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Sample records for proteasome component genes

  1. Arabidopsis MBP1 gene encodes a conserved ubiquitin recognition component of the 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Nocker, S. Van; Deveraux, Q.; Rechsteiner, M.

    1996-01-23

    Multiubiquitin chain attachment is a key step leading to the selective degradation of abnormal polypeptides and many important regulatory proteins by the eukaryotic 26S proteasome. However, the mechanism by which the 26S complex recognizes this posttranslational modification is unknown. Using synthetic multiubiquitin chains to probe an expression library for interacting proteins, we have isolated an Arabidopsis cDNA, designated MBP1, that encodes a 41-kDa acidic protein exhibiting high affinity for chains, especially those containing four or more ubiquitins. Based on similar physical and immunological properties, multiubiquitin binding affinities, and peptide sequence, MBP1 is homologous to subunit 5a of the human 26S proteasome. Structurally related proteins also exist in yeast, Caenorhabditis, and other plant species. Given their binding properties, association with the 26S proteasome, and widespread distribution, MBP1, S5a, and related proteins likely function as essential ubiquitin recognition components of the 26S proteasome. 35 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Interaction of Gcn4 with target gene chromatin is modulated by proteasome function

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Gregory C.; Tansey, William P.

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) influences gene transcription in multiple ways. One way in which the UPS affects transcription centers on transcriptional activators, the function of which can be stimulated by components of the UPS that also trigger their destruction. Activation of transcription by the yeast activator Gcn4, for example, is attenuated by mutations in the ubiquitin ligase that mediates Gcn4 ubiquitylation or by inhibition of the proteasome, leading to the idea that ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of Gcn4 is required for its activity. Here we probe the steps in Gcn4 activity that are perturbed by disruption of the UPS. We show that the ubiquitylation machinery and the proteasome control different steps in Gcn4 function and that proteasome activity is required for the ability of Gcn4 to bind to its target genes in the context of chromatin. Curiously, the effect of proteasome inhibition on Gcn4 activity is suppressed by mutations in the ubiquitin-selective chaperone Cdc48, revealing that proteolysis per se is not required for Gcn4 activity. Our data highlight the role of Cdc48 in controlling promoter occupancy by Gcn4 and support a model in which ubiquitylation of activators—not their destruction—is important for function. PMID:27385344

  3. Ubiquitin-proteasome pathway components as therapeutic targets for CNS maladies.

    PubMed

    Upadhya, Sudarshan C; Hegde, Ashok N

    2005-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), abnormal deposition of insoluble protein aggregates or inclusion bodies within nerve cells is commonly observed in association with several neurodegenerative diseases. The ubiquitinated protein aggregates are believed to result from malfunction or overload of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway or from structural changes in the protein substrates which prevent their recognition and degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Impaired proteolysis might also contribute to the synaptic dysfunction seen early in neurodegenerative diseases because the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is known to play a role in normal functioning of synapses. Because specificity of the ubiquitin proteasome mediated proteolysis is determined by specific ubiquitin ligases (E3s), identification of specific E3s and their allosteric modulators are likely to provide effective therapeutic targets for the treatment of several CNS disorders. Another unexplored area for the discovery of drug targets is the proteasome. Although many inhibitors of the proteasome are available, no effective drugs exist that can stimulate the proteasome. Since abnormal protein aggregation is a common feature of different neurodegenerative diseases, enhancement of proteasome activity might be an efficient way to remove the aggregates that accumulate in the brain. In this review, we discuss how the components of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway could be potential targets for therapy of CNS diseases and disorders.

  4. Gene therapy by proteasome activator, PA28γ, improves motor coordination and proteasome function in Huntington's disease YAC128 mice.

    PubMed

    Jeon, J; Kim, W; Jang, J; Isacson, O; Seo, H

    2016-06-02

    Huntington's disease (HD) is neurologically characterized by involuntary movements, associated with degeneration of the medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) and ubiquitin-positive neuronal intranuclear inclusions (NIIs). It has been reported that the proteolytic activities of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) are generally inhibited in HD patient's brain. We previously discovered that a proteasome activator (PA), PA28γ enhances proteasome activities and cell survival in in vitro HD model. In this study, we aimed to find whether PA28γ gene transfer improves the proteasome activities and pathological symptoms in in vivo HD model. We stereotaxically injected lenti-PA28γ virus into the striatum of mutant (MT) YAC128 HD mice and littermate (LM) controls at 14-18months of age, and validated their behavioral and biochemical changes at 12weeks after the injection. YAC128 mice showed a significant increase in their peptidyl-glutamyl preferring hydrolytic (PGPH) proteasome activity and the mRNA or protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and pro-BDNF after lenti-PA28γ injection. The number of ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies was reduced in the striatum of YAC128 mice after lenti-PA28γ injection. YAC128 mice showed significant improvement of latency to fall on the rota-rod test after lenti-PA28γ injection. These data demonstrate that the gene therapy with PA, PA28γ can improve UPS function as well as behavioral abnormalities in HD model mice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Proteasome inhibition enhances resistance to DNA damage via upregulation of Rpn4-dependent DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Karpov, Dmitry S; Spasskaya, Daria S; Tutyaeva, Vera V; Mironov, Alexander S; Karpov, Vadim L

    2013-09-17

    The 26S proteasome is an ATP-dependent multi-subunit protease complex and the major regulator of intracellular protein turnover and quality control. However, its role in the DNA damage response is controversial. We addressed this question in yeast by disrupting the transcriptional regulation of the PRE1 proteasomal gene. The mutant strain has decreased proteasome activity and is hyper-resistant to various DNA-damaging agents. We found that Rpn4-target genes MAG1, RAD23, and RAD52 are overexpressed in this strain due to Rpn4 stabilisation. These genes represent three different pathways of base excision, nucleotide excision and double strand break repair by homologous recombination (DSB-HR). Consistently, the proteasome mutant displays increased DSB-HR activity. Our data imply that the proteasome may have a negative role in DNA damage response.

  6. The fission yeast nucleoporin Alm1 is required for proteasomal degradation of kinetochore components.

    PubMed

    Salas-Pino, Silvia; Gallardo, Paola; Barrales, Ramón R; Braun, Sigurd; Daga, Rafael R

    2017-10-03

    Kinetochores (KTs) are large multiprotein complexes that constitute the interface between centromeric chromatin and the mitotic spindle during chromosome segregation. In spite of their essential role, little is known about how centromeres and KTs are assembled and how their precise stoichiometry is regulated. In this study, we show that the nuclear pore basket component Alm1 is required to maintain both the proteasome and its anchor, Cut8, at the nuclear envelope, which in turn regulates proteostasis of certain inner KT components. Consistently, alm1-deleted cells show increased levels of KT proteins, including CENP-C(Cnp3), spindle assembly checkpoint activation, and chromosome segregation defects. Our data demonstrate a novel function of the nucleoporin Alm1 in proteasome localization required for KT homeostasis. © 2017 Salas-Pino et al.

  7. A Sporadic Parkinson Disease Model via Silencing of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome/E3 Ligase Component SKP1A*

    PubMed Central

    Fishman-Jacob, Tali; Reznichenko, Lydia; Youdim, Moussa B. H.; Mandel, Silvia A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new model of sporadic Parkinson disease (PD) based on silencing of the SKP1A gene, a component of the ubiquitin-proteasome/E3 ligase complex, Skp1, Cullin 1, F-box protein, which was found to be highly decreased in the substantia nigra of sporadic PD patients. Initially, an embryonic mouse substantia nigra-derived cell line (SN4741 cells) was infected with short hairpin RNA lentiviruses encoding the murine transcript of the SKP1A gene or with scrambled vector. SKP1A silencing resulted in increased susceptibility to neuronal damages induced by the parkinsonism-inducing neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion and serum starvation, in parallel with a decline in the expression of the dopaminergic markers, dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter-2. SKP1A-deficient cells presented a delay in completion of the cell cycle and the inability to arrest at the G0/G1 phase when induced to differentiate. Instead, the cells progressed through S phase, developing rounded aggregates with characteristics of aggresomes including immunoreactivity for γ-tubulin, α-synuclein, ubiquitin, tyrosine hydroxylase, Hsc-70 (70-kDa heat shock cognate protein), and proteasome subunit, and culminating in a lethal phenotype. Conversely, stably enforced expression of wild type SKP1A duplicated the survival index of naïve SN4741 cells under proteasomal inhibition injury, suggesting a new structural role of SKP1 in dopaminergic neuronal function, besides its E3 ligase activity. These results link, for the first time, SKP1 to dopamine neuronal function and survival, suggesting an essential role in sporadic PD. In summary, this new model has reproduced to a significant extent the molecular alterations described in sporadic PD at the cellular level, implicating Skp1 as a potential modifier in sporadic PD neurodegeneration. PMID:19748892

  8. A sporadic Parkinson disease model via silencing of the ubiquitin-proteasome/E3 ligase component SKP1A.

    PubMed

    Fishman-Jacob, Tali; Reznichenko, Lydia; Youdim, Moussa B H; Mandel, Silvia A

    2009-11-20

    The aim of this study was to develop a new model of sporadic Parkinson disease (PD) based on silencing of the SKP1A gene, a component of the ubiquitin-proteasome/E3 ligase complex, Skp1, Cullin 1, F-box protein, which was found to be highly decreased in the substantia nigra of sporadic PD patients. Initially, an embryonic mouse substantia nigra-derived cell line (SN4741 cells) was infected with short hairpin RNA lentiviruses encoding the murine transcript of the SKP1A gene or with scrambled vector. SKP1A silencing resulted in increased susceptibility to neuronal damages induced by the parkinsonism-inducing neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion and serum starvation, in parallel with a decline in the expression of the dopaminergic markers, dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter-2. SKP1A-deficient cells presented a delay in completion of the cell cycle and the inability to arrest at the G(0)/G(1) phase when induced to differentiate. Instead, the cells progressed through S phase, developing rounded aggregates with characteristics of aggresomes including immunoreactivity for gamma-tubulin, alpha-synuclein, ubiquitin, tyrosine hydroxylase, Hsc-70 (70-kDa heat shock cognate protein), and proteasome subunit, and culminating in a lethal phenotype. Conversely, stably enforced expression of wild type SKP1A duplicated the survival index of naïve SN4741 cells under proteasomal inhibition injury, suggesting a new structural role of SKP1 in dopaminergic neuronal function, besides its E3 ligase activity. These results link, for the first time, SKP1 to dopamine neuronal function and survival, suggesting an essential role in sporadic PD. In summary, this new model has reproduced to a significant extent the molecular alterations described in sporadic PD at the cellular level, implicating Skp1 as a potential modifier in sporadic PD neurodegeneration.

  9. Impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in RPE alters the expression of inflammation related genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) plays an important role in regulating gene expression. Retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) are a major source of ocular inflammatory cytokines. In this work we determined the relationship between impairment of the UPP and expression of inflammation-related f...

  10. Dendrite development regulated by the schizophrenia-associated gene FEZ1 involves the ubiquitin proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yasuhito; Khodosevich, Konstantin; Monyer, Hannah

    2014-04-24

    Downregulation of the schizophrenia-associated gene DISC1 and its interacting protein FEZ1 positively regulates dendrite growth in young neurons. However, little is known about the mechanism that controls these molecules during neuronal development. Here, we identify several components of the ubiquitin proteasome system and the cell-cycle machinery that act upstream of FEZ1. We demonstrate that the ubiquitin ligase cell division cycle 20/anaphase-promoting complex (Cdc20/APC) controls dendrite growth by regulating the degradation of FEZ1. Furthermore, dendrite growth is modulated by BubR1, whose known function so far has been restricted to control Cdc20/APC activity during the cell cycle. The modulatory function of BubR1 is dependent on its acetylation status. We show that BubR1 is deacetylated by Hdac11, thereby disinhibiting the Cdc20/APC complex. Because dendrite growth is affected both in hippocampal dentate granule cells and olfactory bulb neurons upon modifying expression of these genes, we conclude that the proposed mechanism governs neuronal development in a general fashion.

  11. Cocaine and ethanol target 26S proteasome activity and gene expression in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Caputi, Francesca Felicia; Carboni, Lucia; Mazza, Daria; Candeletti, Sanzio; Romualdi, Patrizia

    2016-04-01

    Ethanol and cocaine are widely abused drugs triggering long-lasting changes in neuronal circuits and synaptic transmission through the regulation of enzyme activity and gene expression. Compelling evidence indicates that the ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a role in the molecular changes induced by addictive substances, impacting on several mechanisms implicated in abuse. The goal of these studies was to evaluate the effects of cocaine or ethanol on proteasome activity in neuroblastoma cells. Moreover, the gene expression of specific subunits was assessed. Chymotrypsin-like activity was measured after 2 h, 24 h, and 48 h exposure to 5 μM cocaine or 40 mM ethanol. Proteasome subunit transcripts were evaluated by qPCR at the same time-points. Treatments modified proteasome function in opposite directions, since cocaine increased and ethanol reduced chymotrypsin-like activity. Interestingly, we observed gene expression alterations induced by these drugs. In the core particle, the β1 and α5 subunits were mainly up-regulated by cocaine, whereas α6 transcripts were mostly decreased. β2 and β5 did not change. Similarly, ethanol exposure generally increased β1 and α5 mRNAs. Moreover, the β2 subunit was significantly up-regulated by ethanol only. The β5 and α6 subunits were not altered. In the regulatory particle, Rpt3 was increased by cocaine exposure, whereas it was reduced by ethanol. No significant Rpn9 alterations were observed. These findings support the notion that addictive substances regulate proteasome function, contributing to the dysregulations related to drug abuse since the availability of adequate subunit amounts is necessary for proper complex assembly and function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Proteasome-dependent degradation of replisome components regulates faithful DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Roseaulin, Laura C; Noguchi, Chiaki; Noguchi, Eishi

    2013-08-15

    The replication machinery, or the replisome, collides with a variety of obstacles during the normal process of DNA replication. In addition to damaged template DNA, numerous chromosome regions are considered to be difficult to replicate owing to the presence of DNA secondary structures and DNA-binding proteins. Under these conditions, the replication fork stalls, generating replication stress. Stalled forks are prone to collapse, posing serious threats to genomic integrity. It is generally thought that the replication checkpoint functions to stabilize the replisome and replication fork structure upon replication stress. This is important in order to allow DNA replication to resume once the problem is solved. However, our recent studies demonstrated that some replisome components undergo proteasome-dependent degradation during DNA replication in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our investigation has revealed the involvement of the SCF(Pof3) (Skp1-Cullin/Cdc53-F-box) ubiquitin ligase in replisome regulation. We also demonstrated that forced accumulation of the replisome components leads to abnormal DNA replication upon replication stress. Here we review these findings and present additional data indicating the importance of replisome degradation for DNA replication. Our studies suggest that cells activate an alternative pathway to degrade replisome components in order to preserve genomic integrity.

  13. Conservation of the Nrf2-Mediated Gene Regulation of Proteasome Subunits and Glucose Metabolism in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Fuse, Yuji; Tamaoki, Junya; Akiyama, Shin-ichi; Muratani, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The Keap1-Nrf2 system is an evolutionarily conserved defense mechanism against oxidative and xenobiotic stress. Besides the exogenous stress response, Nrf2 has been found to regulate numerous cellular functions, including protein turnover and glucose metabolism; however, the evolutionary origins of these functions remain unknown. In the present study, we searched for novel target genes associated with the zebrafish Nrf2 to answer this question. A microarray analysis of zebrafish embryos that overexpressed Nrf2 revealed that 115 candidate genes were targets of Nrf2, including genes encoding proteasome subunits and enzymes involved in glucose metabolism. A real-time quantitative PCR suggested that the expression of 3 proteasome subunits (psma3, psma5, and psmb7) and 2 enzymes involved in glucose metabolism (pgd and fbp1a) were regulated by zebrafish Nrf2. We thus next examined the upregulation of these genes by an Nrf2 activator, diethyl maleate, using Nrf2 mutant zebrafish larvae. The results of real-time quantitative PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization showed that all of these 5 genes were upregulated by diethyl maleate treatment in an Nrf2-dependent manner, especially in the liver. These findings implied that the Nrf2-mediated regulation of the proteasome subunits and glucose metabolism is evolutionarily conserved among vertebrates. PMID:28116036

  14. Genetic mapping of the LMP2 proteasome subunit gene to the BoLA class IIb region

    SciTech Connect

    Shalhevet, D.; Da, Y.; Beever, J.E.; Eijk, M.J.T. van; Ma, R.; Lewin, H.A.; Gaskins, H.R.

    1995-01-01

    Recent identification of four tightly-linked genes within the class II region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in humans and rodents has led to a better understanding of class I antigen processing mechanisms. Two of these genes, LMP2 and LMP7, encode subunits of a low molecular mass poypeptide (LMP) complex. Several observations suggest that the LMP complex may be the proteolytic system responsible for generating the size-restricted peptides required for MHC class I assembly. For example, the LMP complex is a large cytoplasmic structure that is antigenically and biochemically related to the proteasome, a proteolytic complex that mediates degradation of ubiquitinated substrates. Data regarding proteolytic specificity indicates that the LMP complex may specifically produce nonamers, the appropriate peptide size for class I binding. In addition, similar to all components of the class I assembly process, intra-MHC LMP genes are regulated by IFN{gamma}. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Menin missense mutants encoded by the MEN1 gene that are targeted to the proteasome: restoration of expression and activity by CHIP siRNA.

    PubMed

    Canaff, Lucie; Vanbellinghen, Jean-François; Kanazawa, Ippei; Kwak, Hayeon; Garfield, Natasha; Vautour, Line; Hendy, Geoffrey N

    2012-02-01

    In multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) characterized by tumors of parathyroid, enteropancreas, and anterior pituitary, missense mutations in the MEN1 gene product, menin, occur in a subset of cases. The mutant proteins are degraded by the proteasome. However, whether their expression and activity can be restored is not known. Our objective was to functionally characterize a panel of 16 menin missense mutants, including W423R and S443Y identified in new MEN1 families, with respect to protein stability, targeting to the proteasome and restoration of expression by proteasome inhibitors and expression and function by small interfering RNA technology. Flag-tagged wild-type (WT) and missense menin mutant expression vectors were transiently transfected in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and/or rat insulinoma (Rin-5F) cells. The majority of mutants were short-lived, whereas WT menin was stable. Proteasome inhibitors MG132 and PS-341 and inhibition of the chaperone, heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70), or the ubiquitin ligase, COOH terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP), by specific small interfering RNA, restored the levels of the mutants, whereas that of WT menin was largely unaffected. Inhibition of CHIP restored the ability of mutants to mediate normal functions of menin: TGF-β up-regulation of the promoters of its target genes, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p15 and p21 as well as TGF-β inhibition of cell numbers. When the levels of missense menin mutants that are targeted to the proteasome are normalized they may function similarly to WT menin. Potentially, targeting specific components of the proteasome chaperone pathway could be beneficial in treating a subset of MEN1 cases.

  16. An ethanolic extract of Artemisia dracunculus L. regulates gene expression of ubiquitin-proteasome system enzymes in skeletal muscle: potential role in the treatment of sarcopenic obesity.

    PubMed

    Kirk-Ballard, Heather; Kilroy, Gail; Day, Britton C; Wang, Zhong Q; Ribnicky, David M; Cefalu, William T; Floyd, Z Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is linked to insulin resistance, a primary component of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. The problem of obesity-related insulin resistance is compounded when age-related skeletal muscle loss, called sarcopenia, occurs with obesity. Skeletal muscle loss results from elevated levels of protein degradation and prevention of obesity-related sarcopenic muscle loss will depend on strategies that target pathways involved in protein degradation. An extract from Artemisia dracunculus, termed PMI 5011, improves insulin signaling and increases skeletal muscle myofiber size in a rodent model of obesity-related insulin resistance. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of PMI 5011 on the ubiquitin-proteasome system, a central regulator of muscle protein degradation. Gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis skeletal muscle was obtained from KK-A(y) obese diabetic mice fed a control or 1% (w/w) PMI 5011-supplemented diet. Regulation of genes encoding enzymes of the ubiquitin-proteasome system was determined using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Although MuRF-1 ubiquitin ligase gene expression is consistently down-regulated in skeletal muscle, atrogin-1, Fbxo40, and Traf6 expression is differentially regulated by PMI 5011. Genes encoding other enzymes of the ubiquitin-proteasome system ranging from ubiquitin to ubiquitin-specific proteases are also regulated by PMI 5011. Additionally, expression of the gene encoding the microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3 (LC3), a ubiquitin-like protein pivotal to autophagy-mediated protein degradation, is down-regulated by PMI 5011 in the vastus lateralis. PMI 5011 alters the gene expression of ubiquitin-proteasome system enzymes that are essential regulators of skeletal muscle mass. This suggests that PMI 5011 has therapeutic potential in the treatment of obesity-linked sarcopenia by regulating ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc

  17. The acidosis of chronic renal failure activates muscle proteolysis in rats by augmenting transcription of genes encoding proteins of the ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J L; Wang, X; England, B K; Price, S R; Ding, X; Mitch, W E

    1996-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with negative nitrogen balance and loss of lean body mass. To identify specific proteolytic pathways activated by CRF, protein degradation was measured in incubated epitrochlearis muscles from CRF and sham-operated, pair-fed rats. CRF stimulated muscle proteolysis, and inhibition of lysosomal and calcium-activated proteases did not eliminate this increase. When ATP production was blocked, proteolysis in CRF muscles fell to the same level as that in control muscles. Increased proteolysis was also prevented by feeding CRF rats sodium bicarbonate, suggesting that activation depends on acidification. Evidence that the ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is stimulated by the acidemia of CRF includes the following findings: (a) An inhibitor of the proteasome eliminated the increase in muscle proteolysis; and (b) there was an increase in mRNAs encoding ubiquitin (324%) and proteasome subunits C3 (137%) and C9 (251%) in muscle. This response involved gene activation since transcription of mRNAs for ubiquitin and the C3 subunit were selectively increased in muscle of CRF rats. We conclude that CRF stimulates muscle proteolysis by activating the ATP-ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent pathway. The mechanism depends on acidification and increased expression of genes encoding components of the system. These responses could contribute to the loss of muscle mass associated with CRF. PMID:8617877

  18. Identification and isolation of three proteasome subunits and their encoding genes from Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Shen, M; Chernushevich, I; Burlingame, A L; Wang, C C; Robertson, C D

    1999-08-20

    We have determined peptide sequences of three Trypanosoma brucei proteasome subunit proteins by mass spectrometry of tryptic digests of the proteins purified by two-dimensional (2-D) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Three genes identified by the sequence of their cDNA encode the peptides identified in these three proteins. The three proteins predicted from the gene sequences have significant similarity to other known proteasome subunits and represent an alpha6 type subunit (TbPSA6), and two beta-type subunits belonging to the beta1-type (TbPSB1) and beta2 type (TbPSB2). The sequences of both beta-subunits predict formation of catalytically active subunits through proteolytic processing. The prediction is supported by the presence in each of the two beta-subunits of a tryptic peptide that has the correctly processed N-terminus that creates the threonine nucleophile of the mature protein. This peptide cannot be generated by trypsin because of the required cleavage of a glycine-threonine bond. It is thus likely that there are at least two catalytically active beta-subunits, TbPSB1 and TbPSB2, present in the mature 20S proteasome from T. brucei.

  19. Proteasome Inhibitors Enhance Bacteriophage Lambda (λ) Mediated Gene Transfer in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Volcy, Ketna; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Bacteriophage lambda vectors can transfer their genomes into mammalian cells, resulting in expression of phage-encoded genes. However, this process is inefficient. Experiments were therefore conducted to delineate the rate limiting step(s) involved, using a phage vector that contains a mammalian luciferase reporter gene cassette. The efficiency of phage-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells was quantitated, in the presence or absence of pharmacologic inhibitors of cell uptake and degradation pathways. Inhibitors of lysosomal proteases and proteasome inhibitors strongly enhanced phage-mediated luciferase expression, suggesting that these pathways contribute to the destruction of intracellular phage particles. In contrast, inhibition of endosome acidification had no effect on phage-mediated gene transfer, presumably because phage lambda is tolerant to extended exposure to low pH. These findings provide insights into the pathways by which phage vectors enter and transduce mammalian cells, and suggest that it may be possible to pharmacologically enhance the efficiency of phage-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells. Finally, the data also suggest that the proteasome complex may serve as an innate defense mechanism that restricts the infection of mammalian cells by diverse viral agents. PMID:19064273

  20. Proteasome Accessory Factor C (pafC) Is a novel gene Involved in Mycobacterium Intrinsic Resistance to broad-spectrum antibiotics--Fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiming; Xie, Longxiang; Long, Quanxin; Mao, Jinxiao; Li, Hui; Zhou, Mingliang; Xie, Jianping

    2015-07-03

    Antibiotics resistance poses catastrophic threat to global public health. Novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of action will inspire better measures to control drug resistance. Fluoroquinolones are potent and widely prescribed broad-spectrum antibiotics. Bacterial protein degradation pathways represent novel druggable target for the development of new classes of antibiotics. Mycobacteria proteasome accessory factor C (pafC), a component of bacterial proteasome, is involved in fluoroquinolones resistance. PafC deletion mutants are hypersensitive to fluoroquinolones, including moxifloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, but not to other antibiotics such as isoniazid, rifampicin, spectinomycin, chloramphenicol, capreomycin. This phenotype can be restored by complementation. The pafC mutant is hypersensitive to H2O2 exposure. The iron chelator (bipyridyl) and a hydroxyl radical scavenger (thiourea) can abolish the difference. The finding that pafC is a novel intrinsic selective resistance gene provided new evidence for the bacterial protein degradation pathway as druggable target for the development of new class of antibiotics.

  1. Cks1, Cdk1, and the 19S proteasome collaborate to regulate gene induction-dependent nucleosome eviction in yeast.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Susana; Baskerville, Chris; Yu, Veronica; Reed, Steven I

    2010-11-01

    Cks1, Cdk1 (Cdc28), and the proteasome are required for efficient transcriptional induction of GAL1 and other genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show here that one function of these proteins is to reduce nucleosome density on chromatin in a gene induction-specific manner. The transcriptional requirement for Cks1 can be bypassed if nucleosome density is reduced by an alternative pathway, indicating that this is the primary function of Cks1 in the context of gene induction. We further show that Cks1, Cdk1, and the 19S subunit of the proteasome are recruited to chromatin by binding directly to the histone H4 amino-terminal tail. However, this activity of the proteasome does not require the protease activity associated with the 20S subunit. These data suggest a model where binding of a complex consisting of Cks1, Cdk1, and the 19S proteasome to histone H4 leads to removal of nucleosomes via a nonproteolytic activity of the proteasome.

  2. Genetics of Proteasome Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2013-01-01

    The proteasome is a large, multiple subunit complex that is capable of degrading most intracellular proteins. Polymorphisms in proteasome subunits are associated with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurological diseases, and cancer. One polymorphism in the proteasome gene PSMA6 (−8C/G) is associated with three different diseases: type 2 diabetes, myocardial infarction, and coronary artery disease. One type of proteasome, the immunoproteasome, which contains inducible catalytic subunits, is adapted to generate peptides for antigen presentation. It has recently been shown that mutations and polymorphisms in the immunoproteasome catalytic subunit PSMB8 are associated with several inflammatory and autoinflammatory diseases including Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, CANDLE syndrome, and intestinal M. tuberculosis infection. This comprehensive review describes the disease-related polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with human diseases and the physiological modulation of proteasome function by these polymorphisms. Given the large number of subunits and the central importance of the proteasome in human physiology as well as the fast pace of detection of proteasome polymorphisms associated with human diseases, it is likely that other polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with diseases will be detected in the near future. While disease-associated polymorphisms are now readily discovered, the challenge will be to use this genetic information for clinical benefit. PMID:24490108

  3. Identification and linkage of the proteasome activator complex PA28 subunit genes in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Murray, B W; Sültmann, H; Klein, J

    2000-06-01

    PA28 is an activator of the latent 20S proteasome, a large multisubunit complex involved in intracellular proteolysis. Two forms of hexameric PA28 have been identified, PA28-(alphabeta)3 and PA28-(gamma)6, of which the former is of immunological importance. Both the PA28-alpha and PA28-beta subunits are inducible by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and the PA28-(alphabeta)3 complex enhances the ability of the 20S proteasome to produce peptides suited for binding to major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class I molecules. To identify the homologues of the PA28 subunits in zebrafish we screened a cDNA library and obtained full-length cDNA sequences of the genes PSME1, PSME2 and PSME3 coding for the PA28-alpha, PA28-beta and PA28-gamma subunits, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis indicates the existence of the ancestors of all three genes prior to the divergence of tetrapods and bony fishes. The IFN-gamma-inducible subunits, PA28-alpha and PA28-beta, evolve faster than the presumably older PA28-gamma subunit. Using zebrafish radiation hybrid panels, the genes PSME2 and PSME3 were mapped to linkage group 12 and shown to be separated by a distance of less than 2.4 cM. This observation suggests that an intrachromosomal duplication event created the precursor of the IFN-gamma-inducible genes from a PA28-gamma-like ancestor prior to their recruitment into the Mhc class I peptide presentation pathway.

  4. Positive Symptoms of Psychosis Correlate With Expression of Ubiquitin Proteasome Genes in Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Bousman, Chad A.; Chana, Gursharan; Glatt, Stephen J.; Chandler, Sharon D.; May, Todd; Lohr, James; Kremen, William S.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Everall, Ian P.

    2015-01-01

    Several brain- and blood-based gene expression studies in patients with psychotic disorders (e.g., schizophrenia) have identified genes in the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) pathway as putative biomarkers. However, to date an examination of the UPS pathway in the broader context of symptom severity in psychosis has not been conducted. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between clinical scores on the Scales for the Assessment of Positive and Negative Symptoms (SAPS–SANS) and expression of 43 highly annotated genes within the UPS pathway in blood from patients with psychosis. A sample of 19 psychotic patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (n = 13) or bipolar disorder (n = 6) were recruited. Pearson's partial correlations, adjusting for gender, ethnicity, age, education, medication, smoking, and past 6-month substance use, were performed between each of the selected UPS genes and both scales. Significant Bonferroni-adjusted positive associations were observed between SAPS scores and two ubiquitin conjugation genes (i.e., UBE2K, SIAH2), while a negative association was observed with one deubiquitination gene (i.e., USP2). No gene expression levels were significantly associated with scores on the SANS after correction for multiple testing. Our findings suggest that dysregulation of the UPS, specifically ubiquitin conjugation and deubiquitination, may point to a possible underlying biological mechanism for severity of positive but not negative symptoms. PMID:20552680

  5. PA28 subunits of the mouse proteasome: primary structures and chromosomal localization of the genes.

    PubMed

    Kandil, E; Kohda, K; Ishibashi, T; Tanaka, K; Kasahara, M

    1997-01-01

    The 20S proteasome is a multi-subunit protease responsible for the production of peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Recent evidence indicates that an interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-inducible PA28 activator complex enhances the generation of class I binding peptides by altering the cleavage pattern of the proteasome. In the present study, we determined the primary structures of the mouse PA28 alpha- and beta-subunits. The deduced amino acid sequences of the alpha- and beta-subunits were 49% identical. We also determined the primary structure of the mouse PA28 gamma-subunit (Ki antigen), a protein of unknown function structurally related to the alpha- and beta-subunits. The amino acid sequence identity of the gamma-subunit to the alpha- and beta-subunits was 40% and 32%, respectively. Interspecific backcross mapping showed that the mouse genes coding for the alpha- and beta-subunits (designated Psme1 and Psme2, respectively) are tightly linked and map close to the Atp5g1 locus on chromosome 14. Thus, unlike the LMP2 and LMP7 subunits, the IFN-gamma-inducible subunits of PA28 are encoded outside the MHC. The gene coding for the gamma-subunit (designated Psme3) was mapped to the vicinity of the Brca1 locus on chromosome 11. A computer search of the DNA databases identified a gamma-subunit-like protein in ticks and Caenorhabditis elegans, the organisms with no adaptive immune system. It appears that the IFN-gamma-inducible alpha- and beta-subunits emerged by gene duplication from a gamma-subunit-like precursor.

  6. Detection of Genes Modifying Sensitivity to Proteasome Inhibitors Using a shRNA Library in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    TITLE: Detection of genes modifying sensitivity to proteasome inhibitors using a shRNA Library in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gregory J...shRNA Library in Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Gregory J. Hannon, Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...clinical trials for breast and lung cancers . We are identifying genes that mediate resistance against Velcade that could serve as potential drug

  7. Ageing has no effect on the regulation of the ubiquitin proteasome-related genes and proteins following resistance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Stefanetti, Renae J.; Zacharewicz, Evelyn; Della Gatta, Paul; Garnham, Andrew; Russell, Aaron P.; Lamon, Séverine

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a critical component of the ageing process. Age-related muscle wasting is due to disrupted muscle protein turnover, a process mediated in part by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP). Additionally, older subjects have been observed to have an attenuated anabolic response, at both the molecular and physiological levels, following a single-bout of resistance exercise (RE). We investigated the expression levels of the UPP-related genes and proteins involved in muscle protein degradation in 10 older (60–75 years) vs. 10 younger (18–30 years) healthy male subjects at basal as well as 2 h after a single-bout of RE. MURF1, atrogin-1 and FBXO40, their substrate targets PKM2, myogenin, MYOD, MHC and EIF3F as well as MURF1 and atrogin-1 transcriptional regulators FOXO1 and FOXO3 gene and/or protein expression levels were measured via real time PCR and western blotting, respectively. At basal, no age-related difference was observed in the gene/protein levels of atrogin-1, MURF1, myogenin, MYOD and FOXO1/3. However, a decrease in FBXO40 mRNA and protein levels was observed in older subjects, while PKM2 protein was increased. In response to RE, MURF1, atrogin-1 and FBXO40 mRNA were upregulated in both the younger and older subjects, with changes observed in protein levels. In conclusion, UPP-related gene/protein expression is comparably regulated in healthy young and old male subjects at basal and following RE. These findings suggest that UPP signaling plays a limited role in the process of age-related muscle wasting. Future studies are required to investigate additional proteolytic mechanisms in conjunction with skeletal muscle protein breakdown (MPB) measurements following RE in older vs. younger subjects. PMID:24550841

  8. Large scale RNAi screen in Tribolium reveals novel target genes for pest control and the proteasome as prime target.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Julia; Dao, Van Anh; Majumdar, Upalparna; Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Schwirz, Jonas; Schultheis, Dorothea; Ströhlein, Nadi; Troelenberg, Nicole; Grossmann, Daniela; Richter, Tobias; Dönitz, Jürgen; Gerischer, Lizzy; Leboulle, Gérard; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Stanke, Mario; Bucher, Gregor

    2015-09-03

    Insect pest control is challenged by insecticide resistance and negative impact on ecology and health. One promising pest specific alternative is the generation of transgenic plants, which express double stranded RNAs targeting essential genes of a pest species. Upon feeding, the dsRNA induces gene silencing in the pest resulting in its death. However, the identification of efficient RNAi target genes remains a major challenge as genomic tools and breeding capacity is limited in most pest insects impeding whole-animal-high-throughput-screening. We use the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum as a screening platform in order to identify the most efficient RNAi target genes. From about 5,000 randomly screened genes of the iBeetle RNAi screen we identify 11 novel and highly efficient RNAi targets. Our data allowed us to determine GO term combinations that are predictive for efficient RNAi target genes with proteasomal genes being most predictive. Finally, we show that RNAi target genes do not appear to act synergistically and that protein sequence conservation does not correlate with the number of potential off target sites. Our results will aid the identification of RNAi target genes in many pest species by providing a manageable number of excellent candidate genes to be tested and the proteasome as prime target. Further, the identified GO term combinations will help to identify efficient target genes from organ specific transcriptomes. Our off target analysis is relevant for the sequence selection used in transgenic plants.

  9. Proteasome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Enenkel, Cordula

    2014-01-01

    Proteasomes are highly conserved multisubunit protease complexes and occur in the cyto- and nucleoplasm of eukaryotic cells. In dividing cells proteasomes exist as holoenzymes and primarily localize in the nucleus. During quiescence they dissociate into proteolytic core and regulatory complexes and are sequestered into motile cytosolic clusters. Proteasome clusters rapidly clear upon the exit from quiescence, where proteasome core and regulatory complexes reassemble and localize to the nucleus again. The mechanisms underlying proteasome transport and assembly are not yet understood. Here, I summarize our present knowledge about nuclear transport and assembly of proteasomes in yeast and project our studies in this eukaryotic model organism to the mammalian cell system. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Ubiquitin-Proteasome System. Guest Editors: Thomas Sommer and Dieter H. Wolf.

  10. AAV-mediated gene targeting is significantly enhanced by transient inhibition of nonhomologous end joining or the proteasome in vivo.

    PubMed

    Paulk, Nicole K; Loza, Laura Marquez; Finegold, Milton J; Grompe, Markus

    2012-06-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have clear potential for use in gene targeting but low correction efficiencies remain the primary drawback. One approach to enhancing efficiency is a block of undesired repair pathways like nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) to promote the use of homologous recombination. The natural product vanillin acts as a potent inhibitor of NHEJ by inhibiting DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Using a homology containing rAAV vector, we previously demonstrated in vivo gene repair frequencies of up to 0.1% in a model of liver disease hereditary tyrosinemia type I. To increase targeting frequencies, we administered vanillin in combination with rAAV. Gene targeting frequencies increased up to 10-fold over AAV alone, approaching 1%. Fah(-/-)Ku70(-/-) double knockout mice also had increased gene repair frequencies, genetically confirming the beneficial effects of blocking NHEJ. A second strategy, transient proteasomal inhibition, also increased gene-targeting frequencies but was not additive to NHEJ inhibition. This study establishes the benefit of transient NHEJ inhibition with vanillin, or proteasome blockage with bortezomib, for increasing hepatic gene targeting with rAAV. Functional metabolic correction of a clinically relevant disease model was demonstrated and provided evidence for the feasibility of gene targeting as a therapeutic strategy.

  11. [Effect of proteasome inhibitor bortezomib on proliferation, apoptosis and SHIP gene expression in K562 cells].

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhi-Qiang; Wei, Yu-Tao; Li, Ai-Ming; Cheng, Zhi-Yong

    2013-08-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of proteasome inhibitor bortezomib on proliferation, apoptosis and the SHIP expression of K562 cells. K562 cells were treated with bortezomib of different concentrations. Cell proliferation was analyzed by MTT assay, cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and SHIP mRNA expression was assayed by RT-PCR.The results showed that after being treated with 10, 20, 50 and 100 nmol/L bortezomib for 24 h, the inhibitory rates of K562 cells were (5.76 ± 1.47)%, (10.55 ± 1.59)%, (17.14 ± 2.05)% and (27.69 ± 3.57)% respectively, and were higher than that in control (1.30 ± 0.10); when K562 cells were treated with 20 nmol/L bortezomib for 24, 48 and 72 h, the inhibitory rates of cell proliferation were (10.55 ± 1.59)%, (16.33 ± 2.53)% and (19.78 ± 1.56)% respectively, there was statistic difference of cell proliferation rate between 24 h group and 48 h group (P < 0.05). After being treated with 10,20,50,100 nmol/L bortezomib for 24 h, the apoptotic rates of K562 cells were (12.7 ± 0.6)%, (26.9 ± 0.9)%, (32.6 ± 1.2)% and (72.5 ± 1.5)% respectively,and all higher than that in control (1.0 ± 0.5)% (P < 0.05). According to results of RT-PCR detection, the expression level of SHIP mRNA was obviously up-regulated after treatment with bortezomib, and showed statistical difference in comparison with control. It is concluded that bortezomib inhibits proliferation of K562 cells in time and concentration-dependent manner and induces apoptosis through up-regulation of SHIP gene.

  12. Proteasome Accessory Factor C (pafC) Is a novel gene Involved in Mycobacterium Intrinsic Resistance to broad-spectrum antibiotics - Fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiming; Xie, Longxiang; Long, Quanxin; Mao, Jinxiao; Li, Hui; Zhou, Mingliang; Xie, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics resistance poses catastrophic threat to global public health. Novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of action will inspire better measures to control drug resistance. Fluoroquinolones are potent and widely prescribed broad-spectrum antibiotics. Bacterial protein degradation pathways represent novel druggable target for the development of new classes of antibiotics. Mycobacteria proteasome accessory factor C (pafC), a component of bacterial proteasome, is involved in fluoroquinolones resistance. PafC deletion mutants are hypersensitive to fluoroquinolones, including moxifloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, but not to other antibiotics such as isoniazid, rifampicin, spectinomycin, chloramphenicol, capreomycin. This phenotype can be restored by complementation. The pafC mutant is hypersensitive to H2O2 exposure. The iron chelator (bipyridyl) and a hydroxyl radical scavenger (thiourea) can abolish the difference. The finding that pafC is a novel intrinsic selective resistance gene provided new evidence for the bacterial protein degradation pathway as druggable target for the development of new class of antibiotics. PMID:26139381

  13. Ubiquitin-proteasome system and hereditary cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Schlossarek, Saskia; Frey, Norbert; Carrier, Lucie

    2014-06-01

    Adequate protein turnover is essential for cardiac homeostasis. Different protein quality controls are involved in the maintenance of protein homeostasis, including molecular chaperones and co-chaperones, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). In the last decade, a series of evidence has underlined a major function of the UPS in cardiac physiology and disease. Particularly, recent studies have shown that dysfunctional proteasomal function leads to cardiac disorders. Hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies are the two most prevalent inherited cardiomyopathies. Both are primarily transmitted as an autosomal-dominant trait and mainly caused by mutations in genes encoding components of the cardiac sarcomere, including a relevant striated muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase. A growing body of evidence indicates impairment of the UPS in inherited cardiomyopathies as determined by measurement of the level of ubiquitinated proteins, the activities of the proteasome and/or the use of fluorescent UPS reporter substrates. The present review will propose mechanisms of UPS impairment in inherited cardiomyopathies, summarize the potential consequences of UPS impairment, including activation of the unfolded protein response, and underline some therapeutic options available to restore proteasome function and therefore cardiac homeostasis and function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Protein Quality Control, the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, and Autophagy". Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Basic leucine zipper protein Cnc-C is a substrate and transcriptional regulator of the Drosophila 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Grimberg, Kristian Björk; Beskow, Anne; Lundin, Daniel; Davis, Monica M; Young, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    While the 26S proteasome is a key proteolytic complex, little is known about how proteasome levels are maintained in higher eukaryotic cells. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi) screen of Drosophila melanogaster that was used to identify transcription factors that may play a role in maintaining levels of the 26S proteasome. We used an RNAi library against 993 Drosophila transcription factor genes to identify genes whose suppression in Schneider 2 cells stabilized a ubiquitin-green fluorescent protein reporter protein. This screen identified Cnc (cap 'n' collar [CNC]; basic region leucine zipper) as a candidate transcriptional regulator of proteasome component expression. In fact, 20S proteasome activity was reduced in cells depleted of cnc. Immunoblot assays against proteasome components revealed a general decline in both 19S regulatory complex and 20S proteasome subunits after RNAi depletion of this transcription factor. Transcript-specific silencing revealed that the longest of the seven transcripts for the cnc gene, cnc-C, was needed for proteasome and p97 ATPase production. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR confirmed the role of Cnc-C in activation of transcription of genes encoding proteasome components. Expression of a V5-His-tagged form of Cnc-C revealed that the transcription factor is itself a proteasome substrate that is stabilized when the proteasome is inhibited. We propose that this single cnc gene in Drosophila resembles the ancestral gene family of mammalian nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related transcription factors, which are essential in regulating oxidative stress and proteolysis.

  15. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway and Proteasome Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jayhyuk; Kim, Kyung Bo

    2008-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has emerged as a central player in the regulation of several diverse cellular processes. Here, we describe the important components of this complex biochemical machinery as well as several important cellular substrates targeted by this pathway and examples of human diseases resulting from defects in various components of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In addition, this review covers the chemistry of synthetic and natural proteasome inhibitors, emphasizing their mode of actions toward the 20S proteasome. Given the importance of proteasome-mediated protein degradation in various intracellular processes, inhibitors of this pathway will continue to serve as both molecular probes of major cellular networks as well as potential therapeutic agents for various human diseases. PMID:11410931

  16. Celastrol can inhibit proteasome activity and upregulate the expression of heat shock protein genes, hsp30 and hsp70, in Xenopus laevis A6 cells.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Shantel E; Heikkila, John J

    2010-06-01

    In eukaryotes, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the degradation of most proteins. Proteasome inhibition, which has been associated with various diseases, can cause alterations in various intracellular processes including the expression of heat shock protein (hsp) genes. In this study, we show that celastrol, a quinone methide triterpene and anti-inflammatory agent, inhibited proteasome activity and enhanced HSP accumulation in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells. Treatment of cells with celastrol induced the accumulation of ubiquitinated protein and inhibited chymotrypsin-like activity. This was accompanied by a dose- and time-dependent accumulation of HSP30 and HSP70. Celastrol-induced HSP accumulation was mediated by HSF1-DNA binding activity since this response was inhibited by the HSF1 activation inhibitor, KNK437. Simultaneous exposure of cells with celastrol plus either mild heat shock or the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, produced an enhanced accumulation of HSP30 that was greater than the sum of the individual stressors alone. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that celastrol-induced HSP30 accumulation occurred in the cytoplasm in a granular pattern supplemented with larger circular HSP30 staining structures. HSP30 was also noted in the nucleus with less staining in the nucleolus. In some cells, celastrol induced the collapse of the actin cytoskeleton and conversion to a rounder morphology. In conclusion, this study has shown that celastrol inhibited proteasome activity and induced HSF1-mediated expression of hsp genes in amphibian cells.

  17. The Proteasome Inhibitor Bortezomib Is a Potent Inducer of Zinc Finger AN1-type Domain 2a Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Antonio; Riccio, Anna; Coccia, Marta; Trotta, Edoardo; La Frazia, Simone; Santoro, M. Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    The zinc finger AN1-type domain 2a gene, also known as arsenite-inducible RNA-associated protein (AIRAP), was recently identified as a novel human canonical heat shock gene strictly controlled by heat shock factor (HSF) 1. Little is known about AIRAP gene regulation in human cells. Here we report that bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor with anticancer and antiangiogenic properties used in the clinic for treatment of multiple myeloma, is a potent inducer of AIRAP expression in human cells. Using endothelial cells as a model, we unraveled the molecular mechanism regulating AIRAP expression during proteasome inhibition. Bortezomib induces AIRAP expression at the transcriptional level early after treatment, concomitantly with polyubiquitinated protein accumulation and HSF activation. AIRAP protein is detected at high levels for at least 48 h after bortezomib exposure, together with the accumulation of HSF2, a factor implicated in differentiation and development regulation. Different from heat-mediated induction, in bortezomib-treated cells, HSF1 and HSF2 interact directly, forming HSF1-HSF2 heterotrimeric complexes recruited to a specific heat shock element in the AIRAP promoter. Interestingly, whereas HSF1 has been confirmed to be critical for AIRAP gene transcription, HSF2 was found to negatively regulate AIRAP expression after bortezomib treatment, further emphasizing an important modulatory role of this transcription factor under stress conditions. AIRAP function is still not defined. However, the fact that AIRAP is expressed abundantly in primary human cells at bortezomib concentrations comparable with plasma levels in treated patients suggests that AIRAP may participate in the regulatory network controlling proteotoxic stress during bortezomib treatment. PMID:24619424

  18. Functions of the Proteasome on Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Tyler S.; Tansey, William P.

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome is a large self-compartmentalized protease complex that recognizes, unfolds, and destroys ubiquitylated substrates. Proteasome activities are required for a host of cellular functions, and it has become clear in recent years that one set of critical actions of the proteasome occur on chromatin. In this review, we discuss some of the ways in which proteasomes directly regulate the structure and function of chromatin and chromatin regulatory proteins, and how this influences gene transcription. We discuss lingering controversies in the field, the relative importance of proteolytic versus non-proteolytic proteasome activities in this process, and highlight areas that require further investigation. Our intention is to show that proteasomes are involved in major steps controlling the expression of the genetic information, that proteasomes use both proteolytic mechanisms and ATP-dependent protein remodeling to accomplish this task, and that much is yet to be learned about the full spectrum of ways that proteasomes influence the genome. PMID:25422899

  19. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of three subunits of yeast proteasome.

    PubMed Central

    Emori, Y; Tsukahara, T; Kawasaki, H; Ishiura, S; Sugita, H; Suzuki, K

    1991-01-01

    The genes encoding three subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteasome were cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequences were homologous not only to each other (30 to 40% identity) but also to those of rat and Drosophila proteasomes (25 to 65% identity). However, none of these sequences showed any similarity to any other known sequences, including various proteases, suggesting that these proteasome subunits may constitute a unique gene family. Gene disruption analyses revealed that two of the three subunits (subunits Y7 and Y8) are essential for growth, indicating that the proteasome and its individual subunits play an indispensable role in fundamental biological processes. On the other hand, subunit Y13 is not essential; haploid cells with a disrupted Y13 gene can proliferate, although the doubling time is longer than that of cells with nondisrupted genes. In addition, biochemical analysis revealed that proteasome prepared from the Y13 disrupted cells contains tryptic and chymotryptic activities equivalent to those of nondisrupted cells, indicating that the Y13 subunit is not essential for tryptic or chymotryptic activity. However, the chymotryptic activity of the Y13 disrupted cells is not dependent on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), an activator of proteasome, since nearly full activity was observed in the absence of SDS. Thus, the activity in proteasome of the Y13 disrupted cells might result in unregulated intracellular proteolysis, thus leading to the prolonged cell cycle. These results indicate that cloned proteasome subunits having similar sequences to the yeast Y13 subunit are structural, but not catalytic, components of proteasome. It is also suggested that two subunits (Y7 and Y8) might occupy positions essential to proteasome structure or activity, whereas subunit Y13 is in a nonessential but important position. Images PMID:1898763

  20. 4-Hydroxynonenal differentially regulates adiponectin gene expression and secretion via activating PPARγ and accelerating ubiquitin–proteasome degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wanga, Zhigang; Dou, Xiaobing; Gu, Dongfang; Shen, Chen; Yao, Tong; Nguyen, Van; Braunschweig, Carol; Song, Zhenyuan

    2011-01-01

    Although well-established, the underlying mechanisms involved in obesity-related plasma adiponectin decline remain elusive. Oxidative stress is associated with obesity and insulin resistance and considered to contribute to the progression toward obesity-related metabolic disorders. In this study, we investigated the effects of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), the most abundant lipid peroxidation end product, on adiponectin production and its potential implication in obesity-related adiponectin decrease. Long-term high-fat diet feeding led to obesity in mouse, accompanied by decreased plasma adiponectin and increased adipose tissue 4-HNE content. Exposure of adipocytes to exogenous 4-HNE resulted in decreased adiponectin secretion in a dose-dependent manner, which was consistent with significantly decreased intracellular adiponectin protein abundance. In contrast, adiponectin gene expression was significantly elevated by 4-HNE treatment, which was concomitant with increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) gene expression and transactivity. The effect was abolished by T0070907, a PPAR-γ antagonist, suggesting that PPAR-γ activation plays a critical role in this process. To gain insight into mechanisms involved in adiponectin protein decrease, we examined the effects of 4-HNE on adiponectin protein degradation. Cycloheximide (CHX)-chase assay revealed that 4-HNE exposure accelerated adiponectin protein degradation, which was prevented by MG132, a potent proteasome inhibitor. Immunoprecipitation assay showed that 4-HNE exposure increased ubiquitinated adiponectin protein levels. These data altogether indicated that 4-HNE enhanced adiponectin protein degradation via ubiquitin–proteasome system. Finally, we demonstrated that supplementation of HF diet with betaine, an antioxidant and methyl donor, alleviated high-fat-induced adipose tissue 4-HNE increase and attenuated plasma adiponectin decline. Taken together, our findings suggest that the lipid

  1. Melatonin-induced temporal up-regulation of gene expression related to ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Fernanda C; Azevedo, Mauro F; Budu, Alexandre; Chakrabarti, Debopam; Garcia, Célia R S

    2014-12-03

    There is an increasing understanding that melatonin and the ubiquitin/ proteasome system (UPS) interact to regulate multiple cellular functions. Post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination are important modulators of signaling processes, cell cycle and many other cellular functions. Previously, we reported a melatonin-induced upregulation of gene expression related to ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) in Plasmodium falciparum, the human malaria parasite, and that P. falciparum protein kinase 7 influences this process. This implies a role of melatonin, an indolamine, in modulating intraerythrocytic development of the parasite. In this report we demonstrate by qPCR analysis, that melatonin induces gene upregulation in nine out of fourteen genes of the UPS, consisting of the same set of genes previously reported, between 4 to 5 h after melatonin treatment. We demonstrate that melatonin causes a temporally controlled gene expression of UPS members.

  2. Human Antiviral Protein IFIX Suppresses Viral Gene Expression during Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Infection and Is Counteracted by Virus-induced Proteasomal Degradation.

    PubMed

    Crow, Marni S; Cristea, Ileana M

    2017-04-01

    The interferon-inducible protein X (IFIX), a member of the PYHIN family, was recently recognized as an antiviral factor against infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). IFIX binds viral DNA upon infection and promotes expression of antiviral cytokines. How IFIX exerts its host defense functions and whether it is inhibited by the virus remain unknown. Here, we integrated live cell microscopy, proteomics, IFIX domain characterization, and molecular virology to investigate IFIX regulation and antiviral functions during HSV-1 infection. We find that IFIX has a dynamic localization during infection that changes from diffuse nuclear and nucleoli distribution in uninfected cells to discrete nuclear puncta early in infection. This is rapidly followed by a reduction in IFIX protein levels. Indeed, using immunoaffinity purification and mass spectrometry, we define IFIX interactions during HSV-1 infection, finding an association with a proteasome subunit and proteins involved in ubiquitin-proteasome processes. Using synchronized HSV-1 infection, microscopy, and proteasome-inhibition experiments, we demonstrate that IFIX co-localizes with nuclear proteasome puncta shortly after 3 h of infection and that its pyrin domain is rapidly degraded in a proteasome-dependent manner. We further demonstrate that, in contrast to several other host defense factors, IFIX degradation is not dependent on the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of the viral protein ICP0. However, we show IFIX degradation requires immediate-early viral gene expression, suggesting a viral host suppression mechanism. The IFIX interactome also demonstrated its association with transcriptional regulatory proteins, including the 5FMC complex. We validate this interaction using microscopy and reciprocal isolations and determine it is mediated by the IFIX HIN domain. Finally, we show IFIX suppresses immediate-early and early viral gene expression during infection. Altogether, our study demonstrates that IFIX antiviral

  3. Proteasome dysfunction induces muscle growth defects and protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Yasuo; Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Naoki; Warita, Hitoshi; Kato, Masaaki; Tateyama, Maki; Ando, Risa; Izumi, Rumiko; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Ito, Hidefumi; Urushitani, Makoto; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitin–proteasome and autophagy–lysosome pathways are the two major routes of protein and organelle clearance. The role of the proteasome pathway in mammalian muscle has not been examined in vivo. In this study, we report that the muscle-specific deletion of a crucial proteasomal gene, Rpt3 (also known as Psmc4), resulted in profound muscle growth defects and a decrease in force production in mice. Specifically, developing muscles in conditional Rpt3-knockout animals showed dysregulated proteasomal activity. The autophagy pathway was upregulated, but the process of autophagosome formation was impaired. A microscopic analysis revealed the accumulation of basophilic inclusions and disorganization of the sarcomeres in young adult mice. Our results suggest that appropriate proteasomal activity is important for muscle growth and for maintaining myofiber integrity in collaboration with autophagy pathways. The deletion of a component of the proteasome complex contributed to myofiber degeneration and weakness in muscle disorders that are characterized by the accumulation of abnormal inclusions. PMID:25380823

  4. Dimorphisms of the proteasome subunit beta type 8 gene (PSMB8) of ectothermic tetrapods originated in multiple independent evolutionary events.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Huei; Tanaka, Yuta; Fujito, Naoko T; Nonaka, Masaru

    2013-11-01

    The proteasome subunit beta type 8 gene (PSMB8) encodes one of the beta subunits of the immunoproteasome responsible for the generation of peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. Dimorphic alleles of the PSMB8 gene, termed A and F types, based on the deduced 31st amino acid residue of the mature protein have been reported from various vertebrates. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of dichotomous ancient lineages, one comprising the F-type PSMB8 of basal ray-finned fishes, and the other comprising the A-type PSMB8 of these animals and both the F- and A-type PSMB8 of Xenopus and acanthopterygians, indicating that evolutionary history of the PSMB8 dimorphism was not straightforward. We analyzed the PSMB8 gene of five reptile and one amphibian species and found both the A and F types from all six. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the PSMB8 F type was apparently regenerated from the PSMB8 A type at least five times independently during tetrapod evolution. Genomic typing of wild individuals of geckos and newts indicated that the frequencies of the A- and F-type alleles are not highly biased in these species. Phylogenetic analysis of each exon of the reptile PSMB8 gene suggested interallelic sequence homogenization as a possible evolutionary mechanism for the apparent recurrent regeneration of PSMB8 dimorphism in tetrapods. An extremely strong balancing selection acting on PSMB8 dimorphism was implicated in an unprecedented pattern of allele evolution.

  5. Principal component gene set enrichment (PCGSE).

    PubMed

    Frost, H Robert; Li, Zhigang; Moore, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    Although principal component analysis (PCA) is widely used for the dimensional reduction of biomedical data, interpretation of PCA results remains daunting. Most existing interpretation methods attempt to explain each principal component (PC) in terms of a small number of variables by generating approximate PCs with mainly zero loadings. Although useful when just a few variables dominate the population PCs, these methods can perform poorly on genomic data, where interesting biological features are frequently represented by the combined signal of functionally related sets of genes. While gene set testing methods have been widely used in supervised settings to quantify the association of groups of genes with clinical outcomes, these methods have seen only limited application for testing the enrichment of gene sets relative to sample PCs. We describe a novel approach, principal component gene set enrichment (PCGSE), for unsupervised gene set testing relative to the sample PCs of genomic data. The PCGSE method computes the statistical association between gene sets and individual PCs using a two-stage competitive gene set test. To demonstrate the efficacy of the PCGSE method, we use simulated and real gene expression data to evaluate the performance of various gene set test statistics and significance tests. Gene set testing is an effective approach for interpreting the PCs of high-dimensional genomic data. As shown using both simulated and real datasets, the PCGSE method can generate biologically meaningful and computationally efficient results via a two-stage, competitive parametric test that correctly accounts for inter-gene correlation.

  6. ARS5 is a component of the 26S proteasome complex, and negatively regulates thiol biosynthesis and arsenic tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sung, Dong-Yul; Kim, Tae-Houn; Komives, Elizabeth A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Schroeder, Julian I

    2009-09-01

    A forward-genetic screen in Arabidopsis led to the isolation of several arsenic tolerance mutants. ars5 was the strongest arsenate- and arsenite-resistant mutant identified in this genetic screen. Here, we report the characterization and cloning of the ars5 mutant gene. ars5 is shown to exhibit an increased accumulation of arsenic and thiol compounds during arsenic stress. Rough mapping together with microarray-based expression mapping identified the ars5 mutation in the alpha subunit F (PAF1) of the 26S proteasome complex. Characterization of an independent paf1 T-DNA insertion allele and complementation by PAF1 confirmed that paf1 mutation is responsible for the enhanced thiol accumulation and arsenic tolerance phenotypes. Arsenic tolerance was not observed in a knock-out mutant of the highly homologous PAF2 gene. However, genetic complementation of ars5 by the overexpression of PAF2 suggests that the PAF2 protein is functionally equivalent to PAF1 when expressed at high levels. No detectible difference was observed in total ubiquitinylated protein profiles between ars5 and wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis, suggesting that the arsenic tolerance observed in ars5 is not derived from a general impairment in proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that arsenic induces the enhanced transcriptional activation of several key genes that function in glutathione and phytochelatin biosynthesis in the WT, and this arsenic induction of gene expression is more dramatic in ars5. The enhanced transcriptional response to arsenic and the increased accumulation of thiol compounds in ars5, compared with WT, suggest the presence of a positive regulation pathway for thiol biosynthesis that is enhanced in the ars5 background.

  7. ARS5 is a component of the 26S proteasome complex and negatively regulates thiol biosynthesis and arsenic tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Dong-Yul; Kim, Tae-Houn; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2010-01-01

    Summary A forward genetic screen in Arabidopsis led to the isolation of several arsenic tolerance mutants. ars5 is the strongest arsenate and arsenite resistant mutant identified in this genetic screen. Here, we report the characterization and cloning of the ars5 mutant gene. ars5 is shown to exhibit an increased accumulation of arsenic and thiol compounds during arsenic stress. Rough mapping together with microarray-based expression mapping identified the ars5 mutation in the alpha subunit F (PAF1) of the 26S proteasome complex. Characterization of an independent paf1 T-DNA insertion allele and complementation by PAF1 confirmed that paf1 mutation is responsible for the enhanced thiol accumulation and the arsenic tolerance phenotypes. Arsenic tolerance was not observed in a knockout mutant of the highly homologous PAF2 gene. However, genetic complementation of ars5 by over expression of PAF2 suggests that the PAF2 protein is functionally equivalent to PAF1 when expressed at high levels. No detectible difference was observed in total ubiquitinylated protein profiles between ars5 and wild type Arabidopsis, suggesting that the arsenic tolerance observed in ars5 is not derived from a general impairment in proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that arsenic induces enhanced transcriptional activation of several key genes that function in glutathione and phytochelatin biosynthesis in wild type and this arsenic-induction of gene expression is more dramatic in ars5. The enhanced transcriptional response to arsenic and the increased accumulation of thiol compounds in ars5 compared to WT suggest the presence of a positive regulation pathway for thiol biosynthesis that is enhanced in the ars5 background. PMID:19453443

  8. Regulation of Feedback between Protein Kinase A and the Proteasome System Worsens Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiun-Tsai; Chang, Wei-Cheng; Chen, Hui-Mei; Lai, Hsing-Lin; Chen, Chih-Yeh; Tao, Mi-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. Abnormal regulation of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway occurs during HD progression. Here we found that lower PKA activity was associated with proteasome impairment in the striatum for two HD mouse models (R6/2 and N171-82Q) and in mutant HTT (mHTT)-expressing striatal cells. Because PKA regulatory subunits (PKA-Rs) are proteasome substrates, the mHTT-evoked proteasome impairment caused accumulation of PKA-Rs and subsequently inhibited PKA activity. Conversely, activation of PKA enhanced the phosphorylation of Rpt6 (a component of the proteasome), rescued the impaired proteasome activity, and reduced mHTT aggregates. The dominant-negative Rpt6 mutant (Rpt6S120A) blocked the ability of a cAMP-elevating reagent to enhance proteasome activity, whereas the phosphomimetic Rpt6 mutant (Rpt6S120D) increased proteasome activity, reduced HTT aggregates, and ameliorated motor impairment. Collectively, our data demonstrated that positive feedback regulation between PKA and the proteasome is critical for HD pathogenesis. PMID:23275441

  9. Characterization of the 26S proteasome network in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihui; Delahunty, Claire; Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Rahlfs, Stefan; Helena Prieto, Judith; Yates, John R; Becker, Katja

    2015-12-07

    In eukaryotic cells, the ubiquitin-proteasome system as a key regulator of protein quality control is an excellent drug target. We therefore aimed to analyze the 26S proteasome complex in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, which still threatens almost half of the world's population. First, we established an affinity purification protocol allowing for the isolation of functional 26S proteasome complexes from the parasite. Subunit composition of the proteasome and component stoichiometry were studied and physiologic interacting partners were identified via in situ protein crosslinking. Furthermore, intrinsic ubiquitin receptors of the plasmodial proteasome were determined and their roles in proteasomal substrate recognition were analyzed. Notably, PfUSP14 was characterized as a proteasome-associated deubiquitinase resulting in the concept that targeting proteasomal deubiquitinating activity in P. falciparum may represent a promising antimalarial strategy. The data provide insights into a profound network orchestrated by the plasmodial proteasome and identified novel drug target candidates in the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  10. Characterizing the Dynamics of Proteasome Complexes by Proteomics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Kaake, Robyn M.; Kao, Athit; Yu, Clinton

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The proteasome is the degradation machine of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, which is critical in controlling many essential biological processes. Aberrant regulation of proteasome-dependent protein degradation can lead to various human diseases, and general proteasome inhibitors have shown efficacy for cancer treatments. Though clinically effective, current proteasome inhibitors have detrimental side effects and, thus, better therapeutic strategies targeting proteasomes are needed. Therefore, a comprehensive characterization of proteasome complexes will provide the molecular details that are essential for developing new and improved drugs. Recent Advances: New mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approaches have been developed to study protein interaction networks and structural topologies of proteasome complexes. The results have helped define the dynamic proteomes of proteasome complexes, thus providing new insights into the mechanisms underlying proteasome function and regulation. Critical Issues: The proteasome exists as heterogeneous populations in tissues/cells, and its proteome is highly dynamic and complex. In addition, proteasome complexes are regulated by various mechanisms under different physiological conditions. Consequently, complete proteomic profiling of proteasome complexes remains a major challenge for the field. Future Directions: We expect that proteomic methodologies enabling full characterization of proteasome complexes will continue to evolve. Further advances in MS instrumentation and protein separation techniques will be needed to facilitate the detailed proteomic analysis of low-abundance components and subpopulations of proteasome complexes. The results will help us understand proteasome biology as well as provide new therapeutic targets for disease diagnostics and treatment. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2444–2456. PMID:24423446

  11. Proteasome stress responses in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Renato Graciano; de Magalhães Ornelas, Alice Maria; Morais, Enyara Rezende; de Souza Gomes, Matheus; de Paula Aguiar, Daniela; Magalhães, Lizandra Guidi; Rodrigues, Vanderlei

    2015-05-01

    The proteasome proteolytic system is the major ATP-dependent protease in eukaryotic cells responsible for intracellular protein turnover. Schistosoma mansoni has been reported to contain an ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway, and many studies have suggested a biological role of proteasomes in the development of this parasite. Additionally, evidence has suggested diversity in proteasome composition under several cellular conditions, and this might contribute to the regulation of its function in this parasite. The proteasomal system has been considered important to support the protein homeostasis during cellular stress. In this study, we described in vitro effects of oxidative stress, heat shock, and chemical stress on S. mansoni adults. Our findings showed that chemical stress induced with curcumin, IBMX, and MG132 modified the gene expression of the proteasomal enzymes SmHul5 and SmUbp6. Likewise, the expression of these genes was upregulated during oxidative stress and heat shock. Analyses of the S. mansoni life cycle showed differential gene expression in sporocysts, schistosomulae, and miracidia. These results suggested that proteasome accessory proteins participate in stress response during the parasite development. The expression level of SmHul5 and SmUbp6 was decreased by 16-fold and 9-fold, respectively, by the chemical stress induced with IBMX, which suggests proteasome disassembly. On the other hand, curcumin, MG132, oxidative stress, and heat shock increased the expression of these genes. Furthermore, the gene expression of maturation proteasome protein (SmPOMP) was increased in stress conditions induced by curcumin, MG132, and H₂O₂, which could be related to the synthesis of new proteasomes. S. mansoni adult worms were found to utilize similar mechanisms to respond to different conditions of stress. Our results demonstrated that oxidative stress, heat shock, and chemical stress modified the expression profile of genes related to the ubiquitin-proteasome

  12. A Mutation in a Novel Yeast Proteasomal Gene, RPN11/MPR1, Produces a Cell Cycle Arrest, Overreplication of Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA, and an Altered Mitochondrial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Teresa; Ricci, Carlo; Porro, Danilo; Bolotin-Fukuhara, Monique; Frontali, Laura

    1998-01-01

    We report here the functional characterization of an essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, MPR1, coding for a regulatory proteasomal subunit for which the name Rpn11p has been proposed. For this study we made use of the mpr1-1 mutation that causes the following pleiotropic defects. At 24°C growth is delayed on glucose and impaired on glycerol, whereas no growth is seen at 36°C on either carbon source. Microscopic observation of cells growing on glucose at 24°C shows that most of them bear a large bud, whereas mitochondrial morphology is profoundly altered. A shift to the nonpermissive temperature produces aberrant elongated cell morphologies, whereas the nucleus fails to divide. Flow cytometry profiles after the shift to the nonpermissive temperature indicate overreplication of both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Consistently with the identification of Mpr1p with a proteasomal subunit, the mutation is complemented by the human POH1 proteasomal gene. Moreover, the mpr1-1 mutant grown to stationary phase accumulates ubiquitinated proteins. Localization of the Rpn11p/Mpr1p protein has been studied by green fluorescent protein fusion, and the fusion protein has been found to be mainly associated to cytoplasmic structures. For the first time, a proteasomal mutation has also revealed an associated mitochondrial phenotype. We actually showed, by the use of [rho°] cells derived from the mutant, that the increase in DNA content per cell is due in part to an increase in the amount of mitochondrial DNA. Moreover, microscopy of mpr1-1 cells grown on glucose showed that multiple punctate mitochondrial structures were present in place of the tubular network found in the wild-type strain. These data strongly suggest that mpr1-1 is a valuable tool with which to study the possible roles of proteasomal function in mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:9763452

  13. Dominant-negative mutation in the beta2 and beta6 proteasome subunit genes affect alternative cell fate decisions in the Drosophila sense organ lineage.

    PubMed

    Schweisguth, F

    1999-09-28

    In Drosophila, dominant-negative mutations in the beta2 and beta6 proteasome catalytic subunit genes have been identified as dominant temperature-sensitive (DTS) mutations. At restrictive temperature, beta2 and beta6 DTS mutations confer lethality at the pupal stage. I investigate here the role of proteasome activity in regulating cell fate decisions in the sense organ lineage at the early pupal stage. Temperature-shift experiments in beta2 and beta6 DTS mutant pupae occasionally resulted in external sense organs with two sockets and no shaft. This double-socket phenotype was strongly enhanced in conditions in which Notch signaling was up-regulated. Furthermore, conditional overexpression of the beta6 dominant-negative mutant subunit led to shaft-to-socket and to neuron-to-sheath cell fate transformations, which are both usually associated with increased Notch signaling activity. Finally, expression of the beta6 dominant-negative mutant subunit led to the stabilization of an ectopically expressed nuclear form of Notch in imaginal wing discs. This study demonstrates that mutations affecting two distinct proteasome catalytic subunits affect two alternative cell fate decisions and enhance Notch signaling activity in the sense organ lineage. These findings raise the possibility that the proteasome targets an active form of the Notch receptor for degradation in Drosophila.

  14. Gene set analysis using variance component tests.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Tsung; Lin, Xihong

    2013-06-28

    Gene set analyses have become increasingly important in genomic research, as many complex diseases are contributed jointly by alterations of numerous genes. Genes often coordinate together as a functional repertoire, e.g., a biological pathway/network and are highly correlated. However, most of the existing gene set analysis methods do not fully account for the correlation among the genes. Here we propose to tackle this important feature of a gene set to improve statistical power in gene set analyses. We propose to model the effects of an independent variable, e.g., exposure/biological status (yes/no), on multiple gene expression values in a gene set using a multivariate linear regression model, where the correlation among the genes is explicitly modeled using a working covariance matrix. We develop TEGS (Test for the Effect of a Gene Set), a variance component test for the gene set effects by assuming a common distribution for regression coefficients in multivariate linear regression models, and calculate the p-values using permutation and a scaled chi-square approximation. We show using simulations that type I error is protected under different choices of working covariance matrices and power is improved as the working covariance approaches the true covariance. The global test is a special case of TEGS when correlation among genes in a gene set is ignored. Using both simulation data and a published diabetes dataset, we show that our test outperforms the commonly used approaches, the global test and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). We develop a gene set analyses method (TEGS) under the multivariate regression framework, which directly models the interdependence of the expression values in a gene set using a working covariance. TEGS outperforms two widely used methods, GSEA and global test in both simulation and a diabetes microarray data.

  15. Gene set analysis using variance component tests

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene set analyses have become increasingly important in genomic research, as many complex diseases are contributed jointly by alterations of numerous genes. Genes often coordinate together as a functional repertoire, e.g., a biological pathway/network and are highly correlated. However, most of the existing gene set analysis methods do not fully account for the correlation among the genes. Here we propose to tackle this important feature of a gene set to improve statistical power in gene set analyses. Results We propose to model the effects of an independent variable, e.g., exposure/biological status (yes/no), on multiple gene expression values in a gene set using a multivariate linear regression model, where the correlation among the genes is explicitly modeled using a working covariance matrix. We develop TEGS (Test for the Effect of a Gene Set), a variance component test for the gene set effects by assuming a common distribution for regression coefficients in multivariate linear regression models, and calculate the p-values using permutation and a scaled chi-square approximation. We show using simulations that type I error is protected under different choices of working covariance matrices and power is improved as the working covariance approaches the true covariance. The global test is a special case of TEGS when correlation among genes in a gene set is ignored. Using both simulation data and a published diabetes dataset, we show that our test outperforms the commonly used approaches, the global test and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). Conclusion We develop a gene set analyses method (TEGS) under the multivariate regression framework, which directly models the interdependence of the expression values in a gene set using a working covariance. TEGS outperforms two widely used methods, GSEA and global test in both simulation and a diabetes microarray data. PMID:23806107

  16. Feline immunodeficiency virus OrfA alters gene expression of splicing factors and proteasome-ubiquitination proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, Magnus; Chatterji, Udayan; Schaffer, Lana; Rozieres, Sohela de; Elder, John H.

    2008-02-20

    Expression of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) accessory protein OrfA (or Orf2) is critical for efficient viral replication in lymphocytes, both in vitro and in vivo. OrfA has been reported to exhibit functions in common with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) accessory proteins Vpr and Tat, although the function of OrfA has not been fully explained. Here, we use microarray analysis to characterize how OrfA modulates the gene expression profile of T-lymphocytes. The primary IL-2-dependent T-cell line 104-C1 was transduced to express OrfA. Functional expression of OrfA was demonstrated by trans complementation of the OrfA-defective clone, FIV-34TF10. OrfA-expressing cells had a slightly reduced cell proliferation rate but did not exhibit any significant alteration in cell cycle distribution. Reverse-transcribed RNA from cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GFP + OrfA were hybridized to Affymetrix HU133 Plus 2.0 microarray chips representing more than 47,000 genome-wide transcripts. By using two statistical approaches, 461 (Rank Products) and 277 (ANOVA) genes were identified as modulated by OrfA expression. The functional relevance of the differentially expressed genes was explored by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. The analyses revealed alterations in genes critical for RNA post-transcriptional modifications and protein ubiquitination as the two most significant functional outcomes of OrfA expression. In these two groups, several subunits of the spliceosome, cellular splicing factors and family members of the proteasome-ubiquitination system were identified. These findings provide novel information on the versatile function of OrfA during FIV infection and indicate a fine-tuning mechanism of the cellular environment by OrfA to facilitate efficient FIV replication.

  17. Supplementation with l-carnitine downregulates genes of the ubiquitin proteasome system in the skeletal muscle and liver of piglets.

    PubMed

    Keller, J; Ringseis, R; Koc, A; Lukas, I; Kluge, H; Eder, K

    2012-01-01

    Supplementation of carnitine has been shown to improve performance characteristics such as protein accretion in growing pigs. The molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are largely unknown. Based on recent results from DNA microchip analysis, we hypothesized that carnitine supplementation leads to a downregulation of genes of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). The UPS is the most important system for protein breakdown in tissues, which in turn could be an explanation for increased protein accretion. To test this hypothesis, we fed sixteen male, four-week-old piglets either a control diet or the same diet supplemented with carnitine and determined the expression of several genes involved in the UPS in the liver and skeletal muscle. To further determine whether the effects of carnitine on the expression of genes of the UPS are mediated directly or indirectly, we also investigated the effect of carnitine on the expression of genes of the UPS in cultured C2C12 myotubes and HepG2 liver cells. In the liver of piglets fed the carnitine-supplemented diet, the relative mRNA levels of atrogin-1, E214k and Psma1 were lower than in those of the control piglets (P < 0.05). In skeletal muscle, the relative mRNA levels of atrogin-1, MuRF1, E214k, Psma1 and ubiquitin were lower in piglets fed the carnitine-supplemented diet than that in control piglets (P < 0.05). Incubating C2C12 myotubes and HepG2 liver cells with increasing concentrations of carnitine had no effect on basal and/or hydrocortisone-stimulated mRNA levels of genes of the UPS. In conclusion, this study shows that dietary carnitine decreases the transcript levels of several genes involved in the UPS in skeletal muscle and liver of piglets, whereas carnitine has no effect on the transcript levels of these genes in cultivated HepG2 liver cells and C2C12 myotubes. These data suggest that the inhibitory effect of carnitine on the expression of genes of the UPS is mediated indirectly, probably via modulating

  18. Natural alleles of a proteasome α2 subunit gene contribute to thermotolerance and adaptation of African rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Min; Chao, Dai-Yin; Wu, Yuan; Huang, Xuehui; Chen, Ke; Cui, Long-Gang; Su, Lei; Ye, Wang-Wei; Chen, Hao; Chen, Hua-Chang; Dong, Nai-Qian; Guo, Tao; Shi, Min; Feng, Qi; Zhang, Peng; Han, Bin; Shan, Jun-Xiang; Gao, Ji-Ping; Lin, Hong-Xuan

    2015-07-01

    Global warming threatens many aspects of human life, for example, by reducing crop yields. Breeding heat-tolerant crops using genes conferring thermotolerance is a fundamental way to help deal with this challenge. Here we identify a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) for thermotolerance in African rice (Oryza glaberrima), Thermo-tolerance 1 (TT1), which encodes an α2 subunit of the 26S proteasome involved in the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins. Ubiquitylome analysis indicated that OgTT1 protects cells from heat stress through more efficient elimination of cytotoxic denatured proteins and more effective maintenance of heat-response processes than achieved with OsTT1. Variation in TT1 has been selected for on the basis of climatic temperature and has had an important role in local adaptation during rice evolution. In addition, we found that overexpression of OgTT1 was associated with markedly enhanced thermotolerance in rice, Arabidopsis and Festuca elata. This discovery may lead to an increase in crop security in the face of the ongoing threat of global warming.

  19. Foxp3 enhances HIF-1α target gene expression in human bladder cancer through decreasing its ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chang-Te; Tung, Chun-Liang; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Tsai, Hsin-Tzu; Yang, Wen-Horng; Chang, Hung-I; Chen, Syue-Yi; Tzai, Tzong-Shin

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) can control a transcriptional factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) protein expression in T lymphocyte differentiation through proteasome-mediated degradation. In this study, we unveil a reverse regulatory mechanism contributing to bladder cancer progression; Foxp3 expression attenuates HIF-1α degradation. We first demonstrated that Foxp3 expression positively correlates with the metastatic potential in T24 cells and can increase the expression of HIF-1α-target genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and glucose transporter (GLUT). Foxp3 protein can bind with HIF-1α, particularly under hypoxia. In vivo ubiquination assay demonstrated that Foxp3 can decrease HIF-1α degradation in a dose-dependent manner. Knocking-down of Foxp3 expression blocks in vivo tumor growth in mice and prolongs mice's survival, which is associated with von Willebrand factor expression. Thirty-three of 145 (22.8 %) bladder tumors exhibit Foxp3 expression. Foxp3 expression is an independent predictor for disease progression in superficial bladder cancer patients (p = 0.032), associated with less number of intratumoral CD8+ lymphocyte. The metaanalysis from 2 published datasets showed Foxp3 expression is positively associated with GLUT−4, −9, and VEGF-A, B-, D expression. This reverse post-translational regulation of HIF-1α protein by Foxp3 provides a new potential target for developing new therapeutic strategy for bladder cancer. PMID:27557492

  20. Purification and characterization of Candida albicans 20S proteasome: identification of four proteasomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Fernández Murray, P; Biscoglio, M J; Passeron, S

    2000-03-15

    The 20S proteasome from yeast cells of Candida albicans was purified by successive chromatographic steps to apparent homogeneity, as judged by nondenaturing and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 640 kDa by gel filtration. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate gave at least 10 bands in the range 20-32 kDa. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed the presence of at least 14 polypeptides. By electron microscopy after negative staining, the proteasome preparation appeared as typical symmetrical barrel-shaped particles. The enzyme cleaved the peptidyl-arylamide bonds in the model synthetic substrates Cbz-G-G-L-p-nitroanilide, Cbz-G-G-R-beta-naphthylamide, and Cbz-L-L-E-beta-naphthylamide (chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and peptidylglutamyl-peptide-hydrolyzing activities). The differential sensitivity of these activities to aldehyde peptides and sodium dodecyl sulfate supported the multicatalytic nature of this enzyme. Three proteasomal subunits were identified as alpha6/Pre5, alpha3/Y13, and alpha5/Pup2 by internal sequencing of tryptic fragments. Their sequences perfectly matched the corresponding deduced amino acid sequences of the C. albicans genes. A fourth subunit was identified as alpha7/Prs1 by immunorecognition with a monoclonal antibody specific for C8, the human proteasome subunit homologue. Treatment of the intact isolated 20S proteasome with acid phosphatase and Western blot analysis of the separated components indicated that the alpha7/Prs1 subunit is obtained as a multiply phosphorylated protein.

  1. Phosphorylation regulates mycobacterial proteasome.

    PubMed

    Anandan, Tripti; Han, Jaeil; Baun, Heather; Nyayapathy, Seeta; Brown, Jacob T; Dial, Rebekah L; Moltalvo, Juan A; Kim, Min-Seon; Yang, Seung Hwan; Ronning, Donald R; Husson, Robert N; Suh, Joowon; Kang, Choong-Min

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses a proteasome system that is required for the microbe to resist elimination by the host immune system. Despite the importance of the proteasome in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, the molecular mechanisms by which proteasome activity is controlled remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the α-subunit (PrcA) of the M. tuberculosis proteasome is phosphorylated by the PknB kinase at three threonine residues (T84, T202, and T178) in a sequential manner. Furthermore, the proteasome with phosphorylated PrcA enhances the degradation of Ino1, a known proteasomal substrate, suggesting that PknB regulates the proteolytic activity of the proteasome. Previous studies showed that depletion of the proteasome and the proteasome-associated proteins decreases resistance to reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs) but increases resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here we show that PknA phosphorylation of unprocessed proteasome β-subunit (pre-PrcB) and α-subunit reduces the assembly of the proteasome complex and thereby enhances the mycobacterial resistance to H2O2 and that H2O2 stress diminishes the formation of the proteasome complex in a PknA-dependent manner. These findings indicate that phosphorylation of the M. tuberculosis proteasome not only modulates proteolytic activity of the proteasome, but also affects the proteasome complex formation contributing to the survival of M. tuberculosis under oxidative stress conditions.

  2. Structural analysis and chromosomal localization of the mouse Psmb5 gene coding for the constitutively expressed beta-type proteasome subunit.

    PubMed

    Kohda, K; Matsuda, Y; Ishibashi, T; Tanaka, K; Kasahara, M

    1997-01-01

    The proteasome is a multi-subunit protease responsible for the production of peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. Accumulated evidence indicates that, upon stimulation with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), three beta-type subunits, designated LMP2, LMP7, and PSMB10, are incorporated into the 20S proteasome by displacing the housekeeping beta-type subunits designated PSMB6, PSMB5, and PSMB7, respectively. These changes in the subunit composition appear to facilitate class I-mediated antigen presentation, presumably by altering the cleavage specificities of the proteasome. In the present study, we determined the organization of the mouse gene Psmb5, coding for the PSMB5 subunit. Psmb5 is made up of three exons, spanning approximately 5 kilobases. Its exon-intron organization differs radically from those of the other IFN-gamma-regulated, beta-type subunit genes including Lmp7 with which Psmb5 is believed to share an immediate common ancestor. The structure of the mouse Psmb5 gene is identical to that of its recently characterized human counterpart. Thus, the unique organization of the gene coding for the PSMB5 subunit appears to have been established before mammalian radiation. As well as the Psmb5 gene, the mouse genome contains a processed pseudogene designated Psmb5-ps. Interspecific backcross mapping showed that Psmb5 maps close to the Gtrgal2 locus on chromosome 14 and that Psmb5-ps is located in the vicinity of the Psme3 locus on chromosome 11. These results were confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis that localized Psmb5 to band C2 to proximal D1 of chromosome 14 and Psmb5-ps to band D of chromosome 11.

  3. Proteasome modulator 9 gene SNPs, responsible for anti-depressant response, are in linkage with generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Gragnoli, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Proteasome modulator 9 (PSMD9) gene single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1043307/rs2514259 (E197G) is associated with significant clinical response to the anti-depressant desipramine. PSMD9 SNP rs74421874 [intervening sequence (IVS) 3 + nt460 G>A], rs3825172 (IVS3 + nt437 C>T) and rs1043307/rs2514259 (E197G A>G) are all linked to type 2 diabetes (T2D), maturity-onset-diabetes-of the young 3 (MODY3), obesity and waist circumference, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, T2D-macrovascular and T2D-microvascular disease, T2D-neuropathy, T2D-carpal tunnel syndrome, T2D-nephropathy, T2D-retinopathy, non-diabetic retinopathy and depression. PSMD9 rs149556654 rare SNP (N166S A>G) and the variant S143G A>G also contribute to T2D. PSMD9 is located in the chromosome 12q24 locus, which per se is in linkage with depression, bipolar disorder and anxiety. In the present study, we wanted to determine whether PSMD9 is linked to general anxiety disorder in Italian T2D families. Two-hundred Italian T2D families were phenotyped for generalized anxiety disorder, using the diagnostic criteria of DSM-IV. When the diagnosis was unavailable or unclear, the trait was reported as unknown. The 200 Italians families were tested for the PSMD9 T2D risk SNPs rs74421874 (IVS3 + nt460 G>A), rs3825172 (IVS3 +nt437 T>C) and for the T2D risk and anti-depressant response SNP rs1043307/rs2514259 (E197G A>G) for evidence of linkage with generalized anxiety disorder. Non-parametric linkage analysis was executed via Merlin software. One-thousand simulation tests were performed to exclude results due to random chance. In our study, the PSMD9 gene SNPs rs74421874, rs3825172, and rs1043307/rs2514259 result in linkage to generalized anxiety disorder. This is the first report describing PSMD9 gene SNPs in linkage to generalized anxiety disorder in T2D families.

  4. Homogeneous, bioluminescent proteasome assays.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Martha A; Moravec, Richard A; Riss, Terry L; Bulleit, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Protein degradation is mediated predominantly through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The importance of the proteasome in regulating degradation of proteins involved in cell-cycle control, apoptosis, and angiogenesis led to the recognition of the proteasome as a therapeutic target for cancer. The proteasome is also essential for degrading misfolded and aberrant proteins, and impaired proteasome function has been implicated in neurodegerative and cardiovascular diseases. Robust, sensitive assays are essential for monitoring proteasome activity and for developing inhibitors of the proteasome. Peptide-conjugated fluorophores are widely used as substrates for monitoring proteasome activity, but fluorogenic substrates can exhibit significant background and can be problematic for screening because of cellular autofluorescence or interference from fluorescent library compounds. Furthermore, fluorescent proteasome assays require column-purified 20S or 26S proteasome (typically obtained from erythrocytes), or proteasome extracts from whole cells, as their samples. To provide assays more amenable to high-throughput screening, we developed a homogeneous, bioluminescent method that combines peptide-conjugated aminoluciferin substrates and a stabilized luciferase. Using substrates for the chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like proteasome activities in combination with a selective membrane permeabilization step, we developed single-step, cell-based assays to measure each of the proteasome catalytic activities. The homogeneous method eliminates the need to prepare individual cell extracts as samples and has adequate sensitivity for 96- and 384-well plates. The simple "add and read" format enables sensitive and rapid proteasome assays ideal for inhibitor screening.

  5. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II modulates endothelial cell responses by degrading hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha through interaction with PSMA7, a component of the proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Tandle, Anita T.; Calvani, Maura; Uranchimeg, Badarch; Zahavi, David; Melillo, Giovanni; Libutti, Steven K.

    2009-07-01

    The majority of human tumors are angiogenesis dependent. Understanding the specific mechanisms that contribute to angiogenesis may offer the best approach to develop therapies to inhibit angiogenesis in cancer. Endothelial monocyte activating polypeptide-II (EMAP-II) is an anti-angiogenic cytokine with potent effects on endothelial cells (ECs). It inhibits EC proliferation and cord formation, and it suppresses primary and metastatic tumor growth in-vivo. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms behind the anti-angiogenic activity of EMAP-II. In the present study, we explored the molecular mechanism behind the anti-angiogenic activity exerted by this protein on ECs. Our results demonstrate that EMAP-II binds to the cell surface {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin receptor. The cell surface binding of EMAP-II results in its internalization into the cytoplasmic compartment where it interacts with its cytoplasmic partner PSMA7, a component of the proteasome degradation pathway. This interaction increases hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1{alpha}) degradation under hypoxic conditions. The degradation results in the inhibition of HIF-1{alpha} mediated transcriptional activity as well as HIF-1{alpha} mediated angiogenic sprouting of ECs. HIF-1{alpha} plays a critical role in angiogenesis by activating a variety of angiogenic growth factors. Our results suggest that one of the major anti-angiogenic functions of EMAP-II is exerted through its inhibition of the HIF-1{alpha} activities.

  6. Role of proteasomes in disease

    PubMed Central

    Dahlmann, Burkhardt

    2007-01-01

    A functional ubiquitin proteasome system is essential for all eukaryotic cells and therefore any alteration to its components has potential pathological consequences. Though the exact underlying mechanism is unclear, an age-related decrease in proteasome activity weakens cellular capacity to remove oxidatively modified proteins and favours the development of neurodegenerative and cardiac diseases. Up-regulation of proteasome activity is characteristic of muscle wasting conditions including sepsis, cachexia and uraemia, but may not be rate limiting. Meanwhile, enhanced presence of immunoproteasomes in aging brain and muscle tissue could reflect a persistent inflammatory defence and anti-stress mechanism, whereas in cancer cells, their down-regulation reflects a means by which to escape immune surveillance. Hence, induction of apoptosis by synthetic proteasome inhibitors is a potential treatment strategy for cancer, whereas for other diseases such as neurodegeneration, the use of proteasome-activating or -modulating compounds could be more effective. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; ). PMID:18047740

  7. Cereblon inhibits proteasome activity by binding to the 20S core proteasome subunit beta type 4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Min; Lee, Jongwon; Park, Chul-Seung

    2012-10-26

    In humans, mutations in the gene encoding cereblon (CRBN) are associated with mental retardation. Although CRBN has been investigated in several cellular contexts, its function remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CRBN plays a role in regulating the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Heterologous expression of CRBN inhibited proteasome activity in a human neuroblastoma cell line. Furthermore, proteasome subunit beta type 4 (PSMB4), the β7 subunit of the 20S core complex, was identified as a direct binding partner of CRBN. These findings suggest that CRBN may modulate proteasome activity by directly interacting with the β7 subunit.

  8. Over-expression of genes and proteins of ubiquitin specific peptidases (USPs) and proteasome subunits (PSs) in breast cancer tissue observed by the methods of RFDD-PCR and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shishan; Zhou, Hongying; Xiong, Ruohong; Lu, Youguang; Yan, Dazhong; Xing, Tianyong; Dong, Lihua; Tang, Enjie; Yang, Huijun

    2007-07-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system facilitates the degradation of damaged proteins and regulators of growth and stress response. Alterations in this proteolytic system are associated with a variety of human pathologies. By restriction fragment differential display polymerase chain reaction (RFDD-PCR) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF MS) based on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE), differentially expressed genes and proteins of ubiquitin specific proteases (USPs), proteasome subuinits (PSs) and ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) were analyzed between breast cancer and adjacent normal tissues. Some of them were further verified as over-expression by immunohistochemical stain. Five genes of proteasome subunits (PSs), including PSMB5, PSMD1, PSMD2, PSMD8 and PSMD11, four genes of USPs, including USP9X, USP9Y, USP10 and USP25, and ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) were over-expressed (>3-fold) in breast cancer tissue compared to adjacent normal tissue, and over-expression (>4-fold) of proteins of PSMA1 and SMT3A were observed in breast cancer tissue. PSMD8, PSMD11 and UBE3A were further verified as over-expression by immunohistochemical stain. The action of ubiquitin-proteasome system were obviously enhanced in breast cancer, and selectively intervention in action of ubiquitin-proteasome system may be a useful method of treating human breast cancer.

  9. Regulation of the retinoblastoma-E2F pathway by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Satyaki; Henry, R William

    2015-10-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB) and its related family members p107 and p130 regulate cell proliferation through the transcriptional repression of genes involved in cellular G1 to S phase transition. However, RB proteins are functionally versatile, and numerous genetic and biochemical studies point to expansive roles in cellular growth control, pluripotency, and apoptotic response. For the vast majority of genes, RB family members target the E2F family of transcriptional activators as an integral component of its gene regulatory mechanism. These interactions are regulated via reversible phosphorylation by Cyclin/Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes, a major molecular mechanism that regulates transcriptional output of RB/E2F target genes. Recent studies indicate an additional level of regulation involving the ubiquitin-proteasome system that renders pervasive control over each component of the RB pathway. Disruption of the genetic circuitry for proteasome-mediated targeting of the RB pathway has serious consequences on development and cellular transformation, and is associated with several forms of human cancer. In this review, we discuss the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in proteolytic control of RB-E2F pathway components, and recent data that points to surprising non-proteolytic roles for the ubiquitin-proteasome system in novel transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  10. Regulation of Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan by a proteasomal E3 ligase complex

    PubMed Central

    Ghazi, Arjumand; Henis-Korenblit, Sivan; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    The proteasome maintains cellular homeostasis by degrading oxidized and damaged proteins, a function known to be impaired during aging. The proteasome also acts in a regulatory capacity through E3 ligases to mediate the spatially and temporally controlled breakdown of specific proteins that impact biological processes. We have identified components of a Skp1-Cul1-F-Box E3 ligase complex that are required for the extended lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1-signaling (IIS) mutants. The CUL-1 complex functions in postmitotic, adult somatic tissues of IIS mutants to enhance longevity. Reducing IIS function leads to the nuclear accumulation of the DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor, which extends lifespan by regulating downstream longevity genes. These CUL-1 complex genes act, at least in part, by promoting the transcriptional activity of DAF-16/FOXO. Together, our findings describe a role for an important cellular pathway, the proteasomal pathway, in the genetic determination of lifespan. PMID:17392428

  11. Recognition and Cleavage of Related to Ubiquitin 1 (Rub1) and Rub1-Ubiquitin Chains by Components of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajesh K.; Zerath, Sylvia; Kleifeld, Oded; Scheffner, Martin; Glickman, Michael H.; Fushman, David

    2012-01-01

    Of all ubiquitin-like proteins, Rub1 (Nedd8 in mammals) is the closest kin of ubiquitin. We show via NMR that structurally, Rub1 and ubiquitin are fundamentally similar as well. Despite these profound similarities, the prevalence of Rub1/Nedd8 and of ubiquitin as modifiers of the proteome is starkly different, and their attachments to specific substrates perform different functions. Recently, some proteins, including p53, p73, EGFR, caspase-7, and Parkin, have been shown to be modified by both Rub1/Nedd8 and ubiquitin within cells. To understand whether and how it might be possible to distinguish among the same target protein modified by Rub1 or ubiquitin or both, we examined whether ubiquitin receptors can differentiate between Rub1 and ubiquitin. Surprisingly, Rub1 interacts with proteasome ubiquitin-shuttle proteins comparably to ubiquitin but binds more weakly to a proteasomal ubiquitin receptor Rpn10. We identified Rub1-ubiquitin heteromers in yeast and Nedd8-Ub heteromers in human cells. We validate that in human cells and in vitro, human Rub1 (Nedd8) forms chains with ubiquitin where it acts as a chain terminator. Interestingly, enzymatically assembled K48-linked Rub1-ubiquitin heterodimers are recognized by various proteasomal ubiquitin shuttles and receptors comparably to K48-linked ubiquitin homodimers. Furthermore, these heterologous chains are cleaved by COP9 signalosome or 26S proteasome. A derubylation function of the proteasome expands the repertoire of its enzymatic activities. In contrast, Rub1 conjugates may be somewhat resilient to the actions of other canonical deubiquitinating enzymes. Taken together, these findings suggest that once Rub1/Nedd8 is channeled into ubiquitin pathways, it is recognized essentially like ubiquitin. PMID:23105008

  12. Novel interactions between actin and the proteasome revealed by complex haploinsufficiency.

    PubMed

    Haarer, Brian; Aggeli, Dimitra; Viggiano, Susan; Burke, Daniel J; Amberg, David C

    2011-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a powerful model for uncovering the landscape of binary gene interactions through whole-genome screening. Complex heterozygous interactions are potentially important to human genetic disease as loss-of-function alleles are common in human genomes. We have been using complex haploinsufficiency (CHI) screening with the actin gene to identify genes related to actin function and as a model to determine the prevalence of CHI interactions in eukaryotic genomes. Previous CHI screening between actin and null alleles for non-essential genes uncovered ∼240 deleterious CHI interactions. In this report, we have extended CHI screening to null alleles for essential genes by mating a query strain to sporulations of heterozygous knock-out strains. Using an act1Δ query, knock-outs of 60 essential genes were found to be CHI with actin. Enriched in this collection were functional categories found in the previous screen against non-essential genes, including genes involved in cytoskeleton function and chaperone complexes that fold actin and tubulin. Novel to this screen was the identification of genes for components of the TFIID transcription complex and for the proteasome. We investigated a potential role for the proteasome in regulating the actin cytoskeleton and found that the proteasome physically associates with actin filaments in vitro and that some conditional mutations in proteasome genes have gross defects in actin organization. Whole-genome screening with actin as a query has confirmed that CHI interactions are important phenotypic drivers. Furthermore, CHI screening is another genetic tool to uncover novel functional connections. Here we report a previously unappreciated role for the proteasome in affecting actin organization and function.

  13. Ubiquitin and Proteasomes in Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Fuqiang; Wenzel, Sabine; Tansey, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of gene transcription is vitally important for the maintenance of normal cellular homeostasis. Failure to correctly regulate gene expression, or to deal with problems that arise during the transcription process, can lead to cellular catastrophe and disease. One of the ways cells cope with the challenges of transcription is by making extensive use of the proteolytic and nonproteolytic activities of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Here, we review recent evidence showing deep mechanistic connections between the transcription and ubiquitin-proteasome systems. Our goal is to leave the reader with a sense that just about every step in transcription—from transcription initiation through to export of mRNA from the nucleus—is influenced by the UPS and that all major arms of the system—from the first step in ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation through to the proteasome—are recruited into transcriptional processes to provide regulation, directionality, and deconstructive power. PMID:22404630

  14. Pharmacogenomics of bortezomib test-dosing identifies hyperexpression of proteasome genes, especially PSMD4, as novel high-risk feature in myeloma treated with Total Therapy 3.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, John D; Qu, Pingping; Usmani, Saad; Heuck, Christoph J; Zhang, Qing; Zhou, Yiming; Tian, Erming; Hanamura, Ichiro; van Rhee, Frits; Anaissie, Elias; Epstein, Joshua; Nair, Bijay; Stephens, Owen; Williams, Ryan; Waheed, Sarah; Alsayed, Yazan; Crowley, John; Barlogie, Bart

    2011-09-29

    Gene expression profiling (GEP) of purified plasma cells 48 hours after thalidomide and dexamethasone test doses showed these agents' mechanisms of action and provided prognostic information for untreated myeloma patients on Total Therapy 2 (TT2). Bortezomib was added in Total Therapy 3 (TT3), and 48 hours after bortezomib GEP analysis identified 80 highly survival-discriminatory genes in a training set of 142 TT3A patients that were validated in 128 patients receiving TT3B. The 80-gene GEP model (GEP80) also distinguished outcomes when applied at baseline in both TT3 and TT2 protocols. In context of our validated 70-gene model (GEP70), the GEP80 model identified 9% of patients with a grave prognosis among those with GEP70-defined low-risk disease and 41% of patients with favorable prognosis among those with GEP70-defined high-risk disease. PMSD4 was 1 of 3 genes common to both models. Residing on chromosome 1q21, PSMD4 expression is highly sensitive to copy number. Both higher PSMD4 expression levels and higher 1q21 copy numbers affected clinical outcome adversely. GEP80 baseline-defined high risk, high lactate dehydrogenase, and low albumin were the only independent adverse variables surviving multivariate survival model. We are investigating whether second-generation proteasome inhibitors (eg, carfilzomib) can overcome resistance associated with high PSMD4 levels.

  15. Proteasomal dysfunction in sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    McNaught, Kevin St P; Jackson, Tehone; JnoBaptiste, Ruth; Kapustin, Alexander; Olanow, C Warren

    2006-05-23

    The cause and mechanism of neuronal death in sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) continue to elude investigators. Recently, alterations in proteasomal function have been detected in the brain of patients with the illness. The biochemical basis of the defect and its relevance to the disease process are now being studied. The available results suggest that proteasomal dysfunction could underlie protein accumulation, Lewy body formation, and neuron death in PD. The cause of proteasomal dysfunction is unknown at present, but this could relate to gene mutations, oxidative damage, ATP depletion, or the actions of environmental toxins. It remains to be established if proteasomal dysfunction plays a primary or a secondary role in the initiation or progression of the neurodegenerative process in PD.

  16. Recognition of Client Proteins by the Proteasome.

    PubMed

    Yu, Houqing; Matouschek, Andreas

    2017-05-22

    The ubiquitin proteasome system controls the concentrations of regulatory proteins and removes damaged and misfolded proteins from cells. Proteins are targeted to the protease at the center of this system, the proteasome, by ubiquitin tags, but ubiquitin is also used as a signal in other cellular processes. Specificity is conferred by the size and structure of the ubiquitin tags, which are recognized by receptors associated with the different cellular processes. However, the ubiquitin code remains ambiguous, and the same ubiquitin tag can target different proteins to different fates. After binding substrate protein at the ubiquitin tag, the proteasome initiates degradation at a disordered region in the substrate. The proteasome has pronounced preferences for the initiation site, and its recognition represents a second component of the degradation signal.

  17. The proteasome and the degradation of oxidized proteins: Part III—Redox regulation of the proteasomal system

    PubMed Central

    Höhn, Tobias Jung Annika; Grune, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Here, we review shortly the current knowledge on the regulation of the proteasomal system during and after oxidative stress. After addressing the components of the proteasomal system and the degradation of oxidatively damaged proteins in part I and II of this series, we address here which changes in activity undergo the proteasome and the ubiquitin-proteasomal system itself under oxidative conditions. While several components of the proteasomal system undergo direct oxidative modification, a number of redox-regulated events are modulating the proteasomal activity in a way it can address the major tasks in an oxidative stress situation: the removal of oxidized proteins and the adaptation of the cellular metabolism to the stress situation. PMID:24563857

  18. Proteasome inhibition induces hsp30 and hsp70 gene expression as well as the acquisition of thermotolerance in Xenopus laevis A6 cells

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jordan T. F.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that inhibiting the activity of the proteasome leads to the accumulation of damaged or unfolded proteins within the cell. In this study, we report that proteasome inhibitors, lactacystin and carbobenzoxy-l-leucyl-l-leucyl-l-leucinal (MG132), induced the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins as well as a dose- and time-dependent increase in the relative levels of heat shock protein (HSP)30 and HSP70 and their respective mRNAs in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells. In A6 cells recovering from MG132 exposure, HSP30 and HSP70 levels were still elevated after 24 h but decreased substantially after 48 h. The activation of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) may be involved in MG132-induced hsp gene expression in A6 cells since KNK437, a HSF1 inhibitor, repressed the accumulation of HSP30 and HSP70. Exposing A6 cells to simultaneous MG132 and mild heat shock enhanced the accumulation of HSP30 and HSP70 to a much greater extent than with each stressor alone. Immunocytochemical studies determined that HSP30 was localized primarily in the cytoplasm of lactacystin- or MG132-treated cells. In some cells treated with higher concentrations of MG132 or lactacystin, we observed in the cortical cytoplasm (1) relatively large HSP30 staining structures, (2) colocalization of actin and HSP30, and (3) cytoplasmic areas that were devoid of HSP30. Lastly, MG132 treatment of A6 cells conferred a state of thermotolerance such that they were able to survive a subsequent thermal challenge. PMID:19838833

  19. Production of proteasome inhibitor syringolin A by the endophyte Rhizobium sp. strain AP16.

    PubMed

    Dudnik, Alexey; Bigler, Laurent; Dudler, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Syringolin A, the product of a mixed nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthase encoded by the syl gene cluster, is a virulence factor secreted by certain Pseudomonas syringae strains. Together with the glidobactins produced by a number of beta- and gammaproteobacterial human and animal pathogens, it belongs to the syrbactins, a structurally novel class of proteasome inhibitors. In plants, proteasome inhibition by syringolin A-producing P. syringae strains leads to the suppression of host defense pathways requiring proteasome activity, such as the ones mediated by salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Here we report the discovery of a syl-like gene cluster with some unusual features in the alphaproteobacterial endophyte Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 that encodes a putative syringolin A-like synthetase whose components share 55% to 65% sequence identity (72% to 79% similarity) at the amino acid level. As revealed by average nucleotide identity (ANI) calculations, this strain likely belongs to the same species as biocontrol strain R. rhizogenes K84 (formely known as Agrobacterium radiobacter K84), which, however, carries a nonfunctional deletion remnant of the syl-like gene cluster. Here we present a functional analysis of the syl-like gene cluster of Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 and demonstrate that this endophyte synthesizes syringolin A and some related minor variants, suggesting that proteasome inhibition by syrbactin production can be important not only for pathogens but also for endophytic bacteria in the interaction with their hosts.

  20. Production of Proteasome Inhibitor Syringolin A by the Endophyte Rhizobium sp. Strain AP16

    PubMed Central

    Bigler, Laurent; Dudler, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Syringolin A, the product of a mixed nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthase encoded by the syl gene cluster, is a virulence factor secreted by certain Pseudomonas syringae strains. Together with the glidobactins produced by a number of beta- and gammaproteobacterial human and animal pathogens, it belongs to the syrbactins, a structurally novel class of proteasome inhibitors. In plants, proteasome inhibition by syringolin A-producing P. syringae strains leads to the suppression of host defense pathways requiring proteasome activity, such as the ones mediated by salicylic acid and jasmonic acid. Here we report the discovery of a syl-like gene cluster with some unusual features in the alphaproteobacterial endophyte Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 that encodes a putative syringolin A-like synthetase whose components share 55% to 65% sequence identity (72% to 79% similarity) at the amino acid level. As revealed by average nucleotide identity (ANI) calculations, this strain likely belongs to the same species as biocontrol strain R. rhizogenes K84 (formely known as Agrobacterium radiobacter K84), which, however, carries a nonfunctional deletion remnant of the syl-like gene cluster. Here we present a functional analysis of the syl-like gene cluster of Rhizobium sp. strain AP16 and demonstrate that this endophyte synthesizes syringolin A and some related minor variants, suggesting that proteasome inhibition by syrbactin production can be important not only for pathogens but also for endophytic bacteria in the interaction with their hosts. PMID:24727275

  1. Regulation of proteasome activity in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Marion; Finley, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is the primary selective degradation system in the nuclei and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, required for the turnover of myriad soluble proteins. The hundreds of factors that comprise the UPS include an enzymatic cascade that tags proteins for degradation via the covalent attachment of a poly-ubiquitin chain, and a large multimeric enzyme that degrades ubiquitinated proteins, the proteasome. Protein degradation by the UPS regulates many pathways and is a crucial component of the cellular proteostasis network. Dysfunction of the ubiquitination machinery or the proteolytic activity of the proteasome is associated with numerous human diseases. In this review we discuss the contributions of the proteasome to human pathology, describe mechanisms that regulate the proteolytic capacity of the proteasome, and discuss strategies to modulate proteasome function as a therapeutic approach to ameliorate diseases associated with altered UPS function. PMID:23994620

  2. Proteasome Inhibitors Enhance Gene Delivery by AAV Virus Vectors Expressing Large Genomes in Hemophilia Mouse and Dog Models: A Strategy for Broad Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, Paul E; Lothrop, Clinton D; Sun, Junjiang; Hirsch, Matthew L; Kafri, Tal; Kantor, Boris; Sarkar, Rita; Tillson, D Michael; Elia, Joseph R; Samulski, R Jude

    2010-01-01

    Delivery of genes that are larger than the wild-type adeno-associated virus (AAV) 4,681 nucleotide genome is inefficient using AAV vectors. We previously demonstrated in vitro that concurrent proteasome inhibitor (PI) treatment improves transduction by AAV vectors encoding oversized transgenes. In this study, an AAV vector with a 5.6 kilobase (kb) factor VIII expression cassette was used to test the effect of an US Food and Drug Administration–approved PI (bortezomib) treatment concurrent with vector delivery in vivo. Intrahepatic vector delivery resulted in factor VIII expression that persisted for >1 year in hemophilia mice. Single-dose bortezomib given with AAV2 or AAV8 factor VIII vector enhanced expression on average ~600 and ~300%, respectively. Moreover, coadministration of AAV8.canineFVIII (1 × 1013 vg/kg) and bortezomib in hemophilia A dogs (n = 4) resulted in normalization of the whole blood clotting time (WBCT) and 90% reduction in hemorrhages for >32 months compared to untreated hemophilia A dogs (n = 3) or dogs administered vector alone (n = 3). Demonstration of long-term phenotypic correction of hemophilia A dogs with combination adjuvant bortezomib and AAV vector expressing the oversized transgene establishes preclinical studies that support testing in humans and provides a working paradigm to facilitate a significant expansion of therapeutic targets for human gene therapy. PMID:20700109

  3. The proteasome assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Madura, Kiran

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of the proteasome — the cellular machine that eliminates unwanted proteins — is a carefully choreographed affair, involving a complex sequence of steps overseen by dedicated protein chaperones. PMID:19516331

  4. Inhibition of Proteasome Activity Induces Formation of Alternative Proteasome Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Welk, Vanessa; Coux, Olivier; Kleene, Vera; Abeza, Claire; Trümbach, Dietrich; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is an intracellular protease complex consisting of the 20S catalytic core and its associated regulators, including the 19S complex, PA28αβ, PA28γ, PA200, and PI31. Inhibition of the proteasome induces autoregulatory de novo formation of 20S and 26S proteasome complexes. Formation of alternative proteasome complexes, however, has not been investigated so far. We here show that catalytic proteasome inhibition results in fast recruitment of PA28γ and PA200 to 20S and 26S proteasomes within 2–6 h. Rapid formation of alternative proteasome complexes did not involve transcriptional activation of PA28γ and PA200 but rather recruitment of preexisting activators to 20S and 26S proteasome complexes. Recruitment of proteasomal activators depended on the extent of active site inhibition of the proteasome with inhibition of β5 active sites being sufficient for inducing recruitment. Moreover, specific inhibition of 26S proteasome activity via siRNA-mediated knockdown of the 19S subunit RPN6 induced recruitment of only PA200 to 20S proteasomes, whereas PA28γ was not mobilized. Here, formation of alternative PA200 complexes involved transcriptional activation of the activator. Alternative proteasome complexes persisted when cells had regained proteasome activity after pulse exposure to proteasome inhibitors. Knockdown of PA28γ sensitized cells to proteasome inhibitor-mediated growth arrest. Thus, formation of alternative proteasome complexes appears to be a formerly unrecognized but integral part of the cellular response to impaired proteasome function and altered proteostasis. PMID:27129254

  5. Characterization of the proteasome ß2 subunit gene and its mutant allele in the tephritid fruit fly pest, Anastrepha suspensa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conditional lethal release (CLR) is a proposed variation of the sterile insect technique (SIT) for the biological control of pest insects that would result from the release of transgenic insects carrying dominant conditional lethal genes. After mating with pest insects in the field, lethal gene exp...

  6. Dss1 associating with the proteasome functions in selective nuclear mRNA export in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Mannen, Taro; Andoh, Tomoko; Tani, Tokio

    2008-01-25

    Dss1p is an evolutionarily conserved small protein that interacts with BRCA2, a tumor suppressor protein, in humans. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain lacking the dss1{sup +} gene ({delta}dss1) shows a temperature-sensitive growth defect and accumulation of bulk poly(A){sup +} RNA in the nucleus at a nonpermissive temperature. In situ hybridization using probes for several specific mRNAs, however, revealed that the analyzed mRNAs were exported normally to the cytoplasm in {delta}dss1, suggesting that Dss1p is required for export of some subsets of mRNAs. We identified the pad1{sup +} gene, which encodes a component of the 26S proteasome, as a suppressor for the ts{sup -} phenotype of {delta}dss1. Unexpectedly, overexpression of Pad1p could suppress neither the defect in nuclear mRNA export nor a defect in proteasome function. In addition, loss of proteasome functions does not cause defective nuclear mRNA export. Dss1p seems to be a multifunctional protein involved in nuclear export of specific sets of mRNAs and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in fission yeast.

  7. Knowledge-guided gene ranking by coordinative component analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Xuan, Jianhua; Li, Huai; Wang, Yue; Zhan, Ming; Hoffman, Eric P; Clarke, Robert

    2010-03-30

    In cancer, gene networks and pathways often exhibit dynamic behavior, particularly during the process of carcinogenesis. Thus, it is important to prioritize those genes that are strongly associated with the functionality of a network. Traditional statistical methods are often inept to identify biologically relevant member genes, motivating researchers to incorporate biological knowledge into gene ranking methods. However, current integration strategies are often heuristic and fail to incorporate fully the true interplay between biological knowledge and gene expression data. To improve knowledge-guided gene ranking, we propose a novel method called coordinative component analysis (COCA) in this paper. COCA explicitly captures those genes within a specific biological context that are likely to be expressed in a coordinative manner. Formulated as an optimization problem to maximize the coordinative effort, COCA is designed to first extract the coordinative components based on a partial guidance from knowledge genes and then rank the genes according to their participation strengths. An embedded bootstrapping procedure is implemented to improve statistical robustness of the solutions. COCA was initially tested on simulation data and then on published gene expression microarray data to demonstrate its improved performance as compared to traditional statistical methods. Finally, the COCA approach has been applied to stem cell data to identify biologically relevant genes in signaling pathways. As a result, the COCA approach uncovers novel pathway members that may shed light into the pathway deregulation in cancers. We have developed a new integrative strategy to combine biological knowledge and microarray data for gene ranking. The method utilizes knowledge genes for a guidance to first extract coordinative components, and then rank the genes according to their contribution related to a network or pathway. The experimental results show that such a knowledge-guided strategy

  8. Similarities between methamphetamine toxicity and proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fornai, F; Lenzi, P; Gesi, M; Ferrucci, M; Lazzeri, G; Capobianco, L; de Blasi, A; Battaglia, G; Nicoletti, F; Ruggieri, S; Paparelli, A

    2004-10-01

    The monoamine neurotoxin methamphetamine (METH) is commonly used as an experimental model for Parkinson's disease (PD). In fact, METH-induced striatal dopamine (DA) loss is accompanied by damage to striatal nerve endings arising from the substantia nigra. On the other hand, PD is characterized by neuronal inclusions within nigral DA neurons. These inclusions contain alpha-synuclein, ubiquitin, and various components of a metabolic pathway named the ubiquitin-proteasome (UP) system, while mutation of genes coding for various components of the UP system is responsible for inherited forms of PD. In this presentation we demonstrate for the first time the occurrence of neuronal inclusions in vivo in the nigrostriatal system of the mouse following administration of METH. We analyzed, in vivo and in vitro, the shape and the fine structure of these neuronal bodies by using transmission electron microscopy. Immunocytochemical investigation showed that these METH-induced cytosolic inclusions stain for ubiquitin, alpha-synuclein, and UP-related molecules, thus sharing similar components with Lewy bodies occurring in PD, with an emphasis on enzymes belonging to the UP system. In line with this, blockade of this multicatalytic pathway by the selective inhibitor epoxomycin produced cell inclusions with similar features. Moreover, using a multifaceted pharmacological approach, we could demonstrate the need for endogenous DA in order to form neuronal inclusions.

  9. Inhibition of nuclear factor-{kappa}B and target genes during combined therapy with proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and reirradiation in patients with recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Van Waes, Carter . E-mail: vanwaesc@nidcd.nih.gov; Chang, Angela A.; Lebowitz, Peter F.; Druzgal, Colleen H.; Chen, Zhong; Elsayed, Yusri A.; Sunwoo, John B.; Rudy, Susan; Morris, John C.; Mitchell, James B.; Camphausen, Kevin; Gius, David; Adams, Julian; Sausville, Edward A.; Conley, Barbara A.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib (VELCADE) on transcription factor nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) and target genes and the feasibility of combination therapy with reirradiation in patients with recurrent head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: The tolerability and response to bortezomib 0.6 mg/m{sup 2} and 0.9 mg/m{sup 2} given twice weekly concurrent with daily reirradiation to 50-70 Gy was explored. Blood proteasome inhibition and NF-{kappa}B-modulated cytokines and factors were measured. Proteasome inhibition, nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B phospho-p65, apoptosis, and expression of NF-{kappa}B-modulated mRNAs were compared in serial biopsies from accessible tumors. Results: The maximally tolerated dose was exceeded, and study was limited to 7 and 2 patients, respectively, given bortezomib 0.6 mg/m{sup 2} and 0.9 mg/m{sup 2}/dose with reirradiation. Grade 3 hypotension and hyponatremia were dose limiting. Mucositis was Grade 3 or less and was delayed. The mean blood proteasome inhibition at 1, 24, and 48 h after 0.6 mg/m{sup 2} was 32%, 16%, and 7% and after 0.9 mg/m{sup 2} was 56%, 26%, and 14%, respectively. Differences in proteasome and NF-{kappa}B activity, apoptosis, and expression of NF-{kappa}B-modulated cell cycle, apoptosis, and angiogenesis factor mRNAs were detected in 2 patients with minor tumor reductions and in serum NF-{kappa}B-modulated cytokines in 1 patient with a major tumor reduction. Conclusions: In combination with reirradiation, the maximally tolerated dose of bortezomib was exceeded at a dose of 0.6 mg/m{sup 2} and the threshold of proteasome inhibition. Although this regimen with reirradiation is not feasible, bortezomib induced detectable differences in NF-{kappa}B localization, apoptosis, and NF-{kappa}B-modulated genes and cytokines in tumor and serum in association with tumor reduction, indicating that other schedules of bortezomib combined with primary

  10. Bacterial self-resistance to the natural proteasome inhibitor salinosporamide A

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Andrew J.; McGlinchey, Ryan P.; Lechner, Anna; Moore, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have recently emerged as a therapeutic strategy in cancer chemotherapy but susceptibility to drug resistance limits their efficacy. The marine actinobacterium Salinispora tropica produces salinosporamide A (NPI-0052, marizomib), a potent proteasome inhibitor and promising clinical agent in the treatment of multiple myeloma. Actinobacteria also possess 20S proteasome machinery, raising the question of self-resistance. We identified a redundant proteasome β-subunit, SalI, encoded within the salinosporamide biosynthetic gene cluster and biochemically characterized the SalI proteasome complex. The SalI β-subunit has an altered substrate specificity profile, 30-fold resistance to salinosporamide A, and cross-resistance to the FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. An A49V mutation in SalI correlates to clinical bortezomib resistance from a human proteasome β 5-subunit A49T mutation, suggesting that intrinsic resistance to natural proteasome inhibitors may predict clinical outcomes. PMID:21882868

  11. Effects of proteasome inhibitor MG-132 on the parasite Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Morais, Enyara R; Oliveira, Katia C; Paula, Renato G de; Ornelas, Alice M M; Moreira, Érika B C; Badoco, Fernanda Rafacho; Magalhães, Lizandra G; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Rodrigues, Vanderlei

    2017-01-01

    Proteasome is a proteolytic complex responsible for intracellular protein turnover in eukaryotes, archaea and in some actinobacteria species. Previous work has demonstrated that in Schistosoma mansoni parasites, the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 affects parasite development. However, the molecular targets affected by MG-132 in S. mansoni are not entirely known. Here, we used expression microarrays to measure the genome-wide changes in gene expression of S. mansoni adult worms exposed in vitro to MG-132, followed by in silico functional analyses of the affected genes using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Scanning electron microscopy was used to document changes in the parasites' tegument. We identified 1,919 genes with a statistically significant (q-value ≤ 0.025) differential expression in parasites treated for 24 h with MG-132, when compared with control. Of these, a total of 1,130 genes were up-regulated and 790 genes were down-regulated. A functional gene interaction network comprised of MG-132 and its target genes, known from the literature to be affected by the compound in humans, was identified here as affected by MG-132. While MG-132 activated the expression of the 26S proteasome genes, it also decreased the expression of 19S chaperones assembly, 20S proteasome maturation, ubiquitin-like NEDD8 and its partner cullin-3 ubiquitin ligase genes. Interestingly, genes that encode proteins related to potassium ion binding, integral membrane component, ATPase and potassium channel activities were significantly down-regulated, whereas genes encoding proteins related to actin binding and microtubule motor activity were significantly up-regulated. MG-132 caused important changes in the worm tegument; peeling, outbreaks and swelling in the tegument tubercles could be observed, which is consistent with interference on the ionic homeostasis in S. mansoni. Finally, we showed the down-regulation of Bax pro-apoptotic gene, as well as up-regulation of two apoptosis

  12. Proteasome Activity Profiling Uncovers Alteration of Catalytic β2 and β5 Subunits of the Stress-Induced Proteasome during Salinity Stress in Tomato Roots

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Kaschani, Farnusch; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Hong, Tram N.; Misas-Villamil, Johana C.; Xin, Bo T.; Kaiser, Markus; Overkleeft, Herman S.; Tari, Irma; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.

    2017-01-01

    The stress proteasome in the animal kingdom facilitates faster conversion of oxidized proteins during stress conditions by incorporating different catalytic β subunits. Plants deal with similar kind of stresses and also carry multiple paralogous genes encoding for each of the three catalytic β subunits. Here, we investigated the existence of stress proteasomes upon abiotic stress (salt stress) in tomato roots. In contrast to Arabidopsis thaliana, tomato has a simplified proteasome gene set with single genes encoding each β subunit except for two genes encoding β2. Using proteasome activity profiling on tomato roots during salt stress, we discovered a transient modification of the catalytic subunits of the proteasome coinciding with a loss of cell viability. This stress-induced active proteasome disappears at later time points and coincides with the need to degrade oxidized proteins during salt stress. Subunit-selective proteasome probes and MS analysis of fluorescent 2D gels demonstrated that the detected stress-induced proteasome is not caused by an altered composition of subunits in active proteasomes, but involves an increased molecular weight of both labeled β2 and β5 subunits, and an additional acidic pI shift for labeled β5, whilst labeled β1 remains mostly unchanged. Treatment with phosphatase or glycosidases did not affect the migration pattern. This stress-induced proteasome may play an important role in PCD during abiotic stress. PMID:28217134

  13. Proteasome Activity Profiling Uncovers Alteration of Catalytic β2 and β5 Subunits of the Stress-Induced Proteasome during Salinity Stress in Tomato Roots.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Judit; Poór, Péter; Kaschani, Farnusch; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Hong, Tram N; Misas-Villamil, Johana C; Xin, Bo T; Kaiser, Markus; Overkleeft, Herman S; Tari, Irma; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2017-01-01

    The stress proteasome in the animal kingdom facilitates faster conversion of oxidized proteins during stress conditions by incorporating different catalytic β subunits. Plants deal with similar kind of stresses and also carry multiple paralogous genes encoding for each of the three catalytic β subunits. Here, we investigated the existence of stress proteasomes upon abiotic stress (salt stress) in tomato roots. In contrast to Arabidopsis thaliana, tomato has a simplified proteasome gene set with single genes encoding each β subunit except for two genes encoding β2. Using proteasome activity profiling on tomato roots during salt stress, we discovered a transient modification of the catalytic subunits of the proteasome coinciding with a loss of cell viability. This stress-induced active proteasome disappears at later time points and coincides with the need to degrade oxidized proteins during salt stress. Subunit-selective proteasome probes and MS analysis of fluorescent 2D gels demonstrated that the detected stress-induced proteasome is not caused by an altered composition of subunits in active proteasomes, but involves an increased molecular weight of both labeled β2 and β5 subunits, and an additional acidic pI shift for labeled β5, whilst labeled β1 remains mostly unchanged. Treatment with phosphatase or glycosidases did not affect the migration pattern. This stress-induced proteasome may play an important role in PCD during abiotic stress.

  14. Proteasome subunit Rpn13 is a novel ubiquitin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Husnjak, Koraljka; Elsasser, Suzanne; Zhang, Naixia; Chen, Xiang; Randles, Leah; Shi, Yuan; Hofmann, Kay; Walters, Kylie; Finley, Daniel; Dikic, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Proteasomal receptors that recognize ubiquitin chains attached to substrates are key mediators of selective protein degradation in eukaryotes. Here we report the identification of a new ubiquitin receptor, Rpn13/ARM1, a known component of the proteasome. Rpn13 binds ubiquitin via a conserved N-terminal region termed the Pru domain (Pleckstrin-like receptor for ubiquitin), which binds K48-linked diubiquitin with an affinity of ∼90 nM. Like proteasomal ubiquitin receptor Rpn10/S5a, Rpn13 also binds ubiquitin-like domains of the UBL/UBA family of ubiquitin receptors. A synthetic phenotype results in yeast when specific mutations of the ubiquitin binding sites of Rpn10 and Rpn13 are combined, indicating functional linkage between these ubiquitin receptors. Since Rpn13 is also the proteasomal receptor for Uch37, a deubiquitinating enzyme, our findings suggest a coupling of chain recognition and disassembly at the proteasome. PMID:18497817

  15. Proteasomal dysfunction activates the transcription factor SKN-1 and produces a selective oxidative-stress response in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Nate W; Rea, Shane L; Moyle, Sarah; Kell, Alison; Johnson, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    SKN-1 in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans is functionally orthologous to mammalian NRF2 [NF-E2 (nuclear factor-E2)-related factor 2], a protein regulating response to oxidative stress. We have examined both the expression and activity of SKN-1 in response to a variety of oxidative stressors and to down-regulation of specific gene targets by RNAi (RNA interference). We used an SKN-1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) translational fusion to record changes in both skn-1 expression and SKN-1 nuclear localization, and a gst-4-GFP transcriptional fusion to measure SKN-1 transcriptional activity. GST-4 (glutathione transferase-4) is involved in the Phase II oxidative stress response and its expression is lost in an skn-1(zu67) mutant. In the present study, we show that the regulation of skn-1 is tied to the protein-degradation machinery of the cell. RNAi-targeted removal of most proteasome subunits in C. elegans caused nuclear localization of SKN-1 and, in some cases, induced transcription of gst-4. Most intriguingly, RNAi knockdown of proteasome core subunits caused nuclear localization of SKN-1 and induced gst-4, whereas RNAi knockdown of proteasome regulatory subunits resulted in nuclear localization of SKN-1 but did not induce gst-4. RNAi knockdown of ubiquitin-specific hydrolases and chaperonin components also caused nuclear localization of SKN-1 and, in some cases, also induced gst-4 transcription. skn-1 activation by proteasome dysfunction could be occurring by one or several mechanisms: (i) the reduced processivity of dysfunctional proteasomes may allow oxidatively damaged by-products to build up, which, in turn, activate the skn-1 stress response; (ii) dysfunctional proteasomes may activate the skn-1 stress response by blocking the constitutive turnover of SKN-1; and (iii) dysfunctional proteasomes may activate an unidentified signalling pathway that feeds back to control the skn-1 stress response.

  16. Nuclear ubiquitin proteasome degradation affects WRKY45 function in the rice defense program

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Akane; Inoue, Haruhiko; Goto, Shingo; Nakayama, Akira; Sugano, Shoji; Hayashi, Nagao; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional activator WRKY45 plays a major role in the salicylic acid/benzothiadiazole-induced defense program in rice. Here, we show that the nuclear ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) plays a role in regulating the function of WRKY45. Proteasome inhibitors induced accumulation of polyubiquitinated WRKY45 and transient up-regulation of WRKY45 target genes in rice cells, suggesting that WRKY45 is constantly degraded by the UPS to suppress defense responses in the absence of defense signals. Mutational analysis of the nuclear localization signal indicated that UPS-dependent WRKY45 degradation occurs in the nuclei. Interestingly, the transcriptional activity of WRKY45 after salicylic acid treatment was impaired by proteasome inhibition. The same C-terminal region in WRKY45 was essential for both transcriptional activity and UPS-dependent degradation. These results suggest that UPS regulation also plays a role in the transcriptional activity of WRKY45. It has been reported that AtNPR1, the central regulator of the salicylic acid pathway in Arabidopsis, is regulated by the UPS. We found that OsNPR1/NH1, the rice counterpart of NPR1, was not stabilized by proteasome inhibition under uninfected conditions. We discuss the differences in post-translational regulation of salicylic acid pathway components between rice and Arabidopsis. PMID:23013464

  17. Nuclear ubiquitin proteasome degradation affects WRKY45 function in the rice defense program.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Akane; Inoue, Haruhiko; Goto, Shingo; Nakayama, Akira; Sugano, Shoji; Hayashi, Nagao; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional activator WRKY45 plays a major role in the salicylic acid/benzothiadiazole-induced defense program in rice. Here, we show that the nuclear ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a role in regulating the function of WRKY45. Proteasome inhibitors induced accumulation of polyubiquitinated WRKY45 and transient up-regulation of WRKY45 target genes in rice cells, suggesting that WRKY45 is constantly degraded by the UPS to suppress defense responses in the absence of defense signals. Mutational analysis of the nuclear localization signal indicated that UPS-dependent WRKY45 degradation occurs in the nuclei. Interestingly, the transcriptional activity of WRKY45 after salicylic acid treatment was impaired by proteasome inhibition. The same C-terminal region in WRKY45 was essential for both transcriptional activity and UPS-dependent degradation. These results suggest that UPS regulation also plays a role in the transcriptional activity of WRKY45. It has been reported that AtNPR1, the central regulator of the salicylic acid pathway in Arabidopsis, is regulated by the UPS. We found that OsNPR1/NH1, the rice counterpart of NPR1, was not stabilized by proteasome inhibition under uninfected conditions. We discuss the differences in post-translational regulation of salicylic acid pathway components between rice and Arabidopsis.

  18. The proteasome: mechanisms of biology and markers of activity and response to treatment in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Manasanch, Elisabet E; Korde, Neha; Zingone, Adriana; Tageja, Nishant; Fernandez de Larrea, Carlos; Bhutani, Manisha; Wu, Peter; Roschewski, Mark; Landgren, Ola

    2014-08-01

    Since the early 1990s, the synthesis and subsequent clinical application of small molecule inhibitors of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) has revolutionized the treatment and prognosis of multiple myeloma. In this review, we summarize important aspects of the biology of the UPP with a focus on its structure and key upstream/downstream regulatory components. We then review current knowledge of plasma cell sensitivity to proteasome inhibition and highlight new proteasome inhibitors that have recently entered clinical development. Lastly, we address the putative role of circulating proteasomes as a novel biomarker in multiple myeloma and provide guidance for future clinical trials using proteasome inhibitors.

  19. Ubiquitin recognition by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Yasushi

    2017-02-01

    The 26S proteasome is a 2.5-MDa complex responsible for the selective, ATP-dependent degradation of ubiquitylated proteins in eukaryotic cells. Substrates in hundreds cellular pathways are timely ubiquitylated and converged to the proteasome by direct recognition or by multiple shuttle factors. Engagement of substrate protein triggers conformational changes of the proteasome, which drive substrate unfolding, deubiquitylation and translocation of substrates to proteolytic sites. Recent studies have challenged the previous paradigm that Lys48-linked tetraubiquitin is a minimal degradation signal: in addition, monoubiquitylation or multiple short ubiquitylations can serve as the targeting signal for proteasomal degradation. In this review, I highlight recent advances in our understanding of the proteasome structure, the ubiquitin topology in proteasome targeting, and the cellular factors that regulate proteasomal degradation. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and ubiquitin proteasome-related gene expression in 3 different skeletal muscles of colostrum- versus formula-fed calves.

    PubMed

    Sadri, H; Steinhoff-Wagner, J; Hammon, Harald M; Bruckmaier, R M; Görs, S; Sauerwein, H

    2017-09-13

    The rates of protein turnover are higher during the neonatal period than at any other time in postnatal life. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the ubiquitin-proteasome system are key pathways regulating cellular protein turnover. The objectives of this study were (1) to elucidate the effect of feeding colostrum versus milk-based formula on the mRNA abundance of key components of the mTOR pathway and of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in skeletal muscle of neonatal calves and (2) to compare different muscles. German Holstein calves were fed either colostrum (COL; n = 7) or milk-based formula (FOR; n = 7) up to 4 d of life. The nutrient content in formula and colostrum was similar, but formula had lower concentrations of free branched-chain AA (BCAA) and free total AA, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I than colostrum. Blood samples were taken from d 1 to 4 before morning feeding and before and 2 h after the last feeding on d 4. Muscle samples from M. longissimus dorsi (MLD), M. semitendinosus (MST), and M. masseter (MM) were collected after slaughter on d 4 at 2 h after feeding. The preprandial concentrations of free total AA and BCAA, insulin, and IGF-I in plasma changed over time but did not differ between groups. Plasma free total AA and BCAA concentrations decreased in COL, whereas they increased in FOR after feeding, resulting in higher postprandial plasma total AA and BCAA concentrations in FOR than in COL. Plasma insulin concentrations increased after feeding in both groups but were higher in COL than in FOR. Plasma IGF-I concentrations decreased in COL, whereas they remained unchanged in FOR after feeding. The mRNA abundance of mTOR and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) in 3 different skeletal muscles was greater in COL than in FOR, whereas that of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) was unaffected by diet. The mRNA abundance of ubiquitin activating enzyme (UBA1) and ubiquitin conjugating enzyme

  1. Proteasome Regulation of ULBP1 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Butler, James E.; Moore, Mikel B.; Presnell, Steven R.; Chan, Huei-Wei; Chalupny, N. Jan; Lutz, Charles T.

    2009-01-01

    Killer lymphocytes recognize stress-activated NKG2D ligands on tumors. We examined NKG2D ligand expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells and other cell lines. HNSCC cells typically expressed MHC class I chain-related gene A (MICA), MICB, UL16-binding protein (ULBP)2, and ULBP3, but they were uniformly negative for cell surface ULBP1 and ULBP4. We then studied how cancer treatments affected NKG2D ligand expression. NKG2D ligand expression was not changed by most cancer-relevant treatments. However, bortezomib and other proteasome inhibitor drugs with distinct mechanisms of action dramatically and specifically up-regulated HNSCC ULBP1 mRNA and cell surface protein. Proteasome inhibition also increased RNA for ULBP1 and other NKG2D ligands in nontransformed human keratinocytes. Proteasome inhibitor drugs increased ULBP1 transcription by acting at a site in the 522-bp ULBP1 promoter. Although the DNA damage response pathways mediated by ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) and ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) signaling had been reported to up-regulate NKG2D ligand expression, we found that ULBP1 up-regulation was not inhibited by caffeine and wortmannin, inhibitors of ATM/ATR signaling. ULBP1 expression in HNSCC cells was not increased by several ATM/ATR activating treatments, including bleomycin, cisplatin, aphidicolin, and hydroxyurea. Ionizing radiation caused ATM activation in HNSCC cells, but high-level ULBP1 expression was not induced by gamma radiation or UV radiation. Thus, ATM/ATR signaling was neither necessary nor sufficient for high-level ULBP1 expression in human HNSCC cell lines and could not account for the proteasome effect. The selective induction of ULBP1 expression by proteasome inhibitor drugs, along with variable NKG2D ligand expression by human tumor cells, indicates that NKG2D ligand genes are independently regulated. PMID:19414815

  2. Suppression of 19S proteasome subunits marks emergence of an altered cell state in diverse cancers.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Peter; Sokol, Ethan; Jin, Dexter; Brune, Zarina; Thiru, Prathapan; Ghandi, Mahmoud; Garraway, Levi A; Gupta, Piyush B; Santagata, Sandro; Whitesell, Luke; Lindquist, Susan

    2017-01-10

    The use of proteasome inhibitors to target cancer's dependence on altered protein homeostasis has been greatly limited by intrinsic and acquired resistance. Analyzing data from thousands of cancer lines and tumors, we find that those with suppressed expression of one or more 19S proteasome subunits show intrinsic proteasome inhibitor resistance. Moreover, such proteasome subunit suppression is associated with poor outcome in myeloma patients, where proteasome inhibitors are a mainstay of treatment. Beyond conferring resistance to proteasome inhibitors, proteasome subunit suppression also serves as a sentinel of a more global remodeling of the transcriptome. This remodeling produces a distinct gene signature and new vulnerabilities to the proapoptotic drug, ABT-263. This frequent, naturally arising imbalance in 19S regulatory complex composition is achieved through a variety of mechanisms, including DNA methylation, and marks the emergence of a heritably altered and therapeutically relevant state in diverse cancers.

  3. The 26S proteasome is a multifaceted target for anti-cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Grigoreva, Tatyana A; Tribulovich, Vyacheslav G; Garabadzhiu, Alexander V; Melino, Gerry; Barlev, Nickolai A

    2015-09-22

    Proteasomes play a critical role in the fate of proteins that are involved in major cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, cell cycle, replication, differentiation, immune response, cellular response to stress, etc. In contrast to non-specific degradation by lysosomes, proteasomes are highly selective and destroy only the proteins that are covalently labelled with small proteins, called ubiquitins. Importantly, many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers, are intimately connected to the activity of proteasomes making them an important pharmacological target. Currently, the vast majority of inhibitors are aimed at blunting the proteolytic activities of proteasomes. However, recent achievements in solving structures of proteasomes at very high resolution provided opportunities to design new classes of small molecules that target other physiologically-important enzymatic activities of proteasomes, including the de-ubiquitinating one. This review attempts to catalog the information available to date about novel classes of proteasome inhibitors that may have important pharmacological ramifications.

  4. The 26S proteasome is a multifaceted target for anti-cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Grigoreva, Tatyana A; Tribulovich, Vyacheslav G.; Garabadzhiu, Alexander V.; Melino, Gerry; Barlev, Nickolai A.

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes play a critical role in the fate of proteins that are involved in major cellular processes, including signal transduction, gene expression, cell cycle, replication, differentiation, immune response, cellular response to stress, etc. In contrast to non-specific degradation by lysosomes, proteasomes are highly selective and destroy only the proteins that are covalently labelled with small proteins, called ubiquitins. Importantly, many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers, are intimately connected to the activity of proteasomes making them an important pharmacological target. Currently, the vast majority of inhibitors are aimed at blunting the proteolytic activities of proteasomes. However, recent achievements in solving structures of proteasomes at very high resolution provided opportunities to design new classes of small molecules that target other physiologically-important enzymatic activities of proteasomes, including the de-ubiquitinating one. This review attempts to catalog the information available to date about novel classes of proteasome inhibitors that may have important pharmacological ramifications. PMID:26295307

  5. Independent component analysis of Alzheimer's DNA microarray gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wei; Mou, Xiaoyang; Liu, Qingzhong; Chen, Zhongxue; Vanderburg, Charles R; Rogers, Jack T; Huang, Xudong

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene microarray technology is an effective tool to investigate the simultaneous activity of multiple cellular pathways from hundreds to thousands of genes. However, because data in the colossal amounts generated by DNA microarray technology are usually complex, noisy, high-dimensional, and often hindered by low statistical power, their exploitation is difficult. To overcome these problems, two kinds of unsupervised analysis methods for microarray data: principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA) have been developed to accomplish the task. PCA projects the data into a new space spanned by the principal components that are mutually orthonormal to each other. The constraint of mutual orthogonality and second-order statistics technique within PCA algorithms, however, may not be applied to the biological systems studied. Extracting and characterizing the most informative features of the biological signals, however, require higher-order statistics. Results ICA is one of the unsupervised algorithms that can extract higher-order statistical structures from data and has been applied to DNA microarray gene expression data analysis. We performed FastICA method on DNA microarray gene expression data from Alzheimer's disease (AD) hippocampal tissue samples and consequential gene clustering. Experimental results showed that the ICA method can improve the clustering results of AD samples and identify significant genes. More than 50 significant genes with high expression levels in severe AD were extracted, representing immunity-related protein, metal-related protein, membrane protein, lipoprotein, neuropeptide, cytoskeleton protein, cellular binding protein, and ribosomal protein. Within the aforementioned categories, our method also found 37 significant genes with low expression levels. Moreover, it is worth noting that some oncogenes and phosphorylation-related proteins are expressed in low levels. In comparison to the PCA and support

  6. The ubiquitin proteasome system and myocardial ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Calise, Justine

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) has been the subject of intensive research over the past 20 years to define its role in normal physiology and in pathophysiology. Many of these studies have focused in on the cardiovascular system and have determined that the UPS becomes dysfunctional in several pathologies such as familial and idiopathic cardiomyopathies, atherosclerosis, and myocardial ischemia. This review presents a synopsis of the literature as it relates to the role of the UPS in myocardial ischemia. Studies have shown that the UPS is dysfunctional during myocardial ischemia, and recent studies have shed some light on possible mechanisms. Other studies have defined a role for the UPS in ischemic preconditioning which is best associated with myocardial ischemia and is thus presented here. Very recent studies have started to define roles for specific proteasome subunits and components of the ubiquitination machinery in various aspects of myocardial ischemia. Lastly, despite the evidence linking myocardial ischemia and proteasome dysfunction, there are continuing suggestions that proteasome inhibitors may be useful to mitigate ischemic injury. This review presents the rationale behind this and discusses both supportive and nonsupportive studies and presents possible future directions that may help in clarifying this controversy. PMID:23220331

  7. TCF11/Nrf1-Mediated Induction of Proteasome Expression Prevents Cytotoxicity by Rotenone.

    PubMed

    Sotzny, Franziska; Schormann, Eileen; Kühlewindt, Ina; Koch, Annett; Brehm, Anja; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Gilling, Kate E; Krüger, Elke

    2016-12-01

    Precise regulation of cellular protein degradation is essential for maintaining protein and redox homeostasis. The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) represents one of the major degradation machineries, and UPS disturbances are strongly associated with neurodegeneration. We have previously shown that the transcription factor TCF11/Nrf1 induces antioxidant response element-mediated upregulation of UPS components in response to proteotoxic stress. Knockout of TCF11/Nrf1 is embryonically lethal, and therefore, the present investigation describes the role of oxidative stress in regulating TCF11/Nrf1-dependent proteasome expression in a model system relevant to Parkinson's disease. Using the human dopaminergic neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y and mouse nigrostriatal organotypic slice cultures, gene and protein expression analysis and functional assays revealed oxidative stress is induced by the proteasome inhibitor epoxomicin or the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone and promotes the upregulation of proteasome expression and function mediated by TCF11/Nrf1 activation. In addition, we show that these stress conditions induce the unfolded protein response. TCF11/Nrf1, thus, has a cytoprotective function in response to oxidative and proteotoxic stress. Innovation and Conclusion: We here demonstrate that adaption of the proteasome system in response to oxidative stress is dependent on TCF11/Nrf1 in this model system. We conclude that TCF11/Nrf1, therefore, plays a vital role in maintaining redox and protein homeostasis. This work provides a vital insight into the molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration due to oxidative stress by rotenone, and further studies investigating the role of TCF11/Nrf1 in the human condition would be of considerable interest. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 870-885.

  8. ATPase and ubiquitin-binding proteins of the yeast proteasome.

    PubMed

    Rubin, D M; van Nocker, S; Glickman, M; Coux, O; Wefes, I; Sadis, S; Fu, H; Goldberg, A; Vierstra, R; Finley, D

    1997-03-01

    The 26S proteasome is a 2-Megadalton proteolytic complex with over 30 distinct subunits. The 19S particle, a subcomplex of the 26S proteasome, is thought to confer ATP-dependence and ubiquitin-dependence on the proteolytic core particle of the proteasome. Given the complexity of the 19S particle, genetic approaches are likely to play an important role in its analysis. We have initiated biochemical and genetic studies of the 19S particle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we describe the localization to the proteasome of several ATPases that were previously proposed to be involved in transcription. Independent studies indicate that the mammalian 26S proteasome contains closely related ATPases. We have also found that the multiubiquitin chain binding protein Mcb1, a homolog of the mammalian S5a protein, is a subunit of the yeast proteasome. However, contrary to expectation, MCB1 is not an essential gene in yeast. The mcb1 mutant grows at a nearly wild-type rate, and the breakdown of most ubiquitin-protein conjugates is unaffected in this strain. One substrate, Ub-Proline-beta gal, was found to require MCB1 for its breakdown, but it remains unclear whether Mcb1 serves as a ubiquitin receptor in this process. Our data suggest that the recognition of ubiquitin conjugates by the proteasome is a complex process which must involve proteins other than Mcb1.

  9. The proteasome and epigenetics: zooming in on histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Bach, Svitlana V; Hegde, Ashok N

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome is a structural complex of many proteins that degrades substrates marked by covalent linkage to ubiquitin. Many years of research has shown a role for ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated proteolysis in synaptic plasticity and memory mainly in degrading synaptic, cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins. Recent work indicates that the proteasome has wider proteolytic and non-proteolytic roles in processes such as histone modifications that affect synaptic plasticity and memory. In this review, we assess the evidence gathered from neuronal as well as non-neuronal cell types regarding the function of the proteasome in positive or negative regulation of posttranslational modifications of histones, such as acetylation, methylation and ubiquitination. We discuss the critical roles of the proteasome in clearing excess histone proteins in various cellular contexts and the possible non-proteolytic functions in regulating transcription of target genes. In addition, we summarize the current literature on diverse chromatin-remodeling machineries, such as histone acetyltransferases, deacetylates, methyltransferases and demethylases, as targets for proteasomal degradation across experimental models. Lastly, we provide a perspective on how proteasomal regulation of histone modifications may modulate synaptic plasticity in the nervous system.

  10. Stress regulation of the PAN-proteasome system in the extreme halophilic archaeon Halobacterium.

    PubMed

    Chamieh, H; Marty, V; Guetta, D; Perollier, A; Franzetti, B

    2012-03-01

    In Archaea, the importance of the proteasome system for basic biological processes is only poorly understood. Proteasomes were partially purified from Halobacterium by native gradient density ultracentrifugation. The peptidase activity profiles showed that the 20S proteasome accumulation is altered depending on the physiological state of the cells. The amount of active 20S particles increases in Halobacterium cells as a response to thermal and low salt stresses. In the same conditions, Northern experiments showed a positive transcriptional regulation of the alpha and beta proteasome subunits as well as of the two proteasome regulatory ATPases, PANA and PANB. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated the existence of a physical interaction between the two Proteasome Activating Nucleotidase (PAN) proteins in cell extracts. Thus, a direct regulation occurs on the PAN-proteasome components to adjust the protein degradation activity to growth and environmental constraints. These results also indicate that, in extreme halophiles, proteasome mediated proteolysis is an important aspect of low salt stress response. The tri-peptide vinyl sulfone inhibitor NLVS was used in cell cultures to study the in vivo function of proteasome in Halobacterium. The chemical inhibition of proteasomes was measured in the cellular extracts. It has no effect on cell growth and mortality under normal growth conditions as well as under heat shock conditions. These results suggest that the PAN activators or other proteases compensate for loss of proteasome activity in stress conditions.

  11. Induction of 26S proteasome subunit PSMB5 by the bifunctional inducer 3-methylcholanthrene through the Nrf2-ARE, but not the AhR/Arnt-XRE, pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Mi-Kyoung . E-mail: mkwak@yumail.ac.kr; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2006-07-14

    The 26S proteasome is responsible for degradation of abnormal intracellular proteins, including oxidatively damaged proteins and may play a role as a component of a cellular antioxidative system. However, little is known about regulation of proteasome expression. In the present study, regulation of proteasome expression by the bifunctional enzyme inducer and a specific signaling pathway for this regulation were investigated in murine neuroblastoma cells. Expression of catalytic core subunits including PSMB5 and peptidase activities of the proteasome were elevated following incubation with 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC). Studies using reporter genes containing the murine Psmb5 promoter showed that transcriptional activity of this gene was enhanced by 3-MC. Overexpression of AhR/Arnt did not affect activation of the Pmsb5 promoter by 3-MC and deletion of the xenobiotic response elements (XREs) from this promoter exerted modest effects on inducibility in response to 3-MC. However, mutation of the proximal AREs of the Psmb5 promoter largely abrogated its inducibility by 3-MC. In addition, this promoter showed a blunted response toward 3-MC in the absence of nrf2; 3-MC incubation increased nuclear levels of Nrf2 only in wild-type cells. Collectively, these results indicate that expression of proteasome subunit PSMB5 is modulated by bifunctional enzyme inducers in a manner independent of the AhR/Arnt-XRE pathway but dependent upon the Nrf2-ARE pathway.

  12. The transition zone protein Rpgrip1l regulates proteasomal activity at the primary cilium

    PubMed Central

    Lier, Johanna Maria; Burmühl, Stephan; Struchtrup, Andreas; Deutschmann, Kathleen; Vetter, Maik; Leu, Tristan; Reeg, Sandra; Grune, Tilman; Rüther, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in RPGRIP1L result in severe human diseases called ciliopathies. To unravel the molecular function of RPGRIP1L, we analyzed Rpgrip1l−/− mouse embryos, which display a ciliopathy phenotype and die, at the latest, around birth. In these embryos, cilia-mediated signaling was severely disturbed. Defects in Shh signaling suggested that the Rpgrip1l deficiency causes an impairment of protein degradation and protein processing. Indeed, we detected a cilia-dependent decreased proteasomal activity in the absence of Rpgrip1l. We found different proteasomal components localized to cilia and identified Psmd2, a component of the regulatory proteasomal 19S subunit, as an interaction partner for Rpgrip1l. Quantifications of proteasomal substrates demonstrated that Rpgrip1l regulates proteasomal activity specifically at the basal body. Our study suggests that Rpgrip1l controls ciliary signaling by regulating the activity of the ciliary proteasome via Psmd2. PMID:26150391

  13. Proteasome Inhibition by Fellutamide B Induces Nerve Growth Factor Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hines, John; Groll, Michael; Fahnestock, Margaret; Crews, Craig M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Neurotrophic small molecules have the potential to aid in the treatment of neuronal injury and neurodegenerative diseases. The natural product fellutamide B, originally isolated from Penicillium fellutanum, potently induces nerve growth factor (NGF) release from fibroblasts and glial-derived cells, although the mechanism for this neurotrophic activity has not been elucidated. Here, we report that fellutamide B potently inhibits proteasome catalytic activity. High resolution structural information obtained from co-crystallization of the 20S proteasome reveals novel aspects regarding β-subunit binding and adduct formation by fellutamide B to inhibit their hydrolytic activity. We demonstrate that fellutamide B and other proteasome inhibitors increased NGF gene transcription via a cis-acting element (or elements) in the promoter. These results demonstrate an unrecognized connection between proteasome inhibition and NGF production, suggesting a possible new strategy in the development of neurotrophic agents. PMID:18482702

  14. A nonproteolytic proteasome activity controls organelle fission in yeast.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Line; Saunier, Rémy; Cossard, Raynald; Esposito, Michela; Rinaldi, Teresa; Delahodde, Agnès

    2009-10-15

    To understand the processes underlying organelle function, dynamics and inheritance, it is necessary to identify and characterize the regulatory components involved. Recently in yeast and mammals, proteins of the membrane fission machinery (Dnm1-Mdv1-Caf4-Fis1 in yeast and DLP1-FIS1 in human) have been shown to have a dual localization on mitochondria and peroxisomes, where they control mitochondrial fission and peroxisome division. Here, we show that whereas vacuole fusion is regulated by the proteasome degradation function, mitochondrial fission and peroxisomal division are not controlled by the proteasome activity but rather depend on a new function of the proteasomal lid subunit Rpn11. Rpn11 was found to regulate the Fis1-dependent fission machinery of both organelles. These findings indicate a unique role of the Rpn11 protein in mitochondrial fission and peroxisomal proliferation that is independent of its role in proteasome-associated deubiquitylation.

  15. Mining gene expression data by interpreting principal components

    PubMed Central

    Roden, Joseph C; King, Brandon W; Trout, Diane; Mortazavi, Ali; Wold, Barbara J; Hart, Christopher E

    2006-01-01

    Background There are many methods for analyzing microarray data that group together genes having similar patterns of expression over all conditions tested. However, in many instances the biologically important goal is to identify relatively small sets of genes that share coherent expression across only some conditions, rather than all or most conditions as required in traditional clustering; e.g. genes that are highly up-regulated and/or down-regulated similarly across only a subset of conditions. Equally important is the need to learn which conditions are the decisive ones in forming such gene sets of interest, and how they relate to diverse conditional covariates, such as disease diagnosis or prognosis. Results We present a method for automatically identifying such candidate sets of biologically relevant genes using a combination of principal components analysis and information theoretic metrics. To enable easy use of our methods, we have developed a data analysis package that facilitates visualization and subsequent data mining of the independent sources of significant variation present in gene microarray expression datasets (or in any other similarly structured high-dimensional dataset). We applied these tools to two public datasets, and highlight sets of genes most affected by specific subsets of conditions (e.g. tissues, treatments, samples, etc.). Statistically significant associations for highlighted gene sets were shown via global analysis for Gene Ontology term enrichment. Together with covariate associations, the tool provides a basis for building testable hypotheses about the biological or experimental causes of observed variation. Conclusion We provide an unsupervised data mining technique for diverse microarray expression datasets that is distinct from major methods now in routine use. In test uses, this method, based on publicly available gene annotations, appears to identify numerous sets of biologically relevant genes. It has proven especially

  16. Starvation Induces Proteasome Autophagy with Different Pathways for Core and Regulatory Particles.

    PubMed

    Waite, Kenrick A; De-La Mota-Peynado, Alina; Vontz, Gabrielle; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2016-02-12

    The proteasome is responsible for the degradation of many cellular proteins. If and how this abundant and normally stable complex is degraded by cells is largely unknown. Here we show that in yeast, upon nitrogen starvation, proteasomes are targeted for vacuolar degradation through autophagy. Using GFP-tagged proteasome subunits, we observed that autophagy of a core particle (CP) subunit depends on the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp3, although a regulatory particle (RP) subunit does not. Furthermore, upon blocking of autophagy, RP remained largely nuclear, although CP largely localized to the cytosol as well as granular structures within the cytosol. In all, our data reveal a regulated process for the removal of proteasomes upon nitrogen starvation. This process involves CP and RP dissociation, nuclear export, and independent vacuolar targeting of CP and RP. Thus, in addition to the well characterized transcriptional up-regulation of genes encoding proteasome subunits, cells are also capable of down-regulating cellular levels of proteasomes through proteaphagy.

  17. Effect of ionizing radiation exposure on Trypanosoma cruzi ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Paula G; Passos-Silva, Danielle G; Vieira-da-Rocha, João P; Mendes, Isabela Cecilia; de Oliveira, Karla A; Oliveira, Camila F B; Vilela, Liza F F; Nagem, Ronaldo A P; Cardoso, Joseane; Nardelli, Sheila C; Krieger, Marco A; Franco, Glória R; Macedo, Andrea M; Pena, Sérgio D J; Schenkman, Sérgio; Gomes, Dawidson A; Guerra-Sá, Renata; Machado, Carlos R

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, proteasome involvement in the damage response induced by ionizing radiation (IR) became evident. However, whether proteasome plays a direct or indirect role in IR-induced damage response still unclear. Trypanosoma cruzi is a human parasite capable of remarkable high tolerance to IR, suggesting a highly efficient damage response system. Here, we investigate the role of T. cruzi proteasome in the damage response induced by IR. We exposed epimastigotes to high doses of gamma ray and we analyzed the expression and subcellular localization of several components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We show that proteasome inhibition increases IR-induced cell growth arrest and proteasome-mediated proteolysis is altered after parasite exposure. We observed nuclear accumulation of 19S and 20S proteasome subunits in response to IR treatments. Intriguingly, the dynamic of 19S particle nuclear accumulation was more similar to the dynamic observed for Rad51 nuclear translocation than the observed for 20S. In the other hand, 20S increase and nuclear translocation could be related with an increase of its regulator PA26 and high levels of proteasome-mediated proteolysis in vitro. The intersection between the opposed peaks of 19S and 20S protein levels was marked by nuclear accumulation of both 20S and 19S together with Ubiquitin, suggesting a role of ubiquitin-proteasome system in the nuclear protein turnover at the time. Our results revealed the importance of proteasome-mediated proteolysis in T. cruzi IR-induced damage response suggesting that proteasome is also involved in T. cruzi IR tolerance. Moreover, our data support the possible direct/signaling role of 19S in DNA damage repair. Based on these results, we speculate that spatial and temporal differences between the 19S particle and 20S proteasome controls proteasome multiple roles in IR damage response.

  18. Proteasomal and Autophagic Degradation Systems.

    PubMed

    Dikic, Ivan

    2017-06-20

    Autophagy and the ubiquitin-proteasome system are the two major quality control pathways responsible for cellular homeostasis. As such, they provide protection against age-associated changes and a plethora of human diseases. Ubiquitination is utilized as a degradation signal by both systems, albeit in different ways, to mark cargoes for proteasomal and lysosomal degradation. Both systems intersect and communicate at multiple points to coordinate their actions in proteostasis and organelle homeostasis. This review summarizes molecular details of how proteasome and autophagy pathways are functionally interconnected in cells and indicates common principles and nodes of communication that can be therapeutically exploited.

  19. Distinct Elements in the Proteasomal β5 Subunit Propeptide Required for Autocatalytic Processing and Proteasome Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Li, Yanjie; Arendt, Cassandra S.; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic 20S proteasome assembly remains poorly understood. The subunits stack into four heteroheptameric rings; three inner-ring subunits (β1, β2, and β5) bear the protease catalytic residues and are synthesized with N-terminal propeptides. These propeptides are removed autocatalytically late in assembly. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, β5 (Doa3/Pre2) has a 75-residue propeptide, β5pro, that is essential for proteasome assembly and can work in trans. We show that deletion of the poorly conserved N-terminal half of the β5 propeptide nonetheless causes substantial defects in proteasome maturation. Sequences closer to the cleavage site have critical but redundant roles in both assembly and self-cleavage. A conserved histidine two residues upstream of the autocleavage site strongly promotes processing. Surprisingly, although β5pro is functionally linked to the Ump1 assembly factor, trans-expressed β5pro associates only weakly with Ump1-containing precursors. Several genes were identified as dosage suppressors of trans-expressed β5pro mutants; the strongest encoded the β7 proteasome subunit. Previous data suggested that β7 and β5pro have overlapping roles in bringing together two half-proteasomes, but the timing of β7 addition relative to half-mer joining was unclear. Here we report conditions where dimerization lags behind β7 incorporation into the half-mer. Our results suggest that β7 insertion precedes half-mer dimerization, and the β7 tail and β5 propeptide have unequal roles in half-mer joining. PMID:26627836

  20. Distinct Elements in the Proteasomal β5 Subunit Propeptide Required for Autocatalytic Processing and Proteasome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Li, Yanjie; Arendt, Cassandra S; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2016-01-22

    Eukaryotic 20S proteasome assembly remains poorly understood. The subunits stack into four heteroheptameric rings; three inner-ring subunits (β1, β2, and β5) bear the protease catalytic residues and are synthesized with N-terminal propeptides. These propeptides are removed autocatalytically late in assembly. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, β5 (Doa3/Pre2) has a 75-residue propeptide, β5pro, that is essential for proteasome assembly and can work in trans. We show that deletion of the poorly conserved N-terminal half of the β5 propeptide nonetheless causes substantial defects in proteasome maturation. Sequences closer to the cleavage site have critical but redundant roles in both assembly and self-cleavage. A conserved histidine two residues upstream of the autocleavage site strongly promotes processing. Surprisingly, although β5pro is functionally linked to the Ump1 assembly factor, trans-expressed β5pro associates only weakly with Ump1-containing precursors. Several genes were identified as dosage suppressors of trans-expressed β5pro mutants; the strongest encoded the β7 proteasome subunit. Previous data suggested that β7 and β5pro have overlapping roles in bringing together two half-proteasomes, but the timing of β7 addition relative to half-mer joining was unclear. Here we report conditions where dimerization lags behind β7 incorporation into the half-mer. Our results suggest that β7 insertion precedes half-mer dimerization, and the β7 tail and β5 propeptide have unequal roles in half-mer joining. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Proteasomes: Isolation and Activity Assays

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanjie; Tomko, Robert J.; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, damaged or unneeded proteins are typically degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. In this system, the protein substrate is often first covalently modified with a chain of ubiquitin polypeptides. This chain serves as a signal for delivery to the 26S proteasome, a 2.5 MDa, ATP-dependent multisubunit protease complex. The proteasome consists of a barrel-shaped 20S core particle (CP) that is capped on one or both of its ends by a 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP is responsible for recognizing the substrate, unfolding it, and translocating it into the CP for destruction. Here we describe simple, one-step purifications scheme for isolating the 26S proteasome and its 19S RP and 20S CP subcomplexes from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as assays for measuring ubiquitin-dependent and ubiquitin-independent proteolytic activity in vitro. PMID:26061243

  2. Intron retention as a component of regulated gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Aishwarya G; Smith, Christopher W J

    2017-04-08

    Intron retention has long been an exemplar of regulated splicing with case studies of individual events serving as models that provided key mechanistic insights into the process of splicing control. In organisms such as plants and budding yeast, intron retention is well understood as a major mechanism of gene expression regulation. In contrast, in mammalian systems, the extent and functional significance of intron retention have, until recently, remained greatly underappreciated. Technical challenges to the global detection and quantitation of transcripts with retained introns have often led to intron retention being overlooked or dismissed as "noise". Now, however, with the wealth of information available from high-throughput deep sequencing, combined with focused computational and statistical analyses, we are able to distinguish clear intron retention patterns in various physiological and pathological contexts. Several recent studies have demonstrated intron retention as a central component of gene expression programs during normal development as well as in response to stress and disease. Furthermore, these studies revealed various ways in which intron retention regulates protein isoform production, RNA stability and translation efficiency, and rapid induction of expression via post-transcriptional splicing of retained introns. In this review, we highlight critical findings from these transcriptomic studies and discuss commonalties in the patterns prevalent in intron retention networks at the functional and regulatory levels.

  3. Proteasome inhibitor patents (2010 - present).

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Rainer; Scott, Latanya M; Daniel, Kenyon G; Dou, Q Ping

    2014-04-01

    Over the past 3 years, numerous patents and patent applications have been submitted and published involving compounds designed to inhibit the proteasome. Proteasome inhibition has been of great interest in cancer research since disruption of proteolysis leads to a significant buildup of cytotoxic proteins and activation of apoptotic pathways, particularly in rapidly proliferating cells. The current standards in proteasome inhibition are the only FDA-approved inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib. Although these drugs are quite effective in treating multiple myeloma and other blood tumors, there are shortcomings, including toxicities and resistance. Most of the current patents attempt to improve on existing compounds, by increasing bioavailability and selectivity, while attempting to reduce toxicity. A general categorization of similar compounds was employed to evaluate and compare drug design strategies. This review focuses on novel compounds and subsequent analogs developed for proteasome inhibition, used in preventing and treating human cancers. A comprehensive description and categorization of patents related to each type of compound and its derivatives, as well as their uses and efficacies as anticancer agents is included. A review of combination therapy patents has also been included. Although there are many diverse chemical scaffolds being published, there are few patented proteasome inhibitors whose method of inhibition is genuinely novel. Most patents utilize a destructive chemical warhead to attack the catalytic threonine residue of the proteasome active sites. Few patents try to depart from this, emphasizing the need for developing new mechanisms of action and specific targeting.

  4. Proteasome Activation by Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Leestemaker, Yves; de Jong, Annemieke; Witting, Katharina F; Penning, Renske; Schuurman, Karianne; Rodenko, Boris; Zaal, Esther A; van de Kooij, Bert; Laufer, Stefan; Heck, Albert J R; Borst, Jannie; Scheper, Wiep; Berkers, Celia R; Ovaa, Huib

    2017-06-22

    Drugs that increase 26S proteasome activity have potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. A chemical genetics screen of over 2,750 compounds using a proteasome activity probe as a readout in a high-throughput live-cell fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based assay revealed more than ten compounds that increase proteasome activity, with the p38 MAPK inhibitor PD169316 being one of the most potent ones. Genetic and chemical inhibition of either p38 MAPK, its upstream regulators, ASK1 and MKK6, and downstream target, MK2, enhance proteasome activity. Chemical activation of the 26S proteasome increases PROTAC-mediated and ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation and decreases the levels of both overexpressed and endogenous α-synuclein, without affecting the overall protein turnover. In addition, survival of cells overexpressing toxic α-synuclein assemblies is increased in the presence of p38 MAPK inhibitors. These findings highlight the potential of activation of 26S proteasome activity and that this can be achieved through multiple mechanisms by distinct molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Proteomic remodeling of proteasome in right heart failure.

    PubMed

    Fessart, Delphine; Martin-Negrier, Marie-Laure; Claverol, Stéphane; Thiolat, Marie-Laure; Crevel, Huguette; Toussaint, Christian; Bonneu, Marc; Muller, Bernard; Savineau, Jean-Pierre; Delom, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    The development of right heart failure (RHF) is characterized by alterations of right ventricle (RV) structure and function, but the mechanisms of RHF remain still unknown. Thus, understanding the RHF is essential for improved therapies. Therefore, identification by quantitative proteomics of targets specific to RHF may have therapeutic benefits to identify novel potential therapeutic targets. The objective of this study was to analyze the molecular mechanisms changing RV function in the diseased RHF and thus, to identify novel potential therapeutic targets. For this, we have performed differential proteomic analysis of whole RV proteins using two experimental rat models of RHF. Differential protein expression was observed for hundred twenty six RV proteins including proteins involved in structural constituent of cytoskeleton, motor activity, structural molecule activity, cytoskeleton protein binding and microtubule binding. Interestingly, further analysis of down-regulated proteins, reveals that both protein and gene expressions of proteasome subunits were drastically decreased in RHF, which was accompanied by an increase of ubiquitinated proteins. Interestingly, the proteasomal activities chymotrypsin and caspase-like were decreased whereas trypsin-like activity was maintained. In conclusion, this study revealed the involvement of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in RHF. Three deregulated mechanisms were discovered: (1) decreased gene and protein expressions of proteasome subunits, (2) decreased specific activity of proteasome; and (3) a specific accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins. This modulation of UPS of RV may provide a novel therapeutic avenue for restoration of cardiac function in the diseased RHF. © 2013.

  6. The capture proteasome assay (CAPA) to evaluate subtype-specific proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vigneron, Nathalie; Abi Habib, Joanna; Van den Eynde, Benoît J

    2015-09-01

    We recently developed a new assay to measure proteasome activity in vitro (CAPA for capture proteasome assay) [1], based on proteasome capture on an antibody-coated plate. When used with lysates originating from cells expressing either standard proteasome, immunoproteasome or intermediate proteasomes β5i or β1i-β5i, this assay allows the individual monitoring of the chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like and caspase-like activities of the corresponding proteasome subtypes. The efficiency and specificity of four proteasome inhibitors were studied using the CAPA assay, demonstrating the potential of this assay for the development of subtype-specific proteasome inhibitors.

  7. KIAA0368-deficiency affects disassembly of 26S proteasome under oxidative stress condition.

    PubMed

    Haratake, Kousuke; Sato, Akitsugu; Tsuruta, Fuminori; Chiba, Tomoki

    2016-06-01

    Many cellular stresses cause damages of intracellular proteins, which are eventually degraded by the ubiquitin and proteasome system. The proteasome is a multicatalytic protease complex composed of 20S core particle and the proteasome activators that regulate the proteasome activity. Extracellular mutants 29 (Ecm29) is a 200 kDa protein encoded by KIAA0368 gene, associates with the proteasome, but its role is largely unknown. Here, we generated KIAA0368-deficient mice and investigated the function of Ecm29 in stress response. KIAA0368-deficient mice showed normal peptidase activity and proteasome formation at normal condition. Under stressed condition, 26S proteasome dissociates in wild-type cells, but not in KIAA0368(-/-) cells. This response was correlated with efficient degradation of damaged proteins and resistance to oxidative stress of KIAA0368(-/-) cells. Thus, Ecm29 is involved in the dissociation process of 26S proteasome, providing clue to analyse the mechanism of proteasomal degradation under various stress condition. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Homologues of the Eukaryotic Proteasome Assembly Chaperone 2 (PAC2).

    PubMed

    Bai, Lin; Jastrab, Jordan B; Isasa, Marta; Hu, Kuan; Yu, Hongjun; Gygi, Steven P; Darwin, K Heran; Li, Huilin

    2017-05-01

    A previous bioinformatics analysis identified the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins Rv2125 and Rv2714 as orthologs of the eukaryotic proteasome assembly chaperone 2 (PAC2). We set out to investigate whether Rv2125 or Rv2714 can function in proteasome assembly. We solved the crystal structure of Rv2125 at a resolution of 3.0 Å, which showed an overall fold similar to that of the PAC2 family proteins that include the archaeal PbaB and the yeast Pba1. However, Rv2125 and Rv2714 formed trimers, whereas PbaB forms tetramers and Pba1 dimerizes with Pba2. We also found that purified Rv2125 and Rv2714 could not bind to M. tuberculosis 20S core particles. Finally, proteomic analysis showed that the levels of known proteasome components and substrate proteins were not affected by disruption of Rv2125 in M. tuberculosis Our work suggests that Rv2125 does not participate in bacterial proteasome assembly or function.IMPORTANCE Although many bacteria do not encode proteasomes, M. tuberculosis not only uses proteasomes but also has evolved a posttranslational modification system called pupylation to deliver proteins to the proteasome. Proteasomes are essential for M. tuberculosis to cause lethal infections in animals; thus, determining how proteasomes are assembled may help identify new ways to combat tuberculosis. We solved the structure of a predicted proteasome assembly factor, Rv2125, and isolated a genetic Rv2125 mutant of M. tuberculosis Our structural, biochemical, and genetic studies indicate that Rv2125 and Rv2714 do not function as proteasome assembly chaperones and are unlikely to have roles in proteasome biology in mycobacteria. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Differential expression of 26S proteasome subunits and functional activity during neonatal development.

    PubMed

    Claud, Erika C; McDonald, Julie A K; He, Shu-Mei; Yu, Yueyue; Duong, Lily; Sun, Jun; Petrof, Elaine O

    2014-08-29

    Proteasomes regulate many essential cellular processes by degrading intracellular proteins. While aging is known to be associated with dysfunction of the proteasome, there are few reports detailing activity and function of proteasomes in the early stages of life. To elucidate the function and development of mammalian proteasomes, 26S proteasomes were affinity-purified from rat intestine, spleen and liver. The developmental expression of core, regulatory and immunoproteasome subunits was analyzed by immunoblotting and reverse-transcriptase PCR of mRNA subunits, and proteasome catalytic function was determined by fluorogenic enzymatic assays. The expression of core (β2, β5, α7 and β1) and regulatory (Rpt5) subunits was found to be present at low levels at birth and increased over time particularly at weaning. In contrast, while gradual developmental progression of proteasome structure was also seen with the immunoproteasome subunits (β1i, β5i, and β2i), these were not present at birth. Our studies demonstrate a developmental pattern to 26S proteasome activity and subunit expression, with low levels of core proteasome components and absence of immunoproteasomes at birth followed by increases at later developmental stages. This correlates with findings from other studies of a developmental hyporesponsiveness of the adaptive immune system to allow establishment of microbial colonization immediately after birth.

  10. The ubiquitin-proteasome system: opportunities for therapeutic intervention in solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    The destruction of proteins via the ubiquitin-proteasome system is a multi-step, complex process involving polyubiquitination of substrate proteins, followed by proteolytic degradation by the macromolecular 26S proteasome complex. Inhibitors of the proteasome promote the accumulation of proteins that are deleterious to cell survival, and represent promising anti-cancer agents. In multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma, treatment with the first generation proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, or the second generation inhibitor carfilzomib, has demonstrated significant therapeutic benefit in humans. This has prompted US FDA approval of these agents and development of additional second generation compounds with improved properties. There is considerable interest in extending the benefits of proteasome inhibitors to the treatment of solid tumor malignancies. Herein we review progress that has been made in the preclinical development and clinical evaluation of different proteasome inhibitors in solid tumors. In addition, we describe several novel approaches that are currently being pursued for the treatment of solid tumors, including drug combinatorial strategies incorporating proteasome inhibitors, and the targeting of components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system that are distinct from the 26S proteasome complex. PMID:24659480

  11. Additive loss-of-function proteasome subunit mutations in CANDLE/PRAAS patients promote type I IFN production

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Anja; Liu, Yin; Sheikh, Afzal; Marrero, Bernadette; Omoyinmi, Ebun; Zhou, Qing; Montealegre, Gina; Biancotto, Angelique; Reinhardt, Adam; Almeida de Jesus, Adriana; Pelletier, Martin; Tsai, Wanxia L.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Kardava, Lela; Hill, Suvimol; Kim, Hanna; Lachmann, Helen J.; Megarbane, Andre; Chae, Jae Jin; Brady, Jilian; Castillo, Rhina D.; Brown, Diane; Casano, Angel Vera; Gao, Ling; Chapelle, Dawn; Huang, Yan; Stone, Deborah; Chen, Yongqing; Sotzny, Franziska; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Kastner, Daniel L.; Torrelo, Antonio; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Moir, Susan; Gadina, Massimo; McCoy, Phil; Wesley, Robert; Rother, Kristina; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Brogan, Paul; Krüger, Elke; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in proteasome subunit β 8 (PSMB8), which encodes the inducible proteasome subunit β5i, cause the immune-dysregulatory disease chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE), which is classified as a proteasome-associated autoinflammatory syndrome (PRAAS). Here, we identified 8 mutations in 4 proteasome genes, PSMA3 (encodes α7), PSMB4 (encodes β7), PSMB9 (encodes β1i), and proteasome maturation protein (POMP), that have not been previously associated with disease and 1 mutation in PSMB8 that has not been previously reported. One patient was compound heterozygous for PSMB4 mutations, 6 patients from 4 families were heterozygous for a missense mutation in 1 inducible proteasome subunit and a mutation in a constitutive proteasome subunit, and 1 patient was heterozygous for a POMP mutation, thus establishing a digenic and autosomal dominant inheritance pattern of PRAAS. Function evaluation revealed that these mutations variably affect transcription, protein expression, protein folding, proteasome assembly, and, ultimately, proteasome activity. Moreover, defects in proteasome formation and function were recapitulated by siRNA-mediated knockdown of the respective subunits in primary fibroblasts from healthy individuals. Patient-isolated hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells exhibited a strong IFN gene-expression signature, irrespective of genotype. Additionally, chemical proteasome inhibition or progressive depletion of proteasome subunit gene transcription with siRNA induced transcription of type I IFN genes in healthy control cells. Our results provide further insight into CANDLE genetics and link global proteasome dysfunction to increased type I IFN production. PMID:26524591

  12. Physical and functional association of RNA polymerase II and the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Gillette, Thomas G.; Gonzalez, Fernando; Delahodde, Agnes; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Kodadek, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies from a number of laboratories have revealed a surprising number of connections between RNA polymerase II transcription and the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. We now find yet another intersection of these pathways by showing that the 26S proteasome associates with regions of the GAL1, GAL10, and HSP82 genes, including the 3′ ends, in a transcription-dependent fashion. The appearance of the proteasome on these inducible genes correlates with both the accumulation of transcripts and the buildup of RNA polymerase II complexes in the same region. Furthermore, the 26S proteasome and RNA polymerase II coimmunoprecipitate, and inhibition of 26S proteolytic activity leads to increased read through of a transcription termination site. We suggest that the proteasome is generally recruited to the DNA at sites of stalled RNA polymerase and may act to resolve these complexes. PMID:15069196

  13. Proteasome beta-4 subunit contributes to the development of melanoma and is regulated by miR-148b.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Lin, Di; Lin, Yueqin; Chen, Hongqing; Zou, Minghua; Zhong, Shan; Yi, Xuefeng; Han, Siqi

    2017-06-01

    The proteasome beta-4 subunit is required for the assembly of 20S proteasome complex, forming a pivotal component for the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Emerging evidence indicates that proteasome beta-4 subunit may be involved in underlying progression and mechanisms of malignancies. However, the role of proteasome beta-4 subunit in melanoma is currently unknown. Here, we reported that proteasome beta-4 subunit was markedly upregulated in human melanoma tissues and cells, compared with normal skin samples. High proteasome beta-4 subunit levels were significantly associated with poor overall survival in patients with melanoma. Proteasome beta-4 subunit knockdown strongly decreased melanoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo. We further identified miR-148b as a negative regulator of proteasome beta-4 subunit. Enforced expression of miR-148b resulted in vitro growth inhibition of melanoma cells, whereas this inhibition was further abolished by enforced expression of proteasome beta-4 subunit. Our findings, for the first time, indicated that the miR-148b/proteasome beta-4 subunit axis contributed to the development of melanoma, revealing novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of melanoma.

  14. Reversible phosphorylation of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xing; Huang, Xiuliang; Chen, Mark J

    2017-04-01

    The 26S proteasome at the center of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is essential for virtually all cellular processes of eukaryotes. A common misconception about the proteasome is that, once made, it remains as a static and uniform complex with spontaneous and constitutive activity for protein degradation. Recent discoveries have provided compelling evidence to support the exact opposite insomuch as the 26S proteasome undergoes dynamic and reversible phosphorylation under a variety of physiopathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the history and current understanding of proteasome phosphorylation, and advocate the idea of targeting proteasome kinases/phosphatases as a new strategy for clinical interventions of several human diseases.

  15. The Ubiquitination, Disaggregation and Proteasomal Degradation Machineries in Polyglutamine Disease.

    PubMed

    Nath, Samir R; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2017-01-01

    Polyglutamine disorders are chronic, progressive neurodegenerative diseases caused by expansion of a glutamine tract in widely expressed genes. Despite excellent models of disease, a well-documented clinical history and progression, and established genetic causes, there are no FDA approved, disease modifying treatments for these disorders. Downstream of the mutant protein, several divergent pathways of toxicity have been identified over the last several decades, supporting the idea that targeting only one of these pathways of toxicity is unlikely to robustly alleviate disease progression. As a result, a vast body of research has focused on eliminating the mutant protein to broadly prevent downstream toxicity, either by silencing mutant protein expression or leveraging the endogenous protein quality control machinery. In the latter approach, a focus has been placed on four critical components of mutant protein degradation that are active in the nucleus, a key site of toxicity: disaggregation, ubiquitination, deubiquitination, and proteasomal activity. These machineries have unique functional components, but work together as a cellular defense system that can be successfully leveraged to alleviate disease phenotypes in several models of polyglutamine toxicity. This review will highlight recent advances in understanding both the potential and role of these components of the protein quality control machinery in polyglutamine disease pathophysiology.

  16. The Ubiquitination, Disaggregation and Proteasomal Degradation Machineries in Polyglutamine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Samir R.; Lieberman, Andrew P.

    2017-01-01

    Polyglutamine disorders are chronic, progressive neurodegenerative diseases caused by expansion of a glutamine tract in widely expressed genes. Despite excellent models of disease, a well-documented clinical history and progression, and established genetic causes, there are no FDA approved, disease modifying treatments for these disorders. Downstream of the mutant protein, several divergent pathways of toxicity have been identified over the last several decades, supporting the idea that targeting only one of these pathways of toxicity is unlikely to robustly alleviate disease progression. As a result, a vast body of research has focused on eliminating the mutant protein to broadly prevent downstream toxicity, either by silencing mutant protein expression or leveraging the endogenous protein quality control machinery. In the latter approach, a focus has been placed on four critical components of mutant protein degradation that are active in the nucleus, a key site of toxicity: disaggregation, ubiquitination, deubiquitination, and proteasomal activity. These machineries have unique functional components, but work together as a cellular defense system that can be successfully leveraged to alleviate disease phenotypes in several models of polyglutamine toxicity. This review will highlight recent advances in understanding both the potential and role of these components of the protein quality control machinery in polyglutamine disease pathophysiology. PMID:28381987

  17. The Xanthomonas campestris type III effector XopJ targets the host cell proteasome to suppress salicylic-acid mediated plant defence.

    PubMed

    Üstün, Suayib; Bartetzko, Verena; Börnke, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) requires type III effector proteins (T3Es) for virulence. After translocation into the host cell, T3Es are thought to interact with components of host immunity to suppress defence responses. XopJ is a T3E protein from Xcv that interferes with plant immune responses; however, its host cellular target is unknown. Here we show that XopJ interacts with the proteasomal subunit RPT6 in yeast and in planta to inhibit proteasome activity. A C235A mutation within the catalytic triad of XopJ as well as a G2A exchange within the N-terminal myristoylation motif abolishes the ability of XopJ to inhibit the proteasome. Xcv ΔxopJ mutants are impaired in growth and display accelerated symptom development including tissue necrosis on susceptible pepper leaves. Application of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 restored the ability of the Xcv ΔxopJ to attenuate the development of leaf necrosis. The XopJ dependent delay of tissue degeneration correlates with reduced levels of salicylic acid (SA) and changes in defence- and senescence-associated gene expression. Necrosis upon infection with Xcv ΔxopJ was greatly reduced in pepper plants with reduced expression of NPR1, a central regulator of SA responses, demonstrating the involvement of SA-signalling in the development of XopJ dependent phenotypes. Our results suggest that XopJ-mediated inhibition of the proteasome interferes with SA-dependent defence response to attenuate onset of necrosis and to alter host transcription. A central role of the proteasome in plant defence is discussed.

  18. The Xanthomonas campestris Type III Effector XopJ Targets the Host Cell Proteasome to Suppress Salicylic-Acid Mediated Plant Defence

    PubMed Central

    Börnke, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) requires type III effector proteins (T3Es) for virulence. After translocation into the host cell, T3Es are thought to interact with components of host immunity to suppress defence responses. XopJ is a T3E protein from Xcv that interferes with plant immune responses; however, its host cellular target is unknown. Here we show that XopJ interacts with the proteasomal subunit RPT6 in yeast and in planta to inhibit proteasome activity. A C235A mutation within the catalytic triad of XopJ as well as a G2A exchange within the N-terminal myristoylation motif abolishes the ability of XopJ to inhibit the proteasome. Xcv ΔxopJ mutants are impaired in growth and display accelerated symptom development including tissue necrosis on susceptible pepper leaves. Application of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 restored the ability of the Xcv ΔxopJ to attenuate the development of leaf necrosis. The XopJ dependent delay of tissue degeneration correlates with reduced levels of salicylic acid (SA) and changes in defence- and senescence-associated gene expression. Necrosis upon infection with Xcv ΔxopJ was greatly reduced in pepper plants with reduced expression of NPR1, a central regulator of SA responses, demonstrating the involvement of SA-signalling in the development of XopJ dependent phenotypes. Our results suggest that XopJ-mediated inhibition of the proteasome interferes with SA-dependent defence response to attenuate onset of necrosis and to alter host transcription. A central role of the proteasome in plant defence is discussed. PMID:23785289

  19. Wheat sprout extract-induced apoptosis in human cancer cells by proteasomes modulation.

    PubMed

    Bonfili, Laura; Amici, Manila; Cecarini, Valentina; Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Tacconi, Rosalia; Angeletti, Mauro; Fioretti, Evandro; Keller, Jeffrey N; Eleuteri, Anna Maria

    2009-09-01

    Natural occurring modulators of proteasome functionality are extensively investigated for their implication in cancer therapy. On the basis of our previous evidences both on proteasomal inhibition by monomeric polyphenols, and on the characterization of wheat sprout hydroalcoholic extract, herein we thoroughly report on a comparative study of the effect of wheat sprout extract on both normal and tumour cells. Treatment of isolated 20S proteasomes with wheat sprout extracts induced a gradual inhibition of all proteasome activities. Next, two wheat sprout extract components were separated: a polyphenol and a protein fraction. Both components exerted an in vitro inhibitory effect on proteasome activity. HeLa tumour cells and FHs 74 Int normal cells were exposed to both fractions, resulting in different rates of proteasome inhibition, with tumour cells showing a significantly higher degree of proteasome impairment and apoptosis induction. Furthermore, a decrease in proteasome activities and in cell survival of the human plasmacytoma RPMI 8226 cell line, upon the same treatments, was observed. Collectively, our results provide additional evidences supporting the possible use of natural extracts as coadjuvants in cancer treatments.

  20. Bufalin derivative BF211 inhibits proteasome activity in human lung cancer cells in vitro by inhibiting β1 subunit expression and disrupting proteasome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Feng, Li-xing; Zhang, Dong-mei; Liu, Miao; Liu, Wang; Mi, Tian; Wu, Wan-ying; Jiang, Bao-hong; Yang, Min; Hu, Li-hong; Guo, De-an; Liu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Bufalin is one of the active components in the traditional Chinese medicine ChanSu that is used to treat arrhythmia, inflammation and cancer. BF211 is a bufalin derivative with stronger cytotoxic activity in cancer cells. The aim of this study was to identify the putative target proteins of BF211 and the signaling pathways in cancer cells. Methods: A549 human lung cancer cells were treated with BF211. A SILAC-based proteomic analysis was used to detect the protein expression profiles of BF211-treated A549 cells. Cellular proteasome activities were examined using fluorogenic peptide substrates, and the binding affinities of BF211 to recombinant proteasome subunit proteins were evaluated using the Biacore assay. The expression levels of proteasome subunits were determined using RT-PCR and Western blotting, and the levels of the integral 26S proteasome were evaluated using native PAGE analysis. Results: The proteomic analysis revealed that 1282 proteins were differentially expressed in BF211-treated A549 cells, and the putative target proteins of BF211 were associated with various cellular functions, including transcription, translation, mRNA splicing, ribosomal protein synthesis and proteasome function. In A549 cells, BF211 (5, 10, and 20 nmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited the enzymatic activities of proteasome. But BF211 displayed a moderate affinity in binding to proteasome β1 subunit and no binding affinity to the β2 and β5 subunits. Moreover, BF211 (0.1, 1, and 10 nmol/L) did not inhibit the proteasome activities in the cell lysates. BF211 (5, 10, and 20 nmol/L) significantly decreased the expression level of proteasome β1 subunit and the levels of integral 26S proteasome in A549 cells. Similarly, knockdown of the β1 subunit with siRNA in A549 cells significantly decreased integral 26S proteasome and proteasome activity. Conclusion: BF211 inhibits proteasome activity in A549 cells by decreasing β1 subunit expression and disrupting proteasome assembly

  1. Bufalin derivative BF211 inhibits proteasome activity in human lung cancer cells in vitro by inhibiting β1 subunit expression and disrupting proteasome assembly.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Feng, Li-Xing; Zhang, Dong-Mei; Liu, Miao; Liu, Wang; Mi, Tian; Wu, Wan-Ying; Jiang, Bao-Hong; Yang, Min; Hu, Li-Hong; Guo, De-An; Liu, Xuan

    2016-07-01

    Bufalin is one of the active components in the traditional Chinese medicine ChanSu that is used to treat arrhythmia, inflammation and cancer. BF211 is a bufalin derivative with stronger cytotoxic activity in cancer cells. The aim of this study was to identify the putative target proteins of BF211 and the signaling pathways in cancer cells. A549 human lung cancer cells were treated with BF211. A SILAC-based proteomic analysis was used to detect the protein expression profiles of BF211-treated A549 cells. Cellular proteasome activities were examined using fluorogenic peptide substrates, and the binding affinities of BF211 to recombinant proteasome subunit proteins were evaluated using the Biacore assay. The expression levels of proteasome subunits were determined using RT-PCR and Western blotting, and the levels of the integral 26S proteasome were evaluated using native PAGE analysis. The proteomic analysis revealed that 1282 proteins were differentially expressed in BF211-treated A549 cells, and the putative target proteins of BF211 were associated with various cellular functions, including transcription, translation, mRNA splicing, ribosomal protein synthesis and proteasome function. In A549 cells, BF211 (5, 10, and 20 nmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited the enzymatic activities of proteasome. But BF211 displayed a moderate affinity in binding to proteasome β1 subunit and no binding affinity to the β2 and β5 subunits. Moreover, BF211 (0.1, 1, and 10 nmol/L) did not inhibit the proteasome activities in the cell lysates. BF211 (5, 10, and 20 nmol/L) significantly decreased the expression level of proteasome β1 subunit and the levels of integral 26S proteasome in A549 cells. Similarly, knockdown of the β1 subunit with siRNA in A549 cells significantly decreased integral 26S proteasome and proteasome activity. BF211 inhibits proteasome activity in A549 cells by decreasing β1 subunit expression and disrupting proteasome assembly.

  2. Urban renewal in the nucleus: is protein turnover by proteasomes absolutely required for nuclear receptor-regulated transcription?

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Zafar; O'Malley, Bert W

    2004-03-01

    The importance of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in higher eukaryotes has been well established in cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, and cell differentiation, but has only recently been linked to nuclear hormone receptor-regulated gene transcription. Characterization of a number of ubiquitin proteasome pathway enzymes as coactivators and observations that several nuclear receptors are ubiquitinated and degraded in the course of their nuclear activities provide evidence that ubiquitin proteasome-mediated protein degradation plays an integral role in eukaryotic transcription. In addition to receptors, studies have revealed that coactivators are ubiquitinated and degraded via the proteasome. The notion that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway is involved in gene transcription is further strengthened by the fact that ubiquitin proteasome pathway enzymes are recruited to the promoters of target genes and that proteasome-dependent degradation of nuclear receptors is required for efficient transcriptional activity. These findings suggest that protein degradation is coupled with nuclear receptor coactivation activity. It is possible that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway modulates transcription by promoting remodeling and turnover of the nuclear receptor-transcription complex. In this review, we discus the possible role of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in nuclear hormone receptor-regulated gene transcription.

  3. 20S proteasome activation promotes life span extension and resistance to proteotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chondrogianni, Niki; Georgila, Konstantina; Kourtis, Nikos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Gonos, Efstathios S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is one of the nodal points that need to be preserved to retain physiologic cellular/organismal balance. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the removal of both normal and damaged proteins, with the proteasome being the downstream effector. The proteasome is the major cellular protease with progressive impairment of function during aging and senescence. Despite the documented age-retarding properties of proteasome activation in various cellular models, simultaneous enhancement of the 20S core proteasome content, assembly, and function have never been reported in any multicellular organism. Consequently, the possible effects of the core proteasome modulation on organismal life span are elusive. In this study, we have achieved activation of the 20S proteasome at organismal level. We demonstrate enhancement of proteasome levels, assembly, and activity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, resulting in life span extension and increased resistance to stress. We also provide evidence that the observed life span extension is dependent on the transcriptional activity of Dauer formation abnormal/Forkhead box class O (DAF-16/FOXO), skinhead-1 (SKN-1), and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) factors through regulation of downstream longevity genes. We further show that the reported beneficial effects are not ubiquitous but they are dependent on the genetic context. Finally, we provide evidence that proteasome core activation might be a potential strategy to minimize protein homeostasis deficiencies underlying aggregation-related diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or Huntington’s disease (HD). In summary, this is the first report demonstrating that 20S core proteasome up-regulation in terms of both content and activity is feasible in a multicellular eukaryotic organism and that in turn this modulation promotes extension of organismal health span and life span.—Chondrogianni, N., Georgila, K., Kourtis, N

  4. Structure and function based design of Plasmodium-selective proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; O'Donoghue, Anthony J.; van der Linden, Wouter A.; Xie, Stanley C.; Yoo, Euna; Foe, Ian T.; Tilley, Leann; Craik, Charles S.; da Fonseca, Paula C. A.; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is a multi-component protease complex responsible for regulating key processes such as the cell cycle and antigen presentation1. Compounds that target the proteasome are potentially valuable tools for the treatment of pathogens that depend on proteasome function for survival and replication. In particular, proteasome inhibitors have been shown to be toxic for the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at all stages of its life cycle2-5. Most compounds that have been tested against the parasite also inhibit the mammalian proteasome resulting in toxicity that precludes their use as therapeutic agents2,6. Therefore, better definition of the substrate specificity and structural properties of the Plasmodium proteasome could enable the development of compounds with sufficient selectivity to allow their use as anti-malarial agents. To accomplish this goal, we used a substrate profiling method to uncover differences in the specificities of the human and P. falciparum proteasome. We designed inhibitors based on amino acid preferences specific to the parasite proteasome, and found that they preferentially inhibit the β 2 subunit. We determined the structure of the P. falciparum 20S proteasome bound to the inhibitor using cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and single particle analysis, to a resolution of 3.6 Å. These data reveal the unusually open P. falciparum β2 active site and provide valuable information regarding active site architecture that can be used to further refine inhibitor design. Furthermore, consistent with the recent finding that the proteasome is important for stress pathways associated with resistance of artemisinin (ART) family anti-malarials7,8, we observed growth inhibition synergism with low doses of this β 2 selective inhibitor in ART sensitive and resistant parasites. Finally, we demonstrated that a parasite selective inhibitor could be used to attenuate parasite growth in vivo without significant toxicity to the host. Thus, the

  5. Structure- and function-based design of Plasmodium-selective proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; van der Linden, Wouter A; Xie, Stanley C; Yoo, Euna; Foe, Ian T; Tilley, Leann; Craik, Charles S; da Fonseca, Paula C A; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-02-11

    The proteasome is a multi-component protease complex responsible for regulating key processes such as the cell cycle and antigen presentation. Compounds that target the proteasome are potentially valuable tools for the treatment of pathogens that depend on proteasome function for survival and replication. In particular, proteasome inhibitors have been shown to be toxic for the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at all stages of its life cycle. Most compounds that have been tested against the parasite also inhibit the mammalian proteasome, resulting in toxicity that precludes their use as therapeutic agents. Therefore, better definition of the substrate specificity and structural properties of the Plasmodium proteasome could enable the development of compounds with sufficient selectivity to allow their use as anti-malarial agents. To accomplish this goal, here we use a substrate profiling method to uncover differences in the specificities of the human and P. falciparum proteasome. We design inhibitors based on amino-acid preferences specific to the parasite proteasome, and find that they preferentially inhibit the β2-subunit. We determine the structure of the P. falciparum 20S proteasome bound to the inhibitor using cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle analysis, to a resolution of 3.6 Å. These data reveal the unusually open P. falciparum β2 active site and provide valuable information about active-site architecture that can be used to further refine inhibitor design. Furthermore, consistent with the recent finding that the proteasome is important for stress pathways associated with resistance of artemisinin family anti-malarials, we observe growth inhibition synergism with low doses of this β2-selective inhibitor in artemisinin-sensitive and -resistant parasites. Finally, we demonstrate that a parasite-selective inhibitor could be used to attenuate parasite growth in vivo without appreciable toxicity to the host. Thus, the Plasmodium proteasome is a

  6. Characterization of the gene encoding mouse serum amyloid P component. Comparison with genes encoding other pentraxins.

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, A S; Rits, M

    1989-01-01

    A CBA/J-strain mouse serum amyloid P component (SAP) genomic clone was isolated and analysed. The clone contains the entire SAP gene and specifies a primary transcript of 1065 nucleotide residues. This comprises a first exon of 206 nucleotide residues containing the mRNA 5'-untranslated region and sequence encoding the pre-SAP leader peptide and the first two amino acid residues of mature SAP separated by a single 110-base intron from a 749-nucleotide-residue second exon containing sequence encoding the bulk of the mature SAP and specifying the mRNA 3'-untranslated region. The overall organization is similar to that of the human SAP gene, and the coding region and intron sequences are highly conserved. The SAP RNA cap site was defined by primer extension analysis of polyadenylated acute-phase liver RNA. The 5'-region of the mouse SAP gene contains modified CAAT and TATA promoter elements preceded by a putative hepatocyte-nuclear-factor-1-recognition site; these structures are in a region that is highly homologous to the corresponding region of the human SAP gene. Comparisons of the mouse SAP gene structure and derived amino acid sequence with those of other mammalian pentraxins were made. Images Fig. 3. PMID:2481440

  7. Partial resistance of Medicago truncatula to Aphanomyces euteiches is associated with protection of the root stele and is controlled by a major QTL rich in proteasome-related genes.

    PubMed

    Djébali, Naceur; Jauneau, Alain; Ameline-Torregrosa, Carine; Chardon, Fabien; Jaulneau, Valérie; Mathé, Catherine; Bottin, Arnaud; Cazaux, Marc; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Baranger, Alain; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Dumas, Bernard; Huguet, Thierry; Jacquet, Christophe

    2009-09-01

    A pathosystem between Aphanomyces euteiches, the causal agent of pea root rot disease, and the model legume Medicago truncatula was developed to gain insights into mechanisms involved in resistance to this oomycete. The F83005.5 French accession and the A17-Jemalong reference line, susceptible and partially resistant, respectively, to A. euteiches, were selected for further cytological and genetic analyses. Microscopy analyses of thin root sections revealed that a major difference between the two inoculated lines occurred in the root stele, which remained pathogen free in A17. Striking features were observed in A17 roots only, including i) frequent pericycle cell divisions, ii) lignin deposition around the pericycle, and iii) accumulation of soluble phenolic compounds. Genetic analysis of resistance was performed on an F7 population of 139 recombinant inbred lines and identified a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) near the top of chromosome 3. A second study, with near-isogenic line responses to A. euteiches confirmed the role of this QTL in expression of resistance. Fine-mapping allowed the identification of a 135-kb sequenced genomic DNA region rich in proteasome-related genes. Most of these genes were shown to be induced only in inoculated A17. Novel mechanisms possibly involved in the observed partial resistance are proposed.

  8. The aspartyl protease DDI2 activates Nrf1 to compensate for proteasome dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Shun; Irie, Taro; Hirayama, Shoshiro; Sakurai, Yasuyuki; Yashiroda, Hideki; Naguro, Isao; Ichijo, Hidenori; Hamazaki, Jun; Murata, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    In response to proteasome dysfunction, mammalian cells upregulate proteasome gene expression by activating Nrf1. Nrf1 is an endoplasmic reticulum-resident transcription factor that is continually retrotranslocated and degraded by the proteasome. Upon proteasome inhibition, Nrf1 escapes degradation and is cleaved to become active. However, the processing enzyme for Nrf1 remains obscure. Here we show that the aspartyl protease DNA-damage inducible 1 homolog 2 (DDI2) is required to cleave and activate Nrf1. Deletion of DDI2 reduced the cleaved form of Nrf1 and increased the full-length cytosolic form of Nrf1, resulting in poor upregulation of proteasomes in response to proteasome inhibition. These defects were restored by adding back wild-type DDI2 but not protease-defective DDI2. Our results provide a clue for blocking compensatory proteasome synthesis to improve cancer therapies targeting proteasomes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18357.001 PMID:27528193

  9. Synthesis and Evaluation of Derivatives of the Proteasome Deubiquitinase Inhibitor b-AP15

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; D'Arcy, Pádraig; Caulfield, Thomas R.; Paulus, Aneel; Chitta, Kasyapa; Mohanty, Chitralekha; Gullbo, Joachim; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Linder, Stig

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) is increasingly recognized as a therapeutic target for the development of anticancer therapies. The success of the 20S proteasome core particle (20S CP) inhibitor bortezomib in the clinical management of multiple myeloma has raised the possibility of identifying other UPS components for therapeutic intervention. We previously identified the small molecule b-AP15 as an inhibitor of 19S proteasome deubiquitinase (DUB) activity. Building upon our previous data, we performed a structure–activity relationship (SAR) study on b-AP15 and identified VLX1570 as an analog with promising properties, including enhanced potency and improved solubility in aqueous solution. In silico modeling was consistent with interaction of VLX1570 with key cysteine residues located at the active sites of the proteasome DUBs USP14 and UCHL5. VLX1570 was found to inhibit proteasome deubiquitinase activity in vitro in a manner consistent with competitive inhibition. Furthermore, using active-site-directed probes, VLX1570 also inhibited proteasome DUB activity in exposed cells. Importantly, VLX1570 did not show inhibitory activity on a panel of recombinant non-proteasome DUBs, on recombinant kinases, or on caspase-3 activity, suggesting that VLX1570 is not an overtly reactive general enzyme inhibitor. Taken together, our data shows the chemical and biological properties of VLX1570 as an optimized proteasome DUB inhibitor. PMID:25854145

  10. Ciliopathy proteins regulate paracrine signaling by modulating proteasomal degradation of mediators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangfan P; Tsai, I-Chun; Morleo, Manuela; Oh, Edwin C; Leitch, Carmen C; Massa, Filomena; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Parker, David S; Finley, Daniel; Zaghloul, Norann A; Franco, Brunella; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2014-05-01

    Cilia are critical mediators of paracrine signaling; however, it is unknown whether proteins that contribute to ciliopathies converge on multiple paracrine pathways through a common mechanism. Here, we show that loss of cilopathy-associated proteins Bardet-Biedl syndrome 4 (BBS4) or oral-facial-digital syndrome 1 (OFD1) results in the accumulation of signaling mediators normally targeted for proteasomal degradation. In WT cells, several BBS proteins and OFD1 interacted with proteasomal subunits, and loss of either BBS4 or OFD1 led to depletion of multiple subunits from the centrosomal proteasome. Furthermore, overexpression of proteasomal regulatory components or treatment with proteasomal activators sulforaphane (SFN) and mevalonolactone (MVA) ameliorated signaling defects in cells lacking BBS1, BBS4, and OFD1, in morphant zebrafish embryos, and in induced neurons from Ofd1-deficient mice. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that other proteasome-dependent pathways not known to be associated with ciliopathies are defective in the absence of ciliopathy proteins. We found that loss of BBS1, BBS4, or OFD1 led to decreased NF-κB activity and concomitant IκBβ accumulation and that these defects were ameliorated with SFN treatment. Taken together, our data indicate that basal body proteasomal regulation governs paracrine signaling pathways and suggest that augmenting proteasomal function might benefit ciliopathy patients.

  11. Targeting Tumor Proteasome with Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huanjie; Liu, Jinbao; Dou, Q. Ping

    2012-01-01

    The proteasome is a multicatalytic protease complex whose activity is required for the growth of normal or tumor cells. It has been shown that human cancer cells are more sensitive to proteasome inhibition than normal cells, indicating that the proteasome could be a target of chemotherapy. Studies suggest that traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is an effective approach for cancer treatment. Here we reviewed several TCMs for their potential in treatment of cancer. This short review focuses mainly on the TCMs that potentially target the tumor cellular proteasome and NF-κB pathway whose activation is dependent on the proteasome activity. PMID:20156140

  12. The Proteasome Acts as a Hub for Plant Immunity and Is Targeted by Pseudomonas Type III Effectors1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Arsheed; Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is involved in several aspects of plant immunity and that a range of plant pathogens subvert the ubiquitin-proteasome system to enhance their virulence. Here, we show that proteasome activity is strongly induced during basal defense in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Mutant lines of the proteasome subunits RPT2a and RPN12a support increased bacterial growth of virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (Pst) and Pseudomonas syringae pv maculicola ES4326. Both proteasome subunits are required for pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity responses. Analysis of bacterial growth after a secondary infection of systemic leaves revealed that the establishment of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is impaired in proteasome mutants, suggesting that the proteasome also plays an important role in defense priming and SAR. In addition, we show that Pst inhibits proteasome activity in a type III secretion-dependent manner. A screen for type III effector proteins from Pst for their ability to interfere with proteasome activity revealed HopM1, HopAO1, HopA1, and HopG1 as putative proteasome inhibitors. Biochemical characterization of HopM1 by mass spectrometry indicates that HopM1 interacts with several E3 ubiquitin ligases and proteasome subunits. This supports the hypothesis that HopM1 associates with the proteasome, leading to its inhibition. Thus, the proteasome is an essential component of pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity and SAR, which is targeted by multiple bacterial effectors. PMID:27613851

  13. Development and Characterization of Proteasome Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Bo; Fonseca, Fabiana N.; Crews, Craig M.

    2008-01-01

    Although many proteasome inhibitors have been either synthesized or identified from natural sources, the development of more sophisticated, selective proteasome inhibitors is important for a detailed understanding of proteasome function. We have found that antitumor natural product epoxomicin and eponemycin, both of which are linear peptides containing a α,β-epoxyketone pharmacophore, target proteasome for their antitumor activity. Structural studies of the proteasome–epoxomicin complex revealed that the unique specificity of the natural product toward proteasome is due to the α,β-epoxyketone pharmacophore, which forms an unusual six-membered morpholino ring with the amino terminal catalytic Thr-1 of the 20S proteasome. Thus, we believe that a facile synthetic approach for α,β-epoxyketone linear peptides provides a unique opportunity to develop proteasome inhibitors with novel activities. In this chapter, we discuss the detailed synthetic procedure of the α′,β′-epoxyketone natural product epoxomicin and its derivatives. PMID:16338383

  14. Yeast counterparts of subunits S5a and p58 (S3) of the human 26S proteasome are encoded by two multicopy suppressors of nin1-1.

    PubMed Central

    Kominami, K; Okura, N; Kawamura, M; DeMartino, G N; Slaughter, C A; Shimbara, N; Chung, C H; Fujimuro, M; Yokosawa, H; Shimizu, Y; Tanahashi, N; Tanaka, K; Toh-e, A

    1997-01-01

    Nin1p, a component of the 26S proteasome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is required for activation of Cdc28p kinase at the G1-S-phase and G2-M boundaries. By exploiting the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the nin1-1 mutant, we have screened for genes encoding proteins with related functions to Nin1p and have cloned and characterized two new multicopy suppressors, SUN1 and SUN2, of the nin1-1 mutation. SUN1 can suppress a null nin1 mutation, whereas SUN2, an essential gene, does not. Sun1p is a 268-amino acid protein which shows strong similarity to MBP1 of Arabidopsis thaliana, a homologue of the S5a subunit of the human 26S proteasome. Sun1p binds ubiquitin-lysozyme conjugates as do S5a and MBP1. Sun2p (523 amino acids) was found to be homologous to the p58 subunit of the human 26S proteasome. cDNA encoding the p58 component was cloned. Furthermore, expression of a derivative of p58 from which the N-terminal 150 amino acids had been removed restored the function of a null allele of SUN2. During glycerol density gradient centrifugation, both Sun1p and Sun2p comigrated with the known proteasome components. These results, as well as other structural and functional studies, indicate that both Sun1p and Sun2p are components of the regulatory module of the yeast 26S proteasome. Images PMID:9017604

  15. Proteasome dysfunction triggers activation of SKN-1A/Nrf1 by the aspartic protease DDI-1

    PubMed Central

    Lehrbach, Nicolas J; Ruvkun, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Proteasomes are essential for protein homeostasis in eukaryotes. To preserve cellular function, transcription of proteasome subunit genes is induced in response to proteasome dysfunction caused by pathogen attacks or proteasome inhibitor drugs. In Caenorhabditis elegans, this response requires SKN-1, a transcription factor related to mammalian Nrf1/2. Here, we use comprehensive genetic analyses to identify the pathway required for C. elegans to detect proteasome dysfunction and activate SKN-1. Genes required for SKN-1 activation encode regulators of ER traffic, a peptide N-glycanase, and DDI-1, a conserved aspartic protease. DDI-1 expression is induced by proteasome dysfunction, and we show that DDI-1 is required to cleave and activate an ER-associated isoform of SKN-1. Mammalian Nrf1 is also ER-associated and subject to proteolytic cleavage, suggesting a conserved mechanism of proteasome surveillance. Targeting mammalian DDI1 protease could mitigate effects of proteasome dysfunction in aging and protein aggregation disorders, or increase effectiveness of proteasome inhibitor cancer chemotherapies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17721.001 PMID:27528192

  16. Epigenetics of proteasome inhibition in the liver of rats fed ethanol chronically

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Joan; Dedes, Jennifer; Li, Jun; French, Samuel W; Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of ethanol-induced proteasome inhibition, and the effects of proteasome inhibition in the regulation of epigenetic mechanisms. METHODS: Rats were fed ethanol for 1 mo using the Tsukamoto-French model and were compared to rats given the proteasome inhibitor PS-341 (Bortezomib, Velcade™) by intraperitoneal injection. Microarray analysis and real time PCR were performed and proteasome activity assays and Western blot analysis were performed using isolated nuclei. RESULTS: Chronic ethanol feeding caused a significant inhibition of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in the nucleus, which led to changes in the turnover of transcriptional factors, histone-modifying enzymes, and, therefore, affected epigenetic mechanisms. Chronic ethanol feeding was related to an increase in histone acetylation, and it is hypothesized that the proteasome proteolytic activity regulated histone modifications by controlling the stability of histone modifying enzymes, and, therefore, regulated the chromatin structure, allowing easy access to chromatin by RNA polymerase, and, thus, proper gene expression. Proteasome inhibition by PS-341 increased histone acetylation similar to chronic ethanol feeding. In addition, proteasome inhibition caused dramatic changes in hepatic remethylation reactions as there was a significant decrease in the enzymes responsible for the regeneration of S-adenosylmethionine, and, in particular, a significant decrease in the betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase enzyme. This suggested that hypomethylation was associated with proteasome inhibition, as indicated by the decrease in histone methylation. CONCLUSION: The role of proteasome inhibition in regulating epigenetic mechanisms, and its link to liver injury in alcoholic liver disease, is thus a promising approach to study liver injury due to chronic ethanol consumption. PMID:19222094

  17. 20S proteasome activation promotes life span extension and resistance to proteotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Chondrogianni, Niki; Georgila, Konstantina; Kourtis, Nikos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Gonos, Efstathios S

    2015-02-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is one of the nodal points that need to be preserved to retain physiologic cellular/organismal balance. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the removal of both normal and damaged proteins, with the proteasome being the downstream effector. The proteasome is the major cellular protease with progressive impairment of function during aging and senescence. Despite the documented age-retarding properties of proteasome activation in various cellular models, simultaneous enhancement of the 20S core proteasome content, assembly, and function have never been reported in any multicellular organism. Consequently, the possible effects of the core proteasome modulation on organismal life span are elusive. In this study, we have achieved activation of the 20S proteasome at organismal level. We demonstrate enhancement of proteasome levels, assembly, and activity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, resulting in life span extension and increased resistance to stress. We also provide evidence that the observed life span extension is dependent on the transcriptional activity of Dauer formation abnormal/Forkhead box class O (DAF-16/FOXO), skinhead-1 (SKN-1), and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) factors through regulation of downstream longevity genes. We further show that the reported beneficial effects are not ubiquitous but they are dependent on the genetic context. Finally, we provide evidence that proteasome core activation might be a potential strategy to minimize protein homeostasis deficiencies underlying aggregation-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Huntington's disease (HD). In summary, this is the first report demonstrating that 20S core proteasome up-regulation in terms of both content and activity is feasible in a multicellular eukaryotic organism and that in turn this modulation promotes extension of organismal health span and life span.

  18. Molecular analysis of complement component C4 gene copy number.

    PubMed

    Castley, Alison S L; Martinez, O Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Classical, alternative, or lectin pathways may activate the complement system cascade. The classical pathway includes the C4 protein and functions in the prevention of immune complex precipitation and in clearance of immune complexes.Two isotypes of C4-C4A and C4B-are coded by genes located at two loci within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) on chromosome 6. While these isotypes share over 99% amino acid sequence homology, five nucleotide differences located in exon 26 are responsible for major structural and functional differences between the C4 isotypes.C4A and C4B are highly polymorphic with over 40 alleles, gene duplications, and "null alleles". C4 genes may be short (14.6 kb) or long (21 kb), due to the absence or presence of an endogenous retroviral sequence-HERV-K(C4)-in intron 9, respectively. The C4 gene copy number (GCN) can vary from 1-3 per haplotype or 2-6 per diploid genome. The variation in GCN leads to a range of C4 plasma protein concentrations among healthy subjects. In subjects with equal numbers of C4 genes, subjects with short genes have C4 plasma levels relatively higher than subjects with long genes.Variation of the C4 GCN, the gene size (long or short) and the C4 isotypes (C4A and C4B) may also lead to susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Therefore, in subjects with autoimmune disease, a low serum C4 level may be due to ongoing disease activity associated with complement activation and consumption or it may be due to genetic factors. Distinguishing between these will have clinical implications.Exact determination of GCN can be difficult, at least in part due to the high degree of homology between C4A and C4B and a variety of techniques has been described. This chapter describes a quantitative TaqMan real-time PCR (qPCR) copy number assay, based on our laboratory experience using this assay.

  19. The capture proteasome assay: A method to measure proteasome activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vigneron, Nathalie; Abi Habib, Joanna; Van den Eynde, Benoît J

    2015-08-01

    Because of its crucial role in various cellular processes, the proteasome is the focus of intensive research for the development of proteasome inhibitors to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases. Here, we describe a new and easy assay to measure the different proteasome activities in vitro (chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like) based on proteasome capture on antibody-coated plates, namely the capture proteasome assay (CAPA). Applying the CAPA to lysates from cells expressing standard proteasome, immunoproteasome, or intermediate proteasomes β5i or β1i-β5i, we can monitor the activity of the four proteasome subtypes. The CAPA provided similar results as the standard whole-cell proteasome-Glo assay without the problem of contaminating proteases requiring inhibitors. However, the profile of trypsin-like activity differed between the two assays. This could be partly explained by the presence of MgSO4 in the proteasome-Glo buffer, which inhibits the trypsin-like activity of the proteasome. The CAPA does not need MgSO4 and, therefore, provides a more precise measurement of the trypsin-like activity. The CAPA provides a quick and accurate method to measure proteasome activity in vitro in a very specific manner and should be useful for the development of proteasome inhibitors.

  20. Muscle atrophy, ubiquitin-proteasome, and autophagic pathways in dysferlinopathy.

    PubMed

    Fanin, Marina; Nascimbeni, Anna C; Angelini, Corrado

    2014-09-01

    Muscle fiber atrophy and the molecular pathways underlying this process have not been investigated in dysferlinopathy patients. In 22 muscles from dysferlinopathy patients we investigated fiber atrophy by morphometry and ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagic pathways using protein and/or transcriptional analysis of atrophy- and autophagy-related genes (MuRF1, atrogin1, LC3, p62, Bnip3). Dysferlinopathy showed significant fiber atrophy and higher MuRF-1 protein and mRNA levels, which correlated with fiber size, suggesting activation of the atrophy program by proteasome induction. Some of the MuRF-1 upregulation and proteasome induction may be attributed to the prominent regeneration found. A potential role of impaired autophagy was suggested by p62-positive protein aggregates in atrophic fibers and significantly higher levels of LC3-II and p62 proteins and overexpression of p62 and Bnip3 mRNA. Damaged muscle fibers and prominent inflammatory changes may also enhance autophagy due to the insufficient level of proteasomal degradation of mutant dysferlin. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Mitochondrial and Nuclear Genes of Mitochondrial Components in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kirches, E

    2009-01-01

    Although the observation of aerobic glycolysis of tumor cells by Otto v. Warburg had demonstrated abnormalities of mitochondrial energy metabolism in cancer decades ago, there was no clear evidence for a functional role of mutant mitochondrial proteins in cancer development until the early years of the 21st century. In the year 2000, a major breakthrough was achieved by the observation, that several genes coding for subunits of the respiratory chain (ETC) complex II, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) are tumor suppressor genes in heritable paragangliomas, fulfilling Knudson’s classical two-hit hypothesis. A functional inactivation of both alleles by germline mutations and chromosomal losses in the tumor tissue was found in the patients. Later, SDH mutations were also identified in sporadic paragangliomas and pheochromocytomas. Genes of the mitochondrial ATP-synthase and of mitochondrial iron homeostasis have been implicated in cancer development at the level of cell culture and mouse experiments. In contrast to the well established role of some nuclear SDH genes, a functional impact of the mitochondrial genome itself (mtDNA) in cancer development remains unclear. Nevertheless, the extremely high frequency of mtDNA mutations in solid tumors raises the question, whether this small circular genome might be applicable to early cancer detection. This is a meaningful approach, especially in cancers, which tend to spread tumor cells early into bodily fluids or faeces, which can be screened by non-invasive methods. PMID:19949549

  2. Targeting the ubiquitin–proteasome system for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Min; Schmitt, Sara; Buac, Daniela; Dou, Q Ping

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) degrades 80 – 90% of intracellular proteins. Cancer cells take advantage of the UPS for their increased growth and decreased apoptotic cell death. Thus, the components that make up the UPS represent a diverse group of potential anti-cancer targets. The success of the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib not only proved that the proteasome is a feasible and valuable anti-cancer target, but also inspired researchers to extensively explore other potential targets of this pathway. Areas covered This review provides a broad overview of the UPS and its role in supporting cancer development and progression, especially in aspects of p53 inactivation, p27 turnover and NF-κB activation. Also, efforts toward the development of small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) targeting different steps in this pathway for cancer treatment are reviewed and discussed. Expert opinion Whereas some of the targets in the UPS, such as the 20S pro-teasome, Nedd8 activating enzyme and HDM2, have been well-established and validated, there remains a large pool of candidates waiting to be investigated. Development of SMIs targeting the UPS has been largely facilitated by state-of-the-art technologies such as high-throughput screening and computer-assisted drug design, both of which require a better understanding of the targets of interest. PMID:23822887

  3. Structural components of nuclear integrity with gene regulatory potential.

    PubMed

    Fenelon, Kelli D; Hopyan, Sevan

    2017-10-01

    The nucleus is a mechanosensitive and load-bearing structure. Structural components of the nucleus interact to maintain nuclear integrity and have become subjects of exciting research that is relevant to cell and developmental biology. Here we outline the boundaries of what is known about key architectural elements within the nucleus and highlight their potential structural and transcriptional regulatory functions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. p97-dependent retrotranslocation and proteolytic processing govern formation of active Nrf1 upon proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Senthil K; den Besten, Willem; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2014-01-01

    Proteasome inhibition elicits an evolutionarily conserved response wherein proteasome subunit mRNAs are upregulated, resulting in recovery (i.e., 'bounce-back') of proteasome activity. We previously demonstrated that the transcription factor Nrf1/NFE2L1 mediates this homeostatic response in mammalian cells. We show here that Nrf1 is initially translocated into the lumen of the ER, but is rapidly and efficiently retrotranslocated to the cytosolic side of the membrane in a manner that depends on p97/VCP. Normally, retrotranslocated Nrf1 is degraded promptly by the proteasome and active species do not accumulate. However, in cells with compromised proteasomes, retrotranslocated Nrf1 escapes degradation and is cleaved N-terminal to Leu-104 to yield a fragment that is no longer tethered to the ER membrane. Importantly, this cleavage event is essential for Nrf1-dependent activation of proteasome gene expression upon proteasome inhibition. Our data uncover an unexpected role for p97 in activation of a transcription factor by relocalizing it from the ER lumen to the cytosol. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01856.001.

  5. Transgenic pig carrying green fluorescent proteasomes.

    PubMed

    Miles, Edward L; O'Gorman, Chad; Zhao, Jianguo; Samuel, Melissa; Walters, Eric; Yi, Young-Joo; Sutovsky, Miriam; Prather, Randall S; Wells, Kevin D; Sutovsky, Peter

    2013-04-16

    Among its many functions, the ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates substrate-specific proteolysis during the cell cycle, apoptosis, and fertilization and in pathologies such as Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and liver cirrhosis. Proteasomes are present in human and boar spermatozoa, but little is known about the interactions of proteasomal subunits with other sperm proteins or structures. We have created a transgenic boar with green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged 20S proteasomal core subunit α-type 1 (PSMA1-GFP), hypothesizing that the PSMA1-GFP fusion protein will be incorporated into functional sperm proteasomes. Using direct epifluorescence imaging and indirect immunofluorescence detection, we have confirmed the presence of PSMA1-GFP in the sperm acrosome. Western blotting revealed a protein band corresponding to the predicted mass of PSMA1-GFP fusion protein (57 kDa) in transgenic spermatozoa. Transgenic boar fertility was confirmed by in vitro fertilization, resulting in transgenic blastocysts, and by mating, resulting in healthy transgenic offspring. Immunoprecipitation and proteomic analysis revealed that PSMA1-GFP copurifies with several acrosomal membrane-associated proteins (e.g., lactadherin/milk fat globule E8 and spermadhesin alanine-tryptophan-asparagine). The interaction of MFGE8 with PSMA1-GFP was confirmed through cross-immunoprecipitation. The identified proteasome-interacting proteins may regulate sperm proteasomal activity during fertilization or may be the substrates of proteasomal proteolysis during fertilization. Proteomic analysis also confirmed the interaction/coimmunoprecipitation of PSMA1-GFP with 13/14 proteasomal core subunits. These results demonstrate that the PSMA1-GFP was incorporated in the assembled sperm proteasomes. This mammal carrying green fluorescent proteasomes will be useful for studies of fertilization and wherever the ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a role in cellular function or pathology.

  6. Transgenic pig carrying green fluorescent proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Edward L.; O’Gorman, Chad; Zhao, Jianguo; Samuel, Melissa; Walters, Eric; Yi, Young-Joo; Prather, Randall S.; Wells, Kevin D.; Sutovsky, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Among its many functions, the ubiquitin–proteasome system regulates substrate-specific proteolysis during the cell cycle, apoptosis, and fertilization and in pathologies such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, and liver cirrhosis. Proteasomes are present in human and boar spermatozoa, but little is known about the interactions of proteasomal subunits with other sperm proteins or structures. We have created a transgenic boar with green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged 20S proteasomal core subunit α-type 1 (PSMA1-GFP), hypothesizing that the PSMA1-GFP fusion protein will be incorporated into functional sperm proteasomes. Using direct epifluorescence imaging and indirect immunofluorescence detection, we have confirmed the presence of PSMA1-GFP in the sperm acrosome. Western blotting revealed a protein band corresponding to the predicted mass of PSMA1-GFP fusion protein (57 kDa) in transgenic spermatozoa. Transgenic boar fertility was confirmed by in vitro fertilization, resulting in transgenic blastocysts, and by mating, resulting in healthy transgenic offspring. Immunoprecipitation and proteomic analysis revealed that PSMA1-GFP copurifies with several acrosomal membrane-associated proteins (e.g., lactadherin/milk fat globule E8 and spermadhesin alanine-tryptophan-asparagine). The interaction of MFGE8 with PSMA1-GFP was confirmed through cross-immunoprecipitation. The identified proteasome-interacting proteins may regulate sperm proteasomal activity during fertilization or may be the substrates of proteasomal proteolysis during fertilization. Proteomic analysis also confirmed the interaction/coimmunoprecipitation of PSMA1-GFP with 13/14 proteasomal core subunits. These results demonstrate that the PSMA1-GFP was incorporated in the assembled sperm proteasomes. This mammal carrying green fluorescent proteasomes will be useful for studies of fertilization and wherever the ubiquitin–proteasome system plays a role in cellular function or pathology. PMID:23550158

  7. Proteasome inhibition reverses hedgehog inhibitor and taxane resistance in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Steg, Adam D; Burke, Mata R; Amm, Hope M; Katre, Ashwini A; Dobbin, Zachary C; Jeong, Dae Hoon; Landen, Charles N

    2014-08-30

    The goal of this study was to determine whether combined targeted therapies, specifically those against the Notch, hedgehog and ubiquitin-proteasome pathways, could overcome ovarian cancer chemoresistance. Chemoresistant ovarian cancer cells were exposed to gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSI-I, Compound E) or the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, alone and in combination with the hedgehog antagonist, LDE225. Bortezomib, alone and in combination with LDE225, was evaluated for effects on paclitaxel efficacy. Cell viability and cell cycle analysis were assessed by MTT assay and propidium iodide staining, respectively. Proteasome activity and gene expression were determined by luminescence assay and qPCR, respectively. Studies demonstrated that GSI-I, but not Compound E, inhibited proteasome activity, similar to bortezomib. Proteasome inhibition decreased hedgehog target genes (PTCH1, GLI1 and GLI2) and increased LDE225 sensitivity in vitro. Bortezomib, alone and in combination with LDE225, increased paclitaxel sensitivity through apoptosis and G2/M arrest. Expression of the multi-drug resistance gene ABCB1/MDR1 was decreased and acetylation of α-tubulin, a marker of microtubule stabilization, was increased following bortezomib treatment. HDAC6 inhibitor tubastatin-a demonstrated that microtubule effects are associated with hedgehog inhibition and sensitization to paclitaxel and LDE225. These results suggest that proteasome inhibition, through alteration of microtubule dynamics and hedgehog signaling, can reverse taxane-mediated chemoresistance.

  8. Orthopoxviruses Require a Functional Ubiquitin-Proteasome System for Productive Replication▿

    PubMed Central

    Teale, Alastair; Campbell, Stephanie; Van Buuren, Nick; Magee, Wendy C.; Watmough, Kelly; Couturier, Brianne; Shipclark, Robyn; Barry, Michele

    2009-01-01

    Cellular homeostasis depends on an intricate balance of protein expression and degradation. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays a crucial role in specifically targeting proteins tagged with ubiquitin for destruction. This degradation can be effectively blocked by both chemically synthesized and natural proteasome inhibitors. Poxviruses encode a number of proteins that exploit the ubiquitin-proteasome system, including virally encoded ubiquitin molecules and ubiquitin ligases, as well as BTB/kelch proteins and F-box proteins, which interact with cellular ubiquitin ligases. Here we show that poxvirus infection was dramatically affected by a range of proteasome inhibitors, including MG132, MG115, lactacystin, and bortezomib (Velcade). Confocal microscopy demonstrated that infected cells treated with MG132 or bortezomib lacked viral replication factories within the cytoplasm. This was accompanied by the absence of late gene expression and DNA replication; however, early gene expression occurred unabated. Proteasomal inhibition with MG132 or bortezomib also had dramatic effects on viral titers, severely blocking viral replication and propagation. The effects of MG132 on poxvirus infection were reversible upon washout, resulting in the production of late genes and viral replication factories. Significantly, the addition of an ubiquitin-activating enzyme (E1) inhibitor had a similar affect on late and early protein expression. Together, our data suggests that a functional ubiquitin-proteasome system is required during poxvirus infection. PMID:19109393

  9. An evolutionarily conserved pathway controls proteasome homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Adrien; Bertolotti, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is essential for the selective degradation of most cellular proteins but how cells maintain adequate amounts of proteasome is unclear. Here we found an evolutionarily conserved signalling pathway controlling proteasome homeostasis. Central to this pathway is TORC1 whose inhibition induced all known yeast 19S regulatory particle assembly-chaperones (RACs) as well as proteasome subunits. Downstream of TORC1 inhibition, the yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase, Mpk1, ensured that the supply of RACs and proteasome subunits increased under challenging conditions to maintain proteasomal degradation and cell viability. This adaptive pathway was evolutionarily conserved, with mTOR and Erk5 controlling the levels of the four mammalian RACs and proteasome abundance. Thus, the central growth and stress controllers, TORC1 and Mpk1/Erk5, endow cells with a rapid and vital adaptive response to adjust proteasome abundance to the rising needs. Enhancing this pathway may be a useful therapeutic approach for diseases resulting from impaired proteasomal degradation. PMID:27462806

  10. Modeling proteasome dynamics in Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneppen, Kim; Lizana, Ludvig; Jensen, Mogens H.; Pigolotti, Simone; Otzen, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), there is evidence that α-synuclein (αSN) aggregation is coupled to dysfunctional or overburdened protein quality control systems, in particular the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here, we develop a simple dynamical model for the on-going conflict between αSN aggregation and the maintenance of a functional proteasome in the healthy cell, based on the premise that proteasomal activity can be titrated out by mature αSN fibrils and their protofilament precursors. In the presence of excess proteasomes the cell easily maintains homeostasis. However, when the ratio between the available proteasome and the αSN protofilaments is reduced below a threshold level, we predict a collapse of homeostasis and onset of oscillations in the proteasome concentration. Depleted proteasome opens for accumulation of oligomers. Our analysis suggests that the onset of PD is associated with a proteasome population that becomes occupied in periodic degradation of aggregates. This behavior is found to be the general state of a proteasome/chaperone system under pressure, and suggests new interpretations of other diseases where protein aggregation could stress elements of the protein quality control system.

  11. Proteasome Modulates Mitochondrial Function During Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Claudio A.; Perez, Viviana I.

    2009-01-01

    Proteasome plays fundamental roles in the removal of oxidized proteins and in the normal degradation of short-lived proteins. Previously we have provided evidences that the impairment in proteasome observed during the replicative senescence of human fibroblasts has significant effects on MAPK signaling, proliferation, life span, senescent phenotype and protein oxidative status. These studies have demonstrated that proteasome inhibition and replicative senescence caused accumulation of intracellular protein carbonyl content. In this study, we have investigated the mechanisms by which proteasome dysfunction modulates protein oxidation during cellular senescence. The results indicate that proteasome inhibition during replicative senescence have significant effects on the intra and extracellular ROS production in vitro. The data also show that ROS impaired the proteasome function, which is partially reversible by antioxidants. Increases in ROS after proteasome inhibition correlated with a significant negative effect on the activity of most mitochondrial electron transporters. We propose that failures in proteasome during cellular senescence lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production and oxidative stress. Furthermore, it is likely that changes in proteasome dynamics could generate a pro-oxidative condition at the immediate extracellular microenvironment that could cause tissue injury during aging, in vivo. PMID:17976388

  12. Molecular shredders: how proteasomes fulfill their role.

    PubMed

    Groll, Michael; Clausen, Tim

    2003-12-01

    The 20S proteasome is a large, cylinder-shaped protease that is found in all domains of life and plays a crucial role in cellular protein turnover. It has multiple catalytic centers located within the hollow cavity of a molecular cage. This architecture prevents unwanted degradation of endogenous proteins and promotes processive degradation of substrates by restricting the dissociation of partially digested polypeptides. Although this kind of self-compartmentalization is generally conserved, the proteasomes of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes show many differences in architecture, subunit composition and regulation. The structure of the 20S proteasome and its inherent role in the regulation of proteasome function are gradually being elucidated.

  13. An evolutionarily conserved pathway controls proteasome homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Adrien; Bertolotti, Anne

    2016-08-11

    The proteasome is essential for the selective degradation of most cellular proteins, but how cells maintain adequate amounts of proteasome is unclear. Here we show that there is an evolutionarily conserved signalling pathway controlling proteasome homeostasis. Central to this pathway is TORC1, the inhibition of which induced all known yeast 19S regulatory particle assembly-chaperones (RACs), as well as proteasome subunits. Downstream of TORC1 inhibition, the yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase, Mpk1, acts to increase the supply of RACs and proteasome subunits under challenging conditions in order to maintain proteasomal degradation and cell viability. This adaptive pathway was evolutionarily conserved, with mTOR and ERK5 controlling the levels of the four mammalian RACs and proteasome abundance. Thus, the central growth and stress controllers, TORC1 and Mpk1/ERK5, endow cells with a rapid and vital adaptive response to adjust proteasome abundance in response to the rising needs of cells. Enhancing this pathway may be a useful therapeutic approach for diseases resulting from impaired proteasomal degradation.

  14. The Logic of the 26S Proteasome.

    PubMed

    Collins, Galen Andrew; Goldberg, Alfred L

    2017-05-18

    The ubiquitin proteasome pathway is responsible for most of the protein degradation in mammalian cells. Rates of degradation by this pathway have generally been assumed to be determined by rates of ubiquitylation. However, recent studies indicate that proteasome function is also tightly regulated and determines whether a ubiquitylated protein is destroyed or deubiquitylated and survives longer. This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of the proteasome's multistep ATP-dependent mechanism, its biochemical and structural features that ensure efficient proteolysis and ubiquitin recycling while preventing nonselective proteolysis, and the regulation of proteasome activity by interacting proteins and subunit modifications, especially phosphorylation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dietary components modify gene expression: implications for carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kan; Yang, Wancai; Mariadason, John; Velcich, Anna; Lipkin, Martin; Augenlicht, Leonard

    2005-11-01

    Mouse genetic models that probe important pathways in intestinal cell maturation, such as cell-cycle regulation, apoptosis, and, especially, lineage specific differentiation, have provided profound insight into the underlying mechanisms of intestinal tumor formation and progression. However, a wealth of epidemiological and experimental data indicates that environment, especially the diet, is a principal determinant of relative risk for tumor development. We have demonstrated that even in mouse models in which tumor incidence is strongly initiated by genetic manipulation of genes, such as Apc, p21(WAF1/cip1), and p27(Kip1), a Western-style diet that is high in fat and low in calcium and vitamin D can dramatically increase and accelerate tumor formation. Moreover, experiments show that modulation of calcium and vitamin D levels can substantially influence tumor formation in both the mouse genetic models, as well as in a new dietary model that appears to mimic the development of sporadic colon cancer. Finally, analysis of gene expression profiles provides important insights into how diets may alter metabolic profiles and regulatory pathways that influence probability of tumor formation in the histologically and physiologically normal intestinal mucosa.

  16. Proteasome, but Not Autophagy, Disruption Results in Severe Eye and Wing Dysmorphia: A Subunit- and Regulator-Dependent Process in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pantazi, Asimina D.; Mpakou, Vassiliki E.; Zervas, Christos G.; Papassideri, Issidora S.; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J.

    2013-01-01

    Proteasome-dependent and autophagy-mediated degradation of eukaryotic cellular proteins represent the two major proteostatic mechanisms that are critically implicated in a number of signaling pathways and cellular processes. Deregulation of functions engaged in protein elimination frequently leads to development of morbid states and diseases. In this context, and through the utilization of GAL4/UAS genetic tool, we herein examined the in vivo contribution of proteasome and autophagy systems in Drosophila eye and wing morphogenesis. By exploiting the ability of GAL4-ninaE. GMR and P{GawB}BxMS1096 genetic drivers to be strongly and preferentially expressed in the eye and wing discs, respectively, we proved that proteasomal integrity and ubiquitination proficiency essentially control fly’s eye and wing development. Indeed, subunit- and regulator-specific patterns of severe organ dysmorphia were obtained after the RNAi-induced downregulation of critical proteasome components (Rpn1, Rpn2, α5, β5 and β6) or distinct protein-ubiquitin conjugators (UbcD6, but not UbcD1 and UbcD4). Proteasome deficient eyes presented with either rough phenotypes or strongly dysmorphic shapes, while transgenic mutant wings were severely folded and carried blistered structures together with loss of vein differentiation. Moreover, transgenic fly eyes overexpressing the UBP2-yeast deubiquitinase enzyme were characterized by an eyeless-like phenotype. Therefore, the proteasome/ubiquitin proteolytic activities are undoubtedly required for the normal course of eye and wing development. In contrast, the RNAi-mediated downregulation of critical Atg (1, 4, 7, 9 and 18) autophagic proteins revealed their non-essential, or redundant, functional roles in Drosophila eye and wing formation under physiological growth conditions, since their reduced expression levels could only marginally disturb wing’s, but not eye’s, morphogenetic organization and architecture. However, Atg9 proved indispensable

  17. A monoclonal antibody that distinguishes latent and active forms of the proteasome (multicatalytic proteinase complex)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitman, D.; Etlinger, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated to proteasome purified from human erythrocytes. Five of six proteasome-specific mAbs reacted with three subunits in the molecular mass range of 25-28 kDa, indicating a common epitope. The other mAb (AP5C10) exhibited a more restricted reactivity, recognizing a 32-kDa subunit of the proteasome purified in its latent state. However, when the proteasome is isolated in its active state, AP5C10 reacts with a 28-kDa subunit, evidence for processing of the proteasome subunits during purification. Purified proteasome preparations which exhibited partial latency have both AP5C10 reactive subunits. Although the 32-kDa subunit appears required for latency, loss of this component and generation of the 28-kDa component are not obligatory for activation. The 32- and 28-kDa subunits can each be further resolved into three components by isoelectric focusing. The apparent loss of 4 kDa during the conversion of the 32- to 28-kDa subunit is accompanied by a shift to a more basic pI for each polypeptide. Western blots of the early steps of proteasome purification reveal an AP5C10-reactive protein at 41 kDa. This protein was separated from proteasomes by sizing chromatography and may represent a pool of precursor subunits. Since the 32-kDa subunit appears necessary for latency, it is speculated to play a regulatory role in ATP-dependent proteolytic activity.

  18. A monoclonal antibody that distinguishes latent and active forms of the proteasome (multicatalytic proteinase complex)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitman, D.; Etlinger, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated to proteasome purified from human erythrocytes. Five of six proteasome-specific mAbs reacted with three subunits in the molecular mass range of 25-28 kDa, indicating a common epitope. The other mAb (AP5C10) exhibited a more restricted reactivity, recognizing a 32-kDa subunit of the proteasome purified in its latent state. However, when the proteasome is isolated in its active state, AP5C10 reacts with a 28-kDa subunit, evidence for processing of the proteasome subunits during purification. Purified proteasome preparations which exhibited partial latency have both AP5C10 reactive subunits. Although the 32-kDa subunit appears required for latency, loss of this component and generation of the 28-kDa component are not obligatory for activation. The 32- and 28-kDa subunits can each be further resolved into three components by isoelectric focusing. The apparent loss of 4 kDa during the conversion of the 32- to 28-kDa subunit is accompanied by a shift to a more basic pI for each polypeptide. Western blots of the early steps of proteasome purification reveal an AP5C10-reactive protein at 41 kDa. This protein was separated from proteasomes by sizing chromatography and may represent a pool of precursor subunits. Since the 32-kDa subunit appears necessary for latency, it is speculated to play a regulatory role in ATP-dependent proteolytic activity.

  19. Targeting the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Heart Disease: The Basis for New Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Novel therapeutic strategies to treat heart failure are greatly needed. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) affects the structure and function of cardiac cells through targeted degradation of signaling and structural proteins. This review discusses both beneficial and detrimental consequences of modulating the UPS in the heart. Recent Advances: Proteasome inhibitors were first used to test the role of the UPS in cardiac disease phenotypes, indicating therapeutic potential. In early cardiac remodeling and pathological hypertrophy with increased proteasome activities, proteasome inhibition prevented or restricted disease progression and contractile dysfunction. Conversely, enhancing proteasome activities by genetic manipulation, pharmacological intervention, or ischemic preconditioning also improved the outcome of cardiomyopathies and infarcted hearts with impaired cardiac and UPS function, which is, at least in part, caused by oxidative damage. Critical Issues: An understanding of the UPS status and the underlying mechanisms for its potential deregulation in cardiac disease is critical for targeted interventions. Several studies indicate that type and stage of cardiac disease influence the dynamics of UPS regulation in a nonlinear and multifactorial manner. Proteasome inhibitors targeting all proteasome complexes are associated with cardiotoxicity in humans. Furthermore, the type and dosage of proteasome inhibitor impact the pathogenesis in nonuniform ways. Future Directions: Systematic analysis and targeting of individual UPS components with established and innovative tools will unravel and discriminate regulatory mechanisms that contribute to and protect against the progression of cardiac disease. Integrating this knowledge in drug design may reduce adverse effects on the heart as observed in patients treated with proteasome inhibitors against noncardiac diseases, especially cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2322–2343. PMID:25133688

  20. The ubiquitin proteasome system in neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Norman L

    2009-09-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) orchestrates the turnover of innumerable cellular proteins. In the process of ubiquitination the small protein ubiquitin is attached to a target protein by a peptide bond. The ubiquitinated target protein is subsequently shuttled to a protease complex known as the 26S proteasome and subjected to degradative proteolysis. The UPS facilitates the turnover of proteins in several settings. It targets oxidized, mutant or misfolded proteins for general proteolytic destruction, and allows for the tightly controlled and specific destruction of proteins involved in development and differentiation, cell cycle progression, circadian rhythms, apoptosis, and other biological processes. In neuropathology, alteration of the UPS, or mutations in UPS target proteins may result in signaling abnormalities leading to the initiation or progression of tumors such as astrocytomas, hemangioblastomas, craniopharyngiomas, pituitary adenomas, and medulloblastomas. Dysregulation of the UPS may also contribute to tumor progression by perturbation of DNA replication and mitotic control mechanisms, leading to genomic instability. In neurodegenerative diseases caused by the expression of mutant proteins, the cellular accumulation of these proteins may overload the UPS, indirectly contributing to the disease process, e.g., sporadic Parkinsonism and prion diseases. In other cases, mutation of UPS components may directly cause pathological accumulation of proteins, e.g., autosomal recessive Parkinsonism and spinocerebellar ataxias. Defects or dysfunction of the UPS may also underlie cognitive disorders such as Angelman syndrome, Rett syndrome and autism, and muscle and nerve diseases, e.g., inclusion body myopathy and giant axon neuropathy. This paper describes the basic biochemical mechanisms comprising the UPS and reviews both its theoretical and proven involvement in neuropathological diseases. The potential for the UPS as a target of pharmacological therapy

  1. Gambogic acid is a tissue-specific proteasome inhibitor in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Shouting; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Ningning; Zhao, Chong; Liao, Siyan; Yang, Changshan; Liu, Yurong; Zhao, Canguo; Li, Shujue; Lu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Chunjiao; Guan, Lixia; Zhao, Kai; Shi, Xiaoqing; Song, Wenbin; Zhou, Ping; Dong, Xiaoxian; Guo, Haiping; Wen, Guanmei; Zhang, Change; Jiang, Lili; Ma, Ningfang; Li, Bing; Wang, Shunqing; Tan, Huo; Wang, Xuejun; Dou, Q Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2013-01-31

    Gambogic acid (GA) is a natural compound derived from Chinese herbs that has been approved by the Chinese Food and Drug Administration for clinical trials in cancer patients; however, its molecular targets have not been thoroughly studied. Here, we report that GA inhibits tumor proteasome activity, with potency comparable to bortezomib but much less toxicity. First, GA acts as a prodrug and only gains proteasome-inhibitory function after being metabolized by intracellular CYP2E1. Second, GA-induced proteasome inhibition is a prerequisite for its cytotoxicity and anticancer effect without off-targets. Finally, because expression of the CYP2E1 gene is very high in tumor tissues but low in many normal tissues, GA could therefore produce tissue-specific proteasome inhibition and tumor-specific toxicity, with clinical significance for designing novel strategies for cancer treatment.

  2. Aggresome-like structure induced by isothiocyanates is novel proteasome-dependent degradation machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Mi, Lixin; Gan, Nanqin; Chung, Fung-Lung

    2009-10-16

    Unwanted or misfolded proteins are either refolded by chaperones or degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). When UPS is impaired, misfolded proteins form aggregates, which are transported along microtubules by motor protein dynein towards the juxta-nuclear microtubule-organizing center to form aggresome, a single cellular garbage disposal complex. Because aggresome formation results from proteasome failure, aggresome components are degraded through the autophagy/lysosome pathway. Here we report that small molecule isothiocyanates (ITCs) can induce formation of aggresome-like structure (ALS) through covalent modification of cytoplasmic {alpha}- and {beta}-tubulin. The formation of ALS is related to neither proteasome inhibition nor oxidative stress. ITC-induced ALS is a proteasome-dependent assembly for emergent removal of misfolded proteins, suggesting that the cell may have a previously unknown strategy to cope with misfolded proteins.

  3. A proteasome inhibitor confers cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Lüss, Hartmut; Schmitz, Wilhelm; Neumann, Joachim

    2002-04-01

    In several cell types, proteasome inhibitors like carbobenzoxyl-leucinyl-leucinyl-leucinal (MG132) induce the 72 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp72) and exert cell protective effects. However, data in cardiomyocytes are currently lacking. We investigated the effects of MG132 in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. MG132 time- and concentration-dependently induced Hsp72 and Hsp32 at mRNA and protein levels. Although Hsp60 mRNA was induced, Hsp60 protein levels were not altered. MG132 activated p38 MAP kinase already after 0.5 h. Hsp mRNA induction started after 2 h of MG132 treatment. Subsequently, Hsp72 and Hsp32 protein levels were increased after 4 h. SB202190, an inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase, concentration-dependently attenuated MG132-induced Hsp72-and Hsp32-elevations (by 59% and 41%, respectively, at 1 microM SB202190). In contrast, herbimycin A, a known inductor of Hsp72 in cardiomyocytes, enhanced the MG132-induced Hsp72 and Hsp32 expression even further: additionally applied 2 microM herbimycin A induced Hsp72 and Hsp32 about 2-fold higher than 1 microM MG132 alone. MG132 (1 microM) decreased the hyperthermia- or hydrogen peroxide-induced release of lactate dehydrogenase by 45% and by 35%, respectively (P<0.05, n=5). MG132 (1 microM) prolonged the spontaneous beating time of cardiomyocytes at 46 degrees C from 5+/-2 min (control hyperthermia) to 28+/-5 min (P<0.05, n=4). Thus, inhibition of the proteasome function by MG132 protects cardiomyocytes against hyperthermic or oxidative injury. This protective effect and Hsp induction were abolished by 1 microM SB202190. Proteasome inhibition results in p38 MAP kinase-dependent induction of Hsp72 and Hsp32 and might be a novel cardioprotective modality.

  4. The proteasome complex and the maintenance of pluripotency: sustain the fate by mopping up?

    PubMed

    Schröter, Friederike; Adjaye, James

    2014-02-18

    The proteasome is a multi-enzyme complex responsible for orchestrating protein quality control by degrading misfolded, damaged, abnormal and foreign proteins. Studies related to the association of the proteasomal system in the preservation of self-renewal in both human and mouse pluripotent cells are sparse, and therefore a clear indication of the emergence of a new and important field of research. Under specific conditions the standard proteasome switches to the newly synthesized immunoproteasome, a catalytically active protein chamber also involved in the regulation of protein homeostasis, cell signaling and gene expression. Herein we review recent data to help elucidate and highlight the pivotal role of the proteasome complex, constitutive as well as inducible, in the regulation of self-renewal, pluripotency and differentiation of both embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. The proteasome that is endowed with enhanced proteolytic activity maintains self-renewal by regulating gene expression. In addition to protein degradation, the proteasome activator PA28, compartments of the 19S regulatory particle and key members of the ubiquitin pathway dictate the fate of a pluripotent stem cell. We anticipate that our observations will stimulate active research in this new and emerging theme related to stem cell biology, disease and regenerative medicine.

  5. New cyclic peptide proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Baldisserotto, Anna; Marastoni, Mauro; Gavioli, Riccardo; Tomatis, Roberto

    2009-04-01

    Here we report the study of a new series of vinyl ester cyclopeptide analogues synthesized on the basis of our previous development of a class of cyclopeptides derived from our linear prototype inhibitors. In these compounds, the exocyclic pharmacophoric unit Leu-VE was linked to the gamma-carboxyl group of the glutamic acid residue at the C-terminal. The best analogues of the series have been shown to inhibit the caspase-like activity of the proteasome at nanomolar concentrations and have also demonstrated good resistance to proteolysis and a capacity to permeate the cell membrane.

  6. Examining Proteasome Assembly with Recombinant Archaeal Proteasomes and Nondenaturing PAGE: The Case for a Combined Approach.

    PubMed

    Panfair, Dilrajkaur; Kusmierczyk, Andrew R

    2016-12-17

    Proteasomes are found in all domains of life. They provide the major route of intracellular protein degradation in eukaryotes, though their assembly is not completely understood. All proteasomes contain a structurally conserved core particle (CP), or 20S proteasome, containing two heptameric β subunit rings sandwiched between two heptameric α subunit rings. Archaeal 20S proteasomes are compositionally simpler compared to their eukaryotic counterparts, yet they both share a common assembly mechanism. Consequently, archaeal 20S proteasomes continue to be important models for eukaryotic proteasome assembly. Specifically, recombinant expression of archaeal 20S proteasomes coupled with nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) has yielded many important insights into proteasome biogenesis. Here, we discuss a means to improve upon the usual strategy of coexpression of archaeal proteasome α and β subunits prior to nondenaturing PAGE. We demonstrate that although rapid and efficient, a coexpression approach alone can miss key assembly intermediates. In the case of the proteasome, coexpression may not allow detection of the half-proteasome, an intermediate containing one complete α-ring and one complete β-ring. However, this intermediate is readily detected via lysate mixing. We suggest that combining coexpression with lysate mixing yields an approach that is more thorough in analyzing assembly, yet remains labor nonintensive. This approach may be useful for the study of other recombinant multiprotein complexes.

  7. THE PROTEASOME REGULATES BACTERIAL CpG DNA-INDUCED SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN MURINE MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian Jun; Shen, Jing; Kolbert, Christopher; Raghavakaimal, Sreekumar; Papasian, Christopher J.; Qureshi, Asaf A.; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Morrison, David C.; Qureshi, Nilofer

    2010-01-01

    Our previous work has provided strong evidence that the proteasome is central to the vast majority of genes induced in mouse macrophages in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. In the studies presented here, we evaluated the role of the macrophage proteasome in response to a second microbial product CpG DNA (unmethylated bacterial DNA). For these studies, we applied Affymetrix microarray analysis of RNA derived from murine macrophages stimulated with CpG DNA in the presence or absence of proteasome inhibitor, lactacystin. The results of these studies revealed that similar to LPS, a vast majority of those macrophage genes regulated by CpG DNA are also under the control of the proteasome at 4 h. In contrast to LPS stimulation, however, many of these genes were induced much later than 4 h, at 18 h, in response to CpG DNA. Lactacystin treatment of macrophages completely blocked the CpG DNA-induced gene expression of TNF-α and other genes involved in production of inflammatory mediators. These data strongly support the conclusion that, similar to LPS, the macrophage proteasome is a key regulator of CpG DNA-induced signaling pathways. PMID:20160661

  8. Proteasome function is required for platelet production

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dallas S.; Smith, Matthew C.P.; Campbell, Robert A.; Zimmerman, Patrick W.; Franks, Zechariah B.; Kraemer, Bjorn F.; Machlus, Kellie R.; Ling, Jing; Kamba, Patrick; Schwertz, Hansjörg; Rowley, Jesse W.; Miles, Rodney R.; Liu, Zhi-Jian; Sola-Visner, Martha; Italiano, Joseph E.; Christensen, Hilary; Kahr, Walter H.A.; Li, Dean Y.; Weyrich, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    The proteasome inhibiter bortezomib has been successfully used to treat patients with relapsed multiple myeloma; however, many of these patients become thrombocytopenic, and it is not clear how the proteasome influences platelet production. Here we determined that pharmacologic inhibition of proteasome activity blocks proplatelet formation in human and mouse megakaryocytes. We also found that megakaryocytes isolated from mice deficient for PSMC1, an essential subunit of the 26S proteasome, fail to produce proplatelets. Consistent with decreased proplatelet formation, mice lacking PSMC1 in platelets (Psmc1fl/fl Pf4-Cre mice) exhibited severe thrombocytopenia and died shortly after birth. The failure to produce proplatelets in proteasome-inhibited megakaryocytes was due to upregulation and hyperactivation of the small GTPase, RhoA, rather than NF-κB, as has been previously suggested. Inhibition of RhoA or its downstream target, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), restored megakaryocyte proplatelet formation in the setting of proteasome inhibition in vitro. Similarly, fasudil, a ROCK inhibitor used clinically to treat cerebral vasospasm, restored platelet counts in adult mice that were made thrombocytopenic by tamoxifen-induced suppression of proteasome activity in megakaryocytes and platelets (Psmc1fl/fl Pdgf-Cre-ER mice). These results indicate that proteasome function is critical for thrombopoiesis, and suggest inhibition of RhoA signaling as a potential strategy to treat thrombocytopenia in bortezomib-treated multiple myeloma patients. PMID:25061876

  9. Molecular mechanisms of proteasome plasticity in aging.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Karl A; Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel A

    2010-02-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays a crucial role in regulation of intracellular protein turnover. Proteasome, the central protease of the pathway, encompasses multi-subunit assemblies sharing a common catalytic core supplemented by regulatory modules and localizing to different subcellular compartments. To better comprehend age-related functions of the proteasome we surveyed content, composition and catalytic properties of the enzyme in cytosolic, microsomal and nuclear fractions obtained from mouse livers subjected to organismal aging. We found that during aging subunit composition and subcellular distribution of proteasomes changed without substantial alterations in the total level of core complexes. We observed that the general decline in proteasomes functions was limited to nuclear and cytosolic compartments. Surprisingly, the observed changes in activity and specificity were linked to the amount of the activator module and distinct composition of the catalytic subunits. In contrast, activity, specificity and composition of the microsomal-associated proteasomes remained mostly unaffected by aging; however their relative contribution to the total activity was substantially elevated. Unexpectedly, the nuclear proteasomes were affected most profoundly by aging possibly triggering significant changes in cellular signaling and transcription. Collectively, the data indicate an age-related refocusing of proteasome from the compartment-specific functions towards general protein maintenance.

  10. p53 mutations promote proteasomal activity.

    PubMed

    Oren, Moshe; Kotler, Eran

    2016-07-27

    p53 mutations occur very frequently in human cancer. Besides abrogating the tumour suppressive functions of wild-type p53, many of those mutations also acquire oncogenic gain-of-function activities. Augmentation of proteasome activity is now reported as a common gain-of-function mechanism shared by different p53 mutants, which promotes cancer resistance to proteasome inhibitors.

  11. Colorectal Carcinogenesis, Radiation Quality, and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; Fornace, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    Adult colorectal epithelium undergoes continuous renewal and maintains homeostatic balance through regulated cellular proliferation, differentiation, and migration. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway involving the transcriptional co-activator β-catenin is important for colorectal development and normal epithelial maintenance, and deregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Colorectal carcinogenesis has been linked to radiation exposure, and radiation has been demonstrated to alter Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as well as the proteasomal pathway involved in the degradation of the signaling components and thus regulation of β-catenin. The current review discusses recent progresses in our understanding of colorectal carcinogenesis in relation to different types of radiation and roles that radiation quality plays in deregulating β-catenin and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) for colorectal cancer initiation and progression. PMID:26819641

  12. Unique nonstructural proteins of Pneumonia Virus of Mice (PVM) promote degradation of interferon (IFN) pathway components and IFN-stimulated gene proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Jayeeta; Barik, Sailen

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia Virus of Mice (PVM) is the only virus that shares the Pneumovirus genus of the Paramyxoviridae family with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV). A deadly mouse pathogen, PVM has the potential to serve as a robust animal model of RSV infection, since human RSV does not fully replicate the human pathology in mice. Like RSV, PVM also encodes two nonstructural proteins that have been implicated to suppress the IFN pathway, but surprisingly, they exhibit no sequence similarity with their RSV equivalents. The molecular mechanism of PVM NS function, therefore, remains unknown. Here, we show that recombinant PVM NS proteins degrade the mouse counterparts of the IFN pathway components. Proteasomal degradation appears to be mediated by ubiquitination promoted by PVM NS proteins. Interestingly, NS proteins of PVM lowered the levels of several ISG (IFN-stimulated gene) proteins as well. These results provide a molecular foundation for the mechanisms by which PVM efficiently subverts the IFN response of the murine cell. They also reveal that in spite of their high sequence dissimilarity, the two pneumoviral NS proteins are functionally and mechanistically similar. PMID:27905537

  13. Unique nonstructural proteins of Pneumonia Virus of Mice (PVM) promote degradation of interferon (IFN) pathway components and IFN-stimulated gene proteins.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Jayeeta; Barik, Sailen

    2016-12-01

    Pneumonia Virus of Mice (PVM) is the only virus that shares the Pneumovirus genus of the Paramyxoviridae family with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV). A deadly mouse pathogen, PVM has the potential to serve as a robust animal model of RSV infection, since human RSV does not fully replicate the human pathology in mice. Like RSV, PVM also encodes two nonstructural proteins that have been implicated to suppress the IFN pathway, but surprisingly, they exhibit no sequence similarity with their RSV equivalents. The molecular mechanism of PVM NS function, therefore, remains unknown. Here, we show that recombinant PVM NS proteins degrade the mouse counterparts of the IFN pathway components. Proteasomal degradation appears to be mediated by ubiquitination promoted by PVM NS proteins. Interestingly, NS proteins of PVM lowered the levels of several ISG (IFN-stimulated gene) proteins as well. These results provide a molecular foundation for the mechanisms by which PVM efficiently subverts the IFN response of the murine cell. They also reveal that in spite of their high sequence dissimilarity, the two pneumoviral NS proteins are functionally and mechanistically similar.

  14. Soluble methane monooxygenase component B gene probe for identification of methanotrophs that rapidly degrade trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Tsien, H C; Hanson, R S

    1992-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphisms, Western blot (immunoblot) analysis, and fluorescence-labelled signature probes were used for the characterization of methanotrophic bacteria as well as for the identification of methanotrophs which contained the soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) gene and were able to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE). The gene encoding a soluble MMO component B protein from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b was cloned. It contained a 2.2-kb EcoRI fragment. With this cloned component B gene as probe, methanotroph types I, II, and X and environmental and bioreactor samples were screened for the presence of the gene encoding soluble MMO. Fragments produced by digestion of DNA with rare cutting restriction endonucleases were separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and transferred to Zeta-Probe membrane (Bio-Rad) for Southern blot analysis. Samples were also analyzed for the presence of soluble MMO by Western blot analysis and the ability to degrade TCE. The physiological groups of methanotrophs in each sample were determined by hybridizing cells with fluorescence-labelled signature probes. Among twelve pure or mixed cultures, DNA fragments of seven methanotrophs hybridized with the soluble MMO B gene probe. When grown in media with limited copper, all of these bacteria degraded TCE. All of them are type II methanotrophs. The soluble MMO component B gene of the type X methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath, did not hybridize to the M. trichosporium OB3b soluble MMO component B gene probe, although M. capsulatus Bath also produces a soluble MMO. Images PMID:1349468

  15. A two-component system regulates gene expression of the type IX secretion component proteins via an ECF sigma factor

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, Tomoko; Yukitake, Hideharu; Naito, Mariko; Sato, Keiko; Kikuchi, Yuichiro; Kondo, Yoshio; Shoji, Mikio; Nakayama, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis secretes potent pathogenic proteases, gingipains, via the type IX secretion system (T9SS). This system comprises at least 11 components; however, the regulatory mechanism of their expression has not yet been elucidated. Here, we found that the PorY (PGN_2001)-PorX (PGN_1019)-SigP (PGN_0274) cascade is involved in the regulation of T9SS. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis revealed a direct interaction between a recombinant PorY (rPorY) and a recombinant PorX (rPorX). rPorY autophosphorylated and transferred a phosphoryl group to rPorX in the presence of Mn2+. These results demonstrate that PorX and PorY act as a response regulator and a histidine kinase, respectively, of a two component system (TCS), although they are separately encoded on the chromosome. T9SS component-encoding genes were down-regulated in a mutant deficient in a putative extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor, PGN_0274 (SigP), similar to the porX mutant. Electrophoretic gel shift assays showed that rSigP bound to the putative promoter regions of T9SS component-encoding genes. The SigP protein was lacking in the porX mutant. Co-immunoprecipitation and SPR analysis revealed the direct interaction between SigP and PorX. Together, these results indicate that the PorXY TCS regulates T9SS-mediated protein secretion via the SigP ECF sigma factor. PMID:26996145

  16. Compensatory role of the Nrf2-ARE pathway against paraquat toxicity: Relevance of 26S proteasome activity.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Matsushima, Sayaka; Yamamoto, Takamori; Takada-Takatori, Yuki; Akaike, Akinori; Kume, Toshiaki

    2015-11-01

    Oxidative stress and the ubiquitin-proteasome system play a key role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. Although the herbicide paraquat is an environmental factor that is involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease, the role of 26S proteasome in paraquat toxicity remains to be determined. Using PC12 cells overexpressing a fluorescent protein fused to the proteasome degradation signal, we report here that paraquat yielded an inhibitory effect on 26S proteasome activity without an obvious decline in 20S proteasome activity. Relative low concentrations of proteasome inhibitors caused the accumulation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which is targeted to the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and activated the antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent transcription. Paraquat also upregulated the protein level of Nrf2 without increased expression of Nrf2 mRNA, and activated the Nrf2-ARE pathway. Consequently, paraquat induced expression of Nrf2-dependent ARE-driven genes, such as γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, catalase, and hemeoxygenase-1. Knockdown of Nrf2 or inhibition of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase and catalase exacerbated paraquat-induced toxicity, whereas suppression of hemeoxygenase-1 did not. These data indicate that the compensatory activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway via inhibition of 26S proteasome serves as part of a cellular defense mechanism to protect against paraquat toxicity.

  17. Autophagic degradation of the 26S proteasome is mediated by the dual ATG8/ubiquitin receptor RPN10 in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES

    Marshall, Richard S.; Li, Faqiang; Gemperline, David C.; ...

    2015-05-21

    Autophagic turnover of intracellular constituents is critical for cellular housekeeping, nutrient recycling, and various aspects of growth and development in eukaryotes. In this paper, we show that autophagy impacts the other major degradative route involving the ubiquitin-proteasome system by eliminating 26S proteasomes, a process we termed proteaphagy. Using Arabidopsis proteasomes tagged with GFP, we observed their deposition into vacuoles via a route requiring components of the autophagy machinery. This transport can be initiated separately by nitrogen starvation and chemical or genetic inhibition of the proteasome, implying distinct induction mechanisms. Proteasome inhibition stimulates comprehensive ubiquitylation of the complex, with the ensuingmore » proteaphagy requiring the proteasome subunit RPN10, which can simultaneously bind both ATG8 and ubiquitin. Finally and collectively, we propose that Arabidopsis RPN10 acts as a selective autophagy receptor that targets inactive 26S proteasomes by concurrent interactions with ubiquitylated proteasome subunits/targets and lipidated ATG8 lining the enveloping autophagic membranes.« less

  18. Copper(II) ions affect the gating dynamics of the 20S proteasome: a molecular and in cell study

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Anna Maria; Monaco, Irene; Attanasio, Francesco; Lanza, Valeria; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Tomasello, Marianna Flora; Cunsolo, Alessandra; Rizzarelli, Enrico; De Luigi, Ada; Salmona, Mario; Milardi, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Due to their altered metabolism cancer cells are more sensitive to proteasome inhibition or changes of copper levels than normal cells. Thus, the development of copper complexes endowed with proteasome inhibition features has emerged as a promising anticancer strategy. However, limited information is available about the exact mechanism by which copper inhibits proteasome. Here we show that Cu(II) ions simultaneously inhibit the three peptidase activities of isolated 20S proteasomes with potencies (IC50) in the micromolar range. Cu(II) ions, in cell-free conditions, neither catalyze red-ox reactions nor disrupt the assembly of the 20S proteasome but, rather, promote conformational changes associated to impaired channel gating. Notably, HeLa cells grown in a Cu(II)-supplemented medium exhibit decreased proteasome activity. This effect, however, was attenuated in the presence of an antioxidant. Our results suggest that if, on one hand, Cu(II)-inhibited 20S activities may be associated to conformational changes that favor the closed state of the core particle, on the other hand the complex effect induced by Cu(II) ions in cancer cells is the result of several concurring events including ROS-mediated proteasome flooding, and disassembly of the 26S proteasome into its 20S and 19S components. PMID:27633879

  19. A three component latent class model for robust semiparametric gene discovery.

    PubMed

    Alfo', Marco; Farcomeni, Alessio; Tardella, Luca

    2011-01-01

    We propose a robust model for discovering differentially expressed genes which directly incorporates biological significance, i.e., effect dimension. Using the so-called c-fold rule, we transform the expressions into a nominal observed random variable with three categories: below a fixed lower threshold, above a fixed upper threshold or within the two thresholds. Gene expression data is then transformed into a nominal variable with three levels possibly originated by three different distributions corresponding to under expressed, not differential, and over expressed genes. This leads to a statistical model for a 3-component mixture of trinomial distributions with suitable constraints on the parameter space. In order to obtain the MLE estimates, we show how to implement a constrained EM algorithm with a latent label for the corresponding component of each gene. Different strategies for a statistically significant gene discovery are discussed and compared. We illustrate the method on a little simulation study and a real dataset on multiple sclerosis.

  20. Application of Euclidean distance measurement and principal component analysis for gene identification.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Antara; Barman, Soma

    2016-06-01

    Gene systems are extremely complex, heterogeneous, and noisy in nature. Many statistical tools which are used to extract relevant feature from genes provide fuzzy and ambiguous information. High-dimensional gene expression database available in public domain usually contains thousands of genes. Efficient prediction method is demanding nowadays for accurate identification of such database. Euclidean distance measurement and principal component analysis methods are applied on such databases to identify the genes. In both methods, prediction algorithm is based on homology search approach. Digital Signal Processing technique along with statistical method is used for analysis of genes in both cases. A two-level decision logic is used for gene classification as healthy or cancerous. This binary logic minimizes the prediction error and improves prediction accuracy. Superiority of the method is judged by receiver operating characteristic curve.

  1. Dp71 is regulated by phosphorylation and ubiquitin-proteasome system in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji; Itoh, Kyoko

    2017-10-21

    The Dystrophin (Dp) gene is responsible for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is characterized by progressive muscular degeneration and variable degrees of cognitive impairment. Although Dp71 is the most abundant among the Dp isoforms in the brain, the regulatory mechanisms of the related expression levels have not been elucidated. In this study, we found that the constitutive expression levels of Dp71 in PC12 cells were sensitive to proteasomal inhibition. The ectopic expression of FLAG-tagged ubiquitin revealed that Dp71 was ubiquitinated intracellularly. Interestingly, proteasomal inhibition was accompanied by a posttranslational accumulation of modified Dp71, which was restored by protein phosphatase treatment in vitro, indicating that phosphorylation is responsible for the modification and affects the proteasome-dependent degradation of Dp71. Proteasomal activity-sensitive phosphorylated Dp71 is closely associated with syntrophin, a well-known binding partner of Dp71, and syntrophin is also regulated by proteasomal activity in a similar way to Dp71, suggesting that the posttranslational regulatory machinery for Dp71 level is coupled with Dp71-syntrophin molecular complex. Taken together, our results indicated that the expression levels of Dp71 are posttranslationally regulated by the phosphorylation-ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway, which may indicate the presence of regulatory mechanisms underlying the proteostasis of both Dp and its molecular complex, which may lead to better therapeutic approaches for the treatment of Dp-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of temperature adaptation on the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in notothenioid fishes.

    PubMed

    Todgham, Anne E; Crombie, Timothy A; Hofmann, Gretchen E

    2017-02-01

    There is an accumulating body of evidence suggesting that the sub-zero Antarctic marine environment places physiological constraints on protein homeostasis. Levels of ubiquitin (Ub)-conjugated proteins, 20S proteasome activity and mRNA expression of many proteins involved in both the Ub tagging of damaged proteins as well as the different complexes of the 26S proteasome were measured to examine whether there is thermal compensation of the Ub-proteasome pathway in Antarctic fishes to better understand the efficiency of the protein degradation machinery in polar species. Both Antarctic (Trematomus bernacchii, Pagothenia borchgrevinki) and non-Antarctic (Notothenia angustata, Bovichtus variegatus) notothenioids were included in this study to investigate the mechanisms of cold adaptation of this pathway in polar species. Overall, there were significant differences in the levels of Ub-conjugated proteins between the Antarctic notothenioids and B. variegatus, with N. angustata possessing levels very similar to those of the Antarctic fishes. Proteasome activity in the gills of Antarctic fishes demonstrated a high degree of temperature compensation such that activity levels were similar to activities measured in their temperate relatives at ecologically relevant temperatures. A similar level of thermal compensation of proteasome activity was not present in the liver of two Antarctic fishes. Higher gill proteasome activity is likely due in part to higher cellular levels of proteins involved in the Ub-proteasome pathway, as evidenced by high mRNA expression of relevant genes. Reduced activity of the Ub-proteasome pathway does not appear to be the mechanism responsible for elevated levels of denatured proteins in Antarctic fishes, at least in the gills.

  3. Caspase activation inhibits proteasome function during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Ming; Butterworth, Michael; MacFarlane, Marion; Dubiel, Wolfgang; Ciechanover, Aaron; Cohen, Gerald M

    2004-04-09

    The ubiquitin/proteasome system regulates protein turnover by degrading polyubiquitinated proteins. To date, all studies on the relationship of apoptosis and the proteasome have emphasized the key role of the proteasome in the regulation of apoptosis, by virtue of its ability to degrade regulatory molecules involved in apoptosis. We now demonstrate how induction of apoptosis may regulate the activity of the proteasome. During apoptosis, caspase activation results in the cleavage of three specific subunits of the 19S regulatory complex of the proteasome: S6' (Rpt5) and S5a (Rpn10), whose role is to recognize polyubiquitinated substrates of the proteasome, and S1 (Rpn2), which with S5a and S2 (Rpn1) holds together the lid and base of the 19S regulatory complex. This caspase-mediated cleavage inhibits the proteasomal degradation of ubiquitin-dependent and -independent cellular substrates, including proapoptotic molecules such as Smac, so facilitating the execution of the apoptotic program by providing a feed-forward amplification loop.

  4. Proteasome functional insufficiency in cardiac pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Zheng, Hanqiao; Su, Huabo; Powell, Saul R.

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the degradation of most cellular proteins. Alterations in cardiac UPS, including changes in the degradation of regulatory proteins and proteasome functional insufficiency, are observed in many forms of heart disease and have been shown to play an important role in cardiac pathogenesis. In the past several years, remarkable progress in understanding the mechanisms that regulate UPS-mediated protein degradation has been achieved. A transgenic mouse model of benign enhancement of cardiac proteasome proteolytic function has been created. This has led to the first demonstration of the necessity of proteasome functional insufficiency in the genesis of important pathological processes. Cardiomyocyte-restricted enhancement of proteasome proteolytic function by overexpression of proteasome activator 28α protects against cardiac proteinopathy and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Additionally, exciting advances have recently been achieved in the search for a pharmacological agent to activate the proteasome. These breakthroughs are expected to serve as an impetus to further investigation into the involvement of UPS dysfunction in molecular pathogenesis and to the development of new therapeutic strategies for combating heart disease. An interplay between the UPS and macroautophagy is increasingly suggested in noncardiac systems but is not well understood in the cardiac system. Further investigations into the interplay are expected to provide a more comprehensive picture of cardiac protein quality control and degradation. PMID:21949118

  5. The Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway (UPP) in the regulation of cell cycle control and DNA damage repair and its implication in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yaqin; Chen, Cai; Pan, Junru; Xu, Junfa; Zhou, Zhi-Guang; Wang, Cong-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Accumulated evidence supports that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) plays a crucial role in protein metabolism implicated in the regulation of many biological processes such as cell cycle control, DNA damage response, apoptosis, and so on. Therefore, alterations for the ubiquitin proteasome signaling or functional impairments for the ubiquitin proteasome components are involved in the etiology of many diseases, particularly in cancer development. In this minireview, we first give a brief outline for the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, we then discuss with focus for the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in the regulation of cell cycle control and DNA damage response, the relevance for the altered regulation of these signaling pathways in tumorigenesis is also reviewed. We finally assess and summarize the advancement for targeting the ubiquitin proteasome pathway in cancer therapy. A better understanding of the biological functions underlying ubiquitin regulatory mechanisms would provide us a wider prospective on cancer treatment.

  6. Breast cancer cells: Modulation by melatonin and the ubiquitin-proteasome system--a review.

    PubMed

    Vriend, Jerry; Reiter, Russel J

    2015-12-05

    Melatonin inhibits human breast cancer cells stimulated with estrogen. This antiproliferative action depends on the presence of the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in the human MCF-7 cell line and is strictly dose-dependent. Since researchers concerned with melatonin and breast cancer have not considered the relevance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system to this research in this review we do so. The fact that the first breast cancer susceptibility gene to be identified, Brca1, functions as a ubiquitin ligase indicates that the ubiquitin-proteasome system has a role in regulating susceptibility to breast cancer. While mutations of this gene increase the incidence of breast cancer, the wild type gene suppresses estrogen-dependent transcriptional events relying on the estrogen receptor ERα. Three other ubiquitin ligases, SCF(Skp2), E6AP and APC, interact directly with ERα at the ERE and AP-1 promoters of ERα target genes. Melatonin, like proteasome inhibitors, decreases estrogen-induced gene transcription. Indeed, it has been reported that melatonin specifically inhibits estrogen-induced transcription mediated by ERα at the ERE and AP1 gene promoters. Herein, we present a model in which the inhibitory action of melatonin on MCF-7 cells is mediated, directly or indirectly, by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. In this model ERα, apoptotic proteins, and cell cycle proteins, all influenced by melatonin, are substrates of key ubiquitin ligases including SCF(Skp2), E6AP, and SCF(B-TrCP). Since dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is a risk factor for breast cancer, this model provides a context in which to test the clinical potential, and limitations, of melatonin and proteasome inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The complete spectrum of yeast chromosome instability genes identifies candidate CIN cancer genes and functional roles for ASTRA complex components.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Peter C; Bloom, Michelle S; Solanki-Patil, Tejomayee; Smith, Stephanie; Sipahimalani, Payal; Li, Zhijian; Kofoed, Megan; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Myung, Kyungjae; Hieter, Philip

    2011-04-01

    Chromosome instability (CIN) is observed in most solid tumors and is linked to somatic mutations in genome integrity maintenance genes. The spectrum of mutations that cause CIN is only partly known and it is not possible to predict a priori all pathways whose disruption might lead to CIN. To address this issue, we generated a catalogue of CIN genes and pathways by screening ∼ 2,000 reduction-of-function alleles for 90% of essential genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Integrating this with published CIN phenotypes for other yeast genes generated a systematic CIN gene dataset comprised of 692 genes. Enriched gene ontology terms defined cellular CIN pathways that, together with sequence orthologs, created a list of human CIN candidate genes, which we cross-referenced to published somatic mutation databases revealing hundreds of mutated CIN candidate genes. Characterization of some poorly characterized CIN genes revealed short telomeres in mutants of the ASTRA/TTT components TTI1 and ASA1. High-throughput phenotypic profiling links ASA1 to TTT (Tel2-Tti1-Tti2) complex function and to TORC1 signaling via Tor1p stability, consistent with the role of TTT in PI3-kinase related kinase biogenesis. The comprehensive CIN gene list presented here in principle comprises all conserved eukaryotic genome integrity pathways. Deriving human CIN candidate genes from the list allows direct cross-referencing with tumor mutational data and thus candidate mutations potentially driving CIN in tumors. Overall, the CIN gene spectrum reveals new chromosome biology and will help us to understand CIN phenotypes in human disease.

  8. The Complete Spectrum of Yeast Chromosome Instability Genes Identifies Candidate CIN Cancer Genes and Functional Roles for ASTRA Complex Components

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, Peter C.; Bloom, Michelle S.; Solanki-Patil, Tejomayee; Smith, Stephanie; Sipahimalani, Payal; Li, Zhijian; Kofoed, Megan; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Myung, Kyungjae; Hieter, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome instability (CIN) is observed in most solid tumors and is linked to somatic mutations in genome integrity maintenance genes. The spectrum of mutations that cause CIN is only partly known and it is not possible to predict a priori all pathways whose disruption might lead to CIN. To address this issue, we generated a catalogue of CIN genes and pathways by screening ∼2,000 reduction-of-function alleles for 90% of essential genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Integrating this with published CIN phenotypes for other yeast genes generated a systematic CIN gene dataset comprised of 692 genes. Enriched gene ontology terms defined cellular CIN pathways that, together with sequence orthologs, created a list of human CIN candidate genes, which we cross-referenced to published somatic mutation databases revealing hundreds of mutated CIN candidate genes. Characterization of some poorly characterized CIN genes revealed short telomeres in mutants of the ASTRA/TTT components TTI1 and ASA1. High-throughput phenotypic profiling links ASA1 to TTT (Tel2-Tti1-Tti2) complex function and to TORC1 signaling via Tor1p stability, consistent with the role of TTT in PI3-kinase related kinase biogenesis. The comprehensive CIN gene list presented here in principle comprises all conserved eukaryotic genome integrity pathways. Deriving human CIN candidate genes from the list allows direct cross-referencing with tumor mutational data and thus candidate mutations potentially driving CIN in tumors. Overall, the CIN gene spectrum reveals new chromosome biology and will help us to understand CIN phenotypes in human disease. PMID:21552543

  9. Compromising the 19S proteasome complex protects cells from reduced flux through the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Peter; Mendillo, Marc L; Zhao, Jinghui; Carette, Jan E; Merrill, Parker H; Cikes, Domagoj; Varadarajan, Malini; van Diemen, Ferdy R; Penninger, Josef M; Goldberg, Alfred L; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Santagata, Sandro; Lindquist, Susan

    2015-09-01

    Proteasomes are central regulators of protein homeostasis in eukaryotes. Proteasome function is vulnerable to environmental insults, cellular protein imbalance and targeted pharmaceuticals. Yet, mechanisms that cells deploy to counteract inhibition of this central regulator are little understood. To find such mechanisms, we reduced flux through the proteasome to the point of toxicity with specific inhibitors and performed genome-wide screens for mutations that allowed cells to survive. Counter to expectation, reducing expression of individual subunits of the proteasome's 19S regulatory complex increased survival. Strong 19S reduction was cytotoxic but modest reduction protected cells from inhibitors. Protection was accompanied by an increased ratio of 20S to 26S proteasomes, preservation of protein degradation capacity and reduced proteotoxic stress. While compromise of 19S function can have a fitness cost under basal conditions, it provided a powerful survival advantage when proteasome function was impaired. This means of rebalancing proteostasis is conserved from yeast to humans.

  10. Autoregulation of the 26S proteasome by in situ ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Andrew D.; MacFadden, Andrea; Wu, Zhiping; Peng, Junmin; Liu, Chang-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome degrades ubiquitinated proteins, and proteasomal degradation controls various cellular events. Here we report that the human 26S proteasome is ubiquitinated, by which the ubiquitin receptors Adrm1 and S5a, the ATPase subunit Rpt5, and the deubiquitinating enzyme Uch37 are ubiquitinated in situ by proteasome-associating ubiquitination enzymes. Ubiquitination of these subunits significantly impairs the 26S proteasome's ability to bind, deubiquitinate, and degrade ubiquitinated proteins. Moreover, ubiquitination of the 26S proteasome can be antagonized by proteasome-residing deubiquitinating enzymes, by the binding of polyubiquitin chains, and by certain cellular stress, indicating that proteasome ubiquitination is dynamic and regulated in cells. We propose that in situ ubiquitination of the 26S proteasome regulates its activity, which could function to adjust proteasomal activity in response to the alteration of cellular ubiquitination levels. PMID:24743594

  11. Independent component analysis: mining microarray data for fundamental human gene expression modules

    PubMed Central

    Engreitz, Jesse M.; Daigle, Bernie J.; Marshall, Jonathan J.; Altman, Russ B.

    2010-01-01

    As public microarray repositories rapidly accumulate gene expression data, these resources contain increasingly valuable information about cellular processes in human biology. This presents a unique opportunity for intelligent data mining methods to extract information about the transcriptional modules underlying these biological processes. Modeling cellular gene expression as a combination of functional modules, we use independent component analysis (ICA) to derive 423 fundamental components of human biology from a 9,395-array compendium of heterogeneous expression data. Annotation using the Gene Ontology (GO) suggests that while some of these components represent known biological modules, others may describe biology not well characterized by existing manually-curated ontologies. In order to understand the biological functions represented by these modules, we investigate the mechanism of the preclinical anticancer drug parthenolide (PTL) by analyzing the differential expression of our fundamental components. Our method correctly identifies known pathways and predicts that N-glycan biosynthesis and T-cell receptor signaling may contribute to PTL response. The fundamental gene modules we describe have the potential to provide pathway-level insight into new gene expression datasets. PMID:20619355

  12. Fos family protein degradation by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Gomard, Tiphanie; Jariel-Encontre, Isabelle; Basbous, Jihane; Bossis, Guillaume; Moquet-Torcy, Gabriel; Mocquet-Torcy, Gabriel; Piechaczyk, Marc

    2008-10-01

    c-Fos proto-oncoprotein defines a family of closely related transcription factors (Fos proteins) also comprising Fra-1, Fra-2, FosB and DeltaFosB, the latter two proteins being generated by alternative splicing. Through the regulation of many genes, most of them still unidentified, they regulate major functions from the cell level up to the whole organism. Thus they are involved in the control of proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, as well as in the control of responses to stresses, and they play important roles in organogenesis, immune responses and control of cognitive functions, among others. Fos proteins are intrinsically unstable. We have studied how two of them, c-Fos and Fra-1, are degraded. Departing from the classical scenario where unstable key cell regulators are hydrolysed by the proteasome after polyubiquitination, we showed that the bulk of c-Fos and Fra-1 can be broken down independently of any prior ubiquitination. Certain conserved structural domains suggest that similar mechanisms may also apply to Fra-2 and FosB. Computer search indicates that certain motifs shared by the Fos proteins and putatively responsible for instability are found in no other protein, suggesting the existence of degradation mechanisms specific for this protein family. Under particular signalling conditions, others have shown that a part of cytoplasmic c-Fos requires ubiquitination for fast turnover. This poses the question of the multiplicity of degradation pathways that apply to proteins depending on their intracellular localization.

  13. Immunofluorescent localization of ubiquitin and proteasomes in nucleolar vacuoles of soybean root meristematic cells.

    PubMed

    Stępiński, D

    2012-05-30

    In this study, using the immunofluorescent method, the immunopositive signals to ubiquitin and proteasomes in nucleoli of root meristematic cells of soybean seedlings have been observed. In fact, those signals were present exclusively in nucleolar vacuoles. No signals were observed in the nucleolar territory out of the nucleolar vacuoles or in the nucleoli without vacuoles. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) may act within the nucleoli of plants with high metabolic activities and may provide an additional level of regulation of intracellular proteolysis via compartment-specific activities of their components. It is suggested that the presence of the UPS solely in vacuolated nucleoli serves as a mechanism that enhances the speed of ribosome subunit production in very actively transcribing nucleoli. On the other hand, nucleolar vacuoles in a cell/nucleus could play additional roles associated with temporary sequestration or storage of some cellular factors, including components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  14. Estimating exotic gene flow into native pine stands: zygotic vs. gametic components.

    PubMed

    Unger, G M; Vendramin, G G; Robledo-Arnuncio, J J

    2014-11-01

    Monitoring contemporary gene flow from widespread exotic plantations is becoming an important problem in forest conservation genetics. In plants, where both seed and pollen disperse, three components of exotic gene flow with potentially unequal consequences should be, but have not been, explicitly distinguished: zygotic, male gametic and female gametic. Building on a previous model for estimating contemporary rates of zygotic and male gametic gene flow among plant populations, we present here an approach that additionally estimates the third (female gametic) gene flow component, based on a combination of uni- and biparentally inherited markers. Using this method and a combined set of chloroplast and nuclear microsatellites, we estimate gene flow rates from exotic plantations into two Iberian relict stands of maritime pine (Pinus pinaster) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris). Results show neither zygotic nor female gametic gene flow but moderate (6-8%) male gametic introgression for both species, implying significant dispersal of pollen, but not of seeds, from exotic plantations into native stands shortly after introduced trees reached reproductive maturity. Numerical simulation results suggest that the model yields reasonably accurate estimates for our empirical data sets, especially for larger samples. We discuss conservation management implications of observed levels of exposure to nonlocal genes and identify research needs to determine potentially associated hazards. Our approach should be useful for plant ecologists and ecosystem managers interested in the vectors of contemporary genetic connectivity among discrete plant populations.

  15. The role of the proteasome in AML

    PubMed Central

    Csizmar, C M; Kim, D-H; Sachs, Z

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is deadly hematologic malignancy. Despite a well-characterized genetic and molecular landscape, targeted therapies for AML have failed to significantly improve clinical outcomes. Over the past decade, proteasome inhibition has been demonstrated to be an effective therapeutic strategy in several hematologic malignancies. Proteasome inhibitors, such as bortezomib and carfilzomib, have become mainstays of treatment for multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. In light of this success, there has been a surge of literature exploring both the role of the proteasome and the effects of proteasome inhibition in AML. Pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that proteasome inhibition disrupts proliferative cell signaling pathways, exhibits cytotoxic synergism with other chemotherapeutics and induces autophagy of cancer-related proteins. Meanwhile, clinical trials incorporating bortezomib into combination chemotherapy regimens have reported a range of responses in AML patients, with complete remission rates >80% in some cases. Taken together, this preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that inhibition of the proteasome may be efficacious in this disease. In an effort to focus further investigation into this area, these recent studies and their findings are reviewed here. PMID:27911437

  16. Inhibitors Selective for Mycobacterial Versus Human Proteasomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, G.; Li, D; Sorio de Carvalho, L; Deng, H; Tao, H; Vogt, G; Wu, K; Schneider, J; Chidawanyika, T; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Many anti-infectives inhibit the synthesis of bacterial proteins, but none selectively inhibits their degradation. Most anti-infectives kill replicating pathogens, but few preferentially kill pathogens that have been forced into a non-replicating state by conditions in the host. To explore these alternative approaches we sought selective inhibitors of the proteasome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Given that the proteasome structure is extensively conserved, it is not surprising that inhibitors of all chemical classes tested have blocked both eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteasomes, and no inhibitor has proved substantially more potent on proteasomes of pathogens than of their hosts. Here we show that certain oxathiazol-2-one compounds kill non-replicating M.?tuberculosis and act as selective suicide-substrate inhibitors of the M.?tuberculosis proteasome by cyclocarbonylating its active site threonine. Major conformational changes protect the inhibitor-enzyme intermediate from hydrolysis, allowing formation of an oxazolidin-2-one and preventing regeneration of active protease. Residues outside the active site whose hydrogen bonds stabilize the critical loop before and after it moves are extensively non-conserved. This may account for the ability of oxathiazol-2-one compounds to inhibit the mycobacterial proteasome potently and irreversibly while largely sparing the human homologue.

  17. Proteasomal inhibition after injury prevents fibrosis by modulating TGF-β(1) signalling.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Gökhan M; Budinger, G R Scott; Wu, Minghua; Lam, Anna P; Zirk, Aaron; Rivera, Stephanie; Urich, Daniela; Chiarella, Sergio E; Go, Leonard H T; Ghosh, Asish K; Selman, Moises; Pardo, Annie; Varga, John; Kamp, David W; Chandel, Navdeep S; Sznajder, Jacob Iasha; Jain, Manu

    2012-02-01

    The development of organ fibrosis after injury requires activation of transforming growth factor β(1) which regulates the transcription of profibrotic genes. The systemic administration of a proteasomal inhibitor has been reported to prevent the development of fibrosis in the liver, kidney and bone marrow. It is hypothesised that proteasomal inhibition would prevent lung and skin fibrosis after injury by inhibiting TGF-β(1)-mediated transcription. Bortezomib, a small molecule proteasome inhibitor in widespread clinical use, was administered to mice beginning 7 days after the intratracheal or intradermal administration of bleomycin and lung and skin fibrosis was measured after 21 or 40 days, respectively. To examine the mechanism of this protection, bortezomib was administered to primary normal lung fibroblasts and primary lung and skin fibroblasts obtained from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and scleroderma, respectively. Bortezomib promoted normal repair and prevented lung and skin fibrosis when administered beginning 7 days after the initiation of bleomycin. In primary human lung fibroblasts from normal individuals and patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and in skin fibroblasts from a patient with scleroderma, bortezomib inhibited TGF-β(1)-mediated target gene expression by inhibiting transcription induced by activated Smads. An increase in the abundance and activity of the nuclear hormone receptor PPARγ, a repressor of Smad-mediated transcription, contributed to this response. Proteasomal inhibition prevents lung and skin fibrosis after injury in part by increasing the abundance and activity of PPARγ. Proteasomal inhibition may offer a novel therapeutic alternative in patients with dysregulated tissue repair and fibrosis.

  18. Characterization of the proteasome interaction network using a QTAX-based tag-team strategy and protein interaction network analysis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Cortnie; Milenkovic, Tijana; Przulj, Natasa; Kaiser, Peter; Huang, Lan

    2008-09-09

    Quantitative analysis of tandem-affinity purified cross-linked (x) protein complexes (QTAX) is a powerful technique for the identification of protein interactions, including weak and/or transient components. Here, we apply a QTAX-based tag-team mass spectrometry strategy coupled with protein network analysis to acquire a comprehensive and detailed assessment of the protein interaction network of the yeast 26S proteasome. We have determined that the proteasome network is composed of at least 471 proteins, significantly more than the total number of proteins identified by previous reports using proteasome subunits as baits. Validation of the selected proteasome-interacting proteins by reverse copurification and immunoblotting experiments with and without cross-linking, further demonstrates the power of the QTAX strategy for capturing protein interactions of all natures. In addition, >80% of the identified interactions have been confirmed by existing data using protein network analysis. Moreover, evidence obtained through network analysis links the proteasome to protein complexes associated with diverse cellular functions. This work presents the most complete analysis of the proteasome interaction network to date, providing an inclusive set of physical interaction data consistent with physiological roles for the proteasome that have been suggested primarily through genetic analyses. Moreover, the methodology described here is a general proteomic tool for the comprehensive study of protein interaction networks.

  19. The Ubiquitin–Proteasome System of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Finley, Daniel; Ulrich, Helle D.; Sommer, Thomas; Kaiser, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Protein modifications provide cells with exquisite temporal and spatial control of protein function. Ubiquitin is among the most important modifiers, serving both to target hundreds of proteins for rapid degradation by the proteasome, and as a dynamic signaling agent that regulates the function of covalently bound proteins. The diverse effects of ubiquitylation reflect the assembly of structurally distinct ubiquitin chains on target proteins. The resulting ubiquitin code is interpreted by an extensive family of ubiquitin receptors. Here we review the components of this regulatory network and its effects throughout the cell. PMID:23028185

  20. Reactive nucleolar and Cajal body responses to proteasome inhibition in sensory ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Palanca, Ana; Casafont, Iñigo; Berciano, María T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2014-06-01

    The dysfunction of the ubiquitin proteasome system has been related to a broad array of neurodegenerative disorders in which the accumulation of misfolded protein aggregates causes proteotoxicity. The ability of proteasome inhibitors to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis has emerged as a powerful strategy for cancer therapy. Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor used as an antineoplastic drug, although its neurotoxicity frequently causes a severe sensory peripheral neuropathy. In this study we used a rat model of bortezomib treatment to study the nucleolar and Cajal body responses to the proteasome inhibition in sensory ganglion neurons that are major targets of bortezomib-induced neurotoxicity. Treatment with bortezomib induced dose-dependent dissociation of protein synthesis machinery (chromatolysis) and nuclear retention of poly(A) RNA granules resulting in neuronal dysfunction. However, as a compensatory response to the proteotoxic stress, both nucleoli and Cajal bodies exhibited reactive changes. These include an increase in the number and size of nucleoli, strong nucleolar incorporation of the RNA precursor 5'-fluorouridine, and increased expression of both 45S rRNA and genes encoding nucleolar proteins UBF, fibrillarin and B23. Taken together, these findings appear to reflect the activation of the nucleolar transcription in response to proteotoxic stress Furthermore, the number of Cajal bodies, a parameter related to transcriptional activity, increases upon proteasome inhibition. We propose that nucleoli and Cajal bodies are important targets in the signaling pathways that are activated by the proteotoxic stress response to proteasome inhibition. The coordinating activity of these two organelles in the production of snRNA, snoRNA and rRNA may contribute to neuronal survival after proteasome inhibition. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease.

  1. Regulation of the 26S proteasome by adenovirus E1A

    PubMed Central

    Turnell, Andrew S.; Grand, Roger J.A.; Gorbea, Carlos; Zhang, Xian; Wang, Wenlan; Mymryk, Joe S.; Gallimore, Phillip H.

    2000-01-01

    We have identified the N-terminus of adenovirus early region 1A (AdE1A) as a region that can regulate the 26S proteasome. Specifically, in vitro and in vivo co-precipitation studies have revealed that the 19S regulatory components of the proteasome, Sug1 (S8) and S4, bind through amino acids (aa) 4–25 of Ad5 E1A. In vivo expression of wild-type (wt) AdE1A, in contrast to the N-terminal AdE1A mutant that does not bind the proteasome, reduces ATPase activity associated with anti-S4 immunoprecipitates relative to mock-infected cells. This reduction in ATPase activity correlates positively with the ability of wt AdE1A, but not the N-terminal deletion mutant, to significantly reduce the ability of HPV16 E6 to target p53 for ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation. AdE1A/proteasomal complexes are present in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus, suggesting that AdE1A interferes with both nuclear and cytoplasmic proteasomal degradation. We have also demonstrated that wt AdE1A and the N-terminal AdE1A deletion mutant are substrates for proteasomal-mediated degradation. AdE1A degradation is not, however, mediated through ubiquitylation, but is regulated through phosphorylation of residues within a C-terminal PEST region (aa 224–238). PMID:10970867

  2. Precise assembly and regulation of 26S proteasome and correlation between proteasome dysfunction and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eunju; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) often involve the formation of abnormal and toxic protein aggregates, which are thought to be the primary factor in ND occurrence and progression. Aged neurons exhibit marked increases in aggregated protein levels, which can lead to increased cell death in specific brain regions. As no specific drugs/therapies for treating the symptoms or/and progression of NDs are available, obtaining a complete understanding of the mechanism underlying the formation of protein aggregates is needed for designing a novel and efficient removal strategy. Intracellular proteolysis generally involves either the lysosomal or ubiquitin-proteasome system. In this review, we focus on the structure and assembly of the proteasome, proteasome-mediated protein degradation, and the multiple dynamic regulatory mechanisms governing proteasome activity. We also discuss the plausibility of the correlation between changes in proteasome activity and the occurrence of NDs. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 459-473] PMID:27312603

  3. SANS investigation of assembly state of proteasome activator 28 and the 20S proteasome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Masaaki; Kurimoto, Eiji; Sahashi, Hiroki; Sakata, Eri; Morimoto, Yukio; Itoh, Keiji; Mori, Kazuhiro; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Minami, Yasufumi; Kato, Koichi

    2010-10-01

    The state of proteasome activator 28 (PA28) and the formation of the proteasomal complex in an aqueous solution are investigated with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The most appropriate state of PA28, which well reproduces the observed SANS profile, is the dissociation equilibrium between dimer and monomer with dissociation degree of 0.5. In addition, it is revealed that the packing of PA28 in the dimer is same as that in a crystal. It is also revealed that the proteasomal complex in which two PA28s connects to both basal planes of the 20S proteasome is spontaneously formed in the mixture solution of PA28 and the 20S proteasome.

  4. Precise assembly and regulation of 26S proteasome and correlation between proteasome dysfunction and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Im, Eunju; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2016-09-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) often involve the formation of abnormal and toxic protein aggregates, which are thought to be the primary factor in ND occurrence and progression. Aged neurons exhibit marked increases in aggregated protein levels, which can lead to increased cell death in specific brain regions. As no specific drugs/therapies for treating the symptoms or/and progression of NDs are available, obtaining a complete understanding of the mechanism underlying the formation of protein aggregates is needed for designing a novel and efficient removal strategy. Intracellular proteolysis generally involves either the lysosomal or ubiquitin-proteasome system. In this review, we focus on the structure and assembly of the proteasome, proteasome-mediated protein degradation, and the multiple dynamic regulatory mechanisms governing proteasome activity. We also discuss the plausibility of the correlation between changes in proteasome activity and the occurrence of NDs. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 459-473].

  5. funRNA: a fungi-centered genomics platform for genes encoding key components of RNAi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is involved in genome defense as well as diverse cellular, developmental, and physiological processes. Key components of RNAi are Argonaute, Dicer, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), which have been functionally characterized mainly in model organisms. The key components are believed to exist throughout eukaryotes; however, there is no systematic platform for archiving and dissecting these important gene families. In addition, few fungi have been studied to date, limiting our understanding of RNAi in fungi. Here we present funRNA http://funrna.riceblast.snu.ac.kr/, a fungal kingdom-wide comparative genomics platform for putative genes encoding Argonaute, Dicer, and RdRP. Description To identify and archive genes encoding the abovementioned key components, protein domain profiles were determined from reference sequences obtained from UniProtKB/SwissProt. The domain profiles were searched using fungal, metazoan, and plant genomes, as well as bacterial and archaeal genomes. 1,163, 442, and 678 genes encoding Argonaute, Dicer, and RdRP, respectively, were predicted. Based on the identification results, active site variation of Argonaute, diversification of Dicer, and sequence analysis of RdRP were discussed in a fungus-oriented manner. funRNA provides results from diverse bioinformatics programs and job submission forms for BLAST, BLASTMatrix, and ClustalW. Furthermore, sequence collections created in funRNA are synced with several gene family analysis portals and databases, offering further analysis opportunities. Conclusions funRNA provides identification results from a broad taxonomic range and diverse analysis functions, and could be used in diverse comparative and evolutionary studies. It could serve as a versatile genomics workbench for key components of RNAi. PMID:25522231

  6. Analysis of Genes Involved in Biosynthesis of Coronafacic Acid, the Polyketide Component of the Phytotoxin Coronatine

    PubMed Central

    Rangaswamy, Vidhya; Mitchell, Robin; Ullrich, Matthias; Bender, Carol

    1998-01-01

    Coronafacic acid (CFA) is the polyketide component of coronatine (COR), a phytotoxin produced by the plant-pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. The genes involved in CFA biosynthesis are encoded by a single transcript which encompasses 19 kb of the COR gene cluster. In the present study, the nucleotide sequence was determined for a 4-kb region located at the 3′ end of the CFA biosynthetic gene cluster. Three open reading frames were identified and designated cfa8, cfa9, and tnp1; the predicted translation products of these genes showed relatedness to oxidoreductases, thioesterases, and transposases, respectively. The translational products of cfa8 and cfa9 were overproduced in Escherichia coli BL21; however, tnp1 was not translated in these experiments. Mutagenesis and complementation analysis indicated that cfa8 is required for the production of CFA and COR. Analysis of a cfa9 mutant indicated that this gene is dispensable for CFA and COR production but may increase the release of enzyme-bound products from the COR pathway; tnp1, however, had no obvious function in CFA or COR biosynthesis. A genetic strategy was used to produce CFA in a P. syringae strain which lacks the COR gene cluster; this approach will be useful in future studies designed to investigate biosynthetic products of the CFA gene cluster. PMID:9642184

  7. Arrangement of ribosomal genes in nucleolar domains revealed by detection of "Christmas tree" components.

    PubMed

    Mosgoeller, W; Schöfer, C; Steiner, M; Sylvester, J E; Hozák, P

    2001-12-01

    We investigated how the transcribing ribosomal genes ("Christmas trees") of HeLa cells are arranged in the nucleolus. Hypotonic conditions let the granular component disperse, while fibrillar centres and parts of the dense fibrillar component were resistant to low ionic strength conditions. Both remained within the former nucleolar territory. We used immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridisation at the light microscopic and ultrastructural level for the analysis of the internal nucleolar structures. The 5' ends of ribosomal RNA and ribosomal DNA sequences were found associated with the periphery of fibrillar centres. The hypotony-resistant parts of the dense fibrillar component did not contain the 5' end of the transcript or the gene. The downstream ribosomal DNA sequences were found in the nucleolar territory but not associated with any hypotony-resistant structures. The downstream ribosomal RNA revealed a similar distribution. We show that transcription initiation and transcript elongation occur in different molecular and structural environments. Transcription initiation is located at the periphery of fibrillar centres. Evidently the dense fibrillar component is non-homogeneous in molecular composition. Transcript elongation is continued in a part of the dense fibrillar component which is dissolved under intermediate hypotonic conditions. A structural model of nucleolar transcription is suggested.

  8. Antioxidants block proteasome inhibitor function in endometrial carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Llobet, David; Eritja, Nuria; Encinas, Mario; Sorolla, Anabel; Yeramian, Andree; Schoenenberger, Joan Antoni; Llombart-Cussac, Antonio; Marti, Rosa M; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dolcet, Xavier

    2008-02-01

    We have recently demonstrated that proteasome inhibitors can be effective in inducing apoptotic cell death in endometrial carcinoma cell lines and primary culture explants. Increasing evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species are responsible for proteasome inhibitor-induced cell killing. Antioxidants can thus block apoptosis (cell death) triggered by proteasome inhibition. Here, we have evaluated the effects of different antioxidants (edaravone and tiron) on endometrial carcinoma cells treated with aldehyde proteasome inhibitors (MG-132 or ALLN), the boronic acid-based proteasome inhibitor (bortezomib) and the epoxyketone, epoxomicin. We show that tiron specifically inhibited the cytotoxic effects of bortezomib, whereas edaravone inhibited cell death caused by aldehyde-based proteasome inhibitors. We have, however, found that edaravone completely inhibited accumulation of ubiquitin and proteasome activity decrease caused by MG-132 or ALLN, but not by bortezomib. Conversely, tiron inhibited the ubiquitin accumulation and proteasome activity decrease caused by bortezomib. These results suggest that edaravone and tiron rescue cells of proteasome inhibitors from cell death, by inhibiting blockade of proteasome caused by MG-132 and ALLN or bortezomib, respectively. We also tested other antioxidants, and we found that vitamin C inhibited bortezomib-induced cell death. Similar to tiron, vitamin C inhibited cell death by blocking the ability of bortezomib to inhibit the proteasome. Until now, all the antioxidants that blocked proteasome inhibitor-induced cell death also blocked the proteasome inhibitor mechanism of action.

  9. Evolution of Proteasome Regulators in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Fort, Philippe; Kajava, Andrey V.; Delsuc, Fredéric; Coux, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    All living organisms require protein degradation to terminate biological processes and remove damaged proteins. One such machine is the 20S proteasome, a specialized barrel-shaped and compartmentalized multicatalytic protease. The activity of the 20S proteasome generally requires the binding of regulators/proteasome activators (PAs), which control the entrance of substrates. These include the PA700 (19S complex), which assembles with the 20S and forms the 26S proteasome and allows the efficient degradation of proteins usually labeled by ubiquitin tags, PA200 and PA28, which are involved in proteolysis through ubiquitin-independent mechanisms and PI31, which was initially identified as a 20S inhibitor in vitro. Unlike 20S proteasome, shown to be present in all Eukaryotes and Archaea, the evolutionary history of PAs remained fragmentary. Here, we made a comprehensive survey and phylogenetic analyses of the four types of regulators in 17 clades covering most of the eukaryotic supergroups. We found remarkable conservation of each PA700 subunit in all eukaryotes, indicating that the current complex PA700 structure was already set up in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Also present in LECA, PA200, PA28, and PI31 showed a more contrasted evolutionary picture, because many lineages have subsequently lost one or two of them. The paramount conservation of PA700 composition in all eukaryotes and the dynamic evolution of PA200, PA28, and PI31 are discussed in the light of current knowledge on their physiological roles. PMID:25943340

  10. Evolution of proteasome regulators in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Fort, Philippe; Kajava, Andrey V; Delsuc, Fredéric; Coux, Olivier

    2015-05-04

    All living organisms require protein degradation to terminate biological processes and remove damaged proteins. One such machine is the 20S proteasome, a specialized barrel-shaped and compartmentalized multicatalytic protease. The activity of the 20S proteasome generally requires the binding of regulators/proteasome activators (PAs), which control the entrance of substrates. These include the PA700 (19S complex), which assembles with the 20S and forms the 26S proteasome and allows the efficient degradation of proteins usually labeled by ubiquitin tags, PA200 and PA28, which are involved in proteolysis through ubiquitin-independent mechanisms and PI31, which was initially identified as a 20S inhibitor in vitro. Unlike 20S proteasome, shown to be present in all Eukaryotes and Archaea, the evolutionary history of PAs remained fragmentary. Here, we made a comprehensive survey and phylogenetic analyses of the four types of regulators in 17 clades covering most of the eukaryotic supergroups. We found remarkable conservation of each PA700 subunit in all eukaryotes, indicating that the current complex PA700 structure was already set up in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Also present in LECA, PA200, PA28, and PI31 showed a more contrasted evolutionary picture, because many lineages have subsequently lost one or two of them. The paramount conservation of PA700 composition in all eukaryotes and the dynamic evolution of PA200, PA28, and PI31 are discussed in the light of current knowledge on their physiological roles.

  11. Proteasome activators, PA28γ and PA200, play indispensable roles in male fertility.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin; Haratake, Kousuke; Miyahara, Hatsumi; Chiba, Tomoki

    2016-03-22

    Protein degradation mediated by the proteasome is important for the protein homeostasis. Various proteasome activators, such as PA28 and PA200, regulate the proteasome function. Here we show double knockout (dKO) mice of Psme3 and Psme4 (genes for PA28γ and PA200), but not each single knockout mice, are completely infertile in male. The dKO sperms exhibited remarkable defects in motility, although most of them showed normal appearance in morphology. The proteasome activity of the mutant sperms decreased notably, and the sperms were strongly positive with ubiquitin staining. Quantitative analyses of proteins expressed in dKO sperms revealed up-regulation of several proteins involved in oxidative stress response. Furthermore, increased 8-OHdG staining was observed in dKO sperms head, suggesting defective response to oxidative damage. This report verified PA28γ and PA200 play indispensable roles in male fertility, and provides a novel insight into the role of proteasome activators in antioxidant response.

  12. Proteasome activators, PA28γ and PA200, play indispensable roles in male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin; Haratake, Kousuke; Miyahara, Hatsumi; Chiba, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Protein degradation mediated by the proteasome is important for the protein homeostasis. Various proteasome activators, such as PA28 and PA200, regulate the proteasome function. Here we show double knockout (dKO) mice of Psme3 and Psme4 (genes for PA28γ and PA200), but not each single knockout mice, are completely infertile in male. The dKO sperms exhibited remarkable defects in motility, although most of them showed normal appearance in morphology. The proteasome activity of the mutant sperms decreased notably, and the sperms were strongly positive with ubiquitin staining. Quantitative analyses of proteins expressed in dKO sperms revealed up-regulation of several proteins involved in oxidative stress response. Furthermore, increased 8-OHdG staining was observed in dKO sperms head, suggesting defective response to oxidative damage. This report verified PA28γ and PA200 play indispensable roles in male fertility, and provides a novel insight into the role of proteasome activators in antioxidant response. PMID:27003159

  13. Acetylation-mediated proteasomal degradation of core histones during DNA repair and spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Min-Xian; Pang, Ye; Liu, Cui Hua; Haratake, Kousuke; Du, Bo-Yu; Ji, Dan-Yang; Wang, Guang-Fei; Zhu, Qian-Qian; Song, Wei; Yu, Yadong; Zhang, Xiao-Xu; Huang, Hai-Tao; Miao, Shiying; Chen, Lian-Bin; Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liang, Ya-Nan; Liu, Shan; Cha, Hwangho; Yang, Dong; Zhai, Yonggong; Komatsu, Takuo; Tsuruta, Fuminori; Li, Haitao; Cao, Cheng; Li, Wei; Li, Guo-Hong; Cheng, Yifan; Chiba, Tomoki; Wang, Linfang; Goldberg, Alfred L; Shen, Yan; Qiu, Xiao-Bo

    2013-05-23

    Histone acetylation plays critical roles in chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, and epigenetic regulation of gene expression, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Proteasomes usually catalyze ATP- and polyubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. Here, we show that the proteasomes containing the activator PA200 catalyze the polyubiquitin-independent degradation of histones. Most proteasomes in mammalian testes ("spermatoproteasomes") contain a spermatid/sperm-specific α subunit α4 s/PSMA8 and/or the catalytic β subunits of immunoproteasomes in addition to PA200. Deletion of PA200 in mice abolishes acetylation-dependent degradation of somatic core histones during DNA double-strand breaks and delays core histone disappearance in elongated spermatids. Purified PA200 greatly promotes ATP-independent proteasomal degradation of the acetylated core histones, but not polyubiquitinated proteins. Furthermore, acetylation on histones is required for their binding to the bromodomain-like regions in PA200 and its yeast ortholog, Blm10. Thus, PA200/Blm10 specifically targets the core histones for acetylation-mediated degradation by proteasomes, providing mechanisms by which acetylation regulates histone degradation, DNA repair, and spermatogenesis.

  14. Acetylation-Mediated Proteasomal Degradation of Core Histones during DNA Repair and Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Min-Xian; Pang, Ye; Liu, Cui Hua; Haratake, Kousuke; Du, Bo-Yu; Ji, Dan-Yang; Wang, Guang-Fei; Zhu, Qian-Qian; Song, Wei; Yu, Yadong; Zhang, Xiao-Xu; Huang, Hai-Tao; Miao, Shiying; Chen, Lian-Bin; Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liang, Ya-Nan; Liu, Shan; Cha, Hwangho; Yang, Dong; Zhai, Yonggong; Komatsu, Takuo; Tsuruta, Fuminori; Li, Haitao; Cao, Cheng; Li, Wei; Li, Guo-Hong; Cheng, Yifan; Chiba, Tomoki; Wang, Linfang; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Shen, Yan; Qiu, Xiao-Bo

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone acetylation plays critical roles in chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, and epigenetic regulation of gene expression, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Proteasomes usually catalyze ATP- and polyubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. Here we show that the proteasomes containing the activator PA200 catalyze the polyubiquitin-independent degradation of histones. Most proteasomes in mammalian testes (“spermatoproteasomes”) contain a spermatid/sperm-specific α-subunit α4s/PSMA8 and/or the catalytic β-subunits of immunoproteasomes in addition to PA200. Deletion of PA200 in mice abolishes acetylation-dependent degradation of somatic core histones during DNA double-strand breaks, and delays core histone disappearance in elongated spermatids. Purified PA200 greatly promotes ATP-independent proteasomal degradation of the acetylated core histones, but not polyubiquitinated proteins. Furthermore, acetylation on histones is required for their binding to the bromodomain-like regions in PA200 and its yeast ortholog, Blm10. Thus, PA200/Blm10 specifically targets the core histones for acetylation-mediated degradation by proteasomes, providing mechanisms by which acetylation regulates histone degradation, DNA repair, and spermatogenesis. PMID:23706739

  15. New insights into the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in the regulation of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cui-Hua; Goldberg, Alfred L; Qiu, Xiao-Bo

    2007-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) is the major system responsible for degradation of intracellular proteins in eukaryotes. By controlling the levels of key proteins, it regulates almost all of the cellular activities, including cell cycle progression, DNA replication and repair, transcription, protein quality control, immune response, and apoptosis. UPP is composed of the ubiquitination system that marks proteins for degradation and the proteasome which degrades the ubiquitinated proteins. The 26S proteasome is a 2400 kDa complex consisting of more than 40 subunits. Following ubiquitination catalyzed by the ubiquitin activating enzyme (El), a ubiquitin-carrier protein (E2), and one of the cell's many ubiquitin-protein ligases (E3s), the protein substrates are targeted to the proteasome for degradation into small peptides. E3s regulate the degradation of protein substrates indirectly by determining both the specificity and timing of substrate ubiquitination, whereas the deubiquitinating enzymes can inhibit this process by releasing ubiquitin from substrates. In this review, we attempt to highlight the recent progress in research on UPP and its role in the regulation of apoptosis by focusing on several of its important components, including the ubiqutin ligase Nrdp 1, which regulates ErbB/EGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases, the ubiquitin-carrier protein BRUCE/Apollon (an Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein), and the novel proteasome subunit hRpnl3 (a binding site for the deubiquitinating enzyme, UCH37).

  16. Motor Neuron-specific Disruption of Proteasomes, but Not Autophagy, Replicates Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis*

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Urushitani, Makoto; Inoue, Haruhisa; Koike, Masato; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Komatsu, Masaaki; Tanaka, Keiji; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Misawa, Hidemi; Sakimura, Kenji; Ito, Hidefumi; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2012-01-01

    Evidence suggests that protein misfolding is crucially involved in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, controversy still exists regarding the involvement of proteasomes or autophagy in ALS due to previous conflicting results. Here, we show that impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, but not the autophagy-lysosome system in motor neurons replicates ALS in mice. Conditional knock-out mice of the proteasome subunit Rpt3 in a motor neuron-specific manner (Rpt3-CKO) showed locomotor dysfunction accompanied by progressive motor neuron loss and gliosis. Moreover, diverse ALS-linked proteins, including TAR DNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43), fused in sarcoma (FUS), ubiquilin 2, and optineurin were mislocalized or accumulated in motor neurons, together with other typical ALS hallmarks such as basophilic inclusion bodies. On the other hand, motor neuron-specific knock-out of Atg7, a crucial component for the induction of autophagy (Atg7-CKO), only resulted in cytosolic accumulation of ubiquitin and p62, and no TDP-43 or FUS pathologies or motor dysfunction was observed. These results strongly suggest that proteasomes, but not autophagy, fundamentally govern the development of ALS in which TDP-43 and FUS proteinopathy may play a crucial role. Enhancement of proteasome activity may be a promising strategy for the treatment of ALS. PMID:23095749

  17. Polyamines directly promote antizyme-mediated degradation of ornithine decarboxylase by the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Beenukumar, R. R.; Gödderz, Daniela; Palanimurugan, R.; Dohmen, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), a ubiquitin-independent substrate of the proteasome, is a homodimeric protein with a rate-limiting function in polyamine biosynthesis. Polyamines regulate ODC levels by a feedback mechanism mediated by ODC antizyme (OAZ). Higher cellular polyamine levels trigger the synthesis of OAZ and also inhibit its ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation. OAZ binds ODC monomers and targets them to the proteasome. Here, we report that polyamines, aside from their role in the control of OAZ synthesis and stability, directly enhance OAZ-mediated ODC degradation by the proteasome. Using a stable mutant of OAZ, we show that polyamines promote ODC degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells even when OAZ levels are not changed. Furthermore, polyamines stimulated the in vitro degradation of ODC by the proteasome in a reconstituted system using purified components. In these assays, spermine shows a greater effect than spermidine. By contrast, polyamines do not have any stimulatory effect on the degradation of ubiquitin-dependent substrates. PMID:28357293

  18. Repression of protein translation and mTOR signaling by proteasome inhibitor in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Volta, Viviana; Cho, Chi Hin; Wu, Ya Chun; Li, Hai Tao; Yu, Le; Li, Zhi Jie; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu

    2009-09-04

    Protein homeostasis relies on a balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is a major catabolic pathway for protein degradation. In this respect, proteasome inhibition has been used therapeutically for the treatment of cancer. Whether inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor can repress protein translation via a negative feedback mechanism, however, is unknown. In this study, proteasome inhibitor MG-132 lowered the proliferation of colon cancer cells HT-29 and SW1116. In this connection, MG-132 reduced the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) at Ser2448 and Ser2481 and the phosphorylation of its downstream targets 4E-BP1 and p70/p85 S6 kinases. Further analysis revealed that MG-132 inhibited protein translation as evidenced by the reductions of {sup 35}S-methionine incorporation and polysomes/80S ratio. Knockdown of raptor, a structural component of mTOR complex 1, mimicked the anti-proliferative effect of MG-132. To conclude, we demonstrate that the inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor represses mTOR signaling and protein translation in colon cancer cells.

  19. The intrinsically disordered Sem1 protein functions as a molecular tether during proteasome lid biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tomko, Robert J; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2014-02-06

    The intrinsically disordered yeast protein Sem1 (DSS1 in mammals) participates in multiple protein complexes, including the proteasome, but its role(s) within these complexes is uncertain. We report that Sem1 enforces the ordered incorporation of subunits Rpn3 and Rpn7 into the assembling proteasome lid. Sem1 uses conserved acidic segments separated by a flexible linker to grasp Rpn3 and Rpn7. The same segments are used for protein binding in other complexes, but in the proteasome lid they are uniquely deployed for recognizing separate polypeptides. We engineered TEV protease-cleavage sites into Sem1 to show that the tethering function of Sem1 is important for the biogenesis and integrity of the Rpn3-Sem1-Rpn7 ternary complex but becomes dispensable once the ternary complex incorporates into larger lid precursors. Thus, although Sem1 is a stoichiometric component of the mature proteasome, it has a distinct, chaperone-like function specific to early stages of proteasome assembly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Atypical ubiquitylation in yeast targets lysine-less Asi2 for proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Boban, Mirta; Ljungdahl, Per O; Foisner, Roland

    2015-01-23

    Proteins are typically targeted for proteasomal degradation by the attachment of a polyubiquitin chain to ϵ-amino groups of lysine residues. Non-lysine ubiquitylation of proteasomal substrates has been considered an atypical and rare event limited to complex eukaryotes. Here we report that a fully functional lysine-less mutant of an inner nuclear membrane protein in yeast, Asi2, is polyubiquitylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. Efficient degradation of lysine-free Asi2 requires E3-ligase Doa10 and E2 enzymes Ubc6 and Ubc7, components of the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway. Together, our data suggest that non-lysine ubiquitylation may be more prevalent than currently considered. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Efficient virus-induced gene silencing in plants using a modified geminivirus DNA1 component.

    PubMed

    Huang, Changjun; Xie, Yan; Zhou, Xueping

    2009-04-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is currently recognized as a powerful reverse genetics tool for application in functional genomics. DNA1, a satellite-like and single-stranded DNA molecule associated with begomoviruses (Family Geminiviridae), has been shown to replicate autonomously but requires the helper virus for its dissemination. We developed a VIGS vector based on the DNA1 component of tobacco curly shoot virus (TbCSV), a monopartite begomovirus, by inserting a multiple cloning site between the replication-associated protein open reading frame and the A-rich region for subsequent insertion of DNA fragments of genes targeted for silencing. When a host gene (sulphur, Su) or transgene (green fluorescent protein, GFP) was inserted into the modified DNA1 vector and co-agroinoculated with TbCSV, efficient silencing of the cognate gene was observed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. More interestingly, we demonstrated that this modified DNA1 could effectively suppress GFP in transgenic N. benthamiana or endogenous Su in tobacco plants when co-agroinoculated with tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV), another monopartite begomovirus that does not induce any viral symptoms. A gene-silencing system in Nicotiana spp., Solanum lycopersicum and Petunia hybrida plants was then established using TYLCCNV and the modified DNA1 vector. The system can be used to silence genes involved in meristem and flower development. The modified DNA1 vector was used to silence the AtTOM homologous genes (NbTOM1 and NbTOM3) in N. benthamiana. Silencing of NbTOM1 or NbTOM3 can reduce tobamovirus multiplication to a lower level, and silencing of both genes simultaneously can completely inhibit tobamovirus multiplication. Previous studies have reported that DNA1 is associated with both monopartite and bipartite begomoviruses, as well as curtoviruses. This vector system can therefore be applied for the study, analysis and discovery of gene function in a variety of important crop plants.

  2. Nrf2, a regulator of the proteasome, controls self-renewal and pluripotency in human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jiwon; Wang, Yidi; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Lalli, Matthew A.; Kosik, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2 (Nrf2) is a master transcription factor for cellular defense against endogenous and exogenous stresses by regulating expression of many antioxidant and detoxification genes. Here, we show that Nrf2 acts as a key pluripotency gene and a regulator of proteasome activity in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Nrf2 expression is highly enriched in hESCs and dramatically decreases upon differentiation. Nrf2 inhibition impairs both the self-renewal ability of hESCs and reestablishment of pluripotency during cellular reprogramming. Nrf2 activation can delay differentiation. During early hESC differentiation, Nrf2 closely co-localizes with OCT4 and NANOG. As an underlying mechanism, our data show that Nrf2 regulates proteasome activity in hESCs partially through proteasome maturation protein (POMP), a proteasome chaperone, which in turn controls the proliferation of self-renewing hESCs, three germ layer differentiation and cellular reprogramming. Even modest proteasome inhibition skews the balance of early differentiation toward mesendoderm at the expense of an ectodermal fate by decreasing the protein level of cyclin D1 and delaying the degradation of OCT4 and NANOG proteins. Taken together, our findings suggest a new potential link between environmental stress and stemness with Nrf2 and the proteasome coordinately positioned as key mediators. PMID:24895273

  3. Proteasome inhibitors induce peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor transactivation through RXR accumulation and a protein kinase C-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, W.-C.; Wu, H.-M.; Chi, K.-H.; Chang, Y.-H.; Lin, W.-W. . E-mail: wwl@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2005-03-10

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), a member of nuclear hormone receptors, forms a heterodimeric DNA binding complex with retinoid X receptor (RXR) and serves as a transcriptional regulator of gene expression. In this study, using luciferase assay of a reporter gene containing PPAR response element (PPRE), we found PPRE transactivity was additively induced by PPAR{gamma} activator (15dPGJ{sub 2}) and RXR activator (9-cis retinoic acid, 9-cis RA). Proteasome inhibitors MG132 and MG262 also stimulate PPRE transactivity in a concentration-dependent manner, and this effect is synergistic to 15dPGJ{sub 2} and 9-cis RA. PKC activation by 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ingenol 3,20-dibenzoate (IDB) also led to an increased PPRE activation, and this action was additive to PPAR{gamma} activators and 9-cis RA, but not to proteasome inhibitors. Results indicate that the PPAR{gamma} enhancing effect of proteasome inhibitors was attributed to redox-sensitive PKC activation. Western blot analysis showed that the protein level of RXR{alpha}, but not PPAR{gamma}, RXR{beta}, or PKC isoforms, was accumulated in the presence of proteasome inhibitors. Taken together, we conclude that proteasome inhibitors can upregulate PPRE activity through RXR{alpha} accumulation and a PKC-dependent pathway. The former is due to inhibition of RXR{alpha} degradation through ubiquitin-dependent proteasome system, while the latter is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.

  4. Nrf2, a regulator of the proteasome, controls self-renewal and pluripotency in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jiwon; Wang, Yidi; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Lalli, Matthew A; Kosik, Kenneth S

    2014-10-01

    Nuclear factor, erythroid 2-like 2 (Nrf2) is a master transcription factor for cellular defense against endogenous and exogenous stresses by regulating expression of many antioxidant and detoxification genes. Here, we show that Nrf2 acts as a key pluripotency gene and a regulator of proteasome activity in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Nrf2 expression is highly enriched in hESCs and dramatically decreases upon differentiation. Nrf2 inhibition impairs both the self-renewal ability of hESCs and re-establishment of pluripotency during cellular reprogramming. Nrf2 activation can delay differentiation. During early hESC differentiation, Nrf2 closely colocalizes with OCT4 and NANOG. As an underlying mechanism, our data show that Nrf2 regulates proteasome activity in hESCs partially through proteasome maturation protein (POMP), a proteasome chaperone, which in turn controls the proliferation of self-renewing hESCs, three germ layer differentiation and cellular reprogramming. Even modest proteasome inhibition skews the balance of early differentiation toward mesendoderm at the expense of an ectodermal fate by decreasing the protein level of cyclin D1 and delaying the degradation of OCT4 and NANOG proteins. Taken together, our findings suggest a new potential link between environmental stress and stemness with Nrf2 and the proteasome coordinately positioned as key mediators. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  5. Crystal structure of human proteasome assembly chaperone PAC4 involved in proteasome formation.

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, Eiji; Satoh, Tadashi; Ito, Yuri; Ishihara, Eri; Okamoto, Kenta; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Tanaka, Keiji; Kato, Koichi

    2017-05-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large protein complex, responsible for degradation of ubiquinated proteins in eukaryotic cells. Eukaryotic proteasome formation is a highly ordered process that is assisted by several assembly chaperones. The assembly of its catalytic 20S core particle depends on at least five proteasome-specific chaperones, i.e., proteasome-assembling chaperons 1-4 (PAC1-4) and proteasome maturation protein (POMP). The orthologues of yeast assembly chaperones have been structurally characterized, whereas most mammalian assembly chaperones are not. In the present study, we determined a crystal structure of human PAC4 at 1.90-Å resolution. Our crystallographic data identify a hydrophobic surface that is surrounded by charged residues. The hydrophobic surface is complementary to that of its binding partner, PAC3. The surface also exhibits charge complementarity with the proteasomal α4-5 subunits. This will provide insights into human proteasome-assembling chaperones as potential anticancer drug targets. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  6. Factors affecting drug and gene delivery: effects of interaction with blood components.

    PubMed

    Opanasopit, Praneet; Nishikawa, Makiya; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2002-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery systems have been used extensively to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic activities of a wide variety of drugs and genes. In this article, we summarize the factors determining the tissue disposition of delivery systems: the physicochemical and biological characteristics of the delivery system and the anatomic and physiological characteristics of the tissues. There are several modes of drug and gene targeting, ranging from passive to active targeting, and each of these can be achieved by optimizing the design of the delivery system to suit a specific aim. After entering the systemic circulation, either by an intravascular injection or through absorption from an administration site, however, a delivery system encounters a variety of blood components, including blood cells and a range of serum proteins. These components are by no means inert as far as interaction with the delivery system is concerned, and they can sometimes markedly effect its tissue disposition. The interaction with blood components is known to occur with particulate delivery systems, such as liposomes, or with cationic charge-mediated delivery systems for genes. In addition to these rather nonspecific ones, interactions via the targeting ligand of the delivery system can occur. We recently found that mannosylated carriers interact with serum mannan binding protein, greatly altering their tissue disposition in a number of ways that depend on the properties of the carriers involved.

  7. Arabidopsis ethylene-response gene ETR1: Similiarity of product to two-component regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Kwok, S.F.; Bleecker, A.B.; Meyerowitz, E.M. )

    1993-10-22

    Ethylene behaves as a hormone in plants, regulating such aspects of growth and development as fruit ripening, flower senescence, and abscission. Ethylene insensitivity is conferred by dominant mutations in the ETR1 gene early in the ethylene signal transduction pathway of Arabidopsis thaliana. The ETR1 gene was cloned by the method of chromosome walking. Each of the four known etr1 mutant alleles contains a missense mutation near the amino terminus of the predicted protein. Although the sequence of the amino-terminal half of the deduced ETR1 protein appears to be novel, the carboxyl-terminal half is similar in sequence to both components of the prokaryotic family of signal transducers known as the two-component systems. Thus, an early step in ethylene signal transduction in plants may involve transfer of phosphate as in prokaryotic two-component systems. The dominant etr1-1 mutant gene conferred ethylene insensitivity to wild-type Arabidopsis plants when introduced by transformation.

  8. Proteasome Inhibitors Block Development of Plasmodium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Gantt, Soren M.; Myung, Joon Mo; Briones, Marcelo R. S.; Li, Wei Dong; Corey, E. J.; Omura, Satoshi; Nussenzweig, Victor; Sinnis, Photini

    1998-01-01

    Proteasomes degrade most of the proteins inside eukaryotic cells, including transcription factors and regulators of cell cycle progression. Here we show that nanomolar concentrations of lactacystin, a specific irreversible inhibitor of the 20S proteasome, inhibit development of the exoerythrocytic and erythrocytic stages of the malaria parasite. Although lactacystin-treated Plasmodium berghei sporozoites are still invasive, their development into exoerythrocytic forms (EEF) is inhibited in vitro and in vivo. Erythrocytic schizogony of P. falciparum in vitro is also profoundly inhibited when drug treatment of the synchronized parasites is prior, but not subsequent, to the initiation of DNA synthesis, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of lactacystin is cell cycle specific. Lactacystin reduces P. berghei parasitemia in rats, but the therapeutic index is very low. Along with other studies showing that lactacystin inhibits stage-specific transformation in Trypanosoma and Entamoeba spp., these findings highlight the potential of proteasome inhibitors as drugs for the treatment of diseases caused by protozoan parasites. PMID:9756786

  9. Network component analysis provides quantitative insights on an Arabidopsis transcription factor-gene regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are models of molecule-gene interactions instrumental in the coordination of gene expression. Transcription factor (TF)-GRNs are an important subset of GRNs that characterize gene expression as the effect of TFs acting on their target genes. Although such networks can qualitatively summarize TF-gene interactions, it is highly desirable to quantitatively determine the strengths of the interactions in a TF-GRN as well as the magnitudes of TF activities. To our knowledge, such analysis is rare in plant biology. A computational methodology developed for this purpose is network component analysis (NCA), which has been used for studying large-scale microbial TF-GRNs to obtain nontrivial, mechanistic insights. In this work, we employed NCA to quantitatively analyze a plant TF-GRN important in floral development using available regulatory information from AGRIS, by processing previously reported gene expression data from four shoot apical meristem cell types. Results The NCA model satisfactorily accounted for gene expression measurements in a TF-GRN of seven TFs (LFY, AG, SEPALLATA3 [SEP3], AP2, AGL15, HY5 and AP3/PI) and 55 genes. NCA found strong interactions between certain TF-gene pairs including LFY → MYB17, AG → CRC, AP2 → RD20, AGL15 → RAV2 and HY5 → HLH1, and the direction of the interaction (activation or repression) for some AGL15 targets for which this information was not previously available. The activity trends of four TFs - LFY, AG, HY5 and AP3/PI as deduced by NCA correlated well with the changes in expression levels of the genes encoding these TFs across all four cell types; such a correlation was not observed for SEP3, AP2 and AGL15. Conclusions For the first time, we have reported the use of NCA to quantitatively analyze a plant TF-GRN important in floral development for obtaining nontrivial information about connectivity strengths between TFs and their target genes as well as TF

  10. Variance components models for gene-environment interaction in twin analysis.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Shaun

    2002-12-01

    Gene-environment interaction is likely to be a common and important source of variation for complex behavioral traits. Often conceptualized as the genetic control of sensitivity to the environment, it can be incorporated in variance components twin analyses by partitioning genetic effects into a mean part, which is independent of the environment, and a part that is a linear function of the environment. The model allows for one or more environmental moderator variables (that possibly interact with each other) that may i). be continuous or binary ii). differ between twins within a pair iii). interact with residual environmental as well as genetic effects iv) have nonlinear moderating properties v). show scalar (different magnitudes) or qualitative (different genes) interactions vi). be correlated with genetic effects acting upon the trait, to allow for a test of gene-environment interaction in the presence of gene-environment correlation. Aspects and applications of a class of models are explored by simulation, in the context of both individual differences twin analysis and, in a companion paper (Purcell & Sham, 2002) sibpair quantitative trait locus linkage analysis. As well as elucidating environmental pathways, consideration of gene-environment interaction in quantitative and molecular studies will potentially direct and enhance gene-mapping efforts.

  11. [A Betasatellite-Encoded Protein Regulates Key Components of Gene Silencing System in Plants].

    PubMed

    Eini, O

    2017-01-01

    Small circular single-stranded DNA satellites, called betasatellites, have been found in association with some monopartite begomovirus infections. The Cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite (CLCuMuB) is known to influence symptom induction in cotton leaf curl disease. CLCuMuB contains a single gene, βC1, whose product is a pathogenicity determinant and a suppressor of RNA silencing. Although induction of RNA silencing by RNA and DNA viruses has been well documented in plants, the interactions between betasatellites and the host's silencing machinery remain poorly understood. In this study, the transgenic expression of βC1 from CLCuMuB in Arabidopsis thaliana plants produced severe developmental abnormalities, which resembled those produced by mutations in the key genes of the gene silencing pathway. Analysis of transgenic plants expressing CLCuMuB βC1 using real-time PCR showed that the expression levels of both AGO1 and DCL1 genes were significantly increased. In contrast, the expression of HEN1 gene in the βC1-expressing leaf tissues was similar to that of wild-type plants. The CLCuMuB βC1 protein was found to physically interact with the AGO1 protein in a yeast two-hybrid system. It is possible that specific targeting of the gene silencing key components by the CLCuMuB βC1 inhibits the RNA silencing-based host defence.

  12. The ubiquitin proteasome system in Caenorhabditis elegans and its regulation☆

    PubMed Central

    Papaevgeniou, Nikoletta; Chondrogianni, Niki

    2014-01-01

    Protein degradation constitutes a major cellular function that is responsible for maintenance of the normal cellular physiology either through the degradation of normal proteins or through the elimination of damaged proteins. The Ubiquitin–Proteasome System (UPS)1 is one of the main proteolytic systems that orchestrate protein degradation. Given that up- and down- regulation of the UPS system has been shown to occur in various normal (such as ageing) and pathological (such as neurodegenerative diseases) processes, the exogenous modulation of the UPS function and activity holds promise of (a) developing new therapeutic interventions against various diseases and (b) establishing strategies to maintain cellular homeostasis. Since the proteasome genes are evolutionarily conserved, their role can be dissected in simple model organisms, such as the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. In this review, we survey findings on the redox regulation of the UPS in C. elegans showing that the nematode is an instrumental tool in the identification of major players in the UPS pathway. Moreover, we specifically discuss UPS-related genes that have been modulated in the nematode and in human cells and have resulted in similar effects thus further exhibiting the value of this model in the study of the UPS. PMID:24563851

  13. Normoxic destabilization of ATF-4 depends on proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Wottawa, M; Köditz, J; Katschinski, D M

    2010-04-01

    Hypoxia-inducible gene expression is an important physiological adaptive mechanism in response to a decreased oxygen supply. We have recently described an oxygen- and prolyl-4-hydroxylase (PHD)3-dependent stabilization of the activating transcription factor 4 (ATF-4). The aim of the present study was to examine if the normoxic destabilization of ATF-4 is regulated by oxygen-dependent proteasomal degradation. We determined poly-ubiquitination of ATF-4 in normoxia compared to hypoxia by immunoprecipitation and immunoblots. Furthermore, we analysed the expression of the ATF-4 target gene GADD153 as a function of oxygen concentration. ATF-4 protein levels were not detectable in normoxia. Normoxic degradation correlated with an oxygen-dependent poly-ubiquitination of ATF-4, which was hindered by hypoxic incubation of the cells. As a result of hypoxia, GADD153 was expressed. The hypoxic GADD153 expression was attenuated or increased by transfecting the cells with ATF-4 siRNA or PHD3 siRNA respectively. Our results demonstrate the involvement of oxygen-dependent proteasomal degradation of ATF-4 in the hypoxia-induced expression of GADD153. Taken together, hypoxia/PHD3-regulated stabilization of ATF-4 by hindering oxygen-dependent degradation may play a critical role in linking cell fate decisions to oxygen availability.

  14. Tissue and cell-type co-expression networks of transcription factors and wood component genes in Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rui; Wang, Jack P; Lin, Ying-Chung; Li, Quanzi; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Chen, Hao; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L

    2017-05-01

    Co-expression networks based on transcriptomes of Populus trichocarpa major tissues and specific cell types suggest redundant control of cell wall component biosynthetic genes by transcription factors in wood formation. We analyzed the transcriptomes of five tissues (xylem, phloem, shoot, leaf, and root) and two wood forming cell types (fiber and vessel) of Populus trichocarpa to assemble gene co-expression subnetworks associated with wood formation. We identified 165 transcription factors (TFs) that showed xylem-, fiber-, and vessel-specific expression. Of these 165 TFs, 101 co-expressed (correlation coefficient, r > 0.7) with the 45 secondary cell wall cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin biosynthetic genes. Each cell wall component gene co-expressed on average with 34 TFs, suggesting redundant control of the cell wall component gene expression. Co-expression analysis showed that the 101 TFs and the 45 cell wall component genes each has two distinct groups (groups 1 and 2), based on their co-expression patterns. The group 1 TFs (44 members) are predominantly xylem and fiber specific, and are all highly positively co-expressed with the group 1 cell wall component genes (30 members), suggesting their roles as major wood formation regulators. Group 1 TFs include a lateral organ boundary domain gene (LBD) that has the highest number of positively correlated cell wall component genes (36) and TFs (47). The group 2 TFs have 57 members, including 14 vessel-specific TFs, and are generally less correlated with the cell wall component genes. An exception is a vessel-specific basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) gene that negatively correlates with 20 cell wall component genes, and may function as a key transcriptional suppressor. The co-expression networks revealed here suggest a well-structured transcriptional homeostasis for cell wall component biosynthesis during wood formation.

  15. Trial Watch: Proteasomal inhibitors for anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Obrist, Florine; Manic, Gwenola; Kroemer, Guido; Vitale, Ilio; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The so-called “ubiquitin-proteasome system” (UPS) is a multicomponent molecular apparatus that catalyzes the covalent attachment of several copies of the small protein ubiquitin to other proteins that are generally (but not always) destined to proteasomal degradation. This enzymatic cascade is crucial for the maintenance of intracellular protein homeostasis (both in physiological conditions and in the course of adaptive stress responses), and regulates a wide array of signaling pathways. In line with this notion, defects in the UPS have been associated with aging as well as with several pathological conditions including cardiac, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic disorders. As transformed cells often experience a constant state of stress (as a result of the hyperactivation of oncogenic signaling pathways and/or adverse microenvironmental conditions), their survival and proliferation are highly dependent on the integrity of the UPS. This rationale has driven an intense wave of preclinical and clinical investigation culminating in 2003 with the approval of the proteasomal inhibitor bortezomib by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in multiple myeloma patients. Another proteasomal inhibitor, carfilzomib, is now licensed by international regulatory agencies for use in multiple myeloma patients, and the approved indications for bortezomib have been extended to mantle cell lymphoma. This said, the clinical activity of bortezomib and carfilzomib is often limited by off-target effects, innate/acquired resistance, and the absence of validated predictive biomarkers. Moreover, the antineoplastic activity of proteasome inhibitors against solid tumors is poor. In this Trial Watch we discuss the contribution of the UPS to oncogenesis and tumor progression and summarize the design and/or results of recent clinical studies evaluating the therapeutic profile of proteasome inhibitors in cancer patients. PMID:27308423

  16. Separation of a functional deubiquitylating module from the SAGA complex by the proteasome regulatory particle.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sungsu; Kwak, Jaechan; Kim, Minhoo; Lee, Daeyoup

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is an intricate process tightly linked from gene activation to the nuclear export of mRNA. Recent studies have indicated that the proteasome is essential for gene expression regulation. The proteasome regulatory particle binds to the SAGA complex and affects transcription in an ATP-dependent manner. Here we report that a specific interaction between the proteasomal ATPase, Rpt2p and Sgf73p of the SAGA complex leads to the dissociation of the H2Bub1-deubiquitylating module (herein designated the Sgf73-DUBm) from SAGA both in vitro and in vivo. We show that the localization of the Sgf73-DUBm on chromatin is perturbed in rpt2-1, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is specifically defective in the Rpt2p-Sgf73p interaction. The rpt2-1 mutant also exhibits impaired localization of the TREX-2 and MEX67-MTR2 complexes and is defective in mRNA export. Our findings collectively demonstrate that the proteasome-mediated remodelling of the SAGA complex is a prerequisite for proper mRNA export.

  17. Nuclear effects of ethanol-induced proteasome inhibition in liver cells

    PubMed Central

    Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol ingestion causes alteration in several cellular mechanisms, and leads to inflammation, apoptosis, immunological response defects, and fibrosis. These phenomena are associated with significant changes in the epigenetic mechanisms, and subsequently, to liver cell memory. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is one of the vital pathways in the cell that becomes dysfunctionial as a result of chronic ethanol consumption. Inhibition of the proteasome activity in the nucleus causes changes in the turnover of transcriptional factors, histone modifying enzymes, and therefore, affects epigenetic mechanisms. Alcohol consumption has been associated with an increase in histone acetylation and a decrease in histone methylation, which leads to gene expression changes. DNA and histone modifications that result from ethanol-induced proteasome inhibition are key players in regulating gene expression, especially genes involved in the cell cycle, immunological responses, and metabolism of ethanol. The present review highlights the consequences of ethanol-induced proteasome inhibition in the nucleus of liver cells that are chronically exposed to ethanol. PMID:19291815

  18. Oxidative challenge enhances REGγ-proteasome-dependent protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Shuang; Zuo, Qiuhong; Wu, Lin; Ji, Lei; Zhai, Wanli; Xiao, Jianru; Chen, Jiwu; Li, Xiaotao

    2015-05-01

    Elimination of oxidized proteins is important to cells as accumulation of damaged proteins causes cellular dysfunction, disease, and aging. Abundant evidence shows that the 20S proteasome is largely responsible for degradation of oxidative proteins in both ubiquitin-dependent and ubiquitin-independent pathways. However, the role of the REGγ-proteasome in degrading oxidative proteins remains unclear. Here, we focus on two of the well-known REGγ-proteasome substrates, p21(Waf1/Cip1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein, to analyze the impact of oxidative stress on REGγ-proteasome functions. We demonstrate that REGγ-proteasome is essential for oxidative stress-induced rapid degradation of p21 and HCV proteins. Silencing REGγ abrogated this response in multiple cell lines. Furthermore, pretreatment with proteasome inhibitor MG132 completely blunted oxidant-induced p21 degradation, indicating a proteasome-dependent action. Cellular oxidation promoted REGγ-proteasome-dependent trypsin-like activity by enhancing the interaction between REGγ and 20S proteasome. Antioxidant could counteract oxidation-induced protein degradation, indicating that REGγ-proteasome activity may be regulated by redox state. This study provides further insights into the actions of a unique proteasome pathway in response to an oxidative stress environment, implying a novel molecular basis for REGγ-proteasome functions in antioxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Murraya koenigii leaf extract inhibits proteasome activity and induces cell death in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inhibition of the proteolytic activity of 26S proteasome, the protein-degrading machine, is now considered a novel and promising approach for cancer therapy. Interestingly, proteasome inhibitors have been demonstrated to selectively kill cancer cells and also enhance the sensitivity of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, polyphenols/flavonoids have been reported to inhibit proteasome activity. Murraya koenigii Spreng, a medicinally important herb of Indian origin, has been used for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine. Here we show that Murraya koenigii leaves (curry leaves), a rich source of polyphenols, inhibit the proteolytic activity of the cancer cell proteasome, and cause cell death. Methods Hydro-methanolic extract of curry leaves (CLE) was prepared and its total phenolic content [TPC] determined by, the Folin-Ciocalteau’s method. Two human breast carcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 and a normal human lung fibroblast cell line, WI-38 were used for the studies. Cytotoxicity of the CLE was assessed by the MTT assay. We studied the effect of CLE on growth kinetics using colony formation assay. Growth arrest was assessed by cell cycle analysis and apoptosis by Annexin-V binding using flow cytometry. Inhibition of the endogenous 26S proteasome was studied in intact cells and cell extracts using substrates specific to 20S proteasomal enzymes. Results CLE decreased cell viability and altered the growth kinetics in both the breast cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. It showed a significant arrest of cells in the S phase albeit in cancer cells only. Annexin V binding data suggests that cell death was via the apoptotic pathway in both the cancer cell lines. CLE treatment significantly decreased the activity of the 26S proteasome in the cancer but not normal cells. Conclusions Our study suggests M. koenigii leaves to be a potent source of proteasome inhibitors that lead to cancer cell death. Therefore, identification

  20. Assembly of the 20S Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Kunjappu, Mary J.; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The proteasome is a cellular protease responsible for the selective degradation of the majority of the intracellular proteome. It recognizes, unfolds, and cleaves proteins that are destined for removal, usually by prior attachment to polymers of ubiquitin. This macromolecular machine is composed of two subcomplexes, the 19S regulatory particle (RP) and the 20S core particle (CP), which together contain at least 33 different and precisely positioned subunits. How these subunits assemble into functional complexes is an area of active exploration. Here we describe the current status of studies on the assembly of the 20S proteasome (CP). The 28-subunit CP is found in all three domains of life and its cylindrical stack of four heptameric rings is well conserved. Though several CP subunits possess self-assembly properties, a consistent theme in recent years has been the need for dedicated assembly chaperones that promote on-pathway assembly. To date, a minimum of three accessory factors have been implicated in aiding the construction of the 20S proteasome. These chaperones interact with different assembling proteasomal precursors and usher subunits into specific slots in the growing structure. This review will focus largely on chaperone-dependent CP assembly and its regulation. PMID:23507199

  1. The Proline/Arginine Dipeptide from Hexanucleotide Repeat Expanded C9ORF72 Inhibits the Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Matthews; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Choi, Won Hoon; Safren, Nathaniel; Barmada, Sami

    2017-01-01

    Abstract An intronic hexanucleotide repeat expansion (HRE) mutation in the C9ORF72 gene is the most common cause of familial ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and is found in ∼7% of individuals with apparently sporadic disease. Several different diamino acid peptides can be generated from the HRE by noncanonical translation (repeat-associated non-ATG translation, or RAN translation), and some of these peptides can be toxic. Here, we studied the effects of two arginine containing RAN translation products [proline/arginine repeated 20 times (PR20) and glycine/arginine repeated 20 times (GR20)] in primary rat spinal cord neuron cultures grown on an astrocyte feeder layer. We find that PR20 kills motor neurons with an LD50 of 2 µM, but in contrast to the effects of other ALS-causing mutant proteins (i.e., SOD or TDP43), PR20 does not evoke the biochemical signature of mitochondrial dysfunction, ER stress, or mTORC down-regulation. PR20 does result in a time-dependent build-up of ubiquitylated substrates, and this is associated with a reduction of flux through both autophagic and proteasomal degradation pathways. GR20, however, does not have these effects. The effects of PR20 on the proteasome are likely to be direct because (1) PR20 physically associates with proteasomes in biochemical assays, and (2) PR20 inhibits the degradation of a ubiquitylated test substrate when presented to purified proteasomes. Application of a proteasomal activator (IU1) blocks the toxic effects of PR20 on motor neuron survival. This work suggests that proteasomal activators have therapeutic potential in individuals with C9ORF72 HRE. PMID:28197542

  2. Coordination between proteasome impairment and caspase activation leading to TAU pathology: neuroprotection by cAMP

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, M J; Huang, Q; Figueiredo-Pereira, M E

    2012-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The main component of NFTs is TAU, a highly soluble microtubule-associated protein. However, when TAU is cleaved at Asp421 by caspases it becomes prone to aggregation leading to NFTs. What triggers caspase activation resulting in TAU cleavage remains unclear. We investigated in rat cortical neurons a potential coordination between proteasome impairment and caspase activation. We demonstrate that upon proteasome inhibition, the early accumulation of detergent-soluble ubiquitinated (SUb) proteins paves the way to caspase activation and TAU pathology. This occurs with two drugs that inhibit the proteasome by different means: the product of inflammation prostaglandin J2 (PGJ2) and epoxomicin. Our results pinpoint a critical early event, that is, the buildup of SUb proteins that contributes to caspase activation, TAU cleavage, TAU/Ub-protein aggregation and neuronal death. Furthermore, to our knowledge, we are the first to demonstrate that elevating cAMP in neurons with dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP) or the lipophilic peptide PACAP27 prevents/diminishes caspase activation, TAU cleavage and neuronal death induced by PGJ2, as long as these PGJ2-induced changes are moderate. db-cAMP also stimulated proteasomes, and mitigated proteasome inhibition induced by PGJ2. We propose that targeting cAMP/PKA to boost proteasome activity in a sustainable manner could offer an effective approach to avoid early accumulation of SUb proteins and later caspase activation, and TAU cleavage, possibly preventing/delaying AD neurodegeneration. PMID:22717581

  3. D1 dopamine receptor stimulation impairs striatal proteasome activity in Parkinsonism through 26S proteasome disassembly.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Thiolat, Marie-Laure; Bido, Simone; Martinez, Audrey; Doudnikoff, Evelyne; Baufreton, Jérôme; Bourdenx, Mathieu; Bloch, Bertrand; Bezard, Erwan; Martin-Negrier, Marie-Laure

    2015-06-01

    Among the mechanisms underlying the development of L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson's disease, complex alterations in dopamine signaling in D1 receptor (D1R)-expressing medium spiny striatal neurons have been unraveled such as, but not limited to, dysregulation of D1R expression, lateral diffusion, intraneuronal trafficking, subcellular localization and desensitization, leading to a pathological anchorage of D1R at the plasma membrane. Such anchorage is partly due to a decreased proteasomal activity that is specific of the L-dopa-exposed dopamine-depleted striatum, results from D1R activation and feeds-back the D1R exaggerated cell surface abundance. The precise mechanisms by which L-dopa affects striatal proteasome activity remained however unknown. We here show, in a series of in vitro ex vivo and in vivo models, that such rapid modulation of striatal proteasome activity intervenes through D1R-mediated disassembly of the 26S proteasome rather than change in transcription or translation of proteasome or proteasome subunits intraneuronal relocalization.

  4. Compromising the 19S proteasome complex protects cells from reduced flux through the proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Tsvetkov, Peter; Mendillo, Marc L; Zhao, Jinghui; Carette, Jan E; Merrill, Parker H; Cikes, Domagoj; Varadarajan, Malini; van Diemen, Ferdy R; Penninger, Josef M; Goldberg, Alfred L; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Santagata, Sandro; Lindquist, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are central regulators of protein homeostasis in eukaryotes. Proteasome function is vulnerable to environmental insults, cellular protein imbalance and targeted pharmaceuticals. Yet, mechanisms that cells deploy to counteract inhibition of this central regulator are little understood. To find such mechanisms, we reduced flux through the proteasome to the point of toxicity with specific inhibitors and performed genome-wide screens for mutations that allowed cells to survive. Counter to expectation, reducing expression of individual subunits of the proteasome's 19S regulatory complex increased survival. Strong 19S reduction was cytotoxic but modest reduction protected cells from inhibitors. Protection was accompanied by an increased ratio of 20S to 26S proteasomes, preservation of protein degradation capacity and reduced proteotoxic stress. While compromise of 19S function can have a fitness cost under basal conditions, it provided a powerful survival advantage when proteasome function was impaired. This means of rebalancing proteostasis is conserved from yeast to humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08467.001 PMID:26327695

  5. Identification of proteasome subunit beta type 6 (PSMB6) associated with deltamethrin resistance in mosquitoes by proteomic and bioassay analyses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Linchun; Ye, Yuting; Sun, Haibo; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Li; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Donghui; Ma, Lei; Shen, Bo; Zhu, Changliang

    2013-01-01

    Deltamethrin (DM) insecticides are currently being promoted worldwide for mosquito control, because of the high efficacy, low mammalian toxicity and less environmental impact. Widespread and improper use of insecticides induced resistance, which has become a major obstacle for the insect-borne disease management. Resistance development is a complex and dynamic process involving many genes. To better understand the possible molecular mechanisms involved in DM resistance, a proteomic approach was employed for screening of differentially expressed proteins in DM-susceptible and -resistant mosquito cells. Twenty-seven differentially expressed proteins were identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS). Four members of the ubiquitin-proteasome system were significantly elevated in DM-resistant cells, suggesting that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may play an important role in DM resistance. Proteasome subunit beta type 6 (PSMB6) is a member of 20S proteasomal subunit family, which forms the proteolytic core of 26S proteasome. We used pharmaceutical inhibitor and molecular approaches to study the contributions of PSMB6 in DM resistance: the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 and bortezomib were used to suppress the proteasomal activity and siRNA was designed to block the function of PSMB6. The results revealed that both MG-132 and bortezomib increased the susceptibility in DM-resistant cells and resistance larvae. Moreover, PSMB6 knockdown decreased cellular viability under DM treatment. Taken together, our study indicated that PSMB6 is associated with DM resistance in mosquitoes and that proteasome inhibitors such as MG-132 or bortezomib are suitable for use as a DM synergist for vector control.

  6. Different effects of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs meclofenamate sodium and naproxen sodium on proteasome activity in cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Hwang, Soyun M; Cui, Ziyou; Gilda, Jennifer E; Gomes, Aldrin V

    2016-05-01

    The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like meclofenamate sodium (MS), used to reduce pain, has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Naproxen (NAP), another NSAID, is not associated with increased risk of CVD. The molecular mechanism(s) by which NSAIDs induce CVD is unknown. We investigated the effects of MS and NAP on protein homeostasis and cardiotoxicity in rat cardiac H9c2 cells and murine neonatal cardiomyocytes. MS, but not NAP, significantly inhibited proteasome activity and reduced cardiac cell viability at pharmacological levels found in humans. Although proteasome subunit gene and protein expression were unaffected by NSAIDs, MS treated cell lysates showed higher 20S proteasome content, while purified proteasomes from MS treated cells had lower proteasome activity and higher levels of oxidized subunits than proteasomes from control cells. Addition of exogenous proteasome to MS treated cells improved cell viability. Both MS and NAP increased ROS production, but the rate of ROS production was greater in MS than in NAP treated cells. The ROS production is likely from mitochondria, as MS inhibited mitochondrial Complexes I and III, major sources of ROS, while NAP inhibited Complex I. MS also impaired mitochondrial membrane potential while NAP did not. Antioxidants were able to prevent the reduced cell viability caused by MS treatment. These results suggest that NSAIDs induce cardiotoxicity by a ROS dependent mechanism involving mitochondrial and proteasome dysfunction and may explain why some NSAIDs should not be given to patients for long periods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Suppression of proteasome C2 contralateral to ischemic lesions in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Keyvani, K; Reinecke, S; Abts, H F; Paulus, W; Witte, O W

    2000-03-10

    Functional as well as structural reorganization takes place in the surrounding and remote brain areas after focal ischemic lesions. In particular, reactive or regenerative processes have been described to occur in the contralateral hemisphere. We used mRNA differential display to gain more insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying this type of neuronal plasticity. Circumscribed unilateral infarcts consistently affecting the forelimb area of the primary motor cortex were induced photochemically in adult male Wistar rats. The lesion produced significant behavioral asymmetry with subsequent partial recovery within 1 week. Cloning the genes with altered expression profiles identified the 20S proteasome subunit C2 as a gene whose expression level is decreased in contralateral homotopic cortex. Semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed approximately twofold lower proteasome C2 mRNA levels in the lesion group as compared with the sham-operated group. The proteasome serves as the central enzyme of non-lysosomal protein degradation. It is responsible for intracellular protein turnover and is critically involved in a variety of regulation processes, such as cell cycle, metabolism and differentiation. Our results suggest that proteasome activity may play also a role in contralateral cortical plasticity occurring after focal cerebral ischemia.

  8. Novel strategies to target the ubiquitin proteasome system in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Lub, Susanne; Maes, Ken; Menu, Eline; De Bruyne, Elke; Vanderkerken, Karin; Van Valckenborgh, Els

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy characterized by the accumulation of plasma cells in the bone marrow (BM). The success of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in the treatment of MM highlights the importance of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) in this particular cancer. Despite the prolonged survival of MM patients, a significant amount of patients relapse or become resistant to therapy. This underlines the importance of the development and investigation of novel targets to improve MM therapy. The UPS plays an important role in different cellular processes by targeted destruction of proteins. The ubiquitination process consists of enzymes that transfer ubiquitin to proteins targeting them for proteasomal degradation. An emerging and promising approach is to target more disease specific components of the UPS to reduce side effects and overcome resistance. In this review, we will focus on different components of the UPS such as the ubiquitin activating enzyme E1, the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme E2, the E3 ubiquitin ligases, the deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) and the proteasome. We will discuss their role in MM and the implications in drug discovery for the treatment of MM. PMID:26695547

  9. Functional asymmetries of proteasome translocase pore.

    PubMed

    Erales, Jenny; Hoyt, Martin A; Troll, Fabian; Coffino, Philip

    2012-05-25

    Degradation by proteasomes involves coupled translocation and unfolding of its protein substrates. Six distinct but paralogous proteasome ATPase proteins, Rpt1 to -6, form a heterohexameric ring that acts on substrates. An axially positioned loop (Ar-Φ loop) moves in concert with ATP hydrolysis, engages substrate, and propels it into a proteolytic chamber. The aromatic (Ar) residue of the Ar-Φ loop in all six Rpts of S. cerevisiae is tyrosine; this amino acid is thought to have important functional contacts with substrate. Six yeast strains were constructed and characterized in which Tyr was individually mutated to Ala. The mutant cells were viable and had distinct phenotypes. rpt3, rpt4, and rpt5 Tyr/Ala mutants, which cluster on one side of the ATPase hexamer, were substantially impaired in their capacity to degrade substrates. In contrast, rpt1, rpt2, and rpt6 mutants equaled or exceeded wild type in degradation activity. However, rpt1 and rpt6 mutants had defects that limited cell growth or viability under conditions that stressed the ubiquitin proteasome system. In contrast, the rpt3 mutant grew faster than wild type and to a smaller size, a defect that has previously been associated with misregulation of G1 cyclins. This rpt3 phenotype probably results from altered degradation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. Finally, mutation of five of the Rpt subunits increased proteasome ATPase activity, implying bidirectional coupling between the Ar-Φ loop and the ATP hydrolysis site. The present observations assign specific functions to individual Rpt proteins and provide insights into the diverse roles of the axial loops of individual proteasome ATPases.

  10. Redox control of 20S proteasome gating.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gustavo M; Netto, Luis E S; Simões, Vanessa; Santos, Luiz F A; Gozzo, Fabio C; Demasi, Marcos A A; Oliveira, Cristiano L P; Bicev, Renata N; Klitzke, Clécio F; Sogayar, Mari C; Demasi, Marilene

    2012-06-01

    The proteasome is the primary contributor in intracellular proteolysis. Oxidized or unstructured proteins can be degraded via a ubiquitin- and ATP-independent process by the free 20S proteasome (20SPT). The mechanism by which these proteins enter the catalytic chamber is not understood thus far, although the 20SPT gating conformation is considered to be an important barrier to allowing proteins free entrance. We have previously shown that S-glutathiolation of the 20SPT is a post-translational modification affecting the proteasomal activities. The goal of this work was to investigate the mechanism that regulates 20SPT activity, which includes the identification of the Cys residues prone to S-glutathiolation. Modulation of 20SPT activity by proteasome gating is at least partially due to the S-glutathiolation of specific Cys residues. The gate was open when the 20SPT was S-glutathiolated, whereas following treatment with high concentrations of dithiothreitol, the gate was closed. S-glutathiolated 20SPT was more effective at degrading both oxidized and partially unfolded proteins than its reduced form. Only 2 out of 28 Cys were observed to be S-glutathiolated in the proteasomal α5 subunit of yeast cells grown to the stationary phase in glucose-containing medium. We demonstrate a redox post-translational regulatory mechanism controlling 20SPT activity. S-glutathiolation is a post-translational modification that triggers gate opening and thereby activates the proteolytic activities of free 20SPT. This process appears to be an important regulatory mechanism to intensify the removal of oxidized or unstructured proteins in stressful situations by a process independent of ubiquitination and ATP consumption. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1183-1194.

  11. Redox Control of 20S Proteasome Gating

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Gustavo M.; Simões, Vanessa; Santos, Luiz F.A.; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Demasi, Marcos A.A.; Oliveira, Cristiano L.P.; Bicev, Renata N.; Klitzke, Clécio F.; Sogayar, Mari C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The proteasome is the primary contributor in intracellular proteolysis. Oxidized or unstructured proteins can be degraded via a ubiquitin- and ATP-independent process by the free 20S proteasome (20SPT). The mechanism by which these proteins enter the catalytic chamber is not understood thus far, although the 20SPT gating conformation is considered to be an important barrier to allowing proteins free entrance. We have previously shown that S-glutathiolation of the 20SPT is a post-translational modification affecting the proteasomal activities. Aims: The goal of this work was to investigate the mechanism that regulates 20SPT activity, which includes the identification of the Cys residues prone to S-glutathiolation. Results: Modulation of 20SPT activity by proteasome gating is at least partially due to the S-glutathiolation of specific Cys residues. The gate was open when the 20SPT was S-glutathiolated, whereas following treatment with high concentrations of dithiothreitol, the gate was closed. S-glutathiolated 20SPT was more effective at degrading both oxidized and partially unfolded proteins than its reduced form. Only 2 out of 28 Cys were observed to be S-glutathiolated in the proteasomal α5 subunit of yeast cells grown to the stationary phase in glucose-containing medium. Innovation: We demonstrate a redox post-translational regulatory mechanism controlling 20SPT activity. Conclusion: S-glutathiolation is a post-translational modification that triggers gate opening and thereby activates the proteolytic activities of free 20SPT. This process appears to be an important regulatory mechanism to intensify the removal of oxidized or unstructured proteins in stressful situations by a process independent of ubiquitination and ATP consumption. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1183–1194. PMID:22229461

  12. Proteasome as a Molecular Target of Microcystin-LR

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhu; Zhang, Li; Shi, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    Proteasome degrades proteins in eukaryotic cells. As such, the proteasome is crucial in cell cycle and function. This study proved that microcystin-LR (MC-LR), which is a toxic by-product of algal bloom, can target cellular proteasome and selectively inhibit proteasome trypsin-like (TL) activity. MC-LR at 1 nM can inhibit up to 54% of the purified 20S proteasome TL activity and 43% of the proteasome TL activity in the liver of the cyprinid rare minnow (Gobiocypris rarus). Protein degradation was retarded in GFP-CL1-transfected PC-3 cells because MC-LR inhibited the proteasome TL activity. Docking studies indicated that MC-LR blocked the active site of the proteasome β2 subunit; thus, the proteasome TL activity was inhibited. In conclusion, MC-LR can target proteasome, selectively inhibit proteasome TL activity, and retard protein degradation. This study may be used as a reference of future research on the toxic mechanism of MC-LR. PMID:26090622

  13. Proteasome inhibitors in multiple myeloma: 10 years later

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Paul G.; Cavo, Michele; Orlowski, Robert Z.; San Miguel, Jesús F.; Palumbo, Antonio; Harousseau, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    Proteasome inhibition has emerged as an important therapeutic strategy in multiple myeloma (MM). Since the publication of the first phase 1 trials of bortezomib 10 years ago, this first-in-class proteasome inhibitor (PI) has contributed substantially to the observed improvement in survival in MM patients over the past decade. Although first approved as a single agent in the relapsed setting, bortezomib is now predominantly used in combination regimens. Furthermore, the standard twice-weekly schedule may be replaced by weekly infusion, especially when bortezomib is used as part of combination regimens in frontline therapy. Indeed, bortezomib is an established component of induction therapy for patients eligible or ineligible for autologous stem cell transplantation. Bortezomib has also been incorporated into conditioning regimens before autologous stem cell transplantation, as well as into post-ASCT consolidation therapy, and in the maintenance setting. In addition, a new route of bortezomib administration, subcutaneous infusion, has recently been approved. Recently, several new agents have been introduced into the clinic, including carfilzomib, marizomib, and MLN9708, and trials investigating these “second-generation” PIs in patients with relapsed/refractory MMs have demonstrated positive results. This review provides an overview of the role of PIs in the treatment of MM, focusing on developments over the past decade. PMID:22645181

  14. Improved gene prediction by principal component analysis based autoregressive Yule-Walker method.

    PubMed

    Roy, Manidipa; Barman, Soma

    2016-01-10

    Spectral analysis using Fourier techniques is popular with gene prediction because of its simplicity. Model-based autoregressive (AR) spectral estimation gives better resolution even for small DNA segments but selection of appropriate model order is a critical issue. In this article a technique has been proposed where Yule-Walker autoregressive (YW-AR) process is combined with principal component analysis (PCA) for reduction in dimensionality. The spectral peaks of DNA signal are used to detect protein-coding regions based on the 1/3 frequency component. Here optimal model order selection is no more critical as noise is removed by PCA prior to power spectral density (PSD) estimation. Eigenvalue-ratio is used to find the threshold between signal and noise subspaces for data reduction. Superiority of proposed method over fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method and autoregressive method combined with wavelet packet transform (WPT) is established with the help of receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and discrimination measure (DM) respectively.

  15. Dynamic recruitment of active proteasomes into polyglutamine initiated inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Schipper-Krom, Sabine; Juenemann, Katrin; Jansen, Anne H; Wiemhoefer, Anne; van den Nieuwendijk, Rianne; Smith, Donna L; Hink, Mark A; Bates, Gillian P; Overkleeft, Hermen; Ovaa, Huib; Reits, Eric

    2014-01-03

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease are hallmarked by neuronal intracellular inclusion body formation. Whether proteasomes are irreversibly recruited into inclusion bodies in these protein misfolding disorders is a controversial subject. In addition, it has been proposed that the proteasomes may become clogged by the aggregated protein fragments, leading to impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here, we show by fluorescence pulse-chase experiments in living cells that proteasomes are dynamically and reversibly recruited into inclusion bodies. As these recruited proteasomes remain catalytically active and accessible to substrates, our results challenge the concept of proteasome sequestration and impairment in Huntington's disease, and support the reported absence of proteasome impairment in mouse models of Huntington's disease. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. All rights reserved.

  16. Variance component testing for identifying differentially expressed genes in RNA-seq data.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng; Shao, Fang; Duan, Weiwei; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Feng

    2017-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) enables the measurement and comparison of gene expression with isoform-level quantification. Differences in the effect of each isoform may make traditional methods, which aggregate isoforms, ineffective. Here, we introduce a variance component-based test that can jointly test multiple isoforms of one gene to identify differentially expressed (DE) genes, especially those with isoforms that have differential effects. We model isoform-level expression data from RNA-Seq using a negative binomial distribution and consider the baseline abundance of isoforms and their effects as two random terms. Our approach tests the global null hypothesis of no difference in any of the isoforms. The null distribution of the derived score statistic is investigated using empirical and theoretical methods. The results of simulations suggest that the performance of the proposed set test is superior to that of traditional algorithms and almost reaches optimal power when the variance of covariates is large. This method is also applied to analyze real data. Our algorithm, as a supplement to traditional algorithms, is superior at selecting DE genes with sparse or opposite effects for isoforms.

  17. Stimulation of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway through the expression of amidohydrolase for N-terminal asparagine (Ntan1) in cultured rat hippocampal neurons exposed to static magnetism.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takao; Taniura, Hideo; Goto, Yasuaki; Ogura, Masato; Sng, Judy C G; Yoneda, Yukio

    2006-03-01

    In order to elucidate mechanisms underlying modulation by static magnetism of the cellular functionality and/or integrity in the brain, we screened genes responsive to brief magnetism in cultured rat hippocampal neurons using differential display analysis. We have for the first time cloned and identified Ntan1 (amidohydrolase for N-terminal asparagine) as a magnetism responsive gene in rat brain. Ntan1 is an essential component of a protein degradation signal, which is a destabilizing N-terminal residue of a protein, in the N-end rule. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed abundant expression of Ntan1 mRNA in hippocampal neurons in vivo. Northern blot analysis showed that Ntan1 mRNA was increased about three-fold after 3 h in response to brief magnetism. Brief magnetism also increased the transcriptional activity of Ntan1 promoter by luciferase reporter assay. Brief magnetism induced degradation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) without affecting cell morphology and viability, which was prevented by a selective inhibitor of 26S proteasome in hippocampal neurons. Overexpression of Ntan1 using recombinant Ntan1 adenovirus vector resulted in a marked decrease in the MAP2 protein expression in hippocampal neurons. Our results suggest that brief magnetism leads to the induction of Ntan1 responsible for MAP2 protein degradation through ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in rat hippocampal neurons.

  18. Use of principal component analysis and the GE-biplot for the graphical exploration of gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Pittelkow, Yvonne; Wilson, Susan R

    2005-06-01

    This note is in response to Wouters et al. (2003, Biometrics 59, 1131-1139) who compared three methods for exploring gene expression data. Contrary to their summary that principal component analysis is not very informative, we show that it is possible to determine principal component analyses that are useful for exploratory analysis of microarray data. We also present another biplot representation, the GE-biplot (Gene Expression biplot), that is a useful method for exploring gene expression data with the major advantage of being able to aid interpretation of both the samples and the genes relative to each other.

  19. Bacterial Proteasome Activator Bpa (Rv3780) Is a Novel Ring-Shaped Interactor of the Mycobacterial Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Delley, Cyrille L.; Laederach, Juerg; Ziemski, Michal; Bolten, Marcel; Boehringer, Daniel; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of the proteasome in bacteria is limited to the phylum of actinobacteria, where it is maintained in parallel to the usual bacterial compartmentalizing proteases. The role it plays in these organisms is still not fully understood, but in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) the proteasome supports persistence in the host. In complex with the ring-shaped ATPase Mpa (called ARC in other actinobacteria), the proteasome can degrade proteins that have been post-translationally modified with the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup. Unlike for the eukaryotic proteasome core particle, no other bacterial proteasome interactors have been identified to date. Here we describe and characterize a novel bacterial proteasome activator of Mycobacterium tuberculosis we termed Bpa (Rv3780), using a combination of biochemical and biophysical methods. Bpa features a canonical C-terminal proteasome interaction motif referred to as the HbYX motif, and its orthologs are only found in those actinobacteria encoding the proteasomal subunits. Bpa can inhibit degradation of Pup-tagged substrates in vitro by competing with Mpa for association with the proteasome. Using negative-stain electron microscopy, we show that Bpa forms a ring-shaped homooligomer that can bind coaxially to the face of the proteasome cylinder. Interestingly, Bpa can stimulate the proteasomal degradation of the model substrate β-casein, which suggests it could play a role in the removal of non-native or damaged proteins. PMID:25469515

  20. Ubiquitin-Like Proteasome System Represents a Eukaryotic-Like Pathway for Targeted Proteolysis in Archaea

    DOE PAGES

    Fu, Xian; Liu, Rui; Sanchez, Iona; ...

    2016-05-17

    The molecular mechanisms of targeted proteolysis in archaea are poorly understood, yet they may have deep evolutionary roots shared with the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrate in archaea that TBP2, a TATA-binding protein (TBP) modified by ubiquitin-like isopeptide bonds, is phosphorylated and targeted for degradation by proteasomes. Rapid turnover of TBP2 required the functions of UbaA (the E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog of archaea), AAA ATPases (Cdc48/p97 and Rpt types), a type 2 JAB1/MPN/MOV34 metalloenzyme (JAMM/MPN+) homolog (JAMM2), and 20S proteasomes. The ubiquitin-like protein modifier small archaeal modifier protein 2 (SAMP2) stimulated the degradation of TBP2, but SAMP2 itself wasmore » not degraded. Analysis of the TBP2 fractions that were not modified by ubiquitin-like linkages revealed that TBP2 had multiple N termini, including Met1-Ser2, Ser2, and Met1-Ser2(p) [where (p) represents phosphorylation]. The evidence suggested that the Met1-Ser2(p) form accumulated in cells that were unable to degrade TBP2. We propose a model in archaea in which the attachment of ubiquitin-like tags can target proteins for degradation by proteasomes and be controlled by N-terminal degrons. In support of a proteolytic mechanism that is energy dependent and recycles the ubiquitin-like protein tags, we find that a network of AAA ATPases and a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease are required, in addition to 20S proteasomes, for controlled intracellular proteolysis. IMPORTANCEThis study advances the fundamental knowledge of signal-guided proteolysis in archaea and sheds light on components that are related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotes. In archaea, the ubiquitin-like proteasome system is found to require function of an E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog, a type 2 JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease, and a network of AAA ATPases for the targeted destruction of proteins. We provide evidence that the attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein is controlled by an N

  1. Ubiquitin-Like Proteasome System Represents a Eukaryotic-Like Pathway for Targeted Proteolysis in Archaea

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Xian; Liu, Rui; Sanchez, Iona; Silva-Sanchez, Cecilia; Hepowit, Nathaniel L.; Cao, Shiyun; Chen, Sixue; Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    2016-05-17

    The molecular mechanisms of targeted proteolysis in archaea are poorly understood, yet they may have deep evolutionary roots shared with the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrate in archaea that TBP2, a TATA-binding protein (TBP) modified by ubiquitin-like isopeptide bonds, is phosphorylated and targeted for degradation by proteasomes. Rapid turnover of TBP2 required the functions of UbaA (the E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog of archaea), AAA ATPases (Cdc48/p97 and Rpt types), a type 2 JAB1/MPN/MOV34 metalloenzyme (JAMM/MPN+) homolog (JAMM2), and 20S proteasomes. The ubiquitin-like protein modifier small archaeal modifier protein 2 (SAMP2) stimulated the degradation of TBP2, but SAMP2 itself was not degraded. Analysis of the TBP2 fractions that were not modified by ubiquitin-like linkages revealed that TBP2 had multiple N termini, including Met1-Ser2, Ser2, and Met1-Ser2(p) [where (p) represents phosphorylation]. The evidence suggested that the Met1-Ser2(p) form accumulated in cells that were unable to degrade TBP2. We propose a model in archaea in which the attachment of ubiquitin-like tags can target proteins for degradation by proteasomes and be controlled by N-terminal degrons. In support of a proteolytic mechanism that is energy dependent and recycles the ubiquitin-like protein tags, we find that a network of AAA ATPases and a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease are required, in addition to 20S proteasomes, for controlled intracellular proteolysis.

    IMPORTANCEThis study advances the fundamental knowledge of signal-guided proteolysis in archaea and sheds light on components that are related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotes. In archaea, the ubiquitin-like proteasome system is found to require function of an E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog, a type 2 JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease, and a network of AAA ATPases for the targeted destruction of proteins. We provide evidence that the attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein is controlled

  2. Ubiquitin-Like Proteasome System Represents a Eukaryotic-Like Pathway for Targeted Proteolysis in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xian; Liu, Rui; Sanchez, Iona; Silva-Sanchez, Cecilia; Hepowit, Nathaniel L; Cao, Shiyun; Chen, Sixue; Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    2016-05-17

    The molecular mechanisms of targeted proteolysis in archaea are poorly understood, yet they may have deep evolutionary roots shared with the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrate in archaea that TBP2, a TATA-binding protein (TBP) modified by ubiquitin-like isopeptide bonds, is phosphorylated and targeted for degradation by proteasomes. Rapid turnover of TBP2 required the functions of UbaA (the E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog of archaea), AAA ATPases (Cdc48/p97 and Rpt types), a type 2 JAB1/MPN/MOV34 metalloenzyme (JAMM/MPN+) homolog (JAMM2), and 20S proteasomes. The ubiquitin-like protein modifier small archaeal modifier protein 2 (SAMP2) stimulated the degradation of TBP2, but SAMP2 itself was not degraded. Analysis of the TBP2 fractions that were not modified by ubiquitin-like linkages revealed that TBP2 had multiple N termini, including Met1-Ser2, Ser2, and Met1-Ser2(p) [where (p) represents phosphorylation]. The evidence suggested that the Met1-Ser2(p) form accumulated in cells that were unable to degrade TBP2. We propose a model in archaea in which the attachment of ubiquitin-like tags can target proteins for degradation by proteasomes and be controlled by N-terminal degrons. In support of a proteolytic mechanism that is energy dependent and recycles the ubiquitin-like protein tags, we find that a network of AAA ATPases and a JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease are required, in addition to 20S proteasomes, for controlled intracellular proteolysis. This study advances the fundamental knowledge of signal-guided proteolysis in archaea and sheds light on components that are related to the ubiquitin-proteasome system of eukaryotes. In archaea, the ubiquitin-like proteasome system is found to require function of an E1/MoeB/ThiF homolog, a type 2 JAMM/MPN+ metalloprotease, and a network of AAA ATPases for the targeted destruction of proteins. We provide evidence that the attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein is controlled by an N-terminal degron and

  3. Inhibition of the host proteasome facilitates papaya ringspot virus accumulation and proteosomal catalytic activity is modulated by viral factor HcPro.

    PubMed

    Sahana, Nandita; Kaur, Harpreet; Basavaraj; Tena, Fatima; Jain, Rakesh Kumar; Palukaitis, Peter; Canto, Tomas; Praveen, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin/26S proteasome system plays an essential role not only in maintaining protein turnover, but also in regulating many other plant responses, including plant-pathogen interactions. Previous studies highlighted different roles of the 20S proteasome in plant defense during virus infection, either indirectly through viral suppressor-mediated degradation of Argonaute proteins, affecting the RNA interference pathway, or directly through modulation of the proteolytic and RNase activity of the 20S proteasome, a component of the 20S proteasome, by viral proteins, affecting the levels of viral proteins and RNAs. Here we show that MG132, a cell permeable proteasomal inhibitor, caused an increase in papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) accumulation in its natural host papaya (Carica papaya). We also show that the PRSV HcPro interacts with the papaya homologue of the Arabidopsis PAA (α1 subunit of the 20S proteasome), but not with the papaya homologue of Arabidopsis PAE (α5 subunit of the 20S proteasome), associated with the RNase activity, although the two 20S proteasome subunits interacted with each other. Mutated forms of PRSV HcPro showed that the conserved KITC54 motif in the N-terminal domain of HcPro was necessary for its binding to PAA. Co-agroinfiltration assays demonstrated that HcPro expression mimicked the action of MG132, and facilitated the accumulation of bothtotal ubiquitinated proteins and viral/non-viral exogenous RNA in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. These effects were not observed by using an HcPro mutant (KITS54), which impaired the HcPro - PAA interaction. Thus, the PRSV HcPro interacts with a proteasomal subunit, inhibiting the action of the 20S proteasome, suggesting that HcPro might be crucial for modulating its catalytic activities in support of virus accumulation.

  4. Arabidopsis DNA polymerase ϵ recruits components of Polycomb repressor complex to mediate epigenetic gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Del Olmo, Iván; López, Juan A; Vázquez, Jesús; Raynaud, Cécile; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, José A

    2016-07-08

    Arabidopsis ESD7 locus encodes the catalytic subunit of the DNA Pol ϵ involved in the synthesis of the DNA leading strand and is essential for embryo viability. The hypomorphic allele esd7-1 is viable but displays a number of pleiotropic phenotypic alterations including an acceleration of flowering time. Furthermore, Pol ϵ is involved in the epigenetic silencing of the floral integrator genes FT and SOC1, but the molecular nature of the transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms involved remains elusive. Here we reveal that ESD7 interacts with components of the PRC2 such as CLF, EMF2 and MSI1, and that mutations in ESD7 cause a decrease in the levels of the H3K27me3 mark present in the chromatin of FT and SOC1 We also demonstrate that a domain of the C-terminal region of ESD7 mediates the binding to the different PRC2 components and this interaction is necessary for the proper recruitment of PRC2 to FT and SOC1 chromatin. We unveil the existence of interplay between the DNA replication machinery and the PcG complexes in epigenetic transcriptional silencing. These observations provide an insight into the mechanisms ensuring that the epigenetic code at pivotal loci in developmental control is faithfully transmitted to the progeny of eukaryotic cells. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Arabidopsis DNA polymerase ϵ recruits components of Polycomb repressor complex to mediate epigenetic gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    del Olmo, Iván; López, Juan A.; Vázquez, Jesús; Raynaud, Cécile; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis ESD7 locus encodes the catalytic subunit of the DNA Pol ϵ involved in the synthesis of the DNA leading strand and is essential for embryo viability. The hypomorphic allele esd7-1 is viable but displays a number of pleiotropic phenotypic alterations including an acceleration of flowering time. Furthermore, Pol ϵ is involved in the epigenetic silencing of the floral integrator genes FT and SOC1, but the molecular nature of the transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms involved remains elusive. Here we reveal that ESD7 interacts with components of the PRC2 such as CLF, EMF2 and MSI1, and that mutations in ESD7 cause a decrease in the levels of the H3K27me3 mark present in the chromatin of FT and SOC1. We also demonstrate that a domain of the C-terminal region of ESD7 mediates the binding to the different PRC2 components and this interaction is necessary for the proper recruitment of PRC2 to FT and SOC1 chromatin. We unveil the existence of interplay between the DNA replication machinery and the PcG complexes in epigenetic transcriptional silencing. These observations provide an insight into the mechanisms ensuring that the epigenetic code at pivotal loci in developmental control is faithfully transmitted to the progeny of eukaryotic cells. PMID:26980282

  6. Identification of proteasomal catalytic subunit PSMA6 as a therapeutic target for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kakumu, Tomohiko; Sato, Mitsuo; Goto, Daiki; Kato, Toshio; Yogo, Naoyuki; Hase, Tetsunari; Morise, Masahiro; Fukui, Takayuki; Yokoi, Kohei; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Girard, Luc; Minna, John D; Byers, Lauren A; Heymach, John V; Coombes, Kevin R; Kondo, Masashi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2017-04-01

    To identify potential therapeutic targets for lung cancer, we performed semi-genome-wide shRNA screening combined with the utilization of genome-wide expression and copy number data. shRNA screening targeting 5043 genes in NCI-H460 identified 51 genes as candidates. Pathway analysis revealed that the 51 genes were enriched for the five pathways, including ribosome, proteasome, RNA polymerase, pyrimidine metabolism and spliceosome pathways. We focused on the proteasome pathway that involved six candidate genes because its activation has been demonstrated in diverse human malignancies, including lung cancer. Microarray expression and array CGH data showed that PSMA6, a proteasomal subunit of a 20S catalytic core complex, was highly expressed in lung cancer cell lines, with recurrent gene amplifications in some cases. Therefore, we further examined the roles of PSMA6 in lung cancer. Silencing of PSMA6 induced apoptosis or G2/M cell cycle arrest in cancer cell lines but not in an immortalized normal lung cell line. These results suggested that PSMA6 serves as an attractive target with a high therapeutic index for lung cancer. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  7. Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System Components Modulate Gene Transcription and Virulence of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Khajanchi, Bijay K; Odeh, Evelyn; Gao, Lihui; Jacobs, Mary B; Philipp, Mario T; Lin, Tao; Norris, Steven J

    2015-12-28

    The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) and adenylate cyclase (AC) IV (encoded by BB0723 [cyaB]) are well conserved in different species of Borrelia. However, the functional roles of PEP-PTS and AC in the infectious cycle of Borrelia have not been characterized previously. We examined 12 PEP-PTS transporter component mutants by needle inoculation of mice to assess their ability to cause mouse infection. Transposon mutants with mutations in the EIIBC components (ptsG) (BB0645, thought to be involved in glucose-specific transport) were unable to cause infection in mice, while all other tested PEP-PTS mutants retained infectivity. Infectivity was partially restored in an in trans-complemented strain of the ptsG mutant. While the ptsG mutant survived normally in unfed as well as fed ticks, it was unable to cause infection in mice by tick transmission, suggesting that the function of ptsG is essential to establish infection by either needle inoculation or tick transmission. In Gram-negative organisms, the regulatory effects of the PEP-PTS are mediated by adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels. A recombinant protein encoded by B. burgdorferi BB0723 (a putative cyaB homolog) was shown to have adenylate cyclase activity in vitro; however, mutants with mutations in this gene were fully infectious in the tick-mouse infection cycle, indicating that its function is not required in this process. By transcriptome analysis, we demonstrated that the ptsG gene may directly or indirectly modulate gene expression of Borrelia burgdorferi. Overall, the PEP-PTS glucose transporter PtsG appears to play important roles in the pathogenesis of B. burgdorferi that extend beyond its transport functions.

  8. Phosphoenolpyruvate Phosphotransferase System Components Modulate Gene Transcription and Virulence of Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Odeh, Evelyn; Gao, Lihui; Jacobs, Mary B.; Philipp, Mario T.; Lin, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS) and adenylate cyclase (AC) IV (encoded by BB0723 [cyaB]) are well conserved in different species of Borrelia. However, the functional roles of PEP-PTS and AC in the infectious cycle of Borrelia have not been characterized previously. We examined 12 PEP-PTS transporter component mutants by needle inoculation of mice to assess their ability to cause mouse infection. Transposon mutants with mutations in the EIIBC components (ptsG) (BB0645, thought to be involved in glucose-specific transport) were unable to cause infection in mice, while all other tested PEP-PTS mutants retained infectivity. Infectivity was partially restored in an in trans-complemented strain of the ptsG mutant. While the ptsG mutant survived normally in unfed as well as fed ticks, it was unable to cause infection in mice by tick transmission, suggesting that the function of ptsG is essential to establish infection by either needle inoculation or tick transmission. In Gram-negative organisms, the regulatory effects of the PEP-PTS are mediated by adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels. A recombinant protein encoded by B. burgdorferi BB0723 (a putative cyaB homolog) was shown to have adenylate cyclase activity in vitro; however, mutants with mutations in this gene were fully infectious in the tick-mouse infection cycle, indicating that its function is not required in this process. By transcriptome analysis, we demonstrated that the ptsG gene may directly or indirectly modulate gene expression of Borrelia burgdorferi. Overall, the PEP-PTS glucose transporter PtsG appears to play important roles in the pathogenesis of B. burgdorferi that extend beyond its transport functions. PMID:26712207

  9. Feature selection in gene expression data using principal component analysis and rough set theory.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Debahuti; Dash, Rajashree; Rath, Amiya Kumar; Acharya, Milu

    2011-01-01

    In many fields such as data mining, machine learning, pattern recognition and signal processing, data sets containing huge number of features are often involved. Feature selection is an essential data preprocessing technique for such high-dimensional data classification tasks. Traditional dimensionality reduction approach falls into two categories: Feature Extraction (FE) and Feature Selection (FS). Principal component analysis is an unsupervised linear FE method for projecting high-dimensional data into a low-dimensional space with minimum loss of information. It discovers the directions of maximal variances in the data. The Rough set approach to feature selection is used to discover the data dependencies and reduction in the number of attributes contained in a data set using the data alone, requiring no additional information. For selecting discriminative features from principal components, the Rough set theory can be applied jointly with PCA, which guarantees that the selected principal components will be the most adequate for classification. We call this method Rough PCA. The proposed method is successfully applied for choosing the principal features and then applying the Upper and Lower Approximations to find the reduced set of features from a gene expression data.

  10. Effects of the gene carrier polyethyleneimines on structure and function of blood components.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Dagen; Jiao, Yanpeng; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Wei; Li, Nan; Zuo, Qinhua; Wang, Qian; Xue, Wei; Liu, Zonghua

    2013-01-01

    As a synthetic polycation, polyethylenimine (PEI) is currently one of the most effective non-viral gene carriers. For in vivo applications, PEI will enter systemic circulation and interact with various blood components and then affect their individual bio-functions. Up to now, overall and systematic investigation on the interaction of PEI with multiple blood components at cellular, membrane, and molecular levels is lacking, even though it is critically important for the in vivo safety of PEI. To learn a structure-activity relationship, we investigated the effects of PEI with different molecular weight (MW) and shape (branched or linear) on key blood components and function, specifically, on RBC aggregation and morphological change, platelet activation, conformation change of albumin (as a representative of plasma proteins), and blood coagulation process. Additionally, more proteins from plasma were screened and identified to have associations with PEI by a proteomic analysis. It was found that, the PEIs have severe impact on RBC membrane structure, albumin conformation, and blood coagulation process, but do not significantly activate platelets at low concentrations. Furthermore, 41 plasma proteins were identified to have some interaction with PEI. This indicates that, besides albumin, PEI does interact with a variety of blood plasma proteins, and could have unexplored effects on their structures and bio-functions. The results provide good insight into the molecular design and blood safety of PEI and other polycations for in vivo applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Activity-based imaging probes of the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Carmony, Kimberly Cornish; Kim, Kyung Bo

    2013-09-01

    Over the years, the proteasome has been extensively investigated due to its crucial roles in many important signaling pathways and its implications in diseases. Two proteasome inhibitors--bortezomib and carfilzomib--have received FDA approval for the treatment of multiple myeloma, thereby validating the proteasome as a chemotherapeutic target. As a result, further research efforts have been focused on dissecting the complex biology of the proteasome to gain the insight required for developing next-generation proteasome inhibitors. It is clear that chemical probes have made significant contributions to these efforts, mostly by functioning as inhibitors that selectively block the catalytic activity of proteasomes. Analogues of these inhibitors are now providing additional tools for visualization of catalytically active proteasome subunits, several of which allow real-time monitoring of proteasome activity in living cells as well as in in vivo settings. These imaging probes will provide powerful tools for assessing the efficacy of proteasome inhibitors in clinical settings. In this review, we will focus on the recent efforts towards developing imaging probes of proteasomes, including the latest developments in immunoproteasome-selective imaging probes.

  12. Identification of substrates of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Michael J; Arora, Pooja; Festa, Richard A; Butler-Wu, Susan M; Gokhale, Rajesh S; Darwin, K Heran

    2006-01-01

    The putative proteasome-associated proteins Mpa (Mycobaterium proteasomal ATPase) and PafA (proteasome accessory factor A) of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) are essential for virulence and resistance to nitric oxide. However, a direct link between the proteasome protease and Mpa or PafA has never been demonstrated. Furthermore, protein degradation by bacterial proteasomes in vitro has not been accomplished, possibly due to the failure to find natural degradation substrates or other necessary proteasome co-factors. In this work, we identify the first bacterial proteasome substrates, malonyl Co-A acyl carrier protein transacylase and ketopantoate hydroxymethyltransferase, enzymes that are required for the biosynthesis of fatty acids and polyketides that are essential for the pathogenesis of Mtb. Maintenance of the physiological levels of these enzymes required Mpa and PafA in addition to proteasome protease activity. Mpa levels were also regulated in a proteasome-dependent manner. Finally, we found that a conserved tyrosine of Mpa was essential for function. Thus, these results suggest that Mpa, PafA, and the Mtb proteasome degrade bacterial proteins that are important for virulence in mice. PMID:17082771

  13. Evidence that the Arabidopsis Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolases 1 and 2 associate with the 26S proteasome and the TREX-2 complex.

    PubMed

    Tian, Gang; Lu, Qing; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Rothstein, Steven J; Cui, Yuhai

    2012-11-01

    The 26S proteasome interacts with a number of different proteins, while the TREX-2 complex is an important component of the mRNA export machinery. In animals and yeast, members of the Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolase 37 (UCH37) family are found to associate with the 26S proteasome, but this has not been demonstrated in plants. The Arabidopsis UCH1 and UCH2 are orthologous to UCH37. Here, we show that UCH1 and UCH2 interact with the 26S proteasome lid subunits. In addition, the two UCHs also interact with TREX-2 components. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis UCHs may serve as a link between the 26S proteasome lid complex and the TREX-2 complex.

  14. High Levels of Serum Ubiquitin and Proteasome in a Case of HLA-B27 Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Settimio; Gesualdo, Carlo; Maisto, Rosa; Trotta, Maria Consiglia; Di Carluccio, Nadia; Brigida, Annalisa; Di Iorio, Valentina; Testa, Francesco; Simonelli, Francesca; D’Amico, Michele; Di Filippo, Clara

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the authors describe a case of high serum levels of ubiquitin and proteasome in a woman under an acute attack of autoimmune uveitis. The woman was 52 years old, diagnosed as positive for the Human leukocyte antigen-B27 gene, and came to our observation in January 2013 claiming a severe uveitis attack that involved the right eye. During the acute attack of uveitis, this woman had normal serum biochemical parameters but higher levels of serum ubiquitin and proteasome 20S subunit, with respect to a healthy volunteer matched for age and sex. These levels correlated well with the clinical score attributed to uveitis. After the patient was admitted to therapy, she received oral prednisone in a de-escalation protocol (doses from 50 to 5 mg/day) for four weeks. Following this therapy, she had an expected reduction of clinical signs and score for uveitis, but concomitantly she had a reduction of the serum levels of ubiquitin, poliubiquitinated proteins (MAb-FK1) and proteasome 20S activity. Therefore, a role for ubiquitin and proteasome in the development of human autoimmune uveitis has been hypothesized. PMID:28245629

  15. HUWE1 ubiquitinates MyoD and targets it for proteasomal degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Noy, Tahel; Suad, Oded; Taglicht, Daniel; Ciechanover, Aaron

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HUWE1 ubiquitinates MyoD in vitro and in cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ubiquitination by HUWE1 targets MyoD for proteasomal degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HUWE1 can modify MyoD on its N-terminal residue. -- Abstract: MyoD is a tissue-specific transcriptional activator that acts as a master switch for muscle development. It activates a broad array of muscle-specific genes, which leads to conversion of proliferating myoblasts into mature myotubes. The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays an important role in controlling MyoD. Both its N-terminal residue and internal lysines can be targeted by ubiquitin, and both modifications appear to direct it for proteasomal degradation. The protein is short-lived and has a half-life of {approx}45 min in different cells. It was reported that MyoD can be ubiquitinated by MAFbx/AT-1, but accumulating lines of experimental evidence showed that other ligase(s) may also participate in its targeting. Here we describe the involvement of HUWE1 in the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of MyoD. Furthermore, we show that the ligase can ubiquitinate the protein in its N-terminal residue.

  16. Cereblon is recruited to aggresome and shows cytoprotective effect against ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sawamura, Naoya; Wakabayashi, Satoru; Matsumoto, Kodai; Yamada, Haruka; Asahi, Toru

    2015-09-04

    Cereblon (CRBN) is encoded by a candidate gene for autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability (ID). The nonsense mutation, R419X, causes deletion of 24 amino acids at the C-terminus of CRBN, leading to mild ID. Although abnormal CRBN function may be associated with ID disease onset, its cellular mechanism is still unclear. Here, we examine the role of CRBN in aggresome formation and cytoprotection. In the presence of a proteasome inhibitor, exogenous CRBN formed perinuclear inclusions and co-localized with aggresome markers. Endogenous CRBN also formed perinuclear inclusions under the same condition. Treatment with a microtubule destabilizer or an inhibitor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of CRBN blocked formation of CRBN inclusions. Biochemical analysis showed CRBN containing inclusions were high-molecular weight, ubiquitin-positive. CRBN overexpression in cultured cells suppressed cell death induced by proteasome inhibitor. Furthermore, knockdown of endogenous CRBN in cultured cells increased cell death induced by proteasome inhibitor, compared with control cells. Our results show CRBN is recruited to aggresome and has functional roles in cytoprotection against ubiquitin-proteasome system impaired condition.

  17. Molecular chaperones of the Hsp70 family assist in the assembly of 20S proteasomes.

    PubMed

    Hammack, Lindsay J; Firestone, Kyle; Chang, William; Kusmierczyk, Andrew R

    2017-04-29

    The eukaryotic 26S proteasome is a large protease comprised of two major sub assemblies, the 20S proteasome, or core particle (CP), and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). Assembly of the CP and RP is assisted by an expanding list of dedicated assembly factors. For the CP, this includes Ump1 and the heterodimeric Pba1-Pba2 and Pba3-Pba4 proteins. It is not known how many additional proteins that assist in proteasome biogenesis remain to be discovered. Here, we demonstrate that two members of the Hsp70 family in yeast, Ssa1 and Ssa2, play a direct role in CP assembly. Ssa1 and Ssa2 interact genetically and physically with proteasomal components. Specifically, they associate tightly with known CP assembly intermediates, but not with fully assembled CP, through an extensive purification protocol. And, in yeast lacking both Ssa1 and Ssa2, specific defects in CP assembly are observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Proteasome machinery is instrumental in a common gain-of-function program of the p53 missense mutants in cancer.

    PubMed

    Walerych, Dawid; Lisek, Kamil; Sommaggio, Roberta; Piazza, Silvano; Ciani, Yari; Dalla, Emiliano; Rajkowska, Katarzyna; Gaweda-Walerych, Katarzyna; Ingallina, Eleonora; Tonelli, Claudia; Morelli, Marco J; Amato, Angela; Eterno, Vincenzo; Zambelli, Alberto; Rosato, Antonio; Amati, Bruno; Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Del Sal, Giannino

    2016-08-01

    In cancer, the tumour suppressor gene TP53 undergoes frequent missense mutations that endow mutant p53 proteins with oncogenic properties. Until now, a universal mutant p53 gain-of-function program has not been defined. By means of multi-omics: proteome, DNA interactome (chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing) and transcriptome (RNA sequencing/microarray) analyses, we identified the proteasome machinery as a common target of p53 missense mutants. The mutant p53-proteasome axis globally affects protein homeostasis, inhibiting multiple tumour-suppressive pathways, including the anti-oncogenic KSRP-microRNA pathway. In cancer cells, p53 missense mutants cooperate with Nrf2 (NFE2L2) to activate proteasome gene transcription, resulting in resistance to the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib. Combining the mutant p53-inactivating agent APR-246 (PRIMA-1MET) with the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib is effective in overcoming chemoresistance in triple-negative breast cancer cells, creating a therapeutic opportunity for treatment of solid tumours and metastasis with mutant p53.

  19. Production of Infectious Dengue Virus in Aedes aegypti Is Dependent on the Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Milly M.; Sessions, October M.; Gubler, Duane J.; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) relies on host factors to complete its life cycle in its mosquito host for subsequent transmission to humans. DENV first establishes infection in the midgut of Aedes aegypti and spreads to various mosquito organs for lifelong infection. Curiously, studies have shown that infectious DENV titers peak and decrease thereafter in the midgut despite relatively stable viral genome levels. However, the mechanisms that regulate this decoupling of infectious virion production from viral RNA replication have never been determined. We show here that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) plays an important role in regulating infectious DENV production. Using RNA interference studies, we show in vivo that knockdown of selected UPP components reduced infectious virus production without altering viral RNA replication in the midgut. Furthermore, this decoupling effect could also be observed after RNAi knockdown in the head/thorax of the mosquito, which otherwise showed direct correlation between infectious DENV titer and viral RNA levels. The dependence on the UPP for successful DENV production is further reinforced by the observed up-regulation of key UPP molecules upon DENV infection that overcome the relatively low expression of these genes after a blood meal. Collectively, our findings indicate an important role for the UPP in regulating DENV production in the mosquito vector. PMID:26566123

  20. Ubiquitin/proteasome-rich particulate cytoplasmic structures (PaCSs) in the platelets and megakaryocytes of ANKRD26-related thrombo-cytopenia.

    PubMed

    Necchi, Vittorio; Balduini, Alessandra; Noris, Patrizia; Barozzi, Serena; Sommi, Patrizia; di Buduo, Christian; Balduini, Carlo L; Solcia, Enrico; Pecci, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    ANKRD26-related thrombocytopenia (ANKRD26-RT) is an autosomal-dominant thrombocytopenia caused by mutations in the 5'UTR of the ANKRD26 gene. ANKRD26-RT is characterised by dysmegakaryopoiesis and an increased risk of leukaemia. PaCSs are novel particulate cytoplasmic structures with selective immunoreactivity for polyubiquitinated proteins and proteasome that have been detected in a number of solid cancers, in the epithelia of Helicobacter pylori gastritis and related preneoplastic lesions, and in the neutrophils of Schwachman-Diamond syndrome, a genetic disease with neutropenia and increased leukaemia risk. We searched for PaCSs in blood cells from 14 consecutive patients with ANKRD26-RT. Electron microscopy combined with immunogold staining for polyubiquitinated proteins, 20S and 19S proteasome showed PaCSs in most ANKRD26-RT platelets, as in a restricted minority of platelets from healthy controls and from subjects with other inherited or immune thrombocytopenias. In ANKRD26-RT platelets, the PaCS amount exceeded that of control platelets by a factor of 5 (p<0.0001). Immunoblotting showed that the higher PaCS number was associated with increased amounts of polyubiquitinated proteins and proteasome in ANKRD26-RT platelets. PaCSs were also extensively represented in ANKRD26-RT megakaryocytes, but not in healthy control megakaryocytes, and were absent in other ANKRD26-RT and control blood cells. Therefore, large amounts of PaCSs are a characteristic feature of ANKRD26-RT platelets and megakaryocytes, although these novel cell components are also present in a small subpopulation of normal platelets. The widespread presence of PaCSs in inherited diseases with increased leukaemia risk, as well as in solid neoplasms and their preneoplastic lesions, suggests a link of these structures with oncogenesis.

  1. Ghrelin Gene Variants Influence on Metabolic Syndrome Components in Aged Spanish Population

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Mireia; Adam, Victoria; Palomera, Elisabet; Blesa, Sebastian; Díaz, Gonzalo; Buquet, Xavier; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Martín-Escudero, Juan Carlos; Palanca, Ana; Chaves, Javier Felipe; Puig-Domingo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Background The role of genetic variations within the ghrelin gene on cardiometabolic profile and nutritional status is still not clear in humans, particularly in elderly people. Objectives We investigated six SNPs of the ghrelin gene and their relationship with metabolic syndrome (MS) components. Subjects and Methods 824 subjects (413 men/411 women, age 77.31±5.04) participating in the Mataró aging study (n = 310) and the Hortega study (n = 514) were analyzed. Anthropometric variables, ghrelin, lipids, glucose and blood pressure levels were measured, and distribution of SNPs -994CT (rs26312), -604GA (rs27647), -501AC (rs26802), R51Q (rs34911341), M72L (rs696217) and L90G (rs4684677) of the ghrelin gene evaluated. Genotypes were determined by multiplex PCR and SNaPshot minisequencing. MS (IDF criteria) was found in 54.9%. Results No association between any of the SNPs and levels of total fasting circulating ghrelin levels was found. C/A-A/A genotype of M72L was associated with increased risk of central obesity according to IDF criteria, while G/A-G/G genotypes of -604GA with reduced risk. A/A genotype of -501AC polymorphism was associated to decreased BMI. In relation to lipid profile, the same genotypes of -604GA were associated with increased total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol and -501AC with reduced triglycerides. There were no associations with systolic or diastolic blood pressure levels or with hypertension, glucose levels or diabetes and ghrelin polymorphisms. However, G/G genotype of -604GA was associated with glucose >100 mg/dL. Haplotype analysis showed that only one haplotype is associated with increased risk of waist circumference and central obesity. The analysis of subjects by gender showed an important and different association of these polymorphisms regarding MS parameters. Conclusion Ghrelin gene variants -604GA, -501AC and M72L are associated with certain components of MS, in particular to BMI and lipid profile in elderly Spanish subjects. PMID

  2. Immunoaffinity purification of the functional 20S proteasome from human cells via transient overexpression of specific proteasome subunits.

    PubMed

    Livinskaya, Veronika A; Barlev, Nickolai A; Nikiforov, Andrey A

    2014-05-01

    The proteasome is a multi-subunit proteolytic complex that plays a central role in protein degradation in all eukaryotic cells. It regulates many vital cellular processes therefore its dysfunction can lead to various pathologies including cancer and neurodegeneration. Isolation of enzymatically active proteasomes is a key step to the successful study of the proteasome regulation and functions. Here we describe a simple and efficient protocol for immunoaffinity purification of the functional 20S proteasomes from human HEK 293T cells after transient overexpression of specific proteasome subunits tagged with 3xFLAG. To construct 3xFLAG-fusion proteins, DNA sequences encoding the 20S proteasome subunits PSMB5, PSMA5, and PSMA3 were cloned into mammalian expression vector pIRES-hrGFP-1a. The corresponding recombinant proteins PSMB5-3xFLAG, PSMA5-3xFLAG, or PSMA3-3xFLAG were transiently overexpressed in human HEK 293T cells and were shown to be partially incorporated into the intact proteasome complexes. 20S proteasomes were immunoprecipitated from HEK 293T cell extracts under mild conditions using antibodies against FLAG peptide. Isolation of highly purified 20S proteasomes were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting using antibodies against different proteasome subunits. Affinity purified 20S proteasomes were shown to possess chymotrypsin- and trypsin-like peptidase activities confirming their functionality. This simple single-step affinity method of the 20S proteasome purification can be instrumental to subsequent functional studies of proteasomes in human cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Suppression of BRCA1 sensitizes cells to proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Y; Bouwman, P; Greco, D; Saarela, J; Yadav, B; Jonkers, J; Kuznetsov, S G

    2014-01-01

    BRCA1 is a multifunctional protein best known for its role in DNA repair and association with breast and ovarian cancers. To uncover novel biologically significant molecular functions of BRCA1, we tested a panel of 198 approved and experimental drugs to inhibit growth of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells depleted for BRCA1 by siRNA. 26S proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and carfilzomib emerged as a new class of selective BRCA1-targeting agents. The effect was confirmed in HeLa and U2OS cancer cell lines using two independent siRNAs, and in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells with inducible deletion of Brca1. Bortezomib treatment did not cause any increase in nuclear foci containing phosphorylated histone H2AX, and knockdown of BRCA2 did not entail sensitivity to bortezomib, suggesting that the DNA repair function of BRCA1 may not be directly involved. We found that a toxic effect of bortezomib on BRCA1-depleted cells is mostly due to deregulated cell cycle checkpoints mediated by RB1-E2F pathway and 53BP1. Similar to BRCA1, depletion of RB1 also conferred sensitivity to bortezomib, whereas suppression of E2F1 or 53BP1 together with BRCA1 reduced induction of apoptosis after bortezomib treatment. A gene expression microarray study identified additional genes activated by bortezomib treatment only in the context of inactivation of BRCA1 including a critical involvement of the ERN1-mediated unfolded protein response. Our data indicate that BRCA1 has a novel molecular function affecting cell cycle checkpoints in a manner dependent on the 26S proteasome activity. PMID:25522274

  4. Involvement of proteasomal subunits zeta and iota in RNA degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Petit, F; Jarrousse, A S; Dahlmann, B; Sobek, A; Hendil, K B; Buri, J; Briand, Y; Schmid, H P

    1997-01-01

    We have identified two distinct subunits of 20 S proteasomes that are associated with RNase activity. Proteasome subunits zeta and iota, eluted from two-dimensional Western blots, hydrolysed tobacco mosaic virus RNA, whereas none of the other subunits degraded this substrate under the same conditions. Additionally, proteasomes were dissociated by 6 M urea, and subunit zeta, containing the highest RNase activity, was isolated by anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Purified subunit zeta migrated as a single spot on two-dimensional PAGE with a molecular mass of approx. 28 kDa. Addition of anti-(subunit zeta) antibodies led to the co-precipitation of this proteasome subunit and nuclease activity. This is the first evidence that proteasomal alpha-type subunits are associated with an enzymic activity, and our results provide further evidence that proteasomes may be involved in cellular RNA metabolism. PMID:9337855

  5. Towards quantitative prediction of proteasomal digestion patterns of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldobin, Denis S.; Zaikin, Alexey

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the problem of proteasomal degradation of proteins. Though proteasomes are important for all aspects of cellular metabolism, some details of the physical mechanism of the process remain unknown. We introduce a stochastic model of the proteasomal degradation of proteins, which accounts for the protein translocation and the topology of the positioning of cleavage centers of a proteasome from first principles. For this model we develop a mathematical description based on a master equation and techniques for reconstruction of the cleavage specificity inherent to proteins and the proteasomal translocation rates, which are a property of the proteasome species, from mass spectroscopy data on digestion patterns. With these properties determined, one can quantitatively predict digestion patterns for new experimental set-ups. Additionally we design an experimental set-up for a synthetic polypeptide with a periodic sequence of amino acids, which enables especially reliable determination of translocation rates.

  6. Regulating the 20S Proteasome Ubiquitin-Independent Degradation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Nissan, Gili; Sharon, Michal

    2014-01-01

    For many years, the ubiquitin-26S proteasome degradation pathway was considered the primary route for proteasomal degradation. However, it is now becoming clear that proteins can also be targeted for degradation by the core 20S proteasome itself. Degradation by the 20S proteasome does not require ubiquitin tagging or the presence of the 19S regulatory particle; rather, it relies on the inherent structural disorder of the protein being degraded. Thus, proteins that contain unstructured regions due to oxidation, mutation, or aging, as well as naturally, intrinsically unfolded proteins, are susceptible to 20S degradation. Unlike the extensive knowledge acquired over the years concerning degradation by the 26S proteasome, relatively little is known about the means by which 20S-mediated proteolysis is controlled. Here, we describe our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that coordinate 20S proteasome-mediated degradation, and highlight the gaps in knowledge that remain to be bridged. PMID:25250704

  7. The recognition of ubiquitinated proteins by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Grice, Guinevere L; Nathan, James A

    2016-09-01

    The ability of ubiquitin to form up to eight different polyubiquitin chain linkages generates complexity within the ubiquitin proteasome system, and accounts for the diverse roles of ubiquitination within the cell. Understanding how each type of ubiquitin linkage is correctly interpreted by ubiquitin binding proteins provides important insights into the link between chain recognition and cellular fate. A major function of ubiquitination is to signal degradation of intracellular proteins by the 26S proteasome. Lysine-48 (K48) linked polyubiquitin chains are well established as the canonical signal for proteasomal degradation, but recent studies show a role for other ubiquitin linked chains in facilitating degradation by the 26S proteasome. Here, we review how different types of polyubiquitin linkage bind to ubiquitin receptors on the 26S proteasome, how they signal degradation and discuss the implications of ubiquitin chain linkage in regulating protein breakdown by the proteasome.

  8. Emodin potentiates the antiproliferative effect of interferon α/β by activation of JAK/STAT pathway signaling through inhibition of the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    He, Yujiao; Huang, Junmei; Wang, Ping; Shen, Xiaofei; Li, Sheng; Yang, Lijuan; Liu, Wanli; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Zhang, Guolin; Wang, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a negative regulator of type I interferon (IFN-α/β) signaling. Inhibition of the 26S proteasome by small molecules may be a new strategy to enhance the efficacy of type I IFNs and reduce their side effects. Using cell-based screening assay for new 26S proteasome inhibitors, we found that emodin, a natural anthraquinone, was a potent inhibitor of the human 26S proteasome. Emodin preferably inhibited the caspase-like and chymotrypsin-like activities of the human 26S proteasome and increased the ubiquitination of endogenous proteins in cells. Computational modeling showed that emodin exhibited an orientation/conformation favorable to nucleophilic attack in the active pocket of the β1, β2, and β5 subunits of the 26S proteasome. Emodin increased phosphorylation of STAT1, decreased phosphorylation of STAT3 and increased endogenous gene expression stimulated by IFN-α. Emodin inhibited IFN-α-stimulated ubiquitination and degradation of type I interferon receptor 1 (IFNAR1). Emodin also sensitized the antiproliferative effect of IFN-α in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells and reduced tumor growth in Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma-bearing mice. These results suggest that emodin potentiates the antiproliferative effect of IFN-α by activation of JAK/STAT pathway signaling through inhibition of 26S proteasome-stimulated IFNAR1 degradation. Therefore, emodin warrants further investigation as a new means to enhance the efficacy of IFN-α/β. PMID:26683360

  9. Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven R Schwarze...SUBTITLE Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Proteasome Inhibition 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0392 5c...proteasome inhibition can act as an anti-neoplastic agent in vivo by sensitizing cancer cells to cell death ligands in the tumor microenvironment

  10. Identification of a two-component signal transduction system that regulates maltose genes in Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, Thomas J; Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru; Cheung, Jackie K; Rood, Julian I

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive rod that is widely distributed in nature and is the etiological agent of several human and animal diseases. The complete genome sequence of C. perfringens strain 13 has been determined and multiple two-component signal transduction systems identified. One of these systems, designated here as the MalNO system, was analyzed in this study. Microarray analysis was used to carry out functional analysis of a malO mutant. The results, which were confirmed by quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, indicated that genes putatively involved in the uptake and metabolism of maltose were up-regulated in the malO mutant. These effects were reversed by complementation with the wild-type malO gene. Growth of these isogenic strains in medium with and without maltose showed that the malO mutant recovered more quickly from maltose deprivation when compared to the wild-type and complemented strains, leading to the conclusion that the MalNO system regulates maltose utilization in C. perfringens. It is postulated that this regulatory network may allow this soil bacterium and opportunistic pathogen to respond to environmental conditions where there are higher concentrations of maltose or maltodextrins, such as in the presence of decaying plant material in rich soil.

  11. Endoribonuclease-Based Two-Component Repressor Systems for Tight Gene Expression Control in Plants

    DOE PAGES

    Liang, Yan; Richardson, Sarah; Yan, Jingwei; ...

    2017-01-17

    © 2017 American Chemical Society. Tight control and multifactorial regulation of gene expression are important challenges in genetic engineering and are critical for the development of regulatory circuits. Meeting these challenges will facilitate transgene expression regulation and support the fine-tuning of metabolic pathways to avoid the accumulation of undesired intermediates. By employing the endoribonuclease Csy4 and its recognition sequence from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and manipulating 5′UTR of mRNA, we developed a two-component expression-repression system to tightly control synthesis of transgene products. We demonstrated that this regulatory device was functional in monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plant species, and showed that it can bemore » used to repress transgene expression by > 400-fold and to synchronize transgene repression. In addition to tissue-specific transgene repression, this system offers stimuli-dependent expression control. Using a bioinformatics approach, we identified 54 orthologous systems from various bacteria, and then validated in planta the activity for a few of those systems, demonstrating the potential diversity of such a two-component repressor system.« less

  12. Localization of the mei-1 gene product of Caenorhaditis elegans, a meiotic-specific spindle component

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Genetic evidence suggests that the product of the mei-1 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans is specifically required for meiosis in the female germline. Loss-of-function mei-1 mutations block meiotic spindle formation while a gain-of-function allele instead results in spindle defects during the early mitotic cleavages. In this report, we use immunocytochemistry to examine the localization of the mei-1 product in wild-type and mutant embryos. During metaphase of meiosis I in wild- type embryos, mei-1 protein was found throughout the spindle but was more concentrated toward the poles. At telophase I, mei-1 product colocalized with the chromatin at the spindle poles. The pattern was repeated during meiosis II but no mei-1 product was visible during the subsequent mitotic cleavages. The mei-1 gain-of-function allele resulted in ectopic mei-1 staining in the centers of the microtubule- organizing centers during interphase and in the spindles during the early cleavages. This aberrant localization is probably responsible for the poorly formed and misoriented cleavage spindles characteristic of the mutation. We also examined the localization of mei-1(+) product in the presence of mutations of genes that genetically interact with mei-1 alleles. mei-2 is apparently required to localize mei-1 product to the spindle during meiosis while mel-26 acts as a postmeiotic inhibitor. We conclude that mei-1 encodes a novel spindle component, one that is specialized for the acentriolar meiotic spindles unique to female meiosis. The genes mei-2 and mel-26 are part of a regulatory network that confines mei-1 activity to meiosis. PMID:8027178

  13. Isolation and purification of proteasomes from primary cells.

    PubMed

    Steers, Nicholas J; Peachman, Kristina K; Alving, Carl R; Rao, Mangala

    2014-11-03

    Proteasomes play an important role in cell homeostasis and in orchestrating the immune response by systematically degrading foreign proteins and misfolded or damaged host cell proteins. We describe a protocol to purify functionally active proteasomes from human CD4(+) T cells and dendritic cells derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The purification is a three-step process involving ion-exchange chromatography, ammonium sulfate precipitation, and sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. This method can be easily adapted to purify proteasomes from cell lines or from organs. Methods to characterize and visualize the purified proteasomes are also described.

  14. Proteasomes and protein conjugation across domains of life.

    PubMed

    Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    2011-12-19

    Like other energy-dependent proteases, proteasomes, which are found across the three domains of life, are self-compartmentalized and important in the early steps of proteolysis. Proteasomes degrade improperly synthesized, damaged or misfolded proteins and hydrolyse regulatory proteins that must be specifically removed or cleaved for cell signalling. In eukaryotes, proteins are typically targeted for proteasome-mediated destruction through polyubiquitylation, although ubiquitin-independent pathways also exist. Interestingly, actinobacteria and archaea also covalently attach small proteins (prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup) and small archaeal modifier proteins (Samps), respectively) to certain proteins, and this may serve to target the modified proteins for degradation by proteasomes.

  15. Cell-line-specific high background in the Proteasome-Glo assay of proteasome trypsin-like activity.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Owen M; Downey, Sondra L; Weyburne, Emily S; Williams, David A; Mirabella, Anne C; Overkleeft, Herman S; Kisselev, Alexei F

    2014-04-15

    Proteasome-Glo is a homogeneous cell-based assay of proteasomal chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like activities using luminogenic substrates, commercially available from Promega. Here we report that the background activity from cleavage of the substrate of the trypsin-like sites by nonproteasomal proteases in multiple breast and lung cancer cell lines exceeds the activity of the proteasome. We also observed substantial background chymotrypsin-like activity in some cell lines. Thus, Proteasome-Glo assay must be used with caution, and it is necessary to include a specific proteasome inhibitor to determine the background for each proteasome activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Proteasome activator PA28γ stimulates degradation of GSK3-phosphorylated insulin transcription activator MAFA.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Kenichi; Aramata, Shinsaku; Katakami, Sayo; Yasuda, Kunio; Kataoka, Kohsuke

    2011-08-01

    MAFA is a member of the MAF family of basic leucine zipper transcription factors and is a critical regulator of insulin gene expression and islet β-cell function. To be degraded by the proteasome, MAFA must be phosphorylated by GSK3 and MAP kinases at multiple serine and threonine residues (Ser49, Thr53, Thr57, Ser61, and Ser65) within its amino-terminal domain. In this study, we report that MAFA degradation is stimulated by PA28γ (REGγ and PSME3), a member of a family of proteasome activators that bind and activate the 20S proteasome. To date, only a few PA28γ-proteasome pathway substrates have been identified, including steroid receptor coactivator 3 (SRC3) and the cell cycle inhibitor p21(CIP1). PA28γ binds to MAFA, induces its proteasomal degradation, and thereby attenuates MAFA-driven transcriptional activation of the insulin promoter. Co-expression of GSK3 enhanced the PA28γ-mediated degradation of MAFA, but mutants that contained alanine substitutions at the MAFA phosphorylation sites did not bind PA28γ and were resistant to degradation. We also found that a PA28γ mutant (N151Y) that did not stimulate p21 degradation enhanced MAFA degradation, and another mutant (K188D) that promoted greater p21 degradation did not enhance MAFA degradation.These results suggest that PA28γ stimulates MAFA degradation through a novel molecular mechanism that is distinct from that for the degradation of p21.

  17. Proteasome activator PA28{gamma} stimulates degradation of GSK3-phosphorylated insulin transcription activator MAFA.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Kenichi; Aramata, Shinsaku; Katakami, Sayo; Yasuda, Kunio; Kataoka, Kohsuke

    2011-01-01

    MAFA is a member of the MAF family of basic leucine zipper transcription factors and is a critical regulator of insulin gene expression and islet β-cell function. To be degraded by the proteasome, MAFA must be phosphorylated by GSK3 and MAP kinases at multiple serine and threonine residues (Ser49, Thr53, Thr57, Ser61, and Ser65) within its amino-terminal domain. In this study, we report that MAFA degradation is stimulated by PA28γ (REGγ and PSME3), a member of a family of proteasome activators that bind and activate the 20S proteasome. To date, only a few PA28γ-proteasome pathway substrates have been identified, including steroid receptor coactivator 3 (SRC3) and the cell cycle inhibitor p21 (CIP1). PA28γ binds to MAFA, induces its proteasomal degradation, and thereby attenuates MAFA-driven transcriptional activation of the insulin promoter. Co-expression of GSK3 enhanced the PA28γ-mediated degradation of MAFA, but mutants that contained alanine substitutions at the MAFA phosphorylation sites did not bind PA28γ and were resistant to degradation. We also found that a PA28γ mutant (N151Y) that did not stimulate p21 degradation enhanced MAFA degradation, and another mutant (K188D) that promoted greater p21 degradation did not enhance MAFA degradation. These results suggest that PA28γ stimulates MAFA degradation through a novel molecular mechanism that is distinct from that for the degradation of p21.

  18. The Xanthomonas campestris type III effector XopJ proteolytically degrades proteasome subunit RPT6.

    PubMed

    Üstün, Suayib; Börnke, Frederik

    2015-05-01

    Many animal and plant pathogenic bacteria inject type III effector (T3E) proteins into their eukaryotic host cells to suppress immunity. The Yersinia outer protein J (YopJ) family of T3Es is a widely distributed family of effector proteins found in both animal and plant pathogens, and its members are highly diversified in virulence functions. Some members have been shown to possess acetyltransferase activity; however, whether this is a general feature of YopJ family T3Es is currently unknown. The T3E Xanthomonas outer protein J (XopJ), a YopJ family effector from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria, interacts with the proteasomal subunit Regulatory Particle AAA-ATPase6 (RPT6) in planta to suppress proteasome activity, resulting in the inhibition of salicylic acid-related immune responses. Here, we show that XopJ has protease activity to specifically degrade RPT6, leading to reduced proteasome activity in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus. Proteolytic degradation of RPT6 was dependent on the localization of XopJ to the plasma membrane as well as on its catalytic triad. Mutation of the Walker B motif of RPT6 prevented XopJ-mediated degradation of the protein but not XopJ interaction. This indicates that the interaction of RPT6 with XopJ is dependent on the ATP-binding activity of RPT6, but proteolytic cleavage additionally requires its ATPase activity. Inhibition of the proteasome impairs the proteasomal turnover of Nonexpressor of Pathogenesis-Related1 (NPR1), the master regulator of salicylic acid responses, leading to the accumulation of ubiquitinated NPR1, which likely interferes with the full induction of NPR1 target genes. Our results show that YopJ family T3Es are not only highly diversified in virulence function but also appear to possess different biochemical activities. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  19. The Xanthomonas campestris Type III Effector XopJ Proteolytically Degrades Proteasome Subunit RPT61[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many animal and plant pathogenic bacteria inject type III effector (T3E) proteins into their eukaryotic host cells to suppress immunity. The Yersinia outer protein J (YopJ) family of T3Es is a widely distributed family of effector proteins found in both animal and plant pathogens, and its members are highly diversified in virulence functions. Some members have been shown to possess acetyltransferase activity; however, whether this is a general feature of YopJ family T3Es is currently unknown. The T3E Xanthomonas outer protein J (XopJ), a YopJ family effector from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv vesicatoria, interacts with the proteasomal subunit Regulatory Particle AAA-ATPase6 (RPT6) in planta to suppress proteasome activity, resulting in the inhibition of salicylic acid-related immune responses. Here, we show that XopJ has protease activity to specifically degrade RPT6, leading to reduced proteasome activity in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus. Proteolytic degradation of RPT6 was dependent on the localization of XopJ to the plasma membrane as well as on its catalytic triad. Mutation of the Walker B motif of RPT6 prevented XopJ-mediated degradation of the protein but not XopJ interaction. This indicates that the interaction of RPT6 with XopJ is dependent on the ATP-binding activity of RPT6, but proteolytic cleavage additionally requires its ATPase activity. Inhibition of the proteasome impairs the proteasomal turnover of Nonexpressor of Pathogenesis-Related1 (NPR1), the master regulator of salicylic acid responses, leading to the accumulation of ubiquitinated NPR1, which likely interferes with the full induction of NPR1 target genes. Our results show that YopJ family T3Es are not only highly diversified in virulence function but also appear to possess different biochemical activities. PMID:25739698

  20. Ubiquitin-proteasome dependent degradation of GABAAα1 in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the neurobiological basis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is not fully understood, recent studies have indicated the potential role of GABAA receptors in the pathophysiology of ASD. GABAA receptors play a crucial role in various neurodevelopmental processes and adult neuroplasticity. However, the mechanism(s) of regulation of GABAA receptors in ASD remains poorly understood. Methods Postmortem middle frontal gyrus tissues (13 ASD and 13 control subjects) were used. In vitro studies were performed in primary cortical neurons at days in vitro (DIV) 14. The protein levels were examined by western blotting. Immunofluorescence studies were employed for cellular localization. The gene expression was determined by RT-PCR array and qRT-PCR. Results A significant decrease in GABAAα1 protein, but not mRNA levels was found in the middle frontal gyrus of ASD subjects indicating a post-translational regulation of GABAA receptors in ASD. At the cellular level, treatment with proteasomal inhibitor, MG132, or lactacystin significantly increased GABAAα1 protein levels and Lys48-linked polyubiquitination of GABAAα1, but reduced proteasome activity in mouse primary cortical neurons (DIV 14 from E16 embryos). Moreover, treatment with betulinic acid, a proteasome activator significantly decreased GABAAα1 protein levels in cortical neurons indicating the role of polyubiquitination of GABAAα1 proteins with their subsequent proteasomal degradation in cortical neurons. Ubiquitination specific RT-PCR array followed by western blot analysis revealed a significant increase in SYVN1, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) E3 ubiquitin ligase in the middle frontal gyrus of ASD subjects. In addition, the inhibition of proteasomal activity by MG132 increased the expression of GABAAα1 in the ER. The siRNA knockdown of SYVN1 significantly increased GABAAα1 protein levels in cortical neurons. Moreover, reduced association between SYVN1 and GABAAα1

  1. Coordinated regulation of nuclear receptor CAR by CCRP/DNAJC7, HSP70 and the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Timsit, Yoav E; Negishi, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    The constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR) plays an important role as a coordinate transcription factor in the regulation of various hepatic metabolic pathways for chemicals such as drugs, glucose, fatty acids, bilirubin, and bile acids. Currently, it is known that in its inactive state, CAR is retained in the cytoplasm in a protein complex with HSP90 and the tetratricopeptide repeat protein cytosoplasmic CAR retention protein (CCRP). Upon activation by phenobarbital (PB) or the PB-like inducer 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]-benzene (TCPOBOP), CAR translocates into the nucleus. We have identified two new components to the cytoplasmic regulation of CAR: ubiquitin-dependent degradation of CCRP and protein-protein interaction with HSP70. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 (5 µM) causes CAR to accumulate in the cytoplasm of transfected HepG2 cells. In the presence of MG132, TCPOBOP increases CCRP ubiquitination in HepG2 cells co-expressing CAR, while CAR ubiquitination was not detected. MG132 treatment of HepG2 also attenuated of TCPOBOP-induced CAR transcriptional activation on reporter constructs which contain CAR-binding DNA elements derived from the human CYP2B6 gene. The elevation of cytoplasmic CAR protein with MG132 correlated with an increase of HSP70, and to a lesser extent HSP60. Both CCRP and CAR were found to interact with endogenous HSP70 in HepG2 cells by immunoprecipitation analysis. Induction of HSP70 levels by heat shock also increased cytoplasmic CAR levels, similar to the effect of MG132. Lastly, heat shock attenuated TCPOBOP-induced CAR transcriptional activation, also similar to the effect of MG132. Collectively, these data suggest that ubiquitin-proteasomal regulation of CCRP and HSP70 are important contributors to the regulation of cytoplasmic CAR levels, and hence the ability of CAR to respond to PB or PB-like inducers.

  2. Coordinated Regulation of Nuclear Receptor CAR by CCRP/DNAJC7, HSP70 and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Timsit, Yoav E.; Negishi, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    The constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR) plays an important role as a coordinate transcription factor in the regulation of various hepatic metabolic pathways for chemicals such as drugs, glucose, fatty acids, bilirubin, and bile acids. Currently, it is known that in its inactive state, CAR is retained in the cytoplasm in a protein complex with HSP90 and the tetratricopeptide repeat protein cytosoplasmic CAR retention protein (CCRP). Upon activation by phenobarbital (PB) or the PB-like inducer 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]-benzene (TCPOBOP), CAR translocates into the nucleus. We have identified two new components to the cytoplasmic regulation of CAR: ubiquitin-dependent degradation of CCRP and protein-protein interaction with HSP70. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 (5 µM) causes CAR to accumulate in the cytoplasm of transfected HepG2 cells. In the presence of MG132, TCPOBOP increases CCRP ubiquitination in HepG2 cells co-expressing CAR, while CAR ubiquitination was not detected. MG132 treatment of HepG2 also attenuated of TCPOBOP-induced CAR transcriptional activation on reporter constructs which contain CAR-binding DNA elements derived from the human CYP2B6 gene. The elevation of cytoplasmic CAR protein with MG132 correlated with an increase of HSP70, and to a lesser extent HSP60. Both CCRP and CAR were found to interact with endogenous HSP70 in HepG2 cells by immunoprecipitation analysis. Induction of HSP70 levels by heat shock also increased cytoplasmic CAR levels, similar to the effect of MG132. Lastly, heat shock attenuated TCPOBOP-induced CAR transcriptional activation, also similar to the effect of MG132. Collectively, these data suggest that ubiquitin-proteasomal regulation of CCRP and HSP70 are important contributors to the regulation of cytoplasmic CAR levels, and hence the ability of CAR to respond to PB or PB-like inducers. PMID:24789201

  3. Proteasome Inhibitors Decrease AAV2 Capsid derived Peptide Epitope Presentation on MHC Class I Following Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Jonathan D; Hui, Daniel; Downey, Harre D; Dunn, Danielle; Pien, Gary C; Mingozzi, Federico; Zhou, Shangzhen; High, Katherine A

    2009-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are an extensively studied and highly used vector platform for gene therapy applications. We hypothesize that in the first clinical trial using AAV to treat hemophilia B, AAV capsid proteins were presented on the surface of transduced hepatocytes, resulting in clearance by antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and consequent loss of therapeutic transgene expression. It has been previously shown that proteasome inhibitors can have a dramatic effect on AAV transduction in vitro and in vivo. Here, we describe using the US Food and Drug Administration-approved proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, to decrease capsid antigen presentation on hepatocytes in vitro, whereas at the same time, enhancing gene expression in vivo. Using an AAV capsid-specific T-cell reporter (TCR) line to analyze the effect of proteasome inhibitors on antigen presentation, we demonstrate capsid antigen presentation at low multiplicities of infection (MOIs), and inhibition of antigen presentation at pharmacologic levels of bortezomib. We also demonstrate that bortezomib can enhance Factor IX (FIX) expression from an AAV2 vector in mice, although the same effect was not observed for AAV8 vectors. A pharmacological agent that can enhance AAV transduction, decrease T-cell activation/proliferation, and decrease capsid antigen presentation would be a promising solution to obstacles to successful AAV-mediated, liver-directed gene transfer in humans. PMID:19904235

  4. The role of proteasome in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae response to sub-lethal high pressure treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yoshihide; Higashi, Tetsuji; Rakwal, Randeep; Shibato, Junko; Wakida, Shin-ichi; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2010-12-01

    Hydrostatic pressure is a physical factor that can induce stress in organisms. This stress leads to growth inhibition, cellular arrest, and cellular death, and these effects depend on the degree of pressure, temperature, and sensitivity of the organisms to hydrostatic pressure. Genomics studies of yeast cells under conditions recovering from high pressure-induced cellular damage showed evidence that multiprotein complexes or membrane proteins, and not soluble proteins, are the critical targets. We performed a metabolomic analysis. The metabolomics results suggested that membrane-spanning proteins broke down after high pressure treatment and recovery conditions. We also found 13 genes that were common to essential and pressure-induced gene groups. Among these 13 genes, more than 10 were associated with proteasome structure and functions. This suggests that proteasome structure or functions can be the critical target or a highly important factor. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that yeast cells are sensitive to the proteasome inhibitor MG132 after high pressure treatment.

  5. [Structures and functions of the 26S proteasome Rpn10 family].

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Hiroyuki

    2002-09-01

    The ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway is thought to be one of the vital systems for cellular regulations, including control of the cell cycle, differentiation and apoptosis. In this pathway, poly-ubiquitinated proteins are selectively degraded by the 26S proteasome, a multisubunit proteolytic machinery. Recognition of the poly-ubiquitin chain by the 26S proteasome should be a key step leading to the selective degradation of target proteins, and the Rpn10 subunit of the 26S proteasome has been shown to preferentially bind the poly-ubiquitin chain in vitro. We previously reported that the mouse Rpn10 mRNA family is generated from a single gene by developmentally regulated, alternative splicing. To determine whether such alternative splicing mechanisms occur in organisms other than the mouse, we searched for Rpn10 isoforms in various species. Here we summarize the gene organization of the Rpn10 in lower species and provide evidence that the competence for generating all distinct forms of Rpn10 alternative splicing has expanded through evolution. Some of the Rpn10 family genes were found to be expressed in distinct developmental stages, suggesting that they have distinct functions during embryogenesis. For example, Rpn10c and Rpn10e were exclusively expressed at specific developmental stages and in specific tissues, while Rpn10a was expressed constitutively. Our experimental results indicate that the respective Rpn10 proteins possess distinct roles in the progression of development. Furthermore, some of the Rpn10 variants specifically interacted with important developmental regulators.

  6. The genetic basis for the biosynthesis of the pharmaceutically important class of epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Schorn, Michelle; Zettler, Judith; Noel, Joseph P.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Moore, Bradley S.; Kaysser, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    The epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors are an established class of therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer. Their unique α′,β′-epoxyketone pharmacophore allows binding to the catalytic β-subunits of the proteasome with extraordinary specificity. Here we report the characterization of the first gene clusters for the biosynthesis of natural peptidyl-epoxyketones. The clusters for epoxomicin, the lead compound for the anti-cancer drug Kyprolis™, and for eponemycin were identified in the actinobacterial producer strains ATCC 53904 and Streptomyces hygroscopicus ATCC 53709, respectively, using a modified protocol for Ion Torrent PGM genome sequencing. Both gene clusters code for a hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthase multifunctional enzyme complex and homologous redox enzymes. Epoxomicin and eponemycin were heterologously produced in Streptomyces albus J1046 via whole pathway expression. Moreover, we employed mass spectral molecular networking for a new comparative metabolomics approach in a heterologous system and discovered a number of putative epoxyketone derivatives. With this study we have definitively linked epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors and their biosynthesis genes for the first time in any organism, which will now allow for their detailed biochemical investigation. PMID:24168704

  7. Need for tripeptidyl-peptidase II in major histocompatibility complex class I viral antigen processing when proteasomes are detrimental.

    PubMed

    Guil, Sara; Rodríguez-Castro, Marta; Aguilar, Francisco; Villasevil, Eugenia M; Antón, Luis C; Del Val, Margarita

    2006-12-29

    CD8(+) T lymphocytes recognize infected cells that display virus-derived antigenic peptides complexed with major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. Peptides are mainly byproducts of cellular protein turnover by cytosolic proteasomes. Cytosolic tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) also participates in protein degradation. Several peptidic epitopes unexpectedly do not require proteasomes, but it is unclear which proteases generate them. We studied antigen processing of influenza virus nucleoprotein epitope NP(147-155), an archetype epitope that is even destroyed by a proteasome-mediated mechanism. TPPII, with the assistance of endoplasmic reticulum trimming metallo-aminopeptidases, probably ERAAP (endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase associated with antigen processing), was crucial for nucleoprotein epitope generation both in the presence of functional proteasomes and when blocked by lactacystin, as shown with specific chemical inhibitors and gene silencing. Different protein contexts and subcellular targeting all allowed epitope processing by TPPII as well as trimming. The results show the plasticity of the cell's assortment of proteases for providing ligands for recognition by antiviral CD8(+) T cells. Our observations identify for the first time a set of proteases competent for antigen processing of an epitope that is susceptible to destruction by proteasomes.

  8. Calcium channel blocker verapamil accelerates gambogic acid-induced cytotoxicity via enhancing proteasome inhibition and ROS generation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ningning; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Shouting; Li, Xiaofen; Yang, Changshan; Dou, Q Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2014-04-01

    Verapamil (Ver), an inhibitor of the multidrug resistance gene product, has been proved to be a promising combination partner with other anti-cancer agents including proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Gambogic acid (GA) has been approved for Phase II clinical trials in cancer therapy in China. We have most recently reported that GA is a potent proteasome inhibitor, with anticancer efficiency comparable to bortezomib but much less toxicity. In the current study we investigated whether Ver can enhance the cytotoxicity of GA. We report that (i) the combination of Ver and GA results in synergistic cytotoxic effect and cell death induction in HepG2 and K562 cancer cell lines; (ii) a combinational treatment with Ver and GA induces caspase activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production; (iii) caspase inhibitor z-VAD blocks GA+Ver-induced apoptosis but not proteasome inhibition; (iv) cysteine-containing compound N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prevents GA+Ver-induced poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and proteasome inhibition. These results demonstrate that Ver accelerates GA-induced cytotoxicity via enhancing proteasome inhibition and ROS production. These findings indicate that the natural product GA is a valuable candidate that can be used in combination with Ver, thus representing a compelling anticancer strategy.

  9. GluN2B-Containing NMDA Receptors Regulate AMPA Receptor Traffic through Anchoring of the Synaptic Proteasome.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Joana S; Schmidt, Jeannette; Rio, Pedro; Águas, Rodolfo; Rooyakkers, Amanda; Li, Ka Wan; Smit, August B; Craig, Ann Marie; Carvalho, Ana Luisa

    2015-06-03

    NMDA receptors play a central role in shaping the strength of synaptic connections throughout development and in mediating synaptic plasticity mechanisms that underlie some forms of learning and memory formation in the CNS. In the hippocampus and the neocortex, GluN1 is combined primarily with GluN2A and GluN2B, which are differentially expressed during development and confer distinct molecular and physiological properties to NMDA receptors. The contribution of each subunit to the synaptic traffic of NMDA receptors and therefore to their role during development and in synaptic plasticity is still controversial. We report a critical role for the GluN2B subunit in regulating NMDA receptor synaptic targeting. In the absence of GluN2B, the synaptic levels of AMPA receptors are increased and accompanied by decreased constitutive endocytosis of GluA1-AMPA receptor. We used quantitative proteomic analysis to identify changes in the composition of postsynaptic densities from GluN2B(-/-) mouse primary neuronal cultures and found altered levels of several ubiquitin proteasome system components, in particular decreased levels of proteasome subunits. Enhancing the proteasome activity with a novel proteasome activator restored the synaptic levels of AMPA receptors in GluN2B(-/-) neurons and their endocytosis, revealing that GluN2B-mediated anchoring of the synaptic proteasome is responsible for fine tuning AMPA receptor synaptic levels under basal conditions.

  10. Disassembly of the self-assembled, double-ring structure of proteasome α7 homo-tetradecamer by α6.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kentaro; Noda, Masanori; Yagi, Hirokazu; Thammaporn, Ratsupa; Seetaha, Supaporn; Satoh, Tadashi; Kato, Koichi; Uchiyama, Susumu

    2015-12-14

    The 20S core particle of the eukaryotic proteasome is composed of two α- and two β-rings, each of which is a hetero-heptamer composed of seven homologous but distinct subunits. Although formation of the eukaryotic proteasome is a highly ordered process assisted by assembly chaperones, α7, an α-ring component, has the unique property of self-assembling into a homo-tetradecamer. We used biophysical methods to characterize the oligomeric states of this proteasome subunit and its interaction with α6, which makes direct contacts with α7 in the proteasome α-ring. We determined a crystal structure of the α7 tetradecamer, which has a double-ring structure. Sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation and mass spectrometric analysis under non-denaturing conditions revealed that α7 exclusively exists as homo-tetradecamer in solution and that its double-ring structure is disassembled upon the addition of α6, resulting in a 1:7 hetero-octameric α6-α7 complex. Our findings suggest that proteasome formation involves the disassembly of non-native oligomers, which are assembly intermediates.

  11. Proteasome activities decrease during dexamethasone-induced apoptosis of thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Beyette, J; Mason, G G; Murray, R Z; Cohen, G M; Rivett, A J

    1998-06-01

    The induction of apoptosis in thymocytes by the glucocorticoid dexamethasone was used as a model system to investigate whether there are changes in 20 S and 26 S proteasome activities during apoptosis. We observed that thymocytes contain high concentrations of proteasomes and that following treatment with dexamethasone, cell extracts showed a decrease in proteasome chymotrypsin-like activity which correlated with the degree of apoptosis observed. The decrease in chymotrypsin-like activity of 20 S and 26S proteasomes was still apparent after these complexes had been partially purified from apoptotic thymocyte extracts and was therefore not due to competition resulting from a general increase in protein turnover. The trypsin-like and peptidylglutamylpeptide hydrolase activities of proteasome complexes were also observed to decrease during apoptosis, but these decreases were reversed by the inhibition of apoptosis by the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone. However, the chymotrypsin-like activity of proteasomes decreased further in the presence of the apoptosis inhibitor. Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone was found to inhibit the chymotrypsin- and trypsin-like activity of 26 S proteasomes in vitro. The decrease in proteasome activities in apoptosis did not appear to be due to a decrease in the concentration of total cellular proteasomes. Thus, the early decreases in 20 S and 26 S proteasome activities during apoptosis appear to be due to a down-regulation of their proteolytic activities and not to a decrease in their protein concentration. These data suggest that proteasomes may be responsible, in thymocytes, for the turnover of a protein that functions as a positive regulator of apoptosis.

  12. Protein Expression of Proteasome Subunits in Elderly Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Madeline R; Rubio, Maria D; Haroutunian, Vahram; Meador-Woodruff, James H

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is a major regulator of protein processing, trafficking, and degradation. While protein ubiquitination is utilized for many cellular processes, one major function of this system is to target proteins to the proteasome for degradation. In schizophrenia, studies have found UPS transcript abnormalities in both blood and brain, and we have previously reported decreased protein expression of ubiquitin-associated proteins in brain. To test whether the proteasome is similarly dysregulated, we measured the protein expression of proteasome catalytic subunits as well as essential subunits from proteasome regulatory complexes in 14 pair-matched schizophrenia and comparison subjects in superior temporal cortex. We found decreased expression of Rpt1, Rpt3, and Rpt6, subunits of the 19S regulatory particle essential for ubiquitin-dependent degradation by the proteasome. Additionally, the α subunit of the 11S αβ regulatory particle, which enhances proteasomal degradation of small peptides and unfolded proteins, was also decreased. Haloperidol-treated rats did not have altered expression of these subunits, suggesting the changes we observed in schizophrenia are likely not due to chronic antipsychotic treatment. Interestingly, expression of the catalytic subunits of both the standard and immunoproteasome were unchanged, suggesting the abnormalities we observed may be specific to the complexed state of the proteasome. Aging has significant effects on the proteasome, and several subunits (20S β2, Rpn10, Rpn13, 11Sβ, and 11Sγ) were significantly correlated with subject age. These data provide further evidence of dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in schizophrenia, and suggest that altered proteasome activity may be associated with the pathophysiology of this illness. PMID:26202105

  13. Characterization and transcriptional analysis of the gene cluster for coronafacic acid, the polyketide component of the phytotoxin coronatine.

    PubMed Central

    Liyanage, H; Palmer, D A; Ullrich, M; Bender, C L

    1995-01-01

    Coronafacic acid (CFA), the polyketide component of the phytotoxin coronatine (COR), is activated and coupled to coronamic acid via amide bond formation, a biosynthetic step presumably catalyzed by the CFA ligase (cfl) gene product. The COR biosynthetic gene cluster in Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea PG4180 is located within a 32-kb region of a 90-kb plasmid designated p4180A. In the present study, a cloned region of p4180A complemented all CFA- mutants spanning an 18.8-kb region of the COR biosynthetic cluster. The genetic evidence presented in this study indicates that cfl and the CFA biosynthetic gene cluster are encoded by a single transcript and that transcription of all of the genes in this operon is directed by the cfl promoter. The cfl promoter was localized to a 0.37-kb region upstream of the transcriptional start site by progressive subcloning in pRG960sd, a vector containing a promoterless glucuronidase gene. Transcription of the cfl/CFA operon was temperature sensitive and showed maximal glucuronidase activity at 18 degrees C. Furthermore, transcription of the cfl/CFA operon was dependent on the functional activity of a modified two-component regulatory system located within the COR biosynthetic gene cluster. Thermoregulation of the cfl/CFA operon and the coronamic acid biosynthetic gene cluster via the modified two-component regulatory system is discussed. PMID:8526495

  14. Two-component regulatory systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an intricate network mediating fimbrial and efflux pump gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Sivaneson, Melissa; Mikkelsen, Helga; Ventre, Isabelle; Bordi, Christophe; Filloux, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for chronic and acute infections in humans. Chronic infections are associated with production of fimbriae and the formation of a biofilm. The two-component system Roc1 is named after its role in the regulation of cup genes, which encode components of a machinery allowing assembly of fimbriae. A non-characterized gene cluster, roc2, encodes components homologous to the Roc1 system. We show that cross-regulation occurs between the Roc1 and Roc2 signalling pathways. We demonstrate that the sensors RocS2 and RocS1 converge on the response regulator RocA1 to control cupC gene expression. This control is independent of the response regulator RocA2. Instead, we show that these sensors act via the RocA2 response regulator to repress the mexAB-oprM genes. These genes encode a multidrug efflux pump and are upregulated in the rocA2 mutant, which is less susceptible to antibiotics. It has been reported that in cystic fibrosis lungs, in which P. aeruginosa adopts the biofilm lifestyle, most isolates have an inactive MexAB-OprM pump. The concomitant RocS2-dependent upregulation of cupC genes (biofilm formation) and downregulation of mexAB-oprM genes (antibiotic resistance) is in agreement with this observation. It suggests that the Roc systems may sense the environment in the cystic fibrosis lung. PMID:21205015

  15. Structural Analysis of the Bacterial Proteasome Activator Bpa in Complex with the 20S Proteasome.

    PubMed

    Bolten, Marcel; Delley, Cyrille L; Leibundgut, Marc; Boehringer, Daniel; Ban, Nenad; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2016-12-06

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis harbors proteasomes that recruit substrates for degradation through an ubiquitin-like modification pathway. Recently, a non-ATPase activator termed Bpa (bacterial proteasome activator) was shown to support an alternate proteasomal degradation pathway. Here, we present the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of Bpa in complex with the 20S core particle (CP). For docking into the cryo-EM density, we solved the X-ray structure of Bpa, showing that it forms tight four-helix bundles arranged into a 12-membered ring with a 40 Å wide central pore and the C-terminal helix of each protomer protruding from the ring. The Bpa model was fitted into the cryo-EM map of the Bpa-CP complex, revealing its architecture and striking symmetry mismatch. The Bpa-CP interface was resolved to 3.5 Å, showing the interactions between the C-terminal GQYL motif of Bpa and the proteasome α-rings. This docking mode is related to the one observed for eukaryotic activators with features specific to the bacterial complex. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nuclear proteasomes carry a constitutive posttranslational modification which derails SDS-PAGE (but not CTAB-PAGE).

    PubMed

    Pitcher, David S; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Wang, Ziming; Tzortzis, Konstantinos; Goudevenou, Katerina; Flynn, Helen; Bohn, Georg; Rahemtulla, Amin; Roberts, Irene; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Karadimitris, Anastasios; Kleijnen, Maurits F

    2014-12-01

    We report that subunits of human nuclear proteasomes carry a previously unrecognised, constitutive posttranslational modification. Subunits with this modification are not visualised by SDS-PAGE, which is used in almost all denaturing protein gel electrophoresis. In contrast, CTAB-PAGE readily visualises such modified subunits. Thus, under most experimental conditions, with identical samples, SDS-PAGE yielded gel electrophoresis patterns for subunits of nuclear proteasomes which were misleading and strikingly different from those obtained with CTAB-PAGE. Initial analysis indicates a novel modification of a high negative charge with some similarity to polyADP-ribose, possibly explaining compatibility with (positively-charged) CTAB-PAGE but not (negatively-charged) SDS-PAGE and providing a mechanism for how nuclear proteasomes may interact with chromatin, DNA and other nuclear components.

  17. Proteasome activator 200: the heat is on...

    PubMed

    Savulescu, Anca F; Glickman, Michael H

    2011-05-01

    Proteasomes play a key regulatory role in all eukaryotic cells by removing proteins in a timely manner. There are two predominant forms: The 20S core particle (CP) can hydrolyze peptides and certain unstructured proteins, and the 26S holoenzyme is able to proteolyse most proteins conjugated to ubiquitin. The 26S complex consists of a CP barrel with a 19S regulatory particle (RP; a.k.a PA700) attached to its outer surface. Several studies purified another proteasome activator with a MW of 200 kDa (PA200) that attaches to the same outer ring of the CP. A role for PA200 has been demonstrated in spermatogenesis, in response to DNA repair and in maintenance of mitochondrial inheritance. Enhanced levels of PA200-CP complexes are observed under conditions in which either activated or disrupted CP prevail, suggesting it participates in regulating overall proteolytic activity. PA200, or its yeast ortholog Blm10, may also incorporate into 26S proteasomes yielding PA200-CP-RP hybrids. A three-dimensional molecular structure determined by x-ray crystallography of Blm10-CP provides a model for activation. The carboxy terminus of Blm10 inserts into a dedicated pocket in the outer ring of the CP surface, whereas multiple HEAT-like repeats fold into an asymmetric solenoid wrapping around the central pore to stabilize a partially open conformation. The resulting hollow domelike structure caps the entire CP surface. This asymmetric structure may provide insight as to how the 19S RP, with two HEAT repeatlike subunits (Rpn1, Rpn2) alongside six ATPases (Rpt1-6), attaches to the same surface of the CP ring, and likewise, induces pore opening.

  18. Fast network component analysis (FastNCA) for gene regulatory network reconstruction from microarray data.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chunqi; Ding, Zhi; Hung, Yeung Sam; Fung, Peter Chin Wan

    2008-06-01

    Recently developed network component analysis (NCA) approach is promising for gene regulatory network reconstruction from microarray data. The existing NCA algorithm is an iterative method which has two potential limitations: computational instability and multiple local solutions. The subsequently developed NCA-r algorithm with Tikhonov regularization can help solve the first issue but cannot completely handle the second one. Here we develop a novel Fast Network Component Analysis (FastNCA) algorithm which has an analytical solution that is much faster and does not have the above limitations. Firstly FastNCA is compared to NCA and NCA-r using synthetic data. The reconstruction of FastNCA is more accurate than that of NCA-r and comparable to that of properly converged NCA. FastNCA is not sensitive to the correlation among the input signals, while its performance does degrade a little but not as dramatically as that of NCA. Like NCA, FastNCA is not very sensitive to small inaccuracies in a priori information on the network topology. FastNCA is about several tens times faster than NCA and several hundreds times faster than NCA-r. Then, the method is applied to real yeast cell-cycle microarray data. The activities of the estimated cell-cycle regulators by FastNCA and NCA-r are compared to the semi-quantitative results obtained independently by Lee et al. (2002). It is shown here that there is a greater agreement between the results of FastNCA and Lee's, which is represented by the ratio 23/33, than that between the results of NCA-r and Lee's, which is 14/33. Software and supplementary materials are available from http://www.eee.hku.hk/~cqchang/FastNCA.htm

  19. Ubiquitin proteasome system research in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jia-Ling; Huang, Chang-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is important for the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It is involved in nearly every cellular process and plays an important role in maintaining body homeostasis. An increasing body of evidence has linked alterations in the UPS to gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we summarize the current literature detailing the involvement of the UPS in gastrointestinal cancer, highlighting its role in tumor occurrence and development, providing information for therapeutic targets research and anti-gastrointestinal tumor drug design. PMID:26909134

  20. Ubiquitin proteasome system research in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jia-Ling; Huang, Chang-Zhi

    2016-02-15

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is important for the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It is involved in nearly every cellular process and plays an important role in maintaining body homeostasis. An increasing body of evidence has linked alterations in the UPS to gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we summarize the current literature detailing the involvement of the UPS in gastrointestinal cancer, highlighting its role in tumor occurrence and development, providing information for therapeutic targets research and anti-gastrointestinal tumor drug design.

  1. The Nrf1 CNC-bZIP protein is regulated by the proteasome and activated by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Chepelev, Nikolai L; Bennitz, Joshua D; Huang, Ting; McBride, Skye; Willmore, William G

    2011-01-01

    Nrf1 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45 subunit-related factor 1) is a transcription factor mediating cellular responses to xenobiotic and pro-oxidant stress. Nrf1 regulates the transcription of many stress-related genes through the electrophile response elements (EpREs) located in their promoter regions. Despite its potential importance in human health, the mechanisms controlling Nrf1 have not been addressed fully. We found that proteasomal inhibitors MG-132 and clasto-lactacystin-β-lactone stabilized the protein expression of full-length Nrf1 in both COS7 and WFF2002 cells. Concomitantly, proteasomal inhibition decreased the expression of a smaller, N-terminal Nrf1 fragment, with an approximate molecular weight of 23 kDa. The EpRE-luciferase reporter assays revealed that proteasomal inhibition markedly inhibited the Nrf1 transactivational activity. These results support earlier hypotheses that the 26 S proteasome processes Nrf1 into its active form by removing its inhibitory N-terminal domain anchoring Nrf1 to the endoplasmic reticulum. Immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Nrf1 is ubiquitinated and that proteasomal inhibition increased the degree of Nrf1 ubiquitination. Furthermore, Nrf1 protein had a half-life of approximately 5 hours in COS7 cells. In contrast, hypoxia (1% O(2)) significantly increased the luciferase reporter activity of exogenous Nrf1 protein, while decreasing the protein expression of p65, a shorter form of Nrf1, known to act as a repressor of EpRE-controlled gene expression. Finally, the protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid activated Nrf1 reporter activity, while the latter was repressed by the PKC inhibitor staurosporine. Collectively, our data suggests that Nrf1 is controlled by several post-translational mechanisms, including ubiquitination, proteolytic processing and proteasomal-mediated degradation as well as by its phosphorylation status. © 2011 Chepelev et al.

  2. Catabolism of endogenous and overexpressed APH1a and PEN2: evidence for artifactual involvement of the proteasome in the degradation of overexpressed proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dunys, Julie; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Wilk, Sherwin; St. George-Hyslop, Peter; Alves Da Costa, Cristine; Checler, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    PS (presenilin)-dependent γ-secretase occurs as a high-molecular-mass complex composed of either PS1 or PS2 associated with Nct (nicastrin), PEN2 (presenilin enhancer 2 homologue) and APH1 (anterior pharynx defective 1 homologue). Numerous reports have documented the very complicated physical and functional cross-talk between these proteins that ultimately governs the biological activity of the γ-secretase, but very few studies examined the fate of the components of the complex. We show that, in both HEK-293 cells and the TSM1 neuronal cell line, the immunoreactivities of overexpressed myc-tagged-APH1a and -PEN2 were enhanced by the proteasome inhibitors ZIE and lactacystin, whereas a broad range of protease inhibitors had no effect. By contrast, proteasome inhibitors were totally unable to affect the cellular expression of endogenous APH1aL and PEN2 in HEK-293 cells, TSM1 and primary cultured cortical neurons. To explain this apparent discrepancy, we examined the degradation of myc-tagged-APH1a and -PEN2, in vitro, by cell extracts containing endogenous proteasome and by purified 20S proteasome. Strikingly, myc-tagged-APH1a and -PEN2 resist proteolysis by endogenous proteasome and purified 20S proteasome. We also show that endogenous PEN2 expression was drastically higher in wild-type than in PS- and Nct-deficient fibroblasts and was enhanced by proteasome inhibitors only in the two deficient cell systems. However, here again, purified 20S proteasome appeared unable to cleave endogenous PEN2 present in PS-deficient fibroblasts. The levels of endogenous APH1aL-like immunoreactivity were not modified by proteasome inhibitors and were unaffected by PS deficiency. Altogether, our results indicate that endogenous PEN2 and APH1aL do not undergo proteasomal degradation under physiological conditions in HEK-293 cells, TSM1 cells and fibroblasts and that the clearance of PEN2 in PS- and Nct-deficient fibroblasts is not mediated by 20S proteasome. Whether the 26S

  3. Structure of a proteasome Pba1-Pba2 complex: implications for proteasome assembly, activation, and biological function.

    PubMed

    Stadtmueller, Beth M; Kish-Trier, Erik; Ferrell, Katherine; Petersen, Charisse N; Robinson, Howard; Myszka, David G; Eckert, Debra M; Formosa, Tim; Hill, Christopher P

    2012-10-26

    The 20S proteasome is an essential, 28-subunit protease that sequesters proteolytic sites within a central chamber, thereby repressing substrate degradation until proteasome activators open the entrance/exit gate. Two established activators, Blm10 and PAN/19S, induce gate opening by binding to the pockets between proteasome α-subunits using C-terminal HbYX (hydrophobic-tyrosine-any residue) motifs. Equivalent HbYX motifs have been identified in Pba1 and Pba2, which function in proteasome assembly. Here, we demonstrate that Pba1-Pba2 proteins form a stable heterodimer that utilizes its HbYX motifs to bind mature 20S proteasomes in vitro and that the Pba1-Pba2 HbYX motifs are important for a physiological function of proteasomes, the maintenance of mitochondrial function. Other factors that contribute to proteasome assembly or function also act in the maintenance of mitochondrial function and display complex genetic interactions with one another, possibly revealing an unexpected pathway of mitochondrial regulation involving the Pba1-Pba2 proteasome interaction. Our determination of a proteasome Pba1-Pba2 crystal structure reveals a Pba1 HbYX interaction that is superimposable with those of known activators, a Pba2 HbYX interaction that is different from those reported previously, and a gate structure that is disrupted but not sufficiently open to allow entry of even small peptides. These findings extend understanding of proteasome interactions with HbYX motifs and suggest multiple roles for Pba1-Pba2 interactions throughout proteasome assembly and function.

  4. Ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and cellular responses to oxidative stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) is the primary cytosolic proteolytic machinery for the selective degradation of various forms of damaged proteins. Thus, the UPP is an important protein quality control mechanism. In the canonical UPP, both ubiquitin and the 26S proteasome are involved. Subs...

  5. Functional 20S proteasomes in mature human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Neelam, Sudha; Kakhniashvili, David G; Wilkens, Stephan; Levene, Stephen D; Goodman, Steven R

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether functional 20S and/or 26S proteasomes are present within mature human red blood cells (RBCs; depleted of reticulocytes and leukocytes). Double-immunofluorescence confocal microscopy showed the presence of immunoreactive 20S and 19S proteasomal subunit proteins and their partial co-localization within mature RBCs. Proteasomes isolated from mature RBCs displayed 20S activity in vitro; atomic-force and transmission electron microscopy of isolated proteasomes revealed abundant 20S core particles and very few 26S particles. A two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) approach was used to determine if proteasome-dependent protein degradation occurs within mature RBCs. Twenty-eight proteins were identified with altered protein content in response to lactacystin. Seven cytosolic proteins showed an increase and 16 showed a decrease; five membrane proteins showed a decrease. We conclude that the proteins showing increased abundance are either primary or secondary targets of the 20S proteasome and that putatively degraded proteins are secondary targets. Therefore, functional 20S proteasomes exist within mature RBCs. Our study did not detect 26S proteasome activity using the 2D-DIGE approach.

  6. How the ubiquitin proteasome system regulates the regulators of transcription.

    PubMed

    Ee, Gary; Lehming, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system plays an important role in transcription. Monoubiquitination of activators is believed to aid their function, while the 26S proteasomal degradation of repressors is believed to restrict their function. What remains controversial is the question of whether the degradation of activators aids or restricts their function.

  7. Aging perturbs 26S proteasome assembly in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Vernace, Vita A.; Arnaud, Lisette; Schmidt-Glenewinkel, Thomas; Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with loss of quality control in protein turnover. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is critical to this quality control process as it degrades mutated and damaged proteins. We identified a unique aging-dependent mechanism that contributes to proteasome dysfunction in Drosophila melanogaster. Our studies are the first to show that the major proteasome form in old (43–47 days old) female and male flies is the weakly active 20S core particle, while in younger (1–32 days old) flies highly active 26S proteasomes are preponderant. Old (43–47 days) flies of both genders also exhibit a decline (~50%) in ATP levels, which is relevant to 26S proteasomes, as their assembly is ATP-dependent. The steep declines in 26S proteasome and ATP levels were observed at an age (43–47 days) when the flies exhibited a marked drop in locomotor performance, attesting that these are “old age” events. Remarkably, treatment with a proteasome inhibitor increases ubiquitinated protein levels and shortens the life span of old but not young flies. In conclusion, our data reveal a previously unknown mechanism that perturbs proteasome activity in “old-age” female and male Drosophila most likely depriving them of the ability to effectively cope with proteotoxic damages caused by environmental and/or genetic factors. PMID:17413001

  8. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide and receptor component protein in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Sardi, Claudia; Zambusi, Laura; Finardi, Annamaria; Ruffini, Francesca; Tolun, Adviye A.; Dickerson, Ian M.; Righi, Marco; Zacchetti, Daniele; Grohovaz, Fabio; Provini, Luciano; Furlan, Roberto; Morara, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CGRP) inhibits microglia inflammatory activation in vitro. We here analyzed the involvement of CGRP and Receptor Component Protein (RCP) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Alpha-CGRP deficiency increased EAE scores which followed the scale alpha-CGRP null > heterozygote > wild type. In wild type mice, CGRP delivery into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 1) reduced chronic EAE (C-EAE) signs, 2) inhibited microglia activation (revealed by quantitative shape analysis), and 3) did not alter GFAP expression, cell density, lymphocyte infiltration, and peripheral lymphocyte production of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-17, IL-2, and IL-4. RCP (probe for receptor involvement) was expressed in white matter microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and vascular-endothelial cells: in EAE, also in infiltrating lymphocytes. In relapsing–remitting EAE (R-EAE) RCP increased during relapse, without correlation with lymphocyte density. RCP nuclear localization (stimulated by CGRP in vitro) was I) increased in microglia and decreased in astrocytes (R-EAE), and II) increased in microglia by CGRP CSF delivery (C-EAE). Calcitonin like receptor was rarely localized in nuclei of control and relapse mice. CGRP increased in motoneurons. In conclusion, CGRP can inhibit microglia activation in vivo in EAE. CGRP and its receptor may represent novel protective factors in EAE, apparently acting through the differential cell-specific intracellular translocationof RCP. PMID:24746422

  9. Molecular identification of candidate chemoreceptor genes and signal transduction components in the sensory epithelium of Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Cummins, S F; Leblanc, L; Degnan, B M; Nagle, G T

    2009-07-01

    An ability to sense and respond to environmental cues is essential to the survival of most marine animals. How water-borne chemical cues are detected at the molecular level and processed by molluscs is currently unknown. In this study, we cloned two genes from the marine mollusk Aplysia dactylomela which encode multi-transmembrane proteins. We have performed in situ hybridization that reveals expression and spatial distribution within the long-distance chemosensory organs, the rhinophores. This finding suggests that they could be receptors involved in binding water-borne chemicals and coupling to an intracellular signal pathway. In support of this, we found expression of a phospholipase C and an inositol trisphosphate receptor in the rhinophore sensory epithelia and possibly distributed within outer dendrites of olfactory sensory neurons. In Aplysia, mate attraction and subsequent reproduction is initiated by responding to a cocktail of water-borne protein pheromones released by animal conspecifics. We show that the rhinophore contraction in response to pheromone stimulants is significantly altered following phospholipase C inhibition. Overall, these data provide insight into the molecular components of chemosensory detection in a mollusk. An important next step will be the elucidation of how these coordinate the detection of chemical cues present in the marine environment and activation of sensory neurons.

  10. Mutations in Durum Wheat SBEII Genes affect Grain Yield Components, Quality, and Fermentation Responses in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hazard, Brittany; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Naemeh, Mahmoudreza; Hamilton, M. Kristina; Rust, Bret; Raybould, Helen E.; Newman, John W.; Martin, Roy; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Increased amylose in wheat (Triticum ssp.) starch is associated with increased resistant starch, a fermentable dietary fiber. Fermentation of resistant starch in the large intestine produces short-chain fatty acids that are associated with human health benefits. Since wheat foods are an important component of the human diet, increases in amylose and resistant starch in wheat grains have the potential to deliver health benefits to a large number of people. In three replicated field trials we found that mutations in starch branching enzyme II genes (SBEIIa and SBEIIb) in both A and B genomes (SBEIIa/b-AB) of durum wheat [T. turgidum L. subsp. durum (Desf.) Husn.] resulted in large increases of amylose and resistant starch content. The presence of these four mutations was also associated with an average 5% reduction in kernel weight (P = 0.0007) and 15% reduction in grain yield (P = 0.06) compared to the wild type. Complete milling and pasta quality analysis showed that the mutant lines have an acceptable quality with positive effects on pasta firmness and negative effects on semolina extraction and pasta color. Positive fermentation responses were detected in rats (Rattus spp.) fed with diets incorporating mutant wheat flour. This study quantifies benefits and limitations associated with the deployment of the SBEIIa/b-AB mutations in durum wheat and provides the information required to develop realistic strategies to deploy durum wheat varieties with increased levels of amylose and resistant starch. PMID:27134286

  11. Mutations in Durum Wheat SBEII Genes affect Grain Yield Components, Quality, and Fermentation Responses in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hazard, Brittany; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Naemeh, Mahmoudreza; Hamilton, M Kristina; Rust, Bret; Raybould, Helen E; Newman, John W; Martin, Roy; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Increased amylose in wheat (Triticum ssp.) starch is associated with increased resistant starch, a fermentable dietary fiber. Fermentation of resistant starch in the large intestine produces short-chain fatty acids that are associated with human health benefits. Since wheat foods are an important component of the human diet, increases in amylose and resistant starch in wheat grains have the potential to deliver health benefits to a large number of people. In three replicated field trials we found that mutations in starch branching enzyme II genes (SBEIIa and SBEIIb) in both A and B genomes (SBEIIa/b-AB) of durum wheat [T. turgidum L. subsp. durum (Desf.) Husn.] resulted in large increases of amylose and resistant starch content. The presence of these four mutations was also associated with an average 5% reduction in kernel weight (P = 0.0007) and 15% reduction in grain yield (P = 0.06) compared to the wild type. Complete milling and pasta quality analysis showed that the mutant lines have an acceptable quality with positive effects on pasta firmness and negative effects on semolina extraction and pasta color. Positive fermentation responses were detected in rats (Rattus spp.) fed with diets incorporating mutant wheat flour. This study quantifies benefits and limitations associated with the deployment of the SBEIIa/b-AB mutations in durum wheat and provides the information required to develop realistic strategies to deploy durum wheat varieties with increased levels of amylose and resistant starch.

  12. The Ubiquitin Ligase Hul5 Promotes Proteasomal Processivity▿

    PubMed Central

    Aviram, Sharon; Kornitzer, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large cytoplasmic protease that degrades polyubiquitinated proteins to short peptides in a processive manner. The proteasome 19S regulatory subcomplex tethers the target protein via its polyubiquitin adduct and unfolds the target polypeptide, which is then threaded into the proteolytic site-containing 20S subcomplex. Hul5 is a 19S subcomplex-associated ubiquitin ligase that elongates ubiquitin chains on proteasome-bound substrates. We isolated hul5Δ as a mutation with which fusions of an unstable cyclin to stable reporter proteins accumulate as partially processed products. These products appear transiently in the wild type but are strongly stabilized in 19S ATPase mutants and in the hul5Δ mutant, supporting a role for the ATPase subunits in the unfolding of proteasome substrates before insertion into the catalytic cavity and suggesting a role for Hul5 in the processive degradation of proteins that are stalled on the proteasome. PMID:20008553

  13. The mechanism for molecular assembly of the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Sahara, Kazutaka; Kogleck, Larissa; Yashiroda, Hideki; Murata, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the ubiquitin proteasome system plays important roles in diverse cellular processes. The 26S proteasome is a large enzyme complex that degrades ubiquitinated proteins. It consists of 33 different subunits that form two subcomplexes, the 20S core particle and the 19S regulatory particle. Recently, several chaperones dedicated to the accurate assembly of this protease complex have been identified, but the complete mechanism of the 26S proteasome assembly is still unclear. In this review, we summarize what is known about the assembly of proteasome to date and present our group's recent findings on the role of the GET pathway in the assembly of the 26S proteasome, in addition to its role in mediating the insertion of tail-anchored (TA) proteins into the ER membrane.

  14. Nuclear redistribution of tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein requires proteasome activity.

    PubMed

    Woo, S K; Maouyo, D; Handler, J S; Kwon, H M

    2000-02-01

    Tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP) is the transcription factor that regulates tonicity-responsive expression of the genes for the sodium-myo-inositol cotransporter (SMIT) and the sodium-chloride-betaine cotransporter (BGT1). Hypertonicity stimulates the activity of TonEBP due to a combination of increased protein abundance and increased nuclear distribution (proportion of TonEBP that is in the nucleus). We found that inhibitors of proteasome activity markedly reduce the induction of SMIT and BGT1 mRNA in response to hypertonicity. These inhibitors also reduce hypertonicity-induced stimulation of expression of a reporter gene controlled by the tonicity-responsive enhancer. Western and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the proteasome inhibitors reduce the hypertonicity-induced increase of TonEBP in the nucleus by inhibiting its nuclear redistribution without affecting its abundance. Although the nuclear distribution of TonEBP is sensitive to inhibition of proteasome activity as is that of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, the signaling pathways appear to be different in that hypertonicity does not affect the nuclear distribution of NF-kappaB. Conversely, treatment with tumor necrosis factor-alpha increases the nuclear distribution of NF-kappaB but not TonEBP.

  15. The Impact of Serum Amyloid P-Component on Gene Expression in RAW264.7 Mouse Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Dan; Zhao, Jinzhen; Liu, Jichen; Xiong, Haowei; He, Wenshuai; Hu, Jing; Lai, Wenyan; Guo, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Serum amyloid P-component (SAP) contributes to host defense and prevents fibrosis. Macrophages are the most abundant inflammatory cell type in atherosclerotic plaques. In the present study, using 3H-cholesterol-labeled counting radioactivity assay, we demonstrated that the apoAI-mediated cholesterol efflux in RAW264.7 macrophages was increased by SAP treatment in a time- and dose-dependent manner. We analyzed global gene expression changes upon SAP treatment using RNA sequencing. As a result, a total of 175 differentially expressed genes were identified, of which 134 genes were downregulated and 41 genes were upregulated in SAP treated cells compared to control cells. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed decreased expression of 5 genes and an increase in expression of 1 gene upon SAP treatment. Gene ontology analysis showed that genes involved in response to stimulus were significantly enriched in differentially expressed genes. Beyond protein-coding genes, we also identified 8 differentially expressed long noncoding RNAs. Our study may provide new insights into mechanisms underlying the functional role of SAP in macrophages. PMID:27239478

  16. Cks1-dependent proteasome recruitment and activation of CDC20 transcription in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Morris, May C; Kaiser, Peter; Rudyak, Stanislav; Baskerville, Chris; Watson, Mark H; Reed, Steven I

    2003-06-26

    Cks proteins are small evolutionarily conserved proteins that interact genetically and physically with cyclin-dependent kinases. However, in spite of a large body of genetic, biochemical and structural research, no compelling unifying model of their functions has emerged. Here we show, by investigating the essential role of Cks1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that the protein is primarily involved in promoting mitosis by modulating the transcriptional activation of the APC/C protein-ubiquitin ligase activator Cdc20. Cks1 is required for both the periodic dissociation of Cdc28 kinase from the CDC20 promoter and the periodic association of the proteasome with the promoter. We propose that the essential role of Cks1 is to recruit the proteasome to, and/or dissociate the Cdc28 kinase from, the CDC20 promoter, thus facilitating transcription by remodelling transcriptional complexes or chromatin associated with the CDC20 gene.

  17. Cezanne (OTUD7B) regulates HIF-1α homeostasis in a proteasome-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Bremm, Anja; Moniz, Sonia; Mader, Julia; Rocha, Sonia; Komander, David

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor HIF-1α is essential for cells to rapidly adapt to low oxygen levels (hypoxia). HIF-1α is frequently deregulated in cancer and correlates with poor patient prognosis. Here, we demonstrate that the deubiquitinase Cezanne regulates HIF-1α homeostasis. Loss of Cezanne decreases HIF-1α target gene expression due to a reduction in HIF-1α protein levels. Surprisingly, although the Cezanne-regulated degradation of HIF-1α depends on the tumour suppressor pVHL, hydroxylase and proteasome activity are dispensable. Our data suggest that Cezanne is essential for HIF-1α protein stability and that loss of Cezanne stimulates HIF-1α degradation via proteasome-independent routes, possibly through chaperone-mediated autophagy. Subject Categories Post-translational Modifications, Proteolysis & Proteomics; Signal Transduction PMID:25355043

  18. SUMO regulates proteasome-dependent degradation of FLASH/Casp8AP2

    PubMed Central

    Vennemann, Astrid; Hofmann, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    FLASH/Casp8AP2 is a huge multifunctional protein involved in multiple cellular processes, reaching from death receptor signaling to regulation of histone gene transcription and histone mRNA processing. Previous work has shown that FLASH localizes to Cajal bodies and promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies. However, the function of its nuclear body association remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that murine FLASH is covalently modified by SUMO at Lys residue 1792. Interestingly, ectopic expression of SUMO results in proteasome-dependent degradation of FLASH. A point mutant of FLASH with a mutated SUMO acceptor lysine residue, FLASHK1792R, is resistant to SUMO-induced degradation. Finally, we show that arsenic trioxide, a drug known to potentiate SUMO modification and degradation of PML, triggers recruitment of FLASH to PML bodies and concomitant loss of FLASH protein. Our data suggest that SUMO targets FLASH for proteasome-dependent degradation, which is associated with recruitment of FLASH to PML bodies. PMID:23673342

  19. SUMO regulates proteasome-dependent degradation of FLASH/Casp8AP2.

    PubMed

    Vennemann, Astrid; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2013-06-15

    FLASH/Casp8AP2 is a huge multifunctional protein involved in multiple cellular processes, reaching from death receptor signaling to regulation of histone gene transcription and histone mRNA processing. Previous work has shown that FLASH localizes to Cajal bodies and promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies. However, the function of its nuclear body association remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that murine FLASH is covalently modified by SUMO at Lys residue 1792. Interestingly, ectopic expression of SUMO results in proteasome-dependent degradation of FLASH. A point mutant of FLASH with a mutated SUMO acceptor lysine residue, FLASH(K1792R), is resistant to SUMO-induced degradation. Finally, we show that arsenic trioxide, a drug known to potentiate SUMO modification and degradation of PML, triggers recruitment of FLASH to PML bodies and concomitant loss of FLASH protein. Our data suggest that SUMO targets FLASH for proteasome-dependent degradation, which is associated with recruitment of FLASH to PML bodies.

  20. The carmaphycins: new proteasome inhibitors exhibiting an α,β-epoxyketone warhead from a marine cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Alban R; Kale, Andrew J; Fenley, Andrew T; Byrum, Tara; Debonsi, Hosana M; Gilson, Michael K; Valeriote, Frederick A; Moore, Bradley S; Gerwick, William H

    2012-04-16

    Two new peptidic proteasome inhibitors were isolated as trace components from a Curaçao collection of the marine cyanobacterium Symploca sp. Carmaphycin A (1) and carmaphycin B (2) feature a leucine-derived α,β-epoxyketone warhead directly connected to either methionine sulfoxide or methionine sulfone. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive NMR and MS analyses and confirmed by total synthesis, which in turn provided more material for further biological evaluations. Pure carmaphycins A and B were found to inhibit the β5 subunit (chymotrypsin-like activity) of the S. cerevisiae 20S proteasome in the low nanomolar range. Additionally, they exhibited strong cytotoxicity to lung and colon cancer cell lines, as well as exquisite antiproliferative effects in the NCI60 cell-line panel. These assay results as well as initial structural biology studies suggest a distinctive binding mode for these new inhibitors.

  1. Mutant ubiquitin found in neurodegenerative disorders is a ubiquitin fusion degradation substrate that blocks proteasomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Lindsten, Kristina; de Vrij, Femke M.S.; Verhoef, Lisette G.G.C.; Fischer, David F.; van Leeuwen, Fred W.; Hol, Elly M.; Masucci, Maria G.; Dantuma, Nico P.

    2002-01-01

    Loss of neurons in neurodegenerative diseases is usually preceded by the accumulation of protein deposits that contain components of the ubiquitin/proteasome system. Affected neurons in Alzheimer's disease often accumulate UBB+1, a mutant ubiquitin carrying a 19–amino acid C-terminal extension generated by a transcriptional dinucleotide deletion. Here we show that UBB+1 is a potent inhibitor of ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis in neuronal cells, and that this inhibitory activity correlates with induction of cell cycle arrest. Surprisingly, UBB+1 is recognized as a ubiquitin fusion degradation (UFD) proteasome substrate and ubiquitinated at Lys29 and Lys48. Full blockade of proteolysis requires both ubiquitination sites. Moreover, the inhibitory effect was enhanced by the introduction of multiple UFD signals. Our findings suggest that the inhibitory activity of UBB+1 may be an important determinant of neurotoxicity and contribute to an environment that favors the accumulation of misfolded proteins. PMID:11980917

  2. Harnessing Proteasome Dynamics and Allostery in Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The proteasome is the essential protease that is responsible for regulated cleavage of the bulk of intracellular proteins. Its central role in cellular physiology has been exploited in therapies against aggressive cancers where proteasome-specific competitive inhibitors that block proteasome active centers are very effectively used. However, drugs regulating this essential protease are likely to have broader clinical usefulness. The non-catalytic sites of the proteasome emerge as an attractive alternative target in search of highly specific and diverse proteasome regulators. Recent Advances: Crystallographic models of the proteasome leave the false impression of fixed structures with minimal molecular dynamics lacking long-distance allosteric signaling. However, accumulating biochemical and structural observations strongly support the notion that the proteasome is regulated by precise allosteric interactions arising from protein dynamics, encouraging the active search for allosteric regulators. Here, we discuss properties of several promising compounds that affect substrate gating and processing in antechambers, and interactions of the catalytic core with regulatory proteins. Critical Issues: Given the structural complexity of proteasome assemblies, it is a painstaking process to better understand their allosteric regulation and molecular dynamics. Here, we discuss the challenges and achievements in this field. We place special emphasis on the role of atomic force microscopy imaging in probing the allostery and dynamics of the proteasome, and in dissecting the mechanisms involving small-molecule allosteric regulators. Future Directions: New small-molecule allosteric regulators may become a next generation of drugs targeting the proteasome, which is critical to the development of new therapies in cancers and other diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2286–2301. PMID:24410482

  3. Proteasome proteolysis supports stimulated platelet function and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nilaksh; Li, Wei; Willard, Belinda; Silverstein, Roy L; McIntyre, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitors used in the treatment of hematologic cancers also reduce thrombosis. Whether the proteasome participates in platelet activation or function is unclear because little is known of the proteasome in these terminally differentiated cells. Platelets displayed all 3 primary proteasome protease activities, which MG132 and bortezomib (Velcade) inhibited. Proteasome substrates are marked by ubiquitin, and platelets contained a functional ubiquitination system that modified the proteome by monoubiquitination and polyubiquitination. Systemic MG132 strongly suppressed the formation of occlusive, platelet-rich thrombi in FeCl3-damaged carotid arteries. Transfusion of platelets treated ex vivo with MG132 and washed before transfusion into thrombocytopenic mice also reduced carotid artery thrombosis. Proteasome inhibition reduced platelet aggregation by low thrombin concentrations and ristocetin-stimulated agglutination through the glycoprotein Ib-IX-V complex. This receptor was not appropriately internalized after proteasome inhibition in stimulated platelets, and spreading and clot retraction after MG132 exposure also were decreased. The effects of proteasome inhibitors were not confined to a single receptor as MG132 suppressed thrombin-stimulated, ADP-stimulated, and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated microparticle shedding. Proteasome inhibition increased ubiquitin decoration of cytoplasmic proteins, including the cytoskeletal proteins Filamin A and Talin-1. Mass spectrometry revealed a single MG132-sensitive tryptic cleavage after R1745 in an extended Filamin A loop, which would separate its actin-binding domain from its carboxy terminal glycoprotein Ibα-binding domain. Platelets contain a ubiquitin/proteasome system that marks cytoskeletal proteins for proteolytic modification to promote productive platelet-platelet and platelet-wall interactions.

  4. Rice Stripe Tenuivirus Nonstructural Protein 3 Hijacks the 26S Proteasome of the Small Brown Planthopper via Direct Interaction with Regulatory Particle Non-ATPase Subunit 3

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Wu, Jianxiang; Fu, Shuai; Li, Chenyang; Zhu, Zeng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitin/26S proteasome system plays a vital role in regulating host defenses against pathogens. Previous studies have highlighted different roles for the ubiquitin/26S proteasome in defense during virus infection in both mammals and plants, but their role in the vectors that transmit those viruses is still unclear. In this study, we determined that the 26S proteasome is present in the small brown planthopper (SBPH) (Laodelphgax striatellus) and has components similar to those in plants and mammals. There was an increase in the accumulation of Rice stripe virus (RSV) in the transmitting vector SBPH after disrupting the 26S proteasome, indicating that the SBPH 26S proteasome plays a role in defense against RSV infection by regulating RSV accumulation. Yeast two-hybrid analysis determined that a subunit of the 26S proteasome, named RPN3, could interact with RSV NS3. Transient overexpression of RPN3 had no effect on the RNA silencing suppressor activity of RSV NS3. However, NS3 could inhibit the ability of SBPH rpn3 to complement an rpn3 mutation in yeast. Our findings also indicate that the direct interaction between RPN3 and NS3 was responsible for inhibiting the complementation ability of RPN3. In vivo, we found an accumulation of ubiquitinated protein in SBPH tissues where the RSV titer was high, and silencing of rpn3 resulted in malfunction of the SBPH proteasome-mediated proteolysis. Consequently, viruliferous SBPH in which RPN3 was repressed transmitted the virus more effectively as a result of higher accumulation of RSV. Our results suggest that the RSV NS3 protein is able to hijack the 26S proteasome in SBPH via a direct interaction with the RPN3 subunit to attenuate the host defense response. IMPORTANCE We show, for the first time, that the 26S proteasome components are present in the small brown planthopper and play a role in defense against its vectored plant virus (RSV). In turn, RSV encodes a protein that subverts the SBPH 26S proteasome

  5. ATP Binding by Proteasomal ATPases Regulates Cellular Assembly and Substrate-induced Functions of the 26 S Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Chan; Li, Xiaohua; Thompson, David; DeMartino, George N.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the role of ATP binding by six different ATPase subunits (Rpt1–6) in the cellular assembly and molecular functions of mammalian 26 S proteasome. Four Rpt subunits (Rpt1–4) with ATP binding mutations were incompetent for cellular assembly into 26 S proteasome. In contrast, analogous mutants of Rpt5 and Rpt6 were incorporated normally into 26 S proteasomes in both intact cells and an in vitro assembly assay. Surprisingly, purified 26 S proteasomes containing either mutant Rpt5 or Rpt6 had normal basal ATPase activity and substrate gate opening for hydrolysis of short peptides. However, these mutant 26 S proteasomes were severely defective for ATP-dependent in vitro degradation of ubiquitylated and non-ubiquitylated proteins and did not display substrate-stimulated ATPase and peptidase activities characteristic of normal proteasomes. These results reveal differential roles of ATP binding by various Rpt subunits in proteasome assembly and function. They also indicate that substrate-stimulated ATPase activity and gating depend on the concerted action of a full complement of Rpt subunits competent for ATP binding and that this regulation is essential for normal proteolysis. Thus, protein substrates appear to promote their own degradation by stimulating proteasome functions involved in proteolysis. PMID:23212908

  6. Convergence of the 26S proteasome and the REVOLUTA pathways in regulating inflorescence and floral meristem functions in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Wang, Hua; Luo, Dexian; Zeng, Minhuan; Huang, Hai; Cui, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large multisubunit proteolytic complex, regulating growth and development in eukaryotes by selective removal of short-lived regulatory proteins. Here, it is shown that the 26S proteasome and the transcription factor gene REVOLUTA (REV) act together in maintaining inflorescence and floral meristem (IM and FM) functions. The characterization of a newly identified Arabidopsis mutant, designated ae4 (asymmetric leaves1/2 enhancer4), which carries a mutation in the gene encoding the 26S proteasome subunit, RPN2a, is reported. ae4 and rev have minor defects in phyllotaxy structure and meristem initiation, respectively, whereas ae4 rev demonstrated strong developmental defects. Compared with the rev single mutant, an increased percentage of ae4 rev plants exhibited abnormal vegetative shoot apical and axillary meristems. After flowering, ae4 rev first gave rise to a few normal-looking flowers, and then flowers with reduced numbers of all types of floral organs. In late reproductive development, instead of flowers, the ae4 rev IM produced numerous filamentous structures, which contained cells seen only in the floral organs, and then carpelloid organs. In situ hybridization revealed that expression of the WUSCHEL and CLAVATA3 genes was severely down-regulated or absent in the late appearing ae4 rev primordia, but the genes were strongly expressed in top-layer cells of inflorescence tips. Double mutant plants combining rev with other 26S proteasome subunit mutants, rpn1a and rpn9a, resembled ae4 rev, suggesting that the 26S proteasome might act as a whole in regulating IM and FM functions.

  7. Overview of Proteasome Inhibitor-Based Anti-cancer Therapies: Perspective on Bortezomib and Second Generation Proteasome Inhibitors versus Future Generation Inhibitors of Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Q. Ping; Zonder, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, proteasome inhibition has emerged as an effective therapeutic strategy for treating multiple myeloma (MM) and some lymphomas. In 2003, Bortezomib (BTZ) became the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). BTZ-based therapies have become a staple for the treatment of MM at all stages of the disease. The survival rate of MM patients has improved significantly since clinical introduction of BTZ and other immunomodulatory drugs. However, BTZ has several limitations. Not all patients respond to BTZ-based therapies and relapse occurs in many patients who initially responded. Solid tumors, in particular, are often resistant to BTZ. Furthermore, BTZ can induce dose-limiting peripheral neuropathy (PN). The second generation proteasome inhibitor Carfizomib (CFZ; U.S. FDA approved in August 2012) induces responses in a minority of MM patients relapsed from or refractory to BTZ. There is less PN compared to BTZ. Four other second-generation proteasome inhibitors (Ixazomib, Delanzomib, Oprozomib and Marizomib) with different pharmacologic properties and broader anticancer activities, have also shown some clinical activity in bortezomib-resistant cancers. While the mechanism of resistance to bortezomib in human cancers still remains to be fully understood, targeting the immunoproteasome, ubiquitin E3 ligases, the 19S proteasome and deubiquitinases in pre-clinical studies represents possible directions for future generation inhibitors of ubiquitin-proteasome system in the treatment of MM and other cancers. PMID:25092212

  8. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems That Regulate the Temporal and Spatial Expression of Myxococcus xanthus Sporulation Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Zaara

    2015-01-01

    When starved for nutrients, Myxococcus xanthus produces a biofilm that contains a mat of rod-shaped cells, known as peripheral rods, and aerial structures called fruiting bodies, which house thousands of dormant and stress-resistant spherical spores. Because rod-shaped cells differentiate into spherical, stress-resistant spores and spore differentiation occurs only in nascent fruiting bodies, many genes and multiple levels of regulation are required. Over the past 2 decades, many regulators of the temporal and spatial expression of M. xanthus sporulation genes have been uncovered. Of these sporulation gene regulators, two-component signal transduction circuits, which typically contain a histidine kinase sensor protein and a transcriptional regulator known as response regulator, are among the best characterized. In this review, we discuss prototypical two-component systems (Nla6S/Nla6 and Nla28S/Nla28) that regulate an early, preaggregation phase of sporulation gene expression during fruiting body development. We also discuss orphan response regulators (ActB and FruA) that regulate a later phase of sporulation gene expression, which begins during the aggregation stage of fruiting body development. In addition, we summarize the research on a complex two-component system (Esp) that is important for the spatial regulation of sporulation. PMID:26369581

  9. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems That Regulate the Temporal and Spatial Expression of Myxococcus xanthus Sporulation Genes.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Zaara; Garza, Anthony G

    2015-09-14

    When starved for nutrients, Myxococcus xanthus produces a biofilm that contains a mat of rod-shaped cells, known as peripheral rods, and aerial structures called fruiting bodies, which house thousands of dormant and stress-resistant spherical spores. Because rod-shaped cells differentiate into spherical, stress-resistant spores and spore differentiation occurs only in nascent fruiting bodies, many genes and multiple levels of regulation are required. Over the past 2 decades, many regulators of the temporal and spatial expression of M. xanthus sporulation genes have been uncovered. Of these sporulation gene regulators, two-component signal transduction circuits, which typically contain a histidine kinase sensor protein and a transcriptional regulator known as response regulator, are among the best characterized. In this review, we discuss prototypical two-component systems (Nla6S/Nla6 and Nla28S/Nla28) that regulate an early, preaggregation phase of sporulation gene expression during fruiting body development. We also discuss orphan response regulators (ActB and FruA) that regulate a later phase of sporulation gene expression, which begins during the aggregation stage of fruiting body development. In addition, we summarize the research on a complex two-component system (Esp) that is important for the spatial regulation of sporulation. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. The mouse and human genes encoding the recognition component of the N-end rule pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong Tae; Reiss, Yuval; Fried, Victor A.; Hershko, Avram; Yoon, Jeong Kyo; Gonda, David K.; Sangan, Pitchai; Copeland, Neal G.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Varshavsky, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    The N-end rule relates the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue. The N-end rule pathway is one proteolytic pathway of the ubiquitin system. The recognition component of this pathway, called N-recognin or E3, binds to a destabilizing N-terminal residue of a substrate protein and participates in the formation of a substrate-linked multiubiquitin chain. We report the cloning of the mouse and human Ubr1 cDNAs and genes that encode a mammalian N-recognin called E3α. Mouse UBR1p (E3α) is a 1,757-residue (200-kDa) protein that contains regions of sequence similarity to the 225-kDa Ubr1p of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mouse and human UBR1p have apparent homologs in other eukaryotes as well, thus defining a distinct family of proteins, the UBR family. The residues essential for substrate recognition by the yeast Ubr1p are conserved in the mouse UBR1p. The regions of similarity among the UBR family members include a putative zinc finger and RING-H2 finger, another zinc-binding domain. Ubr1 is located in the middle of mouse chromosome 2 and in the syntenic 15q15-q21.1 region of human chromosome 15. Mouse Ubr1 spans ≈120 kilobases of genomic DNA and contains ≈50 exons. Ubr1 is ubiquitously expressed in adults, with skeletal muscle and heart being the sites of highest expression. In mouse embryos, the Ubr1 expression is highest in the branchial arches and in the tail and limb buds. The cloning of Ubr1 makes possible the construction of Ubr1-lacking mouse strains, a prerequisite for the functional understanding of the mammalian N-end rule pathway. PMID:9653112

  11. Characterization and expression analysis of a complement component gene in sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Zhou, Zunchun; Yang, Aifu; Dong, Ying; Guan, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Bai

    2015-12-01

    The complement system plays a crucial role in the innate immune system of animals. It can be activated by distinct yet overlapping classical, alternative and lectin pathways. In the alternative pathway, complement factor B (Bf) serves as the catalytic subunit of complement component 3 (C3) convertase, which plays the central role among three activation pathways. In this study, the Bf gene in sea cucumber ( Apostichopus japonicus), termed AjBf, was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The full-length cDNA of AjBf was 3231 bp in length barring the poly (A) tail. It contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 2742 bp encoding 913 amino acids, a 105 bp 5'-UTR (5'-terminal untranslated region) and a 384 bp 3'-UTR. AjBf was a mosaic protein with six CCP (complement control protein) domains, a VWA (von Willebrand factor A) domain, and a serine protease domain. The deduced molecular weight of AjBf protein was 101 kDa. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that the expression level of AjBf in A. japonicus was obviously higher at larval stage than that at embryonic stage. Expression detection in different tissues showed that AjBf expressed higher in coelomocytes than in other four tissues. In addation, AjBf expression in different tissues was induced significantly after LPS or PolyI:C challenge. These results indicated that AjBf plays an important role in immune responses to pathogen infection.

  12. Cloning and partial characterization of the proteasome S4 ATPase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Certad, G; Abrahem, A; Georges, E

    1999-11-01

    Certad, G., Abrahem, A., and Georges, E. 1999. Cloning and Partial characterization of the proteasome S4 ATPase from Plasmodium falciparum. Experimental Parasitology 93, 123-131. The ATP-ubiquitin-proteasome pathway mediates the nonlysosomal degradation of cytosolic proteins in eukaryotic cells. The activities of this pathway have been shown to regulate cell growth and differentiation through modulation of regulatory proteins. The proteasome is a large complex consisting of two multisubunit structures, the 20S and 19S(PA700) or P28 complexes, that combine to form the 26S particles. In this study, we describe the cloning of a cDNA encoding the proteasome subunit 4 ATPase homologue from Plasmodium falciparum (PFS4). Analysis of the PFS4 cDNA sequence shows an open reading frame encoding a deduced protein of 455 amino acids. Moreover, comparison of PFS4 cDNA sequence to that of genomic fragments encoding PFS4 showed identical sequences with no detectable introns. Database searches revealed a high sequence identity to those of rice, yeast, mouse, Drosophila, and human S4 ATPases. However, PFS4 contains two unique inserts of nine and seven amino acid residues in the N-terminal domain. Interestingly, only the rice S4 contains the latter (seven amino acids) insert with four identical amino acids. In vitro expression of the full-length cDNA encoding the PFS4, using a transcription-translation-coupled reticulocyte lysate, shows a 50-kDa [(35)S]methionine-labeled protein which was immunoprecipitated with PFS4 anti-peptide antiserum. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA digests shows a single gene copy of PFS4 in P. falciparum. Of interest was the effect of the proteasome-specific natural product, lactacystin, on the growth of the parasite, with IC(50) values of 0.6-0.92 microM. The latter IC(50) values of lactacystin for different clones of P. falciparum are comparable to those obtained for mammalian cell lines (0.65 microM), suggesting the presence of a conserved

  13. BIM(EL), an intrinsically disordered protein, is degraded by 20S proteasomes in the absence of poly-ubiquitylation.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Ceri M; Tsvetkov, Peter; Johnson, Mark; Joyce, Claire L; Lamb, Christopher A; Bryant, Nia J; Komander, David; Shaul, Yosef; Cook, Simon J

    2011-03-15

    BIM-extra long (BIM(EL)), a pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein and part of the BCL-2 family, is degraded by the proteasome following activation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway. Although studies have demonstrated poly-ubiquitylation of BIM(EL) in cells, the nature of the ubiquitin chain linkage has not been defined. Using ubiquitin-binding domains (UBDs) specific for defined ubiquitin chain linkages, we show that BIM(EL) undergoes K48-linked poly-ubiquitylation at either of two lysine residues. Surprisingly, BIM(EL)ΔKK, which lacks both lysine residues, was not poly-ubiquitylated but still underwent ERK1/2-driven, proteasome-dependent turnover. BIM has been proposed to be an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) and some IDPs can be degraded by uncapped 20S proteasomes in the absence of poly-ubiquitylation. We show that BIM(EL) is degraded by isolated 20S proteasomes but that this is prevented when BIM(EL) is bound to its pro-survival target protein MCL-1. Furthermore, knockdown of the proteasome cap component Rpn2 does not prevent BIM(EL) turnover in cells, and inhibition of the E3 ubiquitin ligase β-TrCP, which catalyses poly-Ub of BIM(EL), causes Cdc25A accumulation but does not inhibit BIM(EL) turnover. These results provide new insights into the regulation of BIM(EL) by defining a novel ubiquitin-independent pathway for the proteasome-dependent destruction of this highly toxic protein.

  14. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Controls Lung Proteasomal Degradation and Nuclear Factor-κB Activity in Conditions of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Boncoeur, Emilie; Roque, Telma; Bonvin, Elise; Saint-Criq, Vinciane; Bonora, Monique; Clement, Annick; Tabary, Olivier; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Jacquot, Jacky

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a lethal inherited disorder caused by mutations in a single gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, resulting in progressive oxidative lung damage. In this study, we evaluated the role of CFTR in the control of ubiquitin-proteasome activity and nuclear factor (NF)-κB/IκB-α signaling after lung oxidative stress. After a 64-hour exposure to hyperoxia-mediated oxidative stress, CFTR-deficient (cftr−/−) mice exhibited significantly elevated lung proteasomal activity compared with wild-type (cftr+/+) animals. This was accompanied by reduced lung caspase-3 activity and defective degradation of NF-κB inhibitor IκB-α. In vitro, human CFTR-deficient lung cells exposed to oxidative stress exhibited increased proteasomal activity and decreased NF-κB-dependent transcriptional activity compared with CFTR-sufficient lung cells. Inhibition of the CFTR Cl− channel by CFTRinh-172 in the normal bronchial immortalized cell line 16HBE14o− increased proteasomal degradation after exposure to oxidative stress. Caspase-3 inhibition by Z-DQMD in CFTR-sufficient lung cells mimicked the response profile of increased proteasomal degradation and reduced NF-κB activity observed in CFTR-deficient lung cells exposed to oxidative stress. Taken together, these results suggest that functional CFTR Cl− channel activity is crucial for regulation of lung proteasomal degradation and NF-κB activity in conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:18372427

  15. Proteasome inhibitors to alleviate aberrant IKBKAP mRNA splicing and low IKAP/hELP1 synthesis in familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Mylène; Ibrahim, El Chérif

    2017-07-01

    FD is a rare neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation of the IKBKAP gene, which induces low expression levels of the Elongator subunit IKAP/hELP1 protein. A rational strategy for FD treatment could be to identify drugs increasing IKAP/hELP1 expression levels by blocking protein degradation pathways such as the 26S proteasome. Proteasome inhibitors are promising molecules emerging in cancer treatment and could thus constitute an enticing pharmaceutical strategy for FD treatment. Therefore, we tested three proteasome inhibitors on FD human olfactory ecto-mesenchymal stem cells (hOE-MSCs): two approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA), bortezomib and carfilzomib, as well as epoxomicin. Although all 3 inhibitors demonstrated activity in correcting IKBKAP mRNA aberrant splicing, carfilzomib was superior in enhancing IKAP/hELP1 quantity. Moreover, we observed a synergistic effect of suboptimal doses of carfilzomib on kinetin in improving IKBKAP isoforms ratio and IKAP/hELP1 expression levels allowing to counterbalance carfilzomib toxicity. Finally, we identified several dysregulated miRNAs after carfilzomib treatment that target proteasome-associated mRNAs and determined that IKAP/hELP1 deficiency in FD pathology is correlated to an overactivity of the 26S proteasome. Altogether, these results reinforce the rationale for using chemical compounds inhibiting the 26S proteasome as an innovative option for FD and a promising therapeutic pathway for many other neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Proteasome activation as a novel anti-aging strategy.

    PubMed

    Gonos, Efstathios

    2014-10-01

    Aging and longevity are two multifactorial biological phenomena whose knowledge at molecular level is still limited. We have studied proteasome function in replicative senescence and cell survival (Mol Aspects Med 35, 1-71, 2014). We have observed reduced levels of proteasome content and activities in senescent cells due to the down-regulation of the catalytic subunits of the 20S complex (J Biol Chem 278, 28026-28037, 2003). In support, partial inhibition of proteasomes in young cells by specific inhibitors induces premature senescence which is p53 dependent (Aging Cell 7, 717-732, 2008). Stable over-expression of catalytic subunits or POMP resulted in enhanced proteasome assembly and activities and increased cell survival following treatments with various oxidants. Importantly, the developed "proteasome activated" human fibroblasts cell lines exhibit a delay of senescence by approximately 15% (J Biol Chem 280, 11840-11850, 2005; J Biol Chem 284, 30076-30086, 2009). Our current work proposes that proteasome activation is an evolutionary conserved mechanism, as it can delay aging in various in vivo systems. Moreover, additional findings indicate that the recorded proteasome activation by many inducers is Nrf2-dependent (J Biol Chem 285, 8171-8184, 2010). Finally, we have studied the proteolysis processes of various age-related proteins and we have identified that CHIP is a major p53 E3 ligase in senescent fibroblasts (Free Rad Biol Med 50, 157-165, 2011).

  17. Increased proteasome activity determines human embryonic stem cell identity

    PubMed Central

    Vilchez, David; Boyer, Leah; Morantte, Ianessa; Lutz, Margaret; Merkwirth, Carsten; Joyce, Derek; Spencer, Brian; Page, Lesley; Masliah, Eliezer; Berggren, W. Travis; Gage, Fred H.; Dillin, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are able to replicate continuously in the absence of senescence and, therefore, are immortal in culture1,2. While genome stability is central for survival of stem cells; proteome stability may play an equally important role in stem cell identity and function. Additionally, with the asymmetric divisions invoked by stem cells, the passage of damaged proteins to daughter cells could potentially destroy the resulting lineage of cells. We hypothesized that stem cells have an increased proteostasis ability compared to their differentiated counterparts and asked whether proteasome activity differed among human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Notably, hESC populations exhibit a high proteasome activity that is correlated with increased levels of the 19S proteasome subunit PSMD11/RPN-63–5 and a corresponding increased assembly of the 26S/30S proteasome. Ectopic expression of PSMD11 is sufficient to increase proteasome assembly and activity. Proteasome inhibition affects pluripotency of hESCs inducing differentiation towards specific cell lineages. FOXO4, an insulin/IGF-1 responsive transcription factor associated with long lifespan in invertebrates6,7, regulates proteasome activity by modulating the expression of PSMD11 in hESCs. Our results establish a novel regulation of proteostasis in hESCs that links longevity and stress resistance in invertebrates with hESC function and identity. PMID:22972301

  18. Proteasome inhibitors: a new perspective for treating autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2012-12-01

    Since the discovery of proteasome in the late 1980s, the ubiquitin-proteasome system has been found to exert an important physiological function in all the cells of living organisms - that of ensuring homeostasis. All cell cycle, apoptosis, differentiation, transcription, protein quality control and antigen processing activities require the efficiency of this system. As a matter of fact, several pathological conditions are characterized by deregulation of the ubiquitinproteasome system. These include cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, viral infections and autoimmune diseases. This has stimulated interest in developing proteasome inhibitors for their treatment, but clinical application has been limited due to the toxicity of these compounds. Following experiences with the first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, in the treatment of hematologic malignancies, several molecules with proteasome inhibitor properties were discovered and they were also exploited for the treatment of experimental models of human autoimmunity. Autoimmune disorders are a heterogeneous group of conditions, both organ- and non-organ-specific, whose incidence is increasing worldwide. This has stimulated interest in discovering novel predictive strategies and therapeutics. Here we provide a review of the use of proteasome inhibitors in treating autoimmune conditions and, in particular, systemic autoimmune diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. We also present perspectives derived from more recently discovered compounds with proteasome inhibitor activity and discuss their potential in the management of these disorders.

  19. Emerging Mechanistic Insights into AAA Complexes Regulating Proteasomal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Friedrich; Schuller, Jan M.; Unverdorben, Pia; Aufderheide, Antje

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is an integral element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and, as such, responsible for regulated degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It consists of the core particle, which catalyzes the proteolysis of substrates into small peptides, and the regulatory particle, which ensures specificity for a broad range of substrates. The heart of the regulatory particle is an AAA-ATPase unfoldase, which is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits enabling substrate recognition and processing. Cryo-EM-based studies revealed the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome and its conformational rearrangements, providing insights into substrate recognition, commitment, deubiquitylation and unfolding. The cytosol proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitylated substrates is tuned by various associating cofactors, including deubiquitylating enzymes, ubiquitin ligases, shuttling ubiquitin receptors and the AAA-ATPase Cdc48/p97. Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors function upstream of the 26S proteasome, and their modular organization exhibits some striking analogies to the regulatory particle. In archaea PAN, the closest regulatory particle homolog and Cdc48 even have overlapping functions, underscoring their intricate relationship. Here, we review recent insights into the structure and dynamics of the 26S proteasome and its associated machinery, as well as our current structural knowledge on the Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors that function in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). PMID:25102382

  20. Emerging mechanistic insights into AAA complexes regulating proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Förster, Friedrich; Schuller, Jan M; Unverdorben, Pia; Aufderheide, Antje

    2014-08-06

    The 26S proteasome is an integral element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system(UPS) and, as such, responsible for regulated degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells.It consists of the core particle, which catalyzes the proteolysis of substrates into small peptides, and the regulatory particle, which ensures specificity for a broad range of substrates.The heart of the regulatory particle is an AAA-ATPase unfoldase, which is surrounded by non-ATPase subunits enabling substrate recognition and processing. Cryo-EM-based studies revealed the molecular architecture of the 26S proteasome and its conformational rearrangements, providing insights into substrate recognition, commitment, deubiquitylation and unfolding. The cytosol proteasomal degradation of polyubiquitylated substrates is tuned by various associating cofactors, including deubiquitylating enzymes, ubiquitin ligases,shuttling ubiquitin receptors and the AAA-ATPase Cdc48/p97. Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors function upstream of the 26S proteasome, and their modular organization exhibits some striking analogies to the regulatory particle. In archaea PAN, the closest regulatory particle homolog and Cdc48 even have overlapping functions, underscoring their intricate relationship.Here, we review recent insights into the structure and dynamics of the 26S proteasome and its associated machinery, as well as our current structural knowledge on the Cdc48/p97 and its cofactors that function in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS).

  1. Proteasome expression and activity in cancer and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2017-03-01

    Proteasome is a multi-protein organelle that participates in cellular proteostasis by destroying damaged or short-lived proteins in an organized manner guided by the ubiquitination signal. By being in a central place in the cellular protein complement homeostasis, proteasome is involved in virtually all cell processes including decisions on cell survival or death, cell cycle, and differentiation. These processes are important also in cancer, and thus, the proteasome is an important regulator of carcinogenesis. Cancers include a variety of cells which, according to the cancer stem cell theory, descend from a small percentage of cancer stem cells, alternatively termed tumor-initiating cells. These cells constitute the subsets that have the ability to propagate the whole variety of cancer and repopulate tumors after cytostatic therapies. Proteasome plays a role in cellular processes in cancer stem cells, but it has been found to have a decreased function in them compared to the rest of cancer cells. This article will discuss the transcriptional regulation of proteasome sub-unit proteins in cancer and in particular cancer stem cells and the relationship of the proteasome with the pluripotency that is the defining characteristic of stem cells. Therapeutic opportunities that present from the understanding of the proteasome role will also be discussed.

  2. Proteasomal and lysosomal protein degradation and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuejun; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2014-06-01

    In the cell, the proteasome and lysosomes represent the most important proteolytic machineries, responsible for the protein degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy, respectively. Both the UPS and autophagy are essential to protein quality and quantity control. Alterations in cardiac proteasomal and lysosomal degradation are remarkably associated with most heart disease in humans and are implicated in the pathogenesis of congestive heart failure. Studies carried out in animal models and in cell culture have begun to establish both sufficiency and, in some cases, the necessity of proteasomal functional insufficiency or lysosomal insufficiency as a major pathogenic factor in the heart. This review article highlights some recent advances in the research into proteasome and lysosome protein degradation in relation to cardiac pathology and examines the emerging evidence for enhancing degradative capacities of the proteasome and/or lysosome as a new therapeutic strategy for heart disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Protein Quality Control, the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, and Autophagy". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural Insights on the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteasomal ATPase Mpa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Li, Hua; Lin, Gang; Tang, Chunyan; Li, Dongyang; Nathan, Carl; Darwin, K. Heran; Li, Huilin

    2009-01-01

    Summary Proteasome-mediated protein turnover in all domains of life is an energy-dependent process that requires ATPase activity. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) was recently shown to possess a ubiquitin-like proteasome pathway that plays an essential role in Mtb resistance to killing by products of host macrophages. Here we report our structural and biochemical investigation of Mpa, the presumptive Mtb proteasomal ATPase. We demonstrate that Mpa binds to the Mtb proteasome in the presence of ATPγS, providing the physical evidence that Mpa is the proteasomal ATPase. X-ray crystallographic determination of the conserved inter-domain showed a five-stranded double β-barrel structure containing a Greek key motif. The structure and mutagenesis indicate a major role of the inter-domain for Mpa hexamerization. Our mutational and functional studies further suggest that the central channel in the Mpa hexamer is involved in protein substrate translocation and degradation. These studies provide insights into how a bacterial proteasomal ATPase interacts with and facilitates protein degradation by the proteasome. PMID:19836337

  4. Recent Patents on Proteasome Inhibitors of Natural Origin.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Daniela Correia; Andrade, Paula B; Ribeiro, Vera; Valentao, Patricia; Pereira, David M

    2017-01-01

    The proteasome is the major proteolytic site on the eukaryotic cell, degrading most of its short-lived or misfolded polypeptides. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway has been found to play a fundamental role in the development of several pathologies, from cancer to neurodegenerative diseases, or even retroviral infections. Nature remains a powerful source for the discovery of bioactive compounds. Recently, a number of molecules of natural origin, as well as natural product derivatives, have been described as proteasome inhibitors. Most of these molecules directly block one or more catalytic sites of the 20S proteasome, but some of them act upstream of proteolytic degradation, for instance, inhibiting the ubiquitin tagging process. The present review focuses on recent patents on proteasome inhibitors of natural origin, their derivatives and synthetic routes to obtain such molecules, as well as their application as a tool in chemotherapy. With several of these modulators of the ubiquitin-proteasome system under clinical trials, we hope that the next few years lead to the development of new pharmaceutical drugs and characterization of new proteasome inhibitors of natural origin or inspiration. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Proteasome dynamics between proliferation and quiescence stages of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S; Fatehi, Amatullah K; Enenkel, Cordula

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a critical role in cellular protein homeostasis and is required for the turnover of short-lived and unwanted proteins, which are targeted by poly-ubiquitination for degradation. Proteasome is the key protease of UPS and consists of multiple subunits, which are organized into a catalytic core particle (CP) and a regulatory particle (RP). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, proteasome holo-enzymes are engaged in degrading poly-ubiquitinated substrates and are mostly localized in the nucleus during cell proliferation. While in quiescence, the RP and CP are sequestered into motile and reversible storage granules in the cytoplasm, called proteasome storage granules (PSGs). The reversible nature of PSGs allows the proteasomes to be transported back into the nucleus upon exit from quiescence. Nuclear import of RP and CP through nuclear pores occurs via the canonical pathway that includes the importin-αβ heterodimer and takes advantage of the Ran-GTP gradient across the nuclear membrane. Dependent on the growth stage, either inactive precursor complexes or mature holo-enzymes are imported into the nucleus. The present review discusses the dynamics of proteasomes including their assembly, nucleo-cytoplasmic transport during proliferation and the sequestration of proteasomes into PSGs during quiescence. [Formula: see text].

  6. Deciphering preferential interactions within supramolecular protein complexes: the proteasome case

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Bertrand; Lambour, Thomas; Garrigues, Luc; Amalric, François; Vigneron, Nathalie; Menneteau, Thomas; Stella, Alexandre; Monsarrat, Bernard; Van den Eynde, Benoît; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Bousquet-Dubouch, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, intracellular protein breakdown is mainly performed by the ubiquitin–proteasome system. Proteasomes are supramolecular protein complexes formed by the association of multiple sub-complexes and interacting proteins. Therefore, they exhibit a very high heterogeneity whose function is still not well understood. Here, using a newly developed method based on the combination of affinity purification and protein correlation profiling associated with high-resolution mass spectrometry, we comprehensively characterized proteasome heterogeneity and identified previously unknown preferential associations within proteasome sub-complexes. In particular, we showed for the first time that the two main proteasome subtypes, standard proteasome and immunoproteasome, interact with a different subset of important regulators. This trend was observed in very diverse human cell types and was confirmed by changing the relative proportions of both 20S proteasome forms using interferon-γ. The new method developed here constitutes an innovative and powerful strategy that could be broadly applied for unraveling the dynamic and heterogeneous nature of other biologically relevant supramolecular protein complexes. PMID:25561571

  7. Structural Insights on the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteasomal ATPase Mpa

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Li, H; Lin, G; Tang, C; Li, D; Nathan, C; Heran Darwin, K

    2009-01-01

    Proteasome-mediated protein turnover in all domains of life is an energy-dependent process that requires ATPase activity. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) was recently shown to possess a ubiquitin-like proteasome pathway that plays an essential role in Mtb resistance to killing by products of host macrophages. Here we report our structural and biochemical investigation of Mpa, the presumptive Mtb proteasomal ATPase. We demonstrate that Mpa binds to the Mtb proteasome in the presence of ATPS, providing the physical evidence that Mpa is the proteasomal ATPase. X-ray crystallographic determination of the conserved interdomain showed a five stranded double {beta} barrel structure containing a Greek key motif. Structure and mutational analysis indicate a major role of the interdomain for Mpa hexamerization. Our mutational and functional studies further suggest that the central channel in the Mpa hexamer is involved in protein substrate translocation and degradation. These studies provide insights into how a bacterial proteasomal ATPase interacts with and facilitates protein degradation by the proteasome.

  8. Mammalian proteasome subtypes: Their diversity in structure and function.

    PubMed

    Dahlmann, Burkhardt

    2016-02-01

    The 20S proteasome is a multicatalytic proteinase catalysing the degradation of the majority of intracellular proteins. Thereby it is involved in almost all basic cellular processes, which is facilitated by its association with various regulator complexes so that it appears in different disguises like 26S proteasome, hybrid-proteasome and others. The 20S proteasome has a cylindrical structure built up by four stacked rings composed of α- and β-subunits. Since the three active site-containing β-subunits can all or in part be replaced by immuno-subunits, three main subpopulations exist, namely standard-, immuno- and intermediate-proteasomes. Due to posttranslational modifications or/and genetic variations all α- and β-subunits occur in multiple iso- or proteoforms. This leads to the fact that each of the three subpopulations is composed of a variety of 20S proteasome subtypes. This review summarizes the knowledge of proteasome subtypes in mammalian cells and tissues and their possible biological and medical relevancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Wedelolactone Acts as Proteasome Inhibitor in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Nehybová, Tereza; Šmarda, Jan; Daniel, Lukáš; Stiborek, Marek; Kanický, Viktor; Spasojevič, Ivan; Preisler, Jan; Damborský, Jiří; Beneš, Petr

    2017-03-29

    Wedelolactone is a multi-target natural plant coumestan exhibiting cytotoxicity towards cancer cells. Although several molecular targets of wedelolactone have been recognized, the molecular mechanism of its cytotoxicity has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we show that wedelolactone acts as an inhibitor of chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like activities of proteasome in breast cancer cells. The proteasome inhibitory effect of wedelolactone was documented by (i) reduced cleavage of fluorogenic proteasome substrates; (ii) accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and proteins with rapid turnover in tumor cells; and (iii) molecular docking of wedelolactone into the active sites of proteasome catalytic subunits. Inhibition of proteasome by wedelolactone was independent on its ability to induce reactive oxygen species production by redox cycling with copper ions, suggesting that wedelolactone acts as copper-independent proteasome inhibitor. We conclude that the cytotoxicity of wedelolactone to breast cancer cells is partially mediated by targeting proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Understanding the structural basis for inhibitory mode of wedelolactone might help to open up new avenues for design of novel compounds efficiently inhibiting cancer cells.

  10. Gene Expression of Type VI Secretion System Associated with Environmental Survival in Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae by Principle Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhouqi; Jin, Guoqiang; Li, Bin; Kakar, Kaleem Ullah; Ojaghian, Mohammad Reza; Wang, Yangli; Xie, Guanlin; Sun, Guochang

    2015-09-11

    Valine glycine repeat G (VgrG) proteins are regarded as one of two effectors of Type VI secretion system (T6SS) which is a complex multi-component secretion system. In this study, potential biological roles of T6SS structural and VgrG genes in a rice bacterial pathogen, Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae (Aaa) RS-1, were evaluated under seven stress conditions using principle component analysis of gene expression. The results showed that growth of the pathogen was reduced by H₂O₂ and paraquat-induced oxidative stress, high salt, low temperature, and vgrG mutation, compared to the control. However, pathogen growth was unaffected by co-culture with a rice rhizobacterium Burkholderia seminalis R456. In addition, expression of 14 T6SS structural and eight vgrG genes was significantly changed under seven conditions. Among different stress conditions, high salt, and low temperature showed a higher effect on the expression of T6SS gene compared with host infection and other environmental conditions. As a first report, this study revealed an association of T6SS gene expression of the pathogen with the host infection, gene mutation, and some common environmental stresses. The results of this research can increase understanding of the biological function of T6SS in this economically-important pathogen of rice.

  11. It Is All about (U)biquitin: Role of Altered Ubiquitin-Proteasome System and UCHL1 in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Tramutola, Antonella; Di Domenico, Fabio; Barone, Eugenio; Perluigi, Marzia; Butterfield, D Allan

    2016-01-01

    Free radical-mediated damage to macromolecules and the resulting oxidative modification of different cellular components are a common feature of aging, and this process becomes much more pronounced in age-associated pathologies, including Alzheimer disease (AD). In particular, proteins are particularly sensitive to oxidative stress-induced damage and these irreversible modifications lead to the alteration of protein structure and function. In order to maintain cell homeostasis, these oxidized/damaged proteins have to be removed in order to prevent their toxic accumulation. It is generally accepted that the age-related accumulation of "aberrant" proteins results from both the increased occurrence of damage and the decreased efficiency of degradative systems. One of the most important cellular proteolytic systems responsible for the removal of oxidized proteins in the cytosol and in the nucleus is the proteasomal system. Several studies have demonstrated the impairment of the proteasome in AD thus suggesting a direct link between accumulation of oxidized/misfolded proteins and reduction of this clearance system. In this review we discuss the impairment of the proteasome system as a consequence of oxidative stress and how this contributes to AD neuropathology. Further, we focus the attention on the oxidative modifications of a key component of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, UCHL1, which lead to the impairment of its activity.

  12. Activities of proteasome and m-calpain are essential for Chikungunya virus replication.

    PubMed

    Karpe, Yogesh A; Pingale, Kunal D; Kanade, Gayatri D

    2016-10-01

    Replication of many viruses is dependent on the ubiquitin proteasome system. The present study demonstrates that Chikungunya virus replication increases proteasome activity and induces unfolded protein response (UPR) in cultured cells. Further, it was seen that the virus replication was dependent on the activities of proteasomes and m-calpain. Proteasome inhibition induced accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and earlier visualization of UPR.

  13. Principal Components Analysis Based Unsupervised Feature Extraction Applied to Gene Expression Analysis of Blood from Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Patients

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Y-h.

    2017-01-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) sometimes occurs after recovery from the disease caused by Dengue virus (DENV), and is often fatal. However, the mechanism of DHF has not been determined, possibly because no suitable methodologies are available to analyse this disease. Therefore, more innovative methods are required to analyse the gene expression profiles of DENV-infected patients. Principal components analysis (PCA)-based unsupervised feature extraction (FE) was applied to the gene expression profiles of DENV-infected patients, and an integrated analysis of two independent data sets identified 46 genes as critical for DHF progression. PCA using only these 46 genes rendered the two data sets highly consistent. The application of PCA to the 46 genes of an independent third data set successfully predicted the progression of DHF. A fourth in vitro data set confirmed the identification of the 46 genes. These 46 genes included interferon- and heme-biosynthesis-related genes. The former are enriched in binding sites for STAT1, STAT2, and IRF1, which are associated with DHF-promoting antibody-dependent enhancement, whereas the latter are considered to be related to the dysfunction of spliceosomes, which may mediate haemorrhage. These results are outcomes that other type of bioinformatic analysis could hardly achieve. PMID:28276456

  14. Intermediate filament transcription in astrocytes is repressed by proteasome inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Middeldorp, Jinte; Kamphuis, Willem; Sluijs, Jacqueline A.; Achoui, Dalila; Leenaars, Cathalijn H. C.; Feenstra, Matthijs G. P.; van Tijn, Paula; Fischer, David F.; Berkers, Celia; Ovaa, Huib; Quinlan, Roy A.; Hol, Elly M.

    2009-01-01

    Increased expression of the astrocytic intermediate filament protein glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a characteristic of astrogliosis. This process occurs in the brain during aging and neurodegeneration and coincides with impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system. Inhibition of the proteasome impairs protein degradation; therefore, we hypothesized that the increase in GFAP may be the result of impaired proteasomal activity in astrocytes. We investigated the effect of proteasome inhibitors on GFAP expression and other intermediate filament proteins in human astrocytoma cells and in a rat brain model for astrogliosis. Extensive quantitative RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot analysis resulted unexpectedly in a strong decrease of GFAP mRNA to <4% of control levels [Control (DMSO) 100±19.2%; proteasome inhibitor (epoxomicin) 3.5±1.3%, n=8; P≤0.001] and a loss of GFAP protein in astrocytes in vitro. We show that the proteasome alters GFAP promoter activity, possibly mediated by transcription factors as demonstrated by a GFAP promoter-luciferase assay and RT2 Profiler PCR array for human transcription factors. Most important, we demonstrate that proteasome inhibitors also reduce GFAP and vimentin expression in a rat model for induced astrogliosis in vivo. Therefore, proteasome inhibitors could serve as a potential therapy to modulate astrogliosis associated with CNS injuries and disease.—Middeldorp, J., Kamphuis, W., Sluijs, J. A., Achoui, D., Leenaars, C. H. C., Feenstra, M. G. P., van Tijn, P., Fischer, D. F., Berkers, C., Ovaa, H., Quinlan, R. A., Hol, E. M. Intermediate filament transcription in astrocytes is repressed by proteasome inhibition. PMID:19332645

  15. Transcriptomic analysis of gene expression profiles of stomach carcinoma reveal abnormal expression of mitotic components.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hongfei; Wang, Jisheng; Chen, Hui; Wang, Zhaohong; Fan, Henwei; Ni, Zhonglin

    2017-02-01

    In order to explore the etiology of gastric cancer on global gene expression level, we developed advanced bioinformatic analysis to investigate the variations of global gene expression and the interactions among them. We downloaded the dataset GSE63288 from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database which included 22 human gastric cancer and 22 healthy control samples. We identified the differential expression genes, and explored the Gene ontology (GO) and pathways of the differentially expressed genes. Furthermore, integrative interaction network and co-expression network were employed to identify the key genes which may contribute to gastric cancer progression. The results indicated that 5 kinases including BUB1, TTK protein kinase, Citron Rho-interacting kinase (CIT), ZAK and NEK2 were upregulated in gastric cancer. Interestingly, BUB1, TTK, CIT and NEK2 have shown high expression similarities and bound with each other, and participated in multiple phases of mitosis. Moreover, a subnet of co-expression genes e.g. KIF14, PRC1, CENPF and CENPI was also involved in mitosis which was functionally coupled with the kinases above. By validation assays, the results indicated that CIT, PRC1, TTK and KIF14 were significantly upregulated in gastric cancer. These evidences have suggested that aberrant expression of these genes may drive gastric cancer including progression, invasion and metastasis. Although the causal relationships between gastric cancer and the genes are still lacking, it was reasonable to take them as biomarkers for diagnosis of gastric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A global view of gene expression in lithium and zinc treated sea urchin embryos: new components of gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Poustka, Albert J; Kühn, Alexander; Groth, Detlef; Weise, Vesna; Yaguchi, Shunsuke; Burke, Robert D; Herwig, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Panopoulou, Georgia

    2007-01-01

    Background The genome of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus has recently been sequenced because it is a major model system for the study of gene regulatory networks. Embryonic expression patterns for most genes are unknown, however. Results Using large-scale screens on arrays carrying 50% to 70% of all genes, we identified novel territory-specific markers. Our strategy was based on computational selection of genes that are differentially expressed in lithium-treated embryos, which form excess endomesoderm, and in zinc-treated embryos, in which endomesoderm specification is blocked. Whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) analysis of 700 genes indicates that the apical organ region is eliminated in lithium-treated embryos. Conversely, apical and specifically neural markers are expressed more broadly in zinc-treated embryos, whereas endomesoderm signaling is severely reduced. Strikingly, the number of serotonergic neurons is amplified by at least tenfold in zinc-treated embryos. WISH analysis further indicates that there is crosstalk between the Wnt (wingless int), Notch, and fibroblast growth factor signaling pathways in secondary mesoderm cell specification and differentiation, similar to signaling cascades that function during development of presomitic mesoderm in mouse embryogenesis. We provide differential expression data for more than 4,000 genes and WISH patterns of more than 250 genes, and more than 2,400 annotated WISH images. Conclusion Our work provides tissue-specific expression patterns for a large fraction of the sea urchin genes that have not yet been included in existing regulatory networks and await functional integration. Furthermore, we noted neuron-inducing activity of zinc on embryonic development; this is the first observation of such activity in any organism. PMID:17506889

  17. Rice ROOT ARCHITECTURE ASSOCIATED1 Binds the Proteasome Subunit RPT4 and Is Degraded in a D-Box and Proteasome-Dependent Manner1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ye; Cao, Hong; Jiang, Jiafu; Xu, Yunyuan; Du, Jizhou; Wang, Xin; Yuan, Ming; Wang, Zhiyong; Xu, Zhihong; Chong, Kang

    2008-01-01

    Root growth is mainly determined by cell division and subsequent elongation in the root apical area. Components regulating cell division in root meristematic cells are largely unknown. Previous studies have identified rice (Oryza sativa) ROOT ARCHITECTURE ASSOCIATED1 (OsRAA1) as a regulator in root development. Yet, the function of OsRAA1 at the cellular and molecular levels is unclear. Here, we show that OsRAA1-overexpressed transgenic rice showed reduced primary root growth, increased numbers of cells in metaphase, and reduced numbers of cells in anaphase, which suggests that OsRAA1 is responsible for limiting root growth by inhibiting the onset of anaphase. The expression of OsRAA1 in fission yeast also induced metaphase arrest, which is consistent with the fact that OsRAA1 functions through a conserved mechanism of cell cycle regulation. Moreover, a colocalization assay has shown that OsRAA1 is expressed predominantly at spindles during cell division. Yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays, as well as a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay, all have revealed that OsRAA1 interacts with a rice homolog of REGULATORY PARTICLE TRIPLE-A ATPASE4, a component that is involved in the ubiquitin pathway. Treating transgenic rice with specific inhibitors of the 26S proteasome blocked the degradation of OsRAA1 and increased the number of cells in metaphase. Mutation of a putative ubiquitination-targeting D-box (RGSLDLISL) in OsRAA1 interrupted the destruction of OsRAA1 in transgenic yeast. These results suggest that ubiquitination and proteasomic proteolysis are involved in OsRAA1 degradation, which is essential for the onset of anaphase, and that OsRAA1 may modulate root development mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway as a novel regulatory factor of the cell cycle. PMID:18701670

  18. Emerging therapies targeting the ubiquitin proteasome system in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weathington, Nathaniel M.; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is an essential metabolic constituent of cellular physiology that tightly regulates cellular protein concentrations with specificity and precision to optimize cellular function. Inhibition of the proteasome has proven very effective in the treatment of multiple myeloma, and this approach is being tested for utility in other malignancies. New pharmaceuticals targeting the proteasome itself or specific proximal pathways of the UPS are in development as antiproliferatives or immunomodulatory agents. In this article, we discuss the biology of UPS-targeting drugs, their use as therapy for neoplasia, and the state of clinical and preclinical development for emerging therapeutics. PMID:24382383

  19. Development of proteasome inhibitors as research tools and cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The proteasome is the primary site for protein degradation in mammalian cells, and proteasome inhibitors have been invaluable tools in clarifying its cellular functions. The anticancer agent bortezomib inhibits the major peptidase sites in the proteasome’s 20S core particle. It is a “blockbuster drug” that has led to dramatic improvements in the treatment of multiple myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells. The development of proteasome inhibitors illustrates the unpredictability, frustrations, and potential rewards of drug development but also emphasizes the dependence of medical advances on basic biological research. PMID:23148232

  20. Emerging therapies targeting the ubiquitin proteasome system in cancer.

    PubMed

    Weathington, Nathaniel M; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is an essential metabolic constituent of cellular physiology that tightly regulates cellular protein concentrations with specificity and precision to optimize cellular function. Inhibition of the proteasome has proven very effective in the treatment of multiple myeloma, and this approach is being tested for utility in other malignancies. New pharmaceuticals targeting the proteasome itself or specific proximal pathways of the UPS are in development as antiproliferatives or immunomodulatory agents. In this article, we discuss the biology of UPS-targeting drugs, their use as therapy for neoplasia, and the state of clinical and preclinical development for emerging therapeutics.

  1. Identification of proteasome subunit beta type 2 associated with deltamethrin detoxification in Drosophila Kc cells by cDNA microarray analysis and bioassay analyses.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junli; Jiao, Dongxu; Xu, Qin; Ying, Xiaoli; Liu, Wei; Chi, Qingping; Ye, Yuting; Li, Xueyu; Cheng, Luogen

    2016-05-10

    Insecticide deltamethrin resistance has presented a difficult obstacle for pest control and the resistance development is complex and associated with many genes. To better understand the possible molecular mechanisms involved in DM stress, in this study, cDNA microarray analysis was employed. 448 differentially expressed genes with at least a 2-fold expression difference were identified in Drosophila cells after DM exposure. Moreover, some genes were confirmed with qPCR, which yielded results consistent with the microarray analysis. Three members of the ubiquitin-proteasome system were significantly elevated in DM-stressed cells, suggesting that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may play an important role in DM detoxification. The proteasome beta2 subunit (Prosbeta2) is a member of 20S proteasome subunit family, which forms the proteolytic core of 26S proteasome. Whether Prosbeta2 participates in DM detoxification requires further study. RNAi and heterologous expression were conducted to investigate the contribution of Prosbeta2 in DM detoxification. The results revealed Prosbeta2 knockdown significantly reduce the level of DM detoxification in RNAi-treated cells after 48 h. Overexpression of Prosbeta2 increased cellular viability. These detoxification results represent the first evidence that Prosbeta2 plays a role in the detoxification of DM, which may provide new idea and target for studying the molecular mechanisms of insect resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Proteasome affects the expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-regulated proteins.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takumi; Kawakami, Masayo; Baba, Hiroko; Yahata, Masahiro; Mutoh, Junpei; Takeda, Shuso; Fujita, Hideaki; Tanaka, Yoshitaka; Ishii, Yuji; Yamada, Hideyuki

    2008-11-01

    The effect of proteasome inhibition with N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (ALLN) on the protein expression regulated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was studied in T47D breast tumor cells. The luciferase reporter gene assay using a construct which has the xenobiotic responsive element showed that the inducible expression of the reporter with AhR ligands was significantly reduced by co-treatment with ALLN. The same suppressive effect by ALLN was observed for ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity induced by an AhR ligand, 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC). Despite the above effects, the induced expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNAs was unaffected by ALLN. While lactacystin, another proteasome inhibitor, exhibited the same effect as ALLN on EROD activity induced by 3MC, leupeptin, which is one of the cysteine protease inhibitors, had no such effect. Based on the evidence obtained, it appears that proteasome inhibition results in a reduction in the expression of AhR-regulated proteins.

  3. The Transcription Activity of Gis1 Is Negatively Modulated by Proteasome-mediated Limited Proteolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nianshu; Oliver, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    The transcriptional response to environmental changes has to be prompt but appropriate. Previously, it has been shown that the Gis1 transcription factor is responsible for regulating the expression of postdiauxic shift genes in response to nutrient starvation, and this transcription regulation is dependent upon the Rim15 kinase. Here we demonstrate that the activity of Gis1 is negatively modulated by proteasome-mediated limited proteolysis. Limited degradation of Gis1 by the proteasome leads to the production of smaller variants, which have weaker transcription activities than the full-length protein. The coiled-coil domain, absent from the smaller variants, is part of the second transcription activation domain in Gis1 and is essential for both the limited proteolysis of Gis1 and its full activity. Endogenous Gis1 and its variants, regardless of their transcription capabilities, activate transcription in a Rim15-dependent manner. However, when the full-length Gis1 accumulates in cells due to overexpression or inhibition of the proteasome function, transcription activation by Gis1 is no longer solely controlled by Rim15. Together, these data strongly indicate that the function of the limited degradation is to ensure that Gis1-dependent transcription is strictly regulated by the Rim15 kinase. Furthermore, we have revealed that the kinase activity of Rim15 is essential for this regulation. PMID:20022953

  4. Tripartite degrons confer diversity and specificity on regulated protein degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Guharoy, Mainak; Bhowmick, Pallab; Sallam, Mohamed; Tompa, Peter

    2016-01-06

    Specific signals (degrons) regulate protein turnover mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here we systematically analyse known degrons and propose a tripartite model comprising the following: (1) a primary degron (peptide motif) that specifies substrate recognition by cognate E3 ubiquitin ligases, (2) secondary site(s) comprising a single or multiple neighbouring ubiquitinated lysine(s) and (3) a structurally disordered segment that initiates substrate unfolding at the 26S proteasome. Primary degron sequences are conserved among orthologues and occur in structurally disordered regions that undergo E3-induced folding-on-binding. Posttranslational modifications can switch primary degrons into E3-binding-competent states, thereby integrating degradation with signalling pathways. Degradation-linked lysines tend to be located within disordered segments that also initiate substrate degradation by effective proteasomal engagement. Many characterized mutations and alternative isoforms with abrogated degron components are implicated in disease. These effects result from increased protein stability and interactome rewiring. The distributed nature of degrons ensures regulation, specificity and combinatorial control of degradation.

  5. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway an emerging anticancer strategy for therapeutics: a patent analysis.

    PubMed

    Jain, Chakresh K; Arora, Shivam; Khanna, Aparna; Gupta, Money; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Sharma, Sanjeev K

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of intracellular proteins is targeted by ubiquitin via non-lysosomal proteolytic pathway in the cell system. These ubiquitin molecules have been found to be conserved from yeast to humans. Ubiquitin proteasome machinery utilises ATP and other mechanisms for degrading proteins of cytosol as well as nucleus. This process of ubiquitination is regulated by activating the E3 enzyme ligase, involved in phosphorylation. In humans, proteins which regulate the cell cycle are controlled by ubiquitin; therefore the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway can be targeted for novel anti-cancer strategies. Dysregulation of the components of the ubiquitin system has been linked to many diseases like cancer and inflammation. The primary triggering mechanism (apoptosis) of these diseases can also be induced when TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) binds to its specific receptor DR4 and DR5. In this review, the emerging prospects and importance of ubiquitin proteasome pathway as an evolving anticancer strategy have been discussed. Current challenges in the field of drug discovery have also been discussed on the basis of recent patents on cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  6. Tripartite degrons confer diversity and specificity on regulated protein degradation in the ubiquitin-proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    Guharoy, Mainak; Bhowmick, Pallab; Sallam, Mohamed; Tompa, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Specific signals (degrons) regulate protein turnover mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here we systematically analyse known degrons and propose a tripartite model comprising the following: (1) a primary degron (peptide motif) that specifies substrate recognition by cognate E3 ubiquitin ligases, (2) secondary site(s) comprising a single or multiple neighbouring ubiquitinated lysine(s) and (3) a structurally disordered segment that initiates substrate unfolding at the 26S proteasome. Primary degron sequences are conserved among orthologues and occur in structurally disordered regions that undergo E3-induced folding-on-binding. Posttranslational modifications can switch primary degrons into E3-binding-competent states, thereby integrating degradation with signalling pathways. Degradation-linked lysines tend to be located within disordered segments that also initiate substrate degradation by effective proteasomal engagement. Many characterized mutations and alternative isoforms with abrogated degron components are implicated in disease. These effects result from increased protein stability and interactome rewiring. The distributed nature of degrons ensures regulation, specificity and combinatorial control of degradation. PMID:26732515

  7. Ubiquitin-Proteasome System Inhibition Promotes Long-Term Depression and Synaptic Tagging/Capture.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Korte, Martin; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2016-06-01

    A balance of protein synthesis and degradation is critical for the dynamic regulation and implementation of long-term memory storage. The role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in regulating the plasticity at potentiated synapses is well studied, but its roles in depressed synaptic populations remain elusive. In this study, we probed the possibility of regulating the UPS by inhibiting the proteasome function during the induction of protein synthesis-independent form of hippocampal long-term depression (early-LTD), an important component of synaptic plasticity. Here, we show that protein degradation is involved in early-LTD induction and interfering with this process facilitates early-LTD to late-LTD. We provide evidence here that under the circumstances of proteasome inhibition brain-derived neurotrophic factor is accumulated as plasticity-related protein and it drives the weakly depressed or potentiated synapses to associativity. Thus, UPS inhibition promotes LTD and establishes associativity between weakly depressed or potentiated synapses through the mechanisms of synaptic tagging/capture or cross-capture.

  8. The gene expression profiles in response to 102 traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) components: a general template for research on TCMs.

    PubMed

    Lv, Chao; Wu, Xueting; Wang, Xia; Su, Juan; Zeng, Huawu; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Shan; Liu, Runhui; Li, Honglin; Li, Xuan; Zhang, Weidong

    2017-03-23

    Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) have important therapeutic value in long-term clinical practice. However, because TCMs contain diverse ingredients and have complex effects on the human body, the molecular mechanisms of TCMs are poorly understood. In this work, we determined the gene expression profiles of cells in response to TCM components to investigate TCM activities at the molecular and cellular levels. MCF7 cells were separately treated with 102 different molecules from TCMs, and their gene expression profiles were compared with the Connectivity Map (CMAP). To demonstrate the reliability and utility of our approach, we used nitidine chloride (NC) from the root of Zanthoxylum nitidum, a topoisomerase I/II inhibitor and α-adrenoreceptor antagonist, as an example to study the molecular function of TCMs using CMAP data as references. We successfully applied this approach to the four ingredients in Danshen and analyzed the synergistic mechanism of TCM components. The results demonstrate that our newly generated TCM data and related methods are valuable in the analysis and discovery of the molecular actions of TCM components. This is the first work to establish gene expression profiles for the study of TCM components and serves as a template for general TCM research.

  9. Intracellular proteinases of invertebrates: calcium-dependent and proteasome/ubiquitin-dependent systems.

    PubMed

    Mykles, D L

    1998-01-01

    Cytosolic proteinases carry out a variety of regulatory functions by controlling protein levels and/or activities within cells. Calcium-dependent and ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent pathways are common to all eukaryotes. The former pathway consists of a diverse group of Ca(2+)-dependent cysteine proteinases (CDPs; calpains in vertebrate tissues). The latter pathway is highly conserved and consists of ubiquitin, ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, deubiquitinases, and the proteasome. This review summarizes the biochemical properties and genetics of invertebrate CDPs and proteasomes and their roles in programmed cell death, stress responses (heat shock and anoxia), skeletal muscle atrophy, gametogenesis and fertilization, development and pattern formation, cell-cell recognition, signal transduction and learning, and photoreceptor light adaptation. These pathways carry out bulk protein degradation in the programmed death of the intersegmental and flight muscles of insects and of individuals in a colonial ascidian; molt-induced atrophy of crustacean claw muscle; and responses of brine shrimp, mussels, and insects to environmental stress. Selective proteolysis occurs in response to specific signals, such as in modulating protein kinase A activity in sea hare and fruit fly associated with learning; gametogenesis, differentiation, and development in sponge, echinoderms, nematode, ascidian, and insects; and in light adaptation of photoreceptors in the eyes of squid, insects, and crustaceans. Proteolytic activities and specificities are regulated through proteinase gene expression (CDP isozymes and proteasomal subunits), allosteric regulators, and posttranslational modifications, as well as through specific targeting of protein substrates by a diverse assemblage of ubiquitin-conjugases and deubiquitinases. Thus, the regulation of intracellular proteolysis approaches the complexity and versatility of transcriptional and translational mechanisms.

  10. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome System: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Alzheimer's Disease and Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Gong, Bing; Radulovic, Miroslav; Figueiredo-Pereira, Maria E; Cardozo, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a crucial protein degradation system in eukaryotes. Herein, we will review advances in the understanding of the role of several proteins of the UPS in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). The UPS consists of many factors that include E3 ubiquitin ligases, ubiquitin hydrolases, ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like molecules, and the proteasome itself. An extensive body of work links UPS dysfunction with AD pathogenesis and progression. More recently, the UPS has been shown to have vital roles in recovery of function after SCI. The ubiquitin hydrolase (Uch-L1) has been proposed to increase cellular levels of mono-ubiquitin and hence to increase rates of protein turnover by the UPS. A low Uch-L1 level has been linked with Aβ accumulation in AD and reduced neuroregeneration after SCI. One likely mechanism for these beneficial effects of Uch-L1 is reduced turnover of the PKA regulatory subunit and consequently, reduced signaling via CREB. The neuron-specific F-box protein Fbx2 ubiquitinates β-secretase thus targeting it for proteasomal degradation and reducing generation of Aβ. Both Uch-L1 and Fbx2 improve synaptic plasticity and cognitive function in mouse AD models. The role of Fbx2 after SCI has not been examined, but abolishing ß-secretase reduces neuronal recovery after SCI, associated with reduced myelination. UBB+1, which arises through a frame-shift mutation in the ubiquitin gene that adds 19 amino acids to the C-terminus of ubiquitin, inhibits proteasomal function and is associated with increased neurofibrillary tangles in patients with AD, Pick's disease and Down's syndrome. These advances in understanding of the roles of the UPS in AD and SCI raise new questions but, also, identify attractive and exciting targets for potential, future therapeutic interventions.

  11. Suppression of pain and joint destruction by inhibition of the proteasome system in experimental osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aisha Siddiqah; Li, Jian; Erlandsson-Harris, Helena; Stark, André; Bakalkin, Georgy; Ahmed, Mahmood

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease with pain and loss of joint function as major pathological features. Recent studies show that proteasome inhibitors reduce pain in various pathological conditions. We evaluated the effects of MG132, a reversible proteasome inhibitor on pain and joint destruction in a rat model of osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis was induced by intraarticular injection of monosodium iodoacetate into the rat knee. Knee joint stiffness was scored and nociception was evaluated by mechanical pressure applied to the respective hind paw. Knee joint destruction was assessed by radiological and histological analyses. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in the knee articular cartilage. Expression of substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was studied in the dorsal root ganglia (L4-L6) by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and in the knee joints by immunohistochemistry. Our results indicate that daily treatment of osteoarthritic rats with MG132 significantly increases their mobility while the swelling, pain thresholds, and pathological features of the affected joints were reduced. Furthermore, the upregulated expression of MMP-3, SP, and CGRP in the arthritic rats was normalized by MG132 administration. We conclude that the proteasome inhibitor MG132 reduces pain and joint destruction, probably by involving the peripheral nervous system, and that changes in SP and CGRP expression correlate with alterations in behavioural responses. Our findings suggest that nontoxic proteasome inhibitors may represent a novel pharmacotherapy for osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulation of ErbB2 Receptor Status by the Proteasomal DUB POH1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han; Buus, Richard; Clague, Michael J.; Urbé, Sylvie

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the factors, which control ErbB2 and EGF receptor (EGFR) status in cells is likely to inform future therapeutic approaches directed at these potent oncogenes. ErbB2 is resistant to stimulus-induced degradation and high levels of over-expression can inhibit EGF receptor down-regulation. We now show that for HeLa cells expressing similar numbers of EGFR and ErbB2, EGFR down-regulation is efficient and insensitive to reduction of ErbB2 levels. Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) may extend protein half-lives by rescuing ubiquitinated substrates from proteasomal degradation or from ubiquitin-dependent lysosomal sorting. Using a siRNA library directed at the full complement of human DUBs, we identified POH1 (also known as Rpn11 or PSMD14), a component of the proteasome lid, as a critical DUB controlling the apparent ErbB2 levels. Moreover, the effects on ErbB2 levels can be reproduced by administration of proteasomal inhibitors such as epoxomicin used at maximally tolerated doses. However, the extent of this apparent loss and specificity for ErbB2 versus EGFR could not be accounted for by changes in transcription or degradation rate. Further investigation revealed that cell surface ErbB2 levels are only mildly affected by POH1 knock-down and that the apparent loss can at least partially be explained by the accumulation of higher molecular weight ubiquitinated forms of ErbB2 that are detectable with an extracellular but not intracellular domain directed antibody. We propose that POH1 may deubiquitinate ErbB2 and that this activity is not necessarily coupled to proteasomal degradation. PMID:19436748

  13. Global Analysis of the Human Pathophenotypic Similarity Gene Network Merges Disease Module Components

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Palomares, Armando; Rodríguez-López, Rocío; Ranea, Juan A. G.; Jiménez, Francisca Sánchez; Medina, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    The molecular complexity of genetic diseases requires novel approaches to break it down into coherent biological modules. For this purpose, many disease network models have been created and analyzed. We highlight two of them, “the human diseases networks” (HDN) and “the orphan disease networks” (ODN). However, in these models, each single node represents one disease or an ambiguous group of diseases. In these cases, the notion of diseases as unique entities reduces the usefulness of network-based methods. We hypothesize that using the clinical features (pathophenotypes) to define pathophenotypic connections between disease-causing genes improve our understanding of the molecular events originated by genetic disturbances. For this, we have built a pathophenotypic similarity gene network (PSGN) and compared it with the unipartite projections (based on gene-to-gene edges) similar to those used in previous network models (HDN and ODN). Unlike these disease network models, the PSGN uses semantic similarities. This pathophenotypic similarity has been calculated by comparing pathophenotypic annotations of genes (human abnormalities of HPO terms) in the “Human Phenotype Ontology”. The resulting network contains 1075 genes (nodes) and 26197 significant pathophenotypic similarities (edges). A global analysis of this network reveals: unnoticed pairs of genes showing significant pathophenotypic similarity, a biological meaningful re-arrangement of the pathological relationships between genes, correlations of biochemical interactions with higher similarity scores and functional biases in metabolic and essential genes toward the pathophenotypic specificity and the pleiotropy, respectively. Additionally, pathophenotypic similarities and metabolic interactions of genes associated with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) have been used to merge into a coherent pathological module. Our results indicate that pathophenotypes contribute to identify underlying co

  14. Discovering the hidden sub-network component in a ranked list of genes or proteins derived from genomic experiments.

    PubMed

    García-Alonso, Luz; Alonso, Roberto; Vidal, Enrique; Amadoz, Alicia; de María, Alejandro; Minguez, Pablo; Medina, Ignacio; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2012-11-01

    Genomic experiments (e.g. differential gene expression, single-nucleotide polymorphism association) typically produce ranked list of genes. We present a simple but powerful approach which uses protein-protein interaction data to detect sub-networks within such ranked lists of genes or proteins. We performed an exhaustive study of network parameters that allowed us concluding that the average number of components and the average number of nodes per component are the parameters that best discriminate between real and random networks. A novel aspect that increases the efficiency of this strategy in finding sub-networks is that, in addition to direct connections, also connections mediated by intermediate nodes are considered to build up the sub-networks. The possibility of using of such intermediate nodes makes this approach more robust to noise. It also overcomes some limitations intrinsic to experimental designs based on differential expression, in which some nodes are invariant across conditions. The proposed approach can also be used for candidate disease-gene prioritization. Here, we demonstrate the usefulness of the approach by means of several case examples that include a differential expression analysis in Fanconi Anemia, a genome-wide association study of bipolar disorder and a genome-scale study of essentiality in cancer genes. An efficient and easy-to-use web interface (available at http://www.babelomics.org) based on HTML5 technologies is also provided to run the algorithm and represent the network.

  15. Discovering the hidden sub-network component in a ranked list of genes or proteins derived from genomic experiments

    PubMed Central

    García-Alonso, Luz; Alonso, Roberto; Vidal, Enrique; Amadoz, Alicia; de María, Alejandro; Minguez, Pablo; Medina, Ignacio; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2012-01-01

    Genomic experiments (e.g. differential gene expression, single-nucleotide polymorphism association) typically produce ranked list of genes. We present a simple but powerful approach which uses protein–protein interaction data to detect sub-networks within such ranked lists of genes or proteins. We performed an exhaustive study of network parameters that allowed us concluding that the average number of components and the average number of nodes per component are the parameters that best discriminate between real and random networks. A novel aspect that increases the efficiency of this strategy in finding sub-networks is that, in addition to direct connections, also connections mediated by intermediate nodes are considered to build up the sub-networks. The possibility of using of such intermediate nodes makes this approach more robust to noise. It also overcomes some limitations intrinsic to experimental designs based on differential expression, in which some nodes are invariant across conditions. The proposed approach can also be used for candidate disease-gene prioritization. Here, we demonstrate the usefulness of the approach by means of several case examples that include a differential expression analysis in Fanconi Anemia, a genome-wide association study of bipolar disorder and a genome-scale study of essentiality in cancer genes. An efficient and easy-to-use web interface (available at http://www.babelomics.org) based on HTML5 technologies is also provided to run the algorithm and represent the network. PMID:22844098

  16. Crystal structure of the boronic acid-based proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in complex with the yeast 20S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Groll, Michael; Berkers, Celia R; Ploegh, Hidde L; Ovaa, Huib

    2006-03-01

    The dipeptide boronic acid bortezomib, also termed VELCADE, is a proteasome inhibitor now in use for the treatment of multiple myeloma, and its use for the treatment of other malignancies is being explored. We determined the crystal structure of the yeast 20S proteasome in complex with bortezomib to establish the specificity and binding mode of bortezomib to the proteasome's different catalytically active sites. This structure should enable the rational design of new boronic acid derivatives with improved affinities and specificities for individual active subunits.

  17. Nicotianamine synthase gene family as central components in heavy metal and phytohormone response in maize.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mei-Liang; Qi, Lei-Peng; Pang, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Qian; Lei, Zhi; Tang, Yi-Xiong; Zhu, Xue-Mei; Shao, Ji-Rong; Wu, Yan-Min

    2013-06-01

    Nicotianamine (NA) is an important divalent metal chelator and the main precursor of phytosiderophores. NA is synthesized from S-adenosylmethionine in a process catalyzed by nicotianamine synthase (NAS). In this study, a set of structural and phylogenetic analyses have been applied to identify the maize NAS genes based on the maize genome sequence release. Ten maize NAS genes have been mapped; seven of them have not been reported to date. Phylogenetic analysis and expression pattern from microarray data led to their classification into two different orthologous groups. C-terminal fusion of ZmNAS3 with GFP was found in the cytoplasm of Arabidopsis leaf protoplast. Expression analysis by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed ZmNAS genes are responsive to heavy metal ions (Ni, Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn, and Cd), and all 10 ZmNAS genes were only observed in the root tissue except of ZmNAS6. The promoter of ZmNAS genes was analyzed for the presence of different cis-element response to all kinds of phytohormones and environment stresses. We found that the ZmNAS gene expression of maize seedlings was regulated by jasmonic acid, abscisic acid, and salicylic acid. Microarray data demonstrated that the ZmNAS genes show differential, organ-specific expression patterns in the maize developmental steps. The integrated comparative analysis can improve our current view of ZmNAS genes and facilitate the functional characterization of individual members.

  18. Heritable gene expression differences between lake and stream stickleback include both parallel and antiparallel components.

    PubMed

    Hanson, D; Hu, J; Hendry, A P; Barrett, R D H

    2017-08-23

    The repeated phenotypic patterns that characterize populations undergoing parallel evolution provide support for a deterministic role of adaptation by natural selection. Determining the level of parallelism also at the genetic level is thus central to our understanding of how natural selection works. Many studies have looked for repeated genomic patterns in natural populations, but work on gene expression is less common. The studies that have examined gene expression have found some support for parallelism, but those studies almost always used samples collected from the wild that potentially confounds the effects of plasticity with heritable differences. Here we use two independent pairs of lake and stream threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) raised in common garden conditions to assess both parallel and antiparallel (that is, similar versus different directions of lake-stream expression divergence in the two watersheds) heritable gene expression differences as measured by total RNA sequencing. We find that more genes than expected by chance show either parallel (22 genes, 0.18% of expressed genes) or antiparallel (24 genes, 0.20% of expressed genes) lake-stream expression differences. These results correspond well with previous genomic studies in stickleback ecotype pairs that found similar levels of parallelism. We suggest that parallelism might be similarly constrained at the genomic and transcriptomic levels.Heredity advance online publication, 23 August 2017; doi:10.1038/hdy.2017.50.

  19. Changes in proteasome structure and function caused by HAMLET in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Lotta; Aits, Sonja; Onnerfjord, Patrik; Trulsson, Maria; Storm, Petter; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-01-01

    Proteasomes control the level of endogenous unfolded proteins by degrading them in the proteolytic core. Insufficient degradation due to altered protein structure or proteasome inhibition may trigger cell death. This study examined the proteasome response to HAMLET, a partially unfolded protein-lipid complex, which is internalized by tumor cells and triggers cell death. HAMLET bound directly to isolated 20S proteasomes in vitro and in tumor cells significant co-localization of HAMLET and 20S proteasomes was detected by confocal microscopy. This interaction was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation from extracts of HAMLET-treated tumor cells. HAMLET resisted in vitro degradation by proteasomal enzymes and degradation by intact 20S proteasomes was slow compared to fatty acid-free, partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin. After a brief activation, HAMLET inhibited proteasome activity in vitro and in parallel a change in proteasome structure occurred, with modifications of catalytic (beta1 and beta5) and structural subunits (alpha2, alpha3, alpha6 and beta3). Proteasome inhibition was confirmed in extracts from HAMLET-treated cells and there were indications of proteasome fragmentation in HAMLET-treated cells. The results suggest that internalized HAMLET is targeted to 20S proteasomes, that the complex resists degradation, inhibits proteasome activity and perturbs proteasome structure. We speculate that perturbations of proteasome structure might contribute to the cytotoxic effects of unfolded protein complexes that invade host cells.

  20. Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, Hikaru; Arai, Naoko; Tanaka, Keiji Saeki, Yasushi

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •We succeeded to control the proteasome localization by the anchor-away technique. •Nuclear proteasome-depleted cells showed a lethal phenotype. •Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in dividing cells. -- Abstract: The 26S proteasome is an essential protease complex responsible for the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotic cells. In rapidly proliferating yeast cells, proteasomes are mainly localized in the nucleus, but the biological significance of the proteasome localization is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the proteasome localization and the functions by the anchor-away technique, a ligand-dependent sequestration of a target protein into specific compartment(s). Anchoring of the proteasome to the plasma membrane or the ribosome resulted in conditional depletion of the nuclear proteasomes, whereas anchoring to histone resulted in the proteasome sequestration into the nucleus. We observed that the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in all the proteasome-targeted cells, suggesting that both the nuclear and cytoplasmic proteasomes have proteolytic functions and that the ubiquitinated proteins are produced and degraded in each compartment. Consistent with previous studies, the nuclear proteasome-depleted cells exhibited a lethal phenotype. In contrast, the nuclear sequestration of the proteasome resulted only in a mild growth defect, suggesting that the cytoplasmic proteasomes are not basically indispensable for cell growth in rapidly growing yeast cells.

  1. Metabolomic Quantitative Trait Loci (mQTL) Mapping Implicates the Ubiquitin Proteasome System in Cardiovascular Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, William E.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Stevens, Robert; Craig, Damian; Bain, James R.; Grass, Elizabeth; Haynes, Carol; Kwee, Lydia; Qin, Xuejun; Slentz, Dorothy H.; Krupp, Deidre; Muehlbauer, Michael; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Gregory, Simon G.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Shah, Svati H.

    2015-01-01

    Levels of certain circulating short-chain dicarboxylacylcarnitine (SCDA), long-chain dicarboxylacylcarnitine (LCDA) and medium chain acylcarnitine (MCA) metabolites are heritable and predict cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. Little is known about the biological pathways that influence levels of most of these metabolites. Here, we analyzed genetics, epigenetics, and transcriptomics with metabolomics in samples from a large CVD cohort to identify novel genetic markers for CVD and to better understand the role of metabolites in CVD pathogenesis. Using genomewide association in the CATHGEN cohort (N = 1490), we observed associations of several metabolites with genetic loci. Our strongest findings were for SCDA metabolite levels with variants in genes that regulate components of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress (USP3, HERC1, STIM1, SEL1L, FBXO25, SUGT1) These findings were validated in a second cohort of CATHGEN subjects (N = 2022, combined p = 8.4x10-6–2.3x10-10). Importantly, variants in these genes independently predicted CVD events. Association of genomewide methylation profiles with SCDA metabolites identified two ER stress genes as differentially methylated (BRSK2 and HOOK2). Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) pathway analyses driven by gene variants and SCDA metabolites corroborated perturbations in ER stress and highlighted the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) arm. Moreover, culture of human kidney cells in the presence of levels of fatty acids found in individuals with cardiometabolic disease, induced accumulation of SCDA metabolites in parallel with increases in the ER stress marker BiP. Thus, our integrative strategy implicates the UPS arm of the ER stress pathway in CVD pathogenesis, and identifies novel genetic loci associated with CVD event risk. PMID:26540294

  2. Calreticulin and Arginylated Calreticulin Have Different Susceptibilities to Proteasomal Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Goitea, Victor E.; Hallak, Marta E.

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational arginylation has been suggested to target proteins for proteasomal degradation. The degradation mechanism for arginylated calreticulin (R-CRT) localized in the cytoplasm is unknown. To evaluate the effect of arginylation on CRT stability, we examined the metabolic fates and degradation mechanisms of cytoplasmic CRT and R-CRT in NIH 3T3 and CHO cells. Both CRT isoforms were found to be proteasomal substrates, but the half-life of R-CRT (2 h) was longer than that of cytoplasmic CRT (0.7 h). Arginylation was not required for proteasomal degradation of CRT, although R-CRT displays ubiquitin modification. A CRT mutant incapable of dimerization showed reduced metabolic stability of R-CRT, indicating that R-CRT dimerization may protect it from proteasomal degradation. Our findings, taken together, demonstrate a novel function of arginylation: increasing the half-life of CRT in cytoplasm. PMID:25969538

  3. Prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup), proteasomes and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Darwin, K Heran

    2009-07-01

    Proteasomes are ATP-dependent, multisubunit proteases that are found in all eukaryotes and archaea and some bacteria. In eukaryotes, the small protein ubiquitin is covalently attached in a post-translational manner to proteins that are targeted for proteasomal degradation. Despite the presence of proteasomes in many prokaryotes, ubiquitin or other post-translational protein modifiers were presumed to be absent from these organisms. Recently a prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein, Pup, was found to target proteins for proteolysis by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome. The discovery of this ubiquitin-like modifier opens up the possibility that other bacteria may also have small post-translational protein tagging systems, with the ability to affect cellular processes.

  4. Conserved Sequence Preferences Contribute to Substrate Recognition by the Proteasome*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Houqing; Singh Gautam, Amit K.; Wilmington, Shameika R.; Wylie, Dennis; Martinez-Fonts, Kirby; Kago, Grace; Warburton, Marie; Chavali, Sreenivas; Inobe, Tomonao; Finkelstein, Ilya J.; Babu, M. Madan

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome has pronounced preferences for the amino acid sequence of its substrates at the site where it initiates degradation. Here, we report that modulating these sequences can tune the steady-state abundance of proteins over 2 orders of magnitude in cells. This is the same dynamic range as seen for inducing ubiquitination through a classic N-end rule degron. The stability and abundance of His3 constructs dictated by the initiation site affect survival of yeast cells and show that variation in proteasomal initiation can affect fitness. The proteasome's sequence preferences are linked directly to the affinity of the initiation sites to their receptor on the proteasome and are conserved between Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and human cells. These findings establish that the sequence composition of unstructured initiation sites influences protein abundance in vivo in an evolutionarily conserved manner and can affect phenotype and fitness. PMID:27226608

  5. Peptide-size dependent active transport in the proteasome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaikin, A.; Pöschel, T.

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the transport of proteins inside the proteasome and propose an active-transport mechanism based on a spatially asymmetric interaction potential of peptide chains. The transport is driven by fluctuations which are always present in such systems. We compute the peptide-size dependent transport rate which is essential for the functioning of the proteasome. In agreement with recent experiments, varying temperature changes the transport mechanism qualitatively.

  6. Reconfiguration of the proteasome during chaperone-mediated assembly.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyeon; Li, Xueming; Kim, Ho Min; Singh, Chingakham Ranjit; Tian, Geng; Hoyt, Martin A; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P; Zolkiewski, Michal; Coffino, Philip; Roelofs, Jeroen; Cheng, Yifan; Finley, Daniel

    2013-05-23

    The proteasomal ATPase ring, comprising Rpt1-Rpt6, associates with the heptameric α-ring of the proteasome core particle (CP) in the mature proteasome, with the Rpt carboxy-terminal tails inserting into pockets of the α-ring. Rpt ring assembly is mediated by four chaperones, each binding a distinct Rpt subunit. Here we report that the base subassembly of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteasome, which includes the Rpt ring, forms a high-affinity complex with the CP. This complex is subject to active dissociation by the chaperones Hsm3, Nas6 and Rpn14. Chaperone-mediated dissociation was abrogated by a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue, indicating that chaperone action is coupled to nucleotide hydrolysis by the Rpt ring. Unexpectedly, synthetic Rpt tail peptides bound α-pockets with poor specificity, except for Rpt6, which uniquely bound the α2/α3-pocket. Although the Rpt6 tail is not visualized within an α-pocket in mature proteasomes, it inserts into the α2/α3-pocket in the base-CP complex and is important for complex formation. Thus, the Rpt-CP interface is reconfigured when the lid complex joins the nascent proteasome to form the mature holoenzyme.

  7. Substrate Ubiquitination Controls the Unfolding Ability of the Proteasome.

    PubMed

    Reichard, Eden L; Chirico, Giavanna G; Dewey, William J; Nassif, Nicholas D; Bard, Katelyn E; Millas, Nickolas E; Kraut, Daniel A

    2016-08-26

    In eukaryotic cells, proteins are targeted to the proteasome for degradation by polyubiquitination. These proteins bind to ubiquitin receptors, are engaged and unfolded by proteasomal ATPases, and are processively degraded. The factors determining to what extent the proteasome can successfully unfold and degrade a substrate are still poorly understood. We find that the architecture of polyubiquitin chains attached to a substrate affects the ability of the proteasome to unfold and degrade the substrate, with K48- or mixed-linkage chains leading to greater processivity than K63-linked chains. Ubiquitin-independent targeting of substrates to the proteasome gave substantially lower processivity of degradation than ubiquitin-dependent targeting. Thus, even though ubiquitin chains are removed early in degradation, during substrate engagement, remarkably they dramatically affect the later unfolding of a protein domain. Our work supports a model in which a polyubiquitin chain associated with a substrate switches the proteasome into an activated state that persists throughout the degradation process. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Denervation-Induced Activation of the Standard Proteasome and Immunoproteasome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiming M; Ferrington, Deborah A; Baumann, Cory W; Thompson, LaDora V

    2016-01-01

    The standard 26S proteasome is responsible for the majority of myofibrillar protein degradation leading to muscle atrophy. The immunoproteasome is an inducible form of the proteasome. While its function has been linked to conditions of atrophy, its contribution to muscle proteolysis remains unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if the immunoproteasome plays a role in skeletal muscle atrophy induced by denervation. Adult male C57BL/6 wild type (WT) and immunoproteasome knockout lmp7-/-/mecl-1-/- (L7M1) mice underwent tibial nerve transection on the left hindlimb for either 7 or 14 days, while control mice did not undergo surgery. Proteasome activity (caspase-, chymotrypsin-, and trypsin- like), protein content of standard proteasome (β1, β5 and β2) and immunoproteasome (LMP2, LMP7 and MECL-1) catalytic subunits were determined in the gastrocnemius muscle. Denervation induced significant atrophy and was accompanied by increased activities and protein content of the catalytic subunits in both WT and L7M1 mice. Although denervation resulted in a similar degree of muscle atrophy between strains, the mice lacking two immunoproteasome subunits showed a differential response in the extent and duration of proteasome features, including activities and content of the β1, β5 and LMP2 catalytic subunits. The results indicate that immunoproteasome deficiency alters the proteasome's composition and activities. However, the immunoproteasome does not appear to be essential for muscle atrophy induced by denervation.

  9. DNA methylation of genes of the main components of the telomerase complex in Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Belova, E V; Kozlov, A E; Shubernetskaya, O S; Zvereva, M I; Shpanchenko, O V; Dontsova, O A

    2015-01-01

    The methylation status of the genes of telomerase reverse transcriptase (tert) and telomerase RNA (terc) was determined in brain tissues of Danio rerio of different age. It is found that, regardless of the age of fish, the regulatory region of the tert gene was completely methylated, whereas the coding region remained unmethylated in all cases. The level of methylation of the region located downstream of the coding region of the terc gene changes with age. This region was analyzed in the samples of other tissues, and its methylation status was also nonuniform. The alteration of the methylation status in the 3'-untranslated region of the terc gene suggests the possibility of transcription of the antisense strand in this region.

  10. Regulatory component analysis: a semi-blind extraction approach to infer gene regulatory networks with imperfect biological knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Xuan, Jianhua; Shih, Ie-Ming; Clarke, Robert; Wang, Yue

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of high-throughput biotechnology capable of monitoring genomic signals, it becomes increasingly promising to understand molecular cellular mechanisms through systems biology approaches. One of the active research topics in systems biology is to infer gene transcriptional regulatory networks using various genomic data; this inference problem can be formulated as a linear model with latent signals associated with some regulatory proteins called transcription factors (TFs). As common statistical assumptions may not hold for genomic signals, typical latent variable algorithms such as independent component analysis (ICA) are incapable to reveal underlying true regulatory signals. Liao et al. [1] proposed to perform inference using an approach named network component analysis (NCA), the optimization of which is achieved by a least-squares fitting approach with biological knowledge constraints. However, the incompleteness of biological knowledge and its inconsistency with gene expression data are not considered in the original NCA solution, which could greatly affect the inference accuracy. To overcome these limitations, we propose a linear extraction scheme, namely regulatory component analysis (RCA), to infer underlying regulatory signals even with partial biological knowledge. Numerical simulations show a significant improvement of our proposed RCA over NCA, not only when signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) is low, but also when the given biological knowledge is incomplete and inconsistent to gene expression data. Furthermore, real biological experiments on E. coli are performed for regulatory network inference in comparison with several typical linear latent variable methods, which again demonstrates the effectiveness and improved performance of the proposed algorithm. PMID:22685363

  11. Proteasome inhibition induces DNA damage and reorganizes nuclear architecture and protein synthesis machinery in sensory ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Palanca, Ana; Casafont, Iñigo; Berciano, María T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    Bortezomib is a reversible proteasome inhibitor used as an anticancer drug. However, its clinical use is limited since it causes peripheral neurotoxicity. We have used Sprague-Dawley rats as an animal model to investigate the cellular mechanisms affected by both short-term and chronic bortezomib treatments in sensory ganglia neurons. Proteasome inhibition induces dose-dependent alterations in the architecture, positioning, shape and polarity of the neuronal nucleus. It also produces DNA damage without affecting neuronal survival, and severe disruption of the protein synthesis machinery at the central cytoplasm accompanied by decreased expression of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor. As a compensatory or adaptive survival response against proteotoxic stress caused by bortezomib treatment, sensory neurons preserve basal levels of transcriptional activity, up-regulate the expression of proteasome subunit genes, and generate a new cytoplasmic perinuclear domain for protein synthesis. We propose that proteasome activity is crucial for controlling nuclear architecture, DNA repair and the organization of the protein synthesis machinery in sensory neurons. These neurons are primary targets of bortezomib neurotoxicity, for which reason their dysfunction may contribute to the pathogenesis of the bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy in treated patients.

  12. The Arabidopsis Proteasome RPT5 Subunits Are Essential for Gametophyte Development and Show Accession-Dependent Redundancy[W

    PubMed Central

    Gallois, Jean-Luc; Guyon-Debast, Anouchka; Lécureuil, Alain; Vezon, Daniel; Carpentier, Virginie; Bonhomme, Sandrine; Guerche, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the role of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), which allows proteins to be selectively degraded, during gametophyte development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Three mutant alleles altering the UPS were isolated in the Wassilewskija (Ws) accession: they affect the Regulatory Particle 5a (RPT5a) gene, which (along with RPT5b) encodes one of the six AAA-ATPases of the proteasome regulatory particle. In the heterozygous state, all three mutant alleles displayed 50% pollen lethality, suggesting that RPT5a is essential for male gametophyte development. However, a fourth mutant in the Columbia (Col) accession did not display such a phenotype because the RPT5b Col allele complements the rpt5a defect in the male gametophyte, whereas the RPT5b Ws allele does not. Double rpt5a rpt5b mutants showed a complete male and female gametophyte lethal phenotype in a Col background, indicating that RPT5 subunits are essential for both gametophytic phases. Mitotic divisions were affected in double mutant gametophytes correlating with an absence of the proteasome-dependent cyclinA3 degradation. Finally, we show that RPT5b expression is highly increased when proteasome functioning is defective, allowing complementation of the rpt5a mutation. In conclusion, RPT5 subunits are not only essential for both male and female gametophyte development but also display accession-dependent redundancy and are crucial in cell cycle progression. PMID:19223514

  13. Molecular Characterization of Hap Complex Components Responsible for Methanol-Inducible Gene Expression in the Methylotrophic Yeast Candida boidinii

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Saori; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Nitta, Nobuhisa; Sasano, Yu

    2015-01-01

    We identified genes encoding components of the Hap complex, CbHAP2, CbHAP3, and CbHAP5, as transcription factors regulating methanol-inducible gene expression in the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii. We found that the Cbhap2Δ, Cbhap3Δ, and Cbhap5Δ gene-disrupted strains showed severe growth defects on methanol but not on glucose and nonfermentable carbon sources such as ethanol and glycerol. In these disruptants, the transcriptional activities of methanol-inducible promoters were significantly decreased compared to those of the wild-type strain, indicating that CbHap2p, CbHap3p, and CbHap5p play indispensable roles in methanol-inducible gene expression. Further molecular and biochemical analyses demonstrated that CbHap2p, CbHap3p, and CbHap5p localized to the nucleus and bound to the promoter regions of methanol-inducible genes regardless of the carbon source, and heterotrimer formation was suggested to be necessary for binding to DNA. Unexpectedly, distinct from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Hap complex functioned in methanol-specific induction rather than glucose derepression in C. boidinii. Our results shed light on a novel function of the Hap complex in methanol-inducible gene expression in methylotrophic yeasts. PMID:25595445

  14. Molecular characterization of hap complex components responsible for methanol-inducible gene expression in the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii.

    PubMed

    Oda, Saori; Yurimoto, Hiroya; Nitta, Nobuhisa; Sasano, Yu; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2015-03-01

    We identified genes encoding components of the Hap complex, CbHAP2, CbHAP3, and CbHAP5, as transcription factors regulating methanol-inducible gene expression in the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii. We found that the Cbhap2Δ, Cbhap3Δ, and Cbhap5Δ gene-disrupted strains showed severe growth defects on methanol but not on glucose and nonfermentable carbon sources such as ethanol and glycerol. In these disruptants, the transcriptional activities of methanol-inducible promoters were significantly decreased compared to those of the wild-type strain, indicating that CbHap2p, CbHap3p, and CbHap5p play indispensable roles in methanol-inducible gene expression. Further molecular and biochemical analyses demonstrated that CbHap2p, CbHap3p, and CbHap5p localized to the nucleus and bound to the promoter regions of methanol-inducible genes regardless of the carbon source, and heterotrimer formation was suggested to be necessary for binding to DNA. Unexpectedly, distinct from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Hap complex functioned in methanol-specific induction rather than glucose derepression in C. boidinii. Our results shed light on a novel function of the Hap complex in methanol-inducible gene expression in methylotrophic yeasts.

  15. Selective increase of in vivo firing frequencies in DA SN neurons after proteasome inhibition in the ventral midbrain.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Mahalakshmi; Kern, Beatrice; Vogel, Simone; Klose, Verena; Schneider, Gaby; Roeper, Jochen

    2014-09-01

    The impairment of protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is present in sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD), and might play a key role in selective degeneration of vulnerable dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SN). Further evidence for a causal role of dysfunctional UPS in familial PD comes from mutations in parkin, which results in a loss of function of an E3-ubiquitin-ligase. In a mouse model, genetic inactivation of an essential component of the 26S proteasome lead to widespread neuronal degeneration including DA midbrain neurons and the formation of alpha-synuclein-positive inclusion bodies, another hallmark of PD. Studies using pharmacological UPS inhibition in vivo had more mixed results, varying from extensive degeneration to no loss of DA SN neurons. However, it is currently unknown whether UPS impairment will affect the neurophysiological functions of DA midbrain neurons. To answer this question, we infused a selective proteasome inhibitor into the ventral midbrain in vivo and recorded single DA midbrain neurons 2 weeks after the proteasome challenge. We found a selective increase in the mean in vivo firing frequencies of identified DA SN neurons in anesthetized mice, while those in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) were unaffected. Our results demonstrate that a single-hit UPS inhibition is sufficient to induce a stable and selective hyperexcitability phenotype in surviving DA SN neurons in vivo. This might imply that UPS dysfunction sensitizes DA SN neurons by enhancing 'stressful pacemaking'.

  16. Assessment of Sugar Components and Genes Involved in the Regulation of Sucrose Accumulation in Peach Fruit.

    PubMed

    Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Zheng, Hongyu; Peng, Qian; Jiang, Quan; Wang, Huiliang; Fang, Ting; Liao, Liao; Wang, Lu; He, Huaping; Han, Yuepeng

    2016-09-07

    Soluble sugar contents in mature fruits of 45 peach accessions were quantified using gas chromatography analysis. Sucrose is the predominant sugar in mature fruit, followed by glucose and fructose, which have similar concentrations. Overall, sucrose metabolism and accumulation are crucial determinants of sugar content in peach fruit, and there is a wide range of sucrose concentrations among peach genotypes. To understand the mechanisms regulating sucrose accumulation in peach fruit, expression profiles of genes involved in sucrose metabolism and transport were compared among four genotypes. Two sucrose-cleaving enzyme genes (SUS4 and NINV8), one gene involved in sucrose resynthesis (SPS3), and three sugar transporter genes (SUT2, SUT4, and TMT2) were prevalently expressed in peach fruit, and their expression levels are significantly correlated with sucrose accumulation. In contrast, the VAINV genes responsible for sucrose cleavage in the vacuole were weakly expressed in mature fruit, suggesting that the sucrose-cleaving reaction is not active in the vacuole of sink cells of mature peach fruit. This study suggests that sucrose accumulation in peach fruit involves the coordinated interaction of genes related to sucrose cleavage, resynthesis, and transport, which could be helpful for future peach breeding.

  17. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse genes encoding the alpha receptor component for ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, D M; Rojas, E; Le Beau, M M; Espinosa, R; Brannan, C I; McClain, J; Masiakowski, P; Ip, N Y; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to share receptor components with, and to be structurally related to, a family of broadly acting cytokines, including interleukin-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. However, the CNTF receptor complex also includes a CNTF-specific component known as CNTF receptor alpha (CNTFR alpha). Here we describe the molecular cloning of the human and mouse genes encoding CNTFR. We report that the human and mouse genes have an identical intron-exon structure that correlates well with the domain structure of CNTFR alpha. That is, the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin-like domain are each encoded by single exons, the cytokine receptor-like domain is distributed among 4 exons, and the C-terminal glycosyl phosphatidylinositol recognition domain is encoded by the final coding exon. The position of the introns within the cytokine receptor-like domain corresponds to those found in other members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. Confirming a recent study using radiation hybrids, we have also mapped the human CNTFR gene to chromosome band 9p13 and the mouse gene to a syntenic region of chromosome 4.

  18. Variance component score test for time-course gene set analysis of longitudinal RNA-seq data.

    PubMed

    Agniel, Denis; Hejblum, Boris P

    2017-03-10

    As gene expression measurement technology is shifting from microarrays to sequencing, the statistical tools available for their analysis must be adapted since RNA-seq data are measured as counts. It has been proposed to model RNA-seq counts as continuous variables using nonparametric regression to account for their inherent heteroscedasticity. In this vein, we propose tcgsaseq, a principled, model-free, and efficient method for detecting longitudinal changes in RNA-seq gene sets defined a priori. The method identifies those gene sets whose expression varies over time, based on an original variance component score test accounting for both covariates and heteroscedasticity without assuming any specific parametric distribution for the (transformed) counts. We demonstrate that despite the presence of a nonparametric component, our test statistic has a simple form and limiting distribution, and both may be computed quickly. A permutation version of the test is additionally proposed for very small sample sizes. Applied to both simulated data and two real datasets, tcgsaseq is shown to exhibit very good statistical properties, with an increase in stability and power when compared to state-of-the-art methods ROAST (rotation gene set testing), edgeR, and DESeq2, which can fail to control the type I error under certain realistic settings. We have made the method available for the community in the R package tcgsaseq.

  19. Hsp40 regulates the amount of keratin proteins via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Uchiumi, Asato; Katagata, Yohtaro

    2012-02-01

    Keratins represent important structural components of intermediate filament proteins. Their expression profiles are remarkably tissue-specific. Recent data have shown that keratins associate with many proteins including heat shock proteins (HSP). We recently identified cell-specific keratin and HSP expression. We aimed to gain further insight into the regulation of keratins by specific inhibition through knockdown of Hsp40 in human keratinocyte cells. Keratin-HSP interaction in HaCaT cell lysate was evaluated by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blotting. Immunofluorescence, was used to examine the co-localization of keratins and Hsp40. Hsp40 depletion led to an increase in the levels of keratin proteins (K5, K14, K10) and a decrease in keratin ubiquitination without influencing keratin gene expression. Our results demonstrate direct or indirectly association of Hsp40 and imply that expressed keratin proteins were regulated by Hsp40 depending on the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in HaCaT. Furthermore, the K10 differentiation marker was increased by knockdown of Hsp40. The results presented in this study indicate that Hsp40 is related to the differentiation ex