Science.gov

Sample records for protect rhesus monkeys

  1. Protective efficacy of multiple vaccine platforms against Zika virus challenge in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Abbink, Peter; Larocca, Rafael A; De La Barrera, Rafael A; Bricault, Christine A; Moseley, Edward T; Boyd, Michael; Kirilova, Marinela; Li, Zhenfeng; Ng'ang'a, David; Nanayakkara, Ovini; Nityanandam, Ramya; Mercado, Noe B; Borducchi, Erica N; Agarwal, Arshi; Brinkman, Amanda L; Cabral, Crystal; Chandrashekar, Abishek; Giglio, Patricia B; Jetton, David; Jimenez, Jessica; Lee, Benjamin C; Mojta, Shanell; Molloy, Katherine; Shetty, Mayuri; Neubauer, George H; Stephenson, Kathryn E; Peron, Jean Pierre S; Zanotto, Paolo M de A; Misamore, Johnathan; Finneyfrock, Brad; Lewis, Mark G; Alter, Galit; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Jarman, Richard G; Eckels, Kenneth H; Michael, Nelson L; Thomas, Stephen J; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-09-09

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for a major ongoing epidemic in the Americas and has been causally associated with fetal microcephaly. The development of a safe and effective ZIKV vaccine is therefore an urgent global health priority. Here we demonstrate that three different vaccine platforms protect against ZIKV challenge in rhesus monkeys. A purified inactivated virus vaccine induced ZIKV-specific neutralizing antibodies and completely protected monkeys against ZIKV strains from both Brazil and Puerto Rico. Purified immunoglobulin from vaccinated monkeys also conferred passive protection in adoptive transfer studies. A plasmid DNA vaccine and a single-shot recombinant rhesus adenovirus serotype 52 vector vaccine, both expressing ZIKV premembrane and envelope, also elicited neutralizing antibodies and completely protected monkeys against ZIKV challenge. These data support the rapid clinical development of ZIKV vaccines for humans. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Protective Efficacy of Multiple Vaccine Platforms Against Zika Virus Challenge in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Abbink, Peter; Larocca, Rafael A.; De La Barrera, Rafael A.; Bricault, Christine A.; Moseley, Edward T.; Boyd, Michael; Kirilova, Marinela; Li, Zhenfeng; Ng’ang’a, David; Nanayakkara, Ovini; Nityanandam, Ramya; Mercado, Noe B.; Borducchi, Erica N.; Agarwal, Arshi; Brinkman, Amanda L.; Cabral, Crystal; Chandrashekar, Abishek; Giglio, Patricia B.; Jetton, David; Jimenez, Jessica; Lee, Benjamin C.; Mojta, Shanell; Molloy, Katherine; Shetty, Mayuri; Neubauer, George H.; Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Peron, Jean Pierre S.; Zanotto, Paolo M. de A.; Misamore, Johnathan; Finneyfrock, Brad; Lewis, Mark G.; Alter, Galit; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Jarman, Richard G.; Eckels, Kenneth H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Thomas, Stephen J.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for a major ongoing epidemic in the Americas and has been causally associated with fetal microcephaly. The development of a safe and effective ZIKV vaccine is therefore an urgent global health priority. Here we demonstrate that three different vaccine platforms protect against ZIKV challenge in rhesus monkeys. A purified inactivated virus vaccine induced ZIKV-specific neutralizing antibodies and completely protected monkeys against ZIKV strains from both Brazil and Puerto Rico. Purified immunoglobulin from vaccinated monkeys conferred passive protection in adoptive transfer studies. A plasmid DNA vaccine and a single-shot recombinant rhesus adenovirus serotype 52 vector expressing ZIKV prM-Env also elicited neutralizing antibodies and completely protected monkeys against ZIKV challenge. These data support the rapid clinical development of ZIKV vaccines for humans. PMID:27492477

  3. Rhesus monkey platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Harbury, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to describe the adenine nucleotide metabolism of Rhesus monkey platelets. Nucleotides are labelled with /sup 14/C-adenine and extracted with EDTA-ethanol (EE) and perchlorate (P). Total platelet ATP and ADP (TATP, TADP) is measured in the Holmsen Luciferase assay, and expressed in nanomoles/10/sup 8/ platelets. TR=TATP/TADP. Human platelets release 70% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.7. Rhesus platelets release 82% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.33. Thus, monkey platelets contain more ADP than human platelets. Thin layer chromatography of EE gives a metabolic ratio of 11 in human platelets and 10.5 in monkey platelets. Perchlorate extracts metabolic and actin bound ADP. The human and monkey platelets ratios were 5, indicating they contain the same proportion of actin. Thus, the extra ADP contained in monkey platelets is located in the secretory granules.

  4. Partial protection of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys against superinfection with a heterologous SIV isolate

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette

    2009-01-01

    Although there is increasing evidence that individuals already infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can be infected with a heterologous strain of the virus, the extent of protection against superinfection conferred by the first infection and the biologic consequences of superinfection are not well understood. We explored these questions in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/rhesus monkey model of HIV-1/AIDS. We infected cohorts of rhesus monkeys with either SIVmac251 or SIVsmE660 and then exposed animals to the reciprocal virus through intrarectal inoculations. Employing a quantitative real-time PCR assay, we determined the replication kinetics of the two strains of virus for 20 weeks. We found that primary infection with a replication-competent virus did not protect against acquisition of infection by a heterologous virus but did confer relative control of the superinfecting virus. In animals that became superinfected, there was a reduction in peak replication and rapid control of the second virus. The relative susceptibility to superinfection was not correlated with CD4(+) T-cell count, CD4(+) memory T-cell subsets, cytokine production by virus-specific CD8(+) or CD4(+) cells, or neutralizing antibodies at the time of exposure to the second virus. Although there were transient increases in viral loads of the primary virus and a modest decline in CD4(+) T-cell counts after superinfection, there was no evidence of disease acceleration. These findings indicate that an immunodeficiency virus infection confers partial protection against a second immunodeficiency virus infection, but this protection may be mediated by mechanisms other than classical adaptive immune responses.

  5. Sterile protection against Plasmodium knowlesi in rhesus monkeys from a malaria vaccine: comparison of heterologous prime boost strategies.

    PubMed

    Jiang, George; Shi, Meng; Conteh, Solomon; Richie, Nancy; Banania, Glenna; Geneshan, Harini; Valencia, Anais; Singh, Priti; Aguiar, Joao; Limbach, Keith; Kamrud, Kurt I; Rayner, Jonathan; Smith, Jonathan; Bruder, Joseph T; King, C Richter; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Takeo, Satoru; Endo, Yaeta; Doolan, Denise L; Richie, Thomas L; Weiss, Walter R

    2009-08-10

    Using newer vaccine platforms which have been effective against malaria in rodent models, we tested five immunization regimens against Plasmodium knowlesi in rhesus monkeys. All vaccines included the same four P. knowlesi antigens: the pre-erythrocytic antigens CSP, SSP2, and erythrocytic antigens AMA1, MSP1. We used four vaccine platforms for prime or boost vaccinations: plasmids (DNA), alphavirus replicons (VRP), attenuated adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad), or attenuated poxvirus (Pox). These four platforms combined to produce five different prime/boost vaccine regimens: Pox alone, VRP/Pox, VRP/Ad, Ad/Pox, and DNA/Pox. Five rhesus monkeys were immunized with each regimen, and five Control monkeys received a mock vaccination. The time to complete vaccinations was 420 days. All monkeys were challenged twice with 100 P. knowlesi sporozoites given IV. The first challenge was given 12 days after the last vaccination, and the monkeys receiving the DNA/Pox vaccine were the best protected, with 3/5 monkeys sterilely protected and 1/5 monkeys that self-cured its parasitemia. There was no protection in monkeys that received Pox malaria vaccine alone without previous priming. The second sporozoite challenge was given 4 months after the first. All 4 monkeys that were protected in the first challenge developed malaria in the second challenge. DNA, VRP and Ad5 vaccines all primed monkeys for strong immune responses after the Pox boost. We discuss the high level but short duration of protection in this experiment and the possible benefits of the long interval between prime and boost.

  6. Protective Efficacy of a Global HIV-1 Mosaic Vaccine Against Heterologous SHIV Challenges in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Barouch, Dan H.; Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Borducchi, Erica N.; Smith, Kaitlin; Stanley, Kelly; McNally, Anna G.; Liu, Jinyan; Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Seaman, Michael S.; Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Alter, Galit; Ferguson, Melissa; Li, Wenjun; Earl, Patricia L.; Moss, Bernard; Giorgi, Elena E.; Szinger, James J.; Eller, Leigh Anne; Billings, Erik A.; Rao, Mangala; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Weijtens, Mo; Pau, Maria G.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Robb, Merlin L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Korber, Bette T.; Michael, Nelson L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The global diversity of HIV-1 represents a critical challenge facing HIV-1 vaccine development. HIV-1 mosaic antigens are bioinformatically optimized immunogens designed for improved coverage of HIV-1 diversity. However, the protective efficacy of global HIV-1 vaccine antigens has not previously been evaluated. Here we demonstrate the capacity of bivalent HIV-1 mosaic antigens to protect rhesus monkeys against acquisition of heterologous challenges with the difficult-to-neutralize simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-SF162P3. Adenovirus/poxvirus and adenovirus/adenovirus vector-based vaccines expressing HIV-1 mosaic Env, Gag, and Pol afforded a significant reduction in the per-exposure acquisition risk following repetitive, intrarectal SHIV-SF162P3 challenges. Protection against acquisition of infection was correlated with vaccine-elicited binding, neutralizing, and functional non-neutralizing antibodies. These data demonstrate the protective efficacy of HIV-1 mosaic antigens and suggest a potential strategy towards the development of a global HIV-1 vaccine. Moreover, our findings suggest that the coordinated activity of multiple antibody functions may contribute to protection against difficult-to-neutralize viruses. PMID:24243013

  7. Protective efficacy of a global HIV-1 mosaic vaccine against heterologous SHIV challenges in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Barouch, Dan H; Stephenson, Kathryn E; Borducchi, Erica N; Smith, Kaitlin; Stanley, Kelly; McNally, Anna G; Liu, Jinyan; Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F; Seaman, Michael S; Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Alter, Galit; Ferguson, Melissa; Li, Wenjun; Earl, Patricia L; Moss, Bernard; Giorgi, Elena E; Szinger, James J; Eller, Leigh Anne; Billings, Erik A; Rao, Mangala; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Weijtens, Mo; Pau, Maria G; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H; Korber, Bette T; Michael, Nelson L

    2013-10-24

    The global diversity of HIV-1 represents a critical challenge facing HIV-1 vaccine development. HIV-1 mosaic antigens are bioinformatically optimized immunogens designed for improved coverage of HIV-1 diversity. However, the protective efficacy of such global HIV-1 vaccine antigens has not previously been evaluated. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of bivalent HIV-1 mosaic antigens to protect rhesus monkeys against acquisition of infection following heterologous challenges with the difficult-to-neutralize simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-SF162P3. Adenovirus/poxvirus and adenovirus/adenovirus vector-based vaccines expressing HIV-1 mosaic Env, Gag, and Pol afforded a significant reduction in the per-exposure acquisition risk following repetitive, intrarectal SHIV-SF162P3 challenges. Protection against acquisition of infection correlated with vaccine-elicited binding, neutralizing, and functional nonneutralizing antibodies, suggesting that the coordinated activity of multiple antibody functions may contribute to protection against difficult-to-neutralize viruses. These data demonstrate the protective efficacy of HIV-1 mosaic antigens and suggest a potential strategy for the development of a global HIV-1 vaccine. PAPERCLIP: Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a recombinant subunit West Nile virus vaccine in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Michael M; Nerurkar, Vivek R; Luo, Haiyan; Cropp, Bruce; Carrion, Ricardo; de la Garza, Melissa; Coller, Beth-Ann; Clements, David; Ogata, Steven; Wong, Teri; Martyak, Tim; Weeks-Levy, Carolyn

    2009-09-01

    The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a recombinant subunit West Nile virus (WNV) vaccine was evaluated in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). The vaccine consisted of a recombinant envelope (E) protein truncated at the C-terminal end, resulting in a polypeptide containing 80% of the N-terminal amino acids of the native WNV protein (WN-80E), mixed with an adjuvant (GPI-0100). WN-80E was produced in a Drosophila melanogaster expression system with high yield and purified by immunoaffinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody specific for flavivirus E proteins. Groups of monkeys were vaccinated with formulations containing 1 or 25 microg of WN-80E antigen, and both humoral and cellular immunity were assessed after vaccination. The results demonstrated potent antibody responses to vaccination, as determined by both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and virus-neutralizing antibody assays. All vaccinated animals responded favorably, and there was little difference in response between animals immunized with 1 or 25 microg of WN-80E. Cellular immunity was determined by lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from vaccinated animals stimulated in vitro with WN-80E. Cell-mediated immune responses varied from animal to animal within each group. About half of the animals responded with lymphoproliferation, cytokine production, or both. Again, there was little difference in response between animals immunized with a 1- or 25-microg dose of WN-80E in the vaccine formulations. In a separate experiment, groups of monkeys were immunized with the WN-80E/GPI-0100 vaccine or an adjuvant-only control formulation. Animals were then challenged by inoculation of wild-type WNV, and the level of viremia in each animal was monitored daily for 10 days. The results showed that whereas all animals in the control group had detectable viremia for at least 3 days after challenge, all of the vaccinated animals were negative on all

  9. Rhesus monkeys protected against Plasmodium knowlesi malaria produce antibodies against a 65,000-MrP. knowlesi glycoprotein at the surface of infected erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Ullrich, R; Miller, L H; Wallach, D F; Lightholder, J; Powers, K G; Gwadz, R W

    1981-11-01

    Sera from 27 rhesus monkeys immunized in various ways against the H strain of Plasmodium knowlesi were analyzed by quantitative crossed immunoelectrophoresis. The reaction of the sera was compared with a reference immune serum only reactive with P. knowlesi-specific 65,000-Mr glycoprotein-immune component 13 (gp65/ic13) in membranes of infected rhesus monkey erythrocytes. Triton X-100-solubilized, 125I-labeled membranes of schizont-infected erythrocytes were used as an antigen. Sera from 9 or 10 monkeys immunized by repeated infections with P. knowlesi reacted with gp65/ic13. In 6 of 10 sera, anti-gp65/ic13 was the only antibody reacting with host cell membrane proteins. In contrast, vaccination of 15 monkeys with predominantly sexual stages or trophozoites of P. knowlesi in Freund complete adjuvant resulted in protection against blood challenges in 7 monkeys, only 2 of which contained precipitating antibody against gp65/ic13. None of the sera from monkeys not protected by infections or vaccinations contained detectable levels of precipitating antibodies against gp65/ic13. Our data indicate that gp65/ic13 acts as a prominent immunogen in vivo during natural p. knowlesi infections of rhesus monkeys. There is a positive correlation suggested between anti-gp65/ic13 antibody and protection in the monkeys analyzed. This correlation does not apply to monkeys protected against P. knowlesi malaria by vaccination, pointing to other effective immune defense mechanisms.

  10. Adenovirus prime, Env protein boost vaccine protects against neutralization-resistant SIVsmE660 variants in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Keele, Brandon F; Li, Wenjun; Borducchi, Erica N; Nkolola, Joseph P; Abbink, Peter; Chen, Bing; Seaman, Michael S; Barouch, Dan H

    2017-06-05

    Previous studies have shown that DNA prime, Ad5 boost vaccines protect against neutralization-sensitive but not neutralization-resistant virus variants within the SIVsmE660 swarm. Here we show that Ad prime, Env protein boost vaccines protect against neutralization-resistant SIVsmE660 variants. We perform two studies in rhesus monkeys with Ad35/Ad26 vectors expressing SIVmac239 Gag/Pol/Env with or without an AS01B-adjuvanted SIVmac32H gp140 protein boost. In a repetitive, low-dose challenge study, we observe robust protection against acquisition of infection by both Ad Alone and Ad/Env vaccines. In a single, high-dose challenge study, only the Ad/Env vaccine affords significant protection against acquisition of infection. Analysis of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses from this study demonstrates that the Ad/Env vaccine blocks both neutralization-sensitive and neutralization-resistant SIVsmE660 variants in rhesus monkeys with restrictive TRIM5α alleles. These data demonstrate that the adjuvanted Env protein boost is critical for protecting against high-dose SIVsmE660 challenge and for blocking neutralization-resistant viruses within the SIVsmE660 swarm.

  11. Protection of rhesus monkeys against Soman and prevention of performance decrement by pretreatment with acetylcholinesterase. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, D.M.; Castro, C.A.; De La Hoz, D.M.; Gentry, M.K.; Gold, M.B.

    1992-12-31

    The ability of acetylcholinesterase from fetal bovine serum (FBS AChE) to protect against soman, a highly toxic organophosphorus (OP) compound, was tested in rhesus monkeys. Intravenous administration of FBS AChE produced a minimal behavioral effect on the serial probe recognition task, a sensitive test of cognitive function and short-term memory. Pharmacokinetic studies of injected FBS AChE indicated a plasma half-life of 40 hr for FBS AChE in monkeys. Both in vitro and in vivo titration of FBS AChE with soman produced a 1:1 stoichiometry between organophosphate-inhibited FBS AChE and the cumulative dose of the toxic stereoisomers of soman. Administration of FBS AChE protected monkeys against the lethal effects of up to 2.7 LD50 of soman and prevented any signs of organophosphate intoxication, e.g., excessive secretions, respiratory depression, muscle fasciculations, or convulsions. In addition, monkeys pretreated with FBS AChE were devoid of any behavioral incapacitation after soman challenge, as measured by the serial probe recognition task. Compared to the current multicomponent drug treatment against soman, which does not prevent the signs or the behavioral deficits resulting from OP intoxication, use of FBS AChE as a single pretreatment drug provides significantly effective protection against both the lethal and the behavioral effects of soman.... Pretreatment, Nonhuman primate, Performance decrements, Acetylcholinesterase, Soman, Nerve agents.

  12. Protection from radiation-induced damage of spermatogenesis in the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) by follicle-stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    van Alphen, M.M.; van de Kant, H.J.; de Rooij, D.G.

    1989-02-01

    In adult rhesus monkeys a two- to threefold increase in the number of spermatogonia was found at Day 75 after 1 Gy of X-irradiation when the animals were pretreated with two intramuscular injections of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) each day. Also the percentage of cross-sections of seminiferous tubules showing spermatogonia (repopulation index) was much higher when FSH was given before irradiation. At 75 days postirradiation the repopulation index was 39 +/- 10% after irradiation alone and 81 +/- 11% when FSH pretreatment was applied. The pretreatment with two injections of FSH each day during 16 days caused an increase in the number of proliferating A spermatogonia. In view of earlier results in the mouse, where proliferating spermatogonial stem cells appeared more radioresistant than quiescent ones, it is suggested that the protective effects of FSH treatment are caused by the increase in the proliferative activity of the A spermatogonia and consequently of the spermatogonial stem cells. The results indicate that in the rhesus monkey the maximal protective effect of FSH is reached after a period of treatment between 7 and 16 days.

  13. Chimpanzee counting and rhesus monkey ordinality judgments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.; Washburn, David A.; Hopkins, William D.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E. S.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation is conducted to address the questions of whether chimpanzees can count and whether rhesus monkeys can differentiate written numbers. One investigation demonstrates the capacity of a chimpanzee to produce a quantity of responses appropriate to a given Arabic numeral. Rhesus monkeys are shown to have the capability for making fine differentiations between quantities of pellets and Arabic numerals.

  14. Pneumococcal Meningitis in a Rhesus Monkey.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-17

    REFERENCES 1. Fox JG, Soave OH: Pneumococcic meningoencephalitis in a rhesus monkey. JAm Vet Med Assoc 159: 1595—1597, 1971 2. Fox JG, Wikse SE...Bacterial meningoencephalitis in rhesus monkeys: clinical and pathological features. Lab Anim Sd 21: 558—563, 1971 ¶ 3. Kaufmann AF , Quist KD: Pneumococcal

  15. Chimpanzee counting and rhesus monkey ordinality judgments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.; Washburn, David A.; Hopkins, William D.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E. S.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation is conducted to address the questions of whether chimpanzees can count and whether rhesus monkeys can differentiate written numbers. One investigation demonstrates the capacity of a chimpanzee to produce a quantity of responses appropriate to a given Arabic numeral. Rhesus monkeys are shown to have the capability for making fine differentiations between quantities of pellets and Arabic numerals.

  16. Rhesus monkey heart rate during exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delorge, J.; Thach, J. S., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Various schedules of reinforcement and their relation to heart rates of rhesus monkeys during exercise are described. All the reinforcement schedules produced 100 per cent or higher increments in the heart rates of the monkeys during exercise. Resting heart rates were generally much lower than those previously reported, which was attributed to the lack of physical restraint of the monkeys during recording.

  17. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy in a Rhesus Monkey Model of Vaccine Ac NFU1(S-) MRC Against Primary Type 2 Herpes Simplex Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, G. R. B.; Buchan, A.; Williams, D.; Marsden, J.; Hartley, C.; Wilbanks, G.; Turyk, M.; Namkoong, E. S.

    1982-01-01

    Adult and juvenile Rhesus monkeys were vaccinated with sub-unit formaldehyde-inactivated vaccine Ac NFU1(S-) MRC; no local or systemic side-effects followed vaccination. Vaccinated monkeys developed neutralizing and immunoprecipitating antibody to both type 1 and 2 herpes simplex virus. Antibody levels declined with time but were re-stimulated after virus challenge and to a lesser extent after attempted virus reactivation. There was evidence of protection against s.c. challenge with live type 2 herpes simplex virus. PMID:6295430

  18. Protective Efficacy of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies with Incomplete Neutralization Activity against Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Julg, Boris; Sok, Devin; Schmidt, Stephen D; Abbink, Peter; Newman, Ruchi M; Broge, Thomas; Linde, Caitlyn; Nkolola, Joseph; Le, Khoa; Su, David; Torabi, Julia; Pack, Melissa; Pegu, Amarendra; Allen, Todd M; Mascola, John R; Burton, Dennis R; Barouch, Dan H

    2017-10-15

    HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) have been shown to occasionally display unusual virus neutralization profiles with nonsigmoidal slopes and plateaus at <100% neutralization against a variety of viruses. The significance of incomplete neutralization for the ability of bnAbs to mediate protective effects in vivo, however, is undetermined. In the current study, we selected two bnAbs, PGT121 and 3BNC117, as they incompletely neutralize the clade C simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) stock (SHIV-327c) at 85% and 70%, respectively, and performed a protection study in rhesus macaques. The animals were intravenously (i.v.) administered PGT121 or 3BNC117 at 10 and 2 mg/kg of body weight before being rectally challenged with a single high dose of SHIV-327c. PGT121 protected 6 out of 7 monkeys, while 6 out of 7 3BNC117-pretreated animals became infected, although with significantly delayed plasma viremia compared to the control animals. These data suggest that complete neutralization is not imperative for bnAbs to prevent infection but that with increasing levels of incomplete neutralization the sterilizing activity diminishes.IMPORTANCE Multiple antibodies have been identified that potently neutralize a broad range of circulating HIV strains. However, not every virus-antibody combination results in complete neutralization of the input virus, suggesting that a fraction of virus particles are resistant to antibody neutralization despite high antibody concentrations. This observation of "incomplete neutralization" is associated with nonsigmoidal neutralization curves plateauing below 100% neutralization, but the significance of the phenomenon for the ability of neutralizing antibodies to mediate protective effects in vivo is undetermined. In this study, we show that the broadly neutralizing antibody PGT121, which neutralized only up to 85% of the SHIV-327c challenge stock in vitro, protected 6 out of 7 rhesus macaques against infection while the antibody 3BNC

  19. Immune mechanisms associated with protection from vaginal SIV challenge in rhesus monkeys infected with virulence-attenuated SHIV 89.6.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher J; Abel, Kristina

    2005-10-01

    Although live-attenuated human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV) vaccines may never be used clinically, these vaccines have provided the most durable protection from intravenous (IV) challenge in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/rhesus macaque model. Systemic infection with virulence attenuated-simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) 89.6 provides protection against vaginal SIV challenge. This paper reviews the findings related to the innate and adaptive immune responses and the role of inflammation associated with protection in the SHIV 89.6/SIVmac239 model. By an as yet undefined mechanism, most monkeys vaccinated with live-attenuated SHIV 89.6 mounted effective anti-viral CD8+ T cell responses while avoiding the self-destructive inflammatory cycle found in the lymphoid tissues of unprotected and unvaccinated monkeys.

  20. Spaceflight and immune responses of Rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies indicates that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. The objective of this project is to determine the effects of space flight on immune responses of Rhesus monkeys. The expected significance of the work is a determination of the range of immunological functions of the Rhesus monkey, a primate similar in many ways to man, affected by space flight. Changes in immune responses that could yield alterations in resistance to infection may be determined as well as the duration of alterations in immune responses. Additional information on the nature of cellular interactions for the generation of immune responses may also be obtained.

  1. Canine distemper outbreak in rhesus monkeys, China.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Zhang, Shoufeng; Fan, Quanshui; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Fuqiang; Wang, Wei; Liao, Guoyang; Hu, Rongliang

    2011-08-01

    Since 2006, canine distemper outbreaks have occurred in rhesus monkeys at a breeding farm in Guangxi, People's Republic of China. Approximately 10,000 animals were infected (25%-60% disease incidence); 5%-30% of infected animals died. The epidemic was controlled by vaccination. Amino acid sequence analysis of the virus indicated a unique strain.

  2. Physiology responses of Rhesus monkeys to vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajebrahimi, Zahra; Ebrahimi, Mohammad; Alidoust, Leila; Arabian Hosseinabadi, Maedeh

    Vibration is one of the important environmental factors in space vehicles that it can induce severe physiological responses in most of the body systems such as cardiovascular, respiratory, skeletal, endocrine, and etc. This investigation was to assess the effect of different vibration frequencies on heart rate variability (HRV), electrocardiograms (ECG) and respiratory rate in Rhesus monkeys. Methods: two groups of rhesus monkey (n=16 in each group) was selected as control and intervention groups. Monkeys were held in a sitting position within a specific fixture. The animals of this experiment were vibrated on a table which oscillated right and left with sinusoidal motion. Frequency and acceleration for intervention group were between the range of 1 to 2000 Hz and +0.5 to +3 G during 36 weeks (one per week for 15 min), respectively. All of the animals passed the clinical evaluation (echocardiography, sonography, radiography and blood analysis test) before vibration test and were considered healthy and these tests repeated during and at the end of experiments. Results and discussions: Our results showed that heart and respiratory rates increased significantly in response to increased frequency from 1 to 60 Hz (p <0.05) directly with the +G level reaching a maximum (3G) within a seconds compare to controls. There were no significant differences in heart and respiratory rate from 60 t0 2000 Hz among studied groups. All monkeys passed vibration experiment successfully without any arrhythmic symptoms due to electrocardiography analysis. Conclusion: Our results indicate that vibration in low frequency can effect respiratory and cardiovascular function in rhesus monkey. Keywords: Vibration, rhesus monkey, heart rate, respiratory rate

  3. Rhesus Monkey Heart Rate during Exercise,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Three rhesus monkeys were implanted with ECG telemeters and performed a calisthenic exercise requiring complete arm extension above their heads and...reinforcement schedules. Heart rate samples were obtained both during sleep and high rates of activity. Two animals provided exercise data and one animal...provided data without the exercise task. Highest heart rates were seen in the two exercise animals. No differences in maximum heart rates were related to

  4. The Effect of Heterogeneity on Numerical Ordering in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantlon, Jessica F.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated how within-stimulus heterogeneity affects the ability of rhesus monkeys to order pairs of the numerosities 1 through 9. Two rhesus monkeys were tested in a touch screen task where the variability of elements within each visual array was systematically varied by allowing elements to vary in color, size, shape, or any combination of…

  5. The Effect of Heterogeneity on Numerical Ordering in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantlon, Jessica F.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated how within-stimulus heterogeneity affects the ability of rhesus monkeys to order pairs of the numerosities 1 through 9. Two rhesus monkeys were tested in a touch screen task where the variability of elements within each visual array was systematically varied by allowing elements to vary in color, size, shape, or any combination of…

  6. Spaceflight and Immune Responses of Rhesus Monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1997-01-01

    In the grant period, we perfected techniques for determination of interleukin production and leukocyte subset analysis of rhesus monkeys. These results are outlined in detail in publication number 2, appended to this report. Additionally, we participated in the ARRT restraint test to determine if restraint conditions for flight in the Space Shuttle could contribute to any effects of space flight on immune responses. All immunological parameters listed in the methods section were tested. Evaluation of the data suggests that the restraint conditions had minimal effects on the results observed, but handling of the monkeys could have had some effect. These results are outlined in detail in manuscript number 3, appended to this report. Additionally, to help us develop our rhesus monkey immunology studies, we carried out preliminary studies in mice to determine the effects of stressors on immunological parameters. We were able to show that there were gender-based differences in the response of immunological parameters to a stressor. These results are outlined in detail in manuscript number 4, appended to this report.

  7. Can Rhesus Monkey Learn Executive Attention?

    PubMed Central

    Bramlett-Parker, Jessica; Washburn, David A.

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of data indicates that, compared to humans, rhesus monkeys perform poorly on tasks that assess executive attention, or voluntary control over selection for processing, particularly under circumstances in which attention is attracted elsewhere by competing stimulus control. In the human-cognition literature, there are hotly active debates about whether various competencies such as executive attention, working memory capacity, and fluid intelligence can be improved through training. In the current study, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) completed an attention-training intervention including several inhibitory-control tasks (a Simon task, numerical Stroop task, global/local interference task, and a continuous performance task) to determine whether generalized improvements would be observed on a version of the Attention Network Test (ANT) of controlled attention, which was administered before and after the training intervention. Although the animals demonstrated inhibition of prepotent responses and improved in executive attention with practice, this improvement did not generalize to the ANT at levels consistently better than were observed for control animals. Although these findings fail to encourage the possibility that species differences in cognitive competencies can be ameliorated through training, they do advance our understanding of the competition between stimulus-control and cognitive-control in performance by nonhuman and human primates. PMID:27304969

  8. Natural regulation of rhesus monkey populations in Kathmandu, Nepal. Rhesus monkey groups near Kathmandu, Nepal, show demographic patterns of intrinsic population stability.

    PubMed

    Teas, J; Richie, T L; Taylor, H G; Siddiqi, M F; Southwick, C H

    1981-01-01

    In Kathmandu valley, two populations of rhesus monkeys which are totally protected, have shown relatively stable numbers over a period of several years. Population stability within heterosexual troops appears to have been maintained through lower birth rates and slightly higher infant and adult mortality rates than in comparable rhesus populations in India which have been subject to trapping. Although the behavioral and physiological mechanisms by which these demographic changes occur are not known, behavioral observations on these populations suggest several possibilities. These data represent the first indication of possible mechanisms for population regulation in natural rhesus populations.

  9. Peripheral refraction in normal infant rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Li-Fang; Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Huang, Juan; Qiao-Grider, Ying; Smith, Earl L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To characterize peripheral refractions in infant monkeys. Methods Cross-sectional data for horizontal refractions were obtained from 58 normal rhesus monkeys at 3 weeks of age. Longitudinal data were obtained for both the vertical and horizontal meridians from 17 monkeys. Refractive errors were measured by retinoscopy along the pupillary axis and at eccentricities of 15, 30, and 45 degrees. Axial dimensions and corneal power were measured by ultrasonography and keratometry, respectively. Results In infant monkeys, the degree of radial astigmatism increased symmetrically with eccentricity in all meridians. There were, however, initial nasal-temporal and superior-inferior asymmetries in the spherical-equivalent refractive errors. Specifically, the refractions in the temporal and superior fields were similar to the central ametropia, but the refractions in the nasal and inferior fields were more myopic than the central ametropia and the relative nasal field myopia increased with the degree of central hyperopia. With age, the degree of radial astigmatism decreased in all meridians and the refractions became more symmetrical along both the horizontal and vertical meridians; small degrees of relative myopia were evident in all fields. Conclusions As in adult humans, refractive error varied as a function of eccentricity in infant monkeys and the pattern of peripheral refraction varied with the central refractive error. With age, emmetropization occurred for both central and peripheral refractive errors resulting in similar refractions across the central 45 degrees of the visual field, which may reflect the actions of vision-dependent, growth-control mechanisms operating over a wide area of the posterior globe. PMID:18487366

  10. Chemoprophylaxis with sporozoite immunization in P. knowlesi rhesus monkeys confers protection and elicits sporozoite-specific memory T cells in the liver.

    PubMed

    Pichyangkul, Sathit; Spring, Michele D; Yongvanitchit, Kosol; Kum-Arb, Utaiwan; Limsalakpetch, Amporn; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Ubalee, Ratawan; Vanachayangkul, Pattaraporn; Remarque, Edmond J; Angov, Evelina; Smith, Philip L; Saunders, David L

    2017-01-01

    Whole malaria sporozoite vaccine regimens are promising new strategies, and some candidates have demonstrated high rates of durable clinical protection associated with memory T cell responses. Little is known about the anatomical distribution of memory T cells following whole sporozoite vaccines, and immunization of nonhuman primates can be used as a relevant model for humans. We conducted a chemoprophylaxis with sporozoite (CPS) immunization in P. knowlesi rhesus monkeys and challenged via mosquito bites. Half of CPS immunized animals developed complete protection, with a marked delay in parasitemia demonstrated in the other half. Antibody responses to whole sporozoites, CSP, and AMA1, but not CelTOS were detected. Peripheral blood T cell responses to whole sporozoites, but not CSP and AMA1 peptides were observed. Unlike peripheral blood, there was a high frequency of sporozoite-specific memory T cells observed in the liver and bone marrow. Interestingly, sporozoite-specific CD4+ and CD8+ memory T cells in the liver highly expressed chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR6, both of which are known for liver sinusoid homing. The majority of liver sporozoite-specific memory T cells expressed CD69, a phenotypic marker of tissue-resident memory (TRM) cells, which are well positioned to rapidly control liver-stage infection. Vaccine strategies that aim to elicit large number of liver TRM cells may efficiently increase the efficacy and durability of response against pre-erythrocytic parasites.

  11. Chemoprophylaxis with sporozoite immunization in P. knowlesi rhesus monkeys confers protection and elicits sporozoite-specific memory T cells in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Michele D.; Yongvanitchit, Kosol; Kum-Arb, Utaiwan; Limsalakpetch, Amporn; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Ubalee, Ratawan; Vanachayangkul, Pattaraporn; Remarque, Edmond J.; Angov, Evelina; Smith, Philip L.; Saunders, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Whole malaria sporozoite vaccine regimens are promising new strategies, and some candidates have demonstrated high rates of durable clinical protection associated with memory T cell responses. Little is known about the anatomical distribution of memory T cells following whole sporozoite vaccines, and immunization of nonhuman primates can be used as a relevant model for humans. We conducted a chemoprophylaxis with sporozoite (CPS) immunization in P. knowlesi rhesus monkeys and challenged via mosquito bites. Half of CPS immunized animals developed complete protection, with a marked delay in parasitemia demonstrated in the other half. Antibody responses to whole sporozoites, CSP, and AMA1, but not CelTOS were detected. Peripheral blood T cell responses to whole sporozoites, but not CSP and AMA1 peptides were observed. Unlike peripheral blood, there was a high frequency of sporozoite-specific memory T cells observed in the liver and bone marrow. Interestingly, sporozoite-specific CD4+ and CD8+ memory T cells in the liver highly expressed chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR6, both of which are known for liver sinusoid homing. The majority of liver sporozoite-specific memory T cells expressed CD69, a phenotypic marker of tissue-resident memory (TRM) cells, which are well positioned to rapidly control liver-stage infection. Vaccine strategies that aim to elicit large number of liver TRM cells may efficiently increase the efficacy and durability of response against pre-erythrocytic parasites. PMID:28182750

  12. Turnover of human and monkey plasma kininogens in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, T; Wing, D A; Pierce, J V; Pettit, G W

    1979-01-01

    The normal metabolic turnover of plasma kininogens was studied by measuring the disappearance of intravenously administered radiolabeled human and monkey plasma kininogens from the circulation of healthy adult rhesus monkeys. Curves obtained by plotting log radioactivity against time could be expressed as double exponential equations, with the first term representing diffusion, and the second, catabolism. No significant difference between the turnovers of human and monkey kininogens was observed. The difference between the t1/2 of high molecular weight kininogen (25.95 +/- 1.60 h) (mean +/- SEM) and that of low molecular weight kininogen (18.94 +/- 1.93 h) was only marginally significant (P less than 0.05). In contrast, a highly significant (P less than 0.001) difference in their mean catabolic rates (1.12 +/- 0.08 d-1 for high molecular weight kininogen vs. 2.07 +/- 0.09 d-1 for low molecular weight kininogen) was observed. These differences between the two kininogens were attributed to differences in their distribution between the intra- and extravascular pools. Studies of kininogen turnover will be useful in elucidating the in vivo functions of the various kininogens in health as well as during clinical illness. PMID:105015

  13. Vestibuloocular reflex of rhesus monkeys after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Bernard; Kozlovskaia, Inessa; Raphan, Theodore; Solomon, David; Helwig, Denice; Cohen, Nathaniel; Sirota, Mikhail; Iakushin, Sergei

    1992-01-01

    The vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) of two rhesus monkeys was recorded before and after 14 days of spaceflight. The gain (eye velocity/head velocity) of the horizontal VOR, tested 15 and 18 h after landing, was approximately equal to preflight values. The dominant time constant of the animal tested 15 h after landing was equivalent to that before flight. During nystagmus induced by off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR), the latency, rising time constant, steady-state eye velocity, and phase of modulation in eye velocity and eye position with respect to head position were similar in both monkeys before and after flight. There were changes in the amplitude of modulation of horizontal eye velocity during steady-state OVAR and in the ability to discharge stored activity rapidly by tilting during postrotatory nystagmus (tilt dumping) after flight: OVAR modulations were larger, and tilt dumping was lost in the one animal tested on the day of landing and for several days thereafter. If the gain and time constant of the horizontal VOR exchange in microgravity, they must revert to normal soon after landing. The changes that were observed suggest that adaptation to microgravity had caused alterations in way that the central nervous system processes otolith input.

  14. Spaceflight and immune responses of rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Morton, Darla S.; Swiggett, Jeanene P.; Hakenewerth, Anne M.; Fowler, Nina A.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of restraint on immunological parameters was determined in an 18 day ARRT (adult rhesus restraint test). The monkeys were restrained for 18 days in the experimental station for the orbiting primate (ESOP), the chair of choice for Space Shuttle experiments. Several immunological parameters were determined using peripheral blood, bone marrow, and lymph node specimens from the monkeys. The parameters included: response of bone marrow cells to GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor), leukocyte subset distribution, and production of IFN-a (interferon-alpha) and IFN-gamma (interferon-gamma). The only parameter changed after 18 days of restraint was the percentage of CD8+ T cells. No other immunological parameters showed changes due to restraint. Handling and changes in housing prior to the restraint period did apparently result in some restraint-independent immunological changes. Handling must be kept to a minimum and the animals allowed time to recover prior to flight. All experiments must be carefully controlled. Restraint does not appear to be a major issue regarding the effects of space flight on immune responses.

  15. Thermoregulatory responses of rhesus monkeys during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. M.; Ferraro, J. S.; Fuller, C. A.; Moore-Ede, M. C.; Klimovitsky, V.; Magedov, V.; Alpatov, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    This study examines the activity, axillary temperature (T(ax)), and ankle skin temperature (Tsk) of two male Rhesus monkeys exposed to microgravity in space. The animals were flown on a Soviet biosatellite mission (COSMOS 1514). Measurements on the flight animals, as well as synchronous flight controls, were performed in the Soviet Union. Additional control studies were performed in the United States to examine the possible role of metabolic heat production in the T(ax) response observed during the spaceflight. All monkeys were exposed to a 24-h light-dark cycle (LD 16:8) throughout these studies. During weightlessness, T(ax) in both flight animals was lower than on earth. The largest difference (0.75 degree C) occurred during the night. There was a reduction in mean heart rate and Tsk during flight. This suggests a reduction in both heat loss and metabolic rate during spaceflight. Although the circadian rhythms in all variables were present during flight, some differences were noted. For example, the amplitude of the rhythms in Tsk and activity were attenuated. Furthermore, the T(ax) and activity rhythms did not have precise 24.0 hour periods and may have been externally desynchronized from the 24-h LD cycle. These data suggest a weakening of the coupling between the internal circadian pacemaker and the external LD synchronizer.

  16. Vestibuloocular reflex of rhesus monkeys after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Bernard; Kozlovskaia, Inessa; Raphan, Theodore; Solomon, David; Helwig, Denice; Cohen, Nathaniel; Sirota, Mikhail; Iakushin, Sergei

    1992-01-01

    The vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) of two rhesus monkeys was recorded before and after 14 days of spaceflight. The gain (eye velocity/head velocity) of the horizontal VOR, tested 15 and 18 h after landing, was approximately equal to preflight values. The dominant time constant of the animal tested 15 h after landing was equivalent to that before flight. During nystagmus induced by off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR), the latency, rising time constant, steady-state eye velocity, and phase of modulation in eye velocity and eye position with respect to head position were similar in both monkeys before and after flight. There were changes in the amplitude of modulation of horizontal eye velocity during steady-state OVAR and in the ability to discharge stored activity rapidly by tilting during postrotatory nystagmus (tilt dumping) after flight: OVAR modulations were larger, and tilt dumping was lost in the one animal tested on the day of landing and for several days thereafter. If the gain and time constant of the horizontal VOR exchange in microgravity, they must revert to normal soon after landing. The changes that were observed suggest that adaptation to microgravity had caused alterations in way that the central nervous system processes otolith input.

  17. Accommodation dynamics in aging rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Croft, M A; Kaufman, P L; Crawford, K S; Neider, M W; Glasser, A; Bito, L Z

    1998-12-01

    Accommodation, the mechanism by which the eye focuses on near objects, is lost with increasing age in humans and monkeys. This pathophysiology, called presbyopia, is poorly understood. We studied aging-related changes in the dynamics of accommodation in rhesus monkeys aged 4-24 yr after total iridectomy and midbrain implantation of an electrode to permit visualization and stimulation, respectively, of the eye's accommodative apparatus. Real-time video techniques were used to capture and quantify images of the ciliary body and lens. During accommodation in youth, ciliary body movement was biphasic, lens movement was monophasic, and both slowed as the structures approached their new steady-state positions. Disaccommodation occurred more rapidly for both ciliary body and lens, but with longer latent period, and slowed near the end point. With increasing age, the amplitude of lens and ciliary body movement during accommodation declined, as did their velocities. The latent period of lens and ciliary body movements increased, and ciliary body movement became monophasic. The latent period of lens and ciliary body movement during disaccommodation was not significantly correlated with age, but their velocity declined significantly. The age-dependent decline in amplitude and velocity of ciliary body movements during accommodation suggests that ciliary body dysfunction plays a role in presbyopia. The age changes in lens movement could be a consequence of increasing inelasticity or hardening of the lens, or of age changes in ciliary body motility.

  18. Delay discounting of saccharin in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Kevin B; Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel; Woolverton, William L

    2009-10-01

    The value of a reinforcer decreases as the time until its receipt increases, a phenomenon referred to as delay discounting. Although delay discounting of non-drug reinforcers has been studied extensively in a number of species, our knowledge of discounting in non-human primates is limited. In the present study, rhesus monkeys were allowed to choose in discrete trials between 0.05% saccharin delivered in different amounts and with different delays. Indifference points were calculated and discounting functions were established. Discounting functions for saccharin were well described by a hyperbolic function. Moreover, the discounting rates for saccharin in all six monkeys were comparable to those of other non-human animals responding for non-drug reinforcers. Also consistent with other studies of non-human animals, changing the amount of a saccharin reinforcer available after a 10-s delay did not affect its relative subjective value. Discounting functions for saccharin were steeper than we found in a previous study with cocaine, raising the possibility that drugs such as cocaine may be discounted less steeply than non-drug reinforcers.

  19. Thermoregulatory responses of rhesus monkeys during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. M.; Ferraro, J. S.; Fuller, C. A.; Moore-Ede, M. C.; Klimovitsky, V.; Magedov, V.; Alpatov, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    This study examines the activity, axillary temperature (T(ax)), and ankle skin temperature (Tsk) of two male Rhesus monkeys exposed to microgravity in space. The animals were flown on a Soviet biosatellite mission (COSMOS 1514). Measurements on the flight animals, as well as synchronous flight controls, were performed in the Soviet Union. Additional control studies were performed in the United States to examine the possible role of metabolic heat production in the T(ax) response observed during the spaceflight. All monkeys were exposed to a 24-h light-dark cycle (LD 16:8) throughout these studies. During weightlessness, T(ax) in both flight animals was lower than on earth. The largest difference (0.75 degree C) occurred during the night. There was a reduction in mean heart rate and Tsk during flight. This suggests a reduction in both heat loss and metabolic rate during spaceflight. Although the circadian rhythms in all variables were present during flight, some differences were noted. For example, the amplitude of the rhythms in Tsk and activity were attenuated. Furthermore, the T(ax) and activity rhythms did not have precise 24.0 hour periods and may have been externally desynchronized from the 24-h LD cycle. These data suggest a weakening of the coupling between the internal circadian pacemaker and the external LD synchronizer.

  20. Introduction of mutations into the non-structural genes or 3' untranslated region of an attenuated dengue virus type 4 vaccine candidate further decreases replication in rhesus monkeys while retaining protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Kathryn A; Manlucu, Luella R; Manipon, Gracielle G; Hanson, Christopher T; Whitehead, Stephen S; Murphy, Brian R; Blaney, Joseph E

    2004-09-03

    A dengue virus vaccine candidate, rDEN4Delta30, has been previously reported to be safe and immunogenic in humans, but a subset of vaccinees developed asymptomatic rash, elevation of liver enzymes and/or mild neutropenia. In the current study, mutations that had previously been shown to reduce replication of DEN4 virus in suckling mice and/or in SCID mice engrafted with human liver cells (SCID-HuH-7 mice) were introduced into rDEN4Delta30 in an attempt to further attenuate this virus. Three of the five resulting modified rDEN4Delta30 viruses showed decreased replication in SCID-HuH-7 mice relative to rDEN4Delta30. Moreover, in rhesus monkeys, two of the modified rDEN4Delta30 viruses showed a decrease in replication relative to rDEN4Delta30 while generating levels of neutralizing antibody similar to rDEN4Delta30 virus. All of the modified rDEN4Delta30 viruses completely protected immunized rhesus monkeys from challenge with wild-type DEN4 virus. Based on their attenuation for both human liver cells and rhesus monkeys, two of the modified rDEN4Delta30 vaccine candidates are currently being prepared for use in clinical trials. The application of these attenuating mutations to flavivirus vaccine development is discussed.

  1. Norovirus GII.17 Natural Infections in Rhesus Monkeys, China

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhanlong; Liu, Bo; Tao, Yufen; Li, Chao; Xia, Ming; Zhong, Weiming; Jiang, Xi

    2017-01-01

    Noroviruses are a leading viral cause of acute gastroenteritis among humans. During the 2014–15 epidemic season, norovirus GII.17 was detected in rhesus monkeys in China. Genetic, structural, and challenge studies revealed virus mutations and verified the infections. Thus, cross-species transmission may occur, and monkeys may be a virus reservoir. PMID:28102802

  2. Protein composition of rhesus monkey milk: comparison to human milk.

    PubMed

    Kunz, C; Lönnerdal, B

    1993-04-01

    1. Proteins in human milk and Rhesus monkey milk have been compared by FPLC gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography, SDS-Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, nitrogen and protein determination. 2. Mature Rhesus milk is higher in protein concentration (15-20 mg/ml) than human milk (8-9 mg/ml). 3. Non-Protein nitrogen is 6-13% in Rhesus milk but 25-30% in human milk. 4. Secretory IgA, lactoferrin, serum albumin, alpha-lactalbumin and lysozyme are present in Rhesus milk, but at a lower concentration than in human milk. 5. The casein subunit pattern is more complex in Rhesus milk compared to human milk. 6. The ratio of whey proteins to casein is similar in both milks (approximately 60/40). 7. A protein with a M(r) of 21,600 is a major component in monkey whey but is not found in human milk.

  3. Immunization with Recombinant Helicobacter pylori Urease in Specific-Pathogen-Free Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Solnick, Jay V.; Canfield, Don R.; Hansen, Lori M.; Torabian, Sima Z.

    2000-01-01

    Immunization with urease can protect mice from challenge with Helicobacter pylori, though results vary depending on the particular vaccine, challenge strain, and method of evaluation. Unlike mice, rhesus monkeys are naturally colonized with H. pylori and so may provide a better estimate of vaccine efficacy in humans. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of H. pylori urease as a vaccine in specific-pathogen (H. pylori)-free rhesus monkeys. Monkeys raised from birth and documented to be free of H. pylori were vaccinated with orogastric (n = 4) or intramuscular (n = 5) urease. Two control monkeys were sham vaccinated. All monkeys were challenged with a rhesus monkey-derived strain of H. pylori, and the effects of vaccination were evaluated by use of quantitative cultures of gastric tissue, histology, and measurement of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and salivary IgA. Despite a humoral immune response, all monkeys were infected after H. pylori challenge, and there were no differences in the density of colonization. Immunization with urease therefore does not fully protect against challenge with H. pylori. An effective vaccine to prevent H. pylori infection will require different or more likely additional antigens, as well as improvements in the stimulation of the host immune response. PMID:10768944

  4. Effector-memory T cell responses are associated with protection of rhesus monkeys from mucosal SIV challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Scott G.; Vieville, Cassandra; Whizin, Nathan; Coyne-Johnson, Lia; Siess, Don C.; Drummond, Derek D.; Legasse, Alfred W.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Oswald, Kelli; Trubey, Charles M.; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Nelson, Jay A.; Jarvis, Michael A.; Picker, Louis J.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid onset of massive, systemic viral replication during primary HIV/SIV infection and the immune evasion capabilities of these viruses pose fundamental problems for vaccines that depend upon initial viral replication to stimulate effector T cell expansion and differentiation1–5. We hypothesized that vaccines designed to maintain differentiated “effector memory” T cell (TEM) responses5,6 at viral entry sites might improve efficacy by impairing viral replication at its earliest stage2, and have therefore developed SIV protein-encoding vectors based on rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV), the prototypical inducer of life-long TEM responses7–9. RhCMV vectors expressing SIV Gag, Rev/Nef/Tat, and Env persistently infected rhesus macaques (RM), regardless of pre-existing RhCMV immunity, and primed and maintained robust SIV-specific, CD4+ and CD8+ TEM responses (characterized by coordinate TNF, IFN-γ and MIP-1β expression, cytotoxic degranulation, and accumulation at extra-lymphoid sites) in the absence of neutralizing antibodies. Compared to control RM, these vaccinated RM showed increased resistance to acquisition of progressive SIVmac239 infection upon repeated, limiting dose, intra-rectal challenge, including four animals that controlled rectal mucosal infection without progressive systemic dissemination. These data suggest a new paradigm for AIDS vaccine development: that vaccines capable of generating and maintaining HIV-specific TEM might decrease the incidence of HIV acquisition after sexual exposure. PMID:19219024

  5. Effects of dietary cadmium on rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Nomiyama, Kazuo; Nomiyama, Hiroko; Nomura, Yasuo; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Matsui, Kanji; Yotoriyama, Mamoru; Akahori, Fumiaki; Iwao, Soichiro; Koizumi, Naoko; Masaoka, Toshio; Kitamura, Shoji; Tsuchiya, Kenzaburo; Suzuki, Tatsuo; Kobayashi, Kosaku

    1979-01-01

    Ten male rhesus monkeys, each weighing 3.5 kg, were divided into four groups of 3, 3, 2, and 2, and were fed daily with 100 g pelleted food containing 300, 30, 3, and 0 ppm cadmium, respectively. Urine samples were collected every 2 weeks and blood samples every 4 weeks. One monkey each of the 300 and 30 ppm groups was autopsied for pathological examination and tissue cadmium determination at the week 24 of the experiment; the remaining 8 animals were killed after 55 weeks. The lowest exposed group (3 ppm) did not show any specific biological response to cadmium over a period of 55 weeks. In the 30 ppm group, no significant changes were observed for up to 24 weeks, although cadmium concentration in the renal cortex and urine at 24 weeks were 300 μg/g wet weight and 18 μg/l., respectively. Plasma urea nitrogen and urine protein (quantitative determination) increased after 30 and 36 weeks. At 55 weeks of the experiment, qualitative tests were negative for low molecular weight proteinuria and glycosuria, and the results remained normal for renal and liver function tests and blood analysis, although cadmium concentrations in the renal cortex of two monkeys were 460 and 730 μg/g wet weight and those in the liver were 110 and 160 μg/g wet weight, respectively. In the highest exposure group (300 ppm), urine cadmium increased to 250 μg/l. by 11 weeks, and urine retinol-binding protein, plasma GOT, GPT, and LDH increased after 12 weeks. Proteinuria (quantitative determination), glycosuria, aminoaciduria (panaminoaciduria), and erythrocytopenia were observed after 16 weeks, when urine cadmium was 500–900 μg/l. Hypohemoglobinopathy and proteinuria (qualitative determination) were observed after 20 and 24 weeks, while cadmium concentrations in the renal cortex and the liver were 760 and 430 μg/g wet weight at 24 weeks, respectively. Slightly depressed tubular reabsorption of phosphate, increased urine β2-microglobulin, increased plasma urea nitrogen, and increased

  6. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; Borducchi, Erica N.; Iampietro, M. Justin; Bricault, Christine A.; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Blackmore, Stephen; Parenteau, Lily; Wagh, Kshitij; Handley, Scott A.; Zhao, Guoyan; Virgin, Herbert W.; Korber, Bette; Barouch, Dan H.

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved to have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.

  7. Construction and Evaluation of Novel Rhesus Monkey Adenovirus Vaccine Vectors

    DOE PAGES

    Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Ng'ang'a, David; ...

    2014-11-19

    Adenovirus vectors are widely used as vaccine candidates for a variety of pathogens, including HIV-1. To date, human and chimpanzee adenoviruses have been explored in detail as vaccine vectors. Furthermore, the phylogeny of human and chimpanzee adenoviruses is overlapping, and preexisting humoral and cellular immunity to both are exhibited in human populations worldwide. More distantly related adenoviruses may therefore offer advantages as vaccine vectors. We describe the primary isolation and vectorization of three novel adenoviruses from rhesus monkeys. The seroprevalence of these novel rhesus monkey adenovirus vectors was extremely low in sub-Saharan Africa human populations, and these vectors proved tomore » have immunogenicity comparable to that of human and chimpanzee adenovirus vaccine vectors in mice. These rhesus monkey adenoviruses phylogenetically clustered with the poorly described adenovirus species G and robustly stimulated innate immune responses. These novel adenoviruses represent a new class of candidate vaccine vectors.« less

  8. Auditory Function in Rhesus Monkeys: Effects of Aging and Caloric Restriction in the Wisconsin Monkeys Five Years Later

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Cynthia G.; Chiasson, Kirstin Beach; Leslie, Tami Hanson; Thomas, Denise; Beasley, T. Mark; Kemnitz, Joseph W.; Weindruch, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) slows aging in many species and protects some animals from age-related hearing loss (ARHL), but the effect on humans is not yet known. Because rhesus monkeys are long-lived primates that are phylogenically closer to humans than other research animals are, they provide a better model for studying the effects of CR in aging and ARHL. Subjects were from the pool of 55 rhesus monkeys aged 15–28 years who had been in the Wisconsin study on CR and aging for 8–13.5 years. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) with f2 frequencies from 2211–8837 Hz and auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds from clicks and 8, 16, and 32 kHz tone bursts were obtained. DPOAE levels declined linearly at approximately 1 dB/year, but that rate doubled for the highest frequencies in the oldest monkeys. There were no interactions for diet condition or sex. ABR thresholds to clicks and tone bursts showed increases with aging. Borderline significance was shown for diet in the thresholds at 8 kHz stimuli, with monkeys on caloric restriction having lower thresholds. Because the rhesus monkeys have a maximum longevity of 40 years, the full benefits of CR may not yet be realized. PMID:20079820

  9. Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) Lack Expertise in Face Processing

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Lisa A.; Heintz, Matthew; Pradhan, Gauri

    2010-01-01

    Faces are salient stimuli for primates that rely predominantly on visual cues for recognizing conspecifics and maintaining social relationships. While previous studies have shown similar face discrimination processes in chimpanzees and humans, data from monkeys are unclear. Therefore, three studies examined face processing in rhesus monkeys using the face inversion effect, a fractured face task, and an individual recognition task. Unlike chimpanzees and humans, the monkeys showed a general face inversion effect reflected by significantly better performance on upright compared to inverted faces (conspecifics, human and chimpanzees faces) regardless of the subjects’ expertise with those categories. Fracturing faces alters first- and second-order configural manipulations whereas previous studies in chimpanzees showed selective deficits for second-order configural manipulations. Finally, when required to individuate conspecific’s faces, i.e., matching two different photographs of the same conspecific, monkeys showed poor discrimination and repeated training. These results support evolutionary differences between rhesus monkeys and Hominoids in the importance of configural cues and their ability to individuate conspecifics’ faces, suggesting a lack of face expertise in rhesus monkeys. PMID:19014263

  10. A more consistent intraluminal rhesus monkey model of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Shang, Guowei; Chen, Jian; Geng, Xiaokun; Ye, Xin; Xu, Guoxun; Wang, Ju; Zheng, Jiasheng; Li, Hongjun; Akbary, Fauzia; Li, Shengli; Lu, Jing; Ling, Feng; Ji, Xunming

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular surgery is advantageous in experimentally induced ischemic stroke because it causes fewer cranial traumatic lesions than invasive surgery and can closely mimic the pathophysiology in stroke patients. However, the outcomes are highly variable, which limits the accuracy of evaluations of ischemic stroke studies. In this study, eight healthy adult rhesus monkeys were randomized into two groups with four monkeys in each group: middle cerebral artery occlusion at origin segment (M1) and middle cerebral artery occlusion at M2 segment. The blood flow in the middle cerebral artery was blocked completely for 2 hours using the endovascular microcoil placement technique (1 mm × 10 cm) (undetachable), to establish a model of cerebral ischemia. The microcoil was withdrawn and the middle cerebral artery blood flow was restored. A reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion model was identified by hematoxylin-eosin staining, digital subtraction angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and neurological evaluation. The results showed that the middle cerebral artery occlusion model was successfully established in eight adult healthy rhesus monkeys, and ischemic lesions were apparent in the brain tissue of rhesus monkeys at 24 hours after occlusion. The rhesus monkeys had symptoms of neurological deficits. Compared with the M1 occlusion group, the M2 occlusion group had lower infarction volume and higher neurological scores. These experimental findings indicate that reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion can be produced with the endovascular microcoil technique in rhesus monkeys. The M2 occluded model had less infarction and less neurological impairment, which offers the potential for application in the field of brain injury research. PMID:25657726

  11. A more consistent intraluminal rhesus monkey model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Shang, Guowei; Chen, Jian; Geng, Xiaokun; Ye, Xin; Xu, Guoxun; Wang, Ju; Zheng, Jiasheng; Li, Hongjun; Akbary, Fauzia; Li, Shengli; Lu, Jing; Ling, Feng; Ji, Xunming

    2014-12-01

    Endovascular surgery is advantageous in experimentally induced ischemic stroke because it causes fewer cranial traumatic lesions than invasive surgery and can closely mimic the pathophysiology in stroke patients. However, the outcomes are highly variable, which limits the accuracy of evaluations of ischemic stroke studies. In this study, eight healthy adult rhesus monkeys were randomized into two groups with four monkeys in each group: middle cerebral artery occlusion at origin segment (M1) and middle cerebral artery occlusion at M2 segment. The blood flow in the middle cerebral artery was blocked completely for 2 hours using the endovascular microcoil placement technique (1 mm × 10 cm) (undetachable), to establish a model of cerebral ischemia. The microcoil was withdrawn and the middle cerebral artery blood flow was restored. A reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion model was identified by hematoxylin-eosin staining, digital subtraction angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and neurological evaluation. The results showed that the middle cerebral artery occlusion model was successfully established in eight adult healthy rhesus monkeys, and ischemic lesions were apparent in the brain tissue of rhesus monkeys at 24 hours after occlusion. The rhesus monkeys had symptoms of neurological deficits. Compared with the M1 occlusion group, the M2 occlusion group had lower infarction volume and higher neurological scores. These experimental findings indicate that reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion can be produced with the endovascular microcoil technique in rhesus monkeys. The M2 occluded model had less infarction and less neurological impairment, which offers the potential for application in the field of brain injury research.

  12. RHESUS MONKEY - SAM - POSTFLIGHT - LITTLE JOE II (LJ-2) SPACECRAFT

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-10-23

    S63-19199 (4 Dec. 1959) --- Sam, the Rhesus monkey, and his handler after his ride in the Little Joe 2 (LJ-2) spacecraft. He is still encased in his contour couch. A U.S. Navy destroyer safely recovered Sam after he experienced three minutes of weightlessness during the flight. Photo credit: NASA

  13. Assessing Unit-Price Related Remifentanil Choice in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galuska, Chad M.; Winger, Gail; Woods, James H.; Hursh, Steven R.

    2006-01-01

    Given a commodity available at different prices, a unit-price account of choice predicts preference for the cheaper alternative. This experiment determined if rhesus monkeys preferred remifentanil (an ultra-short-acting [mu]-opioid agonist) delivered at a lower unit price over a higher-priced remifentanil alternative (Phases 1 and 3). Choice…

  14. Assessing Unit-Price Related Remifentanil Choice in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galuska, Chad M.; Winger, Gail; Woods, James H.; Hursh, Steven R.

    2006-01-01

    Given a commodity available at different prices, a unit-price account of choice predicts preference for the cheaper alternative. This experiment determined if rhesus monkeys preferred remifentanil (an ultra-short-acting [mu]-opioid agonist) delivered at a lower unit price over a higher-priced remifentanil alternative (Phases 1 and 3). Choice…

  15. MAC of xenon and halothane in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Whitehurst, S L; Nemoto, E M; Yao, L; Yonas, H

    1994-10-01

    Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) maps produced by 33% xenon-enhanced computed tomographic scanning (Xe/CT LCBF) are useful in the clinical diagnosis and management of patients with cerebrovascular disorders. However, observations in humans that 25-35% xenon (Xe) inhalation increases cerebral blood flow (CBF) have raised concerns that Xe/CT LCBF measurements may be inaccurate and that Xe inhalation may be hazardous in patients with decreased intracranial compliance. In contrast, 33% Xe does not increase CBF in rhesus monkeys. To determine whether this interspecies difference in the effect of Xe on CBF correlates with an interspecies difference in the anesthetic potency of Xe, we measured the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of Xe preventing movement to a tail-clamp stimulus in rhesus monkeys. Using a standard protocol for the determination of MAC in animals, we first measured the MAC of halothane (n = 5), and then used a combination of halothane and Xe to measure the MAC of Xe (n = 7). The halothane MAC was 0.99 +/- 0.12% (M +/- SD), and the Xe MAC was 98 +/- 15%. These results suggest that the MAC of Xe in rhesus monkeys is higher than the reported human Xe MAC value of 71%. Thus the absence of an effect of 33% Xe on CBF in the rhesus monkey may be related to its lower anesthetic potency.

  16. Pretreatment with intravenous levetiracetam in the rhesus monkey Coriaria lactone-induced status epilepticus model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lan; Lei, Song; Chen, Si-Han; Hong, Zhen; Yang, Tian-Hua; Li, Li; Chen, Fei; Li, Hong-Xia; Zhou, Dong; Li, Jin-Mei

    2015-01-15

    To investigate the antiepileptic and protective effects of intravenous levetiracetam (iv LEV) in the rhesus monkey model of acute status epilepticus (SE). Thirty minutes before intraperitoneal induction of SE by Coriaria lactone (CL), rhesus monkeys were treated with LEV (15 or 150 mg/kg) delivered intravenously as a single bolus. CL dose and epileptic behavior were recorded. Electroencephalography (EEG) was performed before and during the experiment. All rhesus monkeys were killed after 1-month video monitoring and processed for pathological investigation of neuronal injury, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) staining. No animal exhibited spontaneous seizures during 1-month video monitoring. Development of acute SE was significantly inhibited in the group given 150 mg/kg LEV, compared with controls and the 15 mg/kg LEV group. Delayed latency, reduction of SE duration, decreased cumulative time of tonic convulsions, slight severity of SE, and a high CL induction dose were observed in the high LEV dose group (p<0.05). The EEG showed less frequent epileptic discharges in the group administered with 150 mg/kg LEV. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, ultrastructural examination, TUNEL and GFAP staining revealed serious damage, including neuron loss, swollen mitochondrion, and strong positivity for TUNEL in the hippocampus and thalamus of controls, whereas moderate damage in the group administered with 15 mg/kg LEV, and very mild damage in the 150 mg/kg LEV group. Gliosis was found in the hippocampus of controls, not in the LEV groups and normal rhesus monkey. The study supports the antiepileptic and protective effect of pretreatment with intravenous LEV in rhesus monkey model with SE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Use of a Recombinant Gamma-2 Herpesvirus Vaccine Vector against Dengue Virus in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bischof, Georg F; Magnani, Diogo M; Ricciardi, Michael; Shin, Young C; Domingues, Aline; Bailey, Varian K; Gonzalez-Nieto, Lucas; Rakasz, Eva G; Watkins, David I; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2017-08-15

    Research on vaccine approaches that can provide long-term protection against dengue virus infection is needed. Here we describe the construction, immunogenicity, and preliminary information on the protective capacity of recombinant, replication-competent rhesus monkey rhadinovirus (RRV), a persisting herpesvirus. One RRV construct expressed nonstructural protein 5 (NS5), while a second recombinant expressed a soluble variant of the E protein (E85) of dengue virus 2 (DENV2). Four rhesus macaques received a single vaccination with a mixture of both recombinant RRVs and were subsequently challenged 19 weeks later with 1 × 10(5) PFU of DENV2. During the vaccine phase, plasma of all vaccinated monkeys showed neutralizing activity against DENV2. Cellular immune responses against NS5 were also elicited, as evidenced by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) tetramer staining in the one vaccinated monkey that was Mamu-A*01 positive. Unlike two of two unvaccinated controls, two of the four vaccinated monkeys showed no detectable viral RNA sequences in plasma after challenge. One of these two monkeys also showed no anamnestic increases in antibody levels following challenge and thus appeared to be protected against the acquisition of DENV2 following high-dose challenge. Continued study will be needed to evaluate the performance of herpesviral and other persisting vectors for achieving long-term protection against dengue virus infection.IMPORTANCE Continuing studies of vaccine approaches against dengue virus (DENV) infection are warranted, particularly ones that may provide long-term immunity against all four serotypes. Here we investigated whether recombinant rhesus monkey rhadinovirus (RRV) could be used as a vaccine against DENV2 infection in rhesus monkeys. Upon vaccination, all animals generated antibodies capable of neutralizing DENV2. Two of four vaccinated monkeys showed no detectable viral RNA after subsequent high-dose DENV2 challenge at 19 weeks

  18. Pathology of Bolivian Hemorrhagic Fever in the Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Terrell, Timothy G.; Stookey, James L.; Eddy, Gerald A.; Kastello, Michael D.

    1973-01-01

    Gross and microscopic lesions associated with Bolivan hemorrhagic fever virus infection in the rhesus monkey were studied in 10 animals which died following inoculation. Gross lesions included skin rash, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, meningeal edema, hydropericardium and enlarged friable livers. Hemorrhagic manifestations of the infection were not consistently observed, but hemorrhages were present in the skin, heart, brain and nares in some monkeys. Histopathologic lesions were fairly consistent. Hepatic necrosis with the presence of acidophilic hyaline bodies, necrotizing enteritis, epithelial necrosis and adrenal cortical necrosis were present in all monkeys. Those monkeys which died after the seventeenth day of infection had nonsupurative meningoencephalitis; lymphoid necrosis was present in 3 monkeys that died after day 18. Other microscopic lesions included myocardial degeneration, lymphoid and reticuloendothelial cell hyperplasia and lymphoid depletion. Most of the histopathologic lesions described in human autopsy material were reproduced; however, the necrosis in the skin and oral mucosa, mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract and the adrenal cortex have not been described in man. Despite these apparent discrepancies the results of this investigation indicate that the rhesus monkey is a good experimental model for the study of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever infection. ImagesFig 12Fig 13Fig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11 PMID:4202335

  19. Evaluation of seven hypotheses for metamemory performance in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Benjamin M.; Schroeder, Gabriel R.; Brown, Emily Kathryn; Templer, Victoria L.; Hampton, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the extent to which nonhumans and humans share mechanisms for metacognition will advance our understanding of cognitive evolution and will improve selection of model systems for biomedical research. Some nonhuman species avoid difficult cognitive tests, seek information when ignorant, or otherwise behave in ways consistent with metacognition. There is agreement that some nonhuman animals “succeed” in these metacognitive tasks, but little consensus about the cognitive mechanisms underlying performance. In one paradigm, rhesus monkeys visually searched for hidden food when ignorant of the location of the food, but acted immediately when knowledgeable. This result has been interpreted as evidence that monkeys introspectively monitored their memory to adaptively control information seeking. However, convincing alternative hypotheses have been advanced that might also account for the adaptive pattern of visual searching. We evaluated seven hypotheses using a computerized task in which monkeys chose either to take memory tests immediately or to see the answer again before proceeding to the test. We found no evidence to support the hypotheses of behavioral cue association, rote response learning, expectancy violation, response competition, generalized search strategy, or postural mediation. In contrast, we repeatedly found evidence to support the memory monitoring hypothesis. Monkeys chose to see the answer when memory was poor, either from natural variation or experimental manipulation. We found limited evidence that monkeys also monitored the fluency of memory access. Overall, the evidence indicates that rhesus monkeys can use memory strength as a discriminative cue for information seeking, consistent with introspective monitoring of explicit memory. PMID:25365530

  20. Tick-borne Langat/mosquito-borne dengue flavivirus chimera, a candidate live attenuated vaccine for protection against disease caused by members of the tick-borne encephalitis virus complex: evaluation in rhesus monkeys and in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Pletnev, A G; Bray, M; Hanley, K A; Speicher, J; Elkins, R

    2001-09-01

    Langat virus (LGT), strain TP21, a naturally avirulent tick-borne flavivirus, was used to construct a chimeric candidate virus vaccine which contained LGT genes for premembrane (preM) and envelope (E) glycoprotein and all other sequences derived from dengue type 4 virus (DEN4). The live virus vaccine was developed to provide resistance to the highly virulent, closely related tick-borne flaviviruses that share protective E epitopes among themselves and with LGT. Toward that end the chimera, initially recovered in mosquito cells, was adapted to grow to high titer in qualified simian Vero cells. When inoculated intraperitoneally (i.p.), the Vero cell-adapted LGT TP21/DEN4 chimera remained completely attenuated for SCID mice. Significantly, the chimera protected immunocompetent mice against the most virulent tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV). Subsequently, rhesus monkeys were immunized in groups of 4 with 10(5) or 10(7) PFU of LGT strain TP21, with 10(5) PFU of DEN4, or with 10(3), 10(5), or 10(7) PFU of the chimera. Each of the monkeys inoculated with DEN4 or LGT TP21 became viremic, and the duration of viremia ranged from 1 to 5 days. In contrast, viremia was detected in only 1 of 12 monkeys inoculated with the LGT TP21/DEN4 chimera; in this instance the level of viremia was at the limit of detection. All monkeys immunized with the chimera or LGT TP21 virus developed a moderate to high level of neutralizing antibodies against LGT TP21 as well as TBEV and were completely protected against subsequent LGT TP21 challenge, whereas monkeys previously immunized with DEN4 virus became viremic when challenged with LGT TP21. These observations suggest that the chimera is attenuated, immunogenic, and able to induce a protective immune response. Furthermore, passive transfer of serum from monkeys immunized with chimera conferred significant protection to mice subsequently challenged with 100 i.p. 50% lethal doses of the highly virulent TBEV. The issue of transmissibility of

  1. Recovery from unilateral labyrinthectomy in rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Fetter, M; Zee, D S

    1988-02-01

    1. We recorded eye movements in six rhesus monkeys before and after unilateral labyrinthectomy and quantified the compensation for both the static and the dynamic disturbances of the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR). 2. When first recorded after labyrinthectomy (18-20 h postlesion), all animals had a spontaneous nystagmus with mean slow-phase velocities ranging from 24 to 54 degrees/s measured in darkness and 0-4 degrees/s measured in the light. The level of nystagmus diminished quickly, and by postoperative day 25 mean values ranged from 4 to 22 degrees/s, measured in darkness. The waveform of individual slow phases was variable, but in the first postoperative week its trajectory usually showed an increasing, or an increasing then decreasing, velocity. This finding indicates that peripheral vestibular lesions can alter the function of the ocular motor eye-position integrator. 3. The VOR gain (eye velocity/head velocity, corrected for spontaneous nystagmus) during rotations (30-300 degrees/s) in the dark was diminished from nearly 1.0 preoperatively to approximately 0.5 when first measured after labyrinthectomy, except for rotations toward the lesioned side at high speeds for which the gain was even lower. Within the first few postoperative days, for rotations toward the intact side, the VOR gain increased rapidly, to approximately 0.8. For rotations toward the lesioned side similar behavior was noted for stimuli of 30-60 degrees/s, but at higher velocities compensation proceeded more slowly. By 3 mo postoperatively gains had reached values ranging from 0.77 to 1.03 for rotations toward the intact side and from 0.61 to 0.98 for rotations toward the lesioned side. Values were higher for lower-velocity stimuli. 4. Caloric testing with ice water in the unoperated ear elicited nystagmus with a mean value of maximum slow-phase velocity of 129 degrees/s preoperatively and 195 degrees/s 3 mo postoperatively. There was no caloric response on the lesioned side. From the

  2. Orientation perception in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Wakita, Masumi

    2008-07-01

    It was previously demonstrated that monkeys divide the orientation continuum into cardinal and oblique categories. However, it is still unclear how monkeys perceive within-category orientations. To better understand monkeys' perception of orientation, two experiments were conducted using five monkeys. In experiment 1, they were trained to identify either one cardinal or one oblique target orientation out of six orientations. The results showed that they readily identified the cardinal target whether it was oriented horizontally or vertically. However, a longer training period was needed to identify the oblique target orientation regardless of its degree and direction of tilt. In experiment 2, the same monkeys were trained to identify two-oblique target orientations out of six orientations. These orientations were paired, either sharing the degree of tilt, direction of tilt, or neither property. The results showed that the monkeys readily identified oblique orientations when they had either the same degree or direction of tilt. However, when the target orientations had neither the same degree nor direction of tilt, the animals had difficulty in identifying them. In summary, horizontal and vertical orientations are individually processed, indicating that monkeys do not have a category for cardinal orientation, but they may recognize cardinal orientations as non-obliques. In addition, monkeys efficiently abstract either the degree or the direction of tilt from oblique orientations, but they have difficulty combining these features to identify an oblique orientation. Thus, not all orientations within the oblique category are equally perceived.

  3. Eruption of Permanent Dentition in Rhesus Monkeys Exposed to ELF (extremely Low Frequency) Fields.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    ýfj NAMRL 1295 ERUPTION OF PERMANENT DENTITION IN RHESUS MONKEYS EXPOSED TO ELF FIELDS Weli Tony D. David, Gregory A. Harris, and John A. Bley, Jr...distribution unlimited. ERUPTION OF PERMANENT DENTITION IN RHESUS MONKEYS EXPOSED TO ELF FIELDS Tony D. David, Gregory A. Harris, and John A. Bley, Jr. Naval...mechanism involved. This interim report concerns the maturation of the permanent dentition in rhesus monkeys. Information dealing with tooth development is

  4. Music perception and octave generalization in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wright, A A; Rivera, J J; Hulse, S H; Shyan, M; Neiworth, J J

    2000-09-01

    Two rhesus monkeys were tested for octave generalization in 8 experiments by transposing 6- and 7-note musical passages by an octave and requiring same or different judgments. The monkeys showed no octave generalization to random-synthetic melodies, atonal melodies, or individual notes. They did show complete octave generalization to childhood songs (e.g., "Happy Birthday") and tonal melodies (from a tonality algorithm). Octave generalization was equally strong for 2-octave transpositions but not for 0.5- or 1.5-octave transpositions of childhood songs. These results combine to show that tonal melodies form musical gestalts for monkeys, as they do for humans, and retain their identity when transposed with whole octaves so that chroma (key) is preserved. This conclusion implicates similar transduction, storage, processing, and relational memory of musical passages in monkeys and humans and has implications for nature-nurture origins of music perception.

  5. Naturally occurring melioidosis in a colonized rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Fritz, P E; Miller, J G; Slayter, M; Smith, T J

    1986-10-01

    An aged wild-caught male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), maintained in a research facility for 10 years, developed bilateral pelvic limb paralysis without other signs of disease. Unresponsive to therapy, the monkey was killed and necropsied. Chronic inflammation with osteolysis of thoracic vertebrae 10-13 was observed. Pseudomonas pseudomallei was cultured and identified from cerebrospinal fluid obtained at the site of the thoracic lesion. This Gram-negative bacterium can cause infection in animals and man and may remain latent for years before the appearance of clinical signs.

  6. Spontaneous Epithelioid Hemangiosarcoma in a Rhesus Monkey (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Takayuki; Gray, Tasha L; Gatto, Nicholas T; Forest, Thomas; Machotka, Sam V; Troth, Sean P; Prahalada, Srinivasa

    2014-01-01

    Epithelioid hemangiosarcoma is a rare malignant endothelial neoplasia with a unique, predominantly epithelioid morphology. A 4-y-old rhesus monkey from our laboratory had multiple neoplastic nodules in a digit, limb skin, hindlimb muscle, and visceral organs including lung, heart, and brain. The nodules were composed of pleomorphic, polygonal, epithelioid, neoplastic cells that were arranged in sheets, nests, and cords and supported by variably dense fibrovascular connective tissue. The morphologic features of this tumor were predominantly epithelioid. However, some regions contained cystic spaces, clefts, and channel-like structures, all of which were lined with morphologically distinct neoplastic endothelial cells. These neoplastic cells, with or without epithelioid morphology, were positive immunohistochemically for CD31, factor VIII-related antigen, and vimentin. The presence of multiple metastatic nodules, high mitotic rate, and extensive Ki67-positive staining were consistent with malignancy. This report is the first description of epithelioid hemangiosarcoma in a rhesus monkey. PMID:25296017

  7. Biological Rhythms and Temperature Regulation in Rhesus Monkeys During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Charles A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This program examined the influence of microgravity on temperature regulation and circadian timekeeping systems in Rhesus monkeys. Animals flown on the Soviet Biosatellite COSMOS 2229 were exposed to 11 2/3 days of microgravity. The circadian patterns temperature regulation, heart rate and activity were monitored constantly. This experiment has extended previous observations from COSMOS 1514 and 2044, as well as provided insights into the physiological mechanisms that produce these changes.

  8. Causal prophylactic efficacy of primaquine, tafenoquine, and atovaquone-proguanil against Plasmodium cynomolgi in a rhesus monkey model.

    PubMed

    DiTusa, Charles; Kozar, Michael P; Pybus, Brandon; Sousa, Jason; Berman, Jonathan; Gettayacamin, Montip; Im-erbsin, Rawiwan; Tungtaeng, Anchalee; Ohrt, Colin

    2014-10-01

    Since the 1940s, the large animal model to assess novel causal prophylactic antimalarial agents has been the Plasmodium cynomolgi sporozoite-infected Indian-origin rhesus monkey. In 2009 the model was reassessed with 3 clinical standards: primaquine (PQ), tafenoquine (TQ), and atovaquone-proguanil. Both control monkeys were parasitemic on day 8 post-sporozoite inoculation on day 0. Primaquine at 1.78 mg base/kg/day on days (-1) to 8 protected 1 monkey and delayed parasitemia patency of the other monkey to day 49. Tafenoquine at 6 mg base/kg/day on days (-1) to 1 protected both monkeys. However, atovaquone-proguanil at 10 mg atovaquone/kg/day on days (-1) to 8 did not protect either monkey and delayed patency only to days 18-19. Primaquine and TQ at the employed regimens are proposed as appropriate doses of positive control drugs for the model at present.

  9. Lassa virus infection of rhesus monkeys: pathogenesis and treatment with ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Jahrling, P B; Hesse, R A; Eddy, G A; Johnson, K M; Callis, R T; Stephen, E L

    1980-05-01

    Rhesus monkeys were experimentally infected with Lassa virus to establish their suitability as a nonhuman primate model for the human disease and to test the protective efficacy of ribavirin, an antiviral drug. Six of 10 untreated control monkeys died after subcutaneous inoculation of 10(6.1) plaque-forming units of Lassa virus (strain Josiah). Infectivity titrations of tissue homogenates from the six dead monkeys indicated significant replication in all tissues tested except the central nervous system. This distribution of virus was confirmed by direct immunofluorescence examination of cryostat-sectioned tissues. Ribavirin was beneficial in the treatment of two groups of infected monkeys. Four monkeys first treated on the day of viral inoculation experienced only mild clinical disease; four monkeys first treated five days later experienced a more severe illness. None of the eight monkeys treated with ribavirin died. Viremia titers and elevations of levels of serum transaminases in treated monkeys were significantly lower than in controls. Ribavirin may be beneficial in the treatment of humans exposed to this life-threatening virus.

  10. GROUP C ARBOVIRUS INFECTIONS IN RHESUS MONKEYS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    demonstrated by monkeys that recovered from one virus infection and challenged with related heterotypic viruses .... infected with any of the group C viruses used were limited to fevers, which were detected in only a few animals. Infections with these viruses appeared to...Macaca mulatta were found to be susceptible to infections with group C arboviruses following subcutaneous inoculation. Infections engendered by

  11. Operant discrimination of an interoceptive stimulus in rhesus monkeys1

    PubMed Central

    Slucki, Henry; Adam, Gyorgi; Porter, Robert W.

    1965-01-01

    Five rhesus macaques monkeys surgically prepared with Thiry small intestinal (jejunum) loops and implanted brain electrodes were restrained in primate chairs and kept on 23-hr deprivation-feeding cycle. After being trained to press a lever for sugar pills on an FR 25 schedule of reinforcement, a discrimination training procedure was established. Lever presses were reinforced during the SD—a non-aversive mechanical stimulus applied to the internal walls of the Thiry loop by rhythmic inflation-deflation of a small latex balloon by air at the rate of one cycle per sec at 100 mm Hg pressure. The SΔ was the absence of the visceral stimulation. The monkeys successfully discriminated between presence and absence of the internal stimulus. A discrimination reversal was attempted and completed on one monkey. The results clearly show operant discrimination based on an interoceptive stimulus. Cortical and subcortical EEG records reflected the onset but not termination of the visceral stimulation. PMID:4954822

  12. Rhesus monkey brain imaging through intact skull with thermoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Wang, Lihong V

    2006-03-01

    Two-dimensional microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography (TAT) is applied to imaging the Rhesus monkey brain through the intact skull. To reduce the wavefront distortion caused by the skull, only the low-frequency components of the thermoacoustic signals (< 1 MHz) are used to reconstruct the TAT images. The methods of signal processing and image reconstruction are validated by imaging a lamb kidney. The resolution of the system is found to be 4 mm when we image a 1-month-old monkey head containing inserted needles. We also image the coronal and axial sections of a 7-month-old monkey head. Brain features that are 3 cm deep in the head are imaged clearly. Our results demonstrate that TAT has potential for use in portable, cost-effective imagers for pediatric brains.

  13. What Are My Chances? Closing the Gap in Uncertainty Monitoring between Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and Capuchin Monkeys (Cebus apella)

    PubMed Central

    Beran, Michael J.; Perdue, Bonnie M.; Smith, J. David

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) but not capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) respond to difficult or ambiguous situations by choosing not to respond or by seeking more information. Here we assessed whether a task with very low chance accuracy could diminish this species difference, presumably indicating that capuchins—compared to macaques—are less risk averse as opposed to less sensitive to signals of uncertainty. Monkeys searched for the largest of six stimuli on a computer screen. Trial difficulty was varied, and monkeys could choose to opt out of any trial. All rhesus monkeys, including some with no prior use of the uncertainty response, selectively avoided the most difficult trials. The majority of capuchins sometimes made uncertainty responses, but at lower rates than rhesus monkeys. Nonetheless, the presence of some adaptive uncertainty responding suggests that capuchins also experience uncertainty and can respond to it, though with less proficiency than macaque monkeys. PMID:25368870

  14. Dissociation of item and source memory in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Basile, Benjamin M; Hampton, Robert R

    2017-09-01

    Source memory, or memory for the context in which a memory was formed, is a defining characteristic of human episodic memory and source memory errors are a debilitating symptom of memory dysfunction. Evidence for source memory in nonhuman primates is sparse despite considerable evidence for other types of sophisticated memory and the practical need for good models of episodic memory in nonhuman primates. A previous study showed that rhesus monkeys confused the identity of a monkey they saw with a monkey they heard, but only after an extended memory delay. This suggests that they initially remembered the source - visual or auditory - of the information but forgot the source as time passed. Here, we present a monkey model of source memory that is based on this previous study. In each trial, monkeys studied two images, one that they simply viewed and touched and the other that they classified as a bird, fish, flower, or person. In a subsequent memory test, they were required to select the image from one source but avoid the other. With training, monkeys learned to suppress responding to images from the to-be-avoided source. After longer memory intervals, monkeys continued to show reliable item memory, discriminating studied images from distractors, but made many source memory errors. Monkeys discriminated source based on study method, not study order, providing preliminary evidence that our manipulation of retention interval caused errors due to source forgetting instead of source confusion. Finally, some monkeys learned to select remembered images from either source on cue, showing that they did indeed remember both items and both sources. This paradigm potentially provides a new model to study a critical aspect of episodic memory in nonhuman primates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Lactobacillus and Pediococcus species richness and relative abundance in the vagina of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Gravett, Michael G.; Jin, Ling; Pavlova, Sylvia I.; Tao, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Background The rhesus monkey is an important animal model to study human vaginal health to which lactic acid bacteria play a significant role. However, the vaginal lactic acid bacterial species richness and relative abundance in rhesus monkeys is largely unknown. Methods Vaginal swab samples were aseptically obtained from 200 reproductive aged female rhesus monkeys. Following Rogosa agar plating, single bacterial colonies representing different morphotypes were isolated and analyzed for whole-cell protein profile, species-specifc PCR, and 16S rRNA gene sequence. Results A total of 510 Lactobacillus strains of 17 species and one Pediococcus acidilactici were identified. The most abundant species was L. reuteri, which colonized the vaginas of 86% monkeys. L. johnsonii was the second most abundant species, which colonized 36% of monkeys. The majority of monkeys were colonized by multiple Lactobacillus species. Conclusions The vaginas of rhesus monkeys are frequently colonized by multiple Lactobacillus species, dominated by L. reuteri. PMID:22429090

  16. Color-detection thresholds in rhesus macaque monkeys and humans

    PubMed Central

    Gagin, Galina; Bohon, Kaitlin S.; Butensky, Adam; Gates, Monica A.; Hu, Jiun-Yiing; Lafer-Sousa, Rosa; Pulumo, Reitumetse L.; Qu, Jane; Stoughton, Cleo M.; Swanbeck, Sonja N.; Conway, Bevil R.

    2014-01-01

    Macaque monkeys are a model of human color vision. To facilitate linking physiology in monkeys with psychophysics in humans, we directly compared color-detection thresholds in humans and rhesus monkeys. Colors were defined by an equiluminant plane of cone-opponent color space. All subjects were tested on an identical apparatus with a four-alternative forced-choice task. Targets were 2° square, centered 2° from fixation, embedded in luminance noise. Across all subjects, the change in detection thresholds from initial testing to plateau performance (“learning”) was similar for +L − M (red) colors and +M − L (bluish-green) colors. But the extent of learning was higher for +S (lavender) than for −S (yellow-lime); moreover, at plateau performance, the cone contrast at the detection threshold was higher for +S than for −S. These asymmetries may reflect differences in retinal circuitry for S-ON and S-OFF. At plateau performance, the two species also had similar detection thresholds for all colors, although monkeys had shorter reaction times than humans and slightly lower thresholds for colors that modulated L/M cones. We discuss whether these observations, together with previous work showing that monkeys have lower spatial acuity than humans, could be accounted for by selective pressures driving higher chromatic sensitivity at the cost of spatial acuity amongst monkeys, specifically for the more recently evolved L − M mechanism. PMID:25027164

  17. Intrapericardial Denervation: Responses to Water Immersion in Rhesus Monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKeever, Kenneth H.; Keil, Lanny C.; Sandler, Harold

    1995-01-01

    Eleven anesthetized rhesus monkeys were used to study cardiovascular, renal, and endocrine alterations associated with 120 min of head-out water immersion. Five animals underwent complete intrapericardial denervation using the Randall technique, while the remaining six monkeys served as intact controls. Each animal was chronically instrumented with an electromagnetic flow probe on the ascending aorta, a strain gauge pressure transducer implanted in the apex of the left ventricle (LV), and electrocardiogram leads anchored to the chest wall and LV. During immersion, LV end-diastolic pressure, urine flow, glomerular filtration rate, sodium excretion, and circulating atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) each increased (P less than 0.05) for intact and denervated monkeys. There were no alterations in free water clearance in either group during immersion, yet fractional excretion of free water increased (P less than 0.05) in the intact monkeys. Plasma renin activity (PRA) decreased (P less than 0.05) during immersion in intact monkeys but not the denervated animals. Plasma vasopressin (PVP) concentration decreased (P less than 0.05) during the first 30 min of immersion in both groups but was not distinguishable from control by 60 min of immersion in denervated monkeys. These data demonstrate that complete cardiac denervation does not block the rise in plasma ANP or prevent the natriuresis associated with head-out water immersion. The suppression of PVP during the first minutes of immersion after complete cardiac denervation suggests that extracardiac sensing mechanisms associated with the induced fluid shifts may be responsible for the findings.

  18. Color-detection thresholds in rhesus macaque monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Gagin, Galina; Bohon, Kaitlin S; Butensky, Adam; Gates, Monica A; Hu, Jiun-Yiing; Lafer-Sousa, Rosa; Pulumo, Reitumetse L; Qu, Jane; Stoughton, Cleo M; Swanbeck, Sonja N; Conway, Bevil R

    2014-07-15

    Macaque monkeys are a model of human color vision. To facilitate linking physiology in monkeys with psychophysics in humans, we directly compared color-detection thresholds in humans and rhesus monkeys. Colors were defined by an equiluminant plane of cone-opponent color space. All subjects were tested on an identical apparatus with a four-alternative forced-choice task. Targets were 2° square, centered 2° from fixation, embedded in luminance noise. Across all subjects, the change in detection thresholds from initial testing to plateau performance (“learning”) was similar for +L − M (red) colors and +M − L (bluish-green) colors. But the extent of learning was higher for +S (lavender) than for −S (yellow-lime); moreover, at plateau performance, the cone contrast at the detection threshold was higher for +S than for −S. These asymmetries may reflect differences in retinal circuitry for S-ON and S-OFF. At plateau performance, the two species also had similar detection thresholds for all colors, although monkeys had shorter reaction times than humans and slightly lower thresholds for colors that modulated L/M cones. We discuss whether these observations, together with previous work showing that monkeys have lower spatial acuity than humans, could be accounted for by selective pressures driving higher chromatic sensitivity at the cost of spatial acuity amongst monkeys, specifically for the more recently evolved L − M mechanism.

  19. Determination of the Infectious Dose of Helicobacter pylori during Primary and Secondary Infection in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Solnick, Jay V.; Hansen, Lori M.; Canfield, Don R.; Parsonnet, Julie

    2001-01-01

    We sought to determine the infectious dose of Helicobacter pylori during primary and secondary infection in the rhesus monkey and to determine whether preinoculation acid suppression is necessary to produce colonization. Mixed inoculation with three human-derived strains showed that H. pylori J166 is particularly adapted to colonization of rhesus monkeys, since it outcompeted two other strains. The minimum infectious dose of H. pylori J166 was 104 bacteria in specific-pathogen (H. pylori)-free monkeys. Rechallenge of these monkeys after antibiotic therapy was characterized by a 10- to 100-fold decrease in bacterial load compared to primary infection, but with little change in the infectious dose. Acid suppression prior to inoculation was not necessary for colonization to occur. These results provide a basis for future animal experiments using more ecologically relevant conditions of inoculation and suggest that reduction in bacterial load rather than complete protection may be a more realistic goal for H. pylori vaccination. PMID:11598063

  20. Temperature and adrenocortical responses in rhesus monkeys exposed to microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Lotz, W.G.; Podgorski, R.P.

    1982-12-01

    To determine if the endocrine response to microwave exposure was similar in a primate to that reported for other animals, rectal temperature and plasma levels of cortisol, thyroxine (T4), and growth hormone (GH) were measured in rhesus monkeys exposed to 1.29-GHz microwave radiation. Exposures were carried out under far-field conditions with the monkey restrained in a chair. Incident power densities of 0, 20, 28, and 38 mW/sq cm were used, with corresponding specific absorption rates of 0, 2.1, 3.0, and 4.1 W/kg. Blood samples were taken hourly via an indwelling jugular venous catheter over a 24-h period before, during, and after an 8-h exposure. Rectal temperature increased an average of 0.5, 0.7, and 1.7 C for the three intensities used. No changes in T4 or GH were observed. Cortisol levels were increased during exposure to 38 mW/sq cm. It was concluded that the temperature and adrenocortical responses to microwave exposure of the rhesus monkey are similar to the corresponding responses of other animals.

  1. Direct demonstration of retroviral recombination in a rhesus monkey.

    PubMed Central

    Wooley, D P; Smith, R A; Czajak, S; Desrosiers, R C

    1997-01-01

    Recombination may be an important mechanism for increasing variation in retroviral populations. Retroviral recombination has been demonstrated in tissue culture systems by artificially creating doubly infected cells. Evidence for retroviral recombination in vivo is indirect and is based principally on the identification of apparently mosaic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genomes from phylogenetic analyses of viral sequences. We infected a rhesus monkey with two different molecularly cloned strains of simian immunodeficiency virus. One strain of virus had a deletion in vpx and vpr, and the other strain had a deletion in nef. Each strain on its own induced low virus loads and was nonpathogenic in rhesus monkeys. When injected simultaneously into separate legs of the same monkey, persistent high virus loads and declines in CD4+ lymphocyte concentrations were observed. Analysis of proviral DNA isolated directly from peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed that full-length, nondeleted SIVmac239 predominated by 2 weeks after infection. These results provide direct experimental evidence for genetic recombination between two different retroviral strains in an infected host. The results illustrate the ease and rapidity with which recombination can occur in an infected animal and the selection that can occur for variants generated by genetic recombination. PMID:9371629

  2. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) map number onto space

    PubMed Central

    Drucker, Caroline B.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Humans map number onto space. However, the origins of this association, and particularly the degree to which it depends upon cultural experience, are not fully understood. Here we provide the first demonstration of a number-space mapping in a non-human primate. We trained four adult male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to select the fourth position from the bottom of a five-element vertical array. Monkeys maintained a preference to choose the fourth position through changes in the appearance, location, and spacing of the vertical array. We next asked whether monkeys show a spatially-oriented number mapping by testing their responses to the same five-element stimulus array rotated ninety degrees into a horizontal line. In these horizontal probe trials, monkeys preferentially selected the fourth position from the left, but not the fourth position from the right. Our results indicate that rhesus macaques map number onto space, suggesting that the association between number and space in human cognition is not purely a result of cultural experience and instead has deep evolutionary roots. PMID:24762923

  3. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) map number onto space.

    PubMed

    Drucker, Caroline B; Brannon, Elizabeth M

    2014-07-01

    Humans map number onto space. However, the origins of this association, and particularly the degree to which it depends upon cultural experience, are not fully understood. Here we provide the first demonstration of a number-space mapping in a non-human primate. We trained four adult male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to select the fourth position from the bottom of a five-element vertical array. Monkeys maintained a preference to choose the fourth position through changes in the appearance, location, and spacing of the vertical array. We next asked whether monkeys show a spatially-oriented number mapping by testing their responses to the same five-element stimulus array rotated ninety degrees into a horizontal line. In these horizontal probe trials, monkeys preferentially selected the fourth position from the left, but not the fourth position from the right. Our results indicate that rhesus macaques map number onto space, suggesting that the association between number and space in human cognition is not purely a result of cultural experience and instead has deep evolutionary roots.

  4. Endocrine responses in the rhesus monkey during acute cold exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lotz, W.G.; Saxton, J.L. )

    1991-03-11

    The authors studied five young male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), 3.4 to 6.7 kg, to determine the relationship between fluid balance hormones and urine production during acute, dry cold exposure. Each monkey served as its own control in duplicate experimental sessions at 6C or 26C. A 6-h experimental session consisted of 120 min equilibration at 26C, 120 min experimental exposure, and 120 min recovery at 26C. Urinary and venous catheters were inserted on the morning of a session. Rectal (Tre) and skin temperatures were monitored continuously. Blood samples were taken at 0, 30, 60 and 120 min of exposure, and at 60 min postexposure. Plasma was analyzed for arginine vasopressin (AVP), atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma aldosterone (PA), and osmolality. Urine samples were analyzed for osmolality, electrolytes, and creatinine. Mean Tre was 1.6C lower after 120 min at 6C than at 26C. Urine volume and osmolality were not altered by cold exposure, as they are in humans and rats. Vasopressin and PA increased sharply, with mean plasma levels in monkeys exposed to cold more than threefold and tenfold, respectively, the levels in monkeys exposed at 26C. In contrast, ANF, PRA, and plasma osmolality were not significantly changed by cold exposure. The absence of a cold-induced diuresis in the monkey may be related to the marked increase in plasma AVP level.

  5. Wave aberrations in rhesus monkeys with vision-induced ametropias.

    PubMed

    Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Kee, Chea-Su; Hung, Li-Fang; Qiao-Grider, Ying; Huang, Juan; Roorda, Austin; Smith, Earl L

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between refractive errors and high-order aberrations in infant rhesus monkeys. Specifically, we compared the monochromatic wave aberrations measured with a Shack-Hartman wavefront sensor between normal monkeys and monkeys with vision-induced refractive errors. Shortly after birth, both normal monkeys and treated monkeys reared with optically induced defocus or form deprivation showed a decrease in the magnitude of high-order aberrations with age. However, the decrease in aberrations was typically smaller in the treated animals. Thus, at the end of the lens-rearing period, higher than normal amounts of aberrations were observed in treated eyes, both hyperopic and myopic eyes and treated eyes that developed astigmatism, but not spherical ametropias. The total RMS wavefront error increased with the degree of spherical refractive error, but was not correlated with the degree of astigmatism. Both myopic and hyperopic treated eyes showed elevated amounts of coma and trefoil and the degree of trefoil increased with the degree of spherical ametropia. Myopic eyes also exhibited a much higher prevalence of positive spherical aberration than normal or treated hyperopic eyes. Following the onset of unrestricted vision, the amount of high-order aberrations decreased in the treated monkeys that also recovered from the experimentally induced refractive errors. Our results demonstrate that high-order aberrations are influenced by visual experience in young primates and that the increase in high-order aberrations in our treated monkeys appears to be an optical byproduct of the vision-induced alterations in ocular growth that underlie changes in refractive error. The results from our study suggest that the higher amounts of wave aberrations observed in ametropic humans are likely to be a consequence, rather than a cause, of abnormal refractive development.

  6. Intrapericardial denervation: Responses to water immersion in rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKeever, Kenneth H.; Keil, Lanny C.; Sandler, Harold

    1995-01-01

    Eleven anesthetized rhesus monkeys were used to study cardiovascular, renal, and endocrine alterations associated with 120 min of head-out water immersion. Five animals underwent complete intrapericardial denervation using the Randall technique, while the remaining six monkeys served as intact controls. Each animal was chronically instrumented with an electromagnetic flow probe on the ascending aorta, a strain gauge pressure transducer implanted in the apex of the left ventricle (LV), and electrocardiogram leads anchored to the chest wall and LV. During immersion, LV end-diastolic pressure, urine flow, glomerular filtration rate, sodium excretion, and circulating atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) each increased (P less than 0.05) for intact and denervated monkeys. There were no alterations in free water clearance in either group during immersion, yet fractional excretion of free water increased (P less than 0.05) in the intact monkeys. Plasma renin activity (PRA) decreased (P less than 0.05) during immersion in intact monkeys but not the denervated animals. Plasma vasopressin (PVP) concentration decreased (P less than 0.05) during the first 30 min of immersion in both groups but was not distinguishable from control by 60 min of immersion in denervated monkeys. These data demonstrate that complete cardiac denervation does not block the rise in plasma ANP or prevent the natriuresis associated with head-out water immersion. The suppression of PVP during the first minutes of immersion after complete cardiac denervation suggests that extracardiac sensing mechanisms associated with the induced fluid shifts may be responsible for the findings. water immersion; natriuresis; vasopressin; eardiae denervation; monkey

  7. The rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) as a flight candidate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debourne, M. N. G.; Bourne, G. H.; Mcclure, H. M.

    1977-01-01

    The intelligence and ruggedness of rhesus monkeys, as well as the abundance of normative data on their anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry, and the availability of captive bred animals qualify them for selection as candidates for orbital flight and weightlessness studies. Baseline data discussed include: physical characteristics, auditory thresholds, visual accuity, blood, serological taxomony, immunogenetics, cytogenics, circadian rhythms, respiration, cardiovascular values, corticosteroid response to charr restraint, microscopy of tissues, pathology, nutrition, and learning skills. Results from various tests used to establish the baseline data are presented in tables.

  8. Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) complex learning skills reassessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, David A.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1991-01-01

    An automated computerized testing facility is employed to study basic learning and transfer in rhesus monkeys including discrimination learning set and mediational learning. The data show higher performance levels than those predicted from other tests that involved compromised learning with analogous conditions. Advanced transfer-index ratios and positive transfer of learning are identified, and indications of mediational learning strategies are noted. It is suggested that these data are evidence of the effectiveness of the present experimental apparatus for enhancing learning in nonhuman primates.

  9. The rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) as a flight candidate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debourne, M. N. G.; Bourne, G. H.; Mcclure, H. M.

    1977-01-01

    The intelligence and ruggedness of rhesus monkeys, as well as the abundance of normative data on their anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry, and the availability of captive bred animals qualify them for selection as candidates for orbital flight and weightlessness studies. Baseline data discussed include: physical characteristics, auditory thresholds, visual accuity, blood, serological taxomony, immunogenetics, cytogenics, circadian rhythms, respiration, cardiovascular values, corticosteroid response to charr restraint, microscopy of tissues, pathology, nutrition, and learning skills. Results from various tests used to establish the baseline data are presented in tables.

  10. [Preliminary study on xenotransfusion from porcine red blood cell into Rhesus monkey].

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying-Xia; Ji, Shou-Ping; Lu, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Cheng-Lin; Li, Li-Li; Gong, Feng; Zhang, Jin-Guo; Zhang, Yang-Pei

    2006-02-01

    In order to study the possibility of xenotransfusion from porcine red blood cell (pRBC) to primate, the antigens on pRBC surface were modified to make it more compatible to primate sera. Porcine RBCs were subjected to both enzymatic removal of membrane alpha-Gal antigens with recombinant alpha-galactosidase (AGL) and covalent attachment of succinimid propionate-linked methoxypolyethyleneglycol (mPEG-SPA) to camouflage non-alphaGal antigens. The effects of double modifications were determinated by hemagglutination and clinical cross-match testing with rhesus sera. In vivo clearance rates and safety of modified pRBCs were measured after it was transfused into Rhesus monkey with or without immunosuppressant treatment. The validity of pRBC was detected in exsanguine Rhesus monkey model. The results showed that AGL could effectively remove alpha-Gal xenoantigens on pRBC membrane and reduce hemagglutination. The combination of mPEG modification with AGL treatment could significantly increased compatibility between pRBCs and Rhesus monkey sera. Modified pRBCs were detectable in Rhesus monkey blood at 12 hours after transfusion, and their survival time was 40 hours in the immunosuppressant-treated Rhesus monkey. In vivo survival rates of pRBCs were 38% in exsanguine Rhesus monkey at 8 hours after transfusion, and during that time, the hemoglobin and hematocrit of Rhesus monkey were maintained at the same level as before it lost blood. It is concluded that the modified pRBC can be safely transfused into Rhesus monkey and relieve the anemic symptom exsanguine Rhesus monkey. It suggested that pRBC can be hopefully used as a blood substitute for primate and human in the future.

  11. Caloric restriction improves health and survival of rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Julie A; Colman, Ricki J; Beasley, T Mark; Allison, David B; Kemnitz, Joseph W; Roth, George S; Ingram, Donald K; Weindruch, Richard; de Cabo, Rafael; Anderson, Rozalyn M

    2017-01-17

    Caloric restriction (CR) without malnutrition extends lifespan and delays the onset of age-related disorders in most species but its impact in nonhuman primates has been controversial. In the late 1980s two parallel studies were initiated to determine the effect of CR in rhesus monkeys. The University of Wisconsin study reported a significant positive impact of CR on survival, but the National Institute on Aging study detected no significant survival effect. Here we present a direct comparison of longitudinal data from both studies including survival, bodyweight, food intake, fasting glucose levels and age-related morbidity. We describe differences in study design that could contribute to differences in outcomes, and we report species specificity in the impact of CR in terms of optimal onset and diet. Taken together these data confirm that health benefits of CR are conserved in monkeys and suggest that CR mechanisms are likely translatable to human health.

  12. Sedative effects of intranasal oxytocin in rabbits and rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hess, L; Votava, M; Málek, J; Kurzová, A; Slíva, J

    2016-12-21

    Oxytocin is a hormone therapeutically used mainly for its peripheral effects during pregnancy in the uterus and breasts. However, additional central effects, i.e. anxiolytic effect, decreased level of social stress and increased empathy have been also observed. Hence, the aim of our study was to evaluate if nasal oxytocin can be used as anxiolytic substance in rhesus monkeys (n=20) and rabbits (n=20). Simultaneously, mean arterial blood pressure, arterial oxygen saturation of hemoglobin and pulse rate were monitored in all the evaluated animals. While rabbits lost righting reflex, monkeys developed a dose-dependent loss of aggressiveness and/or anxiety as evaluated by behavioral methods (aggressive behavior was classified as non-sedated - sedated - strongly sedated).

  13. Caloric restriction improves health and survival of rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Julie A.; Colman, Ricki J.; Beasley, T. Mark; Allison, David B.; Kemnitz, Joseph W.; Roth, George S.; Ingram, Donald K.; Weindruch, Richard; de Cabo, Rafael; Anderson, Rozalyn M.

    2017-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) without malnutrition extends lifespan and delays the onset of age-related disorders in most species but its impact in nonhuman primates has been controversial. In the late 1980s two parallel studies were initiated to determine the effect of CR in rhesus monkeys. The University of Wisconsin study reported a significant positive impact of CR on survival, but the National Institute on Aging study detected no significant survival effect. Here we present a direct comparison of longitudinal data from both studies including survival, bodyweight, food intake, fasting glucose levels and age-related morbidity. We describe differences in study design that could contribute to differences in outcomes, and we report species specificity in the impact of CR in terms of optimal onset and diet. Taken together these data confirm that health benefits of CR are conserved in monkeys and suggest that CR mechanisms are likely translatable to human health. PMID:28094793

  14. Pathology of Lassa virus infection in the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Callis, R T; Jahrling, P B; DePaoli, A

    1982-09-01

    The clinical signs and gross and microscopic lesions of Lassa virus infection in the rhesus monkey are described. Of 17 monkeys infected with Lassa virus, nine died or were killed when moribund. The clinical signs were lethargy, aphagia, constipation, fever, conjunctivitis, and skin rash. Pulmonary congestion, pleural effusion, pericardial edema, hydropericardium, and a few visceral hemorrhages were present grossly. Major microscopic lesions were necrotizing hepatitis and interstitial pneumonia. Other microscopic changes were present in the heart, small intestine, spleen, lymph nodes, kidney, urinary bladder, adrenal glands, and central nervous system; however, most of these lesions were mild. In fact, death could not always be attributed to the morphologic changes; therefore, function alterations must be examined.

  15. Do rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) perceive illusory motion?

    PubMed Central

    Agrillo, Christian; Gori, Simone; Beran, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, visual illusions have been used repeatedly to understand similarities and differences of visual perception of human and non-human animals. However, nearly all studies have focused only on illusions not related to motion perception and, to date, it is unknown whether non-human primates perceive any kind of motion illusion. In the present study we investigated whether rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) perceived one of the most popular motion illusions in humans, the Rotating Snake illusion (RSI). To this purpose, we set up four experiments. In Experiment 1 subjects initially were trained to discriminate static vs. dynamic arrays. Once reaching the learning criterion, they underwent probe trials in which we presented the RSI and a control stimulus identical in overall configuration with the exception that the order of the luminance sequence was changed in a way that no apparent motion is perceived by humans. The overall performance of monkeys indicated that they spontaneously classified RSI as a dynamic array. Subsequently, we tested adult humans in the same task with the aim of directly comparing the performance of human and non-human primates (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3 we found that monkeys can be successfully trained to discriminate between the RSI and a control stimulus. Experiment 4 showed that a simple change in luminance sequence in the two arrays could not explain the performance reported in Exp. 3. These results suggest that some rhesus monkeys display a human-like perception of this motion illusion, raising the possibility that the neurocognitive systems underlying motion perception may be similar between human and non-human primates. PMID:25812828

  16. Retinohypothalamic connections in the rhesus monkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chijuka, John C.

    Previous studies of retinohypothalamic projections in macaques were performed with anterograde degeneration or autoradiographic techniques that were not sufficiently sensitive to fully define these projections. Results of studies in non-primates using sensitive tracers have revealed more extensive retinohypothalamic projection than previously seen. We hypothesize that there are more extensive retinohypothalamic projections in the higher primate, macaque monkey. Thus, the primary goal of this investigation was to characterize the retinohypothalamic projections in the macaque monkey using the more sensitive tract tracer, cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) unilaterally injected intravitreally. Secondary goals were to determine: (1) whether there is a retinal projection to the sleep-related ventrolateral preoptic area of the hypothalamus; (2) whether there are direct retinal projections to gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the hypothalamus; and (3) whether any retinally-projecting hypothalamic neurons can be retrogradely labeled by intravitreal CTB injections. Our results confirmed our hypothesis that there are more extensive projections to the central targets. We found that, in addition to the well-described retinal projection to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, a number of other hypothalamic areas were labeled. We observed projections to the medial and lateral preoptic areas, including the sleep-related ventrolateral preoptic area. A number of retinal fibers terminated immediately dorsal to the supraoptic nucleus (SO), with a few fibers penetrating and terminating within the nucleus. A few fibers continued laterally beyond the SO into the substantia innominata immediately ventral to the nucleus basalis of Meynert. In addition, a dense plexus of CTB-labeled, retinal fibers were present in the subventricular nucleus and adjacent subventricular area. Some of these fibers coursed dorsally from this region to penetrate the ependyma lining the third ventricle and apparently

  17. Effects of spaceflight on bone mineralization in the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Zerath, E; Novikov, V; Leblanc, A; Bakulin, A; Oganov, V; Grynpas, M

    1996-07-01

    We combined dual-photon absorptiometry, iliac crest histomorphometry, and backscattered electrons analysis to characterize bone mineralization effects of a spaceflight on young monkeys. Two 4- to 5-kg male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were flown during a 11.5-day spaceflight that took place onboard Cosmos 2229 biosatellite (Bion 10). Vivarium (n = 4) and Earth-based chair (n = 4) control situations were studied for comparison. Flight monkeys exhibited lower values of iliac cancellous bone volume, associated with nonsignificantly thinner trabeculae. Bone mineralization rate and the proportion of trabecular bone surface involved in mineralization processes were found markedly reduced after spaceflight. Analysis of embedded sections by backscattered electrons imaging showed a nonsignificant shift to lower mineralization in the flight biopsies vs. postflight mock-up biopsies. These results were in accordance with dual-photon absorptiometry evaluations showing a tendency for decreased bone mineral content during flight and recovery thereafter. The ground simulation experiment performed on the same monkeys more than 1 mo after landing suggests that the observed effects were specifically related to spaceflight and that the animals had only partially recovered. Additional animals on future flights will be required to confirm these findings.

  18. Neuroleptic-induced acute dyskinesias in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Porsolt, R D; Jalfre, M

    1981-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys, previously subjected to twice-weekly injections of various neuroleptics, subsequently respond to acute IM injections of haloperidol with marked bucco-lingual and whole body movement disturbances consisting of mouth opening, protrusion, retraction or curling of the tongue together with writhing movements of the neck, trunk and/or limbs. These phenomena, which closely resemble the acute dyskinetic or dystonic reactions described in patients at the beginning of neuroleptic treatment, were also observed after acute IM injections of other neuroleptics such as fluphenazine, metoclopramide, oxiperomide, sulpiride, sultopride and tiapride. No dyskinesias were observed after chlorpromazine, chlordiazepoxide, clozapine, RMI81582 or thioridazine at doses which otherwise had marked behavioural effects. The dyskinesias induced by haloperidol could be suppressed by prior treatment with the anti-cholinergic scopolamine. These observations, which correlate well with clinical findings, suggest that neuroleptic induced acute dyskinesias in the Rhesus monkey might be a useful model for predicting the liability of new anti-psychotics for inducing acute dyskinetic reactions in man.

  19. Subtoxic hepatic vitamin A concentrations in captive rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Penniston, K L; Tanumihardjo, S A

    2001-11-01

    Although the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) is a widely used experimental animal, its exact vitamin A requirement is unknown. An amount of 430-3600 IU/d [129-1080 retinol equivalents (RE)] is recommended, largely on the basis of depletion studies. Normal hepatic vitamin A appears to be 1 micromol/g liver. Our goal was to determine hepatic vitamin A concentrations of captive monkeys. Liver autopsy samples from rhesus and marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) monkeys were obtained from the Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center. The rhesus monkeys consumed a diet with 40 IU (12 RE) retinyl acetate/g. Male and female monkeys consumed an estimated 250 and 175 g diet/d, respectively. Marmosets were fed a powder-based diet consisting of 20 IU (6 RE) retinyl acetate/g. The marmosets consumed an estimated 25 g of the diet/d. Liver samples were extracted and analyzed by HPLC. The vitamin A concentration of the rhesus monkey livers was very high at 17.0 +/- 6.3 micromol/g. The hepatic vitamin A of the marmosets was 1.25 +/- 0.58 micromol/g liver. Histologic examination of the livers revealed Ito cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia in the rhesus monkeys compared with the marmosets. Considering that the natural diet of the rhesus monkey (fruits, seeds, roots and insects) is not high in preformed vitamin A, the vitamin A content of the diet appears excessive, supplying four times the NRC recommendation and resulting in high liver stores.

  20. A MEG investigation of somatosensory processing in the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Tony W; Godwin, Dwayne W; Czoty, Paul W; Nader, Michael A; Kraft, Robert A; Buchheimer, Nancy C; Daunais, James B

    2009-07-15

    The use of minimally and non-invasive neuroimaging methods in animal models has sharply increased over the past decade. Such studies have enhanced understanding of the neural basis of the physical signals quantified by these tools, and have addressed an assortment of fundamental and otherwise intractable questions in neurobiology. To date, these studies have almost exclusively utilized positron-emission tomography or variants of magnetic resonance based imaging. These methods provide largely indirect measures of brain activity and are strongly reliant on intact vasculature and normal blood-flow, which is known to be compromised in many clinical conditions. The current study provides the first demonstration of whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG), a non-invasive and direct measure of neuronal activity, in a rhesus monkey, and in the process supplies the initial data on systems-level dynamics in somatosensory cortices. An adult rhesus monkey underwent three separate studies of tactile stimulation on the pad of the right second or fifth digit as whole-head MEG data were acquired. The neural generators of the primary neuromagnetic components were localized using an equivalent-current-dipole model. Second digit stimulation produced an initial cortical response peaking approximately 16 ms after stimulus onset in the contralateral somatosensory cortices, with a later response at approximately 96 ms in an overlapping or nearby neural area with a roughly orthogonal orientation. Stimulation of the fifth digit produced similar results, the main exception being a substantially weaker later response. We believe the 16 ms response is likely the monkey homologue of the human M50 response, as both are the earliest cortical response and localize to the contralateral primary somatosensory area. Thus, these data suggest that mechanoreception in nonhuman primates operates substantially faster than that in adult humans. More broadly, these results demonstrate that it is feasible to

  1. A MEG investigation of somatosensory processing in the rhesus monkey

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Tony W.; Godwin, Dwayne W.; Czoty, Paul W.; Nader, Michael A.; Kraft, Robert A.; Buchheimer, Nancy C.; Daunais, James B.

    2009-01-01

    The use of minimally and non-invasive neuroimaging methods in animal models has sharply increased over the past decade. Such studies have enhanced understanding of the neural basis of the physical signals quantified by these tools, and have addressed an assortment of fundamental and otherwise intractable questions in neurobiology. To date, these studies have almost exclusively utilized positron-emission tomography or variants of magnetic resonance based imaging. These methods provide largely indirect measures of brain activity and are strongly reliant on intact vasculature and normal blood flow, which is known to be compromised in many clinical conditions. The current study provides the first demonstration of whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG), a non-invasive and direct measure of neuronal activity, in a rhesus monkey, and in the process supplies the initial data on systems-level dynamics in somatosensory cortices. An adult rhesus monkey underwent three separate studies of tactile stimulation on the pad of the right second or fifth digit as whole-head MEG data were acquired. The neural generators of the primary neuromagnetic components were localized using an equivalent-current-dipole model. Second digit stimulation produced an initial cortical response peaking ∼16 ms after stimulus onset in the contralateral somatosensory cortices, with a later response at ∼96 ms in an overlapping or nearby neural area with a roughly orthogonal orientation. Stimulation of the fifth digit produced similar results, the main exception being a substantially weaker later response. We believe the 16ms response is likely the monkey homologue of the human M50 response, as both are the earliest cortical response and localize to the contralateral primary somatosensory area. Thus, these data suggest that mechanoreception in nonhuman primates operates substantially faster than that in adult humans. More broadly, these results demonstrate that it is feasible to use current human whole

  2. Vocal-Tract Resonances as Indexical Cues in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Ghazanfar, Asif A.; Turesson, Hjalmar K.; Maier, Joost X.; van Dinther, Ralph; Patterson, Roy D.; Logothetis, Nikos K.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Vocal-tract resonances (or formants) are acoustic signatures in the voice and are related to the shape and length of the vocal tract. Formants play an important role in human communication, helping us not only to distinguish several different speech sounds [1], but also to extract important information related to the physical characteristics of the speaker, so-called indexical cues. How did formants come to play such an important role in human vocal communication? One hypothesis suggests that the ancestral role of formant perception—a role that might be present in extant nonhuman primates—was to provide indexical cues [2–5]. Although formants are present in the acoustic structure of vowel-like calls of monkeys [3–8] and implicated in the discrimination of call types [8–10], it is not known whether they use this feature to extract indexical cues. Here, we investigate whether rhesus monkeys can use the formant structure in their “coo” calls to assess the age-related body size of conspecifics. Using a preferential-looking paradigm [11, 12] and synthetic coo calls in which formant structure simulated an adult/large- or juvenile/small-sounding individual, we demonstrate that untrained monkeys attend to formant cues and link large-sounding coos to large faces and small-sounding coos to small faces—in essence, they can, like humans [13], use formants as indicators of age-related body size. PMID:17320389

  3. Unconstrained three-dimensional reaching in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Jindrich, Devin L; Courtine, Gregoire; Liu, James J; McKay, Heather L; Moseanko, Rod; Bernot, Timothy J; Roy, Roland R; Zhong, Hui; Tuszynski, Mark H; Reggie Edgerton, V

    2011-03-01

    To better understand normative behavior for quantitative evaluation of motor recovery after injury, we studied arm movements by non-injured rhesus monkeys during a food-retrieval task. While seated, monkeys reached, grasped, and retrieved food items. We recorded three-dimensional kinematics and muscle activity, and used inverse dynamics to calculate joint moments due to gravity, segmental interactions, and to the muscles and tissues of the arm. Endpoint paths showed curvature in three dimensions, suggesting that maintaining straight paths was not an important constraint. Joint moments were dominated by gravity. Generalized muscle and interaction moments were less than half of the gravitational moments. The relationships between shoulder and elbow resultant moments were linear during both reach and retrieval. Although both reach and retrieval required elbow flexor moments, an elbow extensor (triceps brachii) was active during both phases. Antagonistic muscles of both the elbow and hand were co-activated during reach and retrieval. Joint behavior could be described by lumped-parameter models analogous to torsional springs at the joints. Minor alterations to joint quasi-stiffness properties, aided by interaction moments, result in reciprocal movements that evolve under the influence of gravity. The strategies identified in monkeys to reach, grasp, and retrieve items will allow the quantification of prehension during recovery after a spinal cord injury and the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions.

  4. Video-task acquisition in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): a comparative analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, W. D.; Washburn, D. A.; Hyatt, C. W.; Rumbaugh, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This study describes video-task acquisition in two nonhuman primate species. The subjects were seven rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and seven chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). All subjects were trained to manipulate a joystick which controlled a cursor displayed on a computer monitor. Two criterion levels were used: one based on conceptual knowledge of the task and one based on motor performance. Chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys attained criterion in a comparable number of trials using a conceptually based criterion. However, using a criterion based on motor performance, chimpanzees reached criterion significantly faster than rhesus monkeys. Analysis of error patterns and latency indicated that the rhesus monkeys had a larger asymmetry in response bias and were significantly slower in responding than the chimpanzees. The results are discussed in terms of the relation between object manipulation skills and video-task acquisition.

  5. The Rhesus monkey as a model for testing the immunological effects of space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Schaffar, L.; Schmitt, D. A.; Peres, C.; Miller, E. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Rhesus monkey has been proposed as a model for the effects of space flight on immunity. In order to determine the feasibility of the use of the Rhesus monkey as a model, we studied the use of Rhesus monkey cells for immunological procedures that have been shown to be affected by space flight in both rodents and humans. We have shown that both lymph node cells and peripheral blood leukocytes can be stained with monoclonal antibodies to detect the following surface markers: CD4, CD-8, Ia and surface immunoglobulin. Also, the level of Ia antigen expression was increased by treatment of the cells with human interferon-gamma. In addition, cells were induced to produce interferons and interleukins. Isolated neutrophils also demonstrated increased oxidative burst. These data indicate that the Rhesus monkey will be a useful model for space flight studies of immunity.

  6. Characterization of Human Serum Butyrylcholinesterase in Rhesus Monkeys: Behavioral and Physiological Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    The effects of a large dose of human serum butyrylcholinesterase (HuBChe) were evaluated in rhesus monkeys using a serial-probe recognition (SPR) task designed to assess attention and short-term memory.

  7. The Rhesus monkey as a model for testing the immunological effects of space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Schaffar, L.; Schmitt, D. A.; Peres, C.; Miller, E. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Rhesus monkey has been proposed as a model for the effects of space flight on immunity. In order to determine the feasibility of the use of the Rhesus monkey as a model, we studied the use of Rhesus monkey cells for immunological procedures that have been shown to be affected by space flight in both rodents and humans. We have shown that both lymph node cells and peripheral blood leukocytes can be stained with monoclonal antibodies to detect the following surface markers: CD4, CD-8, Ia and surface immunoglobulin. Also, the level of Ia antigen expression was increased by treatment of the cells with human interferon-gamma. In addition, cells were induced to produce interferons and interleukins. Isolated neutrophils also demonstrated increased oxidative burst. These data indicate that the Rhesus monkey will be a useful model for space flight studies of immunity.

  8. Video-task acquisition in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): a comparative analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, W. D.; Washburn, D. A.; Hyatt, C. W.; Rumbaugh, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This study describes video-task acquisition in two nonhuman primate species. The subjects were seven rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and seven chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). All subjects were trained to manipulate a joystick which controlled a cursor displayed on a computer monitor. Two criterion levels were used: one based on conceptual knowledge of the task and one based on motor performance. Chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys attained criterion in a comparable number of trials using a conceptually based criterion. However, using a criterion based on motor performance, chimpanzees reached criterion significantly faster than rhesus monkeys. Analysis of error patterns and latency indicated that the rhesus monkeys had a larger asymmetry in response bias and were significantly slower in responding than the chimpanzees. The results are discussed in terms of the relation between object manipulation skills and video-task acquisition.

  9. The rhesus monkey as a model for testing the immunological effects of space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Schaffar, L.; Schmitt, D. A.; Peres, C.; Miller, E. S.

    1994-08-01

    The Rhesus monkey has been proposed as a model for the effects of space flight on immunity. In order to determine the feasibility of the use of the Rhesus monkey as a model, we studied the use of Rhesus monkey cells for immunological procedures that have been shown to be affected by space flight in both rodents and humans. We have shown that both lymph node cells and peripheral blood leukocytes can be stained with monoclonal antibodies to detect the following surface markers: CD4, CD-8, Ia and surface immunoglobulin. Also, the level of Ia antigen expression was increased by treatment of the cells with human interferon-gamma. In addition, cells were induced to produce interferons and interleukins. Isolated neutrophils also demonstrated increased oxidative burst. These data indicate that the Rhesus monkey will be a useful model for space flight studies of immunity.

  10. Lassa Virus Infection of Rhesus Monkeys: Pathogenesis and Treatment with Ribavirin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    viruses [5, 61, is effective in treating severe The views of the authors do not purport to reflect the posi- Lassa virus disease in rhesus monkeys...THE JOURNAL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES - VOL. 141, NO. 5 MAY 1980 1980 by The University of Chicago. 0022-1899/80/410500 .95 ECr C- Lassa Virus Infection...Atlanta, Georgia Rhesus monkeys were experimentally infected with Lassa virus to establish their suita- bility as a nonhuman primate model for the human

  11. Oxytocin enhances attention to the eye region in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Dal Monte, Olga; Noble, Pamela L.; Costa, Vincent D.; Averbeck, Bruno B.

    2014-01-01

    Human and non-human primates rely on the ability to perceive and interpret facial expressions to guide effective social interactions. The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) has been shown to have a critical role in the perception of social cues, and in humans to increase the number of saccades to the eye region. To develop a useful primate model for the effects of OT on information processing, we investigated the influence of OT on gaze behavior during face processing in rhesus macaques. Forty-five minutes after a single intranasal dose of either 24IU OT or saline, monkeys completed a free-viewing task during which they viewed pictures of conspecifics displaying one of three facial expressions (neutral, open-mouth threat or bared-teeth) for 5 s. The monkey was free to explore the face on the screen while the pattern of eye movements was recorded. OT did not increase overall fixations to the face compared to saline. Rather, when monkeys freely viewed conspecific faces, OT increased fixations to the eye region relative to the mouth region. This effect of OT was particularly pronounced when face position on the screen was manipulated so that the eye region was not the first facial feature seen by the monkeys. Together these findings are consistent with prior evidence in humans that intranasal administration of OT specifically enhances visual attention to the eye region compared to other informative facial features, thus validating the use of non-human primates to mechanistically explore how OT modulates social information processing and behavior. PMID:24624055

  12. White Matter Neurons in Young Adult and Aged Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Farzad; Wang, Xiyue; Rosene, Douglas L.; Rockland, Kathleen S.

    2016-01-01

    In humans and non-human primates (NHP), white matter neurons (WMNs) persist beyond early development. Their functional importance is largely unknown, but they have both corticothalamic and corticocortical connectivity and at least one subpopulation has been implicated in vascular regulation and sleep. Several other studies have reported that the density of WMNs in humans is altered in neuropathological or psychiatric conditions. The present investigation evaluates and compares the density of superficial and deep WMNs in frontal (FR), temporal (TE), and parietal (Par) association regions of four young adult and four aged male rhesus monkeys. A major aim was to determine whether there was age-related neuronal loss, as might be expected given the substantial age-related changes known to occur in the surrounding white matter environment. Neurons were visualized by immunocytochemistry for Neu-N in coronal tissue sections (30 μm thickness), and neuronal density was assessed by systematic random sampling. Per 0.16 mm2 sampling box, this yielded about 40 neurons in the superficial WM and 10 in the deep WM. Consistent with multiple studies of cell density in the cortical gray matter of normal brains, neither the superficial nor deep WM populations showed statistically significant age-related neuronal loss, although we observed a moderate decrease with age for the deep WMNs in the frontal region. Morphometric analyses, in contrast, showed significant age effects in soma size and circularity. In specific, superficial WMNs were larger in FR and Par WM regions of the young monkeys; but in the TE, these were larger in the older monkeys. An age effect was also observed for soma circularity: superficial WMNs were more circular in FR and Par of the older monkeys. This second, morphometric result raises the question of whether other age-related morphological, connectivity, or molecular changes occur in the WMNs. These could have multiple impacts, given the wide range of putative

  13. Pharmacokinetics of bisphenol A in neonatal and adult rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Doerge, Daniel R.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Woodling, Kellie A.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2010-10-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-production volume industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic products and epoxy resin-based food can liners. The presence of BPA in urine of > 90% of Americans aged 6-60 is controversial because of the potential for endocrine disruption, particularly during perinatal development, as suggested by in vitro, experimental animal, and epidemiological studies. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure serum pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) BPA in adult and neonatal rhesus monkeys by oral (PND 5, 35, 70) and intravenous injection (PND 77) routes using d6-BPA to avoid sample contamination. The concentration-time profiles observed in adult monkeys following oral administration of 100 {mu}g/kg bw were remarkably similar to those previously reported in human volunteers given a similar dose; moreover, minimal pharmacokinetic differences were observed between neonatal and adult monkeys for the receptor-active aglycone form of BPA. Circulating concentrations of BPA aglycone were quite low following oral administration (< 1% of total), which reflects the redundancy of active UDP-glucuronosyl transferase isoforms in both gut and liver. No age-related changes were seen in internal exposure metrics for aglycone BPA in monkeys, a result clearly different from developing rats where significant inverse age-related changes, based on immaturity of Phase II metabolism and renal excretion, were recently reported. These observations imply that any toxicological effect observed in rats from early postnatal exposures to BPA could over-predict those possible in primates of the same age, based on significantly higher internal exposures and overall immaturity at birth.

  14. Tissue Distribution of Memory T and B Cells in Rhesus Monkeys following Influenza A Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yongvanitchit, Kosol; Limsalakpetch, Amporn; Kum-Arb, Utaiwan; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Boonnak, Kobporn; Thitithayanont, Arunee; Jongkaewwattana, Anan; Wiboon-ut, Suwimon; Mongkolsirichaikul, Duangrat; Mahanonda, Rangsini; Spring, Michele; Chuang, Ilin; Mason, Carl J.; Saunders, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of influenza-specific immune responses in humans have largely assessed systemic responses involving serum Ab and peripheral blood T cell responses. However, recent evidence indicates that tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells play an important role in local murine intrapulmonary immunity. Rhesus monkeys were pulmonary exposed to 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus at days 0 and 28 and immune responses in different tissue compartments were measured. All animals were asymptomatic postinfection. Although only minimal memory immune responses were detected in peripheral blood, a high frequency of influenza nucleoprotein–specific memory T cells was detected in the lung at the “contraction phase,” 49–58 d after second virus inoculation. A substantial proportion of lung nucleoprotein-specific memory CD8+ T cells expressed CD103 and CD69, phenotypic markers of TRM cells. Lung CD103+ and CD103- memory CD8+ T cells expressed similar levels of IFN-γ and IL-2. Unlike memory T cells, spontaneous Ab secreting cells and memory B cells specific to influenza hemagglutinin were primarily observed in the mediastinal lymph nodes. Little difference in systemic and local immune responses against influenza was observed between young adult (6–8 y) and old animals (18–28 y). Using a nonhuman primate model, we revealed substantial induction of local T and B cell responses following 2009 pandemic H1N1 infection. Our study identified a subset of influenza-specific lung memory T cells characterized as TRM cells in rhesus monkeys. The rhesus monkey model may be useful to explore the role of TRM cells in local tissue protective immunity after rechallenge and vaccination. PMID:26408671

  15. Behavioral consequences of developmental iron deficiency in infant rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Mari S.; Hogrefe, Casey E.; Germann, Stacey L.; Capitanio, John P.; Lozoff, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    Human studies have shown that iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in infants are associated with behavioral impairment, but the periods of brain development most susceptible to iron deficiency have not been established. In the present study, rhesus monkeys were deprived of iron by dietary iron restriction during prenatal (n = 14, 10 μg Fe/g diet) or early postnatal (n = 12, 1.5 mg Fe/L formula) brain development and compared to controls (n = 12, 100 μg Fe/g diet, 12 mg Fe/L formula) in behavioral evaluations conducted during the first four months of life in the nonhuman primate nursery. Iron deficiency anemia was detected in the pregnant dams in the third trimester and compromised iron status was seen in the prenatally iron-deprived infants at birth, but no iron deficiency was seen in either the prenatally or postnatally iron-deprived infants during the period of behavioral evaluation. Neither prenatal nor postnatal iron deprivation led to significant delays in growth, or gross or fine motor development. Prenatally deprived infants demonstrated a 20% reduced spontaneous activity level, lower inhibitory response to novel environments, and more changes from one behavior to another in weekly observation sessions. Postnatally deprived infants demonstrated poorer performance of an object concept task, and greater emotionality relative to controls. This study indicates that different syndromes of behavioral effects are associated with prenatal and postnatal iron deprivation in rhesus monkey infants and that these effects can occur in the absence of concurrent iron deficiency as reflected in hematological measures. PMID:16343844

  16. Behavioral consequences of developmental iron deficiency in infant rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Golub, Mari S; Hogrefe, Casey E; Germann, Stacey L; Capitanio, John P; Lozoff, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    Human studies have shown that iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in infants are associated with behavioral impairment, but the periods of brain development most susceptible to iron deficiency have not been established. In the present study, rhesus monkeys were deprived of iron by dietary iron restriction during prenatal (n=14, 10 microg Fe/g diet) or early postnatal (n=12, 1.5 mg Fe/L formula) brain development and compared to controls (n=12, 100 microg Fe/g diet, 12 mg Fe/L formula) in behavioral evaluations conducted during the first four months of life in the nonhuman primate nursery. Iron deficiency anemia was detected in the pregnant dams in the third trimester and compromised iron status was seen in the prenatally iron-deprived infants at birth, but no iron deficiency was seen in either the prenatally or postnatally iron-deprived infants during the period of behavioral evaluation. Neither prenatal nor postnatal iron deprivation led to significant delays in growth, or gross or fine motor development. Prenatally deprived infants demonstrated a 20% reduced spontaneous activity level, lower inhibitory response to novel environments, and more changes from one behavior to another in weekly observation sessions. Postnatally deprived infants demonstrated poorer performance of an object concept task, and greater emotionality relative to controls. This study indicates that different syndromes of behavioral effects are associated with prenatal and postnatal iron deprivation in rhesus monkey infants and that these effects can occur in the absence of concurrent iron deficiency as reflected in hematological measures.

  17. Evaluation of rhesus monkey and guinea pig hepatic cytosol fractions as models for human aldehyde oxidase.

    PubMed

    Choughule, Kanika V; Barr, John T; Jones, Jeffrey P

    2013-10-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AOX) is a cytosolic enzyme expressed across a wide range of species, including guinea pig and rhesus monkey. These species are believed to be the best preclinical models for studying human AOX-mediated metabolism. We compared AOX activity in rhesus monkeys, guinea pigs, and humans using phthalazine and N-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]acridone-4-carboxamide (DACA) as substrates and raloxifene as an inhibitor. Michaelis-Menten kinetics was observed for phthalazine oxidation in rhesus monkey, guinea pig, and human liver cytosol, whereas substrate inhibition was seen with DACA oxidase activity in all three livers. Raloxifene inhibited phthalazine and DACA oxidase activity uncompetitively in guinea pig, whereas mixed-mode inhibition was seen in rhesus monkey. Our analysis of the primary sequence alignment of rhesus monkey, guinea pig, and human aldehyde oxidase isoform 1 (AOX1) along with homology modeling has led to the identification of several amino acid residue differences within the active site and substrate entrance channel of AOX1. We speculate that some of these residues might be responsible for the differences observed in activity. Overall, our data indicate that rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs would overestimate intrinsic clearance in humans and would be unsuitable to use as animal models. Our study also showed that AOX metabolism in species is substrate-dependent and no single animal model can be reliably used to predict every drug response in humans.

  18. Evaluation of Rhesus Monkey and Guinea Pig Hepatic Cytosol Fractions as Models for Human Aldehyde Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Choughule, Kanika V.; Barr, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AOX) is a cytosolic enzyme expressed across a wide range of species, including guinea pig and rhesus monkey. These species are believed to be the best preclinical models for studying human AOX-mediated metabolism. We compared AOX activity in rhesus monkeys, guinea pigs, and humans using phthalazine and N-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]acridone-4-carboxamide (DACA) as substrates and raloxifene as an inhibitor. Michaelis-Menten kinetics was observed for phthalazine oxidation in rhesus monkey, guinea pig, and human liver cytosol, whereas substrate inhibition was seen with DACA oxidase activity in all three livers. Raloxifene inhibited phthalazine and DACA oxidase activity uncompetitively in guinea pig, whereas mixed-mode inhibition was seen in rhesus monkey. Our analysis of the primary sequence alignment of rhesus monkey, guinea pig, and human aldehyde oxidase isoform 1 (AOX1) along with homology modeling has led to the identification of several amino acid residue differences within the active site and substrate entrance channel of AOX1. We speculate that some of these residues might be responsible for the differences observed in activity. Overall, our data indicate that rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs would overestimate intrinsic clearance in humans and would be unsuitable to use as animal models. Our study also showed that AOX metabolism in species is substrate-dependent and no single animal model can be reliably used to predict every drug response in humans. PMID:23918666

  19. Visual, auditive and somatosensory pathways alterations in geriatric rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Contreras, A; Poblano, A; Arteaga-Silva, M; Hernández-Godínez, B; Hernández-Arciga, U; Toledo, R; Königsberg, M

    2016-04-01

    Synapses loss during aging is associated to neurophysiologic alterations that impair organism's health span, thus making the study and prevention of sensory decline relevant for healthy aging and welfare. Therefore the aim of this study was to obtain normative data related to the electrophysiological responses of the different neurosensory components in the visual, auditory and somatosensory pathways in healthy geriatric rhesus monkeys in captivity. Twenty-four rhesus monkeys were divided in two groups: (i) Geriatric monkeys, 20-30 years of age, and (ii) Young monkeys, 7 years of age. Evoked potentials were obtained from the visual, auditory and somatosensory pathways. Regardless the sensory pathways evaluated, a significant delay in nerve conduction was observed in the geriatric group in comparison to the young group. Evoked potentials allowed identifying changes generated during aging in rhesus monkeys and normative data for this species were obtained. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Natural infection with canine distemper virus in hand-feeding Rhesus monkeys in China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaozeng; Li, Aixue; Ye, Huahu; Shi, Yansheng; Hu, Zhongming; Zeng, Lin

    2010-03-24

    An outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) in hand-feeding Rhesus monkeys in China was reported. Twenty Rhesus monkeys presented blood and mucus in feces, respiratory symptoms, anorexia, acute fever, thicken of footpad and red rashes in the faces over 1-month period. CDV infection was identified by characteristic clinical signs, the specific detection of the BIT Rapid color CDV detection kit, electron microscopy and the results of sequence aligning. A phylogenetic analysis further confirmed that the CDV in the Rhesus monkeys belonged to the clade of the epidemic CDV types of China. All the infected monkeys were monitored and treated with antiserum therapy. The antiserum therapy seemed more effective for adult monkeys than young monkeys. Twelve monkeys died. The high mortality might indicate that the virulence of CDV to monkeys was enhanced. This is the first report we are aware of documenting Rhesus monkeys infected with CDV in China. Urgent work should be done to prevent the possibly epidemic of CDV in non-human primate.

  1. Is radiation-induced ovarian failure in rhesus monkeys preventable by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists?: Preliminary observations

    SciTech Connect

    Ataya, K.; Pydyn, E.; Ramahi-Ataya

    1995-03-01

    With the advent of cancer therapy, increasing numbers of cancer patients are achieving long term survival. Impaired ovarian function after radiation therapy has been reported in several studies. Some investigators have suggested that luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists (LHRHa) can prevent radiation-induced ovarian injury in rodents. Adult female rhesus monkeys were given either vehicle or Leuprolide acetate before, during, and after radiation. Radiation was given in a dose of 200 rads/day for a total of 4000 rads to the ovaries. Frequent serum samples were assayed for estradiol (E{sub 2}) and FSH. Ovariectomy was performed later. Ovaries were processed and serially sectioned. Follicle count and size distribution were determined. Shortly after radiation started, E{sub 2} dropped to low levels, at which it remained, whereas serum FSH level, which was low before radiation, rose soon after starting radiation. In monkeys treated with a combination of LHRHa and radiation, FSH started rising soon after the LHRHa-loaded minipump was removed (after the end of radiation). Serum E{sub 2} increased after the end of LHRHa treatment in the non-irradiated monkey, but not in the irradiated monkey. Follicle counts were not preserved in the LHRHa-treated monkeys that received radiation. The data demonstrated no protective effect of LHRHa treatment against radiation-induced ovarian injury in this rhesus monkey model. 58 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Tonal frequency affects amplitude but not topography of rhesus monkey cranial EEG components.

    PubMed

    Teichert, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    The rhesus monkey is an important model of human auditory function in general and auditory deficits in neuro-psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia in particular. Several rhesus monkey studies have described homologs of clinically relevant auditory evoked potentials such as pitch-based mismatch negativity, a fronto-central negativity that can be observed when a series of regularly repeating sounds is disrupted by a sound of different tonal frequency. As a result it is well known how differences of tonal frequency are represented in rhesus monkey EEG. However, to date there is no study that systematically quantified how absolute tonal frequency itself is represented. In particular, it is not known if frequency affects rhesus monkey EEG component amplitude and topography in the same way as previously shown for humans. A better understanding of the effect of frequency may strengthen inter-species homology and will provide a more solid foundation on which to build the interpretation of frequency MMN in the rhesus monkey. Using arrays of up to 32 cranial EEG electrodes in 4 rhesus macaques we identified 8 distinct auditory evoked components including the N85, a fronto-central negativity that is the presumed homolog of the human N1. In line with human data, the amplitudes of most components including the N85 peaked around 1000 Hz and were strongly attenuated above ∼1750 Hz. Component topography, however, remained largely unaffected by frequency. This latter finding may be consistent with the known absence of certain anatomical structures in the rhesus monkey that are believed to cause the changes in topography in the human by inducing a rotation of generator orientation as a function of tonal frequency. Overall, the findings are consistent with the assumption of a homolog representation of tonal frequency in human and rhesus monkey EEG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pharmacokinetics and disposition of WR-1065 in the rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Mangold, D.J.; Huelle, B.K.; Miller, M.A.; Geary, R.S.; Sanchez-Barona, D.O.; Swynnerton, N.F.; Fleckenstein, L.; Ludden, T.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics of WR-1065 (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethanethiol) were investigated following iv, intraduodenal, and intraportal administrations in the rhesus monkey. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by compartmental modeling of plasma concentration data from 10-min and 120-min iv infusions. Higher apparent volumes of distribution (Vc and Vss) and higher mean residence time (MRT) were observed at the slower infusion rate but a constant total dose. The values reflect a change in the distribution of WR-1065, possibly due to to saturation of binding in plasma and tissue. However, clearance remained unchanged. For a monkey administered approximately twice the 60 mg/kg dose infused over 120 min, data analysis indicates a disproportional increase in AUC and a substantial decrease in clearance. Low and erratic plasma concentrations of free drug (analytically determined without reductive cleavage) were observed following intraduodenal administration of WR-1065, demonstrating the drug's poor oral bioavailability. Results of intraduodenal administrations of radiolabeled drug indicated than an appreciable amount of the radiolabel in the dose reached the systemic circulation. However, after either intraduodenal or iv administration, only 31% of the AUC (radiolabel) could be accounted for as total (free and disulfide-bound) WR-1065 by specific analysis in separate experiments. Low levels of total cysteamine strongly suggest it to be a minor contributor to the disposition of the drug. Free WR-1065 AUC values following intraportal administration were similar to values obtained after iv administration.

  4. Movement Limitation and Immune Responses of Rhesus Monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Morton, Darla S.; Swiggett, Jeanene P.; Hakenewerth, Anne M.; Fowler, Nina A.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of restraint on immunological parameters was determined in an 18 day ARRT (adult rhesus restraint test). The monkeys were restrained for 18 days in the experimental station for the orbiting primate (ESOP), the chair of choice for Space Shuttle experiments. Several immunological parameters were determined using peripheral blood, bone marrow, and lymph node specimens from the monkeys. The parameters included: response of bone marrow cells to GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor), leukocyte subset distribution, and production of IFN-alpha (interferon-alpha) and IFN-gamma (interferon-gamma). The only parameter changed after 18 days of restraint was the percentage of CDB+ T cells. No other immunological parameters showed changes due to restraint. Handling and changes in housing prior to the restraint period did apparently result in some restraint-independent immunological changes. Handling must be kept to a minimum and the animals allowed time to recover prior to flight. All experiments must be carefully controlled. Restraint does not appear to be a major issue regarding the effects of space flight on immune responses.

  5. Lethal experimental infections of rhesus monkeys by aerosolized Ebola virus.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E.; Jaax, N.; White, J.; Jahrling, P.

    1995-01-01

    The potential of aerogenic infection by Ebola virus was established by using a head-only exposure aerosol system. Virus-containing droplets of 0.8-1.2 microns were generated and administered into the respiratory tract of rhesus monkeys via inhalation. Inhalation of viral doses as low as 400 plaque-forming units of virus caused a rapidly fatal disease in 4-5 days. The illness was clinically identical to that reported for parenteral virus inoculation, except for the occurrence of subcutaneous and venipuncture site bleeding and serosanguineous nasal discharge. Immunocytochemistry revealed cell-associated Ebola virus antigens present in airway epithelium, alveolar pneumocytes, and macrophages in the lung and pulmonary lymph nodes; extracellular antigen was present on mucosal surfaces of the nose, oropharynx and airways. Aggregates of characteristic filamentous virus were present within type I pneumocytes, macrophages, and air spaces of the lung by electron microscopy. Demonstration of fatal aerosol transmission of this virus in monkeys reinforces the importance of taking appropriate precautions to prevent its potential aerosol transmission to humans. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7547435

  6. Two processes support visual recognition memory in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Guderian, Sebastian; Brigham, Danielle; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2011-11-29

    A large body of evidence in humans suggests that recognition memory can be supported by both recollection and familiarity. Recollection-based recognition is characterized by the retrieval of contextual information about the episode in which an item was previously encountered, whereas familiarity-based recognition is characterized instead by knowledge only that the item had been encountered previously in the absence of any context. To date, it is unknown whether monkeys rely on similar mnemonic processes to perform recognition memory tasks. Here, we present evidence from the analysis of receiver operating characteristics, suggesting that visual recognition memory in rhesus monkeys also can be supported by two separate processes and that these processes have features considered to be characteristic of recollection and familiarity. Thus, the present study provides converging evidence across species for a dual process model of recognition memory and opens up the possibility of studying the neural mechanisms of recognition memory in nonhuman primates on tasks that are highly similar to the ones used in humans.

  7. Cardiac arrhythmias induced by chloral hydrate in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Han, Pengfei; Song, Haibo; Yang, Pingliang; Xie, Huiqi; Kang, Y James

    2011-06-01

    Chloral hydrate has been long used as a safe sedative and hypnotic drug in humans. However, reports on its cardiovascular adverse effects have been published from time to time. The present study was undertaken to use Rhesus monkeys as a model to define the dose regiment of chloral hydrate at which cardiac arrhythmias can be induced and the consequences of the cardiac events. Male Rhesus monkeys of 2-3 years old were intravenously infused with chloral hydrate starting at 50 mg/kg with an increasing increment of 25 mg/kg until the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. In addition, a traditional up-and-down dosing procedure was applied to define a single dose level at which cardiac arrhythmias can be induced. The data obtained showed that when the sequentially escaladed dose reached 125 mg/kg, cardiac arrhythmias occurred in all monkeys tested. The single effective dose to cause cardiac arrhythmias calculated from the crossover analysis was 143 ± 4 mg/kg. This value would be equivalent to 68.6 ± 1.9 mg/kg for children and 46.4 ± 1.3 mg/kg for adults in humans. Under either multiple or single dose condition, cardiac arrhythmias did not occur before 40 min after the onset of anesthesia induced by chloral hydrate. Cardiac arrhythmias were recovered without help at the end of the anesthesia in most cases, but also continued after the regain of consciousness in some cases. The cardiac arrhythmias were accompanied with compromised cardiac function including suppressed fractional shortening and ejection fraction. This study thus suggests that cautions need to be taken when chloral hydrate is used above certain levels and beyond a certain period of anesthesia, and cardiac arrhythmias induced by chloral hydrate need to be closely monitored because compromised cardiac function may occur simultaneously. In addition, patients with cardiac arrhythmias induced by chloral hydrate should be monitored even after they are recovered from the anesthesia.

  8. Hematological and bone marrow effects of ribavirin in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Canonico, P G; Kastello, M D; Cosgriff, T M; Donovan, J C; Ross, P E; Spears, C T; Stephen, E L

    1984-06-30

    Ribavirin (Virazole, 1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-1,2,4-triazole-3-carboxamide), a broad-spectrum antiviral compound, was evaluated for effects on blood and bone marrow of rhesus monkeys when administered by intramuscular injection for 10 days in doses of 30 or 100 mg/kg/day (four monkeys/group). Both groups developed a normochromic, normocytic anemia that was mild in the low-dose group and severe in the high-dose group. A dose-related erythroid hypoplasia occurred during the treatment period. Myeloid precursors were not affected. Differential counts of erythroid precursors showed a significant decrease in late erythroid forms while early erythroid forms were either unchanged or increased. Megakaryocyte numbers were increased in both groups. Qualitative changes in marrow cells included vacuolization of erythroid precursors and of occasional white cell precursors and megakaryocytes, and the appearance of bone marrow histiocytes containing red cells in various stages of disintegration. Thrombocytosis occurred in both treatment groups, with platelet counts returning to control values after drug withdrawal. Platelet function was not affected by treatment. No drug-related changes were seen during the treatment period for total and differential leukocyte counts, mean corpuscular hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. Reticulocyte counts and mean corpuscular volume increased after treatment then returned to control values. Osmotic fragility of erythrocytes was not changed. These data show that in monkey, ribavirin causes a dose-related decrease in circulating red blood cell mass that is due in part to suppression of late erythroid precursors in bone marrow. These effects are reversible when treatment is discontinued and are not predictive of potentially serious or lasting untoward effects of ribavirin.

  9. Essentialism in the Absence of Language? Evidence from Rhesus Monkeys ("Macaca mulatta")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Webb; Shankar, Maya; Santos, Laurie R.

    2010-01-01

    We explored whether rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) share one important feature of human essentialist reasoning: the capacity to track category membership across radical featural transformations. Specifically, we examined whether monkeys--like children (Keil, 1989)--expect a transformed object to have the internal properties of its original…

  10. Essentialism in the Absence of Language? Evidence from Rhesus Monkeys ("Macaca mulatta")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Webb; Shankar, Maya; Santos, Laurie R.

    2010-01-01

    We explored whether rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) share one important feature of human essentialist reasoning: the capacity to track category membership across radical featural transformations. Specifically, we examined whether monkeys--like children (Keil, 1989)--expect a transformed object to have the internal properties of its original…

  11. Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca Mulatta) Maintain Learning Set Despite Second-Order Stimulus-Response Spatial Discontiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beran, Michael J.; Washburn, David A.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    2007-01-01

    In many discrimination-learning tests, spatial separation between stimuli and response loci disrupts performance in rhesus macaques. However, monkeys are unaffected by such stimulus-response spatial discontiguity when responses occur through joystick-based computerized movement of a cursor. To examine this discrepancy, five monkeys were tested on…

  12. Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca Mulatta) Maintain Learning Set Despite Second-Order Stimulus-Response Spatial Discontiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beran, Michael J.; Washburn, David A.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    2007-01-01

    In many discrimination-learning tests, spatial separation between stimuli and response loci disrupts performance in rhesus macaques. However, monkeys are unaffected by such stimulus-response spatial discontiguity when responses occur through joystick-based computerized movement of a cursor. To examine this discrepancy, five monkeys were tested on…

  13. Exposure to sunlight reduces the risk of myopia in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Ding, Hui; Stell, William K; Liu, Liangping; Li, Saiqun; Liu, Hongshan; Zhong, Xingwu

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to sunlight has recently been postulated as responsible for the effect that more time spent outdoors protects children from myopia, while early life exposure to natural light was reported to be possibly related to onset of myopia during childhood. In this study, we had two aims: to determine whether increasing natural light exposure has a protective effect on hyperopic defocus-induced myopia, and to observe whether early postnatal exposure to natural light causes increased risk of refractive error in adolescence. Eight rhesus monkeys (aged 20-30 days) were treated monocularly with hyperopic-defocus (-3.0D lens) and divided randomly into two groups: AL group (n=4), reared under Artificial (indoor) Lighting (08:00-20:00); and NL group (n=4), exposed to Natural (outdoor) Light for 3 hours per day (11:00-14:00), and to indoor lighting for the rest of the light phase. After being reared with lenses for ca. 190 days, all monkeys were returned to unrestricted vision until the age of 3 years. Another eight age-matched monkeys, reared with unrestricted vision under artificial lighting since birth, were employed as controls. The ocular refraction, corneal curvature and axial dimensions were measured before lens-wearing (at 23±3 days of age), monthly during the light phase, and at the age of puberty (at 1185+3 days of age). During the lens-wearing treatment, infant monkeys in the NL group were more hyperopic than those in the AL group (F=5.726, P=0.032). Furthermore, the two eyes of most NL monkeys remained isometropic, whereas 3 of 4 AL monkeys developed myopic anisometropia more than -2.0D. At adolescence, eyes of AL monkeys showed significant myopic anisometropia compared with eyes of NL monkeys (AL vs NL: -1.66±0.87D vs -0.22±0.44D; P=0.002) and controls (AL vs Control: -1.66±0.87D vs -0.05±0.85D; P<0.0001). All differences in refraction were associated with parallel changes in axial dimensions. Our results suggest that exposure to natural outdoor light

  14. Exposure to Sunlight Reduces the Risk of Myopia in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Ding, Hui; Stell, William K.; Liu, Liangping; Li, Saiqun; Liu, Hongshan; Zhong, Xingwu

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to sunlight has recently been postulated as responsible for the effect that more time spent outdoors protects children from myopia, while early life exposure to natural light was reported to be possibly related to onset of myopia during childhood. In this study, we had two aims: to determine whether increasing natural light exposure has a protective effect on hyperopic defocus-induced myopia, and to observe whether early postnatal exposure to natural light causes increased risk of refractive error in adolescence. Eight rhesus monkeys (aged 20-30 days) were treated monocularly with hyperopic-defocus (-3.0D lens) and divided randomly into two groups: AL group (n=4), reared under Artificial (indoor) Lighting (08:00-20:00); and NL group (n=4), exposed to Natural (outdoor) Light for 3 hours per day (11:00-14:00), and to indoor lighting for the rest of the light phase. After being reared with lenses for ca. 190 days, all monkeys were returned to unrestricted vision until the age of 3 years. Another eight age-matched monkeys, reared with unrestricted vision under artificial lighting since birth, were employed as controls. The ocular refraction, corneal curvature and axial dimensions were measured before lens-wearing (at 23±3 days of age), monthly during the light phase, and at the age of puberty (at 1185+3 days of age). During the lens-wearing treatment, infant monkeys in the NL group were more hyperopic than those in the AL group (F=5.726, P=0.032). Furthermore, the two eyes of most NL monkeys remained isometropic, whereas 3 of 4 AL monkeys developed myopic anisometropia more than -2.0D. At adolescence, eyes of AL monkeys showed significant myopic anisometropia compared with eyes of NL monkeys (AL vs NL: -1.66±0.87D vs -0.22±0.44D; P=0.002) and controls (AL vs Control: -1.66±0.87D vs -0.05±0.85D; P<0.0001). All differences in refraction were associated with parallel changes in axial dimensions. Our results suggest that exposure to natural outdoor light

  15. Nature of the Refractive Errors in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with Experimentally Induced Ametropias

    PubMed Central

    Qiao-Grider, Ying; Hung, Li-Fang; Kee, Chea-su; Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Smith, Earl L.

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the contribution of individual ocular components to vision-induced ametropias in 210 rhesus monkeys. The primary contribution to refractive-error development came from vitreous chamber depth; a minor contribution from corneal power was also detected. However, there was no systematic relationship between refractive error and anterior chamber depth or between refractive error and any crystalline lens parameter. Our results are in good agreement with previous studies in humans, suggesting that the refractive errors commonly observed in humans are created by vision-dependent mechanisms that are similar to those operating in monkeys. This concordance emphasizes the applicability of rhesus monkeys in refractive-error studies. PMID:20600237

  16. Otoacoustic emissions measured in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFadden, Dennis; Pasanen, Edward G.; Raper, Jessica; Wallen, Kim

    2003-10-01

    In humans, otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) are stronger in females than in males and stronger in right ears than in left. The physiological bases for these differences are unknown, but several lines of circumstantial evidence suggest that the sex difference is attributable to androgenizing mechanisms operating during prenatal development. Specifically, it appears that exposure to high levels of androgens during prenatal development diminishes the strength of the cochlear amplifiers and thus the strength of the OAEs. Sex and ear differences in OAEs have not been well studied in species other than humans. Accordingly, click-evoked OAEs and distortion-product OAEs were measured in nine female and nine male rhesus monkeys. For CEOAEs, but less clearly for DPOAEs, females exhibited significantly stronger OAEs than males. There was no consistent ear difference for either sex for either type of OAE. In order to better study the early components of the CEOAE waveform, a nonlinear procedure [Molenaar et al., Hearing Res. 143, 197-207 (2002)] was used to collect CEOAEs along with our standard (linear) procedure. This colony also contains animals of each sex that were treated with androgenic or antiandrogenic agents during prenatal development, and OAEs are also currently being measured on those animals. [Work supported by NIDCD.

  17. Psychobiology of early social attachment in rhesus monkeys. Clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, G W

    1997-01-15

    "Attachment" has been viewed as the process by which the infant bonds to a caregiver and develops and maintains affiliative social relationships. Whereas past theories suggested that the neurobiological mechanisms that enable the infant to engage in regulated social interactions develop autonomously, the more current view is that the organization of cognitive and emotional systems that regulate social behavior depends on early caregiver-infant attachment. It is well known that disruption of caregiver-infant attachment produces abnormal behavior and increases or decreases the activity of different brain neurochemical systems in rhesus monkeys. Furthermore, it has been suggested that these effects might serve as a model for the etiology of some forms of human psychopathology. Current research indicates that caregiver privation alters the development of usual interrelationships among the activity of several neurochemical and neuroendocrine systems and alters basic cognitive processes. In line with the idea that the caregiver usually exerts a potent organizing effect on the infant's psychobiology, the long-standing effects of caregiver privation on behavior and emotionality are probably attributable to changes in multiple regulatory systems and cognitive-emotional integration rather than restricted effects on the activity of any specific set of neurochemical systems.

  18. Rapid Inflammasome Activation following Mucosal SIV Infection of Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Barouch, Dan H; Ghneim, Khader; Bosche, William J; Li, Yuan; Berkemeier, Brian; Hull, Michael; Bhattacharyya, Sanghamitra; Cameron, Mark; Liu, Jinyan; Smith, Kaitlin; Borducchi, Erica; Cabral, Crystal; Peter, Lauren; Brinkman, Amanda; Shetty, Mayuri; Li, Hualin; Gittens, Courtney; Baker, Chantelle; Wagner, Wendeline; Lewis, Mark G; Colantonio, Arnaud; Kang, Hyung-Joo; Li, Wenjun; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Piatak, Michael; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre

    2016-04-21

    The earliest events following mucosal HIV-1 infection, prior to measurable viremia, remain poorly understood. Here, by detailed necropsy studies, we show that the virus can rapidly disseminate following mucosal SIV infection of rhesus monkeys and trigger components of the inflammasome, both at the site of inoculation and at early sites of distal virus spread. By 24 hr following inoculation, a proinflammatory signature that lacked antiviral restriction factors was observed in viral RNA-positive tissues. The early innate response included expression of NLRX1, which inhibits antiviral responses, and activation of the TGF-β pathway, which negatively regulates adaptive immune responses. These data suggest a model in which the virus triggers specific host mechanisms that suppress the generation of antiviral innate and adaptive immune responses in the first few days of infection, thus facilitating its own replication. These findings have important implications for the development of vaccines and other strategies to prevent infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Far-field microwave dosimetry in a rhesus monkey model.

    PubMed

    Olsen, R G; Griner, T A; Prettyman, G D

    1980-01-01

    Dosimetric measurements were made in a muscle-equivalent model of an adult rhesus monkey subjected to far-field irradiation at 1.29 GHz. Profiles of microwave-induced heating in the model were obtained at eight locations, and a gradient-layer whole-body calorimeter was used to measure total absorbed energy. Average specific absorption rate (SAR) was calculated both from the calorimeter experiments and from the local temperature measurements. Thermographic imaging techniques were used to qualitatively show the microwave-induced surface heating patterns. For this model the calculated average SAR was 0.15 9W/dg)/(mW/cm2) which, at 1.29 GHs, makes the absorption cross section 84% of the geometric shadow cross section. The SAR is about three times that predicted for a prolate spheroidal model of similar mass. A disproportionally high absorption occurred in the legs of the model positioned parallel to the E-polarization because of what is believed to be partial-body resonance.

  20. Perinatal bupivacaine and infant behavior in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Golub, M S; Germann, S L

    1998-01-01

    To assess the effect of perinatal epidural bupivacaine analgesia on infant behavioral development, bupivacaine (1.2 mg/kg) was administered to term-pregnant rhesus monkeys (treated, n = 11, procedural controls, n = 8) and infant behavior was evaluated for 1 year using a test battery including infant neurobehavioral tests, observation of spontaneous behavior, and structured cognitive testing. No adverse effects of bupivacaine were detected for neonatal neurobehavior, early cognitive abilities, or performance of cognitive tasks by older infants. Bupivacaine infants directed more, shorter fixations at visual stimuli during visual novelty preference testing. Observation of behavior maturation patterns showed that the increase in manipulatory activity that normally occurs at 2 months of age was delayed in bupivacaine infants, and the increase in motor disturbance behaviors that normally occurs at 10 months of age was prolonged. These results are interpreted in terms of life-history and brain maturation landmarks that appear at these ages. The data suggest that epidural bupivacaine does not cause neonatal abnormalities or specific cognitive deficits but can alter the normal course of behavioral development.

  1. Tissue Specificity of Decellularized Rhesus Monkey Kidney and Lung Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Karina H.; Lee, C. Chang I.; Batchelder, Cynthia A.; Tarantal, Alice F.

    2013-01-01

    Initial steps in establishing an optimal strategy for functional bioengineered tissues is generation of three-dimensional constructs containing cells with the appropriate organization and phenotype. To effectively utilize rhesus monkey decellularized kidney scaffolds, these studies evaluated two key parameters: (1) residual scaffold components after decellularization including proteomics analysis, and (2) the use of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) for recellularization in order to explore cellular differentiation in a tissue-specific manner. Sections of kidney and lung were selected for a comparative evaluation because of their similar pattern of organogenesis. Proteomics analysis revealed the presence of growth factors and antimicrobial proteins as well as stress proteins and complement components. Immunohistochemistry of recellularized kidney scaffolds showed the generation of Cytokeratin+ epithelial tubule phenotypes throughout the scaffold that demonstrated a statistically significant increase in expression of kidney-associated genes compared to baseline hESC gene expression. Recellularization of lung scaffolds showed that cells lined the alveolar spaces and demonstrated statistically significant upregulation of key lung-associated genes. However, overall expression of kidney and lung-associated markers was not statistically different when the kidney and lung recellularized scaffolds were compared. These results suggest that decellularized scaffolds have an intrinsic spatial ability to influence hESC differentiation by physically shaping cells into tissue-appropriate structures and phenotypes, and that additional approaches may be needed to ensure consistent recellularization throughout the matrix. PMID:23717553

  2. Cytotoxic T cells and neutralizing antibodies induced in rhesus monkeys by virus-like particle HIV vaccines in the absence of protection from SHIV infection.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R; Teeuwsen, V J; Deml, L; Notka, F; Haaksma, A G; Jhagjhoorsingh, S S; Niphuis, H; Wolf, H; Heeney, J L

    1998-05-25

    HIV Pr55gag has in the absence of other viral components the capacity to self assemble in budding noninfectious virus-like particles (VLP). The immunological spectrum of the HIV-1IIIB gag-derived VLP was expanded either by stable anchoring of chimeric modified gp 120 on the surface of the VLP (type 1) or by replacing sequences of the Pr55gag precursor by the V3 loop and a linear portion of the CD4 binding domain (type 2). This noninfectious antigen delivery system was evaluated for immunogenicity and efficacy in rhesus macaques without adjuvants. Intramuscular immunization with both types of VLP induced high titers of gag-specific antibodies ranging from 1/8000 to 1/510,000 for type 1 VLP and from 1/4000 to 1/16,000 for type 2 VLP. Only animals immunized with type 1 VLP developed substantial endpoint titers of env-specific antibodies (1/2000-1/32,000) with a neutralizing capacity at serum dilutions of 1/32-1/128. Gag- and env-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity was induced by both types of VLP at similar levels. Four weeks after the last immunization animals were challenged intravenously with 20 MID50 of the cell free homologous envelope simian/HIV-1IIIB chimeric challenge stock Despite HIV-1-specific neutralizing and CTL responses, all vaccinated animals became infected.

  3. Rhesus monkey neural stem cell transplantation promotes neural regeneration in rats with hippocampal lesions.

    PubMed

    Ye, Li-Juan; Bian, Hui; Fan, Yao-Dong; Wang, Zheng-Bo; Yu, Hua-Lin; Ma, Yuan-Ye; Chen, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Rhesus monkey neural stem cells are capable of differentiating into neurons and glial cells. Therefore, neural stem cell transplantation can be used to promote functional recovery of the nervous system. Rhesus monkey neural stem cells (1 × 10(5) cells/μL) were injected into bilateral hippocampi of rats with hippocampal lesions. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that green fluorescent protein-labeled transplanted cells survived and grew well. Transplanted cells were detected at the lesion site, but also in the nerve fiber-rich region of the cerebral cortex and corpus callosum. Some transplanted cells differentiated into neurons and glial cells clustering along the ventricular wall, and integrated into the recipient brain. Behavioral tests revealed that spatial learning and memory ability improved, indicating that rhesus monkey neural stem cells noticeably improve spatial learning and memory abilities in rats with hippocampal lesions.

  4. Newly Identified CYP2C93 Is a Functional Enzyme in Rhesus Monkey, but Not in Cynomolgus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Kohara, Sakae; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Nagata, Ryoichi; Fukuzaki, Koichiro; Utoh, Masahiro; Murayama, Norie; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Cynomolgus monkey and rhesus monkey are used in drug metabolism studies due to their evolutionary closeness and physiological resemblance to human. In cynomolgus monkey, we previously identified cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) 2C76 that does not have a human ortholog and is partly responsible for species differences in drug metabolism between cynomolgus monkey and human. In this study, we report characterization of CYP2C93 cDNA newly identified in cynomolgus monkey and rhesus monkey. The CYP2C93 cDNA contained an open reading frame of 490 amino acids approximately 84–86% identical to human CYP2Cs. CYP2C93 was located in the genomic region, which corresponded to the intergenic region in the human genome, indicating that CYP2C93 does not correspond to any human genes. CYP2C93 mRNA was expressed predominantly in the liver among 10 tissues analyzed. The CYP2C93 proteins heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli metabolized human CYP2C substrates, diclofenac, flurbiprofen, paclitaxel, S-mephenytoin, and tolbutamide. In addition to a normal transcript (SV1), an aberrantly spliced transcript (SV2) lacking exon 2 was identified, which did not give rise to a functional protein due to frameshift and a premature termination codon. Mini gene assay revealed that the genetic variant IVS2-1G>T at the splice site of intron 1, at least partly, accounted for the exon-2 skipping; therefore, this genotype would influence CYP2C93-mediated drug metabolism. SV1 was expressed in 6 of 11 rhesus monkeys and 1 of 8 cynomolgus monkeys, but the SV1 in the cynomolgus monkey was nonfunctional due to a rare null genotype (c.102T>del). These results suggest that CYP2C93 can play roles as a drug-metabolizing enzyme in rhesus monkeys (not in cynomolgus monkeys), although its relative contribution to drug metabolism has yet to be validated. PMID:21347438

  5. [A technique of rhesus monkey neural progenitor cells intravitreal transplant to rats].

    PubMed

    Bian, Hui; Fan, Yao-Dong; Guo, Li-Yun; Yu, Hua-Lin

    2012-02-01

    To investigate a simple and effective intraocular xenotransplant technique of rhesus monkey neural progenitor cells to rats, mechanical injury was induced in the rat's right retina. And the GFP-labeled rhesus monkey neural progenitor cells suspension was slowly injected into the vitreous space of the right injured and left control eye. Confocal image suggested that the xenografted cells survived in both the injured and control eye, meanwhile the cells integrated in the injured right retina. The results demonstrated that intravitreal xenotransplant could be adopted as a simple and reliable method.

  6. Nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibility in interorder rhesus monkey-cow embryos derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Daekee; Koo, Ok-Jae; Kim, Min-Jung; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-10-01

    Monkey interorder somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) using enucleated cow oocytes yielded poor blastocysts development and contradictory results among research groups. Determining the reason for this low blastocyst development is a prerequisite for optimizing iSCNT in rhesus monkeys. The aim of this study was to elucidate nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibility of rhesus monkey-cow iSCNT embryos and its relationship to low blastocyst development. Cytochrome b is a protein of complex III of the electron transport chain (ETC). According to meta-analysis of amino acid sequences, the homology of cytochrome b is 75 % between rhesus monkeys and cattle. To maintain the function of ETC after iSCNT, 4n iSCNT embryos were produced by fusion of non-enucleated cow oocytes and rhesus monkey somatic cells. The blastocyst development rate of 4n iSCNT embryos was higher than that of 2n embryos (P < 0.01). Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an indirect indicator of ETC activity of cells. The ROS levels of 4n iSCNT embryos was higher than that of 2n embryos (P < 0.01). Collectively, rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos reconstructed with cow oocytes have nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibility due to fundamental species differences between rhesus monkeys and cattle. Nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibility seems to correlate with low ETC activity and extremely low blastocyst development of rhesus monkey-cow iSCNT embryos.

  7. Subsecond Timing in Primates: Comparison of Interval Production Between Human Subjects and Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Zarco, Wilbert; Prado, Luis; Mendez, Juan Carlos

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the psychometric similarities and differences in motor timing performance between 20 human subjects and three rhesus monkeys during two timing production tasks. These tasks involved tapping on a push-button to produce the same set of intervals (range of 450 to 1,000 ms), but they differed in the number of intervals produced (single vs. multiple) and the modality of the stimuli (auditory vs. visual) used to define the time intervals. The data showed that for both primate species, variability increased as a function of the length of the produced target interval across tasks, a result in accordance with the scalar property. Interestingly, the temporal performance of rhesus monkeys was equivalent to that of human subjects during both the production of single intervals and the tapping synchronization to a metronome. Overall, however, human subjects were more accurate than monkeys and showed less timing variability. This was especially true during the self-pacing phase of the multiple interval production task, a behavior that may be related to complex temporal cognition, such as speech and music execution. In addition, the well-known human bias toward auditory as opposed to visual cues for the accurate execution of time intervals was not evident in rhesus monkeys. These findings validate the rhesus monkey as an appropriate model for the study of the neural basis of time production, but also suggest that the exquisite temporal abilities of humans, which peak in speech and music performance, are not all shared with macaques. PMID:19812296

  8. Failure of intravenous pentagastrin challenge to induce panic-like effects in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Rupniak, N M; Schaffer, L; Siegl, P; Iversen, S D

    1993-08-01

    We examined the ability of intravenous (i.v.) challenge with pentagastrin to induce behavioural and cardiovascular effects consistent with panic attack in conscious rhesus monkeys. For behavioural evaluation, 4 naive male rhesus monkeys familiar with minimal manual restraint necessary for drug administration received a rapid i.v. bolus of pentagastrin (4, 8 or 16 micrograms/kg) or water on four separate occasions according to a randomised cross-over design. Behaviour was rated by a blind observer continuously during, and for the first 5 min immediately following i.v. injections while the monkey sat on the handler's lap, and then for a further 25 min in an individual observation cage. In separate experiments, the ability of pentagastrin to alter cardiovascular parameters which may accompany panic or anxiety (elevated heart rate and blood pressure) was explored. For cardiovascular studies, 8 male or female rhesus monkeys with femoral artery catheters were chair restrained and received a bolus injection of pentagastrin (4, 8 or 16 micrograms/kg) or saline into the saphenous vein at 30 min intervals. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored continuously using a Statham Gould pressure transducer. Pentagastrin induced no consistent behavioural or cardiovascular changes. Similar pilot studies using CCK4 also failed to reveal such effects. We conclude that CCK-induced panic-like effects may not be demonstrable following challenge with pentagastrin under laboratory conditions in rhesus monkeys.

  9. Single subcutaneous dosing of cefovecin in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta): a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Bakker, J; Thuesen, L R; Braskamp, G; Skaanild, M T; Ouwerling, B; Langermans, J A M; Bertelsen, M F

    2011-10-01

    Cefovecin is a third-generation cephalosporin approved for antibacterial treatment with a 14-day dosing interval in dogs and cats. This antibiotic may also be useful for zoo and wildlife veterinary medicine, because of its broad spectrum and long duration of activity. The aim of the study was to determine whether cefovecin is a suitable antibiotic to prevent skin wound infection in rhesus monkeys. Therefore, the pharmacokinetics (PK) of cefovecin after a single subcutaneous injection at 8 mg/kg bodyweight in four rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and sensitivity of bacterial isolates from fresh skin wounds were determined. After administration, blood, urine, and feces were collected, and concentrations of cefovecin were determined. Further, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for bacteria isolated from fresh skin wounds of monkeys during a health control program were determined. The mean maximum plasma concentration (C(max) ) of cefovecin was 78 μg/mL and was achieved after 57 min. The mean apparent long elimination half-life (t½) was 6.6 h and excretion occurred mainly via urine. The MIC for the majority of the bacteria examined was >100 μg/mL. The PK of cefovecin in rhesus monkeys is substantially different than for dogs and cats. Cefovecin rapidly reached C(max) which however was lower than most of the MIC levels and with a very short t½. Therefore, cefovecin is not recommended for treating skin wounds in rhesus monkeys. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Tissue tropism of simian immunodeficiency virus in rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Wyand, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is a T-lymphotropic lentivirus that is genetically, immunologically, and morphologically related to the human immunodeficiency viruses type 1 and 2 (HIV-1, HIV-2). In rhesus monkeys, SIV induces a progressively fatal immunodeficiency syndrome strikingly similar to human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The tissue and cellular tropism of SIV was determined by immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization using a 3.48 kilobase SIV envelope gene probe labeled with biotin, {sup 35}S, or {sup 3}H. Probes labeled with {sup 35}S nonspecifically bound to tissue eosinophils and produced poor signal resolution compared to tritium labeled probes. Biotin labeled probes did not detect SIV under similar hybridization conditions. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues produced strong hybridization signal with superior morphology compared to frozen tissues. Gastrointestinal, respiratory, and lymphoid tissues most frequently contained SIV RNA. The distribution of SIV did not correlate with sex, or viral inoculum, but was most extensive in animals with SIV induced granulomatous encephalitis. SIV was most frequently observed in lymphocytes and macrophages. In the brain focal granulomas were composed almost entirely of EBM11+, lysozyme+, macrophages which contained large amounts of SIV RNA and p27 core protein detected by the monoclonal antibody R1C7. Cells away from granulomas in the brain parenchyma and around blood vessels contained virus and were compatible with oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Lymph nodes in follicular hyperplasia contained small numbers of SIV positive cells compatible with lymphocytes in the paracortex and mantle zones as well as in cells of the germinal center. Lymph nodes in various stages of follicular depletion with expanded paracortices contained large numbers of cells with SIV RNA in lymphocytes and macrophages.

  11. MRI Overestimates Excitotoxic Amygdala Lesion Damage in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Basile, Benjamin M; Karaskiewicz, Chloe L; Fiuzat, Emily C; Malkova, Ludise; Murray, Elisabeth A

    2017-01-01

    Selective, fiber-sparing excitotoxic lesions are a state-of-the-art tool for determining the causal contributions of different brain areas to behavior. For nonhuman primates especially, it is advantageous to keep subjects with high-quality lesions alive and contributing to science for many years. However, this requires the ability to estimate lesion extent accurately. Previous research has shown that in vivo T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) accurately estimates damage following selective ibotenic acid lesions of the hippocampus. Here, we show that the same does not apply to lesions of the amygdala. Across 19 hemispheres from 13 rhesus monkeys, MRI assessment consistently overestimated amygdala damage as assessed by microscopic examination of Nissl-stained histological material. Two outliers suggested a linear relation for lower damage levels, and values of unintended amygdala damage from a previous study fell directly on that regression line, demonstrating that T2 hypersignal accurately predicts damage levels below 50%. For unintended damage, MRI estimates correlated with histological assessment for entorhinal cortex, perirhinal cortex and hippocampus, though MRI significantly overestimated the extent of that damage in all structures. Nevertheless, ibotenic acid injections routinely produced extensive intentional amygdala damage with minimal unintended damage to surrounding structures, validating the general success of the technique. The field will benefit from more research into in vivo lesion assessment techniques, and additional evaluation of the accuracy of MRI assessment in different brain areas. For now, in vivo MRI assessment of ibotenic acid lesions of the amygdala can be used to confirm successful injections, but MRI estimates of lesion extent should be interpreted with caution.

  12. MRI Overestimates Excitotoxic Amygdala Lesion Damage in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Benjamin M.; Karaskiewicz, Chloe L.; Fiuzat, Emily C.; Malkova, Ludise; Murray, Elisabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Selective, fiber-sparing excitotoxic lesions are a state-of-the-art tool for determining the causal contributions of different brain areas to behavior. For nonhuman primates especially, it is advantageous to keep subjects with high-quality lesions alive and contributing to science for many years. However, this requires the ability to estimate lesion extent accurately. Previous research has shown that in vivo T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) accurately estimates damage following selective ibotenic acid lesions of the hippocampus. Here, we show that the same does not apply to lesions of the amygdala. Across 19 hemispheres from 13 rhesus monkeys, MRI assessment consistently overestimated amygdala damage as assessed by microscopic examination of Nissl-stained histological material. Two outliers suggested a linear relation for lower damage levels, and values of unintended amygdala damage from a previous study fell directly on that regression line, demonstrating that T2 hypersignal accurately predicts damage levels below 50%. For unintended damage, MRI estimates correlated with histological assessment for entorhinal cortex, perirhinal cortex and hippocampus, though MRI significantly overestimated the extent of that damage in all structures. Nevertheless, ibotenic acid injections routinely produced extensive intentional amygdala damage with minimal unintended damage to surrounding structures, validating the general success of the technique. The field will benefit from more research into in vivo lesion assessment techniques, and additional evaluation of the accuracy of MRI assessment in different brain areas. For now, in vivo MRI assessment of ibotenic acid lesions of the amygdala can be used to confirm successful injections, but MRI estimates of lesion extent should be interpreted with caution. PMID:28642691

  13. Cortical activation during cocaine use and extinction in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Howell, Leonard L; Votaw, John R; Goodman, Mark M; Lindsey, Kimberly P

    2010-02-01

    Acute re-exposure to cocaine or drug cues associated with cocaine use can elicit drug craving and relapse. Neuroimaging studies have begun to define neurobiological substrates underlying the acute effects of cocaine or cocaine cues in cocaine-dependent subjects. The present study was the first to use functional brain imaging to document acute cocaine-induced changes in brain activity during active drug use in nonhuman primates. Positron emission tomography imaging with O15-labeled water was used to measure drug-induced changes in cerebral blood flow. The acute effects of cocaine administered noncontingently were characterized in four drug-naïve rhesus monkeys. The same subjects were trained to self-administer cocaine under a fixed ratio schedule during image acquisition. Subsequently, three subjects with an extensive history of cocaine use were trained to self-administer cocaine under a second-order schedule. The same subjects also underwent extinction sessions during which saline was substituted for cocaine under the second-order schedule. Noncontingent administration of cocaine in drug-naïve subjects induced robust activation of prefrontal cortex localized primarily to the dorsolateral regions. In contrast, the pattern of brain activation induced by self-administered cocaine differed qualitatively and included anterior cingulate cortex. Moreover, drug-associated stimuli during extinction also induced robust activation of prefrontal cortex. The effects of cocaine and associated cues extend beyond the limbic system to engage brain areas involved in cognitive processes. The identification of neural circuits underlying the direct pharmacological and conditioned stimulus effects of cocaine may be highly relevant toward efforts to develop treatments for cocaine addiction.

  14. Vestibular functions and sleep in space experiments. [using rhesus and owl monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perachio, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    Physical indices of sleep were continuously monitored in an owl monkey living in a chamber continuously rotating at a constant angular velocity. The electrophysiological data obtained from chronically implanted electrodes was analyzed to determine the chronic effects of vestibular stimulation on sleep and wakefulness cycles. The interaction of linear and angular acceleration on the vestibulo-ocular reflex was investigated in three rhesus monkeys at various angular accelerations.

  15. A draft map of rhesus monkey tissue proteome for biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Gyun; McKinney, Kimberly Q; Lee, Yong-Yook; Chung, Hae-Na; Pavlopoulos, Antonis J; Jung, Kook Y; Kim, Woong-Ki; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Han, David K; Hwang, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Though the rhesus monkey is one of the most valuable non-human primate animal models for various human diseases because of its manageable size and genetic and proteomic similarities with humans, proteomic research using rhesus monkeys still remains challenging due to the lack of a complete protein sequence database and effective strategy. To investigate the most effective and high-throughput proteomic strategy, comparative data analysis was performed employing various protein databases and search engines. The UniProt databases of monkey, human, bovine, rat and mouse were used for the comparative analysis and also a universal database with all protein sequences from all available species was tested. At the same time, de novo sequencing was compared to the SEQUEST search algorithm to identify an optimal work flow for monkey proteomics. Employing the most effective strategy, proteomic profiling of monkey organs identified 3,481 proteins at 0.5% FDR from 9 male and 10 female tissues in an automated, high-throughput manner. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001972. Based on the success of this alternative interpretation of MS data, the list of proteins identified from 12 organs of male and female subjects will benefit future rhesus monkey proteome research.

  16. Effect of space flight on cytokine production and other immunologic parameters of rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Davis, S.; Taylor, G. R.; Mandel, A. D.; Konstantinova, I. V.; Lesnyak, A.; Fuchs, B. B.; Peres, C.; Tkackzuk, J.; Schmitt, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    During a recent flight of a Russian satellite (Cosmos #2229), initial experiments examining the effects of space flight on immunologic responses of rhesus monkeys were performed to gain insight into the effect of space flight on resistance to infection. Experiments were performed on tissue samples taken from the monkeys before and immediately after flight. Additional samples were obtained approximately 1 month after flight for a postflight restraint study. Two types of experiments were carried out throughout this study. The first experiment determined the ability of leukocytes to produce interleukin-1 and to express interleukin-2 receptors. The second experiment examined the responsiveness of rhesus bone marrow cells to recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Human reagents that cross-reacted with monkey tissue were utilized for the bulk of the studies. Results from both studies indicated that there were changes in immunologic function attributable to space flight. Interleukin-1 production and the expression of interleukin-2 receptors was decreased after space flight. Bone marrow cells from flight monkeys showed a significant decrease in their response to GM-CSF compared with the response of bone marrow cells from nonflight control monkeys. These results suggest that the rhesus monkey may be a useful surrogate for humans in future studies that examine the effect of space flight on immune response, particularly when conditions do not readily permit human study.

  17. Effect of space flight on cytokine production and other immunologic parameters of rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.; Davis, S.; Taylor, G. R.; Mandel, A. D.; Konstantinova, I. V.; Lesnyak, A.; Fuchs, B. B.; Peres, C.; Tkackzuk, J.; Schmitt, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    During a recent flight of a Russian satellite (Cosmos #2229), initial experiments examining the effects of space flight on immunologic responses of rhesus monkeys were performed to gain insight into the effect of space flight on resistance to infection. Experiments were performed on tissue samples taken from the monkeys before and immediately after flight. Additional samples were obtained approximately 1 month after flight for a postflight restraint study. Two types of experiments were carried out throughout this study. The first experiment determined the ability of leukocytes to produce interleukin-1 and to express interleukin-2 receptors. The second experiment examined the responsiveness of rhesus bone marrow cells to recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Human reagents that cross-reacted with monkey tissue were utilized for the bulk of the studies. Results from both studies indicated that there were changes in immunologic function attributable to space flight. Interleukin-1 production and the expression of interleukin-2 receptors was decreased after space flight. Bone marrow cells from flight monkeys showed a significant decrease in their response to GM-CSF compared with the response of bone marrow cells from nonflight control monkeys. These results suggest that the rhesus monkey may be a useful surrogate for humans in future studies that examine the effect of space flight on immune response, particularly when conditions do not readily permit human study.

  18. Rhesus monkey sperm cryopreservation with TEST-yolk extender in the absence of permeable cryoprotectant.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qiaoxiang; Correa, Liane M; VandeVoort, Catherine A

    2009-02-01

    Recently, there has been increased interest in ultra-rapid freezing with mammalian spermatozoa, especially for vitrification in the absence of cryoprotectants. Sperm cryopreservation in non-human primates has been successful, but the use of frozen-thawed sperm in standard artificial insemination (AI) remains difficult, and removal of permeable cryoprotectant may offer opportunities for increased AI success. The present study intended to explore the possibility of freezing rhesus monkey sperm in the absence of permeable cryoprotectants. Specifically, we evaluated various factors such as presence or absence of egg yolk, the percentage of egg yolk in the extenders, and the effect of cooling and thawing rate on the success of freezing without permeable cryoprotectants. Findings revealed that freezing with TEST in the absence of egg yolk offers little protection (<15% post-thaw motility). Egg yolk of 40% or more in TEST resulted in decreased motility, while egg yolk in the range of 20-30% yielded the most motile sperm. Cooling at a slow rate (29 degrees C/min) reduced post-thaw motility significantly for samples frozen with TEST-yolk alone, but had no effect for controls in the presence of glycerol. Similarly, slow thawing in room temperature air is detrimental for freezing without permeable cryoprotectant (<2% motility). In addition to motility, the ability of sperm to capacitate based on an increase in intracellular calcium levels upon activation with cAMP and caffeine suggested no difference between fresh and frozen-thawed motile sperm, regardless of treatment. In summary, the present study demonstrates that ejaculated and epididymal sperm from rhesus monkeys can be cryopreserved with TEST-yolk (20%) in the absence of permeable cryoprotectant when samples were loaded in a standard 0.25-mL straw, cooled rapidly in liquid nitrogen vapor at 220 degrees C/min, and thawed rapidly in a 37 degrees C water bath. This study also represents the first success of freezing

  19. Effect of radiation and age on immunoglobulin levels in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, W. H.; Saphire, D. G.; Hackleman, S. M.; Braun, A. M.; Pennington, P.; Scheffler, J.; Wigle, J. C.; Cox, A. B.

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of a study on the immunoglobulin levels of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in a colony consisting of the survivors of monkeys that received a single whole-body exposure to protons, electrons or X rays between 1964 and 1969. This colony has been maintained to assess the long-term effects of ionizing radiation on astronauts and high-flying pilots. Of the original 358 monkeys that were retained for lifetime studies, 129 (97 irradiated and 32 controls) were available for our study. We found no significant difference between the irradiated and control monkeys in mean levels of IgA, IgG and IgM, irrespective of the radiation treatment. The availability of these aged monkeys provided a unique opportunity to compare their immunoglobulin levels to those of other monkeys of various ages, and thus assess the effect of age on immunoglobulin levels. We found that only the IgA levels increase with age.

  20. Effect of radiation and age on immunoglobulin levels in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, W. H.; Saphire, D. G.; Hackleman, S. M.; Braun, A. M.; Pennington, P.; Scheffler, J.; Wigle, J. C.; Cox, A. B.

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of a study on the immunoglobulin levels of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in a colony consisting of the survivors of monkeys that received a single whole-body exposure to protons, electrons or X rays between 1964 and 1969. This colony has been maintained to assess the long-term effects of ionizing radiation on astronauts and high-flying pilots. Of the original 358 monkeys that were retained for lifetime studies, 129 (97 irradiated and 32 controls) were available for our study. We found no significant difference between the irradiated and control monkeys in mean levels of IgA, IgG and IgM, irrespective of the radiation treatment. The availability of these aged monkeys provided a unique opportunity to compare their immunoglobulin levels to those of other monkeys of various ages, and thus assess the effect of age on immunoglobulin levels. We found that only the IgA levels increase with age.

  1. Recombinant poxvirus boosting of DNA-primed rhesus monkeys augments peak but not memory T lymphocyte responses.

    PubMed

    Santra, Sampa; Barouch, Dan H; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Lord, Carol I; Krivulka, Georgia R; Yu, Faye; Beddall, Margaret H; Gorgone, Darci A; Lifton, Michelle A; Miura, Ayako; Philippon, Valerie; Manson, Kelledy; Markham, Phillip D; Parrish, John; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Schmitz, Jörn E; Gelman, Rebecca S; Shiver, John W; Montefiori, David C; Panicali, Dennis; Letvin, Norman L

    2004-07-27

    Although a consensus has emerged that an HIV vaccine should elicit a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response, the characteristics of an effective vaccine-induced T lymphocyte response remain unclear. We explored this issue in the simian human immunodeficiency virus/rhesus monkey model in the course of assessing the relative immunogenicity of vaccine regimens that included a cytokine-augmented plasmid DNA prime and a boost with DNA or recombinant pox vectors. Recombinant vaccinia virus, recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), and recombinant fowlpox were comparable in their immunogenicity. Moreover, whereas the magnitude of the peak vaccine-elicited T lymphocyte responses in the recombinant pox virus-boosted monkeys was substantially greater than that seen in the monkeys immunized with plasmid DNA alone, the magnitudes of recombinant pox boosted CTL responses decayed rapidly and were comparable to those of the DNA-alone-vaccinated monkeys by the time of viral challenge. Consistent with these comparable memory T cell responses, the clinical protection seen in all groups of experimentally vaccinated monkeys was similar. This study, therefore, indicates that the steady-state memory, rather than the peak effector vaccine-elicited T lymphocyte responses, may be the critical immune correlate of protection for a CTL-based HIV vaccine.

  2. Mother-Infant Interaction in Rhesus Monkeys Treated Chronically with Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golub, Mari S.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Drug-exposed mother-infant rhesus monkey pairs were similar to nontreated controls in the amount and types of activity displayed at the infant's tenth and ninetieth day of age. At about 3 months of age drug-exposed pairs increased in interaction, signaling mother-infant independence. This finding suggests that mother-infant attachment may be…

  3. Quantity Representation in Children and Rhesus Monkeys: Linear Versus Logarithmic Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beran, Michael J.; Johnson-Pynn, Julie S.; Ready, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    The performances of 4- and 5-year-olds and rhesus monkeys were compared using a computerized task for quantity assessment. Participants first learned two quantity anchor values and then responded to intermediate values by classifying them as similar to either the large anchor or the small anchor. Of primary interest was an assessment of where the…

  4. Rhesus Monkey - Miss Sam - Fiberglass Couch - Little Joe (LJ)-1B Flight - Prep

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-12-04

    B59-00828 (21 Jan. 1959) --- The test subject, a rhesus monkey named Miss Sam, is seen encased in a model of the Mercury fiberglass contour couch. She is being placed in a container for the Little Joe 1B suborbital test flight of the Mercury Capsule. Photo credit: NASA

  5. Evidence for Motor Planning in Monkeys: Rhesus Macaques Select Efficient Grips when Transporting Spoons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Eliza L.; Berthier, Neil E.; Metevier, Christina M.; Novak, Melinda A.

    2011-01-01

    McCarty and colleagues (1999) developed the elevated spoon task to measure motor planning in human infants. In this task, a spoon containing food was placed on an elevated apparatus that supported both ends of the spoon. The handle was oriented to the left or right on different trials. We presented naive adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with…

  6. Free-Ranging Rhesus Monkeys Spontaneously Individuate and Enumerate Small Numbers of Non-Solid Portions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Justin N.; Hauser, Marc D.; Glynn, David D.; Barner, David

    2008-01-01

    Fundamental questions in cognitive science concern the origins and nature of the units that compose visual experience. Here, we investigate the capacity to individuate and store information about non-solid portions, asking in particular whether free-ranging rhesus monkeys ("Macaca mulatta") quantify portions of a non-solid substance presented in…

  7. Mother-Infant Attachment, Peer Relationships, and the Development of Social Networks in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suomi, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    The social networks that rhesus monkeys develop in nature are centered around multiple generations of matrilineal kin embedded in larger social groupings that have some degree of distinctiveness and permanence. Within each family, infants initially grow up in the care of their mothers and the close presence of relatives, and they subsequently…

  8. Evidence for Motor Planning in Monkeys: Rhesus Macaques Select Efficient Grips when Transporting Spoons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Eliza L.; Berthier, Neil E.; Metevier, Christina M.; Novak, Melinda A.

    2011-01-01

    McCarty and colleagues (1999) developed the elevated spoon task to measure motor planning in human infants. In this task, a spoon containing food was placed on an elevated apparatus that supported both ends of the spoon. The handle was oriented to the left or right on different trials. We presented naive adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with…

  9. The Neural Basis of Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements in the Rhesus Monkey Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilg, Uwe J.; Thier, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements are performed in order to prevent retinal image blur of a moving object. Rhesus monkeys are able to perform smooth pursuit eye movements quite similar as humans, even if the pursuit target does not consist in a simple moving dot. Therefore, the study of the neuronal responses as well as the consequences of…

  10. Mother-Infant Attachment, Peer Relationships, and the Development of Social Networks in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suomi, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    The social networks that rhesus monkeys develop in nature are centered around multiple generations of matrilineal kin embedded in larger social groupings that have some degree of distinctiveness and permanence. Within each family, infants initially grow up in the care of their mothers and the close presence of relatives, and they subsequently…

  11. Quantity Representation in Children and Rhesus Monkeys: Linear Versus Logarithmic Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beran, Michael J.; Johnson-Pynn, Julie S.; Ready, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    The performances of 4- and 5-year-olds and rhesus monkeys were compared using a computerized task for quantity assessment. Participants first learned two quantity anchor values and then responded to intermediate values by classifying them as similar to either the large anchor or the small anchor. Of primary interest was an assessment of where the…

  12. Quantification of Drug Choice with the Generalized Matching Law in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N.; Woods, James H.

    2008-01-01

    The generalized matching law provides precise descriptions of choice, but has not been used to characterize choice between different doses of drugs or different classes of drugs. The current study examined rhesus monkeys' drug self-administration choices between identical drug doses, different doses, different drugs (cocaine, remifentanil, and…

  13. The Neural Basis of Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements in the Rhesus Monkey Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilg, Uwe J.; Thier, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements are performed in order to prevent retinal image blur of a moving object. Rhesus monkeys are able to perform smooth pursuit eye movements quite similar as humans, even if the pursuit target does not consist in a simple moving dot. Therefore, the study of the neuronal responses as well as the consequences of…

  14. Free-Ranging Rhesus Monkeys Spontaneously Individuate and Enumerate Small Numbers of Non-Solid Portions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Justin N.; Hauser, Marc D.; Glynn, David D.; Barner, David

    2008-01-01

    Fundamental questions in cognitive science concern the origins and nature of the units that compose visual experience. Here, we investigate the capacity to individuate and store information about non-solid portions, asking in particular whether free-ranging rhesus monkeys ("Macaca mulatta") quantify portions of a non-solid substance presented in…

  15. Acquisition of Cocaine Self-Administration with Unsignaled Delayed Reinforcement in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galuska, Chad M.; Woods, James H.

    2005-01-01

    Six experimentally naive rhesus monkeys produced 0.01 mg/kg/infusion cocaine by lever pressing under a tandem fixed-ratio 1 differential-reinforcement-of-other- behavior schedule. One lever press initiated an unsignaled 15- or 30-s delay culminating in cocaine delivery. Each press made during the delay reset the delay interval. With two…

  16. Quantification of Drug Choice with the Generalized Matching Law in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koffarnus, Mikhail N.; Woods, James H.

    2008-01-01

    The generalized matching law provides precise descriptions of choice, but has not been used to characterize choice between different doses of drugs or different classes of drugs. The current study examined rhesus monkeys' drug self-administration choices between identical drug doses, different doses, different drugs (cocaine, remifentanil, and…

  17. Influence of Social Variables on the Biobehavioral Response to Separation in Rhesus Monkey Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Seymour; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Four-month-old rhesus monkeys were removed from their social group under three different conditions of perceptual isolation from their mothers and peers. Infant behavior was recorded and blood samples were obtained for analysis of plasma cortisol. Infants never showed signs of depression; their responses following separation were seen as attempts…

  18. Experimental thyroiditis in the rhesus monkey. I. Cytotoxic, mixed-agglutinating and complement-fixing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kite, J. H.; Argue, Helen; Rose, N. R.

    1966-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys inoculated repeatedly with a crude extract of pooled rhesus thyroids plus complete Freund adjuvant produced autoantibodies cytotoxic for monkey and human thyroid cells in vitro. No cytotoxicity was observed with normal rhesus kidney or adrenal cells taken as controls from the same animals. The specific cytotoxic reaction was absorbed by thyroid microsomes, but not by other tissue fractions. Monkey (as well as human) thyroiditis sera failed to fix complement with thyroglobulin although both fixed complement with crude thyroid suspensions. The cytotoxic antibody was heat stable (56°C for 30 min) and required complement for damage to tissue cells. Fractionation by sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation demonstrated that the cytotoxic antibody had a sedimentation rate of about 7S and was stable to sulphydryl agents, whereas the complement-fixing antibody sedimented more rapidly and was largely inactivated by mercaptoethanol treatment. Thus in this case, cytotoxic antibody is not identical with the over-all complement-fixing activity of an antiserum. The presence of organ specific antigen on the surface of cultured rhesus thyroid cells was detected by the mixed agglutination antiglobulin reaction using monkey antisera. The curves of antibody production detected by mixed agglutination and cytotoxicity tend to correspond although the former test was 10–100 times more sensitive. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4958216

  19. Acquisition of Cocaine Self-Administration with Unsignaled Delayed Reinforcement in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galuska, Chad M.; Woods, James H.

    2005-01-01

    Six experimentally naive rhesus monkeys produced 0.01 mg/kg/infusion cocaine by lever pressing under a tandem fixed-ratio 1 differential-reinforcement-of-other- behavior schedule. One lever press initiated an unsignaled 15- or 30-s delay culminating in cocaine delivery. Each press made during the delay reset the delay interval. With two…

  20. In Vitro Interleukin-1 and 2 Production and Interleukin 2 Receptor Expression in the Rhesus Monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Didier A.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Husson, David; Tkaczuk, Jean; Andre, Eric; Schaffar, Laurance

    1996-01-01

    Anti-human monoclonal antibodies were used to detect and quantify interleukins-1 and 2 and interleukin-2 receptor expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a rhesus monkey. Interleukin-1 production could be induced by phorbol esters (PMA) and was potentiated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Interleukin-2 secretion could also be induced by the combination of PHA and PMA, but only weakly with PHA alone. Interleukin-2 receptor expression was present in a subpopulation of unstimulated lymphocytes and could be enhanced by PHA or PMA. These data show once again that the rhesus monkey immune system is cross-reactive with the human one and that rhesus macaque could be a good model to study interleukin therapy.

  1. Common features of mucosal and peripheral antibody responses elicited by candidate HIV-1 vaccines in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Li, Hualin; Stephenson, Kathryn E; Kang, Zi Han; Lavine, Christy L; Seaman, Michael S; Barouch, Dan H

    2014-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccines that elicit protective antibody responses at mucosal sites would be highly desirable. Here, we report that intramuscular immunization of candidate HIV-1 vaccine vectors and purified Env proteins elicited potent and durable humoral immune responses in colorectal mucosa in rhesus monkeys. The kinetics, isotypes, functionality, and epitope specificity of these mucosal antibody responses were similar to those of peripheral responses in serum. These data suggest a close immunological relationship between mucosal and systemic antibody responses following vaccination in primates.

  2. The topographic organization of rhesus monkey prestriate cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Essen, D C; Zeki, S M

    1978-01-01

    1. The topographic organization of prestriate visual cortex in the rhesus monkey has been studied both anatomically, by determining the pattern of termination of fibres passing through the corpus callosum, and physiologically, in the same animals, by plotting receptive field positions for different recording sites. Results are displayed on two-dimensional, "unfolded" maps of the cortex in the dorsal half of the occipital lobe. 2. Transcallosal fibres terminate in a narrow strip of cortex along the boundary between striate and prestriate areas and in a separate, broader, zone occupying much of the anterior bank of the lunate sulcus, the annectant gyrus, and the parietooccipital sulcus. The detailed pattern of inputs is highly complicated but shows considerable similarities from one animal to the next. 3. Physiological recordings confirmed earlier reports that regions where transcallosal fibres terminate correspond to representations of the vertical meridian in the visual field. This relationship is most precise along the striate-prestriate boundary and along the boundary of area V3 farthest from V1; it is less precise within area V4, where the pattern of transcallosal inputs is more complex. 4. A distinct, topographically organized visual area, named V3A, was found in the region between areas V3 and V4 in the lunate and parieto-occipital sulci. Area V3A differs from V2 and V3 in that both superior and inferior visual quadrants are represented in a single region of the dorsal occipital lobe. 5. The contralateral visual field is represented in a suprisingly complex fashion in areas V3A and V4. Within each area there are multiple representations of some, but perhaps not all, parts of the visual hemifield. It is unclear whether V3A and V4 should be more appropriately considered as sets of distinct sub-areas, each representing only a portion of the hemifield, or as larger areas with complicated internal topographies. 6. Most cells in areas V2, V3 and V3A are orientation

  3. Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) Detect Rhythmic Groups in Music, but Not the Beat

    PubMed Central

    Honing, Henkjan; Merchant, Hugo; Háden, Gábor P.; Prado, Luis; Bartolo, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    It was recently shown that rhythmic entrainment, long considered a human-specific mechanism, can be demonstrated in a selected group of bird species, and, somewhat surprisingly, not in more closely related species such as nonhuman primates. This observation supports the vocal learning hypothesis that suggests rhythmic entrainment to be a by-product of the vocal learning mechanisms that are shared by several bird and mammal species, including humans, but that are only weakly developed, or missing entirely, in nonhuman primates. To test this hypothesis we measured auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) in two rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), probing a well-documented component in humans, the mismatch negativity (MMN) to study rhythmic expectation. We demonstrate for the first time in rhesus monkeys that, in response to infrequent deviants in pitch that were presented in a continuous sound stream using an oddball paradigm, a comparable ERP component can be detected with negative deflections in early latencies (Experiment 1). Subsequently we tested whether rhesus monkeys can detect gaps (omissions at random positions in the sound stream; Experiment 2) and, using more complex stimuli, also the beat (omissions at the first position of a musical unit, i.e. the ‘downbeat’; Experiment 3). In contrast to what has been shown in human adults and newborns (using identical stimuli and experimental paradigm), the results suggest that rhesus monkeys are not able to detect the beat in music. These findings are in support of the hypothesis that beat induction (the cognitive mechanism that supports the perception of a regular pulse from a varying rhythm) is species-specific and absent in nonhuman primates. In addition, the findings support the auditory timing dissociation hypothesis, with rhesus monkeys being sensitive to rhythmic grouping (detecting the start of a rhythmic group), but not to the induced beat (detecting a regularity from a varying rhythm). PMID:23251509

  4. Characteristics of blood chemistry, hematology, and lymphocyte subsets in pregnant rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Ling; Gong, Li; Qian, Can; Liang, Zhi-Gang; Zeng, Wen

    2015-06-01

    The present study was designed to characterize the blood chemistry, hematology, and lymphocyte subsets in pregnant rhesus monkeys and provide baseline parameters for future studies of reproductive and developmental toxicity and developmental immunotoxicity. Harem-mating was used in 96 female and 16 male rhesus monkeys. Pregnancy was confirmed on gestation day (GD)18 by ultrasound. The blood samples of rhesus monkeys were collected at various times (20 days before pregnancy and GD20, 100 and 150). The analyses of blood chemistry, hematology, and lymphocyte subsets were performed. Compared with 20 days before pregnancy, Significant decreases (P < 0.05) were observed in HCT and RBC on GD20, GD150 and in HGB on GD150, Significant increases in NEUT and decreases in LYMPH on GD20 were observed. Significant decreases in ALB from GD20 to GD150 were observed, significant decreases in TP was observed on GD100. Significant increases in mean GLU were observed on GD20 and GD150 during pregnancy. Significant decreases (P < 0.05) in CD20(+) subsets on GD100, GD150 and CD4(+)/CD8(+)ratio on GD150 were observed, The significant changes of MCV, MCHC, RDW-SD, MCV, MONO, ALT, AST, GLB, ALP, TBIL, DBIL, IBIL, GGT, CR-S, URIC, TC, TG and CK were observed during the pregnant period, but no biologic change were observed, There were no significant changes in MCH, RDW-CV, MPV, BUN, CD3(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+) during pregnancy. These data provide a database for preclinical study in rhesus monkeys. Physiological anemia, hyperglycemia, and immune suppression may occur in pregnant rhesus monkey which is similar to that found in human, and it is essential to distinguish the physiological changes from the pharmacological effects in reproductive and developmental toxicity and developmental immunotoxicity studies of pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) detect rhythmic groups in music, but not the beat.

    PubMed

    Honing, Henkjan; Merchant, Hugo; Háden, Gábor P; Prado, Luis; Bartolo, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    It was recently shown that rhythmic entrainment, long considered a human-specific mechanism, can be demonstrated in a selected group of bird species, and, somewhat surprisingly, not in more closely related species such as nonhuman primates. This observation supports the vocal learning hypothesis that suggests rhythmic entrainment to be a by-product of the vocal learning mechanisms that are shared by several bird and mammal species, including humans, but that are only weakly developed, or missing entirely, in nonhuman primates. To test this hypothesis we measured auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) in two rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), probing a well-documented component in humans, the mismatch negativity (MMN) to study rhythmic expectation. We demonstrate for the first time in rhesus monkeys that, in response to infrequent deviants in pitch that were presented in a continuous sound stream using an oddball paradigm, a comparable ERP component can be detected with negative deflections in early latencies (Experiment 1). Subsequently we tested whether rhesus monkeys can detect gaps (omissions at random positions in the sound stream; Experiment 2) and, using more complex stimuli, also the beat (omissions at the first position of a musical unit, i.e. the 'downbeat'; Experiment 3). In contrast to what has been shown in human adults and newborns (using identical stimuli and experimental paradigm), the results suggest that rhesus monkeys are not able to detect the beat in music. These findings are in support of the hypothesis that beat induction (the cognitive mechanism that supports the perception of a regular pulse from a varying rhythm) is species-specific and absent in nonhuman primates. In addition, the findings support the auditory timing dissociation hypothesis, with rhesus monkeys being sensitive to rhythmic grouping (detecting the start of a rhythmic group), but not to the induced beat (detecting a regularity from a varying rhythm).

  6. Endocrine and pharmacological factors which influence the onset of labour in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Novy, M J

    1977-01-01

    Indomethacin administration in late pregnancy prolonged gestation in caged rhesus monkeys and inhibited premature labour and postponed delivery in chronically catheterized monkey fetuses. Chronic indomethacin treatment was associated with a reduction in the urinary excretion of a prostaglandin metabolite, a potent inhibitory effect on myometrial cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase, and severe oligohydramnios in pre-term and post-term fetuses. Experimental anencephaly (functional hypophysectomy) of the rhesus fetus results in lowered concentrations of maternal oestradiol and loss of the precise control of gestational length, with 40% of fetuses delivering beyond term. Corticotropin (ACTH) infused into the fetus results in raised concentrations of fetal and maternal cortisol, progesterone and oestrogens. Progesterone concentrations in peripheral blood apparently have little bearing on uterine quiescence in the rhesus monkey, since the concentrations of progesterone in maternal and fetal blood vary directly with uterine activity. The results of chronic infusion of corticotropin in the fetal monkey support the theory that in the monkey parturition is mediated by increased oestrogen production by the fetoplacental unit and by a rise in the concentrations of oestrone and prostaglandin in the amniotic fluid.

  7. Development of a rhesus monkey lung geometry model and application to particle deposition in comparison to humans

    SciTech Connect

    Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen; McClellan, Gene; Corley, Rick; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Richard E.; Harkema, Jack; Carey, Stephan A.; Schelegle, Edward; Hyde, Dallas; Kimbell, Julia S.; Miller, Frederick J.

    2012-11-01

    The exposure-dose-response characterization of an inhalation hazard established in an animal species needs to be translated to an equivalent characterization in humans relative to comparable doses or exposure scenarios. Here, the first geometry model of the conducting airways for rhesus monkeys is developed based upon CT images of the conducting airways of a 6-month-old male, rhesus monkey. An algorithm was developed for adding the alveolar region airways using published rhesus morphometric data. The resultant lung geometry model can be used in mechanistic particle or gaseous dosimetry models. Such dosimetry models require estimates of the upper respiratory tract volume of the animal and the functional residual capacity, as well as of the tidal volume and breathing frequency of the animal. The relationship of these variables to rhesus monkeys of differing body weights was established by synthesizing and modeling published data as well as modeling pulmonary function measurements on 121 rhesus control animals. Deposition patterns of particles up to 10 µm in size were examined for endotracheal and and up to 5 µm for spontaneous breathing in infant and young adult monkeys and compared to those for humans. Deposition fraction of respirable size particles was found to be higher in the conducting airways of infant and young adult rhesus monkeys compared to humans. Due to the filtering effect of the conducting airways, pulmonary deposition in rhesus monkeys was lower than that in humans. Finally, future research areas are identified that would either allow replacing assumptions or improving the newly developed lung model.

  8. Effects of feeding selenium deficient diets to rhesus monkeys (Macaca Mulatta)

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.A.; Whanger, P.D.; Patton, N.M.

    1988-02-01

    Pregnant rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were fed either selenium (Se) deficient or Se supplemented diets with adequate vitamin E. Except for some cardiac irregularities in the first babies born to these females, no physiological disorders due to Se deficiency were seen in a subsequent offspring. Plasma and erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activities and blood Se levels increased in the Se supplemented monkeys but decreased in the deficient ones. The data indicated that hair Se levels reflect long term exposure to this element. In a very preliminary experiment, evidence was obtained to indicate that dietary protein deficiency along with Se deficiency will generate cardiomyopathic lesions characteristic of Se deficiency. It is hypothesized that, in addition to Se deficiency, another dietary deficiency (or abnormality) is necessary to produce Se deficiency lesions in higher primates. Higher glutathione transferase (or non-Se glutathione peroxidase) activity in tissues of rhesus monkeys may account for this resistance.

  9. Characterization and presumptive identification of Helicobacter pylori isolates from rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Drazek, E S; Dubois, A; Holmes, R K

    1994-01-01

    We characterized 38 Helicobacter isolates, including 22 from gastric biopsy samples obtained from 14 rhesus monkeys and single isolates from 16 monkeys in a different colony. Biochemical profiles of these isolates were nearly identical to that of Helicobacter pylori ATCC 43504. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis indicated that each infected monkey harbored one to four strains. The 17 RFLP types found among these 22 isolates differed from all seven RFLPs found among the other 16 isolates. Thus, monkeys within a given colony are more likely to be infected by Helicobacter isolates with the same or a similar RFLP than are monkeys from different colonies. A 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR and cloned from the Helicobacter isolate from rhesus monkey 85D08. Ribotyping with this probe demonstrated less diversity among isolates from rhesus monkeys than was reported among isolates of H. pylori from humans, as did RFLP analysis of a PCR fragment of the ureA-ureB gene cluster. The DNA sequence of the cloned 16S rRNA gene was determined and compared with sequences reported for H. pylori and other Helicobacter species. Our analysis of 127 nucleotides (corresponding with residues 1240 to 1366 of the Escherichia coli 16S rRNA gene) indicated that the Helicobacter isolate from monkey 85D08 was 99.2 to 100% homologous to isolates of H. pylori from humans but only 83.5 to 96.9% homologous with other Helicobacter species in this region of the 16S rRNA gene. These data provide strong support for the presumptive identification of these isolates as H. pylori. Images PMID:7523441

  10. Early experience affects the strength of vigilance for threat in rhesus monkey infants

    PubMed Central

    Mandalaywala, Tara M.; Parker, Karen J.; Maestripieri, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Both human and nonhuman primates exhibit a cognitive bias to social threat, but little is known about how this bias develops. We investigated the development of threat bias in free-ranging infant rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) at 3 (N = 45) and 9 (N = 46) months of age. Three-month-old infant monkeys did not display bias, but 9-month-olds exhibited increased maintenance of attention to threatening social stimuli (vigilance for threat). To examine whether the social environment affected vigilance for threat, behavioral data on maternal rank and protectiveness were collected across the first 12 weeks of life for infants tested at 9 months. Nine-month-old infants of high-ranking mothers and more protective mothers displayed greater vigilance for threat than infants of lower-ranking and less protective mothers. These results demonstrate that infant social cognition is malleable and shaped by mothers both directly (protectiveness) and indirectly (rank), as maternal characteristics affect infants’ social experiences. PMID:25125426

  11. Exploring a partially enclosed space by lead-exposed female rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lasky, R E; Laughlin, N K

    2001-01-01

    Beginning on Day 8 postpartum, lead acetate was administered to female rhesus monkeys (n=48). Their blood lead levels rose to 35-40 microg/dl (the level maintained for the duration of the study period) by 12 weeks of age. Weekly, these lead-exposed monkeys and their controls (n=23) were placed in a partially enclosed space from the second postnatal week until they escaped three times or were 26 weeks old. The lead-exposed monkeys exhibited more fear, were more likely to be agitated, and climbed more frequently during the first testing session. In subsequent sessions, they more frequently explored the periphery of the test area than the controls. The lead-exposed monkeys also tended to escape sooner although that trend did not consistently reach the.05 level of significance. The increased activity and agitation of the lead-exposed monkeys is suggestive of deficits reported in human children with high blood lead levels.

  12. Comprehensive analysis of the T-cell receptor beta chain gene in rhesus monkey by high throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhoufang; Liu, Guangjie; Tong, Yin; Zhang, Meng; Xu, Ying; Qin, Li; Wang, Zhanhui; Chen, Xiaoping; He, Jiankui

    2015-01-01

    Profiling immune repertoires by high throughput sequencing enhances our understanding of immune system complexity and immune-related diseases in humans. Previously, cloning and Sanger sequencing identified limited numbers of T cell receptor (TCR) nucleotide sequences in rhesus monkeys, thus their full immune repertoire is unknown. We applied multiplex PCR and Illumina high throughput sequencing to study the TCRβ of rhesus monkeys. We identified 1.26 million TCRβ sequences corresponding to 643,570 unique TCRβ sequences and 270,557 unique complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) gene sequences. Precise measurements of CDR3 length distribution, CDR3 amino acid distribution, length distribution of N nucleotide of junctional region, and TCRV and TCRJ gene usage preferences were performed. A comprehensive profile of rhesus monkey immune repertoire might aid human infectious disease studies using rhesus monkeys. PMID:25961410

  13. A pilot study on transient ischemic stroke induced with endothelin-1 in the rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Dai, PeiMin; Huang, Hui; Zhang, Lin; He, Jing; Zhao, XuDong; Yang, FuHan; Zhao, Ning; Yang, JianZhen; Ge, LongJiao; Lin, Yu; Yu, HuaLin; Wang, JianHong

    2017-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a vasoconstrictor, has recently been used to induce focal ischemia in rodents and marmoset monkeys. The rhesus monkey, however, has numerous advantages to the rodent and marmoset that make it a superior and irreplaceable animal model for studying stroke in the brain. In the present study, after mapping the preferred hand representation in two healthy male monkeys with intracortical micro-stimulation, ET-1 was microinjected into the contralateral motor cortex (M1) to its preferred hand. The monkeys had been trained in three manual dexterity tasks before the microinjection and were tested for these tasks following the ET-1 injection. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging scans were performed 1, 7, 14 and 28 days post ischemia. It was found that ET-1 impaired the manual dexterity of the monkeys in the vertical slot and rotating Brinkman board tasks 3–8 days after the injection. Brain imaging found that severe edema was present 7 days after the focal ischemia. This data suggest that ET-1 can induce transient ischemic stroke in rhesus monkey and that ET-1 induced focal ischemia in non-human primates is a potential model to study the mechanism of stroke and brain repair after stroke. PMID:28358140

  14. Behavioral efficacy of diazepam against nerve agent exposure in rhesus monkeys. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, C.A.; Larsen, T.; Finger, A.V.; Solana, R.P.; McMaster, S.B.

    1991-12-31

    The possibility that nerve agents will be used on the battlefield is real. The traditional therapy against nerve agent exposure consists of pyridostigmine pretreatment and atropine-pralidoxime chloride therapy administered after nerve agent exposure. This therapy regimen is extremely effective in preventing mortality in laboratory animals exposed to multilethal concentrations of nerve agent, yet these animals often display convulsions, brain damage, and behavioral incapacitation. We report here that the addition of diazepam to the traditional therapy for nerve agent (soman) exposure not only decreases the incidence of convulsions, but also attenuates the cognitive impairments of rhesus monkeys trained on a Serial Probe Recognition (SPR) task. Monkeys which received diazepam treatment required only 6 days before their performance on the SPR task returned to presoman exposure levels, compared to nondiazepamtreated monkeys which required 15 days. Moreover, only 1 out of the 5 monkeys which received diazepain treatment suffered tonic-clonic convulsions; in contrast all 5 monkeys which did not receive diazepam treatment experienced severe convulsive episodes. These results suggest that diazepam would be an excellent adjunct to traditional nerve agent therapy to facilitate behavioral recovery from nerve agent intoxication that might be encountered by US military personnel on the battlefield or accidental organophosphate poisoning encountered in industrial or agricultural accidents. Serial probe recognition task, diazepam, nerve agents, soman convulsions, rhesus monkeys, cognition, organophosphate.

  15. A pilot study on transient ischemic stroke induced with endothelin-1 in the rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Dai, PeiMin; Huang, Hui; Zhang, Lin; He, Jing; Zhao, XuDong; Yang, FuHan; Zhao, Ning; Yang, JianZhen; Ge, LongJiao; Lin, Yu; Yu, HuaLin; Wang, JianHong

    2017-03-30

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a vasoconstrictor, has recently been used to induce focal ischemia in rodents and marmoset monkeys. The rhesus monkey, however, has numerous advantages to the rodent and marmoset that make it a superior and irreplaceable animal model for studying stroke in the brain. In the present study, after mapping the preferred hand representation in two healthy male monkeys with intracortical micro-stimulation, ET-1 was microinjected into the contralateral motor cortex (M1) to its preferred hand. The monkeys had been trained in three manual dexterity tasks before the microinjection and were tested for these tasks following the ET-1 injection. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging scans were performed 1, 7, 14 and 28 days post ischemia. It was found that ET-1 impaired the manual dexterity of the monkeys in the vertical slot and rotating Brinkman board tasks 3-8 days after the injection. Brain imaging found that severe edema was present 7 days after the focal ischemia. This data suggest that ET-1 can induce transient ischemic stroke in rhesus monkey and that ET-1 induced focal ischemia in non-human primates is a potential model to study the mechanism of stroke and brain repair after stroke.

  16. The role of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in comparison with whole egg yolk for sperm cryopreservation in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qiao-Xiang; Rodenburg, Sarah E; Hill, Dana; Vandevoort, Catherine A

    2011-05-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) extracted from hen egg yolk has recently been considered to be superior to whole egg yolk in sperm cryopreservation of various animal species. Meanwhile, there was a notion that high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in egg yolk may have a negative effect on post-thaw survival. The role of LDL and HDL in sperm cryopreservation of rhesus monkeys has not been explored. The present study evaluates their effect in comparison with egg yolk with or without the addition of permeable cryoprotectant (glycerol) on sperm cryopreservation of rhesus macaques. In addition, various additives intended to change the lipid composition of LDL-sperm membrane complex have also been tested for their effectiveness in preserving post-thaw viability. Our findings indicated that LDL is the main component in egg yolk that is responsible for its protective role for sperm cryopreservation in rhesus monkeys. Regardless of the presence or absence of glycerol, the protective role of LDL is similar to that of egg yolk and we did not observe any superiority in post-thaw survival with LDL when compared to egg yolk. Modifying the lipid composition of LDL-sperm membrane complex with the addition of cholesterol, cholesterol loaded cyclodextrin and phosphatidylcholine also did not yield any improvements in post-thaw survival; while addition of methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced post-thaw motility. HDL plays a neutral role in sperm cryopreservation of rhesus monkeys. The present study suggests that egg yolk may still hold advantages when compared with LDL as effective components in extenders for sperm cryopreservation in rhesus monkeys.

  17. The effects of monochromatic illumination on early eye development in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Hu, Min; He, Ji C; Zhou, Xing-Tao; Dai, Jin-Hui; Qu, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Hong; Chu, Ren-Yuan

    2014-03-28

    Influence of longitudinal chromatic aberration (LCA) on emmetropization during early eye development has not been studied in primates. We investigated the effects of quasi-monochromatic lighting on refractive development and eye growth in rhesus monkeys. Infant rhesus monkeys were raised under one of three lighting conditions for 51 weeks: quasi-monochromatic blue light (peak 455 nm), red light (peak 610 nm), and white light (color temperature 5000 K). All animals underwent biometric measurements using cycloplegic streak retinoscope, keratometry, and A-scan ultrasonography for refraction, corneal power, and axial components, respectively, at designated time points. At the 51st week, the mean difference in refraction of the white light and blue light groups, compared with that of the red light group, reached 1.71 diopters (D) and 1.43 D, respectively (both P < 0.001). Two monkeys in the red light group developed myopia at the 16th week, whereas the other seven remained hyperopic throughout the experiment. No significant difference in mean refraction was observed between the blue light group and white light group. Illumination from long-wavelength light during early life could be a risk factor for the development of myopia in a small proportion of rhesus monkeys that are sensitive to L-cone stimulation.

  18. [Experimental choroidal neovascularization induced by laser in the eyes of rhesus monkeys].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Yan, Mi; Wang, Li; Zhang, Jun-jun; Liu, Bin; Meng, Dan; Du, Cai-feng

    2008-07-01

    To establish an experimental model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) through perimacular laser treatment in the eyes of rhesus Monkey. The experimental CNV was induced by perimacular laser injury in the eyes of 8 rhesus monkeys and confirmed by a comparison before and after the laser treatment (20 d, 34 d, 48 d) with fluorescence fundus angiography (FFA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Classic CNV similar to human CNV appeared in 68.8% of the laser spots. Hypofluorescence in the early phase and fluorescence leakage in the late phase were detected by the FFA. High reflect light echogenic mass and retina edema were detected by the OCT. The histopathologic examinations found proliferated fiber-vasculosa membranes in the laser burnt spots. The pathological changes lasted 48 days until the monkeys were killed. The laser induced experimental CNV in rhesus monkey has a high prevalence and stability, which maintains a long period. It is an ideal experimental model for studying the pathologic mechanism of CNV and effective treatment for CNV.

  19. Multidrug-Resistant Proteus mirabilis Isolated From Newly Weaned Infant Rhesus Monkeys and Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wenhai; He, Zhanlong; Huang, Fen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proteus mirabilis is an important uropathogen that causes complicated Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) and induces diarrhea in infants. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate P. mirabilis infection in newly weaned infant rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) with diarrhea. Materials and Methods: Stool samples were collected from 74 rhesus monkeys and 12 ferrets with diarrhea. Proteus mirabilis was isolated from the samples through Polymerase Chain Reaction. The isolated P. mirabilis was subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Results: Seven (7/74, 9.5%) and four (4/12, 30%) P. mirabilis strains were detected in the stool samples collected from the monkeys and ferrets, respectively. Sequence analyses showed that the isolated P. mirabilis was closely related to P. mirabilis strain HI4320, which was isolated from the urine of a patient with a long-term indwelling urinary catheter. In addition, the isolates demonstrated multidrug resistance. Conclusions: Rhesus monkeys and ferrets are susceptible to P. mirabilis, making them useful as animal models for future studies on the mechanism of P. mirabilis-induced UTI and its corresponding treatment. PMID:26301055

  20. Effect of substrates on the mechanical performance of rhesus monkey papillary muscle.

    PubMed

    Snow, T R

    1980-04-15

    This study examines the effect of different substrates on mechanical performance of excised papillary muscles from rhesus monkeys which had been divided into a control group and an experimental group fed a high fat diet for 5 months prior to sacrifice. The results show that performance is affected by availabel substrate for both groups. The performance of the experimental group was depressed relative to control with the short chain fatty acid, butyrate (C4), producing a monotonically decreasing force-frequency response. Relative to the other mammals, isolated rhesus papillary muscles exhibited a protracted treppe which was sensitive to beta-adrenergic blockade with propranolol.

  1. Soluble human CD4 elicits an antibody response in rhesus monkeys that inhibits simian immunodeficiency virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Mamoru; Chen, Zheng W.; Tsubota, Hiroshi; Lord, C.I.; Levine, C.G.; Letvin, N.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Rhesus monkeys infected with the simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques (SIV{sub mac}) demonstrate significant virologic and clinical improvement as a result of treatment with human recombinant soluble CD4 (rsCD4). The authors show that human rsCD4 does not efficiently inhibit SIV{sub mac} replication in bone marrow macrophages of rhesus monkeys and does not significantly augment bone marrow hematopoietic colony formation in vitro. However, plasma of human rsCD4-treated rhesus monkeys does exhibit significant anti-SIV{sub mac} activity in vitro. Plasma of these animals efficiently blocks SIV{sub mac} replicaton in peripheral blood lymphocytes and bone marrow macrophages. It also increases granulocyte/macrophage colony formation in vitro by bone marrow cells of SIV{sub mac}-infected monkeys. This plasma and the IgG fraction of plasma from a rhesus monkey immunized with human rsCD4 in adjuvant demonstrate reactivity with a soluble form of the rhesus monkey CD4 molecule, exhibit binding to CD4{sup +} but not CD8{sup +} concanavalin A-activated rhesus monkey peripheral blood lymphocytes, and precipitate the CD4 molecule from surface-labeled activated rhesus monkey peripheral blood lymphocytes. Moreover, anti-viral activity is demonstrable in the IgG fraction of plasma from a human rsCD4-immunized monkey. These studies raise the possibility that a modified human CD4 molecule serving as an immunogen might elicit an antibody response that could potentially induce a beneficial therapeutic response in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

  2. Sleep Architecture in Unrestrained Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) Synchronized to 24-Hour Light-Dark Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Kung-Chiao; Robinson, Edward L.; Fuller, Charles A.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: To characterize the sleep patterns of unrestrained, diurnal nonhuman primates entrained to 24-hour light-dark cycles. Design: EEG, EMG, and EOG were recorded continuously via implanted telemetry from 5 unrestrained male rhesus monkeys housed individually under a 16:8 light-dark cycle (LD 16:8; L = 13 lux; D = 0 lux). Results: In a LD 16:8 cycle, all 5 monkeys demonstrated a long period of consolidated sleep during the 8-h dark period. On average, sleep accounted for 89.2% of the 8-h dark period and 25.2% of the 16-hour light period. REM sleep occupied 23% of total sleep time over 24 h, or 10.7% of the total time. The average length of the consolidated sleep (CS) period was 10.5 h, although the time of CS onset was variable. In contrast, the end of CS, and thus the onset of consolidated wakefulness (CW) demonstrated very little variation, typically occurring within 2 min of light onset. Ultradian NREM-REM cycles with periods of approximately 60 min were also observed. EEG delta activity during NREM sleep, thought to reflect the homeostatic sleep process, peaked at 3–4 h after CS onset. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates the feasibility of long-term, unrestrained sleep monitoring in nonhuman primates using fully-implantable biotelemetry. With minor exceptions, most notably a delay in peak delta activity, sleep-wake architecture, regulation, and consolidation in rhesus monkeys strongly resembles that of humans. These results demonstrate that the unrestrained rhesus monkey is an excellent biomedical model for human sleep. Citation: Hsieh KC; Robinson EL; Fuller CA. Sleep architecture in unrestrained rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) synchronized to 24-hour light-dark cycles. SLEEP 2008;31(9):1239-1250. PMID:18788649

  3. Auditory Rehabilitation in Rhesus Macaque Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with Auditory Brainstem Implants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Min; Yang, Zhi-Jun; Zhao, Fu; Wang, Bo; Wang, Xing-Chao; Qu, Pei-Ran; Liu, Pi-Nan

    2015-05-20

    The auditory brainstem implants (ABIs) have been used to treat deafness for patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2 and nontumor patients. The lack of an appropriate animal model has limited the study of improving hearing rehabilitation by the device. This study aimed to establish an animal model of ABI in adult rhesus macaque monkey (Macaca mulatta). Six adult rhesus macaque monkeys (M. mulatta) were included. Under general anesthesia, a multichannel ABI was implanted into the lateral recess of the fourth ventricle through the modified suboccipital-retrosigmoid (RS) approach. The electrical auditory brainstem response (EABR) waves were tested to ensure the optimal implant site. After the operation, the EABR and computed tomography (CT) were used to test and verify the effectiveness via electrophysiology and anatomy, respectively. The subjects underwent behavioral observation for 6 months, and the postoperative EABR was tested every two weeks from the 1 st month after implant surgery. The implant surgery lasted an average of 5.2 h, and no monkey died or sacrificed. The averaged latencies of peaks I, II and IV were 1.27, 2.34 and 3.98 ms, respectively in the ABR. One-peak EABR wave was elicited in the operation, and one- or two-peak waves were elicited during the postoperative period. The EABR wave latencies appeared to be constant under different stimulus intensities; however, the amplitudes increased as the stimulus increased within a certain scope. It is feasible and safe to implant ABIs in rhesus macaque monkeys (M. mulatta) through a modified suboccipital RS approach, and EABR and CT are valid tools for animal model establishment. In addition, this model should be an appropriate animal model for the electrophysiological and behavioral study of rhesus macaque monkey with ABI.

  4. Piracetam-induced changes on the brainstem auditory response in anesthetized juvenile rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Report of two clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Durand-Rivera, A; Gonzalez-Pina, R; Hernandez-Godinez, B; Ibanez-Contreras, A; Bueno-Nava, A; Alfaro-Rodriguez, A

    2012-10-01

    We describe two clinical cases and examine the effects of piracetam on the brainstem auditory response in infantile female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We found that the interwave intervals show a greater reduction in a 3-year-old rhesus monkey compared to a 1-year-old rhesus monkey. In this report, we discuss the significance of these observations. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Simian immunodeficiency virus mutants resistant to serum neutralization arise during persistent infection of rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, D P; Collignon, C; Desrosiers, R C

    1993-01-01

    We previously described the pattern of sequence variation in gp120 following persistent infection of rhesus monkeys with the pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239 molecular clone (D.P.W. Burns and R.C. Desrosiers, J. Virol. 65:1843, 1991). Sequence changes were confined largely to five variable regions (V1 to V5), four of which correspond to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 variable regions. Remarkably, 182 of 186 nucleotide substitutions that were documented in these variable regions resulted in amino acid changes. This is an extremely nonrandom pattern, which suggests selective pressure driving amino acid changes in discrete variable domains. In the present study, we investigated whether neutralizing-antibody responses are one selective force responsible at least in part for the observed pattern of sequence variation. Variant env sequences called 1-12 and 8-22 obtained 69 and 93 weeks after infection of a rhesus monkey with cloned SIVmac239 were recombined into the parental SIVmac239 genome, and variant viruses were generated by transfection of cultured cells with cloned DNA. The 1-12 and 8-22 recombinants differ from the parental SIVmac239 at 18 amino acid positions in gp120 and at 5 and 10 amino acid positions, respectively, in gp41. Sequential sera from the monkey infected with cloned SIVmac239 from which the 1-12 and 8-22 variants were isolated showed much higher neutralizing antibody titers to cloned SIVmac239 than to the cloned 1-12 and 8-22 variants. For example, at 55 weeks postinfection the neutralizing antibody titer against SIVmac239 was 640 while those to the variant viruses were 40 and less than 20. Two other rhesus monkeys infected with cloned SIVmac239 showed a similar pattern. Rhesus monkeys were also experimentally infected with the cloned variants so that the type-specific nature of the neutralizing antibody responses could be verified. Indeed, each of these monkeys showed neutralizing-antibody responses of much

  6. An assessment of domain-general metacognitive responding in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Brown, Emily Kathryn; Templer, Victoria L; Hampton, Robert R

    2017-02-01

    Metacognition is the ability to monitor and control one's cognition. Monitoring may involve either public cues or introspection of private cognitive states. We tested rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in a series of generalization tests to determine which type of cues control metacognition. In Experiment 1, monkeys learned a perceptual discrimination in which a "decline-test" response allowed them to avoid tests and receive a guaranteed small reward. Monkeys declined more difficult than easy tests. In Experiments 2-4, we evaluated whether monkeys generalized this metacognitive responding to new perceptual tests. Monkeys showed a trend toward generalization in Experiments 2 & 3, and reliable generalization in Experiment 4. In Experiments 5 & 6, we presented the decline-test response in a delayed matching-to-sample task. Memory tests differed from perceptual tests in that the appearance of the test display could not control metacognitive responding. In Experiment 6, monkeys made prospective metamemory judgments before seeing the tests. Generalization across perceptual tests with different visual properties and mixed generalization from perceptual to memory tests provide provisional evidence that domain-general, private cues controlled metacognition in some monkeys. We observed individual differences in generalization, suggesting that monkeys differ in use of public and private metacognitive cues.

  7. Predicting rhesus monkey eye movements during natural-image search.

    PubMed

    Segraves, Mark A; Kuo, Emory; Caddigan, Sara; Berthiaume, Emily A; Kording, Konrad P

    2017-03-01

    There are three prominent factors that can predict human visual-search behavior in natural scenes: the distinctiveness of a location (salience), similarity to the target (relevance), and features of the environment that predict where the object might be (context). We do not currently know how well these factors are able to predict macaque visual search, which matters because it is arguably the most popular model for asking how the brain controls eye movements. Here we trained monkeys to perform the pedestrian search task previously used for human subjects. Salience, relevance, and context models were all predictive of monkey eye fixations and jointly about as precise as for humans. We attempted to disrupt the influence of scene context on search by testing the monkeys with an inverted set of the same images. Surprisingly, the monkeys were able to locate the pedestrian at a rate similar to that for upright images. The best predictions of monkey fixations in searching inverted images were obtained by rotating the results of the model predictions for the original image. The fact that the same models can predict human and monkey search behavior suggests that the monkey can be used as a good model for understanding how the human brain enables natural-scene search.

  8. Predicting rhesus monkey eye movements during natural-image search

    PubMed Central

    Segraves, Mark A.; Kuo, Emory; Caddigan, Sara; Berthiaume, Emily A.; Kording, Konrad P.

    2017-01-01

    There are three prominent factors that can predict human visual-search behavior in natural scenes: the distinctiveness of a location (salience), similarity to the target (relevance), and features of the environment that predict where the object might be (context). We do not currently know how well these factors are able to predict macaque visual search, which matters because it is arguably the most popular model for asking how the brain controls eye movements. Here we trained monkeys to perform the pedestrian search task previously used for human subjects. Salience, relevance, and context models were all predictive of monkey eye fixations and jointly about as precise as for humans. We attempted to disrupt the influence of scene context on search by testing the monkeys with an inverted set of the same images. Surprisingly, the monkeys were able to locate the pedestrian at a rate similar to that for upright images. The best predictions of monkey fixations in searching inverted images were obtained by rotating the results of the model predictions for the original image. The fact that the same models can predict human and monkey search behavior suggests that the monkey can be used as a good model for understanding how the human brain enables natural-scene search. PMID:28355625

  9. A preliminary report on oral fat tolerance test in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral fat tolerance test (OFTT) has been widely used to assess the postprandial lipemia in human beings, but there is few studies concerning OFTT in nonhuman primates. This study is designed to explore the feasibility of OFTT in rhesus monkeys. Methods In a cross-over study, a total of 8 adult female rhesus monkeys were fed with normal monkey diet (NND), high sugar high fat diet (HHD), and extremely high fat diet (EHD), respectively. Each monkey consumed NND, HHD and EHD respectively, each weighing 60 g. Serial blood samples were collected at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 h after ingesting each kind of food. Triglyceride, cholesterol, glucose, and insulin at each time point were measured. The area under the curve of triglyceride (TG-AUC) and triglyceride peak response (TG-PR) were also calculated. Results All monkeys ingested 3 kinds of foods within 15 minutes. TG-AUC and TG-PR of HHD group were higher than those of the other two groups. Postprandial triglyceride levels at 2, 3, 4, and 5 hours in HHD group during OFTT were also higher than those in NND and EHD group. Conclusions HHD diet can be used in OFTT for nonhuman primates. PMID:24410972

  10. Ethanol-reinforced responding of naive rhesus monkeys: acquisition without induction procedures.

    PubMed

    Macenski, M J; Meisch, R A

    1992-01-01

    Rodents will typically consume greater amounts of low concentration ethanol (1-6%) than water. However, few primate oral self-administration studies have examined low ethanol concentrations. Additionally, there is a scarcity of data showing ethanol-maintained behavior without using induction procedures in either rats or primates. In this study, 14, free-feeding, naive, adult, male rhesus monkeys were given access to a 2% (w/v) ethanol solution and vehicle (tap water) during daily 3-hour sessions. Water was freely available between sessions. Liquids were available under a concurrent fixed-ratio four reinforcement schedule; thus, four responses (mouth-spout contacts) on either spout were immediately followed by the delivery of approximately 0.65 ml of liquid. In phase 1, tap water was available from both spouts. In phase 2, vehicle and a 2% ethanol solution were concurrently available. The 2% ethanol solution maintained considerably higher response rates than vehicle for 12 of 14 monkeys. In phase 3, food intake was limited. During this phase, the 2% ethanol solution maintained significantly higher response rates than vehicle for all monkeys. Additionally, during phase 3, ethanol intakes were greater than those in phase 2 for all monkeys. Central drug effects and taste factors are discussed. These results demonstrate that ethanol will serve as a reinforcer for naive rhesus monkeys in the absence of induction procedures.

  11. Effects of Aroclor 1254 reg sign on hydrocortisone levels in adult Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, J.C.K.; Tryphonas, H.; Jordan, N.; Brien, R.; Karpinski, K.R.; Arnold, D.L. )

    1989-11-01

    Researchers, using female Sprague Dawley rats, reported the effects of chronic (5-7 months) oral dosing with Aroclor 1254{reg sign} (Polychlorinated biphenyls-PCB) on the serum levels of corticosterone, the principle glucocorticoid in rats. Their findings indicated that corticosterone levels were significantly depressed at dose levels of 479 {mu}g/kg bw/day and above. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of PCB on the hydrocortisone levels in Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) serum. In the monkey the controlling hormone is hydrocortisone which is identical to that of humans.

  12. Effect of rotopositioning on the growth and maturation of mandibular bone in immobilized Rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, D. J.; Parvin, C.; Smith, K. C.; France, P.; Kazarian, L.

    1986-01-01

    The rates of bone formation and mineralization in the mandibular cortex of juvenile Rhesus monkeys exposed to immobilization/rotopositioning are evaluated. The monkeys were restrained in a supine position and rotated 90 deg every 30 minutes through a full 360 deg for 14 days. The microscopic distribution of mineral densities in osteonal bone and the porosity of cortical bone are studied using microradiographs, and osteon closure rates are assessed using tetracycline labeling; normal distributions of osteons of different mineral density and cortical bone porosity values are observed. It is concluded that 14 days of immobilization/rotopositioning did not cause abnormal changes in osteon mineralization, cortical porosity, and osteon closure rates.

  13. Changes in the gaze fixation reaction in rhesus monkeys during the initial stage of water immersion.

    PubMed

    Eron, Julia N; Miller, Natalia V; Badakva, Anatoly M

    2004-07-01

    The gaze fixation reaction was studied in three rhesus monkeys before and during thermoneutral (34.5 degrees C) water immersion to the mid-chest level. The angular vestibulo-ocular reflex gain increased and the head angular velocity decreased significantly in all monkeys in 5 h after the start of immersion. Additionally, one animal was immersed to the neck level. Two hours in the condition of more pronounced support deprivation decreased significantly angular velocity of the head but not increased the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex gain. Therefore, support deprivation act upon the head movement control first.

  14. Effect of rotopositioning on the growth and maturation of mandibular bone in immobilized Rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, D. J.; Parvin, C.; Smith, K. C.; France, P.; Kazarian, L.

    1986-01-01

    The rates of bone formation and mineralization in the mandibular cortex of juvenile Rhesus monkeys exposed to immobilization/rotopositioning are evaluated. The monkeys were restrained in a supine position and rotated 90 deg every 30 minutes through a full 360 deg for 14 days. The microscopic distribution of mineral densities in osteonal bone and the porosity of cortical bone are studied using microradiographs, and osteon closure rates are assessed using tetracycline labeling; normal distributions of osteons of different mineral density and cortical bone porosity values are observed. It is concluded that 14 days of immobilization/rotopositioning did not cause abnormal changes in osteon mineralization, cortical porosity, and osteon closure rates.

  15. Evidence for a non-linguistic distinction between singular and plural sets in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Barner, David; Wood, Justin; Hauser, Marc; Carey, Susan

    2008-05-01

    Set representations are explicitly expressed in natural language. For example, many languages distinguish between sets and subsets (all vs. some), as well as between singular and plural sets (a cat vs. some cats). Three experiments explored the hypothesis that these representations are language specific, and thus absent from the conceptual resources of non-linguistic animals. We found that rhesus monkeys spontaneously discriminate sets based on a conceptual singular-plural distinction. Under conditions that do not elicit comparisons based on approximate magnitudes or one-to-one correspondence, rhesus monkeys distinguished between singular and plural sets (1 vs. 2 and 1 vs. 5), but not between two plural sets (2 vs. 3, 2 vs. 4, and 2 vs. 5). These results suggest that set-relational distinctions are not a privileged part of natural language, and may have evolved in non-linguistic species to support domain general quantitative computations.

  16. Perceived control in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) - Enhanced video-task performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, David A.; Hopkins, William D.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1991-01-01

    This investigation was designed to determine whether perceived control effects found in humans extend to rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) tested in a video-task format, using a computer-generated menu program, SELECT. Choosing one of the options in SELECT resulted in presentation of five trials of a corresponding task and subsequent return to the menu. In Experiments 1-3, the animals exhibited stable, meaningful response patterns in this task (i.e., they made choices). In Experiment 4, performance on tasks that were selected by the animals significantly exceeded performance on identical tasks when assigned by the experimenter under comparable conditions (e.g., time of day, order, variety). The reliable and significant advantage for performance on selected tasks, typically found in humans, suggests that rhesus monkeys were able to perceive the availability of choices.

  17. Empty Sets as Part of the Numerical Continuum: Conceptual Precursors to the Zero Concept in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritt, Dustin J.; Rugani, Rosa; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the current research was to explore whether monkeys possess conceptual precursors necessary for understanding zero. We trained rhesus monkeys on a nonsymbolic numerical matching-to-sample task, and on a numerical ordering task. We then introduced nondifferentially reinforced trials that contained empty sets to determine whether monkeys…

  18. Empty Sets as Part of the Numerical Continuum: Conceptual Precursors to the Zero Concept in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritt, Dustin J.; Rugani, Rosa; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the current research was to explore whether monkeys possess conceptual precursors necessary for understanding zero. We trained rhesus monkeys on a nonsymbolic numerical matching-to-sample task, and on a numerical ordering task. We then introduced nondifferentially reinforced trials that contained empty sets to determine whether monkeys…

  19. Control of Working Memory in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Hsiao-Wei; Hampton, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive control is critical for efficiently using the limited resources in working memory. It is well established that humans use rehearsal to increase the probability of remembering needed information, but little is known in nonhumans, with some studies reporting the absence of active control and others subject to alternative explanations. We trained monkeys in a visual matching-to-sample paradigm with a post-sample memory cue. Monkeys either saw a remember cue that predicted the occurrence of a matching test that required memory for the sample, or a forget cue that predicted a discrimination test that did not require memory of the sample. Infrequent probe trials on which monkeys were given tests of the type not cued on that trial were used to assess whether memory was under cognitive control. Our procedures controlled for reward expectation and for the surprising nature of the probes. Monkeys matched less accurately after forget cues, while discrimination accuracy was equivalent in the two cue conditions. We also tested monkeys with lists of two consecutive sample images that shared the same cue. Again, memory for expected memory tests was superior to that on unexpected tests. Together these results show that monkeys cognitively control their working memory. PMID:25436219

  20. Persistent fear responses in rhesus monkeys to the optical stimulus of "looming".

    PubMed

    SCHIFF, W; CAVINESS, J A; GIBSON, J J

    1962-06-15

    The approach of an object corresponds with a spatiotemporal optical stimulus consisting of a symmetrical expansion of a closed contour in the field of view. The visual equivalent of impending collision was isolated and compared with its sequential inversion. Infant and adult rhesus monkeys manifested persistent avoidance responses to "looming" but not to the inverse. This visual stimulus alone is a strong exciter of avoidance, and the response appears early in life.

  1. Therapeutic Efficacy of the Small Molecule GS-5734 against Ebola virus in Rhesus Monkeys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-02

    et al. Euthanasia assessment in ebola virus infected nonhuman primates. Viruses 6, 832 4666-4682, doi:10.3390/v6114666 (2014). 833 834...1 Therapeutic Efficacy of the Small Molecule GS-5734 against Ebola virus in Rhesus 1 Monkeys 2 Travis K. Warren 1 , Robert Jordan 2 , Michael K...National Research Council, 2011. 31 32 Abstract 33 The ongoing 2013-15 Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa ‒ unprecedented in the number of 34

  2. A Finite Element Analysis of the Creep Response of Lumbar Intervertebral Joints in the Rhesus Monkey.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    description of the intervertebral joint. The Rhesus Monkey spine is a complex structure composed of a number of mobile vertebrae. It is divided into 4 reg...IS. -SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 8o:it~Ics A ~JA~q Air. Force insItit of Tehnology (ATCJ 1 9 J N ’ Wrgb-o:.-o.,&O 43 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side

  3. UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity exhibits two developmental groups in liver from foetal rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Leakey, J E; Althaus, Z R; Bailey, J R; Slikker, W

    1983-01-01

    UDP-glucuronyltransferase was assayed in liver from adult rhesus monkeys and foetuses during late gestation. Activities toward 2-aminophenol, 5-hydroxytryptamine, 1-naphthol and 4-nitrophenol in the foetal liver ranged from 46 to 114% of adult values, whereas activities toward bilirubin, oestradiol and testosterone were less than 5% of adult values. This suggests that in primates UDP-glucuronyltransferase develops differentially in two clusters analogous to that in the rat. PMID:6414458

  4. Elasticity and stress relaxation of rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) vocal folds

    PubMed Central

    Riede, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental frequency is an important perceptual parameter for acoustic communication in mammals. It is determined by vocal fold oscillation, which depends on the morphology and viscoelastic properties of the oscillating tissue. In this study, I tested if stress–strain and stress–relaxation behavior of rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) vocal folds allows the prediction of a species' natural fundamental frequency range across its entire vocal repertoire as well as of frequency contours within a single call type. In tensile tests, the load–strain and stress–relaxation behavior of rhesus monkey vocal folds and ventricular folds has been examined. Using the string model, predictions about the species' fundamental frequency range, individual variability, as well as the frequency contour of ‘coo’ calls were made. The low- and mid-frequency range (up to 2 kHz) of rhesus monkeys can be predicted relatively well with the string model. The discrepancy between predicted maximum fundamental frequency and what has been recorded in rhesus monkeys is currently ascribed to the difficulty in predicting the behavior of the lamina propria at very high strain. Histological sections of the vocal fold and different staining techniques identified collagen, elastin, hyaluronan and, surprisingly, fat cells as components of the lamina propria. The distribution of all four components is not uniform, suggesting that different aspects of the lamina propria are drawn into oscillation depending on vocal fold tension. A differentiated recruitment of tissue into oscillation could extend the frequency range specifically at the upper end of the frequency scale. PMID:20709920

  5. A genetic system for rhesus monkey rhadinovirus: use of recombinant virus to quantitate antibody-mediated neutralization.

    PubMed

    Bilello, John P; Morgan, Jennifer S; Damania, Blossom; Lang, Sabine M; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2006-02-01

    Rhesus monkey rhadinovirus (RRV), a simian gamma-2 herpesvirus closely related to the Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, replicates lytically in cultured rhesus monkey fibroblasts and establishes persistence in B cells. Overlapping cosmid clones were generated that encompass the entire 130-kilobase-pair genome of RRV strain 26-95, including the terminal repeat regions required for its replication. Cloned RRV that was produced by cotransfection of overlapping cosmids spanning the entire RRV26-95 genome replicated with growth kinetics and to titers similar to those of the parental, uncloned, wild-type RRV26-95. Expression cassettes for secreted-engineered alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) were inserted upstream of the R1 gene, and the cosmid-based system for RRV genome reconstitution was used to generate replication-competent, recombinant RRV that expressed either the SEAP or GFP reporter gene. Using the SEAP and GFP recombinant RRVs, assays were developed to monitor RRV infection, neutralization, and replication. Heat-inactivated sera from rhesus monkeys that were naturally or experimentally infected with RRV were assayed for their ability to neutralize RRV-SEAP and RRV-GFP infectivity using rhesus monkey fibroblasts. Sera from RRV-positive monkeys, but not RRV-negative monkeys, were consistently able to neutralize RRV infectivity when assayed by the production of SEAP activity or by the ability to express GFP. The neutralizing activity was present in the immunoglobulin fraction. Of the 17 rhesus monkeys tested, sera from rhesus monkey 26-95, i.e., the monkey that yielded the RRV 26-95 isolate, had the highest titer of neutralizing activity against RRV26-95. This cosmid-based genetic system and the reporter virus neutralization assay will facilitate study of the contribution of individual RRV glycoproteins to entry into different cell types, particularly fibroblasts and B cells.

  6. Parallel evolutionary events in the haptoglobin gene clusters of rhesus monkey and human

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, L.M.; Maeda, N.

    1994-08-01

    Parallel occurrences of evolutionary events in the haptoglobin gene clusters of rhesus monkeys and humans were studied. We found six different haplotypes among 11 individuals from two rhesus monkey families. The six haplotypes include two types of haptoglobin gene clusters: one type with a single gene and the other with two genes. DNA sequence analysis indicates that the one-gene and the two-gene clusters were both formed by unequal homologous crossovers between two genes of an ancestral three-gene cluster, near exon 5, the longest exon of the gene. This exon is also the location where a separate unequal homologous crossover occured in the human lineage, forming the human two-gene haptoglobin gene cluster from an ancestral three-gene cluster. The occurrence of independent homologous unequal crossovers in rhesus monkey and in human within the same region of DNA suggests that the evolutionary history of the haptoglobin gene cluster in primates is the consequence of frequent homologous pairings facilitated by the longest and most conserved exon of the gene. 27 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Longitudinal Stability of Friendships in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta): Individual- and Relationship-level Effects

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Tamara A.R.; Capitanio, John P.

    2012-01-01

    The longevity of children’s friendships is influenced by a multitude of individual- and relationship-level attributes, but little is known about the factors that impact friendship maintenance in nonhuman primate juveniles. We investigated whether the following predicted the longitudinal stability of friendships in juvenile rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta): (a) individual characteristics including sex, dominance rank, matriline size, and temperament; and (b) relationship characteristics including kinship, reciprocity, complexity, and similarity between friends in sex, rank, and temperament. We recorded affiliative interactions of 29 two-year-old rhesus monkeys, previously observed as yearlings, at the California National Primate Research Center. Friends were defined as peers with whom subjects spent more time affiliating than expected by chance. Temperament had been assessed at 3-4 months of age. Sex was the only individual characteristic predicting friendship stability: males maintained more friendships from age one to two than did females. Relationship characteristics predicting friendship stability included similarity between individuals in temperament, kinship, and sex. In addition, reciprocated friendships, rather than unidirectional friendships, were significantly more likely to persist over time. Our findings suggest that the factors influencing friendship maintenance in rhesus monkeys are similar to those impacting human friendship longevity. PMID:22352887

  8. Mucosal infection of neonatal rhesus monkeys with cell-free SIV.

    PubMed

    Baba, T W; Koch, J; Mittler, E S; Greene, M; Wyand, M; Penninck, D; Ruprecht, R M

    1994-04-01

    Although the mechanisms for maternal transmission are unknown, approximately half of the infants congenitally infected with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) seem to become infected late in gestation or during delivery. Previously, we have developed a rhesus monkey model for congenital infection by injecting cell-free simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) directly into amniotic fluid. Our results suggested that fetal infection may have occurred via skin or mucous membrane exposure. Mucosal surfaces have also been implicated as a portal of virus entry by a study in which the presence of serosanguinous fluid in neonatal gastric aspirates correlated with an increased rate of HIV-1 transmission. To test whether cell-free virus could transverse intact neonatal mucosal surfaces, we administered SIVmac251 orally to four rhesus monkey neonates within 1 hr following cesarean section delivery. All four neonates developed viremia and were positive by cocultivation and PCR. Seroconversion occurred in three of the four neonates. The SIV dose given was within physiological range as shown by end-point dilution of virus stock and viremic plasma samples of juvenile rhesus monkeys. This primate model for mucosal transmission of cell-free virus features a high infection rate, thus making studies of mucosal immunity and the development of strategies to prevent intrapartum virus transmission possible.

  9. An alternative method of chronic cerebrospinal fluid collection via the cisterna magna in conscious rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Gilberto, David B; Zeoli, Angela H; Szczerba, Peter J; Gehret, John R; Holahan, Marie A; Sitko, Gary R; Johnson, Colena A; Cook, Jacquelynn J; Motzel, Sherri L

    2003-07-01

    Models of chronic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection previously have been established for nonhuman primates and canines; many of these methods implement stainless-steel cannulas into the lateral or 4th ventricles or catheters into the cerebral or spinal subarachnoid space. These models have proved successful and reliable but unfortunately require invasive techniques to pass through the skull or require a laminectomy to enter the spinal subarachnoid space, involve the use of expensive and highly specialized stereotaxic equipment for the precise placement of the implants, and may require exteriorized hardware which is cumbersome to maintain and unaesthetic. The model we developed for the rhesus monkey allows for direct access to CSF outflow from the cisterna magna by using a 3.5-French fenestrated silicone catheter which was placed 1.0 cm into the cisterna. The catheter was attached to a titanium port placed subcutaneously between the scapulae to permit easy access for sampling CSF in a conscious, chaired rhesus monkey. We currently have instrumented animals from which we have consistently collected CSF for over 18 months. This novel, economical, less-invasive method permits chronic, reliable collection of CSF in conscious rhesus monkeys and has the additional advantages that the model is easier to maintain and more aesthetic.

  10. Early adversity contributes to chronic stress induced depression-like behavior in adolescent male rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Yi; Mao, Yu; Feng, Xiao-Li; Zheng, Na; Lü, Long-Bao; Ma, Yuan-Ye; Qin, Dong-Dong; Hu, Xin-Tian

    2016-06-01

    Chronic stress is an important cause for depression. However, not everyone who is exposed to chronic stress will develop depression. Our previous studies demonstrated that early adversity can cause lasting changes in adolescent rhesus monkeys, but depressive symptoms have not been observed. Compared to adults, it is still unknown that whether adolescent rhesus monkeys experiencing early adversity are more likely to develop depressive symptoms. In this study, we investigated the long term relationship between early adversity, chronic stress and adolescent depression for the first time. Eight male rhesus monkeys were reared in maternal separation (MS) or mother-reared (MR) conditions. All of them went through unpredictable chronic stress for two months at their age four. The stressors included space restriction, intimidation, long illumination and fasting. Behavioral and physiological data were collected during the experiment. The results showed that, compared with the MR group, the locomotor activity of MS group was significantly decreased after one month of chronic stress while huddling up and stereotypical behaviors were significantly increased. Moreover, this trend continued and even worsened at the second month. Significantly higher hair cortisol levels and lower body weight were observed in MS group after two months of stress. These results indicate that early adversity is one of the environmental factors which can increase the susceptibility of depression when experiencing chronic stress in the later life. This will further clarify the important roles of early environmental factors in the development of adolescent depression and children rearing conditions should receive more attention.

  11. Rhesus monkey lens as an in vitro model for studying oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Zigler, J.S. Jr.; Lucas, V.A.; Du, X.Y. )

    1989-10-01

    Lenses from young rhesus monkeys were incubated in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or oxygen radical generating systems to determine their suitability as a model for investigating lenticular oxidative stress. Additionally, direct comparisons were made between the effects found with the monkey lenses and those observed with cultured rat lenses exposed to the same oxidizing systems. As in earlier studies with rat lenses the monkey lenses exhibited impaired ability to actively accumulate from the medium radioactively labelled rubidium and choline following exposure to oxidative stress. Based on the effects of various scavengers of oxygen radicals it appeared that the mechanisms responsible for lens damage were the same for both rat and monkey lenses. However, rat lenses were damaged by lower concentrations of oxidants than were monkey lenses. It was concluded that oxidative stress affects both rat and monkey lenses by similar mechanisms but that lenses from monkeys, and probably other primates, are more resistant to these effects because they have better endogenous antioxidant defenses.

  12. Sex differences in rhesus monkey toy preferences parallel those of children

    PubMed Central

    Hassett, Janice M.; Siebert, Erin R.; Wallen, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Socialization processes, parents, or peers encouraging play with gender specific toys are thought to be the primary force shaping sex differences in toy preference. A contrast in view is that toy preferences reflect biologically determined preferences for specific activities facilitated by specific toys. Sex differences in juvenile activities, such as rough and tumble play, peer preferences, and infant interest, share similarities in humans and monkeys. Thus if activity preferences shape toy preferences, male and female monkeys may show toy preferences similar to those seen in boys and girls. We compared the interactions of 34 rhesus monkeys, living within a 135 monkey troop, with human wheeled toys and plush toys. Male monkeys, like boys, showed consistent and strong preferences for wheeled toys, while female monkeys, like girls, showed greater variability in preferences. Thus, the magnitude of preference for wheeled over plush toys differed significantly between males and females. The similarities to human findings demonstrate that such preferences can develop without explicit gendered socialization. We offer the hypothesis that toy preferences reflect hormonally influenced behavioral and cognitive biases which are sculpted by social processes into the sex differences seen in monkeys and humans. PMID:18452921

  13. Alterations in gastric mucus secretion in rhesus monkeys after exposure to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shea-Donohue, T.; Danquechin-Dorval, E.; Montcalm, E.; El-Bayar, H.; Durakovic, A.; Conklin, J.J.; Dubois, A.

    1985-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of gamma-irradiation on soluble gastric mucus. Six conscious chair-adapted rhesus monkeys were studied once before and twice after exposure to ionizing irradiation (800 rads). Using a marker (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA) dilution technique, acidic glycoprotein (AG), neutral glycoprotein (NG), ion, and fluid output were determined during a basal period and after the administration of an 80-ml water load. Irradiation significantly increased the outputs of both AG and NG during the basal period. After the water load, NG output remained elevated but irradiation abolished postload AG output thus inhibiting the normal rise in AG output stimulated by the load. Two days after irradiation NG output had returned to control levels whereas AG output was still suppressed. Sodium and potassium ion outputs were unaltered by irradiation. Chloride and fluid outputs were significantly inhibited on the day of irradiation but had returned to control levels within 3 days. These results indicate that irradiation produces significant changes in both the quantity and nature of the soluble mucus glycoproteins secreted into the gastric juice. It is suggested that these changes may compromise the protective ability of gastric mucus.

  14. Long-term mortality and cancer risk in irradiated rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.H. )

    1991-05-01

    Continuous, 24-year observations on a group of 358 rhesus monkeys reveal that life shortening from exposure to protons in the energy range encountered in the Van Allen belts and solar proton events is influenced primarily by the dose rather than by the energy of radiation. Life shortening in groups exposed to similar surface doses of 138- to 2300-MeV and 32- to 55-MeV protons are not significantly different, but the low-energy protons are associated with more deaths in the early years, while the high-energy protons contribute more to mortality in later years. In males, the most significant cause of life shortening is nonleukemia cancers. In females, radiation increased the risk of endometriosis (an abnormal proliferation of the lining of the uterus) which resulted in significant mortality in the years before early detection and treatment methods were employed. Animals exposed to 55-MeV protons had a high incidence of malignant brain tumors with latent periods ranging from 13 months to 20 years. The first fatal cancer among nonirradiated controls occurred 18 years after the study began. Analysis of the dose-response data supports the 1989 guidelines of the NCRP for maximum permissible radiation exposures in astronauts (NCRP, Guidance on Radiation Received in Space Activities, Report No. 98, National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, Bethesda, MD, 1989).

  15. Huperzine A: Behavioral and Pharmacological Evaluation in Rhesus Monkeys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense USAMRICD-TR-08-05 Huperzine A: Behavioral and Pharmacological Evaluation in Rhesus...public release; distribution unlimited U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010-5400...experimental protocol was approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee at the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense and

  16. Social Facilitation of Cognition in Rhesus Monkeys: Audience Vs. Coaction

    PubMed Central

    Reynaud, Amélie J.; Guedj, Carole; Hadj-Bouziane, Fadila; Meunier, Martine; Monfardini, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Social psychology has long established that the mere presence of a conspecific, be it an active co-performer (coaction effect), or a passive spectator (audience effect) changes behavior in humans. Yet, the process mediating this fundamental social influence has so far eluded us. Brain research and its nonhuman primate animal model, the rhesus macaque, could shed new light on this long debated issue. For this approach to be fruitful, however, we need to improve our patchy knowledge about social presence influence in rhesus macaques. Here, seven adults (two dyads and one triad) performed a simple cognitive task consisting in touching images to obtain food treats, alone vs. in presence of a co-performer or a spectator. As in humans, audience sufficed to enhance performance to the same magnitude as coaction. Effect sizes were however four times larger than those typically reported in humans in similar tasks. Both findings are an encouragement to pursue brain and behavior research in the rhesus macaque to help solve the riddle of social facilitation mechanisms. PMID:26648856

  17. Social Facilitation of Cognition in Rhesus Monkeys: Audience Vs. Coaction.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Amélie J; Guedj, Carole; Hadj-Bouziane, Fadila; Meunier, Martine; Monfardini, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Social psychology has long established that the mere presence of a conspecific, be it an active co-performer (coaction effect), or a passive spectator (audience effect) changes behavior in humans. Yet, the process mediating this fundamental social influence has so far eluded us. Brain research and its nonhuman primate animal model, the rhesus macaque, could shed new light on this long debated issue. For this approach to be fruitful, however, we need to improve our patchy knowledge about social presence influence in rhesus macaques. Here, seven adults (two dyads and one triad) performed a simple cognitive task consisting in touching images to obtain food treats, alone vs. in presence of a co-performer or a spectator. As in humans, audience sufficed to enhance performance to the same magnitude as coaction. Effect sizes were however four times larger than those typically reported in humans in similar tasks. Both findings are an encouragement to pursue brain and behavior research in the rhesus macaque to help solve the riddle of social facilitation mechanisms.

  18. Rapid seeding of the viral reservoir prior to SIV viraemia in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Whitney, James B; Hill, Alison L; Sanisetty, Srisowmya; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Liu, Jinyan; Shetty, Mayuri; Parenteau, Lily; Cabral, Crystal; Shields, Jennifer; Blackmore, Stephen; Smith, Jeffrey Y; Brinkman, Amanda L; Peter, Lauren E; Mathew, Sheeba I; Smith, Kaitlin M; Borducchi, Erica N; Rosenbloom, Daniel I S; Lewis, Mark G; Hattersley, Jillian; Li, Bei; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Geleziunas, Romas; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H; Michael, Nelson L; Barouch, Dan H

    2014-08-07

    The viral reservoir represents a critical challenge for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) eradication strategies. However, it remains unclear when and where the viral reservoir is seeded during acute infection and the extent to which it is susceptible to early antiretroviral therapy (ART). Here we show that the viral reservoir is seeded rapidly after mucosal simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of rhesus monkeys and before systemic viraemia. We initiated suppressive ART in groups of monkeys on days 3, 7, 10 and 14 after intrarectal SIVMAC251 infection. Treatment with ART on day 3 blocked the emergence of viral RNA and proviral DNA in peripheral blood and also substantially reduced levels of proviral DNA in lymph nodes and gastrointestinal mucosa as compared with treatment at later time points. In addition, treatment on day 3 abrogated the induction of SIV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. Nevertheless, after discontinuation of ART following 24 weeks of fully suppressive therapy, virus rebounded in all animals, although the monkeys that were treated on day 3 exhibited a delayed viral rebound as compared with those treated on days 7, 10 and 14. The time to viral rebound correlated with total viraemia during acute infection and with proviral DNA at the time of ART discontinuation. These data demonstrate that the viral reservoir is seeded rapidly after intrarectal SIV infection of rhesus monkeys, during the 'eclipse' phase, and before detectable viraemia. This strikingly early seeding of the refractory viral reservoir raises important new challenges for HIV-1 eradication strategies.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of Oxymorphone in Titi Monkeys (Callicebus spp.) and Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kristi R; Pypendop, Bruno H; Grayson, J Kevin; Stanley, Scott D; Christe, Kari L; Summers, Laura M; Lerche, Nicholas W

    2011-01-01

    Oxymorphone is a pure μ-opioid receptor agonist that is commonly used in nonhuman primate medicine and surgery to minimize pain ranging in intensity from moderate to severe. We compared pharmacokinetic profiles and physiologic and behavioral responses to oxymorphone between titi monkeys (Callicebus spp.) and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Titi monkeys (n = 4) and rhesus macaques (n = 4) were injected intravenously with either a bolus of 0.075 mg/kg oxymorphone or placebo on multiple occasions, with a minimal washout period of 14 d between trials. Blood collection was limited to no more than 3 samples per trial, with samples collected at multiple time points until 10 h after injection. Collection periods, animal order, and testing day were randomized. In addition, macaques underwent a single serial collection at all time points to validate study design. A 2-compartment model best described the disposition of oxymorphone in both species. Clearance was faster in macaques than titi monkeys, in which terminal half-life was longer. Statistically significant physiologic differences were found between species and between treatments within species. Apart from these effects, oxymorphone did not significantly change physiologic parameters over time. After oxymorphone treatment, macaques demonstrated behaviors reflecting pruritis, whereas titi monkeys exhibited sedation. Despite its mild side effects, we recommend the consideration of oxymorphone for pain management protocols in both Old and New World nonhuman primates. PMID:21439215

  20. Reversal of testicular function after prolonged suppression with an LHRH agonist in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, K; Keizer-Zucker, A; Thau, R B; Bardin, C W

    1987-01-01

    Using subcutaneously implanted osmotic pumps, four male rhesus monkeys were continuously infused for 18 months with 100 micrograms/day of [(imBzl)-D-His6-Pro9-NEt]-LHRH (LHRH-A), a potent agonist of LHRH. After an initial increase, serum testosterone levels declined to 10% of pretreatment levels in three monkeys and the response to electroejaculation was lost. There was a decrease in testicular volume. Androgen replacement in the form of subcutaneous SILASTIC implants releasing 7 alpha-methyl-19-nor-testosterone acetate led to a restoration of ejaculatory response and the electroejaculates were devoid of spermatozoa. Under this treatment regimen (100 micrograms LHRH-A + 100 micrograms androgen daily), azoospermia was essentially maintained in the three monkeys for about 8 months. Withdrawal of LHRH-A and androgen treatment led to a complete restoration of testicular function. Serum testosterone returned to control levels and spermatozoa reappeared in the ejaculates with sperm counts reaching the normal range. Testicular volumes showed a gradual increase. These results indicate that continuous administration of an LHRH agonist together with an androgen can induce an extended period of azoospermia in rhesus monkeys. These results also show that after prolonged suppression (more than one year) of testicular function complete recovery occurs after cessation of treatment.

  1. Human insulin versus porcine insulin in rhesus monkeys with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xi; Zeng, Li; Zhang, Shuang; He, Sirong; Ren, Yan; Chen, Younan; Wei, Lingling; Wang, Li; Li, Hongxia; Cheng, Jingqiu; Lu, Yanrong

    2013-02-01

    Monkeys with insulin-dependent diabetes are important preclinical animal models for islet transplantation. Exogenous insulin should be administered to achieve good glycemic control and minimize the long-term vascular complications associated with diabetes until the graft function recovered completely. However, the effect of multiple daily injections of porcine or human insulin and the long-term effects of porcine insulin have not been studied in diabetic rhesus monkeys. Diabetic rhesus monkeys, using a 6-month self-control insulin comparison experiment, were used to detect the incidence of adverse events and long-term diabetes complication events after long-term administration of porcine insulin. In this study, we found that a 20% higher dose of porcine insulin results in similar glycemic control as the human insulin regimen, and adverse events were seldom reported when porcine insulin was administered. Moreover, long-term injection with porcine insulin could delay the rate and severity of diabetes-related complications. Porcine insulin as a competent candidate for regular insulin therapy to maintain blood glucose levels in insulin-dependent diabetic monkeys during preclinical studies of islet transplantation. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Impairment in abstraction and set shifting in aged rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tara L; Killiany, Ronald J; Herndon, James G; Rosene, Douglas L; Moss, Mark B

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the nature of changes in cognition with aging has increased in importance as the number of individuals over the age of 65 years grows. To date, studies have demonstrated that age-related changes occur most extensively in the cognitive domains of memory and executive function. Whereas a large number of studies have been conducted about the effects of aging on memory, far less have explored the effects of aging on the so called "executive function" which include abilities essential for successful performance of higher level activities of daily living. As part of our ongoing effort to better characterize these changes, we assessed executive function in a non-human primate model of normal human aging using the Conceptual Set Shifting Task (CSST). This recently developed task assesses abstraction, concept formation and set shifting in the monkey in a way analogous to the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) in humans. Relative to young adult monkeys, aged monkeys evidenced significant difficulty in both acquisition and performance on this task, and moreover, demonstrated a high degree of perseverative responding. The pattern of performance displayed by the aged monkeys suggests an age-related decline in prefrontal cortex (PFC) functioning.

  3. In vivo evaluation of optic nerve aging in adult rhesus monkey by diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yumei; Li, Longchuan; Preuss, Todd M.; Hu, Xiaoping; Herndon, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Aging of the optic nerve can result in reduced visual sensitivity or vision loss. Normal optic nerve aging has been investigated previously in tissue specimens but poorly explored in vivo. In the present study, the normal aging of optic nerve was evaluated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in non-human primates. Adult female rhesus monkeys at the ages of 9 to 13 years old (young group, n=8) and 21 to 27 years old (old group, n=7) were studied using parallel-imaging-based DTI on a clinical 3T scanner. Compared to young adults, the old monkeys showed 26% lower fractional anisotropy (P<0.01), and 44% greater radial diffusivity, although the latter difference was of marginal statistical significance (P=0.058). These MRI findings are largely consistent with published results of light and electron microscopic studies of optic nerve aging in macaque monkeys, which indicate a loss of fibers and degenerative changes in myelin sheaths. PMID:24649434

  4. Differential expression of anti-glycan antibodies in schistosome-infected humans, rhesus monkeys and mice

    PubMed Central

    Luyai, Anthony E; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Mickum, Megan L; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Nyame, A Kwame; Wilkins, Patricia; Rivera-Marrero, Carlos A; Smith, David F; Van Die, Irma; Secor, W Evan; Cummings, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a debilitating parasitic disease of humans, endemic in tropical areas, for which no vaccine is available. Evidence points to glycan antigens as being important in immune responses to infection. Here we describe our studies on the comparative humoral immune responses to defined schistosome-type glycan epitopes in Schistosoma mansoni-infected humans, rhesus monkeys and mice. Rhesus anti-glycan responses over the course of infection were screened on a defined glycan microarray comprising semi-synthetic glycopeptides terminating with schistosome-associated or control mammalian-type glycan epitopes, as well as a defined glycan microarray of mammalian-type glycans representing over 400 glycan structures. Infected rhesus monkeys generated a high immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody response to the core xylose/core α3 fucose epitope of N-glycans, which peaked at 8–11 weeks post infection, coinciding with maximal ability to kill schistosomula in vitro. By contrast, infected humans generated low antibody levels to this epitope. At 18 months following praziquantel therapy to eliminate the parasite, antibody levels were negligible. Mice chronically infected with S. mansoni generated high levels of anti-fucosylated LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1, 4(Fucα1, 3)GlcNAc) IgM antibodies, but lacked a robust response to the core xylose/core α3 fucose N-glycan antigens compared with other species studied, and their sera demonstrated an intermediate level of schistosomula killing in vitro. These differential responses to parasite glycan antigens may be related to the ability of rhesus monkeys to self-cure in contrast to the chronic infection seen in humans and mice. Our results validate defined glycan microarrays as a useful technology to evaluate diagnostic and vaccine antigens for schistosomiasis and perhaps other infections. PMID:24727442

  5. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) discriminate between knowing and not knowing and collect information as needed before acting.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Robert R; Zivin, Aaron; Murray, Elisabeth A

    2004-10-01

    Humans use memory awareness to determine whether relevant knowledge is available before acting, as when we determine whether we know a phone number before dialing. Such metacognition, or thinking about thinking, can improve selection of appropriate behavior. We investigated whether rhesus monkeys ( Macaca mulatta) are capable of a simple form of metacognitive access to the contents of short-term memory. Monkeys chose among four opaque tubes, one of which concealed food. The tube containing the reward varied randomly from trial to trial. On half the trials the monkeys observed the experimenter baiting the tube, whereas on the remaining trials their view of the baiting was blocked. On each trial, monkeys were allowed a single chance to select the tube containing the reward. During the choice period the monkeys had the opportunity to look down the length of each tube, to determine if it contained food. When they knew the location of the reward, most monkeys chose without looking. In contrast, when ignorant, monkeys often made the effort required to look, thereby learning the location of the reward before choosing. Looking improved accuracy on trials on which monkeys had not observed the baiting. The difference in looking behavior between trials on which the monkeys knew, and trials on which they were ignorant, suggests that rhesus monkeys discriminate between knowing and not knowing. This result extends similar observations made of children and apes to a species of Old World monkey, suggesting that the underlying cognitive capacities may be widely distributed among primates.

  6. Isolation of B virus (herpes group) from the central nervous system of a rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    MELNICK, J L; BANKER, D D

    1954-08-01

    While passaging a recently isolated strain of poliomyelitis virus through a rhesus monkey, another virus was procured from its central nervous system. After intracerebral inoculation, the virus produced meningoencephalitis in monkeys, cotton rats, hamsters, guinea pigs, and rabbits; after intracutaneous inoculation a necrotic skin lesion was produced in the monkey and rabbit and this was often followed by myelitis. The virus could also be passed in newborn mice less than 48 hours old and in chick embryos by inoculation of the chorioallantoic membrane. Immunological and host range studies revealed this virus to be related to the B virus originally described by Sabin and Wright in 1934 (1). To our knowledge this is the first record of B virus having been isolated from a monkey, and lends support to the inclusion of this agent as the simian member of the herpes group. The infection is not uncommon in monkey stocks, as revealed by the finding of antibodies to the virus in their sera. In the present series 9 of 44 monkeys gave positive antibody tests. Gamma globulin prepared in the United States in 1945, 1951, and 1953, as well as a certain proportion of sera from normal individuals in Bombay, India, and elsewhere, showed neutralizing activity against the new strain of B virus, and also to herpes simplex virus. This may be the result of the partial crossing which exists between the two viruses.

  7. ISOLATION OF B VIRUS (HERPES GROUP) FROM THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM OF A RHESUS MONKEY

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, Joseph L.; Banker, Dushyant D.

    1954-01-01

    While passaging a recently isolated strain of poliomyelitis virus through a rhesus monkey, another virus was procured from its central nervous system. After intracerebral inoculation, the virus produced meningoencephalitis in monkeys, cotton rats, hamsters, guinea pigs, and rabbits; after intracutaneous inoculation a necrotic skin lesion was produced in the monkey and rabbit and this was often followed by myelitis. The virus could also be passed in newborn mice less than 48 hours old and in chick embryos by inoculation of the chorioallantoic membrane. Immunological and host range studies revealed this virus to be related to the B virus originally described by Sabin and Wright in 1934 (1). To our knowledge this is the first record of B virus having been isolated from a monkey, and lends support to the inclusion of this agent as the simian member of the herpes group. The infection is not uncommon in monkey stocks, as revealed by the finding of antibodies to the virus in their sera. In the present series 9 of 44 monkeys gave positive antibody tests. Gamma globulin prepared in the United States in 1945, 1951, and 1953, as well as a certain proportion of sera from normal individuals in Bombay, India, and elsewhere, showed neutralizing activity against the new strain of B virus, and also to herpes simplex virus. This may be the result of the partial crossing which exists between the two viruses. PMID:13286422

  8. Effect of radiation and age on immunoglobulin levels in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, W.H.; Hackleman, S.M.; Braun, A.M.; Pennington, P.; Saphire, D.G.; Scheffler, J.; Wigle, J.C.; Cox, A.B.

    1994-06-01

    We report the results of a study on the immunoglobulin levels of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in a colony consisting of the survivors of monkeys that received a single whole-body exposure of protons, electrons or X rays between 1964 and 1969. This colony has been maintained to assess the long-term effects of ionizing radiation on astronauts and high-flying pilots. Of the original 358 monkeys that were retained for lifetime studies, 129 (97 irradiated and 32 controls) were available for our study. We found no significant difference between the irradiated and control monkeys in mean levels of IgA, IgG and IgM, irrespective of the radiation treatment. The availability of these aged monkeys provided a unique opportunity to compare their immunoglobulin levels to those of other monkeys of various ages, and thus assess the effect of age on immunoglobulin levels. We found that only the IgA levels increase with age. 48 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Profiling serum antibodies to Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins in rhesus monkeys with nontuberculous Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Min, Fangui; Pan, Jinchun; Wu, Ruike; Chen, Meiling; Kuang, Huiwen; Zhao, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the prevalence of diseases caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been increasing in both human and animals. In this study, antibody profiles of NTM in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were determined and compared with those of monkeys infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). Antibodies against 10 M. tuberculosis proteins, purified protein derivative (PPD), and mammalian old tuberculin (MOT) were detected in 14 monkeys naturally infected with NTM by indirect ELISA. Sera from 10 monkeys infected with MTBC and 10 healthy monkeys were set as controls. All antigens showed high serological reactivities to MTBC infections and low reactivities in healthy monkeys. NTM infections showed strong antibody responses to MOT and PPD; moderate antibody responses to 16kDa, U1, MPT64L, 14kDa, and TB16.3; and low antibody responses to 38kDa, Ag85b, CFP10, ESAT-6, and CFP10-ESAT-6. According to the criteria of MTBC, only CFP10, ESAT-6, and CFP10-ESAT-6 showed negative antibody responses in all NTM infections. Taken together, these results suggest that positive results of a PPD/MOT-based ELISA in combination with results of antibodies to M. tuberculosis-specific antigens, such as CFP10 and ESAT-6, could discriminate NTM and MTBC infections. Two positive results indicate an MTBC infection, and a negative result for an M. tuberculosis-specific antigen may preliminarily predict an NTM infection.

  10. Profiling serum antibodies to Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins in rhesus monkeys with nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Min, Fangui; Pan, Jinchun; Wu, Ruike; Chen, Meiling; Kuang, Huiwen; Zhao, Weibo

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the prevalence of diseases caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been increasing in both human and animals. In this study, antibody profiles of NTM in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were determined and compared with those of monkeys infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). Antibodies against 10 M. tuberculosis proteins, purified protein derivative (PPD), and mammalian old tuberculin (MOT) were detected in 14 monkeys naturally infected with NTM by indirect ELISA. Sera from 10 monkeys infected with MTBC and 10 healthy monkeys were set as controls. All antigens showed high serological reactivities to MTBC infections and low reactivities in healthy monkeys. NTM infections showed strong antibody responses to MOT and PPD; moderate antibody responses to 16kDa, U1, MPT64L, 14kDa, and TB16.3; and low antibody responses to 38kDa, Ag85b, CFP10, ESAT-6, and CFP10-ESAT-6. According to the criteria of MTBC, only CFP10, ESAT-6, and CFP10-ESAT-6 showed negative antibody responses in all NTM infections. Taken together, these results suggest that positive results of a PPD/MOT-based ELISA in combination with results of antibodies to M. tuberculosis-specific antigens, such as CFP10 and ESAT-6, could discriminate NTM and MTBC infections. Two positive results indicate an MTBC infection, and a negative result for an M. tuberculosis-specific antigen may preliminarily predict an NTM infection. PMID:26437786

  11. Similarity of Bisphenol A Pharmacokinetics in Rhesus Monkeys and Mice: Relevance for Human Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Julia A.; vom Saal, Frederick S.; Welshons, Wade V.; Drury, Bertram; Rottinghaus, George; Hunt, Patricia A.; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Laffont, Céline M.; VandeVoort, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Daily adult human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) has been estimated at < 1 μg/kg, with virtually complete first-pass conjugation in the liver in primates but not in mice. We measured unconjugated and conjugated BPA levels in serum from adult female rhesus monkeys and adult female mice after oral administration of BPA and compared findings in mice and monkeys with prior published data in women. Methods Eleven adult female rhesus macaques were fed 400 μg/kg deuterated BPA (dBPA) daily for 7 days. Levels of serum dBPA were analyzed by isotope-dilution liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (0.2 ng/mL limit of quantitation) over 24 hr on day 1 and on day 7. The same dose of BPA was fed to adult female CD-1 mice; other female mice were administered 3H-BPA at doses ranging from 2 to 100,000 μg/kg. Results In monkeys, the maximum unconjugated serum dBPA concentration of 4 ng/mL was reached 1 hr after feeding and declined to low levels by 24 hr, with no significant bioaccumulation after seven daily doses. Mice and monkeys cleared unconjugated serum BPA at virtually identical rates. We observed a linear (proportional) relationship between administered dose and serum BPA in mice. Conclusions BPA pharmacokinetics in women, female monkeys, and mice is very similar. By comparison with approximately 2 ng/mL unconjugated serum BPA reported in multiple human studies, the average 24-hr unconjugated serum BPA concentration of 0.5 ng/mL in both monkeys and mice after a 400 μg/kg oral dose suggests that total daily human exposure is via multiple routes and is much higher than previously assumed. PMID:20855240

  12. Development of a rhesus monkey lung geometry model and application to particle deposition in comparison to humans

    PubMed Central

    Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen; McClellan, Gene; Corley, Rick; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Richard E.; Harkema, Jack; Carey, Stephan A.; Schelegle, Edward; Hyde, Dallas; Kimbell, Julia S.; Miller, Frederick J.

    2016-01-01

    The exposure-dose-response characterization of an inhalation hazard established in an animal species needs to be translated to an equivalent characterization in humans relative to comparable doses or exposure scenarios. Here, the first geometry model of the conducting airways for rhesus monkeys is developed based upon CT images of the conducting airways of a 6-month-old male, rhesus monkey. An algorithm was developed for adding the alveolar region airways using published rhesus morphometric data. The resultant lung geometry model can be used in mechanistic particle or gaseous dosimetry models. Such dosimetry models require estimates of the upper respiratory tract volume of the animal and the functional residual capacity, as well as of the tidal volume and breathing frequency of the animal. The relationship of these variables to rhesus monkeys of differing body weights was established by synthesizing and modeling published data as well as modeling pulmonary function measurements on 121 rhesus control animals. Deposition patterns of particles up to 10 μm in size were examined for endotracheal and and up to 5 μm for spontaneous breathing in infant and young adult monkeys and compared to those for humans. Deposition fraction of respirable size particles was found to be higher in the conducting airways of infant and young adult rhesus monkeys compared to humans. Due to the filtering effect of the conducting airways, pulmonary deposition in rhesus monkeys was lower than that in humans. Future research areas are identified that would either allow replacing assumptions or improving the newly developed lung model. PMID:23121298

  13. Visual recognition memory is impaired in rhesus monkeys repeatedly exposed to sevoflurane in infancy.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, M C; Murphy, K L; Baxter, M G

    2017-05-31

    . Experimental studies in animals have shown that exposure to general anaesthesia in infancy can cause loss of cells in the central nervous system and long-term impairments in neurocognitive function. Some human epidemiological studies have shown increased risk of learning disability after repeated anaesthesia exposure in early childhood. Thus, we investigated in a highly translational rhesus monkey model, whether repeated exposure in infancy to the inhalation anaesthetic sevoflurane is associated with impaired visual recognition memory during the first two yr of life. . Rhesus monkeys of both sexes were exposed to sevoflurane inhalation anaesthesia on approximately postnatal day 7 and then again 14 and 28 days later, for four h each time. Visual recognition memory was tested using the visual paired comparison task, which measures memory by assessing preference for looking at a new image over a previously-viewed image. Monkeys were tested at 6-10 months of age, again at 12-18 months of age, and again at 24-30 months of age. No memory impairment was detected at 6-10 months old, but significant impairment (reduced time looking at the novel image) was observed at 12-18 and 24-30 months old. . Repeated exposure of infant rhesus monkeys to sevoflurane results in visual recognition memory impairment that emerges after the first yr of life. This is consistent with epidemiological studies that show increased risk of learning disability after repeated exposure to anaesthesia in infancy/early childhood. Moreover, these deficits may emerge at later developmental stages, even when memory performance is unaffected earlier in development.

  14. Effects of pirenzepine on pupil size and accommodation in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ostrin, Lisa A; Frishman, Laura J; Glasser, Adrian

    2004-10-01

    Pirenzepine is suggested to be a relatively selective muscarinic (M(1)) antagonist and is currently under investigation for the treatment of myopia. Atropine, a nonselective M-type antagonist, is used in the treatment of myopia, but has undesired ocular and systemic side effects. An M(1)-specific antagonist may decrease side effects and remain effective at reducing the progression of myopia. In the current study, the effects of pirenzepine on pupil diameter, resting refraction, and accommodation were studied in rhesus monkeys. The time course and extent of mydriasis from subconjunctival injection of 2% pirenzepine were determined in five normal rhesus monkeys, and the effects on static and dynamic accommodation were determined in four rhesus monkeys with permanent indwelling electrodes in the Edinger-Westphal (EW) nucleus of the midbrain. Subconjunctival injections of 0.0002% to 0.2% pirenzepine in log unit dilutions were tested in three monkeys to determine the effects on static EW-stimulated accommodation. At 40 to 50 minutes after pirenzepine injection, accommodation was stimulated pharmacologically in both eyes, and the response was measured for 30 minutes. After 2% pirenzepine injection, pupil size increased 2.02 +/- 0.41 mm, there was a hyperopic shift in resting refraction of 1.07 +/- 0.23 D, and nearly complete cycloplegia occurred. Maximum EW-stimulated accommodation was significantly decreased 20 to 40 minutes after 0.02% or greater pirenzepine. Carbachol-stimulated accommodation was significantly decreased after 0.2% or greater pirenzepine. Subconjunctival injections of 0.02% or greater pirenzepine result in a significant decrease in accommodation and are probably acting through nonselective muscarinic antagonism. Subconjunctival injections of 0.002% or less pirenzepine do not decrease EW-stimulated accommodation.

  15. Effects of Pirenzepine on Pupil Size and Accommodation in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Ostrin, Lisa A.; Frishman, Laura J.; Glasser, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Pirenzepine is suggested to be a relatively selective muscarinic (M1) antagonist and is currently under investigation for the treatment of myopia. Atropine, a nonselective M-type antagonist, is used in the treatment of myopia, but has undesired ocular and systemic side effects. An M1-specific antagonist may decrease side effects and remain effective at reducing the progression of myopia. In the current study, the effects of pirenzepine on pupil diameter, resting refraction, and accommodation were studied in rhesus monkeys. Methods The time course and extent of mydriasis from subconjunctival injection of 2% pirenzepine were determined in five normal rhesus monkeys, and the effects on static and dynamic accommodation were determined in four rhesus monkeys with permanent indwelling electrodes in the Edinger-Westphal (EW) nucleus of the midbrain. Subconjunctival injections of 0.0002% to 0.2% pirenzepine in log unit dilutions were tested in three monkeys to determine the effects on static EW-stimulated accommodation. At 40 to 50 minutes after pirenzepine injection, accommodation was stimulated pharmacologically in both eyes, and the response was measured for 30 minutes. Results After 2% pirenzepine injection, pupil size increased 2.02 ± 0.41 mm, there was a hyperopic shift in resting refraction of 1.07 ± 0.23 D, and nearly complete cycloplegia occurred. Maximum EW-stimulated accommodation was significantly decreased 20 to 40 minutes after 0.02% or greater pirenzepine. Carbachol-stimulated accommodation was significantly decreased after 0.2% or greater pirenzepine. Conclusions Subconjunctival injections of 0.02% or greater pirenzepine result in a significant decrease in accommodation and are probably acting through nonselective muscarinic antagonism. Subconjunctival injections of 0.002% or less pirenzepine do not decrease EW-stimulated accommodation. PMID:15452069

  16. Impact of caloric restriction on health and survival in rhesus monkeys from the NIA study.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Julie A; Roth, George S; Beasley, T Mark; Tilmont, Edward M; Handy, April M; Herbert, Richard L; Longo, Dan L; Allison, David B; Young, Jennifer E; Bryant, Mark; Barnard, Dennis; Ward, Walter F; Qi, Wenbo; Ingram, Donald K; de Cabo, Rafael

    2012-09-13

    Calorie restriction (CR), a reduction of 10–40% in intake of a nutritious diet, is often reported as the most robust non-genetic mechanism to extend lifespan and healthspan. CR is frequently used as a tool to understand mechanisms behind ageing and age-associated diseases. In addition to and independently of increasing lifespan, CR has been reported to delay or prevent the occurrence of many chronic diseases in a variety of animals. Beneficial effects of CR on outcomes such as immune function, motor coordination and resistance to sarcopenia in rhesus monkeys have recently been reported. We report here that a CR regimen implemented in young and older age rhesus monkeys at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) has not improved survival outcomes. Our findings contrast with an ongoing study at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center (WNPRC), which reported improved survival associated with 30% CR initiated in adult rhesus monkeys (7–14 years) and a preliminary report with a small number of CR monkeys. Over the years, both NIA and WNPRC have extensively documented beneficial health effects of CR in these two apparently parallel studies. The implications of the WNPRC findings were important as they extended CR findings beyond the laboratory rodent and to a long-lived primate. Our study suggests a separation between health effects, morbidity and mortality, and similar to what has been shown in rodents, study design, husbandry and diet composition may strongly affect the life-prolonging effect of CR in a long-lived nonhuman primate.

  17. Is the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) comparable to humans? Histomorphology of the sphincteric musculature of the lower urinary tract including 3D-reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ganzer, R; Köhler, D; Neuhaus, J; Dorschner, W; Stolzenburg, J-U

    2004-12-01

    The physiology of the muscle systems of the human lower urinary tract is still not known in detail. To study the functional basics of this complex organ system, experiments are often performed in animal models including rhesus monkeys. To apply the results of animal model studies to the humans, a clear knowledge of the comparative anatomy of both species is necessary. However, detailed comparative studies of the lower urinary tract of the rhesus monkey and the humans are lacking. Accordingly, a detailed study on the sphincteric musculature of the lower urinary tract of the rhesus monkey was performed in order to demonstrate anatomical correspondences and differences between both species. The lower urinary tract anatomy was investigated in 18 male and female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) by serial sections. Immunohistochemical staining methods were used to differentiate striated and smooth musculature. Three-dimensional reconstructions were performed in order to demonstrate the topographical anatomy of the different muscle systems. In both man and male rhesus monkeys, a urethral sphincter muscle exists independent of the pelvic floor musculature, with a smooth and a striated muscular part. A urinary diaphragm (diaphragma urogenitale) does neither exist in the rhesus monkey nor in the human. In contrast to women, a striated muscle encircles the urethra and vagina together in the female rhesus monkey. A vesical sphincter muscle, found in the human bladder outlet, does not exist in the rhesus monkey.

  18. Moderate Level Alcohol During Pregnancy, Prenatal Stress, or Both and Limbic-Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenocortical Axis Response to Stress in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Mary L.; Moore, Colleen F.; Kraemer, Gary W.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between moderate-level prenatal alcohol exposure, prenatal stress, and postnatal response to a challenging event in 6-month-old rhesus monkeys. Forty-one rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) infants were exposed prenatally to moderate level alcohol, maternal stress, or both. Offspring plasma cortisol and…

  19. Moderate Level Alcohol During Pregnancy, Prenatal Stress, or Both and Limbic-Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenocortical Axis Response to Stress in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Mary L.; Moore, Colleen F.; Kraemer, Gary W.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between moderate-level prenatal alcohol exposure, prenatal stress, and postnatal response to a challenging event in 6-month-old rhesus monkeys. Forty-one rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) infants were exposed prenatally to moderate level alcohol, maternal stress, or both. Offspring plasma cortisol and…

  20. Changes in hippocampal ultrastructure and vimentin expression in rhesus monkeys following selective deep hypothermia and blood occlusion.

    PubMed

    Li, B C; Fu, X; Niu, X Q; Fan, Y D; Xu, W; Zhao, X X; Pu, J

    2015-01-30

    Previous studies have shown that selective cerebral profound hypothermia combined with antegrade cerebral perfusion can improve resistance to cerebral hypoxia-ischemia in monkeys. The aim of this study was to observe the effect of selective cerebral profound hypothermia on the ultrastructure and vimentin expression in monkey hippocampi after severe cerebral ischemia. Eight healthy adult rhesus monkeys were randomly divided into two groups: profound hypothermia (N = 5) and normothermia (N = 3). Monkeys in the profound hypothermia group underwent bilateral carotid artery and jugular vein occlusion for 10 minutes at room temperature. Ringer's solution at 4°C was then perfused through the right internal carotid artery and out of the right jugular vein, maintaining the brain temperature below 18°C. Sixty minutes later, cerebral blood flow was restored. The normothermia group underwent all procedures with the exception that the Ringer's solution was 37°C during perfusion. All animals in the profound hypothermia group were successfully resuscitated. No significant abnormalities of hippocampal morphology or ultrastructure were observed. In contrast, no monkeys were alive after perfusion in the normothermia group and they had abnormal hippocampal morphology and ultrastructure to different extents. Vimentin expression in the hippocampus was significantly lower in the profound hypothermia group (47.88% ± 1.66) than the normothermia group (79.51% ± 1.00; P < 0.01). We conclude that selective cerebral profound hypothermia following 10-min occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries was able to downregulate vimentin expression in the hippocampus and protect it from severe cerebral ischemia.

  1. Long Term Mortality and Cancer Risk in Irradiated Rhesus Monkeys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    energy to oenetrate the total body thickness require higher surface doses to induce lethality during the acute radiation sickness phase (within 100...Whether it is spontaneous or radiation - induced , untreated endometriosis in monkeys is often life-threatening due to the size and invasiveness of the...disregarded in the determination of probability of death due to cancer. If the same genetic factors that predispose individuals to radiation - induced cancer

  2. Pathology of Lassa Virus Infection in the Rhesus Monkey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    examined. Lassa fever ’- is an infectious, febrile disease nuclear cell infiltrates and mucosal hemorrhages. of man caused by Lassa virus (LASV), a member... virus titers, suggests that virus replication 1. Buckley, S. M., and Casals, J., 1973. Lassa fever , in the kidney parenchyma was unlikely. A few a new...A., 1973. Comparative pathology of phology and morphogenesis of arenaviruses . BDg. Lassa virus infection in monkeys, guinea pip, W.H.O., 52: 409-419

  3. Disruptions in follicle cell functions in the ovaries of rhesus monkeys during summer

    PubMed Central

    VandeVoort, Catherine A.; Mtango, Namdori R.; Midic, Uros

    2015-01-01

    Oocytes isolated from female rhesus monkeys following standard ovarian stimulation protocols during the summer months displayed a reduced capacity to mature compared with stimulation during the normal breeding season. Because the gene expression profiles of oocyte-associated cumulus cells and mural granulosa cells (CCs and GCs) are indicative of altered oocyte quality and can provide insight into intrafollicular processes that may be disrupted during oogenesis, we performed array-based transcriptome comparisons of CCs and GCs from summer and normal breeding season stimulation cycles. Summer CCs and GCs both display deficiencies in expression of mRNAs related to cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and endocrine signaling, as well as reduced expression of glycogen phosphorylase. Additionally, CCs display deficiencies in expression of mRNAs related to stress response. These results provide the first insight into the specific molecular pathways and processes that are disrupted in the follicles of rhesus macaque females during the summer season. Some of the changes seen in summer GCs and CCs have been reported in humans and in other model mammalian species. This suggests that the seasonal effects seen in the rhesus monkey may help us to understand better the mechanisms that contribute to reduced oocyte quality and fertility in humans. PMID:25586978

  4. Permeability characteristics and osmotic sensitivity of rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) oocytes.

    PubMed

    Songsasen, N; Ratterree, M S; VandeVoort, C A; Pegg, D E; Leibo, S P

    2002-07-01

    Permeability characteristics and sensitivity to osmotic shock are principal parameters that are important to derive procedures for the successful cryopreservation of mammalian oocytes. The osmotically inactive volume of rhesus monkey oocytes was determined by measuring their volumes in the presence of hypertonic solutions of sucrose from 0.2 to 1.5 mol/l, compared with their volume in isotonic TALP-HEPES solution. Boyle-van't Hoff plots at infinite osmolality indicated that the non-osmotic volumes of immature and mature oocytes were 20 and 17% respectively. Osmotic responses of oocytes exposed to 1.0 mol/l solutions of glycerol, dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) and ethylene glycol (EG) were determined. Rhesus monkey oocytes appeared to be less permeable to glycerol than to DMSO or to EG. Sensitivity of oocytes to osmotic shock was determined by exposing them to various solutions of EG (0.1 to 5.0 mol/l) and then abruptly diluting them into isotonic medium. Morphological survival, as measured by membrane integrity, of oocytes diluted out of EG depended significantly on the concentration of EG (P < 0.01). Determination of permeability characteristics and sensitivity to osmotic shock of rhesus oocytes will aid in the derivation of procedures for their cryopreservation.

  5. Personality Structure in Brown Capuchin Monkeys: Comparisons with Chimpanzees, Orangutans, and Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Morton, F. Blake; Lee, Phyllis C.; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M.; Brosnan, Sarah F.; Thierry, Bernard; Paukner, Annika; de Waal, Frans B. M.; Widness, Jane; Essler, Jennifer L.; Weiss, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Species comparisons of personality structure (i.e. how many personality dimensions and the characteristics of those dimensions) can facilitate questions about the adaptive function of personality in nonhuman primates. Here we investigate personality structure in the brown capuchin monkey (Sapajus apella), a New World primate species, and compare this structure to those of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), orangutans (Pongo spp.), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Brown capuchins evolved behavioral and cognitive traits that are qualitatively similar to those of great apes, and individual differences in behavior and cognition are closely associated with differences in personality. Thus, we hypothesized that brown capuchin personality structure would overlap more with great apes than with rhesus macaques. We obtained personality ratings from seven sites on 127 brown capuchin monkeys. Principal-components analysis identified five personality dimensions (Assertiveness, Openness, Neuroticism, Sociability, and Attentiveness), which were reliable across raters and, in a subset of subjects, significantly correlated with relevant behaviors up to a year later. Comparisons between species revealed that brown capuchins and great apes overlapped in personality structure, particularly chimpanzees in the case of Neuroticism. However, in some respects (i.e. capuchin Sociability and Openness) the similarities between capuchins and great apes were not significantly greater than those between capuchins and rhesus macaques. We discuss the relevance of our results to brown capuchin behavior, and the evolution of personality structure in primates. PMID:23668695

  6. Discrimination of faces and houses by rhesus monkeys: the role of stimulus expertise and rotation angle

    PubMed Central

    Heintz, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    The face inversion effect, or impaired recognition of upside down compared to upright faces, is used as a marker for the configural processing of faces in primates. The inversion effect in humans and chimpanzees is strongest for categories of stimuli for which subjects have considerable expertise, primarily conspecifics' faces. Moreover, discrimination performance decreases linearly as faces are incrementally rotated from upright to inverted. This suggests that rotated faces must be transformed, or normalized back into their most typical viewpoint before configural processing can ensue, and the greater the required normalization, the greater the likelihood of errors resulting. Previous studies in our lab have demonstrated a general face inversion effect in rhesus monkeys that was not influenced by expertise. Therefore, the present study examined the influence of rotation angle on the visual perception of face and nonface stimuli that varied in their level of expertise to further delineate the processes underlying the inversion effect in rhesus monkeys. Five subjects discriminated images in five orientation angles. Results showed significant linear impairments for all stimulus categories, including houses. However, compared to the upright images, only rhesus faces resulted in worse performance at rotation angles greater than 45°, suggesting stronger configural processing for stimuli for which subjects had the greatest expertise. PMID:18256863

  7. Long-Term Effects of Castration on the Skeleton of Male Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    KESSLER, MATTHEW J.; WANG, QIAN; CERRONI, ANTONIETTA M.; GRYNPAS, MARC D.; GONZALEZ VELEZ, OLGA D.; RAWLINS, RICHARD G.; ETHUN, KELLY F.; WIMSATT, JEFFREY H.; KENSLER, TERRY B.; PRITZKER, KENNETH P.H.

    2015-01-01

    While osteopenia (OPE) and osteoporosis (OPO) have been studied in various species of aging nonhuman primates and extensively in ovariectomized rhesus and cynomolgus macaques, there is virtually no information on the effects of castration on the skeleton of male nonhuman primates. Most information on castrated male primates comes from a few studies on the skeletons of eunuchs. This report used a subset of the Caribbean Primate Research Center’s (CPRC) Cayo Santiago (CS) rhesus macaque skeletal collection to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the bone mineral density (BMD) of castrated and age-matched intact males and, thereby, determine the long-term effects of castration (orchidectomy) on bone. Lumbar vertebrae, femora and crania were evaluated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA or DXA) and digital radiography augmented, when fresh tissues were available, with autoradiography and histology. Results confirmed physical examinations of long bones that castration causes changes in the skeleton of male rhesus macaques similar to those found in eunuchs, including OPE and OPO of the vertebrae and femora, thinning of the skull, and vertebral fractures and kyphosis of the spine more severe than that caused by normal aging alone. Also like eunuchs, some castrated CS male rhesus monkeys had a longer life span than intact males or females. Based on these results and the effects of castration on other tissues and organs of eunuchs, on behavior, hormone profiles and possibly on cognition and visual perception of human and nonhuman primates, and other mammals, castrated male rhesus macaques should be used with caution for laboratory studies and should be considered a separate category from intact males. Despite these caveats, the castrated male rhesus macaque should make an excellent animal model in which to test hormone replacement therapies for boys and men orchidectomized for testicular and prostate cancer. PMID:25771746

  8. Therapeutic efficacy of the small molecule GS-5734 against Ebola virus in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Warren, Travis K; Jordan, Robert; Lo, Michael K; Ray, Adrian S; Mackman, Richard L; Soloveva, Veronica; Siegel, Dustin; Perron, Michel; Bannister, Roy; Hui, Hon C; Larson, Nate; Strickley, Robert; Wells, Jay; Stuthman, Kelly S; Van Tongeren, Sean A; Garza, Nicole L; Donnelly, Ginger; Shurtleff, Amy C; Retterer, Cary J; Gharaibeh, Dima; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Kenny, Tara; Eaton, Brett P; Grimes, Elizabeth; Welch, Lisa S; Gomba, Laura; Wilhelmsen, Catherine L; Nichols, Donald K; Nuss, Jonathan E; Nagle, Elyse R; Kugelman, Jeffrey R; Palacios, Gustavo; Doerffler, Edward; Neville, Sean; Carra, Ernest; Clarke, Michael O; Zhang, Lijun; Lew, Willard; Ross, Bruce; Wang, Queenie; Chun, Kwon; Wolfe, Lydia; Babusis, Darius; Park, Yeojin; Stray, Kirsten M; Trancheva, Iva; Feng, Joy Y; Barauskas, Ona; Xu, Yili; Wong, Pamela; Braun, Molly R; Flint, Mike; McMullan, Laura K; Chen, Shan-Shan; Fearns, Rachel; Swaminathan, Swami; Mayers, Douglas L; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Lee, William A; Nichol, Stuart T; Cihlar, Tomas; Bavari, Sina

    2016-03-17

    The most recent Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa, which was unprecedented in the number of cases and fatalities, geographic distribution, and number of nations affected, highlights the need for safe, effective, and readily available antiviral agents for treatment and prevention of acute Ebola virus (EBOV) disease (EVD) or sequelae. No antiviral therapeutics have yet received regulatory approval or demonstrated clinical efficacy. Here we report the discovery of a novel small molecule GS-5734, a monophosphoramidate prodrug of an adenosine analogue, with antiviral activity against EBOV. GS-5734 exhibits antiviral activity against multiple variants of EBOV and other filoviruses in cell-based assays. The pharmacologically active nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) is efficiently formed in multiple human cell types incubated with GS-5734 in vitro, and the NTP acts as an alternative substrate and RNA-chain terminator in primer-extension assays using a surrogate respiratory syncytial virus RNA polymerase. Intravenous administration of GS-5734 to nonhuman primates resulted in persistent NTP levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (half-life, 14 h) and distribution to sanctuary sites for viral replication including testes, eyes, and brain. In a rhesus monkey model of EVD, once-daily intravenous administration of 10 mg kg(-1) GS-5734 for 12 days resulted in profound suppression of EBOV replication and protected 100% of EBOV-infected animals against lethal disease, ameliorating clinical disease signs and pathophysiological markers, even when treatments were initiated three days after virus exposure when systemic viral RNA was detected in two out of six treated animals. These results show the first substantive post-exposure protection by a small-molecule antiviral compound against EBOV in nonhuman primates. The broad-spectrum antiviral activity of GS-5734 in vitro against other pathogenic RNA viruses, including filoviruses, arenaviruses, and coronaviruses, suggests the

  9. Therapeutic Efficacy of the Small Molecule GS-5734 against Ebola Virus in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Travis K.; Jordan, Robert; Lo, Michael K.; Ray, Adrian S.; Mackman, Richard L.; Soloveva, Veronica; Siegel, Dustin; Perron, Michel; Bannister, Roy; Hui, Hon C.; Larson, Nate; Strickley, Robert; Wells, Jay; Stuthman, Kelly S.; Van Tongeren, Sean A.; Garza, Nicole L.; Donnelly, Ginger; Shurtleff, Amy C.; Retterer, Cary J.; Gharaibeh, Dima; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Kenny, Tara; Eaton, Brett P.; Grimes, Elizabeth; Welch, Lisa S.; Gomba, Laura; Wilhelmsen, Catherine L.; Nichols, Donald K.; Nuss, Jonathan E.; Nagle, Elyse R.; Kugelman, Jeffrey R.; Palacios, Gustavo; Doerffler, Edward; Neville, Sean; Carra, Ernest; Clarke, Michael O.; Zhang, Lijun; Lew, Willard; Ross, Bruce; Wang, Queenie; Chun, Kwon; Wolfe, Lydia; Babusis, Darius; Park, Yeojin; Stray, Kirsten M.; Trancheva, Iva; Feng, Joy Y.; Baraskaus, Ona; Xu, Yili; Wong, Pamela; Braun, Molly R.; Flint, Mike; McMullan, Laura K.; Chen, Shan-Shan; Fearns, Rachel; Swaminathan, Swami; Mayers, Douglas L.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Lee, William A.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Cihlar, Tomas; Bavari, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Summary The most recent Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa – unprecedented in the number of cases and fatalities, geographic distribution, and number of nations affected – highlights the need for safe, effective, and readily available antiviral agents for treatment and prevention of acute Ebola virus (EBOV) disease (EVD) or sequelae1. No antiviral therapeutics have yet received regulatory approval or demonstrated clinical efficacy. Here we describe the discovery of a novel anti-EBOV small molecule antiviral, GS-5734, a monophosphoramidate prodrug of an adenosine analog. GS-5734 exhibits antiviral activity against multiple variants of EBOV in cell-based assays. The pharmacologically active nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) is efficiently formed in multiple human cell types incubated with GS-5734 in vitro, and the NTP acts as an alternate substrate and RNA-chain terminator in primer-extension assays utilizing a surrogate respiratory syncytial virus RNA polymerase. Intravenous administration of GS-5734 to nonhuman primates resulted in persistent NTP levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (half-life = 14 h) and distribution to sanctuary sites for viral replication including testes, eye, and brain. In a rhesus monkey model of EVD, once daily intravenous administration of 10 mg/kg GS-5734 for 12 days resulted in profound suppression of EBOV replication and protected 100% of EBOV-infected animals against lethal disease, ameliorating clinical disease signs and pathophysiological markers, even when treatments were initiated three days after virus exposure when systemic viral RNA was detected in two of six treated animals. These results provide the first substantive, post-exposure protection by a small-molecule antiviral compound against EBOV in nonhuman primates. The broad-spectrum antiviral activity of GS-5734 in vitro against other pathogenic RNA viruses – including filoviruses, arenaviruses, and coronaviruses – suggests the potential for expanded indications

  10. Population density-dependent hair cortisol concentrations in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Dettmer, A M; Novak, M A; Meyer, J S; Suomi, S J

    2014-04-01

    Population density is known to influence acute measures of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity in a variety of species, including fish, deer, birds, and humans. However, the effects of population density on levels of chronic stress are unknown. Given the fact that exposure to chronically elevated levels of circulating glucocorticoids results in a host of health disparities in animals and humans alike, it is important to understand how population density may impact chronic stress. We assessed hair cortisol concentrations (HCCs), which are reliable indicators of chronic HPA axis activity, in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) to determine the influence of population density on these values. In Experiment 1, we compared HCCs of monkeys living in high-density (HD; 1 monkey/0.87m(2)) and low-density (LD; 1 monkey/63.37m(2)) environments (N=236 hair samples) and found that HD monkeys exhibited higher hair cortisol across all age categories (infant, juvenile, young adult, adult, and aged) except infancy and aged (F(5)=4.240, p=0.001), for which differences were nearly significant. HD monkeys also received more severe fight wounds than LD monkeys (χ(2)=26.053, p<0.001), though no effects of dominance status emerged. In Experiment 2, we examined how HCCs change with fluctuating population levels across 5 years in the adult LD monkeys (N=155 hair samples) and found that increased population density was significantly positively correlated with HCCs in this semi-naturalistic population (r(s)=0.975, p=0.005). These are the first findings to demonstrate that increased population density is associated with increased chronic, endogenous glucocorticoid exposure in a nonhuman primate species. We discuss the implications of these findings with respect to laboratory research, population ecology, and human epidemiology.

  11. Long-term vasectomy: effects on the occurrence and extent of atherosclerosis in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, T B; Alexander, N J

    1980-01-01

    We demonstrated previously that atherosclerosis develops more extensively in vasectomized cynomolgus macaques fed an atherogenic diet and speculated that the immunologic response to sperm antigens may have exacerbated the atherosclerosis. We report here that rhesus monkeys vasectomized for 9-14 yr and fed monkey chow (devoid of cholesterol and low in fat) rather than an atherogenic diet also had more extensive and severe atherosclerosis than did control animals of the same age. The extent of atherosclerosis was considered as the percentage of intimal surface with plaques. No control animals were found to have plaques in the thoracic aorta, but 7 of 10 vasectomized monkeys were affected. The plaques in the vasectomized monkeys occupied about 13% of the intimal surface. In 4 of 7 control monkeys and 7 of 10 vasectomized monkeys there were lesions in the abdominal aortas; the lesions were considerably more extensive and severe in the vasectomized animals. Lesions were also more common in iliac arteries of vasectomized animals, and the extent was increased about threefold. Plaques were seen at the carotid bifurcation in all of the animals of both the control and vasectomized groups. The carotid bifurcation plaques of the vasectomized monkeys were larger than those of the control animals on the right but not on the left side. Histologically, the lesions of vasectomized monkeys did not appear to be qualitatively different from those of control animals, even though they were larger and contained more collagen, lipid, and mucopolysaccharides. Grossly, the distribution of the lesions in the vasectomized animals was different from that in the control animals, and that of lesions induced by atherogenic diets, i.e., the lesions were distributed randomly within the artery rather than around bifurcations. More extensive atherosclerosis was noted among vasectomized animals that were found to lack demonstrable circulating free antisperm antibodies. On the basis of the observations

  12. Population density-dependent hair cortisol concentrations in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, A.M.; Novak, M.A.; Meyer, J.S.; Suomi, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Population density is known to influence acute measures of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity in a variety of species, including fish, deer, birds, and humans. However, the effects of population density on levels of chronic stress are unknown. Given the fact that exposure to chronically elevated levels of circulating glucocorticoids results in a host of health disparities in animals and humans alike, it is important to understand how population density may impact chronic stress. We assessed hair cortisol concentrations (HCCs), which are reliable indicators of chronic HPA axis activity, in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) to determine the influence of population density on these values. In Experiment 1, we compared HCCs of monkeys living in high-density (HD; 1 monkey/0.87m2) and low-density (LD; 1 monkey/63.37m2) environments (N=236 hair samples) and found that HD monkeys exhibited higher hair cortisol across all age categories (infant, juvenile, young adult, adult, and aged) except infancy and aged (F(5)=4.240, p=0.001), for which differences were nearly significant. HD monkeys also received more severe fight wounds than LD monkeys (χ2=26.053, p<0.001), though no effects of dominance status emerged. In Experiment 2, we examined how HCCs change with fluctuating population levels across five years in the adult LD monkeys (N=155 hair samples) and found that increased population density was significantly positively correlated with HCCs in this semi-naturalistic population (r(s)=0.975, p=0.005). These are the first findings to demonstrate that increased population density is associated with increased chronic, endogenous glucocorticoid exposure in a nonhuman primate species. We discuss the implications of these findings with respect to laboratory research, population ecology, and human epidemiology. PMID:24636502

  13. Dexamethasone increases UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity towards bilirubin, oestradiol and testosterone in foetal liver from rhesus monkey during late gestation.

    PubMed Central

    Leakey, J E; Althaus, Z R; Bailey, J R; Slikker, W

    1985-01-01

    We previously showed that in perinatal rhesus monkeys hepatic UDP-glucuronyltransferase activities appear to develop differentially in two clusters, analogous to those of the rat. We demonstrate here that hepatic UDP-glucuronyltransferase activities differ between the rat and the rhesus monkey in their response to glucocorticoids. Treatment of pregnant rhesus monkeys with dexamethasone during late gestation increases UDP-glucuronyltransferase activities towards bilirubin, oestradiol and testosterone in the foetal-liver microsomal fraction to 25, 4 and 4 times their low control values respectively. Analogous dexamethasone treatment in rat fails to increase these activities significantly in the foetal liver. These findings suggest that maternal glucocorticoid therapy in late gestation could greatly increase the newborn primate's capacity to glucuronidate bilirubin. PMID:3919703

  14. Investigations of rhesus monkey video-task performance: evidence for enrichment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, D. A.; Rumbaugh, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed the Language Research Center's Computerized Test System (LRC-CTS) for psychological research. Basically, the LRC-CTS is a battery of software tasks--computerized versions of many of the classic testing paradigms of cognitive and comparative psychology--and the hardware required to administer them. An XT- or 386-compatible computer is connected to a color monitor, onto which computer-generated stimuli are presented. Sound feedback is delivered through an external speaker/amplifier, and a joystick is used as an input device. The animals reach through the mesh of their home cages to manipulate the joystick, which causes isomorphic movements of a cursor on the screen thereby allowing animals to respond according to the varied demands of the tasks. Correct responses are rewarded with a fruit-flavored chow pellet. Using this technology, we have trained and tested rhesus monkeys, a variety of apes, human adults, and normally developing or mentally retarded human children. Other labs using the LRC-CTS are beginning to report encouraging results with other monkey species as well. From this research, a number of interesting and important psychological findings have resulted. In the present paper, however, evidence will be reviewed which suggests that the LRC-CTS is an effective means of providing environmental enrichment to singly housed rhesus monkeys.

  15. Investigations of rhesus monkey video-task performance: evidence for enrichment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, D. A.; Rumbaugh, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed the Language Research Center's Computerized Test System (LRC-CTS) for psychological research. Basically, the LRC-CTS is a battery of software tasks--computerized versions of many of the classic testing paradigms of cognitive and comparative psychology--and the hardware required to administer them. An XT- or 386-compatible computer is connected to a color monitor, onto which computer-generated stimuli are presented. Sound feedback is delivered through an external speaker/amplifier, and a joystick is used as an input device. The animals reach through the mesh of their home cages to manipulate the joystick, which causes isomorphic movements of a cursor on the screen thereby allowing animals to respond according to the varied demands of the tasks. Correct responses are rewarded with a fruit-flavored chow pellet. Using this technology, we have trained and tested rhesus monkeys, a variety of apes, human adults, and normally developing or mentally retarded human children. Other labs using the LRC-CTS are beginning to report encouraging results with other monkey species as well. From this research, a number of interesting and important psychological findings have resulted. In the present paper, however, evidence will be reviewed which suggests that the LRC-CTS is an effective means of providing environmental enrichment to singly housed rhesus monkeys.

  16. Development of a Cognitive Testing Apparatus for Socially Housed Mother-Peer-Reared Infant Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Amanda M.; Murphy, Ashley M.; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Though cognitive testing of infant monkeys has been practiced for the past 40 years, these assessments have been limited primarily to nursery-reared infants due to the confounds of separating mother-reared infants for assessments. Here we describe a pilot study in which we developed a cognitive testing apparatus for socially housed, mother-peer-reared rhesus macaques under one year of age (Macaca mulatta) that allowed the infants to freely return to their mothers for contact comfort. Infants aged 151.2±18.3 days (mean±SEM; n=5) were trained and tested on an object detour reach task. Infants completed training in 5.0±0.2 days, and completed testing in 6.2±0.9 days. Across four days of testing, infants improved to nearly errorless performance (Friedman test: χ2=13.27, df=3, p=0.004) and learned to do the task more quickly (Friedman test: χ2=11.69, df=3, p=0.009). These are the first cognitive data in group-housed, mother-peer-reared rhesus monkeys under one year of age, and they underscore the utility of this apparatus for studying cognitive development in a normative population of infant monkeys. PMID:25782609

  17. Fetal Iron Deficiency and Genotype Influence Emotionality in Infant Rhesus Monkeys123

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Mari S; Hogrefe, Casey E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anemia during the third trimester of fetal development affects one-third of the pregnancies in the United States and has been associated with postnatal behavioral outcomes. This study examines how fetal iron deficiency (ID) interacts with the fetal monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) genotype. MAOA metabolizes monoamine neurotransmitters. MAOA polymorphisms in humans affect temperament and modify the influence of early adverse environments on later behavior. Objective: The aim of the study was to advance translation of developmental ID research in animal models by taking into account genetic factors that influence outcomes in human populations. Methods: Male infant rhesus monkeys 3–4 mo old born to mothers fed an ID (10 ppm iron) diet were compared with controls (100 ppm iron). Infant monkeys with high- or low-transcription rate MAOA polymorphisms were equally distributed between diet groups. Behavioral responses to a series of structured experiences were recorded during a 25-h separation of the infants from their mothers. Results: Infant monkeys with low-transcription MAOA polymorphisms more clearly demonstrated the following ID effects suggested in earlier studies: a 4% smaller head circumference, a 39% lower cortisol response to social separation, a 129% longer engagement with novel visual stimuli, and 33% lesser withdrawal in response to a human intruder. The high MAOA genotype ID monkeys demonstrated other ID effects: less withdrawal and emotionality after social separation and lower “fearful” ratings. Conclusion: MAOA × ID interactions support the role of monoamine neurotransmitters in prenatal ID effects in rhesus monkeys and the potential involvement of common human polymorphisms in determining the pattern of neurobehavioral effects produced by inadequate prenatal nutrition. PMID:25733484

  18. Relevance and clinical significance of serum resistin level in obese T2DM rhesus monkey models.

    PubMed

    Qi, S-D; He, Z-L; Chen, Y; Ma, J; Yu, W-H; Li, Y-Y; Yang, F-M; Wang, J-B; Chen, L-X; Zhao, Y; Lu, S-Y

    2015-09-01

    Resistin is a type of hormone-like adipocytokines, which is secreted specifically by adipocytes. It may be a key factor in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) from obesity- associated insulin resistance due to results that show that it has a close relationship with insulin resistance in rodents. We utilized the rhesus monkeys as study objects to preliminarily test the association with glucose metabolism and to conduct a correlation analysis for clinical parameters and serum resistin levels in obese rhesus monkey models of T2DM. The results suggested that resistin was significantly increased in T2DM monkeys (P <0.01), and that resistin had a positive correlation respectively with total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting insulin (FPI) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), Insulin resistance index (HOA-IR), but a negative correlation with islet β-cell function (HOMA-β). In the course of glucose metabolism, reverse release change of resistin and insulin in T2DM monkeys occurred, but the phenomenon that was not observed in the control group, these findings indicated that resistin negatively regulated and interfered with carbohydrate metabolism in T2DM monkey models. The character of the releasing change of resistin might be a unique process in T2DM. Therefore, all of the results could provide references for clinical diagnostic criteria for human cases of T2DM, and could have clinical significance for obese T2DM diagnosis and degree of insulin resistance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Empty Sets as Part of the Numerical Continuum: Conceptual Precursors to the Zero Concept in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Dustin J.; Rugani, Rosa; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the current research was to explore whether monkeys possess conceptual precursors necessary for understanding zero. We trained rhesus monkeys on a nonsymbolic numerical matching-to-sample task, and on a numerical ordering task. We then introduced nondifferentially reinforced trials that contained empty sets to determine whether monkeys would treat empty sets as numerical values. All monkeys successfully matched and ordered the empty sets without any training. Accuracy showed distance effects, indicating that they treated empty sets as values on a numerical continuum. PMID:19397383

  20. Endovascular ischemic stroke models of adult rhesus monkeys: a comparison of two endovascular methods

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Chen, Jian; Wang, Bincheng; Zhang, Mo; Shi, Jingfei; Ma, Yanhui; Zhu, Zixin; Yan, Feng; He, Xiaoduo; Li, Shengli; Dornbos III, David; Ding, Yuchuan; Ji, Xunming

    2016-01-01

    To further investigate and improve upon current stroke models in nonhuman primates, infarct size, neurologic function and survival were evaluated in two endovascular ischemic models in sixteen rhesus monkeys. The first method utilized a micro-catheter or an inflatable balloon to occlude the M1 segment in six monkeys. In the second model, an autologous clot was injected via a micro-catheter into the M1 segment in ten monkeys. MRI scanning was performed on all monkeys both at baseline and 3 hours after the onset of ischemia. Spetzler neurologic functions were assessed post-operatively, and selective perfusion deficits were confirmed by DSA and MRI in all monkeys. Animals undergoing micro-catheter or balloon occlusion demonstrated more profound hemiparesis, larger infarct sizes, lower Spetzler neurologic scores and increased mortality compared to the thrombus occlusion group. In animals injected with the clot, there was no evidence of dissolution, and the thrombus was either near the injection site (M1) or flushed into the superior division of the MCA (M2). All animals survived the M2 occlusion. M1 occlusion with thrombus generated 50% mortality. This study highlighted clinically important differences in these two models, providing a platform for further study of a translational thromboembolic model of acute ischemic stroke. PMID:27534985

  1. Metabolism of kadsurenone and 9,10-dihydrokadsurenone in rhesus monkeys and rat liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, K.L.; Chang, M.N.; Chabala, J.C.; Chiu, S.H.; Eline, D.; Hucker, H.B.; Sweeney, B.M.; White, S.D.; Arison, B.H.; Smith, J.L.

    1988-09-01

    The metabolism of the PAF antagonists kadsurenone and tritium-labeled 9,10-dihydrokadsurenone was studied in rhesus monkeys and rat liver microsomes. The monkey metabolites of the two drugs were isolated as their glucuronide conjugates from the urine of iv dosed males. The metabolites from both monkey and microsomal metabolism were purified by reverse phase HPLC and identified by spectral (NMR, UV, and mass spectrometric) analysis. The principal pathway of biotransformation of the tritium-labeled 9,10-dihydrokadsurenone in monkeys was hydroxylation of the C-5 propyl side chain to give two metabolites, 10-hydroxy-9,10-dihydrokadsurenone and 9-hydroxy-9,10-dihydrokadsurenone. These compounds were excreted as glucuronides. Microsomal incubation of tritium-labeled 9,10-dihydrokadsurenone yielded the 10-, 9-, and 8-hydroxy-9,10-dihydrokadsurenone as major metabolites. Kadsurenone was also metabolized at the C-5 side chain, an allyl group. The monoglucuronide of 9,10-dihydroxykadsurenone was isolated from monkey urine. Spectral analysis was not definitive as to the site of conjugation, and the structure of the metabolite was assigned as the C-10 conjugate. A major metabolite of rat liver microsomal incubation of kadsurenone was 9,10-dihydroxykadsurenone.

  2. Evidence for motor planning in monkeys: rhesus macaques select efficient grips when transporting spoons.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Eliza L; Berthier, Neil E; Metevier, Christina M; Novak, Melinda A

    2011-07-01

    McCarty and colleagues (1999) developed the elevated spoon task to measure motor planning in human infants. In this task, a spoon containing food was placed on an elevated apparatus that supported both ends of the spoon. The handle was oriented to the left or right on different trials. We presented naïve adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with the elevated spoon problem, and observed how monkeys learned the affordances of spoons over sessions. Strikingly, monkeys developed two different strategies for efficient spoon transport in just 12 to 36 trials. In subsequent testing with a novel double bowl spoon approximately 1 year later, monkeys demonstrated that they were attending to the baited spoon bowl and continued to select efficient grips for transporting the spoon. Monkey data were contrasted with previous studies in human infants using a perception-action perspective in an effort to understand the fundamentals of tool use and motor planning that may be common in the development of these abilities across species and their origins in human behavior. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Interactions of acetylmethadol or methadone with other drugs in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Downs, D A

    1979-03-01

    Behavioral effects and blood or plasma levels of d-amphetamine, ethanol, cocaine, and diazepam were examined in rhesus monkeys treated chronically with alpha-l-acetylmethadol (LAAM), methadone, or vehicle. Chronic treatment with the opiates failed to alter blood or plasma levels and behavioral effects of d-amphetamine or ethanol. LAAM-maintained monkeys were somewhat less sensitive to rate-decreasing effects of cocaine on schedule-controlled responding, but cocaine plasma levels and half-lives generally did not differ across the chronic treatment conditions. Behavioral depression after diazepam was prolonged substantially in LAAM- and methadone-maintained monkeys, but blood levels of diazepam and metabolites were not increased prolonged in those animals. Naloxone partially antagonized the residual depression LAAM- and methadone-maintained monkeys 24 hr after diazepam, but had no effect on the weaker sesidual depression in vehicle-maintained aniamals. Thus, diazepam appeared to interfere with the metabolic inactivation of the opiates. One LAAM-maintained monkey showed recurrent episodes of LAAM overdose and eventually died during the course of the study.

  4. EVIDENCE FOR MOTOR PLANNING IN MONKEYS: RHESUS MACAQUES SELECT EFFICIENT GRIPS WHEN TRANSPORTING SPOONS

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Eliza L.; Berthier, Neil E.; Metevier, Christina M.; Novak, Melinda A.

    2014-01-01

    McCarty and colleagues (1999) developed the elevated spoon task to measure motor planning in human infants. In this task, a spoon containing food was placed on an elevated apparatus that supported both ends of the spoon. The handle was oriented to the left or right on different trials. We presented naïve adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with the elevated spoon problem, and observed how monkeys learned the affordances of spoons over sessions. Strikingly, monkeys developed two different strategies for efficient spoon transport in just 12 to 36 trials. In subsequent testing with a novel double bowl spoon approximately 1 year later, monkeys demonstrated that they were attending to the baited spoon bowl and continued to select efficient grips for transporting the spoon. Monkey data were contrasted with previous studies in human infants using a perception-action perspective in an effort to understand the fundamentals of tool use and motor planning that may be common in the development of these abilities across species and their origins in human behavior. PMID:21676101

  5. Spontaneous voice–face identity matching by rhesus monkeys for familiar conspecifics and humans

    PubMed Central

    Sliwa, Julia; Duhamel, Jean-René; Pascalis, Olivier; Wirth, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of a particular individual occurs when we reactivate links between current perceptual inputs and the previously formed representation of that person. This recognition can be achieved by identifying, separately or simultaneously, distinct elements such as the face, silhouette, or voice as belonging to one individual. In humans, those different cues are linked into one complex conceptual representation of individual identity. Here we tested whether rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) also have a cognitive representation of identity by evaluating whether they exhibit cross-modal individual recognition. Further, we assessed individual recognition of familiar conspecifics and familiar humans. In a free preferential looking time paradigm, we found that, for both species, monkeys spontaneously matched the faces of known individuals to their voices. This finding demonstrates that rhesus macaques possess a cross-modal cognitive representation of individuals that extends from conspecifics to humans, revealing the adaptive potential of identity recognition for individuals of socioecological relevance. PMID:21220340

  6. Breadth of cellular and humoral immune responses elicited in rhesus monkeys by multi-valent mosaic and consensus immunogens.

    PubMed

    Santra, Sampa; Muldoon, Mark; Watson, Sydeaka; Buzby, Adam; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Carlson, Kevin R; Mach, Linh; Kong, Wing-Pui; McKee, Krisha; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Rao, Srinivas S; Mascola, John R; Nabel, Gary J; Korber, Bette T; Letvin, Norman L

    2012-07-05

    To create an HIV-1 vaccine that generates sufficient breadth of immune recognition to protect against the genetically diverse forms of the circulating virus, we have been exploring vaccines based on consensus and mosaic protein designs. Increasing the valency of a mosaic immunogen cocktail increases epitope coverage but with diminishing returns, as increasingly rare epitopes are incorporated into the mosaic proteins. In this study we compared the immunogenicity of 2-valent and 3-valent HIV-1 envelope mosaic immunogens in rhesus monkeys. Immunizations with the 3-valent mosaic immunogens resulted in a modest increase in the breadth of vaccine-elicited T lymphocyte responses compared to the 2-valent mosaic immunogens. However, the 3-valent mosaic immunogens elicited significantly higher neutralizing responses to Tier 1 viruses than the 2-valent mosaic immunogens. These findings underscore the potential utility of polyvalent mosaic immunogens for eliciting both cellular and humoral immune responses to HIV-1. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Breadth of cellular and humoral immune responses elicited in rhesus monkeys by multi-valent mosaic and consensus immunogens

    PubMed Central

    Santra, Sampa; Muldoon, Mark; Watson, Sydeaka; Buzby, Adam; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Carlson, Kevin R.; Mach, Linh; Kong, Wing-Pui; McKee, Krisha; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Rao, Srinivas S.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Korber, Bette T.; Letvin, Norman L.

    2013-01-01

    To create an HIV-1 vaccine that generates sufficient breadth of immune recognition to protect against the genetically diverse forms of the circulating virus, we have been exploring vaccines based on consensus and mosaic protein designs. Increasing the valency of a mosaic immunogen cocktail increases epitope coverage but with diminishing returns, as increasingly rare epitopes are incorporated into the mosaic proteins. In this study we compared the immunogenicity of 2-valent and 3-valent HIV-1 envelope mosaic immunogens in rhesus monkeys. Immunizations with the 3-valent mosaic immunogens resulted in a modest increase in the breadth of vaccine-elicited T lymphocyte responses compared to the 2-valent mosaic immunogens. However, the 3-valent mosaic immunogens elicited significantly higher neutralizing responses to Tier 1 viruses than the 2-valent mosaic immunogens. These findings underscore the potential utility of polyvalent mosaic immunogens for eliciting both cellular and humoral immune responses to HIV-1. PMID:22521913

  8. Iron deficiency anemia and affective response in rhesus monkey infants.

    PubMed

    Golub, Mari S; Hogrefe, Casey E; Widaman, Keith F; Capitanio, John P

    2009-01-01

    Infant iron deficiency anemia (IDA) occurs spontaneously in monkey populations as it does in humans, providing a model for understanding effects on brain and behavior. A set of 34 monkey infants identified as IDA (hemoglobin <11 g/dl) over a 5-year period at the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) was compared to a set of 57 controls (hemoglobin >12 g/dl) matched for age and caging location. The infants had participated in a Biobehavioral Assessment conducted at 3-4 months of age at CNPRC that included measures of behavioral and adrenocortical response to a novel environment. IDA males differed from control males in two factors ("activity," "emotionality") derived from observational data taken on the first and second day of the exposure to the novel environment. In the male infants, IDA was associated with less restriction of activity in the novel environment on both days and less emotionality on the second day (p < .05). IDA males also displayed less response to approach by a human (human intruder test) than did control males. IDA females did not differ from controls. Adrenocortical response was not significantly affected. These findings may be relevant to functional deficits in human infants with IDA that influence later behavior.

  9. Iron Deficiency Anemia and Affective Response in Rhesus Monkey Infants

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Mari S.; Hogrefe, Casey E.; Capitanio, John P.; Widaman, Keith F.

    2012-01-01

    Infant iron deficiency anemia (IDA) occurs spontaneously in monkey populations as it does in humans, providing a model for understanding effects on brain and behavior. A set of 34 monkey infants identified as IDA (hemoglobin <11 g/dL) over a 5-year period at the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) was compared to a set of 57 controls (hemoglobin >12 g/dL) matched for age and caging location. The infants had participated in a Biobehavioral Assessment conducted at 3–4 months of age at CNPRC that included measures of behavioral and adrenocortical response to a novel environment. IDA males differed from control males in two factors (“activity”, “emotionality”) derived from observational data taken on the first and second day of the exposure to the novel environment. In the male infants, IDA was associated with less restriction of activity in the novel environment on both days and less emotionality on the second day (p<.05). IDA males also displayed less response to approach by a human (human intruder test) than did control males. IDA females did not differ from controls. Adrenocortical response was not significantly affected. These findings may be relevant to functional deficits in human infants with IDA that influence later behavior. PMID:18814183

  10. Plasmodium coatneyi in the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) as a model of malaria in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Davison, B B; Cogswell, F B; Baskin, G B; Falkenstein, K P; Henson, E W; Tarantal, A F; Krogstad, D J

    1998-08-01

    Pregnant women with Plasmodium falciparum infection are at increased risk for complications such as anemia and cerebral malaria. In addition, the infants of these women suffer intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), low birth weight (LBW), congenital infection, and high infant mortality. Although much has been learned from studies of malaria during human pregnancy, progress has been limited by the lack of a suitable animal model. Nonhuman primates are of particular interest because, other than the armadillo, they are the only animals with a discoidal, villous, hemochorial placenta like that of humans. We have established a model of malaria during human pregnancy by inoculating pregnant rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with Plasmodium coatneyi (a sequestering parasite) during the first trimester. In our initial experiment, four monkeys were inoculated with a fresh inoculum containing 10(8) viable parasites from an infected donor monkey. All four monkeys became parasitemic seven days postinoculation (PI) and three monkeys aborted 7-10 days PI coincident with high peak parasitemias (41,088-374,325 parasites/mm3). Although abortion is one of the outcomes observed in Plasmodium-infected women, the intent of this study was to examine the effects of Plasmodium infection throughout gestation. Since the rapid onset of high parasitemia may have been responsible for the abortions, a decision was made to reduce the size of the effective inoculum. Six additional pregnant monkeys were inoculated with a frozen isolate taken from the same donor containing 10(6) parasites. These six animals became parasitemic by 14 days PI and, along with monkey E412, carried their infants to term. These seven infants weighed significantly less at term than the infants of uninfected mothers (P = 0.0355). Symmetrical IUGR was detected by ultrasound in one fetus with an LBW of 334 g. Another LBW infant (300 g) had asymmetrical growth retardation, which has been associated with uteroplacental

  11. Improved Methods for Electroacupuncture and Electromyographic Recordings in Normal and Parkinsonian Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Feng; Fan, Xiaotong; Grondin, Richard; Edwards, Ramsey; Forman, Eric; Moorehead, Jennifer; Gerhardt, Greg; Wang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Zhiming

    2010-01-01

    Although acupuncture has been widely and routinely used in healthcare in the USA, its use has been based more on empirical observation than on scientific knowledge. Therefore, there is a great need for better understanding the underlying mechanism(s) of action. A great body of evidence supports that nonhuman primates are a candidate for studying human diseases. However, the use of nonhuman primates in neurophysiological, neuroimaging and neurochemical studies is extremely challenging, especially under fully conscious, alert conditions. In the present study, we developed a protocol for safely performing acupuncture, electro-acupuncture (EA) and electromyography (EMG) in both normal nonhuman primates and animals with parkinsonian-like symptoms. Four normal and four hemiparkinsonian middle-aged rhesus monkeys were extensively trained, behaviorally monitored, and received both EA and EMG for several months. The results demonstrated that (1) all rhesus monkeys used in the study could be trained for procedures including EA and EMG; (2) all animals tolerated the procedures involving needle/electrode insertion; (3) EA procedures used in the study did not adversely alter the animal’s locomotor activities; rather, MPTP-treated animals showed a significant improvement in movement speed; and (4) EMG detected significant differences in muscle activity between the arms with and without MPTP-induced rigidity. Our results support that rhesus monkeys can be used as an experimental animal model to study EA and that EMG has the potential to be used to objectively assess the effects of antiparkinsonian therapies. The results also indicate that animals, especially those with parkinsonian-like symptoms, could benefit from long-term EA stimulations. PMID:20654649

  12. Effects of Vestibular Prosthesis Electrode Implantation and Stimulation on Hearing in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y.; Della Santina, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and activation on hearing in rhesus monkeys, we measured auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) in four rhesus monkeys before and after unilateral implantation of vestibular prosthesis electrodes in each of 3 left semicircular canals (SCC). Each of the 3 left SCCs were implanted with electrodes via a transmastoid approach. Right ears, which served as controls, were not surgically manipulated. Hearing tests were conducted before implantation (BI) and then 4 weeks post implantation both without electrical stimulation (NS) and with electrical stimulation (S). During the latter condition, prosthetic electrical stimuli encoding 3 dimensions of head angular velocity were delivered to the 3 ampullary branches of the left vestibular nerve via each of 3 electrode pairs of a multichannel vestibular prosthesis. Electrical stimuli comprised charge-balanced biphasic pulses at a baseline rate of 94 pulses/sec, with pulse frequency modulated from 48–222 pulses/s by head angular velocity. ABR hearing thresholds to clicks and tone pips at 1, 2, and 4 kHz increased by 5–10 dB from BI to NS and increased another ~5 dB from NS to S in implanted ears. No significant change was seen in right ears. DPOAE amplitudes decreased by 2–14 dB from BI to NS in implanted ears. There was a slight but insignificant decrease of DPOAE amplitude and a corresponding increase of DPOAE/Noise floor ratio between NS and S in implanted ears. Vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and activation have small but measurable effects on hearing in rhesus monkeys. Coupled with the clinical observation that patients with cochlear implants only rarely exhibit signs of vestibular injury or spurious vestibular nerve stimulation, these results suggest that although implantation and activation of multichannel vestibular prosthesis electrodes in human will carry a risk of hearing loss

  13. Visual recognition memory and auditory brainstem response in infant rhesus monkeys exposed perinatally to environmental tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Golub, Mari S; Slotkin, Theodore A; Tarantal, Alice F; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2007-06-02

    The impact of perinatal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) on cognitive development is controversial. We exposed rhesus monkeys to ETS or filtered air (5 animals per group) beginning in utero on day 50 of pregnancy and continuing throughout postnatal testing. In infancy, we evaluated both groups for visual recognition memory and auditory function (auditory brainstem response). The ETS group showed significantly less novelty preference in the visual recognition task whereas no effects on auditory function were detected. These preliminary results support the view that perinatal ETS exposure has adverse effects on cognitive function and indicate further that rhesus monkeys may provide a valuable nonhuman primate model for investigating this link.

  14. Transplantation of Adult Monkey Neural Stem Cells into A Contusion Spinal Cord Injury Model in Rhesus Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Hajinasrollah, Mostafa; Zare Mehrjerdi, Nargess; Azizi, Hossein; Hemmesi, Katayoun; Moghiminasr, Reza; Azhdari, Zahra; Talebi, Ardeshir; Mohitmafi, Soroush; Vosough Taqi Dizaj, Ahmad; Sharifi, Giuve; Baharvand, Hossein; Rezaee, Omidvar; Kiani, Sahar

    2014-01-01

    Objective Currently, cellular transplantation for spinal cord injuries (SCI) is the subject of numerous preclinical studies. Among the many cell types in the adult brain, there is a unique subpopulation of neural stem cells (NSC) that can self-renew and differentiate into neurons. The study aims, therefore, to explore the efficacy of adult monkey NSC (mNSC) in a primate SCI model. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, isolated mNSCs were analyzed by flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and RT-PCR. Next, BrdU-labeled cells were transplanted into a SCI model. The SCI animal model was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological analysis. Animals were clinically observed for 6 months. Results Analysis confirmed homing of mNSCs into the injury site. Transplanted cells expressed neuronal markers (TubIII). Hind limb performance improved in trans- planted animals based on Tarlov’s scale and our established behavioral tests for monkeys. Conclusion Our findings have indicated that mNSCs can facilitate recovery in contusion SCI models in rhesus macaque monkeys. Additional studies are necessary to determine the im- provement mechanisms after cell transplantation. PMID:24567941

  15. Viewing preferences of rhesus monkeys related to memory for complex pictures, colours and faces.

    PubMed

    Wilson, F A; Goldman-Rakic, P S

    1994-01-31

    In order to determine the preferences of rhesus monkeys for visual stimuli, their eye movements were measured in response to presentations of complex pictures, fields of uniform colour, and of faces using the scleral search coil technique. The monkeys (n = 4) controlled both the onset and offset of the stimuli by the direction of their gaze. Each stimulus was presented 4 times, with 0 or 2, and 36 or 38 trials between successive presentations. Several trends were apparent in their scanning behaviour: (1) all 4 monkeys spent more time looking at pictures and faces compared to colour fields. As individuals, they differed in their overall propensity in looking at visual stimuli: monkeys that spent the most (or least) time looking at pictures spent the most (or least) time looking at colour fields. (2) Although the monkeys appeared to prefer pictures and faces to colour fields as measured by gaze duration, preferences for individual pictures, faces and colour fields were not evident. (3) Memory for recently presented stimuli substantially affected gaze duration which was significantly longer for the first compared to the second presentation of the pictures and faces, and memory was estimated to influence gaze duration over as many as 38 intervening trials. These effects were not significant in the case of colour fields. (4) There were no significant differences either in the average latencies to initiate eye movements or the number of saccades on the first and second presentations of pictures, colors or faces for the 4 monkeys. However, the average latencies to the first eye movement within a trial were longer for colour fields than for pictures for all 4 monkeys. Individual monkeys differed substantially in their mean latencies for the initiation of the first eye movement within a trial, which ranged from 235 ms to 414 ms in the two extreme cases. (5) At the presentation of faces, the monkeys tended to make saccades to major facial features, and only occasionally to

  16. Mirror-induced self-directed behaviors in rhesus monkeys after visual-somatosensory training.

    PubMed

    Chang, Liangtang; Fang, Qin; Zhang, Shikun; Poo, Mu-ming; Gong, Neng

    2015-01-19

    Mirror self-recognition is a hallmark of higher intelligence in humans. Most children recognize themselves in the mirror by 2 years of age. In contrast to human and some great apes, monkeys have consistently failed the standard mark test for mirror self-recognition in all previous studies. Here, we show that rhesus monkeys could acquire mirror-induced self-directed behaviors resembling mirror self-recognition following training with visual-somatosensory association. Monkeys were trained on a monkey chair in front of a mirror to touch a light spot on their faces produced by a laser light that elicited an irritant sensation. After 2-5 weeks of training, monkeys had learned to touch a face area marked by a non-irritant light spot or odorless dye in front of a mirror and by a virtual face mark on the mirroring video image on a video screen. Furthermore, in the home cage, five out of seven trained monkeys showed typical mirror-induced self-directed behaviors, such as touching the mark on the face or ear and then looking at and/or smelling their fingers, as well as spontaneously using the mirror to explore normally unseen body parts. Four control monkeys of a similar age that went through mirror habituation but had no training of visual-somatosensory association did not pass any mark tests and did not exhibit mirror-induced self-directed behaviors. These results shed light on the origin of mirror self-recognition and suggest a new approach to studying its neural mechanism.

  17. Characterization of Soman Toxicity in Atropine and Oxime (HI-6 and MMB- 4) Treated Rhesus Monkeys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-30

    Challenged Rhesus Monkeys Pretreated with Pyridostigmine Bromi deo. 3 15. Approval Signatures: P Carl T. 0lson, 0.V.M., Ph.D. t- .3 Study Director P...taken to avoid open flame or heat that may ignite them. F. Safety Regulrements: S 1. Hoods: Hood face velocity must average 100 L 10 Ifpm. The average...S thickness Carrier Gas: Helium Velocity : 30 L S ca/sec for Helium Hake-up Gas: 30 L S *lamin Detector : Flame Ionization Detector (FIO) Oetector

  18. Effects of Head-down Tilt on Nerve Conduction in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Yun; Liu, Li-Zhi; Chen, Zhao-Hui; Dai, Zhong-Quan; Huang, Xu-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Few studies have focused on peripheral nerve conduction during exposure to microgravity. The −6° head-down tilt (HDT) comprises an experimental model used to simulate the space flight environment. This study investigated nerve conduction characteristics of rhesus monkeys before and after prolonged exposure to HDT. Methods: Six rhesus monkeys (3–4 years old) were tilted backward 6° from the horizontal. Nerve conduction studies (NCSs) were performed on the median, ulnar, tibial, and fibular motor nerves. Analysis of variance with a randomized block design was conducted to compare the differences in the NCS before and 7, 21, and 42 days after the −6° HDT. Results: The proximal amplitude of the CMAP of the median nerve was significantly decreased at 21 and 42 days of HDT compared with the amplitude before HDT (4.38 ± 2.83 vs. 8.40 ± 2.66 mV, F = 4.85, P = 0.013 and 3.30 ± 2.70 vs. 8.40 ± 2.66 mV, F = 5.93, P = 0.004, respectively). The distal amplitude of the CMAP of the median nerve was significantly decreased at 7, 21, and 42 days of HDT compared with the amplitude before HDT (7.28 ± 1.27 vs. 10.25 ± 3.40 mV, F = 4.03, P = 0.039; 5.05 ± 2.01 vs. 10.25 ± 3.40 mV, F = 6.25, P = 0.04; and 3.95 ± 2.79 vs. 10.25 ± 3.40 mV, F = 7.35, P = 0.01; respectively). The proximal amplitude of the CMAP of the tibial nerve was significantly decreased at 42 days of HDT compared with the amplitude before HDT (6.14 ± 1.94 vs. 11.87 ± 3.19 mV, F = 5.02, P = 0.039). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the compound muscle action potential amplitudes of nerves are decreased under simulated microgravity in rhesus monkeys. Moreover, rhesus monkeys exposed to HDT might be served as an experimental model for the study of NCS under microgravity. PMID:28139516

  19. Prophylactic Ribavirin Treatment of Dengue Type 1 Infection in Rhesus Monkeys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Fever ,nd Dengue , 15-19 May 1988, Rio de Janeiro. Brazil . Pifat. D.Y., Toribio, F.E., Watson. K.A. and Canonico, P.G. (1990) Effect of human recombinant...FITr’ c COPy 2 Antiviral Research, 13 (1990) 139-150 q Elsevier AVR 00405 Prophylactic ribavirin treatment of dengue type 1 infection in rhesus...with dengue virus. Both placebo- and ribavirin-treated monkeys developed viremia, as measured by direct plaque assay on Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells

  20. A 75-Year Pictorial History of the Cayo Santiago Rhesus Monkey Colony

    PubMed Central

    KESSLER, MATTHEW J.; RAWLINS, RICHARD G.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a pictorial history of the free-ranging colony of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) on Cayo Santiago, Puerto Rico, in commemoration of the 75th anniversary of its establishment by Clarence R. Carpenter in December 1938. It is based on a presentation made by the authors at the symposium, Cayo Santiago: 75 Years of Leadership in Translational Research, held at the 36th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Primatologists in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on 20 June 2013. PMID:25764995

  1. Application of a computer serial probe recognition (SPR) task in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca Mulatta). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, A.V.; Kahler, D.W.

    1992-11-01

    The Serial Probe Recognition (SPR) task was established to fulfill a requirement for a nonhuman primate behavioral task as a final screening of candidate compound for the pretreatment and treatment (PT) against chemical warfare agents. Initially, equipment on hand was reconfigured to support this requirement. From this prototype, we designed and developed a behavioral testing system to study SPR memory in nonhuman primates. Our system consisted of an operant chamber, a personal computer with a monitor, a touch sensitive screen, a pellet dispenser and an interface system. In this report we describe the development and application of the behavioral testing system in our laboratory. Serial probe recognition, Behavior, Training Rhesus Monkeys, Macaca Mulatta.

  2. Aberrant genomic imprinting in rhesus monkey embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Akihisa; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat M; Kuo, Hung-Chih; Wolf, Don P

    2006-03-01

    Genomic imprinting involves modification of a gene or a chromosomal region that results in the differential expression of parental alleles. Disruption or inappropriate expression of imprinted genes is associated with several clinically significant syndromes and tumorigenesis in humans. Additionally, abnormal imprinting occurs in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in clonally derived animals. Imprinted gene expression patterns in primate ESCs are largely unknown, despite the clinical potential of the latter in the cell-based treatment of human disease. Because of the possible implications of abnormal gene expression to cell or tissue replacement therapies involving ESCs, we examined allele specific expression of four imprinted genes in the rhesus macaque. Genomic and complementary DNA from embryos and ESC lines containing useful single nucleotide polymorphisms were subjected to polymerase chain reaction-based amplification and sequence analysis. In blastocysts, NDN expression was variable indicating abnormal or incomplete imprinting whereas IGF2 and SNRPN were expressed exclusively from the paternal allele and H19 from the maternal allele as expected. In ESCs, both NDN and SNRPN were expressed from the paternal allele while IGF2 and H19 showed loss of imprinting and biallelic expression. In differentiated ESC progeny, these expression patterns were maintained. The implications of aberrant imprinted gene expression to ESC differentiation in vitro and on ESC-derived cell function in vivo after transplantation are unknown.

  3. Radiographic Incidence of Spinal Osteopathologies in Captive Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Godínez, Braulio; Ibáñez-Contreras, Alejandra; Perdigón-Castañeda, Gerardo; Galván-Montaño, Alfonso; de Oca, Guadalupe García-Montes; Zapata-Valdez, Carinthia; Tena-Betancourt, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Degenerative spinal disease is a leading cause of chronic disability both in humans and animals. Although widely seen as a normal occurrence of aging, degenerative spinal disease can be caused by various genetic, iatrogenic, inflammatory, and congenital factors. The objective of this study was to characterize the degenerative spine-related diseases and the age at onset in a random subpopulation of 20 captive rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; male, 13; female, 7; age: range, 4 to 27 y; median, 18.5 y). Spinal radiographic evaluation (left lateral, right lateral, and ventrodorsal views) of the spinal column (C1 to S1) was performed, and spinal degenerative disease was scored. The incidence of osteopathology was higher in the 14- to 18-y-old group, but incidence did not differ according to sex. In the studied population, degenerative changes were present in monkeys as young as 9 y of age. PMID:21262126

  4. Checking behavior in rhesus monkeys is related to anxiety and frontal activity

    PubMed Central

    Bosc, Marion; Bioulac, Bernard; Langbour, Nicolas; Nguyen, Tho Hai; Goillandeau, Michel; Dehay, Benjamin; Burbaud, Pierre; Michelet, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    When facing doubt, humans can go back over a performed action in order to optimize subsequent performance. The present study aimed to establish and characterize physiological doubt and checking behavior in non-human primates (NHP). We trained two rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in a newly designed “Check-or-Go” task that allows the animal to repeatedly check and change the availability of a reward before making the final decision towards obtaining that reward. By manipulating the ambiguity of a visual cue in which the reward status is embedded, we successfully modulated animal certainty and created doubt that led the animals to check. This voluntary checking behavior was further characterized by making EEG recordings and measuring correlated changes in salivary cortisol. Our data show that monkeys have the metacognitive ability to express voluntary checking behavior similar to that observed in humans, which depends on uncertainty monitoring, relates to anxiety and involves brain frontal areas. PMID:28349919

  5. Quantity Representation in Children and Rhesus Monkeys: Linear versus Logarithmic Scales

    PubMed Central

    Beran, Michael J.; Johnson-Pynn, Julie S.; Ready, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    The performance of 4- and 5-year-old children and rhesus monkeys was compared using a computerized task for quantity assessment. Participants first learned two quantity anchor values and then responded to intermediate values by classifying them as either similar to the large anchor or the small anchor. Of primary interest was an assessment of where the point of subjective equality (PSE) occurred for each species across four different sets of anchors to determine whether the PSE occurred at the arithmetic mean or the geometric mean. Both species produced PSEs that were closer to the geometric mean for three of four anchor sets. This indicates that monkeys and children access either a logarithmic scale for quantity representation or a linear scale that is subject to scalar variability, both of which are consistent with Weber’s law and representation of quantity that takes the form of analog magnitudes. PMID:18022633

  6. Experience-dependent changes in the development of face preferences in infant rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Parr, Lisa A; Murphy, Lauren; Feczko, Eric; Brooks, Jenna; Collantes, Marie; Heitz, Thomas R

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that early experience shapes the development of visual perception for faces in humans. However, the effect of experience on the development of social attention in non-human primates is unknown. In two studies, we examined the effect of cumulative social experience on developmental changes in attention to the faces of unfamiliar conspecifics or heterospecifics, and mom versus an unfamiliar female. From birth, infant rhesus monkeys preferred to look at conspecific compared to heterospecific faces, but this pattern reversed over time. In contrast, no consistent differences were found for attention to mom's face compared to an unfamiliar female. These results suggest differential roles of social experience in shaping the development of face preferences in infant monkeys. Results have important implications for establishing normative trajectories for the development of face preferences in an animal model of human social behavior. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), video tasks, and implications for stimulus-response spatial contiguity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.; Richardson, W. Kirk; Washburn, David A.; Hopkins, William D.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E. Sue

    1989-01-01

    Recent reports support the argument that the efficiency of primate learning is compromised to the degree that there is spatial discontiguity between discriminands and the locus of response. Experiments are reported here in which two rhesus monkeys easily mastered precise control of a joystick to respond to a variety of computer-generated targets despite the fact that the joystick was located 9 to 18 cm from the video screen. It is argued that stimulus-response contiguity is a significant parameter of learning only to the degree that the monkey visually attends to the directional movements of its hand in order to displace discriminands. If attention is focused on the effects of the hand's movement rather than on the hand itself, stimulus-response contiguity is no longer a primary parameter of learning. The implications of these results for mirror-guided studies are discussed.

  8. Diet-induced iron deficiency anemia and pregnancy outcome in rhesus monkeys12

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Mari S; Hogrefe, Casey E; Tarantal, Alice F; Germann, Stacey L; Beard, John L; Georgieff, Michael K; Calatroni, Agustin; Lozoff, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is relatively common in the third trimester of pregnancy, but causal associations with low birth weight and compromised neonatal iron status are difficult to establish in human populations. Objective The objective was to determine the effects of diet-induced IDA on intrauterine growth and neonatal iron status in an appropriate animal model for third-trimester IDA in women. Design Hematologic and iron-status measures, pregnancy outcomes, and fetal and neonatal evaluations were compared between pregnant rhesus monkeys (n = 14) fed a diet containing 10 μg Fe/g diet from the time of pregnancy detection (gestation days 28–30) and controls (n = 24) fed 100 μg Fe/g diet. Results By the third trimester, 79% of the iron-deprived dams and 29% of the control monkeys had a hemoglobin concentration <11 g/dL. There were also significant group differences in hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, and serum iron. At birth, the newborns of monkeys iron-deprived during pregnancy had significantly lower hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin values and a lower ratio of erythroid to total colony-forming units in bone marrow than did the control newborns. Pregnancy weight gain did not differ significantly between the iron-deprived and control dams, and the fetuses and newborns of the iron-deprived dams were not growth retarded relative to the controls. Gestation length, the number of stillbirths, and neonatal neurobehavioral test scores did not differ significantly by diet group. Conclusion These data indicate that an inadequate intake of iron from the diet during pregnancy in rhesus monkeys can lead to compromised hematologic status of the neonate without indications of growth retardation or impaired neurologic function at birth. PMID:16522913

  9. Preclinical evaluation of a urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-targeted nanoprobe in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yushu; Gong, Li; Gao, Ning; Liao, Jichun; Sun, Jiayu; Wang, Yuqing; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Pengjin; Fan, Qing; Wang, Yongqiang Andrew; Zeng, Wen; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily; Gao, Fabao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To translate a recombinant peptide containing the amino-terminal fragment (ATF) of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-targeted magnetic iron oxide (IO) nanoparticles (uPAR-targeted human ATF-IONPs) into clinical applications, we conducted a pilot study to evaluate the toxicity and pharmacokinetics of this nanoparticle in normal rhesus monkeys. Methods We assessed the changes in the following: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals from pretreatment stage to 14 days posttreatment, serum iron concentrations from 5 minutes posttreatment to 12 weeks posttreatment, routine blood examination and serum chemistry analysis results from pretreatment stage to 12 weeks after administration, and results of staining of the liver with Perls’ Prussian Blue and hematoxylin–eosin at 24 hours and 3 months posttreatment in two rhesus monkeys following an intravenous administration of the targeted nanoparticles either with a polyethylene glycol (ATF-PEG-IONP) or without a PEG (ATF-IONP) coating. Results The levels of alkaline phosphatase, alanine transaminase, and direct bilirubin in the two monkeys increased immediately after the administration of the IONPs but returned to normal within 20 days and stayed within the normal reference range 3 months after the injection. The creatinine levels of the two monkeys stayed within the normal range during the study. In addition, red blood cells, white blood cells, hemoglobin level, and platelets remained normal during the 3 months of the study. Conclusion All of the results suggest that a transient injury in terms of normal organ functions, but no microscopic necrotic lesions, was observed at a systemic delivery dose of 5 mg/kg of iron equivalent concentration in the acute phase, and that no chronic toxicity was found 3 months after the injection. Therefore, we conclude that uPAR-targeted IONPs have the potential to be used as receptor-targeted MRI contrasts as well as theranostic agents for the detection and treatment of

  10. Diet-induced iron deficiency anemia and pregnancy outcome in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Golub, Mari S; Hogrefe, Casey E; Tarantal, Alice F; Germann, Stacey L; Beard, John L; Georgieff, Michael K; Calatroni, Agustin; Lozoff, Betsy

    2006-03-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is relatively common in the third trimester of pregnancy, but causal associations with low birth weight and compromised neonatal iron status are difficult to establish in human populations. The objective was to determine the effects of diet-induced IDA on intrauterine growth and neonatal iron status in an appropriate animal model for third-trimester IDA in women. Hematologic and iron-status measures, pregnancy outcomes, and fetal and neonatal evaluations were compared between pregnant rhesus monkeys (n = 14) fed a diet containing 10 microg Fe/g diet from the time of pregnancy detection (gestation days 28-30) and controls (n = 24) fed 100 microg Fe/g diet. By the third trimester, 79% of the iron-deprived dams and 29% of the control monkeys had a hemoglobin concentration <11 g/dL. There were also significant group differences in hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, and serum iron. At birth, the newborns of monkeys iron-deprived during pregnancy had significantly lower hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin values and a lower ratio of erythroid to total colony-forming units in bone marrow than did the control newborns. Pregnancy weight gain did not differ significantly between the iron-deprived and control dams, and the fetuses and newborns of the iron-deprived dams were not growth retarded relative to the controls. Gestation length, the number of stillbirths, and neonatal neurobehavioral test scores did not differ significantly by diet group. These data indicate that an inadequate intake of iron from the diet during pregnancy in rhesus monkeys can lead to compromised hematologic status of the neonate without indications of growth retardation or impaired neurologic function at birth.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of rhesus monkey platelet glycoprotein Ibα, a major ligand-binding subunit of GPIb-IX-V complex.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jianlin; Shen, Yang; Shi, Meimei; Lu, Yanrong; Cheng, Jingqiu; Chen, Younan

    2014-05-01

    Through binding to von Willebrand factor (VWF), platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ibα, the major ligand-binding subunit of the GPIb-IX-V complex, initiates platelet adhesion and aggregation in response to exposed VWF or elevated fluid-shear stress. There is little data regarding non-human primate platelet GPIbα. This study cloned and characterized rhesus monkey (Macaca Mullatta) platelet GPIbα. DNAMAN software was used for sequence analysis and alignment. N/O-glycosylation sites and 3-D structure modelling were predicted by online OGPET v1.0, NetOGlyc 1.0 Server and SWISS-MODEL, respectively. Platelet function was evaluated by ADP- or ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation. Rhesus monkey GPIbα contains 2,268 nucleotides with an open reading frame encoding 755 amino acids. Rhesus monkey GPIbα nucleotide and protein sequences share 93.27% and 89.20% homology respectively, with human. Sequences encoding the leucine-rich repeats of rhesus monkey GPIbα share strong similarity with human, whereas PEST sequences and N/O-glycosylated residues vary. The GPIbα-binding residues for thrombin, filamin A and 14-3-3ζ are highly conserved between rhesus monkey and human. Platelet function analysis revealed monkey and human platelets respond similarly to ADP, but rhesus monkey platelets failed to respond to low doses of ristocetin where human platelets achieved 76% aggregation. However, monkey platelets aggregated in response to higher ristocetin doses. Monkey GPIbα shares strong homology with human GPIbα, however there are some differences in rhesus monkey platelet activation through GPIbα engagement, which need to be considered when using rhesus monkey platelet to investigate platelet GPIbα function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Interactions between Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and heroin: self-administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Xu; Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P

    2012-12-01

    The cannabinoid receptor agonist Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) enhances the antinociceptive effects of µ-opioid receptor agonists, raising the possibility of using a combination of THC and opioids for treating pain. This study examined the effects of noncontingent and contingent administration of THC on intravenous heroin self-administration in rhesus monkeys. Self-administration of different unit doses of heroin (0.0001-0.1 mg/kg/infusion) generated a typical inverted U-shaped dose-response curve. In one experiment (n=4), noncontingent THC (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently shifted the heroin dose-response curve downward in three monkeys and slightly leftward in one monkey. In a second experiment (n=4), monkeys could self-administer THC alone (0.0032-0.032 mg/kg/infusion), heroin alone, or a mixture of THC and heroin. THC alone did not maintain responding above that obtained with saline; however, increasing the THC dose with heroin dose dependently decreased the number of infusions received and the rate of responding, as compared with data that were obtained with heroin alone. These results indicate that THC does not significantly enhance the positive reinforcing effects of heroin, further supporting the view that combining cannabinoid and opioid receptor agonists (e.g. for treating pain) does not increase, and might decrease, the abuse liability of individual drugs.

  13. Interactions between delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and heroin: self-administration in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Xu; Koek, Wouter; France, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor agonist delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) enhances the antinociceptive effects of mu opioid receptor agonists, raising the possibility of using a combination of THC and opioids for treating pain. This study examined the effects of noncontingent and contingent administration of THC on i.v. heroin self-administration in rhesus monkeys. Self-administration of different unit doses of heroin (0.0001–0.1 mg/kg/infusion) generated a typical inverted U-shaped dose-response curve. In one experiment (n=4), noncontingent THC (0.1–1.0 mg/kg) dose-dependently shifted the heroin dose-response curve downward in three monkeys and slightly leftward in one monkey. In a second experiment (n=4), monkeys could self-administer THC alone (0.0032–0.032 mg/kg/infusion), heroin alone, or a mixture of THC and heroin. THC alone did not maintain responding above that obtained with saline; however, increasing the THC dose with heroin dose-dependently decreased the number of infusions received and the rate of responding, as compared to data that were obtained with heroin alone. These results indicate that THC does not significantly enhance the positive reinforcing effects of heroin, further supporting the view that combining cannabinoid and opioid receptor agonists (e.g., for treating pain) does not increase, and might decrease, the abuse liability of the individual drugs. PMID:23044830

  14. Two-item same/different discrimination in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Basile, Benjamin M; Moylan, Emily J; Charles, David P; Murray, Elisabeth A

    2015-11-01

    Almost all nonhuman animals can recognize when one item is the same as another item. It is less clear whether nonhuman animals possess abstract concepts of "same" and "different" that can be divorced from perceptual similarity. Pigeons and monkeys show inconsistent performance, and often surprising difficulty, in laboratory tests of same/different learning that involve only two items. Previous results from tests using multi-item arrays suggest that nonhumans compute sameness along a continuous scale of perceptual variability, which would explain the difficulty of making two-item same/different judgments. Here, we provide evidence that rhesus monkeys can learn a two-item same/different discrimination similar to those on which monkeys and pigeons have previously failed. Monkeys' performance transferred to novel stimuli and was not affected by perceptual variations in stimulus size, rotation, view, or luminance. Success without the use of multi-item arrays, and the lack of effect of perceptual variability, suggests a computation of sameness that is more categorical, and perhaps more abstract, than previously thought.

  15. Combined unilateral lesions of the amygdala and orbital prefrontal cortex impair affective processing in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Alicia; Murray, Elisabeth A

    2004-05-01

    The amygdala and orbital prefrontal cortex (PFo) interact as part of a system for affective processing. To assess whether there is a hemispheric functional specialization for the processing of emotion or reward or both in nonhuman primates, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with combined lesions of the amygdala and PFo in one hemisphere, either left or right, were compared with unoperated controls on a battery of tasks that tax affective processing, including two tasks that tax reward processing and two that assess emotional reactions. Although the two operated groups did not differ from each other, monkeys with unilateral lesions, left and right, showed altered reward-processing abilities as evidenced by attenuated reinforcer devaluation effects and an impairment in object reversal learning relative to controls. In addition, both operated groups showed blunted emotional reactions to a rubber snake. By contrast, monkeys with unilateral lesions did not differ from controls in their responses to an unfamiliar human (human "intruder"). Although the results provide no support for a hemispheric specialization of function, they yield the novel finding that unilateral lesions of the amygdala-orbitofrontal cortical circuit in monkeys are sufficient to significantly disrupt affective processing.

  16. [Pharmacokinetics of salvianolic acid A after single intravenous administration in Rhesus monkey].

    PubMed

    Song, Jun-ke; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Wei-ku; Feng, Zhang-ying; Xie, Tao; Du, Guan-Hua

    2015-09-01

    Salvianolic acid A (Sal A) is one of the most effective compounds isolated from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza. Up to now, several studies regarding the pharmacokinetic profiles of Sal A have been reported, however there is no such study reported in monkeys, the species which is more similar to human. The aim of this study is to develop a LC-MS method for the determination of Sal A in monkey plasma and apply it to the pharmacokinetic studies of monkeys. After single intravenous administration of Sal A, the plasma concentration-time curves were observed and the main pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. The plasma concentration at 2 min (C2 (min)) values were (28.343 ± 6.426), (45.679 ± 12.301) and (113.293 ± 24.360) mg x L(-1) for Rhesus monkeys treated with Sal A at 2.5, 5 and 10 mg x kg(-1). The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC(0-∞)) values were (3.316 ± 0.871), (5.754 ± 2.150) and (13.761 ± 2.825) μg x L(-1) x h, respectively. Furthermore, this method was improved and applied to the simultaneous determination of Sal A, Sal B and Sal C, which provided useful information for preclinical studies and clinical trials of Sal A, Sal B and Sal C.

  17. Assessment of motor function of the hand in aged rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tara L; Killiany, Ronald J; Pessina, Monica A; Moss, Mark B; Rosene, Douglas L

    2010-01-01

    In the elderly, intact motor functions of the upper extremity are critical for the completion of activities of daily living. Many studies have provided insight into age-related changes in motor function. However, the precise nature and extent of motor impairments of the upper extremity remains unclear. In the current study we have modified two tasks to assess hand/digit function in both young and aged rhesus monkeys. We tested monkeys from 9 to 26 years of age on these tasks to determine the level of fine motor performance across the adult age range. Compared to young monkeys (9-12 years of age), aged monkeys (15-26 years of age) were mildly impaired on fine motor control of the digits. These findings are consistent with previous studies that have found age-related impairment in fine motor function. However, the magnitude and extent of impairment in the current study does differ from previous findings and is likely due to methodological differences in the degree of task complexity.

  18. STUDIES ON ACUTE DISSEMINATED ENCEPHALOMYELITIS PRODUCED EXPERIMENTALLY IN RHESUS MONKEYS

    PubMed Central

    Lumsden, Charles E.; Kabat, Elvin A.; Wolf, Abner; Bezer, Ada E.

    1950-01-01

    1. Animals injected with emulsions of monkey brain with adjuvants show a complex pattern of antibody response as determined by complement fixation tests. 2. Organ-specific complement-fixing antibodies to constituents of brain tissue may be formed which fix complement with brain tissues of various animal species but fail to react with other organs or with rabbit placenta. 3. Antibodies may be formed to some constituent of brain other than nervous tissue. It would seem that these can be detected by the strong complement fixation given with rabbit placenta. 4. Sera from individual animals may contain antibodies to the brain or placenta constituents, to both, or to neither. Occasional individual sera show unique patterns of antibody response as determined with various additional antigens such as fetal brain, posterior pituitary, or peripheral nerves. 5. No evidence of any etiological relationship between the development of encephalomyelitis and the complement-fixing antibodies to brain demonstrable in the sera could be found. The complement-fixing antibody to the placental constituent was unrelated to the encephalomyelitis. PMID:15436935

  19. Defense-in-depth by mucosally administered anti-HIV dimeric IgA2 and systemic IgG1 mAbs: Complete protection of rhesus monkeys from mucosal SHIV challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sholukh, Anton M.; Watkins, Jennifer D.; Vyas, Hemant K.; Gupta, Sandeep; Lakhashe, Samir K.; Thorat, Swati; Zhou, Mingkui; Hemashettar, Girish; Bachler, Barbara C.; Forthal, Donald N.; Villinger, Francois; Sattentau, Quentin J.; Weiss, Robin A.; Agatic, Gloria; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Heeney, Jonathan L.; Ruprecht, Ruth M.

    2015-01-01

    Although IgA is the most abundantly produced immunoglobulin in humans, its role in preventing HIV-1 acquisition, which occurs mostly via mucosal routes, remains unclear. In our passive mucosal immunizations of rhesus macaques (RMs), the anti-HIV-1 neutralizing monoclonal antibody (nmAb) HGN194, given either as dimeric IgA1 (dIgA1) or dIgA2 intrarectally (i.r.), protected 83% or 17% of the RMs against i.r. simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge, respectively. Data from the RV144 trial implied that vaccine-induced plasma IgA counteracted the protective effector mechanisms of IgG1 with the same epitope specificity. We thus hypothesized that mucosal dIgA2 might diminish the protection provided by IgG1 mAbs targeting the same epitope. To test our hypothesis, we administered HGN194 IgG1 intravenously (i.v.) either alone or combined with i.r. HGN194 dIgA2. We enrolled SHIV-exposed, persistently aviremic RMs protected by previously administered nmAbs; RM anti-human IgG responses were undetectable. However, low-level SIV Gag-specific proliferative T-cell responses were found. These animals resemble HIV-exposed, uninfected humans, in which local and systemic cellular immune responses have been observed. HGN194 IgG1 and dIgA2 used alone and the combination of the two neutralized the challenge virus equally well in vitro. All RMs given only i.v. HGN194 IgG1 became infected. In contrast, all RMs given HGN194 IgG1 + dIgA2 were completely protected against high-dose i.r. SHIV-1157ipEL-p challenge. These data imply that combining suboptimal defenses at the mucosal and systemic levels can completely prevent virus acquisition. Consequently, active vaccination should focus on defense-in-depth, a strategy that seeks to build up defensive fall-back positions well behind the fortified frontline. PMID:25769884

  20. Effectiveness of spiramycin for treatment of congenital Toxoplasma gondii infection in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Schoondermark-Van de Ven, E; Melchers, W; Camps, W; Eskes, T; Meuwissen, J; Galama, J

    1994-01-01

    The effectiveness of spiramycin for the treatment of rhesus monkey fetuses congenitally infected with Toxoplasma gondii was studied. Eight monkeys were infected at day 90 of pregnancy. This is comparable to the second trimester of organogenetic development in humans. Transmission of infection was found prenatally in five of the eight monkeys by detection of the parasite in the amniotic fluid. Treatment with spiramycin (20 mg/kg/day in two intermittent doses given intravenously) was started as soon as fetal infection was proven and was continued until birth. Nine to 14 days after initiation of treatment, the parasite was still detectable in amniotic fluid samples from four of these five cases. However, the parasite was detected only by PCR and not by mouse inoculation. T. gondii was also detected only by PCR in the placenta of one monkey that delivered prematurely. This monkey received spiramycin treatment for only 2 weeks. In the four monkeys that received treatment for about 7 weeks, the parasite was not present at birth in the placenta nor in amniotic fluid or neonatal organs. Spiramycin accumulates mainly in maternal tissues. Although concentrations in neonatal tissue were found to be 5 to 28 times higher than the corresponding concentrations in neonatal serum, the concentrations in neonatal tissue were still 11 to 16 times lower than those found in the mothers. However, no spiramycin was found in the fetal brains. Early treatment with spiramycin may prevent transmission of infection to the fetus but most probably cannot interrupt an existing brain infection, which is the most severe outcome of congenital toxoplasmosis in humans. Images PMID:7811000

  1. Urinary excretion of cortisol from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) habituated to restraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, C. E.; Ortiz, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    Use of monkeys in research has often required that they be restrained in a chair. However, chair restraint can elicit an initial neuroendocrine stress response. Also, inactivity associated with restraint can induce muscular atrophy. We proposed that prior habituation of monkeys to chair restraint would attenuate these neuroendocrine responses without causing substantial muscle wasting. Four rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained and habituated to a restraint chair specifically designed for spaceflight. During the study, monkeys were placed in metabolic cages for 7 days (prerestraint, Phase I), placed in a chair restraint for 18 days (Phase II), and then returned to their metabolic cages for 5 days (postrestraint, Phase III). Urine was collected between 0700-1100 daily, and measurements of cortisol, creatinine, and electrolyte concentrations were adjusted for hourly excretion rates. Body weights of the monkeys did not change between start of the prerestraint and postrestraint phases (10.3 +/- 0.8 vs. 10.3 +/- 0.9 kg, respectively). During the 3 phases, mean excretion rate of cortisol did not change (24.1 +/- 10.3, 26.7 +/- 7.7, and 19.3 +/- 5.8 microg/h, respectively). Mean excretion rate of creatinine (37.3 +/- 7.5, 37.5 +/- 12.2, and 36.9 +/- 17.1 mg/h, respectively), Na+ (3.3 +/- 1.2, 3.2 +/- 1.2, 2.2 +/- 1.8 mmol/h, respectively), and K+ (5.3 +/- 1.8, 5.4 +/- 1.6, and 4.3 +/- 2.8 mmol/h, respectively) were also not altered. Lack of an increase in excreted urinary cortisol suggested that prior habituation to chair restraint attenuated neuroendocrine responses reported previously. Also, the chair restraint method used appeared to allow adequate activity, because the monkeys did not have indices of muscle wasting.

  2. Ranking Cognitive Flexibility in a Group Setting of Rhesus Monkeys with a Set-Shifting Procedure.

    PubMed

    Shnitko, Tatiana A; Allen, Daicia C; Gonzales, Steven W; Walter, Nicole A R; Grant, Kathleen A

    2017-01-01

    Attentional set-shifting ability is an executive function underling cognitive flexibility in humans and animals. In humans, this function is typically observed during a single experimental session where dimensions of playing cards are used to measure flexibility in the face of changing rules for reinforcement (i.e., the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST)). In laboratory animals, particularly non-human primates, variants of the WCST involve extensive training and testing on a series of dimensional discriminations, usually in social isolation. In the present study, a novel experimental approach was used to assess attentional set-shifting simultaneously in 12 rhesus monkeys. Specifically, monkeys living in individual cages but in the same room were trained at the same time each day in a set-shifting task in the same housing environment. As opposed to the previous studies, each daily session began with a simple single-dimension discrimination regardless of the animal's performance on the previous session. A total of eight increasingly difficult, discriminations (sets) were possible in each daily 45 min session. Correct responses were reinforced under a second-order schedule of flavored food pellet delivery, and criteria for completing a set was 12 correct trials out of a running total of 15 trials. Monkeys progressed through the sets at their own pace and abilities. The results demonstrate that all 12 monkeys acquired the simple discrimination (the first set), but individual differences in the ability to progress through all eight sets were apparent. A performance index (PI) that encompassed progression through the sets, errors and session duration was calculated and used to rank each monkey's performance in relation to each other. Overall, this version of a set-shifting task results in an efficient assessment of reliable differences in cognitive flexibility in a group of monkeys.

  3. Urinary excretion of cortisol from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) habituated to restraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, C. E.; Ortiz, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    Use of monkeys in research has often required that they be restrained in a chair. However, chair restraint can elicit an initial neuroendocrine stress response. Also, inactivity associated with restraint can induce muscular atrophy. We proposed that prior habituation of monkeys to chair restraint would attenuate these neuroendocrine responses without causing substantial muscle wasting. Four rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained and habituated to a restraint chair specifically designed for spaceflight. During the study, monkeys were placed in metabolic cages for 7 days (prerestraint, Phase I), placed in a chair restraint for 18 days (Phase II), and then returned to their metabolic cages for 5 days (postrestraint, Phase III). Urine was collected between 0700-1100 daily, and measurements of cortisol, creatinine, and electrolyte concentrations were adjusted for hourly excretion rates. Body weights of the monkeys did not change between start of the prerestraint and postrestraint phases (10.3 +/- 0.8 vs. 10.3 +/- 0.9 kg, respectively). During the 3 phases, mean excretion rate of cortisol did not change (24.1 +/- 10.3, 26.7 +/- 7.7, and 19.3 +/- 5.8 microg/h, respectively). Mean excretion rate of creatinine (37.3 +/- 7.5, 37.5 +/- 12.2, and 36.9 +/- 17.1 mg/h, respectively), Na+ (3.3 +/- 1.2, 3.2 +/- 1.2, 2.2 +/- 1.8 mmol/h, respectively), and K+ (5.3 +/- 1.8, 5.4 +/- 1.6, and 4.3 +/- 2.8 mmol/h, respectively) were also not altered. Lack of an increase in excreted urinary cortisol suggested that prior habituation to chair restraint attenuated neuroendocrine responses reported previously. Also, the chair restraint method used appeared to allow adequate activity, because the monkeys did not have indices of muscle wasting.

  4. Attenuation of cocaine self-administration by chronic oral phendimetrazine in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Czoty, P W; Blough, B E; Fennell, T R; Snyder, R W; Nader, M A

    2016-06-02

    Chronic treatment with the monoamine releaser d-amphetamine has been consistently shown to decrease cocaine self-administration in laboratory studies and clinical trials. However, the abuse potential of d-amphetamine is an obstacle to widespread clinical use. Approaches are needed that exploit the efficacy of the agonist approach but avoid the abuse potential associated with dopamine releasers. The present study assessed the effectiveness of chronic oral administration of phendimetrazine (PDM), a pro-drug for the monoamine releaser phenmetrazine (PM), to decrease cocaine self-administration in four rhesus monkeys. Each day, monkeys pressed a lever to receive food pellets under a 50-response fixed-ratio (FR) schedule of reinforcement and self-administered cocaine (0.003-0.56 mg/kg per injection, i.v.) under a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule in the evening. After completing a cocaine self-administration dose-response curve, sessions were suspended and PDM was administered (1.0-9.0 mg/kg, p.o., b.i.d.). Cocaine self-administration was assessed using the PR schedule once every 7 days while food-maintained responding was studied daily. When a persistent decrease in self-administration was observed, the cocaine dose-effect curve was re-determined. Daily PDM treatment decreased cocaine self-administration by 30-90% across monkeys for at least 4 weeks. In two monkeys, effects were completely selective for cocaine. Tolerance developed to initial decreases in food-maintained responding in the third monkey and in the fourth subject, fluctuations were observed that were lower in magnitude than effects on cocaine self-administration. Cocaine dose-effect curves were shifted down and/or rightward in three monkeys. These data provide further support for the use of agonist medications for cocaine abuse, and indicate that the promising effects of d-amphetamine extend to a more clinically viable pharmacotherapy.

  5. Metabolizable energy intake during long-term calorie restriction in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Raman, Aarthi; Baum, Scott T; Colman, Ricki J; Kemnitz, Joseph W; Weindruch, Richard; Schoeller, Dale A

    2007-10-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is a dietary intervention shown to increase maximum life-span. The aim of this study was to compare the metabolizable energy of the pelleted semi-purified diet with estimated energy intake from food weight. Energy density of diet, urine and feces were measured by bomb calorimetry in rhesus monkeys (23-29 years old) on CR (CR, n=11) and control (C, n=9). Food moisture was measured to be 2-fold higher (9+/-1%) than indicated on the label (approximately 5%). The measured gross energy of diet was 4.4 kcal/g dry weight of CR and 4.5 kcal/g dry weight of C diets. In a two-day trial, food intake (mean+/-SD) was 112+/-20 g and 136+/-26 g of dry mass/d in the CR and C monkeys, respectively (p=0.003). The fraction of the diet absorbed (CR=0.91; C=0.95) was different (p<0.001) between CR and C monkeys. Using these coefficients, the metabolizable energy intake averaged over 6 months was 450+/-53 and 534+/-97 kcal/d in CR and C monkeys, respectively (Diff=16%; p=0.03). These values were compared with energy expenditure (EE), as measured annually by indirect calorimetry (490+/-61 kcal/d in CR and 532+/-62 kcal/d in C monkeys). Adjusted for changes in body composition (2+/-10 kcal/d in CR and -7+/-12 kcal/d in C), energy balance was not different from zero in CR (-42+/-42 kcal/d) and C (9+/-61 kcal/d) monkeys. Use of diet weight is a reasonable estimate of the level of CR when food waste is assessed.

  6. Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca Mulatta) Demonstrate Robust Memory for What and Where, but Not When, in an Open-Field Test of Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, R.R.; Hampstead, B.M.; Murray, E.A.

    2005-01-01

    We adapted a paradigm developed by Clayton and Dickinson (1998), who demonstrated memory for what, where, and when in scrub jays, for use with rhesus monkeys. In the study phase of each trial, monkeys found a preferred and a less-preferred food reward in a trial-unique array of three locations in a large room. After 1h, monkeys returned to the…

  7. Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca Mulatta) Demonstrate Robust Memory for What and Where, but Not When, in an Open-Field Test of Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, R.R.; Hampstead, B.M.; Murray, E.A.

    2005-01-01

    We adapted a paradigm developed by Clayton and Dickinson (1998), who demonstrated memory for what, where, and when in scrub jays, for use with rhesus monkeys. In the study phase of each trial, monkeys found a preferred and a less-preferred food reward in a trial-unique array of three locations in a large room. After 1h, monkeys returned to the…

  8. Circadian Activity Associated With Spatial Learning and Memory in Aging Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Haley, G.E.; Landauer, N.; Renner, L.; Weiss, A.; Hooper, K.; Urbanski, H.F.; Kohama, S.G.; Neuringer, M.; Raber, J.

    2009-01-01

    In rodents, spatial learning and memory tests require navigation, whereas in nonhuman primates these tests generally do not involve a navigational component, thus assessing nonhomologous neural systems. To allow closer parallels between rodent and primate studies, we developed a navigational spatial learning and memory task for nonhuman primates and assessed the performance of elderly (19-25 years) female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). The animals were allowed to navigate in a room containing a series of food ports. After they learned to retrieve food from the ports, a single port was repeatedly baited and the animals were tested until they learned the correct location. The location of the baited port was then changed (shift position). We also determined whether test performance was associated with circadian activity measured with accelerometers. Performance measures included trials to criterion, search strategies, and several indices of circadian activity. Animals learned the task as reflected in their search strategies. Correlations were found between the number of initial or shift trials and circadian activity parameters including day activity, dark:light activity ratio, sleep latency, and wake bouts. Thus, disruptions in circadian rhythms in nonhuman primates are associated with poorer performance on this novel test. These data support the usefulness of this spatial navigational test to assess spatial learning and memory in rhesus monkeys and the importance of circadian activity in performance. PMID:19416674

  9. A Rhesus Monkey Model of Self Injury: Effects of Relocation Stress on Behavior and Neuroendocrine Function

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Matthew D.; Lutz, Corrine K.; Tiefenbacher, Stefan; Novak, Melinda A.; Meyer, Jerrold S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Self-injurious behavior (SIB), a disorder that afflicts many individuals within both clinical and non-clinical populations, has been linked to states of heightened stress and arousal. However, there are no published longitudinal data on the relationship between increases in stress and changes in the incidence of SIB. The present study investigated the short- and long-term behavioral and neuroendocrine responses of SIB and control monkeys to the stress of relocation. Methods Twenty adult male rhesus macaques were exposed to the stress of relocation to a new housing arrangement in a newly constructed facility. Daytime behavior, sleep, and multiple measures of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis function were investigated before and after the move. Results Relocation induced a complex pattern of short- and long-term effects in the animals. The SIB animals showed a long-lasting increase in self-biting behavior as well as evidence of sleep disturbance. Both groups exhibited elevated cortisol levels in saliva, serum, and hair, and also an unexpected delayed increase in circulating concentrations of corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG). Conclusions Our results indicate that relocation is a significant stressor for rhesus macaques, and that this stressor triggers an increase in self-biting behavior as well as sleep disturbance in monkeys previously identified as suffering from SIB. These findings suggest that life stresses may similarly exacerbate SIB in humans with this disorder. The HPA axis results underscore the potential role of CBG in regulating long-term neuroendocrine responses to major stressors. PMID:18164279

  10. Effect of long-term castration on serum biochemistry in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, P; Arindkar, S; Singh, S; Majumdar, S S

    2013-06-01

    Testicular failure has an effect on normal physiology. To address this issue, an experimental non-human primate model of long-term castrated rhesus monkey was chosen for this study to evaluate the influence of castration on various biochemical parameters. Nine castrated rhesus monkeys were evaluated for changes in body weight, serum testosterone, and serum biochemical parameters as compared to those in non-castrated macaques. Castration caused statistically significant changes in body weight, biochemical analytes, and testosterone levels. Body weight and testosterone levels were decreased, and there were increase in alanine aminotransferase, cholesterol, serum bilirubin, phosphorous, alkaline phosphatase, urea and a decrease in serum protein, uric acid, creatinine, and triglycerides. This study provided essential baseline information on biochemical variables due to the effect of castration associated with declining levels of testosterone, as data are not readily accessible from the existing body of scientific literature on non-human primates. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Mass spectral characterization of doxylamine and its rhesus monkey urinary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Holder, C L; Korfmacher, W A; Slikker, W; Thompson, H C; Gosnell, A B

    1985-04-01

    This study describes the use of mass spectrometry (MS), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and chemical derivatization techniques for the identification of doxylamine and five rhesus monkey urinary metabolites. The analyses were performed using chemical ionization mass spectrometry with either methane or ammonia as the reagent gas. The confirmation of the structures of two of these urinary metabolites was aided by the synthesis of doxylamine N-oxide and desmethyldoxylamine and by the use of methylation and acetylation derivatization techniques. Doxylamine N-oxide, desmethyldoxylamine, didesmethyldoxylamine, and two metabolites which resulted from the cleavage of the aliphatic tertiary nitrogen side chain to the subsequent 2-[1-phenyl-1-(2-pyridinyl)ethoxy]acetic acid or 2-[1-phenyl-1-(2-pyridinyl)ethoxy]methanol compounds were isolated and identified from rhesus monkey urine. Additional data concerning the mass spectral analysis of derivatization or reaction products from the three chloroformate reactions with doxylamine, and the synthesis and separation techniques which afforded mass spectral identification of the urinary metabolites are also presented.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of doxylamine, a component of Bendectin, in the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Slikker, W; Holder, C L; Lipe, G W; Bailey, J R; Young, J F

    1989-01-01

    The elimination of doxylamine and metabolites was determined after iv administration of [14C]doxylamine succinate at 0.7 and 13.3 mg/kg to the adult female rhesus monkey. Although the total recovery of radioactivity was the same for the low- and high-dose studies (90.2%), the rate of plasma elimination of doxylamine and its demethylated metabolite (desmethyldoxylamine) was slower for the high dose group. The 24 hr urinary excretion of doxylamine metabolites, desmethyl- and didesmethyldoxylamine, was significantly increased and the polar doxylamine metabolites were significantly decreased as the iv doxylamine succinate dose was increased. The plasma elimination of gas chromatograph (GC)-detected doxylamine was determined after oral administration of Bendectin (doxylamine succinate and pyridoxine hydrochloride) at 7, 13.3, and 27 mg/kg to adult female rhesus monkeys. As the dose increased, the clearance of doxylamine decreased. A statistically evaluated fit of the oral data to a single-compartment, parallel first-order elimination model and a single-compartment, parallel first- and second-order (Michaelis-Menten) elimination model indicated that the more complex model containing the second-order process was most consistent with the observed elimination data.

  13. Myosin heavy chain and fibre diameter of extrinsic tongue muscles in rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Smith, J Chadwick; Goldberg, Stephen J; Shall, Mary S

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify the myosin heavy chain (MHC) phenotype and fibre diameters of hypoglossal innervated extrinsic tongue muscles in rhesus monkey. Genioglossus, styloglossus and hyoglossus muscle samples obtained from three female rhesus monkeys were analysed for MHC isoforms via gel electrophoresis and stained with MHC antibodies to measure least mean diameters. MHC phenotypes were consistent for all three muscles. Each muscle was predominantly composed of MHC type IIa and I. All three isoforms were significantly different from each other in fibre diameter for styloglossus and genioglossus (IIb>IIa and IIx>I; P<0.001). For hyoglossus, the MHC type II isoforms had larger diameters than the MHC type I isoform (P<0.001). While the extrinsic tongue muscle MHC and/or muscle fibre type composition may be different between mammalian species, there are consistent similarities between the intrinsic and extrinsic tongue muscles. We suggest this is necessary for the highly coordinated activities performed by the tongue such as mastication, respiration and swallowing. The differences in fibre diameters among MHC isoforms suggest a large force gradation, which would be consistent with the coordination of these activities. The similarities among primates in MHC and/or muscle fibre composition as well as similar cortical inputs to the hypoglossal nucleus, suggest that we could expect to see similar MHC phenotype for extrinsic tongue muscles in human.

  14. A simple model of radial nerve injury in the rhesus monkey to evaluate peripheral nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Huang, Xijun; Fu, Guo; Gu, Liqiang; Liu, Xiaolin; Wang, Honggang; Hu, Jun; Yi, Jianhua; Niu, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Qingtang

    2014-01-01

    Current research on bone marrow stem cell transplantation and autologous or xenogenic nerve transplantation for peripheral nerve regeneration has mainly focused on the repair of peripheral nerve defects in rodents. In this study, we established a standardized experimental model of radial nerve defects in primates and evaluated the effect of repair on peripheral nerve injury. We repaired 2.5-cm lesions in the radial nerve of rhesus monkeys by transplantation of autografts, acellular allografts, or acellular allografts seeded with autologous bone marrow stem cells. Five months after surgery, regenerated nerve tissue was assessed for function, electrophysiology, and histomorphometry. Postoperative functional recovery was evaluated by the wrist-extension test. Compared with the simple autografts, the acellular allografts and allografts seeded with bone marrow stem cells facilitated remarkable recovery of the wrist-extension functions in the rhesus monkeys. This functional improvement was coupled with radial nerve distal axon growth, a higher percentage of neuron survival, increased nerve fiber density and diameter, increased myelin sheath thickness, and increased nerve conduction velocities and peak amplitudes of compound motor action potentials. Furthermore, the quality of nerve regeneration in the bone marrow stem cells-laden allografts group was comparable to that achieved with autografts. The wrist-extension test is a simple behavioral method for objective quantification of peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:25206757

  15. Home cage presentation of complex discrimination tasks to marmosets and rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Crofts, H S; Muggleton, N G; Bowditch, A P; Pearce, P C; Nutt, D J; Scott, E A

    1999-07-01

    The study reported here demonstrates the feasibility of presenting cognitive tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) to either marmosets or rhesus monkeys in their home cages. This location of testing offers opportunities for the measurement of additional indices, for example spontaneous behaviour (Prowse et al. 1995) and electrophysiology (Pearce et al. 1998) as well as facilitating repeated test presentation. Results from 12 marmosets and 4 rhesus monkeys which have completed several sequences of an eight-stage discrimination task involving simple discriminations, compound discriminations and reversals are reported. The paradigm developed has application in long-term studies. Tests from CANTAB have been used extensively in normal humans (Robbins et al. 1994) as well as a range of patient groups (Owen et al. 1992, Elliott et al. 1995) and to assess drug effects (Coull et al. 1996). Additionally some of these tests have been presented to marmosets (Roberts et al. 1988) to examine neuropsychological functioning. This comparative approach facilitates meaningful cross species comparison, particularly in the study of the effects of pharmacological intervention.

  16. OVARIAN RESERVE TESTS AND THEIR UTILITY IN PREDICTING RESPONSE TO CONTROLLED OVARIAN STIMULATION IN RHESUS MONKEYS

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Julie M.; Takahashi, Diana L; Ingram, Donald K.; Mattison, Julie A.; Roth, George; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Zelinski, Mary B.

    2010-01-01

    Controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) is an alternative to natural breeding in nonhuman primates; however, these protocols are costly with no guarantee of success. Toward the objective of predicting COS outcome in rhesus monkeys, the current study evaluated three clinically used ovarian reserve tests (ORTs): day 3 (d3) follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) with d3 inhibin B (INHB), the clomiphene citrate challenge test (CCCT), and the exogenous FSH Ovarian Reserve Test (EFORT). A COS was also performed and response was classified as either successful (COS+) or unsuccessful (COS−) and retrospectively compared to ORT predictions. FSH and INHB were assessed for best hormonal index in conjunction with the aforementioned tests. INHB was consistently more accurate than FSH in all ORTs used. Overall, a modified version of the CCCT using INHB values yielded the best percentage of correct predictions. This is the first report of ORT evaluation in rhesus monkeys and may provide a useful diagnostic test prior to costly follicle stimulations, as well as predicting the onset of menopause. PMID:20336797

  17. Ultrastructural evidence for impaired mitochondrial fission in the aged rhesus monkey dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Yury M; Datta, Dibyadeep; Paspalas, Constantinos D; Arnsten, Amy F T

    2017-03-01

    Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex mediates high-order cognitive functions that are impaired early in the aging process in monkeys and humans. Here, we report pronounced changes in mitochondrial morphology in dendrites of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex neurons from aged rhesus macaques. Electron microscopy paired with 3D reconstruction from serial sections revealed an age-related increase in mitochondria with thin segments that intermingled with enlarged ones, the 'mitochondria-on-a-string' phenotype, similar to those recently reported in patients with Alzheimer's disease. The thin mitochondrial segments were associated with endoplasmic reticulum cisterns, and the mitochondrial proteins Fis1 and Drp1, all of which initiate mitochondrial fission. These data suggest that the 'mitochondria-on-a-string' phenotype may reflect malfunction in mitochondrial dynamics, whereby fission is initiated, but the process is incomplete due to malfunction of subsequent step(s). Thus, aged rhesus monkeys may be particularly helpful in exploring the age-related changes that render higher cortical circuits so vulnerable to degeneration.

  18. Interleukin-6 causes hypocholesterolemia in middle-aged and old rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, W H; Sun, W H; Binkley, N; Kouba, E; Ershler, W

    1995-05-01

    Hypocholesterolemia is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality in older people. We have hypothesized that hypocholesterolemia in older people is due to the chronic effect of proinflammatory cytokines on lipoprotein metabolism. To test the effects of the chronic administration of interleukin-6 (IL-6) on lipoprotein levels in middle-aged and old rhesus monkeys, five middle-aged and five old rhesus monkeys received a subcutaneous injection of recombinant human IL-6 (15 micrograms/kg) for 28 days. Lipid, apolipoprotein, and albumin levels were measured at 0, 28, and 42 days after injection. Total and HDL cholesterol levels fell by 16 and 23%, respectively, after IL-6 injections. The concentrations of apolipoproteins A1 and B also decreased. The changes in lipoprotein levels were accompanied by a decrease in albumin levels and body weight. Levels of lipids and plasma proteins returned toward normal 2 weeks after injections were stopped. There was no difference in response between middle-aged and older animals. Chronic IL-6 injections cause acquired hypocholesterolemia, hypoalbuminemia, and weight loss in nonhuman primates. These changes are similar to those seen in older persons with acquired hypocholesterolemia.

  19. Identification of the VH genes encoding xenoantibodies in non-immunosuppressed rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Kleihauer, Annette; Gregory, Clare R; Borie, Dominic C; Kyles, Andrew E; Shulkin, Irina; Patanwala, Insiyyah; Zahorsky-Reeves, Joanne; Starnes, Vaughn A; Mullen, Yoko; Todorov, Ivan T; Kearns-Jonker, Mary

    2005-01-01

    The major immunological barrier that prevents the use of wild-type pig xenografts as an alternative source of organs for human xenotransplantation is antibody-mediated rejection. In this study, we identify the immunoglobulin variable region heavy (IgVH) chain genes encoding xenoantibodies to porcine heart and fetal porcine islet xenografts in non-immunosuppressed rhesus monkeys. We sought to compare the IgVH genes encoding xenoantibodies to porcine islets and solid organ xenografts. The immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG xenoantibody response was analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and cDNA libraries from peripheral blood lymphocytes were prepared and sequenced. The relative frequency of IgVH gene usage was established by colony filter hybridization. Induced xenoantibodies were encoded by the IGHV3-11 germline progenitor, the same germline gene that encodes xenoantibodies in humans mounting active xenoantibody responses. The immune response to pig xenografts presented as solid organs or isolated cells is mediated by identical IgVH genes in rhesus monkeys. These animals represent a clinically relevant model to identify the immunological basis of pig-to-human xenograft rejection. PMID:16108821

  20. Detection of group B streptococcal antigens in amniotic fluid of rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hemming, V G; London, W T; Smith, L P; Curfman, B L; Fischer, G W; Sever, J L

    1983-06-01

    To simulate group B streptococci (GBS) amniotic fluid infections common in humans and to examine bacterial growth and the appearance of GBS antigens in vivo, GBS were injected into the amniotic cavity of 19 near-term rhesus monkeys. Transabdominal aspirates of amniotic fluid were obtained before bacterial challenge, after 2 and 6 h, and during cesarean section delivery (24 h). Each fluid was quantitatively cultured for GBS. Specimens of amniotic fluid and gastric aspirate from each infant were tested for the presence of GBS antigens with a commercial latex particle agglutination test (Wellcogen Strep B; Wellcome Diagnostics, Dartford, England). To eliminate nonspecific latex particle agglutination reactivity, presumably caused by proteins, a processing procedure was required. Despite active proliferation of bacteria, only 12% of the 2-h amniotic specimens were latex particle agglutination positive. In contrast, 94% of th3 6-h and 100% of the 24-h specimens had detectable antigens, as did 89% of the gastric fluid specimens aspirated from the 19 newborns. Latex particle agglutination tests, after proper processing, will readily detect GBS antigens in amniotic or gastric aspirate fluid from experimentally infected rhesus monkeys.

  1. Coronary arterial ectasia, a predominant type of coronary sclerosis in aged captive rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed Central

    Uno, H.; Poff, B.

    1983-01-01

    In hearts from aged rhesus monkeys, ranging from 20 to over 30 years, marked coronary arterial ectasia, dilatation, and tortuosity of the entire vessel were observed in 18 animals. Another 7 animals showed a moderate degree of ectatic changes. Dilated arteries showed remarkable thinness of the tunica media with atrophy and attenuation of the muscle cells and increased fibrous tissue. Diffuse or focal intimal fibrous thickening was present in the ectatic arterial wall, but cholesterol deposit, calcification, or the presence of lipid-laden foam cells in the intimal and medial wall was not observed. A focal degeneration and fibrosis of the myocardium were seen in the hearts of 11 cases. Clinically, 2 cases had either spontaneous diabetes mellitus or cardiac decompensation with mitral insufficiency, but the others had no abnormal metabolic or cardiovascular histories. Coronary arterial ectasia accompanied with medial fibrosis appears to be a predominant type of coronary arterial lesion in aged rhesus monkeys under long-term captivity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:6859217

  2. Dengue Type Four Viruses with E-Glu345Lys Adaptive Mutation from MRC-5 Cells Induce Low Viremia but Elicit Potent Neutralizing Antibodies in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Tsai, Meng-Ju; Hsiao, Hung-Ju; Peng, Jia-Guan; Sue, Shih-Che; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of virulence and immunogenicity is important for development of live-attenuated dengue vaccines. We previously reported that an infectious clone-derived dengue type 4 virus (DENV-4) passaged in MRC-5 cells acquired a Glu345Lys (E-E345K) substitution in the E protein domain III (E-DIII). The same cloned DENV-4 was found to yield a single E-Glu327Gly (E-E327G) mutation after passage in FRhL cells and cause the loss of immunogenicity in rhesus monkeys. Here, we used site-directed mutagenesis to generate the E-E345K and E-E327G mutants from DENV-4 and DENV-4Δ30 infectious clones and propagated in Vero or MRC-5 cells. The E-E345K mutations were consistently presented in viruses recovered from MRC-5 cells, but not Vero cells. Recombinant E-DIII proteins of E345K and E327G increased heparin binding correlated with the reduced infectivity by heparin treatment in cell cultures. Different from the E-E327G mutant viruses to lose the immunogencity in rhesus monkeys, the E-E345K mutant viruses were able to induce neutralizing antibodies in rhesus monkeys with an almost a 10-fold lower level of viremia as compared to the wild type virus. Monkeys immunized with the E-E345K mutant virus were completely protected with no detectable viremia after live virus challenges with the wild type DENV-4. These results suggest that the E-E345K mutant virus propagated in MRC-5 cells may have potential for the use in live-attenuated DENV vaccine development. PMID:24959738

  3. Dengue type four viruses with E-Glu345Lys adaptive mutation from MRC-5 cells induce low viremia but elicit potent neutralizing antibodies in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiao-Han; Lee, Hsiang-Chi; Li, Xiao-Feng; Tsai, Meng-Ju; Hsiao, Hung-Ju; Peng, Jia-Guan; Sue, Shih-Che; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of virulence and immunogenicity is important for development of live-attenuated dengue vaccines. We previously reported that an infectious clone-derived dengue type 4 virus (DENV-4) passaged in MRC-5 cells acquired a Glu345Lys (E-E345K) substitution in the E protein domain III (E-DIII). The same cloned DENV-4 was found to yield a single E-Glu327Gly (E-E327G) mutation after passage in FRhL cells and cause the loss of immunogenicity in rhesus monkeys. Here, we used site-directed mutagenesis to generate the E-E345K and E-E327G mutants from DENV-4 and DENV-4Δ30 infectious clones and propagated in Vero or MRC-5 cells. The E-E345K mutations were consistently presented in viruses recovered from MRC-5 cells, but not Vero cells. Recombinant E-DIII proteins of E345K and E327G increased heparin binding correlated with the reduced infectivity by heparin treatment in cell cultures. Different from the E-E327G mutant viruses to lose the immunogencity in rhesus monkeys, the E-E345K mutant viruses were able to induce neutralizing antibodies in rhesus monkeys with an almost a 10-fold lower level of viremia as compared to the wild type virus. Monkeys immunized with the E-E345K mutant virus were completely protected with no detectable viremia after live virus challenges with the wild type DENV-4. These results suggest that the E-E345K mutant virus propagated in MRC-5 cells may have potential for the use in live-attenuated DENV vaccine development.

  4. Elastic properties of external cortical bone in the craniofacial skeleton of the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Dechow, Paul C

    2006-11-01

    Knowledge of elastic properties and of their variation in the cortical bone of the craniofacial skeleton is indispensable for creating accurate finite-element models to explore the biomechanics and adaptation of the skull in primates. In this study, we measured elastic properties of the external cortex of the rhesus monkey craniofacial skeleton, using an ultrasonic technique. Twenty-eight cylindrical cortical specimens were removed from each of six craniofacial skeletons of adult Macaca mulatta. Thickness, density, and a set of longitudinal and transverse ultrasonic velocities were measured on each specimen to allow calculation of the elastic properties in three dimensions, according to equations derived from Newton's second law and Hooke's law. The axes of maximum stiffness were determined by fitting longitudinal velocities measured along the perimeter of each cortical specimen to a sinusoidal function. Results showed significant differences in elastic properties between different functional areas of the rhesus cranium, and that many sites have a consistent orientation of maximum stiffness among specimens. Overall, the cortical bones of the rhesus monkey skull can be modeled as orthotropic in many regions, and as transversely isotropic in some regions, e.g., the supraorbital region. There are differences from human crania, suggesting that structural differences in skeletal form relate to differences in cortical material properties across species. These differences also suggest that we require more comparative data on elastic properties in primate craniofacial skeletons to explore effectively the functional significance of these differences, especially when these differences are elucidated through modeling approaches, such as finite-element modeling. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Evaluation in Rhesus Monkeys of a Bivalent Live Attenuated Dengue Vaccine Containing Types 2 and 4 Viruses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    previous reports,(1) antibody levels of most of the vaccinated animals declined markedly on or before post vacination day 150. PR13s showed that the EM-4...V.H., Gould, D.J., Chapple, F.E., and Russell, P.K.: Dengue 2 vacine , viremia and Inmune response in rhesus monkeys. Infect. Immun. 27, 181-186, 1980. 2

  6. Differential Antagonism of Cocaine Self-Administration and Cocaine-Induced Disruptions of Learning by Haloperidol in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winsauer, Peter J.; Moerschbaecher, Joseph M.; Roussell, Alison M.

    2008-01-01

    Six rhesus monkeys responding under a three-component multiple schedule were administered haloperidol to determine its effects on cocaine self-administration and on cocaine's disruptive effects on the repeated acquisition and performance of response chains. In the absence of haloperidol, 0.0032 - 0.032 mg/kg/infusion of cocaine increased response…

  7. Effects of prenatal androgens on rhesus monkeys: A model system to explore the organizational hypothesis in primates

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Jan; Zehr, Julia L.; Loose, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    After proposing the organizational hypothesis from research in prenatally androgenized guinea pigs (Phoenix et al., 1959), the same authors almost immediately extended the hypothesis to a nonhuman primate model, the rhesus monkey. Studies over the last 50 years have verified that prenatal androgens have permanent effects in rhesus monkeys on the neural circuits that underlie sexually dimorphic behaviors. These behaviors include both sexual and social behaviors, all of which are also influenced by social experience. Many juvenile behaviors such as play and mounting are masculinized, and aspects of adult sexual behavior are both masculinized (e.g. approaches, sex contacts, and mounts) and defeminized (e.g. sexual solicits). Different behavioral endpoints have different periods of maximal susceptibility to the organizing actions of prenatal androgens. Aromatization is not important, as both testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are equally effective in rhesus monkeys. Although the full story of the effects of prenatal androgens on sexual and social behaviors in the rhesus monkey has not yet completely unfolded, much progress has been made. Amazingly, a large number of the inferences drawn from the original 1959 study have proved applicable to this nonhuman primate model. PMID:19446080

  8. Differential Antagonism of Cocaine Self-Administration and Cocaine-Induced Disruptions of Learning by Haloperidol in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winsauer, Peter J.; Moerschbaecher, Joseph M.; Roussell, Alison M.

    2008-01-01

    Six rhesus monkeys responding under a three-component multiple schedule were administered haloperidol to determine its effects on cocaine self-administration and on cocaine's disruptive effects on the repeated acquisition and performance of response chains. In the absence of haloperidol, 0.0032 - 0.032 mg/kg/infusion of cocaine increased response…

  9. A calorie-restricted diet decreases brain iron accumulation and preserves motor performance in old rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Kastman, EK; Willette, AA; Coe, CL; Bendlin, BB; Kosmatka, KJ; McLaren, DG; Xu, G; Canu, E; Field, AS; Alexander, AL; Voytko, ML; Beasley, TM; Colman, RJ; Weindruch, R; Johnson, SC

    2010-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) reduces the pathological effects of aging and extends the lifespan in many species, including nonhuman primates, although the effect on the brain is less well characterized. We used two common indicators of aging, motor performance speed and brain iron deposition measured in vivo using MRI, to determine the potential effect of CR on elderly rhesus macaques eating restricted (n = 24, 13 males, 11 females) and standard diets (n= 17, 8 males, 9 females). Both the CR and control monkeys showed age-related increases in iron concentrations in globus pallidus (GP) and substantia nigra (SN), although the CR group had significantly less iron deposition in the GP, SN, red nucleus and temporal cortex. A Diet x Age interaction revealed that CR modified age-related brain changes, evidenced as attenuation in the rate of iron accumulation in basal ganglia and parietal, temporal, and perirhinal cortex. Additionally, control monkeys had significantly slower fine motor performance on the Movement Assessment Panel, which was negatively correlated with iron accumulation in left SN and parietal lobe, although CR animals did not show this relationship. Our observations suggest that the CR induced benefit of reduced iron deposition and preserved motor function may indicate neural protection similar to effects described previously in aging rodent and primate species. PMID:20534842

  10. Mu/Kappa Opioid Interactions in Rhesus Monkeys: Implications for Analgesia and Abuse Liability

    PubMed Central

    Negus, S. Stevens; Katrina Schrode, KA; Stevenson, Glenn W.

    2008-01-01

    Mu opioid receptor agonists are clinically valuable as analgesics; however, their use is limited by high abuse liability. Kappa opioid agonists also produce antinociception, but they do not produce mu agonist-like abuse-related effects, suggesting that they may enhance the antinociceptive effects and/or attenuate the abuse-related effects of mu agonists. To evaluate this hypothesis, the present study examined interactions between the mu agonist fentanyl and the kappa agonist U69,593 in three behavioral assays in rhesus monkeys. In an assay of schedule-controlled responding, monkeys responded under a fixed-ratio 30 (FR 30) schedule of food presentation. Fentanyl and U69,593 each produced rate-decreasing effects when administered alone, and mixtures of 0.22:1, 0.65:1 and 1.96:1 U69,593/fentanyl usually produced subadditive effects. In an assay of thermal nociception, tail withdrawal latencies were measured from water heated to 50°C. Fentanyl and U69,593 each produced dose-dependent antinociception, and effects were additive for all mixtures. In an assay of drug self-administration, rhesus monkeys responded for i.v. drug injection, and both dose and FR values were manipulated. Fentanyl maintained self-administration, whereas U69,593 did not. Addition of U69,593 to fentanyl produced a proportion-dependent decrease in both rates of fentanyl self-administration and behavioral economic measures of the reinforcing efficacy of fentanyl. Taken together, these results suggest that simultaneous activation of mu and kappa receptors, either with a mixture of selective drugs or with a single drug that targets both receptors, may reduce abuse liability without reducing analgesic effects relative to selective mu agonists administered alone. PMID:18837635

  11. Peer social interaction is facilitated in juvenile rhesus monkeys treated with fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Golub, Mari S; Hogrefe, Casey E; Bulleri, Alicia M

    2016-06-01

    Fluoxetine improves social interactions in children with autism, social anxiety and social phobia. It is not known whether this effect is mediated directly or indirectly by correcting the underlying pathology. Genetics may also influence the drug effect. Polymorphisms of the MAOA (monoamine oxidase A) gene interact with fluoxetine to influence metabolic profiles in juvenile monkeys. Juvenile nonhuman primates provide an appropriate model for studying fluoxetine effects and drug*gene interactions in children. Male rhesus monkeys 1-3 years of age living in permanent social pairs were treated daily with a therapeutic dose of fluoxetine or vehicle (n = 16/group). Both members of each social pair were assigned to the same treatment group. They were observed for social interactions with their familiar cagemate over a 2-year dosing period. Subjects were genotyped for MAOA variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphisms categorized for high or low transcription rates (hi-MAOA, low-MAOA). Fluoxetine-treated animals spent 30% more time in social interaction than vehicle controls. Fluoxetine significantly increased the duration of quiet interactions, the most common type of interaction, and also of immature sexual behavior typical of rhesus in this age group. Specific behaviors affected depended on MAOA genotype of the animal and its social partner. When given fluoxetine, hi-MOAO monkeys had more social invitation and initiation behaviors and low-MAOA subjects with low-MAOA partners had more grooming and an increased frequency of some facial and vocal expressive behaviors. Fluoxetine may facilitate social interaction in children independent of remediation of psychopathology. Common genetic variants may modify this effect.

  12. Pathobiological and Behavioral Effects of Lead Intoxication in the Infant Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Allen, J. R.; McWey, P. J.; Suomi, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    When infant rhesus monkeys were exposed to lead via the addition of lead acetate (0.5–9 mg/kg body weight) to their formula or by the consumption of lead particles from lead-based surrogate mothers, they developed symptoms of lead intoxication within 6 weeks. Seizures, muscular tremors, and altered social interaction were the predominant changes. Visual impairment was also apparent in the more severely affected animals. In the animals showing obvious symptoms lead levels varied between 300 to 500 μg/100 ml of blood. Even in those animals having blood lead levels below 100 μg, hyperactivity and insomnia were observed. When the exposure to lead was eliminated, seizures subsided and visual impairment was reduced; however, the abnormal social interaction persisted. These animals also experienced a gradual decline in hematocrit and hemoglobin values during the period of examination. Liver and kidney biopsies obtained from these lead-exposed animals revealed characteristic intranuclear inclusions. When adolescent and adult monkeys were exposed to doses of lead acetate similar to those employed in the infant experiments, lead levels in excess of 200 μg/100 ml of blood were recorded. However, there were no obvious behavioral abnormalities observed. There were, however, numerous lead inclusion bodies in kidney biopsy specimens from these animals. These data suggest that, like man, the infant nonhuman primate is much more susceptible to lead intoxication than is the adult. The clinical and behavioral changes recorded in these infant rhesus monkeys suggest their use as an experimental model to evaluate lead intoxication. ImagesFIGURE 6. PMID:4208658

  13. Shallow discounting of delayed cocaine by male rhesus monkeys when immediate food is the choice alternative.

    PubMed

    Huskinson, Sally L; Myerson, Joel; Green, Leonard; Rowlett, James K; Woolverton, William L; Freeman, Kevin B

    2016-12-01

    Huskinson et al. (2015) recently examined delay discounting in monkeys choosing between an immediate drug (cocaine) reinforcer and a delayed nondrug (food) reinforcer. The present experiment examined the reverse situation: choice between immediate nondrug (food) and delayed drug (cocaine) reinforcers. Whereas the former choice situation exemplifies drug abuse from a delay-discounting perspective, our interest in the latter choice situation is derived from the observation that drug abusers, who characteristically are associated with impulsive choice, typically must devote considerable time to procuring drugs, often at the expense of immediate nondrug alternatives. Accordingly, we analyzed 3 male rhesus monkeys' choices between immediate food and delayed cocaine (0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg/injection) using a hyperbolic model that allowed us to compare discounting rates between qualitatively different reinforcers. Choice of immediate food increased with food amount, and choice functions generally shifted leftward as delay to cocaine increased, indicating a decrease in the subjective value of cocaine. Compared with our previous delay-discounting experiment with immediate cocaine versus delayed food, both doses of delayed cocaine were discounted at a shallow rate. The present results demonstrate that rhesus monkeys will tolerate relatively long delays in an immediate-food versus delayed-drug situation, suggesting that in intertemporal choices between cocaine and food, the subjective value of cocaine is less affected by the delay until reinforcement than is the subjective value of delayed food. More generally, the present findings suggest that although drug abusers may choose impulsively when immediate drug reinforcement is available, they exercise self-control in the acquisition of a highly preferred, delayed drug reinforcer. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Lung effects of inhaled corticosteroids in a rhesus monkey model of childhood asthma

    PubMed Central

    Plopper, C. G.; Joad, J. P.; Miller, L. A.; Schelegle, E. S.; Fanucchi, M. V.; Van Winkle, L. S.; Tyler, N. K.; Avdalovic, M. V.; Evans, M. J.; Lasley, W. L.; Buckpitt, A. R.; Pinkerton, K. E.; Tarkington, B. K.; Davis, S.; Nishio, S. J.; Gershwin, L. J.; Wu, R.; Hyde, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The risks for infants and young children receiving inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy are largely unknown. Recent clinical studies indicate that ICS therapy in pre-school children with symptoms of asthma result in decreased symptoms without influencing the clinical disease course, but potentially affect postnatal growth and development. The current study employs a primate experimental model to identify the risks posed by ICS therapy. Objective To (1) establish whether ICS therapy in developing primate lungs reverses pulmonary pathobiology associated with allergic airway disease (AAD) and (2) define the impact of ICS on postnatal lung growth and development in primates. Methods Infant rhesus monkeys were exposed, from 1 through 6 months, to filtered air (FA) with house dust mite allergen and ozone using a protocol that produces AAD (AAD monkeys), or to FA alone (Control monkeys). From three through 6 months, the monkeys were treated daily with ICS (budesonide) or saline. Results Several AAD manifestations (airflow restrictions, lavage eosinophilia, basement membrane zone thickening, epithelial mucin composition) were reduced with ICS treatment, without adverse effects on body growth or adrenal function; however, airway branching abnormalities and intraepithelial innervation were not reduced. In addition, several indicators of postnatal lung growth and differentiation: vital capacity, inspiratory capacity, compliance, non-parenchymal lung volume and alveolarization, were increased in both AAD and Control monkeys that received ICS treatment. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Incomplete prevention of pathobiological changes in the airways and disruption of postnatal growth and differentiation of airways and lung parenchyma in response to ICS pose risks for developing primate lungs. These responses also represent two mechanisms that could compromise ICS therapy’s ability to alter clinical disease course in young children. PMID:22702509

  15. Ranking Cognitive Flexibility in a Group Setting of Rhesus Monkeys with a Set-Shifting Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Shnitko, Tatiana A.; Allen, Daicia C.; Gonzales, Steven W.; Walter, Nicole A. R.; Grant, Kathleen A.

    2017-01-01

    Attentional set-shifting ability is an executive function underling cognitive flexibility in humans and animals. In humans, this function is typically observed during a single experimental session where dimensions of playing cards are used to measure flexibility in the face of changing rules for reinforcement (i.e., the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST)). In laboratory animals, particularly non-human primates, variants of the WCST involve extensive training and testing on a series of dimensional discriminations, usually in social isolation. In the present study, a novel experimental approach was used to assess attentional set-shifting simultaneously in 12 rhesus monkeys. Specifically, monkeys living in individual cages but in the same room were trained at the same time each day in a set-shifting task in the same housing environment. As opposed to the previous studies, each daily session began with a simple single-dimension discrimination regardless of the animal’s performance on the previous session. A total of eight increasingly difficult, discriminations (sets) were possible in each daily 45 min session. Correct responses were reinforced under a second-order schedule of flavored food pellet delivery, and criteria for completing a set was 12 correct trials out of a running total of 15 trials. Monkeys progressed through the sets at their own pace and abilities. The results demonstrate that all 12 monkeys acquired the simple discrimination (the first set), but individual differences in the ability to progress through all eight sets were apparent. A performance index (PI) that encompassed progression through the sets, errors and session duration was calculated and used to rank each monkey’s performance in relation to each other. Overall, this version of a set-shifting task results in an efficient assessment of reliable differences in cognitive flexibility in a group of monkeys. PMID:28386222

  16. Physical activity of adult female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) across the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Hunnell, Nathan A; Rockcastle, Nathan J; McCormick, Kristen N; Sinko, Laurel K; Sullivan, Elinor L; Cameron, Judy L

    2007-06-01

    Physical activity is an important physiological variable impacting on a number of systems in the body. In rodents and several species of domestic animals, levels of physical activity have been reported to vary across the estrous cycle; however, it is unclear whether such changes in activity occur in women and other primates across the menstrual cycle. To determine whether significant changes in activity occur over the menstrual cycle, we continuously measured physical activity in seven adult female rhesus monkeys by accelerometry over the course of one menstrual cycle. Monkeys were checked daily for menses, and daily blood samples were collected for measurement of reproductive hormones. All monkeys displayed ovulatory menstrual cycles, ranging from 23 to 31 days in length. There was a significant increase in estradiol from the early follicular phase to the day of ovulation (F(1.005,5.023) = 40.060, P = 0.001). However, there was no significant change in physical activity across the menstrual cycle (F(2,12) = 0.225, P = 0.802), with activity levels being similar in the early follicular phase, on the day of the preovulatory rise in estradiol and during the midluteal phase. Moreover, the physical activity of these monkeys was not outside the range of physical activity that we measured in 15 ovariectomized monkeys. We conclude that, in primates, physical activity does not change across the menstrual cycle and is not influenced by physiological changes in circulating estradiol. This finding will allow investigators to record physical activity in female primates without the concern of controlling for the phase of the menstrual cycle.

  17. Analysis of maternal microchimerism in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) using real-time quantitative PCR amplification of MHC polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Bakkour, Sonia; Baker, Chris A R; Tarantal, Alice F; Wen, Li; Busch, Michael P; Lee, Tzong-Hae; McCune, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    Although pregnancy-associated microchimerism is known to exist in humans, its clinical significance remains unclear. Fetal microchimerism has been documented in rhesus monkeys, but the trafficking and persistence of maternal cells in the monkey fetus and infant have not been fully explored. To investigate the frequency of maternal microchimerism in the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategy was developed and validated to target polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene sequences. Informative PCR assays were identified for 19 of 25 dams and their respective offspring. Analyses were performed on tissues (thymus, liver, spleen, lymph nodes, and bone marrow) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected prenatally and postnatally in a subset of animals. Seven of 19 monkeys had detectable maternal microchimerism in at least one compartment (range: 0.001-1.9% chimeric cells). In tissues, maternal microchimerism was found in 2 of 7 fetuses and 3 of 12 juveniles (1-1.5 years of age), and most of the animals that were positive had microchimeric cells in more than one tissue. Maternal microchimerism was detected in PBMCs from all (4 of 4) fetuses. These observations suggest that maternal microchimerism occurs in the rhesus monkey fetus and can be detected in tissues in a subset of offspring after birth.

  18. Effects of varenicline on the reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Gould, Robert W; Czoty, Paul W; Nader, Susan H; Nader, Michael A

    2011-11-01

    Varenicline is a low-efficacy, α4β2* subtype-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist that has shown success in smoking cessation and promise in preclinical assessments relating to other drugs of abuse. The primary goal of the present study was to examine the effects of varenicline on cocaine self-administration and cocaine discrimination and compare these effects with those of the nAChR agonist nicotine and antagonist mecamylamine. One limitation of agonist treatments is the potential for abuse. Thus, a second goal was to examine the abuse potential of varenicline in rhesus monkeys. In the first experiment, rhesus monkeys (n = 3) were trained to self-administer cocaine (saline, 0.01-0.56 mg/kg) under a progressive-ratio schedule of reinforcement; monkeys also earned all of their food by responding on another lever under a fixed-ratio 50 schedule of reinforcement. Chronic administration of varenicline (0.01-0.56 mg/kg p.o., salt) potentiated the reinforcing effects of cocaine, whereas mecamylamine (0.3-1.7 mg/kg p.o, i.m., i.v., salt) had no significant effects on cocaine self-administration up to doses that disrupted food-maintained responding. Neither varenicline (0.01-0.17 mg/kg, salt) nor nicotine (0.01-0.1 mg/kg, base) functioned as reinforcers when substituted for cocaine. Finally, in monkeys trained to discriminate self-administered 0.3 mg/kg cocaine, varenicline (0.1-0.3 mg/kg i.v.) did not substitute for cocaine but, along with mecamylamine (0.3-1.7 mg/kg i.v.) and nicotine (0.03-0.1 mg/kg i.v.), potentiated the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine. These results suggest that varenicline has low abuse liability in monkey models of cocaine abuse, but would not be an effective medication for cocaine addiction.

  19. Depletion of the spermatogonia from the seminiferous epithelium of the rhesus monkey after X irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    van Alphen, M.M.; van de Kant, H.J.; de Rooij, D.G.

    1988-03-01

    In unirradiated testes large differences were found in the total number of spermatogonia among different monkeys, but the number of spermatogonia in the right and the left testes of the same monkey appeared to be rather similar. During the first 11 days after irradiation with 0.5 to 4.0 Gy of X rays the number of Apale spermatogonia (Ap) decreased to about 13% of the control level, while the number of Adark spermatogonia (Ad) did not change significantly. A significant decrease in the number of Ad spermatogonia was seen at Day 14 together with a significant increase in the number of Ap spermatogonia. It was concluded that the resting Ad spermatogonia are activated into proliferating Ap spermatogonia. After Day 16 the number of both Ap and Ad spermatogonia decreased to low levels. Apparently the new Ap spermatogonia were formed by lethally irradiated Ad spermatogonia and degenerated while attempting to divide. The activation of the Ad spermatogonia was found to take place throughout the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium. Serum FSH, LH, and testosterone levels were measured before and after irradiation. Serum FSH levels already had increased during the first week after irradiation to 160% of the control level. Serum LH levels increased between 18 and 25 days after irradiation. Serum testosterone levels did not change at all. The results found in the rhesus monkey are in line with those found in humans, but due to the presence of Ad spermatogonia they differ from those obtained in non-primates.

  20. The calcium endocrine system of adolescent rhesus monkeys and controls before and after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Navidi, Meena; Deftos, Leonard; Thierry-Palmer, Myrtle; Dotsenko, Rita; Bigbee, Allison; Grindeland, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    The calcium endocrine system of nonhuman primates can be influenced by chairing for safety and the weightless environment of spaceflight. The serum of two rhesus monkeys flown on the Bion 11 mission was assayed pre- and postflight for vitamin D metabolites, parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, parameters of calcium homeostasis, cortisol, and indexes of renal function. Results were compared with the same measures from five monkeys before and after chairing for a flight simulation study. Concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were 72% lower after the flight than before, and more than after chairing on the ground (57%, P < 0.05). Decreases in parathyroid hormone did not reach significance. Calcitonin showed modest decreases postflight (P < 0.02). Overall, effects of spaceflight on the calcium endocrine system were similar to the effects of chairing on the ground, but were more pronounced. Reduced intestinal calcium absorption, losses in body weight, increases in cortisol, and higher postflight blood urea nitrogen were the changes in flight monkeys that distinguished them from the flight simulation study animals.

  1. Discriminative and reinforcing stimulus effects of nicotine, cocaine, and cocaine + nicotine combinations in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K; Newman, Jennifer L

    2011-06-01

    Concurrent cigarette smoking and cocaine use is well documented. However, the behavioral pharmacology of cocaine and nicotine combinations is poorly understood, and there is a need for animal models to examine this form of polydrug abuse. The purpose of this study was twofold: first to assess the effects of nicotine on the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine, and second, to study self-administration of nicotine/cocaine combinations in a novel polydrug abuse model. In drug discrimination experiments, nicotine increased the discriminative stimulus effects of low cocaine doses in two of three monkeys, but nicotine did not substitute for cocaine in any monkey. Self-administration of cocaine and nicotine alone, and cocaine + nicotine combinations was studied under a second-order fixed ratio 2, variable ratio 16 (FR2[VR16:S]) schedule of reinforcement. Cocaine and nicotine alone were self-administered in a dose-dependent manner. The combination of marginally reinforcing doses of cocaine and nicotine increased drug self-administration behavior above levels observed with the same dose of either cocaine or nicotine alone. These findings indicate that nicotine may increase cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects in rhesus monkeys, and illustrate the feasibility of combining cocaine and nicotine in a preclinical model of polydrug abuse. Further studies of the behavioral effects of nicotine + cocaine combinations will contribute to our understanding the pharmacology of dual nicotine and cocaine dependence, and will be useful for evaluation of new treatment medications.

  2. Exploring the extent and function of higher-order auditory cortex in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Poremba, Amy; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2007-07-01

    Just as cortical visual processing continues far beyond the boundaries of early visual areas, so too does cortical auditory processing continue far beyond the limits of early auditory areas. In passively listening rhesus monkeys examined with metabolic mapping techniques, cortical areas reactive to auditory stimulation were found to include the entire length of the superior temporal gyrus (STG) as well as several other regions within the temporal, parietal, and frontal lobes. Comparison of these widespread activations with those from an analogous study in vision supports the notion that audition, like vision, is served by several cortical processing streams, each specialized for analyzing a different aspect of sensory input, such as stimulus quality, location, or motion. Exploration with different classes of acoustic stimuli demonstrated that most portions of STG show greater activation on the right than on the left regardless of stimulus class. However, there is a striking shift to left-hemisphere "dominance" during passive listening to species-specific vocalizations, though this reverse asymmetry is observed only in the region of temporal pole. The mechanism for this left temporal pole "dominance" appears to be suppression of the right temporal pole by the left hemisphere, as demonstrated by a comparison of the results in normal monkeys with those in split-brain monkeys.

  3. Recognition errors suggest fast familiarity and slow recollection in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Basile, Benjamin M.; Hampton, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    One influential model of recognition posits two underlying memory processes: recollection, which is detailed but relatively slow, and familiarity, which is quick but lacks detail. Most of the evidence for this dual-process model in nonhumans has come from analyses of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves in rats, but whether ROC analyses can demonstrate dual processes has been repeatedly challenged. Here, we present independent converging evidence for the dual-process model from analyses of recognition errors made by rhesus monkeys. Recognition choices were made in three different ways depending on processing duration. Short-latency errors were disproportionately false alarms to familiar lures, suggesting control by familiarity. Medium-latency responses were less likely to be false alarms and were more accurate, suggesting onset of a recollective process that could correctly reject familiar lures. Long-latency responses were guesses. A response deadline increased false alarms, suggesting that limiting processing time weakened the contribution of recollection and strengthened the contribution of familiarity. Together, these findings suggest fast familiarity and slow recollection in monkeys, that monkeys use a “recollect to reject” strategy to countermand false familiarity, and that primate recognition performance is well-characterized by a dual-process model consisting of recollection and familiarity. PMID:23864646

  4. Acquisition Of Cocaine Self-Administration With Unsignaled Delayed Reinforcement In Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Galuska, Chad M; Woods, James H

    2005-01-01

    Six experimentally naive rhesus monkeys produced 0.01 mg/kg/infusion cocaine by lever pressing under a tandem fixed-ratio 1 differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior schedule. One lever press initiated an unsignaled 15- or 30-s delay culminating in cocaine delivery. Each press made during the delay reset the delay interval. With two exceptions, responding was acquired and maintained at higher rates than responding on a second (inoperative) lever. For the exceptions, a cancellation contingency was arranged in which each formerly inoperative-lever response reset the tandem schedule. This manipulation reduced presses on the inoperative lever. Subsequently, the consequences of responding on the two levers were reversed, and the monkeys again responded at higher rates on the operative lever. As a comparison, 3 additional experimentally naive monkeys received response-independent cocaine deliveries. Although lever pressing was observed, it extinguished and was subsequently reestablished under the tandem schedule. The results suggest that although response-reinforcer contiguity is not required for cocaine to acquire reinforcing functions, a response-reinforcer relation appears necessary. PMID:16262189

  5. Robust vaccine-elicited cellular immune responses in breast milk following systemic simian immunodeficiency virus DNA prime and live virus vector boost vaccination of lactating rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Andrew B; Christian, Elizabeth C; Seaman, Michael S; Sircar, Piya; Carville, Angela; Gomez, Carmen E; Esteban, Mariano; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Barouch, Dan H; Letvin, Norman L; Permar, Sallie R

    2010-12-01

    Breast milk transmission of HIV remains an important mode of infant HIV acquisition. Enhancement of mucosal HIV-specific immune responses in milk of HIV-infected mothers through vaccination may reduce milk virus load or protect against virus transmission in the infant gastrointestinal tract. However, the ability of HIV/SIV strategies to induce virus-specific immune responses in milk has not been studied. In this study, five uninfected, hormone-induced lactating, Mamu A*01(+) female rhesus monkey were systemically primed and boosted with rDNA and the attenuated poxvirus vector, NYVAC, containing the SIVmac239 gag-pol and envelope genes. The monkeys were boosted a second time with a recombinant Adenovirus serotype 5 vector containing matching immunogens. The vaccine-elicited immunodominant epitope-specific CD8(+) T lymphocyte response in milk was of similar or greater magnitude than that in blood and the vaginal tract but higher than that in the colon. Furthermore, the vaccine-elicited SIV Gag-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocyte polyfunctional cytokine responses were more robust in milk than in blood after each virus vector boost. Finally, SIV envelope-specific IgG responses were detected in milk of all monkeys after vaccination, whereas an SIV envelope-specific IgA response was only detected in one vaccinated monkey. Importantly, only limited and transient increases in the proportion of activated or CCR5-expressing CD4(+) T lymphocytes in milk occurred after vaccination. Therefore, systemic DNA prime and virus vector boost of lactating rhesus monkeys elicits potent virus-specific cellular and humoral immune responses in milk and may warrant further investigation as a strategy to impede breast milk transmission of HIV.

  6. Effects of vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and stimulation on hearing in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y; Della Santina, Charles C

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the effects of vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and activation on hearing in rhesus monkeys, we measured auditory brainstem responses (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) in four rhesus monkeys before and after unilateral implantation of vestibular prosthesis electrodes in each of 3 left semicircular canals (SCC). Each of the 3 left SCCs were implanted with electrodes via a transmastoid approach. Right ears, which served as controls, were not surgically manipulated. Hearing tests were conducted before implantation (BI) and then 4 weeks post-implantation both without electrical stimulation (NS) and with electrical stimulation (S). During the latter condition, prosthetic electrical stimuli encoding 3 dimensions of head angular velocity were delivered to the 3 ampullary branches of the left vestibular nerve via each of 3 electrode pairs of a multichannel vestibular prosthesis. Electrical stimuli comprised charge-balanced biphasic pulses at a baseline rate of 94 pulses/s, with pulse frequency modulated from 48 to 222 pulses/s by head angular velocity. ABR hearing thresholds to clicks and tone pips at 1, 2, and 4 kHz increased by 5-10 dB from BI to NS and increased another ∼5 dB from NS to S in implanted ears. No significant change was seen in right ears. DPOAE amplitudes decreased by 2-14 dB from BI to NS in implanted ears. There was a slight but insignificant decrease of DPOAE amplitude and a corresponding increase of DPOAE/Noise floor ratio between NS and S in implanted ears. Vestibular prosthesis electrode implantation and activation have small but measurable effects on hearing in rhesus monkeys. Coupled with the clinical observation that patients with cochlear implants only rarely exhibit signs of vestibular injury or spurious vestibular nerve stimulation, these results suggest that although implantation and activation of multichannel vestibular prosthesis electrodes in human will carry a risk of hearing loss

  7. What interests them in the pictures?--differences in eye-tracking between rhesus monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying-Zhou; Jiang, Hui-Hui; Liu, Ci-Rong; Wang, Jian-Hong; Yu, Cheng-Yang; Carlson, Synnöve; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Saarinen, Veli-Matti; Rizak, Joshua D; Tian, Xiao-Guang; Tan, Hen; Chen, Zhu-Yue; Ma, Yuan-Ye; Hu, Xin-Tian

    2013-10-01

    Studies estimating eye movements have demonstrated that non-human primates have fixation patterns similar to humans at the first sight of a picture. In the current study, three sets of pictures containing monkeys, humans or both were presented to rhesus monkeys and humans. The eye movements on these pictures by the two species were recorded using a Tobii eye-tracking system. We found that monkeys paid more attention to the head and body in pictures containing monkeys, whereas both monkeys and humans paid more attention to the head in pictures containing humans. The humans always concentrated on the eyes and head in all the pictures, indicating the social role of facial cues in society. Although humans paid more attention to the hands than monkeys, both monkeys and humans were interested in the hands and what was being done with them in the pictures. This may suggest the importance and necessity of hands for survival. Finally, monkeys scored lower in eye-tracking when fixating on the pictures, as if they were less interested in looking at the screen than humans. The locations of fixation in monkeys may provide insight into the role of eye movements in an evolutionary context.

  8. Immune and airway effects of house dust mite aeroallergen exposures during postnatal development of the infant rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Miller, L A; Plopper, C G; Hyde, D M; Gerriets, J E; Pieczarka, E M; Tyler, N K; Evans, M J; Gershwin, L J; Schelegle, E S; Van Winkle, L S

    2003-12-01

    The effect of chronic environmental aeroallergen exposure on the immune system and airways has not been experimentally defined in very young children. The purpose of this study was to determine the immunophenotype of peripheral blood and airway leucocytes in the newborn rhesus macaque monkey, following recurrent aerosol exposure to house dust mite (HDM) (Dermatophagoides farinae). A regimen of HDM aerosolization was initiated for 2 h per day, three times per week, starting when rhesus macaque monkeys were 1 week of age. All monkeys were inoculated with diptheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine at 5 weeks of age to simulate human infant vaccination schedules. Following 8 weeks of HDM aeroallergen exposure, infant monkeys exhibited a significant reduction in the total peripheral blood lymphocyte numbers and a decreased frequency of peripheral blood CD4+ T lymphocytes with a CD45RA-'memory' immunophenotype. Lavage CD4+ T lymphocytes from HDM-exposed monkeys showed elevated expression of CD25, as well as an increase in CD45RA-/CD62L-/CD11ahigh immunophenotype. Eosinophils were more abundant within airways of HDM-exposed monkeys, accumulating maximally within the trachea. These data demonstrate the development of immunological responses following chronic inhalation of a common environmental allergen during postnatal maturation in the non-human primate.

  9. Effect of genistein on steroid hormone production in the pregnant rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R M; Phillippi, P P; Swan, K F; Henson, M C

    1999-10-01

    Genistein is a phytoestrogen found in soy beans. Phytoestrogens have been reported to cause reproductive problems in sheep and rats. This research was conducted to determine the effects of genistein fed to rhesus monkeys during pregnancy, with specific interest on fetal growth and steroidogenesis in the maternal-fetoplacental unit. Two groups of five monkeys each were selected in early stages of pregnancy. One group was administered genistein in a fruit treat each weekday until Cesarean section 10 days prior to term. The second, control group, received fruit treats without genistein. Maternal blood samples were collected on Tuesday and Friday of each week. At delivery, samples were collected from the maternal peripheral circulation, uterine veins, uterine-ovarian veins, and the fetal heart. Comparisons between control and genistein-treated monkeys revealed no differences in the maternal weight gained during pregnancy, or in fetal weights or placental weights at delivery. Serum was assayed by radioimmunoassay (RIA) for estradiol, progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), and estrone. No significant differences (P > 0.05) were noted in progesterone or DHEA-S levels at delivery or during the pregnancy; however, estradiol levels were higher (P < 0.05) in the four areas studied at delivery and in the maternal blood with advancing gestation. Additionally, estrone levels tended to increase more rapidly (P = 0. 057) in the maternal blood of monkeys receiving genistein than in untreated controls, suggesting that genistein may stimulate the deconjugation of estrone in the gut, thus allowing its reabsorption into the peripheral circulation and conversion to estradiol.

  10. Concurrent determination of bisphenol A pharmacokinetics in maternal and fetal rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Tucker A.; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Roegge, Cindy S.; Callicott, Ralph J.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2013-02-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important industrial chemical used as the monomer for polycarbonate plastic and in epoxy resins for food can liners. Worldwide biomonitoring studies consistently find a high prevalence of BPA conjugates in urine (> 90%) in amounts consistent with aggregate exposure at levels below 1 μg/kg bw/d. The current study used LC/MS/MS to measure concurrently the pharmacokinetics of aglycone (active) and conjugated (inactive) deuterated BPA (d6) in maternal and fetal rhesus monkey serum, amniotic fluid, and placenta following intravenous injection in the dam (100 μg/kg bw). Internal exposures of the fetus to aglycone d6-BPA (serum AUC) were attenuated by maternal, placental, and fetal Phase II metabolism to less than half that in the dam. Levels of aglycone and conjugated d6-BPA measured in whole placenta were consistent with a role in metabolic detoxification. The monotonic elimination of aglycone d6-BPA from the fetal compartment accompanied by persistent conjugate levels provides further evidence arguing against the hypothesis that BPA conjugates are selectively deconjugated by either the placenta or fetus. These results also provide benchmarks to guide the interpretation of human cord blood, amniotic fluid, and placenta sampling and measurement strategies as a basis for estimating fetal exposures to BPA. This study in a non-human primate model provides additional pharmacokinetic data for use in PBPK modeling of perinatal exposures to BPA from food contact, medical devices, and other environmental sources. - Highlights: ► Maternal, placental, and fetal Phase II metabolism attenuate fetal exposure to BPA. ► Serum AUC for aglycone BPA in fetal monkeys is less than half of that in the dam. ► BPA profiles in monkey fetus rule out selective deconjugation and accumulation. ► BPA levels in monkey placenta are similar to other metabolically active tissues. ► Some published human cord blood data for BPA are inconsistent with these measurements.

  11. Lorcaserin Reduces the Discriminative Stimulus and Reinforcing Effects of Cocaine in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Gregory T.; Gerak, Lisa R.; Javors, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine abuse and obesity are serious public health problems, and studies suggest that both dopamine and serotonin systems are involved in regulating the consumption of drugs and food. Lorcaserin has serotonin (5-HT)2C receptor agonist actions, is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating obesity, and might be effective for treating cocaine abuse. These studies characterized the pharmacokinetic and behavioral profiles of lorcaserin (intragastric administration) and determined the effectiveness of lorcaserin to alter discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects of cocaine (intravenous administration) in rhesus monkeys. Administered acutely, lorcaserin dose-dependently increased the occurrence of yawning while decreasing spontaneous activity and operant responding for food. These effects appeared within 30–60 minutes of administration and began to dissipate by 240 minutes, a time course closely matching plasma concentrations of lorcaserin. In monkeys discriminating cocaine from saline, lorcaserin alone did not occasion cocaine-appropriate responding but shifted the cocaine dose-response curve to the right and down in two of three monkeys. When administered acutely, lorcaserin dose-dependently decreased the rate at which monkeys responded for infusions of cocaine. When administered chronically, 3.2 mg/kg lorcaserin reduced the rate of cocaine-maintained responding by 50% for the duration of a 14-day treatment period. Together, these results show that lorcaserin attenuates the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine after acute administration and the reinforcing effects of cocaine after acute and repeated administration, consistent with the view that it might have utility in treating cocaine abuse. PMID:26534942

  12. Associations between early life experience, chronic HPA axis activity, and adult social rank in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Amanda M; Wooddell, Lauren J; Rosenberg, Kendra L; Kaburu, Stefano S K; Novak, Melinda A; Meyer, Jerrold S; Suomi, Stephen J

    2017-02-01

    Early life experience and socioeconomic status (SES) are well-established predictors of health outcomes in people. Both factors likely influence health outcomes via hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation. However, it is unclear how early experience and HPA axis activity influence adult social status. We studied differentially reared female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta, N = 90) as models to test the hypothesis that chronic HPA axis activity assessed via hair cortisol concentrations (HCCs) mediated the relationship between early life experience and adult social rank. We found that mother-peer-reared (MPR) monkeys acquired higher social ranks than either of the two nursery-reared (NR) groups (peer-reared, PR, or surrogate-peer-reared, SPR monkeys) (β = -0.07, t(89) = -2.16, p = 0.034). We also found that MPR HCCs were lower during the juvenile period at 18 months (F(2,25) = 3.49, p = 0.047). Furthermore, for MPR but not NR monkeys, changes in HCCs from 18 to 24 months (r(s) = -0.627, p = 0.039) and adult HCCs (r(s) = -0.321, p = 0.03) were negatively correlated with adult social rank. These findings suggest that chronic HPA axis regulation in juvenility, and perhaps in adulthood, may influence adult social status for primates that experience typical early rearing. However, early life adversity may result in dissociation between neuroendocrine stress regulation and adult social competence, which may be risk factors for adverse health outcomes.

  13. Importance of vpr for infection of rhesus monkeys with simian immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, S M; Weeger, M; Stahl-Hennig, C; Coulibaly, C; Hunsmann, G; Müller, J; Müller-Hermelink, H; Fuchs, D; Wachter, H; Daniel, M M

    1993-01-01

    The importance of the vpr gene for simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication, persistence, and disease progression was examined by using the infectious pathogenic molecular clone called SIVmac239. The ATG start codon of the vpr gene was converted to TTG by site-specific mutagenesis. The constructed Vpr- mutant virus is identical with the parental SIVmac239/nef-stop virus with the exception of this one nucleotide. These viruses replicated with similar kinetics and to similar extents in rhesus monkey lymphocyte cultures and in the human CEMX174 cell line. Five rhesus monkeys were inoculated with the Vpr- variant of SIVmac239/nef-stop, and two monkeys received SIVmac239/nef-stop as controls. Both controls showed reversion of the TAA stop signal in nef by 2 weeks postinfection, as has been observed previously. Reversion of the TAA stop codon in nef also occurred in the five monkeys that received the Vpr- variant, but reversion was delayed on average to about 4 weeks. Thus, the mutation in vpr appeared to delay the rapidity with which reversion occurred in the nef gene. Reversion of the TTG sequence in vpr to ATG was observed in three of the five test animals. Reversion in vpr was first observed in these three animals 4 to 8 weeks postinfection. No vpr revertants were found over the entire 66 weeks of observation in the other two test animals that received the vpr mutant. Antibodies to vpr developed in those three animals in which reversion of vpr was documented, but antibodies to vpr were not observed in the two animals in which reversion of vpr was not detected. Antibody responses to gag and to whole virus antigens were of similar strength in all seven animals. Both control animals and two of the test animals in which vpr reverted maintained high virus loads and developed progressive disease. Low virus burden and no disease have been observed in the two animals in which vpr did not revert and in the one animal in which vpr reversion was first detected only at 8

  14. Chronic, Wireless Recordings of Large Scale Brain Activity in Freely Moving Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, David A.; Lebedev, Mikhail A.; Hanson, Timothy L.; Dimitrov, Dragan F.; Lehew, Gary; Meloy, Jim; Rajangam, Sankaranarayani; Subramanian, Vivek; Ifft, Peter J.; Li, Zheng; Ramakrishnan, Arjun; Tate, Andrew; Zhuang, Katie; Nicolelis, Miguel A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in techniques for recording large-scale brain activity contribute to both the elucidation of neurophysiological principles and the development of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). Here we describe a neurophysiological paradigm for performing tethered and wireless large-scale recordings based on movable volumetric three-dimensional (3D) multielectrode implants. This approach allowed us to isolate up to 1,800 units per animal and simultaneously record the extracellular activity of close to 500 cortical neurons, distributed across multiple cortical areas, in freely behaving rhesus monkeys. The method is expandable, in principle, to thousands of simultaneously recorded channels. It also allows increased recording longevity (5 consecutive years), and recording of a broad range of behaviors, e.g. social interactions, and BMI paradigms in freely moving primates. We propose that wireless large-scale recordings could have a profound impact on basic primate neurophysiology research, while providing a framework for the development and testing of clinically relevant neuroprostheses. PMID:24776634

  15. [The effect of adrafinil on the nocturnal activity of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta)].

    PubMed

    Milhaud, C L; Klein, M J

    1985-01-01

    The nocturnal activity of a primate was used as an evaluation criterium for a stimulating substance: adrafinil (CRL 40028). Ten rhesus monkeys were placed in a controlled environment and their activity was measured, in relative time, using an ultra-sound system. The animals repeatedly received 60, 90 and 120 mg X kg-1 adrafinil per os. Globally, the dose of 60 mg X kg-1 doubled the animals' nocturnal activity whereas 90 and 120 mg X kg-1 increased it fourfold, the activity level becoming practically identical to diurnal activity. The effects of 60 mg X kg-1 were only significant after the second treatment whereas doses of 90 and 120 mg X kg-1 were already significantly efficient after the first administration. A stimulating effect persisted approximately 36 hrs after the second treatment with 90 or 120 mg X kg-1. No sedative effect of recovery was observed during the posttreatment phase.

  16. Great apes and rhesus monkeys as subjects for psychopharmacological studies of stimulants and depressants.

    PubMed

    Pieper, W A

    1976-09-01

    A group of experiments is described in which chimpanzees and orangutans are utilized as subjects in research projects designed to evaluate the effects of stimulant and depressant drugs on learning and performance. Efficiency of performance on a task which measures spaced responding was impaired when subjects smoked cigarettes containing delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol prior to testing. In a sequential learning task, these subjects also demonstrated reduced performance when stimulatn drugs were orally administered before testing. Depressant drugs did not produce comparable decrements in sequential learning performance. Physical and behavioral tolerance and dependence on ethanol were investigated in rhesus monkey subjects using a variety of experimental procedures, including forced oral acceptance, intragastric intubation, intravenous infusion, and conditioned voluntary oral acceptance.

  17. Sensory Processing in Rhesus Monkeys: Developmental Continuity, Prenatal Treatment, and Genetic Influences.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Mary L; Moore, Colleen F; Adkins, Miriam; Barr, Christina S; Larson, Julie A; Resch, Leslie M; Roberts, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal sensory processing (tactile and vestibular function) was tested in 78 rhesus macaques from two experiments. At ages 4-5 years, striatal dopamine D2 receptor binding was examined using positron emission tomography. At ages 5-7 years, adult sensory processing was assessed. Findings were: (a) prenatal stress exposure yielded less optimal neonatal sensory processing; (b) animals carrying the short rh5-HTTLPR allele had less optimal neonatal sensory scores than monkeys homozygous for the long allele; (c) neonatal sensory processing was significantly related to striatal D2 receptor binding for carriers of the short allele, but not for animals homozygous for the long allele; and (d) there was moderate developmental continuity in sensory processing from the neonatal period to adulthood.

  18. The rhesus monkey connectome predicts disrupted functional networks resulting from pharmacogenetic inactivation of the amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, David S; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Machado, Christopher J; Bennett, Jeffrey; Shen, Kelly; Grant, Kathleen A; Fair, Damien A; Amaral1, David G

    2016-01-01

    Summary Contemporary research suggests that the mammalian brain is a complex system, implying that damage to even a single functional area could have widespread consequences across the system. To test this hypothesis, we pharmacogenetically inactivated the rhesus monkey amygdala, a subcortical region with distributed and well-defined cortical connectivity. We then examined the impact of that perturbation on global network organization using resting-state functional connectivity MRI. Amygdala inactivation disrupted amygdalocortical communication and distributed corticocortical coupling across multiple functional brain systems. Altered coupling was explained using a graph-based analysis of experimentally established structural connectivity to simulate disconnection of the amygdala. Communication capacity via monosynaptic and polysynaptic pathways, in aggregate, largely accounted for the correlational structure of endogenous brain activity and many of the non-local changes that resulted from amygdala inactivation. These results highlight the structural basis of distributed neural activity and suggest a strategy for linking focal neuropathology to remote neurophysiological changes. PMID:27477019

  19. Hemagglutination assay of antibodies associated with pulmonary acariasis in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Kim, C S; Bang, F B; DiGiacomo, R F

    1972-01-01

    Antibodies associated with infection by lung mites (Pneumonyssus simicola) in rhesus monkeys were measured by passive hemagglutination methods. Tanned human Rh negative O red blood cells or sheep red blood cells coated with soluble acarine antigens were used to detect mite-specific antibodies. Large quantities of host-specific mite antigens (P. simicola) were difficult to obtain, so free-living mite species such as Dermatophagoides farina, Acarina sheldonii, and Tyrophagus putrificiensis were also utilized. Although the best serological specificity and sensitivity were obtained with P. simicola and its derivatives (1:640), several free-living acarine species were useful in detecting antibodies to mites. Skin tests carried out on a limited number of animals were positive for both immediate and delayed hypersensitivity.

  20. Changes in blood parameters in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) during the first trimester of gestation.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Contreras, Alejandra; Hernández-Godínez, Braulio; Reyes-Pantoja, Sergio A; Jiménez-García, Andrea; Solís-Chavéz, Salvador A; Suarez-Gutiérrez, Rodrigo; Gálvan-Montaño, Alfonso

    2013-08-01

    Regarding the good practice in the laboratory work, it is essential to have a broad spectrum of biochemical and hematological references in pregnant females to determine the health status of the colony. To establish reference values to reveal changes in hematology and blood chemistry in pregnant rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) in their first trimester of pregnancy. Twenty-eight females in reproductive stage were used, divided into two groups: 14 pregnant macaques in their first trimester and 14 non-pregnant used as the control group. Blood samples were collected for the hematological test and blood chemistry. The results showed significant difference in the blood chemistry for the following parameters: glucose, total bilirubin, and total protein. The hematological evaluation revealed significant difference in leukocytes and neutrophils. These findings offer a reference range and provide a basis for improvement in techniques and refinement of clinical processes in these specimens. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Sequence of the rhesus monkey T-cell receptor {beta} chain diversity and joining loci

    SciTech Connect

    Cheynier, R.; Henrichwark, S.; Wain-Hobson, S.

    1996-06-01

    Rhesus monkeys are frequently used as animal models for human diseases, most noticeably for simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection and simian AIDS. An analysis of HIV proviruses and HIV-specific cytotoxic T cells in splenic white pulps relied heavily on the analysis of rearranged TCRBV sequences. The spleens were derived from patients with drug-insensitive idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura and frequently taken at an advanced stage of disease. In order to obtain some insight into the balance of forces between the virus and the immune system during earlier stages of infection, one must inevitably turn to the SIV/macaque AIDS model. As a prerequisite to undertaking similar virological and immunological studies the nucleotide sequence of the macaque TCRBJ loci had to be established. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Gestational changes in the germinal matrix of the normal rhesus monkey fetus.

    PubMed

    Lenn, N J; Whitmore, L

    1985-01-01

    To explain the reported predisposition to germinal matrix hemorrhage in premature infants, pathogenetically important morphological features of the germinal matrix should be present in the 3rd trimester and rapidly change near term. Such features were sought in this study of the germinal matrix and its vasculature in normal rhesus monkey fetuses. The matrix cells, glia, ependyma, and capillaries showed no important structural changes during the 3rd trimester. The terminal vein tributaries were greatly enlarged by 148 days, but cellular and collagen support in their walls was minimal at this time. The latter features developed by the final days of gestation. These findings do not support a structural immaturity or specialization of the germinal matrix predisposing to germinal matrix hemorrhage. Our results, therefore, support the recent emphasis on physiological parameters in the pathogenesis and prevention of germinal matrix hemorrhage.

  3. Mosaic HIV-1 Vaccines Expand the Breadth and Depth of Cellular Immune Responses in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Barouch, Dan H.; O'Brien, Kara L.; Simmons, Nathaniel L.; King, Sharon L.; Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F.; Sun, Ying-Hua; La Porte, Annalena; Riggs, Ambryice M.; Lynch, Diana M.; Clark, Sarah L.; Backus, Katherine; Perry, James R.; Seaman, Michael S.; Carville, Angela; Mansfield, Keith G.; Szinger, James J.; Fischer, Will; Muldoon, Mark; Korber, Bette

    2010-01-01

    The worldwide diversity of HIV-1 presents an unprecedented challenge for vaccine development 1-2. Antigens derived from natural HIV-1 sequences have elicited only limited breadth of cellular immune responses in nonhuman primate studies and clinical trials to date. Polyvalent “mosaic” antigens, in contrast, are designed to optimize cellular immunologic coverage of global HIV-1 sequence diversity 3. Here we show that mosaic HIV-1 Gag, Pol, and Env antigens expressed by recombinant, replication-incompetent adenovirus serotype 26 vectors markedly augmented both the breadth and depth without compromising the magnitude of antigen-specific T lymphocyte responses as compared with consensus or natural sequence HIV-1 antigens in rhesus monkeys. Polyvalent mosaic antigens therefore represent a promising strategy to expand cellular immunologic vaccine coverage for genetically diverse pathogens such as HIV-1. PMID:20173752

  4. [Cellular composition of the lymph nodes of monkeys (rhesus macaque) under normal and experimental conditions].

    PubMed

    Rusina, A K

    1978-01-01

    By means of mathematical methods, quantitative and qualitative changes were studied in different structural components of the mesenteric (ileocecal) lymph nodes in normal monkeys (Macaca rhesus) and under per os administration of Salmonella typhi murium, streptomycin-dependent. Cellular composition was calculated in the cortical plateau, cortical (lymphoid) cords and in follicules. Average percent of every cell type was determined. Vaccine administration, was stated to inhibit cytopoiesis in the cortical plateau and in the follicules with light centers. An inverse correlation was noted between the content of small and medium size lymphocytes. Different reactivity of certain structural components in the lymph nodes was demonstrated. As a response to the vaccine administration, plasmocellular acidophilic and macrophagal reactions were most pronounced in the cortical (lymphoid) cords.

  5. Effects of antipsychotic compounds in rhesus monkeys given a choice between cocaine and food.

    PubMed

    Woolverton, W L; Balster, R L

    1981-08-01

    Chlorpromazine (CPZ) and haloperidol (H) have been suggested as possible antagonists of the reinforcing effects of psychomotor stimulant drugs. To test this hypothesis in animals, four rhesus monkeys were trained in a preference procedure to choose between intravenous injections of cocaine or food presentation. Frequency of cocaine choice increased as unit dose of cocaine was increased. Continuous infusions of low or intermediate doses of CPZ or H either did not affect or increased the frequency of cocaine choice. Higher doses of CPZ or H completely suppressed responding for both reinforcers. Although ther appears to be a mutual antagonism of some of the effects of cocaine and these antipsychotic compounds, the results of the present experiment fail to support the hypothesis that the reinforcing effects of cocaine can be antagonized with CPZ or H.

  6. EV71-infected CD14(+) cells modulate the immune activity of T lymphocytes in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Pu, Jing; Huang, Hongtai; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Longding; Yang, Erxia; Zhou, Xiaofang; Ma, Na; Zhao, Hongling; Wang, Lichun; Xie, Zhenfeng; Tang, Donghong; Li, Qihan

    2013-07-01

    Preliminary studies of the major pathogen enterovirus 71 (EV71), a member of the Picornaviridae family, have suggested that EV71 may be a major cause of fatal hand, foot and mouth disease cases. Currently, the role of the pathological changes induced by EV71 infection in the immunopathogenic response remains unclear. Our study focused on the interaction between this virus and immunocytes and indicated that this virus has the ability to replicate in CD14(+) cells. Furthermore, these EV71-infected CD14(+) cells have the capacity to stimulate the proliferation of T cells and to enhance the release of certain functional cytokines. An adaptive immune response induced by the back-transfusion of EV71-infected CD14(+) cells was observed in donor neonatal rhesus monkeys. Based on these observations, the proposed hypothesis is that CD14(+) cells infected by the EV71 virus might modulate the anti-EV71 adaptive immune response by inducing simultaneous T-cell activation.

  7. Mosaic HIV-1 vaccines expand the breadth and depth of cellular immune responses in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Barouch, Dan H; O'Brien, Kara L; Simmons, Nathaniel L; King, Sharon L; Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F; Sun, Ying-Hua; La Porte, Annalena; Riggs, Ambryice M; Lynch, Diana M; Clark, Sarah L; Backus, Katherine; Perry, James R; Seaman, Michael S; Carville, Angela; Mansfield, Keith G; Szinger, James J; Fischer, Will; Muldoon, Mark; Korber, Bette

    2010-03-01

    The worldwide diversity of HIV-1 presents an unprecedented challenge for vaccine development. Antigens derived from natural HIV-1 sequences have elicited only a limited breadth of cellular immune responses in nonhuman primate studies and clinical trials to date. Polyvalent 'mosaic' antigens, in contrast, are designed to optimize cellular immunologic coverage of global HIV-1 sequence diversity. Here we show that mosaic HIV-1 Gag, Pol and Env antigens expressed by recombinant, replication-incompetent adenovirus serotype 26 vectors markedly augmented both the breadth and depth without compromising the magnitude of antigen-specific T lymphocyte responses as compared with consensus or natural sequence HIV-1 antigens in rhesus monkeys. Polyvalent mosaic antigens therefore represent a promising strategy to expand cellular immunologic vaccine coverage for genetically diverse pathogens such as HIV-1.

  8. Cortisol in Neonatal Mother's Milk Predicts Later Infant Social and Cognitive Functioning in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Amanda M; Murphy, Ashley M; Guitarra, Denisse; Slonecker, Emily; Suomi, Stephen J; Rosenberg, Kendra L; Novak, Melinda A; Meyer, Jerrold S; Hinde, Katie

    2017-03-29

    Milk provides not only the building blocks for somatic development but also the hormonal signals that contribute to the biopsychological organization of the infant. Among mammals, glucocorticoids (GCs) in mother's milk have been associated with infant temperament. This study extended prior work to investigate rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) mother-infant dyads (N = 34) from birth through 8 months postpartum. Regression analysis revealed that cortisol concentrations in milk during the neonatal period predicted impulsivity on a cognitive task, but not global social behaviors, months later. During this time period, sex-differentiated social behavior emerged. For female infants, milk cortisol concentrations predicted total frequency of play. Collectively, these findings support and extend the "lactational programming" hypothesis on the impact of maternal-origin hormones ingested via milk.

  9. Sensory Processing in Rhesus Monkeys: Developmental Continuity, Prenatal Treatment, and Genetic Influences

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Mary L.; Moore, Colleen F.; Adkins, Miriam; Barr, Christina S.; Larson, Julie A.; Resch, Leslie M.; Roberts, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal sensory processing (tactile and vestibular function) was tested in 78 rhesus macaques from two experiments. At ages 4–5 years, striatal dopamine D2 receptor binding was examined using positron emission tomography. At ages 5–7 years, adult sensory processing was assessed. Findings were: (a) prenatal stress exposure yielded less optimal neonatal sensory processing; (b) animals carrying the short rh5-HTTLPR allele had less optimal neonatal sensory scores than monkeys homozygous for the long allele; (c) neonatal sensory processing was significantly related to striatal D2 receptor binding for carriers of the short allele, but not for animals homozygous for the long allele; and (d) there was moderate developmental continuity in sensory processing from the neonatal period to adulthood. PMID:27338151

  10. Mucosal Immunization of Lactating Female Rhesus Monkeys with a Transmitted/Founder HIV-1 Envelope Induces Strong Env-Specific IgA Antibody Responses in Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Fouda, Genevieve G. A.; Amos, Joshua D.; Wilks, Andrew B.; Pollara, Justin; Ray, Caroline A.; Chand, Anjali; Kunz, Erika L.; Liebl, Brooke E.; Whitaker, Kaylan; Carville, Angela; Smith, Shannon; Colvin, Lisa; Pickup, David J.; Staats, Herman F.; Overman, Glenn; Eutsey-Lloyd, Krissey; Parks, Robert; Chen, Haiyan; LaBranche, Celia; Barnett, Susan; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Ferrari, Guido; Montefiori, David C.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Letvin, Norman L.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that vaccination of lactating rhesus monkeys with a DNA prime/vector boost strategy induces strong T-cell responses but limited envelope (Env)-specific humoral responses in breast milk. To improve vaccine-elicited antibody responses in milk, hormone-induced lactating rhesus monkeys were vaccinated with a transmitted/founder (T/F) HIV Env immunogen in a prime-boost strategy modeled after the moderately protective RV144 HIV vaccine. Lactating rhesus monkeys were intramuscularly primed with either recombinant DNA (n = 4) or modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) poxvirus vector (n = 4) expressing the T/F HIV Env C.1086 and then boosted twice intramuscularly with C.1086 gp120 and the adjuvant MF59. The vaccines induced Env-binding IgG and IgA as well as neutralizing and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) responses in plasma and milk of most vaccinated animals. Importantly, plasma neutralization titers against clade C HIV variants MW965 (P = 0.03) and CAP45 (P = 0.04) were significantly higher in MVA-primed than in DNA-primed animals. The superior systemic prime-boost regimen was then compared to a mucosal-boost regimen, in which animals were boosted twice intranasally with C.1086 gp120 and the TLR 7/8 agonist R848 following the same systemic prime. While the systemic and mucosal vaccine regimens elicited comparable levels of Env-binding IgG antibodies, mucosal immunization induced significantly stronger Env-binding IgA responses in milk (P = 0.03). However, the mucosal regimen was not as potent at inducing functional IgG responses. This study shows that systemic MVA prime followed by either intranasal or systemic protein boosts can elicit strong humoral responses in breast milk and may be a useful strategy to interrupt postnatal HIV-1 transmission. PMID:23596289

  11. Characterization of the Sweet Taste Receptor Tas1r2 from an Old World Monkey Species Rhesus Monkey and Species-Dependent Activation of the Monomeric Receptor by an Intense Sweetener Perillartine.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chenggu; Jiang, Hua; Li, Lei; Liu, Tianming; Song, Xuejie; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Sweet state is a basic physiological sensation of humans and other mammals which is mediated by the broadly acting sweet taste receptor-the heterodimer of Tas1r2 (taste receptor type 1 member 2) and Tas1r3 (taste receptor type 1 member 3). Various sweeteners interact with either Tas1r2 or Tas1r3 and then activate the receptor. In this study, we cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the taste receptor Tas1r2 from a species of Old World monkeys, the rhesus monkey. Paired with the human TAS1R3, it was shown that the rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to natural sugars, amino acids and their derivates. Furthermore, similar to human TAS1R2, rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to artificial sweeteners and sweet-tasting proteins. However, the responses induced by rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could not be inhibited by the sweet inhibitor amiloride. Moreover, we found a species-dependent activation of the Tas1r2 monomeric receptors of human, rhesus monkey and squirrel monkey but not mouse by an intense sweetener perillartine. Molecular modeling and sequence analysis indicate that the receptor has the conserved domains and ligand-specific interactive residues, which have been identified in the characterized sweet taste receptors up to now. This is the first report of the functional characterization of sweet taste receptors from an Old World monkey species.

  12. Characterization of the Sweet Taste Receptor Tas1r2 from an Old World Monkey Species Rhesus Monkey and Species-Dependent Activation of the Monomeric Receptor by an Intense Sweetener Perillartine

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chenggu; Jiang, Hua; Li, Lei; Liu, Tianming; Song, Xuejie; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Sweet state is a basic physiological sensation of humans and other mammals which is mediated by the broadly acting sweet taste receptor-the heterodimer of Tas1r2 (taste receptor type 1 member 2) and Tas1r3 (taste receptor type 1 member 3). Various sweeteners interact with either Tas1r2 or Tas1r3 and then activate the receptor. In this study, we cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the taste receptor Tas1r2 from a species of Old World monkeys, the rhesus monkey. Paired with the human TAS1R3, it was shown that the rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to natural sugars, amino acids and their derivates. Furthermore, similar to human TAS1R2, rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to artificial sweeteners and sweet-tasting proteins. However, the responses induced by rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could not be inhibited by the sweet inhibitor amiloride. Moreover, we found a species-dependent activation of the Tas1r2 monomeric receptors of human, rhesus monkey and squirrel monkey but not mouse by an intense sweetener perillartine. Molecular modeling and sequence analysis indicate that the receptor has the conserved domains and ligand-specific interactive residues, which have been identified in the characterized sweet taste receptors up to now. This is the first report of the functional characterization of sweet taste receptors from an Old World monkey species. PMID:27479072

  13. Immunization of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus monkeys with soluble human CD4 elicits an antiviral response.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, M; Levine, C G; Shen, L; Fisher, R A; Letvin, N L

    1991-01-01

    Since the CD4 molecule is a high-affinity cell-surface receptor for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), it has been suggested that a soluble truncated form of CD4 may compete with cell-surface CD4 for HIV binding and thus be of use in the therapy of AIDS. We have utilized the simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques (SIVmac)-infected rhesus monkeys to explore another possible therapeutic application of CD4 in AIDS--the use of recombinant soluble CD4 (rsCD4) as an immunogen. SIVmac-infected rhesus monkeys immunized with human rsCD4 developed not only an anti-human CD4 but also an anti-rhesus monkey CD4 antibody response. Coincident with the generation of this antibody response, SIVmac could not be isolated easily from peripheral blood lymphocytes and bone marrow macrophages of these animals. Furthermore, the decreased number of both granulocyte/macrophage and erythrocyte colonies grown from the bone marrow of these immunized monkeys rose to normal levels. These findings suggest that a modified human CD4 molecule serving as an immunogen might elicit an antibody response in man that could induce a beneficial therapeutic response in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:2052546

  14. Neuron Numbers in the Hypothalamus of the Normal Aging Rhesus Monkey: Stability Across the Adult Lifespan and Between the Sexes

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D.E.; Killiany, R.J.; Rosene, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    Normal aging is accompanied by changes in hypothalamic functions including autonomic and endocrine functions and circadian rhythms. The rhesus monkey provides an excellent model of normal aging without the potential confounds of incipient Alzheimer's disease inherent in human populations. This study examined the hypothalamus of 51 rhesus monkeys (23 male, 18 female, 6.5–31 years old) using design-based stereology to obtain unbiased estimates of neuron and glia numbers and the Cavalieri method to estimate volumes for eight reference spaces: total unilateral hypothalamus, suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), supraoptic nucleus (SON), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), dorsomedial nucleus (DM), ventromedial nucleus (VM), medial mammillary nucleus (MMN), and lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). The results demonstrated no age-related difference in neuron number, glia number, or volume in any area in either sex except the PVN of male monkeys, which showed a significant increase in both neuron and glia numbers with age. Comparison of males and females for sexual dimorphisms revealed no significant differences in neuron number. However, males had more glia overall as well as in the SCN, DM, and LHA and had a larger hypothalamic volume overall and in the SCN, SON, VM, DM, and MMN. These results demonstrate that hypothalamic neuron loss cannot account for age-related deficits in hypothalamic function and provides further evidence of the absence of neurode-generation and cell death in the normal aging rhesus monkey. PMID:21935936

  15. Impaired performance from brief social isolation of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) - A multiple video-task assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, David A.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1991-01-01

    Social isolation has been demonstrated to produce profound and lasting psychological effects in young primates. In the present investigation, two adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were isolated from one another for up to 6 days and tested on 7 video tasks designed to assess psychomotor and cognitive functioning. Both the number and quality (i.e., speed and accuracy) of responses were significantly compromised in the social isolation condition relative to levels in which the animals were tested together. It is argued that adult rhesus are susceptible to performance disruption by even relatively brief social isolation, and that these effects can best be assessed by a battery of complex and sensitive measures.

  16. Impaired performance from brief social isolation of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) - A multiple video-task assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, David A.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1991-01-01

    Social isolation has been demonstrated to produce profound and lasting psychological effects in young primates. In the present investigation, two adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were isolated from one another for up to 6 days and tested on 7 video tasks designed to assess psychomotor and cognitive functioning. Both the number and quality (i.e., speed and accuracy) of responses were significantly compromised in the social isolation condition relative to levels in which the animals were tested together. It is argued that adult rhesus are susceptible to performance disruption by even relatively brief social isolation, and that these effects can best be assessed by a battery of complex and sensitive measures.

  17. Effects of 12 days exposure to simulated microgravity on central circulatory hemodynamics in the rhesus monkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Koenig, S. C.; Krotov, V. P.; Fanton, J. W.; Korolkov, V. I.; Trambovetsky, E. V.; Ewert, D. L.; Truzhennikov, A.; Latham, R. D.

    Central circulatory hemodynamic responses were measured before and during the initial 9 days of a 12-day 10 ° head-down tilt (HDT) in 4 flight-sized juvenile rhesus monkeys who were surgically instrumented with a variety of intrathoracic catheters and blood flow sensors to assess the effects of simulated microgravity on central circulatory hemodynamics. Each subject underwent measurements of aortic and left ventricular pressures, and aortic flow before and during HDT as well as during a passive head-up postural test before and after HDT. Heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure were measured, and dP/dt and left ventricular elastance was calculated from hemodynamic measurements. The postural test consisted of 5 min of supine baseline control followed by 5 minutes of 90 ° upright tilt (HUT). Heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure showed no consistent alterations during HDT. Left ventricular elastance was reduced in all animals throughout HDT, indicating that cardiac compliance was increased. HDT did not consistently alter left ventricular +dP/dt, indicating no change in cardiac contractility. Heart rate during the post-HDT HUT postural test was elevated compared to pre-HDT while post-HDT cardiac output was decreased by 52% as a result of a 54% reduction in stroke volume throughout HUT. Results from this study using an instrumented rhesus monkey suggest that exposure to microgravity may increase ventricular compliance without alterating cardiac contractility. Our project supported the notion that an invasively-instrumented animal model should be viable for use in spaceflight cardiovascular experiments to assess potential changes in myocardial function and cardiac compliance.

  18. Effects of 12 days exposure to simulated microgravity on central circulatory hemodynamics in the rhesus monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Koenig, S. C.; Krotov, V. P.; Fanton, J. W.; Korolkov, V. I.; Trambovetsky, E. V.; Ewert, D. L.; Truzhennikov, A.; Latham, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    Central circulatory hemodynamic responses were measured before and during the initial 9 days of a 12-day 10 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) in 4 flight-sized juvenile rhesus monkeys who were surgically instrumented with a variety of intrathoracic catheters and blood flow sensors to assess the effects of simulated microgravity on central circulatory hemodynamics. Each subject underwent measurements of aortic and left ventricular pressures, and aortic flow before and during HDT as well as during a passive head-up postural test before and after HDT. Heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure were measured, and dP/dt and left ventricular elastance was calculated from hemodynamic measurements. The postural test consisted of 5 min of supine baseline control followed by 5 minutes of 90 degrees upright tilt (HUT). Heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure showed no consistent alterations during HDT. Left ventricular elastance was reduced in all animals throughout HDT, indicating that cardiac compliance was increased. HDT did not consistently alter left ventricular +dP/dt, indicating no change in cardiac contractility. Heart rate during the post-HDT HUT postural test was elevated compared to pre-HDT while post-HDT cardiac output was decreased by 52% as a result of a 54% reduction in stroke volume throughout HUT. Results from this study using an instrumented rhesus monkey suggest that exposure to microgravity may increase ventricular compliance without alternating cardiac contractility. Our project supported the notion that an invasively-instrumented animal model should be viable for use in spaceflight cardiovascular experiments to assess potential changes in myocardial function and cardiac compliance.

  19. Neurotoxin-Induced Catecholaminergic Loss in the Colonic Myenteric Plexus of Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Jeanette M; Resnikoff, Henry; Bondarenko, Viktorya; Joers, Valerie; Mejia, Andres; Simmons, Heather; Emborg, Marina E

    2017-01-01

    Objective Constipation is a common non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Although pathology of the enteric nervous system (ENS) has been associated with constipation in PD, the contribution of catecholaminergic neurodegeneration to this symptom is currently debated. The goal of this study was to assess the effects of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on the colonic myenteric plexus and shed light on the role of catecholaminergic innervation in gastrointestinal (GI) function. Methods Proximal colon tissue from 6-OHDA-treated (n=5) and age-matched control (n=5) rhesus monkeys was immunostained and quantified using ImageJ software. All animals underwent routine daily feces monitoring to assess for constipation or other GI dysfunction. Results Quantification of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC)-immunoreactivity (-ir) revealed significant reduction in myenteric ganglia of 6-OHDA-treated animals compared to controls (TH-ir: 87.8%, P<0.0001; AADC-ir: 61.7% P=0.0034). Analysis of pan-neuronal markers (PGP9.5, HuC/D), other neurochemical phenotypes (VIP, nNOS), PD-associated pathology proteins (α-synuclein, phosphorylated α-synuclein), glial marker GFAP and neuroinflammation and oxidative stress (HLA-DR, CD45, Nitrotyrosine) did not show significant differences. Monitoring of feces revealed frequent (>30% days) soft stool or diarrhea in 2 of the 5 6-OHDA-treated animals and 0 of the 5 control animals during the 2 months prior to necropsy, with no animals exhibiting signs of constipation. Conclusion Systemic administration of 6-OHDA to rhesus monkeys significantly reduced catecholaminergic expression in the colonic myenteric plexus without inducing constipation. These findings support the concept that ENS catecholaminergic loss is not responsible for constipation in PD. PMID:28090391

  20. Endocrine and neurochemical effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine and its stereoisomers in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Murnane, K S; Fantegrossi, W E; Godfrey, J R; Banks, M L; Howell, L L

    2010-08-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is an amphetamine derivative that elicits complex biological effects in humans. One plausible mechanism for this phenomenon is that racemic MDMA is composed of two stereoisomers that exhibit qualitatively different pharmacological effects. In support of this, studies have shown that R(-)-MDMA tends to have hallucinogen-like effects, whereas S(+)-MDMA tends to have psychomotor stimulant-like effects. However, relatively little is known about whether these stereoisomers engender different endocrine and neurochemical effects. In the present study, the endocrine and neurochemical effects of each stereoisomer and the racemate were assessed in four rhesus monkeys after intravenous delivery at doses (1-3 mg/kg) that approximated voluntary self-administration by rhesus monkeys and human recreational users. Specifically, fluorescence-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to assess plasma prolactin concentrations, and in vivo microdialysis was used to assess extracellular dopamine and serotonin concentrations in the dorsal striatum. R(-)-MDMA, but not S(+)-MDMA, significantly increased plasma prolactin levels and the effects of S,R(+/-)-MDMA were intermediate to each of its component stereoisomers. Although S(+)-MDMA did not alter prolactin levels, it did significantly increase extracellular serotonin concentrations. In addition, S(+)-MDMA, but not R(-)-MDMA, significantly increased dopamine concentrations. Furthermore, as in the prolactin experiment, the effects of the racemate were intermediate to each of the stereoisomers. These studies demonstrate the stereoisomers of MDMA engender qualitatively different endocrine and neurochemical effects, strengthening the inference that differences in these stereoisomers might be the mechanism producing the complex biological effects of the racemic mixture of MDMA in humans.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of inhaled nano- and microparticle deposition in the rhesus monkey nasal passages.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Jeffry D; Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen T; McClellan, Gene E

    2013-10-01

    Anatomically accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the nasal passages of an infant (6 months old, 1.3 kg) and adult (7 years old, 11.9 kg) rhesus monkey were used to predict nasal deposition of inhaled nano- and microparticles. Steady-state, inspiratory airflow simulations were conducted at flow rates equal to 100, 200 and 300% of the estimated minute volume for resting breathing in each model. Particle transport and deposition simulations were conducted using the Lagrangian method to track the motion of inhaled particles. Nasal deposition fractions were higher in the infant model than the adult model at equivalent physiologic flow rates. Deposition curves collapsed when differences in nasal geometry were accounted for by plotting microparticle deposition versus the Stokes number and nanoparticle deposition as a function of the Schmidt number and diffusion parameter. Particle deposition was also quantified on major nasal epithelial types. Maximum olfactory deposition ranged from 5 to 14% for 1-2 nm particles in the adult and infant models, depending on flow rate. For these particle sizes, deposition on respiratory/transitional epithelia ranged from 40 to 50%. Increased deposition was also predicted for olfactory and respiratory/transitional epithelia for particle sizes >5 µm in the infant model and >8 µm in the adult model. Semi-empirical curves were developed based on the CFD simulation results to allow for simplified calculations of age-based deposition in the rhesus monkey nasal passages that can be implemented into lung dosimetry models.

  2. Effects of 12 days exposure to simulated microgravity on central circulatory hemodynamics in the rhesus monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Koenig, S. C.; Krotov, V. P.; Fanton, J. W.; Korolkov, V. I.; Trambovetsky, E. V.; Ewert, D. L.; Truzhennikov, A.; Latham, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    Central circulatory hemodynamic responses were measured before and during the initial 9 days of a 12-day 10 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) in 4 flight-sized juvenile rhesus monkeys who were surgically instrumented with a variety of intrathoracic catheters and blood flow sensors to assess the effects of simulated microgravity on central circulatory hemodynamics. Each subject underwent measurements of aortic and left ventricular pressures, and aortic flow before and during HDT as well as during a passive head-up postural test before and after HDT. Heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure were measured, and dP/dt and left ventricular elastance was calculated from hemodynamic measurements. The postural test consisted of 5 min of supine baseline control followed by 5 minutes of 90 degrees upright tilt (HUT). Heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac output, and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure showed no consistent alterations during HDT. Left ventricular elastance was reduced in all animals throughout HDT, indicating that cardiac compliance was increased. HDT did not consistently alter left ventricular +dP/dt, indicating no change in cardiac contractility. Heart rate during the post-HDT HUT postural test was elevated compared to pre-HDT while post-HDT cardiac output was decreased by 52% as a result of a 54% reduction in stroke volume throughout HUT. Results from this study using an instrumented rhesus monkey suggest that exposure to microgravity may increase ventricular compliance without alternating cardiac contractility. Our project supported the notion that an invasively-instrumented animal model should be viable for use in spaceflight cardiovascular experiments to assess potential changes in myocardial function and cardiac compliance.

  3. Effects of punishment on choice between cocaine and food in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Negus, S Stevens

    2005-09-01

    Punishment is widely used in an effort to control drug-taking behavior; however, only a few preclinical studies have investigated the effects of punishment on drug self-administration. Such studies may contribute to more rational use of punishment to control drug use. To evaluate the effects of punishment on choice between cocaine and food in rhesus monkeys. Rhesus monkeys were trained under a concurrent-choice schedule of food delivery (1 g pellets, fixed-ratio 100 schedule) or cocaine injections (0-0.1 mg/kg per injection, fixed-ratio 10 schedule). Full cocaine choice dose-effect curves were determined under baseline conditions and under test conditions in which a putative punisher (intravenous histamine injection; 0.0032-0.032 mg/kg per injection) was paired with either food or cocaine delivery. Under baseline conditions, cocaine produced a dose-dependent increase in cocaine choice. Histamine functioned as a punisher of both food- and cocaine-maintained responding. Pairing histamine with food delivery reduced food choice, increased cocaine choice, and produced left shifts in the cocaine choice dose-effect curve. Conversely, pairing histamine with cocaine decreased cocaine choice, increased food choice, and produced right shifts in the cocaine choice dose-effect curve. The magnitude of histamine's punishing effects was directly related to histamine dose and probability of histamine delivery, and inversely related to the magnitude of the reinforcer. These results demonstrate that a primary effect of punishment in the context of food vs cocaine choice is not only a decrease in the behavior being punished, but also an increase in the unpunished alternative behavior.

  4. Relationships among cognitive function, fine motor speed and age in the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Lacreuse, Agnès; Espinosa, Paola M; Herndon, James G

    2006-09-01

    Declines in fine motor skills and cognitive function are well known features of human aging. Yet, the relationship between age-related impairments in motor and cognitive function remains unclear. Rhesus monkeys, like humans, show marked decline in cognitive and fine motor function with age and are excellent models to investigate potential interactions between age-related declines in cognitive and motor functioning. We investigated the relationships among cognition, motor function and age in 30 male and female rhesus monkeys, 5-28 years of age, tested on a battery of cognitive tasks [acquisition of the delayed non-matching-to-sample (DNMS), DNMS-120s, DNMS-600s, acquisition of delayed recognition span test (DRST), spatial-DRST and object-DRST] and a fine motor task (Lifesaver test). Global cognitive ability, as assessed by the cognitive performance index (CPI), was impaired with age in both sexes, while age-related motor slowing was found only in males. After age was controlled for, half the variance in CPI was predicted by motor speed, with better cognitive ability associated with slower motor skills. Analyses at the level of each cognitive task revealed that motor speed and age predicted the rate of acquisition of the DNMS. This relationship was robust in males and absent in females. Motor speed was not a significant predictor of any other cognitive variable. We conclude that the relationship between cognition and motor function (1) may be limited to non-spatial tasks; (2) exists independently of age; (3) may reflect different contributions of the fronto-striatal system; (4) may be particularly evident in males.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of spiramycin in the rhesus monkey: transplacental passage and distribution in tissue in the fetus.

    PubMed Central

    Schoondermark-Van de Ven, E; Galama, J; Camps, W; Vree, T; Russel, F; Meuwissen, J; Melchers, W

    1994-01-01

    Transplacental transfer of spiramycin was investigated in a rhesus monkey model to study whether the antibiotic reaches therapeutic levels in the fetus. Spiramycin concentrations were measured by bioassay and high-performance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined for bioactive spiramycin as measured by the bioassay. Pharmacokinetic pilot studies showed that spiramycin distribution follows a two-compartment model in rhesus monkeys. Following a single intravenous dose of 50 or 250 mg, dose-dependent kinetics were observed. At a dose of 50 mg, 10% of the dose was excreted unchanged in the urine. At the higher dose of 250 mg, an oliguric effect was observed. Spiramycin concentrations in fetal serum were measured over time while the maternal concentration was maintained at a constant level. During a 5-h experiment, a maximum fetal-maternal serum ratio of 0.27 was found. In three fetuses, concentrations in serum and tissue were measured following intravenous administration of 50 mg of spiramycin twice daily to the mother for at least 7 days. The fetal-maternal serum ratios were found to be 0.4 to 0.58 after intravenous administration of the final dose of 50 mg to the mother. It appeared that spiramycin accumulated in the soft tissues, especially in the liver and spleen, of both the mother and the fetus. The concentration in placental tissue appeared to be 10 to 20 times that of the concentration in fetal serum. The concentration of spiramycin in amniotic fluid was about five times higher than the concentration in fetal serum. Another important observation was that absolutely no spiramycin was found in the brain. PMID:7810999

  6. Social subordination produces distinct stress-related phenotypes in female rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Michopoulos, Vasiliki; Higgins, Melinda; Toufexis, Donna; Wilson, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    Social subordination in female macaques is imposed by harassment and the threat of aggression and produces reduced control over one's social and physical environment and a dysregulation of the limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis resembling that observed in people suffering from psychopathologies. These effects support the contention that this particular animal model is an ethologically relevant paradigm in which to investigate the etiology of stress-induced psychological illness related to women. Here, we sought to expand this model by performing a discriminate analysis (DA) on 33 variables within three domains; behavioral, metabolic/anthropomorphic, and neuroendocrine, collected from socially housed female rhesus monkeys in order to assess whether exposure to social subordination produces a distinct phenotype. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was also calculated to determine each domain's classification accuracy. DA found significant markers within each domain that differentiated dominant and subordinate females. Subordinate females received more aggression, showed more submissive behavior, and received less of affiliation from others than did dominant females. Metabolic differences included increased leptin, and reduced adiponectin in dominant compared to subordinate females. Dominant females exhibited increased sensitivity to hormonal stimulation with higher serum LH in response to estradiol, cortisol in response to ACTH, and increased glucocorticoid negative feedback. Serum oxytocin, CSF DOPAC and serum PACAP were all significantly higher in dominant females. ROC curve analysis accurately predicted social status in all three domains. Results suggest that socially house rhesus monkeys represent a cogent animal model in which to study the physiology and behavioral consequences of chronic psychosocial stress in humans. PMID:22244748

  7. Upregulation of Aβ42 in the Brain and Bodily Fluids of Rhesus Monkeys with Aging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiao; Lu, Jing; Yao, Zitong; Wang, Shubo; Zhu, Liming; Wang, Ju; Chen, Baian

    2017-01-01

    The cerebral accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) is one of the key pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ is also found in bodily fluids such as the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma. However, the significance of Aβ accumulation in the brain and different bodily pools, as well as its correlation with aging and cerebral amyloid pathology, is not completely understood. To better understand this question, we selected the rhesus monkey, which is phylogenetically and physiologically highly similar to the human, as a model to study. We quantified the levels of the two main Aβ isoforms (Aβ42 and Aβ40) in different sections of the brain (frontal cortex, temporal cortex, and hippocampus) and bodily fluids (CSF and plasma) of rhesus monkeys at different developmental phases (young, 5-9 years of age; mature, 10-19 years of age; and old, 21-24 years of age). We found that the levels of neuronal and insoluble Aβ42 increased significantly in the brain with aging, suggesting that this specific isoform might be directly involved in aging and AD-like pathophysiology. There was no significant change in the Aβ40 level in the brain with aging. In addition, the Aβ42 level, but not the Aβ40 level, in both the CSF and plasma increased with aging. We also identified a positive correlation between Aβ42 in the CSF and plasma and Aβ42 in the brain. Taken collectively, our results indicate that there is an association between Aβ accumulation and age. These results support the increased incidence of AD with aging.

  8. Prenatal stress, moderate fetal alcohol, and dopamine system function in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Roberts, A D; Moore, C F; DeJesus, O T; Barnhart, T E; Larson, J A; Mukherjee, J; Nickles, R J; Schueller, M J; Shelton, S E; Schneider, M L

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the striatal dopamine system integrity and associated behavior in 5- to 7-year-old rhesus monkeys born from mothers that experienced stress and/or consumed moderate levels of alcohol during pregnancy. Thirty-one young adult rhesus monkeys were derived from females randomly assigned to one of four groups: (1) control group that consumed isocaloric sucrose solution throughout gestation; (2) stress group that experienced prenatal stress (10-min removal from home cage and exposure to three random loud noise bursts, gestational days 90 through 145); (3) alcohol group that consumed alcohol (0.6 g/kg/day) throughout gestation; or (4) combined alcohol plus stress group that received both treatments. The subjects were assessed for striatal dopamine system function using positron emission tomography (PET), in which the dopamine (DA)-rich striatum was evaluated in separate scans for the trapping of [(18)F]-Fallypride (FAL) and 6-[(18)F]fluoro-m-tyrosine (FMT) to assess dopamine D2 receptor binding potential (BP) and DA synthesis via dopa decarboxylase activity, respectively. Subjects were previously assessed for non-matching-to-sample (NMS) task acquisition, with ratings of behavioral inhibition, stereotypies, and activity made after each NMS testing session. Subjects from prenatal stress conditions (Groups 2 and 4) showed an increase in the ratio of striatal dopamine D2 receptor BP and DA synthesis compared to controls (Group 1). An increase in the radiotracer distribution volume ratios (DVRs), which is used to evaluate the balance between striatal DA synthesis and receptor availability, respectively, was significantly correlated with less behavioral inhibition. The latter supports a hypothesis linking striatal function to behavioral inhibitory control.

  9. Development of a flow feedback pulse duplicator system with rhesus monkey arterial input impedance characteristics.

    PubMed

    Schaub, J D; Koenig, S C; Schroeder, M J; Ewert, D L; Drew, G A; Swope, R D

    1999-01-01

    An in vitro pulsatile pump flow system that is capable of producing physiologic pressures and flows in a mock circulatory system tuned to reproduce the first nine harmonics of the input impedance of a rhesus monkey was developed and tested. The system was created as a research tool for evaluating cardiovascular function and for the design, testing, and evaluation of electrical-mechanical cardiovascular models and chronically implanted sensors. The system possesses a computerized user interface for controlling a linear displacement pulsatile pump in a controlled flow loop format to emulate in vivo cardiovascular characteristics. Evaluation of the pump system consisted of comparing its aortic pressure and flow profiles with in vivo rhesus hemodynamic waveforms in the time and frequency domains. Comparison of aortic pressure and flow data between the pump system and in vivo data showed good agreement in the time and frequency domains, however, the pump system produced a larger pulse pressure. The pump system can be used for comparing cardiovascular parameters with predicted cardiovascular model values and for evaluating such items as vascular grafts, heart valves, biomaterials, and sensors. This article describes the development and evaluation of this feedback controlled cardiovascular dynamics simulation modeling system.

  10. Metric characteristics of the canine dental complex in prenatally androgenized female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Zingeser, M R; Phoenix, C H

    1978-08-01

    Permanent maxillary canine teeth (C1) are appreciably larger in males than in females in most nonhominid Anthropoidea. Mandibular canines (C1) and mandibular first premolars (P3), against which C1 are sharpened in honing behavior, reflect commensurate sexual dimorphism. These three teeth constitute the canine dental complex. The canine complex crown metrics of seven mature genetically female rhesus Macaques, androgenized by prenatal exposure to testosterone propionate, were compared with a control sample (N = 12) for evidence of masculinization. The C1 and C1 were measured for clinical crown lengths (L) and mesiodistal and buccolingual widths. The functionally significant and highly dimorphic honing dimensions (HD), which approximate the honing surfaces of P3, were noted. In t-test comparisons, the C1 L and P3 HD in androgenized monkeys were significantly larger than those of the control group (P less than 0.05). Identical results were obtained with White's nonparametric ranking technique. Standardized lateral skull radiographs showing earlier dental formative stages were available for five of the seven animals, and these were compared with radiographs of control skulls. The developing C1 were longer and wider than in the controls. This was not reflected in the crown metrics of mature animals because of marked dental attrition. We concluded that androgens can masculinize the female rhesus canine complex, if given during critical periods of prenatal development. We hypothesize that genes encoding the male canine complex are normally activated by endogenous fetal androgens during such critical periods.

  11. 5-androstenediol improves survival in clinically unsupported rhesus monkeys with radiation-induced myelosuppression.

    PubMed

    Stickney, Dwight R; Dowding, Charles; Authier, Simon; Garsd, Armando; Onizuka-Handa, Nanette; Reading, Christopher; Frincke, James M

    2007-04-01

    We previously reported that five daily intramuscular doses of 5-androstenediol (AED), a naturally occurring adrenal steroid hormone, stimulated multilineage recovery of bone marrow in rhesus monkeys with radiation-induced myelosuppression after 4.0 Gy total body irradiation (TBI). Here we report the effect of AED on the survival of eighty rhesus macaques that received a 6.0 Gy dose of TBI in four sequential pilot studies. The drug was administered intramuscularly, based on body weight, 2-4 h after irradiation and continued once daily for a total of five injections. No clinical support in the form of antibiotics or transfusions was given to the animals at any time during the study. Five of the 40 (12.5%) treated animals died, compared to 13 of 40 (32.5%) of the animals in the control group (p=0.032). The combination of accumulated days of thrombocytopenia (<20,000 platelets/microL) up to day 14 (before the first death) together with treatment, accurately predicts mortality (p<0.001). The compound significantly reduced the duration of thrombocytopenia and neutropenia (p<0.01). The accumulation of days of neutropenia (ANC<500 cells/microL) up to day 14 plays no major role in predicting death. AED shows significant activity in irradiated primates with acute hematopoietic radiation syndrome.

  12. Development of a flow feedback pulse duplicator system with rhesus monkey arterial input impedance characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaub, J. D.; Koenig, S. C.; Schroeder, M. J.; Ewert, D. L.; Drew, G. A.; Swope, R. D.; Convertino, V. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    An in vitro pulsatile pump flow system that is capable of producing physiologic pressures and flows in a mock circulatory system tuned to reproduce the first nine harmonics of the input impedance of a rhesus monkey was developed and tested. The system was created as a research tool for evaluating cardiovascular function and for the design, testing, and evaluation of electrical-mechanical cardiovascular models and chronically implanted sensors. The system possesses a computerized user interface for controlling a linear displacement pulsatile pump in a controlled flow loop format to emulate in vivo cardiovascular characteristics. Evaluation of the pump system consisted of comparing its aortic pressure and flow profiles with in vivo rhesus hemodynamic waveforms in the time and frequency domains. Comparison of aortic pressure and flow data between the pump system and in vivo data showed good agreement in the time and frequency domains, however, the pump system produced a larger pulse pressure. The pump system can be used for comparing cardiovascular parameters with predicted cardiovascular model values and for evaluating such items as vascular grafts, heart valves, biomaterials, and sensors. This article describes the development and evaluation of this feedback controlled cardiovascular dynamics simulation modeling system.

  13. Chronic oxytocin administration inhibits food intake, increases energy expenditure, and produces weight loss in fructose-fed obese rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Blevins, James E; Graham, James L; Morton, Gregory J; Bales, Karen L; Schwartz, Michael W; Baskin, Denis G; Havel, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    Despite compelling evidence that oxytocin (OT) is effective in reducing body weight (BW) in diet-induced obese (DIO) rodents, studies of the effects of OT in humans and rhesus monkeys have primarily focused on noningestive behaviors. The goal of this study was to translate findings in DIO rodents to a preclinical translational model of DIO. We tested the hypothesis that increased OT signaling would reduce BW in DIO rhesus monkeys by inhibiting food intake and increasing energy expenditure (EE). Male DIO rhesus monkeys from the California National Primate Research Center were adapted to a 12-h fast and maintained on chow and a daily 15% fructose-sweetened beverage. Monkeys received 2× daily subcutaneous vehicle injections over 1 wk. We subsequently identified doses of OT (0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg) that reduced food intake and BW in the absence of nausea or diarrhea. Chronic administration of OT for 4 wk (0.2 mg/kg for 2 wk; 0.4 mg/kg for 2 wk) reduced BW relative to vehicle by 3.3 ± 0.4% (≈0.6 kg; P < 0.05). Moreover, the low dose of OT suppressed 12-h chow intake by 26 ± 7% (P < 0.05). The higher dose of OT reduced 12-h chow intake by 27 ± 5% (P < 0.05) and 8-h fructose-sweetened beverage intake by 18 ± 8% (P < 0.05). OT increased EE during the dark cycle by 14 ± 3% (P < 0.05) and was associated with elevations of free fatty acids and glycerol and reductions in triglycerides suggesting increased lipolysis. Together, these data suggest that OT reduces BW in DIO rhesus monkeys through decreased food intake as well as increased EE and lipolysis.

  14. Development of bilirubin transport and metabolism in the newborn rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Gartner, L M; Lee, K S; Vaisman, S; Lane, D; Zarafu, I

    1977-04-01

    Hepatic transport and metabolism of bilirubin have been examined in term, premature, and postmature newborn Macaca mulatta (rhesus) monkeys with and without prior phenobarbital treatment of pregnant mother and neonate. In untreated neonates a biphasic pattern of physiologic unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia has been observed. Phase I was characterized by a rapid increase in serum bilirubin concentration to 4.5 mg/dl by 19 hours and an equally rapid decline to 1.0 mg/dl by 48 hours of age. Phase II was characterized by a stable elevation at 1.0 mg/dl (four times greater than in the adult) from 48 to 96 hourse of age, followed by a decline to normal adult concentrations thereafter. An identical pattern was observed in 29 normal, term human neonates, but the duration of each phase was approximately three times as long as that in the monkey. Phase I hyperbilirubinemia appears to result from a sixfold increase in bilirubin load presented to the liver in the neonatal period, combined with marked deficieny in hepatic bilirubin conjugation, the rate-limiting step during Phase I. Hepatic uptake of bilirubin is not rate limiting during Phase I but may contribute to Phase II hyperbilirubinemia. An increased bilirubin load persists throughout the first 19 days of life in the monkey. Phase I physiologic jaundice in the monkey neonate was completely eliminated by prenatal maternal and neonatal administration of phenobarbital. A threefold enhancement of hepatic conjugation of bilirubin (glucuronyl transferase activity) during Phase I entirely accounted for the prevention of hyperbilirubinemia. The bilirubin load was unaffected by administration of phenobarbital. Whereas in control neonates the bilirubin load slightly exceeded hepatic bilirubin conjugating capacity and resulted in retention of bilirubin, in phenobarbital-treated neonates, hepatic conjugating capacity slightly exceeded that required for the bilirubin load. Administration of phenobarbital failed to alter Phase II

  15. Pit-1/growth hormone factor 1 splice variant expression in the rhesus monkey pituitary gland and the rhesus and human placenta.

    PubMed

    Schanke, J T; Conwell, C M; Durning, M; Fisher, J M; Golos, T G

    1997-03-01

    We have examined the expression of Pit-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) splice variants in the nonhuman primate pituitary and in rhesus and human placenta. Full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) representing Pit-1 and the Pit-1 beta splice variants were cloned from a rhesus monkey pituitary cDNA library and were readily detectable by RT-PCR with rhesus pituitary gland RNA. The Pit-1T variant previously reported in mouse pituitary tumor cell lines was not detectable in normal rhesus pituitary tissue, although two novel splice variants were detected. A cDNA approximating the rat Pit-1 delta 4 variant was cloned but coded for a truncated and presumably nonfunctional protein. Only by using a nested RT-PCR approach were Pit-1 and Pit-1 beta variants consistently detectable in both human and rhesus placental tissue. The Pit-1 beta variant mRNA was not detectable in JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells unless the cells were stimulated with 8-Br-cAMP. Immunoblot studies with nuclear extracts from primary rhesus syncytiotrophoblast cultures or JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells indicated that although mRNA levels were very low, Pit-1 protein was detectable in differentiated cytotrophoblasts, and levels increased after treatment with 8-Br-cAMP. Two major species of Pit-1 protein were detected that corresponded to the two major bands in rat pituitary GH3 cell nuclear extracts. Low levels of slightly larger bands also were seen, which may represent Pit-1 beta protein or phosphorylated species. We conclude that Pit-1 splice variants expressed in the primate pituitary gland differ from those in the rodent gland and that the Pit-1 and Pit-1 beta mRNAs expressed in the placenta give rise to a pattern of protein expression similar to that seen in pituitary cells, which is inducible by treatment with 8-Br-cAMP.

  16. Ethograms indicate stable well-being during prolonged training phases in rhesus monkeys used in neurophysiological research.

    PubMed

    Hage, Steffen R; Ott, Torben; Eiselt, Anne-Kathrin; Jacob, Simon N; Nieder, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Awake, behaving rhesus monkeys are widely used in neurophysiological research. Neural signals are typically measured from monkeys trained with operant conditioning techniques to perform a variety of behavioral tasks in exchange for rewards. Over the past years, monkeys' psychological well-being during experimentation has become an increasingly important concern. We suggest objective criteria to explore whether training sessions during which the monkeys work under controlled water intake over many days might affect their behavior. With that aim, we analyzed a broad range of species-specific behaviors over several months ('ethogram') and used these ethograms as a proxy for the monkeys' well-being. Our results show that monkeys' behavior during training sessions is unaffected by the duration of training-free days in-between. Independently of the number of training-free days (two or nine days) with ad libitum food and water supply, the monkeys were equally active and alert in their home group cages during training phases. This indicates that the monkeys were well habituated to prolonged working schedules and that their well-being was stably ensured during the training sessions.

  17. Primacy and recency effects in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) using a serial probe recognition task. III. A developmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Matzke, S M; Castro, C A

    1998-04-01

    In children, the recency effect emerges prior to the primacy effect. To determine whether this dissociation is also seen in nonhuman primates, we evaluated the development of the primacy and recency effect in 3 young adult (35 months) and 4 adolescent (21 months) male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) using a six-item serial probe recognition (SPR) task. As predicted, the young adult monkeys displayed both effects, while the adolescent monkeys only displayed the recency effect. Not until after 26 months of training on the SPR task did the adolescent monkeys exhibit both the primacy and recency effect. Interference and strategy differences are discussed in terms of the results along with an interpretation of Rudy's (1992) configural association theory of cognitive development. Additional possible explanations for this developmental dissociation include the delayed maturation of the neocortical, hippocampal, and/or cholinergic systems, the latter two having been shown to be important in the expression of the primacy but not the recency effect.

  18. Blood schizontocidal activity of WR 238605 (Tafenoquine) against Plasmodium cynomolgi and Plasmodium fragile infections in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Puri, S K; Dutta, G P

    2003-04-01

    A new 8-aminoquinoline antimalarial WR 238605 (Tafenoquine), developed initially as a primaquine alternative for prevention of Plasmodium vivax relapses was evaluated for blood schizontocidal activity against two simian malaria infections namely Plasmodium cynomolgi B and Plasmodium fragile in rhesus monkeys. Treatment with WR 238605 at a dose of 3.16 mg(base)/kg/day x 7 days cured established trophozoite induced infections in monkeys with both these parasites. The lower dose of 1.00 mg/kg/day cured 9 out of 12 monkeys infected with P. cynomolgi B and 10 out of 11 monkeys infected with P. fragile. Primaquine was only partially curative at 10.0 mg(base)/kg/day x 7 dose regimen against both these infections. The potent blood schizontocidal activity of tafenoquine adds to the armoury of antimalarial drugs.

  19. Age-Related Decline in Rod Phototransduction Sensitivity in Rhesus Monkeys Fed an n-3 Fatty Acid Deficient Diet

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, Brett G; Neuringer, Martha

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an n-3 fatty acid is the major polyunsaturate in rod outer segments. The effect of long term n-3 fatty acid deficiency on rod and cone phototransduction was investigated in the rhesus monkey. Methods From birth to ≅ 9 years rhesus monkeys were fed an n-3 deficient diet (n=9) known to reduce retinal DHA by 80%. Monkeys in the control group (n=12) received either 8% α-linolenic acid (ALA) or 0.6% DHA both of which support normal retinal DHA levels. None of the diets contained carotenoids. Photoactivation kinetics were assessed from the rate of increase, and a P3 model fit of the ERG a-wave. Maximal cone amplitude and sensitivity were measured from the cone a-wave at 4 ms. The rod photoresponse and rod recovery were derived using a paired flash method. Results Rod sensitivity was reduced by 40% in the n-3 deficient monkeys at 9 but not 4.5 years. The onset of the rising phase of the photoresponse was significantly delayed (p<0.004) at 9 years. Rod recovery was delayed by 20% in n-3 deficient monkeys at both ages, but only for bright saturating flashes. Cone phototransduction was not altered by n-3 deficiency Conclusions Long-term dietary n-3 deficiency in the rhesus monkey was associated with two changes in retinal function. First, there was a delay in rod recovery that has remained relatively constant throughout life. Second, there was an age dependent loss in rod phototransduction sensitivity; the lack of dietary carotenoids may have contributed to this decline. PMID:19369246

  20. Valproic acid developmental toxicity and pharmacokinetics in the rhesus monkey: an interspecies comparison.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, A G; Nau, H; Binkerd, P; Rowland, J M; Rowland, J R; Cukierski, M J; Cukierski, M A

    1988-10-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the developmental toxicity and drug distributional and metabolic characteristics of prenatal valproic acid (VPA) exposure in rhesus monkeys. Oral administration of 20-600 mg/kg/day VPA (approximately 1-15 X human therapeutic dose) to 33 animals on variable gestational days (GD) during organogenesis resulted in dose-dependent developmental toxicity manifested as increased embryo/fetal mortality, intrauterine growth retardation, and craniofacial and skeletal defects. Biphasic plasma elimination curves were observed for total and free VPA on the first (GD 21) and last (GD 50) days of treatment in the 100- and 200-mg/kg/day dose groups. VPA exhibited dose-independent elimination kinetics at the plasma concentrations observed in this study. There was no significant change in pharmacokinetic parameters (maternal plasma elimination rate, area under the curve, peak plasma concentration) between the first and last days of treatment at either dose level. Placental transfer studies indicated that embryos were exposed to half the free VPA concentrations present in maternal plasma on GD 37. Comparisons of interspecies sensitivity to VPA-induced developmental toxicity in the mouse, rat, monkey, and man are made.

  1. Effects of buprenorphine on candy and sweetened fluid self-administration by rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Comer, Sandra D; Evans, Suzette M; Pudiak, Cindy M; Foltin, Richard W

    2002-11-01

    . Previous studies have shown that buprenorphine differentially suppresses the reinforcing effects of different drugs (cocaine, alfentanil), drug versus nondrug reinforcers (food, drug), and the same reinforcer (food) maintained under different schedules of reinforcement. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether buprenorphine (0.03, 0.1, 0.3 mg/kg) differentially affects candy versus sweetened fluid self-administration. The hypotheses were that (1) candy would maintain higher rates of responding and would be chosen on more occasions than sweetened fluid, and (2) buprenorphine would produce smaller disruptions in responding for the more-preferred reinforcer. During separate sessions, rhesus monkeys self-administered candy alone, sweetened fluid alone, or had the opportunity to choose between candy and sweetened fluid. Monkeys responded under a second order, two-chain schedule of reinforcement. Candy was a more-preferred reinforcer than sweetened fluid. Buprenorphine significantly decreased rates of responding for fluid, but increased rates of responding for candy. Although buprenorphine significantly decreased both candy and fluid intake, it produced a more robust, and longer-lasting suppression of sweetened-fluid intake than candy. Choice to self-administer candy or fluid was not affected by buprenorphine. These results demonstrate that behavior maintained by a less-preferred reinforcer is more easily disrupted by buprenorphine than is behavior maintained by a more-preferred reinforcer.

  2. Similar stimulus features control visual classification in orangutans and rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Rachel F L; Stoinski, Tara S; Mickelberg, Jennifer L; Basile, Benjamin M; Gazes, Regina Paxton; Templer, Victoria L; Hampton, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    Many species classify images according to visual attributes. In pigeons, local features may disproportionately control classification, whereas in primates global features may exert greater control. In the absence of explicitly comparative studies, in which different species are tested with the same stimuli under similar conditions, it is not possible to determine how much of the variation in the control of classification is due to species differences and how much is due to differences in the stimuli, training, or testing conditions. We tested rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus and Pongo abelii) in identical tests in which images were modified to determine which stimulus features controlled classification. Monkeys and orangutans were trained to classify full color images of birds, fish, flowers, and people; they were later given generalization tests in which images were novel, black and white, black and white line drawings, or scrambled. Classification in these primate species was controlled by multiple stimulus attributes, both global and local, and the species behaved similarly.

  3. Primary pulmonary sarcoma in a rhesus monkey after inhalation of plutonium dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.F.; Brooks, A.L.; Mewhinney, J.A.

    1987-11-01

    A pulmonary fibrosarcoma of bronchial origin was discovered in a Rhesus monkey that died of pulmonary fibrosis 9 years after inhalation of plutonium-239 dioxide and with a radiation dose to lung of 1400 rad (14 Gy). It grew around the major bronchus of the right cardiac lung lobe and extended into the bronchial lumen and into surrounding pulmonary parenchyma. It also readily invaded muscular pulmonary arteries, resulting in infarction and scarring in the right cardiac lobe. Despite this aggressive growth, the tumor did not metastasize. The primary cause of death was severe pulmonary fibrosis involving the alveolar septa and and perivascular and peribronchial interstitium. Bullous or pericitrical emphysema was prominent. The initial lung burden of plutonium in this monkey was 270 nCi (10 kBq) which is equivalent to approximately 500 times the maximum permissible lung burden for man on a radioactivity per unit body weight basis. The time-dose relationship for survival is consistent with that of dogs and baboons that inhaled plutonium dioxide and died with lung tumors.

  4. Estrogen formation and binding in the cerebral cortex of the developing rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    MacLusky, N.J.; Naftolin, F.; Goldman-Rakic, P.S.

    1986-01-01

    These studies were undertaken to determine whether estrogen receptors and the microsomal enzyme system called the aromatase complex, which is responsible for conversion of androgen to estrogen, are present in the brain of the rhesus monkey during perinatal life. Four monkeys (three females-one fetus removed on day 153 of gestation and two infants, 5 and 6 days postnatal-and 1 male, 2 days postnatal) were studied. Cytosol estrogen receptors were detected in all brain regions examined. The apparent equilibrium dissociations constants for reaction of these sites with /sup 3/H/sup -/moxestrol were similar to those for uterine and pituitary cytosol estrogen receptors (0.3-1.1 nM). Within the brain, highest levels of binding were observed in the hypothalamus-preoptic area, with fairly even, lower concentrations throughout the cortical structures. Aromatase complex activity was detected in the majority of the tissue specimens. The highest levels of estrogen formation were observed in the hypothalamus. Among the cortical samples, the highest levels of aromatase complex activity were found in regions of the association cortex. The lowest levels of aromatase activity were found in the somatosensory and motor cortices of the postnatal animals. These results suggest that locally-formed estrogen may be involved in the effects of circulating androgens on the developing primate neocortex.

  5. Stability of the translocation frequency following whole-body irradiation measured in rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, J. N.; Hill, F. S.; Burk, C. E.; Cox, A. B.; Straume, T.

    1996-01-01

    Chromosome translocations are persistent indicators of prior exposure to ionizing radiation and the development of 'chromosome painting' to efficiently detect translocations has resulted in a powerful biological dosimetry tool for radiation dose reconstruction. However, the actual stability of the translocation frequency with time after exposure must be measured before it can be used reliably to obtain doses for individuals exposed years or decades previously. Human chromosome painting probes were used here to measure reciprocal translocation frequencies in cells from two tissues of 8 rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) irradiated almost three decades previously. Six of the monkeys were exposed in 1965 to whole-body (fully penetrating) radiation and two were unexposed controls. The primates were irradiated as juveniles to single doses of 0.56, 1.13, 2.00, or 2.25 Gy. Blood lymphocytes (and skin fibroblasts from one individual) were obtained for cytogenetic analysis in 1993, near the end of the animals' lifespans. Results show identical dose-response relationships 28 y after exposure in vivo and immediately after exposure in vitro. Because chromosome aberrations are induced with identical frequencies in vivo and in vitro, these results demonstrate that the translocation frequencies induced in 1965 have not changed significantly during the almost three decades since exposure. Finally, our emerging biodosimetry data for individual radiation workers are now confirming the utility of reciprocal translocations measured by FISH in radiation dose reconstruction.

  6. Aspartame demand in rhesus monkeys: effects of volume and concentration manipulations.

    PubMed

    Wade-Galuska, Tammy; Galuska, Chad M; Winger, Gail; Woods, James H

    2007-01-10

    Three rhesus monkeys' lever presses produced aspartame-sweetened water according to a fixed-ratio schedule. The response requirement was increased across sessions and a demand-function analysis was used to assess the reinforcing effectiveness of different magnitudes of aspartame by manipulating reinforcer duration (1 and 3s) in Phase 1 and concentration (0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 1.0mg/ml) in Phase 2. When duration was manipulated, the number of aspartame deliveries was mainly a function of the response requirement rather than unit price (responses/duration), suggesting that changes in duration did not significantly affect the reinforcing effectiveness of aspartame. When concentration was manipulated and the lowest concentration excluded, consumption was best described by unit price (responses/concentration) in two monkeys and by the response requirement in the third. Although results from the concentration manipulation provide some evidence that consumption was modulated by unit price, the results overall suggest that scalar equivalence does not exist between the components of unit price; specifically, the response requirement exerted a larger influence than duration or concentration on total consumption. Finally, a normalized demand analysis revealed that aspartame is a more elastic commodity than food and drug reinforcers.

  7. Ad26/MVA therapeutic vaccination with TLR7 stimulation in SIV-infected rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Borducchi, Erica N; Cabral, Crystal; Stephenson, Kathryn E; Liu, Jinyan; Abbink, Peter; Ng'ang'a, David; Nkolola, Joseph P; Brinkman, Amanda L; Peter, Lauren; Lee, Benjamin C; Jimenez, Jessica; Jetton, David; Mondesir, Jade; Mojta, Shanell; Chandrashekar, Abishek; Molloy, Katherine; Alter, Galit; Gerold, Jeffrey M; Hill, Alison L; Lewis, Mark G; Pau, Maria G; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Geleziunas, Romas; Kim, Jerome H; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-12-08

    The development of immunologic interventions that can target the viral reservoir in HIV-1-infected individuals is a major goal of HIV-1 research. However, little evidence exists that the viral reservoir can be sufficiently targeted to improve virologic control following discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy. Here we show that therapeutic vaccination with Ad26/MVA (recombinant adenovirus serotype 26 (Ad26) prime, modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) boost) and stimulation of TLR7 (Toll-like receptor 7) improves virologic control and delays viral rebound following discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy in SIV-infected rhesus monkeys that began antiretroviral therapy during acute infection. Therapeutic vaccination with Ad26/MVA resulted in a marked increase in the magnitude and breadth of SIV-specific cellular immune responses in virologically suppressed, SIV-infected monkeys. TLR7 agonist administration led to innate immune stimulation and cellular immune activation. The combination of Ad26/MVA vaccination and TLR7 stimulation resulted in decreased levels of viral DNA in lymph nodes and peripheral blood, and improved virologic control and delayed viral rebound following discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy. The breadth of cellular immune responses correlated inversely with set point viral loads and correlated directly with time to viral rebound. These data demonstrate the potential of therapeutic vaccination combined with innate immune stimulation as a strategy aimed at a functional cure for HIV-1 infection.

  8. Visual Nesting of Stimuli Affects Rhesus Monkeys' (Macaca mulatta) Quantity Judgments in a Bisection Task

    PubMed Central

    Beran, Michael J.; Parrish, Audrey E.

    2013-01-01

    Nonhuman animals are highly proficient at judging relative quantities presented in a variety of formats including visual, auditory, and even cross modal formats. Performance typically is constrained by the ratio between sets, as would be expected under Weber's Law, and as is described in the Approximate Number System (ANS) hypothesis. In most cases, tests are designed to avoid any perceptual confusion for animals regarding the stimulus sets, but despite this, animals show some of the perceptual biases that humans show based on organization of stimuli. Here, we demonstrate an additional perceptual bias that emerges from the illusion of nested sets. When arrays of circles were presented on a computer screen and were to be classified as larger than or as smaller than an established central value, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) underestimated quantities when circles were nested within each other. This matched a previous report with adult humans (Chesney & Gelman, 2012), indicating that macaques, like humans, show the pattern of biased perception predicted by ANS estimation. Although some macaques overcame this perceptual bias demonstrating that they could come to view nested stimuli as individual elements to be included in the estimates of quantity used for classifying arrays, the majority of the monkeys showed the bias of underestimating nested arrays throughout the experiment. PMID:23709063

  9. Stability of the translocation frequency following whole-body irradiation measured in rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, J. N.; Hill, F. S.; Burk, C. E.; Cox, A. B.; Straume, T.

    1996-01-01

    Chromosome translocations are persistent indicators of prior exposure to ionizing radiation and the development of 'chromosome painting' to efficiently detect translocations has resulted in a powerful biological dosimetry tool for radiation dose reconstruction. However, the actual stability of the translocation frequency with time after exposure must be measured before it can be used reliably to obtain doses for individuals exposed years or decades previously. Human chromosome painting probes were used here to measure reciprocal translocation frequencies in cells from two tissues of 8 rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) irradiated almost three decades previously. Six of the monkeys were exposed in 1965 to whole-body (fully penetrating) radiation and two were unexposed controls. The primates were irradiated as juveniles to single doses of 0.56, 1.13, 2.00, or 2.25 Gy. Blood lymphocytes (and skin fibroblasts from one individual) were obtained for cytogenetic analysis in 1993, near the end of the animals' lifespans. Results show identical dose-response relationships 28 y after exposure in vivo and immediately after exposure in vitro. Because chromosome aberrations are induced with identical frequencies in vivo and in vitro, these results demonstrate that the translocation frequencies induced in 1965 have not changed significantly during the almost three decades since exposure. Finally, our emerging biodosimetry data for individual radiation workers are now confirming the utility of reciprocal translocations measured by FISH in radiation dose reconstruction.

  10. Effects of spatial training on transitive inference performance in humans and rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Gazes, Regina Paxton; Lazareva, Olga F.; Bergene, Clara N.; Hampton, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    It is often suggested that transitive inference (TI; if A>B and B>C then A>C) involves mentally representing overlapping pairs of stimuli in a spatial series. However, there is little direct evidence to unequivocally determine the role of spatial representation in TI. We tested whether humans and rhesus monkeys use spatial representations in TI by training them to organize seven images in a vertical spatial array. Then, we presented subjects with a TI task using these same images. The implied TI order was either congruent or incongruent with the order of the trained spatial array. Humans in the congruent condition learned premise pairs more quickly, and were faster and more accurate in critical probe tests, suggesting that the spatial arrangement of images learned during spatial training influenced subsequent TI performance. Monkeys first trained in the congruent condition also showed higher test trial accuracy when the spatial and inferred orders were congruent. These results directly support the hypothesis that humans solve TI problems by spatial organization, and suggest that this cognitive mechanism for inference may have ancient evolutionary roots. PMID:25546105

  11. Familial hypercholesterolemia in a rhesus monkey pedigree: molecular basis of low density lipoprotein receptor deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, M; Li, Z G; Pfaffinger, D; Neven, L; Scanu, A M

    1990-01-01

    We have recently identified a family of rhesus monkeys with members exhibiting a spontaneous hypercholesterolemia associated with a low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) deficiency. By using the polymerase chain reaction, we now show that the affected monkeys are heterozygous for a nonsense mutation in exon 6 of the LDLR gene. This mutation changes the sequence of the codon for amino acid 284 (tryptophan) from TGG to TAG, thereby generating a nonsense codon potentially resulting in a truncated 283-amino acid protein, which needs documentation, however. This G----A mutation also creates a site for the restriction endonuclease Spe I. Using this site as a marker for this nonsense mutation, we have shown that the mutation is present in all of the affected members of the pedigree and absent in unaffected members and that the mutation segregates with the phenotype of spontaneous hypercholesterolemia through three generations. Quantitative analyses of RNA obtained from liver biopsies show that the abundance of the LDLR RNA is also reduced by about 50%. Thus, we have identified a primate model for human familial hypercholesterolemia which will be useful for studying the relationship between the LDLR and lipoprotein metabolism and for assessing the efficacy of diets and drugs in the treatment of human familial hypercholesterolemia. Images PMID:2326270

  12. Effects of confined space and near vision stimulation on refractive status and vitreous chamber depth in adolescent rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Leng, Yunxia; Lan, Weizhong; Yu, Keming; Liu, Bingqian; Yang, Zhikuan; Li, Zheng; Zhong, Xingwu; Zhang, Shaochong; Ge, Jian

    2010-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of sustained near vision stimulation, on the refractive development and elongation of the vitreous chamber in adolescent rhesus monkeys. A total of 12 adolescent rhesus monkeys (1.5-2.0 years old) were randomly assigned to 3 groups. In groups A (n=4) and B (n=4), monkeys were reared in close-vision cages for 8 and 4 h d(-1), respectively; tiny granules were added on the cage floor to avoid visual deprivation and to encourage near gaze. In group C (n=4), monkeys were reared in open-vision cages, with non-granule food as a control. Vitreous chamber depth, refractive status, and corneal refractive power were assessed over 18 months. Paired t-test was used to compare the differences and a P-value<0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. In group A, vitreous chamber depth and optical axis elongated significantly, and refractive error shifted towards myopia during the observation period. In group B, vitreous chambers and optical axis elongated but the refractive power did not show significant changes. In group C, there was no significant elongation in vitreous chambers and optical axis, and the refractive power changed slightly towards hypermetropia. There were no significant changes in corneal refractive power in each group. Sustained near vision can promote vitreous chamber growth and induce myopic shifts in refractive power in adolescent monkeys. Our results demonstrate the potential for a primate model of near-work-related myopia.

  13. Evaluating the Behavioral and Physiological Safety of Human Butyrylcholinesterase in Rhesus Monkeys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    Grauer , Grunwald, Cohen, & Ashani, 1997; Wolfe et al., 1992; Wolfe, Rush, Doctor, Koplovitz, & Jones, 1987). A clear advantage of using this strategy...Raveh, L., Grauer , E., Grunwald, J., Cohen, E., & Ashani, Y. (1997). The stoichiometry of protection against soman and VX toxicity in monkeys

  14. Mucinous gastric hyperplasia in a colony of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) induced by polychlorinated biphenyl (Aroclor 1254)

    SciTech Connect

    Geistfeld, J.G.; Bond, M.G.; Bullock, B.C.; Varian, M.C.

    1982-02-01

    Since 1971, 45 of 259 male rhesus monkeys housed in a primate building have died of a chronic and progressive disease characterized by diarrhea, dehydration, weakness, gingivitis, emaciation, and alopecia. The principal necropsy finding in these monkeys, and in eight others killed for experimental purposes, was hypertrophic and hyperplastic mucinous gastropathy involving both the mucosa and submucosa. The toxic agent involved was identified as the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), Aroclor 1254. The suspected source of the toxic agent was a concrete sealer used during building construction.

  15. Metaphase yields from staphylococcal enterotoxin A stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes of unirradiated and irradiated aged rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, F. S.; Cox, A. B.; Salmon, Y. L.; Cantu, A. O.; Lucas, J. N.

    1994-01-01

    The mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) works well in both human and cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) lymphocyte cultures to stimulate T cell proliferation. T cells from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) are less responsive than human cells, producing few metaphases when thousands are required, e.g. in biological dosimetry studies. We show that staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), one of the most potent mitogens known, at a concentration of 0.5 microgram/ml stimulated peripheral lymphocytes to grow with a mitotic index (MI) averaging 0.13 metaphases/cell in old, irradiated rhesus macaques. This was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than that produced by PHA (MI < 0.01) in lymphocytes from the same animals. Whole blood was cultured for 96, 120 and 144 h for five irradiated individuals and for two controls. All cells cultured with SEA produced a high MI with a peak response at 120 h whereas the same cultures showed low MI for each PHA stimulated culture.

  16. Metaphase yields from staphylococcal enterotoxin A stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes of unirradiated and irradiated aged rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, F. S.; Cox, A. B.; Salmon, Y. L.; Cantu, A. O.; Lucas, J. N.

    1994-01-01

    The mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) works well in both human and cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) lymphocyte cultures to stimulate T cell proliferation. T cells from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) are less responsive than human cells, producing few metaphases when thousands are required, e.g. in biological dosimetry studies. We show that staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), one of the most potent mitogens known, at a concentration of 0.5 microgram/ml stimulated peripheral lymphocytes to grow with a mitotic index (MI) averaging 0.13 metaphases/cell in old, irradiated rhesus macaques. This was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than that produced by PHA (MI < 0.01) in lymphocytes from the same animals. Whole blood was cultured for 96, 120 and 144 h for five irradiated individuals and for two controls. All cells cultured with SEA produced a high MI with a peak response at 120 h whereas the same cultures showed low MI for each PHA stimulated culture.

  17. Study of treatment of congenital Toxoplasma gondii infection in rhesus monkeys with pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine.

    PubMed Central

    Schoondermark-van de Ven, E; Galama, J; Vree, T; Camps, W; Baars, I; Eskes, T; Meuwissen, J; Melchers, W

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy of the combination of pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine for the treatment of congenital Toxoplasma gondii infection in rhesus monkeys was studied. The dosage regimen for pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine was established by pharmacokinetic studies in two monkeys. Those studies showed that the distributions of both drugs followed a one-compartment model. The serum elimination half-lives were found to be 5.2 h for sulfadiazine and 44.4 h for pyrimethamine. Sulfadiazine reached a maximum concentration in serum of 58.7 micrograms/ml, whereas a maximum concentration in serum of 0.22 micrograms/ml was found for pyrimethamine. Ten monkeys were infected intravenously with T. gondii at day 90 of pregnancy, which is comparable to the second trimester of organogenetic development in humans. Treatment was administered to six monkeys, in whose fetuses infection was diagnosed antenatally. From the moment that fetal infection was proven, the monkeys were treated throughout pregnancy with 1 mg of pyrimethamine per kg of body weight per day and 50 mg of sulfadiazine per kg of body weight per day orally. The therapy was supplemented with 3.5 mg of folinic acid once a week. No toxic side effects were found with this drug regimen. The parasite was no longer detectable in the next consecutive amniotic fluid sample, taken 10 to 13 days after treatment was started. Furthermore, T. gondii was also not found in the neonate at birth. The parasite was still present at birth in three of four untreated fetuses that served as controls. Both drugs crossed the placenta very well. Concentrations in fetal serum varied from 0.05 to 0.14 micrograms/ml for pyrimethamine and from 1.0 to 5.4 micrograms/ml for sulfadiazine. In addition, pyrimethamine was found to accumulate in the brain tissue, with concentrations being three to four times higher than the corresponding concentrations in serum. Thirty percent of the sulfadiazine was found to reach the brain tissue when compared with the

  18. Restoration of 3D Vestibular Sensation in Rhesus Monkeys Using a Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y.; Davidovics, Natan; Chiang, Bryce; Ahn, Joong Ho; Della Santina, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    Profound bilateral loss of vestibular hair cell function can cause chronically disabling loss of balance and inability to maintain stable vision during head and body movements. We have previously shown that chinchillas rendered bilaterally vestibular-deficient via intratympanic administration of the ototoxic antibiotic gentamicin regain a more nearly normal 3-dimensional vestibulo-ocular reflex (3D VOR) when head motion information sensed by a head-mounted multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) is encoded via rate-modulated pulsatile stimulation of vestibular nerve branches. Despite significant improvement versus the unaided condition, animals still exhibited some 3D VOR misalignment (i.e., the 3D axis of eye movement responses did not precisely align with the axis of head rotation), presumably due to current spread between a given ampullary nerve’s stimulating electrode(s) and afferent fibers in nontargeted branches of the vestibular nerve. Assuming that effects of current spread depend on relative orientation and separation between nerve branches, anatomic differences between chinchilla and human labyrinths may limit the extent to which results in chinchillas accurately predict MVP performance in humans. In this report, we describe the MVP-evoked 3D VOR measured in alert rhesus monkeys, which have labyrinths that are larger than chinchillas and temporal bone anatomy more similar to humans. Electrodes were implanted in five monkeys treated with intratympanic gentamicin to bilaterally ablate vestibular hair cell mechanosensitivity. Eye movements mediated by the 3D VOR were recorded during passive sinusoidal (0.2–5 Hz, peak 50°/s) and acceleration-step (1000°/s2 to 150°/s) whole-body rotations in darkness about each semicircular canal axis. During constant 100 pulse/s stimulation (i.e., MVP powered ON but set to stimulate each ampullary nerve at a constant mean baseline rate not modulated by head motion), 3D VOR responses to head rotation exhibited

  19. Pharmacologic characterization of a nicotine-discriminative stimulus in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Colin S; Javors, Martin A; McMahon, Lance R

    2012-06-01

    This study examined mechanisms by which nicotine (1.78 mg/kg base s.c.) produces discriminative stimulus effects in rhesus monkeys. In addition to nicotine, various test compounds were studied including other nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists (varenicline and cytisine), antagonists [mecamylamine and the α4β2 receptor-selective antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE)], a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist/indirect-acting catecholamine agonist (bupropion), and non-nicotinics (cocaine and midazolam). Nicotine, varenicline, and cytisine dose-dependently increased drug-lever responding; the ED(50) values were 0.47, 0.53, and 39 mg/kg, respectively. Bupropion and cocaine produced 100% nicotine-lever responding in a subset of monkeys, whereas mecamylamine, DHβE, and midazolam produced predominantly vehicle-lever responding. The training dose of nicotine resulted in 1128 ng/ml cotinine in saliva. Mecamylamine antagonized the discriminative stimulus effects of nicotine and varenicline, whereas DHβE was much less effective. Nicotine and varenicline had synergistic discriminative stimulus effects. In monkeys responding predominantly on the vehicle lever after a test compound (bupropion, cocaine, and midazolam), that test compound blocked the nicotine-discriminative stimulus, perhaps reflecting a perceptual-masking phenomenon. These results show that nicotine, varenicline, and cytisine produce discriminative stimulus effects through mecamylamine-sensitive receptors (i.e., nicotinic acetylcholine) in primates, whereas the involvement of DHβE-sensitive receptors (i.e., α4β2) is unclear. The current nicotine-discrimination assay did not detect a difference in agonist efficacy between nicotine, varenicline, and cytisine, but did show evidence of involvement of dopamine. The control that nicotine has over choice behavior can be disrupted by non-nicotinic compounds, suggesting that non-nicotinics could be exploited to decrease the control that tobacco has

  20. Modification of ethanol's reinforcing effectiveness in rhesus monkeys by cocaine, flunitrazepam, or gamma-hydroxybutyrate.

    PubMed

    Winger, Gail; Galuska, Chad M; Hursh, Steven R

    2007-09-01

    Although ethanol is frequently used in combination with other psychoactive drugs, the behavioral and pharmacological reasons for this form of polydrug abuse have not been well described. Rhesus monkeys with indwelling intravenous catheters produced intravenous injections of ethanol (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg/inj), flunitrazepam (0.001-0.03 mg/kg/inj), cocaine (0.01 or 0.03 mg/kg/inj), or combinations of ethanol and these drugs or gammahydroxybutyrate (GHB) (1.0 or 3.2 mg/kg/inj) by lever pressing according to a fixed-ratio schedule. The response requirement for each drug or drug combination was increased across sessions (10, 32, 100, 320, or 1,000). The dependent variables were rates of responding maintained by the drug or drug combination and the elasticity of drug demand when consumption was expressed as a function of price. Elasticity (P (max)) values for each drug varied among the monkeys but retained the same rank order for the monkeys, suggesting a fundamental difference in the animals' apparent sensitivities to the reinforcing effects of the drugs. Combining ethanol with the other drugs did not increase their reinforcing effectiveness. GHB (ineffective in previous studies) did not modify ethanol's reinforcing effects; demand functions for the combination of ethanol and flunitrazepam were slightly less elastic than for ethanol alone, but no different from that for flunitrazepam alone; adding ethanol to cocaine detracted from the reinforcing effectiveness of cocaine. The hypothesis that use of ethanol in combination with sedative and stimulant drugs is due to an ability of ethanol to enhance the reinforcing effects of these drugs is not supported.

  1. Discriminative stimulus effects of benzodiazepine (BZ)(1) receptor-selective ligands in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Lance R; Gerak, Lisa R; Carter, Lawrence; Ma, Chunrong; Cook, James M; France, Charles P

    2002-02-01

    Drug discrimination was used to examine the effects of benzodiazepine (BZ)(1) receptor-selective ligands in rhesus monkeys. In diazepam-treated (5.6 mg/kg, p.o.) monkeys discriminating the nonselective BZ antagonist flumazenil (0.32 mg/kg, s.c.), the BZ(1)-selective antagonist beta-carboline-3-carboxylate-t-butyl ester (beta-CCt) substituted for flumazenil. The onset of action of beta-CCt was delayed with a dose of 5.6 mg/kg beta-CCt substituting for flumazenil 2 h after injection. In monkeys discriminating the nonselective BZ agonist midazolam (0.56 mg/kg, s.c.), the BZ(1)-selective agonists zaleplon (ED(50) = 0.78 mg/kg) and zolpidem (ED(50) = 1.73 mg/kg) substituted for midazolam. The discriminative stimulus effects of midazolam, zaleplon, and zolpidem were antagonized by beta-CCt (1.0-5.6 mg/kg, s.c.), and the effects of zaleplon and zolpidem were also antagonized by flumazenil (0.01-0.32 mg/kg, s.c.). Schild analyses supported the notion of a simple, competitive interaction between beta-CCt and midazolam (slope = -1.08; apparent pA(2) = 5.41) or zaleplon (slope = -1.57; apparent pA(2) = 5.49) and not between beta-CCt and zolpidem. Schild analyses also were consistent with a simple, competitive interaction between flumazenil and zaleplon (slope = -1.03; apparent pA(2) = 7.45) or zolpidem (slope = -1.11; apparent pA(2) = 7.63). These results suggest that the same BZ receptor subtype(s) mediate(s) the effects of midazolam, zolpidem, and zaleplon under these conditions and that selective binding of BZ ligands does not necessarily confer selective effects in vivo.

  2. Characterization of perfect microsatellite based on genome-wide and chromosome level in Rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongtao; Hu, Zongxiu; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Xiuyue; Li, Jing; Yue, Bisong

    2016-11-05

    Microsatellite studies based on chromosomes level would contribute to the biometric correlation analysis of chromosome and microsatellite applications on the specific chromosome. In this study, the total microsatellite length of 1,141,024 loci was 21.8Mb, which covered about 0.74% of the male Rhesus monkey genome. Perfect mononucleotide SSRs were the most abundant, followed by the pattern: perfect di->tetra->tri->penta->hexanucleotide SSRs. The main range of repeat times focused on 12-32 times (mono-), 7-23 times (di-), 5-10 times (tri-), 4-14 times (tetra-), 4-9 times (penta-), 4-8 times (hexa-), respectively. The largest SSRs number was found in chromosome 1 with 94,347 loci, followed by chromosome 3, 2, 7 and 5, and the smallest number was in chromosome 18. The predominant repeat types in male Rhesus monkey genome and chromosome Y were basically A, AC, AG, AAT, AAC, AAAT, AAAC, AAAG, AAACA and AAACAA. SSRs number of all chromosomes was closely positively correlated with chromosome sequence size (r=0.969, p<0.01), and significantly negatively correlated with abundance (r=-0.24, 0.01Rhesus monkey, which might contributed to the DNA methylation of CpG islands for sex chromosome X inactivation and expression regulation. These results and exported tetranucleotide repeat sequences in each chromosome for primer design would facilitate the exploration of microsatellites structural function, composition mode and molecular markers development in Rhesus monkey genome.

  3. Dose-response studies on the spermatogonial stem cells of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) after X irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    van Alphen, M.M.; van de Kant, H.J.; Davids, J.A.; Warmer, C.J.; Bootsma, A.L.; de Rooij, D.G. )

    1989-09-01

    Studies of the dose response of the spermatogonial stem cells in the rhesus monkey were performed at intervals of 130 and 160 days after graded doses of X irradiation. The D0 of the spermatogonial stem cells was established using the total numbers of the type A spermatogonia that were present at 130 and 160 days after irradiation and was found to be 1.07 Gy; the 95% confidence interval was 0.90-1.34 Gy.

  4. Effect of hypoxia by intermittent altitude exposure on semen characteristics and testicular morphology of male rhesus monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, D. K.

    1995-09-01

    Semen characteristics and testicular morphology of rhesus monkeys were studied on exposure to a simulated high altitude of 4411 m for 21 days. There was a partially reversible decrease in the semen volume, sperm count and sperm motility, as well as an elevation of pH and fructose concentration. These changes were associated with degeneration of the germinal epithelium and spermatogenic arrest at the end of third week of exposure which had not recovered even 3 weeks after the exposure.

  5. Type 2 diabetes mellitus non-genetic Rhesus monkey model induced by high fat and high sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuai-yao; Qi, Su-dong; Zhao, Yuan; Li, Yan-yan; Yang, Feng-mei; Yu, Wen-hai; Jin, Ma; Chen, Li-Xiong; Wang, Jun-bin; He, Zhan-long; Li, Hong-jun

    2015-01-01

    To build an ideal animal model for studying the mechanism of occurrence, developing and treating of diabetes become a more important issue, facing with the fact that the big threat of diabetes to human health has been worsen. First, we used the normal control diets or the high-fat/high-sucrose diets to feed the adult rhesus monkeys and the macaques induced by the high-fat/high-sucrose diets in the high-fat/high-sucrose group and the type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) group developed the hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia at 6 months in accordance with the precious researches that reported that minipigs, rats and mice could develop hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia and obesity after being induced with high-fat/high-carbohydrate diets. Second, the rhesus monkeys in T2DM group were injected STZ at a low dosage of 35 mg/kg BW to induce glucose persistent elevation which maintained pretty well after 12 months. Third, we took the assay of glucose tolerance test and insulin resistance index, assessed the changing tendency of serum resistin and analysed the pathological characteristics of the tissues like pancreas and liver by staining in different ways. The results indicate the rhesus monkeys in T2DM group have lots of clinical features of T2DM. The experimental non-genetic T2DM rhesus monkeys model not only contribute to simulating of clinical manifestations and pathological features of human T2DM, but also may be a good kind of model for research on the treatment of T2DM and for new drugs evaluation. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Do primates see the solitaire illusion differently? A comparative assessment of humans (Homo sapiens), chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta), and capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella).

    PubMed

    Agrillo, Christian; Parrish, Audrey E; Beran, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    An important question in comparative psychology is whether human and nonhuman animals share similar principles of perceptual organization. Despite much empirical research, no firm conclusion has been drawn. The Solitaire illusion is a numerosity illusion in humans that occurs when one misperceives the relative number of 2 types of items presented in intermingled sets. To date, no study has investigated whether nonhuman animals perceive the Solitaire illusion as humans do. Here, we compared the perception of the Solitaire illusion in human and nonhuman primates in 3 experiments. We first observed (Experiment 1) the spontaneous behavior of chimpanzees when presented with 2 arrays composed of a different number of preferred and nonpreferred food items. In probe trials, preferred items were presented in the Solitaire pattern in 2 different spatial arrangements (either clustered centrally or distributed on the perimeter). Chimpanzees did not show any misperception of quantity in the Solitaire pattern. Next, humans, chimpanzees, rhesus monkeys, and capuchin monkeys underwent the same testing of relative quantity judgments in a computerized task that also presented the Solitaire illusion (Experiments 2 and 3). Unlike humans, chimpanzees did not appear to perceive the illusion, in agreement with Experiment 1. The performance of rhesus monkeys and capuchin monkeys was also different from that of humans, but was slightly more indicative of a potential Solitaire illusion. On the whole, our results suggest a potential discontinuity in the visual mechanisms underlying the Solitaire illusion between human and nonhuman primates.

  7. Treatment and risk factor analysis of hypoglycemia in diabetic rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    He, Sirong; Chen, Younan; Wei, Lingling; Jin, Xi; Zeng, Li; Ren, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Li; Li, Hongxia; Lu, Yanrong; Cheng, Jingqiu

    2011-02-01

    of diabetic monkeys, particularly monitoring and protecting their renal function.

  8. Maternal antibodies from mothers of children with autism alter brain growth and social behavior development in the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Bauman, M D; Iosif, A-M; Ashwood, P; Braunschweig, D; Lee, A; Schumann, C M; Van de Water, J; Amaral, D G

    2013-07-09

    Antibodies directed against fetal brain proteins of 37 and 73 kDa molecular weight are found in approximately 12% of mothers who have children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but not in mothers of typically developing children. This finding has raised the possibility that these immunoglobulin G (IgG) class antibodies cross the placenta during pregnancy and impact brain development, leading to one form of ASD. We evaluated the pathogenic potential of these antibodies by using a nonhuman primate model. IgG was isolated from mothers of children with ASD (IgG-ASD) and of typically developing children (IgG-CON). The purified IgG was administered to two groups of female rhesus monkeys (IgG-ASD; n=8 and IgG-CON; n=8) during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy. Another control group of pregnant monkeys (n=8) was untreated. Brain and behavioral development of the offspring were assessed for 2 years. Behavioral differences were first detected when the macaque mothers responded to their IgG-ASD offspring with heightened protectiveness during early development. As they matured, IgG-ASD offspring consistently deviated from species-typical social norms by more frequently approaching familiar peers. The increased approach was not reciprocated and did not lead to sustained social interactions. Even more striking, IgG-ASD offspring displayed inappropriate approach behavior to unfamiliar peers, clearly deviating from normal macaque social behavior. Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging analyses revealed that male IgG-ASD offspring had enlarged brain volume compared with controls. White matter volume increases appeared to be driving the brain differences in the IgG-ASD offspring and these differences were most pronounced in the frontal lobes.

  9. Maternal antibodies from mothers of children with autism alter brain growth and social behavior development in the rhesus monkey

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, M D; Iosif, A-M; Ashwood, P; Braunschweig, D; Lee, A; Schumann, C M; Van de Water, J; Amaral, D G

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies directed against fetal brain proteins of 37 and 73 kDa molecular weight are found in approximately 12% of mothers who have children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but not in mothers of typically developing children. This finding has raised the possibility that these immunoglobulin G (IgG) class antibodies cross the placenta during pregnancy and impact brain development, leading to one form of ASD. We evaluated the pathogenic potential of these antibodies by using a nonhuman primate model. IgG was isolated from mothers of children with ASD (IgG-ASD) and of typically developing children (IgG-CON). The purified IgG was administered to two groups of female rhesus monkeys (IgG-ASD; n=8 and IgG-CON; n=8) during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy. Another control group of pregnant monkeys (n=8) was untreated. Brain and behavioral development of the offspring were assessed for 2 years. Behavioral differences were first detected when the macaque mothers responded to their IgG-ASD offspring with heightened protectiveness during early development. As they matured, IgG-ASD offspring consistently deviated from species-typical social norms by more frequently approaching familiar peers. The increased approach was not reciprocated and did not lead to sustained social interactions. Even more striking, IgG-ASD offspring displayed inappropriate approach behavior to unfamiliar peers, clearly deviating from normal macaque social behavior. Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging analyses revealed that male IgG-ASD offspring had enlarged brain volume compared with controls. White matter volume increases appeared to be driving the brain differences in the IgG-ASD offspring and these differences were most pronounced in the frontal lobes. PMID:23838889

  10. RepSox improves viability and regulates gene expression in rhesus monkey-pig interspecies cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hai-Ying; Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Luo, Zhao-Bo; Li, Xiao-Chen; Zhang, Yu-Chen; Xing, Xiao-Xu; Xuan, Mei-Fu; Zhang, Guang-Lei; Luo, Qi-Rong; Wang, Jun-Xia; Cui, Cheng-Du; Li, Wen-Xue; Cui, Zheng-Yun; Yin, Xi-Jun; Kang, Jin-Dan

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effect of the small molecule, RepSox, on the expression of developmentally important genes and the pre-implantation development of rhesus monkey-pig interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) embryos. Rhesus monkey cells expressing the monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 which have a normal (42) chromosome complement, were used as donor cells to generate iSCNT embryos. RepSox increased the expression levels of the pluripotency-related genes, Oct4 and Nanog (p < 0.05), but not of Sox2 compared with untreated embryos at the 2-4-cell stage. Expression of the anti-apoptotic gene, Bcl2, and the pro-apoptotic gene Bax was also affected at the 2-4-cell stage. RepSox treatment also increased the immunostaining intensity of Oct4 at the blastocyst stage (p < 0.05). Although the blastocyst developmental rate was higher in the group treated with 25 µM RepSox for 24 h than in the untreated control group (2.4 vs. 1.2%, p > 0.05), this was not significant. RepSox can improve the developmental potential of rhesus monkey-pig iSCNT embryos by regulating the expression of pluripotency-related genes.

  11. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to study human relaxin in human pregnancy and in pregnant rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lucas, C; Bald, L N; Martin, M C; Jaffe, R B; Drolet, D W; Mora-Worms, M; Bennett, G; Chen, A B; Johnston, P D

    1989-03-01

    A sensitive and specific double-antibody enzyme-linked immunoassay, using a synthetic analogue of human relaxin for standard and immunogen, was developed for the measurement of human relaxin (hRLX) in serum and plasma. No cross-reactivity was observed for human insulin, human insulin-like growth factor-I, hGH, human chorionic gonadotropin, hFSH, hLH or human prolactin. The assay was used to monitor RLX concentrations in samples from men, non-pregnant and pregnant women, and in pregnant rhesus monkeys infused with hRLX. RLX was not detected in serum from men nor from non-pregnant women, while a concentration of 600 ng/l was measured in pooled sera from two pregnant women (pregnancies achieved by in-vitro fertilization). Immunoreactive RLX (1.1 micrograms/g) was found in human corpora lutea taken from ectopic pregnancies at 7 weeks. In an experiment with a pregnant rhesus monkey infused with human RLX analogue, less than 1.5% of the maternal concentration was measured in the fetal circulation. Even though preliminary, these data suggest a low level of transfer of human analogue relaxin across the placenta in a rhesus monkey. Further studies of the physiology of RLX in human pregnancy will be facilitated by the availability of this immunoassay.

  12. Nalfurafine hydrochloride, a selective κ opioid receptor agonist, has no reinforcing effect on intravenous self-administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Kaoru; Hirakata, Mikito; Miyamoto, Yohei; Kainoh, Mie; Wakasa, Yoshio; Yanagita, Tomoji

    2016-01-01

    Nalfurafine hydrochloride [(E)-N-[17-(cyclopropylmethyl)-4,5α-epoxy-3,14-dihydroxymorphinan-6β-yl]-3-(furan-3-yl)-N-methylprop-2-enamide monohydrochloride; nalfurafine] is used in Japan as an antipruritic for the treatment of intractable pruritus in patients undergoing hemodialysis or with chronic liver disease. It is a potent and selective agonist at the κ opioid receptor, but also has weak and partial agonist activity at μ opioid receptors. Opioids, especially those acting at μ receptors, carry a risk of abuse. This is an important factor in the consideration of therapeutic risk vs. benefit in clinical use and the potential for misuse as a public health problem. It is therefore necessary to carefully evaluate the reinforcing effects of nalfurafine. To this end, we investigated intravenous self-administration of nalfurafine in rhesus monkeys. The number of self-administration of nalfurafine at doses of 0.0625, 0.125 and 0.25 μg/kg/infusion was not higher than that of saline in rhesus monkeys that frequently self-administered pentazocine (0.25 mg/kg/infusion). These results indicate that nalfurafine has no reinforcing effect in rhesus monkeys in the intravenous self-administration paradigm.

  13. A 4-channel 3 Tesla phased array receive coil for awake rhesus monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments.

    PubMed

    Khachaturian, Mark Haig

    2010-01-01

    Awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI combined with conventional neuroscience techniques has the potential to study the structural and functional neural network. The majority of monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments are performed with single coils which suffer from severe EPI distortions which limit resolution. By constructing phased array coils for monkey MRI studies, gains in SNR and anatomical accuracy (i.e., reduction of EPI distortions) can be achieved using parallel imaging. The major challenges associated with constructing phased array coils for monkeys are the variation in head size and space constraints. Here, we apply phased array technology to a 4-channel phased array coil capable of improving the resolution and image quality of full brain awake monkey fMRI and diffusion MRI experiments. The phased array coil is that can adapt to different rhesus monkey head sizes (ages 4-8) and fits in the limited space provided by monkey stereotactic equipment and provides SNR gains in primary visual cortex and anatomical accuracy in conjunction with parallel imaging and improves resolution in fMRI experiments by a factor of 2 (1.25 mm to 1.0 mm isotropic) and diffusion MRI experiments by a factor of 4 (1.5 mm to 0.9 mm isotropic).

  14. Looking Ahead? Computerized Maze Task Performance by Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta), Capuchin Monkeys (Cebus apella), and Human Children (Homo sapiens)

    PubMed Central

    Beran, Michael J.; Parrish, Audrey E.; Futch, Sara E.; Evans, Theodore A.; Perdue, Bonnie M.

    2015-01-01

    Human and nonhuman primates are not mentally constrained to the present. They can remember the past and – at least to an extent – anticipate the future. Anticipation of the future ranges from long-term prospection such as planning for retirement to more short-term future oriented cognition such as planning a route through a maze. Here we tested a great ape species (chimpanzees), an Old World monkey species (rhesus macaques) a New World monkey species (capuchin monkeys) and human children on a computerized maze task. All subjects had to move a cursor through a maze to reach a goal at the bottom of the screen. For best performance on the task, subjects had to “plan ahead” to the end of the maze to move the cursor in the correct direction, avoid traps, and reverse directions if necessary. Mazes varied in difficulty. Chimpanzees were better than both monkey species, and monkeys showed a particular deficit when moving away from the goal or changing directions was required. Children showed a similar pattern to monkeys regarding the effects of reversals and moves away from the goal, but their overall performance in terms of correct maze completion was similar to the chimpanzees. The results highlight similarities as well as differences in planning across species and the role that inhibitory control may play in future oriented cognition in primates. PMID:25798793

  15. Differences between male and female rhesus monkey erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase and plasma cholinesterase activity before and after exposure to sarin

    SciTech Connect

    Woodard, C.L.; Calamaio, C.A.; Kaminskis, A.; Anderson, D.R.; Harris, L.W.

    1993-05-13

    The female rhesus monkey has a menstrual cycle like the human. Additionally, several differences in enzyme levels between males and females and in the female during the menstrual cycle are present. Therefore we quantitated plasma cholinesterase (ChE/BuChE) and erythrocyte (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity before and after exposure to sarin (GB)(1 5 ug/kg, iv; a 0.75 LD50), in male and female rhesus (Macaca mulatta) monkeys. Twenty-eight-day preexposure baseline plasma ChE and RBC AChE values for six male and six female rhesus monkeys were compared for intra-animal, within sex and between sex differences. After these baseline values were obtained, the organophosphorus (OP) compound/Isopropyl methylphosphono-fluoridate (GB) was administered to atropinized monkeys to determine if there was a significant in vivo difference between the sexes in their response to this intoxication in regard to the rate of BuChE /AChE inhibition, pyridine-2-aldoxime methyl chloride (2-PAM) reactivation of the phosphonylated BuChE and the rate of aging of the phosphonylated:BuChE/AChE. In the pre-exposure portion of the protocol; the intra-animal and intra-group BuChE/AChE variations were found to be minimal; but there were significant differences between the male and female monkeys in both plasma BuChE and RBC AChE levels; although probably clinically insignificant in respect to an OP intoxication. No significant cyclic fluctuations were seen during the 28-day study in either sex.

  16. Extent of thermal processing of infant formula affects copper status in infant rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, B; Kelleher, S L; Lien, E L

    2001-05-01

    Infant rhesus monkeys are excellent models in which to study the effect of infant formulas on trace element absorption and status. Infants fed powdered formula from birth exhibit normal growth and have blood variables similar to those of breast-fed infants. The objectives were to evaluate the effects of feeding ready-to-feed (RTF) formulas exposed to different heat treatments to infant monkeys, and, for one of these formulas, to compare the effect of fortification with 2 iron concentrations. From birth to age 5 mo, infant monkeys (n = 6/group) were fed one of the following formulas exclusively: 1) 12 mg Fe/L processed in cans (RTF-12), 2) formula in glass bottles with 12 mg Fe/L and manufactured by an ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) process (UHT-12), or 3) formula manufactured by a standard thermal process (STP), containing either 8 (STP-8) or 12 (STP-12) mg Fe/L. All formulas had similar copper concentrations (0.6 mg Cu/L). Anthropometric measures and venous blood samples were taken monthly. Weight and length gain did not differ among groups; however, the STP-12 group weighed less than the UHT-12 group at ages 2, 4, and 5 mo. Hemoglobin values were significantly lower in the RTF-12 group than in all other groups at ages 4 and 5 mo and serum ferritin was lower in the RTF-12 group than in the STP-12 group at age 5 mo. Copper status was lower in STP-12 infants than in STP-8 infants. There was a progressive and significant decline in plasma copper, ceruloplasmin, and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase activity in infants fed canned formula (RTF-12). Furthermore, coat color changed from normal brown to silver. These outcomes suggest that the canned formula induced copper deficiency in infant monkeys. Excessive heat treatment of formula can have a pronounced negative effect on copper status. High iron concentrations did not improve iron status but may adversely affect copper status.

  17. Radical curative efficacy of tafenoquine combination regimens in Plasmodium cynomolgi-infected Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Tafenoquine is an 8-aminoquinoline being developed for radical cure (blood and liver stage elimination) of Plasmodium vivax. During monotherapy treatment, the compound exhibits slow parasite and fever clearance times, and toxicity in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a concern. Combination with other antimalarials may mitigate these concerns. Methods In 2005, the radical curative efficacy of tafenoquine combinations was investigated in Plasmodium cynomolgi-infected naïve Indian-origin Rhesus monkeys. In the first cohort, groups of two monkeys were treated with a three-day regimen of tafenoquine at different doses alone and in combination with a three-day chloroquine regimen to determine the minimum curative dose (MCD). In the second cohort, the radical curative efficacy of a single-day regimen of tafenoquine-mefloquine was compared to that of two three-day regimens comprising tafenoquine at its MCD with chloroquine or artemether-lumefantrine in groups of six monkeys. In a final cohort, the efficacy of the MCD of tafenoquine against hypnozoites alone and in combination with chloroquine was investigated in groups of six monkeys after quinine pre-treatment to eliminate asexual parasites. Plasma tafenoquine, chloroquine and desethylchloroquine concentrations were determined by LC-MS in order to compare doses of the drugs to those used clinically in humans. Results The total MCD of tafenoquine required in combination regimens for radical cure was ten-fold lower (1.8 mg/kg versus 18 mg/kg) than for monotherapy. This regimen (1.8 mg/kg) was equally efficacious as monotherapy or in combination with chloroquine after quinine pre-treatment to eliminate asexual stages. The same dose of (1.8 mg/kg) was radically curative in combination with artemether-lumefantrine. Tafenoquine was also radically curative when combined with mefloquine. The MCD of tafenoquine monotherapy for radical cure (18 mg/kg) appears to be biologically equivalent to a 600

  18. Radical curative efficacy of tafenoquine combination regimens in Plasmodium cynomolgi-infected Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Dow, Geoffrey S; Gettayacamin, Montip; Hansukjariya, Pranee; Imerbsin, Rawiwan; Komcharoen, Srawuth; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Kyle, Dennis; Milhous, Wilbur; Cozens, Simon; Kenworthy, David; Miller, Anne; Veazey, Jim; Ohrt, Colin

    2011-07-29

    Tafenoquine is an 8-aminoquinoline being developed for radical cure (blood and liver stage elimination) of Plasmodium vivax. During monotherapy treatment, the compound exhibits slow parasite and fever clearance times, and toxicity in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a concern. Combination with other antimalarials may mitigate these concerns. In 2005, the radical curative efficacy of tafenoquine combinations was investigated in Plasmodium cynomolgi-infected naïve Indian-origin Rhesus monkeys. In the first cohort, groups of two monkeys were treated with a three-day regimen of tafenoquine at different doses alone and in combination with a three-day chloroquine regimen to determine the minimum curative dose (MCD). In the second cohort, the radical curative efficacy of a single-day regimen of tafenoquine-mefloquine was compared to that of two three-day regimens comprising tafenoquine at its MCD with chloroquine or artemether-lumefantrine in groups of six monkeys. In a final cohort, the efficacy of the MCD of tafenoquine against hypnozoites alone and in combination with chloroquine was investigated in groups of six monkeys after quinine pre-treatment to eliminate asexual parasites. Plasma tafenoquine, chloroquine and desethylchloroquine concentrations were determined by LC-MS in order to compare doses of the drugs to those used clinically in humans. The total MCD of tafenoquine required in combination regimens for radical cure was ten-fold lower (1.8 mg/kg versus 18 mg/kg) than for monotherapy. This regimen (1.8 mg/kg) was equally efficacious as monotherapy or in combination with chloroquine after quinine pre-treatment to eliminate asexual stages. The same dose of (1.8 mg/kg) was radically curative in combination with artemether-lumefantrine. Tafenoquine was also radically curative when combined with mefloquine. The MCD of tafenoquine monotherapy for radical cure (18 mg/kg) appears to be biologically equivalent to a 600-1200 mg dose in humans. At

  19. Production of rhesus monkey cloned embryos expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hai-Ying; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Gao, Qing-Shan; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Rhesus monkey cells were electroporated with a plasmid containing mRFP1, and an mRFP1-expressing cell line was generated. • For the first time, mRFP1-expressing rhesus monkey cells were used as donor cells for iSCNT. • The effect of VPA on the development of embryos cloned using iSCNT was determined. - Abstract: Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is a promising method to clone endangered animals from which oocytes are difficult to obtain. Monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) is an excellent selection marker for transgenically modified cloned embryos during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this study, mRFP-expressing rhesus monkey cells or porcine cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes to generate iSCNT and SCNT embryos, respectively. The development of these embryos was studied in vitro. The percentage of embryos that underwent cleavage did not significantly differ between iSCNT and SCNT embryos (P > 0.05; 71.53% vs. 80.30%). However, significantly fewer iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reached the blastocyst stage (2.04% vs. 10.19%, P < 0.05). Valproic acid was used in an attempt to increase the percentage of iSCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage. However, the percentages of embryos that underwent cleavage and reached the blastocyst stage were similar between untreated iSCNT embryos and iSCNT embryos treated with 2 mM valproic acid for 24 h (72.12% vs. 70.83% and 2.67% vs. 2.35%, respectively). These data suggest that porcine-rhesus monkey interspecies embryos can be generated that efficiently express mRFP1. However, a significantly lower proportion of iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reach the blastocyst stage. Valproic acid does not increase the percentage of porcine-rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos that reach the blastocyst stage. The mechanisms underling nuclear reprogramming and epigenetic modifications in iSCNT need to be investigated further.

  20. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) do recognize themselves in the mirror: implications for the evolution of self-recognition.

    PubMed

    Rajala, Abigail Z; Reininger, Katharine R; Lancaster, Kimberly M; Populin, Luis C

    2010-09-29

    Self-recognition in front of a mirror is used as an indicator of self-awareness. Along with humans, some chimpanzees and orangutans have been shown to be self-aware using the mark test. Monkeys are conspicuously absent from this list because they fail the mark test and show persistent signs of social responses to mirrors despite prolonged exposure, which has been interpreted as evidence of a cognitive divide between hominoids and other species. In stark contrast with those reports, the rhesus monkeys in this study, who had been prepared for electrophysiological recordings with a head implant, showed consistent self-directed behaviors in front of the mirror and showed social responses that subsided quickly during the first experimental session. The self-directed behaviors, which were performed in front of the mirror and did not take place in its absence, included extensive observation of the implant and genital areas that cannot be observed directly without a mirror. We hypothesize that the head implant, a most salient mark, prompted the monkeys to overcome gaze aversion inhibition or lack of interest in order to look and examine themselves in front of the mirror. The results of this study demonstrate that rhesus monkeys do recognize themselves in the mirror and, therefore, have some form of self-awareness. Accordingly, instead of a cognitive divide, they support the notion of an evolutionary continuity of mental functions.

  1. The relationship between cocaine self-administration and actigraphy-based measures of sleep in adult rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Brutcher, Robert E; Nader, Michael A

    2013-09-01

    Clinical trials show that chronic cocaine users suffer from sleep disturbances and preclinical research has shown that acute sleep deprivation increases the rate of cocaine self-administration in rats. This study examined the effect of cocaine self-administration on behavioral indices of sleep and alternatively the effect of sleep disruption on cocaine-maintained responding by rhesus monkeys. Seven adult rhesus monkeys, fitted with Actical® activity monitors, were trained to respond under a concurrent choice paradigm with food (three 1.0-g pellets) and cocaine (0.003-0.3 mg/kg) or saline presentation. For each monkey, the lowest preferred dose of cocaine (>80% cocaine choice) was determined. Activity data were analyzed during lights out (2000-0600) to determine sleep efficiency, sleep latency, and total activity counts. Subsequently, the monkeys' sleep was disrupted (every hour during lights-out period) the night prior to food-cocaine choice sessions. Self-administration of the preferred dose of cocaine resulted in a significant decrease in sleep efficiency, with a significant increase in total lights-out activity. Sleep disruption significantly altered behavioral indices of sleep, similar to those seen following cocaine self-administration. However, sleep disruption did not affect cocaine self-administration under concurrent choice conditions. Based on these findings, cocaine self-administration does appear to disrupt behavioral indices of sleep, although it remains to be determined if treatments that improve sleep measures can affect future cocaine taking.

  2. Emergence and evolution of inter-specific segregating retrocopies in cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) and rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Qu; Su, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Retroposition is an RNA-mediated mechanism to generate gene duplication, and is believed to play an important role in genome evolution and phenotypic adaptation in various species including primates. Previous studies suggested an elevated rate of recent retroposition in the rhesus macaque genome. To better understand the impact of retroposition on macaque species which have undergone an adaptive radiation approximately 3–6 million years ago, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline to identify recently derived retrocopies in cynomolgus monkeys. As a result, we identified seven experimentally validated young retrocopies, all of which are polymorphic in cynomolgus monkeys. Unexpectedly, five of them are also present in rhesus monkeys and are still segregating. Molecular evolutionary analysis indicates that the observed inter-specific polymorphism is attribute to ancestral polymorphism. Further population genetics analysis provided strong evidence of balancing selection on at least one case (Crab-eating monkey retrocopy 6, or CER6) in both species. CER6 is in adjacent with an immunoglobulin related gene and may be involved in host-pathogen interaction, a well-known target of balancing selection. Altogether, our data support that retroposition is an important force to shape genome evolution and species adaptation. PMID:27600022

  3. Immunohistochemical Localization of AMPA Type Glutamate Receptor Subunits in the Striatum of Rhesus Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yun-Ping; Shelby, Evan; Reiner, Anton J.

    2010-01-01

    Corticostriatal and thalamostriatal projections utilize glutamate as their neurotransmitter. Their influence on striatum is mediated, in part, by ionotropic AMPA-type glutamate receptors, which are heteromers composed of GluR1-4 subunits. While the cellular localization of AMPA-type subunits in the basal ganglia has been well characterized in rodents, the cellular localization of AMPA subunits in primate basal ganglia is not. We thus carried out immunohistochemical studies of GluR1-4 distribution in rhesus monkey basal ganglia in conjunction with characterization of each major neuron type. In striatum, about 65% of striatal neurons immunolabeled for GluR1, 75%-79% immunolabeled for GluR2 or GluR2/3, and only 2.5% possessed GluR4. All neurons the large size of cholinergic interneurons (mean diameter 26.1μm) were moderately labeled for GluR1, while all neurons in the size range of parvalbuminergic interneurons (mean diameter 13.8μm) were intensely rich in GluR1. Additionally, somewhat more than half of neurons in the size range of projection neurons (mean diameter 11.6μm) immunolabeled for GluR1, and about one third of these were very rich in GluR1. About half of neurons the size of cholinergic interneurons were immunolabeled for GluR2, and the remainder of the neurons that were immunolabeled for GluR2 coincided with projection neurons in size and shape (GluR2 diameter=10.7μm), indicating that the vast majority of striatal projection neurons possess immunodectible GluR2. Similar results were observed with GluR2/3 immunolabeling. Half of the neurons the size of cholinergic interneurons immunolabeled for GluR4 and seemingly all neurons in the size range of parvalbuminergic interneurons possessed GluR4. These results indicate that AMPA receptor subunit combinations for striatal projection neurons in rhesus monkey are similar to those for the corresponding neuron types in rodents, and thus their AMPA responses to glutamate likely to be similar to those demonstrated

  4. Isolation, molecular cloning and in vitro expression of rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) prominin-1.s1 complementary DNA encoding a potential hematopoietic stem cell antigen.

    PubMed

    Husain, S M; Shou, Y; Sorrentino, B P; Handgretinger, R

    2006-10-01

    Human prominin-1 (CD133 or AC133) is an important cell surface marker used to isolate primitive hematopoietic stem cells. The commercially available antibody to human prominin-1 does not recognize rhesus prominin-1. Therefore, we isolated, cloned and characterized the complementary DNA (cDNA) of rhesus prominin-1 gene and determined its coding potential. Following the nomenclature of prominin family of genes, we named this cDNA as rhesus prominin-1.s1. The amino acid sequence data of the putative rhesus prominin-1.s1 could be used in designing antigenic peptides to raise antibodies for use in isolation of pure populations of rhesus prominin-1(+) hematopoietic cells. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no previously published report about the isolation of a prominin-1 cDNA from rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

  5. The effects of horizontal body casting on blood volume, drug responsiveness, and +Gz tolerance in the rhesus