCCs (n = 3). Almost all chromophobe RCCs and HOCTs revealed positive staining for S100A1, Ksp-cadherin and CD82. They stained either focally or diffusely for CK7, and were negative for CA-IX. All clear cell RCCs were positively stained for CA-IX and negative for CK7. These data confirmed that mutant FLCN-associated oncocytic and clear cell RCCs exhibited generally similar immunostaining patterns compared to their sporadic counterparts. Frequent positive staining for S100A1, Ksp-cadherin and CD82 in chromophobe RCCs and HOCTs indicated that these two types were relatively similar rather than distinctively different in their patterns of immunoreactivity. Characteristic peri-nuclear halos and polygonal cells with clear cytoplasm, which often misleads pathologists into the diagnosis of clear cell RCC, should be carefully examined using an immunohistochemical panel including CA-IX, Ksp-cadherin, CD82 and CK7.

  15. Molecular genetics and clinical features of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Laura S; Linehan, W Marston

    2015-10-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an inherited renal cancer syndrome in which affected individuals are at risk of developing benign cutaneous fibrofolliculomas, bilateral pulmonary cysts and spontaneous pneumothoraces, and kidney tumours. Bilateral multifocal renal tumours that develop in BHD syndrome are most frequently hybrid oncocytic tumours and chromophobe renal carcinoma, but can present with other histologies. Germline mutations in the FLCN gene on chromosome 17 are responsible for BHD syndrome--BHD-associated renal tumours display inactivation of the wild-type FLCN allele by somatic mutation or chromosomal loss, confirming that FLCN is a tumour suppressor gene that fits the classic two-hit model. FLCN interacts with two novel proteins, FNIP1 and FNIP2, and with AMPK, a negative regulator of mTOR. Studies with FLCN-deficient cell and animal models support a role for FLCN in modulating the AKT-mTOR pathway. Emerging evidence links FLCN with a number of other molecular pathways and cellular processes important for cell homeostasis that are frequently deregulated in cancer, including regulation of TFE3 and/or TFEB transcriptional activity, amino-acid-dependent mTOR activation through Rag GTPases, TGFβ signalling, PGC1α-driven mitochondrial biogenesis, and autophagy. Currently, surgical intervention is the only therapy available for BHD-associated renal tumours, but improved understanding of the FLCN pathway will hopefully lead to the development of effective forms of targeted systemic therapy for this disease.

  16. Birt–Hogg–Dubé syndrome: a case report and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Dea Kejlberg; Villumsen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Madsen, Mia Gebauer; Sommerlund, Mette; Bendstrup, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited syndrome caused by mutations in the folliculin coding gene (FLCN). The clinical manifestations of the syndrome involve the skin, lungs, and kidneys. Because of the rarity of the syndrome, guidelines for diagnosis and management of the patients with BHDS are lacking. Objective: To present a case story and a review of the literature on BHDS in order to give an update on genetics, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis and follow-up strategies. Design: Literature review and case story. Results: A PubMed and Embase search identified 330 papers. BHDS is characterized by small benign tumors in the skin, spontaneous pneumothoraces caused by cysts in the lungs and a seven-fold increased risk of renal cancer. A case story of a young female patient presenting with pneumothorax and a family history of recurrent pneumothoraces in many relatives illustrates how the history and the diagnostic work up resulted in a diagnosis of BHDS. Conclusion: BHDS is a rare inherited disorder. In patients with spontaneous pneumothorax or cystic lung disease without any obvious explanation, BHDS should be considered. Concomitant skin manifestations, a family history of familiar pneumothorax, renal cancers and skin manifestations supports the suspicion of BHDS. Early diagnosis is important in order to subject patients to systematic screening for renal cancers. A radiological surveillance strategy for renal cancer is proposed. PMID:28326182

  17. Birt–Hogg–Dubé syndrome: clinicopathological features of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Mitsuko; Nakatani, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    Birt–Hogg–Dubé syndrome (BHD) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterised by fibrofolliculomas, renal tumours, pulmonary cysts and pneumothorax. The pulmonary cysts and repeated episodes of pneumothorax are the clinical hallmarks for discovering families affected by the syndrome. This disorder is caused by mutations in the gene coding for folliculin (FLCN). FLCN forms a complex with FLCN-interacting protein 1 (FNIP1) and FNIP2 (also known as FNIPL), and the complex cross-talks with signalling molecules such as 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Heterozygous Flcn knockout mice and rats with Flcn gene mutations develop renal cysts, adenomas and/or carcinomas. These findings suggest that FLCN functions as a tumour suppressor that inhibits renal carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms of the formation of pulmonary cysts and pneumothorax associated with heterozygous mutations in FLCN are poorly understood. Resected lung specimens from patients with BHD are often misdiagnosed by pathologists as non-specific blebs or bullae or emphysema, and patients with BHD who have pulmonary cysts and repeated pneumothorax frequently do not receive appropriate medical investigations. This review discusses the clinical and pathological features of lungs of patients with BHD, focusing on the diagnostic pathology and possible mechanisms of cyst formation. PMID:23223565

  18. Clinical Features, Genetics and Potential Therapeutic Approaches for Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Laura S.; Linehan, W. Marston

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder that predisposes to fibrofolliculomas, pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal neoplasia. BHD is characterized by germline mutations in tumor suppressor FLCN. Inactivation of the remaining FLCN allele in kidney cells drives tumorigenesis. Novel FLCN-interacting proteins, FNIP1 and FNIP2, were identified. Studies with FLCN-deficient in vitro and in vivo models support a role for FLCN in modulating AKT-mTOR signaling. Emerging evidence suggests that FLCN may interact in a number of pathways/processes. Identification of FLCN’s major functional roles will provide the basis for developing targeted therapies for BHD patients. Areas covered This review covers BHD diagnostic criteria, clinical manifestations and genetics, as well as molecular consequences of FLCN inactivation. Recommended surveillance practices, patient management, and potential therapeutic options are discussed. Expert opinion In the decade since FLCN was identified as causative for BHD, we have gained a greater understanding of the clinical spectrum and genetics of this cancer syndrome. Recent studies have identified interactions between FLCN and a variety of signaling pathways and cellular processes, notably AKT-mTOR. Currently, surgical intervention is the only available therapy for BHD-associated renal tumors. Effective therapies will need to target primary pathways/processes deregulated in FLCN-deficient renal tumors and fibrofolliculomas. PMID:26581862

  19. Proteasome activities decrease during dexamethasone-induced apoptosis of thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Beyette, J; Mason, G G; Murray, R Z; Cohen, G M; Rivett, A J

    1998-06-01

    The induction of apoptosis in thymocytes by the glucocorticoid dexamethasone was used as a model system to investigate whether there are changes in 20 S and 26 S proteasome activities during apoptosis. We observed that thymocytes contain high concentrations of proteasomes and that following treatment with dexamethasone, cell extracts showed a decrease in proteasome chymotrypsin-like activity which correlated with the degree of apoptosis observed. The decrease in chymotrypsin-like activity of 20 S and 26S proteasomes was still apparent after these complexes had been partially purified from apoptotic thymocyte extracts and was therefore not due to competition resulting from a general increase in protein turnover. The trypsin-like and peptidylglutamylpeptide hydrolase activities of proteasome complexes were also observed to decrease during apoptosis, but these decreases were reversed by the inhibition of apoptosis by the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone. However, the chymotrypsin-like activity of proteasomes decreased further in the presence of the apoptosis inhibitor. Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone was found to inhibit the chymotrypsin- and trypsin-like activity of 26 S proteasomes in vitro. The decrease in proteasome activities in apoptosis did not appear to be due to a decrease in the concentration of total cellular proteasomes. Thus, the early decreases in 20 S and 26 S proteasome activities during apoptosis appear to be due to a down-regulation of their proteolytic activities and not to a decrease in their protein concentration. These data suggest that proteasomes may be responsible, in thymocytes, for the turnover of a protein that functions as a positive regulator of apoptosis.

  20. Protein Expression of Proteasome Subunits in Elderly Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Madeline R; Rubio, Maria D; Haroutunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is a major regulator of protein processing, trafficking, and degradation. While protein ubiquitination is utilized for many cellular processes, one major function of this system is to target proteins to the proteasome for degradation. In schizophrenia, studies have found UPS transcript abnormalities in both blood and brain, and we have previously reported decreased protein expression of ubiquitin-associated proteins in brain. To test whether the proteasome is similarly dysregulated, we measured the protein expression of proteasome catalytic subunits as well as essential subunits from proteasome regulatory complexes in 14 pair-matched schizophrenia and comparison subjects in superior temporal cortex. We found decreased expression of Rpt1, Rpt3, and Rpt6, subunits of the 19S regulatory particle essential for ubiquitin-dependent degradation by the proteasome. Additionally, the α subunit of the 11S αβ regulatory particle, which enhances proteasomal degradation of small peptides and unfolded proteins, was also decreased. Haloperidol-treated rats did not have altered expression of these subunits, suggesting the changes we observed in schizophrenia are likely not due to chronic antipsychotic treatment. Interestingly, expression of the catalytic subunits of both the standard and immunoproteasome were unchanged, suggesting the abnormalities we observed may be specific to the complexed state of the proteasome. Aging has significant effects on the proteasome, and several subunits (20S β2, Rpn10, Rpn13, 11Sβ, and 11Sγ) were significantly correlated with subject age. These data provide further evidence of dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in schizophrenia, and suggest that altered proteasome activity may be associated with the pathophysiology of this illness. PMID:26202105

  1. Structural Analysis of the Bacterial Proteasome Activator Bpa in Complex with the 20S Proteasome.

    PubMed

    Bolten, Marcel; Delley, Cyrille L; Leibundgut, Marc; Boehringer, Daniel; Ban, Nenad; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2016-12-06

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis harbors proteasomes that recruit substrates for degradation through an ubiquitin-like modification pathway. Recently, a non-ATPase activator termed Bpa (bacterial proteasome activator) was shown to support an alternate proteasomal degradation pathway. Here, we present the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of Bpa in complex with the 20S core particle (CP). For docking into the cryo-EM density, we solved the X-ray structure of Bpa, showing that it forms tight four-helix bundles arranged into a 12-membered ring with a 40 Å wide central pore and the C-terminal helix of each protomer protruding from the ring. The Bpa model was fitted into the cryo-EM map of the Bpa-CP complex, revealing its architecture and striking symmetry mismatch. The Bpa-CP interface was resolved to 3.5 Å, showing the interactions between the C-terminal GQYL motif of Bpa and the proteasome α-rings. This docking mode is related to the one observed for eukaryotic activators with features specific to the bacterial complex. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Proteasome activator 200: the heat is on...

    PubMed

    Savulescu, Anca F; Glickman, Michael H

    2011-05-01

    Proteasomes play a key regulatory role in all eukaryotic cells by removing proteins in a timely manner. There are two predominant forms: The 20S core particle (CP) can hydrolyze peptides and certain unstructured proteins, and the 26S holoenzyme is able to proteolyse most proteins conjugated to ubiquitin. The 26S complex consists of a CP barrel with a 19S regulatory particle (RP; a.k.a PA700) attached to its outer surface. Several studies purified another proteasome activator with a MW of 200 kDa (PA200) that attaches to the same outer ring of the CP. A role for PA200 has been demonstrated in spermatogenesis, in response to DNA repair and in maintenance of mitochondrial inheritance. Enhanced levels of PA200-CP complexes are observed under conditions in which either activated or disrupted CP prevail, suggesting it participates in regulating overall proteolytic activity. PA200, or its yeast ortholog Blm10, may also incorporate into 26S proteasomes yielding PA200-CP-RP hybrids. A three-dimensional molecular structure determined by x-ray crystallography of Blm10-CP provides a model for activation. The carboxy terminus of Blm10 inserts into a dedicated pocket in the outer ring of the CP surface, whereas multiple HEAT-like repeats fold into an asymmetric solenoid wrapping around the central pore to stabilize a partially open conformation. The resulting hollow domelike structure caps the entire CP surface. This asymmetric structure may provide insight as to how the 19S RP, with two HEAT repeatlike subunits (Rpn1, Rpn2) alongside six ATPases (Rpt1-6), attaches to the same surface of the CP ring, and likewise, induces pore opening.

  3. Ubiquitin proteasome system research in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jia-Ling; Huang, Chang-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is important for the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It is involved in nearly every cellular process and plays an important role in maintaining body homeostasis. An increasing body of evidence has linked alterations in the UPS to gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we summarize the current literature detailing the involvement of the UPS in gastrointestinal cancer, highlighting its role in tumor occurrence and development, providing information for therapeutic targets research and anti-gastrointestinal tumor drug design. PMID:26909134

  4. Ubiquitin proteasome system research in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jia-Ling; Huang, Chang-Zhi

    2016-02-15

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is important for the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It is involved in nearly every cellular process and plays an important role in maintaining body homeostasis. An increasing body of evidence has linked alterations in the UPS to gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we summarize the current literature detailing the involvement of the UPS in gastrointestinal cancer, highlighting its role in tumor occurrence and development, providing information for therapeutic targets research and anti-gastrointestinal tumor drug design.

  5. Purification and characterization of Candida albicans 20S proteasome: identification of four proteasomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Fernández Murray, P; Biscoglio, M J; Passeron, S

    2000-03-15

    The 20S proteasome from yeast cells of Candida albicans was purified by successive chromatographic steps to apparent homogeneity, as judged by nondenaturing and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 640 kDa by gel filtration. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate gave at least 10 bands in the range 20-32 kDa. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed the presence of at least 14 polypeptides. By electron microscopy after negative staining, the proteasome preparation appeared as typical symmetrical barrel-shaped particles. The enzyme cleaved the peptidyl-arylamide bonds in the model synthetic substrates Cbz-G-G-L-p-nitroanilide, Cbz-G-G-R-beta-naphthylamide, and Cbz-L-L-E-beta-naphthylamide (chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and peptidylglutamyl-peptide-hydrolyzing activities). The differential sensitivity of these activities to aldehyde peptides and sodium dodecyl sulfate supported the multicatalytic nature of this enzyme. Three proteasomal subunits were identified as alpha6/Pre5, alpha3/Y13, and alpha5/Pup2 by internal sequencing of tryptic fragments. Their sequences perfectly matched the corresponding deduced amino acid sequences of the C. albicans genes. A fourth subunit was identified as alpha7/Prs1 by immunorecognition with a monoclonal antibody specific for C8, the human proteasome subunit homologue. Treatment of the intact isolated 20S proteasome with acid phosphatase and Western blot analysis of the separated components indicated that the alpha7/Prs1 subunit is obtained as a multiply phosphorylated protein.

  6. Distinct Elements in the Proteasomal β5 Subunit Propeptide Required for Autocatalytic Processing and Proteasome Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Li, Yanjie; Arendt, Cassandra S.; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic 20S proteasome assembly remains poorly understood. The subunits stack into four heteroheptameric rings; three inner-ring subunits (β1, β2, and β5) bear the protease catalytic residues and are synthesized with N-terminal propeptides. These propeptides are removed autocatalytically late in assembly. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, β5 (Doa3/Pre2) has a 75-residue propeptide, β5pro, that is essential for proteasome assembly and can work in trans. We show that deletion of the poorly conserved N-terminal half of the β5 propeptide nonetheless causes substantial defects in proteasome maturation. Sequences closer to the cleavage site have critical but redundant roles in both assembly and self-cleavage. A conserved histidine two residues upstream of the autocleavage site strongly promotes processing. Surprisingly, although β5pro is functionally linked to the Ump1 assembly factor, trans-expressed β5pro associates only weakly with Ump1-containing precursors. Several genes were identified as dosage suppressors of trans-expressed β5pro mutants; the strongest encoded the β7 proteasome subunit. Previous data suggested that β7 and β5pro have overlapping roles in bringing together two half-proteasomes, but the timing of β7 addition relative to half-mer joining was unclear. Here we report conditions where dimerization lags behind β7 incorporation into the half-mer. Our results suggest that β7 insertion precedes half-mer dimerization, and the β7 tail and β5 propeptide have unequal roles in half-mer joining. PMID:26627836

  7. Distinct Elements in the Proteasomal β5 Subunit Propeptide Required for Autocatalytic Processing and Proteasome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Li, Yanjie; Arendt, Cassandra S; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2016-01-22

    Eukaryotic 20S proteasome assembly remains poorly understood. The subunits stack into four heteroheptameric rings; three inner-ring subunits (β1, β2, and β5) bear the protease catalytic residues and are synthesized with N-terminal propeptides. These propeptides are removed autocatalytically late in assembly. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, β5 (Doa3/Pre2) has a 75-residue propeptide, β5pro, that is essential for proteasome assembly and can work in trans. We show that deletion of the poorly conserved N-terminal half of the β5 propeptide nonetheless causes substantial defects in proteasome maturation. Sequences closer to the cleavage site have critical but redundant roles in both assembly and self-cleavage. A conserved histidine two residues upstream of the autocleavage site strongly promotes processing. Surprisingly, although β5pro is functionally linked to the Ump1 assembly factor, trans-expressed β5pro associates only weakly with Ump1-containing precursors. Several genes were identified as dosage suppressors of trans-expressed β5pro mutants; the strongest encoded the β7 proteasome subunit. Previous data suggested that β7 and β5pro have overlapping roles in bringing together two half-proteasomes, but the timing of β7 addition relative to half-mer joining was unclear. Here we report conditions where dimerization lags behind β7 incorporation into the half-mer. Our results suggest that β7 insertion precedes half-mer dimerization, and the β7 tail and β5 propeptide have unequal roles in half-mer joining. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Structure of a proteasome Pba1-Pba2 complex: implications for proteasome assembly, activation, and biological function.

    PubMed

    Stadtmueller, Beth M; Kish-Trier, Erik; Ferrell, Katherine; Petersen, Charisse N; Robinson, Howard; Myszka, David G; Eckert, Debra M; Formosa, Tim; Hill, Christopher P

    2012-10-26

    The 20S proteasome is an essential, 28-subunit protease that sequesters proteolytic sites within a central chamber, thereby repressing substrate degradation until proteasome activators open the entrance/exit gate. Two established activators, Blm10 and PAN/19S, induce gate opening by binding to the pockets between proteasome α-subunits using C-terminal HbYX (hydrophobic-tyrosine-any residue) motifs. Equivalent HbYX motifs have been identified in Pba1 and Pba2, which function in proteasome assembly. Here, we demonstrate that Pba1-Pba2 proteins form a stable heterodimer that utilizes its HbYX motifs to bind mature 20S proteasomes in vitro and that the Pba1-Pba2 HbYX motifs are important for a physiological function of proteasomes, the maintenance of mitochondrial function. Other factors that contribute to proteasome assembly or function also act in the maintenance of mitochondrial function and display complex genetic interactions with one another, possibly revealing an unexpected pathway of mitochondrial regulation involving the Pba1-Pba2 proteasome interaction. Our determination of a proteasome Pba1-Pba2 crystal structure reveals a Pba1 HbYX interaction that is superimposable with those of known activators, a Pba2 HbYX interaction that is different from those reported previously, and a gate structure that is disrupted but not sufficiently open to allow entry of even small peptides. These findings extend understanding of proteasome interactions with HbYX motifs and suggest multiple roles for Pba1-Pba2 interactions throughout proteasome assembly and function.

  9. Ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and cellular responses to oxidative stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) is the primary cytosolic proteolytic machinery for the selective degradation of various forms of damaged proteins. Thus, the UPP is an important protein quality control mechanism. In the canonical UPP, both ubiquitin and the 26S proteasome are involved. Subs...

  10. Functional 20S proteasomes in mature human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Neelam, Sudha; Kakhniashvili, David G; Wilkens, Stephan; Levene, Stephen D; Goodman, Steven R

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether functional 20S and/or 26S proteasomes are present within mature human red blood cells (RBCs; depleted of reticulocytes and leukocytes). Double-immunofluorescence confocal microscopy showed the presence of immunoreactive 20S and 19S proteasomal subunit proteins and their partial co-localization within mature RBCs. Proteasomes isolated from mature RBCs displayed 20S activity in vitro; atomic-force and transmission electron microscopy of isolated proteasomes revealed abundant 20S core particles and very few 26S particles. A two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) approach was used to determine if proteasome-dependent protein degradation occurs within mature RBCs. Twenty-eight proteins were identified with altered protein content in response to lactacystin. Seven cytosolic proteins showed an increase and 16 showed a decrease; five membrane proteins showed a decrease. We conclude that the proteins showing increased abundance are either primary or secondary targets of the 20S proteasome and that putatively degraded proteins are secondary targets. Therefore, functional 20S proteasomes exist within mature RBCs. Our study did not detect 26S proteasome activity using the 2D-DIGE approach.

  11. How the ubiquitin proteasome system regulates the regulators of transcription.

    PubMed

    Ee, Gary; Lehming, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system plays an important role in transcription. Monoubiquitination of activators is believed to aid their function, while the 26S proteasomal degradation of repressors is believed to restrict their function. What remains controversial is the question of whether the degradation of activators aids or restricts their function.

  12. Aging perturbs 26S proteasome assembly in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Vernace, Vita A.; Arnaud, Lisette; Schmidt-Glenewinkel, Thomas; Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with loss of quality control in protein turnover. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is critical to this quality control process as it degrades mutated and damaged proteins. We identified a unique aging-dependent mechanism that contributes to proteasome dysfunction in Drosophila melanogaster. Our studies are the first to show that the major proteasome form in old (43–47 days old) female and male flies is the weakly active 20S core particle, while in younger (1–32 days old) flies highly active 26S proteasomes are preponderant. Old (43–47 days) flies of both genders also exhibit a decline (~50%) in ATP levels, which is relevant to 26S proteasomes, as their assembly is ATP-dependent. The steep declines in 26S proteasome and ATP levels were observed at an age (43–47 days) when the flies exhibited a marked drop in locomotor performance, attesting that these are “old age” events. Remarkably, treatment with a proteasome inhibitor increases ubiquitinated protein levels and shortens the life span of old but not young flies. In conclusion, our data reveal a previously unknown mechanism that perturbs proteasome activity in “old-age” female and male Drosophila most likely depriving them of the ability to effectively cope with proteotoxic damages caused by environmental and/or genetic factors. PMID:17413001

  13. The DUB/USP17 deubiquitinating enzymes: A gene family within a tandemly repeated sequence, is also embedded within the copy number variable Beta-defensin cluster

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The DUB/USP17 subfamily of deubiquitinating enzymes were originally identified as immediate early genes induced in response to cytokine stimulation in mice (DUB-1, DUB-1A, DUB-2, DUB-2A). Subsequently we have identified a number of human family members and shown that one of these (DUB-3) is also cytokine inducible. We originally showed that constitutive expression of DUB-3 can block cell proliferation and more recently we have demonstrated that this is due to its regulation of the ubiquitination and activity of the 'CAAX' box protease RCE1. Results Here we demonstrate that the human DUB/USP17 family members are found on both chromosome 4p16.1, within a block of tandem repeats, and on chromosome 8p23.1, embedded within the copy number variable beta-defensin cluster. In addition, we show that the multiple genes observed in humans and other distantly related mammals have arisen due to the independent expansion of an ancestral sequence within each species. However, it is also apparent when sequences from humans and the more closely related chimpanzee are compared, that duplication events have taken place prior to these species separating. Conclusions The observation that the DUB/USP17 genes, which can influence cell growth and survival, have evolved from an unstable ancestral sequence which has undergone multiple and varied duplications in the species examined marks this as a unique family. In addition, their presence within the beta-defensin repeat raises the question whether they may contribute to the influence of this repeat on immune related conditions. PMID:20403174

  14. Proteasome subunit Rpn13 is a novel ubiquitin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Husnjak, Koraljka; Elsasser, Suzanne; Zhang, Naixia; Chen, Xiang; Randles, Leah; Shi, Yuan; Hofmann, Kay; Walters, Kylie; Finley, Daniel; Dikic, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Proteasomal receptors that recognize ubiquitin chains attached to substrates are key mediators of selective protein degradation in eukaryotes. Here we report the identification of a new ubiquitin receptor, Rpn13/ARM1, a known component of the proteasome. Rpn13 binds ubiquitin via a conserved N-terminal region termed the Pru domain (Pleckstrin-like receptor for ubiquitin), which binds K48-linked diubiquitin with an affinity of ∼90 nM. Like proteasomal ubiquitin receptor Rpn10/S5a, Rpn13 also binds ubiquitin-like domains of the UBL/UBA family of ubiquitin receptors. A synthetic phenotype results in yeast when specific mutations of the ubiquitin binding sites of Rpn10 and Rpn13 are combined, indicating functional linkage between these ubiquitin receptors. Since Rpn13 is also the proteasomal receptor for Uch37, a deubiquitinating enzyme, our findings suggest a coupling of chain recognition and disassembly at the proteasome. PMID:18497817

  15. The Ubiquitin Ligase Hul5 Promotes Proteasomal Processivity▿

    PubMed Central

    Aviram, Sharon; Kornitzer, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large cytoplasmic protease that degrades polyubiquitinated proteins to short peptides in a processive manner. The proteasome 19S regulatory subcomplex tethers the target protein via its polyubiquitin adduct and unfolds the target polypeptide, which is then threaded into the proteolytic site-containing 20S subcomplex. Hul5 is a 19S subcomplex-associated ubiquitin ligase that elongates ubiquitin chains on proteasome-bound substrates. We isolated hul5Δ as a mutation with which fusions of an unstable cyclin to stable reporter proteins accumulate as partially processed products. These products appear transiently in the wild type but are strongly stabilized in 19S ATPase mutants and in the hul5Δ mutant, supporting a role for the ATPase subunits in the unfolding of proteasome substrates before insertion into the catalytic cavity and suggesting a role for Hul5 in the processive degradation of proteins that are stalled on the proteasome. PMID:20008553

  16. The mechanism for molecular assembly of the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Sahara, Kazutaka; Kogleck, Larissa; Yashiroda, Hideki; Murata, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the ubiquitin proteasome system plays important roles in diverse cellular processes. The 26S proteasome is a large enzyme complex that degrades ubiquitinated proteins. It consists of 33 different subunits that form two subcomplexes, the 20S core particle and the 19S regulatory particle. Recently, several chaperones dedicated to the accurate assembly of this protease complex have been identified, but the complete mechanism of the 26S proteasome assembly is still unclear. In this review, we summarize what is known about the assembly of proteasome to date and present our group's recent findings on the role of the GET pathway in the assembly of the 26S proteasome, in addition to its role in mediating the insertion of tail-anchored (TA) proteins into the ER membrane.

  17. Harnessing Proteasome Dynamics and Allostery in Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The proteasome is the essential protease that is responsible for regulated cleavage of the bulk of intracellular proteins. Its central role in cellular physiology has been exploited in therapies against aggressive cancers where proteasome-specific competitive inhibitors that block proteasome active centers are very effectively used. However, drugs regulating this essential protease are likely to have broader clinical usefulness. The non-catalytic sites of the proteasome emerge as an attractive alternative target in search of highly specific and diverse proteasome regulators. Recent Advances: Crystallographic models of the proteasome leave the false impression of fixed structures with minimal molecular dynamics lacking long-distance allosteric signaling. However, accumulating biochemical and structural observations strongly support the notion that the proteasome is regulated by precise allosteric interactions arising from protein dynamics, encouraging the active search for allosteric regulators. Here, we discuss properties of several promising compounds that affect substrate gating and processing in antechambers, and interactions of the catalytic core with regulatory proteins. Critical Issues: Given the structural complexity of proteasome assemblies, it is a painstaking process to better understand their allosteric regulation and molecular dynamics. Here, we discuss the challenges and achievements in this field. We place special emphasis on the role of atomic force microscopy imaging in probing the allostery and dynamics of the proteasome, and in dissecting the mechanisms involving small-molecule allosteric regulators. Future Directions: New small-molecule allosteric regulators may become a next generation of drugs targeting the proteasome, which is critical to the development of new therapies in cancers and other diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2286–2301. PMID:24410482

  18. Proteasome proteolysis supports stimulated platelet function and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nilaksh; Li, Wei; Willard, Belinda; Silverstein, Roy L; McIntyre, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitors used in the treatment of hematologic cancers also reduce thrombosis. Whether the proteasome participates in platelet activation or function is unclear because little is known of the proteasome in these terminally differentiated cells. Platelets displayed all 3 primary proteasome protease activities, which MG132 and bortezomib (Velcade) inhibited. Proteasome substrates are marked by ubiquitin, and platelets contained a functional ubiquitination system that modified the proteome by monoubiquitination and polyubiquitination. Systemic MG132 strongly suppressed the formation of occlusive, platelet-rich thrombi in FeCl3-damaged carotid arteries. Transfusion of platelets treated ex vivo with MG132 and washed before transfusion into thrombocytopenic mice also reduced carotid artery thrombosis. Proteasome inhibition reduced platelet aggregation by low thrombin concentrations and ristocetin-stimulated agglutination through the glycoprotein Ib-IX-V complex. This receptor was not appropriately internalized after proteasome inhibition in stimulated platelets, and spreading and clot retraction after MG132 exposure also were decreased. The effects of proteasome inhibitors were not confined to a single receptor as MG132 suppressed thrombin-stimulated, ADP-stimulated, and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated microparticle shedding. Proteasome inhibition increased ubiquitin decoration of cytoplasmic proteins, including the cytoskeletal proteins Filamin A and Talin-1. Mass spectrometry revealed a single MG132-sensitive tryptic cleavage after R1745 in an extended Filamin A loop, which would separate its actin-binding domain from its carboxy terminal glycoprotein Ibα-binding domain. Platelets contain a ubiquitin/proteasome system that marks cytoskeletal proteins for proteolytic modification to promote productive platelet-platelet and platelet-wall interactions.

  19. ATP Binding by Proteasomal ATPases Regulates Cellular Assembly and Substrate-induced Functions of the 26 S Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Chan; Li, Xiaohua; Thompson, David; DeMartino, George N.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the role of ATP binding by six different ATPase subunits (Rpt1–6) in the cellular assembly and molecular functions of mammalian 26 S proteasome. Four Rpt subunits (Rpt1–4) with ATP binding mutations were incompetent for cellular assembly into 26 S proteasome. In contrast, analogous mutants of Rpt5 and Rpt6 were incorporated normally into 26 S proteasomes in both intact cells and an in vitro assembly assay. Surprisingly, purified 26 S proteasomes containing either mutant Rpt5 or Rpt6 had normal basal ATPase activity and substrate gate opening for hydrolysis of short peptides. However, these mutant 26 S proteasomes were severely defective for ATP-dependent in vitro degradation of ubiquitylated and non-ubiquitylated proteins and did not display substrate-stimulated ATPase and peptidase activities characteristic of normal proteasomes. These results reveal differential roles of ATP binding by various Rpt subunits in proteasome assembly and function. They also indicate that substrate-stimulated ATPase activity and gating depend on the concerted action of a full complement of Rpt subunits competent for ATP binding and that this regulation is essential for normal proteolysis. Thus, protein substrates appear to promote their own degradation by stimulating proteasome functions involved in proteolysis. PMID:23212908

  20. Overview of Proteasome Inhibitor-Based Anti-cancer Therapies: Perspective on Bortezomib and Second Generation Proteasome Inhibitors versus Future Generation Inhibitors of Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Q. Ping; Zonder, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, proteasome inhibition has emerged as an effective therapeutic strategy for treating multiple myeloma (MM) and some lymphomas. In 2003, Bortezomib (BTZ) became the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). BTZ-based therapies have become a staple for the treatment of MM at all stages of the disease. The survival rate of MM patients has improved significantly since clinical introduction of BTZ and other immunomodulatory drugs. However, BTZ has several limitations. Not all patients respond to BTZ-based therapies and relapse occurs in many patients who initially responded. Solid tumors, in particular, are often resistant to BTZ. Furthermore, BTZ can induce dose-limiting peripheral neuropathy (PN). The second generation proteasome inhibitor Carfizomib (CFZ; U.S. FDA approved in August 2012) induces responses in a minority of MM patients relapsed from or refractory to BTZ. There is less PN compared to BTZ. Four other second-generation proteasome inhibitors (Ixazomib, Delanzomib, Oprozomib and Marizomib) with different pharmacologic properties and broader anticancer activities, have also shown some clinical activity in bortezomib-resistant cancers. While the mechanism of resistance to bortezomib in human cancers still remains to be fully understood, targeting the immunoproteasome, ubiquitin E3 ligases, the 19S proteasome and deubiquitinases in pre-clinical studies represents possible directions for future generation inhibitors of ubiquitin-proteasome system in the treatment of MM and other cancers. PMID:25092212

  1. Treatment of Plasmodium chabaudi Parasites with Curcumin in Combination with Antimalarial Drugs: Drug Interactions and Implications on the Ubiquitin/Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Zoraima; Machado, Marta; Lindeza, Ana; do Rosário, Virgílio; Gazarini, Marcos L.; Lopes, Dinora

    2013-01-01

    Antimalarial drug resistance remains a major obstacle in malaria control. Evidence from Southeast Asia shows that resistance to artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) is inevitable. Ethnopharmacological studies have confirmed the efficacy of curcumin against Plasmodium spp. Drug interaction assays between curcumin/piperine/chloroquine and curcumin/piperine/artemisinin combinations and the potential of drug treatment to interfere with the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) were analyzed. In vivo efficacy of curcumin was studied in BALB/c mice infected with Plasmodium chabaudi clones resistant to chloroquine and artemisinin, and drug interactions were analyzed by isobolograms. Subtherapeutic doses of curcumin, chloroquine, and artemisinin were administered to mice, and mRNA was collected following treatment for RT-PCR analysis of genes encoding deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs). Curcumin was found be nontoxic in BALB/c mice. The combination of curcumin/chloroquine/piperine reduced parasitemia to 37% seven days after treatment versus the control group's 65%, and an additive interaction was revealed. Curcumin/piperine/artemisinin combination did not show a favorable drug interaction in this murine model of malaria. Treatment of mice with subtherapeutic doses of the drugs resulted in a transient increase in genes encoding DUBs indicating UPS interference. If curcumin is to join the arsenal of available antimalarial drugs, future studies exploring suitable drug partners would be of interest. PMID:23691276

  2. Proteasome activation as a novel anti-aging strategy.

    PubMed

    Gonos, Efstathios

    2014-10-01

    Aging and longevity are two multifactorial biological phenomena whose knowledge at molecular level is still limited. We have studied proteasome function in replicative senescence and cell survival (Mol Aspects Med 35, 1-71, 2014). We have observed reduced levels of proteasome content and activities in senescent cells due to the down-regulation of the catalytic subunits of the 20S complex (J Biol Chem 278, 28026-28037, 2003). In support, partial inhibition of proteasomes in young cells by specific inhibitors induces premature senescence which is p53 dependent (Aging Cell 7, 717-732, 2008). Stable over-expression of catalytic subunits or POMP resulted in enhanced proteasome assembly and activities and increased cell survival following treatments with various oxidants. Importantly, the developed "proteasome activated" human fibroblasts cell lines exhibit a delay of senescence by approximately 15% (J Biol Chem 280, 11840-11850, 2005; J Biol Chem 284, 30076-30086, 2009). Our current work proposes that proteasome activation is an evolutionary conserved mechanism, as it can delay aging in various in vivo systems. Moreover, additional findings indicate that the recorded proteasome activation by many inducers is Nrf2-dependent (J Biol Chem 285, 8171-8184, 2010). Finally, we have studied the proteolysis processes of various age-related proteins and we have identified that CHIP is a major p53 E3 ligase in senescent fibroblasts (Free Rad Biol Med 50, 157-165, 2011).

  3. ATPase and ubiquitin-binding proteins of the yeast proteasome.

    PubMed

    Rubin, D M; van Nocker, S; Glickman, M; Coux, O; Wefes, I; Sadis, S; Fu, H; Goldberg, A; Vierstra, R; Finley, D

    1997-03-01

    The 26S proteasome is a 2-Megadalton proteolytic complex with over 30 distinct subunits. The 19S particle, a subcomplex of the 26S proteasome, is thought to confer ATP-dependence and ubiquitin-dependence on the proteolytic core particle of the proteasome. Given the complexity of the 19S particle, genetic approaches are likely to play an important role in its analysis. We have initiated biochemical and genetic studies of the 19S particle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we describe the localization to the proteasome of several ATPases that were previously proposed to be involved in transcription. Independent studies indicate that the mammalian 26S proteasome contains closely related ATPases. We have also found that the multiubiquitin chain binding protein Mcb1, a homolog of the mammalian S5a protein, is a subunit of the yeast proteasome. However, contrary to expectation, MCB1 is not an essential gene in yeast. The mcb1 mutant grows at a nearly wild-type rate, and the breakdown of most ubiquitin-protein conjugates is unaffected in this strain. One substrate, Ub-Proline-beta gal, was found to require MCB1 for its breakdown, but it remains unclear whether Mcb1 serves as a ubiquitin receptor in this process. Our data suggest that the recognition of ubiquitin conjugates by the proteasome is a complex process which must involve proteins other than Mcb1.

  4. The proteasome and epigenetics: zooming in on histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Bach, Svitlana V; Hegde, Ashok N

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome is a structural complex of many proteins that degrades substrates marked by covalent linkage to ubiquitin. Many years of research has shown a role for ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated proteolysis in synaptic plasticity and memory mainly in degrading synaptic, cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins. Recent work indicates that the proteasome has wider proteolytic and non-proteolytic roles in processes such as histone modifications that affect synaptic plasticity and memory. In this review, we assess the evidence gathered from neuronal as well as non-neuronal cell types regarding the function of the proteasome in positive or negative regulation of posttranslational modifications of histones, such as acetylation, methylation and ubiquitination. We discuss the critical roles of the proteasome in clearing excess histone proteins in various cellular contexts and the possible non-proteolytic functions in regulating transcription of target genes. In addition, we summarize the current literature on diverse chromatin-remodeling machineries, such as histone acetyltransferases, deacetylates, methyltransferases and demethylases, as targets for proteasomal degradation across experimental models. Lastly, we provide a perspective on how proteasomal regulation of histone modifications may modulate synaptic plasticity in the nervous system.

  5. Increased proteasome activity determines human embryonic stem cell identity

    PubMed Central

    Vilchez, David; Boyer, Leah; Morantte, Ianessa; Lutz, Margaret; Merkwirth, Carsten; Joyce, Derek; Spencer, Brian; Page, Lesley; Masliah, Eliezer; Berggren, W. Travis; Gage, Fred H.; Dillin, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are able to replicate continuously in the absence of senescence and, therefore, are immortal in culture1,2. While genome stability is central for survival of stem cells; proteome stability may play an equally important role in stem cell identity and function. Additionally, with the asymmetric divisions invoked by stem cells, the passage of damaged proteins to daughter cells could potentially destroy the resulting lineage of cells. We hypothesized that stem cells have an increased proteostasis ability compared to their differentiated counterparts and asked whether proteasome activity differed among human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Notably, hESC populations exhibit a high proteasome activity that is correlated with increased levels of the 19S proteasome subunit PSMD11/RPN-63–5 and a corresponding increased assembly of the 26S/30S proteasome. Ectopic expression of PSMD11 is sufficient to increase proteasome assembly and activity. Proteasome inhibition affects pluripotency of hESCs inducing differentiation towards specific cell lineages. FOXO4, an insulin/IGF-1 responsive transcription factor associated with long lifespan in invertebrates6,7, regulates proteasome activity by modulating the expression of PSMD11 in hESCs. Our results establish a novel regulation of proteostasis in hESCs that links longevity and stress resistance in invertebrates with hESC function and identity. PMID:22972301

  6. Proteasome inhibitors: a new perspective for treating autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2012-12-01

    Since the discovery of proteasome in the late 1980s, the ubiquitin-proteasome system has been found to exert an important physiological function in all the cells of living organisms - that of ensuring homeostasis. All cell cycle, apoptosis, differentiation, transcription, protein quality control and antigen processing activities require the efficiency of this system. As a matter of fact, several pathological conditions are characterized by deregulation of the ubiquitinproteasome system. These include cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, viral infections and autoimmune diseases. This has stimulated interest in developing proteasome inhibitors for their treatment, but clinical application has been limited due to the toxicity of these compounds. Following experiences with the first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, in the treatment of hematologic malignancies, several molecules with proteasome inhibitor properties were discovered and they were also exploited for the treatment of experimental models of human autoimmunity. Autoimmune disorders are a heterogeneous group of conditions, both organ- and non-organ-specific, whose incidence is increasing worldwide. This has stimulated interest in discovering novel predictive strategies and therapeutics. Here we provide a review of the use of proteasome inhibitors in treating autoimmune conditions and, in particular, systemic autoimmune diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. We also present perspectives derived from more recently discovered compounds with proteasome inhibitor activity and discuss their potential in the management of these disorders.

  7. Emerging Mechanistic Insights into AAA Complexes Regulating Proteasomal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Friedrich; Schuller, Jan M.; Unverdorben, Pia; Aufderheide, Antje

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is an integral element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and, as such, responsible for regulated degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It consists of the core particle, which catalyzes the proteolysis of substrates into small peptides, and the regulatory particle, which ensures specificity for a broad range of substrates. The heart of the regulatory particle is an AAA-ATPase unfoldase, which is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits enabling substrate recognition and processing. Cryo-EM-based studies revealed the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome and its conformational rearrangements, providing insights into substrate recognition, commitment, deubiquitylation and unfolding. The cytosol proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitylated substrates is tuned by various associating cofactors, including deubiquitylating enzymes, ubiquitin ligases, shuttling ubiquitin receptors and the AAA-ATPase Cdc48/p97. Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors function upstream of the 26S proteasome, and their modular organization exhibits some striking analogies to the regulatory particle. In archaea PAN, the closest regulatory particle homolog and Cdc48 even have overlapping functions, underscoring their intricate relationship. Here, we review recent insights into the structure and dynamics of the 26S proteasome and its associated machinery, as well as our current structural knowledge on the Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors that function in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). PMID:25102382

  8. Emerging mechanistic insights into AAA complexes regulating proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Förster, Friedrich; Schuller, Jan M; Unverdorben, Pia; Aufderheide, Antje

    2014-08-06

    The 26S proteasome is an integral element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system(UPS) and, as such, responsible for regulated degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells.It consists of the core particle, which catalyzes the proteolysis of substrates into small peptides, and the regulatory particle, which ensures specificity for a broad range of substrates.The heart of the regulatory particle is an AAA-ATPase unfoldase, which is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits enabling substrate recognition and processing. Cryo-EM-based studies revealed the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome and its conformational rearrangements, providing insights into substrate recognition, commitment, deubiquitylation and unfolding. The cytosol proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitylated substrates is tuned by various associating cofactors, including deubiquitylating enzymes, ubiquitin ligases,shuttling ubiquitin receptors and the AAA-ATPase Cdc48/p97. Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors function upstream of the 26S proteasome, and their modular organization exhibits some striking analogies to the regulatory particle. In archaea PAN, the closest regulatory particle homolog and Cdc48 even have overlapping functions, underscoring their intricate relationship.Here, we review recent insights into the structure and dynamics of the 26S proteasome and its associated machinery, as well as our current structural knowledge on the Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors that function in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS).

  9. Proteasome expression and activity in cancer and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2017-03-01

    Proteasome is a multi-protein organelle that participates in cellular proteostasis by destroying damaged or short-lived proteins in an organized manner guided by the ubiquitination signal. By being in a central place in the cellular protein complement homeostasis, proteasome is involved in virtually all cell processes including decisions on cell survival or death, cell cycle, and differentiation. These processes are important also in cancer, and thus, the proteasome is an important regulator of carcinogenesis. Cancers include a variety of cells which, according to the cancer stem cell theory, descend from a small percentage of cancer stem cells, alternatively termed tumor-initiating cells. These cells constitute the subsets that have the ability to propagate the whole variety of cancer and repopulate tumors after cytostatic therapies. Proteasome plays a role in cellular processes in cancer stem cells, but it has been found to have a decreased function in them compared to the rest of cancer cells. This article will discuss the transcriptional regulation of proteasome sub-unit proteins in cancer and in particular cancer stem cells and the relationship of the proteasome with the pluripotency that is the defining characteristic of stem cells. Therapeutic opportunities that present from the understanding of the proteasome role will also be discussed.

  10. Proteasomal and lysosomal protein degradation and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuejun; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2014-06-01

    In the cell, the proteasome and lysosomes represent the most important proteolytic machineries, responsible for the protein degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy, respectively. Both the UPS and autophagy are essential to protein quality and quantity control. Alterations in cardiac proteasomal and lysosomal degradation are remarkably associated with most heart disease in humans and are implicated in the pathogenesis of congestive heart failure. Studies carried out in animal models and in cell culture have begun to establish both sufficiency and, in some cases, the necessity of proteasomal functional insufficiency or lysosomal insufficiency as a major pathogenic factor in the heart. This review article highlights some recent advances in the research into proteasome and lysosome protein degradation in relation to cardiac pathology and examines the emerging evidence for enhancing degradative capacities of the proteasome and/or lysosome as a new therapeutic strategy for heart disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Protein Quality Control, the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, and Autophagy". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural Insights on the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteasomal ATPase Mpa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Li, Hua; Lin, Gang; Tang, Chunyan; Li, Dongyang; Nathan, Carl; Darwin, K. Heran; Li, Huilin

    2009-01-01

    Summary Proteasome-mediated protein turnover in all domains of life is an energy-dependent process that requires ATPase activity. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) was recently shown to possess a ubiquitin-like proteasome pathway that plays an essential role in Mtb resistance to killing by products of host macrophages. Here we report our structural and biochemical investigation of Mpa, the presumptive Mtb proteasomal ATPase. We demonstrate that Mpa binds to the Mtb proteasome in the presence of ATPγS, providing the physical evidence that Mpa is the proteasomal ATPase. X-ray crystallographic determination of the conserved inter-domain showed a five-stranded double β-barrel structure containing a Greek key motif. The structure and mutagenesis indicate a major role of the inter-domain for Mpa hexamerization. Our mutational and functional studies further suggest that the central channel in the Mpa hexamer is involved in protein substrate translocation and degradation. These studies provide insights into how a bacterial proteasomal ATPase interacts with and facilitates protein degradation by the proteasome. PMID:19836337

  12. Recent Patents on Proteasome Inhibitors of Natural Origin.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Daniela Correia; Andrade, Paula B; Ribeiro, Vera; Valentao, Patricia; Pereira, David M

    2017-01-01

    The proteasome is the major proteolytic site on the eukaryotic cell, degrading most of its short-lived or misfolded polypeptides. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has been found to play a fundamental role in the development of several pathologies, from cancer to neurodegenerative diseases, or even retroviral infections. Nature remains a powerful source for the discovery of bioactive compounds. Recently, a number of molecules of natural origin, as well as natural product derivatives, have been described as proteasome inhibitors. Most of these molecules directly block one or more catalytic sites of the 20S proteasome, but some of them act upstream of proteolytic degradation, for instance, inhibiting the ubiquitin tagging process. The present review focuses on recent patents on proteasome inhibitors of natural origin, their derivatives and synthetic routes to obtain such molecules, as well as their application as a tool in chemotherapy. With several of these modulators of the ubiquitin-proteasome system under clinical trials, we hope that the next few years lead to the development of new pharmaceutical drugs and characterization of new proteasome inhibitors of natural origin or inspiration. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Proteasome dynamics between proliferation and quiescence stages of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S; Fatehi, Amatullah K; Enenkel, Cordula

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a critical role in cellular protein homeostasis and is required for the turnover of short-lived and unwanted proteins, which are targeted by poly-ubiquitination for degradation. Proteasome is the key protease of UPS and consists of multiple subunits, which are organized into a catalytic core particle (CP) and a regulatory particle (RP). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, proteasome holo-enzymes are engaged in degrading poly-ubiquitinated substrates and are mostly localized in the nucleus during cell proliferation. While in quiescence, the RP and CP are sequestered into motile and reversible storage granules in the cytoplasm, called proteasome storage granules (PSGs). The reversible nature of PSGs allows the proteasomes to be transported back into the nucleus upon exit from quiescence. Nuclear import of RP and CP through nuclear pores occurs via the canonical pathway that includes the importin-αβ heterodimer and takes advantage of the Ran-GTP gradient across the nuclear membrane. Dependent on the growth stage, either inactive precursor complexes or mature holo-enzymes are imported into the nucleus. The present review discusses the dynamics of proteasomes including their assembly, nucleo-cytoplasmic transport during proliferation and the sequestration of proteasomes into PSGs during quiescence. [Formula: see text].

  14. Deciphering preferential interactions within supramolecular protein complexes: the proteasome case

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Bertrand; Lambour, Thomas; Garrigues, Luc; Amalric, François; Vigneron, Nathalie; Menneteau, Thomas; Stella, Alexandre; Monsarrat, Bernard; Van den Eynde, Benoît; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Bousquet-Dubouch, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, intracellular protein breakdown is mainly performed by the ubiquitin–proteasome system. Proteasomes are supramolecular protein complexes formed by the association of multiple sub-complexes and interacting proteins. Therefore, they exhibit a very high heterogeneity whose function is still not well understood. Here, using a newly developed method based on the combination of affinity purification and protein correlation profiling associated with high-resolution mass spectrometry, we comprehensively characterized proteasome heterogeneity and identified previously unknown preferential associations within proteasome sub-complexes. In particular, we showed for the first time that the two main proteasome subtypes, standard proteasome and immunoproteasome, interact with a different subset of important regulators. This trend was observed in very diverse human cell types and was confirmed by changing the relative proportions of both 20S proteasome forms using interferon-γ. The new method developed here constitutes an innovative and powerful strategy that could be broadly applied for unraveling the dynamic and heterogeneous nature of other biologically relevant supramolecular protein complexes. PMID:25561571

  15. Structural Insights on the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteasomal ATPase Mpa

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Li, H; Lin, G; Tang, C; Li, D; Nathan, C; Heran Darwin, K

    2009-01-01

    Proteasome-mediated protein turnover in all domains of life is an energy-dependent process that requires ATPase activity. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) was recently shown to possess a ubiquitin-like proteasome pathway that plays an essential role in Mtb resistance to killing by products of host macrophages. Here we report our structural and biochemical investigation of Mpa, the presumptive Mtb proteasomal ATPase. We demonstrate that Mpa binds to the Mtb proteasome in the presence of ATPS, providing the physical evidence that Mpa is the proteasomal ATPase. X-ray crystallographic determination of the conserved interdomain showed a five stranded double {beta} barrel structure containing a Greek key motif. Structure and mutational analysis indicate a major role of the interdomain for Mpa hexamerization. Our mutational and functional studies further suggest that the central channel in the Mpa hexamer is involved in protein substrate translocation and degradation. These studies provide insights into how a bacterial proteasomal ATPase interacts with and facilitates protein degradation by the proteasome.

  16. Mammalian proteasome subtypes: Their diversity in structure and function.

    PubMed

    Dahlmann, Burkhardt

    2016-02-01

    The 20S proteasome is a multicatalytic proteinase catalysing the degradation of the majority of intracellular proteins. Thereby it is involved in almost all basic cellular processes, which is facilitated by its association with various regulator complexes so that it appears in different disguises like 26S proteasome, hybrid-proteasome and others. The 20S proteasome has a cylindrical structure built up by four stacked rings composed of α- and β-subunits. Since the three active site-containing β-subunits can all or in part be replaced by immuno-subunits, three main subpopulations exist, namely standard-, immuno- and intermediate-proteasomes. Due to posttranslational modifications or/and genetic variations all α- and β-subunits occur in multiple iso- or proteoforms. This leads to the fact that each of the three subpopulations is composed of a variety of 20S proteasome subtypes. This review summarizes the knowledge of proteasome subtypes in mammalian cells and tissues and their possible biological and medical relevancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Wedelolactone Acts as Proteasome Inhibitor in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Nehybová, Tereza; Šmarda, Jan; Daniel, Lukáš; Stiborek, Marek; Kanický, Viktor; Spasojevič, Ivan; Preisler, Jan; Damborský, Jiří; Beneš, Petr

    2017-03-29

    Wedelolactone is a multi-target natural plant coumestan exhibiting cytotoxicity towards cancer cells. Although several molecular targets of wedelolactone have been recognized, the molecular mechanism of its cytotoxicity has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we show that wedelolactone acts as an inhibitor of chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like activities of proteasome in breast cancer cells. The proteasome inhibitory effect of wedelolactone was documented by (i) reduced cleavage of fluorogenic proteasome substrates; (ii) accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and proteins with rapid turnover in tumor cells; and (iii) molecular docking of wedelolactone into the active sites of proteasome catalytic subunits. Inhibition of proteasome by wedelolactone was independent on its ability to induce reactive oxygen species production by redox cycling with copper ions, suggesting that wedelolactone acts as copper-independent proteasome inhibitor. We conclude that the cytotoxicity of wedelolactone to breast cancer cells is partially mediated by targeting proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Understanding the structural basis for inhibitory mode of wedelolactone might help to open up new avenues for design of novel compounds efficiently inhibiting cancer cells.

  18. Activities of proteasome and m-calpain are essential for Chikungunya virus replication.

    PubMed

    Karpe, Yogesh A; Pingale, Kunal D; Kanade, Gayatri D

    2016-10-01

    Replication of many viruses is dependent on the ubiquitin proteasome system. The present study demonstrates that Chikungunya virus replication increases proteasome activity and induces unfolded protein response (UPR) in cultured cells. Further, it was seen that the virus replication was dependent on the activities of proteasomes and m-calpain. Proteasome inhibition induced accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and earlier visualization of UPR.

  19. Intermediate filament transcription in astrocytes is repressed by proteasome inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Middeldorp, Jinte; Kamphuis, Willem; Sluijs, Jacqueline A.; Achoui, Dalila; Leenaars, Cathalijn H. C.; Feenstra, Matthijs G. P.; van Tijn, Paula; Fischer, David F.; Berkers, Celia; Ovaa, Huib; Quinlan, Roy A.; Hol, Elly M.

    2009-01-01

    Increased expression of the astrocytic intermediate filament protein glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a characteristic of astrogliosis. This process occurs in the brain during aging and neurodegeneration and coincides with impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system. Inhibition of the proteasome impairs protein degradation; therefore, we hypothesized that the increase in GFAP may be the result of impaired proteasomal activity in astrocytes. We investigated the effect of proteasome inhibitors on GFAP expression and other intermediate filament proteins in human astrocytoma cells and in a rat brain model for astrogliosis. Extensive quantitative RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot analysis resulted unexpectedly in a strong decrease of GFAP mRNA to <4% of control levels [Control (DMSO) 100±19.2%; proteasome inhibitor (epoxomicin) 3.5±1.3%, n=8; P≤0.001] and a loss of GFAP protein in astrocytes in vitro. We show that the proteasome alters GFAP promoter activity, possibly mediated by transcription factors as demonstrated by a GFAP promoter-luciferase assay and RT2 Profiler PCR array for human transcription factors. Most important, we demonstrate that proteasome inhibitors also reduce GFAP and vimentin expression in a rat model for induced astrogliosis in vivo. Therefore, proteasome inhibitors could serve as a potential therapy to modulate astrogliosis associated with CNS injuries and disease.—Middeldorp, J., Kamphuis, W., Sluijs, J. A., Achoui, D., Leenaars, C. H. C., Feenstra, M. G. P., van Tijn, P., Fischer, D. F., Berkers, C., Ovaa, H., Quinlan, R. A., Hol, E. M. Intermediate filament transcription in astrocytes is repressed by proteasome inhibition. PMID:19332645

  20. Mapping the interactome of HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins with the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Poirson, Juline; Biquand, Elise; Straub, Marie-Laure; Cassonnet, Patricia; Nominé, Yves; Jones, Louis; van der Werf, Sylvie; Travé, Gilles; Zanier, Katia; Jacob, Yves; Demeret, Caroline; Masson, Murielle

    2017-08-08

    Protein ubiquitination and its reverse reaction, deubiquitination, regulate protein stability, protein binding activity, and their subcellular localization. These reactions are catalyzed by the enzymes E1, E2, and E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligases and deubiquitinases (DUBs). The Ub-proteasome system (UPS) is targeted by viruses for the sake of their replication and to escape host immune response. To identify novel partners of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E6 and E7 proteins, we assembled and screened a library of 590 cDNAs related to the UPS by using the Gaussia princeps luciferase protein complementation assay. HPV16 E6 was found to bind to the homology to E6AP C terminus-type Ub ligase (E6AP), three really interesting new gene (RING)-type Ub ligases (MGRN1, LNX3, LNX4), and the DUB Ub-specific protease 15 (USP15). Except for E6AP, the binding of UPS factors did not require the LxxLL-binding pocket of HPV16 E6. LNX3 bound preferentially to all high-risk mucosal HPV E6 tested, whereas LNX4 bound specifically to HPV16 E6. HPV16 E7 was found to bind to several broad-complex tramtrack and bric-a-brac domain-containing proteins (such as TNFAIP1/KCTD13) that are potential substrate adaptors of Cullin 3-RING Ub ligases, to RING-type Ub ligases implicated in innate immunity (RNF135, TRIM32, TRAF2, TRAF5), to the substrate adaptor DCAF15 of Cullin 4-RING Ub ligase and to some DUBs (USP29, USP33). The binding to UPS factors did not require the LxCxE motif but rather the C-terminal region of HPV16 E7 protein. The identified UPS factors interacted with most of E7 proteins across different HPV types. This study establishes a strategy for the rapid identification of interactions between host or pathogen proteins and the human ubiquitination system. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  1. The ubiquitin proteasome system in neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Norman L

    2009-09-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) orchestrates the turnover of innumerable cellular proteins. In the process of ubiquitination the small protein ubiquitin is attached to a target protein by a peptide bond. The ubiquitinated target protein is subsequently shuttled to a protease complex known as the 26S proteasome and subjected to degradative proteolysis. The UPS facilitates the turnover of proteins in several settings. It targets oxidized, mutant or misfolded proteins for general proteolytic destruction, and allows for the tightly controlled and specific destruction of proteins involved in development and differentiation, cell cycle progression, circadian rhythms, apoptosis, and other biological processes. In neuropathology, alteration of the UPS, or mutations in UPS target proteins may result in signaling abnormalities leading to the initiation or progression of tumors such as astrocytomas, hemangioblastomas, craniopharyngiomas, pituitary adenomas, and medulloblastomas. Dysregulation of the UPS may also contribute to tumor progression by perturbation of DNA replication and mitotic control mechanisms, leading to genomic instability. In neurodegenerative diseases caused by the expression of mutant proteins, the cellular accumulation of these proteins may overload the UPS, indirectly contributing to the disease process, e.g., sporadic Parkinsonism and prion diseases. In other cases, mutation of UPS components may directly cause pathological accumulation of proteins, e.g., autosomal recessive Parkinsonism and spinocerebellar ataxias. Defects or dysfunction of the UPS may also underlie cognitive disorders such as Angelman syndrome, Rett syndrome and autism, and muscle and nerve diseases, e.g., inclusion body myopathy and giant axon neuropathy. This paper describes the basic biochemical mechanisms comprising the UPS and reviews both its theoretical and proven involvement in neuropathological diseases. The potential for the UPS as a target of pharmacological therapy

  2. Emerging therapies targeting the ubiquitin proteasome system in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weathington, Nathaniel M.; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is an essential metabolic constituent of cellular physiology that tightly regulates cellular protein concentrations with specificity and precision to optimize cellular function. Inhibition of the proteasome has proven very effective in the treatment of multiple myeloma, and this approach is being tested for utility in other malignancies. New pharmaceuticals targeting the proteasome itself or specific proximal pathways of the UPS are in development as antiproliferatives or immunomodulatory agents. In this article, we discuss the biology of UPS-targeting drugs, their use as therapy for neoplasia, and the state of clinical and preclinical development for emerging therapeutics. PMID:24382383

  3. Development of proteasome inhibitors as research tools and cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The proteasome is the primary site for protein degradation in mammalian cells, and proteasome inhibitors have been invaluable tools in clarifying its cellular functions. The anticancer agent bortezomib inhibits the major peptidase sites in the proteasome’s 20S core particle. It is a “blockbuster drug” that has led to dramatic improvements in the treatment of multiple myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells. The development of proteasome inhibitors illustrates the unpredictability, frustrations, and potential rewards of drug development but also emphasizes the dependence of medical advances on basic biological research. PMID:23148232

  4. Emerging therapies targeting the ubiquitin proteasome system in cancer.

    PubMed

    Weathington, Nathaniel M; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is an essential metabolic constituent of cellular physiology that tightly regulates cellular protein concentrations with specificity and precision to optimize cellular function. Inhibition of the proteasome has proven very effective in the treatment of multiple myeloma, and this approach is being tested for utility in other malignancies. New pharmaceuticals targeting the proteasome itself or specific proximal pathways of the UPS are in development as antiproliferatives or immunomodulatory agents. In this article, we discuss the biology of UPS-targeting drugs, their use as therapy for neoplasia, and the state of clinical and preclinical development for emerging therapeutics.

  5. Crystal structure of the boronic acid-based proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in complex with the yeast 20S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Groll, Michael; Berkers, Celia R; Ploegh, Hidde L; Ovaa, Huib

    2006-03-01

    The dipeptide boronic acid bortezomib, also termed VELCADE, is a proteasome inhibitor now in use for the treatment of multiple myeloma, and its use for the treatment of other malignancies is being explored. We determined the crystal structure of the yeast 20S proteasome in complex with bortezomib to establish the specificity and binding mode of bortezomib to the proteasome's different catalytically active sites. This structure should enable the rational design of new boronic acid derivatives with improved affinities and specificities for individual active subunits.

  6. Changes in proteasome structure and function caused by HAMLET in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Lotta; Aits, Sonja; Onnerfjord, Patrik; Trulsson, Maria; Storm, Petter; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-01-01

    Proteasomes control the level of endogenous unfolded proteins by degrading them in the proteolytic core. Insufficient degradation due to altered protein structure or proteasome inhibition may trigger cell death. This study examined the proteasome response to HAMLET, a partially unfolded protein-lipid complex, which is internalized by tumor cells and triggers cell death. HAMLET bound directly to isolated 20S proteasomes in vitro and in tumor cells significant co-localization of HAMLET and 20S proteasomes was detected by confocal microscopy. This interaction was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation from extracts of HAMLET-treated tumor cells. HAMLET resisted in vitro degradation by proteasomal enzymes and degradation by intact 20S proteasomes was slow compared to fatty acid-free, partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin. After a brief activation, HAMLET inhibited proteasome activity in vitro and in parallel a change in proteasome structure occurred, with modifications of catalytic (beta1 and beta5) and structural subunits (alpha2, alpha3, alpha6 and beta3). Proteasome inhibition was confirmed in extracts from HAMLET-treated cells and there were indications of proteasome fragmentation in HAMLET-treated cells. The results suggest that internalized HAMLET is targeted to 20S proteasomes, that the complex resists degradation, inhibits proteasome activity and perturbs proteasome structure. We speculate that perturbations of proteasome structure might contribute to the cytotoxic effects of unfolded protein complexes that invade host cells.

  7. Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, Hikaru; Arai, Naoko; Tanaka, Keiji Saeki, Yasushi

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •We succeeded to control the proteasome localization by the anchor-away technique. •Nuclear proteasome-depleted cells showed a lethal phenotype. •Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in dividing cells. -- Abstract: The 26S proteasome is an essential protease complex responsible for the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotic cells. In rapidly proliferating yeast cells, proteasomes are mainly localized in the nucleus, but the biological significance of the proteasome localization is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the proteasome localization and the functions by the anchor-away technique, a ligand-dependent sequestration of a target protein into specific compartment(s). Anchoring of the proteasome to the plasma membrane or the ribosome resulted in conditional depletion of the nuclear proteasomes, whereas anchoring to histone resulted in the proteasome sequestration into the nucleus. We observed that the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in all the proteasome-targeted cells, suggesting that both the nuclear and cytoplasmic proteasomes have proteolytic functions and that the ubiquitinated proteins are produced and degraded in each compartment. Consistent with previous studies, the nuclear proteasome-depleted cells exhibited a lethal phenotype. In contrast, the nuclear sequestration of the proteasome resulted only in a mild growth defect, suggesting that the cytoplasmic proteasomes are not basically indispensable for cell growth in rapidly growing yeast cells.

  8. A nonproteolytic proteasome activity controls organelle fission in yeast.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Line; Saunier, Rémy; Cossard, Raynald; Esposito, Michela; Rinaldi, Teresa; Delahodde, Agnès

    2009-10-15

    To understand the processes underlying organelle function, dynamics and inheritance, it is necessary to identify and characterize the regulatory components involved. Recently in yeast and mammals, proteins of the membrane fission machinery (Dnm1-Mdv1-Caf4-Fis1 in yeast and DLP1-FIS1 in human) have been shown to have a dual localization on mitochondria and peroxisomes, where they control mitochondrial fission and peroxisome division. Here, we show that whereas vacuole fusion is regulated by the proteasome degradation function, mitochondrial fission and peroxisomal division are not controlled by the proteasome activity but rather depend on a new function of the proteasomal lid subunit Rpn11. Rpn11 was found to regulate the Fis1-dependent fission machinery of both organelles. These findings indicate a unique role of the Rpn11 protein in mitochondrial fission and peroxisomal proliferation that is independent of its role in proteasome-associated deubiquitylation.

  9. Calreticulin and Arginylated Calreticulin Have Different Susceptibilities to Proteasomal Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Goitea, Victor E.; Hallak, Marta E.

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational arginylation has been suggested to target proteins for proteasomal degradation. The degradation mechanism for arginylated calreticulin (R-CRT) localized in the cytoplasm is unknown. To evaluate the effect of arginylation on CRT stability, we examined the metabolic fates and degradation mechanisms of cytoplasmic CRT and R-CRT in NIH 3T3 and CHO cells. Both CRT isoforms were found to be proteasomal substrates, but the half-life of R-CRT (2 h) was longer than that of cytoplasmic CRT (0.7 h). Arginylation was not required for proteasomal degradation of CRT, although R-CRT displays ubiquitin modification. A CRT mutant incapable of dimerization showed reduced metabolic stability of R-CRT, indicating that R-CRT dimerization may protect it from proteasomal degradation. Our findings, taken together, demonstrate a novel function of arginylation: increasing the half-life of CRT in cytoplasm. PMID:25969538

  10. Proteasome Inhibition by Fellutamide B Induces Nerve Growth Factor Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hines, John; Groll, Michael; Fahnestock, Margaret; Crews, Craig M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Neurotrophic small molecules have the potential to aid in the treatment of neuronal injury and neurodegenerative diseases. The natural product fellutamide B, originally isolated from Penicillium fellutanum, potently induces nerve growth factor (NGF) release from fibroblasts and glial-derived cells, although the mechanism for this neurotrophic activity has not been elucidated. Here, we report that fellutamide B potently inhibits proteasome catalytic activity. High resolution structural information obtained from co-crystallization of the 20S proteasome reveals novel aspects regarding β-subunit binding and adduct formation by fellutamide B to inhibit their hydrolytic activity. We demonstrate that fellutamide B and other proteasome inhibitors increased NGF gene transcription via a cis-acting element (or elements) in the promoter. These results demonstrate an unrecognized connection between proteasome inhibition and NGF production, suggesting a possible new strategy in the development of neurotrophic agents. PMID:18482702

  11. Prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup), proteasomes and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Darwin, K Heran

    2009-07-01

    Proteasomes are ATP-dependent, multisubunit proteases that are found in all eukaryotes and archaea and some bacteria. In eukaryotes, the small protein ubiquitin is covalently attached in a post-translational manner to proteins that are targeted for proteasomal degradation. Despite the presence of proteasomes in many prokaryotes, ubiquitin or other post-translational protein modifiers were presumed to be absent from these organisms. Recently a prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein, Pup, was found to target proteins for proteolysis by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome. The discovery of this ubiquitin-like modifier opens up the possibility that other bacteria may also have small post-translational protein tagging systems, with the ability to affect cellular processes.

  12. Conserved Sequence Preferences Contribute to Substrate Recognition by the Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Houqing; Singh Gautam, Amit K.; Wilmington, Shameika R.; Wylie, Dennis; Martinez-Fonts, Kirby; Kago, Grace; Warburton, Marie; Chavali, Sreenivas; Inobe, Tomonao; Finkelstein, Ilya J.; Babu, M. Madan

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome has pronounced preferences for the amino acid sequence of its substrates at the site where it initiates degradation. Here, we report that modulating these sequences can tune the steady-state abundance of proteins over 2 orders of magnitude in cells. This is the same dynamic range as seen for inducing ubiquitination through a classic N-end rule degron. The stability and abundance of His3 constructs dictated by the initiation site affect survival of yeast cells and show that variation in proteasomal initiation can affect fitness. The proteasome's sequence preferences are linked directly to the affinity of the initiation sites to their receptor on the proteasome and are conserved between Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and human cells. These findings establish that the sequence composition of unstructured initiation sites influences protein abundance in vivo in an evolutionarily conserved manner and can affect phenotype and fitness. PMID:27226608

  13. Peptide-size dependent active transport in the proteasome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaikin, A.; Pöschel, T.

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the transport of proteins inside the proteasome and propose an active-transport mechanism based on a spatially asymmetric interaction potential of peptide chains. The transport is driven by fluctuations which are always present in such systems. We compute the peptide-size dependent transport rate which is essential for the functioning of the proteasome. In agreement with recent experiments, varying temperature changes the transport mechanism qualitatively.

  14. Proteasome dysfunction induces muscle growth defects and protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Yasuo; Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Naoki; Warita, Hitoshi; Kato, Masaaki; Tateyama, Maki; Ando, Risa; Izumi, Rumiko; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Ito, Hidefumi; Urushitani, Makoto; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitin–proteasome and autophagy–lysosome pathways are the two major routes of protein and organelle clearance. The role of the proteasome pathway in mammalian muscle has not been examined in vivo. In this study, we report that the muscle-specific deletion of a crucial proteasomal gene, Rpt3 (also known as Psmc4), resulted in profound muscle growth defects and a decrease in force production in mice. Specifically, developing muscles in conditional Rpt3-knockout animals showed dysregulated proteasomal activity. The autophagy pathway was upregulated, but the process of autophagosome formation was impaired. A microscopic analysis revealed the accumulation of basophilic inclusions and disorganization of the sarcomeres in young adult mice. Our results suggest that appropriate proteasomal activity is important for muscle growth and for maintaining myofiber integrity in collaboration with autophagy pathways. The deletion of a component of the proteasome complex contributed to myofiber degeneration and weakness in muscle disorders that are characterized by the accumulation of abnormal inclusions. PMID:25380823

  15. Reconfiguration of the proteasome during chaperone-mediated assembly.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyeon; Li, Xueming; Kim, Ho Min; Singh, Chingakham Ranjit; Tian, Geng; Hoyt, Martin A; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P; Zolkiewski, Michal; Coffino, Philip; Roelofs, Jeroen; Cheng, Yifan; Finley, Daniel

    2013-05-23

    The proteasomal ATPase ring, comprising Rpt1-Rpt6, associates with the heptameric α-ring of the proteasome core particle (CP) in the mature proteasome, with the Rpt carboxy-terminal tails inserting into pockets of the α-ring. Rpt ring assembly is mediated by four chaperones, each binding a distinct Rpt subunit. Here we report that the base subassembly of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteasome, which includes the Rpt ring, forms a high-affinity complex with the CP. This complex is subject to active dissociation by the chaperones Hsm3, Nas6 and Rpn14. Chaperone-mediated dissociation was abrogated by a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue, indicating that chaperone action is coupled to nucleotide hydrolysis by the Rpt ring. Unexpectedly, synthetic Rpt tail peptides bound α-pockets with poor specificity, except for Rpt6, which uniquely bound the α2/α3-pocket. Although the Rpt6 tail is not visualized within an α-pocket in mature proteasomes, it inserts into the α2/α3-pocket in the base-CP complex and is important for complex formation. Thus, the Rpt-CP interface is reconfigured when the lid complex joins the nascent proteasome to form the mature holoenzyme.

  16. Substrate Ubiquitination Controls the Unfolding Ability of the Proteasome.

    PubMed

    Reichard, Eden L; Chirico, Giavanna G; Dewey, William J; Nassif, Nicholas D; Bard, Katelyn E; Millas, Nickolas E; Kraut, Daniel A

    2016-08-26

    In eukaryotic cells, proteins are targeted to the proteasome for degradation by polyubiquitination. These proteins bind to ubiquitin receptors, are engaged and unfolded by proteasomal ATPases, and are processively degraded. The factors determining to what extent the proteasome can successfully unfold and degrade a substrate are still poorly understood. We find that the architecture of polyubiquitin chains attached to a substrate affects the ability of the proteasome to unfold and degrade the substrate, with K48- or mixed-linkage chains leading to greater processivity than K63-linked chains. Ubiquitin-independent targeting of substrates to the proteasome gave substantially lower processivity of degradation than ubiquitin-dependent targeting. Thus, even though ubiquitin chains are removed early in degradation, during substrate engagement, remarkably they dramatically affect the later unfolding of a protein domain. Our work supports a model in which a polyubiquitin chain associated with a substrate switches the proteasome into an activated state that persists throughout the degradation process. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Denervation-Induced Activation of the Standard Proteasome and Immunoproteasome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiming M; Ferrington, Deborah A; Baumann, Cory W; Thompson, LaDora V

    2016-01-01

    The standard 26S proteasome is responsible for the majority of myofibrillar protein degradation leading to muscle atrophy. The immunoproteasome is an inducible form of the proteasome. While its function has been linked to conditions of atrophy, its contribution to muscle proteolysis remains unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if the immunoproteasome plays a role in skeletal muscle atrophy induced by denervation. Adult male C57BL/6 wild type (WT) and immunoproteasome knockout lmp7-/-/mecl-1-/- (L7M1) mice underwent tibial nerve transection on the left hindlimb for either 7 or 14 days, while control mice did not undergo surgery. Proteasome activity (caspase-, chymotrypsin-, and trypsin- like), protein content of standard proteasome (β1, β5 and β2) and immunoproteasome (LMP2, LMP7 and MECL-1) catalytic subunits were determined in the gastrocnemius muscle. Denervation induced significant atrophy and was accompanied by increased activities and protein content of the catalytic subunits in both WT and L7M1 mice. Although denervation resulted in a similar degree of muscle atrophy between strains, the mice lacking two immunoproteasome subunits showed a differential response in the extent and duration of proteasome features, including activities and content of the β1, β5 and LMP2 catalytic subunits. The results indicate that immunoproteasome deficiency alters the proteasome's composition and activities. However, the immunoproteasome does not appear to be essential for muscle atrophy induced by denervation.

  18. A Case of Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) Syndrome Harboring a Novel Folliculin (FLCN) Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Yukawa, Takuro; Fukazawa, Takuya; Yoshida, Masakazu; Morita, Ichiro; Kato, Katsuya; Monobe, Yasumasa; Furuya, Mitsuko; Naomoto, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 56 Final Diagnosis: Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome Symptoms: Dyspnea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Pulmonology Objective: Rare disease Background: Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder clinically characterized by pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, renal cell cancer, and skin fibrofolliculomas. The disorder is caused by germline mutations in the FLCN gene. Case Report: A 56-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with a diagnosis of bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest revealed bilateral multiple bullae predominantly located in the subpleural and mediastinal areas in the bilateral upper and lower lobes. Although she was cured by thoracic cavity drainage, she underwent resection of bilateral lung bullae because she had a prior history of right pneumothorax at 37- and 45-years of age. She had no signs of renal tumor but had fibrofolliculoma in her face and a family history of pneumothorax, we therefore suspected BHD syndrome. DNA sequence analyses determined that there was a two base pair deletion in exon 4 of the FLCN gene, confirming the diagnosis of BHD syndrome. Conclusions: Here we report a case of BHD syndrome with a previously unreported FLCN mutation. PMID:27780965

  19. High resolution imaging of the equine cornea using the DUB(®)-SkinScanner v3.9.

    PubMed

    Herbig, Lena E; Köhler, Lothar; Eule, J Corinna

    2016-12-05

    The aim was to describe the use of the DUB®-SkinScanner v3.9 (taberna pro medicum GmbH, Lueneburg, Germany) for the examination of the equine cornea. Using the DUB(®)-SkinScanner v3.9 various pathological corneal conditions were pictured in the A- and B-mode at a frequency of 22 and/or 50 MHz in nine eyes of eight horses. Scans were obtained from standing horses or from horses under general anesthesia non-related to image acquisition. The examination allowed real time imaging and measurement of the equine cornea in vivo. Compared to slit-lamp biomicroscopy additional information was obtained in seven of nine eyes regarding the corneal thickness, in four of nine eyes regarding the epithelium, in five of nine eyes regarding the stroma and in five of nine eyes regarding the endothelium. The DUB(®)-SkinScanner v3.9 is a valuable high-resolution imaging tool for the evaluation of the equine cornea under practice conditions. The image acquisition does not depend on corneal transparency and provides additional diagnostic information to the standard slit-lamp biomicroscopy.

  20. Structural basis for the assembly and gate closure mechanisms of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 20S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, H.; Wang, T.; Pan, H.; Lin, G.

    2010-06-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) possesses a proteasome system analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Mtb requires the proteasome to resist killing by the host immune system. The detailed assembly process and the gating mechanism of Mtb proteasome have remained unknown. Using cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, we have obtained structures of three Mtb proteasome assembly intermediates, showing conformational changes during assembly, and explaining why the {beta}-subunit propeptide inhibits rather than promotes assembly. Although the eukaryotic proteasome core particles close their protein substrate entrance gates with different amino terminal peptides of the seven {alpha}-subunits, it has been unknown how a prokaryotic proteasome might close the gate at the symmetry axis with seven identical peptides. We found in the new Mtb proteasome crystal structure that the gate is tightly sealed by the seven identical peptides taking on three distinct conformations. Our work provides the structural bases for assembly and gating mechanisms of the Mtb proteasome.

  1. Structural Basis for the Assembly and Gate Closure Mechanisms of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 20S Proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.; Li, H; Wang, T; Pan, H; Lin, G; Li, H

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) possesses a proteasome system analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Mtb requires the proteasome to resist killing by the host immune system. The detailed assembly process and the gating mechanism of Mtb proteasome have remained unknown. Using cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, we have obtained structures of three Mtb proteasome assembly intermediates, showing conformational changes during assembly, and explaining why the {beta}-subunit propeptide inhibits rather than promotes assembly. Although the eukaryotic proteasome core particles close their protein substrate entrance gates with different amino terminal peptides of the seven {alpha}-subunits, it has been unknown how a prokaryotic proteasome might close the gate at the symmetry axis with seven identical peptides. We found in the new Mtb proteasome crystal structure that the gate is tightly sealed by the seven identical peptides taking on three distinct conformations. Our work provides the structural bases for assembly and gating mechanisms of the Mtb proteasome.

  2. Similarities between methamphetamine toxicity and proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fornai, F; Lenzi, P; Gesi, M; Ferrucci, M; Lazzeri, G; Capobianco, L; de Blasi, A; Battaglia, G; Nicoletti, F; Ruggieri, S; Paparelli, A

    2004-10-01

    The monoamine neurotoxin methamphetamine (METH) is commonly used as an experimental model for Parkinson's disease (PD). In fact, METH-induced striatal dopamine (DA) loss is accompanied by damage to striatal nerve endings arising from the substantia nigra. On the other hand, PD is characterized by neuronal inclusions within nigral DA neurons. These inclusions contain alpha-synuclein, ubiquitin, and various components of a metabolic pathway named the ubiquitin-proteasome (UP) system, while mutation of genes coding for various components of the UP system is responsible for inherited forms of PD. In this presentation we demonstrate for the first time the occurrence of neuronal inclusions in vivo in the nigrostriatal system of the mouse following administration of METH. We analyzed, in vivo and in vitro, the shape and the fine structure of these neuronal bodies by using transmission electron microscopy. Immunocytochemical investigation showed that these METH-induced cytosolic inclusions stain for ubiquitin, alpha-synuclein, and UP-related molecules, thus sharing similar components with Lewy bodies occurring in PD, with an emphasis on enzymes belonging to the UP system. In line with this, blockade of this multicatalytic pathway by the selective inhibitor epoxomycin produced cell inclusions with similar features. Moreover, using a multifaceted pharmacological approach, we could demonstrate the need for endogenous DA in order to form neuronal inclusions.

  3. Parkin promotes proteasomal degradation of misregulated BAX.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Zeynep; Funk, Kathrin; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Todt, Franziska; Zerbes, Ralf M; Oelgeklaus, Aline; Tanaka, Atsushi; van der Laan, Martin; Edlich, Frank

    2017-09-01

    The pro-apoptotic BCL-2 protein BAX commits human cells to apoptosis by permeabilizing the outer mitochondrial membrane. BAX activation has been suggested to require the separation of helix α5 from α6 - the 'latch' from the 'core' domain - among other conformational changes. Here, we show that conformational changes in this region impair BAX translocation to the mitochondria and retrotranslocation back into the cytosol, and therefore BAX inhibition, but not activation. Redirecting misregulated BAX to the mitochondria revealed an alternative mechanism of BAX inhibition. The E3 ligase parkin, which is known to trigger mitochondria-specific autophagy, ubiquitylates BAX K128 and targets the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 protein for proteasomal degradation. Retrotranslocation-deficient BAX is completely degraded in a parkin-dependent manner. Although only a minor pool of endogenous BAX escapes retrotranslocation into the cytosol, parkin-dependent targeting of misregulated BAX on the mitochondria provides substantial protection against BAX apoptotic activity. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Fos family protein degradation by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Gomard, Tiphanie; Jariel-Encontre, Isabelle; Basbous, Jihane; Bossis, Guillaume; Moquet-Torcy, Gabriel; Mocquet-Torcy, Gabriel; Piechaczyk, Marc

    2008-10-01

    c-Fos proto-oncoprotein defines a family of closely related transcription factors (Fos proteins) also comprising Fra-1, Fra-2, FosB and DeltaFosB, the latter two proteins being generated by alternative splicing. Through the regulation of many genes, most of them still unidentified, they regulate major functions from the cell level up to the whole organism. Thus they are involved in the control of proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, as well as in the control of responses to stresses, and they play important roles in organogenesis, immune responses and control of cognitive functions, among others. Fos proteins are intrinsically unstable. We have studied how two of them, c-Fos and Fra-1, are degraded. Departing from the classical scenario where unstable key cell regulators are hydrolysed by the proteasome after polyubiquitination, we showed that the bulk of c-Fos and Fra-1 can be broken down independently of any prior ubiquitination. Certain conserved structural domains suggest that similar mechanisms may also apply to Fra-2 and FosB. Computer search indicates that certain motifs shared by the Fos proteins and putatively responsible for instability are found in no other protein, suggesting the existence of degradation mechanisms specific for this protein family. Under particular signalling conditions, others have shown that a part of cytoplasmic c-Fos requires ubiquitination for fast turnover. This poses the question of the multiplicity of degradation pathways that apply to proteins depending on their intracellular localization.

  5. From bortezomib to other inhibitors of the proteasome and beyond.

    PubMed

    Buac, Daniela; Shen, Min; Schmitt, Sara; Kona, Fathima Rani; Deshmukh, Rahul; Zhang, Zhen; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Mitra, Bharati; Dou, Q Ping

    2013-01-01

    The cancer drug discovery field has placed much emphasis on the identification of novel and cancer-specific molecular targets. A rich source of such targets for the design of novel anti-tumor agents is the ubiqutin-proteasome system (UP-S), a tightly regulated, highly specific pathway responsible for the vast majority of protein turnover within the cell. Because of its critical role in almost all cell processes that ensure normal cellular function, its inhibition at one point in time was deemed non-specific and therefore not worth further investigation as a molecular drug target. However, today the proteasome is one of the most promising anti-cancer drug targets of the century. The discovery that tumor cells are in fact more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than normal cells indeed paved the way for the design of its inhibitors. Such efforts have led to bortezomib, the first FDA approved proteasome inhibitor now used as a frontline treatment for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM), relapsed/refractory MM and mantle cell lymphoma. Though successful in improving clinical outcomes for patients with hematological malignancies, relapse often occurs in those who initially responded to bortezomib. Therefore, the acquisition of bortezomib resistance is a major issue with its therapy. Furthermore, some neuro-toxicities have been associated with bortezomib treatment and its efficacy in solid tumors is lacking. These observations have encouraged researchers to pursue the next generation of proteasome inhibitors, which would ideally overcome bortezomib resistance, have reduced toxicities and a broader range of anti-cancer activity. This review summarizes the success and limitations of bortezomib, and describes recent advances in the field, including, and most notably, the most recent FDA approval of carfilzomib in July, 2012, a second generation proteasome inhibitor. Other proteasome inhibitors currently in clinical trials and those that are currently experimental grade

  6. From Bortezomib to other Inhibitors of the Proteasome and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Buac, Daniela; Shen, Min; Schmitt, Sara; Kona, Fathima Rani; Deshmukh, Rahul; Zhang, Zhen; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Mitra, Bharati; Dou, Q. Ping

    2013-01-01

    The cancer drug discovery field has placed much emphasis on the identification of novel and cancer-specific molecular targets. A rich source of such targets for the design of novel anti-tumor agents is the ubiqutin-proteasome system (UP-S), a tightly regulated, highly specific pathway responsible for the vast majority of protein turnover within the cell. Because of its critical role in almost all cell processes that ensure normal cellular function, its inhibition at one point in time was deemed non-specific and therefore not worth further investigation as a molecular drug target. However, today the proteasome is one of the most promising anti-cancer drug targets of the century. The discovery that tumor cells are in fact more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than normal cells indeed paved the way for the design of its inhibitors. Such efforts have led to bortezomib, the first FDA approved proteasome inhibitor now used as a frontline treatment for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM), relapsed/refractory MM and mantle cell lymphoma. Though successful in improving clinical outcomes for patients with hematological malignancies, relapse often occurs in those who initially responded to bortezomib. Therefore, the acquisition of bortezomib resistance is a major issue with its therapy. Furthermore, some neuro-toxicities have been associated with bortezomib treatment and its efficacy in solid tumors is lacking. These observations have encouraged researchers to pursue the next generation of proteasome inhibitors, which would ideally overcome bortezomib resistance, have reduced toxicities and a broader range of anti-cancer activity. This review summarizes the success and limitations of bortezomib, and describes recent advances in the field, including, and most notably, the most recent FDA approval of carfilzomib in July, 2012, a second generation proteasome inhibitor. Other proteasome inhibitors currently in clinical trials and those that are currently experimental grade

  7. The novel β2-selective proteasome inhibitor LU-102 synergizes with bortezomib and carfilzomib to overcome proteasome inhibitor resistance of myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Marianne; Bader, Juergen; Geurink, Paul P; Weyburne, Emily S; Mirabella, Anne C; Silzle, Tobias; Shabaneh, Tamer B; van der Linden, Wouter A; de Bruin, Gerjan; Haile, Sarah R; van Rooden, Eva; Appenzeller, Christina; Li, Nan; Kisselev, Alexei F; Overkleeft, Herman; Driessen, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Proteasome inhibitor resistance is a challenge for myeloma therapy. Bortezomib targets the β5 and β1 activity, but not the β2 activity of the proteasome. Bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells down-regulate the activation status of the unfolded protein response, and up-regulate β2 proteasome activity. To improve proteasome inhibition in bortezomib-resistant myeloma and to achieve more efficient UPR activation, we have developed LU-102, a selective inhibitor of the β2 proteasome activity. LU-102 inhibited the β2 activity in intact myeloma cells at low micromolar concentrations without relevant co-inhibition of β1 and β5 proteasome subunits. In proteasome inhibitor-resistant myeloma cells, significantly more potent proteasome inhibition was achieved by bortezomib or carfilzomib in combination with LU-102, compared to bortezomib/carfilzomib alone, resulting in highly synergistic cytotoxic activity of the drug combination via endoplasmatic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. Combining bortezomib/carfilzomib with LU-102 significantly prolonged proteasome inhibition and increased activation of the unfolded protein response and IRE1-a activity. IRE1-α has recently been shown to control myeloma cell differentiation and bortezomib sensitivity (Leung-Hagesteijn, Cancer Cell 24:3, 289-304). Thus, β2-selective proteasome inhibition by LU-102 in combination with bortezomib or carfilzomib results in synergistic proteasome inhibition, activation of the unfolded protein response, and cytotoxicity, and overcomes bortezomib/carfilzomib resistance in myeloma cells in vitro.

  8. Synthetic analogs of green tea polyphenols as proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David M.; Wang, Zhigang; Kazi, Aslamuzzaman; Li, Lian-Hai; Chan, Tak-Hang; Dou, Q. Ping

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Animal, epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated the anti-tumor activity of pharmacological proteasome inhibitors and the cancer-preventive effects of green tea consumption. Previously, one of our laboratories reported that natural ester bond-containing green tea polyphenols (GTPs), such as (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate [(-)-EGCG] and (-)-gallocatechin-3-gallate [(-)-GCG], are potent and specific proteasome inhibitors. Another of our groups, for the first time, was able to enantioselectively synthesize (-)-EGCG as well as other analogs of this natural GTP. Our interest in designing and developing novel synthetic GTPs as proteasome inhibitors and potential cancer-preventive agents prompted our current study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: GTP analogs, (+)-EGCG, (+)-GCG, and a fully benzyl-protected (+)-EGCG [Bn-(+)-EGCG], were prepared by enantioselective synthesis. Inhibition of the proteasome or calpain (as a control) activities under cell-free conditions were measured by fluorogenic substrate assay. Inhibition of intact tumor cell proteasome activity was measured by accumulation of some proteasome target proteins (p27, I kappa B-alpha and Bax) using Western blot analysis. Inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis by synthetic GTPs were determined by G(1) arrest and caspase activation, respectively. Finally, inhibition of the transforming activity of human prostate cancer cells by synthetic GTPs was measured by a colony formation assay. RESULTS: (+)-EGCG and (+)-GCG potently and specifically inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of purified 20S proteasome and the 26S proteasome in tumor cell lysates, while Bn-(+)-EGCG does not. Treatment of leukemic Jurkat T or prostate cancer LNCaP cells with either (+)-EGCG or (+)-GCG accumulated p27 and IkappaB-alpha proteins, associated with an increased G(1) population. (+)-EGCG treatment also accumulated the pro-apoptotic Bax protein and induced apoptosis in LNCaP cells expressing

  9. Fast axonal transport of the proteasome complex depends on membrane interaction and molecular motor function.

    PubMed

    Otero, Maria G; Alloatti, Matías; Cromberg, Lucas E; Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Encalada, Sandra E; Pozo Devoto, Victorio M; Bruno, Luciana; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Falzone, Tomás L

    2014-04-01

    Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in neurons depends on the correct delivery of the proteasome complex. In neurodegenerative diseases, aggregation and accumulation of proteins in axons link transport defects with degradation impairments; however, the transport properties of proteasomes remain unknown. Here, using in vivo experiments, we reveal the fast anterograde transport of assembled and functional 26S proteasome complexes. A high-resolution tracking system to follow fluorescent proteasomes revealed three types of motion: actively driven proteasome axonal transport, diffusive behavior in a viscoelastic axonema and proteasome-confined motion. We show that active proteasome transport depends on motor function because knockdown of the KIF5B motor subunit resulted in impairment of the anterograde proteasome flux and the density of segmental velocities. Finally, we reveal that neuronal proteasomes interact with intracellular membranes and identify the coordinated transport of fluorescent proteasomes with synaptic precursor vesicles, Golgi-derived vesicles, lysosomes and mitochondria. Taken together, our results reveal fast axonal transport as a new mechanism of proteasome delivery that depends on membrane cargo 'hitch-hiking' and the function of molecular motors. We further hypothesize that defects in proteasome transport could promote abnormal protein clearance in neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Proteasome inhibition alleviates prolonged moderate compression-induced muscle pathology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanism initiating deep pressure ulcer remains to be elucidated. The present study tested the hypothesis that the ubiquitin proteasome system is involved in the signalling mechanism in pressure-induced deep tissue injury. Methods Adult Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to an experimental compression model to induce deep tissue injury. The tibialis region of the right hind limb was subjected to 100 mmHg of static pressure for six hours on each of two consecutive days. The compression pressure was continuously monitored by a three-axial force transducer within the compression indentor. The left hind limb served as the intra-animal control. Muscle tissues underneath the compressed region were collected and used for analyses. Results Our results demonstrated that the activity of 20S proteasome and the protein abundance of ubiquitin and MAFbx/atrogin-1 were elevated in conjunction with pathohistological changes in the compressed muscle, as compared to control muscle. The administration of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 was found to be effective in ameliorating the development of pathological histology in compressed muscle. Furthermore, 20S proteasome activity and protein content of ubiquitin and MAFbx/atrogin-1 showed no apparent increase in the MG132-treated muscle following compression. Conclusion Our data suggest that the ubiquitin proteasome system may play a role in the pathogenesis of pressure-induced deep tissue injury. PMID:21385343

  11. The Proteasome Inhibition Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bentea, Eduard; Verbruggen, Lise; Massie, Ann

    2016-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of Parkinson’s disease are the progressive loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and the formation of intracellular inclusion bodies, termed Lewy bodies, in surviving neurons. Accumulation of proteins in large insoluble cytoplasmic aggregates has been proposed to result, partly, from a failure in the function of intracellular protein degradation pathways. Evidence in support for such a hypothesis emerged in the beginning of the years 2000 with studies demonstrating structural and functional deficits in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in post-mortem nigral tissue of patients with Parkinson’s disease. These fundamental findings have inspired the development of a new generation of animal models based on the use of proteasome inhibitors to disturb protein homeostasis and trigger nigral dopaminergic neurodegeneration. In this review, we provide an updated overview of the current approaches in employing proteasome inhibitors to model Parkinson’s disease, with particular emphasis on rodent studies. In addition, the mechanisms underlying proteasome inhibition-induced cell death and the validity criteria (construct, face and predictive validity) of the model will be critically discussed. Due to its distinct, but highly relevant mechanism of inducing neuronal death, the proteasome inhibition model represents a useful addition to the repertoire of toxin-based models of Parkinson’s disease that might provide novel clues to unravel the complex pathogenesis of this disorder. PMID:27802243

  12. Proteasome Inhibitors in the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jatin J.; Orlowski, Robert Z.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting intracellular protein turnover by inhibiting the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway as a strategy for cancer therapy is a new addition to our chemotherapeutic armamentarium, and has seen its greatest successes against multiple myeloma. The first-in-class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib was initially approved for treatment of patients in the relapsed/refractory setting as a single agent, and was recently shown to induce even greater benefits as part of rationally-designed combinations that overcome chemoresistance. Modulation of proteasome function is also a rational approach to achieve chemosensitization to other anti-myeloma agents, and bortezomib has now been incorporated into the front-line setting. Bortezomib-based induction regimens are able to achieve higher overall response rates and response qualities than was the case with prior standards of care, and unlike these older approaches, maintain efficacy in patients with clinically- and molecularly-defined high-risk disease. Second-generation proteasome inhibitors with novel properties, such as NPI-0052 and carfilzomib, are entering the clinical arena, and showing evidence of anti-myeloma activity. In this spotlight review, we provide an overview of the current state of the art use of bortezomib and other proteasome inhibitors against multiple myeloma, and highlight areas for future study that will further optimize our ability to benefit patients with this disease. PMID:19741722

  13. Targeting proteasome ubiquitin receptor Rpn13 in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Song, Y; Ray, A; Li, S; Das, D S; Tai, Y T; Carrasco, R D; Chauhan, D; Anderson, K C

    2016-09-01

    Proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is an effective therapy for relapsed and newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM); however, dose-limiting toxicities and the development of resistance can limit its long-term utility. Recent research has focused on targeting ubiquitin receptors upstream of 20S proteasome, with the aim of generating less toxic therapies. Here we show that 19S proteasome-associated ubiquitin receptor Rpn13 is more highly expressed in MM cells than in normal plasma cells. Rpn13-siRNA (small interfering RNA) decreases MM cell viability. A novel agent RA190 targets Rpn13 and inhibits proteasome function, without blocking the proteasome activity or the 19S deubiquitylating activity. CRISPR/Cas9 Rpn13-knockout demonstrates that RA190-induced activity is dependent on Rpn13. RA190 decreases viability in MM cell lines and patient MM cells, inhibits proliferation of MM cells even in the presence of bone marrow stroma and overcomes bortezomib resistance. Anti-MM activity of RA190 is associated with induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis and unfolded protein response-related apoptosis. MM xenograft model studies show that RA190 is well tolerated, inhibits tumor growth and prolongs survival. Combining RA190 with bortezomib, lenalidomide or pomalidomide induces synergistic anti-MM activity. Our preclinical data validates targeting Rpn13 to overcome bortezomib resistance, and provides the framework for clinical evaluation of Rpn13 inhibitors, alone or in combination, to improve patient outcome in MM.

  14. Degradation of pro-insulin-receptor proteins by proteasomes.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Miguel; Velasco, Eduardo; Kumate, Jesús

    2004-01-01

    Type-2 diabetes is characterized by hyperinsulinemia, peripheral insulin resistance, and diminished tyrosine phosphorylation activity. It has been recently shown that proteasomes are implicated in the degradation of the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) but not in that of the insulin receptor (IR). However, it is unknown whether proteasomes are involved in pro-IR degradation. We used CHO-IR and the 3T3-L1 cells treated with insulin at different concentrations and compared the proteasome activity of IRS-1, IR, and pro-IR degradation either in presence or in absence of lactacystin. A total of 100 nM of insulin allowed degradation of IRS-1 after 6 h of incubation. At 1,000 nM of insulin, pro-IR degradation began at 1 h of incubation, similar to IRS-1 degradation. Surprisingly, at a higher concentration (10 microM) of insulin, a drastic decrease of proteins was observed from the first minute of incubation. This activity was blocked by lactacystin, a specific proteasome inhibitor. According to these results, we propose that pro-IR is degraded by proteasomes.

  15. Proteasome Inhibition Suppresses Dengue Virus Egress in Antibody Dependent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Vivian V.; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Horrevorts, Sophie; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV) is a cause of significant global health burden, with an estimated 390 million infections occurring annually. However, no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatment for dengue is available. DENV interacts with host cell factors to complete its life cycle although this virus-host interplay remains to be fully elucidated. Many studies have identified the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) to be important for successful DENV production, but how the UPP contributes to DENV life cycle as host factors remains ill defined. We show here that proteasome inhibition decouples infectious virus production from viral RNA replication in antibody-dependent infection of THP-1 cells. Molecular and imaging analyses in β-lactone treated THP-1 cells suggest that proteasome function does not prevent virus assembly but rather DENV egress. Intriguingly, the licensed proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, is able to inhibit DENV titers at low nanomolar drug concentrations for different strains of all four serotypes of DENV in primary monocytes. Furthermore, bortezomib treatment of DENV-infected mice inhibited the spread of DENV in the spleen as well as the overall pathological changes. Our findings suggest that preventing DENV egress through proteasome inhibition could be a suitable therapeutic strategy against dengue. PMID:26565697

  16. Clioquinol - a novel copper-dependent and independent proteasome inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, A D

    2011-03-01

    Clioquinol (5-chloro-7-iodo-quinolin-8-ol) was used in the 1950's-1970's as an oral anti-parasitic agent. More recently, studies have demonstrated that Clioquinol displays preclinical efficacy in the treatment of malignancy. Its anti-cancer activity relates, at least in part, to its ability to inhibit the proteasome through mechanisms dependent and independent of its ability to bind heavy metals such as copper. By acting as a metal ionophore Clioquinol transports metal ions from the extracellular environment into the cell and mobilizes weakly bound intracellular stores. It then directs the metal to the proteasome resulting in disruption of this enzymatic complex. In addition, Clioquinol is capable of directly inhibiting the proteasome at higher concentrations. Thus, Clioquinol represents a novel therapeutic strategy to inhibit the proteasome. Given the prior toxicology and pharmacology studies, Clioquinol could be rapidly repositioned for a new anti-cancer indication. This review highlights the mechanism of action of Clioquinol as a proteasome inhibitor. In addition, it discusses the human pharmacology and toxicology studies and how this information would guide a phase I clinical trial of this agent for patients with malignancy.

  17. Proteomic remodeling of proteasome in right heart failure.

    PubMed

    Fessart, Delphine; Martin-Negrier, Marie-Laure; Claverol, Stéphane; Thiolat, Marie-Laure; Crevel, Huguette; Toussaint, Christian; Bonneu, Marc; Muller, Bernard; Savineau, Jean-Pierre; Delom, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    The development of right heart failure (RHF) is characterized by alterations of right ventricle (RV) structure and function, but the mechanisms of RHF remain still unknown. Thus, understanding the RHF is essential for improved therapies. Therefore, identification by quantitative proteomics of targets specific to RHF may have therapeutic benefits to identify novel potential therapeutic targets. The objective of this study was to analyze the molecular mechanisms changing RV function in the diseased RHF and thus, to identify novel potential therapeutic targets. For this, we have performed differential proteomic analysis of whole RV proteins using two experimental rat models of RHF. Differential protein expression was observed for hundred twenty six RV proteins including proteins involved in structural constituent of cytoskeleton, motor activity, structural molecule activity, cytoskeleton protein binding and microtubule binding. Interestingly, further analysis of down-regulated proteins, reveals that both protein and gene expressions of proteasome subunits were drastically decreased in RHF, which was accompanied by an increase of ubiquitinated proteins. Interestingly, the proteasomal activities chymotrypsin and caspase-like were decreased whereas trypsin-like activity was maintained. In conclusion, this study revealed the involvement of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in RHF. Three deregulated mechanisms were discovered: (1) decreased gene and protein expressions of proteasome subunits, (2) decreased specific activity of proteasome; and (3) a specific accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins. This modulation of UPS of RV may provide a novel therapeutic avenue for restoration of cardiac function in the diseased RHF. © 2013.

  18. Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome: report of two novel germline mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene.

    PubMed

    Palmirotta, Raffaele; Donati, Pietro; Savonarola, Annalisa; Cota, Carlo; Ferroni, Patrizia; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2008-01-01

    Molecular analysis of the folliculin (FLCN) gene was performed in four consenting patients from two families with Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, showing the occurrence of two frameshift mutations located respectively in exons 5 (802insA) and 9 (1345delAAAG) of the FLCN gene. A novel homozygous sequence variant in the intron 9 (IVS9 +5C>T) was also found. 1345delAAAG was associated with a wide variety of tumors, including stomach, colon, breast and parotid cancer. Conversely, the family carrying 802insA only had clinical evidence of dermatological lesions. These findings further suggest the relevance of exon 9 mutations in cancer predisposition for BHD.

  19. Novel germline mutations in FLCN gene identified in two Chinese patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Teng; Ning, Xianghui; He, Qun; Gong, Kan

    2017-01-09

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, a hereditary renal cancer syndrome caused by mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene, is characterized by the presence of fibrofolliculomas, pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Few BHD syndrome cases have been reported in Asian countries, and cutaneous presentations are relatively rare in Asian patients. Asian BHD patients may be misdiagnosed due to their atypical manifestations. Here, we report two Chinese BHD patients with novel FLCN mutations (c.946-947delAG in exon 9 and c.770-772delCCT in exon 7). Both of them had RCC and spontaneous pneumothorax without fibrofolliculomas. In patients with RCC and pulmonary cysts but without cutaneous lesions, screening for mutations in the FLCN gene should be performed, especially for those with a family history of RCC or pulmonary cysts (pneumothorax).

  20. Successful treatment of facial papules with electrodessication in a patient with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Sara E; Mahmoudizad, Rod; Parekh, Palak K

    2014-07-15

    We report a case of a 51-year-old Hispanic female who presented with a several year history of multiple flesh colored papules of cosmetic concern on the nose and medial cheeks. Biopsies revealed fibrofolliculoma and trichodiscoma. The patient was referred for genetic testing and was found to be positive for the FLCN gene defect, confirming a diagnosis of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome. Further work-up with screening renal ultrasound and CT scan of the thorax and abdomen was unrevealing. For treatment of these skin lesions, dermasanding was attempted initially with only minimal benefit. She subsequently had multiple lesions treated with electrodessication at a low setting and was very pleased with the results. Curettage was not performed and importantly, there has yet to be a recurrence of lesions treated with only hyfrecation.

  1. Amyloid-β Increases Activity of Proteasomes Capped with 19S and 11S Regulators.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Alexey V; Kulikova, Alexandra A; Astakhova, Tatiana M; Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Burnysheva, Ksenia M; Adzhubei, Alexei A; Erokhov, Pavel A; Evgen'ev, Michail B; Sharova, Natalia P; Karpov, Vadim L; Makarov, Alexander A

    2016-09-06

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) in neurons accompanies Alzheimer's disease progression. In the cytoplasm Aβ influences activity of proteasomes, the multisubunit protein complexes that hydrolyze the majority of intracellular proteins. However, the manner in which Aβ affects the proteolytic activity of proteasomes has not been established. In this study the effect of Aβ42 and Aβ42 with isomerized Asp7 on activity of different forms of proteasomes has been analyzed. It has been shown that Aβ peptides efficiently reduce activity of the 20S proteasomes, but increase activity of the 20S proteasomes capped with the 19S and/or 11S regulators. Modulation of proteasome activity is mainly determined by the C-terminal segment of Aβ (amino acids 17-42). This study demonstrated an important role of proteasome regulators in the interplay between Aβ and the proteasomes.

  2. Bacterial self-resistance to the natural proteasome inhibitor salinosporamide A

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Andrew J.; McGlinchey, Ryan P.; Lechner, Anna; Moore, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have recently emerged as a therapeutic strategy in cancer chemotherapy but susceptibility to drug resistance limits their efficacy. The marine actinobacterium Salinispora tropica produces salinosporamide A (NPI-0052, marizomib), a potent proteasome inhibitor and promising clinical agent in the treatment of multiple myeloma. Actinobacteria also possess 20S proteasome machinery, raising the question of self-resistance. We identified a redundant proteasome β-subunit, SalI, encoded within the salinosporamide biosynthetic gene cluster and biochemically characterized the SalI proteasome complex. The SalI β-subunit has an altered substrate specificity profile, 30-fold resistance to salinosporamide A, and cross-resistance to the FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. An A49V mutation in SalI correlates to clinical bortezomib resistance from a human proteasome β 5-subunit A49T mutation, suggesting that intrinsic resistance to natural proteasome inhibitors may predict clinical outcomes. PMID:21882868

  3. Potential Roles for Ubiquitin and the Proteasome during Ribosome Biogenesis‡

    PubMed Central

    Stavreva, Diana A.; Kawasaki, Miyuki; Dundr, Miroslav; Koberna, Karel; Müller, Waltraud G.; Tsujimura-Takahashi, Teruko; Komatsu, Wataru; Hayano, Toshiya; Isobe, Toshiaki; Raska, Ivan; Misteli, Tom; Takahashi, Nobuhiro; McNally, James G.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the possible involvement of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in ribosome biogenesis. We find by immunofluorescence that ubiquitin is present within nucleoli and also demonstrate by immunoprecipitation that complexes associated with pre-rRNA processing factors are ubiquitinated. Using short proteasome inhibition treatments, we show by fluorescence microscopy that nucleolar morphology is disrupted for some but not all factors involved in ribosome biogenesis. Interference with proteasome degradation also induces the accumulation of 90S preribosomes, alters the dynamic properties of a number of processing factors, slows the release of mature rRNA from the nucleolus, and leads to the depletion of 18S and 28S rRNAs. Together, these results suggest that the UPS is probably involved at many steps during ribosome biogenesis, including the maturation of the 90S preribosome. PMID:16782897

  4. Proteasomes play an essential role in thymocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, L M; Goldberg, A L; Poirier, G G; Schwartz, L M; Osborne, B A

    1996-01-01

    Cell death in many different organisms requires the activation of proteolytic cascades involving cytosolic proteases. Here we describe a novel requirement in thymocyte cell death for the 20S proteasome, a highly conserved multicatalytic protease found in all eukaryotes. Specific inhibitors of proteasome function blocked cell death induced by ionizing radiation, glucocorticoids or phorbol ester. In addition to inhibiting apoptosis, these signals prevented the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase that accompanies many cell deaths. Since overall rates of protein degradation were not altered significantly during cell death in thymocytes, these results suggest that the proteasome may either degrade regulatory protein(s) that normally inhibit the apoptotic pathway or may proteolytically activate protein(s) than promote cell death. Images PMID:8670888

  5. An extracellular proteasome releases endostatin from human collagen XVIII.

    PubMed

    Reiss-Pistilli, Maria L V; Schuppan, Detlef; Barroso, Madalena M S; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Farias, Shirley; Lery, Letícia; Bauer, Michael; Juliano, Luiz; Juliano, Maria A; Coelho-Sampaio, Tatiana

    2017-02-01

    Endostatin is a potent anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor protein capable of regressing tumors without inducing acquired resistance. Since it is a fragment of the parental molecule, collagen XVIII, its endogenous production depends on the activity of a specific proteolytic enzyme. While such an enzyme has been described in mice, a human counterpart has not been identified so far. Here, we searched for this enzyme by using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptide containing the cleavage site of human collagen XVIII. We found that the cleavage activity was present in various murine and human tumor cells but not in untransformed cells. It was ascribed to a large protein complex identified as an extracellular form of proteasome 20S. Since circulating proteasome 20S has recently emerged as an important marker of tumor progression, the possibility of proteasomes controlling the production of angiostatic endostatin may inspire the development of new anticancer therapies.

  6. Vinyl ester-based cyclic peptide proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Baldisserotto, Anna; Marastoni, Mauro; Fiorini, Stella; Pretto, Loretta; Ferretti, Valeria; Gavioli, Riccardo; Tomatis, Roberto

    2008-03-15

    The 20S proteasome is a multicatalytic protease complex responsible for the degradation of many proteins in mammalian cells. Specific inhibition of proteasome enzymatic subunits represents a topic of great interest for the development of new drug therapies. Following our previous development of a new class of peptide-based inhibitors bearing a C-terminal vinyl ester residue as a pharmacophoric unit that are able to interact with the catalytic threonine, we report here the synthesis and biological properties of a new series of vinyl ester cyclopeptide analogues. Some of these derivatives were shown to inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome at nanomolar concentration and their potency was found to depend on the size of the tetrapeptidic cyclic portion.

  7. Melatonin production: proteasomal proteolysis in serotonin N-acetyltransferase regulation.

    PubMed

    Gastel, J A; Roseboom, P H; Rinaldi, P A; Weller, J L; Klein, D C

    1998-02-27

    The nocturnal increase in circulating melatonin in vertebrates is regulated by 10- to 100-fold increases in pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) activity. Changes in the amount of AA-NAT protein were shown to parallel changes in AA-NAT activity. When neural stimulation was switched off by either light exposure or L-propranolol-induced beta-adrenergic blockade, both AA-NAT activity and protein decreased rapidly. Effects of L-propranolol were blocked in vitro by dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) or inhibitors of proteasomal proteolysis. This result indicates that adrenergic-cAMP regulation of AA-NAT is mediated by rapid reversible control of selective proteasomal proteolysis. Similar proteasome-based mechanisms may function widely as selective molecular switches in vertebrate neural systems.

  8. Transcriptional upregulation of BAG3 upon proteasome inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huaqin Liu Haimei; Zhang Haiyan; Guan Yifu; Du Zhenxian

    2008-01-11

    Proteasome inhibitors exhibit antitumoral activity against malignancies of different histology. Emerging evidence indicates that antiapoptotic factors may also accumulate as a consequence of exposure to these drugs, thus it seems plausible that activation of survival signaling cascades might compromise their antitumoral effects. Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG) family proteins are characterized by their property of interaction with a variety of partners involved in modulating the proliferation/death balance, including heat shock proteins (HSP), Bcl-2, Raf-1. In this report, we demonstrated that BAG3 is a novel antiapoptotic molecule induced by proteasome inhibitors in various cancer cells at the transcriptional level. Moreover, we demonstrated that BAG3 knockdown by siRNA sensitized cancer cells to MG132-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our results suggest that BAG3 induction might represents as an unwanted molecular consequence of utilizing proteasome inhibitors to combat tumors.

  9. Progressively impaired proteasomal capacity during terminal plasma cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cenci, Simone; Mezghrani, Alexandre; Cascio, Paolo; Bianchi, Giada; Cerruti, Fulvia; Fra, Anna; Lelouard, Hugues; Masciarelli, Silvia; Mattioli, Laura; Oliva, Laura; Orsi, Andrea; Pasqualetto, Elena; Pierre, Philippe; Ruffato, Elena; Tagliavacca, Luigina; Sitia, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    After few days of intense immunoglobulin (Ig) secretion, most plasma cells undergo apoptosis, thus ending the humoral immune response. We asked whether intrinsic factors link plasma cell lifespan to Ig secretion. Here we show that in the late phases of plasmacytic differentiation, when antibody production becomes maximal, proteasomal activity decreases. The excessive load for the reduced proteolytic capacity correlates with accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins, stabilization of endogenous proteasomal substrates (including Xbp1s, IκBα, and Bax), onset of apoptosis, and sensitization to proteasome inhibitors (PI). These events can be reproduced by expressing Ig-μ chain in nonlymphoid cells. Our results suggest that a developmental program links plasma cell death to protein production, and help explaining the peculiar sensitivity of normal and malignant plasma cells to PI. PMID:16498407

  10. Proteasomal degradation of beta-carotene metabolite--modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Sommerburg, Olaf; Karius, Nicole; Siems, Werner; Langhans, Claus-Dieter; Leichsenring, Michael; Breusing, Nicolle; Grune, Tilman

    2009-01-01

    Free radical attack on beta-carotene results in the formation of high amounts of carotene breakdown products (CBPs) having biological activities. As several of the CBPs are reactive aldehydes, it has to be considered that these compounds are able to modify proteins. Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate whether CBP-modification of proteins is leading to damaged proteins recognized and degraded by the proteasomal system. We used the model proteins tau and ferritin to test whether CBPs will modify them and whether such modifications lead to enhanced proteasomal degradation. To modify proteins, we used crude CBPs as a mixture obtained after hypochloric acid derived BC degradation, as well as several single compounds, as apo8'-carotenal, retinal, or beta-ionone. The majority of the CBPs found in our reaction mixture are well known metabolites as described earlier after BC degradation using different oxidants. CBPs are able to modify proteins, and in in vitro studies, we were able to demonstrate that the 20S proteasome is able to recognize and degrade CBP-modified proteins preferentially. In testing the proteolytic response of HT22 cells toward CBPs, we could demonstrate an enhanced protein turnover, which is sensitive to lactacystin. Interestingly, the proteasomal activity is resistant to treatment with CBP. On the other hand, we were able to demonstrate that supraphysiological levels of CBPs might lead to the formation of protein-CBP-adducts that are able to inhibit the proteasome. Therefore, the removal of CBP-modified proteins seems to be catalyzed by the proteasomal system and is effective, if the formation of CBPs is not overwhelming and leading to protein aggregates.

  11. Lysine 419 targets human glucocorticoid receptor for proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Andrew D; Cao, Yan; Chandramouleeswaran, Sindhu; Cidlowski, John A

    2010-12-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) are members of a highly conserved family of ligand dependent transcription factors which following hormone binding undergo homologous down-regulation reducing the levels of receptor protein. This decline in human GR (hGR) is due in part to a decrease in protein receptor stability that may limit cellular responsiveness to ligand. To examine the role of the proteasome protein degradation pathway in steroid-dependent hGR responsiveness, we utilized the proteasomal inhibitors MG-132, beta-lactone, and epoxomicin. HeLa cells and COS cells were treated with proteasome inhibitors in the presence of the GR agonist dexamethasone (Dex), or were pretreated with proteasomal inhibitor and then Dex. Dexamethasone induced glucocorticoid responsive reporter activity significantly over untreated controls, whereas cells treated with proteasomal inhibitors and Dex together showed 2-3-fold increase in activity. Protein sequence analysis of the hGR protein identified several candidate protein degradation motifs including a PEST element. Mutagenesis of this element at lysine 419 was done and mutant K419A hGR failed to undergo ligand dependent down-regulation. Mutant K419A hGR displayed 2-3-fold greater glucocorticoid responsive reporter activity in the presence of Dex than wild type hGR. These differences in transcriptional activity were not due to altered subcellular localization, since when the mutant K419A hGR was fused with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) it was found to move in and out of the nucleus similarly to wild type hGR. Together these results suggest that the proteasome and the identified PEST degradation motif limit steroid-dependent human glucocorticoid receptor signaling.

  12. Impaired methylation as a novel mechanism for proteasome suppression in liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Osna, Natalia A.; White, Ronda L.; Donohue, Terrence M.; Beard, Michael R.; Tuma, Dean J.; Kharbanda, Kusum K.

    2010-01-08

    The proteasome is a multi-catalytic protein degradation enzyme that is regulated by ethanol-induced oxidative stress; such suppression is attributed to CYP2E1-generated metabolites. However, under certain conditions, it appears that in addition to oxidative stress, other mechanisms are also involved in proteasome regulation. This study investigated whether impaired protein methylation that occurs during exposure of liver cells to ethanol, may contribute to suppression of proteasome activity. We measured the chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity in Huh7CYP cells, hepatocytes, liver cytosols and nuclear extracts or purified 20S proteasome under conditions that maintain or prevent protein methylation. Reduction of proteasome activity of hepatoma cell and hepatocytes by ethanol or tubercidin was prevented by simultaneous treatment with S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Moreover, the tubercidin-induced decline in proteasome activity occurred in both nuclear and cytosolic fractions. In vitro exposure of cell cytosolic fractions or highly purified 20S proteasome to low SAM:S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) ratios in the buffer also suppressed proteasome function, indicating that one or more methyltransferase(s) may be associated with proteasomal subunits. Immunoblotting a purified 20S rabbit red cell proteasome preparation using methyl lysine-specific antibodies revealed a 25 kDa proteasome subunit that showed positive reactivity with anti-methyl lysine. This reactivity was modified when 20S proteasome was exposed to differential SAM:SAH ratios. We conclude that impaired methylation of proteasome subunits suppressed proteasome activity in liver cells indicating an additional, yet novel mechanism of proteasome activity regulation by ethanol.

  13. Proteasome Activity Profiling Uncovers Alteration of Catalytic β2 and β5 Subunits of the Stress-Induced Proteasome during Salinity Stress in Tomato Roots

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Kaschani, Farnusch; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Hong, Tram N.; Misas-Villamil, Johana C.; Xin, Bo T.; Kaiser, Markus; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Tari, Irma; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.

    2017-01-01

    The stress proteasome in the animal kingdom facilitates faster conversion of oxidized proteins during stress conditions by incorporating different catalytic β subunits. Plants deal with similar kind of stresses and also carry multiple paralogous genes encoding for each of the three catalytic β subunits. Here, we investigated the existence of stress proteasomes upon abiotic stress (salt stress) in tomato roots. In contrast to Arabidopsis thaliana, tomato has a simplified proteasome gene set with single genes encoding each β subunit except for two genes encoding β2. Using proteasome activity profiling on tomato roots during salt stress, we discovered a transient modification of the catalytic subunits of the proteasome coinciding with a loss of cell viability. This stress-induced active proteasome disappears at later time points and coincides with the need to degrade oxidized proteins during salt stress. Subunit-selective proteasome probes and MS analysis of fluorescent 2D gels demonstrated that the detected stress-induced proteasome is not caused by an altered composition of subunits in active proteasomes, but involves an increased molecular weight of both labeled β2 and β5 subunits, and an additional acidic pI shift for labeled β5, whilst labeled β1 remains mostly unchanged. Treatment with phosphatase or glycosidases did not affect the migration pattern. This stress-induced proteasome may play an important role in PCD during abiotic stress. PMID:28217134

  14. Proteasome Activity Profiling Uncovers Alteration of Catalytic β2 and β5 Subunits of the Stress-Induced Proteasome during Salinity Stress in Tomato Roots.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Kaschani, Farnusch; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Hong, Tram N; Misas-Villamil, Johana C; Xin, Bo T; Kaiser, Markus; Overkleeft, Herman S; Tari, Irma; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2017-01-01

    The stress proteasome in the animal kingdom facilitates faster conversion of oxidized proteins during stress conditions by incorporating different catalytic β subunits. Plants deal with similar kind of stresses and also carry multiple paralogous genes encoding for each of the three catalytic β subunits. Here, we investigated the existence of stress proteasomes upon abiotic stress (salt stress) in tomato roots. In contrast to Arabidopsis thaliana, tomato has a simplified proteasome gene set with single genes encoding each β subunit except for two genes encoding β2. Using proteasome activity profiling on tomato roots during salt stress, we discovered a transient modification of the catalytic subunits of the proteasome coinciding with a loss of cell viability. This stress-induced active proteasome disappears at later time points and coincides with the need to degrade oxidized proteins during salt stress. Subunit-selective proteasome probes and MS analysis of fluorescent 2D gels demonstrated that the detected stress-induced proteasome is not caused by an altered composition of subunits in active proteasomes, but involves an increased molecular weight of both labeled β2 and β5 subunits, and an additional acidic pI shift for labeled β5, whilst labeled β1 remains mostly unchanged. Treatment with phosphatase or glycosidases did not affect the migration pattern. This stress-induced proteasome may play an important role in PCD during abiotic stress.

  15. Perilous journey: a tour of the ubiquitin–proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    Kleiger, Gary; Mayor, Thibault

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells are equipped to degrade proteins via the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS). Proteins become degraded upon their conjugation to chains of ubiquitin where they are then directed to the 26S proteasome, a macromolecular protease. The transfer of ubiquitin to proteins and their subsequent degradation are highly complex processes, and new research is beginning to uncover the molecular details of how ubiquitination and degradation take place in the cell. We review some of the new data providing insights into how these processes occur. Although distinct mechanisms are often observed, some common themes are emerging for how the UPS guides protein substrates through their final journey. PMID:24457024

  16. Poxvirus Exploitation of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Michele; van Buuren, Nicholas; Burles, Kristin; Mottet, Kelly; Wang, Qian; Teale, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitination plays a critical role in many cellular processes. A growing number of viruses have evolved strategies to exploit the ubiquitin-proteasome system, including members of the Poxviridae family. Members of the poxvirus family have recently been shown to encode BTB/kelch and ankyrin/F-box proteins that interact with cullin-3 and cullin-1 based ubiquitin ligases, respectively. Multiple members of the poxvirus family also encode ubiquitin ligases with intrinsic activity. This review describes the numerous mechanisms that poxviruses employ to manipulate the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:21994622

  17. Effects of Radiation on Proteasome Function in Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Mimosine is a L- amino acid found in large quantities in the foliage and the seeds of Laucena glauca and Mimosa pudica . It is a reversible inhibitor of DNA...PC-3 cells). Using the expression vector given to us by Dr. Lan Huang from UC Irvine, we were able to tag one of the 19S proteasome subunit (Rpn11...and use it as a bait for the pulling down the intact 26S proteasome complex. After having reported on all the proteins associated to the

  18. Structural analysis of the 26S proteasome by cryoelectron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nickell, Stephan; Mihalache, Oana; Beck, Florian; Hegerl, Reiner; Korinek, Andreas; Baumeister, Wolfgang . E-mail: baumeist@biochem.mpg.de

    2007-02-02

    The 26S proteasome is the key enzyme of intracellular protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. It is a multisubunit complex of 2.5 MDa confining the proteolytic action to an inner compartment with tightly controlled access. Structural studies of this intriguing molecular machine have been hampered by its intrinsic instability and its dynamics. Here we have used an unconventional approach to obtain a three-dimensional structure of the holocomplex uncompromised by preparation-induced alterations and unbiased by any starting model. We have performed a tomographic reconstruction, followed by averaging over approx. 150 individual reconstructions, of Drosophila 26S proteasomes suspended in a thin layer of amorphous ice.

  19. Cell cycle-dependent expression of Dub3, Nanog and the p160 family of nuclear receptor coactivators (NCoAs) in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, Siem; Golfetto, Eleonora; Vanacker, Jean-Marc; Maiorano, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESC) is tightly regulated by a network of transcription factors among which the estrogen-related receptor β (Esrrb). Esrrb contributes to the relaxation of the G1 to S-phase (G1/S) checkpoint in mouse ESCs by transcriptional control of the deubiquitylase Dub3 gene, contributing to Cdc25A persistence after DNA damage. We show that in mESCs, Dub3 gene expression is cell cycle regulated and is maximal prior G1/S transition. In addition, following UV-induced DNA damage in G1, Dub3 expression markedly increases in S-phase also suggesting a role in checkpoint recovery. Unexpectedly, we also observed cell cycle-regulation of Nanog expression, and not Oct4, reaching high levels prior to G1/S transition, finely mirroring Cyclin E1 fluctuations. Curiously, while Esrrb showed only limited cell-cycle oscillations, transcript levels of the p160 family of nuclear receptor coactivators (NCoAs) displayed strong cell cycle-dependent fluctuations. Since NCoAs function in concert with Esrrb in transcriptional activation, we focussed on NCoA1 whose levels specifically increase prior onset of Dub3 transcription. Using a reporter assay, we show that NCoA1 potentiates Esrrb-mediated transcription of Dub3 and we present evidence of protein interaction between the SRC1 splice variant NCoA1 and Esrrb. Finally, we show a differential developmental regulation of all members of the p160 family during neural conversion of mESCs. These findings suggest that in mouse ESCs, changes in the relative concentration of a coactivator at a given cell cycle phase, may contribute to modulation of the transcriptional activity of the core transcription factors of the pluripotent network and be implicated in cell fate decisions upon onset of differentiation.

  20. Cell Cycle-Dependent Expression of Dub3, Nanog and the p160 Family of Nuclear Receptor Coactivators (NCoAs) in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    van der Laan, Siem; Golfetto, Eleonora; Vanacker, Jean-Marc; Maiorano, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESC) is tightly regulated by a network of transcription factors among which the estrogen-related receptor β (Esrrb). Esrrb contributes to the relaxation of the G1 to S-phase (G1/S) checkpoint in mouse ESCs by transcriptional control of the deubiquitylase Dub3 gene, contributing to Cdc25A persistence after DNA damage. We show that in mESCs, Dub3 gene expression is cell cycle regulated and is maximal prior G1/S transition. In addition, following UV-induced DNA damage in G1, Dub3 expression markedly increases in S-phase also suggesting a role in checkpoint recovery. Unexpectedly, we also observed cell cycle-regulation of Nanog expression, and not Oct4, reaching high levels prior to G1/S transition, finely mirroring Cyclin E1 fluctuations. Curiously, while Esrrb showed only limited cell-cycle oscillations, transcript levels of the p160 family of nuclear receptor coactivators (NCoAs) displayed strong cell cycle-dependent fluctuations. Since NCoAs function in concert with Esrrb in transcriptional activation, we focussed on NCoA1 whose levels specifically increase prior onset of Dub3 transcription. Using a reporter assay, we show that NCoA1 potentiates Esrrb-mediated transcription of Dub3 and we present evidence of protein interaction between the SRC1 splice variant NCoA1 and Esrrb. Finally, we show a differential developmental regulation of all members of the p160 family during neural conversion of mESCs. These findings suggest that in mouse ESCs, changes in the relative concentration of a coactivator at a given cell cycle phase, may contribute to modulation of the transcriptional activity of the core transcription factors of the pluripotent network and be implicated in cell fate decisions upon onset of differentiation. PMID:24695638

  1. Muscle atrophy, ubiquitin-proteasome, and autophagic pathways in dysferlinopathy.

    PubMed

    Fanin, Marina; Nascimbeni, Anna C; Angelini, Corrado

    2014-09-01

    Muscle fiber atrophy and the molecular pathways underlying this process have not been investigated in dysferlinopathy patients. In 22 muscles from dysferlinopathy patients we investigated fiber atrophy by morphometry and ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagic pathways using protein and/or transcriptional analysis of atrophy- and autophagy-related genes (MuRF1, atrogin1, LC3, p62, Bnip3). Dysferlinopathy showed significant fiber atrophy and higher MuRF-1 protein and mRNA levels, which correlated with fiber size, suggesting activation of the atrophy program by proteasome induction. Some of the MuRF-1 upregulation and proteasome induction may be attributed to the prominent regeneration found. A potential role of impaired autophagy was suggested by p62-positive protein aggregates in atrophic fibers and significantly higher levels of LC3-II and p62 proteins and overexpression of p62 and Bnip3 mRNA. Damaged muscle fibers and prominent inflammatory changes may also enhance autophagy due to the insufficient level of proteasomal degradation of mutant dysferlin. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Targeting the ubiquitin–proteasome system for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Min; Schmitt, Sara; Buac, Daniela; Dou, Q Ping

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) degrades 80 – 90% of intracellular proteins. Cancer cells take advantage of the UPS for their increased growth and decreased apoptotic cell death. Thus, the components that make up the UPS represent a diverse group of potential anti-cancer targets. The success of the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib not only proved that the proteasome is a feasible and valuable anti-cancer target, but also inspired researchers to extensively explore other potential targets of this pathway. Areas covered This review provides a broad overview of the UPS and its role in supporting cancer development and progression, especially in aspects of p53 inactivation, p27 turnover and NF-κB activation. Also, efforts toward the development of small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) targeting different steps in this pathway for cancer treatment are reviewed and discussed. Expert opinion Whereas some of the targets in the UPS, such as the 20S pro-teasome, Nedd8 activating enzyme and HDM2, have been well-established and validated, there remains a large pool of candidates waiting to be investigated. Development of SMIs targeting the UPS has been largely facilitated by state-of-the-art technologies such as high-throughput screening and computer-assisted drug design, both of which require a better understanding of the targets of interest. PMID:23822887

  3. Proteasomal regulation of caspase-8 in cancer cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Fiandalo, Michael V; Schwarze, Steven R; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that proteasome inhibition sensitizes TRAIL resistant prostate cancer cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis via stabilization of the active p18 subunit of caspase-8. The present study investigated the impact of proteasome inhibition on caspase-8 stability, ubiquitination, trafficking, and activation in cancer cells. Using caspase-8 deficient neuroblastoma (NB7) cells for reconstituting non-cleavable mutant forms of caspase-8, we demonstrated that the non-cleavable forms of caspase-8 are capable of inducing apoptosis comparably to wild-type caspase-8, in response to proteasome inhibitor and GST-TRAIL. Moreover in the LNCaP human prostate cancer cells, caspase-8 polyubiquitination occurs after TRAIL stimulation and caspase-8 processing. Subcellular fractionation analysis revealed caspase-8 activity in both cytosol and plasma membrane fractions in both NB7 reconstituted caspase-8 cell lines, as well the LNCaP prostate cancer cells. The present results suggest that caspase-8 stabilization through proteasome inhibition leads to reactivation of the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis and identify E3 ligase mediating caspase-8 polyubiquitination, as a novel molecular target. Inhibition of this E3 ligase in combination with TRAIL towards restoring apoptosis signaling activation may have potential therapeutic significance in resistant tumors.

  4. The Regulatory Complex of Drosophila melanogaster 26s Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Hölzl, Harald; Kapelari, Barbara; Kellermann, Josef; Seemüller, Erika; Sümegi, Máté; Udvardy, Andor; Medalia, Ohad; Sperling, Joseph; Müller, Shirley A.; Engel, Andreas; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2000-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster embryos are a source for homogeneous and stable 26S proteasomes suitable for structural studies. For biochemical characterization, purified 26S proteasomes were resolved by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and subunits composing the regulatory complex (RC) were identified by amino acid sequencing and immunoblotting, before corresponding cDNAs were sequenced. 17 subunits from Drosophila RCs were found to have homologues in the yeast and human RCs. An additional subunit, p37A, not yet described in RCs of other organisms, is a member of the ubiquitin COOH-terminal hydrolase family (UCH). Analysis of EM images of 26S proteasomes-UCH-inhibitor complexes allowed for the first time to localize one of the RC's specific functions, deubiquitylating activity. The masses of 26S proteasomes with either one or two attached RCs were determined by scanning transmission EM (STEM), yielding a mass of 894 kD for a single RC. This value is in good agreement with the summed masses of the 18 identified RC subunits (932 kD), indicating that the number of subunits is complete. PMID:10893261

  5. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway and Synaptic Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegde, Ashok N.

    2010-01-01

    Proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) has emerged as a new molecular mechanism that controls wide-ranging functions in the nervous system, including fine-tuning of synaptic connections during development and synaptic plasticity in the adult organism. In the UPP, attachment of a small protein, ubiquitin, tags the substrates for…

  6. Novel proteasome inhibitors as potential drugs to combat tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yong; Pieters, Jean

    2010-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the most notorious killers worldwide. These pathogens have evolved to infect human beings in a so-called dormant form that is extremely difficult to treat. New work, however, suggests that mycobacterial proteasomes, multicomponent structures that protect the microbe from damaging effects of nitric oxide generated by the host, can be selectively and specifically blocked by small molecules.

  7. Peptide-based proteasome inhibitors in anticancer drug design.

    PubMed

    Micale, Nicola; Scarbaci, Kety; Troiano, Valeria; Ettari, Roberta; Grasso, Silvana; Zappalà, Maria

    2014-09-01

    The identification of the key role of the eukaryotic 26S proteasome in regulated intracellular proteolysis and its importance as a target in many pathological conditions wherein the proteasomal activity is defective (e.g., malignancies, autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, etc.) prompted several research groups to the development of specific inhibitors of this multicatalytic complex with the aim of obtaining valid drug candidates. In regard to the anticancer therapy, the peptide boronate bortezomib (Velcade®) represents the first molecule approved by FDA for the treatment of multiple myeloma in 2003 and mantle cell lymphoma in 2006. Since then, a plethora of molecules targeting the proteasome have been identified as potential anticancer agents and a few of them reached clinical trials or are already in the market (i.e., carfilzomib; Kyprolis®). In most cases, the design of new proteasome inhibitors (PIs) takes into account a proven peptide or pseudopeptide motif as a base structure and places other chemical entities throughout the peptide skeleton in such a way to create an efficacious network of interactions within the catalytic sites. The purpose of this review is to provide an in-depth look at the current state of the research in the field of peptide-based PIs, specifically those ones that might find an application as anticancer agents.

  8. Exploring the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Protein Degradation Pathway in Yeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Tamara J.; McWatters, Melissa K.; McQuade, Kristi L.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory investigating the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in yeast. In this exercise, the enzyme beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) is expressed in yeast under the control of a stress response promoter. Following exposure to heat stress to induce beta-gal expression, cycloheximide is added to halt…

  9. Exploring the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Protein Degradation Pathway in Yeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Tamara J.; McWatters, Melissa K.; McQuade, Kristi L.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory investigating the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in yeast. In this exercise, the enzyme beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) is expressed in yeast under the control of a stress response promoter. Following exposure to heat stress to induce beta-gal expression, cycloheximide is added to halt…

  10. Green Tea Polyphenols as Proteasome Inhibitors: Implication in Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H.; Landis-Piwowar, K.; Chan, T.H.; Dou, Q.P.

    2012-01-01

    Next to water, tea is the most popular beverage in the world. The most abundant and active compound in green tea is (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), which is extensively studied for its cancer-preventive and anti-cancer activities as well as its cellular targets. One potential molecular target of EGCG is the proteasome. While molecular docking and structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis suggests that the ester carbon of EGCG is important for mediating its proteasome-inhibitory activity, EGCG is very unstable under physiological conditions. Therefore, a series of analogs were synthesized aiming to improve stability and bioavailability of EGCG. Among them, peracetate-protected or the prodrug of EGCG was found to have increased bioavailability, stability, and proteasome-inhibitory activities against various human cancer cells and tumors compared to EGCG, suggesting its potential use for cancer prevention and treatment. Epidemiological studies have indicated that green tea consumption is associated with the reduced risk of cancers, especially associated with the reduced risk of late stage of cancers. This risk reduction may be attributed not only to proteasome inhibition, but also to numerous other intracellular molecules targeted by EGCG that are involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and metastasis. PMID:21247384

  11. The Proteasome and Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bonet-Costa, Vicent; Pomatto, Laura Corrales-Diaz; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that is projected to exceed more than 100 million cases worldwide by 2050. Aging is considered the primary risk factor for some 90% of Alzheimer's cases but a significant 10% of patients suffer from aggressive, early-onset forms of the disease. There is currently no effective Alzheimer's treatment and this, coupled with a growing aging population, highlights the necessity to understand the mechanism(s) of disease initiation and propagation. A major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease pathology is the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates (an early marker of Alzheimer's disease), and neurofibrillary tangles, comprising the hyper-phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein Tau. Recent Advances: Protein oxidation is frequently invoked as a potential factor in the progression of Alzheimer's disease; however, whether it is a cause or a consequence of the pathology is still being debated. The Proteasome complex is a major regulator of intracellular protein quality control and an essential proteolytic enzyme for the processing of both Aβ and Tau. Recent studies have indicated that both protein oxidation and excessive phosphorylation may limit Proteasomal processing of Aβ and Tau in Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the Proteasome may be a key factor in understanding the development of Alzheimer's disease pathology; however, its significance is still very much under investigation. Discovering how the proteasome is affected, regulated, or dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease could be a valuable tool in the efforts to understand and, ultimately, eradicate the disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 886-901.

  12. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway and Synaptic Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegde, Ashok N.

    2010-01-01

    Proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) has emerged as a new molecular mechanism that controls wide-ranging functions in the nervous system, including fine-tuning of synaptic connections during development and synaptic plasticity in the adult organism. In the UPP, attachment of a small protein, ubiquitin, tags the substrates for…

  13. MONOUBIQUITINATION OF RPN10 REGULATES SUBSTRATE RECRUITMENT TO THE PROTEASOME

    PubMed Central

    Isasa, Marta; Katz, Elijah J.; Kim, Woong; Yugo, Verónica; González, Sheyla; Kirkpatrick, Donald S.; Thomson, Timothy M.; Finley, Daniel; Gygi, Steven P.; Crosas, Bernat

    2012-01-01

    The proteasome recognizes its substrates via a diverse set of ubiquitin receptors, including subunits Rpn10/S5a and Rpn13. In addition, shuttling factors, such as Rad23, recruit substrates to the proteasome by delivering ubiquitinated proteins. Despite the increasing understanding of the factors involved in this process, the regulation of substrate delivery remains largely unexplored. Here we report that Rpn10 is monoubiquitinated in vivo and that this modification has profound effects on proteasome function. Monoubiquitination regulates the capacity of Rpn10 to interact with substrates by inhibiting Rpn10’s ubiquitin interacting motif (UIM). We show that Rsp5, a member of NEDD4 ubiquitin-protein ligase family, and Ubp2, a deubiquitinating enzyme, control the levels of Rpn10 monoubiquitination in vivo. Notably, monoubiquitination of Rpn10 is decreased under stress conditions, suggesting a mechanism of control of receptor availability mediated by the Rsp5-Ubp2 system. Our results reveal an unanticipated link between monoubiquitination signal and regulation of proteasome function. PMID:20542005

  14. Blm10 facilitates nuclear import of proteasome core particles

    PubMed Central

    Weberruss, Marion H; Savulescu, Anca F; Jando, Julia; Bissinger, Thomas; Harel, Amnon; Glickman, Michael H; Enenkel, Cordula

    2013-01-01

    Short-lived proteins are degraded by proteasome complexes, which contain a proteolytic core particle (CP) but differ in the number of regulatory particles (RPs) and activators. A recently described member of conserved proteasome activators is Blm10. Blm10 contains 32 HEAT-like modules and is structurally related to the nuclear import receptor importin/karyopherin β. In proliferating yeast, RP-CP assemblies are primarily nuclear and promote cell division. During quiescence, RP-CP assemblies dissociate and CP and RP are sequestered into motile cytosolic proteasome storage granuli (PSG). Here, we show that CP sequestration into PSG depends on Blm10, whereas RP sequestration into PSG is independent of Blm10. PSG rapidly clear upon the resumption of cell proliferation and proteasomes are relocated into the nucleus. Thereby, Blm10 facilitates nuclear import of CP. Blm10-bound CP serves as an import receptor–cargo complex, as Blm10 mediates the interaction with FG-rich nucleoporins and is dissociated from the CP by Ran-GTP. Thus, Blm10 represents the first CP-dedicated nuclear import receptor in yeast. PMID:23982732

  15. Blm10 facilitates nuclear import of proteasome core particles.

    PubMed

    Weberruss, Marion H; Savulescu, Anca F; Jando, Julia; Bissinger, Thomas; Harel, Amnon; Glickman, Michael H; Enenkel, Cordula

    2013-10-16

    Short-lived proteins are degraded by proteasome complexes, which contain a proteolytic core particle (CP) but differ in the number of regulatory particles (RPs) and activators. A recently described member of conserved proteasome activators is Blm10. Blm10 contains 32 HEAT-like modules and is structurally related to the nuclear import receptor importin/karyopherin β. In proliferating yeast, RP-CP assemblies are primarily nuclear and promote cell division. During quiescence, RP-CP assemblies dissociate and CP and RP are sequestered into motile cytosolic proteasome storage granuli (PSG). Here, we show that CP sequestration into PSG depends on Blm10, whereas RP sequestration into PSG is independent of Blm10. PSG rapidly clear upon the resumption of cell proliferation and proteasomes are relocated into the nucleus. Thereby, Blm10 facilitates nuclear import of CP. Blm10-bound CP serves as an import receptor-cargo complex, as Blm10 mediates the interaction with FG-rich nucleoporins and is dissociated from the CP by Ran-GTP. Thus, Blm10 represents the first CP-dedicated nuclear import receptor in yeast.

  16. Activity-based profiling of the proteasome pathway during hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Nasheri, Neda; Ning, Zhibin; Figeys, Daniel; Yao, Shao; Goto, Natalie K; Pezacki, John Paul

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection often leads to chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The stability of the HCV proteins is controlled by ubiquitin-dependent and ubiquitin-independent proteasome pathways. Many viruses modulate proteasome function for their propagation. To examine the interrelationship between HCV and the proteasome pathways we employed a quantitative activity-based protein profiling method. Using this approach we were able to quantify the changes in the activity of several proteasome subunits and found that proteasome activity is drastically reduced by HCV replication. The results imply a link between the direct downregulation of the activity of this pathway and chronic HCV infection.

  17. The proteasome: mechanisms of biology and markers of activity and response to treatment in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Manasanch, Elisabet E; Korde, Neha; Zingone, Adriana; Tageja, Nishant; Fernandez de Larrea, Carlos; Bhutani, Manisha; Wu, Peter; Roschewski, Mark; Landgren, Ola

    2014-08-01

    Since the early 1990s, the synthesis and subsequent clinical application of small molecule inhibitors of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) has revolutionized the treatment and prognosis of multiple myeloma. In this review, we summarize important aspects of the biology of the UPP with a focus on its structure and key upstream/downstream regulatory components. We then review current knowledge of plasma cell sensitivity to proteasome inhibition and highlight new proteasome inhibitors that have recently entered clinical development. Lastly, we address the putative role of circulating proteasomes as a novel biomarker in multiple myeloma and provide guidance for future clinical trials using proteasome inhibitors.

  18. Proteasome inhibitor-adapted myeloma cells are largely independent from proteasome activity and show complex proteomic changes, in particular in redox and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, G P; Besse, L; Li, N; Kraus, M; Besse, A; Meeuwenoord, N; Bader, J; Everts, B; den Dulk, H; Overkleeft, H S; Florea, B I; Driessen, C

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive resistance of myeloma to proteasome inhibition represents a clinical challenge, whose biology is poorly understood. Proteasome mutations were implicated as underlying mechanism, while an alternative hypothesis based on low activation status of the unfolded protein response was recently suggested (IRE1/XBP1-low model). We generated bortezomib- and carfilzomib-adapted, highly resistant multiple myeloma cell clones (AMO-BTZ, AMO-CFZ), which we analyzed in a combined quantitative and functional proteomic approach. We demonstrate that proteasome inhibitor-adapted myeloma cells tolerate subtotal proteasome inhibition, irrespective of a proteasome mutation, and uniformly show an 'IRE1/XBP1-low' signature. Adaptation of myeloma cells to proteasome inhibitors involved quantitative changes in >600 protein species with similar patterns in AMO-BTZ and AMO-CFZ cells: proteins involved in metabolic regulation, redox homeostasis, and protein folding and destruction were upregulated, while apoptosis and transcription/translation were downregulated. The quantitatively most upregulated protein in AMO-CFZ cells was the multidrug resistance protein (MDR1) protein ABCB1, and carfilzomib resistance could be overcome by MDR1 inhibition. We propose a model where proteasome inhibitor-adapted myeloma cells tolerate subtotal proteasome inhibition owing to metabolic adaptations that favor the generation of reducing equivalents, such as NADPH, which is supported by oxidative glycolysis. Proteasome inhibitor resistance may thus be targeted by manipulating the energy and redox metabolism. PMID:27118406

  19. Proteasome inhibitor-adapted myeloma cells are largely independent from proteasome activity and show complex proteomic changes, in particular in redox and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soriano, G P; Besse, L; Li, N; Kraus, M; Besse, A; Meeuwenoord, N; Bader, J; Everts, B; den Dulk, H; Overkleeft, H S; Florea, B I; Driessen, C

    2016-11-01

    Adaptive resistance of myeloma to proteasome inhibition represents a clinical challenge, whose biology is poorly understood. Proteasome mutations were implicated as underlying mechanism, while an alternative hypothesis based on low activation status of the unfolded protein response was recently suggested (IRE1/XBP1-low model). We generated bortezomib- and carfilzomib-adapted, highly resistant multiple myeloma cell clones (AMO-BTZ, AMO-CFZ), which we analyzed in a combined quantitative and functional proteomic approach. We demonstrate that proteasome inhibitor-adapted myeloma cells tolerate subtotal proteasome inhibition, irrespective of a proteasome mutation, and uniformly show an 'IRE1/XBP1-low' signature. Adaptation of myeloma cells to proteasome inhibitors involved quantitative changes in >600 protein species with similar patterns in AMO-BTZ and AMO-CFZ cells: proteins involved in metabolic regulation, redox homeostasis, and protein folding and destruction were upregulated, while apoptosis and transcription/translation were downregulated. The quantitatively most upregulated protein in AMO-CFZ cells was the multidrug resistance protein (MDR1) protein ABCB1, and carfilzomib resistance could be overcome by MDR1 inhibition. We propose a model where proteasome inhibitor-adapted myeloma cells tolerate subtotal proteasome inhibition owing to metabolic adaptations that favor the generation of reducing equivalents, such as NADPH, which is supported by oxidative glycolysis. Proteasome inhibitor resistance may thus be targeted by manipulating the energy and redox metabolism.

  20. Integration of autophagy, proteasomal degradation, unfolded protein response and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Benbrook, D M; Long, A

    2012-10-01

    A single cell has the potential to kill an entire human being. Efforts to cure cancer are limited by survival of individual cancer cells despite immune surveillance and toxic therapies. Understanding the intricate network of pathways that maintain cellular homeostasis and mediate stress response or default into cell death is critical to the development of strategies to eradicate cancer. Autophagy, proteasomal degradation and the unfolded protein response (UPR) are cellular pathways that degrade and recycle excess or damaged proteins to maintain cellular homeostasis and survival. This review will discuss autophagy and how it is integrated with proteasomal degradation and UPR to govern cell fate through restoration of cellular homeostasis or default into the apoptotic cell death pathway. The first response of autophagy is macroautophagy, which sequesters cytoplasm including organelles inside double-membraned autophagosome vesicles that fuse with lysosomes to degrade and recycle the contents. Ubiquitination patterns on proteins targeted for degradation determine whether adapter proteins will bring them to developing autophagosomes or to proteasomes. Macroautophagy is followed by chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), in which Hsc70 (Heat shock cognate 70) selectively binds proteins with exposed KFERQ motifs and pushes them inside lysosomes through the LAMP-2A (Lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2A) receptor. These two processes and the lesser understood microautophagy, which involves direct engulfment of proteins into lysosomes, occur at basal and induced levels. Insufficient proteasome function or ER stress induction of UPR can induce autophagy, which can mitigate damage and stress. If this network is incapable of repairing the damage or overcoming continued stress, the default pathway of apoptosis is engaged to destroy the cell. Induction of macroautophagy by cancer therapeutics has led to clinical trials investigating combinations of HCQ (hydroxychloriquine

  1. Therapeutic potential of proteasome inhibitors in congenital erythropoietic porphyria.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Jean-Marc; Duchartre, Yann; Costet, Pierre; Lalanne, Magalie; Ged, Cécile; Lain, Ana; Millet, Oscar; de Verneuil, Hubert; Richard, Emmanuel

    2013-11-05

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) deficiency resulting in massive porphyrin accumulation in blood cells, which is responsible for hemolytic anemia and skin photosensitivity. Among the missense mutations actually described up to now in CEP patients, the C73R and the P248Q mutations lead to a profound UROS deficiency and are usually associated with a severe clinical phenotype. We previously demonstrated that the UROS(C73R) mutant protein conserves intrinsic enzymatic activity but triggers premature degradation in cellular systems that could be prevented by proteasome inhibitors. We show evidence that the reduced kinetic stability of the UROS(P248Q) mutant is also responsible for increased protein turnover in human erythroid cells. Through the analysis of EGFP-tagged versions of UROS enzyme, we demonstrate that both UROS(C73R) and UROS(P248Q) are equally destabilized in mammalian cells and targeted to the proteasomal pathway for degradation. We show that a treatment with proteasomal inhibitors, but not with lysosomal inhibitors, could rescue the expression of both EGFP-UROS mutants. Finally, in CEP mice (Uros(P248Q/P248Q)) treated with bortezomib (Velcade), a clinically approved proteasome inhibitor, we observed reduced porphyrin accumulation in circulating RBCs and urine, as well as reversion of skin photosensitivity on bortezomib treatment. These results of medical importance pave the way for pharmacologic treatment of CEP disease by preventing certain enzymatically active UROS mutants from early degradation by using proteasome inhibitors or chemical chaperones.

  2. Morphine Induces Ubiquitin-Proteasome Activity and Glutamate Transporter Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liling; Wang, Shuxing; Sung, Backil; Lim, Grewo; Mao, Jianren

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate transporters play a crucial role in physiological glutamate homeostasis, neurotoxicity, and glutamatergic regulation of opioid tolerance. However, how the glutamate transporter turnover is regulated remains poorly understood. Here we show that chronic morphine exposure induced posttranscriptional down-regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAC1 in C6 glioma cells with a concurrent decrease in glutamate uptake and increase in proteasome activity, which were blocked by the selective proteasome inhibitor MG-132 or lactacystin but not the lysosomal inhibitor chloroquin. At the cellular level, chronic morphine induced the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome Ten)-mediated up-regulation of the ubiquitin E3 ligase Nedd4 via cAMP/protein kinase A signaling, leading to EAAC1 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Either Nedd4 or PTEN knockdown with small interfering RNA prevented the morphine-induced EAAC1 degradation and decreased glutamate uptake. These data indicate that cAMP/protein kinase A signaling serves as an intracellular regulator upstream to the activation of the PTEN/Nedd4-mediated ubiquitin-proteasome system activity that is critical for glutamate transporter turnover. Under an in vivo condition, chronic morphine exposure also induced posttranscriptional down-regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAC1, which was prevented by MG-132, and transcriptional up-regulation of PTEN and Nedd4 within the spinal cord dorsal horn. Thus, inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated glutamate transporter degradation may be an important mechanism for preventing glutamate overexcitation and may offer a new strategy for treating certain neurological disorders and improving opioid therapy in chronic pain management. PMID:18539596

  3. Therapeutic potential of proteasome inhibitors in congenital erythropoietic porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Blouin, Jean-Marc; Duchartre, Yann; Costet, Pierre; Lalanne, Magalie; Ged, Cécile; Lain, Ana; Millet, Oscar; de Verneuil, Hubert; Richard, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) deficiency resulting in massive porphyrin accumulation in blood cells, which is responsible for hemolytic anemia and skin photosensitivity. Among the missense mutations actually described up to now in CEP patients, the C73R and the P248Q mutations lead to a profound UROS deficiency and are usually associated with a severe clinical phenotype. We previously demonstrated that the UROSC73R mutant protein conserves intrinsic enzymatic activity but triggers premature degradation in cellular systems that could be prevented by proteasome inhibitors. We show evidence that the reduced kinetic stability of the UROSP248Q mutant is also responsible for increased protein turnover in human erythroid cells. Through the analysis of EGFP-tagged versions of UROS enzyme, we demonstrate that both UROSC73R and UROSP248Q are equally destabilized in mammalian cells and targeted to the proteasomal pathway for degradation. We show that a treatment with proteasomal inhibitors, but not with lysosomal inhibitors, could rescue the expression of both EGFP-UROS mutants. Finally, in CEP mice (UrosP248Q/P248Q) treated with bortezomib (Velcade), a clinically approved proteasome inhibitor, we observed reduced porphyrin accumulation in circulating RBCs and urine, as well as reversion of skin photosensitivity on bortezomib treatment. These results of medical importance pave the way for pharmacologic treatment of CEP disease by preventing certain enzymatically active UROS mutants from early degradation by using proteasome inhibitors or chemical chaperones. PMID:24145442

  4. Proteasomes in lungs from organ donors and patients with end-stage pulmonary diseases.

    PubMed

    Baker, T A; Bach, H H; Gamelli, R L; Love, R B; Majetschak, M

    2014-01-01

    Proteasomes appear to be involved in the pathophysiology of various acute and chronic lung diseases. Information on the human lung proteasome in health and disease, however, is sparse. Therefore, we studied whether end-stage pulmonary diseases are associated with alterations in lung 20S/26S proteasome content, activity and 20S subunit composition. Biopsies were obtained from donor lungs (n=7) and explanted lungs from patients undergoing lung transplantation because of end stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; n=7), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, n=7) and pulmonary sarcoidosis (n=5). 20S/26S proteasomes in lung extracts were quantified by ELISA, chymotrypsin-like proteasome peptidase activities measured and 20S proteasome beta subunits analyzed by Western blot. As compared with donor lungs, proteasome content was increased in IPF and sarcoidosis, but not in COPD. The relative distribution of free 20S and 26S proteasomes was similar; 20S proteasome was predominant in all extracts. Proteasome peptidase activities in donor and diseased lungs were indistinguishable. All extracts contained a mixed composition of inducible 20S beta immuno-subunits and their constitutive counterparts; a disease associated distribution could not be identified. A higher content of lung proteasomes in IPF and pulmonary sarcoidosis may contribute to the pathophysiology of human fibrotic lung diseases.

  5. Stress regulation of the PAN-proteasome system in the extreme halophilic archaeon Halobacterium.

    PubMed

    Chamieh, H; Marty, V; Guetta, D; Perollier, A; Franzetti, B

    2012-03-01

    In Archaea, the importance of the proteasome system for basic biological processes is only poorly understood. Proteasomes were partially purified from Halobacterium by native gradient density ultracentrifugation. The peptidase activity profiles showed that the 20S proteasome accumulation is altered depending on the physiological state of the cells. The amount of active 20S particles increases in Halobacterium cells as a response to thermal and low salt stresses. In the same conditions, Northern experiments showed a positive transcriptional regulation of the alpha and beta proteasome subunits as well as of the two proteasome regulatory ATPases, PANA and PANB. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated the existence of a physical interaction between the two Proteasome Activating Nucleotidase (PAN) proteins in cell extracts. Thus, a direct regulation occurs on the PAN-proteasome components to adjust the protein degradation activity to growth and environmental constraints. These results also indicate that, in extreme halophiles, proteasome mediated proteolysis is an important aspect of low salt stress response. The tri-peptide vinyl sulfone inhibitor NLVS was used in cell cultures to study the in vivo function of proteasome in Halobacterium. The chemical inhibition of proteasomes was measured in the cellular extracts. It has no effect on cell growth and mortality under normal growth conditions as well as under heat shock conditions. These results suggest that the PAN activators or other proteases compensate for loss of proteasome activity in stress conditions.

  6. Suppression of 19S proteasome subunits marks emergence of an altered cell state in diverse cancers.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Peter; Sokol, Ethan; Jin, Dexter; Brune, Zarina; Thiru, Prathapan; Ghandi, Mahmoud; Garraway, Levi A; Gupta, Piyush B; Santagata, Sandro; Whitesell, Luke; Lindquist, Susan

    2017-01-10

    The use of proteasome inhibitors to target cancer's dependence on altered protein homeostasis has been greatly limited by intrinsic and acquired resistance. Analyzing data from thousands of cancer lines and tumors, we find that those with suppressed expression of one or more 19S proteasome subunits show intrinsic proteasome inhibitor resistance. Moreover, such proteasome subunit suppression is associated with poor outcome in myeloma patients, where proteasome inhibitors are a mainstay of treatment. Beyond conferring resistance to proteasome inhibitors, proteasome subunit suppression also serves as a sentinel of a more global remodeling of the transcriptome. This remodeling produces a distinct gene signature and new vulnerabilities to the proapoptotic drug, ABT-263. This frequent, naturally arising imbalance in 19S regulatory complex composition is achieved through a variety of mechanisms, including DNA methylation, and marks the emergence of a heritably altered and therapeutically relevant state in diverse cancers.

  7. The 26S proteasome is a multifaceted target for anti-cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Grigoreva, Tatyana A; Tribulovich, Vyacheslav G; Garabadzhiu, Alexander V; Melino, Gerry; Barlev, Nickolai A

    2015-09-22

    Proteasomes play a critical role in the fate of proteins that are involved in major cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, cell cycle, replication, differentiation, immune response, cellular response to stress, etc. In contrast to non-specific degradation by lysosomes, proteasomes are highly selective and destroy only the proteins that are covalently labelled with small proteins, called ubiquitins. Importantly, many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers, are intimately connected to the activity of proteasomes making them an important pharmacological target. Currently, the vast majority of inhibitors are aimed at blunting the proteolytic activities of proteasomes. However, recent achievements in solving structures of proteasomes at very high resolution provided opportunities to design new classes of small molecules that target other physiologically-important enzymatic activities of proteasomes, including the de-ubiquitinating one. This review attempts to catalog the information available to date about novel classes of proteasome inhibitors that may have important pharmacological ramifications.

  8. Crystal structure of archaeal homolog of proteasome-assembly chaperone PbaA.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Arunima; Satoh, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Masato; Kato, Koichi

    2014-10-24

    Formation of the eukaryotic proteasome is not a spontaneous process but a highly ordered process assisted by several assembly chaperones. In contrast, archaeal proteasome subunits can spontaneously assemble into an active form. Recent bioinformatic analysis identified the proteasome-assembly chaperone-like proteins, PbaA and PbaB, in archaea. Our previous study showed that the PbaB homotetramer functions as a proteasome activator through its tentacle-like C-terminal segments. However, a functional role of the other homolog PbaA has remained elusive. Here we determined the 2.25-Å resolution structure of PbaA, illustrating its disparate tertiary and quaternary structures compared with PbaB. PbaA forms a homopentamer in which the C-terminal segments, with a putative proteasome-activating motif, are packed against the core. These findings offer deeper insights into the molecular evolution relationships between the proteasome-assembly chaperones and the proteasome activators.

  9. Open-gate mutants of the mammalian proteasome show enhanced ubiquitin-conjugate degradation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Hoon; de Poot, Stefanie A H; Lee, Jung Hoon; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Han, Dong Hoon; Kim, Yun Kyung; Finley, Daniel; Lee, Min Jae

    2016-03-09

    When in the closed form, the substrate translocation channel of the proteasome core particle (CP) is blocked by the convergent N termini of α-subunits. To probe the role of channel gating in mammalian proteasomes, we deleted the N-terminal tail of α3; the resulting α3ΔN proteasomes are intact but hyperactive in the hydrolysis of fluorogenic peptide substrates and the degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins. Cells expressing the hyperactive proteasomes show markedly elevated degradation of many established proteasome substrates and resistance to oxidative stress. Multiplexed quantitative proteomics revealed ∼ 200 proteins with reduced levels in the mutant cells. Potentially toxic proteins such as tau exhibit reduced accumulation and aggregate formation. These data demonstrate that the CP gate is a key negative regulator of proteasome function in mammals, and that opening the CP gate may be an effective strategy to increase proteasome activity and reduce levels of toxic proteins in cells.

  10. The 26S proteasome is a multifaceted target for anti-cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Grigoreva, Tatyana A; Tribulovich, Vyacheslav G.; Garabadzhiu, Alexander V.; Melino, Gerry; Barlev, Nickolai A.

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes play a critical role in the fate of proteins that are involved in major cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, cell cycle, replication, differentiation, immune response, cellular response to stress, etc. In contrast to non-specific degradation by lysosomes, proteasomes are highly selective and destroy only the proteins that are covalently labelled with small proteins, called ubiquitins. Importantly, many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers, are intimately connected to the activity of proteasomes making them an important pharmacological target. Currently, the vast majority of inhibitors are aimed at blunting the proteolytic activities of proteasomes. However, recent achievements in solving structures of proteasomes at very high resolution provided opportunities to design new classes of small molecules that target other physiologically-important enzymatic activities of proteasomes, including the de-ubiquitinating one. This review attempts to catalog the information available to date about novel classes of proteasome inhibitors that may have important pharmacological ramifications. PMID:26295307

  11. Inhibition of the 26S proteasome by peptide mimics of the coiled-coil region of its ATPase subunits.

    PubMed

    Inobe, Tomonao; Genmei, Reiko

    Regulation of proteasomal degradation is an indispensable tool for biomedical studies. Thus, there is demand for novel proteasome inhibitors. Proteasomal degradation requires formation of coiled-coil structure by the N-terminal region of ATPase subunits of the proteasome cap. Here we show that peptides that mimic the N-terminal coiled-coil region of ATPase subunits interfere with proteasome function. These results suggest that coiled-coil peptides represent promising new proteasome inhibitors and that N-terminal coiled-coil regions of ATPase subunits are targets for proteasome inhibition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Where Birt–Hogg–Dubé meets Cowden Syndrome: mirrored genetic defects in two cases of syndromic oncocytic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Pradella, Laura Maria; Lang, Martin; Kurelac, Ivana; Mariani, Elisa; Guerra, Flora; Zuntini, Roberta; Tallini, Giovanni; MacKay, Alan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Seri, Marco; Turchetti, Daniela; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Birt–Hogg–Dubè (BHD) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterised by skin fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal cancer. The association of benign cutaneous lesions and increased cancer risk is also a feature of Cowden Syndrome (CS), an autosomal dominant disease caused by PTEN mutations. BHD and CS patients may develop oncocytomas, rare neoplasias that are phenotypically characterised by a prominent mitochondrial hyperplasia. We here describe the genetic analysis of a parotid and a thyroid oncocytoma, developed by a BHD and a CS patient, respectively. The BHD lesion was shown to maintain the wild-type allele of FLCN, while losing one PTEN allele. On the other hand, a double heterozygosity for the same two genes was found to be the only detectable tumorigenic hit in the CS oncocytoma. Both conditions occurred in a context of high chromosomal stability, as highlighted by comparative genomic hybridisation analysis. We conclude that, similarly to PTEN, FLCN may not always follow the classical Two Hits model of tumorigenesis and may hence belong to a class of non-canonical tumour suppressor genes. We hence introduce a role of PTEN/FLCN double heterozygosity in syndromic oncocytic tumorigenesis, suggesting this to be an alternative determinant to pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations, which are instead the genetic hallmark of sporadic oncocytic tumours. PMID:23386036

  13. Intratumoral peripheral small papillary tufts: a diagnostic clue of renal tumors associated with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Naoto; Furuya, Mitsuko; Nagashima, Yoji; Gotohda, Hiroko; Moritani, Suzuko; Kawakami, Fumi; Imamura, Yoshiaki; Bando, Yoshimi; Takahashi, Masayuki; Kanayama, Hiro-omi; Ota, Satoshi; Michal, Michal; Hes, Ondrej; Nakatani, Yukio

    2014-06-01

    In this article, we searched for the common histologic characteristic of renal tumors in patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS). We selected 6 patients with histologically confirmed renal tumor in BHDS. Germline FLCN gene mutation has been identified in 5 patients. Multifocality and bilaterality of the renal tumors were pathologically or radiologically confirmed in 5 and 2 cases, respectively. Histologic subtypes of the dominant tumor included 3 previously described hybrid oncocytic tumors, one composite chromophobe/papillary/clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and one unclassified RCC resembling hybrid chromophobe/clear cell RCC. In one case, chromophobe RCC and clear cell RCC were separately observed. Small papillary lesions located in the peripheral area of the tumor, which we designated as intratumoral peripheral small papillary tufts, were identified in all patients. In conclusion, multifocality/bilaterality of renal tumors, discordance of histologic subtypes, and the presence of intratumoral peripheral small papillary tufts may be important clues to identify BHDS-associated renal tumors.

  14. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: novel FLCN frameshift deletion in daughter and father with renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Näf, Ernst; Laubscher, Dominik; Hopfer, Helmut; Streit, Markus; Matyas, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutation of the FLCN gene causes Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD), a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by skin fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal tumours. We identified a hitherto unreported pathogenic FLCN frameshift deletion c.563delT (p.Phe188Serfs*35) in a family of a 46-year-old woman presented with macrohematuria due to bilateral chromophobe renal carcinomas. A heritable renal cancer was suspected due to the bilaterality of the tumour and as the father of this woman had suffered from renal cancer. Initially, however, BHD was overlooked by the medical team despite the highly suggestive clinical presentation. We assume that BHD is underdiagnosed, at least partially, due to low awareness of this variable condition and to insufficient use of appropriate genetic testing. Our study indicates that BHD and FLCN testing should be routinely considered in patients with positive family or personal history of renal tumours. In addition, we demonstrate how patients and their families can play a driving role in initiating genetic diagnosis, presymptomatic testing of at-risk relatives, targeted disease management, and genetic counselling of rare diseases such as BHD.

  15. Review of renal tumors associated with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome with focus on clinical and pathobiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, N; Furuya, M; Nagashima, Y; Gotohda, H; Kawakami, F; Moritani, S; Ota, S; Hora, M; Michal, M; Hes, O; Nakatani, Y

    2014-06-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by clinical features of skin lesions, pulmonary lesions and renal tumor. The gene responsible for this syndrome is located on chromosome 17p11.2 and designated as FLCN. In this article, we review renal tumors associated with BHDS with a focus on clinical and pathobiological aspects. Renal tumors often occur multifocally or bilaterally in the imaging analyses or gross examination. Histological examination of renal tumors includes a variety of subtypes such as hybrid oncocytic tumor, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC), oncocytoma, clear cell RCC and papillary RCC. The histologic discordance in multiple tumors seems to be characteristic of this syndrome. Oncocytosis is observed histologically in about half of the cases. Several investigations have elucidated that folliculin may be involved in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway recently. Renal tumors composed of clear cells may behave in an aggressive fashion. However, renal tumors including hybrid oncocytic tumor, chromophobe RCC and oncocytoma behave mostly in an indolent fashion.

  16. Genetically diagnosed Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome and familial cerebral cavernous malformations in the same individual: a case report.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, James; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Skytte, Anne-Bine

    2017-01-01

    When faced with an unusual clinical feature in a patient with a Mendelian disorder, the clinician may entertain the possibilities of either the feature representing a novel manifestation of that disorder or the co-existence of a different inherited condition. Here we describe an individual with a submandibular oncocytoma, pulmonary bullae and renal cysts as well as multiple cerebral cavernous malformations and haemangiomas. Genetic investigations revealed constitutional mutations in FLCN, associated with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) and CCM2, associated with familial cerebral cavernous malformation. Intracranial vascular pathologies (but not cerebral cavernous malformation) have recently been described in a number of individuals with BHD (Kapoor et al. in Fam Cancer 14:595-597, 10.1007/s10689-015-9807-y , 2015) but it is not yet clear whether they represent a genuine part of that conditions' phenotypic spectrum. We suggest that in such instances of potentially novel clinical features, more extensive genetic testing to consider co-existing conditions should be considered where available. The increased use of next generation sequencing applications in diagnostic settings is likely to lead more cases such as this being revealed.

  17. A Case of Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) Syndrome Harboring a Novel Folliculin (FLCN) Gene Mutation.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Takuro; Fukazawa, Takuya; Yoshida, Masakazu; Morita, Ichiro; Kato, Katsuya; Monobe, Yasumasa; Furuya, Mitsuko; Naomoto, Yoshio

    2016-10-26

    BACKGROUND Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder clinically characterized by pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, renal cell cancer, and skin fibrofolliculomas. The disorder is caused by germline mutations in the FLCN gene. CASE REPORT A 56-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with a diagnosis of bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest revealed bilateral multiple bullae predominantly located in the subpleural and mediastinal areas in the bilateral upper and lower lobes. Although she was cured by thoracic cavity drainage, she underwent resection of bilateral lung bullae because she had a prior history of right pneumothorax at 37- and 45-years of age. She had no signs of renal tumor but had fibrofolliculoma in her face and a family history of pneumothorax, we therefore suspected BHD syndrome. DNA sequence analyses determined that there was a two base pair deletion in exon 4 of the FLCN gene, confirming the diagnosis of BHD syndrome. CONCLUSIONS Here we report a case of BHD syndrome with a previously unreported FLCN mutation.

  18. A 4-bp Deletion in the Birt-Hogg-Dubé Gene (FLCN) Causes Dominantly Inherited Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Jodie N.; Tapanainen, Hanna; Somer, Mirja; Tukiainen, Pentti; Aittomäki, Kristiina

    2005-01-01

    Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP), a condition in which air enters the pleural space and causes secondary lung collapse, is mostly sporadic but also occurs in families. The precise etiology of PSP remains unknown, although it is associated with emphysemalike changes (bullae) in the lungs of almost all patients. We describe the results of a genetic study of a large Finnish family with a dominantly inherited tendency to PSP. A genomewide scan suggested linkage to chromosome 17p11. Screening of the best candidate gene, FLCN, revealed a 4-bp deletion in the first coding exon, which causes a frameshift that predicts a protein truncation 50 missense amino acids downstream. All carriers of the deletion had bullous lung lesions. Mutations in FLCN are also responsible for Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome (a dominantly inherited disease characterized by benign skin tumors, PSP, and diverse types of renal cancer) and, rarely, are detected in sporadic renal and colorectal tumors. Unlike other FLCN mutations, the exon 4 deletion seems to be associated with bullous lung changes only with 100% penetrance. These results suggest that changes in FLCN may have an important role in the development of PSP and, more importantly, of emphysema, a chronic pulmonary disease that often leads to formation of bullous lesions and lowered pulmonary function. Additionally, given the strong association of PSP and BHD, the connection between these conditions needs to be investigated further, particularly in patients with familial PSP, who may be at a greater risk of developing renal cancer. PMID:15657874

  19. The folliculin mutation database: an online database of mutations associated with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ming-Hui; Blake, Patrick W; Shevchenko, Julia; Toro, Jorge R

    2009-09-01

    The folliculin gene (FLCN), also known as BHD, is the only known susceptibility gene for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome. BHDS is the autosomal dominant predisposition to the development of follicular hamartomas, lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, and/or kidney neoplasms. To date, 53 unique germline mutations have been reported. FLCN mutation detection rate is 88%. FLCN encodes a predicted 579-amino acid protein, designated folliculin that is highly conserved between humans and homologs in mice, Drosophila, and C. elegans. We developed the first online database detailing all FLCN variants identified in our laboratory and reported in the literature. The FLCN database applies, and assists researchers in applying HGVS nomenclature guidelines. To date, the FCLN database includes 84 variants: 53 unique germline mutations and 31 SNPs. The majority of FLCN germline mutations are predicted to produce a truncated folliculin, resulting in loss of function. The FLCN mutations consist of: 45% (24/53) deletions, 32% (17/53) substitutions (10 putative-splice site, 5 nonsense, and 2 missense), 15% (8/53) duplications, 6% (3/53) insertion/deletions and 2% (1/53) insertions. The database strives to systematically unify current knowledge of FLCN variants and will be useful to geneticists and genetic counselors while also providing a rapid and systematic resource for investigators.

  20. Molecular and cellular roles of PI31 (PSMF1) protein in regulation of proteasome function.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohua; Thompson, David; Kumar, Brajesh; DeMartino, George N

    2014-06-20

    We investigated molecular features and cellular roles of PI31 (PSMF1) on regulation of proteasome function. PI31 has a C-terminal HbYX (where Hb is a hydrophobic amino acid, Y is tyrosine, and X is any amino acid) motif characteristic of several proteasome activators. Peptides corresponding to the PI31 C terminus also bind to and activate the 20 S proteasome in an HbYX-dependent manner, but intact PI31protein inhibits in vitro 20 S activity. Binding to and inhibition of the proteasome by PI31 are conferred by the HbYX-containing proline-rich C-terminal domain but do not require HbYX residues. Thus, multiple regions of PI31 bind independently to the proteasome and collectively determine effects on activity. PI31 blocks the ATP-dependent in vitro assembly of 26 S proteasome from 20 S proteasome and PA700 subcomplexes but has no effect on in vitro activity of the intact 26 S proteasome. To determine the physiologic significance of these in vitro effects, we assessed multiple aspects of cellular proteasome content and function after altering PI31 levels. We detected no change in overall cellular proteasome content or function when PI31 levels were either increased by moderate ectopic overexpression or decreased by RNA interference (RNAi). We also failed to identify a role of PI31 ADP-ribosylation as a mechanism for regulation of overall 26 S proteasome content and function, as recently proposed. Thus, despite its in vitro effects on various proteasome activities and its structural relationship to established proteasome regulators, cellular roles and mechanisms of PI31 in regulation of proteasome function remain unclear and require future definition. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Molecular and Cellular Roles of PI31 (PSMF1) Protein in Regulation of Proteasome Function*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohua; Thompson, David; Kumar, Brajesh; DeMartino, George N.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated molecular features and cellular roles of PI31 (PSMF1) on regulation of proteasome function. PI31 has a C-terminal HbYX (where Hb is a hydrophobic amino acid, Y is tyrosine, and X is any amino acid) motif characteristic of several proteasome activators. Peptides corresponding to the PI31 C terminus also bind to and activate the 20 S proteasome in an HbYX-dependent manner, but intact PI31protein inhibits in vitro 20 S activity. Binding to and inhibition of the proteasome by PI31 are conferred by the HbYX-containing proline-rich C-terminal domain but do not require HbYX residues. Thus, multiple regions of PI31 bind independently to the proteasome and collectively determine effects on activity. PI31 blocks the ATP-dependent in vitro assembly of 26 S proteasome from 20 S proteasome and PA700 subcomplexes but has no effect on in vitro activity of the intact 26 S proteasome. To determine the physiologic significance of these in vitro effects, we assessed multiple aspects of cellular proteasome content and function after altering PI31 levels. We detected no change in overall cellular proteasome content or function when PI31 levels were either increased by moderate ectopic overexpression or decreased by RNA interference (RNAi). We also failed to identify a role of PI31 ADP-ribosylation as a mechanism for regulation of overall 26 S proteasome content and function, as recently proposed. Thus, despite its in vitro effects on various proteasome activities and its structural relationship to established proteasome regulators, cellular roles and mechanisms of PI31 in regulation of proteasome function remain unclear and require future definition. PMID:24770418

  2. Gene therapy by proteasome activator, PA28γ, improves motor coordination and proteasome function in Huntington's disease YAC128 mice.

    PubMed

    Jeon, J; Kim, W; Jang, J; Isacson, O; Seo, H

    2016-06-02

    Huntington's disease (HD) is neurologically characterized by involuntary movements, associated with degeneration of the medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) and ubiquitin-positive neuronal intranuclear inclusions (NIIs). It has been reported that the proteolytic activities of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) are generally inhibited in HD patient's brain. We previously discovered that a proteasome activator (PA), PA28γ enhances proteasome activities and cell survival in in vitro HD model. In this study, we aimed to find whether PA28γ gene transfer improves the proteasome activities and pathological symptoms in in vivo HD model. We stereotaxically injected lenti-PA28γ virus into the striatum of mutant (MT) YAC128 HD mice and littermate (LM) controls at 14-18months of age, and validated their behavioral and biochemical changes at 12weeks after the injection. YAC128 mice showed a significant increase in their peptidyl-glutamyl preferring hydrolytic (PGPH) proteasome activity and the mRNA or protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and pro-BDNF after lenti-PA28γ injection. The number of ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies was reduced in the striatum of YAC128 mice after lenti-PA28γ injection. YAC128 mice showed significant improvement of latency to fall on the rota-rod test after lenti-PA28γ injection. These data demonstrate that the gene therapy with PA, PA28γ can improve UPS function as well as behavioral abnormalities in HD model mice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Role of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Systems in the Biology and Virulence of Protozoan Parasites.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Christian; San Francisco, Juan; Gutiérrez, Bessy; González, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, proteasomes perform crucial roles in many cellular pathways by degrading proteins to enforce quality control and regulate many cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, signal transduction, cell death, immune responses, metabolism, protein-quality control, and development. The catalytic heart of these complexes, the 20S proteasome, is highly conserved in bacteria, yeast, and humans. However, until a few years ago, the role of proteasomes in parasite biology was completely unknown. Here, we summarize findings about the role of proteasomes in protozoan parasites biology and virulence. Several reports have confirmed the role of proteasomes in parasite biological processes such as cell differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, and encystation. Proliferation and cell differentiation are key steps in host colonization. Considering the importance of proteasomes in both processes in many different parasites such as Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Toxoplasma, and Entamoeba, parasite proteasomes might serve as virulence factors. Several pieces of evidence strongly suggest that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is also a viable parasitic therapeutic target. Research in recent years has shown that the proteasome is a valid drug target for sleeping sickness and malaria. Then, proteasomes are a key organelle in parasite biology and virulence and appear to be an attractive new chemotherapeutic target.

  4. Role of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Systems in the Biology and Virulence of Protozoan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Christian; San Francisco, Juan; Gutiérrez, Bessy; González, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, proteasomes perform crucial roles in many cellular pathways by degrading proteins to enforce quality control and regulate many cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, signal transduction, cell death, immune responses, metabolism, protein-quality control, and development. The catalytic heart of these complexes, the 20S proteasome, is highly conserved in bacteria, yeast, and humans. However, until a few years ago, the role of proteasomes in parasite biology was completely unknown. Here, we summarize findings about the role of proteasomes in protozoan parasites biology and virulence. Several reports have confirmed the role of proteasomes in parasite biological processes such as cell differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, and encystation. Proliferation and cell differentiation are key steps in host colonization. Considering the importance of proteasomes in both processes in many different parasites such as Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Toxoplasma, and Entamoeba, parasite proteasomes might serve as virulence factors. Several pieces of evidence strongly suggest that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is also a viable parasitic therapeutic target. Research in recent years has shown that the proteasome is a valid drug target for sleeping sickness and malaria. Then, proteasomes are a key organelle in parasite biology and virulence and appear to be an attractive new chemotherapeutic target. PMID:26090380

  5. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P.; Li, Huilin; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-03-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and protein degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world’s most devastating pathogens.

  6. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DOE PAGES

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; ...

    2015-03-23

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and proteinmore » degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world’s most devastating pathogens.« less

  7. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J. Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P.; Li, Huilin; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and protein degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world's most devastating pathogens. PMID:25831519

  8. An adenosine triphosphate-independent proteasome activator contributes to the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jastrab, Jordan B; Wang, Tong; Murphy, J Patrick; Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Merkx, Remco; Huang, Jessica; Chatterjee, Champak; Ovaa, Huib; Gygi, Steven P; Li, Huilin; Darwin, K Heran

    2015-04-07

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes a proteasome that is highly similar to eukaryotic proteasomes and is required to cause lethal infections in animals. The only pathway known to target proteins for proteasomal degradation in bacteria is pupylation, which is functionally analogous to eukaryotic ubiquitylation. However, evidence suggests that the M. tuberculosis proteasome contributes to pupylation-independent pathways as well. To identify new proteasome cofactors that might contribute to such pathways, we isolated proteins that bound to proteasomes overproduced in M. tuberculosis and found a previously uncharacterized protein, Rv3780, which formed rings and capped M. tuberculosis proteasome core particles. Rv3780 enhanced peptide and protein degradation by proteasomes in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-independent manner. We identified putative Rv3780-dependent proteasome substrates and found that Rv3780 promoted robust degradation of the heat shock protein repressor, HspR. Importantly, an M. tuberculosis Rv3780 mutant had a general growth defect, was sensitive to heat stress, and was attenuated for growth in mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP-independent proteasome activators are not confined to eukaryotes and can contribute to the virulence of one the world's most devastating pathogens.

  9. Application of proteasomal inhibitors to mouse sympathetic neurons activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Lang-Rollin, Isabelle; Vekrellis, Konstantinos; Wang, Qiaohong; Rideout, Hardy J; Stefanis, Leonidas

    2004-09-01

    Proteasomal dysfunction may play a role in a number of neurodegenerative conditions, and in particular Parkinson's disease (PD) and related Lewy body (LB) diseases. Application of proteasomal inhibitors to neuronal cell culture systems is associated with survival-promoting effects or with cell death depending on the model system. We have applied pharmacological proteasomal inhibitors to cultured neonatal mouse sympathetic neurons in order to investigate whether these catecholaminergic neurons, which are affected in PD, are sensitive to proteasomal inhibition and, if so, which cell death pathway is activated. We report here that proteasomal inhibition leads to apoptotic death of mouse sympathetic neurons. This death is accompanied by caspase 3 activation and cytochrome c release from the mitochondria and is abrogated by caspase inhibition. Bax deletion prevented both cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activation, and also provided complete protection against proteasomal inhibition-induced death. Bcl-2 overexpression achieved a similar survival-promoting effect. There was no change in Bax levels following proteasomal inhibition, suggesting that Bax itself is not regulated by the proteasome in this cell culture system, and that a primary increase in Bax is unlikely to account for death. In contrast, levels of the BH3-only protein, Bim, increased with proteasomal inhibition. We conclude that proteasomal inhibition of mouse sympathetic neurons activates the intrinsic apoptotic pathway involving bcl-2 family members and the mitochondria.

  10. Fellutamide B is a Potent Inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G.; Li, D; Chidawanyika, T; Nathan, C; Li, H

    2010-01-01

    Via high-throughput screening of a natural compound library, we have identified a lipopeptide aldehyde, fellutamide B (1), as the most potent inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteasome tested to date. Kinetic studies reveal that 1 inhibits both Mtb and human proteasomes in a time-dependent manner under steady-state condition. Remarkably, 1 inhibits the Mtb proteasome in a single-step binding mechanism with K{sub i} = 6.8 nM, whereas it inhibits the human proteasome {beta}5 active site following a two-step mechanism with K{sub i} = 11.5 nM and K*{sub i} = 0.93 nM. Co-crystallization of 1 bound to the Mtb proteasome revealed a structural basis for the tight binding of 1 to the active sites of the Mtb proteasome. The hemiacetal group of 1 in the Mtb proteasome takes the (R)-configuration, whereas in the yeast proteasome it takes the (S)-configuration, indicating that the pre-chiral CHO group of 1 binds to the active site Thr1 in a different orientation. Re-examination of the structure of the yeast proteasome in complex with 1 showed significant conformational changes at the substrate-binding cleft along the active site. These structural differences are consistent with the different kinetic mechanisms of 1 against Mtb and human proteasomes.

  11. Structural Models for Interactions between the 20S Proteasome and Its PAN/19S Activators

    SciTech Connect

    Stadtmueller, B.; Ferrell, K; Whitby, F; Heroux, A; Robinson, H; Myszka, D; Hill, C

    2009-01-01

    Proteasome activity is regulated by sequestration of its proteolytic centers in a barrel-shaped structure that limits substrate access. Substrates enter the proteasome by means of activator complexes that bind to the end rings of proteasome alpha subunits and induce opening of an axial entrance/exit pore. The PA26 activator binds in a pocket on the proteasome surface using main chain contacts of its C-terminal residues and uses an internal activation loop to trigger gate opening by repositioning the proteasome Pro-17 reverse turn. Subunits of the unrelated PAN/19S activators bind with their C termini in the same pockets but can induce proteasome gate opening entirely from interactions of their C-terminal peptides, which are reported to cause gate opening by inducing a rocking motion of proteasome alpha subunits rather than by directly contacting the Pro-17 turn. Here we report crystal structures and binding studies of proteasome complexes with PA26 constructs that display modified C-terminal residues, including those corresponding to PAN. These findings suggest that PA26 and PAN/19S C-terminal residues bind superimposably and that both classes of activator induce gate opening by using direct contacts to residues of the proteasome Pro-17 reverse turn. In the case of the PAN and 19S activators, a penultimate tyrosine/phenylalanine residue contacts the proteasome Gly-19 carbonyl oxygen to stabilize the open conformation.

  12. Effect of ionizing radiation exposure on Trypanosoma cruzi ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Paula G; Passos-Silva, Danielle G; Vieira-da-Rocha, João P; Mendes, Isabela Cecilia; de Oliveira, Karla A; Oliveira, Camila F B; Vilela, Liza F F; Nagem, Ronaldo A P; Cardoso, Joseane; Nardelli, Sheila C; Krieger, Marco A; Franco, Glória R; Macedo, Andrea M; Pena, Sérgio D J; Schenkman, Sérgio; Gomes, Dawidson A; Guerra-Sá, Renata; Machado, Carlos R

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, proteasome involvement in the damage response induced by ionizing radiation (IR) became evident. However, whether proteasome plays a direct or indirect role in IR-induced damage response still unclear. Trypanosoma cruzi is a human parasite capable of remarkable high tolerance to IR, suggesting a highly efficient damage response system. Here, we investigate the role of T. cruzi proteasome in the damage response induced by IR. We exposed epimastigotes to high doses of gamma ray and we analyzed the expression and subcellular localization of several components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We show that proteasome inhibition increases IR-induced cell growth arrest and proteasome-mediated proteolysis is altered after parasite exposure. We observed nuclear accumulation of 19S and 20S proteasome subunits in response to IR treatments. Intriguingly, the dynamic of 19S particle nuclear accumulation was more similar to the dynamic observed for Rad51 nuclear translocation than the observed for 20S. In the other hand, 20S increase and nuclear translocation could be related with an increase of its regulator PA26 and high levels of proteasome-mediated proteolysis in vitro. The intersection between the opposed peaks of 19S and 20S protein levels was marked by nuclear accumulation of both 20S and 19S together with Ubiquitin, suggesting a role of ubiquitin-proteasome system in the nuclear protein turnover at the time. Our results revealed the importance of proteasome-mediated proteolysis in T. cruzi IR-induced damage response suggesting that proteasome is also involved in T. cruzi IR tolerance. Moreover, our data support the possible direct/signaling role of 19S in DNA damage repair. Based on these results, we speculate that spatial and temporal differences between the 19S particle and 20S proteasome controls proteasome multiple roles in IR damage response.

  13. Anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor properties of proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Kenyon G; Kuhn, Deborah J; Kazi, Aslamuzzaman; Dou, Q Ping

    2005-11-01

    Tumor growth and metastasis depend on the formation of blood vessels, angiogenesis, to supply the developing mass with nutrients, oxygen, and waste removal. The proteasome, a massive multisubunit catabolic body, exerts a regulatory influence on angiogenesis. Inhibition of the proteasome activity has been found to inhibit angiogenesis and induce apoptosis in human cancer cells with limited toxicity to normal cells. Therefore, the dual action of angiogenesis inhibition and cell death induction makes proteasome inhibition an attractive modality for chemotherapy. A variety of proteasome inhibitors have been studied including: antibiotics such as lactacystin, the green tea polyphenols, and the boronic acid Velcade (MLN-341). Most recently, certain classes of copper compounds have been found to act as potent proteasome inhibitors. The potential of particular organic compounds, such as 8-hydroxyquinoline, to spontaneously bind with tumor cellular copper and form proteasome inhibitors provides a new modality of anti-proteasome and anti-angiogenesis chemotherapy. This review examines angiogenesis, the proteasome, representative proteasome inhibitors, and the emerging role of copper. The formation of new blood vessels, or angiogenesis, is an important and necessary function in both embryonic development and wound repair. Therefore, the ability to regenerate or form new vessels for blood flow is essential. The control of angiogenic pathways is tightly regulated in normal differentiated adult cells, which generally do not stimulate blood vessel growth unless injury occurs. However, cancerous tissues stimulate angiogenesis that in turn leads to increased tumor formation and possible metastases. Many of the factors involved in angiogenesis are regulated by the proteasome, which recently has become a focus in anti-cancer therapies due to its involvement in cell cycle and apoptosis control. Here we discuss angiogenesis and its relation to the proteasome. Additionally, current

  14. The 26S Proteasome Complex: An Attractive Target for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Frankland-Searby, Sarah; Bhaumik, Sukesh R.

    2011-01-01

    The 26S proteasome complex engages in an ATP-dependent proteolytic degradation of a variety of oncoproteins, transcription factors, cell cycle specific cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, ornithine decarboxylase, and other key regulatory cellular proteins. Thus, the proteasome regulates either directly or indirectly many important cellular processes. Altered regulation of these cellular events is linked to the development of cancer. Therefore, the proteasome has become an attractive target for the treatment of numerous cancers. Several proteasome inhibitors that target the proteolytic active sites of the 26S proteasome complex have been developed and tested for anti-tumor activities. These proteasome inhibitors have displayed impressive anti-tumor functions by inducing apoptosis in different tumor types. Further, the proteasome inhibitors have been shown to induce cell cycle arrest, and inhibit angiogenesis, cell-cell adhesion, cell migration, immune and inflammatory responses, and DNA repair response. A number of proteasome inhibitors are now in clinical trials to treat multiple myeloma and solid tumors. Many other proteasome inhibitors with different efficiencies are being developed and tested for anti-tumor activities. Several proteasome inhibitors currently in clinical trials have shown significantly improved anti-tumor activities when combined with other drugs such as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, Akt (protein kinase B) inhibitors, DNA damaging agents, Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90) inhibitors, and lenalidomide. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib is now in the clinic to treat multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. Here, we discuss the 26S proteasome complex in carcinogenesis and different proteasome inhibitors with their potential therapeutic applications in treatment of numerous cancers. PMID:22037302

  15. Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a male pattern ( hirsutism ) Hot flashes Mood swings Tenderness and dryness of the vagina A woman ... may include one or more of the following: Low-dose birth control pills Hormone therapy High-dose estrogen therapy for women with very heavy ...

  16. Bufalin derivative BF211 inhibits proteasome activity in human lung cancer cells in vitro by inhibiting β1 subunit expression and disrupting proteasome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Feng, Li-xing; Zhang, Dong-mei; Liu, Miao; Liu, Wang; Mi, Tian; Wu, Wan-ying; Jiang, Bao-hong; Yang, Min; Hu, Li-hong; Guo, De-an; Liu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Bufalin is one of the active components in the traditional Chinese medicine ChanSu that is used to treat arrhythmia, inflammation and cancer. BF211 is a bufalin derivative with stronger cytotoxic activity in cancer cells. The aim of this study was to identify the putative target proteins of BF211 and the signaling pathways in cancer cells. Methods: A549 human lung cancer cells were treated with BF211. A SILAC-based proteomic analysis was used to detect the protein expression profiles of BF211-treated A549 cells. Cellular proteasome activities were examined using fluorogenic peptide substrates, and the binding affinities of BF211 to recombinant proteasome subunit proteins were evaluated using the Biacore assay. The expression levels of proteasome subunits were determined using RT-PCR and Western blotting, and the levels of the integral 26S proteasome were evaluated using native PAGE analysis. Results: The proteomic analysis revealed that 1282 proteins were differentially expressed in BF211-treated A549 cells, and the putative target proteins of BF211 were associated with various cellular functions, including transcription, translation, mRNA splicing, ribosomal protein synthesis and proteasome function. In A549 cells, BF211 (5, 10, and 20 nmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited the enzymatic activities of proteasome. But BF211 displayed a moderate affinity in binding to proteasome β1 subunit and no binding affinity to the β2 and β5 subunits. Moreover, BF211 (0.1, 1, and 10 nmol/L) did not inhibit the proteasome activities in the cell lysates. BF211 (5, 10, and 20 nmol/L) significantly decreased the expression level of proteasome β1 subunit and the levels of integral 26S proteasome in A549 cells. Similarly, knockdown of the β1 subunit with siRNA in A549 cells significantly decreased integral 26S proteasome and proteasome activity. Conclusion: BF211 inhibits proteasome activity in A549 cells by decreasing β1 subunit expression and disrupting proteasome assembly

  17. Bufalin derivative BF211 inhibits proteasome activity in human lung cancer cells in vitro by inhibiting β1 subunit expression and disrupting proteasome assembly.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Feng, Li-Xing; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Liu, Miao; Liu, Wang; Mi, Tian; Wu, Wan-Ying; Jiang, Bao-Hong; Yang, Min; Hu, Li-Hong; Guo, De-An; Liu, Xuan

    2016-07-01

    Bufalin is one of the active components in the traditional Chinese medicine ChanSu that is used to treat arrhythmia, inflammation and cancer. BF211 is a bufalin derivative with stronger cytotoxic activity in cancer cells. The aim of this study was to identify the putative target proteins of BF211 and the signaling pathways in cancer cells. A549 human lung cancer cells were treated with BF211. A SILAC-based proteomic analysis was used to detect the protein expression profiles of BF211-treated A549 cells. Cellular proteasome activities were examined using fluorogenic peptide substrates, and the binding affinities of BF211 to recombinant proteasome subunit proteins were evaluated using the Biacore assay. The expression levels of proteasome subunits were determined using RT-PCR and Western blotting, and the levels of the integral 26S proteasome were evaluated using native PAGE analysis. The proteomic analysis revealed that 1282 proteins were differentially expressed in BF211-treated A549 cells, and the putative target proteins of BF211 were associated with various cellular functions, including transcription, translation, mRNA splicing, ribosomal protein synthesis and proteasome function. In A549 cells, BF211 (5, 10, and 20 nmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited the enzymatic activities of proteasome. But BF211 displayed a moderate affinity in binding to proteasome β1 subunit and no binding affinity to the β2 and β5 subunits. Moreover, BF211 (0.1, 1, and 10 nmol/L) did not inhibit the proteasome activities in the cell lysates. BF211 (5, 10, and 20 nmol/L) significantly decreased the expression level of proteasome β1 subunit and the levels of integral 26S proteasome in A549 cells. Similarly, knockdown of the β1 subunit with siRNA in A549 cells significantly decreased integral 26S proteasome and proteasome activity. BF211 inhibits proteasome activity in A549 cells by decreasing β1 subunit expression and disrupting proteasome assembly.

  18. The ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates plant hormone signaling

    PubMed Central

    Santner, Aaron; Estelle, Mark

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Plants utilize the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) to modulate nearly every aspect of growth and development. Ubiquitin is covalently attached to target proteins through the action of three enzymes known as E1, E2, and E3. The ultimate outcome of this post-translational modification depends on the nature of the ubiquitin linkage and the extent of polyubiquitination. In most cases, ubiquitination results in degradation of the target protein in the 26S proteasome. During the last 10 years it has become clear that the UPS plays a prominent regulatory role in hormone biology. E3 ubiquitin ligases in particular actively participate in hormone perception, de-repression of hormone signaling pathways, degradation of hormone specific transcription factors, and regulation of hormone biosynthesis. It is certain that additional functions will be discovered as more of the nearly 1200 potential E3s in plants are elucidated. PMID:20409276

  19. Colorectal Carcinogenesis, Radiation Quality, and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Fornace, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    Adult colorectal epithelium undergoes continuous renewal and maintains homeostatic balance through regulated cellular proliferation, differentiation, and migration. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway involving the transcriptional co-activator β-catenin is important for colorectal development and normal epithelial maintenance, and deregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Colorectal carcinogenesis has been linked to radiation exposure, and radiation has been demonstrated to alter Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as well as the proteasomal pathway involved in the degradation of the signaling components and thus regulation of β-catenin. The current review discusses recent progresses in our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis in relation to different types of radiation and roles that radiation quality plays in deregulating β-catenin and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) for colorectal cancer initiation and progression. PMID:26819641

  20. Conformational switching of the 26S proteasome enables substrate degradation.

    PubMed

    Matyskiela, Mary E; Lander, Gabriel C; Martin, Andreas

    2013-07-01

    The 26S proteasome is the major eukaryotic ATP-dependent protease, responsible for regulating the proteome through degradation of ubiquitin-tagged substrates. Its regulatory particle, containing the heterohexameric AAA+ ATPase motor and the essential deubiquitinase Rpn11, recognizes substrates, removes their ubiquitin chains and translocates them into the associated peptidase after unfolding, but detailed mechanisms remain unknown. Here we present the 26S proteasome structure from Saccharomyces cerevisiae during substrate degradation, showing that the regulatory particle switches from a preengaged to a translocation-competent conformation. This conformation is characterized by a rearranged ATPase ring with uniform subunit interfaces, a widened central channel coaxially aligned with the peptidase and a spiral orientation of pore loops that suggests a rapid progression of ATP-hydrolysis events around the ring. Notably, Rpn11 moves from an occluded position to directly above the central pore, thus facilitating substrate deubiquitination concomitant with translocation.

  1. Cylindrocyclophanes with Proteasome Inhibitory Activity from the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp

    PubMed Central

    Chlipala, George E.; Sturdy, Megan; Krunic, Aleksej; Lantvit, Daniel D.; Shen, Qi; Porter, Kyle; Swanson, Steven M.; Orjala, Jimmy

    2010-01-01

    Material collected from a parkway in the city of Chicago afforded the isolation of a Nostoc species (UIC 10022A). The extract of this strain displayed significant inhibition of the 20S proteasome as well as antiproliferative activity against HT29, MCF7, NCI-H460, and SF268 cancer cell lines. A standardized dereplication protocol allowed for the rapid identification of three known (11-13) and nine new (1-9) chlorinated cylindrocyclophanes from less than 100 mg of organic extract. Scale-up isolation of 1-9 and 11-13 from a larger extract was guided by LC-UV-MS data. In addition, KBr enrichment of the culture media afforded the isolation of a brominated cylindrocyclophane (10). Biological evaluation of 1-5, 9, and 10-13 revealed a large range of activity against the 20S proteasome and allowed the determination of preliminary structure-activity relationships (SAR) of the cylindrocyclophane pharmacophore. PMID:20825206

  2. Toward an Integrated Structural Model of the 26S Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the end point of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and degrades ubiquitylated substrates. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP), where degradation occurs, and the 19S regulatory particle (RP), which ensures substrate specificity of degradation. Whereas the CP is resolved to atomic resolution, the architecture of the RP is largely unknown. We provide a comprehensive analysis of the current structural knowledge on the RP, including structures of the RP subunits, physical protein-protein interactions, and cryoelectron microscopy data. These data allowed us to compute an atomic model for the CP-AAA-ATPase subcomplex. In addition to this atomic model, further subunits can be mapped approximately, which lets us hypothesize on the substrate path during its degradation. PMID:20467039

  3. Gates, channels, and switches: elements of the proteasome machine

    PubMed Central

    Finley, Daniel; Chen, Xiang; Walters, Kylie J.

    2015-01-01

    The proteasome has emerged as an intricate machine that has dynamic mechanisms to regulate the timing of its activity, its selection of substrates, and its processivity. The 19-subunit regulatory particle (RP) recognizes ubiquitinated proteins, removes ubiquitin, and injects the target protein into the proteolytic chamber of the core particle (CP) via a narrow channel. Translocation into the CP requires substrate unfolding, which is achieved through mechanical force applied by a hexameric ATPase ring of the RP. Recent cryo-electron microscopy studies have defined distinct conformational states of the RP, providing illustrative snapshots of what appear to be progressive steps of substrate engagement. Here, we bring together this new information with molecular analyses to describe the principles of proteasome activity and regulation. PMID:26643069

  4. Pulmonary Neoplasms in Patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome: Histopathological Features and Genetic and Somatic Events.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Mitsuko; Tanaka, Reiko; Okudela, Koji; Nakamura, Satoko; Yoshioka, Hiromu; Tsuzuki, Toyonori; Shibuya, Ryo; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Shirasaki, Hiroki; Sudo, Yoshiko; Kimura, Naoko; Yamada, Kazuaki; Uematsu, Shugo; Kunimura, Toshiaki; Kato, Ikuma; Nakatani, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) is an inherited disorder caused by genetic mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene. Individuals with BHD have multiple pulmonary cysts and are at a high risk for developing renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). Currently, little information is available about whether pulmonary cysts are absolutely benign or if the lungs are at an increased risk for developing neoplasms. Herein, we describe 14 pulmonary neoplastic lesions in 7 patients with BHD. All patients were confirmed to have germline FLCN mutations. Neoplasm histologies included adenocarcinoma in situ (n = 2), minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (n = 1), papillary adenocarcinoma (n = 1), micropapillary adenocarcinoma (n = 1), atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (n = 8), and micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia (MPH)-like lesion (n = 1). Five of the six adenocarcinoma/MPH-like lesions (83.3%) demonstrated a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of FLCN. All of these lesions lacked mutant alleles and preserved wild-type alleles. Three invasive adenocarcinomas possessed additional somatic events: 2 had a somatic mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR) and another had a somatic mutation in KRAS. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that most of the lesions were immunostained for phospho-mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR) and phospho-S6. Collective data indicated that pulmonary neoplasms of peripheral adenocarcinomatous lineage in BHD patients frequently exhibit LOH of FLCN with mTOR pathway signaling. Additional driver gene mutations were detected only in invasive cases, suggesting that FLCN LOH may be an underlying abnormality that cooperates with major driver gene mutations in the progression of pulmonary adenocarcinomas in BHD patients.

  5. Lung Cysts, Spontaneous Pneumothorax, and Genetic Associations in 89 Families with Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Jorge R.; Pautler, Stephen E.; Stewart, Laveta; Glenn, Gladys M.; Weinreich, Michael; Toure, Ousmane; Wei, Ming-Hui; Schmidt, Laura S.; Davis, Lewis; Zbar, Berton; Choyke, Peter; Steinberg, Seth M.; Nguyen, Dao M.; Linehan, W. Marston

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) is an autosomal, dominantly inherited genodermatosis that predisposes to fibrofolliculomas, kidney neoplasms, lung cysts, and spontaneous pneumothorax. Objectives: We evaluated 198 patients from 89 families with BHDS to characterize the risk factors for pneumothorax and genotype–pulmonary associations. Methods: Helical computed tomography scans of the chest were used to screen for pulmonary abnormalities. BHD mutation data were used for genotype–pulmonary associations. We examined the relationship of pneumothorax with categorical parameters (sex, smoking history, and lung cysts) and continuous parameters (number of cysts, lung cyst volume, and largest cyst diameter and volume). Logistic regression analyses were used to identify the risk factors associated with pneumothorax. Measurements and Main Results: Twenty-four percent (48/198) of patients with BHDS had a history of pneumothorax. The presence of lung cysts was significantly associated with pneumothorax (p = 0.006). Total lung cyst volume, largest cyst diameter and volume, and every parameter related to the number of lung cysts were significantly associated (p < 0.0001) with pneumothorax. A logistic regression analysis showed that only the total number of cysts in the right parenchymal lower lobe and the total number of cysts located on the pleural surface in the right middle lobe were needed to classify a patient as to whether or not he or she was likely to have a pneumothorax. Exon location of the BHD mutation was associated with the numbers of cysts (p = 0.0002). Conclusions: This study indicates that patients with BHDS have a significant association between lung cysts and spontaneous pneumothorax. PMID:17322109

  6. Pulmonary Neoplasms in Patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome: Histopathological Features and Genetic and Somatic Events

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Mitsuko; Tanaka, Reiko; Okudela, Koji; Nakamura, Satoko; Yoshioka, Hiromu; Tsuzuki, Toyonori; Shibuya, Ryo; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Shirasaki, Hiroki; Sudo, Yoshiko; Kimura, Naoko; Yamada, Kazuaki; Uematsu, Shugo; Kunimura, Toshiaki; Kato, Ikuma; Nakatani, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) is an inherited disorder caused by genetic mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene. Individuals with BHD have multiple pulmonary cysts and are at a high risk for developing renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). Currently, little information is available about whether pulmonary cysts are absolutely benign or if the lungs are at an increased risk for developing neoplasms. Herein, we describe 14 pulmonary neoplastic lesions in 7 patients with BHD. All patients were confirmed to have germline FLCN mutations. Neoplasm histologies included adenocarcinoma in situ (n = 2), minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (n = 1), papillary adenocarcinoma (n = 1), micropapillary adenocarcinoma (n = 1), atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (n = 8), and micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia (MPH)-like lesion (n = 1). Five of the six adenocarcinoma/MPH-like lesions (83.3%) demonstrated a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of FLCN. All of these lesions lacked mutant alleles and preserved wild-type alleles. Three invasive adenocarcinomas possessed additional somatic events: 2 had a somatic mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR) and another had a somatic mutation in KRAS. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that most of the lesions were immunostained for phospho-mammalian target of rapamycin (p-mTOR) and phospho-S6. Collective data indicated that pulmonary neoplasms of peripheral adenocarcinomatous lineage in BHD patients frequently exhibit LOH of FLCN with mTOR pathway signaling. Additional driver gene mutations were detected only in invasive cases, suggesting that FLCN LOH may be an underlying abnormality that cooperates with major driver gene mutations in the progression of pulmonary adenocarcinomas in BHD patients. PMID:26974543

  7. Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome Presenting as a Nevus Comedonicus-Like Lesion in an 8-Year-Old Boy.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Jessica; Landau, Joseph W

    2016-09-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is an uncommon genodermatosis characterized by hair follicle hamartomas and an increased risk of pneumothorax and renal cell carcinoma. Recognition of cutaneous manifestations is essential because it allows for early screening and management of systemic complications. We present the case of an 8-year-old boy with a recently described cystic and comedonal variant of the classic fibrofolliculoma, which had been present since birth.

  8. Proteasome regulates turnover of toxic human amylin in pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanghamitra; Trikha, Saurabh; Sarkar, Anjali; Jeremic, Aleksandar M.

    2016-01-01

    Toxic human amylin (hA) oligomers and aggregates are implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although recent studies demonstrated a causal connection between hA uptake and toxicity in pancreatic cells, the mechanism of amylin’s clearance following its internalization and its relationship to toxicity is yet to be determined, and hence was investigated here. Using pancreatic rat insulinoma β-cells and human islets as model systems, we show that hA, following its internalization, first accumulates in the cytosol followed by its translocation into nucleus, and to a lesser extent lysosomes, keeping the net cytosolic amylin content low. An increase in hA accumulation in the nucleus of pancreatic cells correlated with its cytotoxicity, suggesting that its excessive accumulation in the nucleus is detrimental. hA interacted with 20S core and 19S lid subunits of the β-cell proteasomal complex, as suggested by immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies, which subsequently resulted in a decrease in the proteasome’s proteolytic activity in these cells. In vitro binding and activity assays confirmed an intrinsic and potent ability of amylin to interact with the 20S core complex thereby modulating its proteolytic activity. Interestingly, less toxic and aggregation incapable rat amylin (rA) showed a comparable inhibitory effect on proteasome activity and protein ubiquitination, decoupling amylin aggregation/toxicity and amylin-induced protein stress. In agreement with these studies, inhibition of proteasomal proteolytic activity significantly increased intracellular amylin content and toxicity. Taken together, our results suggest a pivotal role of proteasomes in amylin’s turnover and detoxification in pancreatic cells. PMID:27340132

  9. Effects of Radiation on Proteasome Function in Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    peroxiredoxin 1 dynein, cytoplasmic, heavy polypeptide 1 annexin I Beta 5-tubulin thioredoxin-like 1 Tubulin alpha-1A chain annexin A2 isoform...online), which is a substrate of the 26S proteasome (34), and negative for the differentiation mark- ers GFAP and neuron-specific class III -tubulin...and neuron-specific class III -tubulin, indicating that they had undergone differentiation (Figure 2, D–F). Similarly, spheres derived from the U343

  10. Puromycin induces SUMO and ubiquitin redistribution upon proteasome inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Hotaru; Saitoh, Hisato

    2016-07-29

    We have previously reported the co-localization of O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at promyelocytic leukemia-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132, implying a role for the ubiquitin family in sequestering OP-puromycylated immature polypeptides to the nucleus during impaired proteasome activity. Here, we found that as expected puromycin induced SUMO-1/2/3 accumulation with ubiquitin at multiple nuclear foci in HeLa cells when co-exposed to MG132. Co-administration of puromycin and MG132 also facilitated redistribution of PML and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 concurrently with SUMO-2/3. As removal of the drugs from the medium led to disappearance of the SUMO-2/3-ubiquitin nuclear foci, our findings indicated that nuclear assembly/disassembly of SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin was pharmacologically manipulable, supporting our previous observation on OP-Puro, which predicted the ubiquitin family function in sequestrating aberrant proteins to the nucleus. -- Highlights: •Puromycin exhibits the O-propargyl-puromycin effect. •Puromycin induces SUMO redistribution upon proteasome inhibition. •Ubiquitin and RNF4 accumulate at PML-nuclear bodies with SUMO-2/3. •The ubiquitin family may function in nuclear sequestration of immature proteins.

  11. The Ubiquitin–Proteasome System and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Saul R.; Herrmann, Joerg; Lerman, Amir; Patterson, Cam; Wang, Xuejun

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, the role of the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) has been the subject of numerous studies to elucidate its role in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology. There have been many advances in this field including the use of proteomics to achieve a better understanding of how the cardiac proteasome is regulated. Moreover, improved methods for the assessment of UPS function and the development of genetic models to study the role of the UPS have led to the realization that often the function of this system deviates from the norm in many cardiovascular pathologies. Hence, dysfunction has been described in atherosclerosis, familial cardiac proteinopathies, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathies, and myocardial ischemia. This has led to numerous studies of the ubiquitin protein (E3) ligases and their roles in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. This has also led to the controversial proposition of treating atherosclerosis, cardiac hypertrophy, and myocardial ischemia with proteasome inhibitors. Furthering our knowledge of this system may help in the development of new UPS-based therapeutic modalities for mitigation of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22727426

  12. The role of allostery in the ubiquitin-proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Nussinov, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    The Ubiquitin-Proteasome System is involved in many cellular processes including protein degradation. Degradation of a protein via this system involves two successive steps: ubiquitination and degradation. Ubiquitination tags the target protein with ubiquitin-like proteins, such as ubiquitin, SUMO and NEDD8, via a cascade involving three enzymes: activating enzyme E1, conjugating enzyme E2, and E3 ubiquitin ligases. The proteasomes recognize the ubiquitin-like protein tagged substrate proteins and degrade them. Accumulating evidence indicates that allostery is a central player in the regulation of ubiquitination, as well as deubiquitination and degradation. Here, we provide an overview of the key mechanistic roles played by allostery in all steps of these processes, and highlight allosteric drugs targeting them. Throughout the review, we emphasize the crucial mechanistic role played by linkers in allosterically controlling the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System action by biasing the sampling of the conformational space, which facilitate the catalytic reactions of the ubiquitination and degradation. Finally, we propose that allostery may similarly play key roles in the regulation of molecular machines in the cell, and as such allosteric drugs can be expected to be increasingly exploited in therapeutic regimes. PMID:23234564

  13. Monoubiquitination joins polyubiquitination as an esteemed proteasomal targeting signal.

    PubMed

    Livneh, Ido; Kravtsova-Ivantsiv, Yelena; Braten, Ori; Kwon, Yong Tae; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2017-06-01

    A polyubiquitin chain attached covalently to the target substrate has been recognized for long as the "canonical" proteasomal degradation signal. However, several proteins have been shown to be targeted for degradation following monoubiquitination, indicating that the proteasome can recognize signals other than a ubiquitin polymer. A comprehensive screen aiming at determining the extent of this mode of recognition revealed that ∼40% of mammalian and ∼20% of yeast proteins are degraded following monoubiquitination. Characterization of these proteins showed that on average, the monoubiquitinated proteins are smaller than the polyubiquitinated ones, and in humans, are less disordered. Further, proteins degraded by the two different modes belong to distinct functional groups. These findings along with detailed structural analysis of the proteasome, its ubiquitin receptors and deubiquitinating enzymes, suggest that the ubiquitin signal - its formation, recognition, editing, and removal - is far more complex and diverse than originally assumed. Also see the video abstract here: https://youtu.be/QKpN9c6Rg20. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Ashok N.

    2010-01-01

    Proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) has emerged as a new molecular mechanism that controls wide-ranging functions in the nervous system, including fine-tuning of synaptic connections during development and synaptic plasticity in the adult organism. In the UPP, attachment of a small protein, ubiquitin, tags the substrates for degradation by a multisubunit complex called the proteasome. Linkage of ubiquitin to protein substrates is highly specific and occurs through a series of well-orchestrated enzymatic steps. The UPP regulates neurotransmitter receptors, protein kinases, synaptic proteins, transcription factors, and other molecules critical for synaptic plasticity. Accumulating evidence indicates that the operation of the UPP in neurons is not homogeneous and is subject to tightly managed local regulation in different neuronal subcompartments. Investigations on both invertebrate and vertebrate model systems have revealed local roles for enzymes that attach ubiquitin to substrate proteins, as well as for enzymes that remove ubiquitin from substrates. The proteasome also has been shown to possess disparate functions in different parts of the neuron. Here I give a broad overview of the role of the UPP in synaptic plasticity and highlight the local roles and regulation of the proteolytic pathway in neurons. PMID:20566674

  15. Molecular Architecture and Assembly of the Eukaryotic Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Tomko, Robert J.; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome system is responsible for most cellular quality-control and regulatory protein degradation. Its substrates, which are usually modified by polymers of ubiquitin, are ultimately degraded by the 26S proteasome. This 2.6 MDa protein complex is separated into a barrel-shaped proteolytic 20S core particle (CP) of 28 subunits capped on one or both ends by a 19S regulatory particle (RP) comprising at least 19 subunits. The RP coordinates substrate recognition, removal of substrate polyubiquitin chains, and substrate unfolding and translocation into the CP for degradation. While many atomic structures of the CP have been determined, the RP has resisted high-resolution analysis. Recently, however, a combination of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), biochemical analysis, and crystal structure determination of several RP subunits has yielded a near-atomic resolution view of much of the complex. Major new insights into chaperone-assisted proteasome assembly have also recently been made. Here we review these novel findings. PMID:23495936

  16. Voltage sensor mutations differentially target misfolded K+ channel subunits to proteasomal and non-proteasomal disposal pathways

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Michael P.; Khanna, Rajesh; Lee, Eun Jeon; Papazian, Diane M.

    2011-01-01

    In Shaker K+ channels, formation of an electrostatic interaction between two charged residues, D316 and K374 in transmembrane segments S3 and S4, respectively, is a key step in voltage sensor biogenesis. Mutations D316K and K374E disrupt formation of the voltage sensor and lead to endoplasmic reticulum retention. We have now investigated the fates of these misfolded proteins. Both are significantly less stable than the wild-type protein. D316K is degraded by cytoplasmic proteasomes, whereas K374E is degraded by a lactacystin-insensitive, non-proteasomal pathway. Our results suggest that the D316K and K374E proteins are misfolded in recognizably different ways, an observation with implications for voltage sensor biogenesis. PMID:15196930

  17. 1.15 Å resolution structure of the proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 PDZ domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Chingakham R.; Lovell, Scott; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan; Chowdhury, Wasimul Q.; Geanes, Eric S.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2014-03-25

    The proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 binds to the proteasome subunit Rpt5 using its PDZ domain. The structure of the Nas2 PDZ domain has been determined. The 26S proteasome is a 2.5 MDa protease dedicated to the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this complex containing 66 polypeptides is assisted by at least nine proteasome-specific chaperones. One of these, Nas2, binds to the proteasomal AAA-ATPase subunit Rpt5. The PDZ domain of Nas2 binds to the C-terminal tail of Rpt5; however, it does not require the C-terminus of Rpt5 for binding. Here, the 1.15 Å resolution structure of the PDZ domain of Nas2 is reported. This structure will provide a basis for further insights regarding the structure and function of Nas2 in proteasome assembly.

  18. Computational Approaches for the Discovery of Human Proteasome Inhibitors: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Romina A; Serra, Patrícia; Salvador, Jorge A R; Guedes, Rita C

    2016-07-16

    Proteasome emerged as an important target in recent pharmacological research due to its pivotal role in degrading proteins in the cytoplasm and nucleus of eukaryotic cells, regulating a wide variety of cellular pathways, including cell growth and proliferation, apoptosis, DNA repair, transcription, immune response, and signaling processes. The last two decades witnessed intensive efforts to discover 20S proteasome inhibitors with significant chemical diversity and efficacy. To date, the US FDA approved to market three proteasome inhibitors: bortezomib, carfilzomib, and ixazomib. However new, safer and more efficient drugs are still required. Computer-aided drug discovery has long being used in drug discovery campaigns targeting the human proteasome. The aim of this review is to illustrate selected in silico methods like homology modeling, molecular docking, pharmacophore modeling, virtual screening, and combined methods that have been used in proteasome inhibitors discovery. Applications of these methods to proteasome inhibitors discovery will also be presented and discussed to raise improvements in this particular field.

  19. DNA damage modulates interactions between microRNAs and the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Tsimokha, Anna S; Kulichkova, Valentina A.; Karpova, Elena V.; Zaykova, Julia J.; Aksenov, Nikolai D; Vasilishina, Anastasia A.; Kropotov, Andrei V.; Antonov, Alexey; Barlev, Nikolai A.

    2014-01-01

    26S proteasomes are known as major non-lysosomal cellular machines for coordinated and specific destruction of ubiquitinylated proteins. The proteolytic activities of proteasomes are controlled by various post-translational modifications in response to environmental cues, including DNA damage. Besides proteolysis, proteasomes also associate with RNA hydrolysis and splicing. Here, we extend the functional diversity of proteasomes by showing that they also dynamically associate with microRNAs (miRNAs) both in the nucleus and cytoplasm of cells. Moreover, DNA damage induced by an anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin, alters the repertoire of proteasome-associated miRNAs, enriching the population of miRNAs that target cell cycle checkpoint regulators and DNA repair proteins. Collectively, these data uncover yet another potential mode of action for proteasomes in the cell via their dynamic association with microRNAs. PMID:25004448

  20. Starvation Induces Proteasome Autophagy with Different Pathways for Core and Regulatory Particles.

    PubMed

    Waite, Kenrick A; De-La Mota-Peynado, Alina; Vontz, Gabrielle; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2016-02-12

    The proteasome is responsible for the degradation of many cellular proteins. If and how this abundant and normally stable complex is degraded by cells is largely unknown. Here we show that in yeast, upon nitrogen starvation, proteasomes are targeted for vacuolar degradation through autophagy. Using GFP-tagged proteasome subunits, we observed that autophagy of a core particle (CP) subunit depends on the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp3, although a regulatory particle (RP) subunit does not. Furthermore, upon blocking of autophagy, RP remained largely nuclear, although CP largely localized to the cytosol as well as granular structures within the cytosol. In all, our data reveal a regulated process for the removal of proteasomes upon nitrogen starvation. This process involves CP and RP dissociation, nuclear export, and independent vacuolar targeting of CP and RP. Thus, in addition to the well characterized transcriptional up-regulation of genes encoding proteasome subunits, cells are also capable of down-regulating cellular levels of proteasomes through proteaphagy.

  1. Proteasomal control of cytokinin synthesis protects Mycobacterium tuberculosis against nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Samanovic, Marie I.; Tu, Shengjiang; Novák, Ondřej; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; McAllister, Fiona E.; Aravind, L.; Gygi, Steven P.; Hubbard, Stevan R.; Strnad, Miroslav; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Summary One of several roles of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome is to defend against host-produced nitric oxide (NO), a free radical that can damage numerous biological macromolecules. Mutations that inactivate proteasomal degradation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis result in bacteria that are hypersensitive to NO and attenuated for growth in vivo, but it was not known why. To elucidate the link between proteasome function, NO-resistance, and pathogenesis, we screened for suppressors of NO hypersensitivity in a mycobacterial proteasome ATPase mutant and identified mutations in Rv1205. We determined that Rv1205 encodes a pupylated proteasome substrate. Rv1205 is a homologue of the plant enzyme LONELY GUY, which catalyzes the production of hormones called cytokinins. Remarkably, we report for the first time that an obligate human pathogen secretes several cytokinins. Finally, we determined that the Rv1205-dependent accumulation of cytokinin breakdown products is likely responsible for the sensitization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome-associated mutants to NO. PMID:25728768

  2. Binding of Ubiquitin Conjugates to Proteasomes as Visualized with Native Gels

    PubMed Central

    Elsasser, Suzanne; Shi, Yuan; Finley, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Summary The proteasome is an ATP-dependent molecular machine that degrades proteins through the concerted activity of dozens of subunits. It is the yin to the ribosome’s yang, and together these entities mold the protein landscape of the cell. Native gels are generally superior to conventional and affinity purifications for the analytical resolution proteasomal variants, and have thus become a staple of proteasome work. Here we describe the technique of using native gels to observe proteasomes in complex with ubiquitin conjugates. We discuss the consequences of ubiquitin conjugate length and concentration on the migration of these complexes, the use of this mobility shift to evaluate the relative affinity of mutant proteasomes for ubiquitin conjugates, and the effects of deubiquitinating enzymes and competing ubiquitin binding proteins on the interactions of ubiquitin conjugates with the proteasome. PMID:22350901

  3. Quantitative time-resolved analysis reveals intricate, differential regulation of standard- and immuno-proteasomes.

    PubMed

    Liepe, Juliane; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg; Bellavista, Elena; Kloetzel, Peter M; Stumpf, Michael P H; Mishto, Michele

    2015-09-22

    Proteasomal protein degradation is a key determinant of protein half-life and hence of cellular processes ranging from basic metabolism to a host of immunological processes. Despite its importance the mechanisms regulating proteasome activity are only incompletely understood. Here we use an iterative and tightly integrated experimental and modelling approach to develop, explore and validate mechanistic models of proteasomal peptide-hydrolysis dynamics. The 20S proteasome is a dynamic enzyme and its activity varies over time because of interactions between substrates and products and the proteolytic and regulatory sites; the locations of these sites and the interactions between them are predicted by the model, and experimentally supported. The analysis suggests that the rate-limiting step of hydrolysis is the transport of the substrates into the proteasome. The transport efficiency varies between human standard- and immuno-proteasomes thereby impinging upon total degradation rate and substrate cleavage-site usage.

  4. Coordination of oxidized protein hydrolase and the proteasome in the clearance of cytotoxic denatured proteins.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kei; Kiuchi, Yukari; Ando, Ken; Hayakawa, Makio; Kikugawa, Kiyomi

    2004-11-05

    Intracellular accumulation of denatured proteins impairs cellular function. The proteasome is recognized as an enzyme responsible for the effective clearance of those cytotoxic denatured proteins. As another enzyme that participates in the destruction of damaged proteins, we have identified oxidized protein hydrolase (OPH) and found that OPH confers cellular resistance to various kinds of oxidative stress. In this study, we demonstrate the roles of the proteasome and OPH in the clearance of denatured proteins. The inhibition of proteasome activity results in the elevation of protein carbonyls in cells under oxidative stress. On the other hand, cells overexpressing OPH retain higher resistance to oxidative stress, even though the proteasome activity is inhibited. Furthermore, upon inhibition of the proteasome activity, OPH is recruited to a novel organelle termed the aggresome where misfolded or denatured proteins are processed. Thus, OPH and the proteasome coordinately contribute to the clearance of cytotoxic denatured proteins.

  5. The transition zone protein Rpgrip1l regulates proteasomal activity at the primary cilium

    PubMed Central

    Lier, Johanna Maria; Burmühl, Stephan; Struchtrup, Andreas; Deutschmann, Kathleen; Vetter, Maik; Leu, Tristan; Reeg, Sandra; Grune, Tilman; Rüther, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in RPGRIP1L result in severe human diseases called ciliopathies. To unravel the molecular function of RPGRIP1L, we analyzed Rpgrip1l−/− mouse embryos, which display a ciliopathy phenotype and die, at the latest, around birth. In these embryos, cilia-mediated signaling was severely disturbed. Defects in Shh signaling suggested that the Rpgrip1l deficiency causes an impairment of protein degradation and protein processing. Indeed, we detected a cilia-dependent decreased proteasomal activity in the absence of Rpgrip1l. We found different proteasomal components localized to cilia and identified Psmd2, a component of the regulatory proteasomal 19S subunit, as an interaction partner for Rpgrip1l. Quantifications of proteasomal substrates demonstrated that Rpgrip1l regulates proteasomal activity specifically at the basal body. Our study suggests that Rpgrip1l controls ciliary signaling by regulating the activity of the ciliary proteasome via Psmd2. PMID:26150391

  6. Structure of an endogenous yeast 26S proteasome reveals two major conformational states

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Bai; Huang, Xiuliang; Wu, Jianping; Mei, Ziqing; Wang, Yiwei; Xue, Xiaobin; Yan, Chuangye; Wang, Jiawei; Finley, Daniel J.; Shi, Yigong; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic proteasome mediates degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins. Here we report the single-particle cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of the endogenous 26S proteasome from Saccharomyces cerevisiae at 4.6- to 6.3-Å resolution. The fine features of the cryo-EM maps allow modeling of 18 subunits in the regulatory particle and 28 in the core particle. The proteasome exhibits two distinct conformational states, designated M1 and M2, which correspond to those reported previously for the proteasome purified in the presence of ATP-γS and ATP, respectively. These conformations also correspond to those of the proteasome in the presence and absence of exogenous substrate. Structure-guided biochemical analysis reveals enhanced deubiquitylating enzyme activity of Rpn11 upon assembly of the lid. Our structures serve as a molecular basis for mechanistic understanding of proteasome function. PMID:26929360

  7. Structure of an endogenous yeast 26S proteasome reveals two major conformational states.

    PubMed

    Luan, Bai; Huang, Xiuliang; Wu, Jianping; Mei, Ziqing; Wang, Yiwei; Xue, Xiaobin; Yan, Chuangye; Wang, Jiawei; Finley, Daniel J; Shi, Yigong; Wang, Feng

    2016-03-08

    The eukaryotic proteasome mediates degradation of polyubiquitinated proteins. Here we report the single-particle cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of the endogenous 26S proteasome from Saccharomyces cerevisiae at 4.6- to 6.3-Å resolution. The fine features of the cryo-EM maps allow modeling of 18 subunits in the regulatory particle and 28 in the core particle. The proteasome exhibits two distinct conformational states, designated M1 and M2, which correspond to those reported previously for the proteasome purified in the presence of ATP-γS and ATP, respectively. These conformations also correspond to those of the proteasome in the presence and absence of exogenous substrate. Structure-guided biochemical analysis reveals enhanced deubiquitylating enzyme activity of Rpn11 upon assembly of the lid. Our structures serve as a molecular basis for mechanistic understanding of proteasome function.

  8. Proteasome activity is required for the initiation of precancerous pancreatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Furuyama, Takaki; Tanaka, Shinji; Shimada, Shu; Akiyama, Yoshimitsu; Matsumura, Satoshi; Mitsunori, Yusuke; Aihara, Arihiro; Ban, Daisuke; Ochiai, Takanori; Kudo, Atsushi; Fukamachi, Hiroshi; Arii, Shigeki; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya; Tanabe, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Proteasome activity is significantly increased in advanced cancers, but its role in cancer initiation is not clear, due to difficulties in monitoring this process in vivo. We established a line of transgenic mice that carried the ZsGreen-degronODC (Gdeg) proteasome reporter to monitor the proteasome activity. In combination with Pdx-1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D model, proteasome activity was investigated in the initiation of precancerous pancreatic lesions (PanINs). Normal pancreatic acini in Gdeg mice had low proteasome activity. By contrast, proteasome activity was increased in the PanIN lesions that developed in Gdeg;Pdx-1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D mice. Caerulein administration to Gdeg;Pdx-1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D mice induced constitutive elevation of proteasome activity in pancreatic tissues and accelerated PanIN formation. The proteasome inhibitor markedly reduced PanIN formation in Gdeg;Pdx-1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D mice (P = 0.001), whereas it had no effect on PanIN lesions that had already formed. These observations indicated the significance of proteasome activity in the initiation of PanIN but not the maintenance per se. In addition, the expressions of pERK and its downstream factors including cyclin D1, NF-κB, and Cox2 were decreased after proteasome inhibition in PanINs. Our studies showed activation of proteasome is required specifically for the initiation of PanIN. The roles of proteasome in the early stages of pancreatic carcinogenesis warrant further investigation. PMID:27244456

  9. Clinical Use of Proteasome Inhibitors in the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Merin, Noah M.; Kelly, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable hematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of neoplastic plasma cells. The use of proteasome inhibitors in the treatment of MM has led to significant improvements in outcomes. This article reviews data on the use of the two approved proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib and carlfilzomib), as well as newer agents under development. Emphasis is placed on the clinical use of proteasome inhibitors, including management of side effects and combination with other agents. PMID:25545164

  10. Changes in expression of proteasome in rats at different stages of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ismawati; Oenzil, Fadil; Yanwirasti; Yerizel, Eti

    2016-06-01

    It has been suggested that proteasome system has a role in initiation, progression, and complication stages of atherosclerosis. Although there is still controversy, there has been no research that compares the expression of proteasome in tissue and serum at each of these stages. This study aimed to investigated the expression of proteasome at different stages of atherosclerosis using rat model. We measured the expression of aortic proteasome by immunohistochemical analyses and were then analyzed using ImageJ software for percentage of area and integrated density. We used Photoshop version 3.0 to analyze aortic proteasome expression as a comparison. We measured serum proteasome expression by enzyme linked immunosorbents assays. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare mean value of percentage of area and serum proteasome. Analysis of variance test was used to compare mean value of integrated density. Correlation test between vascular proteasome expression and serum proteasome expression was made using Spearman test. A P-value of 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Compared with normal, percentage of area was higher in initiation, progression, and complication. Compared with normal, integrated density was higher in initiation and further higher in progression and complication. Data from Image J is similar with data from Photoshop. Serum proteasome expression was higher in initiation compared with normal, and further higher in progression and complication. It was concluded that there were different vascular proteasome expression and serum proteasome expression at the stages of atherosclerosis. These results may be used in research into new marker and therapeutic target in atherosclerosis.

  11. Structural Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Homologues of the Eukaryotic Proteasome Assembly Chaperone 2 (PAC2).

    PubMed

    Bai, Lin; Jastrab, Jordan B; Isasa, Marta; Hu, Kuan; Yu, Hongjun; Gygi, Steven P; Darwin, K Heran; Li, Huilin

    2017-05-01

    A previous bioinformatics analysis identified the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins Rv2125 and Rv2714 as orthologs of the eukaryotic proteasome assembly chaperone 2 (PAC2). We set out to investigate whether Rv2125 or Rv2714 can function in proteasome assembly. We solved the crystal structure of Rv2125 at a resolution of 3.0 Å, which showed an overall fold similar to that of the PAC2 family proteins that include the archaeal PbaB and the yeast Pba1. However, Rv2125 and Rv2714 formed trimers, whereas PbaB forms tetramers and Pba1 dimerizes with Pba2. We also found that purified Rv2125 and Rv2714 could not bind to M. tuberculosis 20S core particles. Finally, proteomic analysis showed that the levels of known proteasome components and substrate proteins were not affected by disruption of Rv2125 in M. tuberculosis Our work suggests that Rv2125 does not participate in bacterial proteasome assembly or function.IMPORTANCE Although many bacteria do not encode proteasomes, M. tuberculosis not only uses proteasomes but also has evolved a posttranslational modification system called pupylation to deliver proteins to the proteasome. Proteasomes are essential for M. tuberculosis to cause lethal infections in animals; thus, determining how proteasomes are assembled may help identify new ways to combat tuberculosis. We solved the structure of a predicted proteasome assembly factor, Rv2125, and isolated a genetic Rv2125 mutant of M. tuberculosis Our structural, biochemical, and genetic studies indicate that Rv2125 and Rv2714 do not function as proteasome assembly chaperones and are unlikely to have roles in proteasome biology in mycobacteria. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Absence of the Birt-Hogg-Dubé gene product is associated with increased hypoxia-inducible factor transcriptional activity and a loss of metabolic flexibility.

    PubMed

    Preston, R S; Philp, A; Claessens, T; Gijezen, L; Dydensborg, A B; Dunlop, E A; Harper, K T; Brinkhuizen, T; Menko, F H; Davies, D M; Land, S C; Pause, A; Baar, K; van Steensel, M A M; Tee, A R

    2011-03-10

    Under conditions of reduced tissue oxygenation, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) controls many processes, including angiogenesis and cellular metabolism, and also influences cell proliferation and survival decisions. HIF is centrally involved in tumour growth in inherited diseases that give rise to renal cell carcinoma (RCC), such as Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome and tuberous sclerosis complex. In this study, we examined whether HIF is involved in tumour formation of RCC in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome. For this, we analysed a Birt-Hogg-Dubé patient-derived renal tumour cell line (UOK257) that is devoid of the Birt-Hogg-Dubé protein (BHD) and observed high levels of HIF activity. Knockdown of BHD expression also caused a threefold activation of HIF, which was not as a consequence of more HIF1α or HIF2α protein. Transcription of HIF target genes VEGF, BNIP3 and CCND1 was also increased. We found nuclear localization of HIF1α and increased expression of VEGF, BNIP3 and GLUT1 in a chromophobe carcinoma from a Birt-Hogg-Dubé patient. Our data also reveal that UOK257 cells have high lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity. We observed increased expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (a HIF gene target), which in turn leads to increased phosphorylation and inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Together with increased protein levels of GLUT1, our data reveal that UOK257 cells favour glycolytic rather than lipid metabolism (a cancer phenomenon termed the 'Warburg effect'). UOK257 cells also possessed a higher expression level of the L-lactate influx monocarboxylate transporter 1 and consequently utilized L-lactate as a metabolic fuel. As a result of their higher dependency on glycolysis, we were able to selectively inhibit the growth of these UOK257 cells by treatment with 2-deoxyglucose. This work suggests that targeting glycolytic metabolism may be used therapeutically to treat Birt-Hogg-Dubé-associated renal lesions.

  13. [Immune proteasomes in the development of rat immune system].

    PubMed

    Karpova, Ia D; Lyupina, Iu V; Astakhova, T M; Stepanova, A A; Erokhov, P A; Abramova, E B; Sharova, N P

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of the expression of LMP7 and LMP2 proteasome subunits in embryonic and early postnatal development of rat spleen and liver is investigated in comparison with the dynamics of chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like proteasome activities and expression of MHC (major histocompatibility complex) class I molecules. The immune subunits LMP7 and LMP2 distribution in spleen and liver cells in the development process is also studied. A mutual for both organs tendency to the increase of the expression of both LMP7 subunit and LMP2 one on P21 (the 21st postnatal day) as compared to the embryonic period is discovered. However, the total proteasome level is shown to be constant. At definite development stages, the dynamics of immune subunits expression in the spleen and liver was different. In the spleen gradual enhancement of both immune subunits level being detected on P1, P18 and P21, in the liver gradual enhancement periods on E16 (the 16th embryonic day) and E18 changed to the stage of the shrink of immune subunits level on P5. This level did not reliably change till P18 and was augmented on P21. The alterations revealed were accompanied by chymotrypsin-like activity raise and caspase-like activity drop in spleen by P21 as compared with the embryonic period, which proves the enlargement of proteasome ability to form antigenic epitopes for MHC class I molecules. In the liver, both activities increased by P21 in comparison with the embryonic period. Such dynamics of caspase-like activity can be explained not only by the change of proteolytic constitutive and immune subunits, but also by additional regulatory mechanisms. Besides, it is discovered that the increment of immune subunits expression in the early spleen development is connected with the process of successive forming the white pulp by B- and T-lymphocytes enriched by immune subunits. In the liver, the growth of immune subunits level by P21 was accompanied by their expression expansion in hepatocytes, while

  14. A mammalian nervous-system-specific plasma membrane proteasome complex that modulates neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Kapil V; Margolis, Seth S

    2017-04-01

    In the nervous system, rapidly occurring processes such as neuronal transmission and calcium signaling are affected by short-term inhibition of proteasome function. It is unclear how proteasomes are able to acutely regulate such processes, as this action is inconsistent with their canonical role in proteostasis. Here we describe a mammalian nervous-system-specific membrane proteasome complex that directly and rapidly modulates neuronal function by degrading intracellular proteins into extracellular peptides that can stimulate neuronal signaling. This proteasome complex is closely associated with neuronal plasma membranes, exposed to the extracellular space, and catalytically active. Selective inhibition of the membrane proteasome complex by a cell-impermeable proteasome inhibitor blocked the production of extracellular peptides and attenuated neuronal-activity-induced calcium signaling. Moreover, we observed that membrane-proteasome-derived peptides were sufficient to induce neuronal calcium signaling. Our discoveries challenge the prevailing notion that proteasomes function primarily to maintain proteostasis, and highlight a form of neuronal communication that takes place through a membrane proteasome complex.

  15. The Proteasome Distinguishes between Heterotypic and Homotypic Lysine-11-Linked Polyubiquitin Chains.

    PubMed

    Grice, Guinevere L; Lobb, Ian T; Weekes, Michael P; Gygi, Steven P; Antrobus, Robin; Nathan, James A

    2015-07-28

    Proteasome-mediated degradation occurs with proteins principally modified with lysine-48 polyubiquitin chains. Whether the proteasome also can bind atypical ubiquitin chains, including those linked by lysine-11, has not been well established. This is critically important, as lysine-11 polyubiquitination has been implicated in both proteasome-mediated degradation and non-degradative outcomes. Here we demonstrate that pure homotypic lysine-11-linked chains do not bind strongly to the mammalian proteasome. By contrast, heterotypic polyubiquitin chains, containing lysine-11 and lysine-48 linkages, not only bind to the proteasome but also stimulate the proteasomal degradation of the cell-cycle regulator cyclin B1. Thus, while heterotypic lysine-11-linked chains facilitate proteasomal degradation, homotypic lysine-11 linkages adopt conformations that prevent association with the proteasome. Our data demonstrate the capacity of the proteasome to bind ubiquitin chains of distinct topology, with implications for the recognition and diverse biological functions of mixed ubiquitin chains. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. APEH Inhibition Affects Osteosarcoma Cell Viability via Downregulation of the Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Rosanna; Gogliettino, Marta; Cocca, Ennio; Iannitti, Roberta; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Ruvo, Menotti; Balestrieri, Marco; Rossi, Mosè; Palmieri, Gianna

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is a multienzymatic complex that controls the half-life of the majority of intracellular proteins, including those involved in apoptosis and cell-cycle progression. Recently, proteasome inhibition has been shown to be an effective anticancer strategy, although its downregulation is often accompanied by severe undesired side effects. We previously reported that the inhibition of acylpeptide hydrolase (APEH) by the peptide SsCEI 4 can significantly affect the proteasome activity in A375 melanoma or Caco-2 adenocarcinoma cell lines, thus shedding new light on therapeutic strategies based on downstream regulation of proteasome functions. In this work, we investigated the functional correlation between APEH and proteasome in a panel of cancer cell lines, and evaluated the cell proliferation upon SsCEI 4-treatments. Results revealed that SsCEI 4 triggered a proliferative arrest specifically in osteosarcoma U2OS cells via downregulation of the APEH–proteasome system, with the accumulation of the typical hallmarks of proteasome: NF-κB, p21Waf1, and polyubiquitinylated proteins. We found that the SsCEI 4 anti-proliferative effect involved a senescence-like growth arrest without noticeable cytotoxicity. These findings represent an important step toward understanding the mechanism(s) underlying the APEH-mediated downregulation of proteasome in order to design new molecules able to efficiently regulate the proteasome system for alternative therapeutic strategies. PMID:27669226

  17. Protein oxidative modification in the aging organism and the role of the ubiquitin proteasomal system.

    PubMed

    Kastle, Marc; Grune, Tilman

    2011-12-01

    Living in an oxygen containing environment is automatically connected to oxidative stress. Beside lipids and nucleic acids, especially proteins are very susceptible for oxidative modifications. These oxidative modifications comprise alterations of single amino acids, like the formation of protein carbonyls and methionine sulfoxide, or the aggregation of whole proteins. Due to the ongoing accumulation of protein aggregates during the aging process, the cellular protein quality control system becomes more and more overwhelmed. One essential element of the protein quality control machinery is the ubiquitin proteasomal system which plays therefore a crucial part in the aging process, too. Ubiquitination of proteins is a three step mechanism to tag proteins with a polyubiquitin chain for the proteasome. The proteasome is a regulated, barrel-shaped multi-enzyme complex which is responsible for the degradation of proteins. Although there is no drastic loss of all proteasomal subunits during the aging process, there is a functional decline of the proteasome activity in aging organisms. Impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system leads to increasing protein aggregation and cellular death. A lot of age related diseases are closely connected to an inhibition of the proteasome and the formation of large protein aggregates. Especially skin aging, atherosclerosis, age-dependent macula degeneration, cataract formation and several neurodegenerative diseases are directly connected to the decline of proteasome function. This review outlines the connections between aging, oxidative stress and protein oxidation, as well as the influence on the ubiquitin proteasomal system and several associated diseases.

  18. Force Spectroscopy of Substrate Molecules En Route to the Proteasome's Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Classen, Mirjam; Breuer, Sarah; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Guckenberger, Reinhard; Witt, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    We used an atomic force microscope to study the mechanism underlying the translocation of substrate molecules inside the proteasome. Our specific experimental setup allowed us to measure interaction forces between the 20S proteasome and its substrates. The substrate (β-casein) was covalently bound either via a thiol-Au bond or by a PEG-based binding procedure to the atomic force microscope cantilever tip and offered as bait to proteasomes from Methanosarcina mazei. The proteasomes were immobilized densely in an upright orientation on mica, which made their upper pores accessible for substrates to enter. Besides performing conventional single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments, we developed a three-step procedure that allows the detection of specific proteasome-substrate single-molecule events without tip-sample contact. Using the active 20S wild type and an inactive active-site mutant, as well as two casein mutants bound with opposite termini to the microscope tip, we detected no directional preference of the proteasome-substrate interactions. By comparing the distribution of the measured forces for the proteasome-substrate interactions, were observed that a significant proportion of interaction events occurred at higher forces for the active versus the inactive proteasome. These forces can be attributed to the translocation of substrate en route to the active sites that are harbored deep inside the proteasome. PMID:21244845

  19. Osmotic stress inhibits proteasome by p38 MAPK-dependent phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Park, Yoon; Yoon, Sungjoo Kim; Yoon, Jong-Bok

    2010-12-31

    Osmotic stress causes profound perturbations of cell functions. Although the adaptive responses required for cell survival upon osmotic stress are being unraveled, little is known about the effects of osmotic stress on ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. We now report that hyperosmotic stress inhibits proteasome activity by activating p38 MAPK. Osmotic stress increased the level of polyubiquitinated proteins in the cell. The selective p38 inhibitor SB202190 decreased osmotic stress-associated accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins, indicating that p38 MAPK plays an inhibitory role in the ubiquitin proteasome system. Activated p38 MAPK stabilized various substrates of the proteasome and increased polyubiquitinated proteins. Proteasome preparations purified from cells expressing activated p38 MAPK had substantially lower peptidase activities than control proteasome samples. Proteasome phosphorylation sites dependent on p38 were identified by measuring changes in the extent of proteasome phosphorylation in response to p38 MAPK activation. The residue Thr-273 of Rpn2 is the major phosphorylation site affected by p38 MAPK. The mutation T273A in Rpn2 blocked the proteasome inhibition that is mediated by p38 MAPK. These results suggest that p38 MAPK negatively regulates the proteasome activity by phosphorylating Thr-273 of Rpn2.

  20. Differential expression of 26S proteasome subunits and functional activity during neonatal development.

    PubMed

    Claud, Erika C; McDonald, Julie A K; He, Shu-Mei; Yu, Yueyue; Duong, Lily; Sun, Jun; Petrof, Elaine O

    2014-08-29

    Proteasomes regulate many essential cellular processes by degrading intracellular proteins. While aging is known to be associated with dysfunction of the proteasome, there are few reports detailing activity and function of proteasomes in the early stages of life. To elucidate the function and development of mammalian proteasomes, 26S proteasomes were affinity-purified from rat intestine, spleen and liver. The developmental expression of core, regulatory and immunoproteasome subunits was analyzed by immunoblotting and reverse-transcriptase PCR of mRNA subunits, and proteasome catalytic function was determined by fluorogenic enzymatic assays. The expression of core (β2, β5, α7 and β1) and regulatory (Rpt5) subunits was found to be present at low levels at birth and increased over time particularly at weaning. In contrast, while gradual developmental progression of proteasome structure was also seen with the immunoproteasome subunits (β1i, β5i, and β2i), these were not present at birth. Our studies demonstrate a developmental pattern to 26S proteasome activity and subunit expression, with low levels of core proteasome components and absence of immunoproteasomes at birth followed by increases at later developmental stages. This correlates with findings from other studies of a developmental hyporesponsiveness of the adaptive immune system to allow establishment of microbial colonization immediately after birth.

  1. The Cdc48-Vms1 complex maintains 26S proteasome architecture.

    PubMed

    Tran, Joseph R; Brodsky, Jeffrey L

    2014-03-15

    The 26S proteasome is responsible for most regulated protein turnover and for the degradation of aberrant proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this ~2.5 MDa multicatalytic protease requires several dedicated chaperones and, once assembled, substrate selectivity is mediated by ubiquitin conjugation. After modification with ubiquitin, substrates are escorted to the proteasome by myriad factors, including Cdc48 (cell-division cycle 48). Cdc48 also associates with numerous cofactors, but, to date, it is unclear whether each cofactor facilitates proteasome delivery. We discovered that yeast lacking a conserved Cdc48 cofactor, Vms1 [VCP (valosin-containing protein)/Cdc48-associated mitochondrial stress-responsive], accumulate proteasome-targeted ubiquitinated proteins. Vms1 mutant cells also contain elevated levels of unassembled 20S proteasome core particles and select 19S cap subunits. In addition, we found that the ability of Vms1 to support 26S proteasome assembly requires Cdc48 interaction, and that the loss of Vms1 reduced 26S proteasome levels and cell viability after prolonged culture in the stationary phase. The results of the present study highlight an unexpected link between the Cdc48-Vms1 complex and the preservation of proteasome architecture, and indicate how perturbed proteasome assembly affects the turnover of ubiquitinated proteins and maintains viability in aging cells.

  2. Natural Compounds with Proteasome Inhibitory Activity for Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H; Landis-Piwowar, KR.; Chen, D; Milacic, V; Dou, QP

    2012-01-01

    The proteasome is a multicatalytic protease complex that degrades most endogenous proteins including misfolded or damaged proteins to ensure normal cellular function. The ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway plays an essential role in multiuple cellular processes, including cell cycle progression, proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis. It has been shown that human cancer cells are more sensitive to proteasome inhibition than normal cells, indicating that a proteasome inhibitor could be used as a novel anticancer drug. Indeed, this idea has been supported by the encouraging results of the clinical trials using the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a drug approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Several natural compounds, including the microbial metabolite lactacystin, green tea polyphenols, and traditional medicinal triterpenes, have been shown to be potent proteasome inhibitors. These findings suggest the potential use of natural proteasome inhibitors as not only chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents, but also tumor sensitizers to conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In this review, we will summarize the structure and biological activities of the proteasome and several natural compounds with proteasome inhibitory activity, and will discuss the potential use of these compounds for the prevention and treatment of human cancers. PMID:18537678

  3. The Cdc48–Vms1 complex maintains 26S proteasome architecture

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Joseph R.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is responsible for most regulated protein turnover and for the degradation of aberrant proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this ~2.5 MDa multicatalytic protease requires several dedicated chaperones and, once assembled, substrate selectivity is mediated by ubiquitin conjugation. After modification with ubiquitin, substrates are escorted to the proteasome by myriad factors, including Cdc48 (cell-division cycle 48). Cdc48 also associates with numerous cofactors, but, to date, it is unclear whether each cofactor facilitates proteasome delivery. We discovered that yeast lacking a conserved Cdc48 cofactor, Vms1 [VCP (valosin-containing protein)/Cdc48-associated mitochondrial stress-responsive], accumulate proteasome-targeted ubiquitinated proteins. Vms1 mutant cells also contain elevated levels of unassembled 20S proteasome core particles and select 19S cap subunits. In addition, we found that the ability of Vms1 to support 26S proteasome assembly requires Cdc48 interaction, and that the loss of Vms1 reduced 26S proteasome levels and cell viability after prolonged culture in the stationary phase. The results of the present study highlight an unexpected link between the Cdc48–Vms1 complex and the preservation of proteasome architecture, and indicate how perturbed proteasome assembly affects the turnover of ubiquitinated proteins and maintains viability in aging cells. PMID:24351022

  4. The ubiquitin-proteasome system: opportunities for therapeutic intervention in solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    The destruction of proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome system is a multi-step, complex process involving polyubiquitination of substrate proteins, followed by proteolytic degradation by the macromolecular 26S proteasome complex. Inhibitors of the proteasome promote the accumulation of proteins that are deleterious to cell survival, and represent promising anti-cancer agents. In multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma, treatment with the first generation proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, or the second generation inhibitor carfilzomib, has demonstrated significant therapeutic benefit in humans. This has prompted US FDA approval of these agents and development of additional second generation compounds with improved properties. There is considerable interest in extending the benefits of proteasome inhibitors to the treatment of solid tumor malignancies. Herein we review progress that has been made in the preclinical development and clinical evaluation of different proteasome inhibitors in solid tumors. In addition, we describe several novel approaches that are currently being pursued for the treatment of solid tumors, including drug combinatorial strategies incorporating proteasome inhibitors, and the targeting of components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system that are distinct from the 26S proteasome complex. PMID:24659480

  5. Proteasome function is not impaired in healthy aging of the lung.

    PubMed

    Caniard, Anne; Ballweg, Korbinian; Lukas, Christina; Yildirim, Ali Ö; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2015-10-01

    Aging is the progressive loss of cellular function which inevitably leads to death. Failure of proteostasis including the decrease in proteasome function is one hallmark of aging. In the lung, proteasome activity was shown to be impaired in age-related diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, little is known on proteasome function during healthy aging. Here, we comprehensively analyzed healthy lung aging and proteasome function in wildtype, proteasome reporter and immunoproteasome knockout mice. Wildtype mice spontaneously developed senile lung emphysema while expression and activity of proteasome complexes and turnover of ubiquitinated substrates was not grossly altered in lungs of aged mice. Immunoproteasome subunits were specifically upregulated in the aged lung and the caspase-like proteasome activity concomitantly decreased. Aged knockout mice for the LMP2 or LMP7 immunoproteasome subunits showed no alteration in proteasome activities but exhibited typical lung aging phenotypes suggesting that immunoproteasome function is dispensable for physiological lung aging in mice. Our results indicate that healthy aging of the lung does not involve impairment of proteasome function. Apparently, the reserve capacity of the proteostasis systems in the lung is sufficient to avoid severe proteostasis imbalance during healthy aging.

  6. Ubiquitin-proteasome pathway components as therapeutic targets for CNS maladies.

    PubMed

    Upadhya, Sudarshan C; Hegde, Ashok N

    2005-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), abnormal deposition of insoluble protein aggregates or inclusion bodies within nerve cells is commonly observed in association with several neurodegenerative diseases. The ubiquitinated protein aggregates are believed to result from malfunction or overload of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway or from structural changes in the protein substrates which prevent their recognition and degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Impaired proteolysis might also contribute to the synaptic dysfunction seen early in neurodegenerative diseases because the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is known to play a role in normal functioning of synapses. Because specificity of the ubiquitin proteasome mediated proteolysis is determined by specific ubiquitin ligases (E3s), identification of specific E3s and their allosteric modulators are likely to provide effective therapeutic targets for the treatment of several CNS disorders. Another unexplored area for the discovery of drug targets is the proteasome. Although many inhibitors of the proteasome are available, no effective drugs exist that can stimulate the proteasome. Since abnormal protein aggregation is a common feature of different neurodegenerative diseases, enhancement of proteasome activity might be an efficient way to remove the aggregates that accumulate in the brain. In this review, we discuss how the components of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway could be potential targets for therapy of CNS diseases and disorders.

  7. Proteasome function is not impaired in healthy aging of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Christina; Yildirim, Ali Ö.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the progressive loss of cellular function which inevitably leads to death. Failure of proteostasis including the decrease in proteasome function is one hallmark of aging. In the lung, proteasome activity was shown to be impaired in age‐related diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, little is known on proteasome function during healthy aging. Here, we comprehensively analyzed healthy lung aging and proteasome function in wildtype, proteasome reporter and immunoproteasome knockout mice. Wildtype mice spontaneously developed senile lung emphysema while expression and activity of proteasome complexes and turnover of ubiquitinated substrates was not grossly altered in lungs of aged mice. Immunoproteasome subunits were specifically upregulated in the aged lung and the caspase‐like proteasome activity concomitantly decreased. Aged knockout mice for the LMP2 or LMP7 immunoproteasome subunits showed no alteration in proteasome activities but exhibited typical lung aging phenotypes suggesting that immunoproteasome function is dispensable for physiological lung aging in mice. Our results indicate that healthy aging of the lung does not involve impairment of proteasome function. Apparently, the reserve capacity of the proteostasis systems in the lung is sufficient to avoid severe proteostasis imbalance during healthy aging. PMID:26540298

  8. Structural analysis of the dodecameric proteasome activator PafE in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DOE PAGES

    Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Wang, Tong; ...

    2016-03-21

    Here, the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires a proteasome system to cause lethal infections in mice. We recently found that proteasome accessory factor E (PafE, Rv3780) activates proteolysis by the Mtb proteasome independently of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Moreover, PafE contributes to the heat-shock response and virulence of Mtb. Here, we show that PafE subunits formed four-helix bundles similar to those of the eukaryotic ATP-independent proteasome activator subunits of PA26 and PA28. However, unlike any other known proteasome activator, PafE formed dodecamers with 12-fold symmetry, which required a glycine-XXX-glycine-XXX-glycine motif that is not found in previously described activators. Intriguingly, themore » truncation of the PafE carboxyl-terminus resulted in the robust binding of PafE rings to native proteasome core particles and substantially increased proteasomal activity, suggesting that the extended carboxyl-terminus of this cofactor confers suboptimal binding to the proteasome core particle. Collectively, our data show that proteasomal activation is not limited to hexameric ATPases in bacteria.« less

  9. Structural analysis of the dodecameric proteasome activator PafE in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Wang, Tong; Jastrab, Jordan B.; Darwin, K. Heran; Li, Huilin

    2016-01-01

    The human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires a proteasome system to cause lethal infections in mice. We recently found that proteasome accessory factor E (PafE, Rv3780) activates proteolysis by the Mtb proteasome independently of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Moreover, PafE contributes to the heat-shock response and virulence of Mtb. Here, we show that PafE subunits formed four-helix bundles similar to those of the eukaryotic ATP-independent proteasome activator subunits of PA26 and PA28. However, unlike any other known proteasome activator, PafE formed dodecamers with 12-fold symmetry, which required a glycine-XXX-glycine-XXX-glycine motif that is not found in previously described activators. Intriguingly, the truncation of the PafE carboxyl-terminus resulted in the robust binding of PafE rings to native proteasome core particles and substantially increased proteasomal activity, suggesting that the extended carboxyl-terminus of this cofactor confers suboptimal binding to the proteasome core particle. Collectively, our data show that proteasomal activation is not limited to hexameric ATPases in bacteria. PMID:27001842

  10. Structural analysis of the dodecameric proteasome activator PafE in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lin; Hu, Kuan; Wang, Tong; Jastrab, Jordan B; Darwin, K Heran; Li, Huilin

    2016-04-05

    The human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires a proteasome system to cause lethal infections in mice. We recently found that proteasome accessory factor E (PafE, Rv3780) activates proteolysis by the Mtb proteasome independently of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Moreover, PafE contributes to the heat-shock response and virulence of Mtb Here, we show that PafE subunits formed four-helix bundles similar to those of the eukaryotic ATP-independent proteasome activator subunits of PA26 and PA28. However, unlike any other known proteasome activator, PafE formed dodecamers with 12-fold symmetry, which required a glycine-XXX-glycine-XXX-glycine motif that is not found in previously described activators. Intriguingly, the truncation of the PafE carboxyl-terminus resulted in the robust binding of PafE rings to native proteasome core particles and substantially increased proteasomal activity, suggesting that the extended carboxyl-terminus of this cofactor confers suboptimal binding to the proteasome core particle. Collectively, our data show that proteasomal activation is not limited to hexameric ATPases in bacteria.

  11. Hyperhomocysteinemia-induced oxidative stress differentially alters proteasome composition and activities in heart and aorta.

    PubMed

    Derouiche, Faouzia; Bôle-Feysot, Christine; Naïmi, Dalila; Coëffier, Moïse

    2014-09-26

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is associated with cardiovascular diseases and is thought to induce endogenous oxidative stress and causes many cellular damages. Proteasome that degrades oxidized and ubiquitinated proteins can regulate the cellular response to oxidative stress. We aimed to investigate whether hyperhomocysteinemia induces oxidative stress and alters proteasome function and composition in heart and aorta tissues of rat. To create hyperhomocysteinemia, male Wistar rats (Pasteur Institute-Algiers) were received daily intraperitoneal injections of dl-homocysteine (0.6-1.2μM/g body weight) for 3weeks. Biomarkers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT)) were first measured by biochemical methods and tissue damages by histological sections. Proteasome activities were quantitated using fluorogenic synthetic peptides; ubiquitinated proteins and proteasome subunits expression were then evaluated by SDS PAGE and Western blot analysis. We showed increased MDA and PC but decreased SOD and CAT levels both in plasma, heart and aorta accompanied by histological changes. A significant decrease of proteasome activities was observed in heart, whereas proteasome activity was not affected in aorta. However proteasome composition was altered in both tissues, as the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins. Data demonstrated an alteration of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in hyperhomocysteinemia as a result of accumulating oxidized and ubiquitinated proteins in response to oxidative stress. Further studies must be conducted to better understanding mechanisms responsible of proteasome alterations in hyperhomocysteinemia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. KIAA0368-deficiency affects disassembly of 26S proteasome under oxidative stress condition.

    PubMed

    Haratake, Kousuke; Sato, Akitsugu; Tsuruta, Fuminori; Chiba, Tomoki

    2016-06-01

    Many cellular stresses cause damages of intracellular proteins, which are eventually degraded by the ubiquitin and proteasome system. The proteasome is a multicatalytic protease complex composed of 20S core particle and the proteasome activators that regulate the proteasome activity. Extracellular mutants 29 (Ecm29) is a 200 kDa protein encoded by KIAA0368 gene, associates with the proteasome, but its role is largely unknown. Here, we generated KIAA0368-deficient mice and investigated the function of Ecm29 in stress response. KIAA0368-deficient mice showed normal peptidase activity and proteasome formation at normal condition. Under stressed condition, 26S proteasome dissociates in wild-type cells, but not in KIAA0368(-/-) cells. This response was correlated with efficient degradation of damaged proteins and resistance to oxidative stress of KIAA0368(-/-) cells. Thus, Ecm29 is involved in the dissociation process of 26S proteasome, providing clue to analyse the mechanism of proteasomal degradation under various stress condition. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Assembly of an Evolutionarily Conserved Alternative Proteasome Isoform in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Achuth; Vuong, Simone Anh-Thu; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2016-03-29

    Targeted intracellular protein degradation in eukaryotes is largely mediated by the proteasome. Here, we report the formation of an alternative proteasome isoform in human cells, previously found only in budding yeast, that bears an altered subunit arrangement in the outer ring of the proteasome core particle. These proteasomes result from incorporation of an additional α4 (PSMA7) subunit in the position normally occupied by α3 (PSMA4). Assembly of "α4-α4" proteasomes depends on the relative cellular levels of α4 and α3 and on the proteasome assembly chaperone PAC3. The oncogenic tyrosine kinases ABL and ARG and the tumor suppressor BRCA1 regulate cellular α4 levels and formation of α4-α4 proteasomes. Cells primed to assemble α4-α4 proteasomes exhibit enhanced resistance to toxic metal ions. Taken together, our results establish the existence of an alternative mammalian proteasome isoform and suggest a potential role in enabling cells to adapt to environmental stresses. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Structure and function based design of Plasmodium-selective proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; O'Donoghue, Anthony J.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Xie, Stanley C.; Yoo, Euna; Foe, Ian T.; Tilley, Leann; Craik, Charles S.; da Fonseca, Paula C. A.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is a multi-component protease complex responsible for regulating key processes such as the cell cycle and antigen presentation1. Compounds that target the proteasome are potentially valuable tools for the treatment of pathogens that depend on proteasome function for survival and replication. In particular, proteasome inhibitors have been shown to be toxic for the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at all stages of its life cycle2-5. Most compounds that have been tested against the parasite also inhibit the mammalian proteasome resulting in toxicity that precludes their use as therapeutic agents2,6. Therefore, better definition of the substrate specificity and structural properties of the Plasmodium proteasome could enable the development of compounds with sufficient selectivity to allow their use as anti-malarial agents. To accomplish this goal, we used a substrate profiling method to uncover differences in the specificities of the human and P. falciparum proteasome. We designed inhibitors based on amino acid preferences specific to the parasite proteasome, and found that they preferentially inhibit the β 2 subunit. We determined the structure of the P. falciparum 20S proteasome bound to the inhibitor using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single particle analysis, to a resolution of 3.6 Å. These data reveal the unusually open P. falciparum β2 active site and provide valuable information regarding active site architecture that can be used to further refine inhibitor design. Furthermore, consistent with the recent finding that the proteasome is important for stress pathways associated with resistance of artemisinin (ART) family anti-malarials7,8, we observed growth inhibition synergism with low doses of this β 2 selective inhibitor in ART sensitive and resistant parasites. Finally, we demonstrated that a parasite selective inhibitor could be used to attenuate parasite growth in vivo without significant toxicity to the host. Thus, the

  15. Structure- and function-based design of Plasmodium-selective proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; van der Linden, Wouter A; Xie, Stanley C; Yoo, Euna; Foe, Ian T; Tilley, Leann; Craik, Charles S; da Fonseca, Paula C A; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-02-11

    The proteasome is a multi-component protease complex responsible for regulating key processes such as the cell cycle and antigen presentation. Compounds that target the proteasome are potentially valuable tools for the treatment of pathogens that depend on proteasome function for survival and replication. In particular, proteasome inhibitors have been shown to be toxic for the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at all stages of its life cycle. Most compounds that have been tested against the parasite also inhibit the mammalian proteasome, resulting in toxicity that precludes their use as therapeutic agents. Therefore, better definition of the substrate specificity and structural properties of the Plasmodium proteasome could enable the development of compounds with sufficient selectivity to allow their use as anti-malarial agents. To accomplish this goal, here we use a substrate profiling method to uncover differences in the specificities of the human and P. falciparum proteasome. We design inhibitors based on amino-acid preferences specific to the parasite proteasome, and find that they preferentially inhibit the β2-subunit. We determine the structure of the P. falciparum 20S proteasome bound to the inhibitor using cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle analysis, to a resolution of 3.6 Å. These data reveal the unusually open P. falciparum β2 active site and provide valuable information about active-site architecture that can be used to further refine inhibitor design. Furthermore, consistent with the recent finding that the proteasome is important for stress pathways associated with resistance of artemisinin family anti-malarials, we observe growth inhibition synergism with low doses of this β2-selective inhibitor in artemisinin-sensitive and -resistant parasites. Finally, we demonstrate that a parasite-selective inhibitor could be used to attenuate parasite growth in vivo without appreciable toxicity to the host. Thus, the Plasmodium proteasome is a

  16. 20S proteasome activation promotes life span extension and resistance to proteotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chondrogianni, Niki; Georgila, Konstantina; Kourtis, Nikos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Gonos, Efstathios S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is one of the nodal points that need to be preserved to retain physiologic cellular/organismal balance. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the removal of both normal and damaged proteins, with the proteasome being the downstream effector. The proteasome is the major cellular protease with progressive impairment of function during aging and senescence. Despite the documented age-retarding properties of proteasome activation in various cellular models, simultaneous enhancement of the 20S core proteasome content, assembly, and function have never been reported in any multicellular organism. Consequently, the possible effects of the core proteasome modulation on organismal life span are elusive. In this study, we have achieved activation of the 20S proteasome at organismal level. We demonstrate enhancement of proteasome levels, assembly, and activity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, resulting in life span extension and increased resistance to stress. We also provide evidence that the observed life span extension is dependent on the transcriptional activity of Dauer formation abnormal/Forkhead box class O (DAF-16/FOXO), skinhead-1 (SKN-1), and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) factors through regulation of downstream longevity genes. We further show that the reported beneficial effects are not ubiquitous but they are dependent on the genetic context. Finally, we provide evidence that proteasome core activation might be a potential strategy to minimize protein homeostasis deficiencies underlying aggregation-related diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or Huntington’s disease (HD). In summary, this is the first report demonstrating that 20S core proteasome up-regulation in terms of both content and activity is feasible in a multicellular eukaryotic organism and that in turn this modulation promotes extension of organismal health span and life span.—Chondrogianni, N., Georgila, K., Kourtis, N

  17. Subcellular localization of proteasomes and their regulatory complexes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, P; Fuertes, G; Murray, R Z; Bose, S; Knecht, E; Rechsteiner, M C; Hendil, K B; Tanaka, K; Dyson, J; Rivett, J

    2000-01-01

    Proteasomes can exist in several different molecular forms in mammalian cells. The core 20S proteasome, containing the proteolytic sites, binds regulatory complexes at the ends of its cylindrical structure. Together with two 19S ATPase regulatory complexes it forms the 26S proteasome, which is involved in ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. The 20S proteasome can also bind 11S regulatory complexes (REG, PA28) which play a role in antigen processing, as do the three variable gamma-interferon-inducible catalytic beta-subunits (e.g. LMP7). In the present study, we have investigated the subcellular distribution of the different forms of proteasomes using subunit specific antibodies. Both 20S proteasomes and their 19S regulatory complexes are found in nuclear, cytosolic and microsomal preparations isolated from rat liver. LMP7 was enriched approximately two-fold compared with core alpha-type proteasome subunits in the microsomal preparations. 20S proteasomes were more abundant than 26S proteasomes, both in liver and cultured cell lines. Interestingly, some significant differences were observed in the distribution of different subunits of the 19S regulatory complexes. S12, and to a lesser extent p45, were found to be relatively enriched in nuclear fractions from rat liver, and immunofluorescent labelling of cultured cells with anti-p45 antibodies showed stronger labelling in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm. The REG was found to be localized predominantly in the cytoplasm. Three- to six-fold increases in the level of REG were observed following gamma-interferon treatment of cultured cells but gamma-interferon had no obvious effect on its subcellular distribution. These results demonstrate that different regulatory complexes and subpopulations of proteasomes have different distributions within mammalian cells and, therefore, that the distribution is more complex than has been reported for yeast proteasomes. PMID:10657252

  18. The Ubiquitin–Proteasome System of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Finley, Daniel; Ulrich, Helle D.; Sommer, Thomas; Kaiser, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Protein modifications provide cells with exquisite temporal and spatial control of protein function. Ubiquitin is among the most important modifiers, serving both to target hundreds of proteins for rapid degradation by the proteasome, and as a dynamic signaling agent that regulates the function of covalently bound proteins. The diverse effects of ubiquitylation reflect the assembly of structurally distinct ubiquitin chains on target proteins. The resulting ubiquitin code is interpreted by an extensive family of ubiquitin receptors. Here we review the components of this regulatory network and its effects throughout the cell. PMID:23028185

  19. Dysregulation of Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qiuyang; Huang, Timothy; Zhang, Lishan; Zhou, Ying; Luo, Hong; Xu, Huaxi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is one of the major protein degradation pathways, where abnormal UPS function has been observed in cancer and neurological diseases. Many neurodegenerative diseases share a common pathological feature, namely intracellular ubiquitin-positive inclusions formed by aggregate-prone neurotoxic proteins. This suggests that dysfunction of the UPS in neurodegenerative diseases contributes to the accumulation of neurotoxic proteins and to instigate neurodegeneration. Here, we review recent findings describing various aspects of UPS dysregulation in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. PMID:28018215

  20. Proteasomal inhibition causes loss of nigral tyrosine hydroxylase neurons.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Anthony H V; Cleeter, Michael W J; Muddle, John R; Workman, Jane M; Cooper, J Mark; King, Rosalind H M

    2006-08-01

    Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasomal system (UPS) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. The systemic administration of UPS inhibitors has been reported to induce nigrostriatal cell death and model Parkinson's disease pathology in rodents. We administered a synthetic, specific UPS inhibitor (PSI) subcutaneously to rats and quantified substantia nigral tyrosine hydroxylase-positive dopaminergic neurons by stereology. PSI caused a 15% decrease in UPS activity at 2 weeks and a 42% reduction in substantia nigra pars compacta tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons at 8 weeks. Systemic inhibition of the UPS warrants further evaluation as a means to model Parkinson's disease.

  1. Quantitative live-cell imaging reveals spatio-temporal dynamics and cytoplasmic assembly of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Pack, Chan-Gi; Yukii, Haruka; Toh-e, Akio; Kudo, Tai; Tsuchiya, Hikaru; Kaiho, Ai; Sakata, Eri; Murata, Shigeo; Yokosawa, Hideyoshi; Sako, Yasushi; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Tanaka, Keiji; Saeki, Yasushi

    2014-03-06

    The 26S proteasome is a 2.5-MDa multisubunit protease complex that degrades polyubiquitylated proteins. Although its functions and structure have been extensively characterized, little is known about its dynamics in living cells. Here, we investigate the absolute concentration, spatio-temporal dynamics and complex formation of the proteasome in living cells using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We find that the 26S proteasome complex is highly mobile, and that almost all proteasome subunits throughout the cell are stably incorporated into 26S proteasomes. The interaction between 19S and 20S particles is stable even in an importin-α mutant, suggesting that the 26S proteasome is assembled in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, a genetically stabilized 26S proteasome mutant is able to enter the nucleus. These results suggest that the 26S proteasome completes its assembly process in the cytoplasm and translocates into the nucleus through the nuclear pore complex as a holoenzyme.

  2. Molecular characterization and intracellular distribution of the alpha 5 subunit of Trypanosoma cruzi 20S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Bessy; Osorio, Luis; Motta, María Cristina M; Huima-Byron, Telervo; Erdjument-Bromage, Heydeie; Muñoz, Christian; Sagua, Hernán; Mortara, Renato A; Echeverría, Alex; Araya, Jorge E; González, Jorge

    2009-12-01

    Three different monoclonal antibodies were produced against Trypanosona cruzi proteasomes. These antibodies were shown to react with a single 27-kDa band on immunoblots of purified proteasomes. Using a 7E5 monoclonal antibody (IgG1) that recognized the alpha5 subunit of protozoan protease we have studied the intracellular distribution of the T. cruzi 20S proteasome. Contrary to all cell types described to date, T. cruzi 20S proteasome was found not only in the cytoplasm and nucleus but also in the kinetoplast. As revealed by confocal microscopy, the reactivity of monoclonal antibody 7E5 was highly specific for protozoan proteasome because the antibody recognized only the proteasomes from parasites and not those from the mammalian host in T. cruzi infected cells. These findings were confirmed by immunoblots or immunoprecipitations, followed by chymotrypsin-like activity detection in kinetoplasts isolated by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradients. Proteasome 20S was present in all T. cruzi stages and only slight differences in terms of relative abundance were found. The potential role of the proteasome in kinetoplast remodeling remains to be determined.

  3. Proteasome inhibition increases DNA and RNA oxidation in astrocyte and neuron cultures.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qunxing; Dimayuga, Edgardo; Markesbery, William R; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2004-12-01

    Increased levels of nucleic acid oxidation have been described as part of normal brain aging and have been demonstrated to occur in multiple neurological disorders. The basis for increased nucleic acid oxidation in each of these conditions is presently unknown. Proteasome inhibition occurs in a host of neurodegenerative conditions and likely contributes to increased levels of oxidative damage and neurotoxicity. In the present study we demonstrate for the first time the ability of proteasome inhibition to increase the level of nucleic acid oxidation in primary neuron and astrocyte cultures. Administration of proteasome inhibitors (MG262, MG115) at concentrations that do not induce neuron death in the first 24 h of treatment, dramatically increase the levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 8-hydroxyguanosine (8OHG) immunoreactivity in both cell types. Neurons underwent larger increases in nucleic acid oxidation compared to astrocyte cultures. While both DNA and RNA oxidation were observed following proteasome inhibition, RNA appeared to undergo a greater degree of oxidation than DNA. Both 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA were dramatically decreased following proteasome inhibition. Interestingly, an accumulation of unprocessed and/or cross-linked RNA species was observed following proteasome inhibition. Taken together, these data indicate the ability of proteasome inhibition to increase the levels of nucleic acid oxidation in both neurons and astrocytes, and suggest that proteasome inhibition may have deleterious effects on transcription and translation in both neurons and glia.

  4. p62 links the autophagy pathway and the ubiqutin-proteasome system upon ubiquitinated protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei Jing; Ye, Lin; Huang, Wei Fang; Guo, Lin Jie; Xu, Zi Gan; Wu, Hong Luan; Yang, Chen; Liu, Hua Feng

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy are two distinct and interacting proteolytic systems. They play critical roles in cell survival under normal conditions and during stress. An increasing body of evidence indicates that ubiquitinated cargoes are important markers of degradation. p62, a classical receptor of autophagy, is a multifunctional protein located throughout the cell and involved in many signal transduction pathways, including the Keap1-Nrf2 pathway. It is involved in the proteasomal degradation of ubiquitinated proteins. When the cellular p62 level is manipulated, the quantity and location pattern of ubiquitinated proteins change with a considerable impact on cell survival. Altered p62 levels can even lead to some diseases. The proteotoxic stress imposed by proteasome inhibition can activate autophagy through p62 phosphorylation. A deficiency in autophagy may compromise the ubiquitin-proteasome system, since overabundant p62 delays delivery of the proteasomal substrate to the proteasome despite proteasomal catalytic activity being unchanged. In addition, p62 and the proteasome can modulate the activity of HDAC6 deacetylase, thus influencing the autophagic degradation.

  5. Fate of Pup inside the Mycobacterium Proteasome Studied by in-Cell NMR

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Andres Y.; Burz, David S.; Reverdatto, Sergey; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome is required for maximum virulence and to resist killing by the host immune system. The prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein, Pup-GGE, targets proteins for proteasome-mediated degradation. We demonstrate that Pup-GGQ, a precursor of Pup-GGE, is not a substrate for proteasomal degradation. Using STINT-NMR, an in-cell NMR technique, we studied the interactions between Pup-GGQ, mycobacterial proteasomal ATPase, Mpa, and Mtb proteasome core particle (CP) inside a living cell at amino acid residue resolution. We showed that under in-cell conditions, in the absence of the proteasome CP, Pup-GGQ interacts with Mpa only weakly, primarily through its C-terminal region. When Mpa and non-stoichiometric amounts of proteasome CP are present, both the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of Pup-GGQ bind strongly to Mpa. This suggests a mechanism by which transient binding of Mpa to the proteasome CP controls the fate of Pup. PMID:24040288

  6. Inhibitory effects of pesticides on proteasome activity: implication in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Feng; Li, Sharon; Chou, Arthur P; Bronstein, Jeff M

    2006-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested a correlation of pesticides and Parkinson's disease (PD) while genetic and biochemical studies have implicated the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in the pathogenesis of PD. In the present studies, we tested the hypothesis that pesticide exposure increases the risk of developing PD by inhibiting the UPS. The effects of pesticides on proteasome activity were examined in SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells overexpressing a GFP-conjugated proteasome degradation signal, GFP(u). Six out of 25 representative pesticides, including rotenone, ziram, diethyldithiocarbamate, endosulfan, benomyl, and dieldrin, showed inhibitory effects on proteasome activities at low concentrations (10 nM to 10 microM). Unlike proteasome inhibitors, they did not inhibit 20 S proteasome activities in cell lysates. Except for rotenone, the other five pesticides did not induce significantly cellular oxidative stress. The cytotoxic effects of these pesticides were closely correlated with proteasome inhibition. Our results suggest proteasome inhibition as a potential mechanism for the epidemiological association of pesticides and PD.

  7. The aspartyl protease DDI2 activates Nrf1 to compensate for proteasome dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Shun; Irie, Taro; Hirayama, Shoshiro; Sakurai, Yasuyuki; Yashiroda, Hideki; Naguro, Isao; Ichijo, Hidenori; Hamazaki, Jun; Murata, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    In response to proteasome dysfunction, mammalian cells upregulate proteasome gene expression by activating Nrf1. Nrf1 is an endoplasmic reticulum-resident transcription factor that is continually retrotranslocated and degraded by the proteasome. Upon proteasome inhibition, Nrf1 escapes degradation and is cleaved to become active. However, the processing enzyme for Nrf1 remains obscure. Here we show that the aspartyl protease DNA-damage inducible 1 homolog 2 (DDI2) is required to cleave and activate Nrf1. Deletion of DDI2 reduced the cleaved form of Nrf1 and increased the full-length cytosolic form of Nrf1, resulting in poor upregulation of proteasomes in response to proteasome inhibition. These defects were restored by adding back wild-type DDI2 but not protease-defective DDI2. Our results provide a clue for blocking compensatory proteasome synthesis to improve cancer therapies targeting proteasomes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18357.001 PMID:27528193

  8. Nelfinavir augments proteasome inhibition by bortezomib in myeloma cells and overcomes bortezomib and carfilzomib resistance.

    PubMed

    Kraus, M; Bader, J; Overkleeft, H; Driessen, C

    2013-03-01

    HIV protease inhibitors (HIV-PI) are oral drugs for HIV treatment. HIV-PI have antitumor activity via induction of ER-stress, inhibition of phospho-AKT (p-AKT) and the proteasome, suggesting antimyeloma activity. We characterize the effects of all approved HIV-PI on myeloma cells. HIV-PI were compared regarding cytotoxicity, proteasome activity, ER-stress induction and AKT phosphorylation using myeloma cells in vitro. Nelfinavir is the HIV-PI with highest cytotoxic activity against primary myeloma cells and with an IC50 near therapeutic drug blood levels (8-14 μM), irrespective of bortezomib sensitivity. Only nelfinavir inhibited intracellular proteasome activity in situ at drug concentrations <40 μM. Ritonavir, saquinavir and lopinavir inhibited p-AKT comparable to nelfinavir, and showed similar synergistic cytotoxicity with bortezomib against bortezomib-sensitive cells. Nelfinavir had superior synergistic activity with bortezomib/carfilzomib in particular against bortezomib/carfilzomib-resistant myeloma cells. It inhibited not only the proteasomal β1/β5 active sites, similar to bortezomib/carfilzomib, but in addition the β2 proteasome activity not targeted by bortezomib/carfilzomib. Additional inhibition of β2 proteasome activity is known to sensitize cells for bortezomib and carfilzomib. Nelfinavir has unique proteasome inhibiting activity in particular on the bortezomib/carfilzomib-insensitive tryptic (β2) proteasome activity in intact myeloma cells, and is active against bortezomib/carfilzomib-resistant myeloma cells in vitro.

  9. Regulation of Feedback between Protein Kinase A and the Proteasome System Worsens Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiun-Tsai; Chang, Wei-Cheng; Chen, Hui-Mei; Lai, Hsing-Lin; Chen, Chih-Yeh; Tao, Mi-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. Abnormal regulation of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway occurs during HD progression. Here we found that lower PKA activity was associated with proteasome impairment in the striatum for two HD mouse models (R6/2 and N171-82Q) and in mutant HTT (mHTT)-expressing striatal cells. Because PKA regulatory subunits (PKA-Rs) are proteasome substrates, the mHTT-evoked proteasome impairment caused accumulation of PKA-Rs and subsequently inhibited PKA activity. Conversely, activation of PKA enhanced the phosphorylation of Rpt6 (a component of the proteasome), rescued the impaired proteasome activity, and reduced mHTT aggregates. The dominant-negative Rpt6 mutant (Rpt6S120A) blocked the ability of a cAMP-elevating reagent to enhance proteasome activity, whereas the phosphomimetic Rpt6 mutant (Rpt6S120D) increased proteasome activity, reduced HTT aggregates, and ameliorated motor impairment. Collectively, our data demonstrated that positive feedback regulation between PKA and the proteasome is critical for HD pathogenesis. PMID:23275441

  10. The Lysine 48 and Lysine 63 Ubiquitin Conjugates Are Processed Differently by the 26 S Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Andrew D.; Zhang, Nan-Yan; Xu, Ping; Han, Ke-Jun; Noone, Seth; Peng, Junmin; Liu, Chang-Wei

    2009-01-01

    The role of Lys-63 ubiquitin chains in targeting proteins for proteasomal degradation is still obscure. We systematically compared proteasomal processing of Lys-63 ubiquitin chains with that of the canonical proteolytic signal, Lys-48 ubiquitin chains. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of ubiquitin chains in HeLa cells determines that the levels of Lys-63 ubiquitin chains are insensitive to short-time proteasome inhibition. Also, the Lys-48/Lys-63 ratio in the 26 S proteasome-bound fraction is 1.7-fold more than that in the cell lysates, likely because some cellular Lys-63 ubiquitin conjugates are sequestered by Lys-63 chain-specific binding proteins. In vitro, Lys-48 and Lys-63 ubiquitin chains bind the 26 S proteasome comparably, whereas Lys-63 chains are deubiquitinated 6-fold faster than Lys-48 chains. Also, Lys-63 tetraubiquitin-conjugated UbcH10 is rapidly deubiquitinated into the monoubiquitinated form, whereas Lys-48 tetraubiquitin targets UbcH10 for degradation. Furthermore, we found that both the ubiquitin aldehyde- and 1,10-phenanthroline-sensitive deubiquitinating activities of the 26 S proteasome contribute to Lys-48- and Lys-63-linkage deubiquitination, albeit the inhibitory extents are different. Together, our findings suggest that compared with Lys-48 chains, cellular Lys-63 chains have less proteasomal accessibility, and proteasome-bound Lys-63 chains are more rapidly deubiquitinated, which could cause inefficient degradation of Lys-63 conjugates. PMID:19858201

  11. The proteasome pathway destabilizes Yersinia outer protein E and represses its antihost cell activities.

    PubMed

    Ruckdeschel, Klaus; Pfaffinger, Gudrun; Trülzsch, Konrad; Zenner, Gerhardt; Richter, Kathleen; Heesemann, Jürgen; Aepfelbacher, Martin

    2006-05-15

    Pathogenic Yersinia spp. neutralize host defense mechanisms by engaging a type III protein secretion system that translocates several Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into the host cell. Although the modulation of the cellular responses by individual Yops has been intensively studied, little is known about the fate of the translocated Yops inside the cell. In this study, we investigated involvement of the proteasome, the major nonlysosomal proteolytic system in eukaryotic cells, in Yop destabilization and repression. Our data show that inhibition of the proteasome in Yersinia enterocolitica-infected cells selectively stabilized the level of YopE, but not of YopH or YopP. In addition, YopE was found to be modified by ubiquitination. This suggests that the cytotoxin YopE is physiologically subjected to degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway inside the host cell. Importantly, the increased levels of YopE upon proteasome inhibition were associated with decreased activity of its cellular target Rac. Thus, the GTPase-down-regulating function of YopE is enhanced when the proteasome is inhibited. The stabilization of YopE by proteasome inhibitor treatment furthermore led to aggravation of the cytotoxic YopE effects on the actin cytoskeleton and on host cell morphology. Together, these data show that the host cell proteasome functions to destabilize and inactivate the Yersinia effector protein YopE. This implies the proteasome as integral part of the cellular host immune response against the immunomodulatory activities of a translocated bacterial virulence protein.

  12. Wheat sprout extract-induced apoptosis in human cancer cells by proteasomes modulation.

    PubMed

    Bonfili, Laura; Amici, Manila; Cecarini, Valentina; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Tacconi, Rosalia; Angeletti, Mauro; Fioretti, Evandro; Keller, Jeffrey N; Eleuteri, Anna Maria

    2009-09-01

    Natural occurring modulators of proteasome functionality are extensively investigated for their implication in cancer therapy. On the basis of our previous evidences both on proteasomal inhibition by monomeric polyphenols, and on the characterization of wheat sprout hydroalcoholic extract, herein we thoroughly report on a comparative study of the effect of wheat sprout extract on both normal and tumour cells. Treatment of isolated 20S proteasomes with wheat sprout extracts induced a gradual inhibition of all proteasome activities. Next, two wheat sprout extract components were separated: a polyphenol and a protein fraction. Both components exerted an in vitro inhibitory effect on proteasome activity. HeLa tumour cells and FHs 74 Int normal cells were exposed to both fractions, resulting in different rates of proteasome inhibition, with tumour cells showing a significantly higher degree of proteasome impairment and apoptosis induction. Furthermore, a decrease in proteasome activities and in cell survival of the human plasmacytoma RPMI 8226 cell line, upon the same treatments, was observed. Collectively, our results provide additional evidences supporting the possible use of natural extracts as coadjuvants in cancer treatments.

  13. Prokaryotic Ubiquitin-Like Protein Provides a Two-Part Degron to Mycobacterium Proteasome Substrates▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Kristin E.; Pearce, Michael J.; Darwin, K. Heran

    2010-01-01

    Prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup) is a posttranslational modifier that targets proteins for degradation by the mycobacterial proteasome. We show that the disordered amino terminus of Pup is required for degradation, while the helical carboxyl terminus mediates its attachment to proteins. Thus, Pup has distinct regions that either interact with pupylation enzymes or initiate proteasomal degradation. PMID:20233925

  14. Ciliopathy proteins regulate paracrine signaling by modulating proteasomal degradation of mediators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangfan P; Tsai, I-Chun; Morleo, Manuela; Oh, Edwin C; Leitch, Carmen C; Massa, Filomena; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Parker, David S; Finley, Daniel; Zaghloul, Norann A; Franco, Brunella; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    Cilia are critical mediators of paracrine signaling; however, it is unknown whether proteins that contribute to ciliopathies converge on multiple paracrine pathways through a common mechanism. Here, we show that loss of cilopathy-associated proteins Bardet-Biedl syndrome 4 (BBS4) or oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 (OFD1) results in the accumulation of signaling mediators normally targeted for proteasomal degradation. In WT cells, several BBS proteins and OFD1 interacted with proteasomal subunits, and loss of either BBS4 or OFD1 led to depletion of multiple subunits from the centrosomal proteasome. Furthermore, overexpression of proteasomal regulatory components or treatment with proteasomal activators sulforaphane (SFN) and mevalonolactone (MVA) ameliorated signaling defects in cells lacking BBS1, BBS4, and OFD1, in morphant zebrafish embryos, and in induced neurons from Ofd1-deficient mice. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that other proteasome-dependent pathways not known to be associated with ciliopathies are defective in the absence of ciliopathy proteins. We found that loss of BBS1, BBS4, or OFD1 led to decreased NF-κB activity and concomitant IκBβ accumulation and that these defects were ameliorated with SFN treatment. Taken together, our data indicate that basal body proteasomal regulation governs paracrine signaling pathways and suggest that augmenting proteasomal function might benefit ciliopathy patients.

  15. Structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome and mechanism of inhibition by a peptidyl boronate

    SciTech Connect

    Hu,G.; Lin, G.; Wang, M.; Dick, L.; Xu, R.; Nathan, C.; Li, H.

    2006-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has the remarkable ability to resist killing by human macrophages. The 750 kDa proteasome, not available in most eubacteria except Actinomycetes, appears to contribute to Mtb's resistance. The crystal structure of the Mtb proteasome at 3.0 Angstroms resolution reveals a substrate-binding pocket with composite features of the distinct {beta}1, {beta}2 and {beta}5 substrate binding sites of eukaryotic proteasomes, accounting for the broad specificity of the Mtb proteasome towards oligopeptides described in the companion article [Lin et al. (2006), Mol Microbiol doi:10.1111/j.1365-2958.2005.05035.x]. The substrate entrance at the end of the cylindrical proteasome appears open in the crystal structure due to partial disorder of the a-subunit N-terminal residues. However, cryo-electron microscopy of the core particle reveals a closed end, compatible with the density observed in negative-staining electron microscopy that depended on the presence of the N-terminal octapeptides of the a-subunits in the companion article, suggesting that the Mtb proteasome has a gated structure. We determine for the first time the proteasomal inhibition mechanism of the dipeptidyl boronate N-(4-morpholine)carbonyl-{beta}-(1-naphthyl)-l-alanine-l-leucine boronic acid (MLN-273), an analogue of the antimyeloma drug bortezomib. The structure improves prospects for designing Mtb-specific proteasomal inhibitors as a novel approach to chemotherapy of tuberculosis.

  16. Proteasome activation during cardiac hypertrophy by the chaperone H11 Kinase/Hsp22.

    PubMed

    Hedhli, Nadia; Wang, Li; Wang, Qian; Rashed, Eman; Tian, Yimin; Sui, Xiangzhen; Madura, Kiran; Depre, Christophe

    2008-02-01

    The regulation of protein degradation by the proteasome during cardiac hypertrophy remains largely unknown. Also, the proteasome translocates to the nuclear periphery in response to cellular stress in yeast, which remains unexplored in mammals. The purpose of this study was to determine the quantitative and qualitative adaptation of the proteasome during stable cardiac hypertrophy. We measured proteasome activity, expression and sub-cellular distribution in a model of chronic cardiac hypertrophy induced by the stress-response chaperone H11 Kinase/Hsp22 (Hsp22). Over-expression of Hsp22 in a transgenic (TG) mouse leads to a 30% increase in myocyte cross-sectional area compared to wild-type (WT) mice (P < 0.01). Characterization of the proteasome in hearts from TG mice vs. WT revealed an increased expression of both 19S and 20S subunits (P < 0.05), a doubling in 20S catalytic activity (P < 0.01), a redistribution of both subunits from the cytosol to the nuclear periphery, and a four-fold increase in nuclear-associated 20S catalytic activity (P < 0.001). The perinuclear proteasome co-localized and interacted with Hsp22. Inhibition of proteasome activity by epoxomicin reduced hypertrophy in TG by 50% (P < 0.05). Adeno-mediated over-expression of Hsp22 in isolated cardiac myocytes increased both cell growth and proteasome activity, and both were prevented upon inhibition of the proteasome. Similarly, stimulation of cardiac cell growth by pro-hypertrophic stimuli increased Hsp22 expression and proteasome activity, and proteasome inhibition in that setting prevented hypertrophy. Proteasome inhibitors also prevented the increase in rate of protein synthesis observed after over-expression of Hsp22 or upon addition of pro-hypertrophic stimuli. Hsp22-mediated cardiac hypertrophy promotes an increased expression and activity, and a subcellular redistribution of the proteasome. Inhibition of the proteasome reverses cardiac hypertrophy upon Hsp22 over-expression or upon

  17. Comparative study of the biochemical properties of proteasomes in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Raule, Mary; Cerruti, Fulvia; Cascio, Paolo

    2015-07-15

    Information on the biochemical properties of proteasomes is lacking or, at best, only fragmentary for most species of veterinary interest. Moreover, direct comparison of the limited data available on the enzymatic features of proteasomes in domestic animals is rendered difficult due to the heterogeneity of the experimental settings used. This represents a clear drawback in veterinary research, given the crucial involvement of proteasomes in control of several physiological and pathological processes. We performed the first comparative analysis of key biochemical properties of proteasomes obtained from 8 different domestic mammals. Specifically, we investigated the three main peptidase activities of constitutive and immunoproteasomes in parallel and systematically checked the sensitivity of the chymotryptic site to three of the most potent and selective inhibitors available. Overall, there was substantial similarity in the enzymatic features of proteasomes among the species examined, although some interesting species-specific features were observed.

  18. Physical and functional association of RNA polymerase II and the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Gillette, Thomas G.; Gonzalez, Fernando; Delahodde, Agnes; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Kodadek, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies from a number of laboratories have revealed a surprising number of connections between RNA polymerase II transcription and the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. We now find yet another intersection of these pathways by showing that the 26S proteasome associates with regions of the GAL1, GAL10, and HSP82 genes, including the 3′ ends, in a transcription-dependent fashion. The appearance of the proteasome on these inducible genes correlates with both the accumulation of transcripts and the buildup of RNA polymerase II complexes in the same region. Furthermore, the 26S proteasome and RNA polymerase II coimmunoprecipitate, and inhibition of 26S proteolytic activity leads to increased read through of a transcription termination site. We suggest that the proteasome is generally recruited to the DNA at sites of stalled RNA polymerase and may act to resolve these complexes. PMID:15069196

  19. Structural Insights into the Regulatory Particle of the Proteasome from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.; Hu, M; Tian, G; Zhang, P; Finley, D; Jeffrey, P; Shi, Y

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic proteasome consists of a core particle (CP), which degrades unfolded protein, and a regulatory particle (RP), which is responsible for recognition, ATP-dependent unfolding, and translocation of polyubiquitinated substrate protein. In the archaea Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, the RP is a homohexameric complex of proteasome-activating nucleotidase (PAN). Here, we report the crystal structures of essential elements of the archaeal proteasome: the CP, the ATPase domain of PAN, and a distal subcomplex that is likely the first to encounter substrate. The distal subcomplex contains a coiled-coil segment and an OB-fold domain, both of which appear to be conserved in the eukaryotic proteasome. The OB domains of PAN form a hexameric ring with a 13 A pore, which likely constitutes the outermost constriction of the substrate translocation channel. These studies reveal structural codes and architecture of the complete proteasome, identify potential substrate-binding sites, and uncover unexpected asymmetry in the RP of archaea and eukaryotes.

  20. Parkin mediates proteasome-dependent protein degradation and rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Saori R; Kishi, Chieko; Ishihara, Naotada; Mizushima, Noboru

    2011-06-03

    Upon mitochondrial depolarization, Parkin, a Parkinson disease-related E3 ubiquitin ligase, translocates from the cytosol to mitochondria and promotes their degradation by mitophagy, a selective type of autophagy. Here, we report that in addition to mitophagy, Parkin mediates proteasome-dependent degradation of outer membrane proteins such as Tom20, Tom40, Tom70, and Omp25 of depolarized mitochondria. By contrast, degradation of the inner membrane and matrix proteins largely depends on mitophagy. Furthermore, Parkin induces rupture of the outer membrane of depolarized mitochondria, which also depends on proteasomal activity. Upon induction of mitochondrial depolarization, proteasomes are recruited to mitochondria in the perinuclear region. Neither proteasome-dependent degradation of outer membrane proteins nor outer membrane rupture is required for mitophagy. These results suggest that Parkin regulates degradation of outer and inner mitochondrial membrane proteins differently through proteasome- and mitophagy-dependent pathways.

  1. Distinct temporal requirements for autophagy and the proteasome in yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fu-ping; Guo, Yue-shuai; Hu, Yang; Liu, Wei-xiao; Wang, Qian; Wang, Yuan-ting; Yu, Hai-Yan; Tang, Chao-ming; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Tao; Xie, Zhi-ping; Sha, Jia-hao; Guo, Xuejiang; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a special type of cellular renovation that involves 2 successive cell divisions and a single round of DNA replication. Two major degradation systems, the autophagy-lysosome and the ubiquitin-proteasome, are involved in meiosis, but their roles have yet to be elucidated. Here we show that autophagy mainly affects the initiation of meiosis but not the nuclear division. Autophagy works not only by serving as a dynamic recycling system but also by eliminating some negative meiotic regulators such as Ego4 (Ynr034w-a). In a quantitative proteomics study, the proteasome was found to be significantly upregulated during meiotic divisions. We found that proteasomal activity is essential to the 2 successive meiotic nuclear divisions but not for the initiation of meiosis. Our study defines the roles of autophagy and the proteasome in meiosis: Autophagy mainly affects the initiation of meiosis, whereas the proteasome mainly affects the 2 successive meiotic divisions.

  2. Proteasome involvement in a complex cascade mediating SigT degradation during differentiation of Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xu-Ming; Ren, Ni-Ni; Sun, Ning; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Ri-Cheng; Tang, Yi; Li, Yong-Quan

    2014-02-14

    In Streptomyces coelicolor, the ECF sigma factor SigT negatively regulates cell differentiation, and is degraded by ClpP protease in a dual positive feedback manner. Here we further report that the proteasome is required for degradation of SigT, but not for degradation of its anti-sigma factor RstA, and RstA can protect SigT from degradation independent of the proteasome. Meanwhile, deletion of the proteasome showed reduced production of secondary metabolites, and the fermentation medium from wild type could promote SigT degradation. Furthermore, overexpression of redD or actII-orf4 in the proteasome-deficiency mutant resulted in SigT degradation and over-production of both undecylprodigiosin and actinorhodin. Therefore the proteasome is required for SigT degradation by affecting the production of secondary metabolites during cell differentiation.

  3. Proteasome inhibition enhances resistance to DNA damage via upregulation of Rpn4-dependent DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Karpov, Dmitry S; Spasskaya, Daria S; Tutyaeva, Vera V; Mironov, Alexander S; Karpov, Vadim L

    2013-09-17

    The 26S proteasome is an ATP-dependent multi-subunit protease complex and the major regulator of intracellular protein turnover and quality control. However, its role in the DNA damage response is controversial. We addressed this question in yeast by disrupting the transcriptional regulation of the PRE1 proteasomal gene. The mutant strain has decreased proteasome activity and is hyper-resistant to various DNA-damaging agents. We found that Rpn4-target genes MAG1, RAD23, and RAD52 are overexpressed in this strain due to Rpn4 stabilisation. These genes represent three different pathways of base excision, nucleotide excision and double strand break repair by homologous recombination (DSB-HR). Consistently, the proteasome mutant displays increased DSB-HR activity. Our data imply that the proteasome may have a negative role in DNA damage response.

  4. Inhibition of Proteasome Activity Impairs Centrosome-dependent Microtubule Nucleation and Organization

    PubMed Central

    Didier, Christine; Merdes, Andreas; Gairin, Jean-Edouard

    2008-01-01

    Centrosomes are dynamic organelles that consist of a pair of cylindrical centrioles, surrounded by pericentriolar material. The pericentriolar material contains factors that are involved in microtubule nucleation and organization, and its recruitment varies during the cell cycle. We report here that proteasome inhibition in HeLa cells induces the accumulation of several proteins at the pericentriolar material, including gamma-tubulin, GCP4, NEDD1, ninein, pericentrin, dynactin, and PCM-1. The effect of proteasome inhibition on centrosome proteins does not require intact microtubules and is reversed after removal of proteasome inhibitors. This accrual of centrosome proteins is paralleled by accumulation of ubiquitin in the same area and increased polyubiquitylation of nonsoluble gamma-tubulin. Cells that have accumulated centrosome proteins in response to proteasome inhibition are impaired in microtubule aster formation. Our data point toward a role of the proteasome in the turnover of centrosome proteins, to maintain proper centrosome function. PMID:18094058

  5. Inhibition of proteasome activity impairs centrosome-dependent microtubule nucleation and organization.

    PubMed

    Didier, Christine; Merdes, Andreas; Gairin, Jean-Edouard; Jabrane-Ferrat, Nabila

    2008-03-01

    Centrosomes are dynamic organelles that consist of a pair of cylindrical centrioles, surrounded by pericentriolar material. The pericentriolar material contains factors that are involved in microtubule nucleation and organization, and its recruitment varies during the cell cycle. We report here that proteasome inhibition in HeLa cells induces the accumulation of several proteins at the pericentriolar material, including gamma-tubulin, GCP4, NEDD1, ninein, pericentrin, dynactin, and PCM-1. The effect of proteasome inhibition on centrosome proteins does not require intact microtubules and is reversed after removal of proteasome inhibitors. This accrual of centrosome proteins is paralleled by accumulation of ubiquitin in the same area and increased polyubiquitylation of nonsoluble gamma-tubulin. Cells that have accumulated centrosome proteins in response to proteasome inhibition are impaired in microtubule aster formation. Our data point toward a role of the proteasome in the turnover of centrosome proteins, to maintain proper centrosome function.

  6. The use of mass spectrometry to identify antigens from proteasome processing.

    PubMed

    Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Claverol, Stéphane; Gairin, Jean Edouard; Monsarrat, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool for the characterization of antigenic peptides that play a major role in the immune system. Most of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I peptides are generated during the degradation of intracellular proteins by the proteasome, a catalytic complex present in all eukaryotic cells. This chapter focuses on the contribution of MS to the understanding of the mechanisms of antigen processing by the proteasome. This knowledge may be valuable for the design of specific inhibitors of proteasome, which has recently been recognized as a therapeutic target in cancer therapies and for the development of efficient peptidic vaccines in immunotherapies. Examples from the literature have been chosen to illustrate how MS data can contribute first to the understanding of the mechanisms of proteasomal processing and, second, to the understanding of the crucial role of proteasome in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) activation. The general strategy based on MS analyses used in these studies is also described.

  7. Distinct temporal requirements for autophagy and the proteasome in yeast meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Fu-Ping; Guo, Yue-Shuai; Hu, Yang; Liu, Wei-Xiao; Wang, Qian; Wang, Yuan-Ting; Yu, Hai-Yan; Tang, Chao-Ming; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Tao; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Sha, Jia-Hao; Guo, Xuejiang; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Meiosis is a special type of cellular renovation that involves 2 successive cell divisions and a single round of DNA replication. Two major degradation systems, the autophagy-lysosome and the ubiquitin-proteasome, are involved in meiosis, but their roles have yet to be elucidated. Here we show that autophagy mainly affects the initiation of meiosis but not the nuclear division. Autophagy works not only by serving as a dynamic recycling system but also by eliminating some negative meiotic regulators such as Ego4 (Ynr034w-a). In a quantitative proteomics study, the proteasome was found to be significantly upregulated during meiotic divisions. We found that proteasomal activity is essential to the 2 successive meiotic nuclear divisions but not for the initiation of meiosis. Our study defines the roles of autophagy and the proteasome in meiosis: Autophagy mainly affects the initiation of meiosis, whereas the proteasome mainly affects the 2 successive meiotic divisions. PMID:27050457

  8. Proteasome Activity Is Affected by Fluctuations in Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Sbardella, Diego; Tundo, Grazia Raffaella; Sciandra, Francesca; Bozzi, Manuela; Gioia, Magda; Ciaccio, Chiara; Tarantino, Umberto; Brancaccio, Andrea; Coletta, Massimo; Marini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-Degrading-Enzyme (IDE) is a Zn2+-dependent peptidase highly conserved throughout evolution and ubiquitously distributed in mammalian tissues wherein it displays a prevalent cytosolic localization. We have recently demonstrated a novel Heat Shock Protein-like behaviour of IDE and its association with the 26S proteasome. In the present study, we examine the mechanistic and molecular features of IDE-26S proteasome interaction in a cell experimental model, extending the investigation also to the effect of IDE on the enzymatic activities of the 26S proteasome. Further, kinetic investigations indicate that the 26S proteasome activity undergoes a functional modulation by IDE through an extra-catalytic mechanism. The IDE-26S proteasome interaction was analyzed during the Heat Shock Response and we report novel findings on IDE intracellular distribution that might be of critical relevance for cell metabolism. PMID:26186340

  9. A mass spectrometry platform for a streamlined investigation of proteasome integrity, posttranslational modifications, and inhibitor binding.

    PubMed

    Gersch, Malte; Hackl, Mathias W; Dubiella, Christian; Dobrinevski, Alexander; Groll, Michael; Sieber, Stephan A

    2015-03-19

    The proteasome is responsible for the majority of protein degradation within eukaryotic cells and proteasome inhibitors have gained blockbuster status as anticancer drugs. Here, we introduce an analytical platform comprising reverse phase chromatography, intact protein mass spectrometry, and customized data analysis that allows a streamlined investigation of proteasome integrity and posttranslational modifications. We report the complete mass spectrometric assignment of all subunits of the yeast core particle, as well as of the human constitutive 20S proteasome and the human immunoproteasome, including phosphorylated isoforms of α7. Importantly, we found several batches of commercially available immunoproteasome to also contain constitutive catalytic subunits. Moreover, we applied the method to study the binding mechanisms of proteasome inhibitors, both validating the approach and providing a direct readout of subunit preferences complementary to biochemical methods. Collectively, our platform facilitates an easy, reliable and comprehensive detection of different types of covalent modifications on multisubunit protein complexes with high accuracy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of sperm proteasomes during sperm aster formation and early zygote development: implications for fertilization failure in humans.

    PubMed

    Rawe, Vanesa Y; Díaz, Emilce S; Abdelmassih, Roger; Wójcik, Cezary; Morales, Patricio; Sutovsky, Peter; Chemes, Héctor E

    2008-03-01

    BACKGROUND Sperm aster organization during bovine and human fertilization requires a paternally-derived centriole that must first disengage from the sperm tail connecting-piece. We investigated the participation of the 26S proteasome in this process. METHODS Proteasome localization and enzymatic activity were studied in normal and pathological human spermatozoa by immunocytochemistry and enzyme-substrate assays. The role of proteasomes during bovine zygote development was investigated using a pharmacological proteasome-inhibitor, MG132, and with anti-proteasome antibodies delivered by Streptolysin O-permeabilization or with the Chariot reagent. Human zygotes discarded after ICSI failures (n = 28) were also examined. RESULTS Proteasomes were localized in the sperm acrosome and connecting-piece, as well as in the pronuclei of bovine and human zygotes. Proteasomal enzymatic activities were decreased in defective human spermatozoa. Disrupted sperm aster formation and pronuclear development were found after pharmacological and immunological block of proteasomes in human/bovine spermatozoa and oocytes, as well as in 28 discarded human post-ICSI fertilization failures. CONCLUSIONS Specific proteasome inhibition disrupts sperm aster formation and pronuclear development/apposition in bovine and human zygotes. Human spermatozoa with defective centriolar/pericentriolar structures have decreased proteasomal enzymatic activity. Release of a functional sperm centriole that acts as a zygote microtubule-organizing center probably relies on selective proteasomal proteolysis. These findings suggest an important role of sperm proteasomes in zygotic development.

  11. Degrasyn activates proteasomal-dependent degradation of c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey; Talpaz, Moshe; Bornmann, William; Kong, Ling-Yuan; Donato, Nicholas J

    2007-04-15

    c-Myc is a highly unstable transcription factor whose deregulation and increased expression are associated with cancer. Degrasyn, a small synthetic molecule, induces rapid degradation of c-Myc protein in MM-1 multiple myeloma and other tumor cell lines. Destruction of c-Myc by degrasyn requires the presence of a region of c-Myc between amino acid residues 316 and 378 that has not previously been associated with c-Myc stability. Degrasyn-induced degradation of c-Myc depends on proteasomes but is independent of the degron regions previously shown to be important for ubiquitin-mediated targeting and proteasomal destruction of the protein. Degrasyn-dependent c-Myc proteolysis is not mediated by any previously identified c-Myc regulatory mechanism, does not require new protein synthesis, and does not depend on the nuclear localization of c-Myc. Degrasyn reduced c-Myc levels in A375 melanoma cells and in A375 tumors in nude mice, and this activity correlated with tumor growth inhibition. Together, these results suggest that degrasyn reduces the stability of c-Myc in vitro and in vivo through a unique signaling process that uses c-Myc domains not previously associated with c-Myc regulation.

  12. The ubiquitin proteasome system in Caenorhabditis elegans and its regulation☆

    PubMed Central

    Papaevgeniou, Nikoletta; Chondrogianni, Niki

    2014-01-01

    Protein degradation constitutes a major cellular function that is responsible for maintenance of the normal cellular physiology either through the degradation of normal proteins or through the elimination of damaged proteins. The Ubiquitin–Proteasome System (UPS)1 is one of the main proteolytic systems that orchestrate protein degradation. Given that up- and down- regulation of the UPS system has been shown to occur in various normal (such as ageing) and pathological (such as neurodegenerative diseases) processes, the exogenous modulation of the UPS function and activity holds promise of (a) developing new therapeutic interventions against various diseases and (b) establishing strategies to maintain cellular homeostasis. Since the proteasome genes are evolutionarily conserved, their role can be dissected in simple model organisms, such as the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. In this review, we survey findings on the redox regulation of the UPS in C. elegans showing that the nematode is an instrumental tool in the identification of major players in the UPS pathway. Moreover, we specifically discuss UPS-related genes that have been modulated in the nematode and in human cells and have resulted in similar effects thus further exhibiting the value of this model in the study of the UPS. PMID:24563851

  13. Ubiquitin, Proteasomes and Proteolytic Mechanisms Activated by Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Vik; Mitch, William E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) includes 3 enzymes that conjugate ubiquitin to intracellular proteins that are then recognized and degraded in the proteasome. The process participates in the regulation of cell metabolism. In the kidney, the UPS regulates the turnover of transporters and signaling proteins and its activity is down regulated in acidosis-induced proximal tubular cell hypertrophy. In chronic kidney disease (CKD), muscle wasting occurs because complications of CKD including acidosis, insulin resistance, inflammation, and increased angiotensin II levels stimulate the UPS to degrade muscle proteins. This response also includes caspase-3 and calpains which act to cleave muscle proteins to provide substrates for the UPS. For example, caspase-3 degrades actomyosin, leaving a 14kD fragment of actin in muscle. The 14 kD actin fragment is increased in muscle of patient with kidney disease, burn injury and surgery. In addition, acidosis, insulin resistance, inflammation and angiotensin II stimulate glucocorticoid production. Glucocorticoids are also required for the muscle wasting that occurs in CKD. Thus, the UPS is involved in regulating kidney function and participates in highly organized responses that degrade muscle protein in response to loss of kidney function. PMID:18723090

  14. Oxidative stress and proteasome inhibitors in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Lipchick, Brittany C; Fink, Emily E; Nikiforov, Mikhail A

    2016-03-01

    Multiple myeloma is a form of plasma cell neoplasm that accounts for approximately 10% of all hematological malignancies. Recently, several novel drugs have been discovered that almost doubled the overall survival of multiple myeloma patients. One of these drugs, the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (Velcade) has demonstrated remarkable response rates in multiple myeloma patients, and yet, currently this disease remains incurable. The major factor undermining the success of multiple myeloma treatment is a rapidly emerging resistance to the available therapy. Thus, the development of stand-alone or adjuvant anti-myeloma agents becomes of paramount importance. Overproduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) often accompanies malignant transformation due to oncogene activation and/or enhanced metabolism in tumor cells. As a result, these cells possess higher levels of ROS and lower levels of antioxidant molecules compared to their normal counterparts. Unbalanced production of ROS leads to oxidative stress which, if left unchecked, could be toxic for the cell. In multiple myeloma cells where high rates of immunoglobulin synthesis is an additional factor contributing to overproduction of ROS, further induction of oxidative stress can be an effective strategy to cope with this disease. Here we will review the available data on the role of oxidative stress in the cytotoxicity of proteasome inhibitors and the use of ROS-inducing compounds as anti-myeloma agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Normoxic destabilization of ATF-4 depends on proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Wottawa, M; Köditz, J; Katschinski, D M

    2010-04-01

    Hypoxia-inducible gene expression is an important physiological adaptive mechanism in response to a decreased oxygen supply. We have recently described an oxygen- and prolyl-4-hydroxylase (PHD)3-dependent stabilization of the activating transcription factor 4 (ATF-4). The aim of the present study was to examine if the normoxic destabilization of ATF-4 is regulated by oxygen-dependent proteasomal degradation. We determined poly-ubiquitination of ATF-4 in normoxia compared to hypoxia by immunoprecipitation and immunoblots. Furthermore, we analysed the expression of the ATF-4 target gene GADD153 as a function of oxygen concentration. ATF-4 protein levels were not detectable in normoxia. Normoxic degradation correlated with an oxygen-dependent poly-ubiquitination of ATF-4, which was hindered by hypoxic incubation of the cells. As a result of hypoxia, GADD153 was expressed. The hypoxic GADD153 expression was attenuated or increased by transfecting the cells with ATF-4 siRNA or PHD3 siRNA respectively. Our results demonstrate the involvement of oxygen-dependent proteasomal degradation of ATF-4 in the hypoxia-induced expression of GADD153. Taken together, hypoxia/PHD3-regulated stabilization of ATF-4 by hindering oxygen-dependent degradation may play a critical role in linking cell fate decisions to oxygen availability.

  16. Proteasome inhibitors in multiple myeloma: 10 years later

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Paul G.; Cavo, Michele; Orlowski, Robert Z.; San Miguel, Jesús F.; Palumbo, Antonio; Harousseau, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Proteasome inhibition has emerged as an important therapeutic strategy in multiple myeloma (MM). Since the publication of the first phase 1 trials of bortezomib 10 years ago, this first-in-class proteasome inhibitor (PI) has contributed substantially to the observed improvement in survival in MM patients over the past decade. Although first approved as a single agent in the relapsed setting, bortezomib is now predominantly used in combination regimens. Furthermore, the standard twice-weekly schedule may be replaced by weekly infusion, especially when bortezomib is used as part of combination regimens in frontline therapy. Indeed, bortezomib is an established component of induction therapy for patients eligible or ineligible for autologous stem cell transplantation. Bortezomib has also been incorporated into conditioning regimens before autologous stem cell transplantation, as well as into post-ASCT consolidation therapy, and in the maintenance setting. In addition, a new route of bortezomib administration, subcutaneous infusion, has recently been approved. Recently, several new agents have been introduced into the clinic, including carfilzomib, marizomib, and MLN9708, and trials investigating these “second-generation” PIs in patients with relapsed/refractory MMs have demonstrated positive results. This review provides an overview of the role of PIs in the treatment of MM, focusing on developments over the past decade. PMID:22645181

  17. Proteasomal Dysfunction Induced By Diclofenac Engenders Apoptosis Through Mitochondrial Pathway.

    PubMed

    Amanullah, Ayeman; Upadhyay, Arun; Chhangani, Deepak; Joshi, Vibhuti; Mishra, Ribhav; Yamanaka, Koji; Mishra, Amit

    2017-05-01

    Diclofenac is the most commonly used phenylacetic acid derivative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that demonstrates significant analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory effects. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated anti-proliferative activity of NSAIDs and examined their apoptotic induction effects in different cancer cell lines. However, the precise molecular mechanisms by which these pharmacological agents induce apoptosis and exert anti-carcinogenic properties are not well known. Here, we have observed that diclofenac treatment induces proteasome malfunction and promotes accumulation of different critical proteasome substrates, including few pro-apoptotic proteins in cells. Exposure of diclofenac consequently elevates aggregation of various ubiquitylated misfolded proteins. Finally, we have shown that diclofenac treatment promotes apoptosis in cells, which could be because of mitochondrial membrane depolarization and cytochrome c release into cytosol. This study suggests possible beneficial insights of NSAIDs-induced apoptosis that may improve our existing knowledge in anti-proliferative interspecific strategies development. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1014-1027, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The proteasome inhibitor, PS-341, causes cytokeratin aggresome formation.

    PubMed

    Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia; Riley, Nora E; Nan, Li; Montgomery, Rosalyn O; Li, Jun; French, Barbara A; Lue, Yan H; French, Samuel W

    2004-02-01

    Mallory body (MB) experimental induction takes 10 weeks of drug ingestion. Therefore, it is difficult to study the dynamics and mechanisms involved in vivo. Consequently, an in vitro study was done using primary tissue culture of hepatocytes from drug-primed mice livers in which MBs had already formed. The hypothesis to be tested was that MBs are cytokeratin aggresomes, which form when hepatocytes have a defective ubiquitin-proteasome pathway by which turnover of cytokeratin proteins is prevented. To test this hypothesis, primary tissue cultures of the hepatocytes from normal and MB-forming livers were incubated with the proteasome inhibitor PS-341 and then the cytokeratin filaments and the filament connecting proteins, that is, beta-actin, and ZO1, were visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy. PS-341 caused detachment of the cytokeratins from the cell surface plasma membrane. The cytokeratin filaments retracted toward the nucleus and cytokeratin aggresomes formed. In human livers, MBs showed colocalization of cytokeratin-8 (CK-8) with ubiquitin but not with beta-actin or ZO1. Mouse hepatoma cell lines were studied using PS-341 to induce cytokeratin aggresome formation. In these cell lines, the cytokeratin filaments first retracted toward the nucleus then formed cytokeratin-ubiquitin aggresomes polarized at one side of the nucleus. At the same time, the cells became dissociated from each other, however. The results simulated MB formation. MBs differ from cytokeratin aggresomes both morphologically and in ultrastructure.

  19. Epigenetics of proteasome inhibition in the liver of rats fed ethanol chronically

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Joan; Dedes, Jennifer; Li, Jun; French, Samuel W; Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of ethanol-induced proteasome inhibition, and the effects of proteasome inhibition in the regulation of epigenetic mechanisms. METHODS: Rats were fed ethanol for 1 mo using the Tsukamoto-French model and were compared to rats given the proteasome inhibitor PS-341 (Bortezomib, Velcade™) by intraperitoneal injection. Microarray analysis and real time PCR were performed and proteasome activity assays and Western blot analysis were performed using isolated nuclei. RESULTS: Chronic ethanol feeding caused a significant inhibition of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in the nucleus, which led to changes in the turnover of transcriptional factors, histone-modifying enzymes, and, therefore, affected epigenetic mechanisms. Chronic ethanol feeding was related to an increase in histone acetylation, and it is hypothesized that the proteasome proteolytic activity regulated histone modifications by controlling the stability of histone modifying enzymes, and, therefore, regulated the chromatin structure, allowing easy access to chromatin by RNA polymerase, and, thus, proper gene expression. Proteasome inhibition by PS-341 increased histone acetylation similar to chronic ethanol feeding. In addition, proteasome inhibition caused dramatic changes in hepatic remethylation reactions as there was a significant decrease in the enzymes responsible for the regeneration of S-adenosylmethionine, and, in particular, a significant decrease in the betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase enzyme. This suggested that hypomethylation was associated with proteasome inhibition, as indicated by the decrease in histone methylation. CONCLUSION: The role of proteasome inhibition in regulating epigenetic mechanisms, and its link to liver injury in alcoholic liver disease, is thus a promising approach to study liver injury due to chronic ethanol consumption. PMID:19222094

  20. Shikonin Exerts Antitumor Activity via Proteasome Inhibition and Cell Death Induction in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huanjie; Zhou, Ping; Huang, Hongbiao; Chen, Di; Ma, Ningfang; Cui, Cindy Qiuzhi; Shen, Shouxing; Dong, Weihua; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Lian, Wen; Wang, Xuejun; Dou, Q. Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2009-01-01

    Dysregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays an essential role in tumor growth and development. Shikonin, a natural naphthoquinone isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine Zi Cao (gromwell), has been reported to possess tumor cell-killing activity, and results from a clinical study using a shikonin-containing mixture demonstrated its safety and efficacy for the treatment of late-stage lung cancer. In the present study, we reported that shikonin is an inhibitor of tumor proteasome activity in vitro and in vivo. Our computational modeling predicts that the carbonyl carbons C1 and C4 of shikonin potentially interact with the catalytic site of β5 chymotryptic subunit of the proteasome. Indeed, shikonin potently inhibits the chymotrypsin-like activity of purified 20S proteasome (IC50 12.5 μmol/L) and tumor cellular 26S proteasome (IC50 between 2-16 μmol/L). Inhibition of the proteasome by shikonin in murine hepatoma H22, leukemia P388 and human prostate cancer PC-3 cultures resulted in accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and several proteasome target proapoptotic proteins (IκB-α, Bax and p27), followed by induction of cell death. Shikonin treatment resulted in tumor growth inhibition in both H22 allografts and PC-3 xenografts, associated with suppression of the proteasomal activity and induction of cell death in vivo. Finally, shikonin treatment significantly prolonged the survival period of mice bearing P388 leukemia. Our results indicate that the tumor proteasome is one of the cellular targets of shikonin, and inhibition of the proteasome activity by shikonin contributes to its anti-tumor property. PMID:19165859

  1. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of three subunits of yeast proteasome.

    PubMed Central

    Emori, Y; Tsukahara, T; Kawasaki, H; Ishiura, S; Sugita, H; Suzuki, K

    1991-01-01

    The genes encoding three subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteasome were cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequences were homologous not only to each other (30 to 40% identity) but also to those of rat and Drosophila proteasomes (25 to 65% identity). However, none of these sequences showed any similarity to any other known sequences, including various proteases, suggesting that these proteasome subunits may constitute a unique gene family. Gene disruption analyses revealed that two of the three subunits (subunits Y7 and Y8) are essential for growth, indicating that the proteasome and its individual subunits play an indispensable role in fundamental biological processes. On the other hand, subunit Y13 is not essential; haploid cells with a disrupted Y13 gene can proliferate, although the doubling time is longer than that of cells with nondisrupted genes. In addition, biochemical analysis revealed that proteasome prepared from the Y13 disrupted cells contains tryptic and chymotryptic activities equivalent to those of nondisrupted cells, indicating that the Y13 subunit is not essential for tryptic or chymotryptic activity. However, the chymotryptic activity of the Y13 disrupted cells is not dependent on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), an activator of proteasome, since nearly full activity was observed in the absence of SDS. Thus, the activity in proteasome of the Y13 disrupted cells might result in unregulated intracellular proteolysis, thus leading to the prolonged cell cycle. These results indicate that cloned proteasome subunits having similar sequences to the yeast Y13 subunit are structural, but not catalytic, components of proteasome. It is also suggested that two subunits (Y7 and Y8) might occupy positions essential to proteasome structure or activity, whereas subunit Y13 is in a nonessential but important position. Images PMID:1898763

  2. 20S proteasome activation promotes life span extension and resistance to proteotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Chondrogianni, Niki; Georgila, Konstantina; Kourtis, Nikos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Gonos, Efstathios S

    2015-02-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is one of the nodal points that need to be preserved to retain physiologic cellular/organismal balance. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the removal of both normal and damaged proteins, with the proteasome being the downstream effector. The proteasome is the major cellular protease with progressive impairment of function during aging and senescence. Despite the documented age-retarding properties of proteasome activation in various cellular models, simultaneous enhancement of the 20S core proteasome content, assembly, and function have never been reported in any multicellular organism. Consequently, the possible effects of the core proteasome modulation on organismal life span are elusive. In this study, we have achieved activation of the 20S proteasome at organismal level. We demonstrate enhancement of proteasome levels, assembly, and activity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, resulting in life span extension and increased resistance to stress. We also provide evidence that the observed life span extension is dependent on the transcriptional activity of Dauer formation abnormal/Forkhead box class O (DAF-16/FOXO), skinhead-1 (SKN-1), and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) factors through regulation of downstream longevity genes. We further show that the reported beneficial effects are not ubiquitous but they are dependent on the genetic context. Finally, we provide evidence that proteasome core activation might be a potential strategy to minimize protein homeostasis deficiencies underlying aggregation-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Huntington's disease (HD). In summary, this is the first report demonstrating that 20S core proteasome up-regulation in terms of both content and activity is feasible in a multicellular eukaryotic organism and that in turn this modulation promotes extension of organismal health span and life span.

  3. Circulating extracellular proteasome in the cerebrospinal fluid: a study on concentration and proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Oliver; Anlasik, Timur; Wiedemann, Jonas; Thomassen, Jan; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Hagel, Vincent; Keyvani, Kathy; Schwieger, Isabel; Dahlmann, Burkhardt; Sure, Ulrich; Sixt, Stephan Urs

    2012-03-01

    Alterations of the intracellular ubiquitin-proteasome pathway are found in neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders of the central nervous system, as well as in its malignancies. Inhibitory substrates of the proteasomes represent promising approaches to control autoimmune inflammations and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. Extracellular circulating proteasomes are positively correlated to outcome prognosis in hematogenic neoplasias and the outcome in critically ill patients. Previously, we reported raised levels of proteolytic active 20S proteasomes in the extracellular alveolar space in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). For the cerebrospinal fluid, we assumed that extracellular circulating proteasomes with enzymatic activity can be found, too. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of twenty-six patients (14 females, 12 males), who underwent diagnostic spinal myelography, were analyzed for leukocyte cell count, total protein content, lactate and interleukine-6 (Il-6) concentrations. CSF samples were analyzed for concentration and enzymatic activity of extracellular 20S proteasomes (fluorescenic substrate cleavage; femtokatal). Blood samples were analyzed with respect to concentration of extracellular circulating proteasomes. Choroidal plexus was harvested at autopsies and examined with immunoelectron microscopy (EM) for identification of possible transportation mechanisms. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS (18.0.3). In all patients, extracellular proteasome was found in the CSF. The mean concentration was 24.6 ng/ml. Enzymatic activity of the 20S subunits of proteasomes was positively identified by the fluorescenic subtrate cleavage at a mean of 8.5 fkat/ml. Concentrations of extracellular proteasomes in the CSF, total protein content and Il-6 were uncorrelated. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed merging vesicles of proteasomes with the outer cell membrane suggestive of an exozytic transport mechanism. For the first time

  4. 26S and PA28-20S Proteasome Activity in Cytosolic Extracts from Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hernebring, Malin

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is a complex multisubunit protease that plays a major role in the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Proteasome function is one of the key players regulating the proteome and it is vital for many cellular processes. The method described here makes it possible to assay the proteolytic capacities of proteasome complexes separately in crude cytosolic extracts from ES cells. The method is based on hydrolysis of a fluorogenic peptide substrate in lysates prepared under conditions that favor the interactions of the 20S proteasomal catalytical core with either the 19S or the PA28αβ proteasome regulator.

  5. Proteasome inhibitors in cancer therapy: Treatment regimen and peripheral neuropathy as a side effect.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Gulce Sari; Torcun, Ceyda Corek; Grune, Tilman; Ozer, Nesrin Kartal; Karademir, Betul

    2017-02-01

    Proteasomal system plays an important role in protein turnover, which is essential for homeostasis of cells. Besides degradation of oxidized proteins, it is involved in the regulation of many different signaling pathways. These pathways include mainly cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, transcriptional activation and angiogenesis. Thus, proteasomal system is a crucial target for treatment of several diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, cystic fibrosis, atherosclerosis, autoimmune diseases, diabetes and cancer. Over the last fifteen years, proteasome inhibitors have been tested to highlight their mechanisms of action and used in the clinic to treat different types of cancer. Proteasome inhibitors are mainly used in combinational therapy along with classical chemo-radiotherapy. Several studies have proved their significant effects but serious side effects such as peripheral neuropathy, limits their use in required effective doses. Recent studies focus on peripheral neuropathy as the primary side effect of proteasome inhibitors. Therefore, it is important to delineate the underlying mechanisms of peripheral neuropathy and develop new inhibitors according to obtained data. This review will detail the role of proteasome inhibition in cancer therapy and development of peripheral neuropathy as a side effect. Additionally, new approaches to prevent treatment-limiting side effects will be discussed in order to help researchers in developing effective strategies to overcome side effects of proteasome inhibitors.

  6. Chronic contractile activity upregulates the proteasome system in rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ordway, G A; Neufer, P D; Chin, E R; DeMartino, G N

    2000-03-01

    Remodeling of skeletal muscle in response to altered patterns of contractile activity is achieved, in part, by the regulated degradation of cellular proteins. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is a dominant pathway for protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. To test the role of this pathway in contraction-induced remodeling of skeletal muscle, we used a well-established model of continuous motor nerve stimulation to activate tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of New Zealand White rabbits for periods up to 28 days. Western blot analysis revealed marked and coordinated increases in protein levels of the 20S proteasome and two of its regulatory proteins, PA700 and PA28. mRNA of a representative proteasome subunit also increased coordinately in contracting muscles. Chronic contractile activity of TA also increased total proteasome activity in extracts, as measured by the hydrolysis of a proteasome-specific peptide substrate, and the total capacity of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, as measured by the ATP-dependent hydrolysis of an exogenous protein substrate. These results support the potential role of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation in the contraction-induced remodeling of skeletal muscle.

  7. Proteasome activity and its relationship with protein phosphorylation during capacitation and acrosome reaction in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Morales, Patricio; Díaz, Emilce S; Kong, Milene

    2007-01-01

    We have shown that the proteasome is present in mammalian sperm and plays a role during fertilisation. In this work we studied the relationship between protein phosphorylation and proteasomal activity in human sperm. Aliquots of motile sperm were incubated for 0, 5 and 18 h at 37 degrees C, 5% CO2, with different concentration of the kinase inhibitors genistein, H89 or tamoxifen. Control aliquots were treated with the inhibitor solvent. The chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome was assayed using a fluorogenic substrate. Aliquots of spermatozoa capacitated during 18 h were incubated for 30 min with kinase inhibitors and then with 7 microM progesterone (P). The percentage of viable acrosome-reacted sperm was evaluated using FITC-labeled Pisum sativum agglutinin. The results indicate that spermatozoa treated with different concentrations of genistein and tamoxifen did not modify the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome during capacitation. On the other hand, proteasome activity was significantly decreased by incubation with H89. Sperm treatment with genistein, H89 and tamoxifen significantly inhibited the P-induced acrosome reaction. Western blot analysis indicated that the proteasome inhibitor, epoxomicin, reduced serine protein phosphorylation. These results suggest that the enzymatic activity of the proteasome is modulated by protein kinase A, and that both enzymes are involved in the P-induced acrosome reaction.

  8. Knocking out ubiquitin proteasome system function in vivo and in vitro with genetically encodable tandem ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Y; Isono, E; Shimada, M; Kawahara, H; Yokosawa, H; Toh-E, A

    2005-01-01

    At present, the 26S proteasome-specific inhibitor is not available. We constructed polyubiquitin derivatives that contained a tandem repeat of ubiquitins and were insensitive to ubiquitin hydrolases. When these artificial polyubiquitins (tUbs, tandem ubiquitins) were overproduced in the wild-type yeast strain, growth was strongly inhibited, probably because of inhibition of the 26S proteasome. We also found that several substrates of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway were stabilized by expressing tUbs in vivo. tUbs containing four units or more of the ubiquitin monomer were found to form a complex with the 26S proteasome. We showed that tUb bound to the 26S proteasome inhibited the in vitro degradation of polyubiquitinylated Sic1 by the 26S proteasome. When tUB6 (six-mer) messenger RNA was injected into Xenopus embryos, cell division was inhibited, suggesting that tUb can be used as a versatile inhibitor of the 26S proteasome.

  9. Biological significance of co- and post-translational modifications of the yeast 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Hisashi; Kimura, Yayoi; Kimura, Ayuko

    2016-02-16

    In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), co- and post-translational modifications of the 26S proteasome, a large protein complex, were comprehensively detected by proteomic techniques, and their functions were investigated. The presence, number, site, and state of co- and post-translational modifications of the 26S proteasome differ considerably among yeast, human, and mouse. The roles of phosphorylation, N(α)-acetylation, N(α)-myristoylation, N(α)-methylation, and N-terminal truncation in the yeast 26S proteasome were investigated. Although there is only one modification site for either N(α)-acetylation, N(α)-myristoylation, or N(α)-methylation, these modifications play an important role in the functions of the yeast proteasome. In contrast, there are many phosphorylation sites in the yeast 26S proteasome. However, the phosphorylation patterns might be a few, suggesting that tiny modifications exert considerable effects on the function of the proteasome. Protein co- and post-translational modifications produce different protein species which often have different functions. The yeast 26S proteasome, a large protein complex, consisting of many subunits has a number of co- and post-translational modification sites. This review describes the effects of the modifications on the function of the protein complex. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein species. Guest Editors: Peter Jungblut, Hartmut Schlüter and Bernd Thiede. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. p97-dependent retrotranslocation and proteolytic processing govern formation of active Nrf1 upon proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Senthil K; den Besten, Willem; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2014-01-01

    Proteasome inhibition elicits an evolutionarily conserved response wherein proteasome subunit mRNAs are upregulated, resulting in recovery (i.e., 'bounce-back') of proteasome activity. We previously demonstrated that the transcription factor Nrf1/NFE2L1 mediates this homeostatic response in mammalian cells. We show here that Nrf1 is initially translocated into the lumen of the ER, but is rapidly and efficiently retrotranslocated to the cytosolic side of the membrane in a manner that depends on p97/VCP. Normally, retrotranslocated Nrf1 is degraded promptly by the proteasome and active species do not accumulate. However, in cells with compromised proteasomes, retrotranslocated Nrf1 escapes degradation and is cleaved N-terminal to Leu-104 to yield a fragment that is no longer tethered to the ER membrane. Importantly, this cleavage event is essential for Nrf1-dependent activation of proteasome gene expression upon proteasome inhibition. Our data uncover an unexpected role for p97 in activation of a transcription factor by relocalizing it from the ER lumen to the cytosol. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01856.001.

  11. K(ATP) channel block prevents proteasome inhibitor-induced apoptosis in differentiated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Da Hee; Lee, Min Sung; Lee, Chung Soo

    2015-10-05

    Dysfunction of the proteasome system has been suggested to be implicated in neuronal degeneration. Modulation of KATP channels appears to affect the viability of neuronal cells exposed to toxic insults. However, the effect of KATP channel blockers on the neuronal cell death mediated by proteasome inhibition has not been studied. The present study investigated the effect of KATP channel blockers on proteasome inhibitor-induced apoptosis in differentiated PC12 cells and SH-SY5Y cells. 5-Hydroxydecanoate (a selective KATP channel blocker) and glibenclamide (a cell surface and mitochondrial KATP channel inhibitor) reduced the proteasome inhibitor-induced apoptosis. Addition of the KATP channel blockers attenuated the proteasome inhibitor-induced changes in the levels of apoptosis-related proteins, the loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, the increase in the formation of reactive oxygen species and the depletion of glutathione in both cell lines. The results show that KATP channel blockers may attenuate proteasome inhibitor-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells by suppressing activation of the mitochondrial pathway and of the caspase-8- and Bid-dependent pathways. The preventive effect appears to be associated with the inhibition of the formation of reactive oxygen species and the depletion of glutathione. KATP channel blockade appears to prevent proteasome inhibition-induced neuronal cell death.

  12. Circulating 20S Proteasome Is Independently Associated with Abdominal Muscle Mass in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fukasawa, Hirotaka; Kaneko, Mai; Niwa, Hiroki; Matsuyama, Takashi; Yasuda, Hideo; Kumagai, Hiromichi; Furuya, Ryuichi

    2015-01-01

    Protein-energy wasting is highly prevalent in hemodialysis patients, and it contributes to patient morbidity and mortality. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is the major pathway for intracellular protein degradation and it is involved in the regulation of basic cellular processes. However, the role of this system in the determination of nutritional status is largely unknown. To examine a relationship between protein-energy wasting and the ubiquitin-proteasome system, a cross-sectional study of 76 hemodialysis patients was performed. Plasma concentrations of 20S proteasome were studied to evaluate its association with muscle and fat mass, which were investigated by abdominal muscle and fat areas measured using computed tomography and by creatinine production estimated using the creatinine kinetic model. Plasma 20S proteasome concentrations significantly and negatively correlated with abdominal muscle areas and creatinine production (rho = -0.263, P < 0.05 and rho = -0.241, P < 0.05, respectively), but not abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat areas. Multiple regression analyses showed that 20S proteasome was a significant independent predictor of abdominal muscle area (P < 0.05). In conclusion, plasma 20S proteasome concentrations were independently associated with abdominal muscle mass in hemodialysis patients. Our findings indicate a relationship between circulating 20S proteasomes and muscle metabolism in these patients. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000012341 PMID:25803510

  13. Age-dependent protein modifications and declining proteasome activity in the human lens.

    PubMed

    Viteri, Gabriela; Carrard, Géraldine; Birlouez-Aragón, Inès; Silva, Eduardo; Friguet, Bertrand

    2004-07-15

    The proteasome is known to be the main enzymatic complex responsible for the intracellular degradation of altered proteins, and the age-related accumulation of modified lens proteins is associated to the formation of cataracts. The aim of this study was to determine whether the human lens proteasome becomes functionally impaired with age. The soluble and insoluble protein fractions of human lenses corresponding to various age-groups were characterized in terms of their levels of glyco-oxidative damage and found to show increasing anti-carboxymethyl-lysine immunoreactivity with age. Concomitantly, decreasing proteasome contents and peptidase activities were observed in the water-soluble fraction. The fact that peptidylglutamyl-peptide hydrolase activity is most severely affected with age suggests that specific changes are undergone by the proteasome itself. In particular, increasing levels of carboxymethylation were observed with age in the proteasome. It was concluded that the lower levels of soluble active enzymatic complex present in elderly lenses and the post-translational modifications affecting the proteasome may at least partly explain the decrease in proteasome activity and the concomitant accumulation of carboxymethylated and ubiquitinated proteins which occur with age.

  14. Purification and characterization of 26S proteasomes from human and mouse spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Tipler, C P; Hutchon, S P; Hendil, K; Tanaka, K; Fishel, S; Mayer, R J

    1997-12-01

    We purified by fractionation on 10-40% glycerol gradients, 26S proteasomes from normal human spermatozoa. These proteasomes, which participate in the ATP-dependent degradation of ubiquitinated proteins, share a similar sedimentation coefficient to those purified from other human tissues. Fluorogenic peptide assays reveal they have chymotrypsin, trypsin and peptidyl-glutamyl-like peptide hydrolysing activities; the chymotrypsin activity is ablated by the specific 26S proteasome inhibitor MG132. Confirmation that these large proteases are 26S proteasomes is provided by detection of the 20S proteasome subunits HC2, XAPC7, RN3 and Z and regulatory ATPases MSS1, TBP1, SUG1 and SUG2 by Western analyses with monoclonal antisera. These antigens are found only in the gradient fractions enriched in proteolytic activities. We have also shown that, although mature spermatozoa from mice have considerably reduced amounts of a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) and ubiquitin-protein conjugates in comparison with less mature germ cells, they retain relatively high values of 26S proteasome activity. This suggests that proteasomes may have further roles to play in normal sperm physiology.

  15. Bladder cancer detection using a peptide substrate of the 20S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Gruba, Natalia; Wysocka, Magdalena; Brzezińska, Magdalena; Dębowski, Dawid; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Gorodkiewicz, Ewa; Guszcz, Tomasz; Czaplewski, Cezary; Rolka, Krzysztof; Lesner, Adam

    2016-08-01

    The 20S catalytic core of the human 26S proteasome can be secreted from cells, and high levels of extracellular 20S proteasome have been linked to many types of cancers and autoimmune diseases. Several diagnostic approaches have been developed that detect 20S proteasome activity in plasma, but these suffer from problems with efficiency and sensitivity. In this report, we describe the optimization and synthesis of an internally quenched fluorescent substrate of the 20S proteasome, and investigate its use as a potential diagnostic test in bladder cancer. This peptide, 2-aminobenzoic acid (ABZ)-Val-Val-Ser-Tyr-Ala-Met-Gly-Tyr(3-NO2 )-NH2 , is cleaved by the chymotrypsin 20S proteasome subunit and displays an excellent specificity constant value (9.7 × 10(5)  m(-1) ·s(-1) ) and a high kcat (8 s(-1) ). Using this peptide, we identified chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity in the majority of urine samples obtained from patients with bladder cancer, whereas the proteasome activity in urine samples from healthy volunteers was below the detection limit (0.5 pm). These findings were confirmed by an inhibitory study and immunochemistry methods. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. Suppression of cytochrome P450 3A protein levels by proteasome inhibitors.

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C. ); Kocarek, Thomas A.; Shen, Shang; Bollinger, Nikki ); Dahn, Michael S.; Lee, Donna W.

    2003-06-01

    We have previously reported that CYP3A cross-links with polyubiquitinated proteins in microsomes from nicardipine-treated rats in a process that is distinct from classical polyubiquitination. To further examine the role of the proteasome in CYP3A degradation, we investigated the effects of proteasome inhibitors lactacystin, MG132, proteasome inhibitor 1, and hemin in primary cultures of rat and human hepatocytes. With the exception of hemin, these agents increased the total pool of ubiquitinated proteins in microsomes isolated from rat hepatocytes, indicating that lactacystin, MG132, and proteasome inhibitor 1 effectively inhibited the proteasome in these cells. All four agents caused a reduction in the amount of the major approximately 55-kDa CYP3A band, opposite to what would be expected if the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway degraded CYP3A. Only hemin treatment caused an increase in high molecular mass (HMM) CYP3A bands. Because hemin treatment did not alter levels of ubiquitin in CYP3 A immunoprecipitates, the HMM CYP3A bands formed in response to hemin treatment clearly were not due to proteasome inhibition. Rather, because hemin treatment also caused an increase in HMM CYP3A in the detergent-insoluble fraction of the 10,000g pellet, the HMM CYP3A seems to represent a large protein complex that is unlikely to primarily represent ubiquitination.

  17. Recruitment and dynamics of proteasome association with rhTRIM5α cytoplasmic complexes during HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Cindy M; Cianci, Gianguido C; Hope, Thomas J

    2012-09-01

    A variety of proteins have been identified that restrict infection by different viruses. One such restriction factor is the rhesus macaque variant of TRIM5α (rhTRIM5α), which potently blocks infection by HIV-1. The block to infection mediated by rhTRIM5α occurs early after entry into the host cell, generally prior to reverse transcription. However, proteasome inhibitors reveal an intermediate step of restriction in which virus can complete reverse transcription, but still fails to infect the cell. While proteasome inhibitors have been a useful tool in understanding how restriction takes place, the role of the proteasome itself during restriction has not yet been examined. Here, we characterize the interaction of rhTRIM5α and incoming virions with the proteasome. We show that proteasomes localize to rhTRIM5α cytoplasmic bodies, and this localization is more evident when the activity of the proteasome is inhibited pharmacologically. We also show that restricted virus associates with complexes of proteasomes and rhTRIM5α, suggesting that rhTRIM5α utilizes the proteasome during restriction. Finally, live cell imaging experiments reveal that virus associates with proteasomes, and proteasome inhibition affects the duration of association. Taken together, these studies implicate the proteasome as playing a functional role during rhTRIM5α restriction of incoming virions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Proteasome beta-4 subunit contributes to the development of melanoma and is regulated by miR-148b.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Lin, Di; Lin, Yueqin; Chen, Hongqing; Zou, Minghua; Zhong, Shan; Yi, Xuefeng; Han, Siqi

    2017-06-01

    The proteasome beta-4 subunit is required for the assembly of 20S proteasome complex, forming a pivotal component for the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Emerging evidence indicates that proteasome beta-4 subunit may be involved in underlying progression and mechanisms of malignancies. However, the role of proteasome beta-4 subunit in melanoma is currently unknown. Here, we reported that proteasome beta-4 subunit was markedly upregulated in human melanoma tissues and cells, compared with normal skin samples. High proteasome beta-4 subunit levels were significantly associated with poor overall survival in patients with melanoma. Proteasome beta-4 subunit knockdown strongly decreased melanoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo. We further identified miR-148b as a negative regulator of proteasome beta-4 subunit. Enforced expression of miR-148b resulted in vitro growth inhibition of melanoma cells, whereas this inhibition was further abolished by enforced expression of proteasome beta-4 subunit. Our findings, for the first time, indicated that the miR-148b/proteasome beta-4 subunit axis contributed to the development of melanoma, revealing novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of melanoma.

  19. Effects of Hydroxy Groups in the A-Ring on the Anti-proteasome Activity of Flavone.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kasumi; Yang, Jia-Hua; Sato, Eiji; Miura, Naoyuki; Wu, Yi-Xin

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays an important role in regulating apoptosis and the cell cycle. Recently, proteasome inhibitors have been shown to have antitumor effects and have been used in anticancer therapy for several cancers such as multiple myeloma. Although some flavones, such as apigenin, chrysin and luteolin, have a specific role in the inhibition of proteasome activity and induced apoptosis in some reports, these findings did not address all flavone types. To further investigate the proteasome-inhibitory mechanism of flavonoids, we examined the inhibitory activity of 5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone, baicalein and 5,6,7,4'-tetrahydroxyflavone, scutellarein on extracted proteasomes from mice and cancer cells. Unlike the other flavones, baicalein and scutellarein did not inhibit proteasome activity or accumulate levels of ubiquitinated proteins. These results indicate that flavones with hydroxy groups at positions 5, 6 and 7 of the A-ring lack the anti-proteasome function.

  20. Altered ubiquitin-proteasome signaling in right ventricular hypertrophy and failure

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Viswanathan; Zhao, Mingming; Reddy, Sushma; Fajardo, Giovanni; Wang, Xuejun; Dewey, Shannamar; Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) have been described in left ventricular hypertrophy and failure, although results have been inconsistent. The role of the UPS in right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy (RVH) and RV failure (RVF) is unknown. Given the greater percent increase in RV mass associated with RV afterload stress, as present in many congenital heart lesions, we hypothesized that alterations in the UPS could play an important role in RVH/RVF. UPS expression and activity were measured in the RV from mice with RVH/RVF secondary to pulmonary artery constriction (PAC). Epoxomicin and MG132 were used to inhibit the proteasome, and overexpression of the 11S PA28α subunit was used to activate the proteasome. PAC mice developed RVH (109.3% increase in RV weight to body weight), RV dilation with septal shift, RV dysfunction, and clinical RVF. Proteasomal function (26S β5 chymotrypsin-like activity) was decreased 26% (P < 0.05). Protein expression of 19S subunit Rpt5 (P < 0.05), UCHL1 deubiquitinase (P < 0.0001), and Smurf1 E3 ubiquitin ligase (P < 0.01) were increased, as were polyubiquitinated proteins (P < 0.05) and free-ubiquitins (P = 0.05). Pro-apoptotic Bax was increased (P < 0.0001), whereas anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 decreased (P < 0.05), resulting in a sixfold increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Proteasomal inhibition did not accelerate RVF. However, proteasome enhancement by cardiac-specific proteasome overexpression partially improved survival. Proteasome activity is decreased in RVH/RVF, associated with upregulation of key UPS regulators and pro-apoptotic signaling. Enhancement of proteasome function partially attenuates RVF, suggesting that UPS dysfunction contributes to RVF. PMID:23729213

  1. Activation of Chymotrypsin-Like Activity of the Proteasome during Ischemia Induces Myocardial Dysfunction and Death.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Gina; Berrios, Daniela; Olmedo, Ivonne; Pezoa, Javier; Riquelme, Jaime A; Montecinos, Luis; Pedrozo, Zully; Donoso, Paulina

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of the ubiquitin-proteasome system improve hemodynamic parameters and decrease the infarct size after ischemia reperfusion. The molecular basis of this protection is not fully understood since most available data report inhibition of the 26 proteasome after ischemia reperfusion. The decrease in cellular ATP levels during ischemia leads to the dissociation of the 26S proteasome into the 19S regulatory complex and the 20S catalytic core, which results in protein degradation independently of ubiquitination. There is scarce information on the activity of the 20S proteasome during cardiac ischemia. Accordingly, the aim of this work was to determine the effects of 30 minutes of ischemia, or 30 min of ischemia followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion on the three main peptidase activities of the 20S proteasome in Langendorff perfused rat hearts. We found that 30 min of ischemia produced a significant increase in the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome, without changes in its caspase-like or trypsin-like activities. In contrast, all three activities were decreased upon reperfusion. Ixazomib, perfused before ischemia at a concentration that reduced the chymotrypsin-like activity to 50% of the control values, without affecting the other proteasomal activities, improved the hemodynamic parameters upon reperfusion and decreased the infarct size. Ixazomib also prevented the 50% reduction in RyR2 content observed after ischemia. The protection was lost, however, when simultaneous inhibition of chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities of the proteasome was achieved at higher concentration of ixazomib. Our results suggest that selective inhibition of chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome during ischemia preserves key proteins for cardiomyocyte function and exerts a positive impact on cardiac performance after reperfusion.

  2. Activation of Chymotrypsin-Like Activity of the Proteasome during Ischemia Induces Myocardial Dysfunction and Death

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Gina; Berrios, Daniela; Olmedo, Ivonne; Pezoa, Javier; Riquelme, Jaime A.; Montecinos, Luis; Pedrozo, Zully; Donoso, Paulina

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of the ubiquitin-proteasome system improve hemodynamic parameters and decrease the infarct size after ischemia reperfusion. The molecular basis of this protection is not fully understood since most available data report inhibition of the 26 proteasome after ischemia reperfusion. The decrease in cellular ATP levels during ischemia leads to the dissociation of the 26S proteasome into the 19S regulatory complex and the 20S catalytic core, which results in protein degradation independently of ubiquitination. There is scarce information on the activity of the 20S proteasome during cardiac ischemia. Accordingly, the aim of this work was to determine the effects of 30 minutes of ischemia, or 30 min of ischemia followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion on the three main peptidase activities of the 20S proteasome in Langendorff perfused rat hearts. We found that 30 min of ischemia produced a significant increase in the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome, without changes in its caspase-like or trypsin-like activities. In contrast, all three activities were decreased upon reperfusion. Ixazomib, perfused before ischemia at a concentration that reduced the chymotrypsin-like activity to 50% of the control values, without affecting the other proteasomal activities, improved the hemodynamic parameters upon reperfusion and decreased the infarct size. Ixazomib also prevented the 50% reduction in RyR2 content observed after ischemia. The protection was lost, however, when simultaneous inhibition of chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities of the proteasome was achieved at higher concentration of ixazomib. Our results suggest that selective inhibition of chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome during ischemia preserves key proteins for cardiomyocyte function and exerts a positive impact on cardiac performance after reperfusion. PMID:27529620

  3. Niclosamide Prevents the Formation of Large Ubiquitin-Containing Aggregates Caused by Proteasome Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Winget, Jason M.; Brack, Maria; Rotblat, Barak; Novoa, Carolina Arias; Balgi, Aruna D.; Sorensen, Poul H.; Roberge, Michel; Mayor, Thibault

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein aggregation is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases and has been linked to the failure to degrade misfolded and damaged proteins. In the cell, aberrant proteins are degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system that mainly targets short-lived proteins, or by the lysosomes that mostly clear long-lived and poorly soluble proteins. Both systems are interconnected and, in some instances, autophagy can redirect proteasome substrates to the lysosomes. Principal Findings To better understand the interplay between these two systems, we established a neuroblastoma cell population stably expressing the GFP-ubiquitin fusion protein. We show that inhibition of the proteasome leads to the formation of large ubiquitin-containing inclusions accompanied by lower solubility of the ubiquitin conjugates. Strikingly, the formation of the ubiquitin-containing aggregates does not require ectopic expression of disease-specific proteins. Moreover, formation of these focused inclusions caused by proteasome inhibition requires the lysine 63 (K63) of ubiquitin. We then assessed selected compounds that stimulate autophagy and found that the antihelmintic chemical niclosamide prevents large aggregate formation induced by proteasome inhibition, while the prototypical mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin had no apparent effect. Niclosamide also precludes the accumulation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins and of p62 upon proteasome inhibition. Moreover, niclosamide induces a change in lysosome distribution in the cell that, in the absence of proteasome activity, may favor the uptake into lysosomes of ubiquitinated proteins before they form large aggregates. Conclusions Our results indicate that proteasome inhibition provokes the formation of large ubiquitin containing aggregates in tissue culture cells, even in the absence of disease specific proteins. Furthermore our study suggests that the autophagy-inducing compound niclosamide may promote the selective clearance of ubiquitinated

  4. Altered ubiquitin-proteasome signaling in right ventricular hypertrophy and failure.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Viswanathan; Zhao, Mingming; Reddy, Sushma; Fajardo, Giovanni; Wang, Xuejun; Dewey, Shannamar; Gomes, Aldrin V; Bernstein, Daniel

    2013-08-15

    Alterations in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) have been described in left ventricular hypertrophy and failure, although results have been inconsistent. The role of the UPS in right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy (RVH) and RV failure (RVF) is unknown. Given the greater percent increase in RV mass associated with RV afterload stress, as present in many congenital heart lesions, we hypothesized that alterations in the UPS could play an important role in RVH/RVF. UPS expression and activity were measured in the RV from mice with RVH/RVF secondary to pulmonary artery constriction (PAC). Epoxomicin and MG132 were used to inhibit the proteasome, and overexpression of the 11S PA28α subunit was used to activate the proteasome. PAC mice developed RVH (109.3% increase in RV weight to body weight), RV dilation with septal shift, RV dysfunction, and clinical RVF. Proteasomal function (26S β₅ chymotrypsin-like activity) was decreased 26% (P < 0.05). Protein expression of 19S subunit Rpt5 (P < 0.05), UCHL1 deubiquitinase (P < 0.0001), and Smurf1 E3 ubiquitin ligase (P < 0.01) were increased, as were polyubiquitinated proteins (P < 0.05) and free-ubiquitins (P = 0.05). Pro-apoptotic Bax was increased (P < 0.0001), whereas anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 decreased (P < 0.05), resulting in a sixfold increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Proteasomal inhibition did not accelerate RVF. However, proteasome enhancement by cardiac-specific proteasome overexpression partially improved survival. Proteasome activity is decreased in RVH/RVF, associated with upregulation of key UPS regulators and pro-apoptotic signaling. Enhancement of proteasome function partially attenuates RVF, suggesting that UPS dysfunction contributes to RVF.

  5. Targeting the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Heart Disease: The Basis for New Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Novel therapeutic strategies to treat heart failure are greatly needed. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) affects the structure and function of cardiac cells through targeted degradation of signaling and structural proteins. This review discusses both beneficial and detrimental consequences of modulating the UPS in the heart. Recent Advances: Proteasome inhibitors were first used to test the role of the UPS in cardiac disease phenotypes, indicating therapeutic potential. In early cardiac remodeling and pathological hypertrophy with increased proteasome activities, proteasome inhibition prevented or restricted disease progression and contractile dysfunction. Conversely, enhancing proteasome activities by genetic manipulation, pharmacological intervention, or ischemic preconditioning also improved the outcome of cardiomyopathies and infarcted hearts with impaired cardiac and UPS function, which is, at least in part, caused by oxidative damage. Critical Issues: An understanding of the UPS status and the underlying mechanisms for its potential deregulation in cardiac disease is critical for targeted interventions. Several studies indicate that type and stage of cardiac disease influence the dynamics of UPS regulation in a nonlinear and multifactorial manner. Proteasome inhibitors targeting all proteasome complexes are associated with cardiotoxicity in humans. Furthermore, the type and dosage of proteasome inhibitor impact the pathogenesis in nonuniform ways. Future Directions: Systematic analysis and targeting of individual UPS components with established and innovative tools will unravel and discriminate regulatory mechanisms that contribute to and protect against the progression of cardiac disease. Integrating this knowledge in drug design may reduce adverse effects on the heart as observed in patients treated with proteasome inhibitors against noncardiac diseases, especially cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2322–2343. PMID:25133688

  6. Insights into the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, Stephan; Beck, Florian; Scheres, Sjors H. W.; Korinek, Andreas; Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Mihalache, Oana; Sun, Na; Nagy, István; Sali, Andrej; Plitzko, Jürgen M.; Carazo, Jose-Maria; Mann, Matthias; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy in conjunction with advanced image analysis was used to analyze the structure of the 26S proteasome and to elucidate its variable features. We have been able to outline the boundaries of the ATPase module in the “base” part of the regulatory complex that can vary in its position and orientation relative to the 20S core particle. This variation is consistent with the “wobbling” model that was previously proposed to explain the role of the regulatory complex in opening the gate in the α-rings of the core particle. In addition, a variable mass near the mouth of the ATPase ring has been identified as Rpn10, a multiubiquitin receptor, by correlating the electron microscopy data with quantitative mass spectrometry. PMID:19581588

  7. Failure of ubiquitin proteasome system: risk for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chen; Geetha, Thangiah; Babu, Jeganathan Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is the primary proteolytic quality control system in cells and has an essential function in the nervous system. UPS dysfunction has been linked to neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. The pathology of neurodegenerative diseases is characterized by the abnormal accumulation of insoluble protein aggregates or inclusion bodies within neurons. The failure or dysregulation of the UPS prevents the degradation of misfolded/aberrant proteins, leading to deficient synaptic function that eventually affects the nervous system. In this review, we discuss the UPS and its physiological roles in the nervous system, its influence on neuronal function, and how UPS dysfunction contributes to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Legionella Metaeffector Exploits Host Proteasome to Temporally Regulate Cognate Effector

    PubMed Central

    Kubori, Tomoko; Shinzawa, Naoaki; Kanuka, Hirotaka; Nagai, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Pathogen-associated secretion systems translocate numerous effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells to coordinate cellular processes important for infection. Spatiotemporal regulation is therefore important for modulating distinct activities of effectors at different stages of infection. Here we provide the first evidence of “metaeffector,” a designation for an effector protein that regulates the function of another effector within the host cell. Legionella LubX protein functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that hijacks the host proteasome to specifically target the bacterial effector protein SidH for degradation. Delayed delivery of LubX to the host cytoplasm leads to the shutdown of SidH within the host cells at later stages of infection. This demonstrates a sophisticated level of coevolution between eukaryotic cells and L. pneumophila involving an effector that functions as a key regulator to temporally coordinate the function of a cognate effector protein. PMID:21151961

  9. Viruses and the 26S proteasome: hacking into destruction.

    PubMed

    Banks, Lawrence; Pim, David; Thomas, Miranda

    2003-08-01

    The discovery that the human papillomavirus E6 oncoprotein could direct the ubiquitination and degradation of the p53 tumour suppressor at the 26S proteasome was the beginning of a new view on virus-host interactions. A decade later, a plethora of viral proteins have been shown to direct host-cell proteins for proteolytic degradation. These activities are required for various aspects of the virus life-cycle from entry, through replication and enhanced cell survival, to viral release. As with oncogenes and cell-cycle control, the study of apparently simple viruses has provided a wealth of information on the function of a whole class of cellular proteins whose function is arguably as important as that of the kinases: the ubiquitin-protein ligases.

  10. Parkin promotes proteasomal degradation of synaptotagmin IV by accelerating polyubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Kabayama, Hiroyuki; Tokushige, Naoko; Takeuchi, Makoto; Kabayama, Miyuki; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2017-04-01

    Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase whose mutations cause autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinson's disease (PD). Unlike the human phenotype, parkin knockout (KO) mice show no apparent dopamine neuron degeneration, although they demonstrate reduced expression and activity of striatal mitochondrial proteins believed to be necessary for neuronal survival. Instead, parkin-KO mice show reduced striatal evoked dopamine release, abnormal synaptic plasticity, and non-motor symptoms, all of which appear to mimic the preclinical features of Parkinson's disease. Extensive studies have screened candidate synaptic proteins responsible for reduced evoked dopamine release, and synaptotagmin XI (Syt XI), an isoform of Syt family regulating membrane trafficking, has been identified as a substrate of parkin in humans. However, its expression level is unaltered in the striatum of parkin-KO mice. Thus, the target(s) of parkin and the molecular mechanisms underlying the impaired dopamine release in parkin-KO mice remain unknown. In this study, we focused on Syt IV because of its highly homology to Syt XI, and because they share an evolutionarily conserved lack of Ca(2+)-binding capacity; thus, Syt IV plays an inhibitory role in Ca(2+)-dependent neurotransmitter release in PC12 cells and neurons in various brain regions. We found that a proteasome inhibitor increased Syt IV protein, but not Syt XI protein, in neuron-like, differentiated PC12 cells, and that parkin interacted with and polyubiquitinated Syt IV, thereby accelerating its protein turnover. Parkin overexpression selectively degraded Syt IV protein, but not Syt I protein (indispensable for Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis), thus enhancing depolarization-dependent exocytosis. Furthermore, in parkin-KO mice, the level of striatal Syt IV protein was increased. Our data indicate a crucial role for parkin in the proteasomal degradation of Syt IV, and provide a potential mechanism of parkin-regulated, evoked neurotransmitter release

  11. The interrelationship of proteasome impairment and oligomeric intermediates in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Deger, Jennifer M; Gerson, Julia E; Kayed, Rakez

    2015-01-01

    Various neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the accumulation of amyloidogenic proteins such as tau, α-synuclein, and amyloid-β. Prior to the formation of these stable aggregates, intermediate species of the respective proteins—oligomers—appear. Recently acquired data have shown that oligomers may be the most toxic and pathologically significant to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. The covalent modification of these oligomers may be critically important for biological processes in disease. Ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifiers are the commonly used tags for degradation. While the modification of large amyloid aggregates by ubiquitination is well established, very little is known about the role ubiquitin may play in oligomer processing and the importance of the more recently discovered sumoylation. Many proteins involved in neurodegeneration have been found to be sumoylated, notably tau protein in brains afflicted with Alzheimer’s. This evidence suggests that while the cell may not have difficulty recognizing dangerous proteins, in brains afflicted with neurodegenerative disease, the proteasome may be unable to properly digest the tagged proteins. This would allow toxic aggregates to develop, leading to even more proteasome impairment in a snowball effect that could explain the exponential progression in most neurodegenerative diseases. A better understanding of the covalent modifications of oligomers could have a huge impact on the development of therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases. This review will focus on the proteolysis of tau and other amyloidogenic proteins induced by covalent modification, and recent findings suggesting a relationship between tau oligomers and sumoylation. PMID:26053162

  12. Suppression of BRCA1 sensitizes cells to proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Y; Bouwman, P; Greco, D; Saarela, J; Yadav, B; Jonkers, J; Kuznetsov, S G

    2014-01-01

    BRCA1 is a multifunctional protein best known for its role in DNA repair and association with breast and ovarian cancers. To uncover novel biologically significant molecular functions of BRCA1, we tested a panel of 198 approved and experimental drugs to inhibit growth of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells depleted for BRCA1 by siRNA. 26S proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and carfilzomib emerged as a new class of selective BRCA1-targeting agents. The effect was confirmed in HeLa and U2OS cancer cell lines using two independent siRNAs, and in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells with inducible deletion of Brca1. Bortezomib treatment did not cause any increase in nuclear foci containing phosphorylated histone H2AX, and knockdown of BRCA2 did not entail sensitivity to bortezomib, suggesting that the DNA repair function of BRCA1 may not be directly involved. We found that a toxic effect of bortezomib on BRCA1-depleted cells is mostly due to deregulated cell cycle checkpoints mediated by RB1-E2F pathway and 53BP1. Similar to BRCA1, depletion of RB1 also conferred sensitivity to bortezomib, whereas suppression of E2F1 or 53BP1 together with BRCA1 reduced induction of apoptosis after bortezomib treatment. A gene expression microarray study identified additional genes activated by bortezomib treatment only in the context of inactivation of BRCA1 including a critical involvement of the ERN1-mediated unfolded protein response. Our data indicate that BRCA1 has a novel molecular function affecting cell cycle checkpoints in a manner dependent on the 26S proteasome activity. PMID:25522274

  13. Extracellular proteasome-osteopontin circuit regulates cell migration with implications in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dianzani, Chiara; Bellavista, Elena; Liepe, Juliane; Verderio, Claudia; Martucci, Morena; Santoro, Aurelia; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Luca Gigliotti, Casimiro; Boggio, Elena; Ferrara, Benedetta; Riganti, Loredana; Keller, Christin; Janek, Katharina; Niewienda, Agathe; Fenoglio, Chiara; Sorosina, Melissa; Cantello, Roberto; Kloetzel, Peter M.; Stumpf, Michael P. H.; Paul, Friedemann; Ruprecht, Klemens; Galimberti, Daniela; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Comi, Cristoforo; Dianzani, Umberto; Mishto, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Osteopontin is a pleiotropic cytokine that is involved in several diseases including multiple sclerosis. Secreted osteopontin is cleaved by few known proteases, modulating its pro-inflammatory activities. Here we show by in vitro experiments that secreted osteopontin can be processed by extracellular proteasomes, thereby producing fragments with novel chemotactic activity. Furthermore, osteopontin reduces the release of proteasomes in the extracellular space. The latter phenomenon seems to occur in vivo in multiple sclerosis, where it reflects the remission/relapse alternation. The extracellular proteasome-mediated inflammatory pathway may represent a general mechanism to control inflammation in inflammatory diseases. PMID:28276434

  14. Proteasome inhibitors induce apoptosis and reduce viral replication in primary effusion lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saji, Chiaki; Higashi, Chizuka; Niinaka, Yasufumi; Yamada, Koji; Noguchi, Kohji; Fujimuro, Masahiro

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Constitutive NF-{kappa}B signaling is essential for the survival and growth of PEL cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B signaling is upregulated by the proteasome-dependent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteasome inhibitors suppress NF-{kappa}B signaling and induce apoptosis in PEL cells through stabilization of I{kappa}B{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteasome inhibitors suppress viral replication in PEL cells during lytic KSHV infection. -- Abstract: Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an aggressive neoplasm caused by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). This study provides evidence that proteasomal activity is required for both survival of PEL cells stably harboring the KSHV genome and viral replication of KSHV. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of proteasome inhibitors on PEL cells. The proteasome inhibitors MG132, lactacystin, and proteasome inhibitor I dramatically inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of PEL cells through the accumulation of p21 and p27. Furthermore, proteasome inhibitors induced the stabilization of NF-{kappa}B inhibitory molecule (I{kappa}B{alpha}) and suppressed the transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in PEL cells. The NF-{kappa}B specific inhibitor BAY11-7082 also induced apoptosis in PEL cells. The constitutive activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling is essential for the survival and growth of B cell lymphoma cells, including PEL cells. NF-{kappa}B signaling is upregulated by proteasome-dependent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. The suppression of NF-{kappa}B signaling by proteasome inhibitors may contribute to the induction of apoptosis in PEL cells. In addition, proteasome activity is required for KSHV replication in KSHV latently infected PEL cells. MG132 reduced the production of progeny virus from PEL cells at low concentrations, which do not affect PEL cell growth. These findings suggest that proteasome inhibitors

  15. [Design, synthesis and biological assay of novel tripeptidic tetrazoles as inhibitors of 20S proteasome].

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-Heng; Xu, Bo; Cui, Jing-Rong; Yang, Zhen-Jun; Zhang, Liang-Ren; Zhang, Li-He

    2012-04-01

    Ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) is one of the ways utilized for selective degradation of many proteins in cells, and the 20S proteasome takes the functional machinery where hydrolysis of targeted proteins takes place. Based on existing peptide inhibitors, a series of novel tripeptidic tetrazoles have been designed, synthesized, and the structures have been confirmed with 1H NMR, MS and elemental analysis. Among them, three compounds (6b, 6d and 6h) showed inhibitory activities of ChT-L of 20S proteasome.

  16. Function-Oriented Biosynthesis of β-Lactone Proteasome Inhibitors in Salinispora tropica

    PubMed Central

    Nett, Markus; Gulder, Tobias A. M.; Kale, Andrew J.; Hughes, Chambers C.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2009-01-01

    The natural proteasome inhibitor salinosporamide A from the marine bacterium Salinispora tropica is a promising drug candidate for the treatment of multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. Using a comprehensive approach that combined chemical synthesis with metabolic engineering, we generated a series of salinosporamide analogues with altered proteasome binding affinity. One of the engineered compounds is equipotent to salinosporamide A in inhibition of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome, yet, exhibits superior activity in the cell-based HCT-116 assay. PMID:19746976

  17. Extracellular proteasome-osteopontin circuit regulates cell migration with implications in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dianzani, Chiara; Bellavista, Elena; Liepe, Juliane; Verderio, Claudia; Martucci, Morena; Santoro, Aurelia; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Luca Gigliotti, Casimiro; Boggio, Elena; Ferrara, Benedetta; Riganti, Loredana; Keller, Christin; Janek, Katharina; Niewienda, Agathe; Fenoglio, Chiara; Sorosina, Melissa; Cantello, Roberto; Kloetzel, Peter M; Stumpf, Michael P H; Paul, Friedemann; Ruprecht, Klemens; Galimberti, Daniela; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Comi, Cristoforo; Dianzani, Umberto; Mishto, Michele

    2017-03-09

    Osteopontin is a pleiotropic cytokine that is involved in several diseases including multiple sclerosis. Secreted osteopontin is cleaved by few known proteases, modulating its pro-inflammatory activities. Here we show by in vitro experiments that secreted osteopontin can be processed by extracellular proteasomes, thereby producing fragments with novel chemotactic activity. Furthermore, osteopontin reduces the release of proteasomes in the extracellular space. The latter phenomenon seems to occur in vivo in multiple sclerosis, where it reflects the remission/relapse alternation. The extracellular proteasome-mediated inflammatory pathway may represent a general mechanism to control inflammation in inflammatory diseases.

  18. Proteasome dysfunction in Drosophila signals to an Nrf2-dependent regulatory circuit aiming to restore proteostasis and prevent premature aging

    PubMed Central

    Tsakiri, Eleni N.; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P.; Papassideri, Issidora S.; Terpos, Evangelos; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.; Bohmann, Dirk; Trougakos, Ioannis P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The ubiquitin–proteasome system is central to the regulation of cellular proteostasis. Nevertheless, the impact of in vivo proteasome dysfunction on the proteostasis networks and the aging processes remains poorly understood. We found that RNAi-mediated knockdown of 20S proteasome subunits in Drosophila melanogaster resulted in larval lethality. We therefore studied the molecular effects of proteasome dysfunction in adult flies by developing a model of dose-dependent pharmacological proteasome inhibition. Impaired proteasome function promoted several ‘old-age’ phenotypes and markedly reduced flies’ lifespan. In young somatic tissues and in gonads of all ages, loss of proteasome activity induced higher expression levels and assembly rates of proteasome subunits. Proteasome dysfunction was signaled to the proteostasis network by reactive oxygen species that originated from malfunctioning mitochondria and triggered an Nrf2-dependent upregulation of the proteasome subunits. RNAi-mediated Nrf2 knockdown reduced proteasome activities, flies’ resistance to stress, as well as longevity. Conversely, inducible activation of Nrf2 in transgenic flies upregulated basal proteasome expression and activity independently of age and conferred resistance to proteotoxic stress. Interestingly, prolonged Nrf2 overexpression reduced longevity, indicating that excessive activation of the proteostasis pathways can be detrimental. Our in vivo studies add new knowledge on the proteotoxic stress-related regulation of the proteostasis networks in higher metazoans. Proteasome dysfunction triggers the activation of an Nrf2-dependent tissue- and age-specific regulatory circuit aiming to adjust the cellular proteasome activity according to temporal and/or spatial proteolytic demands. Prolonged deregulation of this proteostasis circuit accelerates aging. PMID:23738891

  19. No association between Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome skin fibrofolliculomas and the first 10 described human polyomaviruses or human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Maria; Nordfors, Cecilia; Vlastos, Andrea; Ferrara, Giovanni; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Dalianis, Tina

    2014-11-01

    The rare autosomal dominant condition Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) is attributed to mutations on chromosome 17 in the folliculin (FLCN) gene, but not always diagnosed due to lack of, or a variety of symptoms such as fibrofolliculomas, lung cystic lesions, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal cancer. We hypothesized that the lack of or variability in symptoms could be due to BHD patients potentially being abnormally susceptible to infections with human papillomavirus (HPV) or human polyomavirus (HPyV), which can be associated with skin lesions or latency in the kidneys. Seven fibrofolliculoma skin lesions, one renal cancer and one lung cyst from nine patients with BHD treated at the Karolinska University Hospital were therefore analyzed for cutaneous and mucosal HPV types and 10 HPyVs by bead based multiplex assays or by PCR. All samples were negative for viral DNA. In conclusion, the data suggest that HPV and HPyVs do not contribute to BHD pathology.

  20. Localization of the proteasomal ubiquitin receptors Rpn10 and Rpn13 by electron cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Eri; Bohn, Stefan; Mihalache, Oana; Kiss, Petra; Beck, Florian; Nagy, Istvan; Nickell, Stephan; Tanaka, Keiji; Saeki, Yasushi; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2012-01-31

    Two canonical subunits of the 26S proteasome, Rpn10 and Rpn13, function as ubiquitin (Ub) receptors. The mutual arrangement of these subunits--and all other non-ATPase subunits--in the regulatory particle is unknown. Using electron cryomicroscopy, we calculated difference maps between wild-type 26S proteasome from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and deletion mutants (rpn10Δ, rpn13Δ, and rpn10Δrpn13Δ). These maps allowed us to localize the two Ub receptors unambiguously. Rpn10 and Rpn13 mapped to the apical part of the 26S proteasome, above the N-terminal coiled coils of the AAA-ATPase heterodimers Rpt4/Rpt5 and Rpt1/Rpt2, respectively. On the basis of the mutual positions of Rpn10 and Rpn13, we propose a model for polyubiquitin binding to the 26S proteasome.

  1. Localization of the proteasomal ubiquitin receptors Rpn10 and Rpn13 by electron cryomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Eri; Bohn, Stefan; Mihalache, Oana; Kiss, Petra; Beck, Florian; Nagy, Istvan; Nickell, Stephan; Tanaka, Keiji; Saeki, Yasushi; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Two canonical subunits of the 26S proteasome, Rpn10 and Rpn13, function as ubiquitin (Ub) receptors. The mutual arrangement of these subunits—and all other non-ATPase subunits—in the regulatory particle is unknown. Using electron cryomicroscopy, we calculated difference maps between wild-type 26S proteasome from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and deletion mutants (rpn10Δ, rpn13Δ, and rpn10Δrpn13Δ). These maps allowed us to localize the two Ub receptors unambiguously. Rpn10 and Rpn13 mapped to the apical part of the 26S proteasome, above the N-terminal coiled coils of the AAA-ATPase heterodimers Rpt4/Rpt5 and Rpt1/Rpt2, respectively. On the basis of the mutual positions of Rpn10 and Rpn13, we propose a model for polyubiquitin binding to the 26S proteasome. PMID:22215586

  2. The role of proteasome inhibition in the treatment of malignant and non-malignant hematologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Citrin, Rebecca; Foster, Jessica B; Teachey, David T

    2016-09-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have garnered interest as novel chemotherapeutic agents based on their ability to inhibit the growth of cancer cells by altering the balance of intracellular proteins. Initial clinical trials of this drug class focused on bortezomib, a reversible inhibitor of the 20S proteasome, with promising results for the treatment of adult hematologic malignancies, including multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. This article will review the use of bortezomib and other proteasome inhibitors in both adult and pediatric populations, with a focus on their use in pediatrics. Expert commentary: Bortezomib moved into the pediatric oncology arena with encouraging results in multiple early phase trials for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. Bortezomib is also being studied in the treatment of non-malignant disorders, including antibody-mediated allograft rejection, graft-versus-host disease, and autoimmune cytopenias. The numerous applications of bortezomib have inspired the development of second-generation proteasome inhibitors.

  3. Remodelling of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in response to interferons.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Ulrike; Krüger, Elke

    2008-10-01

    Peptide generation by the UPS (ubiquitin-proteasome system) is rate-limiting in MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation in response to virus-induced IFNs (interferons). In this process, the role of IFN-induced rapid remodelling of the UPS is less defined. IFN-mediated de novo formation of different proteasome compositions as i20S (immunoproteasomes) or m20S (mixed-type proteasomes) essentially supports the rapid adjustment of the mammalian immune system to pathogens. This adjustment is of particular importance for the immune response to rapidly replicating viruses. In agreement, i20S formation has been shown to be an accelerated and transient response. Moreover, i20S and/or PA28 (proteasome activator 28) are essentially required for the generation of certain viral epitopes. In the present paper, we discuss how IFNs consecutively regulate the UPS at different levels, thereby improving the immune responsiveness of target cells.

  4. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel non-peptide boronic acid derivatives as proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ying; Li, Aibo; Wu, Jianwei; Feng, Haiwei; Wang, Letian; Liu, Hongwu; Xu, Yungen; Xu, Qingxiang; Zhao, Li; Li, Yuyan

    2017-03-10

    A novel series of non-peptide proteasome inhibitors bearing the 1, 4-naphthoquinone scaffold and boronic acid warhead was developed. In the biological evaluation on the chymotrypsin-like activity of human 20S proteasome, five compounds showed IC50 values in the nanomolar range. Docking experiments into the yeast 20S proteasome rationalized their biological activities and allowed further optimization of this interesting class of inhibitors. Within the cellular proliferation inhibition assay and western blot analysis, compound 3e demonstrated excellent anti-proliferative activity against solid tumor cells and clear accumulation of ubiquitinated cellular proteins. Furthermore, in the microsomal stability assay compound 3e demonstrated much improved metabolic stability compared to bortezomib, emerging as a promising lead compound for further design of non-peptide proteasome inhibitors.

  5. The effects of proteasome inhibitors on bone remodeling in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Zangari, Maurizio; Suva, Larry J

    2016-05-01

    Bone disease is a characteristic feature of multiple myeloma, a malignant plasma cell dyscrasia. In patients with multiple myeloma, the normal process of bone remodeling is dysregulated by aberrant bone marrow plasma cells, resulting in increased bone resorption, prevention of new bone formation, and consequent bone destruction. The ubiquitin-proteasome system, which is hyperactive in patients with multiple myeloma, controls the catabolism of several proteins that regulate bone remodeling. Clinical studies have reported that treatment with the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib reduces bone resorption and increases bone formation and bone mineral density in patients with multiple myeloma. Since the introduction of bortezomib in 2003, several next-generation proteasome inhibitors have also been used clinically, including carfilzomib, oprozomib, ixazomib, and delanzomib. This review summarizes the available preclinical and clinical evidence regarding the effect of proteasome inhibitors on bone remodeling in multiple myeloma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Inherent asymmetry in the 26S proteasome is defined by the ubiquitin receptor RPN13.

    PubMed

    Berko, Dikla; Herkon, Ora; Braunstein, Ilana; Isakov, Elada; David, Yael; Ziv, Tamar; Navon, Ami; Stanhill, Ariel

    2014-02-28

    The 26S double-capped proteasome is assembled in a hierarchic event that is orchestrated by dedicated set of chaperons. To date, all stoichiometric subunits are considered to be present in equal ratios, thus providing symmetry to the double-capped complex. Here, we show that although the vast majority (if not all) of the double-capped 26S proteasomes, both 19S complexes, contain the ubiquitin receptor Rpn10/S5a, only one of these 19S particles contains the additional ubiquitin receptor Rpn13, thereby defining asymmetry in the 26S proteasome. These results were validated in yeast and mammals, utilizing biochemical and unbiased AQUA-MS methodologies. Thus, the double-capped 26S proteasomes are asymmetric in their polyubiquitin binding capacity. Our data point to a potential new role for ubiquitin receptors as directionality factors that may participate in the prevention of simultaneous substrates translocation into the 20S from both 19S caps.

  7. Aggresome-like structure induced by isothiocyanates is novel proteasome-dependent degradation machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Mi, Lixin; Gan, Nanqin; Chung, Fung-Lung

    2009-10-16

    Unwanted or misfolded proteins are either refolded by chaperones or degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). When UPS is impaired, misfolded proteins form aggregates, which are transported along microtubules by motor protein dynein towards the juxta-nuclear microtubule-organizing center to form aggresome, a single cellular garbage disposal complex. Because aggresome formation results from proteasome failure, aggresome components are degraded through the autophagy/lysosome pathway. Here we report that small molecule isothiocyanates (ITCs) can induce formation of aggresome-like structure (ALS) through covalent modification of cytoplasmic {alpha}- and {beta}-tubulin. The formation of ALS is related to neither proteasome inhibition nor oxidative stress. ITC-induced ALS is a proteasome-dependent assembly for emergent removal of misfolded proteins, suggesting that the cell may have a previously unknown strategy to cope with misfolded proteins.

  8. Operational definition of intrinsically unstructured protein sequences based on susceptibility to the 20S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Peter; Asher, Gad; Paz, Aviv; Reuven, Nina; Sussman, Joel L; Silman, Israel; Shaul, Yosef

    2008-03-01

    Intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs), also known as natively unfolded proteins, lack well-defined secondary and tertiary structure under physiological conditions. In recent years, growing experimental and theoretical evidence has accumulated, indicating that many entire proteins and protein sequences are unstructured under physiological conditions, and that they play significant roles in diverse cellular processes. Bioinformatic algorithms have been developed to identify such sequences in proteins for which structural data are lacking, but still generate substantial numbers of false positives and negatives. We describe here a simple and reliable in vitro assay for identifying IUP sequences based on their susceptibility to 20S proteasomal degradation. We show that 20S proteasomes digest IUP sequences, under conditions in which native, and even molten globule states, are resistant. Furthermore, we show that protein-protein interactions can protect IUPs against 20S proteasomal action. Taken together, our results thus suggest that the 20S proteasome degradation assay provides a powerful system for operational definition of IUPs.

  9. Gambogic acid is a tissue-specific proteasome inhibitor in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Shouting; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Ningning; Zhao, Chong; Liao, Siyan; Yang, Changshan; Liu, Yurong; Zhao, Canguo; Li, Shujue; Lu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Chunjiao; Guan, Lixia; Zhao, Kai; Shi, Xiaoqing; Song, Wenbin; Zhou, Ping; Dong, Xiaoxian; Guo, Haiping; Wen, Guanmei; Zhang, Change; Jiang, Lili; Ma, Ningfang; Li, Bing; Wang, Shunqing; Tan, Huo; Wang, Xuejun; Dou, Q Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2013-01-31

    Gambogic acid (GA) is a natural compound derived from Chinese herbs that has been approved by the Chinese Food and Drug Administration for clinical trials in cancer patients; however, its molecular targets have not been thoroughly studied. Here, we report that GA inhibits tumor proteasome activity, with potency comparable to bortezomib but much less toxicity. First, GA acts as a prodrug and only gains proteasome-inhibitory function after being metabolized by intracellular CYP2E1. Second, GA-induced proteasome inhibition is a prerequisite for its cytotoxicity and anticancer effect without off-targets. Finally, because expression of the CYP2E1 gene is very high in tumor tissues but low in many normal tissues, GA could therefore produce tissue-specific proteasome inhibition and tumor-specific toxicity, with clinical significance for designing novel strategies for cancer treatment.

  10. Ubiquitin-Like Protein Involved in the Proteasome Pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Michael J.; Mintseris, Julian; Ferreyra, Jessica; Gygi, Steven P.; Darwin, K. Heran

    2009-01-01

    The protein modifier ubiquitin is a signal for proteasome-mediated degradation in eukaryotes. Proteasome-bearing prokaryotes have been thought to degrade proteins via a ubiquitin-independent pathway. We have identified a prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein, Pup (Rv2111c), which was specifically conjugated to proteasome substrates in the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Pupylation occurred on lysines and required proteasome accessory factor A (PafA). In a pafA mutant, pupylated proteins were absent and substrates accumulated, thereby connecting pupylation with degradation. Although analogous to ubiquitylation, pupylation appears to proceed by a different chemistry. Thus, like eukaryotes, bacteria may use a small-protein modifier to control protein stability. PMID:18832610

  11. Recent advances in the structural biology of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Wehmer, Marc; Sakata, Eri

    2016-10-01

    There is growing appreciation for the fundamental role of structural dynamics in the function of macromolecules. In particular, the 26S proteasome, responsible for selective protein degradation in an ATP dependent manner, exhibits dynamic conformational changes that enable substrate processing. Recent cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) work has revealed the conformational dynamics of the 26S proteasome and established the function of the different conformational states. Technological advances such as direct electron detectors and image processing algorithms allowed resolving the structure of the proteasome at atomic resolution. Here we will review those studies and discuss their contribution to our understanding of proteasome function. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Arabidopsis MBP1 gene encodes a conserved ubiquitin recognition component of the 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Nocker, S. Van; Deveraux, Q.; Rechsteiner, M.

    1996-01-23

    Multiubiquitin chain attachment is a key step leading to the selective degradation of abnormal polypeptides and many important regulatory proteins by the eukaryotic 26S proteasome. However, the mechanism by which the 26S complex recognizes this posttranslational modification is unknown. Using synthetic multiubiquitin chains to probe an expression library for interacting proteins, we have isolated an Arabidopsis cDNA, designated MBP1, that encodes a 41-kDa acidic protein exhibiting high affinity for chains, especially those containing four or more ubiquitins. Based on similar physical and immunological properties, multiubiquitin binding affinities, and peptide sequence, MBP1 is homologous to subunit 5a of the human 26S proteasome. Structurally related proteins also exist in yeast, Caenorhabditis, and other plant species. Given their binding properties, association with the 26S proteasome, and widespread distribution, MBP1, S5a, and related proteins likely function as essential ubiquitin recognition components of the 26S proteasome. 35 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Structure of archaeal proteasomal ATPase PAN by single particle cryoEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royal, Renee; Yadong, Yu; Cheng, Yifan

    2010-02-01

    ATP dependent protein degradation in eukaryotes by 26S proteasome are essential for many cellular processes including apoptosis, cell cycles and signal transduction. 26S proteasome is composed of a barrel shaped 20S protease core and two regulatory particles capped on each end. The ATPases in the 19S regulatory particles unfold and translocate substrates into 20S for degradation. Archaea has a homologous yet simpler 20S proteasome and a regulatory ATPase, proteasome activating nucleotidase (PAN.) In this study we used single particle cryoEM to study the three dimensional structure of PAN. We obtained a 3D reconstruction of PAN at a resolution of 18 Angstroms. By docking the atomic structure of PAN's N-terminal domain and ATPase domain to the atomic structure determined x-ray crystallography, we generated an atomic model of full length PAN ATPase. )

  14. Novel internally quenched substrate of the trypsin-like subunit of 20S eukaryotic proteasome.

    PubMed

    Gruba, Natalia; Wysocka, Magdalena; Brzezińska, Magdalena; Debowski, Dawid; Rolka, Krzysztof; Martin, Nathaniel I; Lesner, Adam

    2016-09-01

    This article describes the synthesis, using combinatorial chemistry, of internally quenched substrates of the trypsin-like subunit of human 20S proteasome. Such substrates were optimized in both the nonprime and prime regions of the peptide chain. Two were selected as the most susceptible for proteasomal proteolysis with excellent kinetic parameters: (i) ABZ-Val-Val-Ser-Arg-Ser-Leu-Gly-Tyr(3-NO2)-NH2 (kcat/KM = 934,000 M(-1) s(-1)) and (ii) ABZ-Val-Val-Ser-GNF-Ala-Met-Gly-Tyr(3-NO2)-NH2 (kcat/KM = 1,980,000 M(-1) s(-1)). Both compounds were efficiently hydrolyzed by the 20S proteasome at picomolar concentrations, demonstrating significant selectivity over other proteasome entities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of rat liver and brain proteasomes for oxidative stress-induced inactivation: Influence of ageing and dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Dasuri, Kalavathi; Nguyen, Anhthao; Zhang, Le; Fernandez-Kim, Ok Sun; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Blalock, Bradford A; Cabo, Rafael De; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined brain and liver derived proteasome complexes to elucidate if there is a differential susceptibility in proteasome complexes from these tissues to undergo inactivation following exposure to oxidative stressors. It then examined the influence of ageing and dietary restriction (DR) on the observed proteasome inactivation. Studies used a filtration based methodology that allows for enrichment of proteasome complexes with less tissue than is required for traditional chromatography procedures. The results indicate that the brain has much lower levels of overall proteasome activity and exhibits increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide mediated inactivation as compared to proteasome complexes derived from the liver. Interestingly, the brain proteasome complexes did not appear to have increased susceptibility to 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE)-induced inactivation. Surprisingly, ageing and DR induced minimal effects on oxidative stress mediated proteasome inhibition. These results indicate that the brain not only has lower levels of proteasome activity compared to the liver, but is also more susceptible to inactivation following exposure to some (but certainly not all) oxidative stressors. This data also suggest that ageing and DR may not significantly modulate the resistance of the proteasome to inactivation in some experimental settings.

  16. Inhibition of Tumor Cellular Proteasome Activity by Triptolide Extracted from the Chinese Medicinal Plant ‘Thunder God Vine’

    PubMed Central

    LU, LI; KANWAR, JYOTI; SCHMITT, SARA; CUI, QIUZHI CINDY; ZHANG, CHUANYIN; ZHAO, CONG; DOU, Q. PING

    2012-01-01

    Aims The molecular mechanisms of triptolide responsible for its antitumor properties are not yet fully understood. The ubiquitin/proteasome system is an important pathway of protein degradation in cells. This study investigated whether triptolide may inhibit proteasomal activity and induce apoptosis in human cancer cells. Materials and Methods In vitro proteasome inhibition was measured by incubation of a purified 20S proteasome with triptolide. Human breast and prostate cancer cell lines were also treated with different doses of triptolide for different times, followed by measurement of proteasome inhibition (levels of the chymotrypsin-like activity, ubiquitinated proteins and three well-known proteasome target proteins, p27, IκB-α and Bax) and apoptosis induction (caspase-3 activity and PARP cleavage). Results Triptolide did not inhibit the chymotrypsin-like activity of purified 20S proteasome. However, treatment of triptolide was able to cause decreased levels of cellular proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity and accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and three well-known proteasome target proteins in human breast and prostate cancer cells, associated with apoptosis induction. Conclusion It is possible that at least one of metabolites of triptolide has proteasome-inhibitory activity. PMID:21273574

  17. Proteasome subtypes and regulators in the processing of antigenic peptides presented by class I molecules of the major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Vigneron, Nathalie; Van den Eynde, Benoît J

    2014-11-18

    The proteasome is responsible for the breakdown of cellular proteins. Proteins targeted for degradation are allowed inside the proteasome particle, where they are cleaved into small peptides and released in the cytosol to be degraded into amino acids. In vertebrates, some of these peptides escape degradation in the cytosol, are loaded onto class I molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and displayed at the cell surface for scrutiny by the immune system. The proteasome therefore plays a key role for the immune system: it provides a continued sampling of intracellular proteins, so that CD8-positive T-lymphocytes can kill cells expressing viral or tumoral proteins. Consequently, the repertoire of peptides displayed by MHC class I molecules at the cell surface depends on proteasome activity, which may vary according to the presence of proteasome subtypes and regulators. Besides standard proteasomes, cells may contain immunoproteasomes, intermediate proteasomes and thymoproteasomes. Cells may also contain regulators of proteasome activity, such as the 19S, PA28 and PA200 regulators. Here, we review the effects of these proteasome subtypes and regulators on the production of antigenic peptides. We also discuss an unexpected function of the proteasome discovered through the study of antigenic peptides: its ability to splice peptides.

  18. Proteasome Subtypes and Regulators in the Processing of Antigenic Peptides Presented by Class I Molecules of the Major Histocompatibility Complex

    PubMed Central

    Vigneron, Nathalie; Van den Eynde, Benoît J.

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome is responsible for the breakdown of cellular proteins. Proteins targeted for degradation are allowed inside the proteasome particle, where they are cleaved into small peptides and released in the cytosol to be degraded into amino acids. In vertebrates, some of these peptides escape degradation in the cytosol, are loaded onto class I molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and displayed at the cell surface for scrutiny by the immune system. The proteasome therefore plays a key role for the immune system: it provides a continued sampling of intracellular proteins, so that CD8-positive T-lymphocytes can kill cells expressing viral or tumoral proteins. Consequently, the repertoire of peptides displayed by MHC class I molecules at the cell surface depends on proteasome activity, which may vary according to the presence of proteasome subtypes and regulators. Besides standard proteasomes, cells may contain immunoproteasomes, intermediate proteasomes and thymoproteasomes. Cells may also contain regulators of proteasome activity, such as the 19S, PA28 and PA200 regulators. Here, we review the effects of these proteasome subtypes and regulators on the production of antigenic peptides. We also discuss an unexpected function of the proteasome discovered through the study of antigenic peptides: its ability to splice peptides. PMID:25412285

  19. Differential regulation of proteasome functionality in reproductive vs. somatic tissues of Drosophila during aging or oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Tsakiri, Eleni N.; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P.; Papassideri, Issidora S.; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.; Bohmann, Dirk; Trougakos, Ioannis P.

    2013-01-01

    Proteasome is central to proteostasis maintenance, as it degrades both normal and damaged proteins. Herein, we undertook a detailed analysis of proteasome regulation in the in vivo setting of Drosophila melanogaster. We report that a major hallmark of somatic tissues of aging flies is the gradual accumulation of ubiquitinated and carbonylated proteins; these effects correlated with a ∼50% reduction of proteasome expression and catalytic activities. In contrast, gonads of aging flies were relatively free of proteome oxidative damage and maintained substantial proteasome expression levels and highly active proteasomes. Moreover, gonads of young flies were found to possess more abundant and more active proteasomes than somatic tissues. Exposure of flies to oxidants induced higher proteasome activities specifically in the gonads, which were, independently of age, more resistant than soma to oxidative challenge and, as analyses in reporter transgenic flies showed, retained functional antioxidant responses. Finally, inducible Nrf2 activation in transgenic flies promoted youthful proteasome expression levels in the aged soma, suggesting that age-dependent Nrf2 dysfunction is causative of decreasing somatic proteasome expression during aging. The higher investment in proteostasis maintenance in the gonads plausibly facilitates proteome stability across generations; it also provides evidence in support of the trade-off theories of aging.—Tsakiri, E. N., Sykiotis, G. P., Papassideri, I. S., Gorgoulis, V. G., Bohmann, D., Trougakos, I. P. Differential regulation of proteasome functionality in reproductive vs. somatic tissues of Drosophila during aging or oxidative stress. PMID:23457214

  20. The potential of ixazomib, a second-generation proteasome inhibitor, in the treatment of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Brayer, Jason; Baz, Rachid

    2017-01-01

    The therapeutic armamentarium for multiple myeloma has recently benefited from the addition of several new agents (including second-generation proteasome inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies and histone deacetylase inhibitors). This review will focus on ixazomib, an orally bioavailable second-generation proteasome inhibitor. Specifically, we will review the preclinical data, clinical trial experience, potential indications as well as unanswered questions pertaining to this new agent in multiple myeloma. PMID:28694935

  1. Molecular study on copper-mediated tumor proteasome inhibition and cell death

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIA; CUI, QIUZHI; FAN, YUHUA; BI, CAIFENG; DOU, Q. PING

    2013-01-01

    The metal ion copper is a cofactor essential for maintaining normal biological and physical functions in human beings. High copper levels have been found in variety of tumor tissues and are inv