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Sample records for protected left-turn signalized

  1. Exposure to lateral collision in signalized intersections with protected left turn under different traffic control strategies.

    PubMed

    Midenet, Sophie; Saunier, Nicolas; Boillot, Florence

    2011-11-01

    This paper proposes an original definition of the exposure to lateral collision in signalized intersections and discusses the results of a real world experiment. This exposure is defined as the duration of situations where the stream that is given the right-of-way goes through the conflict zone while road users are waiting in the cross-traffic approach. This measure, obtained from video sensors, makes it possible to compare different operating conditions such as different traffic signal strategies. The data from a real world experiment is used, where the adaptive real-time strategy CRONOS (ContRol Of Networks by Optimization of Switchovers) and a time-plan strategy with vehicle-actuated ranges alternately controlled an isolated intersection near Paris. Hourly samples with similar traffic volumes are compared and the exposure to lateral collision is different in various areas of the intersection and various traffic conditions for the two strategies. The total exposure under peak hour traffic conditions drops by roughly 5 min/h with the CRONOS strategy compared to the time-plan strategy, which occurs mostly on entry streams. The results are analyzed through the decomposition of cycles in phase sequences and recommendations are made for traffic control strategies.

  2. Modeling left-turn crash occurrence at signalized intersections by conflicting patterns.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuesong; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    In order to better understand the underlying crash mechanisms, left-turn crashes occurring at 197 four-legged signalized intersections over 6 years were classified into nine patterns based on vehicle maneuvers and then were assigned to intersection approaches. Crash frequency of each pattern was modeled at the approach level by mainly using Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) with the Negative Binomial as the link function to account for the correlation among the crash data. GEE with a binomial logit link function was also applied for patterns with fewer crashes. The Cumulative Residuals test shows that, for correlated left-turn crashes, GEE models usually outperformed basic Negative Binomial models. The estimation results show that there are obvious differences in the factors that cause the occurrence of different left-turn collision patterns. For example, for each pattern, the traffic flows to which the colliding vehicles belong are identified to be significant. The width of the crossing distance (represented by the number of through lanes on the opposing approach of the left-turning traffic) is associated with more left-turn traffic colliding with opposing through traffic (Pattern 5), but with less left-turning traffic colliding with near-side crossing through traffic (Pattern 8). The safety effectiveness of the left-turning signal is not consistent for different crash patterns; "protected" phasing is correlated with fewer Pattern 5 crashes, but with more Pattern 8 crashes. The study indicates that in order to develop efficient countermeasures for left-turn crashes and improve safety at signalized intersections, left-turn crashes should be considered in different patterns.

  3. Left-turn phase: permissive, protected, or both? A quasi-experimental design in New York City.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Chen, Cynthia; Ewing, Reid

    2015-03-01

    The practice of left-turn phasing selection (permissive, protected-only, or both) varies from one locality to another. The literature evidence on this issue is equally mixed and insufficient. In this study, we evaluate the safety impacts of changing left-turn signal phasing from permissive to protected/permissive or protected-only at 68 intersections in New York City using a rigorous quasi-experimental design accompanied with regression modeling. Changes in police reported crashes including total crashes, multiple-vehicle crashes, left-turn crashes, pedestrian crashes and bicyclist crashes were compared between before period and after period for the treatment group and comparison group by means of negative binomial regression using a Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) technique. Confounding factors such as the built environment characteristics that were not controlled in comparison group selection are accounted for by this approach. The results show that the change of permissive left-turn signal phasing to protected/permissive or protected-only signal phasing does not result in a significant reduction in intersection crashes. Though the protected-only signal phasing does reduce the left-turn crashes and pedestrian crashes, this reduction was offset by a possible increase in over-taking crashes. These results suggest that left-turn phasing should not be treated as a universal solution that is always better than the permissive control for left-turn vehicles. The selection and implementation of left-turn signal phasing needs to be done carefully, considering potential trade-offs between safety and delay, and many other factors such as geometry, traffic flows and operations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Safety evaluation of signalized intersections with left-turn waiting area in China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinguo; Zhang, Guopeng; Bai, Wei; Fan, Wenbo

    2016-10-01

    In recent years the metropolitans in China have seen the surging installations of the left-turn waiting area (LWA) at the signalized intersections. The design allows the left-turning vehicles to enter the intersection at the onset of the through green phase (of the same approach) and wait for the exclusive left-turn signal at the LWA. The LWA layout can effectively reduce the probability of stranded and queue overflow of the left-turn vehicles, but no study is conducted yet to assess the safety performance of the signalized intersections with LWA. The paper adopts the traffic conflict technique (represented by post-encroachment time), compares the discrepancy of conflict types between intersections with LWA and without, and develops the severity models to identify the contributing factors for the left-turn conflicts. Results demonstrate that the left-turn volume, driving outside the LWA, running red light, the presence of secondary conflicts, and the rear-end conflicts significantly increase the severities of traffic conflicts at the LWA. The findings serve to provide recommendations to revise the current design standard of the LWA (GB5768-2009) and consequently improve the safety operations of signalized intersections with LWA in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of bus stop with left-turn lines between two adjacent signalized intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Ming-Bao; Ye, Lan-Hang; Pei, Ya-Nan

    2016-08-01

    Based on the symmetric two-lane Nagel-Schreckenberg (STNS) model, a three-lane cellular automaton model between two intersections containing a bus stop with left-turning buses is established in which model the occurrences of vehicle accidents are taken into account. The characteristics of traffic flows with different ratios of left-turn lines are discussed via the simulation experiments. The results indicate that the left-turn lines have more negative effects on capacity, accident rate as well as delay if the stop is located close to the intersections, where the negative effect in a near-side stop is more severe than that in a far-side one. The range of appropriate position for a bus stop without the bottleneck effect becomes more and more narrow with the increase of the ratio of left-turn bus lines. When the inflow is small, a short signal cycle and a reasonable offset are beneficial. When the inflow reaches or exceeds the capacity, a longer signal cycle is helpful. But if the stop position is inappropriate, the increase of cycle fails in reducing the negative effect of left-turning buses and the effectiveness of offset is weakened. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 50478088) and the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. E2015202266).

  6. Safety effects of traffic signing for left turn flashing yellow arrow signals.

    PubMed

    Schattler, Kerrie L; Gulla, Cody J; Wallenfang, Travis J; Burdett, Beau A; Lund, Jessica A

    2015-02-01

    In 2010, the left turn flashing yellow arrow (FYA) signal displays were installed at signalized intersections on state routes in the Peoria, Illinois, area. Supplemental traffic signs with text "Left Turn Yield on Flashing Yellow Arrow" were mounted on the mast arm adjacent to the left turn signal at over half of the FYA installations. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the effectiveness evaluation of the FYA supplemental sign on safety. Analyses are presented on the effects of the FYA supplemental sign for all drivers and a subset of drivers age 65 and older. A crash-based comparison of 164 FYA approaches including 90 approaches with the sign and 74 approaches without the sign showed greater crash reductions when the supplemental FYA sign was present. The results also showed that crashes involving drivers age 65 and older did not experience the same magnitudes of crash reductions as compared to all drivers. The findings of this research indicate that supplemental FYA signs may help in improving safety for left-turning vehicles during the permissive interval. Thus, it is recommended that supplemental signs be used when initially implementing the FYA, and that effort to educate the driving public on new traffic control be made to further improve safety at signalized intersections. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. A restricted branch and bound approach for setting the left turn phase sequences in signalized networks

    SciTech Connect

    Pillai, R.S.; Rathi, A.K.; Cohen, S.

    1994-07-01

    The main objective of synchronized signal timing is to keep traffic moving along arterial in platoons throughout the signal system by proper setting of left turn phase sequence at signals along the arterials/networks. The synchronization of traffic signals located along the urban/suburban arterials in metropolitan areas is perhaps one of the most cost-effective method for improving traffic flow along these streets. The popular technique for solving this problem formulates it as a mixed integer linear program and used Land and Powell branch and bound search to arrive at the optimal solution. The computation time tends to be excessive for realistic multiarterial network problems due to the exhaustive nature of the branch and bound search technique. Furthermore, the Land and Powell branch and bound code is known to be numerically unstable, which results in suboptimal solutions for network problems with a range on the cycle time variable. This paper presents the development of a fast and numerically stable heuristic, developed using MINOS linear programming solver. The new heuristic can generate optimal/near-optimal solutions in a fraction of the time needed to compute the optimal solution by Land and Powell code. The solution technique is based on restricted search using branch and bound technique. The efficiency of the heuristic approach is demonstrated by numerical results for a set of test problems.

  8. Assessing the effect of introducing a permitted phase through the use of flashing yellow arrow signal for left-turning vehicles.

    PubMed

    Pulugurtha, Srinivas S; Chittoor Khader, Khamar Salma

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates the direct and indirect effects of introducing a permitted phase, through the use of flashing yellow arrow (FYA) signal for left-turning vehicles, in reducing crashes at intersections. Data for 18 study intersections in the city of Charlotte, NC, USA were used to conduct a before-after comparison study through the use of Empirical Bayes (EB) method and examine the effects. The estimated number of left-turn crashes, had the FYA signal not been installed, was compared to the actual number of left-turn crashes to assess the direct effect, while the estimated total number of crashes, had the FYA signal not been installed, was compared to the actual total number of crashes to assess the indirect effect. Only left-turn crashes along a selected FYA leg were used to examine the direct effect as the number of legs (approaches) with the FYA signal varied between the selected study intersections. The results obtained indicate that the FYA signal helps reduce the left-turn crashes (direct effect). It does not lead to any negative consequences. Instead, the FYA signal has the potential to indirectly lower the total number of crashes (indirect effect) and contribute to improved safety at intersections.

  9. MAXBAND Version 3.1: Heuristic and optimal approach for setting the left turn phase sequences in signalized networks

    SciTech Connect

    Pillai, R.S.; Rathi, A.K.

    1995-02-01

    The main objective of synchronized signal timing is to keep traffic moving along arterials in platoons throughout the signal system by proper setting of left turn phase sequence at signals along the arterials/networks. The synchronization of traffic signals located along the urban/suburban arterials in metropolitan areas is perhaps one of the most cost-effective methods for improving traffic flow along these streets. MAXBAND Version 2.1 (formerly known as MAXBAND-86), a progression-based optimization model, is used for generating signal timing plan for urban networks. This model formulates the problem as a mixed integer linear program and uses Land and Powell branch and bound search to arrive at the optimal solution. The computation time of MAXBAND Version 2.1 tends to be excessive for realistic multiarterial network problems due to the exhaustive nature of the branch and bound search technique. Furthermore, the Land and Powell branch and bound code is known to be numerically unstable, which results in suboptimal solutions for network problems with a range on the cycle time variable. This report presents the development of a new version of MAXBAND called MAXBAND Version 3.1. This new version has a fast heuristic algorithm and a fast optimal algorithm for generating signal timing plan for arterials and networks. MAXBAND 3.1 can generate optimal/near-optimal solutions in fraction of the time needed to compute the optimal solution by Version 2.1. The heuristic algorithm in the new model is based on restricted search using branch and bound technique. The algorithm for generating the optimal solution is faster and more efficient than version 2.1 algorithm. Furthermore, the new version is numerically stable. The efficiency of the new model is demonstrated by numerical results for a set of test problems.

  10. Safety of the Las Vegas left-turn display.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Ozlem; Tian, Zong Z; Gibby, A Reed

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a safety evaluation of a special protected/permitted left turn signal control (Las Vegas LT Display) that has been implemented in the urbanized area of Las Vegas, Nevada. The Las Vegas LT Display eliminates the yellow trap condition for leading approach in lead/lag operation. It provides protected only left turns during certain times of day by suppressing the permitted green ball and yellow ball displays. Before and after studies were conducted using the crash data from 10 intersections. Results from the analyses indicated that no obvious safety concerns due to use of the special display. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Safety evaluation of intersections with dynamic use of exit-lanes for left-turn using field data.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Liu, Yue

    2017-05-01

    As a newly proposed unconventional intersection design, the exit-lanes for left-turn (EFL) intersection is found to be effective in increasing the intersection capacity with high level of application flexibility, especially under heavy left-turn traffic conditions. However, the operational safety of EFL is of most concern to the authority prior to its implementation. This paper evaluates the safety of the EFL intersections by studying the behavior of left-turn maneuvers using field data collected at 7 locations in China. A total of 22830 left-turn vehicles were captured, in which 9793 vehicles turned left using the mixed-usage area. Four potential safety problems, including the red-light violations, head-on collision risks, trapped vehicles, and rear-end crash risks, were discussed. Statistical analyses were carried out to compare the safety risk between the EFL intersection and the conventional one. Results indicate that the safety problems of EFL intersections mainly lie in higher percentages in red-light violations at the pre-signal (1.83% higher), wrong-way violation problems during the peak hours (the violation rate reaches up to 11.07%), and the lower travel speeds in the mixed-usage area (18.75% lower). Such risks can be counteracted, however, by providing more guiding information, installing cameras to investigate and punish violation maneuvers, and adjusting design parameter values for layout design and signal timing, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Driving simulator evaluation of drivers' response to intersections with dynamic use of exit-lanes for left-turn.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Yun, Meiping; Zhang, H Michael; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2015-08-01

    With the worsening of urban traffic congestion in large cities around the world, researchers have been looking for unconventional designs and/or controls to squeeze more capacity out of intersections, the most common bottlenecks of the road network. One of these innovative intersection designs, known as the exit-lanes for left-turn (EFL), opens up exit-lanes to be used by left-turn traffic with the help of an additional traffic light installed at the median opening (the pre-signal). This paper studies how drivers respond to EFL intersections with a series of driving simulator experiments. In our experiments, 64 drivers were recruited and divided into two groups. One group is trained to use the EFL while the other group is not. In addition, four scenarios were considered with different sign and marking designs and traffic conditions in the experiments. Results indicate that drivers show certain amount of confusion and hesitation when encountering an EFL intersection for the first time. They can be overcome, however, by increasing exposure through driver education or by cue provided from other vehicles. Moreover, drivers unfamiliar with EFL operation can make a left turn using the conventional left-turn lanes as usual. The EFL operation is not likely to pose any serious safety risk of the intersection in real life operations.

  13. Thunderstorm-scale variations of echoes associated with left-turn tornado families

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    The origin of tornadoes is studied on the basis of changing radar echo shapes and tornado location relative to the echoes. Three types of tornadoes appear to be associated with different hook echo configurations. No-turn or right-turn tornadoes are linked to a steady hook which does not change shape or orientation. Left-turn tornado families are generated in cases where the hook is unsteady and changes orientation at each successive tornado birth. Finally, left-turn tornado families may also be formed when the hook undergoes no orientation change and the tornadoes move along the rear of the hook. The correlation between a thunderstorm-scale cycle and periodic tornado production is also discussed.

  14. Thunderstorm-scale variations of echoes associated with left-turn tornado families

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    The origin of tornadoes is studied on the basis of changing radar echo shapes and tornado location relative to the echoes. Three types of tornadoes appear to be associated with different hook echo configurations. No-turn or right-turn tornadoes are linked to a steady hook which does not change shape or orientation. Left-turn tornado families are generated in cases where the hook is unsteady and changes orientation at each successive tornado birth. Finally, left-turn tornado families may also be formed when the hook undergoes no orientation change and the tornadoes move along the rear of the hook. The correlation between a thunderstorm-scale cycle and periodic tornado production is also discussed.

  15. Childrens' left-turning preference is not modulated by magical ideation.

    PubMed

    Streuli, Jürg C; Obrist, Gina; Brugger, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The literature on human turning preferences is inconsistent. While the few studies with children below 14 years of age uniformly describe an overall left-turning (counterclockwise) tendency, a recent Internet study with more than 1500 adults found a right-sided (clockwise) bias. We set out to investigate spontaneous turning behaviour in children age 5-3 years and, based on neuropsychiatric work in adults, also explored a potential association with magical thinking. Findings indicated a clear left-turning preference, independent of a participant's sex and handedness. Whether a child responded a question about the existence of extrasensory communication in the affirmative or not was unrelated to direction and size of turning bias and lateral preference. Our results are consistent with a left-sided turning preference reported for children, but in opposition to the clockwise bias recently described in a large-scale study with adults. Whether they point to a maturational gradient in the preferred direction of spontaneous whole-body rotation or rather to a lack of comparability between measures used in observational versus Internet-based studies remains to be further investigated. Regarding a purported association between body turns and magical thinking, our study is preliminary, as only one single question was used to probe the latter.

  16. AUGMENTED REALITY CUES TO ASSIST OLDER DRIVERS WITH GAP ESTIMATION FOR LEFT-TURNS

    PubMed Central

    Rusch, Michelle L.; Schall, Mark C.; Lee, John D.; Dawson, Jeffrey D.; Rizzo, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of augmented reality (AR) cues designed to assist middle-aged and older drivers with a range of UFOV impairments, judging when to make left-turns across oncoming traffic. Previous studies have shown that AR cues can help middle-aged and older drivers respond to potential roadside hazards by increasing hazard detection without interfering with other driving tasks. Intersections pose a critical challenge for cognitively impaired drivers, prone to misjudge time-to-contact with oncoming traffic. We investigated whether AR cues improve or interfere with hazard perception in left-turns across oncoming traffic for drivers with age-related cognitive decline. Sixty-four middle-aged and older drivers with a range of UFOV impairment judged when it would be safe to turn left across oncoming traffic approaching the driver from the opposite direction in a rural stop-sign controlled intersection scenario implemented in a static base driving simulator. Outcome measures used to evaluate the effectiveness of AR cueing included: Time-to-Contact (TTC), Gap Time Variation (GTV), Response Rate, and Gap Response Variation (GRV). All drivers estimated TTCs were shorter in cued than in uncued conditions. In addition, drivers responded more often in cued conditions than in uncued conditions and GRV decreased for all drivers in scenarios that contained AR cues. For both TTC and response rate, drivers also appeared to adjust their behavior to be consistent with the cues, especially drivers with the poorest UFOV scores (matching their behavior to be close to middle-aged drivers). Driver ratings indicated that cueing was not considered to be distracting. Further, various conditions of reliability (e.g., 15% miss rate) did not appear to affect performance or driver ratings. PMID:24950128

  17. Evaluation of a Risk Awareness Perception Training Program on Novice Teen Driver Behavior at Left-Turn Intersections

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Catherine C.; Kandadai, Venk; Loeb, Helen; Seacrist, Thomas; Lee, Yi-Ching; Bonfiglio, Dana; Fisher, Donald L.; Winston, Flaura K.

    2015-01-01

    Collisions at left turn intersections are among the most prevalent types of teen driver serious crashes, with inadequate surveillance as a key factor. Risk awareness perception training (RAPT) has shown effectiveness in improving hazard anticipation for latent hazards. The goal of this study was to determine if RAPT version 3 (RAPT-3) improved intersection turning behaviors among novice teen drivers when the hazards were not latent and frequent glancing to multiple locations at the intersection was needed. Teens aged 16–18 with ≤180 days of licensure were randomly assigned to: 1) an intervention group (n=18) that received RAPT-3 (Trained); or 2) a control group (n=19) that received no training (Untrained). Both groups completed RAPT-3 Baseline Assessment and the Trained group completed RAPT-3 Training and RAPT-3 Post Assessment. Training effects were evaluated on a driving simulator. Simulator (gap selection errors and collisions) and eye tracker (traffic check errors) metrics from six left-turn stop sign controlled intersections in the Simulated Driving Assessment (SDA) were analyzed. The Trained group scored significantly higher in RAPT-3 Post Assessment than RAPT-3 Baseline Assessment (p< 0.0001). There were no significant differences in either traffic check and gap selection errors or collisions among Trained and Untrained teens in the SDA. Though Trained teens learned about hazard anticipation related to latent hazards, learning did not translate to performance differences in left-turn stop sign controlled intersections where the hazards were not latent. Our findings point to further research to better understand the challenges teens have with left turn intersections. PMID:26709331

  18. Effects of major-road vehicle speed and driver age and gender on left-turn gap acceptance.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuedong; Radwan, Essam; Guo, Dahai

    2007-07-01

    Because the driver's gap-acceptance maneuver is a complex and risky driving behavior, it is a highly concerned topic for traffic safety and operation. Previous studies have mainly focused on the driver's gap acceptance decision itself but did not pay attention to the maneuver process and driving behaviors. Using a driving simulator experiment for left-turn gap acceptance at a stop-controlled intersection, this study evaluated the effects of major traffic speed and driver age and gender on gap acceptance behaviors. The experiment results illustrate relationships among drivers' left-turn gap decision, driver's acceleration rate, steering action, and the influence of the gap-acceptance maneuver on the vehicles in the major traffic stream. The experiment results identified an association between high crash risk and high traffic speed at stop-controlled intersections. The older drivers, especially older female drivers, displayed a conservative driving attitude as a compensation for reduced driving ability, but also showed to be the most vulnerable group for the relatively complex driving maneuvers.

  19. Signal peptide protection by specific chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Genest, Olivier; Seduk, Farida; Ilbert, Marianne; Mejean, Vincent; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal . E-mail: iobbi@ibsm.cnrs-mrs.fr

    2006-01-20

    TorD is the private chaperone of TorA, a periplasmic respiratory molybdoenzyme of Escherichia coli. In this study, it is demonstrated that TorD is required to maintain the integrity of the twin-arginine signal sequence of the cytoplasmic TorA precursors. In the absence of TorD, 35 out of the 39 amino acid residues of the signal peptide were lost and the proteolysis of the N-terminal extremity of TorA precursors was not prevented by the molybdenum cofactor insertion. We thus propose that one of the main roles of TorD is to protect the TorA signal peptide to allow translocation of the enzyme by the TAT system.

  20. 49 CFR 236.14 - Spring switch signal protection; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; requirements. 236... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.14 Spring switch signal protection; requirements. (a... track signaled for movements in only one direction through a spring switch in automatic block...

  1. 49 CFR 236.14 - Spring switch signal protection; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; requirements. 236... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.14 Spring switch signal protection; requirements. (a... track signaled for movements in only one direction through a spring switch in automatic block...

  2. 49 CFR 236.14 - Spring switch signal protection; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; requirements. 236... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.14 Spring switch signal protection; requirements. (a... track signaled for movements in only one direction through a spring switch in automatic block...

  3. 49 CFR 236.14 - Spring switch signal protection; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; requirements. 236... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.14 Spring switch signal protection; requirements. (a... track signaled for movements in only one direction through a spring switch in automatic block...

  4. 49 CFR 236.14 - Spring switch signal protection; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; requirements. 236... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.14 Spring switch signal protection; requirements. (a... track signaled for movements in only one direction through a spring switch in automatic block...

  5. Vitamin D receptor signaling in renal and cardiovascular protection.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan Chun

    2013-09-01

    The high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with chronic kidney disease is believed to be an important risk factor for the cardiorenal syndrome commonly seen in this patient population. African Americans suffer a disproportionally high incidence of renal and cardiovascular disease with poor disease outcome, which may be partly attributed to their low vitamin D status in part owing to low subcutaneous photoproduction of vitamin D. Mounting evidence from animal and clinical studies has shown beneficial effects of vitamin D therapy on the renal and cardiovascular systems, and the underlying renoprotective and cardioprotective mechanisms of vitamin D receptor (VDR)-mediated signaling are under intense investigation. In this article, our most recent understanding of the renal protective mechanism of the podocyte VDR signaling against diabetic nephropathy and the anti-atherosclerotic role of macrophage VDR signaling in the regulation of atherosclerosis is reviewed.

  6. Kappa opioid receptor signaling protects cartilage tissue against posttraumatic degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu; Shkhyan, Ruzanna; Lee, Siyoung; Gullo, Francesca; Petrigliano, Frank A.; Ba, Kai; Wang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, and pain relief with opioid-like drugs is a commonly used therapeutic for osteoarthritic patients. Recent studies published by our group showed that the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) is highly expressed during human development in joint-forming cells. However, the precise role of this receptor in the skeletal system remains elusive. The main aim of the current study was to investigate the role of KOR signaling in synovial and cartilaginous tissues in pathological conditions. Our data demonstrate that KOR null mice exhibit accelerated cartilage degeneration after injury when compared with WT mice. Activation of KOR signaling increased the expression of anabolic enzymes and inhibited cartilage catabolism and degeneration in response to proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α. In addition, selective KOR agonists increased joint lubrication via the activation of cAMP/CREB signaling in chondrocytes and synovial cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate direct effects of KOR agonists on cartilage and synovial cells and reveals a protective effect of KOR signaling against cartilage degeneration after injury. In addition to pain control, local administration of dynorphin or other KOR agonist represents an attractive therapeutic approach in patients with early stages of osteoarthritis. PMID:28097228

  7. 49 CFR 236.12 - Spring switch signal protection; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; where required... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.12 Spring switch signal protection; where required. Signal protection shall be provided for facing and trailing movements through spring switch...

  8. 49 CFR 236.12 - Spring switch signal protection; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; where required... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.12 Spring switch signal protection; where required. Signal protection shall be provided for facing and trailing movements through spring switch...

  9. 49 CFR 236.12 - Spring switch signal protection; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; where required... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.12 Spring switch signal protection; where required. Signal protection shall be provided for facing and trailing movements through spring switch...

  10. 49 CFR 236.12 - Spring switch signal protection; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; where required... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.12 Spring switch signal protection; where required. Signal protection shall be provided for facing and trailing movements through spring switch...

  11. 49 CFR 236.12 - Spring switch signal protection; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; where required... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.12 Spring switch signal protection; where required. Signal protection shall be provided for facing and trailing movements through spring switch...

  12. Enhancement of endocannabinoid signaling protects against cocaine-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Vilela, Luciano R.; Gobira, Pedro H.; Viana, Thercia G.; Medeiros, Daniel C.; Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H.; Doria, Juliana G.; Rodrigues, Flávia; Aguiar, Daniele C.; Pereira, Grace S.; Massessini, André R.; Ribeiro, Fabíola M.; Oliveira, Antonio Carlos P. de; Moraes, Marcio F.D.; Moreira, Fabricio A.

    2015-08-01

    Cocaine is an addictive substance with a potential to cause deleterious effects in the brain. The strategies for treating its neurotoxicity, however, are limited. Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system exerts neuroprotective functions against various stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main enzyme responsible for terminating the actions of the endocannabinoid anandamide, reduces seizures and cell death in the hippocampus in a model of cocaine intoxication. Male Swiss mice received injections of endocannabinoid-related compounds followed by the lowest dose of cocaine that induces seizures, electroencephalographic activity and cell death in the hippocampus. The molecular mechanisms were studied in primary cell culture of this structure. The FAAH inhibitor, URB597, reduced cocaine-induced seizures and epileptiform electroencephalographic activity. The cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor selective agonist, ACEA, mimicked these effects, whereas the antagonist, AM251, prevented them. URB597 also inhibited cocaine-induced activation and death of hippocampal neurons, both in animals and in primary cell culture. Finally, we investigated if the PI3K/Akt/ERK intracellular pathway, a cell surviving mechanism coupled to CB{sub 1} receptor, mediated these neuroprotective effects. Accordingly, URB597 injection increased ERK and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Moreover, the neuroprotective effect of this compound was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the pharmacological facilitation of the anandamide/CB1/PI3K signaling protects the brain against cocaine intoxication in experimental models. This strategy may be further explored in the development of treatments for drug-induced neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • Cocaine toxicity is characterized by seizures and hippocampal cell death. • The endocannabinoid anandamide acts as a brain protective mechanism. • Inhibition of anandamide hydrolysis

  13. Enhancement of endocannabinoid signaling protects against cocaine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Luciano R; Gobira, Pedro H; Viana, Thercia G; Medeiros, Daniel C; Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H; Doria, Juliana G; Rodrigues, Flávia; Aguiar, Daniele C; Pereira, Grace S; Massessini, André R; Ribeiro, Fabíola M; de Oliveira, Antonio Carlos P; Moraes, Marcio F D; Moreira, Fabricio A

    2015-08-01

    Cocaine is an addictive substance with a potential to cause deleterious effects in the brain. The strategies for treating its neurotoxicity, however, are limited. Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system exerts neuroprotective functions against various stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main enzyme responsible for terminating the actions of the endocannabinoid anandamide, reduces seizures and cell death in the hippocampus in a model of cocaine intoxication. Male Swiss mice received injections of endocannabinoid-related compounds followed by the lowest dose of cocaine that induces seizures, electroencephalographic activity and cell death in the hippocampus. The molecular mechanisms were studied in primary cell culture of this structure. The FAAH inhibitor, URB597, reduced cocaine-induced seizures and epileptiform electroencephalographic activity. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor selective agonist, ACEA, mimicked these effects, whereas the antagonist, AM251, prevented them. URB597 also inhibited cocaine-induced activation and death of hippocampal neurons, both in animals and in primary cell culture. Finally, we investigated if the PI3K/Akt/ERK intracellular pathway, a cell surviving mechanism coupled to CB1 receptor, mediated these neuroprotective effects. Accordingly, URB597 injection increased ERK and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Moreover, the neuroprotective effect of this compound was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the pharmacological facilitation of the anandamide/CB1/PI3K signaling protects the brain against cocaine intoxication in experimental models. This strategy may be further explored in the development of treatments for drug-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Eicosanoid signaling in insects: from discovery to plant protection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prostaglandins (PGs) and related eicosanoids are signal moieties derived from arachidonic acid and two other C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids. They were discovered in the 1930s in the context of mammalian reproductive physiology; PGs were associated with the prostate gland, hence their name, and they...

  15. Key Technologies Development of Transient Signals Based Protection Device Using DSP and S-Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingmao; Zheng, Gao

    2017-05-01

    The correctness of new principle of transient signal based protection used to be verified by simulating. In order to further introduce the dynamic simulation experiments for the transient signal based protection algorithm, the key technologies of transient signal based protection device were developed. The hardware of the synchronous multi-channel data acquisition and high-speed data processing was designed with kernel of high speed floating point digital signal processor TMS320C6748 and simultaneous sampling analog-to-digital converter. The sampling program reads the AD conversion data using DMA mode, which reduce the consumption of CPU time. The S transform was used to extract the fault traveling wave signals from the sampled data. The time consumption of algorithm which extract the traveling wave was analyzed when it ran on TMS320C6748. The test result shows that the hardware and software design is feasible.

  16. 49 CFR 1242.58 - Operating signals and interlockers, operating drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts XX-51-59, XX-51-60 and XX-51-61). 1242.58 Section 1242.58... Operating signals and interlockers, operating drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts XX-51-59..., interlockers, drawbridges and highway crossings are located. ...

  17. 49 CFR 1242.58 - Operating signals and interlockers, operating drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts XX-51-59, XX-51-60 and XX-51-61). 1242.58 Section 1242.58... Operating signals and interlockers, operating drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts XX-51-59..., interlockers, drawbridges and highway crossings are located. ...

  18. 49 CFR 1242.58 - Operating signals and interlockers, operating drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts XX-51-59, XX-51-60 and XX-51-61). 1242.58 Section 1242.58... Operating signals and interlockers, operating drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts XX-51-59..., interlockers, drawbridges and highway crossings are located. ...

  19. 49 CFR 1242.58 - Operating signals and interlockers, operating drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts XX-51-59, XX-51-60 and XX-51-61). 1242.58 Section 1242.58... Operating signals and interlockers, operating drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts XX-51-59..., interlockers, drawbridges and highway crossings are located. ...

  20. Oligodendrocyte-specific activation of PERK signaling protects mice against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wensheng; Lin, Yifeng; Li, Jin; Fenstermaker, Ali G; Way, Sharon W; Clayton, Benjamin; Jamison, Stephanie; Harding, Heather P; Ron, David; Popko, Brian

    2013-04-03

    There is compelling evidence that oligodendrocyte apoptosis, in response to CNS inflammation, contributes significantly to the development of the demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Therefore, approaches designed to protect oligodendrocytes would likely have therapeutic value. Activation of pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) signaling in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress increases cell survival under various cytotoxic conditions. Moreover, there is evidence that PERK signaling is activated in oligodendrocytes within demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis and EAE. Our previous study demonstrated that CNS delivery of the inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ before EAE onset protected mice against EAE, and this protection was dependent on PERK signaling. In our current study, we sought to elucidate the role of PERK signaling in oligodendrocytes during EAE. We generated transgenic mice that allow for temporally controlled activation of PERK signaling, in the absence of ER stress, specifically in oligodendrocytes. We demonstrated that persistent activation of PERK signaling was not deleterious to oligodendrocyte viability or the myelin of adult animals. Importantly, we found that enhanced activation of PERK signaling specifically in oligodendrocytes significantly attenuated EAE disease severity, which was associated with reduced oligodendrocyte apoptosis, demyelination, and axonal degeneration. This effect was not the result of an altered degree of the inflammatory response in EAE mice. Our results provide direct evidence that activation of PERK signaling in oligodendrocytes is cytoprotective, protecting mice against EAE.

  1. PD-1 Coinhibitory Signals: The Link Between Pathogenesis and Protection

    PubMed Central

    Kulpa, Deanna A.; Lawani, Mariam; Cooper, Anthony; Peretz, Yoav; Ahlers, Jeff; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    In the majority of HIV-1 infected individuals, the adaptive immune response drives virus escape resulting in persistent viremia and a lack of immune-mediated control. The expression of negative regulatory molecules such as PD-1 during chronic HIV infection provides a useful marker to differentiate functional memory T cell subsets and the frequency of T cells with an exhausted phenotype. In addition, cell-based measurements of virus persistence equate with activation markers and the frequency of CD4 T cells expressing PD-1. High-level expression of PD-1 and its ligands PD-L1 and - L2 are found on hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells, which are regulated by chronic antigen stimulation, Type 1 and Type II interferons (IFNs), and homeostatic cytokines. In HIV infected subjects, PD-1 levels on CD4 and CD8 T cells continue to remain high following combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART). System biology approaches have begun to elucidate signal transduction pathways regulated by PD-1 expression in CD4 and CD8 T cell subsets that become dysfunctional through chronic TCR activation and PD-1 signaling. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of transcriptional signatures and signal transduction pathways associated with immune exhaustion with a focus on recent work in our laboratory characterizing the role of PD-1 in T cell dysfunction and HIV pathogenesis. We also highlight the therapeutic potential of blocking PD-1-PD-L1 and other immune checkpoints for activating potent cellular immune responses against chronic viral infections and cancer. PMID:23548749

  2. Levosimendan Administration in Limb Ischemia: Multicomponent Signaling Serving Kidney Protection

    PubMed Central

    Onody, Peter; Aranyi, Peter; Turoczi, Zsolt; Stangl, Rita; Fulop, Andras; Dudas, Emese; Lotz, Gabor; Szijarto, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives Acute renal failure is a severe complication of lower extremity major arterial reconstructions, which could even be fatal. Levosimendan is a dual-acting positive inotropic and vasodilatory agent, which is suspected to have protective effects against cardiac ischemia. However, there is no data available on lower limb or remote organ ischemic injuries therefore the aim of the study was to investigate the effect of levosimendan on lower limb ischemia-reperfusion injury and the corollary renal dysfunction. Methods Male Wistar rats underwent 180 min bilateral lower limb ischemia followed by 4 or 24 hours of reperfusion. Intravenous Levosimendan was administered continuously (0.2μg/bwkg/min) throughout the whole course of ischemia and the first 3h of reperfusion. Results were compared with sham-operated and ischemia-reperfusion groups. Hemodynamic monitoring was performed by invasive arterial blood pressure measurement. Kidney and lower limb muscle microcirculation was registered by a laser Doppler flowmeter. After 4h and 24h of reperfusion, serum, urine and histological samples were collected. Results Systemic hemodynamic parameters and microcirculation of kidney and the lower limb significantly improved in the Levosimendan treated group. Muscle viability was significantly preserved 4 and 24 hours after reperfusion. At the same time, renal functional laboratory tests and kidney histology demonstrated significantly less expressive kidney injury in Levosimendan groups. TNF-α levels were significantly less elevated in the Levosimendan group 4 hours after reperfusion. Conclusion The results claim a protective role for Levosimendan administration during major vascular surgeries to prevent renal complications. PMID:27684548

  3. Mitochondria-controlled signaling mechanisms of brain protection in hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lukyanova, Ludmila D.; Kirova, Yulia I.

    2015-01-01

    The article is focused on the role of the cell bioenergetic apparatus, mitochondria, involved in development of immediate and delayed molecular mechanisms for adaptation to hypoxic stress in brain cortex. Hypoxia induces reprogramming of respiratory chain function and switching from oxidation of NAD-related substrates (complex I) to succinate oxidation (complex II). Transient, reversible, compensatory activation of respiratory chain complex II is a major mechanism of immediate adaptation to hypoxia necessary for (1) succinate-related energy synthesis in the conditions of oxygen deficiency and formation of urgent resistance in the body; (2) succinate-related stabilization of HIF-1α and initiation of its transcriptional activity related with formation of long-term adaptation; (3) succinate-related activation of the succinate-specific receptor, GPR91. This mechanism participates in at least four critical regulatory functions: (1) sensor function related with changes in kinetic properties of complex I and complex II in response to a gradual decrease in ambient oxygen concentration; this function is designed for selection of the most efficient pathway for energy substrate oxidation in hypoxia; (2) compensatory function focused on formation of immediate adaptive responses to hypoxia and hypoxic resistance of the body; (3) transcriptional function focused on activated synthesis of HIF-1 and the genes providing long-term adaptation to low pO2; (4) receptor function, which reflects participation of mitochondria in the intercellular signaling system via the succinate-dependent receptor, GPR91. In all cases, the desired result is achieved by activation of the succinate-dependent oxidation pathway, which allows considering succinate as a signaling molecule. Patterns of mitochondria-controlled activation of GPR-91- and HIF-1-dependent reaction were considered, and a possibility of their participation in cellular-intercellular-systemic interactions in hypoxia and adaptation was

  4. Type I interferon signaling protects mice from lethal henipavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Dhondt, Kévin P; Mathieu, Cyrille; Chalons, Marie; Reynaud, Joséphine M; Vallve, Audrey; Raoul, Hervé; Horvat, Branka

    2013-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are closely related, recently emerged paramyxoviruses that form Henipavirus genus and are capable of causing considerable morbidity and mortality in a number of mammalian species, including humans. However, in contrast to many other species and despite expression of functional virus entry receptors, mice are resistant to henipavirus infection. We report here the susceptibility of mice deleted for the type I interferon receptor (IFNAR-KO) to both HeV and NiV. Intraperitoneally infected mice developed fatal encephalitis, with pathology and immunohistochemical features similar to what was found in humans. Viral RNA was found in the majority of analyzed organs, and sublethally infected animals developed virus-specific neutralizing antibodies. Altogether, these results reveal IFNAR-KO mice as a new small animal model to study HeV and NiV pathogenesis, prophylaxis, and treatment and suggest the critical role of type I interferon signaling in the control of henipavirus infection.

  5. Endogenous VMH amylin signaling is required for full leptin signaling and protection from diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose A; Le Foll, Christelle; Johnson, Miranda D; Lutz, Thomas A; Hayes, Matthew R; Levin, Barry E

    2016-02-15

    Amylin enhances arcuate (ARC) and ventromedial (VMN) hypothalamic nuclei leptin signaling and synergistically reduces food intake and body weight in selectively bred diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Since DIO (125)I-amylin dorsomedial nucleus-dorsomedial VMN binding was reduced, we postulated that this contributed to DIO ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) leptin resistance, and that impairing VMH (ARC + VMN) calcitonin receptor (CTR)-mediated signaling by injecting adeno-associated virus (AAV) expressing a short hairpin portion of the CTR mRNA would predispose diet-resistant (DR) rats to obesity on high-fat (45%) diet (HFD). Depleting VMH CTR by 80-90% in 4-wk-old male DR rats reduced their ARC and VMN (125)I-labeled leptin binding by 57 and 51%, respectively, and VMN leptin-induced phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3-positive neurons by 59% vs. AAV control rats. After 6 wk on chow, VMH CTR-depleted DR rats ate and gained the equivalent amount of food and weight but had 18% heavier fat pads (relative to carcass weight), 144% higher leptin levels, and were insulin resistant compared with control AAV DR rats. After 6 wk more on HFD, VMH CTR-depleted DR rats ate the same amount but gained 28% more weight, had 60% more carcass fat, 254% higher leptin levels, and 132% higher insulin areas under the curve during an oral glucose tolerance test than control DR rats. Therefore, impairing endogenous VMH CTR-mediated signaling reduced leptin signaling and caused DR rats to become more obese and insulin resistant, both on chow and HFD. These results suggest that endogenous VMH amylin signaling is required for full leptin signaling and protection from HFD-induced obesity.

  6. Endogenous VMH amylin signaling is required for full leptin signaling and protection from diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Dunn-Meynell, Ambrose A.; Le Foll, Christelle; Johnson, Miranda D.; Lutz, Thomas A.; Hayes, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Amylin enhances arcuate (ARC) and ventromedial (VMN) hypothalamic nuclei leptin signaling and synergistically reduces food intake and body weight in selectively bred diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Since DIO 125I-amylin dorsomedial nucleus-dorsomedial VMN binding was reduced, we postulated that this contributed to DIO ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) leptin resistance, and that impairing VMH (ARC + VMN) calcitonin receptor (CTR)-mediated signaling by injecting adeno-associated virus (AAV) expressing a short hairpin portion of the CTR mRNA would predispose diet-resistant (DR) rats to obesity on high-fat (45%) diet (HFD). Depleting VMH CTR by 80–90% in 4-wk-old male DR rats reduced their ARC and VMN 125I-labeled leptin binding by 57 and 51%, respectively, and VMN leptin-induced phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3-positive neurons by 59% vs. AAV control rats. After 6 wk on chow, VMH CTR-depleted DR rats ate and gained the equivalent amount of food and weight but had 18% heavier fat pads (relative to carcass weight), 144% higher leptin levels, and were insulin resistant compared with control AAV DR rats. After 6 wk more on HFD, VMH CTR-depleted DR rats ate the same amount but gained 28% more weight, had 60% more carcass fat, 254% higher leptin levels, and 132% higher insulin areas under the curve during an oral glucose tolerance test than control DR rats. Therefore, impairing endogenous VMH CTR-mediated signaling reduced leptin signaling and caused DR rats to become more obese and insulin resistant, both on chow and HFD. These results suggest that endogenous VMH amylin signaling is required for full leptin signaling and protection from HFD-induced obesity. PMID:26676252

  7. 78 FR 13747 - Safety Advisory 2013-01; Passing Stop Signals Protecting Movable Bridges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... Federal Railroad Administration Safety Advisory 2013-01; Passing Stop Signals Protecting Movable Bridges... movable bridge. FRA is issuing this notice in response to a recent train accident involving a derailment... movable bridges to determine if effective span locking is being provided; (2) review current operating...

  8. TGF-β signaling in the kidney: profibrotic and protective effects

    PubMed Central

    Sureshbabu, Angara; Muhsin, Saif A.

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is generally considered as a central mediator of fibrotic diseases. Indeed, much focus has been placed on inhibiting TGF-β and its downstream targets as ideal therapeutic strategies. However, pharmacological blockade of TGF-β has not yet translated into successful therapy for humans, which may be due to pleiotropic effects of TGF-β signaling. Equally, TGF-β signaling as a protective response in kidney injury has been relatively underexplored. An emerging body of evidence from experimental kidney disease models indicates multifunctionality of TGF-β capable of inducing profibrotic and protective effects. This review discusses recent advances highlighting the diverse roles of TGF-β in promoting not only renal fibrosis but also protective responses of TGF-β signaling. We review, in particular, growing evidence that supports protective effects of TGF-β by mechanisms which include inhibiting inflammation and induction of autophagy. Additional detailed studies are required to fully understand the diverse mechanisms of TGF-β actions in renal fibrosis and inflammation that will likely direct toward effective antifibrotic therapies. PMID:26739888

  9. TGF-β signaling in the kidney: profibrotic and protective effects.

    PubMed

    Sureshbabu, Angara; Muhsin, Saif A; Choi, Mary E

    2016-04-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is generally considered as a central mediator of fibrotic diseases. Indeed, much focus has been placed on inhibiting TGF-β and its downstream targets as ideal therapeutic strategies. However, pharmacological blockade of TGF-β has not yet translated into successful therapy for humans, which may be due to pleiotropic effects of TGF-β signaling. Equally, TGF-β signaling as a protective response in kidney injury has been relatively underexplored. An emerging body of evidence from experimental kidney disease models indicates multifunctionality of TGF-β capable of inducing profibrotic and protective effects. This review discusses recent advances highlighting the diverse roles of TGF-β in promoting not only renal fibrosis but also protective responses of TGF-β signaling. We review, in particular, growing evidence that supports protective effects of TGF-β by mechanisms which include inhibiting inflammation and induction of autophagy. Additional detailed studies are required to fully understand the diverse mechanisms of TGF-β actions in renal fibrosis and inflammation that will likely direct toward effective antifibrotic therapies. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. S-nitrosylation: NO-related redox signaling to protect against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junhui; Steenbergen, Charles; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in the regulation of cardiovascular function. S-nitrosylation, the covalent attachment of an NO moiety to sulfhydryl residues of proteins, resulting in the formation of S-nitrosothiols (SNOs), is a prevalent posttranslational protein modification involved in redox-based cellular signaling. Under physiologic conditions, protein S-nitrosylation and SNOs provide protection preventing further cellular oxidative and nitrosative stress. However, oxidative stress and the resultant dysfunction of NO signaling have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Identification of signaling pathways associated with cancer protection in Laron syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lapkina-Gendler, Lena; Rotem, Itai; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Gurwitz, David; Sarfstein, Rive; Laron, Zvi; Werner, Haim

    2016-05-01

    The growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) pathway emerged in recent years as a critical player in cancer biology. Enhanced expression or activation of specific components of the GH-IGF1 axis, including the IGF1 receptor (IGF1R), is consistently associated with a transformed phenotype. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that patients with Laron syndrome (LS), the best-characterized entity among the congenital IGF1 deficiencies, seem to be protected from cancer development. To identify IGF1-dependent genes and signaling pathways associated with cancer protection in LS, we conducted a genome-wide analysis using immortalized lymphoblastoid cells derived from LS patients and healthy controls of the same gender, age range, and ethnic origin. Our analyses identified a collection of genes that are either over- or under-represented in LS-derived lymphoblastoids. Gene differential expression occurs in several gene families, including cell cycle, metabolic control, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, Jak-STAT signaling, and PI3K-AKT signaling. Major differences between LS and healthy controls were also noticed in pathways associated with cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, and autophagy. Our results highlight the key role of the GH-IGF1 axis in the initiation and progression of cancer. Furthermore, data are consistent with the concept that homozygous congenital IGF1 deficiency may confer protection against future tumor development.

  12. Imipramine protects retinal ganglion cells from oxidative stress through the tyrosine kinase receptor B signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ming-lei; Liu, Guo-hua; Guo, Jin; Yu, Shu-juan; Huang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration is irreversible in glaucoma and tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB)-associated signaling pathways have been implicated in the process. In this study, we attempted to examine whether imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant, may protect hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced RGC degeneration through the activation of the TrkB pathway in RGC-5 cell lines. RGC-5 cell lines were pre-treated with imipramine 30 minutes before exposure to H2O2. Western blot assay showed that in H2O2 -damaged RGC-5 cells, imipramine activated TrkB pathways through extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase/TrkB phosphorylation. TUNEL staining assay also demonstrated that imipramine ameliorated H2O2 -induced apoptosis in RGC-5 cells. Finally, TrkB-IgG intervention was able to reverse the protective effect of imipramine on H2O2 -induced RGC-5 apoptosis. Imipramine therefore protects RGCs from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through the TrkB signaling pathway. PMID:27127489

  13. Myocardial protection evoked by hyperoxic exposure involves signaling through nitric oxide and mitogen activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Ruusalepp, Arno; Czibik, Gabor; Flatebø, Torun; Vaage, Jarle; Valen, Guro

    2007-07-01

    Hyperoxic exposure in vivo (> 95% oxygen) attenuates ischemia-reperfusion injury, but the signaling mechanisms of this cardioprotection are not fully determined. We studied a possible role of nitric oxide (NO) and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) in hyperoxic protection. Mice (n = 7-9 in each group) were kept in normoxic or hyperoxic environments for 15 min prior to harvesting the heart and Langendorff perfusion with global ischemia (45 min) and reperfusion (60 min). Endpoints were cardiac function and infarct size. Additional hearts were collected to evaluate MAPK phosphorylation (immunoblot). The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME, the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 and the p38 MAPK inhibitor FR167653 were injected intraperitoneally before hyperoxia or normoxia. Hyperoxia improved postischemic functional recovery and reduced infarct size (p < 0.05). Hyperoxic exposure caused cardiac phosphorylation of the MAPK family members p38 and ERK1/2, but not JNK. L-NAME, PD98059 and FR167653 all reduced the protection afforded by hyperoxic exposure, but did not influence performance or infarction in hearts of normoxic mice. The hyperoxia-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 was reduced by L-NAME and both MAPK inhibitors. Nitric oxide triggers hyperoxic protection, and ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK are involved in signaling of protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  14. Nicousamide protects kidney podocyte by inhibiting the TGFβ receptor II phosphorylation and AGE-RAGE signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sen; Wang, Dongjie; Xue, Nina; Lai, Fangfang; Ji, Ming; Jin, Jing; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2017-01-01

    Nicousamide, a clinical phase II renal protective new drug, has been demonstrated to have renal protective effect on diabetic nephropathy (DN) by experimental animal model. Its known molecular mechanisms include AGE formation blocking and moderately decreasing the blood pressure. Nicousamide shows potential on attenuating albuminuria, thereby suggests it might have protective effect on podocytes. The aim of present study was to investigate whether nicousamide could protect integrity of podocytes, and further its protection mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were induced to DN by streptozotocin, and nicousamide (20 and 40 mg/kg) was orally administrated for 20 weeks. Every five weeks, the albuminuria was measured, and renal pathology was evaluated at the end of experiment. Real-time PCR and immunofluorescence were used to test expression of podocyte marker nephrin, CD2AP and podocine in rat kidney tissues. Western blot was used to test the activation and phosphorylation of TGFβ1-smad signaling pathway. surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology was used to analyze whether nicousamide can interact with TGFβ1 receptor II (TGFβ RII) and receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). Results demonstrate that nicousamide significantly reduces albuminuria and ameliorate the glomerulosclerosis in DN rats. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence demonstrate that nicousamide can increase the expression of podocyte markers and keep podocyte effacement. Phosphorylation of TGFβ RII and smad2 in rat kidney was inhibited by nicousamide dose dependently. SPR demonstrate that nicousamide have strong binding capability with hRAGE with Kd approximate 6 μM. These results indicate a protective effect of nicousamide against podocyte injury, and this effect might contribute from suppression of TGFβ-involved fibrosis and AGE-RAGE signaling activation. PMID:28123638

  15. The transrepression arm of glucocorticoid receptor signaling is protective in mutant huntingtin-mediated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Varadarajan, S; Breda, C; Smalley, J L; Butterworth, M; Farrow, S N; Giorgini, F; Cohen, G M

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) occurs following the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and orchestrates an intricate balance between its prosurvival and apoptotic arms to restore cellular homeostasis and integrity. However, in certain neurodegenerative diseases, the apoptotic arm of the UPR is enhanced, resulting in excessive neuronal cell death and disease progression, both of which can be overcome by modulating the UPR. Here, we describe a novel crosstalk between glucocorticoid receptor signaling and the apoptotic arm of the UPR, thus highlighting the potential of glucocorticoid therapy in treating neurodegenerative diseases. Several glucocorticoids, but not mineralocorticoids, selectively antagonize ER stress-induced apoptosis in a manner that is downstream of and/or independent of the conventional UPR pathways. Using GRT10, a novel selective pharmacological modulator of glucocorticoid signaling, we describe the importance of the transrepression arm of the glucocorticoid signaling pathway in protection against ER stress-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, we also observe the protective effects of glucocorticoids in vivo in a Drosophila model of Huntington's disease (HD), wherein treatment with different glucocorticoids diminished rhabdomere loss and conferred neuroprotection. Finally, we find that growth differentiation factor 15 has an important role downstream of glucocorticoid signaling in antagonizing ER stress-induced apoptosis in cells, as well as in preventing HD-mediated neurodegeneration in flies. Thus, our studies demonstrate that this novel crosstalk has the potential to be effectively exploited in alleviating several neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25656655

  16. Potential protective mechanisms of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) signaling in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Vatsal; Vezina, Chad M.

    2011-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is an evolutionarily conserved ligand activated transcription factor best known for its role in mediating toxic responses to dioxin-like environmental contaminants. However, AHR signaling has also emerged as an active participant in processes of normal development and disease progression. Here, we review the role of AHR signaling in prostate development and disease processes, with a particular emphasis on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Inappropriate AHR activation has recently been associated with a decreased risk of symptomatic BPH in humans and has been shown to impair prostate development and disrupt endocrine signaling in rodents. We highlight known physiological responses to AHR activation in prostate and other tissues and discuss potential mechanisms by which it may act in adult human prostate to protect against symptomatic BPH. PMID:21684673

  17. Parkin protects dopaminergic neurons from excessive Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Rawal, Nina; Corti, Olga; Sacchetti, Paola; Ardilla-Osorio, Hector; Sehat, Bita; Brice, Alexis; Arenas, Ernest

    2009-10-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by degeneration of the dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra but the molecular mechanisms underlying the degenerative process remain elusive. Several reports suggest that cell cycle deregulation in post-mitotic neurons could lead to neuronal cell death. We now show that Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase linked to familial PD, regulates {beta}-catenin protein levels in vivo. Stabilization of {beta}-catenin in differentiated primary ventral midbrain neurons results in increased levels of cyclin E and proliferation, followed by increased levels of cleaved PARP and loss of DA neurons. Wnt3a signaling also causes death of post-mitotic DA neurons in parkin null animals, suggesting that both increased stabilization and decreased degradation of {beta}-catenin results in DA cell death. These findings demonstrate a novel regulation of Wnt signaling by Parkin and suggest that Parkin protects DA neurons against excessive Wnt signaling and {beta}-catenin-induced cell death.

  18. Parkin protects dopaminergic neurons from excessive Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Nina; Corti, Olga; Sacchetti, Paola; Ardilla-Osorio, Hector; Sehat, Bita; Brice, Alexis; Arenas, Ernest

    2009-10-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by degeneration of the dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra but the molecular mechanisms underlying the degenerative process remain elusive. Several reports suggest that cell cycle deregulation in post-mitotic neurons could lead to neuronal cell death. We now show that Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase linked to familial PD, regulates beta-catenin protein levels in vivo. Stabilization of beta-catenin in differentiated primary ventral midbrain neurons results in increased levels of cyclin E and proliferation, followed by increased levels of cleaved PARP and loss of DA neurons. Wnt3a signaling also causes death of post-mitotic DA neurons in parkin null animals, suggesting that both increased stabilization and decreased degradation of beta-catenin results in DA cell death. These findings demonstrate a novel regulation of Wnt signaling by Parkin and suggest that Parkin protects DA neurons against excessive Wnt signaling and beta-catenin-induced cell death.

  19. Survivable Lightpath Provisioning in WDM Mesh Networks Under Shared Path Protection and Signal Quality Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Shen, Lu; Ramamurthy, Byrav

    2005-04-01

    This paper addresses the problem of survivable lightpath provisioning in wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM) mesh networks, taking into consideration optical-layer protection and some realistic optical signal quality constraints. The investigated networks use sparsely placed optical-electrical-optical (O/E/O) modules for regeneration and wavelength conversion. Given a fixed network topology with a number of sparsely placed O/E/O modules and a set of connection requests, a pair of link-disjoint lightpaths is established for each connection. Due to physical impairments and wavelength continuity,both the working and protection lightpaths need to be regenerated at some intermediate nodes to overcome signal quality degradation and wavelength contention. In the present paper, resource-efficient provisioning solutions are achieved with the objective of maximizing resource sharing. The authors propose a resource-sharing scheme that supports three kinds of resource-sharing scenarios, including a conventional wavelength-link sharing scenario, which shares wavelength links between protection lightpaths, and two new scenarios, which share O/E/O modules between protection lightpaths and between working and protection lightpaths. An integer linear programming (ILP)-based solution approach is used to find optimal solutions. The authors also propose a local optimization heuristic approach and a tabu search heuristic approach to solve this problem for real-world,large mesh networks. Numerical results show that our solution approaches work well under a variety of network settings and achieves a high level of resource-sharing rates (over 60% for O/E/O modules and over 30% for wavelength links), which translate into great savings in network costs.

  20. IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes protects from autoimmune mediated neurological disability.

    PubMed

    Hindinger, Claudia; Bergmann, Cornelia C; Hinton, David R; Phares, Timothy W; Parra, Gabriel I; Hussain, Shabbir; Savarin, Carine; Atkinson, Roscoe D; Stohlman, Stephen A

    2012-01-01

    Demyelination and axonal degeneration are determinants of progressive neurological disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Cells resident within the central nervous system (CNS) are active participants in development, progression and subsequent control of autoimmune disease; however, their individual contributions are not well understood. Astrocytes, the most abundant CNS cell type, are highly sensitive to environmental cues and are implicated in both detrimental and protective outcomes during autoimmune demyelination. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in transgenic mice expressing signaling defective dominant-negative interferon gamma (IFN-γ) receptors on astrocytes to determine the influence of inflammation on astrocyte activity. Inhibition of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes did not influence disease incidence, onset, initial progression of symptoms, blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity or the composition of the acute CNS inflammatory response. Nevertheless, increased demyelination at peak acute disease in the absence of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes correlated with sustained clinical symptoms. Following peak disease, diminished clinical remission, increased mortality and sustained astrocyte activation within the gray matter demonstrate a critical role of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes in neuroprotection. Diminished disease remission was associated with escalating demyelination, axonal degeneration and sustained inflammation. The CNS infiltrating leukocyte composition was not altered; however, decreased IL-10 and IL-27 correlated with sustained disease. These data indicate that astrocytes play a critical role in limiting CNS autoimmune disease dependent upon a neuroprotective signaling pathway mediated by engagement of IFN-γ receptors.

  1. IFN-γ Signaling to Astrocytes Protects from Autoimmune Mediated Neurological Disability

    PubMed Central

    Hindinger, Claudia; Bergmann, Cornelia C.; Hinton, David R.; Phares, Timothy W.; Parra, Gabriel I.; Hussain, Shabbir; Savarin, Carine; Atkinson, Roscoe D.; Stohlman, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    Demyelination and axonal degeneration are determinants of progressive neurological disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Cells resident within the central nervous system (CNS) are active participants in development, progression and subsequent control of autoimmune disease; however, their individual contributions are not well understood. Astrocytes, the most abundant CNS cell type, are highly sensitive to environmental cues and are implicated in both detrimental and protective outcomes during autoimmune demyelination. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in transgenic mice expressing signaling defective dominant-negative interferon gamma (IFN-γ) receptors on astrocytes to determine the influence of inflammation on astrocyte activity. Inhibition of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes did not influence disease incidence, onset, initial progression of symptoms, blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity or the composition of the acute CNS inflammatory response. Nevertheless, increased demyelination at peak acute disease in the absence of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes correlated with sustained clinical symptoms. Following peak disease, diminished clinical remission, increased mortality and sustained astrocyte activation within the gray matter demonstrate a critical role of IFN-γ signaling to astrocytes in neuroprotection. Diminished disease remission was associated with escalating demyelination, axonal degeneration and sustained inflammation. The CNS infiltrating leukocyte composition was not altered; however, decreased IL-10 and IL-27 correlated with sustained disease. These data indicate that astrocytes play a critical role in limiting CNS autoimmune disease dependent upon a neuroprotective signaling pathway mediated by engagement of IFN-γ receptors. PMID:22848713

  2. Reducing canonical Wingless/Wnt signaling pathway confers protection against mutant Huntingtin toxicity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Pascale; Besson, Marie-Thérèse; Devaux, Jérôme; Liévens, Jean-Charles

    2012-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disease characterized by movement disorders, cognitive decline and neuropsychiatric symptoms. HD is caused by expanded CAG tract within the coding region of Huntingtin protein. Despite major insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to HD, no effective cure is yet available. Mutant Huntingtin (mHtt) has been reported to alter the stability and levels of β-Catenin, a key molecule in cell adhesion and signal transduction in Wingless (Wg)/Wnt pathway. However it remains to establish whether manipulation of Wg/Wnt signaling can impact HD pathology. We here investigated the phenotypic interactions between mHtt and Wg/Wnt signaling by using the power of Drosophila genetics. We provide compelling evidence that reducing Armadillo/β-Catenin levels confers protection and that this beneficial effect is correlated with the inactivation of the canonical Wg/Wnt signaling pathway. Knockdowns of Wnt ligands or of the downstream transcription factor Pangolin/TCF both ameliorate the survival of HD flies. Similarly, overexpression of one Armadillo/β-Catenin destruction complex component (Axin, APC2 or Shaggy/GSK-3β) increases the lifespan of HD flies. Loss of functional Armadillo/β-Catenin not only abolishes neuronal intrinsic but also glia-induced alterations in HD flies. Our findings highlight that restoring canonical Wg/Wnt signaling may be of therapeutic value.

  3. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack

    SciTech Connect

    Scherbakov, Alexander M.; Stefanova, Lidia B.; Sorokin, Danila V.; Semina, Svetlana E.; Berstein, Lev M.; Krasil’nikov, Mikhail A.

    2013-12-10

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors – from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O{sub 2} atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK – the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well

  4. How the Wnt signaling pathway protects from neurodegeneration: the mitochondrial scenario.

    PubMed

    Arrázola, Macarena S; Silva-Alvarez, Carmen; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder and is characterized by progressive memory loss and cognitive decline. One of the hallmarks of AD is the overproduction of amyloid-beta aggregates that range from the toxic soluble oligomer (Aβo) form to extracellular accumulations in the brain. Growing evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction is a common feature of neurodegenerative diseases and is observed at an early stage in the pathogenesis of AD. Reports indicate that mitochondrial structure and function are affected by Aβo and can trigger neuronal cell death. Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles, and the balance between their fusion and fission processes is essential for neuronal function. Interestingly, in AD, the process known as "mitochondrial dynamics" is also impaired by Aβo. On the other hand, the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway has an essential role in synaptic maintenance and neuronal functions, and its deregulation has also been implicated in AD. We have demonstrated that canonical Wnt signaling, through the Wnt3a ligand, prevents the permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes through the inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), induced by Aβo. In addition, we showed that non-canonical Wnt signaling, through the Wnt5a ligand, protects mitochondria from fission-fusion alterations in AD. These results suggest new approaches by which different Wnt signaling pathways protect neurons in AD, and support the idea that mitochondria have become potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Here we discuss the neuroprotective role of the canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling pathways in AD and their differential modulation of mitochondrial processes, associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration.

  5. How the Wnt signaling pathway protects from neurodegeneration: the mitochondrial scenario

    PubMed Central

    Arrázola, Macarena S.; Silva-Alvarez, Carmen; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder and is characterized by progressive memory loss and cognitive decline. One of the hallmarks of AD is the overproduction of amyloid-beta aggregates that range from the toxic soluble oligomer (Aβo) form to extracellular accumulations in the brain. Growing evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction is a common feature of neurodegenerative diseases and is observed at an early stage in the pathogenesis of AD. Reports indicate that mitochondrial structure and function are affected by Aβo and can trigger neuronal cell death. Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles, and the balance between their fusion and fission processes is essential for neuronal function. Interestingly, in AD, the process known as “mitochondrial dynamics” is also impaired by Aβo. On the other hand, the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway has an essential role in synaptic maintenance and neuronal functions, and its deregulation has also been implicated in AD. We have demonstrated that canonical Wnt signaling, through the Wnt3a ligand, prevents the permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes through the inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), induced by Aβo. In addition, we showed that non-canonical Wnt signaling, through the Wnt5a ligand, protects mitochondria from fission-fusion alterations in AD. These results suggest new approaches by which different Wnt signaling pathways protect neurons in AD, and support the idea that mitochondria have become potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Here we discuss the neuroprotective role of the canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling pathways in AD and their differential modulation of mitochondrial processes, associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration. PMID:25999816

  6. Is lipid signaling through cannabinoid 2 receptors part of a protective system?

    PubMed Central

    Pacher, P.; Mechoulam, R.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian body has a highly developed immune system which guards against continuous invading protein attacks and aims at preventing, attenuating or repairing the inflicted damage. It is conceivable that through evolution analogous biological protective systems have been evolved against non-protein attacks. There is emerging evidence that lipid endocannabinoid signaling through cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptors may represent an example/part of such a protective system/armamentarium. Inflammation/tissue injury triggers rapid elevations in local endocannabinoid levels, which in turn regulate signaling responses in immune and other cells modulating their critical functions. Changes in endocannabinoid levels and/or CB2 receptor expressions have been reported in almost all diseases affecting humans, ranging from cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, liver, kidney, neurodegenerative, psychiatric, bone, skin, auto-immune, lung disorders to pain and cancer, and modulating CB2 receptor activity holds tremendous therapeutic potential in these pathologies. While CB2 receptor activation in general mediates immunosuppressive effects, which limit inflammation and associated tissue injury in large number of pathological conditions, in some disease states activation of the CB2 receptor may enhance or even trigger tissue damage, which will also be discussed alongside the protective actions of the CB2 receptor stimulation with endocannabinoids or synthetic agonists, and the possible biological mechanisms involved in these effects. PMID:21295074

  7. Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Signaling Axis Meets p53 Genome Protection Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Haim; Sarfstein, Rive; LeRoith, Derek; Bruchim, Ilan

    2016-01-01

    Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental evidence indicate that the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are important mediators in the biochemical chain of events that lead from a phenotypically normal to a neoplastic cell. The IGF1 receptor (IGF1R), which mediates the biological actions of IGF1 and IGF2, exhibits potent pro-survival and antiapoptotic activities. The IGF1R is highly expressed in most types of cancer and is regarded as a promising therapeutic target in oncology. p53 is a transcription factor with tumor suppressor activity that is usually activated in response to DNA damage and other forms of cellular stress. On the basis of its protective activities, p53 is commonly regarded as the guardian of the genome. We provide evidence that the IGF signaling axis and p53 genome protection pathways are tightly interconnected. Wild-type, but not mutant, p53 suppresses IGF1R gene transcription, leading to abrogation of the IGF signaling network, with ensuing cell cycle arrest. Gain-of-function, or loss-of-function, mutations of p53 in tumor cells may disrupt its inhibitory activity, thus generating oncogenic molecules capable of transactivating the IGF1R gene. The interplay between the IGF1 and p53 pathways is also of major relevance in terms of metabolic regulation, including glucose transport and glycolysis. A better understanding of the complex physical and functional interactions between these important signaling pathways will have major basic and translational relevance. PMID:27446805

  8. BDNF/TrkB signaling protects HT-29 human colon cancer cells from EGFR inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetto de Farias, Caroline; Heinen, Tiago Elias; Pereira dos Santos, Rafael; Abujamra, Ana Lucia; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; and others

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF protected HT-29 colorectal cancer cells from the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TrkB inhibition potentiated the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF/TrkB signaling might be involved in resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. -- Abstract: The clinical success of targeted treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) is often limited by resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB have recently emerged as anticancer targets, and we have previously shown increased BDNF levels in CRC tumor samples. Here we report the findings from in vitro experiments suggesting that BDNF/TrkB signaling can protect CRC cells from the antitumor effects of EGFR blockade. The anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab reduced both cell proliferation and the mRNA expression of BDNF and TrkB in human HT-29 CRC cells. The inhibitory effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation and survival was counteracted by the addition of human recombinant BDNF. Finally, the Trk inhibitor K252a synergistically enhanced the effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation, and this effect was blocked by BDNF. These results provide the first evidence that increased BDNF/TrkB signaling might play a role in resistance to EGFR blockade. Moreover, it is possible that targeting TrkB could potentiate the anticancer effects of anti-EGFR therapy.

  9. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Protects Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells Against Ionizing Radiation in an Autocrine Manner

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Lin, Chin-Ping; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Shieh, Hui-Ru; Chao, Nicholas K.; Chao, K.S. Clifford

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is critical to embryogenesis and resistance to chemotherapy. We aimed to examine the role of Shh signaling in the response to radiation of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Methods and Materials: Response to ionizing radiation therapy (RT) was evaluated by clonogenic assay. Quantitative RT-polymerase chain reaction for patched-1 (PTCH-1) expression was performed. Cytosolic accumulation of Shh and nuclear translocation of Gli-1 were assessed by immunofluorescence. Gli-1 knockdown was done by RNA interference (RNAi). Immunoprecipitation was performed to detect Shh ligand in conditioned medium. Immunofluorescent stain for {gamma}-H2AX was used as an index of DNA double strand breaks (DSB). Expression of proteins related to DNA damage repair was assessed by Western blotting. Results: We found that Shh ligand could protect human HCC HA22T and Sk-Hep1 cells against RT. In HA22T cells, Shh ligand activated the Shh signaling with upregulation of Shh, PTCH-1, and Gli-1 expression. The nuclear translocation of Gli-1 further supports the activation of Gli-1. The radioprotection by Shh ligand was partly blocked by Shh antibody neutralization and was abolished by Gli-1 RNAi, suggesting a critical role of Shh signaling in radiation resistance. Furthermore, we noted that soluble factors secreted into conditioned medium, either constitutively or responding to radiation, by HA22T or Sk-Hep1 cells protected subsequent culturing cells against RT. Immunoprecipitation shows the presence of Shh peptide in conditioned medium. Intriguingly, antibody neutralization of Shh ligand or knockdown of Gli-1 reversed the radioprotective effect of conditioned medium. Furthermore, Shh ligand reduced the RT-induced phosphorylation of checkpoint kinase 1 and impaired the repair of DNA DSB. Conclusions: Activation of Shh signaling protects HCC cells against ionizing radiation in an autocrine manner. Impairment of DNA damage repair might involve

  10. Progesterone Protects Against BPA-induced Arrhythmias in Female Rat Cardiac Myocytes via Rapid Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianyong; Hong, Kui; Wang, Hong-Sheng

    2017-01-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) that has a range of potential adverse health effects. Previously we showed that acute exposure to BPA promoted arrhythmias in female rat hearts through estrogen receptor rapid signaling. Progesterone (P4) and estrogen have antagonistic or complementary actions in a number of tissues and systems. In the current study, we examined the influence, and possible protective effect, of P4 on the rapid cardiac actions of BPA in female rat cardiac myocytes. Preincubation with physiological concentration (1 nM) of P4 abolished BPA-induced triggered activities in female cardiac myocytes. Further, P4 abrogated BPA-induced alterations in Ca2+ handling including elevated sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak and Ca2+ load. Key to the inhibitory effect of P4 is its blockade of BPA-induced increase in the phosphorylation of phospholamban. At myocyte and protein levels, these inhibitory actions of P4 were blocked by pretreatment with the nuclear P4 receptor (nPR) antagonist RU486. Analysis using membrane impermeable BSA-conjugated P4 suggested that the actions of P4 were mediated by membrane-initiated signaling. The inhibitory G (Gi) protein and phophoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), but not tyrosine protein kinase activation, were involved in the observed effects of P4. In conclusion, P4 exerts an acute protective effect against BPA-induced arrhythmogenesis in female cardiac myocytes, through nPR and the Gi/PI3K signaling pathway. Our findings highlight the importance of considering the impact of EDCs in the context of native hormonals, and may provide potential therapeutic strategies for the protection against the cardiac toxicities associated with BPA exposure.

  11. Signal transduction induced by activated protein C: no role in protection against sepsis?

    PubMed

    Slofstra, Sjoukje H; ten Cate, Hugo; Spek, C Arnold

    2006-08-01

    The anticoagulant activated protein C (APC) is historically known as a risk factor for venous thrombosis. However, after the positive results of the protein C worldwide evaluation in severe sepsis (PROWESS) trial, which showed that APC was the first drug that considerably reduced sepsis-related mortality, APC is considered a pleiotropic protein with both anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. In addition, in vitro studies have suggested that APC-induced intracellular signal transduction is a potential mechanism by which APC might be protective against sepsis. Recently, however, the efficacy of APC in sepsis has been argued, and also the extent to which the signal transduction capacity of APC contributes to its pro-survival effects is debated. Here, we review the role of APC in the body natural defense against sepsis and discuss the mechanism by which APC might act at a cellular level.

  12. Pilose antler peptide protects osteoblasts from inflammatory and oxidative injury through EGF/EGFR signaling.

    PubMed

    Chunhui, Yang; Wenjun, Cai; Hui, Wen; Liquan, Sha; Changwei, Zhao; Tianzhu, Zhang; Wenhai, Zhao

    2017-02-16

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF)/EFG receptor (EGFR) signaling plays an important role in the osteoblastogenesis. The potential effects of pilose antler peptide (PAP) on osteoblast cell damages was investigated in our present study through EGF/EGFR signaling. In MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells, PAP treatment significantly inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines by decreasing the levels of serum proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). PAP treatment also alleviated the oxidative responses as indicated by increased activities of catalase (SOD) and decreased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA). EGF inhibition, by siRNA knockdown, almost abolished PAP-induced osteoblast cytoprotection against inflammation and oxidant stress. Further, our results showed that PAP stimulated the nuclear erythroid factor 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)2/heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) signaling, and inhibited the activation of uclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway in MC3T3-E1 cells. On the other hand, EGF siRNA knockdown inhibited PAP-induced cytoprotection, which decreased the expression of Nrf-2, HO-1 and increased the level of p-NF-κBp65, p-IκBα in MC3T3-E1 cells. Thus, our research demonstrated that PAP protects osteoblasts from inflammatory and oxidative injury through EGF/EGFR signaling.

  13. STAT1 signaling is essential for protection against Cryptococcus neoformans infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Leopold Wager, Chrissy M; Hole, Camaron R; Wozniak, Karen L; Olszewski, Michal A; Wormley, Floyd L

    2014-10-15

    Nonprotective immune responses to highly virulent Cryptococcus neoformans strains, such as H99, are associated with Th2-type cytokine production, alternatively activated macrophages, and inability of the host to clear the fungus. In contrast, experimental studies show that protective immune responses against cryptococcosis are associated with Th1-type cytokine production and classical macrophage activation. The protective response induced during C. neoformans strain H99γ (C. neoformans strain H99 engineered to produce murine IFN-γ) infection correlates with enhanced phosphorylation of the transcription factor STAT1 in macrophages; however, the role of STAT1 in protective immunity to C. neoformans is unknown. The current studies examined the effect of STAT1 deletion in murine models of protective immunity to C. neoformans. Survival and fungal burden were evaluated in wild-type and STAT1 knockout (KO) mice infected with either strain H99γ or C. neoformans strain 52D (unmodified clinical isolate). Both strains H99γ and 52D were rapidly cleared from the lungs, did not disseminate to the CNS, or cause mortality in the wild-type mice. Conversely, STAT1 KO mice infected with H99γ or 52D had significantly increased pulmonary fungal burden, CNS dissemination, and 90-100% mortality. STAT1 deletion resulted in a shift from Th1 to Th2 cytokine bias, pronounced lung inflammation, and defective classical macrophage activation. Pulmonary macrophages from STAT1 KO mice exhibited defects in NO production correlating with inefficient inhibition of fungal proliferation. These studies demonstrate that STAT1 signaling is essential not only for regulation of immune polarization but also for the classical activation of macrophages that occurs during protective anticryptococcal immune responses.

  14. Epithelial IL-23R Signaling Licenses Protective IL-22 Responses in Intestinal Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Aden, Konrad; Rehman, Ateequr; Falk-Paulsen, Maren; Secher, Thomas; Kuiper, Jan; Tran, Florian; Pfeuffer, Steffen; Sheibani-Tezerji, Raheleh; Breuer, Alexandra; Luzius, Anne; Jentzsch, Marlene; Häsler, Robert; Billmann-Born, Susanne; Will, Olga; Lipinski, Simone; Bharti, Richa; Adolph, Timon; Iovanna, Juan L; Kempster, Sarah L; Blumberg, Richard S; Schreiber, Stefan; Becher, Burkhard; Chamaillard, Mathias; Kaser, Arthur; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2016-08-23

    A plethora of functional and genetic studies have suggested a key role for the IL-23 pathway in chronic intestinal inflammation. Currently, pathogenic actions of IL-23 have been ascribed to specific effects on immune cells. Herein, we unveil a protective role of IL-23R signaling. Mice deficient in IL-23R expression in intestinal epithelial cells (Il23R(ΔIEC)) have reduced Reg3b expression, show a disturbed colonic microflora with an expansion of flagellated bacteria, and succumb to DSS colitis. Surprisingly, Il23R(ΔIEC) mice show impaired mucosal IL-22 induction in response to IL-23. αThy-1 treatment significantly deteriorates colitis in Il23R(ΔIEC) animals, which can be rescued by IL-22 application. Importantly, exogenous Reg3b administration rescues DSS-treated Il23R(ΔIEC) mice by recruiting neutrophils as IL-22-producing cells, thereby restoring mucosal IL-22 levels. The study identifies a critical barrier-protective immune pathway that originates from, and is orchestrated by, IL-23R signaling in intestinal epithelial cells. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ceftriaxone Protects Astrocytes from MPP(+) via Suppression of NF-κB/JNK/c-Jun Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunlong; Zhang, Xiuping; Qu, Shaogang

    2015-08-01

    Ceftriaxone has been shown to attenuate the dopaminergic neuron death and alleviate behavioral disorders in Parkinson's disease models via upregulation of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) and decreases in extracellular glutamate. However, details of how this neuroprotection occurs are uncertain. We hypothesized that cytoprotection by ceftriaxone in astrocytes exposed to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) involves suppression of the NF-κB/JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway. Here, we observed a protective effect of ceftriaxone in primary astrocytes exposed to MPP(+). Ceftriaxone enhanced glutamate uptake and promoted primary astrocyte viability after MPP(+) exposure. Ceftriaxone enhances glutamate uptake via upregulation of GLT-1 in the plasma membrane, and alleviates MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity via suppression of NF-κB/JNK/c-Jun signaling. Collectively, our data offer evidence that increased expression and function of GLT-1 are involved in the protective mechanism of ceftriaxone in astrocytes exposed to MPP(+) in vitro, and we offer insight into the potential therapeutic role of ceftriaxone in treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  16. Silymarin protects against acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity via Nrf2 signalling in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Sun, Hong-Yang; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Hong-Yu; Shao, Mei-Li

    2017-04-01

    Silymarin (SM) is a well-known antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer compound extracted from the milk thistle. Here, we investigated the protective effect of SM against acrylamide (AA)-induced neurotoxicity, mainly caused by oxidative stress, via activation of the nuclear transcription factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signalling pathway in PC12 cells. The MTT reduction assay was used to measure cell viability in various drug-treated groups and demonstrated that SM could increase cell viability in AA-treated PC12 cells. We then measured the reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels by the peroxide-sensitive fluorescent probe DCFH-DA and intracellular glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels by absorption spectrophotometry. Our data revealed that SM could reduce ROS and MDA levels and increase GSH levels in AA-induced PC12 cells. To identify a potential mechanism for SM-induced protection, we measured the mRNA and protein expression levels of Nrf2 and its downstream target antioxidants glutathione peroxidase (Gpx), glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) and glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM) by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. The results suggested that SM could activate Nrf2 signalling and increase the expression of Nrf2, Gpx, GCLC and GCLM in AA-treated PC12 cells. In conclusion, SM can effectively alleviate AA-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells.

  17. Cellular automaton simulations of a four-leg intersection with two-phase signalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Cheng-Jie; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Rui; Wang, Hao

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we present a cellular automaton (CA) simulation of a signalized intersection. When there is no exclusive lane for left-turn vehicles, through vehicles and left-turn vehicles have to share one lane. Under such situation usually two-phase signalization is adopted, and the conflicts between the two traffic streams need to be analyzed. We use a refined configuration for the intersection simulation: the geometry of the intersection has been considered and vehicles are assumed to move along 1/4 circle arcs. We focus on the averaged travel times on left lanes and their distributions. The diagrams of intersection approach capacities (IACs) and the corresponding phase diagrams are also presented, which depend on the approach flow rates and the percentage of left-turn vehicles. Besides, we find that the minimum green time could be determined by finding out the critical value for the travel times.

  18. [Protective effect of quercetin against immunological liver injury through activating Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway].

    PubMed

    Wei, Caibing; Zhou, Liandi; Zhang, Yuzhen; Zhang, Jiawei; Zhang, Qihui; Tao, Kun

    2017-03-01

    Objective To observe the protective effect of quercetin against immunological liver injury induced by triptolide, and investigate the involvement of Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway in the protection. Methods Fifty C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into five groups: control group, model group, (20, 50, 80) mg/kg quercetin pre-treatment groups. Each group included 10 mice. The mice were treated with different doses of quercetin once daily for consecutive 10 days. At the end of the experiment, triptolide (500 μg/kg) was given intragastrically to induce immunological liver injury in all groups except for the control group. Twenty-two hours later, the levels of serum ALT , AST were detected. The contents of GSH, SOD and MDA in liver tissue homogenates were measured through commercial kits. HE staining was performed to observe pathologic changes of the liver. The mRNA expressions of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NQO1, glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) was tested by quantitative real-time PCR, and the protein expression of Nrf2 was detected by Western blotting. Results Compared with the model group, the serum activities of ALT and AST as well as MDA content remarkably decreased by the administration of quercetin (80 mg/kg), while GSH, SOD contents were elevated in liver tissues; pathologic changes of the liver was ameliorated evidently by quercetin; Nrf2 protein expression in the nucleus as well as mRNA expressions of HO-1, NQO1, GCLC increased. Moreover, the protective effect of 50 mg/kg quercetin was not as good as that of 80 mg/kg quercetin, and 20 mg/kg quercetin did little against the immunological liver injury. Conclusion High-dose quercetin can inhibit immunological liver injury induced by triptolide, and the mechanism may be associated with the activation of Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway.

  19. Extracellular renalase protects cells and organs by outside-in signalling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Safirstein, Robert; Velazquez, Heino; Guo, Xiao-Jia; Hollander, Lindsay; Chang, John; Chen, Tian-Min; Mu, Jian-Jun; Desir, Gary V

    2017-02-26

    Renalase was discovered as a protein synthesized by the kidney and secreted in blood where it circulates at a concentration of approximately 3-5 μg/ml. Initial reports suggested that it functioned as an NAD(P)H oxidase and could oxidize catecholamines. Administration of renalase lowers blood pressure and heart rate and also protects cells and organs against ischaemic and toxic injury. Although renalase's protective effect was initially ascribed to its oxidase properties, a paradigm shift in our understanding of the cellular actions of renalase is underway. We now understand that, independent of its enzymatic properties, renalase functions as a cytokine that provides protection to cells, tissues and organs by interacting with its receptor to activate protein kinase B, JAK/STAT, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. In addition, recent studies suggest that dysregulated renalase signalling may promote survival of several tumour cells due to its capacity to augment expression of growth-related genes. In this review, we focus on the cytoprotective actions of renalase and its capacity to sustain cancer cell growth and also the translational opportunities these findings represent for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for organ injury and cancer.

  20. Escin activates AKT-Nrf2 signaling to protect retinal pigment epithelium cells from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaijun; Jiang, Yiqian; Wang, Wei; Ma, Jian; Chen, Min

    2015-12-25

    Here we explored the anti-oxidative and cytoprotective potentials of escin, a natural triterpene-saponin, against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. We showed that escin remarkably attenuated H2O2-induced death and apoptosis of established (ARPE-19) and primary murine RPE cells. Meanwhile, ROS production and lipid peroxidation by H2O2 were remarkably inhibited by escin. Escin treatment in RPE cells resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by transcription of anti-oxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes, including HO-1, NQO-1 and SRXN-1. Knockdown of Nrf2 through targeted shRNAs/siRNAs alleviated escin-mediated ARE gene transcription, and almost abolished escin-mediated anti-oxidant activity and RPE cytoprotection against H2O2. Reversely, escin was more potent against H2O2 damages in Nrf2-over-expressed ARPE-19 cells. Further studies showed that escin-induced Nrf2 activation in RPE cells required AKT signaling. AKT inhibitors (LY294002 and perifosine) blocked escin-induced AKT activation, and dramatically inhibited Nrf2 phosphorylation, its cytosol accumulation and nuclear translocation in RPE cells. Escin-induced RPE cytoprotection against H2O2 was also alleviated by the AKT inhibitors. Together, these results demonstrate that escin protects RPE cells from oxidative stress possibly through activating AKT-Nrf2 signaling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Tumor Suppressor A20 Protects against Cardiac Hypertrophy and Fibrosis through Blocking TAK1-Dependent Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Tang, Qi-Zhu; Wang, Ai-Bing; Chen, Manyin; Zhou, Heng; Liu, Chen; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Qinglin; Bian, Zhou-Yan; Bai, Xue; Zhu, Li-Hua; Wang, Lang; Li, Hongliang

    2010-01-01

    A20 or tumor necrosis factor–induced protein 3 is a negative regulator of nuclear factor κB signaling. A20 has been shown previously to attenuate cardiac hypertrophy in vitro and postmyocardial infarction remodeling in vivo. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that overexpression of A20 in the murine heart would protect against cardiac hypertrophy in vivo. The effects of constitutive human A20 expression on cardiac hypertrophy were investigated using in vitro and in vivo models. Cardiac hypertrophy was produced by aortic banding in A20 transgenic mice and control animals. The extent of cardiac hypertrophy was quantitated by echocardiography, as well as by pathological and molecular analyses of heart samples. Constitutive overexpression of human A20 in the murine heart attenuated the hypertrophicresponse and markedly reduced inflammation, apoptosis, and fibrosis. Cardiac function was also preserved in hearts with increased A20 levels in response to hypertrophic stimuli. Western blot experiments further showed A20 expression markedly blocked transforming growth factor-β–activated kinase 1–dependent c-Jun N-terminal kinase/p38 signaling cascade but with no difference in either extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 or AKT activation in vivo and in vitro. In cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocytes, [3H]proline incorporation and Western blot assays revealed that A20 expression suppressed transforming growth factor-β–induced collagen synthesis and transforming growth factor-β–activated kinase 1–dependent Smad 2/3/4 activation. In conclusion, A20 improves cardiac functions and inhibits cardiac hypertrophy, inflammation, apoptosis, and fibrosis by blocking transforming growth factor-β–activated kinase 1–dependent signaling. PMID:20585109

  2. Prothymosin-alpha preconditioning activates TLR4-TRIF signaling to induce protection of ischemic retina.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sebok Kumar; Matsunaga, Hayato; Ishii, Ken J; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Prothymosin-alpha protects the brain and retina from ischemic damage. Although prothymosin-alpha contributes to toll-like receptor (TLR4)-mediated immnunopotentiation against viral infection, the beneficial effects of prothymosin-alpha-TLR4 signaling in protecting against ischemia remain to be elucidated. In this study, intravitreal administration of prothymosin-alpha 48 h before induction of retinal ischemia prevented retinal cellular damage as evaluated by histology, and retinal functional deficits as evaluated by electroretinography. Prothymosin-alpha preconditioning completely prevented the ischemia-induced loss of ganglion cells with partial survival of bipolar and photoreceptor cells, but not amacrine cells, in immunohistochemistry experiments. Prothymosin-alpha treatment in the absence of ischemia caused mild activation, proliferation, and migration of retinal microglia, whereas the ischemia-induced microglial activation was inhibited by prothymosin-alpha preconditioning. All these preventive effects of prothymosin-alpha preconditioning were abolished in TLR4 knock-out mice and by pre-treatments with anti-TLR4 antibodies or minocycline, a microglial inhibitor. Prothymosin-alpha preconditioning inhibited the retinal ischemia-induced up-regulation of TLR4-related injury genes, and increased expression of TLR4-related protective genes. Furthermore, the prothymosin-alpha preconditioning-induced prevention of retinal ischemic damage was abolished in TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β knock-out mice, but not in myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 knock-out mice. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that prothymosin-alpha preconditioning selectively drives TLR4-TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β signaling and microglia in the prevention of retinal ischemic damage. We propose the following mechanism for prothymosin-alpha (ProTα) preconditioning-induced retinal prevention against ischemia: Pro

  3. A Protective Role for Interleukin-1 Signaling during Mouse Adenovirus Type 1-Induced Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Castro-Jorge, Luiza A; Pretto, Carla D; Smith, Asa B; Foreman, Oded; Carnahan, Kelly E; Spindler, Katherine R

    2017-02-15

    encephalitis in its natural host, providing a good model for studying factors involved in encephalitis development. We investigated the role of IL-1 signaling during MAV-1-induced encephalitis. Unexpectedly, the lack of IL-1 signaling increased the mortality and inflammation in mice infected with MAV-1. Also, there was an increase in the transcription of type I IFN-stimulated genes that correlated with the observed increased mortality and inflammation. The findings highlight the complex nature of encephalitis and suggests that IL-1 has a protective effect for the development of MAV-1-induced encephalitis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Carnosine protects neurons against oxidative stress and modulates the time profile of MAPK cascade signaling.

    PubMed

    Kulebyakin, Konstantin; Karpova, Larisa; Lakonsteva, Ekaterina; Krasavin, Mikhail; Boldyrev, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Carnosine is a known protector of neuronal cells against oxidative injury which prevents both apoptotic and necrotic cellular death. It was shown earlier that carnosine serves as an intracellular buffer of free radicals. Using the model of ligand-dependent oxidative stress in neurons, we have shown that homocysteine (HC) initiates long-term activation of extracellular signal regulated kinase, isoforms 1 and 2 (ERK 1/2) and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) which corresponds to exitotoxic effect resulting in cellular death. L-carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) protects neurons from both excitotoxic effect of homocysteine and cellular death. Its analogs, β-alanyl-D-histidine (D-carnosine) and L-histidyl-β-alanine, restricted accumulation of free radicals and delayed activation of ERK1/2 and JNK in neuronal cells, but did not promote neuronal viability.

  5. Ischemic preconditioning protects the brain against injury via inhibiting CaMKII-nNOS signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Qi, Da-Shi; Zhou, Cui; Han, Dong; Li, Pei-Pei; Zhang, Fang; Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Han, Meng; Di, Jie-Hui; Ye, Jun-Song; Yu, Hong-Min; Song, Yuan-Jian; Zhang, Guang-Yi

    2016-03-01

    Although studies have shown that cerebral ischemic preconditioning (IPC) can ameliorate ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) induced brain damage, but its precise mechanisms remain unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective mechanisms of IPC against ischemic brain damage induced by cerebral I/R and to explore whether the Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated up-regulation of nNOS ser847-phosphorylation signaling pathway contributed to the protection provided by IPC. Transient global brain ischemia was induced by 4-vessel occlusion in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were pretreated with 3 min of IPC alone or KN62 (selective antagonist of CaMKII) treatment before IPC, after reperfusion for 3 days, 6 min ischemia was induced. Cresyl violet staining was used to examine the survival of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Immunoblotting was performed to measure the phosphorylation of CaMKII, nNOS, c-Jun and the expression of FasL. Immunoprecipitation was used to examine the binding between PSD95 and nNOS. The results showed that IPC could significantly protect neurons against cerebral I/R injury, furthermore, the combination of PSD95 and nNOS was increased, coinstantaneously the phosphorylation of CaMKII and nNOS (ser847) were up-regulated, however the activation of c-Jun and FasL were reduced. Conversely, KN62 treatment before IPC reversed all these effects of IPC. Taken together, the results suggest that IPC could diminish ischemic brain injury through CaMKII-mediated up-regulation of nNOS ser847-phosphorylation signaling pathway.

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi evades the protective role of interferon-gamma-signaling in parasite-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Philipp; Ruppert, Volker; Schwarz, Ralph T; Meyer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is responsible for the zoonotic Chagas disease, a chronic and systemic infection in humans and warm-blooded animals typically leading to progressive dilated cardiomyopathy and gastrointestinal manifestations. In the present study, we report that the transcription factor STAT1 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 1) reduces the susceptibility of human cells to infection with T. cruzi. Our in vitro data demonstrate that interferon -γ (IFNγ) pre-treatment causes T. cruzi-infected cells to enter an anti-parasitic state through the activation of the transcription factor STAT1. Whereas stimulation of STAT1-expressing cells with IFNγ significantly impaired intracellular replication of parasites, no protective effect of IFNγ was observed in STAT1-deficient U3A cells. The gene encoding indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (ido) was identified as a STAT1-regulated target gene engaged in parasite clearance. Exposure of cells to T. cruzi trypomastigotes in the absence of IFNγ resulted in both sustained tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of STAT1 and its increased DNA binding. Furthermore, we found that in response to T. cruzi the total amount of intracellular STAT1 increased in an infectious dose-dependent manner, both at the mRNA and protein level. While STAT1 activation is a potent strategy of the host in the fight against the invading pathogen, amastigotes replicating intracellularly antagonize this pathway by specifically promoting the dephosphorylation of STAT1 serine 727, thereby partially circumventing its protective effects. These findings point to the crucial role of the IFNγ/STAT1 signal pathway in the evolutionary combat between T. cruzi parasites and their host.

  7. Inhibitor of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 protects against acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Breckenridge, David G.; Liles, John T.; Lebofsky, Margitta; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-07-01

    Metabolic activation and oxidant stress are key events in the pathophysiology of acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. The initial mitochondrial oxidative stress triggered by protein adduct formation is amplified by c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and ultimately cell necrosis. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is considered the link between oxidant stress and JNK activation. The objective of the current study was to assess the efficacy and mechanism of action of the small-molecule ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 in a murine model of APAP hepatotoxicity. APAP (300 mg/kg) caused extensive glutathione depletion, JNK activation and translocation to the mitochondria, oxidant stress and liver injury as indicated by plasma ALT activities and area of necrosis over a 24 h observation period. Pretreatment with 30 mg/kg of GS-459679 almost completely prevented JNK activation, oxidant stress and injury without affecting the metabolic activation of APAP. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of GS-459679, mice were treated with APAP and then with the inhibitor. Given 1.5 h after APAP, GS-459679 was still protective, which was paralleled by reduced JNK activation and p-JNK translocation to mitochondria. However, GS-459679 treatment was not more effective than N-acetylcysteine, and the combination of GS-459679 and N-acetylcysteine exhibited similar efficacy as N-acetylcysteine monotherapy, suggesting that GS-459769 and N-acetylcysteine affect the same pathway. Importantly, inhibition of ASK1 did not impair liver regeneration as indicated by PCNA staining. In conclusion, the ASK1 inhibitor GS-459679 protected against APAP toxicity by attenuating JNK activation and oxidant stress in mice and may have therapeutic potential for APAP overdose patients. - Highlights: • Two ASK1 inhibitors protected against acetaminophen-induced liver injury. • The ASK1 inhibitors protect when used as pre- or post-treatment. • Protection by ASK1 inhibitor is

  8. Tie-mediated signal from apoptotic cells protects stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yalan; Su, Tin Tin; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2015-01-01

    Many types of normal and cancer stem cells are resistant to killing by genotoxins, but the mechanism for this resistance is poorly understood. Here we show that adult stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster germline and midgut are resistant to ionizing radiation (IR) or chemically induced apoptosis and dissect the mechanism for this protection. We find that upon IR the receptor tyrosine kinase Tie/Tie-2 is activated, leading to the upregulation of microRNA bantam that represses FOXO-mediated transcription of pro-apoptotic Smac/DIA-BLO orthologue, Hid in germline stem cells. Knockdown of the IR-induced putative Tie ligand, Pvf1, a functional homologue of human Angiopoietin, in differentiating daughter cells renders germline stem cells sensitive to IR, suggesting that the dying daughters send a survival signal to protect their stem cells for future repopulation of the tissue. If conserved in cancer stem cells, this mechanism may provide therapeutic options for the eradication of cancer. PMID:25959206

  9. Signaling through hepatocyte vasopressin receptor 1 protects mouse liver from ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jingbo; Ma, Tonghui; Lin, Xiaozhu; Jiang, Liping; Cheng, Jilin; Tao, Ran

    2016-01-01

    Terlipressin has been used extensively in the management of certain complications associated with end-stage liver diseases (ESLDs). In our pilot study, terlipressin treatment showed beneficial effects on liver function in patients with decompensated cirrhosis, however whether it plays a role in liver ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) remains unknown. Using a mouse nonlethal hepatic IR model, we found terlipressin administration significantly ameliorated IR-induced liver apoptosis, necrosis and inflammation. Furthermore, despite its known effect on visceral vasoconstriction, hemodynamic evaluation of murine hepatic tissue after IR revealed no change of overall hepatic blood flow after terlipressin treatment. Further studies identified the upregulation of vasopressin receptor 1 (V1R) expression on hepatocytes upon IR. In isolated hepatocyte hypoxia/reoxygenation model, the active component of terlipressin, lysine vasopressin, conferred hepatocytes resistant to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Mechanistic studies revealed the V1R engagement activated the Wnt/β-catenin/FoxO3a/AKT pathway, which subsequently circumvented the proapoptotic events, thus ameliorated hepatocyte apoptosis. Furthermore, genetic knockdown of V1R expression in hepatocyte cell lines or blockade of this signaling pathway abrogated such protective effect. Conclusion: These data highlight the functional importance of the hepatocyte V1R/Wnt/β-catenin/FoxO3a/AKT pathway in protecting liver from oxidative stress-induced injury. PMID:27713143

  10. Development of critical-area criteria for protecting Microwave Landing System azimuth and elevation antenna guidance signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibenedetto, Michael Francis

    This dissertation presents the methodologies used to develop and validate protective zoning requirements for Microwave Landing System (MLS) azimuth and elevation guidance signals. Typically, the aviation community refers to these protective zoning requirements as critical areas. The purpose of defining critical areas about the azimuth and elevation antennas is to protect the radiated guidance signals from multipath errors caused by electromagnetic scattering of these signals by transient vehicles and aircraft. A method for applying the Federal Aviation Administration MLS Mathematic Model to characterize the guidance signal errors caused by interfering aircraft located ahead of the azimuth or elevation antenna is presented. This method was used to generate error-contour plots characterizing the guidance signal errors caused along a standard precision approach profile as a function of interfering aircraft type, location, and orientation. Error budgets were developed, including allocations to the error permitted to be caused by interfering aircraft. Based on these allocations, error-contour plots were analyzed to determine the areas that bound all of the interfering aircraft locations that have the potential to cause guidance-signal error that exceed the allocations. Methods for adapting these criteria to protect non-standard, computed-centerline, and advanced approach procedures are presented. The dissertation provides azimuth and elevation critical-area criteria for basic, computed-centerline, and advanced MLS procedures. Also, it presents the status of critical- area criteria development for Precision Distance Measuring Equipment. The dissertation recommends that validation and refinement of the criteria be performed as indicated by operational experience.

  11. Autophagy protects meniscal cells from glucocorticoids-induced apoptosis via inositol trisphosphate receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chao; Gu, Wen; Cai, Gui-Quan; Peng, Jian-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2015-09-01

    Intra-articular injection of glucocorticoids (GCs) has been widely used in the management of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Nevertheless, several studies showed that GCs had toxic effects on chondrocytes as well as synovial cells. Previously we reported the protective role of autophagy in the degeneration of meniscal tissues. However, the effects of GCs on autophagy in the meniscal cells have not been fully elucidated. To investigate whether GCs can regulate autophagy in human meniscal cells, the meniscal cells were cultured in vitro and exposed in the presence of dexamethasone. The levels of apoptosis and autophagy were investigated via flow cytometry as well as western blotting analysis. The changes of the aggrecanases were measured using real-time PCR. The role of autophagy in dexamethasone-induced apoptosis was investigated using pharmacological agents and RNA interference technique. An agonist of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) was used to investigate the mechanism of dexamethasone-induced autophagy. The results showed that dexamethasone induced autophagy as well as apoptosis in normal human meniscal cells. Using RNA interference technique and pharmacological agents, our results showed that autophagy protected the meniscal cells from dexamethasone-induced apoptosis. Our results also indicated that dexamethasone increased the mRNA levels of aggrecanases. This catabolic effect of dexamethasone was enhanced by 3-MA, the autophagy inhibitor. Furthermore, our results showed that dexamethasone induced autophagy via suppressing the phosphorylation of IP3R. In summary, our results indicated that autophagy protected meniscal cells from GCs-induced apoptosis via inositol trisphosphate receptor signaling.

  12. Lutein has a protective effect on hepatotoxicity induced by arsenic via Nrf2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Shugang; Ding, Yusong; Niu, Qiang; Xu, Shangzhi; Pang, Lijuan; Ma, Rulin; Jing, Mingxia; Feng, Gangling; Tang, Jing Xia; Zhang, Qian; Ma, Xiaomei; Yan, Yizhong; Zhang, Jingyu; Wei, Meng; Wang, Hai Xia; Li, Feng; Guo, Shuxia

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic produces liver disease through the oxidative stress. While lutein can alleviate cytotoxic and oxidative injury, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway plays a critical role in defending oxidative species. However, the mechanisms by which lutein protects the liver against the effect of arsenic are not known. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the mechanisms involved in the action of lutein using mice model in which hepatotoxicity was induced by arsenic. We found that mice treatment with lutein could reverse changes in morphological and liver indexes and result in a significant improvement in hepatic function comparing with arsenic trioxide group. Lutein treatment improved the activities of antioxidant enzymes and attenuated increasing of ROS and MDA induced by arsenic trioxide. Lutein could increase the mRNA and protein expression of Nrf2 signaling related genes (Nrf2, Nqo1, Ho-1, and Gst). These findings provide additional evidence that lutein may be useful for reducing reproductive injury associated with oxidative stress by the activation of Nrf2 signaling. Our findings suggest a possible mechanism of antioxidant lutein in preventing the hepatotoxicity, which implicate that a dietary lutein may be a potential treatment for liver diseases, especially for arsenicosis therapy.

  13. Lutein Has a Protective Effect on Hepatotoxicity Induced by Arsenic via Nrf2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shugang; Ding, Yusong; Niu, Qiang; Xu, Shangzhi; Pang, Lijuan; Ma, Rulin; Jing, Mingxia; Feng, Gangling; Tang, Jing Xia; Zhang, Qian; Ma, Xiaomei; Yan, Yizhong; Wang, Hai Xia; Li, Feng; Guo, Shuxia

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic produces liver disease through the oxidative stress. While lutein can alleviate cytotoxic and oxidative injury, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway plays a critical role in defending oxidative species. However, the mechanisms by which lutein protects the liver against the effect of arsenic are not known. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the mechanisms involved in the action of lutein using mice model in which hepatotoxicity was induced by arsenic. We found that mice treatment with lutein could reverse changes in morphological and liver indexes and result in a significant improvement in hepatic function comparing with arsenic trioxide group. Lutein treatment improved the activities of antioxidant enzymes and attenuated increasing of ROS and MDA induced by arsenic trioxide. Lutein could increase the mRNA and protein expression of Nrf2 signaling related genes (Nrf2, Nqo1, Ho-1, and Gst). These findings provide additional evidence that lutein may be useful for reducing reproductive injury associated with oxidative stress by the activation of Nrf2 signaling. Our findings suggest a possible mechanism of antioxidant lutein in preventing the hepatotoxicity, which implicate that a dietary lutein may be a potential treatment for liver diseases, especially for arsenicosis therapy. PMID:25815309

  14. Resveratrol protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress through SIRT1 and mitochondrial biogenesis signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-guang; Zhu, Wei; Tao, Jian-ping; Xin, Ping; Liu, Ming-ya; Li, Jing-bo; Wei, Meng

    2013-08-23

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is generated by oxidative stress and plays an important role in various cardiac pathologies. The SIRT1 signaling pathway and mitochondrial biogenesis play essential roles in mediating the production of ROS. SIRT1 activated by resveratrol protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress, but the exact mechanisms by which SIRT1 prevents oxidative stress, and its relationship with mitochondrial biogenesis, remain unclear. In this study, it was observed that after stimulation with 50μMH2O2 for 6h, H9C2 cells produced excessive ROS and downregulated SIRT1. The mitochondrial protein NDUFA13 was also downregulated by ROS mediated by SIRT1. Resveratrol induced the expression of SIRT1 and mitochondrial genes NDUFA1, NDUFA2, NDUFA13 and Mn-SOD. However, the production of these genes was reversed by SIRT1 inhibitor nicotinamide. These results suggest that resveratrol inhibits ROS generation in cardiomyocytes via SIRT1 and mitochondrial biogenesis signaling pathways. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Not just signal shutoff: the protective role of arrestin-1 in rod cells.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Martha E; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Heck, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The retinal rod cell is an exquisitely sensitive single-photon detector that primarily functions in dim light (e.g., moonlight). However, rod cells must routinely survive light intensities more than a billion times greater (e.g., bright daylight). One serious challenge to rod cell survival in daylight is the massive amount of all-trans-retinal that is released by Meta II, the light-activated form of the photoreceptor rhodopsin. All-trans-retinal is toxic, and its condensation products have been implicated in disease. Our recent work has developed the concept that rod arrestin (arrestin-1), which terminates Meta II signaling, has an additional role in protecting rod cells from the consequences of bright light by limiting free all-trans-retinal. In this chapter we will elaborate upon the molecular mechanisms by which arrestin-1 serves as both a single-photon response quencher as well as an instrument of rod cell survival in bright light. This discussion will take place within the framework of three distinct functional modules of vision: signal transduction, the retinoid cycle, and protein translocation.

  16. Orexins protect neuronal cell cultures against hypoxic stress: an involvement of Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Sokołowska, Paulina; Urbańska, Anna; Biegańska, Kaja; Wagner, Waldemar; Ciszewski, Wojciech; Namiecińska, Magdalena; Zawilska, Jolanta B

    2014-01-01

    Orexins A and B are peptides produced mainly by hypothalamic neurons that project to numerous brain structures. We have previously demonstrated that rat cortical neurons express both types of orexin receptors, and their activation by orexins initiates different intracellular signals. The present study aimed to determine the effect of orexins on the Akt kinase activation in the rat neuronal cultures and the significance of that response in neurons subjected to hypoxic stress. We report the first evidence that orexins A and B stimulated Akt in cortical neurons in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Orexin B more potently than orexin A increased Akt phosphorylation, but the maximal effect of both peptides on the kinase activation was very similar. Next, cultured cortical neurons were challenged with cobalt chloride, an inducer of reactive oxygen species and hypoxia-mediated signaling pathways. Under conditions of chemical hypoxia, orexins potently increased neuronal viability and protected cortical neurons against oxidative stress. Our results also indicate that Akt kinase plays an important role in the pro-survival effects of orexins in neurons, which implies a possible mechanism of the orexin-induced neuroprotection.

  17. Is resistant starch protective against colorectal cancer via modulation of the WNT signalling pathway?

    PubMed

    Malcomson, Fiona C; Willis, Naomi D; Mathers, John C

    2015-08-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence suggests that non-digestible carbohydrates (NDC) including resistant starch are protective against colorectal cancer. These anti-neoplastic effects are presumed to result from the production of the SCFA, butyrate, by colonic fermentation, which binds to the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR43 to regulate inflammation and other cancer-related processes. The WNT pathway is central to the maintenance of homeostasis within the large bowel through regulation of processes such as cell proliferation and migration and is frequently aberrantly hyperactivated in colorectal cancers. Abnormal WNT signalling can lead to irregular crypt cell proliferation that favours a hyperproliferative state. Butyrate has been shown to modulate the WNT pathway positively, affecting functional outcomes such as apoptosis and proliferation. Butyrate's ability to regulate gene expression results from epigenetic mechanisms, including its role as a histone deacetylase inhibitor and through modulating DNA methylation and the expression of microRNA. We conclude that genetic and epigenetic modulation of the WNT signalling pathway may be an important mechanism through which butyrate from fermentation of resistant starch and other NDC exert their chemoprotective effects.

  18. Unmasking of a Protective TNFR1 Mediated Signal in the Collagen Arthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Williams-Skipp, Cheryll; Raman, Thiagarajan; Valuck, Robert J.; Watkins, Herschel; Palmer, Brent E.; Scheinman, Robert I.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: TNFR1 plays a major role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we explore the relative importance of TNFR1 signaling in the hematopoietic tissue compartment for disease progression. METHODS: DBA/1 mice were lethally irradiated and rescued with bone marrow derived from either DBA/1 or TNFR1−/− animals. The mice were then input into the collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model and disease progression characterized. RESULTS: Surprisingly, TNFR1−/− transplant mice input into the CIA model develop increased disease as compared to controls. This could not be attributed to either an increased primary response to collagen or to the contribution of a non-DBA genetic background. Histological markers of advanced disease were evident in TNFR1−/− transplant mice shortly after initiation of the immune response to collagen and long before clinical evidence of disease. Serum TNFα was undetectable while serum IL-12p40 levels were increased in TNFR1−/− transplant mice at the end point of the study. CONCLUSION: These data raise the intriguing possibility of the existence of an anti-inflammatory TNFR1 mediated circuit in the hematopoietic compartment. This circuit bears a resemblance to emerging data delineating a switch in TNFα function observed in the resolution of bacterial infections. These data suggest that TNFR1 mediated signals in the radio-resistant tissues contributes to disease progression while TNFR1 mediated signals in the radio-sensitive tissues can contribute to protection from disease. We thus put forward the hypothesis that the degree of responce to TNFα blockade in RA is dependent, in part, on the relative genetic strengths of these two pathways. PMID:19180511

  19. Liver protects metastatic prostate cancer from induced death by activating E-cadherin signaling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bo; Wheeler, Sarah E; Clark, Amanda M; Whaley, Diana L; Yang, Min; Wells, Alan

    2016-11-01

    Liver is one of the most common sites of cancer metastasis. Once disseminated, the prognosis is poor as these tumors often display generalized chemoresistance, particularly for carcinomas that derive not from the aerodigestive tract. When these cancers seed the liver, the aggressive cells usually undergo a mesenchymal to epithelial reverting transition that both aids colonization and renders the tumor cells chemoresistant. In vitro studies demonstrate that hepatocytes drive this phenotypic shift. However, the in vivo evidence and the molecular signals that protect these cells from induced death are yet to be defined. Herein, we report that membrane surface E-cadherin-expressing prostate cancer cells were resistant to cell death by chemotherapeutic drugs but E-cadherin null cells or those expressing E-cadherin only in the cytoplasm were sensitive to death signals and chemotherapies both in vitro and in vivo. While cell-cell E-cadherin ligandation reduced mitogenesis, this chemoprotection was proliferation-independent as killing of both 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine-positive (or Ki67(+) ) and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine-negative (Ki67(-) ) cells was inversely related to membrane-bound E-cadherin. Inhibiting the canonical survival kinases extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases, protein kinase B, and Janus kinase, which are activated by chemotherapeutics in epithelial cell-transitioned prostate cancer, abrogated the chemoresistance both in cell culture and in animal models of metastatic cancer. For disseminated tumors, protein kinase B disruption in itself had no effect on tumor survival but was synergistic with chemotherapy, leading to increased killing.

  20. Escin activates AKT-Nrf2 signaling to protect retinal pigment epithelium cells from oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kaijun; Jiang, Yiqian; Wang, Wei; Ma, Jian; Chen, Min

    2015-12-25

    Here we explored the anti-oxidative and cytoprotective potentials of escin, a natural triterpene-saponin, against hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. We showed that escin remarkably attenuated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced death and apoptosis of established (ARPE-19) and primary murine RPE cells. Meanwhile, ROS production and lipid peroxidation by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were remarkably inhibited by escin. Escin treatment in RPE cells resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by transcription of anti-oxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes, including HO-1, NQO-1 and SRXN-1. Knockdown of Nrf2 through targeted shRNAs/siRNAs alleviated escin-mediated ARE gene transcription, and almost abolished escin-mediated anti-oxidant activity and RPE cytoprotection against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Reversely, escin was more potent against H{sub 2}O{sub 2} damages in Nrf2-over-expressed ARPE-19 cells. Further studies showed that escin-induced Nrf2 activation in RPE cells required AKT signaling. AKT inhibitors (LY294002 and perifosine) blocked escin-induced AKT activation, and dramatically inhibited Nrf2 phosphorylation, its cytosol accumulation and nuclear translocation in RPE cells. Escin-induced RPE cytoprotection against H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was also alleviated by the AKT inhibitors. Together, these results demonstrate that escin protects RPE cells from oxidative stress possibly through activating AKT-Nrf2 signaling.

  1. Inhibition of sterile danger signals, uric acid and ATP, prevents inflammasome activation and protects from alcoholic steatohepatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Iracheta-Vellve, Arvin; Petrasek, Jan; Satishchandran, Abhishek; Gyongyosi, Benedek; Saha, Banishree; Kodys, Karen; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A.; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The inflammasome is a well-characterized inducer of inflammation in ASH. Inflammasome activation requires two signals for mature interleukin (IL)-1β production. Here we asked whether metabolic danger signals trigger inflammasome activation in ASH. Methods Wild-type mice, ATP receptor 2×7 (P2rx7)-KO mice, or mice overexpressing uricase were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol or control diet. We also implemented a pharmacological approach in which mice were treated with probenecid or allopurinol. Results The sterile danger signals, ATP and uric acid, were increased in the serum and liver of alcohol-fed mice. Depletion of uric acid or ATP, or lack of ATP signaling attenuated ASH and prevented inflammasome activation and its major downstream cytokine, IL-1β. Pharmacological depletion of uric acid with allopurinol provided significant protection from alcohol-induced inflammatory response, steatosis and liver damage, and additional protection was achieved in mice treated with probenecid, which depletes uric acid and blocks ATP-induced P2rx7 signaling. We found that alcohol-damaged hepatocytes released uric acid and ATP in vivo and in vitro and that these sterile danger signals activated the inflammasome in LPS-exposed liver mononuclear cells. Conclusions Our data indicate that the second signal in inflammasome activation and IL-1β production in ASH results from the endogenous danger signals, uric acid and ATP. Inhibition of signaling triggered by uric acid and ATP may have therapeutic implications in ASH. PMID:26100496

  2. Effects of Wearing NBC (Nuclear, Biological and Chemical) Protective Clothing in the Heat on Detection of Visual Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    agents, as well as nuclear weaponry. In the face of’ such threats, the United States Army has developed equinment and clothing systems designed to...AD_ REPORT NO. T7185 EFFECTS OF WEARING NBC PROTECTIVE CLOTHING IN THE HEAT ON DETECTION OF VISUAL SIGNALS U S ARMY RESEARCH INSTITUTE N OF...CATALOG NUMBER T7/•5 ( 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Effects of Wearing NBC Protective Clothing in the Technical Report Heat

  3. The cochlear CRF signaling systems and their mechanisms of action in modulating cochlear sensitivity and protection against trauma

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Christine E.; Basappa, Johnvesly; Turcan, Sevin; Vetter, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    A key requirement for encoding the auditory environment is the ability to dynamically alter cochlear sensitivity. However, merely attaining a steady state of maximal sensitivity is not a viable solution since the sensory cells and ganglion cells of the cochlea are prone to damage following exposure to loud sound. Most often, such damage is via initial metabolic insult that can lead to cellular death. Thus, establishing the highest sensitivity must be balanced with protection against cellular metabolic damage that can lead to loss of hair cells and ganglion cells, resulting in loss of frequency representation. While feedback mechanisms are known to exist in the cochlea that alter sensitivity, they respond only after stimulus encoding, allowing potentially damaging sounds to impact the inner ear at times coincident with increased sensitivity. Thus, questions remain concerning the endogenous signaling systems involved in dynamic modulation of cochlear sensitivity and protection against metabolic stress. Understanding endogenous signaling systems involved in cochlear protection may lead to new strategies and therapies for prevention of cochlear damage and consequent hearing loss. We have recently discovered a novel cochlear signaling system that is molecularly equivalent to the classic hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. This cochlear HPA-equivalent system functions to balance auditory sensitivity and susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss, and also protects against cellular metabolic insults resulting from exposures to ototoxic drugs. We review the anatomy, physiology, and cellular signaling of this system, and compare it to similar signaling in other organs/tissues of the body. PMID:21909974

  4. Airway Epithelial Cell Integrity Protects from Cytotoxicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Sensing Signals.

    PubMed

    Losa, Davide; Köhler, Thilo; Bacchetta, Marc; Saab, Joanna Bou; Frieden, Maud; van Delden, Christian; Chanson, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Cell-to-cell communication via gap junctions regulates airway epithelial cell homeostasis and maintains the epithelium host defense. Quorum-sensing molecules produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinate the expression of virulence factors by this respiratory pathogen. These bacterial signals may also incidentally modulate mammalian airway epithelial cell responses to the pathogen, a process called interkingdom signaling. We investigated the interactions between the P. aeruginosa N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C12) quorum-sensing molecule and human airway epithelial cell gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). C12 degradation and its effects on cells were monitored in various airway epithelial cell models grown under nonpolarized and polarized conditions. Its concentration was further monitored in daily tracheal aspirates of colonized intubated patients. C12 rapidly altered epithelial integrity and decreased GJIC in nonpolarized airway epithelial cells, whereas other quorum-sensing molecules had no effect. The effects of C12 were dependent on [Ca(2+)]i and could be prevented by inhibitors of Src tyrosine family and Rho-associated protein kinases. In contrast, polarized airway cells grown on Transwell filters were protected from C12 except when undergoing repair after wounding. In vivo during colonization of intubated patients, C12 did not accumulate, but it paralleled bacterial densities. In vitro C12 degradation, a reaction catalyzed by intracellular paraoxonase 2 (PON2), was impaired in nonpolarized cells, whereas PON2 expression was increased during epithelial polarization. The cytotoxicity of C12 on nonpolarized epithelial cells, combined with its impaired degradation allowing its accumulation, provides an additional pathogenic mechanism for P. aeruginosa infections.

  5. ERK Signaling Pathway Plays a Key Role in Baicalin Protection Against Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chia-Chih; Day, Yuan-Ji; Lee, Hung-Chen; Liou, Jiin-Tarng; Chou, An-Hsun; Liu, Fu-Chao

    2017-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose causes hepatocytes necrosis and acute liver failure. Baicalin (BA), a major flavonoid of Scutellariae radix, has potent hepatoprotective properties in traditional medicine. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of BA on a APAP-induced liver injury in a mouse model. The mice received an intraperitoneal hepatotoxic dose of APAP (300[Formula: see text]mg/kg) and after 30[Formula: see text]min, were treated with BA at concentrations of 0, 15, 30, or 60[Formula: see text]mg/kg. After 16[Formula: see text]h of treatment, the mice were sacrificed for further analysis. APAP administration significantly elevated the serum alanine transferase (ALT) enzyme levels and hepatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity when compared with control animals. Baicalin treatment significantly attenuated the elevation of liver ALT levels, as well as hepatic MPO activity in a dose- dependent manner (15-60[Formula: see text]mg/kg) in APAP-treated mice. The strongest beneficial effects of BA were seen at a dose of 30[Formula: see text]mg/kg. BA treatment at 30[Formula: see text]mg/kg after APAP overdose reduced elevated hepatic cytokine (TNF-[Formula: see text] and IL-6) levels, and macrophage recruitment around the area of hepatotoxicity in immunohistochemical staining. Significantly, BA treatment can also decrease hepatic phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) expression, which is induced by APAP overdose. Our data suggests that baicalin treatment can effectively attenuate APAP-induced liver injury by down-regulating the ERK signaling pathway and its downstream effectors of inflammatory responses. These results support that baicalin is a potential hepatoprotective agent.

  6. Changes in LXR signaling influence early-pregnancy lipogenesis and protect against dysregulated fetoplacental lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Vanya; Papacleovoulou, Georgia; Bellafante, Elena; Borges Manna, Luiza; Jansen, Eugene; Baron, Silvère; Abu-Hayyeh, Shadi; Parker, Malcolm; Williamson, Catherine

    2017-10-01

    Human pregnancy is associated with enhanced de novo lipogenesis in the early stages followed by hyperlipidemia during advanced gestation. Liver X receptors (LXRs) are oxysterol-activated nuclear receptors that stimulate de novo lipogenesis and also promote the efflux of cholesterol from extrahepatic tissues followed by its transport back to the liver for biliary excretion. Although LXR is recognized as a master regulator of triglyceride and cholesterol homeostasis, it is unknown whether it facilitates the gestational adaptations in lipid metabolism. To address this question, biochemical profiling, protein quantification, and gene expression studies were used, and gestational metabolic changes in T0901317-treated wild-type mice and Lxrab(-/-) mutants were investigated. Here, we show that altered LXR signaling contributes to the enhanced lipogenesis in early pregnancy by increasing the expression of hepatic Fas and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (Scd1). Both the pharmacological activation of LXR with T0901317 and the genetic ablation of its two isoforms disrupted the increase in hepatic fatty acid biosynthesis and the development of hypertriglyceridemia during early gestation. We also demonstrate that absence of LXR enhances maternal white adipose tissue lipolysis, causing abnormal accumulation of triglycerides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids in the fetal liver. Together, these data identify LXR as an important factor in early-pregnancy lipogenesis that is also necessary to protect against abnormalities in fetoplacental lipid homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Autophagy protects intestinal epithelial cells against deoxynivalenol toxicity by alleviating oxidative stress via IKK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yulong; Li, Jianjun; Li, Fengna; Hu, Chien-An A; Liao, Peng; Tan, Kunrong; Tan, Bie; Xiong, Xia; Liu, Gang; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2015-12-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular process of homeostatic degradation that promotes cell survival under various stressors. Deoxynivalenol (DON), a fungal toxin, often causes diarrhea and disturbs the homeostasis of the intestinal system. To investigate the function of intestinal autophagy in response to DON and associated mechanisms, we firstly knocked out ATG5 (autophagy-related gene 5) in porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) using CRISPR-Cas9 technology. When treated with DON, autophagy was induced in IPEC-J2 cells but not in IPEC-J2.Atg5ko cells. The deficiency in autophagy increased DON-induced apoptosis in IPEC-J2.atg5ko cells, in part, through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The cellular stress response can be restored in IPEC-J2.atg5ko cells by overexpressing proteins involved in protein folding. Interestingly, we found that autophagy deficiency downregulated the expression of endoplasmic reticulum folding proteins BiP and PDI when IPEC-J2.atg5ko cells were treated with DON. In addition, we investigated the molecular mechanism of autophagy involved in the IKK, AMPK, and mTOR signaling pathway and found that Bay-117082 and Compound C, specific inhibitors for IKK and AMPK, respectively, inhibited the induction of autophagy. Taken together, our results suggest that autophagy is pivotal for protection against DON in pig intestinal cells.

  8. IL-17 Receptor Signaling in Oral Epithelial Cells Is Critical for Protection against Oropharyngeal Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Conti, Heather R; Bruno, Vincent M; Childs, Erin E; Daugherty, Sean; Hunter, Joseph P; Mengesha, Bemnet G; Saevig, Danielle L; Hendricks, Matthew R; Coleman, Bianca M; Brane, Lucas; Solis, Norma; Cruz, J Agustin; Verma, Akash H; Garg, Abhishek V; Hise, Amy G; Richardson, Jonathan P; Naglik, Julian R; Filler, Scott G; Kolls, Jay K; Sinha, Satrajit; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2016-11-09

    Signaling through the IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) is required to prevent oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in mice and humans. However, the IL-17-responsive cell type(s) that mediate protection are unknown. Using radiation chimeras, we were able to rule out a requirement for IL-17RA in the hematopoietic compartment. We saw remarkable concordance of IL-17-controlled gene expression in C. albicans-infected human oral epithelial cells (OECs) and in tongue tissue from mice with OPC. To interrogate the role of the IL-17R in OECs, we generated mice with conditional deletion of IL-17RA in superficial oral and esophageal epithelial cells (Il17ra(ΔK13)). Following oral Candida infection, Il17ra(ΔK13) mice exhibited fungal loads and weight loss indistinguishable from Il17ra(-/-) mice. Susceptibility in Il17ra(ΔK13) mice correlated with expression of the antimicrobial peptide β-defensin 3 (BD3, Defb3). Consistently, Defb3(-/-) mice were susceptible to OPC. Thus, OECs dominantly control IL-17R-dependent responses to OPC through regulation of BD3 expression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Interaction between photosynthetic electron transport and chloroplast sinks triggers protection and signalling important for plant productivity

    PubMed Central

    Gollan, Peter J.; Lima-Melo, Yugo; Tiwari, Arjun; Tikkanen, Mikko

    2017-01-01

    The photosynthetic light reactions provide energy that is consumed and stored in electron sinks, the products of photosynthesis. A balance between light reactions and electron consumption in the chloroplast is vital for plants, and is protected by several photosynthetic regulation mechanisms. Photosystem I (PSI) is particularly susceptible to photoinhibition when these factors become unbalanced, which can occur in low temperatures or in high light. In this study we used the pgr5 Arabidopsis mutant that lacks ΔpH-dependent regulation of photosynthetic electron transport as a model to study the consequences of PSI photoinhibition under high light. We found that PSI damage severely inhibits carbon fixation and starch accumulation, and attenuates enzymatic oxylipin synthesis and chloroplast regulation of nuclear gene expression after high light stress. This work shows that modifications to regulation of photosynthetic light reactions, which may be designed to improve yield in crop plants, can negatively impact metabolism and signalling, and thereby threaten plant growth and stress tolerance. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Enhancing photosynthesis in crop plants: targets for improvement’. PMID:28808104

  10. Demethyleneberberine Protects against Hepatic Fibrosis in Mice by Modulating NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongchen; Zhao, Zheng; Yan, Yan; Qiang, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Cuisong; Li, Ruiyan; Chen, Huan; Zhang, Yubin

    2016-01-01

    Demethyleneberberine (DMB) is an essential metabolite of Berberine (BBR) in vivo. Recent reports have revealed multiple novel therapeutic applications of BBR. However, the pharmacological activities of DMB remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to demonstrate the hepatoprotective and anti-fibrotic effects of DMB both in vitro and in vivo. Here we showed that DMB protects against thioacetamide (TAA)-induced hepatic fibrosis in mice and exhibits a higher safety profile as compared to BBR. Flow cytometry and Western blotting analysis showed that DMB is able to suppress the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and induce cell apoptosis through the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) cascade. Immunohistochemical (IHC) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis indicated that DMB also has inhibitory effects on collagen synthesis and is able to increase collagen degradation by blocking the transforming growth factor β 1 (TGF-β1)-Smad signaling and reducing the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMPs). These findings indicate that DMB has the potential to attenuate hepatic fibrosis via suppressing HSC activation. PMID:27376272

  11. Loss of dual leucine zipper kinase signaling is protective in animal models of neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Le Pichon, Claire E; Meilandt, William J; Dominguez, Sara; Solanoy, Hilda; Lin, Han; Ngu, Hai; Gogineni, Alvin; Sengupta Ghosh, Arundhati; Jiang, Zhiyu; Lee, Seung-Hye; Maloney, Janice; Gandham, Vineela D; Pozniak, Christine D; Wang, Bei; Lee, Sebum; Siu, Michael; Patel, Snahel; Modrusan, Zora; Liu, Xingrong; Rudhard, York; Baca, Miriam; Gustafson, Amy; Kaminker, Josh; Carano, Richard A D; Huang, Eric J; Foreman, Oded; Weimer, Robby; Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Lewcock, Joseph W

    2017-08-16

    Hallmarks of chronic neurodegenerative disease include progressive synaptic loss and neuronal cell death, yet the cellular pathways that underlie these processes remain largely undefined. We provide evidence that dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) is an essential regulator of the progressive neurodegeneration that occurs in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. We demonstrate that DLK/c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling was increased in mouse models and human patients with these disorders and that genetic deletion of DLK protected against axon degeneration, neuronal loss, and functional decline in vivo. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of DLK activity was sufficient to attenuate the neuronal stress response and to provide functional benefit even in the presence of ongoing disease. These findings demonstrate that pathological activation of DLK is a conserved mechanism that regulates neurodegeneration and suggest that DLK inhibition may be a potential approach to treat multiple neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  12. Rapamycin protects against paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis: Activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiheng; Tai, Wenlin; Qu, Xiaoyuan; Wu, Wenjuan; Li, ZhenKun; Deng, Shuhao; Vongphouttha, Chanthasone; Dong, Zhaoxing

    2017-08-19

    Paraquat (PQ) is a widely used herbicide indeveloping countries worldwide, and pulmonary fibrosis is one of the most typical features of PQ poisoning. The molecular mechanism of PQ toxicity especially how to treat PQ-induced pulmonary fibrosis is still largely unknown. In animal model of pulmonary fibrosis, we used HE staining, western blotting assay and Real-time PCR assay to analyze the effects of rapamycin on the PQ-induced epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). We found that PQ induced the pulmonary fibrosis using HE staining and Masson's staining, and up-regulated the activity of HYP and the mRNA expressions of Collagen I and III (COL-1and COL-3) in pulmonary tissues. We also found that rapamycin down-regulated the mesenchymal cell marker Vimentin and up-regulated the epithelial cell marker E-cadherin both in mRNA and protein levels compared with PQ group. And the EMT associated transcription factor Snail was decreased by rapamycin treatment compared with PQ group. And PQ decreased the Nrf2 expression both in mRNA and protein levels, and rapamycin inhibited these effects of PQ. SFN, a activator of Nrf2, could inhibit the EMT and the expression of Snail. And knockdowon of Nrf2 could abolish the inhibitory effects of rapamycin of PQ-induced EMT. In conclusion, rapamycin protects against paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis by activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Interaction between photosynthetic electron transport and chloroplast sinks triggers protection and signalling important for plant productivity.

    PubMed

    Gollan, Peter J; Lima-Melo, Yugo; Tiwari, Arjun; Tikkanen, Mikko; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2017-09-26

    The photosynthetic light reactions provide energy that is consumed and stored in electron sinks, the products of photosynthesis. A balance between light reactions and electron consumption in the chloroplast is vital for plants, and is protected by several photosynthetic regulation mechanisms. Photosystem I (PSI) is particularly susceptible to photoinhibition when these factors become unbalanced, which can occur in low temperatures or in high light. In this study we used the pgr5 Arabidopsis mutant that lacks ΔpH-dependent regulation of photosynthetic electron transport as a model to study the consequences of PSI photoinhibition under high light. We found that PSI damage severely inhibits carbon fixation and starch accumulation, and attenuates enzymatic oxylipin synthesis and chloroplast regulation of nuclear gene expression after high light stress. This work shows that modifications to regulation of photosynthetic light reactions, which may be designed to improve yield in crop plants, can negatively impact metabolism and signalling, and thereby threaten plant growth and stress tolerance.This article is part of the themed issue 'Enhancing photosynthesis in crop plants: targets for improvement'. © 2017 The Authors.

  14. Research on traffic flow characteristics at signal intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jun-Wei; Yu, Sen-Bin; Qian, Yong-Sheng; Wei, Xu-Ting; Feng, Xiao; Wang, Hui

    2017-09-01

    Based on the cautious driving behavior and the principle of the vehicles at left-side having priority to pass in the intersection, a two-dimensional cellular automata model for planar signalized intersection (NS-STCA) is established. The different turning vehicles are regarded as the research objects and the effect of the left-turn probability, signal cycle, vehicle flow density on traffic flow at the intersection is investigated.

  15. RNA helicase signaling is critical for type i interferon production and protection against Rift Valley fever virus during mucosal challenge.

    PubMed

    Ermler, Megan E; Yerukhim, Ekaterina; Schriewer, Jill; Schattgen, Stefan; Traylor, Zachary; Wespiser, Adam R; Caffrey, Daniel R; Chen, Zhijian J; King, Charles H; Gale, Michael; Colonna, Marco; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Buller, R Mark L; Hise, Amy G

    2013-05-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging RNA virus with devastating economic and social consequences. Clinically, RVFV induces a gamut of symptoms ranging from febrile illness to retinitis, hepatic necrosis, hemorrhagic fever, and death. It is known that type I interferon (IFN) responses can be protective against severe pathology; however, it is unknown which innate immune receptor pathways are crucial for mounting this response. Using both in vitro assays and in vivo mucosal mouse challenge, we demonstrate here that RNA helicases are critical for IFN production by immune cells and that signaling through the helicase adaptor molecule MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling) is protective against mortality and more subtle pathology during RVFV infection. In addition, we demonstrate that Toll-like-receptor-mediated signaling is not involved in IFN production, further emphasizing the importance of the RNA cellular helicases in type I IFN responses to RVFV.

  16. Functional proteomic analysis of a three-tier PKCepsilon-Akt-eNOS signaling module in cardiac protection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Baines, Christopher P; Zong, Chenggong; Cardwell, Ernest M; Wang, Guangwu; Vondriska, Thomas M; Ping, Peipei

    2005-02-01

    Cardiac protective signaling networks have been shown to involve PKCepsilon. However, the molecular mechanisms by which PKCepsilon interacts with other members of these networks to form task-specific modules remain unknown. Among 93 different PKCepsilon-associated proteins that have been identified, Akt and endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) are of importance because of their independent abilities to promote cell survival and prevent cell death. The simultaneous association of PKCepsilon, Akt, and eNOS has not been examined, and, in particular, the formation of a module containing these three proteins and the role of such a module in the regulation of NO production and cardiac protection are unknown. The present study was undertaken to determine whether these molecules form a signaling module and, thereby, play a collective role in cardiac signaling. Using recombinant proteins in vitro and PKCepsilon transgenic mouse hearts, we demonstrate the following: 1) PKCepsilon, Akt, and eNOS interact and form signaling modules in vitro and in the mouse heart. Activation of either PKCepsilon or Akt enhances the formation of PKCepsilon-Akt-eNOS signaling modules. 2) PKCepsilon directly phosphorylates and enhances activation of Akt in vitro, and PKCepsilon activation increases phosphorylation and activation of Akt in PKCepsilon transgenic mouse hearts. 3) PKCepsilon directly phosphorylates eNOS in vitro, and this phosphorylation enhances eNOS activity. Activation of PKCepsilon in vivo increased phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser(1177), indicating eNOS activation. This study characterizes, for the first time, the physical, as well as functional, coupling of PKCepsilon, Akt, and eNOS in the heart and implicates these PKCepsilon-Akt-eNOS signaling modules as critical signaling elements during PKCepsilon-induced cardiac protection.

  17. Human TLR1 Deficiency Is Associated with Impaired Mycobacterial Signaling and Protection from Leprosy Reversal Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Misch, Elizabeth A.; Macdonald, Murdo; Ranjit, Chaman; Sapkota, Bishwa R.; Wells, Richard D.; Siddiqui, M. Ruby; Kaplan, Gilla; Hawn, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important regulators of the innate immune response to pathogens, including Mycobacterium leprae, which is recognized by TLR1/2 heterodimers. We previously identified a transmembrane domain polymorphism, TLR1_T1805G, that encodes an isoleucine to serine substitution and is associated with impaired signaling. We hypothesized that this TLR1 SNP regulates the innate immune response and susceptibility to leprosy. In HEK293 cells transfected with the 1805T or 1805G variant and stimulated with extracts of M. leprae, NF-κB activity was impaired in cells with the 1805G polymorphism. We next stimulated PBMCs from individuals with different genotypes for this SNP and found that 1805GG individuals had significantly reduced cytokine responses to both whole irradiated M. leprae and cell wall extracts. To investigate whether TLR1 variation is associated with clinical presentations of leprosy or leprosy immune reactions, we examined 933 Nepalese leprosy patients, including 238 with reversal reaction (RR), an immune reaction characterized by a Th1 T cell cytokine response. We found that the 1805G allele was associated with protection from RR with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.51 (95% CI 0.29–0.87, p = 0.01). Individuals with 1805 genotypes GG or TG also had a reduced risk of RR in comparison to genotype TT with an OR of 0.55 (95% CI 0.31–0.97, p = 0.04). To our knowledge, this is the first association of TLR1 with a Th1-mediated immune response. Our findings suggest that TLR1 deficiency influences adaptive immunity during leprosy infection to affect clinical manifestations such as nerve damage and disability. PMID:18461142

  18. Localization of association signal from risk and protective variants in sequencing studies.

    PubMed

    Brisbin, Abra; Jenkins, Gregory D; Ellsworth, Katarzyna A; Wang, Liewei; Fridley, Brooke L

    2012-01-01

    Aggregating information across multiple variants in a gene or region can improve power for rare variant association testing. Power is maximized when the aggregation region contains many causal variants and few neutral variants. In this paper, we present a method for the localization of the association signal in a region using a sliding-window based approach to rare variant association testing in a region. We first introduce a novel method for analysis of rare variants, the Difference in Minor Allele Frequency test (DMAF), which allows combined analysis of common and rare variants, and makes no assumptions about the direction of effects. In whole-region analyses of simulated data with risk and protective variants, DMAF and other methods which pool data across individuals were found to outperform methods which pool data across variants. We then implement a sliding-window version of DMAF, using a step-down permutation approach to control type I error with the testing of multiple windows. In simulations, the sliding-window DMAF improved power to detect a causal sub-region, compared to applying DMAF to the whole region. Sliding-window DMAF was also effective in localizing the causal sub-region. We also applied the DMAF sliding-window approach to test for an association between response to the drug gemcitabine and variants in the gene FKBP5 sequenced in 91 lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from white non-Hispanic individuals. The application of the sliding-window test procedure detected an association in a sub-region spanning an exon and two introns, when rare and common variants were analyzed together.

  19. Protective role of licochalcone B against ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity through regulation of Erk signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiao-peng; Qian, Dong-wei; Xie, Zhen; Hui, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Oxidative stress has been established as a key cause of alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity. Licochalcone B, an extract of licorice root, has shown antioxidative properties. This study was to investigate the effects and mechanisms of licochalcone B in ethanol-induced hepatic injury in an in vitro study. Materials and Methods: An in vitro model of Ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in BRL cells was used in this study. Cell injury was assessed using WST-1 assay and lactate dehydrogenase, alanine transaminase, and aspartate aminotransferase release assay. Cell apoptosis were quantified by flow cytometric analysis. The intracellular oxidative level was evaluated by reactive oxidative species, malondialdehyde and glutathione detection. Furthermore, the expression level of Erk, p-Erk, Nrf-2 were assessed using Western blot. Results: Treatment with ethanol induced marked cell injury and cell apoptosis in BRL cells. Licochalcone B significantly attenuated ethanol-induced cell injury, and inhibited cell apoptosis. Furthermore, licochalcone B significantly inhibited ethanol-induced intracellular oxidative level, upregulated the expression of p-Erk, and promoted nuclear localization of Nrf2. Additionally, this hepatoprotective role was significantly abolished by inhibition of Erk signaling. However, no apparent effects of Erk inhibition were observed on ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that licochalcone B protects hepatocyte from alcohol-induced cell injury, and this hepatoprotective role might be attributable to apoptosis reduction, inhibition of oxidative stress, and upregulation of Erk–Nrf2. Therefore, licochalcone B might possess potential as a novel therapeutic drug candidate for alcohol-related liver disorders. PMID:28293388

  20. mIGF-1/JNK1/SirT1 signaling confers protection against oxidative stress in the heart.

    PubMed

    Vinciguerra, Manlio; Santini, Maria Paola; Martinez, Conception; Pazienza, Valerio; Claycomb, William C; Giuliani, Alessandro; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2012-02-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of aging-associated heart failure. Among various signaling pathways mediating oxidative stress, the NAD(+) -dependent protein deacetylase SirT1 has been implicated in the protection of heart muscle. Expression of a locally acting insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) propeptide (mIGF-1) helps the heart to recover from infarct and enhances SirT1 expression in cardiomyocytes (CM) in vitro, exerting protection from hypertrophic and oxidative stresses. To study the role of mIGF-1/SirT1 signaling in vivo, we generated cardiac-specific mIGF-1 transgenic mice in which SirT1 was depleted from adult CM in a tamoxifen-inducible and conditional fashion. Analysis of these mice confirmed that mIGF-1-induced SirT1 activity is necessary to protect the heart from paraquat (PQ)-induced oxidative stress and lethality. In cultured CM, mIGF-1 increases SirT1 expression through a c-Jun NH(2)-terminal protein kinase 1 (JNK1)-dependent signaling mechanism. Thus, mIGF-1 protects the heart from oxidative stress via SirT1/JNK1 activity, suggesting new avenues for cardiac therapy during aging and heart failure.

  1. Coconut oil protects cortical neurons from amyloid beta toxicity by enhancing signaling of cell survival pathways.

    PubMed

    Nafar, F; Clarke, J P; Mearow, K M

    2017-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that has links with other conditions that can often be modified by dietary and life-style interventions. In particular, coconut oil has received attention as having potentially having benefits in lessening the cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease. In a recent report, we showed that neuron survival in cultures co-treated with coconut oil and Aβ was rescued compared to cultures exposed only to Aβ. Here we investigated treatment with Aβ for 1, 6 or 24 h followed by addition of coconut oil for a further 24 h, or treatment with coconut oil for 24 h followed by Aβ exposure for various periods. Neuronal survival and several cellular parameters (cleaved caspase 3, synaptophysin labeling and ROS) were assessed. In addition, the influence of these treatments on relevant signaling pathways was investigated with Western blotting. In terms of the treatment timing, our data indicated that coconut oil rescues cells pre-exposed to Aβ for 1 or 6 h, but is less effective when the pre-exposure has been 24 h. However, pretreatment with coconut oil prior to Aβ exposure showed the best outcomes. Treatment with octanoic or lauric acid also provided protection against Aβ, but was not as effective as the complete oil. The coconut oil treatment reduced the number of cells with cleaved caspase and ROS labeling, as well as rescuing the loss of synaptophysin labeling observed with Aβ treatment. Treatment with coconut oil, as well as octanoic, decanoic and lauric acids, resulted in a modest increase in ketone bodies compared to controls. The biochemical data suggest that Akt and ERK activation may contribute to the survival promoting influence of coconut oil. This was supported by observations that a PI3-Kinase inhibitor blocked the rescue effect of CoOil on Aβ amyloid toxicity. Further studies into the mechanisms of action of coconut oil and its constituent medium chain fatty acids are warranted.

  2. Inhibitory effect of cadmium on estrogen signaling in zebrafish brain and protection by zinc.

    PubMed

    Chouchene, Lina; Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Gueguen, Marie-Madeleine; Hinfray, Nathalie; Brion, François; Piccini, Benjamin; Kah, Olivier; Saïd, Khaled; Messaoudi, Imed; Pakdel, Farzad

    2016-06-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the effects of Cd exposure on estrogen signaling in the zebrafish brain, as well as the potential protective role of Zn against Cd-induced toxicity. For this purpose, the effects on transcriptional activation of the estrogen receptors (ERs), aromatase B (Aro-B) protein expression and molecular expression of related genes were examined in vivo using wild-type and transgenic zebrafish embryos. For in vitro studies, an ER-negative glial cell line (U251MG) transfected with different zebrafish ER subtypes (ERα, ERβ1 and ERβ2) was also used. Embryos were exposed either to estradiol (E2 ), Cd, E2 +Cd or E2 +Cd+Zn for 72 h and cells were exposed to the same treatments for 30 h. Our results show that E2 treatment promoted the transcriptional activation of ERs and increased Aro-B expression, at both the protein and mRNA levels. Although exposure to Cd, does not affect the studied parameters when administered alone, it significantly abolished the E2 -stimulated transcriptional response of the reporter gene for the three ER subtypes in U251-MG cells, and clearly inhibited the E2 induction of Aro-B in radial glial cells of zebrafish embryos. These inhibitory effects were accompanied by a significant downregulation of the expression of esr1, esr2a, esr2b and cyp19a1b genes compared to the E2 -treated group used as a positive control. Zn administration during simultaneous exposure to E2 and Cd strongly stimulated zebrafish ERs transactivation and increased Aro-B protein expression, whereas mRNA levels of the three ERs as well as the cyp19a1b remained unchanged in comparison with Cd-treated embryos. In conclusion, our results clearly demonstrate that Cd acts as a potent anti-estrogen in vivo and in vitro, and that Cd-induced E2 antagonism can be reversed, at the protein level, by Zn supplement. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Constitutive overexpression of Norrin activates Wnt/β-catenin and endothelin-2 signaling to protect photoreceptors from light damage.

    PubMed

    Braunger, Barbara M; Ohlmann, Andreas; Koch, Marcus; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Volz, Cornelia; Yang, Ying; Bösl, Michael R; Cvekl, Ales; Jägle, Herbert; Seeliger, Mathias W; Tamm, Ernst R

    2013-02-01

    Norrin is a retinal signaling molecule which is expressed in Müller glia and binds to Frizzled-4 to activate canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Norrin is part of an essential signaling system that controls the formation of retinal capillaries during development. To evaluate neuroprotective properties of Norrin independently from its function during retinal angiogenesis, we generated transgenic mice (Rpe65-Norrin) that constitutively express Norrin in the retinal pigmented epithelium. Substantial amounts of Norrin were secreted into the outer retina, which triggered retinal Wnt/β-catenin signaling in conjunction with an increase in the expression of endothelin-2 (EDN2), endothelin receptor B (EDNRB), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Photoreceptors of Norrin-overexpressing mice were significantly less vulnerable to light-induced damage compared to their wild-type littermates. Following light damage, we observed less apoptotic death of photoreceptors and a better retinal function than in controls. The protective effects were abolished if either Wnt/β-catenin or EDN2 signaling was blocked by intravitreal injection of Dickkopf-1 or BQ788, respectively. Light-damaged retinae from transgenic mice contained higher amounts of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and pAkt than those of wild-type littermates. We conclude that constitutive overexpression of Norrin protects photoreceptors from light damage, an effect that is mediated by Wnt/β-catenin and EDN2 signaling and involves neurotrophic activities of BDNF. The findings suggest that Norrin and its associated signaling pathways have strong potentials to attenuate photoreceptor death following injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cellular signaling protective against noise-induced hearing loss – A role for novel intrinsic cochlear signaling involving corticotropin-releasing factor?

    PubMed

    Vetter, Douglas E

    2015-09-01

    Hearing loss afflicts approximately 15% of the world's population, and crosses all socioeconomic boundaries. While great strides have been made in understanding the genetic components of syndromic and non-syndromic hearing loss, understanding of the mechanisms underlying noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) have come much more slowly. NIHL is not simply a mechanism by which older individuals loose their hearing. Significantly, the incidence of NIHL is increasing, and is now involving ever younger populations. This may predict future increased occurrences of hearing loss. Current research has shown that even short-term exposures to loud sounds generating what was previously considered temporary hearing loss, actually produces an almost immediate and permanent loss of specific populations of auditory nerve fibers. Additionally, recurrent exposures to intense sound may hasten age-related hearing loss. While NIHL is a significant medical concern, to date, few compounds have delivered significant protection, arguing that new targets need to be identified. In this commentary, we will explore cellular signaling processes taking place in the cochlea believed to be involved in protection against hearing loss, and highlight new data suggestive of novel signaling not previously recognized as occurring in the cochlea, that is perhaps protective of hearing. This includes a recently described local hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA)-like signaling system fully contained in the cochlea. This system may represent a local cellular stress-response system based on stress hormone release similar to the systemic HPA axis. Its discovery may hold hope for new drug therapies that can be delivered directly to the cochlea, circumventing systemic side effects.

  5. Use and Protection of GPS Sidelobe Signals for Enhanced Navigation Performance in High Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Joel J. K.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Bauer, Frank H.; Moreau, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    GPS (Global Positioning System) Space Service Volume (SSV) signal environment is from 3,000-36,000 kilometers altitude. Current SSV specifications only capture performance provided by signals transmitted within 23.5(L1) or 26(L2-L5) off-nadir angle. Recent on-orbit data lessons learned show significant PNT (Positioning, Navigation and Timing) performance improvements when the full aggregate signal is used. Numerous military civil operational missions in High Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (HEOGEO) utilize the full signal to enhance vehicle PNT performance

  6. Disruption of sonic hedgehog signaling in Ellis-van Creveld dwarfism confers protection against bipolar affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Ginns, E I; Galdzicka, M; Elston, R C; Song, Y E; Paul, S M; Egeland, J A

    2015-10-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, an autosomal recessively inherited chondrodysplastic dwarfism, is frequent among Old Order Amish of Pennsylvania. Decades of longitudinal research on bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) revealed cosegregation of high numbers of EvC and Bipolar I (BPI) cases in several large Amish families descending from the same pioneer. Despite the high prevalence of both disorders in these families, no EvC individual has ever been reported with BPI. The proximity of the EVC gene to our previously reported chromosome 4p16 BPAD locus with protective alleles, coupled with detailed clinical observations that EvC and BPI do not occur in the same individuals, led us to hypothesize that the genetic defect causing EvC in the Amish confers protection from BPI. This hypothesis is supported by a significant negative association of these two disorders when contrasted with absence of disease (P=0.029, Fisher's exact test, two-sided, verified by permutation to estimate the null distribution of the test statistic). As homozygous Amish EVC mutations causing EvC dwarfism do so by disrupting sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, our data implicate Shh signaling in the underlying pathophysiology of BPAD. Understanding how disrupted Shh signaling protects against BPI could uncover variants in the Shh pathway that cause or increase risk for this and related mood disorders.

  7. A novel inhibitor of the insulin/IGF signaling pathway protects from age-onset, neurodegeneration-linked proteotoxicity.

    PubMed

    El-Ami, Tayir; Moll, Lorna; Carvalhal Marques, Filipa; Volovik, Yuli; Reuveni, Hadas; Cohen, Ehud

    2014-02-01

    Aging manipulation is an emerging strategy aimed to postpone the manifestation of late-onset neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's (AD) and Huntington's diseases (HD) and to slow their progression once emerged. Reducing the activity of the insulin/IGF signaling cascade (IIS), a prominent aging-regulating pathway, protects worms from proteotoxicity of various aggregative proteins, including the AD-associated peptide, Aβ- and the HD-linked peptide, polyQ40. Similarly, IGF1 signaling reduction protects mice from AD-like disease. These discoveries suggest that IIS inhibitors can serve as new drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative maladies including AD and HD. Here, we report that NT219, a novel IIS inhibitor, mediates a long-lasting, highly efficient inhibition of this signaling cascade by a dual mechanism; it reduces the autophosphorylation of the IGF1 receptor and directs the insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 (IRS 1/2) for degradation. NT219 treatment promotes stress resistance and protects nematodes from AD- and HD-associated proteotoxicity without affecting lifespan. Our discoveries strengthen the theme that IIS inhibition has a therapeutic potential as a cure for neurodegenerative maladies and point at NT219 as a promising compound for the treatment of these disorders through a selective manipulation of aging.

  8. Phase Retrieval from Modulus Using Homeomorphic Signal Processing and the Complex Cepstrum: An Algorithm for Lightning Protection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G A

    2004-06-08

    In general, the Phase Retrieval from Modulus problem is very difficult. In this report, we solve the difficult, but somewhat more tractable case in which we constrain the solution to a minimum phase reconstruction. We exploit the real-and imaginary part sufficiency properties of the Fourier and Hilbert Transforms of causal sequences to develop an algorithm for reconstructing spectral phase given only spectral modulus. The algorithm uses homeomorphic signal processing methods with the complex cepstrum. The formal problem of interest is: Given measurements of only the modulus {vert_bar}H(k){vert_bar} (no phase) of the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) of a real, finite-length, stable, causal time domain signal h(n), compute a minimum phase reconstruction {cflx h}(n) of the signal. Then compute the phase of {cflx h}(n) using a DFT, and exploit the result as an estimate of the phase of h(n). The development of the algorithm is quite involved, but the final algorithm and its implementation are very simple. This work was motivated by a Phase Retrieval from Modulus Problem that arose in LLNL Defense Sciences Engineering Division (DSED) projects in lightning protection for buildings. The measurements are limited to modulus-only spectra from a spectrum analyzer. However, it is desired to perform system identification on the building to compute impulse responses and transfer functions that describe the amount of lightning energy that will be transferred from the outside of the building to the inside. This calculation requires knowledge of the entire signals (both modulus and phase). The algorithm and software described in this report are proposed as an approach to phase retrieval that can be used for programmatic needs. This report presents a brief tutorial description of the mathematical problem and the derivation of the phase retrieval algorithm. The efficacy of the theory is demonstrated using simulated signals that meet the assumptions of the algorithm. We see that for

  9. Microbes versus microbes: immune signals generated by probiotic lactobacilli and their role in protection against microbial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cross, Martin L

    2002-12-13

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria can signal the immune system through innate cell surface pattern recognition receptors or via direct lymphoid cell activation. In some cases, this action has been shown to be sufficient to modulate local- and systemic-level in vivo immune responses. Practical applications of probiotics include their use in anti-tumour and anti-allergy immunotherapy, but there is also increasing evidence that some probiotics can stimulate a protective immune response sufficiently to enhance resistance to microbial pathogens. This review outlines the experimental and clinical evidence for enhanced anti-microbial immune protection by probiotic lactic acid bacteria, focussing on those studies where a correlative or suggestive link has been shown between immune modulation and enhanced protection.

  10. Activated signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 signaling induces CD46 expression and protects human cancer cells from complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Buettner, Ralf; Huang, Mei; Gritsko, Tanya; Karras, Jim; Enkemann, Steve; Mesa, Tania; Nam, Sangkil; Yu, Hua; Jove, Richard

    2007-08-01

    CD46 is one of the complement-regulatory proteins expressed on the surface of normal and tumor cells for protection against complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Cancer cells need to access the blood circulation for continued growth and metastasis, thus exposing themselves to destruction by complement system components. Previous studies have established that the signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) transcription factor is persistently activated in a wide variety of human cancer cells and primary tumor tissues compared with their normal counterparts. Using microarray gene expression profiling, we identified the CD46 gene as a target for activated STAT3 signaling in human breast and prostate cancer cells. The CD46 promoter contains two binding sites for activated STAT3 and mutations introduced into the major site abolished STAT3 binding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirms binding of STAT3 to the CD46 promoter. CD46 promoter activity is induced by activation of STAT3 and blocked by a dominant-negative form of STAT3 in luciferase reporter assays. CD46 mRNA expression is induced by interleukin-6 and by transient transfection of normal human epithelial cells with a persistently active mutant construct of STAT3, STAT3C. Furthermore, we show that inhibition of STAT3-mediated CD46 cell surface expression sensitizes DU145 prostate cancer cells to cytotoxicity in an in vitro complement lysis assay using rabbit anti-DU145 antiserum and rabbit complement. These results show that activated STAT3 signaling induces the CD46 promoter and protects human cancer cells from complement-dependent cytotoxicity, suggesting a potential mechanism whereby oncogenic signaling contributes to tumor cell evasion of antibody-mediated immunity.

  11. Valproic acid protects against haemorrhagic shock‐induced signalling changes via PPARγ activation in an in vitro model

    PubMed Central

    Zuckermann, Alexandra M E; La Ragione, Roberto M; Baines, Deborah L

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Valproic acid (VPA), a widely used epilepsy and bipolar disorder treatment, provides acute protection against haemorrhagic shock‐induced mortality in a range of in vivo models through an unknown mechanism. In the liver, this effect occurs with a concomitant protection against a decrease in GSK3β‐Ser9 phosphorylation. Here, we developed an in vitro model to investigate this protective effect of VPA and define a molecular mechanism. Experimental Approach The human hepatocarcinoma cell line (Huh7) was exposed to conditions occurring during haemorrhagic shock (hypoxia, hypercapnia and hypothermia) to investigate the changes in GSK3β‐Ser9 phosphorylation for a 4 h period following treatment with VPA, related congeners, PPAR agonists, antagonists and siRNA. Key Results Huh7 cells undergoing combined hypoxia, hypercapnia, and hypothermia reproduced the reduced GSK3β‐Ser9 phosphorylation shown in vivo during haemorrhagic shock, and this change was blocked by VPA. The protective effect occurred through upstream PTEN and Akt signalling, and prevented downstream β‐catenin degradation while increasing histone 2/3 acetylation. This effect was reproduced by several VPA‐related compounds with known PPARγ agonist activity, independent of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitory activity. Specific pharmacological inhibition (by T0070907) or knockdown of PPARγ blocked the protective effect of VPA against these signalling changes and apoptosis. In addition, specific activation of PPARγ using ciglitazone reproduced the changes induced by VPA in haemorrhagic shock‐like conditions. Conclusion and Implications Changes in GSK3β‐Ser9 phosphorylation in in vivo haemorrhagic shock models can be modelled in vitro, and this has identified a role for PPARγ activation in the protective role of VPA. PMID:26333042

  12. Epithelial-specific A2B adenosine receptor signaling protects the colonic epithelial barrier during acute colitis

    PubMed Central

    Aherne, CM; Saeedi, B; Collins, CB; Masterson, JC; McNamee, EN; Perrenoud, L; Rapp, CR; Curtis, VF; Bayless, A; Fletcher, A; Glover, LE; Evans, CM; Jedlicka, P; Furuta, GT; de Zoeten, EF; Colgan, SP; Eltzschig, HK

    2015-01-01

    Central to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) pathogenesis is loss of mucosal barrier function. Emerging evidence implicates extracellular adenosine signaling in attenuating mucosal inflammation. We hypothesized that adenosine-mediated protection from intestinal barrier dysfunction involves tissue-specific signaling through the A2B adenosine receptor (Adora2b) at the intestinal mucosal surface. To address this hypothesis, we combined pharmacologic studies and studies in mice with global or tissue-specific deletion of the Adora2b receptor. Adora2b−/− mice experienced a significantly heightened severity of colitis, associated with a more acute onset of disease and loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function. Comparison of mice with Adora2b deletion on vascular endothelial cells (Adora2bfl/flVeCadCre+) or intestinal epithelia (Adora2bfl/flVillinCre+) revealed a selective role for epithelial Adora2b signaling in attenuating colonic inflammation. In vitro studies with Adora2b knockdown in intestinal epithelial cultures or pharmacologic studies highlighted Adora2b-driven phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a specific barrier repair response. Similarly, in vivo studies in genetic mouse models or treatment studies with an Adora2b agonist (BAY 60-6583) recapitulate these findings. Taken together, our results suggest that intestinal epithelial Adora2b signaling provides protection during intestinal inflammation via enhancing mucosal barrier responses. PMID:25850656

  13. Insulin/PI3K signaling protects dentate neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation in organotypic slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaolu; Yao, Hang; Douglas, Robert M; Gu, Xiang Q; Wang, Juan; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2010-01-01

    It is known that ischemia/reperfusion induces neurodegeneration in the hippocampus in a subregion-dependent manner. This study investigated the mechanism of selective resistance/vulnerability to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) using mouse organotypic hippocampal cultures. Analysis of propidium iodide uptake showed that OGD-induced duration- and subregion-dependent neuronal injury. When compared with the CA1-3 subregions, dentate neuronal survival was more sensitive to inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling under basal conditions. Dentate neuronal sensitivity to PI3K/Akt signaling activation was inversely related to its vulnerability to OGD-induced injury; insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 pre-treatment conferred neuroprotection to dentate neurons via activation of PI3K/Akt signaling. In contrast, CA1 and CA3 neurons were less sensitive to disruptions of endogenous PI3K/Akt signaling and protective effects of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1, but more vulnerable to OGD. OGD-induced injury in CA1 was reduced by inhibition of NMDA receptor or mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, and was prevented by blocking NMDA receptor in the presence of insulin. The CA2 subregion was distinctive in its response to glutamate, OGD, and insulin, compared with other CA subregions. CA2 neurons were sensitive to the protective effects of insulin against OGD-induced injury, but more resistant to glutamate. Distinctive distribution of insulin receptor beta and basal phospho-Akt was detected in our slice cultures. Our results suggest a role for insulin signaling in subregional resistance/vulnerability to cerebral ischemia.

  14. Stem cell factor (SCF) protects osteoblasts from oxidative stress through activating c-Kit-Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lei; Wu, Zhong; Yin, Gang; Liu, Haifeng; Guan, Xiaojun; Zhao, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Jianguang; Zhu, Jianguo

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • SCF receptor c-Kit is functionally expressed in primary and transformed osteoblasts. • SCF protects primary and transformed osteoblasts from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • SCF activation of c-Kit in osteoblasts, required for its cyto-protective effects. • c-Kit mediates SCF-induced Akt activation in cultured osteoblasts. • Akt activation is required for SCF-regulated cyto-protective effects in osteoblasts. - Abstract: Osteoblasts regulate bone formation and remodeling, and are main target cells of oxidative stress in the progression of osteonecrosis. The stem cell factor (SCF)-c-Kit pathway plays important roles in the proliferation, differentiation and survival in a range of cell types, but little is known about its functions in osteoblasts. In this study, we found that c-Kit is functionally expressed in both osteoblastic-like MC3T3-E1 cells and primary murine osteoblasts. Its ligand SCF exerted significant cyto-protective effects against hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). SCF activated its receptor c-Kit in osteoblasts, which was required for its cyto-protective effects against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Pharmacological inhibition (by Imatinib and Dasatinib) or shRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Kit thus inhibited SCF-mediated osteoblast protection. Further investigations showed that protection by SCF against H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was mediated via activation of c-Kit-dependent Akt pathway. Inhibition of Akt activation, through pharmacological or genetic means, suppressed SCF-mediated anti-H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activity in osteoblasts. In summary, we have identified a new SCF-c-Kit-Akt physiologic pathway that protects osteoblasts from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced damages, and might minimize the risk of osteonecrosis caused by oxidative stress.

  15. Verapamil protects against cartilage degradation in osteoarthritis by inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, Akira; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Sakai, Tadahiro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2014-01-01

    In past years, the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway has emerged as a critical regulator of cartilage development and homeostasis. FRZB, a soluble antagonist of Wnt signaling, has been studied in osteoarthritis (OA) animal models and OA patients as a modulator of Wnt signaling. We screened for FDA-approved drugs that induce FRZB expression and suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We found that verapamil, a widely prescribed L-type calcium channel blocker, elevated FRZB expression and suppressed Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human OA chondrocytes. Expression and nuclear translocation of β-catenin was attenuated by verapamil in OA chondrocytes. Lack of the verapamil effects in LiCl-treated and FRZB-downregulated OA chondrocytes also suggested that verpamil suppressed Wnt signaling by inducing FRZB. Verapamil enhanced gene expressions of chondrogenic markers of ACAN encoding aggrecan, COL2A1 encoding collagen type II α1, and SOX9, and suppressed Wnt-responsive AXIN2 and MMP3 in human OA chondrocytes. Verapamil ameliorated Wnt3A-induced proteoglycan loss in chondrogenically differentiated ATDC5 cells. Verapamil inhibited hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes in the explant culture of mouse tibiae. Intraarticular injection of verapamil inhibited OA progression as well as nuclear localizations of β-catenin in a rat OA model. We propose that verapamil holds promise as a potent therapeutic agent for OA by upregulating FRZB and subsequently downregulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  16. Catalpol Protects Pre-Myelinating Oligodendrocytes against Ischemia-induced Oxidative Injury through ERK1/2 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiyan; Ma, Teng; Li, Chengren; Tian, Yanping; Li, Hongli

    2016-01-01

    The vulnerability of pre-myelinating oligodendrocytes (PreOLs) to ischemic injury plays an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of perinatal white matter injury. Although oxidative stress is thought to be a major pathogenic mechanism predisposing the PreOLs to injury, no effective therapies have been identified to date. The present study aimed to investigate the direct protective effects of catalpol, a potent antioxidant and free radical scavenger, on ischemia-induced oxidative damage in PreOLs and to explore whether the ERK1/2 signaling pathway contributed to the protection provided by catalpol. Primary cultures of PreOLs exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by reperfusion were used as an in vitro model of ischemia. Pretreatment with 0.5 mM catalpol for 1 h prior to OGD treatment significantly reversed ischemia-induced apoptosis in PreOLs and myelination deficits by inhibiting intracellular Ca2+ increase, reducing mitochondrial damage, and ameliorating overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The expression levels of phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) and activated poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1) were also markedly decreased by catalpol treatment. Blocking the ERK1/2 signaling pathway with the MEK inhibitor U0126 and catalpol significantly protected PreOLs from ROS-mediated apoptosis under OGD. Taken together, these results suggest that catalpol protects PreOLs against ischemia-induced oxidative injury through ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Catalpol may be a candidate for treating ischemic white matter damage. PMID:27994507

  17. Autophagy protects gastric mucosal epithelial cells from ethanol-induced oxidative damage via mTOR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Weilong; Bai, Jie; Tian, Shaobo; Ma, Muyuan; Li, Wei; Yin, Yuping; Deng, Rui; Cui, Jinyuan; Li, Jinjin; Wang, Guobin; Zhang, Peng; Tao, Kaixiong

    2017-05-01

    Alcohol abuse is an important cause of gastric mucosal epithelial cell injury and gastric ulcers. A number of studies have demonstrated that autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved cellular mechanism, has a protective effect on cell survival. However, it is not known whether autophagy can protect gastric mucosal epithelial cells against the toxic effects of ethanol. In the present study, gastric mucosal epithelial cells (GES-1 cells) and Wistar rats were treated with ethanol to detect the adaptive response of autophagy. Our results demonstrated that ethanol exposure induced gastric mucosal epithelial cell damage, which was accompanied by the downregulation of mTOR signaling pathway and activation of autophagy. Suppression of autophagy with pharmacological agents resulted in a significant increase of GES-1 cell apoptosis and gastric mucosa injury, suggesting that autophagy could protect cells from ethanol toxicity. Furthermore, we evaluated the cellular oxidative stress response following ethanol treatment and found that autophagy induced by ethanol inhibited generation of reactive oxygen species and degradation of antioxidant and lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, these findings provide evidence that ethanol can activate autophagy via downregulation of the mTOR signaling pathway, serving as an adaptive mechanism to ameliorate oxidative damage induced by ethanol in gastric mucosal epithelial cells. Therefore, modifying autophagy may provide a therapeutic strategy against alcoholic gastric mucosa injury. Impact statement The effect and mechanism of autophagy on ethanol-induced cell damage remain controversial. In this manuscript, we report the results of our study demonstrating that autophagy can protect gastric mucosal epithelial cells against ethanol toxicity in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that ethanol can activate autophagy via downregulation of the mTOR signaling pathway, serving as an adaptive mechanism to ameliorate ethanol-induced oxidative damage in

  18. Interferon Gamma Induces Protective Non-Canonical Signaling Pathways in Primary Neurons

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Lauren A.; Henkins, Kristen M.; Kulkarni, Apurva; Matullo, Christine M.; Balachandran, Siddharth; Pattisapu, Anil K.; Rall, Glenn F.

    2016-01-01

    The signal transduction molecule, Stat1, is critical for the expression of type I and II interferon (IFN)-responsive genes in most cells; however, we previously showed that primary hippocampal mouse neurons express low basal Stat1, with delayed and attenuated expression of IFN-responsive genes. Moreover, IFNγ-dependent resolution of a neurotropic viral challenge in permissive mice is Stat1-independent. Here, we show that exogenous INFγ has no deleterious impact on neuronal viability, and staurosporine-induced apoptosis in neurons is significantly blunted by the addition of INFγ, suggesting that INFγ confers a pro-survival signal in neurons. To identify the pathways induced by INFγ in neurons, the activation of alternative signal transducers associated with INFγ signaling was assessed. Rapid and pronounced activation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (Erk1/2) was observed in neurons, compared to a modest response in fibroblasts. Moreover, the absence of Stat1 in primary fibroblasts led to enhanced Erk activation following IFNγ addition, implying that the cell-specific availability of signal transducers can diversify the cellular response following IFN engagement. PMID:26190522

  19. Biallelic expression of Tbx1 protects the embryo against developmental defects caused by increased Receptor Tyrosine Kinase signalling

    PubMed Central

    Simrick, Subreena; Szumska, Dorota; Gardiner, Jennifer R.; Jones, Kieran; Sagar, Karun; Morrow, Bernice; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Basson, M. Albert

    2014-01-01

    Background 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome in humans, characterised by cardiovascular defects such as interrupted aortic arch, outflow tract defects, thymus and parathyroid hypo- or aplasia and cleft palate. Heterozygosity of Tbx1, the mouse homologue of the candidate TBX1 gene, results in mild defects dependent on genetic background, whereas complete inactivation results in severe malformations in multiple tissues. Results The loss of function mutations in two Sprouty genes, which encode feedback antagonists of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, phenocopy many defects associated with the syndrome in the mouse. The stepwise reduction of Sprouty gene dosage resulted in different phenotypes emerging at specific steps, suggesting that the threshold up to which a given developmental process can tolerate increased RTK signaling is different. Tbx1 heterozygosity significantly exacerbated the severity of all these defects, which correlated with a substantial increase in RTK signaling. Conclusions Our findings suggest that TBX1 functions as an essential component of a mechanism that protects the embryo against perturbations in RTK signaling that may lead to developmental defects characteristic of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. We propose that genetic factors that enhance RTK signalling ought to be considered as potential genetic modifiers of this syndrome. PMID:22674535

  20. Stem cell factor (SCF) protects osteoblasts from oxidative stress through activating c-Kit-Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Wu, Zhong; Yin, Gang; Liu, Haifeng; Guan, Xiaojun; Zhao, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Jianguang; Zhu, Jianguo

    2014-12-12

    Osteoblasts regulate bone formation and remodeling, and are main target cells of oxidative stress in the progression of osteonecrosis. The stem cell factor (SCF)-c-Kit pathway plays important roles in the proliferation, differentiation and survival in a range of cell types, but little is known about its functions in osteoblasts. In this study, we found that c-Kit is functionally expressed in both osteoblastic-like MC3T3-E1 cells and primary murine osteoblasts. Its ligand SCF exerted significant cyto-protective effects against hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). SCF activated its receptor c-Kit in osteoblasts, which was required for its cyto-protective effects against H₂O₂. Pharmacological inhibition (by Imatinib and Dasatinib) or shRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Kit thus inhibited SCF-mediated osteoblast protection. Further investigations showed that protection by SCF against H₂O₂ was mediated via activation of c-Kit-dependent Akt pathway. Inhibition of Akt activation, through pharmacological or genetic means, suppressed SCF-mediated anti-H₂O₂ activity in osteoblasts. In summary, we have identified a new SCF-c-Kit-Akt physiologic pathway that protects osteoblasts from H₂O₂-induced damages, and might minimize the risk of osteonecrosis caused by oxidative stress.

  1. Curcumin protects neuronal-like cells against acrolein by restoring Akt and redox signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Doggui, Sihem; Belkacemi, Abdenour; Paka, Ghislain Djiokeng; Perrotte, Morgane; Pi, Rongbiao; Ramassamy, Charles

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the neuroprotective effect of curcumin against the toxicity induced by acrolein and to identify its cellular mechanisms and targets. Human neuroblastoma cells SK-N-SH were treated with acrolein. Curcumin, from 5 μM, was able to protect SK-N-SH cells against acrolein toxicity. The addition of curcumin restored the expression of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, reactive oxygen species, and reactive nitrogen species levels but had no effect on the decrease of glutathione (GSH) and on the elevation of protein carbonyls. Acrolein induced the activity of Nrf2, NF-κB, and Sirt1. These activations were prevented by the presence of curcumin. Acrolein also induced a decrease of the pAkt, which was counteracted by curcumin. To increase its solubility, we have encapsulated curcumin in a biodegradable poly(lactide-co-glycolide) based nanoparticulate formulation (Nps-Cur). Our results showed that 0.5 μM of Nps-Cur can protect neuronal cells challenged with acrolein while free curcumin was not able to display neuroprotection. Our results provided evidence that curcumin was able to protect SK-N-SH cells against acrolein toxicity. This protection is mediated through the antioxidant, the redox, and the survival regulated pathways by curcumin. Moreover, our results demonstrated that Nps-Cur had higher capacity than curcumin to protect SK-N-SH cells against acrolein. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Inhibition of Rac1 signaling by lovastatin protects against anthracycline-induced cardiac toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Huelsenbeck, J; Henninger, C; Schad, A; Lackner, K J; Kaina, B; Fritz, G

    2011-01-01

    Normal tissue damage limits the efficacy of anticancer therapy. For anthracyclines, the clinically most relevant adverse effect is cardiotoxicity. The mechanisms involved are poorly understood and putative cardioprotectants are controversially discussed. Here, we show that the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin protects rat H9c2 cardiomyoblasts from doxorubicin in vitro. Protection by lovastatin is related to inhibition of the Ras-homologous GTPase Rac1. It rests on a reduced formation of DNA double-strand breaks, resulting from the inhibition of topoisomerase II by doxorubicin. Doxorubicin transport and reactive oxygen species are not involved. Protection by lovastatin was confirmed in vivo. In mice, lovastatin mitigated acute doxorubicin-induced heart and liver damage as indicated by reduced mRNA levels of the pro-fibrotic cytokine connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and pro-inflammatory cytokines, respectively. Lovastatin also protected from doxorubicin-provoked subacute cardiac damage as shown by lowered mRNA levels of CTGF and atrial natriuretic peptide. Increase in the serum concentration of troponin I and cardiac fibrosis following doxorubicin treatment were also reduced by lovastatin. Whereas protecting the heart from harmful doxorubicin effects, lovastatin augmented its anticancer efficacy in a mouse xenograft model with human sarcoma cells. These data show that statins lower the incidence of cardiac tissue injury after anthracycline treatment in a Rac1-dependent manner, without impairing the therapeutic efficacy. PMID:21833028

  3. SC79 protects retinal pigment epithelium cells from UV radiation via activating Akt-Nrf2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi-Qing; Huang, Wei; Li, Ke-Ran; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Cao, Guo-Fan; Cao, Cong; Jiang, Qin

    2016-09-13

    Excessive Ultra-violet (UV) radiation causes oxidative damages and apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Here we tested the potential activity of SC79, a novel small molecule activator of Akt, against the process. We showed that SC79 activated Akt in primary and established (ARPE-19 line) RPE cells. It protected RPE cells from UV damages possibly via inhibiting cell apoptosis. Akt inhibition, via an Akt specific inhibitor (MK-2206) or Akt1 shRNA silence, almost abolished SC79-induced RPE cytoprotection. Further studies showed that SC79 activated Akt-dependent NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling and inhibited UV-induced oxidative stress in RPE cells. Reversely, Nrf2 shRNA knockdown or S40T mutation attenuated SC79-induced anti-UV activity. For the in vivo studies, we showed that intravitreal injection of SC79 significantly protected mouse retina from light damages. Based on these results, we suggest that SC79 protects RPE cells from UV damages possibly via activating Akt-Nrf2 signaling axis.

  4. SC79 protects retinal pigment epithelium cells from UV radiation via activating Akt-Nrf2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guo-fan; Cao, Cong; Jiang, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Excessive Ultra-violet (UV) radiation causes oxidative damages and apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Here we tested the potential activity of SC79, a novel small molecule activator of Akt, against the process. We showed that SC79 activated Akt in primary and established (ARPE-19 line) RPE cells. It protected RPE cells from UV damages possibly via inhibiting cell apoptosis. Akt inhibition, via an Akt specific inhibitor (MK-2206) or Akt1 shRNA silence, almost abolished SC79-induced RPE cytoprotection. Further studies showed that SC79 activated Akt-dependent NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling and inhibited UV-induced oxidative stress in RPE cells. Reversely, Nrf2 shRNA knockdown or S40T mutation attenuated SC79-induced anti-UV activity. For the in vivo studies, we showed that intravitreal injection of SC79 significantly protected mouse retina from light damages. Based on these results, we suggest that SC79 protects RPE cells from UV damages possibly via activating Akt-Nrf2 signaling axis. PMID:27517753

  5. Myofiber-specific inhibition of TGFβ signaling protects skeletal muscle from injury and dystrophic disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Accornero, Federica; Kanisicak, Onur; Tjondrokoesoemo, Andoria; Attia, Aria C; McNally, Elizabeth M; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2014-12-20

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a disease characterized by skeletal muscle necrosis and the progressive accumulation of fibrotic tissue. While transforming growth factor (TGF)-β has emerged as central effector of MD and fibrotic disease, the cell types in diseased muscle that underlie TGFβ-dependent pathology have not been segregated. Here, we generated transgenic mice with myofiber-specific inhibition of TGFβ signaling owing to expression of a TGFβ type II receptor dominant-negative (dnTGFβRII) truncation mutant. Expression of dnTGFβRII in myofibers mitigated the dystrophic phenotype observed in δ-sarcoglycan-null (Sgcd(-/-)) mice through a mechanism involving reduced myofiber membrane fragility. The dnTGFβRII transgene also reduced muscle injury and improved muscle regeneration after cardiotoxin injury, as well as increased satellite cell numbers and activity. An unbiased global expression analysis revealed a number of potential mechanisms for dnTGFβRII-mediated protection, one of which was induction of the antioxidant protein metallothionein (Mt). Indeed, TGFβ directly inhibited Mt gene expression in vitro, the dnTGFβRII transgene conferred protection against reactive oxygen species accumulation in dystrophic muscle and treatment with Mt mimetics protected skeletal muscle upon injury in vivo and improved the membrane stability of dystrophic myofibers. Hence, our results show that the myofibers are central mediators of the deleterious effects associated with TGFβ signaling in MD.

  6. MCPIP1 Negatively Regulates Toll-like Receptor 4 Signaling and Protects Mice from LPS-induced Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shengping; Miao, Ruidong; Zhou, Zhou; Wang, Tianyi; Liu, Jianguo; Liu, Gang; Chen, Y. Eugene; Xin, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Jifeng; Fu, Mingui

    2013-01-01

    Septic shock is one of leading causes of morbidity and mortality in hospital patients. However, genetic factors predisposing to septic shock are not fully understood. Our previous work showed that MCP-induced protein 1 (MCPIP1) was induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS), which then negatively regulates LPS-induced inflammatory signaling in vitro. Here we report that although MCPIP1 was induced by various toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands in macrophages, MCPIP1-deficient mice are extremely susceptible to TLR4 ligand (LPS)-induced septic shock and death, but not to the TLR2, 3, 5 and 9 ligands-induced septic shock. Consistently, LPS induced tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) production in MCPIP1-deficient mice was 20-fold greater than that in their wild-type littermates. Further analysis revealed that MCPIP1-deficient mice developed severe acute lung injury after LPS injection and JNK signaling was highly activated in MCPIP1-deificient lungs after LPS stimulation. Finally, macrophage-specific MCPIP1 transgenic mice were partially protected from LPS-induced septic shock, suggesting that inflammatory cytokines from sources other than macrophages may significantly contribute to the pathogenesis of LPS-induced septic shock. Taken together, these results suggest that MCPIP1 selectively suppresses TLR4 signaling pathway and protects mice from LPS-induced septic shock. PMID:23422584

  7. Catalase protects tumor cells from apoptosis induction by intercellular ROS signaling.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, Wibke; Bauer, Georg

    2009-11-01

    Transformed cells are subject to intercellular induction of apoptosis by neighbouring nontransformed cells and to autocrine apoptotic self-destruction. Both processes depend on extracellular superoxide anion generation by the transformed cells and on the release of peroxidase from both nontransformed and transformed cells. This concerted action results in HOCl synthesis, HOCl-superoxide anion interaction and generation of apoptosis-inducing hydroxyl radicals. In contrast to transformed cells, ex vivo tumor cells are resistant against intercellular induction of apoptosis and autocrine apoptotic self-destruction. Resistance of tumor cells against intercellular ROS signaling depends on interference through catalase expression on the membrane. Intercellular ROS signaling of tumor cells can be restored when i) exogenous HOCl is added; ii) exogenous hydrogen peroxide is supplied, or iii) catalase is inhibited. These findings define the biochemical basis for specific apoptosis induction in tumor cells through re-establishment of intercellular ROS signaling, a potential novel approach in tumor prevention and therapy.

  8. Gamma Interferon Signaling in Oligodendrocytes Is Critical for Protection from Neurotropic Coronavirus Infection ▿

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Gabriel I.; Bergmann, Cornelia C.; Phares, Timothy W.; Hinton, David R.; Atkinson, Roscoe; Stohlman, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    Neurotropic coronavirus induces acute encephalomyelitis and demyelination in mice. Infection of BALB/c (H-2d) mice expressing a dominant negative gamma interferon (IFN-γ) receptor specifically in oligodendrocytes was examined to determine the influence of IFN-γ signaling on pathogenesis. Inhibition of IFN-γ signaling in oligodendrocytes increased viral load, infection of oligodendrocytes, oligodendrocyte loss, demyelination, and axonal damage resulting in increased mortality. IFN-γ levels and the inflammatory response were not altered, although the level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mRNA was increased. These data indicate that IFN-γ signaling by oligodendroglia reduces viral replication but affects both demyelination and tissue destruction in a host-specific manner. PMID:20042510

  9. Gamma interferon signaling in oligodendrocytes is critical for protection from neurotropic coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Parra, Gabriel I; Bergmann, Cornelia C; Phares, Timothy W; Hinton, David R; Atkinson, Roscoe; Stohlman, Stephen A

    2010-03-01

    Neurotropic coronavirus induces acute encephalomyelitis and demyelination in mice. Infection of BALB/c (H-2(d)) mice expressing a dominant negative gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) receptor specifically in oligodendrocytes was examined to determine the influence of IFN-gamma signaling on pathogenesis. Inhibition of IFN-gamma signaling in oligodendrocytes increased viral load, infection of oligodendrocytes, oligodendrocyte loss, demyelination, and axonal damage resulting in increased mortality. IFN-gamma levels and the inflammatory response were not altered, although the level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mRNA was increased. These data indicate that IFN-gamma signaling by oligodendroglia reduces viral replication but affects both demyelination and tissue destruction in a host-specific manner.

  10. Comparison of 14 decibels versus 20 decibels desired to undesired signal protection ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badinelli, Martin; Cushman, Arthur; Randazzo, Philip

    1991-04-01

    Due to a shortage of very high frequency (VHF) communications frequencies, the FAA must use the same frequencies in different airspaces across the country. The geographical separation between ground transmitters is engineered to provide a desired signal that is at least 14 decibel (dB) above any co-channel signal the receiver may receive. The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) recommends a greater 20-dB separation. This difference between the two signals is known as the desired to undesired (D/U) ratio. Tests performed on eight avionics receivers at the FAA Technical Center to compare receiver performance when exposed to 14- and 20-dB co-channel interference are described. It was concluded that at both D/U ratios, the receiver was able to reproduce clear, audible, and intelligible speech at both D/U ratios.

  11. IGFBP-3 inhibits TNF-α production and TNFR-2 signaling to protect against retinal endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuhua; Steinle, Jena J

    2014-09-01

    In models of diabetic retinopathy, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) protects against tumor necrosis factors-alpha (TNF-α)-mediated apoptosis of retinal microvascular endothelial cells (REC), but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Our current findings suggest that at least two discrete but complimentary pathways contribute to the protective effects of IGFBP-3; 1) IGFBP-3 directly activates the c-Jun kinase/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3/TNF-α converting enzyme (c-Jun/TIMP-3/TACE), pathway, which in turn inhibits TNF-α production; 2) IGFBP-3 acts through the IGFBP-3 receptor, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), to inhibit signaling of TNF-α receptor 2 (TNFR2). Combined, these two IGFBP-3 pathways substantially reduce REC apoptosis and offer potential targets for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy.

  12. Ghrelin Protects against Dexamethasone-Induced INS-1 Cell Apoptosis via ERK and p38MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid excess induces apoptosis of islet cells, which may result in diabetes. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of ghrelin on dexamethasone-induced INS-1 cell apoptosis. Our data showed that ghrelin (0.1 μM) inhibited dexamethasone-induced (0.1 μM) apoptosis of INS-1 cells and facilitated cell proliferation. Moreover, ghrelin upregulated Bcl-2 expression, downregulated Bax expression, and decreased caspase-3 activity. The protective effect of ghrelin against dexamethasone-induced INS-1 cell apoptosis was mediated via growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a. Further studies revealed that ghrelin increased ERK activation and decreased p38MAPK expression after dexamethasone treatment. Ghrelin-mediated protection of dexamethasone-induced apoptosis of INS-1 cells was attenuated using the ERK inhibitor U0126 (10 μM), and cell viability increased using the p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 (10 μM). In conclusion, ghrelin could protect against dexamethasone-induced INS-1 cell apoptosis, at least partially via GHS-R1a and the signaling pathway of ERK and p38MAPK. PMID:27190513

  13. PAR2 exerts local protection against acute pancreatitis via modulation of MAP kinase and MAP kinase phosphatase signaling.

    PubMed

    Namkung, Wan; Yoon, Jae Seok; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Min Goo

    2008-11-01

    During acute pancreatitis, protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) can be activated by interstitially released trypsin. In the mild form of pancreatitis, PAR2 activation exerts local protection against intrapancreatic damage, whereas, in the severe form of pancreatitis, PAR2 activation mediates some systemic complications. This study aimed to identify the molecular mechanisms of PAR2-mediated protective effects against intrapancreatic damage. A mild form of acute pancreatitis was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of caerulein (40 microg/kg) in rats. Effects of PAR2 activation on intrapancreatic damage and on mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling were assessed. Caerulein treatment activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) within 15 min and maintained phosphorylation of ERK and JNK for 2 h in the rat pancreas. Although PAR2 activation by the pretreatment with PAR2-activating peptide (AP) itself increased ERK phosphorylation in rat pancreas, the same treatment remarkably decreased caerulein-induced activation of ERK and JNK principally by accelerating their dephosphorylation. Inhibition of ERK and JNK phosphorylation by the pretreatment with MAP/ERK kinase (MEK) or JNK inhibitors decreased caerulein-induced pancreatic damage that was similar to the effect induced by PAR2-AP. Notably, in caerulein-treated rats, PAR2-AP cotreatment highly increased the expression of a group of MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs) that deactivate ERK and JNK. The above results imply that downregulation of MAP kinase signaling by MKP induction is a key mechanism involved in the protective effects of PAR2 activation on caerulein-induced intrapancreatic damage.

  14. Progesterone Attenuates Microglial-Driven Retinal Degeneration and Stimulates Protective Fractalkine-CX3CR1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Roche, Sarah L; Wyse-Jackson, Alice C; Gómez-Vicente, Violeta; Lax, Pedro; Ruiz-Lopez, Ana M; Byrne, Ashleigh M; Cuenca, Nicolás; Cotter, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a degenerative disease leading to photoreceptor cell loss. Mouse models of RP, such as the rd10 mouse (B6.CXBl-Pde6brd10/J), have enhanced our understanding of the disease, allowing for development of potential therapeutics. In 2011, our group first demonstrated that the synthetic progesterone analogue 'Norgestrel' is neuroprotective in two mouse models of retinal degeneration, including the rd10 mouse. We have since elucidated several mechanisms by which Norgestrel protects stressed photoreceptors, such as upregulating growth factors. This study consequently aimed to further characterize Norgestrel's neuroprotective effects. Specifically, we sought to investigate the role that microglia might play; for microglial-derived inflammation has been shown to potentiate neurodegeneration. Dams of post-natal day (P) 10 rd10 pups were given a Norgestrel-supplemented diet (80mg/kg). Upon weaning, pups remained on Norgestrel. Tissue was harvested from P15-P50 rd10 mice on control or Norgestrel-supplemented diet. Norgestrel-diet administration provided significant retinal protection out to P40 in rd10 mice. Alterations in microglial activity coincided with significant protection, implicating microglial changes in Norgestrel-induced neuroprotection. Utilizing primary cultures of retinal microglia and 661W photoreceptor-like cells, we show that rd10 microglia drive neuronal cell death. We reveal a novel role of Norgestrel, acting directly on microglia to reduce pro-inflammatory activation and prevent neuronal cell death. Norgestrel effectively suppresses cytokine, chemokine and danger-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP) expression in the rd10 retina. Remarkably, Norgestrel upregulates fractalkine-CX3CR1 signaling 1 000-fold at the RNA level, in the rd10 mouse. Fractalkine-CX3CR1 signaling has been shown to protect neurons by regulating retinal microglial activation and migration. Ultimately, these results present Norgestrel as a promising

  15. Progesterone Attenuates Microglial-Driven Retinal Degeneration and Stimulates Protective Fractalkine-CX3CR1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Vicente, Violeta; Lax, Pedro; Ruiz-Lopez, Ana M.; Byrne, Ashleigh M.; Cuenca, Nicolás; Cotter, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a degenerative disease leading to photoreceptor cell loss. Mouse models of RP, such as the rd10 mouse (B6.CXBl-Pde6brd10/J), have enhanced our understanding of the disease, allowing for development of potential therapeutics. In 2011, our group first demonstrated that the synthetic progesterone analogue ‘Norgestrel’ is neuroprotective in two mouse models of retinal degeneration, including the rd10 mouse. We have since elucidated several mechanisms by which Norgestrel protects stressed photoreceptors, such as upregulating growth factors. This study consequently aimed to further characterize Norgestrel’s neuroprotective effects. Specifically, we sought to investigate the role that microglia might play; for microglial-derived inflammation has been shown to potentiate neurodegeneration. Dams of post-natal day (P) 10 rd10 pups were given a Norgestrel-supplemented diet (80mg/kg). Upon weaning, pups remained on Norgestrel. Tissue was harvested from P15-P50 rd10 mice on control or Norgestrel-supplemented diet. Norgestrel-diet administration provided significant retinal protection out to P40 in rd10 mice. Alterations in microglial activity coincided with significant protection, implicating microglial changes in Norgestrel-induced neuroprotection. Utilizing primary cultures of retinal microglia and 661W photoreceptor-like cells, we show that rd10 microglia drive neuronal cell death. We reveal a novel role of Norgestrel, acting directly on microglia to reduce pro-inflammatory activation and prevent neuronal cell death. Norgestrel effectively suppresses cytokine, chemokine and danger-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP) expression in the rd10 retina. Remarkably, Norgestrel upregulates fractalkine-CX3CR1 signaling 1 000-fold at the RNA level, in the rd10 mouse. Fractalkine-CX3CR1 signaling has been shown to protect neurons by regulating retinal microglial activation and migration. Ultimately, these results present Norgestrel as a

  16. 49 CFR 1242.58 - Operating signals and interlockers, operating drawbridges, highway crossing protection (accounts...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... BETWEEN FREIGHT SERVICE AND PASSENGER SERVICE FOR RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Transportation § 1242.58... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operating signals and interlockers, operating... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD,...

  17. Protection of Armadillo/β-Catenin by Armless, a Novel Positive Regulator of Wingless Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Reim, Gerlinde; Hruzova, Martina; Goetze, Sandra; Basler, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    The Wingless (Wg/Wnt) signaling pathway is essential for metazoan development, where it is central to tissue growth and cellular differentiation. Deregulated Wg pathway activation underlies severe developmental abnormalities, as well as carcinogenesis. Armadillo/β-Catenin plays a key role in the Wg transduction cascade; its cytoplasmic and nuclear levels directly determine the output activity of Wg signaling and are thus tightly controlled. In all current models, once Arm is targeted for degradation by the Arm/β-Catenin destruction complex, its fate is viewed as set. We identified a novel Wg/Wnt pathway component, Armless (Als), which is required for Wg target gene expression in a cell-autonomous manner. We found by genetic and biochemical analyses that Als functions downstream of the destruction complex, at the level of the SCF/Slimb/βTRCP E3 Ub ligase. In the absence of Als, Arm levels are severely reduced. We show by biochemical and in vivo studies that Als interacts directly with Ter94, an AAA ATPase known to associate with E3 ligases and to drive protein turnover. We suggest that Als antagonizes Ter94's positive effect on E3 ligase function and propose that Als promotes Wg signaling by rescuing Arm from proteolytic degradation, spotlighting an unexpected step where the Wg pathway signal is modulated. PMID:25369031

  18. Inhibition of insulin/IGF-1 receptor signaling protects from mitochondria-mediated kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Ising, Christina; Koehler, Sybille; Brähler, Sebastian; Merkwirth, Carsten; Höhne, Martin; Baris, Olivier R; Hagmann, Henning; Kann, Martin; Fabretti, Francesca; Dafinger, Claudia; Bloch, Wilhelm; Schermer, Bernhard; Linkermann, Andreas; Brüning, Jens C; Kurschat, Christine E; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Wiesner, Rudolf J; Langer, Thomas; Benzing, Thomas; Brinkkoetter, Paul Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and alterations in energy metabolism have been implicated in a variety of human diseases. Mitochondrial fusion is essential for maintenance of mitochondrial function and requires the prohibitin ring complex subunit prohibitin-2 (PHB2) at the mitochondrial inner membrane. Here, we provide a link between PHB2 deficiency and hyperactive insulin/IGF-1 signaling. Deletion of PHB2 in podocytes of mice, terminally differentiated cells at the kidney filtration barrier, caused progressive proteinuria, kidney failure, and death of the animals and resulted in hyperphosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein (S6RP), a known mediator of the mTOR signaling pathway. Inhibition of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling system through genetic deletion of the insulin receptor alone or in combination with the IGF-1 receptor or treatment with rapamycin prevented hyperphosphorylation of S6RP without affecting the mitochondrial structural defect, alleviated renal disease, and delayed the onset of kidney failure in PHB2-deficient animals. Evidently, perturbation of insulin/IGF-1 receptor signaling contributes to tissue damage in mitochondrial disease, which may allow therapeutic intervention against a wide spectrum of diseases. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  19. Quetiapine Ameliorates Schizophrenia-Like Behaviors and Protects Myelin Integrity in Cuprizone Intoxicated Mice: The Involvement of Notch Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua-ning; Liu, Gao-hua; Zhang, Rui-guo; Xue, Fen; Wu, Di; Chen, Yun-chun; Peng, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Background: White matter disturbances and myelin impairment are key features of schizophrenia. The antipsychotic drug quetiapine can promote the maturation of oligodendrocytes, but the molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Methods: The schizophrenia-like behaviors, degrees of demyelination, and levels of Notch signaling molecules in forebrains of adult male C57BL/6 mice were examined after fed with cuprizone (0.2% wt/wt) in the presence or absence of 10mg/kg/d quetiapine for 6 weeks. These parameters were also observed after the transcranial injection of Notch signaling inhibitor MW167 (1mM) daily during the last week of the treatment period. Results: Quetiapine ameliorated the schizophrenia-like behaviors and decreased expression of myelin basic protein and inhibition of Notch signaling molecules, such as Notch1, Hes1, and Hes5, in the forebrain that induced by cuprizone. These beneficial effects of quetiapine were abolished by MW167. Conclusions: The antipsychotic and myelin protective effects of quetiapine are mediated by Notch signaling in a mouse model of cuprizone-induced demyelination associated with schizophrenia-like behaviors. The Notch pathway might therefore be a novel target for the development of antipsychotic drugs. PMID:26232790

  20. Quetiapine Ameliorates Schizophrenia-Like Behaviors and Protects Myelin Integrity in Cuprizone Intoxicated Mice: The Involvement of Notch Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-ning; Liu, Gao-hua; Zhang, Rui-guo; Xue, Fen; Wu, Di; Chen, Yun-chun; Peng, Ye; Peng, Zheng-wu; Tan, Qing-rong

    2015-08-01

    White matter disturbances and myelin impairment are key features of schizophrenia. The antipsychotic drug quetiapine can promote the maturation of oligodendrocytes, but the molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. The schizophrenia-like behaviors, degrees of demyelination, and levels of Notch signaling molecules in forebrains of adult male C57BL/6 mice were examined after fed with cuprizone (0.2% wt/wt) in the presence or absence of 10mg/kg/d quetiapine for 6 weeks. These parameters were also observed after the transcranial injection of Notch signaling inhibitor MW167 (1mM) daily during the last week of the treatment period. Quetiapine ameliorated the schizophrenia-like behaviors and decreased expression of myelin basic protein and inhibition of Notch signaling molecules, such as Notch1, Hes1, and Hes5, in the forebrain that induced by cuprizone. These beneficial effects of quetiapine were abolished by MW167. The antipsychotic and myelin protective effects of quetiapine are mediated by Notch signaling in a mouse model of cuprizone-induced demyelination associated with schizophrenia-like behaviors. The Notch pathway might therefore be a novel target for the development of antipsychotic drugs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  1. Signals of Climate Change in Butterfly Communities in a Mediterranean Protected Area

    PubMed Central

    Zografou, Konstantina; Kati, Vassiliki; Grill, Andrea; Wilson, Robert J.; Tzirkalli, Elli; Pamperis, Lazaros N.; Halley, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The European protected-area network will cease to be efficient for biodiversity conservation, particularly in the Mediterranean region, if species are driven out of protected areas by climate warming. Yet, no empirical evidence of how climate change influences ecological communities in Mediterranean nature reserves really exists. Here, we examine long-term (1998–2011/2012) and short-term (2011–2012) changes in the butterfly fauna of Dadia National Park (Greece) by revisiting 21 and 18 transects in 2011 and 2012 respectively, that were initially surveyed in 1998. We evaluate the temperature trend for the study area for a 22-year-period (1990–2012) in which all three butterfly surveys are included. We also assess changes in community composition and species richness in butterfly communities using information on (a) species’ elevational distributions in Greece and (b) Community Temperature Index (calculated from the average temperature of species' geographical ranges in Europe, weighted by species' abundance per transect and year). Despite the protected status of Dadia NP and the subsequent stability of land use regimes, we found a marked change in butterfly community composition over a 13 year period, concomitant with an increase of annual average temperature of 0.95°C. Our analysis gave no evidence of significant year-to-year (2011–2012) variability in butterfly community composition, suggesting that the community composition change we recorded is likely the consequence of long-term environmental change, such as climate warming. We observe an increased abundance of low-elevation species whereas species mainly occurring at higher elevations in the region declined. The Community Temperature Index was found to increase in all habitats except agricultural areas. If equivalent changes occur in other protected areas and taxonomic groups across Mediterranean Europe, new conservation options and approaches for increasing species’ resilience may have to be

  2. Signals of climate change in butterfly communities in a Mediterranean protected area.

    PubMed

    Zografou, Konstantina; Kati, Vassiliki; Grill, Andrea; Wilson, Robert J; Tzirkalli, Elli; Pamperis, Lazaros N; Halley, John M

    2014-01-01

    The European protected-area network will cease to be efficient for biodiversity conservation, particularly in the Mediterranean region, if species are driven out of protected areas by climate warming. Yet, no empirical evidence of how climate change influences ecological communities in Mediterranean nature reserves really exists. Here, we examine long-term (1998-2011/2012) and short-term (2011-2012) changes in the butterfly fauna of Dadia National Park (Greece) by revisiting 21 and 18 transects in 2011 and 2012 respectively, that were initially surveyed in 1998. We evaluate the temperature trend for the study area for a 22-year-period (1990-2012) in which all three butterfly surveys are included. We also assess changes in community composition and species richness in butterfly communities using information on (a) species' elevational distributions in Greece and (b) Community Temperature Index (calculated from the average temperature of species' geographical ranges in Europe, weighted by species' abundance per transect and year). Despite the protected status of Dadia NP and the subsequent stability of land use regimes, we found a marked change in butterfly community composition over a 13 year period, concomitant with an increase of annual average temperature of 0.95°C. Our analysis gave no evidence of significant year-to-year (2011-2012) variability in butterfly community composition, suggesting that the community composition change we recorded is likely the consequence of long-term environmental change, such as climate warming. We observe an increased abundance of low-elevation species whereas species mainly occurring at higher elevations in the region declined. The Community Temperature Index was found to increase in all habitats except agricultural areas. If equivalent changes occur in other protected areas and taxonomic groups across Mediterranean Europe, new conservation options and approaches for increasing species' resilience may have to be devised.

  3. Luciferase protection against proteolytic degradation: a key for improving signal in nano-system biology.

    PubMed

    Ataei, Farangis; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Khajeh, Khosro

    2009-10-26

    Luciferase is most widely used bioluminescence protein in biotechnological processes, but the enzyme is susceptible to proteolytic degradation, thereby its intracellular half-life decreased. Osmolytes are known to enhance the stability of proteins and protect them in a native folded and functional state. The effects of osmolytes, including sucrose, glycine and DMSO on the stability of luciferase were investigated. To different extents, all osmolytes protected the luciferase towards proteolytic degradation in a concentration-dependent manner. The results showed that 1.5M sucrose, 1.5M glycine and 15% DMSO are the best. The ability of these osmolytes to protect luciferase against proteolysis decreased from sucrose, glycine, and finally DMSO. Enzymatic kinetic data showed that the luciferase activity is significantly kept in the presence of sucrose and glycine compared to DMSO, particularly at high temperatures. Bioluminescence intensity, circular dichroism (CD), intrinsic and ANS fluorescence experiments showed change in secondary and tertiary luciferase structure. These results suggest that osmolytes exert an important effect on stabilization of luciferase conformation; decreasing the unfolding rate, preventing adaptation and binding of luciferase at the active site of proteases, thereby the proteolytic digestion reduced and its active conformation was kept.

  4. Optical encryption with protection against Dirac delta and plain signal attacks.

    PubMed

    Falaggis, Konstantinos; Ramírez Andrade, Ana Hiza; Gaxiola Luna, José Gabriel; Ojeda, Carina Gutierrez; Porras-Aguilar, Rosario

    2016-10-15

    This Letter proposes an optical encryption technique that disguises the information with modular arithmetic concepts and time-varying noise components that are unknown to the receiver. Optical encryption systems that use these techniques produce a nondeterministic system response, as well as noise like image data that can easily be generated with ordinary spatial light modulators. The principle of this technique is demonstrated for the double random phase encoding (DRPE) method. The conventional DRPE method has major vulnerabilities for Dirac signal and plain signal attacks, making them impractical for secure encryption. It is shown that the proposed encryption technique provides a robustness against these types of attacks, allowing optical DRPE to be employed in secure encryptions. Moreover, applications of this Letter are not limited to DRPE alone but can also be adopted by other optical encryption techniques such as fractional Fourier transform and Fresnel-transform-based techniques.

  5. Natriuretic peptide receptor B signaling in the cardiovascular system: protection from cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Pagel-Langenickel, Ines; Buttgereit, Jens; Bader, Michael; Langenickel, Thomas H

    2007-08-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NP) represent a family of structurally homologous but genetically distinct peptide hormones involved in regulation of fluid and electrolyte balance, blood pressure, fat metabolism, cell proliferation, and long bone growth. Recent work suggests a role for natriuretic peptide receptor B (NPR-B) signaling in regulation of cardiac growth by either a direct effect on cardiomyocytes or by modulation of other signaling pathways including the autonomic nervous system. The research links NPR-B for the first time to a cardiac phenotype in vivo and underlines the importance of the NP in the cardiovascular system. This manuscript will focus on the role of NPR-B and its ligand C-type natriuretic peptide in cardiovascular physiology and disease and will evaluate these new findings in the context of the known function of this receptor, with a perspective on how future research might further elucidate NPR-B function.

  6. Bmp signaling in colonic mesenchyme regulates stromal microenvironment and protects from polyposis initiation.

    PubMed

    Allaire, Joannie M; Roy, Sébastien A B; Ouellet, Camille; Lemieux, Étienne; Jones, Christine; Paquet, Marilène; Boudreau, Francois; Perreault, Nathalie

    2016-06-01

    In the colon, myofibroblasts are primary contributors in the establishment of the microenvironment involved in tissue homeostasis. Alterations in myofibroblast functions lead to changes resulting in a toxic microenvironment nurturing tumorigenesis. Bone morphogenetic proteins (Bmps) are morphogens known to play key roles in adult gut homeostasis. Studies in genetically-modified mice have shown that Bmp disruption in all cell layers leads to the development of gut polyposis. In contrast, our studies showed that loss of Bmp exclusively in the gastrointestinal epithelium resulted in increased epithelial proliferation without polyposis initiation, thus suggesting a key role for mesenchymal Bmp signaling in polyposis initiation. In order to identify the role of mesenchymal Bmp signaling on the microenvironment and its impact on colonic mucosa, a mouse model was generated with suppression of Bmp signaling exclusively in myofibroblasts (Bmpr1aΔMES). Bmpr1aΔMES mice exhibited increased subepithelial proliferation with changes in cellular composition leading to the development of a primed stroma with modulation of extracellular matrix proteins, immune cells and cytokines as early as 90 days of age. This microenvironmental deregulation was associated with increased polyposis initiation at one year of age. These results are the first to demonstrate that mesenchymal Bmpr1a inactivation alone is sufficient to prompt an expansion of myofibroblasts leading to the development of a reactive mesenchyme that contributes to polyposis initiation in the colon. These findings support the novel concept that inhibition of Bmp signaling in mesenchymal cells surrounding the normal epithelium leads to important changes instructing a toxic microenvironment sufficient to induce colonic polyposis. © 2016 UICC.

  7. Yellow and the Novel Aposematic Signal, Red, Protect Delias Butterflies from Predators

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Jocelyn Liang Qi

    2017-01-01

    Butterflies of the South Asian and Australian genus Delias possess striking colours on the ventral wings that are presumed to serve as warning signals to predators. However, this has not been shown empirically. Here we experimentally tested whether the colours of one member of this diverse genus, Delias hyparete, function as aposematic signals. We constructed artificial paper models with either a faithful colour representation of D. hyparete, or with all of its colours converted to grey scale. We also produced models where single colours were left intact, while others were converted to grey-scale or removed entirely. We placed all model types simultaneously in the field, attached to a live mealworm, and measured relative attack rates at three separate field sites. Faithful models of D. hyparete, suffered the least amount of attacks, followed by grey-scale models with unaltered red patches, and by grey-scale models with unaltered yellow patches. We conclude that red and yellow colours function as warning signals. By mapping dorsal and ventral colouration onto a phylogeny of Delias, we observed that yellow and red colours appear almost exclusively on the ventral wing surfaces, and that basal lineages have mostly yellow, white, and black wings, whereas derived lineages contain red colour in addition to the other colours. Red appears to be, thus, a novel adaptive trait in this lineage of butterflies. PMID:28060944

  8. The fear of other persons' laughter: Poor neuronal protection against social signals of anger and aggression.

    PubMed

    Papousek, Ilona; Schulter, Günter; Rominger, Christian; Fink, Andreas; Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2016-01-30

    The fear of other persons' laughter (gelotophobia) occurs in the context of several psychiatric conditions, particularly in the schizophrenia spectrum and social phobia. It entails severe personal and inter-personal problems including heightened aggression and possibly violence. Individuals with gelotophobia (n=30; 24 with social phobia or Cluster A diagnosis) and matched symptom-free controls (n=30) were drawn from a large screening sample (n=1440). EEG coherences were recorded during the confrontation with other people's affect expressions, to investigate the brain's modulatory control over the emotionally laden perceptual input. Gelotophobia was associated with more loose functional coupling of prefrontal and posterior cortex during the processing of expressions of anger and aggression, thus leaving the individual relatively unprotected from becoming affected by these social signals. The brain's response to social signals of anger/aggression and the accompanied heightened permeability for this kind of information explains the particular sensitivity to actual or supposed malicious aspects of laughter (and possibly of other ambiguous social signals) in individuals with gelotophobia, which represents the core feature of the condition. Heightened perception of stimuli that could be perceived as offensive, which is inherent in several psychiatric conditions, may be particularly evident in the fear of other persons' laughter. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Yellow and the Novel Aposematic Signal, Red, Protect Delias Butterflies from Predators.

    PubMed

    Wee, Jocelyn Liang Qi; Monteiro, Antónia

    2017-01-01

    Butterflies of the South Asian and Australian genus Delias possess striking colours on the ventral wings that are presumed to serve as warning signals to predators. However, this has not been shown empirically. Here we experimentally tested whether the colours of one member of this diverse genus, Delias hyparete, function as aposematic signals. We constructed artificial paper models with either a faithful colour representation of D. hyparete, or with all of its colours converted to grey scale. We also produced models where single colours were left intact, while others were converted to grey-scale or removed entirely. We placed all model types simultaneously in the field, attached to a live mealworm, and measured relative attack rates at three separate field sites. Faithful models of D. hyparete, suffered the least amount of attacks, followed by grey-scale models with unaltered red patches, and by grey-scale models with unaltered yellow patches. We conclude that red and yellow colours function as warning signals. By mapping dorsal and ventral colouration onto a phylogeny of Delias, we observed that yellow and red colours appear almost exclusively on the ventral wing surfaces, and that basal lineages have mostly yellow, white, and black wings, whereas derived lineages contain red colour in addition to the other colours. Red appears to be, thus, a novel adaptive trait in this lineage of butterflies.

  10. BLT1 signalling protects the liver against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by preventing excessive accumulation of hepatic neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Kojo, Ken; Ito, Yoshiya; Eshima, Koji; Nishizawa, Nobuyuki; Ohkubo, Hirotoki; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Shimizu, Takao; Watanabe, Masahiko; Majima, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a potent chemoattractant for neutrophils. Signalling of LTB4 receptor type 1 (BLT1) has pro-inflammatory functions through neutrophil recruitment. In this study, we investigated whether BLT1 signalling plays a role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury by affecting inflammatory responses including the accumulation of hepatic neutrophils. BLT1-knockout (BLT1−/−) mice and their wild-type (WT) counterparts were subjected to a single APAP overdose (300 mg/kg), and various parameters compared within 24 h after treatment. Compared with WT mice, BLT1−/− mice exhibited exacerbation of APAP-induced liver injury as evidenced by enhancement of alanine aminotransferase level, necrotic area, hepatic neutrophil accumulation, and expression of cytokines and chemokines. WT mice co-treated with APAP and ONO-0457, a specific antagonist for BLT1, displayed amplification of the injury, and similar results to those observed in BLT1−/− mice. Hepatic neutrophils in BLT1−/− mice during APAP hepatotoxicity showed increases in the production of reactive oxygen species and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Administration of isolated BLT1-deficient neutrophils into WT mice aggravated the liver injury elicited by APAP. These results demonstrate that BLT1 signalling dampens the progression of APAP hepatotoxicity through inhibiting an excessive accumulation of activated neutrophils. The development of a specific agonist for BLT1 could be useful for the prevention of APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:27404729

  11. Oleanolic acid protects against diabetic cardiomyopathy via modulation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2 and insulin signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei-Fang; Wang, Peng; Li, Hua; Li, Tian-Yi; Feng, Ming; Chen, Su-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Oleanolic acid (OL) is a pentacyclic triterpene compound used for the treatment of hepatitis, liver fibrosis and liver cirrhosis. In China, there is no published research on the effect or biological utilization of OL on liver diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effects of OL against diabetic cardiomyopathy and its possible mechanism. A rat model of diabetes was established using streptozotocin and the effect of OL on diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) was evaluated. The results demonstrated that OL significantly reversed the DCM-induced changes to body weight, heart rate, echocardiography and hemodynamics, phosphorylated-glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP) activity in diabetic rats (all P<0.01). Treatment of diabetic rats with OL significantly inhibited oxidative stress and activated heme oxygenase (HO)-1/nuclear factor erythroid 2 (Nrf2) signaling in a rat model of diabetes (both P<0.01). The results of the present study indicate that OL protects against DCM through the HO-1/Nrf2 and insulin modulating GS/GP signaling pathways. PMID:28673009

  12. Saikosaponin d protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibiting NFκB and STAT3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Aiming; Tanaka, Naoki; Sun, Lu; Guo, Bin; Kim, Jung-Hwan; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Jiang, Changtao; Yang, Julin; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    Overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) can cause acute liver injury that is sometimes fatal, requiring efficient pharmacological intervention. The traditional Chinese herb Bupleurum falcatum has been widely used for the treatment of several liver diseases in eastern Asian countries, and saikosaponin d (SSd) is one of its major pharmacologically-active components. However, the efficacy of Bupleurum falcatum or SSd on APAP toxicity remains unclear. C57BL/6 mice were administered SSd intraperitoneally once daily for five days, followed by APAP challenge. Biochemical and pathological analysis revealed that mice treated with SSd were protected against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. SSd markedly suppressed phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and reversed the APAP-induced increases in the target genes of NF-kB, such as pro-inflammatory cytokine Il6 and Ccl2, and those of STAT3, such as Socs3, Fga, Fgb and Fgg. SSd also enhanced the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine Il10 mRNA. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SSd protects mice from APAP-induced hepatotoxicity mainly through down-regulating NF-kB- and STAT3-mediated inflammatory signaling. This study unveils one of the possible mechanisms of hepatoprotection caused by Bupleurum falcatum and/or SSd. PMID:25265579

  13. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Signalling Exerts Chondrogenesis Promoting and Protecting Effects: Implication of Calcineurin as a Downstream Target

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Tamás; Matta, Csaba; Katona, Éva; Somogyi, Csilla; Takács, Roland; Gergely, Pál; Csernoch, László; Panyi, Gyorgy; Tóth, Gábor; Reglődi, Dóra; Tamás, Andrea; Zákány, Róza

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is an important neurotrophic factor influencing differentiation of neuronal elements and exerting protecting role during traumatic injuries or inflammatory processes of the central nervous system. Although increasing evidence is available on its presence and protecting function in various peripheral tissues, little is known about the role of PACAP in formation of skeletal components. To this end, we aimed to map elements of PACAP signalling in developing cartilage under physiological conditions and during oxidative stress. mRNAs of PACAP and its receptors (PAC1,VPAC1, VPAC2) were detectable during differentiation of chicken limb bud-derived chondrogenic cells in micromass cell cultures. Expression of PAC1 protein showed a peak on days of final commitment of chondrogenic cells. Administration of either the PAC1 receptor agonist PACAP 1-38, or PACAP 6-38 that is generally used as a PAC1 antagonist, augmented cartilage formation, stimulated cell proliferation and enhanced PAC1 and Sox9 protein expression. Both variants of PACAP elevated the protein expression and activity of the Ca-calmodulin dependent Ser/Thr protein phosphatase calcineurin. Application of PACAPs failed to rescue cartilage formation when the activity of calcineurin was pharmacologically inhibited with cyclosporine A. Moreover, exogenous PACAPs prevented diminishing of cartilage formation and decrease of calcineurin activity during oxidative stress. As an unexpected phenomenon, PACAP 6-38 elicited similar effects to those of PACAP 1-38, although to a different extent. On the basis of the above results, we propose calcineurin as a downstream target of PACAP signalling in differentiating chondrocytes either in normal or pathophysiological conditions. Our observations imply the therapeutical perspective that PACAP can be applied as a natural agent that may have protecting effect during joint inflammation and/or may promote cartilage regeneration

  14. Interleukin-27 Protects Cardiomyocyte-Like H9c2 Cells against Metabolic Syndrome: Role of STAT3 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Wei-Lian; Huang, Yu-Tzu; Ma, Ming-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    The present results demonstrated that high glucose (G), salt (S), and cholesterol C (either alone or in combination), as mimicking extracellular changes in metabolic syndrome, damage cardiomyocyte-like H9c2 cells and reduce their viability in a time-dependent manner. However, the effects were greatest when cells were exposed to all three agents (GSC). The mRNA of glycoprotein (gp) 130 and WSX-1, both components of the interleukin (IL)-27 receptor, were present in H9c2 cells. Although mRNA expression was not affected by exogenous treatment with IL-27, the expression of gp130 mRNA (but not that of WSX-1 mRNA) was attenuated by GSC. Treatment of IL-27 to H9c2 cells increased activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and protected cells from GSC-induced cytochrome c release and cell damage. The protective effects of IL-27 were abrogated by the STAT3 inhibitor, stattic. The results of the present study clearly demonstrate that the STAT3 pathway triggered by anti-inflammatory IL-27 plays a role in protecting cardiomyocytes against GSC-mediated damage. PMID:26339633

  15. TLR4 and TLR9 signals stimulate protective immunity against blood-stage Plasmodium yoelii infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Zhu, Xiaotong; Feng, Yonghui; Pang, Wei; Qi, Zanmei; Cui, Liwang; Cao, Yaming

    2016-11-01

    The mechanisms regulating the induction of protective immunity against blood-stage malaria remain unclear. Resistant DBA/2 mouse develops a higher Th1 response compared with a susceptible BALB/c strain during Plasmodium yoelii (Py) infection. It is known that the T helper cell response is initiated and polarized by dendritic cells (DCs) of the innate immune system, during which TLR4 and TLR9 are important receptors for the innate recognition of the malaria parasite and its products. We hypothesized that TLR4/9 may play critical roles in the induction of protective immunity against Py infection. We used TLR4/9 antagonists and agonists to study their effects on mouse resistance to Py infection. We found that the administration of an antagonist prior to infection aggravated disease outcomes, impaired DC functions and suppressed the pro-inflammatory response to Py infection in resistant DBA/2 mice. Treatment with the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not TLR9 agonist significantly improved the survival rate of susceptible Py-infected BALB/c mice. LPS administration promoted the activation and expansion of DCs and drove a Th1-biased response. Our data demonstrate the important roles of TLR4/9 signals in inducing resistance to malaria parasites and provide evidence for the rational use of TLR agonists to potentiate protective immunity against Plasmodium infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypoxic preconditioning protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury through AMPK/eNOS/PGC-1α signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liang; Zhou, Lu; Wu, Xiaowei; Liu, Chao; Fan, Yue; Li, Qingping

    2014-01-01

    Objective: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important regulator of multiple cellular pathways in the setting of energetic stress. Whether AMPK plays a critical role in hypoxic preconditioning (HPC), protecting cardiomyocytes against hypoxia reoxygenation (H/R) injury remains uncertain. Methods: H9c2 cells were preconditioned by exposing to 10 min of hypoxia and 30 min of reoxygenation. Then, the preconditioned and non-preconditioned cardiomyocytes were exposed to 90 min of hypoxia followed by 120 min of reoxygenation. Results: HPC protected H9c2 cells against H/R injury, the AMPK inhibitor or eNOS inhibitor abolished the effect of HPC. Compared with H/R group, HPC significantly increased the expression of p-AMPK (Thr172). HPC also markedly increased p-eNOS (Ser1177) expression, which was abolished by AMPK inhibition. HPC significantly increased PGC-1α expression, which were nullified by AMPK inhibition or eNOS inhibition. HPC attenuated the oxidative stress by increasing the SOD activity and decreasing the MDA and ROS level, which were abolished by AMPK inhibition or eNOS inhibition. Interestingly, the AMPK activator metformin mimicked the effects of HPC in part. Conclusions: These results indicated that HPC protects H9c2 cells against H/R injury by reducing oxidative stress partly via AMPK/eNOS/PGC-1α signaling pathway. PMID:25550773

  17. Algae Undaria pinnatifida Protects Hypothalamic Neurons against Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress through Akt/mTOR Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongwan; Moon, Il Soo; Goo, Tae-Won; Moon, Seong-Su; Seo, Minchul

    2015-11-25

    Increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is known to be one of the causes of hypothalamic neuronal damage, as well as a cause of metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. Recent evidence has suggested that Undaria pinnatifida (UP), an edible brown algae, has antioxidant activity. However, the neuroprotective effect of UP has yet to be examined. In this study, to investigate the neuroprotective effect of UP on ER stress-induced neuronal damage in mouse hypothalamic neurons, mice immortal hypothalamic neurons (GT1-7) were incubated with extract of UP. ER stress was induced by treating with tunicamycin. Tunicamycin induced apoptotic cell death was compared with the vehicle treatment through excessive ER stress. However UP protected GT1-7 cells from cell death, occurring after treatment with tunicamycin by reducing ER stress. Treatment with UP resulted in reduced increment of ATF6 and CHOP, and recovered the decrease of phosphorylation of Akt/mTOR by tunicamycin and the increment of autophagy. These results show that UP protects GT1-7 cells from ER stress induced cell death through the Akt/mTOR pathway. The current study suggests that UP may have a beneficial effect on cerebral neuronal degeneration in metabolic diseases with elevated ER stress.

  18. Radiofrequency Renal Denervation Protects the Ischemic Heart via Inhibition of GRK2 and Increased Nitric Oxide Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Polhemus, David J.; Gao, Juan; Scarborough, Amy L.; Trivedi, Rishi; McDonough, Kathleen H.; Goodchild, Traci T.; Smart, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) is currently under development for the treatment of resistant hypertension and is thought to reduce blood pressure via interruption of sympathetic pathways that modulate cardiovascular function. The sympathetic nervous system also plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of acute myocardial infarction and heart failure. Objective: We examined whether treatment with radiofrequency (RF)-RDN would protect the heart against subsequent myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury via direct effects on the myocardium. Methods and Results: Spontaneously hypertensive rats received either bilateral RF-RDN or sham-RDN. At 4 weeks after RF-RDN (n=14) or sham-RDN (n=14) treatment, spontaneously hypertensive rats were subjected to 30 minutes of transient coronary artery occlusion and 24 hours –7 days reperfusion. Four weeks after RF-RDN, myocardial oxidative stress was markedly attenuated, and transcription and translation of antioxidants, superoxide dismutase 1 and glutathione peroxidase-1, were significantly upregulated compared with sham-RDN spontaneously hypertensive rats. RF-RDN also inhibited myocardial G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 pathological signaling and enhanced myocardial endothelial nitric oxide synthase function and nitric oxide signaling. RF-RDN therapy resulted in a significant reduction in myocardial infarct size per area at risk compared with sham-RDN (26.8 versus 43.9%; P<0.01) at 24 hours postreperfusion and significantly improved left ventricular function at 7 days after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. Conclusions: RF-RDN reduced oxidative stress, inhibited G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 signaling, increased nitric oxide bioavailability, and ameliorated myocardial reperfusion injury in the setting of severe hypertension. These findings provide new insights into the remote cardioprotective effects of RF-RDN acting directly on cardiac myocytes to attenuate cell death and protect against ischemic

  19. Use and Protection of GPS Sidelobe Signals for Enhanced Navigation Performance in High Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Joel J. K.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Bauer, Frank H.; Moreau, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    The application of the Global Positioning System (GPS) for navigation of spacecraft in High and Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (HEO/GEO) has crossed a threshold and is now being employed in operational missions. Utilizing advanced GPS receivers optimized for these missions, space users have made extensive use of the sidelobe transmissions from the GPS satellites to realize navigation performance that far exceeds that predicted by pre-launch simulations. Unfortunately, the official specification for the GPS Space Service Volume (SSV), developed in 2006, assumes that only signals emanating from the main beam of the GPS transmit antenna are useful for navigation, which greatly under-estimates the number of signals available for navigation purposes. As a result, future high-altitude space users may be vulnerable to any GPS design changes that suppress the sidelobe transmissions, beginning with Block III space vehicles (SVs) 11-32. This paper presents proposed changes to the GPS system SSV requirements, as informed by data from recent experiments in the SSV and new mission applications that are enabled by GPS navigation in HEO/GEO regimes. The NASA/NOAA GOES-R series satellites are highlighted as an example of a mission that relies on this currently-unspecified GPS system performance to meet mission requirements.

  20. Reducing VEGF-B Signaling Ameliorates Renal Lipotoxicity and Protects against Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Falkevall, Annelie; Mehlem, Annika; Palombo, Isolde; Heller Sahlgren, Benjamin; Ebarasi, Lwaki; He, Liqun; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Olauson, Hannes; Axelsson, Jonas; Sundelin, Birgitta; Patrakka, Jaakko; Scotney, Pierre; Nash, Andrew; Eriksson, Ulf

    2017-03-07

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the most common cause of severe renal disease, and few treatment options are available today that prevent the progressive loss of renal function. DKD is characterized by altered glomerular filtration and proteinuria. A common observation in DKD is the presence of renal steatosis, but the mechanism(s) underlying this observation and to what extent they contribute to disease progression are unknown. Vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGF-B) controls muscle lipid accumulation through regulation of endothelial fatty acid transport. Here, we demonstrate in experimental mouse models of DKD that renal VEGF-B expression correlates with the severity of disease. Inhibiting VEGF-B signaling in DKD mouse models reduces renal lipotoxicity, re-sensitizes podocytes to insulin signaling, inhibits the development of DKD-associated pathologies, and prevents renal dysfunction. Further, we show that elevated VEGF-B levels are found in patients with DKD, suggesting that VEGF-B antagonism represents a novel approach to treat DKD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Importance of selenium and selenoprotein for brain function: From antioxidant protection to neuronal signalling.

    PubMed

    Solovyev, Nikolay D

    2015-12-01

    Multiple biological functions of selenium manifest themselves mainly via 25 selenoproteins that have selenocysteine at their active centre. Selenium is vital for the brain and seems to participate in the pathology of disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and epilepsy. Since selenium was shown to be involved in diverse functions of the central nervous system, such as motor performance, coordination, memory and cognition, a possible role of selenium and selenoproteins in brain signalling pathways may be assumed. The aim of the present review is to analyse possible relations between selenium and neurotransmission. Selenoproteins seem to be of special importance in the development and functioning of GABAergic (GABA, γ-aminobutyric acid) parvalbumin positive interneurons of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Dopamine pathway might be also selenium dependent as selenium shows neuroprotection in the nigrostriatal pathway and also exerts toxicity towards dopaminergic neurons under higher concentrations. Recent findings also point to acetylcholine neurotransmission involvement. The role of selenium and selenoproteins in neurotransmission might not only be limited to their antioxidant properties but also to inflammation, influencing protein phosphorylation and ion channels, alteration of calcium homeostasis and brain cholesterol metabolism. Moreover, a direct signalling function was proposed for selenoprotein P through interaction with post-synaptic apoliprotein E receptors 2 (ApoER2).

  2. Are extracellular matrix surface network components involved in signalling and protective function?

    PubMed Central

    Kozieradzka-Kiszkurno, Małgorzata; Świerczyńska, Joanna; Góralski, Grzegorz; Ślesak, Halina; Bohdanowicz, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    Endosperm is an interesting model for in vitro experiments, because of its unique origin, development and ploidy level. Here we used Actinidia deliciosa endosperm-derived callus to investigate morphology, histology and chemistry of extracellular matrix (ECM) structures in morphogenically stable tissue from long-term culture. SEM and TEM analysis showed that ECM is a heterogenous layer which consists of amorphous, dark-staining material, osmiophilic granules and reticulated fibres outside the outer callus cell wall. This structure may serve as a structural marker of morphogenic competence in endosperm-derived callus, because of its presence on the surface of callus forming morphogenic domains and its disappearance during organ growth. Based on immunolabelling, histochemistry, solvent and enzyme treatments, we suggest that pectins and lipids are components of the ECM layer. These results might indicate protective, water retention and/or cell communication functions for this ECM layer. PMID:19704835

  3. Chloroquine Inhibits HMGB1 Inflammatory Signaling and Protects Mice from Lethal Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Minghua; Cao, Lizhi; Xie, Min; Yu, Yan; Kang, Rui; Yang, Liangchun; Zhao, Mingyi; Tang, Daolin

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is caused by an overwhelming immune response to bacterial infection. The discovery of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) as a late mediator of lethal sepsis has prompted investigation into the development of new therapeutics which specifically target this protein. Here, we show that chloroquine, an anti-malarial drug, prevents lethality in mice with established endotoxemia or sepsis. This effect is still observed even if administration of chloroquine is delayed. The protective effects of chloroquine were mediated through inhibition of HMGB1 release in macrophages, monocytes, and endothelial cells, thereby preventing its cytokine-like activities. As an inhibitor of autophagy, chloroquine specifically inhibited HMGB1-induced Iκ-B degradation and NF-κB activation. These findings define a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory effects of chloroquine and also suggest a new potential clinical use for this drug in the setting of sepsis. PMID:23707973

  4. Rewiring monocyte glucose metabolism via C-type lectin signaling protects against disseminated candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Andrés, Jorge; Arts, Rob J W; Ter Horst, Rob; Gresnigt, Mark S; Smeekens, Sanne P; Ratter, Jacqueline M; Lachmandas, Ekta; Boutens, Lily; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Joosten, Leo A B; Notebaart, Richard A; Ardavín, Carlos; Netea, Mihai G

    2017-09-01

    Monocytes are innate immune cells that play a pivotal role in antifungal immunity, but little is known regarding the cellular metabolic events that regulate their function during infection. Using complementary transcriptomic and immunological studies in human primary monocytes, we show that activation of monocytes by Candida albicans yeast and hyphae was accompanied by metabolic rewiring induced through C-type lectin-signaling pathways. We describe that the innate immune responses against Candida yeast are energy-demanding processes that lead to the mobilization of intracellular metabolite pools and require induction of glucose metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation and glutaminolysis, while responses to hyphae primarily rely on glycolysis. Experimental models of systemic candidiasis models validated a central role for glucose metabolism in anti-Candida immunity, as the impairment of glycolysis led to increased susceptibility in mice. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of understanding the complex network of metabolic responses triggered during infections, and unveil new potential targets for therapeutic approaches against fungal diseases.

  5. Chemical Biology of Hydropersulfides and Related Species: Possible Roles in Cellular Protection and Redox Signaling.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Lucía; Bianco, Christopher L; Toscano, John P; Lin, Joseph; Akaike, Takaaki; Fukuto, Jon M

    2017-10-01

    For >20 years, physiological signaling associated with the endogenous generation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been of significant interest. Despite its presumed importance, the biochemical mechanisms associated with its actions have not been elucidated. Recent Advances: Recently it has been found that H2S-related or derived species are highly prevalent in mammalian systems and that these species may be responsible for some, if not the majority, of the biological actions attributed to H2S. One of the most prevalent and intriguing species are hydropersulfides (RSSH), which can be present at significant levels. Indeed, it appears that H2S and RSSH are intimately linked in biological systems and likely to be mutually inclusive. The fact that H2S and polysulfides such as RSSH are present simultaneously means that the biological actions previously assigned to H2S can be instead because of the presence of RSSH (or other polysulfides). Thus, it remains possible that hydropersulfides are the biological effectors, and H2S serves, to a certain extent, as a marker for persulfides and polysulfides. Addressing this possibility will to a large extent be based on the chemistry of these species. Currently, it is known that persulfides possess unique and novel chemical properties that may explain their biological prevalence. However, significantly more work will be required to establish the possible physiological roles of these species. Moreover, an understanding of the regulation of their biosynthesis and degradation will become important topics in piecing together their biology. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  6. Histamine H3 Receptor-Mediated Signaling Protects Mice from Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Bradley S.; Morisset, Séverine; Dubayle, David; Peronet, Roger; Dy, Michel; Louis, Jacques; Arrang, Jean-Michel; Mécheri, Salaheddine

    2009-01-01

    Background Histamine is a biogenic amine that has been shown to contribute to several pathological conditions, such as allergic conditions, experimental encephalomyelitis, and malaria. In humans, as well as in murine models of malaria, increased plasma levels of histamine are associated with severity of infection. We reported recently that histamine plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of experimental cerebral malaria (CM) in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Histamine exerts its biological effects through four different receptors designated H1R, H2R, H3R, and H4R. Principal Findings In the present work, we explored the role of histamine signaling via the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) in the pathogenesis of murine CM. We observed that the lack of H3R expression (H3R−/− mice) accelerates the onset of CM and this was correlated with enhanced brain pathology and earlier and more pronounced loss of blood brain barrier integrity than in wild type mice. Additionally tele-methylhistamine, the major histamine metabolite in the brain, that was initially present at a higher level in the brain of H3R−/− mice was depleted more quickly post-infection in H3R−/− mice as compared to wild-type counterparts. Conclusions Our data suggest that histamine regulation through the H3R in the brain suppresses the development of CM. Thus modulating histamine signaling in the central nervous system, in combination with standard therapies, may represent a novel strategy to reduce the risk of progression to cerebral malaria. PMID:19547708

  7. Cholinergic Signaling Exerts Protective Effects in Models of Sympathetic Hyperactivity-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gavioli, Mariana; Lara, Aline; Almeida, Pedro W. M.; Lima, Augusto Martins; Damasceno, Denis D.; Rocha-Resende, Cibele; Ladeira, Marina; Resende, Rodrigo R.; Martinelli, Patricia M.; Melo, Marcos Barrouin; Brum, Patricia C.; Fontes, Marco Antonio Peliky; Souza Santos, Robson A.; Prado, Marco A. M.; Guatimosim, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic control of the heart is exerted by two distinct branches; the autonomic component represented by the parasympathetic nervous system, and the recently described non-neuronal cardiomyocyte cholinergic machinery. Previous evidence has shown that reduced cholinergic function leads to deleterious effects on the myocardium. Yet, whether conditions of increased cholinergic signaling can offset the pathological remodeling induced by sympathetic hyperactivity, and its consequences for these two cholinergic axes are unknown. Here, we investigated two models of sympathetic hyperactivity: i) the chronic beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation evoked by isoproterenol (ISO), and ii) the α2A/α2C-adrenergic receptor knockout (KO) mice that lack pre-synaptic adrenergic receptors. In both models, cholinergic signaling was increased by administration of the cholinesterase inhibitor, pyridostigmine. First, we observed that isoproterenol produces an autonomic imbalance characterized by increased sympathetic and reduced parasympathetic tone. Under this condition transcripts for cholinergic proteins were upregulated in ventricular myocytes, indicating that non-neuronal cholinergic machinery is activated during adrenergic overdrive. Pyridostigmine treatment prevented the effects of ISO on autonomic function and on the ventricular cholinergic machinery, and inhibited cardiac remodeling. α2A/α2C-KO mice presented reduced ventricular contraction when compared to wild-type mice, and this dysfunction was also reversed by cholinesterase inhibition. Thus, the cardiac parasympathetic system and non-neuronal cardiomyocyte cholinergic machinery are modulated in opposite directions under conditions of increased sympathetic drive or ACh availability. Moreover, our data support the idea that pyridostigmine by restoring ACh availability is beneficial in heart disease. PMID:24992197

  8. Ablation of Type-1 IFN Signaling in Hematopoietic Cells Confers Protection Following Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Karve, Ila P; Zhang, Moses; Habgood, Mark; Frugier, Tony; Brody, Kate M; Sashindranath, Maithili; Ek, C Joakim; Chappaz, Stephane; Kile, Ben T; Wright, David; Wang, Hong; Johnston, Leigh; Daglas, Maria; Ates, Robert C; Medcalf, Robert L; Taylor, Juliet M; Crack, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Type-1 interferons (IFNs) are pleiotropic cytokines that signal through the type-1 IFN receptor (IFNAR1). Recent literature has implicated the type-1 IFNs in disorders of the CNS. In this study, we have investigated the role of type-1 IFNs in neuroinflammation following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Using a controlled cortical impact model, TBI was induced in 8- to 10-week-old male C57BL/6J WT and IFNAR1(-/-) mice and brains were excised to study infarct volume, inflammatory mediator release via quantitative PCR analysis and immune cell profile via immunohistochemistry. IFNAR1(-/-) mice displayed smaller infarcts compared with WT mice after TBI. IFNAR1(-/-) mice exhibited an altered anti-inflammatory environment compared with WT mice, with significantly reduced levels of the proinflammatory mediators TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6, an up-regulation of the anti-inflammatory mediator IL-10 and an increased activation of resident and peripheral immune cells after TBI. WT mice injected intravenously with an anti-IFNAR1 blocking monoclonal antibody (MAR1) 1 h before, 30 min after or 30 min and 2 d after TBI displayed significantly improved histological and behavioral outcome. Bone marrow chimeras demonstrated that the hematopoietic cells are a peripheral source of type-1 IFNs that drives neuroinflammation and a worsened TBI outcome. Type-1 IFN mRNA levels were confirmed to be significantly altered in human postmortem TBI brains. Together, these data demonstrate that type-1 IFN signaling is a critical pathway in the progression of neuroinflammation and presents a viable therapeutic target for the treatment of TBI.

  9. DR3 signaling protects against cisplatin nephrotoxicity mediated by tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Al-Lamki, Rafia S; Lu, WanHua; Finlay, Sarah; Twohig, Jason P; Wang, Eddie C Y; Tolkovsky, Aviva M; Bradley, John R

    2012-04-01

    The expression of death receptor 3 (DR3), a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily, is up-regulated in human tubular epithelial cells (TECs) during renal injury, but its function in this setting remains unknown. We used cisplatin to induce renal injury in wild-type (DR3(+/+)) or congenitally deficient DR3(-/-) mice to examine the in vivo role of DR3. Cisplatin induced the expression of DR3, its ligand, TNF-like ligand 1A (TL1A), and TNF in TECs, as observed in human renal injury. Cisplatin increased apoptotic death of DR3(-/-) TECs by twofold compared with DR3(+/+) TECs, whereas it reduced the number of tubules expressing phospho-NF-κBp65(Ser276) by 50% at 72 hours. Similar degrees of induction of DR3, TL1A, and TNF, and changes in apoptosis and phospho-NF-κBp65(Ser276), were obtained in mouse kidney organ cultures treated with cisplatin for 3 hours, suggesting a direct effect on TECs. TNF was implicated in mediating cisplatin-induced tubular damage given that the in vivo co-administration of GM6001, an inhibitor of TNF maturation and release, significantly reduced TNF production and tubular damage. Moreover, TNF exacerbated, whereas TL1A reduced, cisplatin-induced apoptosis in the DR3(+/+) mouse proximal tubule cell line, TKPTS. Our data demonstrate that cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is mitigated by DR3 signaling, suggesting that this occurs by antagonizing pro-apoptotic signals induced by TNF. Therefore, activating DR3 may be beneficial in reducing acute kidney injury. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ablation of Type-1 IFN Signaling in Hematopoietic Cells Confers Protection Following Traumatic Brain Injury123

    PubMed Central

    Karve, Ila P.; Zhang, Moses; Habgood, Mark; Frugier, Tony; Brody, Kate M.; Sashindranath, Maithili; Ek, C. Joakim; Kile, Ben T.; Wright, David; Wang, Hong; Johnston, Leigh; Daglas, Maria; Ates, Robert C.; Medcalf, Robert L.; Taylor, Juliet M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Type-1 interferons (IFNs) are pleiotropic cytokines that signal through the type-1 IFN receptor (IFNAR1). Recent literature has implicated the type-1 IFNs in disorders of the CNS. In this study, we have investigated the role of type-1 IFNs in neuroinflammation following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Using a controlled cortical impact model, TBI was induced in 8- to 10-week-old male C57BL/6J WT and IFNAR1−/− mice and brains were excised to study infarct volume, inflammatory mediator release via quantitative PCR analysis and immune cell profile via immunohistochemistry. IFNAR1−/− mice displayed smaller infarcts compared with WT mice after TBI. IFNAR1−/− mice exhibited an altered anti-inflammatory environment compared with WT mice, with significantly reduced levels of the proinflammatory mediators TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6, an up-regulation of the anti-inflammatory mediator IL-10 and an increased activation of resident and peripheral immune cells after TBI. WT mice injected intravenously with an anti-IFNAR1 blocking monoclonal antibody (MAR1) 1 h before, 30 min after or 30 min and 2 d after TBI displayed significantly improved histological and behavioral outcome. Bone marrow chimeras demonstrated that the hematopoietic cells are a peripheral source of type-1 IFNs that drives neuroinflammation and a worsened TBI outcome. Type-1 IFN mRNA levels were confirmed to be significantly altered in human postmortem TBI brains. Together, these data demonstrate that type-1 IFN signaling is a critical pathway in the progression of neuroinflammation and presents a viable therapeutic target for the treatment of TBI. PMID:27022620

  11. Protection From Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis by Anti-Catabolic Signaling in the Absence of Sost/Sclerostin.

    PubMed

    Sato, Amy Y; Cregor, Meloney; Delgado-Calle, Jesus; Condon, Keith W; Allen, Matthew R; Peacock, Munro; Plotkin, Lilian I; Bellido, Teresita

    2016-10-01

    Excess of glucocorticoids, either due to disease or iatrogenic, increases bone resorption and decreases bone formation and is a leading cause of osteoporosis and bone fractures worldwide. Improved therapeutic strategies are sorely needed. We investigated whether activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling protects against the skeletal actions of glucocorticoids, using female mice lacking the Wnt/β-catenin antagonist and bone formation inhibitor Sost. Glucocorticoids decreased the mass, deteriorated the microarchitecture, and reduced the structural and material strength of bone in wild-type (WT), but not in Sost(-/-) mice. The high bone mass exhibited by Sost(-/-) mice is due to increased bone formation with unchanged resorption. However, unexpectedly, preservation of bone mass and strength in Sost(-/-) mice was due to prevention of glucocorticoid-induced bone resorption and not to restoration of bone formation. In WT mice, glucocorticoids increased the expression of Sost and the number of sclerostin-positive osteocytes, and altered the molecular signature of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by decreasing the expression of genes associated with both anti-catabolism, including osteoprotegerin (OPG), and anabolism/survival, such as cyclin D1. In contrast in Sost(-/-) mice, glucocorticoids did not decrease OPG but still reduced cyclin D1. Thus, in the context of glucocorticoid excess, activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by Sost/sclerostin deficiency sustains bone integrity by opposing bone catabolism despite markedly reduced bone formation and increased apoptosis. This crosstalk between glucocorticoids and Wnt/β-catenin signaling could be exploited therapeutically to halt resorption and bone loss induced by glucocorticoids and to inhibit the exaggerated bone formation in diseases of unwanted hyperactivation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  12. Tnfa Signaling Through Tnfr2 Protects Skin Against Oxidative Stress–Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    López-Muñoz, Azucena; García-Moreno, Diana; Espín-Palazón, Raquel; Tyrkalska, Sylwia D.; Cayuela, María L.; Renshaw, Stephen A.; Corbalán-Vélez, Raúl; Vidal-Abarca, Inmaculada; Tsai, Huai-Jen; Meseguer, José; Sepulcre, María P.; Mulero, Victoriano

    2014-01-01

    TNFα overexpression has been associated with several chronic inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, lichen planus, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Paradoxically, numerous studies have reported new-onset psoriasis and lichen planus following TNFα antagonist therapy. Here, we show that genetic inhibition of Tnfa and Tnfr2 in zebrafish results in the mobilization of neutrophils to the skin. Using combinations of fluorescent reporter transgenes, fluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry, we identified the local production of dual oxidase 1 (Duox1)-derived H2O2 by Tnfa- and Tnfr2-deficient keratinocytes as a trigger for the activation of the master inflammation transcription factor NF-κB, which then promotes the induction of genes encoding pro-inflammatory molecules. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of Duox1 completely abrogated skin inflammation, placing Duox1-derived H2O2 upstream of this positive feedback inflammatory loop. Strikingly, DUOX1 was drastically induced in the skin lesions of psoriasis and lichen planus patients. These results reveal a crucial role for TNFα/TNFR2 axis in the protection of the skin against DUOX1-mediated oxidative stress and could establish new therapeutic targets for skin inflammatory disorders. PMID:24802997

  13. Tnfa signaling through tnfr2 protects skin against oxidative stress-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Candel, Sergio; de Oliveira, Sofía; López-Muñoz, Azucena; García-Moreno, Diana; Espín-Palazón, Raquel; Tyrkalska, Sylwia D; Cayuela, María L; Renshaw, Stephen A; Corbalán-Vélez, Raúl; Vidal-Abarca, Inmaculada; Tsai, Huai-Jen; Meseguer, José; Sepulcre, María P; Mulero, Victoriano

    2014-05-01

    TNFα overexpression has been associated with several chronic inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, lichen planus, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Paradoxically, numerous studies have reported new-onset psoriasis and lichen planus following TNFα antagonist therapy. Here, we show that genetic inhibition of Tnfa and Tnfr2 in zebrafish results in the mobilization of neutrophils to the skin. Using combinations of fluorescent reporter transgenes, fluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry, we identified the local production of dual oxidase 1 (Duox1)-derived H₂O₂ by Tnfa- and Tnfr2-deficient keratinocytes as a trigger for the activation of the master inflammation transcription factor NF-κB, which then promotes the induction of genes encoding pro-inflammatory molecules. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of Duox1 completely abrogated skin inflammation, placing Duox1-derived H₂O₂ upstream of this positive feedback inflammatory loop. Strikingly, DUOX1 was drastically induced in the skin lesions of psoriasis and lichen planus patients. These results reveal a crucial role for TNFα/TNFR2 axis in the protection of the skin against DUOX1-mediated oxidative stress and could establish new therapeutic targets for skin inflammatory disorders.

  14. Imbalanced gp130 signalling in ApoE-deficient mice protects against atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Gareth W; McLeod, Louise; Kennedy, Catherine L; Bozinovski, Steven; Najdovska, Meri; Jenkins, Brendan J

    2015-02-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 is a key modulator of the acute phase response (APR), and while both are implicated in atherosclerosis, the pathological role of specific IL-6 signalling cascades is ill-defined. Since IL-6 employs the cytokine receptor gp130 to primarily activate the STAT3 pathway, here we evaluate whether gp130-dependent STAT3 activation modulates atherosclerosis. High-fat diet-induced atherosclerosis was established in ApoE(-/-) mice crossed with gp130(F/F) knock-in mice displaying elevated gp130-dependent STAT3 activation and production of the APR protein, serum amyloid A (SAA). Also generated were gp130(F/F):Stat3(-/+):ApoE(-/-) mice displaying genetically-normalised STAT3 activation and SAA levels, and bone marrow chimeras involving ApoE(-/-) and gp130(F/F):ApoE(-/-) mice. At 10 weeks post high-fat diet, aortic atherosclerotic lesions, including the presence of CD68(+) macrophages, and plasma lipid and SAA profiles, were assessed. Aortic plaque development and plasma triglyceride levels in gp130(F/F):ApoE(-/-) mice were significantly reduced (3-fold, P < 0.001) compared to ApoE(-/-) littermates. By contrast, in gp130(F/F):ApoE(-/-) mice, atherosclerotic plaques contained augmented CD68(+) macrophage infiltrates, and plasma SAA levels were elevated, compared to ApoE(-/-) mice. Atherosclerotic lesion development and plasma triglyceride levels in gp130(F/F):ApoE(-/-) and gp130(F/F):Stat3(-/+):ApoE(-/-) mice were comparable, despite a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in macrophage numbers in lesions, and also plasma SAA levels, in gp130(F/F):Stat3(-/+):ApoE(-/-) mice. Aortic plaque development and plasma triglyceride levels were comparable in ApoE(-/-) mice reconstituted with gp130(F/F):ApoE(-/-) (ApoE(F/F:ApoE)) or ApoE(-/-) (ApoE(ApoE)) bone marrow cells. Deregulation of gp130/STAT3 signalling augments the APR and macrophage infiltration during atherosclerosis without impacting on the development of aortic plaques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd

  15. L-Lactate protects neurons against excitotoxicity: implication of an ATP-mediated signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Jourdain, P.; Allaman, I.; Rothenfusser, K.; Fiumelli, H.; Marquet, P.; Magistretti, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Converging experimental data indicate a neuroprotective action of L-Lactate. Using Digital Holographic Microscopy, we observe that transient application of glutamate (100 μM; 2 min) elicits a NMDA-dependent death in 65% of mouse cortical neurons in culture. In the presence of L-Lactate (or Pyruvate), the percentage of neuronal death decreases to 32%. UK5099, a blocker of the Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier, fully prevents L-Lactate-mediated neuroprotection. In addition, L-Lactate-induced neuroprotection is not only inhibited by probenicid and carbenoxolone, two blockers of ATP channel pannexins, but also abolished by apyrase, an enzyme degrading ATP, suggesting that ATP produced by the Lactate/Pyruvate pathway is released to act on purinergic receptors in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Finally, pharmacological approaches support the involvement of the P2Y receptors associated to the PI3-kinase pathway, leading to activation of KATP channels. This set of results indicates that L-Lactate acts as a signalling molecule for neuroprotection against excitotoxicity through coordinated cellular pathways involving ATP production, release and activation of a P2Y/KATP cascade. PMID:26893204

  16. Protective role of JAK/STAT signaling against renal fibrosis in mice with unilateral ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Koike, Kiyomi; Ueda, Seiji; Yamagishi, Sho-ichi; Yasukawa, Hideo; Kaida, Yusuke; Yokoro, Miyuki; Fukami, Kei; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Okuda, Seiya

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is involved in renal fibrosis, a final common pathway for kidney diseases. To clarify how JAK/STAT/SOCS system was involved in renal fibrosis, UUO was induced in BALB/c or SOCS3(+/-) mice in the presence or absence of JAK inhibitor-incorporated nanoparticle (pyridine6-PGLA). UUO increased pSTAT3 and subsequently elevated SOCS3 levels in the obstructed kidneys. pSTAT3 levels were further increased in SOCS3(+/-) mice. UUO-induced renal fibrosis was markedly suppressed in SOCS3(+/-) mice, while it was aggravated by pre-treatment with pyridine6-PGLA. Although there were no differences in renal mRNA levels of TGF-β and collagens between wild and SOCS3(+/-) mice, MMP-2 activity was enhanced in SOCS3(+/-) UUO mice. Activated MMP-2 was completely suppressed by pyridine6-PGLA-pre-treatment. TNF-α one of JAK/STAT activators, increased pSTAT3 levels and subsequently induced MMP-2 activation in proximal tubular cells. These results suggest that JAK/STAT3 signaling may play a role in repair process of renal fibrosis in UUO partly via MMP-2 activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Autophagy protects against dasatinib-induced hepatotoxicity via p38 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaochun; Wang, Jincheng; Dai, Jiabin; Shao, Jinjin; Ma, Jian; Chen, Chao; Ma, Shenglin; He, Qiaojun; Luo, Peihua; Yang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Liver dysfunction is a common side effect associated with the treatment of dasatinib and its mechanism is poorly understood. Autophagy has been thought to be a potent survival or death factor for liver dysfunction, which may shed the light on a novel strategy for the intervention of hepatotoxicity caused by dasatinib. In this study, we show for the first time that autophagy is induced, which is consistent with the formation of liver damage. Autophagy inhibition exacerbated dasatinib-induced liver failure, suggesting that autophagy acted as a self-defense mechanism to promote survival. Oxidative stress has been shown to be an important stimulus for autophagy and hepatotoxicity. Interestingly, dasatinib increased the activity of p38, which is a critical modulator of the oxidative stress related to liver injury and autophagy. p38 silencing significantly blocked LC3-II induction and p62 reduction by dasatinib, which was accompanied by increased caspase-3 and PARP cleavage, indicating that autophagy alleviated dasatinib-induced hepatotoxicity via p38 signaling. Finally, the p38 agonist isoproterenol hydrochloride (ISO) alleviated dasatinib-induced liver failure by enhancing autophagy without affecting the anticancer activity of dasatinib. Thus, this study revealed that p38-activated autophagy promoted survival during liver injury, which may provide novel approaches for managing the clinical applications of dasatinib. PMID:25749037

  18. Protection of Momordica charantia polysaccharide against intracerebral hemorrhage-induced brain injury through JNK3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhen-Zhen; Zhou, Xiao-Ling; Li, Yi-Hang; Zhang, Feng; Li, Feng-Ying; Su-Hua, Qi

    2015-01-01

    It has been well documented that Momordica charantia polysaccharide (MCP) has multiple biological effects such as immune enhancement, anti-oxidation and anti-cancer. However, the potential protective effects of MCP on stroke damage and its relative mechanisms remain unclear. Our present study demonstrated that MCP could scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) in intra-cerebral hemorrhage damage, significantly attenuating the neuronal death induced by thrombin in primary hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we found that MCP prevented the activation of the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK3), c-Jun and caspase-3, which was caused by the intra-cerebral hemorrhage injury. Taken together, our study demonstrated that MCP had a neuroprotective effect in response to intra-cerebral hemorrhage and its mechanisms involved the inhibition of JNK3 signaling pathway.

  19. Involvement of Bcl-2 Signal Pathway in the Protective Effects of Apigenin on Anoxia/Reoxygenation-induced Myocardium Injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuanjun; He, Huan; Luo, Yong; Zhou, Min; Yin, Dong; He, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Apigenin is a type of flavonoids, which has been demonstrated to protect myocardium against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, the mechanism is still unclear. We hypothesized that the mechanism of cardioprotective action of apigenin on the I/R-induced injury might be caused via B-cell lymphoma (Bcl) signaling pathway. In this study, an in vitro I/R model was replicated on Langendorff-perfused heart and H9c2 cardiomyocytes by anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R) treatment. The recovery of cardiac contractile function, infarct size, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) in the perfusate, the expression and activity of Bcl-2 and caspase-3, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis were measured in the Langendorff heart undergoing A/R injury. In addition, the cell viability, LDH release, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), expression of cytochrome c in the cytosol, and cell apoptosis were examined in the culture of H9c2 cardiomyocytes after the A/R. The results showed that apigenin significantly improved rat heart contractile function, reduced LDH release, infarct size and apoptotic rate, upregulated the expression of Bcl-2 and caspase-3, and downregulated the expression of cleaved caspase-3 after the A/R. Moreover, apigenin increased the cell viability and decreased the release of LDH, production of reactive oxygen species, release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into the cytosol, and cell apoptosis in the culture of H9c2 cardiomyocytes after the A/R. In addition, inhibition of Bcl-2 activity by ABT-737 markedly attenuated the protective effect of apigenin on the A/R-induced myocardium injury. Taken together, we firstly demonstrated that the effect of apigenin against A/R injury in cardiomyocytes involves Bcl-2 signal pathway and at least partly depends on its effect of upregulating the expression of Bcl-2.

  20. Role of Opioid Receptors Signaling in Remote Electrostimulation - Induced Protection against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsin-Ju; Huang, Shiang-Suo; Tsou, Meng-Ting; Wang, Hsiao-Ting; Chiu, Jen-Hwey

    2015-01-01

    Aims Our previous studies demonstrated that remote electro-stimulation (RES) increased myocardial GSK3 phosphorylation and attenuated ischemia/ reperfusion (I/R) injury in rat hearts. However, the role of various opioid receptors (OR) subtypes in preconditioned RES-induced myocardial protection remains unknown. We investigated the role of OR subtype signaling in RES-induced cardioprotection against I/R injury of the rat heart. Methods & Results Male Spraque-Dawley rats were used. RES was performed on median nerves area with/without pretreatment with various receptors antagonists such as opioid receptor (OR) subtype receptors (KOR, DOR, and MOR). The expressions of Akt, GSK3, and PKCε expression were analyzed by Western blotting. When RES was preconditioned before the I/R model, the rat's hemodynamic index, infarction size, mortality and serum CK-MB were evaluated. Our results showed that Akt, GSK3 and PKCε expression levels were significantly increased in the RES group compared to the sham group, which were blocked by pretreatment with specific antagonists targeting KOR and DOR, but not MOR subtype. Using the I/R model, the duration of arrhythmia and infarct size were both significantly attenuated in RES group. The mortality rates of the sham RES group, the RES group, RES group + KOR antagonist, RES group + DOR/MOR antagonists (KOR left), RES group + DOR antagonist, and RES group + KOR/MOR antagonists (DOR left) were 50%, 20%, 67%, 13%, 50% and 55%, respectively. Conclusion The mechanism of RES-induced myocardial protection against I/R injury seems to involve multiple target pathways such as Akt, KOR and/or DOR signaling. PMID:26430750

  1. Compound 9a, a novel synthetic histone deacetylase inhibitor, protects against septic injury in mice by suppressing MAPK signalling.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Jin; Baek, Ki Seon; Park, Hyun-Ju; Jung, Young Hoon; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2016-03-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening clinical condition characterized by uncontrolled inflammatory responses and is a major cause of death in intensive care units. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have recently exhibited anti-inflammatory properties. MAPK phosphatase (MKP) suppresses MAPK signalling, which plays an important role in inflammatory responses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective mechanisms of Compound 9a, a newly synthetized HDAC inhibitor, against septic injury. The anti-inflammatory properties of Compound 9a were assayed in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. In vivo, polymicrobial sepsis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by caecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The mice were treated with Compound 9a (i.p., 10 mg∙kg(-1) ) 2 h before and immediately after CLP. Compound 9a inhibited the increased production of TNF-α, IL-6 and NO in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. In mice with CLP, Compound 9a improved survival rate, attenuated organ injuries and decreased serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels. CLP increased expression of toll-like receptor 4, phosphorylated (p)-p38, p-JNK and p-ERK proteins, which was attenuated by Compound 9a. Compound 9a decreased MKP-1 association with HDAC1 and enhanced MKP-1 acetylation and enhanced MKP-1 association with p-p38 and p-ERK. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of Compound 9a on serum cytokine levels and phosphorylation of MAPK were abolished by MKP-1 siRNA. Our findings suggest that Compound 9a protected against septic injury by suppressing MAPK-mediated inflammatory signalling. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Compound 9a, a novel synthetic histone deacetylase inhibitor, protects against septic injury in mice by suppressing MAPK signalling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So‐Jin; Baek, Ki Seon; Park, Hyun‐Ju; Jung, Young Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Sepsis is a life‐threatening clinical condition characterized by uncontrolled inflammatory responses and is a major cause of death in intensive care units. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have recently exhibited anti‐inflammatory properties. MAPK phosphatase (MKP) suppresses MAPK signalling, which plays an important role in inflammatory responses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective mechanisms of Compound 9a, a newly synthetized HDAC inhibitor, against septic injury. Experimental Approach The anti‐inflammatory properties of Compound 9a were assayed in LPS‐stimulated RAW264.7 cells. In vivo, polymicrobial sepsis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by caecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The mice were treated with Compound 9a (i.p., 10 mg∙kg−1) 2 h before and immediately after CLP. Key Results Compound 9a inhibited the increased production of TNF‐α, IL‐6 and NO in LPS‐stimulated RAW264.7 cells. In mice with CLP, Compound 9a improved survival rate, attenuated organ injuries and decreased serum TNF‐α and IL‐6 levels. CLP increased expression of toll‐like receptor 4, phosphorylated (p)‐p38, p‐JNK and p‐ERK proteins, which was attenuated by Compound 9a. Compound 9a decreased MKP‐1 association with HDAC1 and enhanced MKP‐1 acetylation and enhanced MKP‐1 association with p‐p38 and p‐ERK. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of Compound 9a on serum cytokine levels and phosphorylation of MAPK were abolished by MKP‐1 siRNA. Conclusions and Implications Our findings suggest that Compound 9a protected against septic injury by suppressing MAPK‐mediated inflammatory signalling. PMID:26689981

  3. Protective Role of Fucoidan in Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury through Inhibition of MAPK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Che, Nan; Ma, Yijie; Xin, Yinhu

    2016-11-25

    Fucoidan has been reported to exhibit various beneficial activities ranging from to antivirus and anticancer properties. However, little information is available about the effects of fucoidan on cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Our study aimed to explore the effects of fucoidan on cerebral IRI, as well as the underlying mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly subjected to four groups: Sham, IRI+saline (IRI+S), IRI+80 mg/kg fucoidan (IRI+F80), and IRI+160 mg/kg fucoidan (IRI+F160). Fucoidan (80 mg/kg or 160 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected from 7 days before the rats were induced to cerebral IRI model with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) method. At 24 h after reperfusion, neurological deficits and the total infarct volume were determined. The levels of inflammation-associated cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α), oxidative stress-related proteins (malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) in the ischemic brain were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Besides, the levels of apoptosis-related proteins (p-53, Bax, and B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway (phosphorylation-extracellular signalregulated kinase (p-ERK), p-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p-p38) were measured. Results showed that administration of fucoidan significantly reduced the neurological deficits and infarct volume compared to the IRI+S group in a dose-dependent manner. Also, fucoidan statistically decreased the levels of inflammation-associated cytokines, and oxidative stress-related proteins, inhibited apoptosis, and suppressed the MAPK pathway. So, Fucoidan plays a protective role in cerebral IRI might be by inhibition of MAPK pathway.

  4. MyD88-dependent signaling contributes to protection following Bacillus anthracis spore challenge of mice: implications for Toll-like receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Molly A; Green, Candace S; Lowchyj, Lisa; Lee, Gloria M; Grippe, Vanessa K; Smith, Michael F; Huang, Li-Yun; Harvill, Eric T; Merkel, Tod J

    2005-11-01

    Bacillus anthracis is a spore-forming, gram-positive organism that is the causative agent of the disease anthrax. Recognition of Bacillus anthracis by the host innate immune system likely plays a key protective role following infection. In the present study, we examined the role of TLR2, TLR4, and MyD88 in the response to B. anthracis. Heat-killed Bacillus anthracis stimulated TLR2, but not TLR4, signaling in HEK293 cells and stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production in C3H/HeN, C3H/HeJ, and C57BL/6J bone marrow-derived macrophages. The ability of heat-killed B. anthracis to induce a TNF-alpha response was preserved in TLR2-/- but not in MyD88-/- macrophages. In vivo studies revealed that TLR2-/- mice and TLR4-deficient mice were resistant to challenge with aerosolized Sterne strain spores but MyD88-/- mice were as susceptible as A/J mice. We conclude that, although recognition of B. anthracis occurs via TLR2, additional MyD88-dependent pathways contribute to the host innate immune response to anthrax infection.

  5. Rutin Protects against Pirarubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity through TGF-β1-p38 MAPK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yadi; Zhang, Yang; Sun, Bo; Tong, Qing

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the potential protective effect of rutinum (RUT) against pirarubicin- (THP-) induced cardiotoxicity. THP was used to induce toxicity in rat H9c2 cardiomyoblasts. Positive control cells were pretreated with a cardioprotective agent dexrazoxane (DZR) prior to treatment with THP. Some of the cells were preincubated with RUT and a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor, SB203580, both individually and in combination, prior to THP exposure. At a dose range of 30–70 μM, RUT significantly prevented THP-induced reduction in cell viability; the best cardioprotective effect was observed at a dose of 50 μM. Administration of RUT and SB203580, both individually as well as in combination, suppressed the elevation of intracellular ROS, inhibited cell apoptosis, and reversed the THP-induced upregulation of TGF-β1, p-p38 MAPK, cleaved Caspase-9, Caspase-7, and Caspase-3. A synergistic effect was observed on coadministration of RUT and SB203580. RUT protected against THP-induced cardiotoxicity by inhibition of ROS generation and suppression of cell apoptosis. The cardioprotective effect of RUT appears to be associated with the modulation of the TGF-β1-p38 MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:28367221

  6. Interference with Akt signaling protects against myocardial infarction and death by limiting the consequences of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Bethany A.; Ma, Lining; West, Xiaoxia Z.; Ding, Liang; Malinin, Nikolay L.; Weber, Malory E.; Tischenko, Mira; Goc, Anna; Somanath, Payaningal R.; Penn, Marc S.; Podrez, Eugene A.; Byzova, Tatiana V.

    2014-01-01

    The intricacy of multiple feedback loops in the pathways downstream of Akt allows Akt to control multiple cellular processes in the cardiovascular system and precludes inferring consequences of its activation in specific pathological conditions. Akt1, the major Akt isoform in heart and vasculature, has a protective role in the endothelium during atherosclerosis. However, Akt1 activation has been proposed to have detrimental consequences in the cardiovascular system. Mice lacking the apolipoprotein E (ApoE), which promotes clearance of remnant lipoproteins, and the high-density lipoprotein receptor SR-BI are a model of spontaneous myocardial infarction and severe dyslipidemia. Akt1 was activated in these mice, and this activation correlated with cardiac dysfunction, hypertrophy, and fibrosis; increased infarct area; macrophage cholesterol accumulation and atherosclerosis; and reduced lifespan. Akt1 activation was associated with inflammation, oxidative stress, accumulation of oxidized lipids and increased abundance of CD36, a major sensor of oxidative stress, which created a positive feedback loop that exacerbated the consequences of oxidative stress. Thus, interference with Akt1 signaling in vivo could be protective and improve survival in dyslipidemia in the absence of SR-BI by reducing oxidative stress and responses to oxidized lipids. PMID:23921086

  7. Recombinant BCG Expressing ESX-1 of Mycobacterium marinum Combines Low Virulence with Cytosolic Immune Signaling and Improved TB Protection.

    PubMed

    Gröschel, Matthias I; Sayes, Fadel; Shin, Sung Jae; Frigui, Wafa; Pawlik, Alexandre; Orgeur, Mickael; Canetti, Robin; Honoré, Nadine; Simeone, Roxane; van der Werf, Tjip S; Bitter, Wilbert; Cho, Sang-Nae; Majlessi, Laleh; Brosch, Roland

    2017-03-14

    Recent insights into the mechanisms by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of human tuberculosis, is recognized by cytosolic nucleotide sensors have opened new avenues for rational vaccine design. The only licensed anti-tuberculosis vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis BCG, provides limited protection. A feature of BCG is the partial deletion of the ESX-1 type VII secretion system, which governs phagosomal rupture and cytosolic pattern recognition, key intracellular phenotypes linked to increased immune signaling. Here, by heterologously expressing the esx-1 region of Mycobacterium marinum in BCG, we engineered a low-virulence, ESX-1-proficient, recombinant BCG (BCG::ESX-1(Mmar)) that induces the cGas/STING/TBK1/IRF-3/type I interferon axis and enhances AIM2 and NLRP3 inflammasome activity, resulting in both higher proportions of CD8(+) T cell effectors against mycobacterial antigens shared with BCG and polyfunctional CD4(+) Th1 cells specific to ESX-1 antigens. Importantly, independent mouse vaccination models show that BCG::ESX-1(Mmar) confers superior protection relative to parental BCG against challenges with highly virulent M. tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sesamin protects against renal ischemia reperfusion injury by promoting CD39-adenosine-A2AR signal pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Gong, Xia; Kuang, Ge; Jiang, Rong; Wan, Jingyuan; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is a leading cause of acute kidney injury with high morbidity and mortality due to limited therapy. Here, we examine whether sesamin attenuates renal IRI in an animal model and explore the underlying mechanisms. Male mice were subjected to right renal ischemia for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h with sesamin (100 mg/kg) during which the left kidney was removed. Renal damage and function were assessed subsequently. The results showed that sesamin reduced kidney ischemia reperfusion injury, as assessed by decreased serum creatinine (Scr) and Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), alleviated tubular damage and apoptosis. In addition, sesamin inhibited neutrophils infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β production in IR-preformed kidney. Notably, sesamin promoted the expression of CD39, A2A adenosine receptor (A2AAR), and A2BAR mRNA and protein as well as adenosine production. Furthermore, CD39 inhibitor or A2AR antagonist abolished partly the protection of sesamin in kidney IRI. In conclusion, sesamin could effectively protect kidney from IRI by inhibiting inflammatory responses, which might be associated with promoting the adenosine-CD39-A2AR signaling pathway.

  9. Sesamin protects against renal ischemia reperfusion injury by promoting CD39-adenosine-A2AR signal pathway in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Gong, Xia; Kuang, Ge; Jiang, Rong; Wan, Jingyuan; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is a leading cause of acute kidney injury with high morbidity and mortality due to limited therapy. Here, we examine whether sesamin attenuates renal IRI in an animal model and explore the underlying mechanisms. Male mice were subjected to right renal ischemia for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h with sesamin (100 mg/kg) during which the left kidney was removed. Renal damage and function were assessed subsequently. The results showed that sesamin reduced kidney ischemia reperfusion injury, as assessed by decreased serum creatinine (Scr) and Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), alleviated tubular damage and apoptosis. In addition, sesamin inhibited neutrophils infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β production in IR-preformed kidney. Notably, sesamin promoted the expression of CD39, A2A adenosine receptor (A2AAR), and A2BAR mRNA and protein as well as adenosine production. Furthermore, CD39 inhibitor or A2AR antagonist abolished partly the protection of sesamin in kidney IRI. In conclusion, sesamin could effectively protect kidney from IRI by inhibiting inflammatory responses, which might be associated with promoting the adenosine-CD39-A2AR signaling pathway. PMID:27347331

  10. Blind synchronization of the OFDM signals in multipath channels on the basis of the time and frequency protection intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkov, G. N.; Gorokhov, K. V.; Kolobkov, A. V.

    2013-08-01

    New methods of symbol-timing and carrier-frequency blind synchronization of an OFDM-signal receiver are developed and studied. They generalize the well-known methods which use either the protection interval in time in the cyclic prefix form or the protection interval with respect to frequency in the form of virtual subcarriers, and are based on their joint application. To reduce the computational complexity, approximate algorithms which are based on the approximation of the optimal rules, but, according to the study results, have almost the same characteristics of parameter-estimation accuracy and the reception bit-error-rate performance are proposed. It is shown that in terms of the parameter-estimation accuracy and the reception bit-error-rate performance, the proposed methods are superior to the well-known methods of synchronization by the cyclic prefix and the virtual subcarriers in the two-path Rayleigh-fading channel. For incoherent systems with the differential phase shift keying variants, using such methods makes it possible to rule out the necessity of accurate synchronization and, due to insignificant redundancy of the system band and the cyclic prefix length, closely approach the reception bit-error-rate performance for perfect synchronization.

  11. Sinomenine Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice via Adenosine A2A Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Li; He, Xie; Zeng, Yi-Jun; Dai, Shuang-Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Sinomenine (SIN) is a bioactive alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum, which is widely used in the clinical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. In this study, we investigate the role of SIN in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in mice. After ALI, lung water content and histological signs of pulmonary injury were attenuated, whereas the PaO2/FIO2 (P/F) ratios were elevated significantly in the mice pretreated with SIN. Additionally, SIN markedly inhibited inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and IL-1β expression levels as well as neutrophil infiltration in the lung tissues of the mice. Microarray analysis and real-time PCR showed that SIN treatment upregulated adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) expression, and the protective effect of SIN was abolished in A2AR knockout mice. Further investigation in isolated mouse neutrophils confirmed the upregulation of A2AR by SIN and showed that A2AR-cAMP-PKA signaling was involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of SIN. Taken together, these findings demonstrate an A2AR-associated anti-inflammatory effect and the protective role of SIN in ALI, which suggests a potential novel approach to treat ALI. PMID:23555007

  12. Sinomenine protects against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice via adenosine A(2A) receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Li; He, Xie; Zeng, Yi-Jun; Dai, Shuang-Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Sinomenine (SIN) is a bioactive alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum, which is widely used in the clinical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. In this study, we investigate the role of SIN in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in mice. After ALI, lung water content and histological signs of pulmonary injury were attenuated, whereas the PaO2/FIO2 (P/F) ratios were elevated significantly in the mice pretreated with SIN. Additionally, SIN markedly inhibited inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and IL-1β expression levels as well as neutrophil infiltration in the lung tissues of the mice. Microarray analysis and real-time PCR showed that SIN treatment upregulated adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) expression, and the protective effect of SIN was abolished in A(2A)R knockout mice. Further investigation in isolated mouse neutrophils confirmed the upregulation of A(2A)R by SIN and showed that A(2A)R-cAMP-PKA signaling was involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of SIN. Taken together, these findings demonstrate an A(2A)R-associated anti-inflammatory effect and the protective role of SIN in ALI, which suggests a potential novel approach to treat ALI.

  13. Schisandrol B protects against acetaminophen-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice via activation of the NRF2/ARE signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yi-ming; Wang, Ying; Tan, Hua-sen; Yu, Tao; Fan, Xiao-mei; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Huang, Min; Bi, Hui-chang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) acts through the antioxidant response element (ARE) to regulate the expression of many detoxifying and antioxidant genes responsible for cytoprotective processes. We previously reported that Schisandrol B (SolB) isolated from Schisandra sphenanthera produced a protective effect against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury. In this study we investigated whether the NRF2/ARE signaling pathway was involved in this hepato-protective effect. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with SolB (200 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 3 d before injection of APAP (400 mg/kg, ip). Serum and liver tissue samples were collected 6 h later. The mRNA and protein expression were measured using qRT-PCR and Western blot assay, respectively. The activation of NRF2 was examined in HepG2 cells using luciferase reporter gene assay. Results: SolB pretreatment significantly alleviated the hepatic injury (large patchy necrosis and hyperemia of the hepatic sinus), the increase of serum AST, ALT levels and hepatic MDA contents, and the decrease of liver and mitochondrial glutathione levels in APAP-treated mice. Furthermore, SolB pretreatment significantly increased nuclear accumulation of NRF2 and increased hepatic expression of NRF2 downstream proteins, including GCLC, GSR, NQO1, GSTs, MRP2, MRP3 and MRP4 in APAP-treated mice. Moreover, treatment with SolB (2.5–20 μmol/L) dose-dependently increased the activity of NRF2 reporter gene in HepG2 cells. Conclusion: SolB exhibits a remarkable protective effect against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, partially via activation of the NRF2/ARE pathway and regulation of NRF2 target genes, which induce detoxification and increase antioxidant capacity. PMID:26806302

  14. Controlling the signal: Practical privacy protection of genomic data sharing through Beacon services.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhiyu; Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Malin, Bradley

    2017-07-26

    Genomic data is increasingly collected by a wide array of organizations. As such, there is a growing demand to make summary information about such collections available more widely. However, over the past decade, a series of investigations have shown that attacks, rooted in statistical inference methods, can be applied to discern the presence of a known individual's DNA sequence in the pool of subjects. Recently, it was shown that the Beacon Project of the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health, a web service for querying about the presence (or absence) of a specific allele, was vulnerable. The Integrating Data for Analysis, Anonymization, and Sharing (iDASH) Center modeled a track in their third Privacy Protection Challenge on how to mitigate the Beacon vulnerability. We developed the winning solution for this track. This paper describes our computational method to optimize the tradeoff between the utility and the privacy of the Beacon service. We generalize the genomic data sharing problem beyond that which was introduced in the iDASH Challenge to be more representative of real world scenarios to allow for a more comprehensive evaluation. We then conduct a sensitivity analysis of our method with respect to several state-of-the-art methods using a dataset of 400,000 positions in Chromosome 10 for 500 individuals from Phase 3 of the 1000 Genomes Project. All methods are evaluated for utility, privacy and efficiency. Our method achieves better performance than all state-of-the-art methods, irrespective of how key factors (e.g., the allele frequency in the population, the size of the pool and utility weights) change from the original parameters of the problem. We further illustrate that it is possible for our method to exhibit subpar performance under special cases of allele query sequences. However, we show our method can be extended to address this issue when the query sequence is fixed and known a priori to the data custodian, so that they may plan stage their

  15. Protective role for TLR4 signaling in atherosclerosis progression as revealed by infection with a common oral pathogen.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Chie; Papadopoulos, George; Gudino, Cynthia V; Weinberg, Ellen O; Barth, Kenneth R; Madrigal, Andrés G; Chen, Yang; Ning, Hua; LaValley, Michael; Gibson, Frank C; Hamilton, James A; Genco, Caroline A

    2012-10-01

    Clinical and epidemiological studies have implicated chronic infections in the development of atherosclerosis. It has been proposed that common mechanisms of signaling via TLRs link stimulation by multiple pathogens to atherosclerosis. However, how pathogen-specific stimulation of TLR4 contributes to atherosclerosis progression remains poorly understood. In this study, atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein-E null (ApoE(-/-)) and TLR4-deficient (ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-)) mice were orally infected with the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-) mice were markedly more susceptible to atherosclerosis after oral infection with P. gingivalis. Using live animal imaging, we demonstrate that enhanced lesion progression occurs progressively and was increasingly evident with advancing age. Immunohistochemical analysis of lesions from ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-) mice revealed an increased inflammatory cell infiltrate composed primarily of macrophages and IL-17 effector T cells (Th17), a subset linked with chronic inflammation. Furthermore, enhanced atherosclerosis in TLR4-deficient mice was associated with impaired development of Th1 immunity and regulatory T cell infiltration. In vitro studies suggest that the mechanism of TLR4-mediated protective immunity may be orchestrated by dendritic cell IL-12 and IL-10, which are prototypic Th1 and regulatory T cell polarizing cytokines. We demonstrate an atheroprotective role for TLR4 in response to infection with the oral pathogen P. gingivalis. Our results point to a role for pathogen-specific TLR signaling in chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  16. Targeted disruption of TGF-beta1/Smad3 signaling protects against renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Misako; Muragaki, Yasuteru; Saika, Shizuya; Roberts, Anita B; Ooshima, Akira

    2003-11-01

    Tubulointerstitial fibrosis is the final common result of a variety of progressive injuries leading to chronic renal failure. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is reportedly upregulated in response to injurious stimuli such as unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO), causing renal fibrosis associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of the renal tubules and synthesis of extracellular matrix. We now show that mice lacking Smad3 (Smad3ex8/ex8), a key signaling intermediate downstream of the TGF-beta receptors, are protected against tubulointerstitial fibrosis following UUO as evidenced by blocking of EMT and abrogation of monocyte influx and collagen accumulation. Culture of primary renal tubular epithelial cells from wild-type or Smad3-null mice confirms that the Smad3 pathway is essential for TGF-beta1-induced EMT and autoinduction of TGF-beta1. Moreover, mechanical stretch of the cultured epithelial cells, mimicking renal tubular distention due to accumulation of urine after UUO, induces EMT following Smad3-mediated upregulation of TGF-beta1. Exogenous bone marrow monocytes accelerate EMT of the cultured epithelial cells and renal tubules in the obstructed kidney after UUO dependent on Smad3 signaling. Together the data demonstrate that the Smad3 pathway is central to the pathogenesis of interstitial fibrosis and suggest that inhibitors of this pathway may have clinical application in the treatment of obstructive nephropathy.

  17. Toll-like receptor 2 signaling protects mice from tumor development in a mouse model of colitis-induced cancer.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Emily L; Crother, Timothy R; Rabizadeh, Shervin; Hu, Bing; Wang, Hanlin; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Wong, Michelle H; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Arditi, Moshe

    2010-09-27

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a disorder of chronic inflammation with increased susceptibility to colorectal cancer. The etiology of IBD is unclear but thought to result from a dysregulated adaptive and innate immune response to microbial products in a genetically susceptible host. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling induced by intestinal commensal bacteria plays a crucial role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, innate immunity and the enhancement of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) integrity. However, the role of TLR2 in the development of colorectal cancer has not been studied. We utilized the AOM-DSS model for colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) in wild type (WT) and TLR2(-/-) mice. Colons harvested from WT and TLR2(-/-) mice were used for histopathology, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and cytokine analysis. Mice deficient in TLR2 developed significantly more and larger colorectal tumors than their WT controls. We provide evidence that colonic epithelium of TLR2(-/-) mice have altered immune responses and dysregulated proliferation under steady-state conditions and during colitis, which lead to inflammatory growth signals and predisposition to accelerated neoplastic growth. At the earliest time-points assessed, TLR2(-/-) colons exhibited a significant increase in aberrant crypt foci (ACF), resulting in tumors that developed earlier and grew larger. In addition, the intestinal microenvironment revealed significantly higher levels of IL-6 and IL-17A concomitant with increased phospho-STAT3 within ACF. These observations indicate that in colitis, TLR2 plays a protective role against the development of CAC.

  18. Cardiac protective effects of irbesartan via the PPAR-gamma signaling pathway in angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Zhou; Shang, Qian-Hui; Jin, Hai-Yan; Song, Bei; Oudit, Gavin Y; Lu, Lin; Zhou, Tong; Xu, Ying-Le; Gao, Ping-Jin; Zhu, Ding-Liang; Penninger, Josef M; Zhong, Jiu-Chang

    2013-09-25

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a monocarboxypeptidase which metabolizes angiotensin II (Ang II) to generate Ang-(1-7), has been shown to prevent cardiac hypertrophy and injury but the mechanism remains elusive. Irbesartan has the dual actions of angiotensin receptor blockade and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) activation. We hypothesized that irbesartan would exert its protective effects on ACE2 deficiency-mediated myocardial fibrosis and cardiac injury via the PPARγ signaling. 10-week-old ACE2 knockout (ACE2KO; Ace2(-/y)) mice received daily with irbesartan (50 mg/kg) or saline for 2 weeks. The wild-type mice (Ace2(+/y)) were used to the normal controls. We examined changes in myocardial ultrastructure, fibrosis-related genes and pathological signaling by real-time PCR gene array, Western blotting, Masson trichrome staining and transmission electron microscope analyses, respectively. Compared with the Ace2(+/y) mice, cardiac expression of PPARα and PPARγ were reduced in Ace2(-/y) mice and the myocardial collagen volume fraction (CVF) and expression of fibrosis-related genes were increased, including transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), collagen I and collagen III. Moreover, ACE2 deficiency triggered cardiac hypertrophy, increased myocardial fibrosis and adverse ultrastructure injury in ACE2KO hearts with higher levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), without affecting cardiac systolic function. Intriguingly, treatment with irbesartan significantly reversed ACE2 deficiency-mediated pathological hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis in Ace2(-/y) mice linked with enhancement of plasma Ang-(1-7) level and downregulation of AT1 receptor in heart. Consistent with attenuation of myocardial fibrosis and ultrastructure injury, the myocardial CVF and levels of ANF, TGFβ1, CTGF, collagen I, collagen III and phosphorylated ERK1

  19. The Chemical Basis of Thiol Addition to Nitro-conjugated Linoleic Acid, a Protective Cell-signaling Lipid.

    PubMed

    Turell, Lucía; Vitturi, Darío A; Coitiño, E Laura; Lebrato, Lourdes; Möller, Matías N; Sagasti, Camila; Salvatore, Sonia R; Woodcock, Steven R; Alvarez, Beatriz; Schopfer, Francisco J

    2017-01-27

    Nitroalkene fatty acids are formed in vivo and exert protective and anti-inflammatory effects via reversible Michael addition to thiol-containing proteins in key signaling pathways. Nitro-conjugated linoleic acid (NO2-CLA) is preferentially formed, constitutes the most abundant nitrated fatty acid in humans, and contains two carbons that could potentially react with thiols, modulating signaling actions and levels. In this work, we examined the reactions of NO2-CLA with low molecular weight thiols (glutathione, cysteine, homocysteine, cysteinylglycine, and β-mercaptoethanol) and human serum albumin. Reactions followed reversible biphasic kinetics, consistent with the presence of two electrophilic centers in NO2-CLA located on the β- and δ-carbons with respect to the nitro group. The differential reactivity was confirmed by computational modeling of the electronic structure. The rates (kon and koff) and equilibrium constants for both reactions were determined for different thiols. LC-UV-Visible and LC-MS analyses showed that the fast reaction corresponds to β-adduct formation (the kinetic product), while the slow reaction corresponds to the formation of the δ-adduct (the thermodynamic product). The pH dependence of the rate constants, the correlation between intrinsic reactivity and thiol pKa, and the absence of deuterium solvent kinetic isotope effects suggested stepwise mechanisms with thiolate attack on NO2-CLA as rate-controlling step. Computational modeling supported the mechanism and revealed additional features of the transition states, anionic intermediates, and final neutral products. Importantly, the detection of cysteine-δ-adducts in human urine provided evidence for the biological relevance of this reaction. Finally, human serum albumin was found to bind NO2-CLA both non-covalently and to form covalent adducts at Cys-34, suggesting potential modes for systemic distribution. These results provide new insights into the chemical basis of NO2-CLA

  20. The Chemical Basis of Thiol Addition to Nitro-conjugated Linoleic Acid, a Protective Cell-signaling Lipid*♦

    PubMed Central

    Turell, Lucía; Vitturi, Darío A.; Coitiño, E. Laura; Lebrato, Lourdes; Möller, Matías N.; Sagasti, Camila; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Alvarez, Beatriz; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    Nitroalkene fatty acids are formed in vivo and exert protective and anti-inflammatory effects via reversible Michael addition to thiol-containing proteins in key signaling pathways. Nitro-conjugated linoleic acid (NO2-CLA) is preferentially formed, constitutes the most abundant nitrated fatty acid in humans, and contains two carbons that could potentially react with thiols, modulating signaling actions and levels. In this work, we examined the reactions of NO2-CLA with low molecular weight thiols (glutathione, cysteine, homocysteine, cysteinylglycine, and β-mercaptoethanol) and human serum albumin. Reactions followed reversible biphasic kinetics, consistent with the presence of two electrophilic centers in NO2-CLA located on the β- and δ-carbons with respect to the nitro group. The differential reactivity was confirmed by computational modeling of the electronic structure. The rates (kon and koff) and equilibrium constants for both reactions were determined for different thiols. LC-UV-Visible and LC-MS analyses showed that the fast reaction corresponds to β-adduct formation (the kinetic product), while the slow reaction corresponds to the formation of the δ-adduct (the thermodynamic product). The pH dependence of the rate constants, the correlation between intrinsic reactivity and thiol pKa, and the absence of deuterium solvent kinetic isotope effects suggested stepwise mechanisms with thiolate attack on NO2-CLA as rate-controlling step. Computational modeling supported the mechanism and revealed additional features of the transition states, anionic intermediates, and final neutral products. Importantly, the detection of cysteine-δ-adducts in human urine provided evidence for the biological relevance of this reaction. Finally, human serum albumin was found to bind NO2-CLA both non-covalently and to form covalent adducts at Cys-34, suggesting potential modes for systemic distribution. These results provide new insights into the chemical basis of NO2-CLA

  1. Degradation of the Plant Defense Signal Salicylic Acid Protects Ralstonia solanacearum from Toxicity and Enhances Virulence on Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Lowe-Power, Tiffany M.; Jacobs, Jonathan M.; Ailloud, Florent; Fochs, Brianna; Prior, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plants use the signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) to trigger defenses against diverse pathogens, including the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. SA can also inhibit microbial growth. Most sequenced strains of the heterogeneous R. solanacearum species complex can degrade SA via gentisic acid to pyruvate and fumarate. R. solanacearum strain GMI1000 expresses this SA degradation pathway during tomato pathogenesis. Transcriptional analysis revealed that subinhibitory SA levels induced expression of the SA degradation pathway, toxin efflux pumps, and some general stress responses. Interestingly, SA treatment repressed expression of virulence factors, including the type III secretion system, suggesting that this pathogen may suppress virulence functions when stressed. A GMI1000 mutant lacking SA degradation activity was much more susceptible to SA toxicity but retained the wild-type colonization ability and virulence on tomato. This may be because SA is less important than gentisic acid in tomato defense signaling. However, another host, tobacco, responds strongly to SA. To test the hypothesis that SA degradation contributes to virulence on tobacco, we measured the effect of adding this pathway to the tobacco-pathogenic R. solanacearum strain K60, which lacks SA degradation genes. Ectopic addition of the GMI1000 SA degradation locus, including adjacent genes encoding two porins and a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, significantly increased the virulence of strain K60 on tobacco. Together, these results suggest that R. solanacearum degrades plant SA to protect itself from inhibitory levels of this compound and also to enhance its virulence on plant hosts like tobacco that use SA as a defense signal molecule. PMID:27329752

  2. rSj16 Protects against DSS-Induced Colitis by Inhibiting the PPAR-α Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifu; Xie, Hui; Xu, Lian; Liao, Qi; Wan, Shuo; Yu, Zilong; Lin, Datao; Zhang, Beibei; Lv, Zhiyue; Wu, Zhongdao; Sun, Xi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic studies and animal model experiments have shown that parasites have significant modulatory effects on autoimmune disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recombinant Sj16 (rSj16), a 16-kDa secreted protein of Schistosoma japonicum (S.japonicum) produced by Escherichia coli (E. coli), has been shown to have immunoregulatory effects in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we aimed to determine the effects of rSj16 on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Methods: DSS-induced colitis mice were treated with rSj16. Body weight loss, disease activity index (DAI), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity levels, colon lengths, macroscopic scores, histopathology findings, inflammatory cytokine levels and regulatory T cell (Treg) subset levels were examined. Moreover, the differential genes expression after treated with rSj16 were sequenced, analyzed and identified. Results: rSj16 attenuated clinical activity of DSS-induced colitis mice, diminished pro-inflammatory cytokine production, up-regulated immunoregulatory cytokine production and increased Treg percentages in DSS-induced colitis mice. Moreover, DSS-induced colitis mice treated with rSj16 displayed changes in the expression levels of specific genes in the colon and show the crucial role of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPAR-α) signaling pathway. PPAR-α activation diminished the therapeutic effects of rSj16 in DSS-induced colitis mice, indicating that the PPAR-α signaling pathway plays a crucial role in DSS-induced colitis development. Conclusions: rSj16 has protective effects on DSS-induced colitis, effects mediated mainly by PPAR-α signaling pathway inhibition. The findings of this study suggest that rSj16 may be useful as a therapeutic agent and that PPAR-α may be a new therapeutic target in the treatment of IBD.

  3. rSj16 Protects against DSS-Induced Colitis by Inhibiting the PPAR-α Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lifu; Xie, Hui; Xu, Lian; Liao, Qi; Wan, Shuo; Yu, Zilong; Lin, Datao; Zhang, Beibei; Lv, Zhiyue; Wu, Zhongdao; Sun, Xi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic studies and animal model experiments have shown that parasites have significant modulatory effects on autoimmune disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recombinant Sj16 (rSj16), a 16-kDa secreted protein of Schistosoma japonicum (S.japonicum) produced by Escherichia coli (E. coli), has been shown to have immunoregulatory effects in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we aimed to determine the effects of rSj16 on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Methods: DSS-induced colitis mice were treated with rSj16. Body weight loss, disease activity index (DAI), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity levels, colon lengths, macroscopic scores, histopathology findings, inflammatory cytokine levels and regulatory T cell (Treg) subset levels were examined. Moreover, the differential genes expression after treated with rSj16 were sequenced, analyzed and identified. Results: rSj16 attenuated clinical activity of DSS-induced colitis mice, diminished pro-inflammatory cytokine production, up-regulated immunoregulatory cytokine production and increased Treg percentages in DSS-induced colitis mice. Moreover, DSS-induced colitis mice treated with rSj16 displayed changes in the expression levels of specific genes in the colon and show the crucial role of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPAR-α) signaling pathway. PPAR-α activation diminished the therapeutic effects of rSj16 in DSS-induced colitis mice, indicating that the PPAR-α signaling pathway plays a crucial role in DSS-induced colitis development. Conclusions: rSj16 has protective effects on DSS-induced colitis, effects mediated mainly by PPAR-α signaling pathway inhibition. The findings of this study suggest that rSj16 may be useful as a therapeutic agent and that PPAR-α may be a new therapeutic target in the treatment of IBD. PMID:28912887

  4. Selenoproteins protect against avian nutritional muscular dystrophy by metabolizing peroxides and regulating redox/apoptotic signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jia-Qiang; Ren, Fa-Zheng; Jiang, Yun-Yun; Xiao, Chen; Lei, Xin Gen

    2015-06-01

    -κB inhibitor α. In conclusion, the downregulation of SelP-L, GPx1, GPx4, Sep15, SelW, and SelN by dietary Se deficiency might account for induced oxidative stress and the subsequent peroxidative damage of chick muscle cells via the activation of the p53/caspase 9/caspase 3, COX2/FAK/PI3K/Akt/NF-κB, and p38 MAPK/JNK/ERK signaling pathways. Metabolism of peroxides and redox regulation are likely to be the mechanisms whereby these selenoproteins prevented the onset of NMD in chicks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Degradation of the Plant Defense Signal Salicylic Acid Protects Ralstonia solanacearum from Toxicity and Enhances Virulence on Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Lowe-Power, Tiffany M; Jacobs, Jonathan M; Ailloud, Florent; Fochs, Brianna; Prior, Philippe; Allen, Caitilyn

    2016-06-21

    Plants use the signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) to trigger defenses against diverse pathogens, including the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum SA can also inhibit microbial growth. Most sequenced strains of the heterogeneous R. solanacearum species complex can degrade SA via gentisic acid to pyruvate and fumarate. R. solanacearum strain GMI1000 expresses this SA degradation pathway during tomato pathogenesis. Transcriptional analysis revealed that subinhibitory SA levels induced expression of the SA degradation pathway, toxin efflux pumps, and some general stress responses. Interestingly, SA treatment repressed expression of virulence factors, including the type III secretion system, suggesting that this pathogen may suppress virulence functions when stressed. A GMI1000 mutant lacking SA degradation activity was much more susceptible to SA toxicity but retained the wild-type colonization ability and virulence on tomato. This may be because SA is less important than gentisic acid in tomato defense signaling. However, another host, tobacco, responds strongly to SA. To test the hypothesis that SA degradation contributes to virulence on tobacco, we measured the effect of adding this pathway to the tobacco-pathogenic R. solanacearum strain K60, which lacks SA degradation genes. Ectopic addition of the GMI1000 SA degradation locus, including adjacent genes encoding two porins and a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, significantly increased the virulence of strain K60 on tobacco. Together, these results suggest that R. solanacearum degrades plant SA to protect itself from inhibitory levels of this compound and also to enhance its virulence on plant hosts like tobacco that use SA as a defense signal molecule. Plant pathogens such as the bacterial wilt agent Ralstonia solanacearum threaten food and economic security by causing significant losses for small- and large-scale growers of tomato, tobacco, banana, potato, and ornamentals. Like most plants

  6. Protection Against Epithelial Damage During Candida albicans Infection Is Mediated by PI3K/Akt and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, David L.; Shen, Chengguo; Murciano, Celia; Runglall, Manohursingh; Richardson, Jonathan P.; Arno, Matthew; Aldecoa-Otalora, Estibaliz; Naglik, Julian R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The ability of epithelial cells (ECs) to discriminate between commensal and pathogenic microbes is essential for healthy living. Key to these interactions are mucosal epithelial responses to pathogen-induced damage. Methods. Using reconstituted oral epithelium, we assessed epithelial gene transcriptional responses to Candida albicans infection by microarray. Signal pathway activation was monitored by Western blotting and transcription factor enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the role of these pathways in C. albicans–induced damage protection was determined using chemical inhibitors. Results. Transcript profiling demonstrated early upregulation of epithelial genes involved in immune responses. Many of these genes constituted components of signaling pathways, but only NF-κB, MAPK, and PI3K/Akt pathways were functionally activated. We demonstrate that PI3K/Akt signaling is independent of NF-κB and MAPK signaling and plays a key role in epithelial immune activation and damage protection via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation. Conclusions. PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling may play a critical role in protecting epithelial cells from damage during mucosal fungal infections independent of NF-κB or MAPK signaling. PMID:24357630

  7. Dietary fat overcomes the protective activity of thrombospondin-1 signaling in the ApcMin/+ model of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Pantoja, D R; Sipes, J M; Martin-Manso, G; Westwood, B; Morris, N L; Ghosh, A; Emenaker, N J; Roberts, D D

    2016-01-01

    Thrombospondin 1 is a glycoprotein that regulates cellular phenotype through interactions with its cellular receptors and extracellular matrix-binding partners. Thrombospondin 1 locally regulates angiogenesis and inflammatory responses that contribute to colorectal carcinogenesis in ApcMin/+ mice. The ability of thrombospondin 1 to regulate responses of cells and tissues to a variety of stresses suggested that loss of thrombospondin 1 may also have broader systemic effects on metabolism to modulate carcinogenesis. ApcMin/+:Thbs1−/− mice exhibited decreased survival and higher tumor multiplicities in the small and large intestine relative to ApcMin/+ mice when fed a low (5%) fat western diet. However, the protective effect of endogenous thrombospondin 1 was lost when the mice were fed a western diet containing 21% fat. Biochemical profiles of liver tissue identified systemic metabolic changes accompanying the effects of thrombospondin 1 and dietary lipid intake on tumorigenesis. A high-fat western diet differentially regulated elements of amino acid, energy and lipid metabolism in ApcMin/+:Thbs1−/− mice relative to ApcMin/+:Thbs1+/+mice. Metabolic changes in ketone body and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates indicate functional interactions between Apc and thrombospondin 1 signaling that control mitochondrial function. The cumulative diet-dependent differential changes observed in ApcMin/+:Thbs1−/− versus ApcMin/+ mice include altered amino acid and lipid metabolism, mitochondrial dysfunction, eicosanoids and ketone body formation. This metabolic profile suggests that the protective role of thrombospondin 1 to decrease adenoma formation in ApcMin/+ mice results in part from improved mitochondrial function. PMID:27239962

  8. Dietary fat overcomes the protective activity of thrombospondin-1 signaling in the Apc(Min/+) model of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Soto-Pantoja, D R; Sipes, J M; Martin-Manso, G; Westwood, B; Morris, N L; Ghosh, A; Emenaker, N J; Roberts, D D

    2016-05-30

    Thrombospondin 1 is a glycoprotein that regulates cellular phenotype through interactions with its cellular receptors and extracellular matrix-binding partners. Thrombospondin 1 locally regulates angiogenesis and inflammatory responses that contribute to colorectal carcinogenesis in Apc(Min/+) mice. The ability of thrombospondin 1 to regulate responses of cells and tissues to a variety of stresses suggested that loss of thrombospondin 1 may also have broader systemic effects on metabolism to modulate carcinogenesis. Apc(Min/+):Thbs1(-/-) mice exhibited decreased survival and higher tumor multiplicities in the small and large intestine relative to Apc(Min/+) mice when fed a low (5%) fat western diet. However, the protective effect of endogenous thrombospondin 1 was lost when the mice were fed a western diet containing 21% fat. Biochemical profiles of liver tissue identified systemic metabolic changes accompanying the effects of thrombospondin 1 and dietary lipid intake on tumorigenesis. A high-fat western diet differentially regulated elements of amino acid, energy and lipid metabolism in Apc(Min/+):Thbs1(-/-) mice relative to Apc(Min/+):Thbs1(+/+)mice. Metabolic changes in ketone body and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates indicate functional interactions between Apc and thrombospondin 1 signaling that control mitochondrial function. The cumulative diet-dependent differential changes observed in Apc(Min/+):Thbs1(-/-) versus Apc(Min/+) mice include altered amino acid and lipid metabolism, mitochondrial dysfunction, eicosanoids and ketone body formation. This metabolic profile suggests that the protective role of thrombospondin 1 to decrease adenoma formation in Apc(Min/+) mice results in part from improved mitochondrial function.

  9. Protective Effect of Astragaloside IV Against Paraquat-Induced Lung Injury in Mice by Suppressing Rho Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tong; Wang, Ruoning; Jiang, Wenjiao; Wang, Huimin; Xu, Ang; Lu, Guo; Ren, Yi; Xu, Yangmei; Song, Yangyang; Yong, Shoulei; Ji, Hui; Ma, Zhanqiang

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the protective effects of astragaloside IV (AS IV) against paraquat (PQ)-induced pulmonary injury in vivo. Fifty BALB/C mice were randomized into five groups: (1) control, (2) PQ, (3) PQ + dexamethasone (Dex, 5 mg/kg), (4) PQ + AS IV (50 mg/kg), and (5) PQ + AS IV (100 mg/kg). A single dose of PQ (50 mg/kg, i.p.) was intraperitoneally given to induced acute lung injury. Then, mice were treated with AS IV (50 and 100 mg/kg/day, orally) for 5 days. At the end of the experiment, animals were euthanized; then, the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were collected for histological observation, biochemical assay, and Western blot analysis. Malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in lung tissues, and interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in BALF were determined. Histological examination indicated that AS IV attenuated lung damage caused by PQ. Biochemical results showed that AS IV treatment significantly reduced the levels of MDA, MPO, and inflammatory cytokines while increased the levels of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px compared with those in PQ group. Western blot results revealed that AS IV attenuated the Txnip/Trx expressions and inhibited Rho/ROCK/nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) signaling pathway in PQ-challenged mice. These findings suggested the protective effect of AS IV as a natural product on PQ-induced pulmonary injury.

  10. The Growth Hormone Secretagogue Hexarelin Protects Rat Cardiomyocytes From in vivo Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury Through Interleukin-1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiannan; Li, Yi; Zhang, Juan; Liu, Yusheng; Lu, Qinghua

    2017-04-06

    Hexarelin, a synthetic growth hormone-releasing peptide, has been proven to possess cardioprotective actions through its binding to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) 1a and the non-GHSR receptor CD36. However, its effect on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury has not been fully clarified in vivo. We aimed to determine whether hexarelin treatment could protect cardiomyocytes from I/R injury and to examine the underlying mechanisms. In vivo hearts of male SD rats underwent 30 minutes of ischemia by left coronary artery ligation followed by reperfusion. The rats were then treated subcutaneously twice daily with hexarelin [100 μg/kg·day], ghrelin [400 μg/ kg·day], or saline for 7 days. Echocardiography, malondialdehyde detection, and histochemical staining were performed after treatment. In addition, Western blot was used to examine the expression levels of IL-1β, IL-1Ra, and IL-1RI. Our study showed that hexarelin treatment improved cardiac systolic function, decreased malondialdehyde production, and increased the number of surviving cardiomyocytes. The beneficial effects of hexarelin treatment were slightly superior to those of equimolar ghrelin treatment. We meanwhile confirmed that hexarelin induced down-regulation of IL-1β expression and up-regulation of IL-1Ra expression in I/R myocardium, which could be neutralized by the GHSR antagonist [D-Lys3]-growth hormone releasing peptide-6 ([D-Lys3]-GHRP-6). These findings suggest that hexarelin protects in vivo cardiomyocytes from I/R injury partly by modification of the IL-1 signaling pathway through the activation of cardiac GHSR1a receptors.

  11. Uterine FK506-binding protein 52 (FKBP52)-peroxiredoxin-6 (PRDX6) signaling protects pregnancy from overt oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Yasushi; Acar, Nuray; Tranguch, Susanne; Burnum, Kristin E; Xie, Huirong; Kodama, Ako; Osuga, Yutaka; Ustunel, Ismail; Friedman, David B; Caprioli, Richard M; Daikoku, Takiko; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2010-08-31

    Immunophilin FK506-binding protein 52 (FKBP52) is a cochaperone that binds to the progesterone receptor (PR) to optimize progesterone (P(4))-PR signaling. We recently showed that Fkbp52-deficient (Fkbp52(-/-)) mice have reduced uterine PR responsiveness and implantation failure which is rescued by excess P(4) supplementation in a genetic background-dependent manner. This finding led us to hypothesize that FKBP52 has functions in addition to optimizing PR activity. Using proteomics analysis, we found that uterine levels of peroxiredoxin-6 (PRDX6), a unique antioxidant, are significantly lower in Fkbp52(-/-) mice than in WT and PR-null (Pgr(-/-)) mice. We also found that Fkbp52(-/-) mice with reduced uterine PRDX6 levels are susceptible to paraquat-induced oxidative stress (OS), leading to implantation failure even with P(4) supplementation. The same dose of paraquat did not interfere with implantation in WT mice. Moreover, treatment with antioxidants alpha-tocopherol and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) attenuated paraquat-induced implantation failure in P(4)-treated Fkbp52(-/-) mice. Functional analyses using mouse embryonic fibroblasts show that Fkbp52 deficiency associated with reduced PRDX6 levels promotes H(2)O(2)-induced cell death, which is reversed by the addition of NAC or by forced expression of PRDX6, suggesting that Fkbp52 deficiency diminishes the threshold against OS by reducing PRDX6 levels. These findings provide evidence that heightened uterine OS in Fkbp52(-/-) females with reduced PRDX6 levels induces implantation failure even in the presence of excess P(4). This study shows that FKBP52-PRDX6 signaling protects pregnancy from overt OS.

  12. Protective Role for TLR4 Signaling in Atherosclerosis Progression as Revealed by Infection with a Common Oral Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Chie; Papadopoulos, George; Gudino, Cynthia V.; Weinberg, Ellen O.; Barth, Kenneth R.; Madrigal, Andrés G.; Chen, Yang; Ning, Hua; LaValley, Michael; Gibson, Frank C.; Hamilton, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical and epidemiological studies have implicated chronic infections in the development of atherosclerosis. It has been proposed that common mechanisms of signaling via TLRs link stimulation by multiple pathogens to atherosclerosis. However, how pathogen-specific stimulation of TLR4 contributes to atherosclerosis progression remains poorly understood. In this study, atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein-E null (ApoE−/−) and TLR4-deficient (ApoE−/−TLR4−/−) mice were orally infected with the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. ApoE−/−TLR4−/− mice were markedly more susceptible to atherosclerosis after oral infection with P. gingivalis. Using live animal imaging, we demonstrate that enhanced lesion progression occurs progressively and was increasingly evident with advancing age. Immunohistochemical analysis of lesions from ApoE−/−TLR4−/− mice revealed an increased inflammatory cell infiltrate composed primarily of macrophages and IL-17 effector T cells (Th17), a subset linked with chronic inflammation. Furthermore, enhanced atherosclerosis in TLR4-deficient mice was associated with impaired development of Th1 immunity and regulatory T cell infiltration. In vitro studies suggest that the mechanism of TLR4-mediated protective immunity may be orchestrated by dendritic cell IL-12 and IL-10, which are prototypic Th1 and regulatory T cell polarizing cytokines. We demonstrate an atheroprotective role for TLR4 in response to infection with the oral pathogen P. gingivalis. Our results point to a role for pathogen-specific TLR signaling in chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis. PMID:22956579

  13. MyD88 Mediates Instructive Signaling in Dendritic Cells and Protective Inflammatory Response during Rickettsial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bechelli, Jeremy; Smalley, Claire; Zhao, Xuemei; Judy, Barbara; Valdes, Patricia; Walker, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Spotted fever group rickettsiae cause potentially life-threatening infections throughout the world. Several members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family are involved in host response to rickettsiae, and yet the mechanisms by which these TLRs mediate host immunity remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we found that host susceptibility of MyD88−/− mice to infection with Rickettsia conorii or Rickettsia australis was significantly greater than in wild-type (WT) mice, in association with severely impaired bacterial clearance in vivo. R. australis-infected MyD88−/− mice showed significantly lower expression levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-1β, accompanied by significantly fewer inflammatory infiltrates of macrophages and neutrophils in infected tissues, than WT mice. The serum levels of IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-6, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor were significantly reduced, while monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, and RANTES were significantly increased in infected MyD88−/− mice compared to WT mice. Strikingly, R. australis infection was incapable of promoting increased expression of MHC-IIhigh and production of IL-12p40 in MyD88−/− bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) compared to WT BMDCs, although costimulatory molecules were upregulated in both types of BMDCs. Furthermore, the secretion levels of IL-1β by Rickettsia-infected BMDCs and in the sera of infected mice were significantly reduced in MyD88−/− mice compared to WT controls, suggesting that in vitro and in vivo production of IL-1β is MyD88 dependent. Taken together, our results suggest that MyD88 signaling mediates instructive signals in DCs and secretion of IL-1β and type 1 immune cytokines, which may account for the protective inflammatory response during rickettsial infection. PMID:26755162

  14. MyD88 Mediates Instructive Signaling in Dendritic Cells and Protective Inflammatory Response during Rickettsial Infection.

    PubMed

    Bechelli, Jeremy; Smalley, Claire; Zhao, Xuemei; Judy, Barbara; Valdes, Patricia; Walker, David H; Fang, Rong

    2016-04-01

    Spotted fever group rickettsiae cause potentially life-threatening infections throughout the world. Several members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family are involved in host response to rickettsiae, and yet the mechanisms by which these TLRs mediate host immunity remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we found that host susceptibility of MyD88(-/-)mice to infection with Rickettsia conorii or Rickettsia australis was significantly greater than in wild-type (WT) mice, in association with severely impaired bacterial clearance in vivo R. australis-infected MyD88(-/-)mice showed significantly lower expression levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and IL-1β, accompanied by significantly fewer inflammatory infiltrates of macrophages and neutrophils in infected tissues, than WT mice. The serum levels of IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-6, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor were significantly reduced, while monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, and RANTES were significantly increased in infected MyD88(-/-)mice compared to WT mice. Strikingly, R. australis infection was incapable of promoting increased expression of MHC-II(high)and production of IL-12p40 in MyD88(-/-)bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) compared to WT BMDCs, although costimulatory molecules were upregulated in both types of BMDCs. Furthermore, the secretion levels of IL-1β by Rickettsia-infected BMDCs and in the sera of infected mice were significantly reduced in MyD88(-/-)mice compared to WT controls, suggesting that in vitro and in vivo production of IL-1β is MyD88 dependent. Taken together, our results suggest that MyD88 signaling mediates instructive signals in DCs and secretion of IL-1β and type 1 immune cytokines, which may account for the protective inflammatory response during rickettsial infection. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. RhoB protects human keratinocytes from UVB-induced apoptosis through epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Canguilhem, Bruno; Pradines, Anne; Baudouin, Caroline; Boby, Céline; Lajoie-Mazenc, Isabelle; Charveron, Marie; Favre, Gilles

    2005-12-30

    Exposure of the skin to UVB light results in the formation of DNA photolesions that can give rise to cell death, mutations, and the onset of carcinogenic events. Specific proteins are activated by UVB and then trigger signal transduction pathways that lead to cellular responses. An alteration of these signaling molecules is thought to be a fundamental event in tumor promotion by UVB irradiation. RhoB, encoding a small GTPase has been identified as a DNA damage-inducible gene. RhoB is involved in epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor trafficking, cytoskeletal organization, cell transformation, and survival. We have analyzed the regulation of RhoB and elucidated its role in the cellular response of HaCaT keratinocytes to relevant environmental UVB irradiation. We report here that the activated GTP-bound form of RhoB is increased rapidly within 5 min of exposure to UVB, and then RhoB protein levels increased concomitantly with EGF receptor (EGFR) activation. Inhibition of UVB-induced EGFR activation prevents RhoB protein expression and AKT phosphorylation but not the early activation of RhoB. Blocking UVB-induced RhoB expression with specific small interfering RNAs inhibits AKT and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta phosphorylation through inhibition of EGFR expression. Moreover, down-regulation of RhoB potentiates UVB-induced cell apoptosis. In contrast, RhoB overexpression protects keratinocytes against UVB-induced apoptosis. These results indicated that RhoB is regulated upon UVB exposure by a two-step process consisting of an early EGFR-independent RhoB activation followed by an EGFR-dependent induction of RhoB expression. Moreover, we have demonstrated that RhoB is essential in regulating keratinocyte cell survival after UVB exposure, suggesting its potential role in photocarcinogenesis.

  16. A variant of Smurf2 protects mice against colitis-associated colon cancer by inducing transforming growth factor β signaling.

    PubMed

    Dornhoff, Heike; Becker, Christoph; Wirtz, Stefan; Strand, Dennis; Tenzer, Stefan; Rosfa, Susanne; Neufert, Clemens; Mudter, Jonas; Markl, Jürgen; Siebler, Jürgen; Neurath, Markus F

    2012-05-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling, which is down-regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Smad ubiquitin regulating factor 2 (Smurf2), promotes development of cancer. We identified a splice variant of Smurf2 (ΔE2Smurf2) and investigated its role in colon carcinogenesis in mice. Colitis-associated colon cancer was induced in mice by administration of azoxymethane, followed by 3 cycles of oral administration of dextran sodium sulfate. Messenger RNA levels of Smurf2 in colon tumors and control tissue were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction; lymphocyte and cytokine levels were measured in tumor and tissue samples. Tumor-infiltrating CD4(+) cells expressed higher levels of ΔE2Smurf2 than CD4(+) cells from nontumor tissues of wild-type mice. T cell-specific overexpression of ΔE2Smurf2 increased TGF-β signaling by suppressing protein levels of Smurf2, accompanied by an increase in levels of TGF-β receptor type II. Transgenic mice that overexpress ΔE2Smurf2 were protected against development of colitis-associated tumors and down-regulated proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6. Patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease had a significantly lower ratio of Smurf2/ΔE2Smurf2 than control individuals. T cell-specific ΔE2Smurf2 degrades wild-type Smurf2 and controls intestinal tumor growth in mice by up-regulating TGF-β receptor type II, reducing proliferation and production of proinflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sustained activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway protects cells from photofrin-mediated photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhimin; Singh, Gurmit; Rainbow, Andrew J

    2002-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a cancer therapy in which a photosensitizer selectively accumulates in tumor cells and is subsequently activated by light of a specific wavelength. The activation of the photosensitizer leads to cytotoxic photoproducts that result in tumor regression. PDT can lead to several cellular responses including cell cycle arrest, necrosis, and apoptosis, as well as trigger many signaling pathways. It has been suggested that extracellular signal-activated protein kinases (ERKs), one subfamily of mitogen-activated protein kinases, play a crucial role in the cellular response to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. However, the role of ERKs in the cell survival after PDT is less clear. We have examined the response of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase ERK1/2 in PDT-resistant (LFS087) and PDT-sensitive (GM38A) cells after Photofrin-mediated PDT. ERK1/2 activity was induced rapidly in both cell types after PDT. The PDT-induced ERK1/2 activity was transient in GM38A cells and by 3 h had returned to a level significant lower than basal levels, whereas the induction of ERK1/2 was sustained in LFS087 cells and lasted for at least 11 h. Blocking of the sustained ERK activity with PD98059, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein/ERK kinase, significantly decreased cell survival of LFS087 after PDT. PDT also induced the expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase, MKP-1, but reduced Raf-1 protein levels in both cell types. In GM38A cells, the substantially induced levels of MKP-1 correlated with the transient activation of ERK1/2 by PDT, and both basal and induced levels of MKP-1 were substantially greater in GM38 compared with Li Fraumeni syndrome cells. These observations suggest that sustained ERK1/2 activation protects cells from Photofrin-mediated phototoxicity and that the duration of ERK1/2 activation is regulated by MKP-1. In addition, the activation of ERK1/2 by Photofrin-mediated PDT is Raf-1 independent.

  18. Triptolide induces protective autophagy through activation of the CaMKKβ-AMPK signaling pathway in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Mao, Lin; Han, Yangyang; Yan, Jun; Lei, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Triptolide, an active compound extracted from the Chinese herb thunder god vine (Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F.), has potent anti-tumor activity. Recently, triptolide was found to induce autophagy in cancer cells. However, the effects of triptolide on autophagy in human prostate cancer (PCa) cells have not yet been clearly elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that triptolide induces autophagy in three PCa cell lines, PC-3, LNCaP and C4–2. Furthermore, we found that triptolide mediates intracellular accumulation of free calcium by stimulating the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. This activates the CaMKKβ-AMPK signaling pathway, which in turn inhibits mTOR and activates both ULK1 and Beclin 1, finally resulting in autophagy. Moreover, we found that treatment with autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ) enhances triptolide-induced PCa cell death and growth inhibition. Using a PC-3-xenografted mouse model, we showed that blocking autophagy with CQ significantly promoted triptolide-induced tumor growth inhibition in vivo. Overall, our results show that triptolide induces protective autophagy through the CaMKKβ-AMPK pathway in PCa cells, implying that a combination of triptolide with autophagy inhibitors may potentially be an effective therapeutic strategy for PCa. PMID:26734992

  19. PPARα Activation Protects against Anti-Thy1 Nephritis by Suppressing Glomerular NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Koji; Kamijo, Yuji; Nakajima, Takero; Harada, Makoto; Higuchi, Makoto; Ehara, Takashi; Shigematsu, Hidekazu; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2012-01-01

    The vast increase of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has attracted considerable attention worldwide, and the development of a novel therapeutic option against a representative kidney disease that leads to CKD, mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (MsPGN) would be significant. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a member of the steroid/nuclear receptor superfamily, is known to perform various physiological functions. Recently, we reported that PPARα in activated mesangial cells exerted anti-inflammatory effects and that the deficiency of PPARα resulted in high susceptibility to glomerulonephritis. To investigate whether PPARα activation improves the disease activity of MsPGN, we examined the protective effects of a PPARα agonist, clofibrate, in a well-established model of human MsPGN, anti-Thy1 nephritis, for the first time. This study demonstrated that pretreatment with clofibrate (via a 0.02% or 0.1% clofibrate-containing diet) continuously activated the glomerular PPARα, which outweighed the PPARα deterioration associated with the nephritic process. The PPARα activation appeared to suppress the NF-κB signaling pathway in glomeruli by the induction of IκBα, resulting in the reduction of proteinuria and the amelioration of the active inflammatory pathologic glomerular changes. These findings suggest the antinephritic potential of PPARα-related medicines against MsPGN. PPARα-related medicines might be useful as a treatment option for CKD. PMID:22675338

  20. PPARα Activation Protects against Anti-Thy1 Nephritis by Suppressing Glomerular NF-κB Signaling.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Koji; Kamijo, Yuji; Nakajima, Takero; Harada, Makoto; Higuchi, Makoto; Ehara, Takashi; Shigematsu, Hidekazu; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2012-01-01

    The vast increase of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has attracted considerable attention worldwide, and the development of a novel therapeutic option against a representative kidney disease that leads to CKD, mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (MsPGN) would be significant. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a member of the steroid/nuclear receptor superfamily, is known to perform various physiological functions. Recently, we reported that PPARα in activated mesangial cells exerted anti-inflammatory effects and that the deficiency of PPARα resulted in high susceptibility to glomerulonephritis. To investigate whether PPARα activation improves the disease activity of MsPGN, we examined the protective effects of a PPARα agonist, clofibrate, in a well-established model of human MsPGN, anti-Thy1 nephritis, for the first time. This study demonstrated that pretreatment with clofibrate (via a 0.02% or 0.1% clofibrate-containing diet) continuously activated the glomerular PPARα, which outweighed the PPARα deterioration associated with the nephritic process. The PPARα activation appeared to suppress the NF-κB signaling pathway in glomeruli by the induction of IκBα, resulting in the reduction of proteinuria and the amelioration of the active inflammatory pathologic glomerular changes. These findings suggest the antinephritic potential of PPARα-related medicines against MsPGN. PPARα-related medicines might be useful as a treatment option for CKD.

  1. The Polyphenol Fisetin Protects Bone by Repressing NF-κB and MKP-1-Dependent Signaling Pathways in Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Léotoing, Laurent; Wauquier, Fabien; Guicheux, Jérôme; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Wittrant, Yohann; Coxam, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a bone pathology leading to increase fractures risk and challenging quality of life. Since current treatments could exhibit deleterious side effects, the use of food compounds derived from plants represents a promising innovative alternative due to their potential therapeutic and preventive activities against human diseases. In this study, we investigated the ability of the polyphenol fisetin to counter osteoporosis and analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. In vivo, fisetin consumption significantly prevented bone loss in estrogen deficiency and inflammation mice osteoporosis models. Indeed, bone mineral density, micro-architecture parameters and bone markers were positively modulated by fisetin. Consistent with in vivo results, we showed that fisetin represses RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and activity as demonstrated by an inhibition of multinucleated cells formation, TRAP activity and differentiation genes expression. The signaling pathways NF-κB, p38 MAPK, JNK and the key transcription factors c-Fos and NFATc1 expressions induced by RANKL, were negatively regulated by fisetin. We further showed that fisetin inhibits the constitutive proteasomal degradation of MKP-1, the phosphatase that deactivates p38 and JNK. Consistently, using shRNA stable cell lines, we demonstrated that impairment of MKP-1 decreases fisetin potency. Taken together, these results strongly support that fisetin should be further considered as a bone protective agent. PMID:23861901

  2. The polyphenol fisetin protects bone by repressing NF-κB and MKP-1-dependent signaling pathways in osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Léotoing, Laurent; Wauquier, Fabien; Guicheux, Jérôme; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Wittrant, Yohann; Coxam, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a bone pathology leading to increase fractures risk and challenging quality of life. Since current treatments could exhibit deleterious side effects, the use of food compounds derived from plants represents a promising innovative alternative due to their potential therapeutic and preventive activities against human diseases. In this study, we investigated the ability of the polyphenol fisetin to counter osteoporosis and analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. In vivo, fisetin consumption significantly prevented bone loss in estrogen deficiency and inflammation mice osteoporosis models. Indeed, bone mineral density, micro-architecture parameters and bone markers were positively modulated by fisetin. Consistent with in vivo results, we showed that fisetin represses RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and activity as demonstrated by an inhibition of multinucleated cells formation, TRAP activity and differentiation genes expression. The signaling pathways NF-κB, p38 MAPK, JNK and the key transcription factors c-Fos and NFATc1 expressions induced by RANKL, were negatively regulated by fisetin. We further showed that fisetin inhibits the constitutive proteasomal degradation of MKP-1, the phosphatase that deactivates p38 and JNK. Consistently, using shRNA stable cell lines, we demonstrated that impairment of MKP-1 decreases fisetin potency. Taken together, these results strongly support that fisetin should be further considered as a bone protective agent.

  3. LL202 protects against dextran sulfate sodium-induced experimental colitis in mice by inhibiting MAPK/AP-1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yue; Hu, Yang; Li, Zhiyu; Guo, Qinglong; Zhao, Kai; Lu, Na

    2016-01-01

    LL202, a newly-synthesized flavonoid derivative, has been reported to inhibit inflammatory-induced angiogenesis. However, the exact role of LL202 in inflammation along with its mechanism has not been explored. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of LL202 on intestinal inflammation by establishing dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced experimental colitis. LL202 attenuated DSS-induced body weight loss, colon length shortening and colonic pathological damage. The inflammatory cells infiltration, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activities were decreased by LL202 in a dose-dependent manner. LL202 reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in serum and colon of DSS-induced mice as well. Mechanically, LL202 could decrease the expression and nuclear translation of AP-1 to protect against DSS-induced colitis. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced THP-1 cells, LL202 markedly decreased the secretion, mRNA level and protein expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α via inhibiting ERK/JNK/p38 MAPK pathways and the nuclear translocation of AP-1. Furthermore, these findings were confirmed in LPS-induced bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that LL202 could exert its anti-inflammatory effect via inhibiting MAPK/AP-1 signaling, which suggested that LL202 might be a potential effective drug for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:27590510

  4. Triptolide induces protective autophagy through activation of the CaMKKβ-AMPK signaling pathway in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Huang, Weiwei; Zhang, Zhe; Mao, Lin; Han, Yangyang; Yan, Jun; Lei, Ming

    2016-02-02

    Triptolide, an active compound extracted from the Chinese herb thunder god vine (Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F.), has potent anti-tumor activity. Recently, triptolide was found to induce autophagy in cancer cells. However, the effects of triptolide on autophagy in human prostate cancer (PCa) cells have not yet been clearly elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that triptolide induces autophagy in three PCa cell lines, PC-3, LNCaP and C4-2. Furthermore, we found that triptolide mediates intracellular accumulation of free calcium by stimulating the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. This activates the CaMKKβ-AMPK signaling pathway, which in turn inhibits mTOR and activates both ULK1 and Beclin 1, finally resulting in autophagy. Moreover, we found that treatment with autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ) enhances triptolide-induced PCa cell death and growth inhibition. Using a PC-3-xenografted mouse model, we showed that blocking autophagy with CQ significantly promoted triptolide-induced tumor growth inhibition in vivo. Overall, our results show that triptolide induces protective autophagy through the CaMKKβ-AMPK pathway in PCa cells, implying that a combination of triptolide with autophagy inhibitors may potentially be an effective therapeutic strategy for PCa.

  5. Emodin protects against diabetic cardiomyopathy by regulating the AKT/GSK-3β signaling pathway in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiqin; Chen, Qingwei; Ke, Dazhi; Li, Guiqiong; Deng, Wei

    2014-09-17

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has been recognized as a major health problem. Emodin (Emo) has been reported to exhibit protective effects against diabetic nephropathy. However, little has been known about the effect of Emo on diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). A type 2 DM model was induced in rats by low dose streptozotocin (STZ) combined with high energy intake. We found that Emo-treated groups displayed significantly higher body weight (BW) and lower heart weight (HW)/BW. Furthermore, Emo could significantly decrease blood glucose, total cholesterol (TG) levels, and triglyceride (TC) levels in diabetic rats. Moreover, the Emo-treated group showed a marked increase in heart rate (HR) and showed lower left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD), left ventricular end-systolic diameter (LVESD), left ventricular posterior wall thickness (LWPWT), and interventricular septal diastolic wall thickness (IVSD). Emo induced a significant increase in phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β in myocardium. These results suggest that Emo may have great therapeutic potential in the treatment of DCM by Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway.

  6. Betulinic acid protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Shujie; Zhu, Hongcan; He, Ping; Teng, Junfang

    2016-12-01

    Betulinic acid (BA), a naturally occurring pentacyclic lupane group triterpenoid, has been demonstrated to protect against ischemia/reperfusion-induced renal damage. However, the effects of BA on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury remain unclear. Hence, this study was to investigate the effects of BA on oxygen and glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R) induced neuronal injury in rat hippocampal neurons. Our results showed that BA pretreatment greatly attenuated OGD/R-induced neuronal injury. BA also inhibited OGD/R-induced intracellular ROS production and MDA level in rat hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Bcl-2, up-regulation of Bax and the consequent activation of caspase-3 induced by OGD/R were reversed by BA pretreatment. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that BA pretreatment up-regulated the expression levels of p-PI3K and p-Akt in hippocampal neurons induced by OGD/R. Taken together, these data suggested that BA inhibits OGD/R-induced neuronal injury in rat hippocampal neurons through the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  7. RhNRG-1β Protects the Myocardium against Irradiation-Induced Damage via the ErbB2-ERK-SIRT1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Gu, Anxin; Jie, Yamin; Sun, Liang; Zhao, Shuping; E, Mingyan; You, Qingshan

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), which is a serious side effect of the radiotherapy applied for various tumors due to the inevitable irradiation of the heart, cannot be treated effectively using current clinical therapies. Here, we demonstrated that rhNRG-1β, an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like protein, protects myocardium tissue against irradiation-induced damage and preserves cardiac function. rhNRG-1β effectively ameliorated irradiation-induced myocardial nuclear damage in both cultured adult rat-derived cardiomyocytes and rat myocardium tissue via NRG/ErbB2 signaling. By activating ErbB2, rhNRG-1β maintained mitochondrial integrity, ATP production, respiratory chain function and the Krebs cycle status in irradiated cardiomyocytes. Moreover, the protection of irradiated cardiomyocytes and myocardium tissue by rhNRG-1β was at least partly mediated by the activation of the ErbB2-ERK-SIRT1 signaling pathway. Long-term observations further showed that rhNRG-1β administered in the peri-irradiation period exerts continuous protective effects on cardiac pump function, the myocardial energy metabolism, cardiomyocyte volume and interstitial fibrosis in the rats receiving radiation via NRG/ErbB2 signaling. Our findings indicate that rhNRG-1β can protect the myocardium against irradiation-induced damage and preserve cardiac function via the ErbB2-ERK-SIRT1 signaling pathway.

  8. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells and Toll-like receptor 7-dependent signalling promote efficient protection of mice against highly virulent influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Michael M; Ohnemus, Annette; Cornitescu, Marius; Staeheli, Peter

    2012-03-01

    Types I and III interferons (IFNs) elicit protective antiviral immune responses during influenza virus infection. Although many cell types can synthesize IFN in response to virus infection, it remains unclear which IFN sources contribute to antiviral protection in vivo. We found that mice carrying functional alleles of the Mx1 influenza virus resistance gene partially lost resistance to infection with a highly pathogenic H7N7 influenza A virus strain if Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) signalling was compromised. This effect was achieved by deleting either the TLR7 gene or the gene encoding the TLR7 adaptor molecule MyD88. A similar decrease of influenza virus resistance was observed when animals were deprived of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) at day 1 post-infection. Our results provide in vivo proof that pDCs contribute to the protection of the lung against influenza A virus infections, presumably via signals from TLR7.

  9. Extracellular UDP and P2Y6 function as a danger signal to protect mice from vesicular stomatitis virus infection through an increase in IFN-β production.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruimei; Tan, Binghe; Yan, Yan; Ma, Xiaobin; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Zhi; Liu, Mingyao; Qian, Min; Du, Bing

    2014-11-01

    Extracellular nucleotides that constitute a "danger signal" play an important role in the regulation of immune responses. However, the function and mechanism of extracellular UDP and P2Y6 in antiviral immunity remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo protection of UDP/P2Y6 signaling in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection. First, we demonstrated that VSV-infected cells secrete UDP from the cytoplasm as a danger signal to arouse surrounding cells. Meanwhile, expression of the UDP-specific receptor P2Y6 also was enhanced by VSV. Consequently, UDP protects RAW 264.7 cells, murine embryonic fibroblasts, bone marrow-derived macrophages, and L929 cells from VSV and GFP lentivirus infection. This protection can be blocked by the P2Y6 selective antagonist MRS2578 or IFN-α/β receptor-blocking Ab. VSV-induced cell death and virus replication were both enhanced significantly by knocking down and knocking out P2Y6 in different cells. Mechanistically, UDP facilitates IFN-β secretion through the p38/JNK- and ATF-2/c-Jun-signaling pathways, which are crucial in promoting antiviral immunity. Interestingly, UDP was released through a caspase-cleaved pannexin-1 channel in VSV-induced apoptotic cells and protected cells from infection through P2Y6 receptor in an autocrine or paracrine manner. Furthermore, UDP also protected mice from VSV infection through P2Y6 receptors in an acute neurotropic infection mouse model. Taken together, these results demonstrate the important role of extracellular UDP and P2Y6 as a danger signal in antiviral immune responses and suggest a potential therapeutic role for UDP/P2Y6 in preventing and controlling viral diseases.

  10. Carnosic acid protects normal mouse hepatocytes against H2 O2 -induced cytotoxicity via sirtuin 1-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Takikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Carnosic acid (CA) is well known for its antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of CA on cytotoxicity under oxidative stress. Primary hepatocytes and AML12 cells were treated with: (i) 0.1 μM, 1 μM and 10 μM CA; (ii) 3 mM H2 O2 with or without 1 μM CA; or (iii) 3 mM H2 O2 with 1 μM CA and 0.04 μM sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) inhibitor EX527 or 10 μM mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor U0126. Cell viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage were determined. In addition, total protein levels of cleaved caspase 3, SIRT1, phosphorylated Nrf2, 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and MAPKs were evaluated by western blot analysis and suspension array system. First, although 10 μM CA produced cytotoxicity, CA at concentrations at or below 1 μM did not inhibit cell viability. Second, H2 O2 increased total cellular ROS and LDH leakage and decreased cell viability, whereas co-treatment with H2 O2 and 1 μM CA significantly inhibited these effects of H2 O2 . Third, CA at 1 μM increased protein levels of SIRT1. Pretreatment with EX527 or transfection of siRNA-targeting SIRT1 weakened the protective effects of CA against H2 O2 -induced cell death. Fourth, H2 O2 induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in primary hepatocytes. U0126 inhibited oxidative damage induced by H2 O2 . Co-treatment with CA inhibited ERK1/2 activation induced by H2 O2 . Our data indicate that CA protects against oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity via SIRT1 by regulating subsequent downstream factors such as ERK1/2. © 2015 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  11. Signal transduction involved in lipoxin A4-induced protection of tubular epithelial cells against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng-Hua; Wang, Ming-Jie; Lü, Jing; Chen, Xiao-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that lipoxin A4 (LXA4) may exert a renoprotective effect on ischemia/reperfusion injury in various animal models. The underlying mechanism of LXA4-induced renoprotection during ischemia/reperfusion injury remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated LXA4-induced protection on renal tubular cells subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury, and determined the effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) on LXA4 treatment. HK-2 human tubular epithelial cells exposed to H/R injury were pretreated with LXA4, signal molecule inhibitors or the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin-IX, or were transfected with PPARγ small interfering RNA (siRNA) or nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) siRNA. The protein and mRNA expression levels of PPARγ and HO-1 were analyzed using western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Binding activity of Nrf2 to the HO-1 E1 enhancer was determined using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Nrf2 binding to the HO-1 antioxidant responsive element (ARE) was assessed using electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Preincubation of cells with LXA4 exposed to H/R injury led to a decreased production of inducible nitrogen oxide synthase, malondialdehyde, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, leucine aminopeptidase and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase. In addition, LXA4 pretreatment increased cell viability, protein and mRNA expression levels of PPARγ and HO-1 and PPARγ and HO-1 promoter activity. SB20358 is a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) pathway inhibitor, which reduced LXA4-induced PPARγ expression levels. LXA4 treatment upregulated p38 MAPK activation, Nrf2 nuclear translocation and increased binding activity of Nrf2 to HO-1 ARE and E1 enhancer in cells exposed to H/R injury. Transfection of the cells with PPARγ siRNA reduced the LXA4-induced Nrf2 translocation. Transfection of the cells with PPARγ siRNA or Nrf2 si

  12. Nelfinavir Suppresses Insulin Signaling and Nitric Oxide Production by Human Aortic Endothelial Cells: Protective Effects of Thiazolidinediones

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Debasis; Liu, Kai; Hamblin, Milton; Lasky, Joseph A.; Agrawal, Krishna C.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background In human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1)–infected individuals, exposure to a protease inhibitor (PI)-based highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen increases cardiovascular disease and endothelial dysfunction. However, the mechanisms of PI-induced effects on endothelial cells (ECs) are not known. Furthermore, strategies to suppress these deleterious outcomes of PIs need to be developed. Insulin-induced PI3K/Akt signaling and endothelial nitric oxide (NO)-synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation regulates NO production by ECs that maintain vascular homeostasis. We evaluated whether nelfinavir (NEL), a potent HIV-1 PI that suppresses Akt phosphorylation, can alter insulin-induced NO production in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and whether insulin sensitization of HAECs via the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonists, thiazolidinediones, can ameliorate these side effects. Methods Real-time NO production in HAECs was monitored by fluorimetric dyes DAF-FM DA and DAF-2 DA. Immunodetection studies were used to determine the phosphorylation of Akt, eNOS, insulin receptor-β (IR-β), insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), and PI3K/p85α. Expression of eNOS messenger RNA was measured by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results In vitro exposure (72 hours) of HAECs to NEL (0.25-2 μg/mL) decreased both basal (2.5-fold) and insulin-induced NO production (4- to 5-fold). NEL suppressed insulin-induced phosphorylation of both Akt and eNOS at serine residues 473 and 1177, respectively. NEL decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of IR-β, IRS-1, and PI3K. Coexposure to troglitazone (TRO; 250 nM) ameliorated the suppressive effects of NEL on insulin signaling and NO production. Coexposure to TRO also increased eNOS expression in NEL-treated HAECs. Conclusion Our findings indicate that treatment with potent insulin sensitizers may protect against PI-mediated endothelial dysfunction during long-term HAART. PMID:23533049

  13. Stanniocalcin-1 Protects a Mouse Model from Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Affecting ROS-Mediated Multiple Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dajun; Shang, Huiping; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC-1) protects against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (RIRI). However, the molecular mechanisms remain widely unknown. STC-1 inhibits reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas most ROS-mediated pathways are associated with ischemic injury. Therefore, to explore the mechanism, the effects of STC-1 on ROS-medicated pathways were studied. Non-traumatic vascular clamps were used to establish RIRI mouse models. The serum levels of STC-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon (IFN) γ, P53, and capase-3 were measured by ELISA kits. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured by fluorescence spectrofluorometer. All these molecules changed significantly in a RIRI model mouse when compared with those in a sham control. Kidney cells were isolated from sham and model mice. STC-1 was overexpressed or knockout in these kidney cells. The molecules in ROS-medicated pathways were measured by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot. The results showed that STC-1 is an effective ROS scavenger. The serum levels of STC-1, MDA and SOD activity were increased while the serum levels of IL-6, iIFN-γ, P53, and capase-3 were decreased in a model group when compared with a sham control (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the levels of STC-1,p53, phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (p-MEKK-1), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK), IkB kinase (p-IKK), nuclear factor (NF) κB, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK-1) and caspase-3 changed significantly in kidney cells isolated from a RIRI model when compared to those isolated from a sham control (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, STC-1 overexpression or silence caused significant changes of the levels of these ROS-mediated molecules. Therefore, STC-1 maybe improve anti-inflammation, anti-oxidant and anti-apoptosis activities by affecting ROS-mediated pathways, especially the phospho-modifications of the respective proteins, resulting in the increase of SOD and

  14. Activation of IGF1 Signaling in the Cochlea Induces the Transcription of Its Mediators During the Protection of Cochlear Hair Cells Against Aminoglycoside.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yushi; Yamamoto, Norio; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Omori, Koichi; Ito, Juichi

    2017-02-01

    Transcription of the Erk and Akt genes and phosphorylation of their products are promoted by insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) during hair cell protection. IGF1 protects mammalian hair cells in animal models from various types of damage, including aminoglycoside. Moreover, clinical trials have revealed that IGF1 was effective for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. In this process, activation of the downstream of IGF1 signaling, including the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and AKT proteins, is involved. However, the regulation of IGF1 signaling mediators at the transcriptional level has not been studied. We used a neomycin damage model on neonatal mouse cochlear explant culture. Explants established from neonatal mice were treated with either neomycin alone or neomycin and IGF1. The expression levels of IGF1 signaling mediator genes, Akt1, Mapk3, and Mapk1, in the explants were compared using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction at several time points. Inhibitors of IGF1 signaling were added to confirm that this observation was dependent on IGF1 signaling. The expression levels of all genes tested were significantly upregulated in neomycin+IGF1 treatment samples (p < 0.0001, analysis of variance [ANOVA]). Addition of inhibitors of IGF1 signaling significantly attenuated the upregulation of expression (p < 0.0001, ANOVA). IGF1 treatment upregulates the expression of its mediator genes during the protection of hair cells against aminoglycoside. The regulation of mediator gene expression may serve as a novel treatment for sensorineural hearing loss.

  15. Across-Species Transfer of Protection by Remote Ischemic Preconditioning With Species-Specific Myocardial Signal Transduction by Reperfusion Injury Salvage Kinase and Survival Activating Factor Enhancement Pathways.

    PubMed

    Skyschally, Andreas; Gent, Sabine; Amanakis, Georgios; Schulte, Christiane; Kleinbongard, Petra; Heusch, Gerd

    2015-07-17

    Reduction of myocardial infarct size by remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC), that is, cycles of ischemia/reperfusion in an organ remote from the heart before sustained myocardial ischemia/reperfusion, was confirmed in all species so far, including humans. To identify myocardial signal transduction of cardioprotection by RIPC. Anesthetized pigs were subjected to RIPC (4×5/5 minutes hindlimb ischemia/reperfusion) or placebo (PLA) before 60/180 minutes coronary occlusion/reperfusion. Phosphorylation of protein kinase B, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (reperfusion injury salvage kinase [RISK] pathway), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (survival activating factor enhancement [SAFE] pathway) in the area at risk was determined by Western blot. Wortmannin/U0126 or AG490 was used for pharmacological RISK or SAFE blockade, respectively. Plasma sampled after RIPC or PLA, respectively, was transferred to isolated bioassay rat hearts subjected to 30/120 minutes global ischemia/reperfusion. RIPC reduced infarct size in pigs to 16±11% versus 43±11% in PLA (% area at risk; mean±SD; P<0.05). RIPC increased the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 at early reperfusion, and AG490 abolished the protection, whereas RISK blockade did not. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 phosphorylation was decreased at early reperfusion in both RIPC and PLA. In isolated rat hearts, pig plasma taken after RIPC reduced infarct size (25±5% of ventricular mass versus 38±5% in PLA; P<0.05) and activated both RISK and SAFE. RISK or SAFE blockade abrogated this protection. Cardioprotection by RIPC in pigs causally involves activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 but not of RISK. Protection can be transferred with plasma from pigs to isolated rat hearts where activation of both RISK and SAFE is causally involved. The myocardial signal transduction of RIPC is the same as that of ischemic

  16. Protective effect of naringenin against experimental colitis via suppression of Toll-like receptor 4/NF-κB signalling.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wei; Zhang, Jingjing; Sun, Aning; Zhang, Eryun; Ding, Lili; Mukherjee, Subhajit; Wei, Xiaohui; Chou, Guixin; Wang, Zheng-Tao; Mani, Sridhar

    2013-08-01

    Naringenin, one of the most abundant flavonoids in citrus, grapefruits and tomatoes, has been used as a traditional anti-inflammatory agent for centuries. However, the molecular mechanism of naringenin in intestinal inflammation remains unknown so far. The present study investigated a molecular basis for the protective effect of naringenin in dextran sulphate sodium-induced murine colitis. Pre-administration of naringenin significantly reduced the severity of colitis and resulted in down-regulation of pro-inflammatory mediators (inducible NO synthase (iNOS), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), cyclo-oxygenase-2 (Cox2), TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA) in the colon mucosa. The decline in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, specifically TNF-α and IL-6, correlated with a decrease in mucosal Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) mRNA and protein. Phospho-NF-κB p65 protein was significantly decreased, which correlated with a similar decrease in phospho-IκBα protein. Consistent with the in vivo results, naringenin exposure blocked lipopolysaccharide-stimulated nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells. In addition, in vitro NF-κB reporter assays performed on human colonic HT-29 cells exposed to naringenin demonstrated a significant inhibition of TNF-α-induced NF-κB luciferase expression. Thus, for the first time, the present study indicates that targeted inhibition of the TLR4/NF-κB signalling pathway might be an important mechanism for naringenin in abrogating experimental colitis.

  17. Oral pirfenidone protects against fibrosis by inhibiting fibroblast proliferation and TGF-β signaling in a murine colitis model.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanwei; Ren, Jianan; Hu, Qiongyuan; Deng, Youming; Chen, Guopu; Guo, Kun; Li, Ranran; Li, Yuan; Wu, Lei; Wang, Gefei; Gu, Guosheng; Li, Jieshou

    2016-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), particularly Crohn's disease, frequently causes intestinal fibrosis that ultimately leads to formation of strictures requiring bowel resection. Currently there is no effective antifibrotic therapy available for this disease. Pirfenidone is a small compound that has a broad spectrum of antifibrogenic effect and has been used for the treatment of fibrotic diseases in various organs. The present study aimed to investigate the antifibrogenic effect of pirfenidone in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced murine colitis model. C57BL/6 mice were used and animals were randomly divided into groups receiving pirfenidone or vehicle by oral or transanal routes. Inflammation- and fibrosis-related indexes including body weight, colon length, disease activity, histological change, mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic cytokines were assessed. Furthermore, we performed in vitro analysis using CCD18-Co fibroblasts to evaluate cell proliferation, transdifferentiation, and viability after the cells were cultured with pirfenidone. It was found that oral administration of pirfenidone reduced deposition of collagen in colitis-associated fibrosis, and significantly suppressed the mRNA expression of col1a2, col3a1, and TGF-β. Moreover, pirfenidone inhibited the activation of TGF-β-related smad and MAPK pathways both in vitro and in vivo. Clinical and histological evaluation demonstrated that pirfenidone had no anti-inflammatory effect. The antifibrogenic effect was reduced when pirfenidone was administered in a delayed manner and was unobserved if given locally. Pirfenidone suppressed fibroblast proliferation and transdifferentiation without observed toxicity. Altogether, our results suggested that oral pirfenidone protects against fibrosis of DSS-induced colitis through inhibiting the proliferation of colonic fibroblasts and TGF-β signaling pathways.

  18. Tetramethyl Pyrazine Protects Hippocampal Neurons Against Anoxia/Reoxygenation Injury Through Inhibiting Apoptosis Mediated by JNK/MARK Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ming; Ma, Wuhua; Zhang, Xiong; Wang, Yong; Gao, Xiaoqiu

    2016-01-01

    Background Tetramethyl pyrazine (TMP) is a typical biologically active alkaloid isolated from the Chinese herb Ligusticum walliichi. It has been reported that TMP shows neuroprotective and stroke injury reductive properties in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) animal models. In the present study we sought to investigate the effect and potential intervention mechanism of TMP in anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R) rat hippocampal neurons. Material/Methods After being cultured for 7 days, primary hippocampal neurons were randomly assigned into a normal control group (N), a TMP group (C: 0 ug/ml, L: 60 ug/ml, M: 200ug/ml and H: 800 ug/ml), and a JNK inhibitor group (S: SP600125, 10 μmol/L). A hypoxia/reoxygenation model were prepared 1 h after incubation. Hippocampal neurons were incubated in 90% N2 and 10% CO2 for 2 h, and then reoxygenated for 24 h in an incubator with 5%CO2 at the temperature of 37°C. The apoptosis rate, MKK4 and MKK7 mRNA and JNK kinase protein levels (C-fos, c-jun, and P-JNK) of hippocampal neurons were detected. Results The apoptosis rates of hippocampal neurons induced by A/R showed significant reduction after being pre-treated with JNK inhibitor, TMP 60 μg/ml, 200 μg/ml, and 800 μg/ml. The JNK kinase MKK4mRNA and MKK7mRNA levels, as well as the expressions of C-fos, C-jun, and P-JNK protein levels, were also be reduced. Conclusions TMP may produce a protective effect in anoxia/reoxygenation-induced primary hippocampal neuronal injury by inhibiting the apoptosis of the hippocampal neurons; the possible mechanism may be inhibition of the JNK signal pathway. PMID:28009855

  19. Unsaturation of Very-Long-Chain Ceramides Protects Plant from Hypoxia-Induced Damages by Modulating Ethylene Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lu-Jun; Huang, Li; Chen, Liang; Wang, Feng-Zhu; Xia, Fan-Nv; Zhu, Tian-Ren; Wu, Jian-Xin; Yin, Jian; Liao, Bin; Shi, Jianxin; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Aharoni, Asaph; Yao, Nan; Shu, Wensheng; Xiao, Shi

    2015-01-01

    Lipid remodeling is crucial for hypoxic tolerance in animals, whilst little is known about the hypoxia-induced lipid dynamics in plants. Here we performed a mass spectrometry-based analysis to survey the lipid profiles of Arabidopsis rosettes under various hypoxic conditions. We observed that hypoxia caused a significant increase in total amounts of phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid and oxidized lipids, but a decrease in phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Particularly, significant gains in the polyunsaturated species of PC, PE and phosphatidylinositol, and losses in their saturated and mono-unsaturated species were evident during hypoxia. Moreover, hypoxia led to a remarkable elevation of ceramides and hydroxyceramides. Disruption of ceramide synthases LOH1, LOH2 and LOH3 enhanced plant sensitivity to dark submergence, but displayed more resistance to submergence under light than wild type. Consistently, levels of unsaturated very-long-chain (VLC) ceramide species (22:1, 24:1 and 26:1) predominantly declined in the loh1, loh2 and loh3 mutants under dark submergence. In contrast, significant reduction of VLC ceramides in the loh1-1 loh3-1 knockdown double mutant and lacking of VLC unsaturated ceramides in the ads2 mutants impaired plant tolerance to both dark and light submergences. Evidence that C24:1-ceramide interacted with recombinant CTR1 protein and inhibited its kinase activity in vitro, enhanced ER-to-nucleus translocation of EIN2-GFP and stabilization of EIN3-GFP in vivo, suggests a role of ceramides in modulating CTR1-mediated ethylene signaling. The dark submergence-sensitive phenotypes of loh mutants were rescued by a ctr1-1 mutation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that unsaturation of VLC ceramides is a protective strategy for hypoxic tolerance in Arabidopsis. PMID:25822663

  20. Tetramethyl Pyrazine Protects Hippocampal Neurons Against Anoxia/Reoxygenation Injury Through Inhibiting Apoptosis Mediated by JNK/MARK Signal Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ming; Ma, Wuhua; Zhang, Xiong; Wang, Yong; Gao, Xiaoqiu

    2016-12-23

    BACKGROUND Tetramethyl pyrazine (TMP) is a typical biologically active alkaloid isolated from the Chinese herb Ligusticum walliichi. It has been reported that TMP shows neuroprotective and stroke injury reductive properties in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) animal models. In the present study we sought to investigate the effect and potential intervention mechanism of TMP in anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R) rat hippocampal neurons. MATERIAL AND METHODS After being cultured for 7 days, primary hippocampal neurons were randomly assigned into a normal control group (N), a TMP group (C: 0 ug/ml, L: 60 ug/ml, M: 200ug/ml and H: 800 ug/ml), and a JNK inhibitor group (S: SP600125, 10 μmol/L). A hypoxia/reoxygenation model were prepared 1 h after incubation. Hippocampal neurons were incubated in 90% N2 and 10% CO2 for 2 h, and then reoxygenated for 24 h in an incubator with 5%CO2 at the temperature of 37°C. The apoptosis rate, MKK4 and MKK7 mRNA and JNK kinase protein levels (C-fos, c-jun, and P-JNK) of hippocampal neurons were detected. RESULTS The apoptosis rates of hippocampal neurons induced by A/R showed significant reduction after being pre-treated with JNK inhibitor, TMP 60 µg/ml, 200 µg/ml, and 800 µg/ml. The JNK kinase MKK4mRNA and MKK7mRNA levels, as well as the expressions of C-fos, C-jun, and P-JNK protein levels, were also be reduced. CONCLUSIONS TMP may produce a protective effect in anoxia/reoxygenation-induced primary hippocampal neuronal injury by inhibiting the apoptosis of the hippocampal neurons; the possible mechanism may be inhibition of the JNK signal pathway.

  1. Interference of silibinin with IGF-1R signalling pathways protects human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells from UVB-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Weiwei; Otkur, Wuxiyar; Li, Lingzhi; Wang, Qiong; He, Hao; Zang, Linghe; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Tashiro, Shin-ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Xia, Mingyu; Ikejima, Takashi

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Silibinin protects A431 cells from UVB irradiation-induced apoptosis. ► Up-regulation of the IGF-1R-JNK/ERK pathways by UVB induces cell apoptosis. ► Silibinin inhibits IGF-1R pathways to repress caspase-8-mediated apoptosis. -- Abstract: Ultraviolet B (UVB) from sunlight is a major cause of cutaneous lesion. Silibinin, a traditional hepatic protectant, elicits protective effects against UVB-induced cellular damage. In A431 cells, the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) was markedly up-regulated by UVB irradiation. The activation of the IGF-1R signalling pathways contributed to apoptosis of the cells rather than rescuing the cells from death. Up-regulated IGF-1R stimulated downstream mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), such as c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). The subsequent activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 led to apoptosis. The activation of IGF-1R signalling pathways is the cause of A431 cell death. The pharmacological inhibitors and the small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting IGF-1R suppressed the downstream activation of JNK/ERK-caspases to help the survival of the UVB-irradiated A431 cells. Indeed, silibinin treatment suppressed the IGF-1R-JNK/ERK pathways and thus protected the cells from UVB-induced apoptosis.

  2. Involvement of PKCα and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in EGCG's protection against stress-induced neural injuries in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoling; Liu, Fengqin; Jin, Haimin; Li, Renjia; Wang, Yonghui; Zhang, Wanqi; Wang, Haichao; Chen, Weiqiang

    2017-03-27

    Stress-induced neural injuries are closely linked to the pathogenesis of various neuropsychiatric disorders and psychosomatic diseases. We and others have previously demonstrated certain protective effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) in stress-induced cerebral impairments, but the underlying protective mechanisms still remain poorly elucidated. Here we provide evidence to support the possible involvement of PKCα and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathways in EGCG-mediated protection against restraint stress-induced neural injuries in rats. In both open-field and step-through behavioral tests, the restraint stress-induced neuronal impairments were significantly ameliorated by administration of EGCG or green tea polyphenols (GTPs), which was associated with a partial restoration of normal plasma glucocorticoid, dopamine and serotonin levels. Furthermore, the stress-induced decrease of PKCα and ERK1/2 expression and phosphorylation was significantly attenuated by EGCG and to a less extent by GTP administration. Additionally, EGCG supplementation restored the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the expression of a key regulator of cellular energy metabolism, the peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), in stressed animals. In conclusion, PKCα and ERK1/2 signaling pathways as well as PGC-1α-mediated ATP production might be involved in EGCG-mediated protection against stress-induced neural injuries.

  3. Sevoflurane Postconditioning Protects Rat Hearts against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury via the Activation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Chen; Yu, Shuchun; Luo, Zhenzhong; Chen, Yong; Liu, Qin; Hua, Fuzhou; Xu, Guohai; Yu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) pathway plays a key role in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a downstream target of PI3K/AKT signaling, is necessary and sufficient to protect the heart from I/R injury. Inhaled anesthetic sevoflurane is widely used in cardiac surgeries because its induction and recovery are faster and smoother than other inhaled anesthetics. Sevoflurane proved capable of inducing postconditioning effects in the myocardium. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for sevoflurane-induced postconditioning (SPC) were largely unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that SPC protects myocardium from I/R injury with narrowed cardiac infarct focus, increased ATP content, and decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis, which are mainly due to the activation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling and the protection of mitochondrial energy metabolism. Application of dactolisib (BEZ235), a PI3K/mTOR dual inhibitor, abolishes the up-regulation of pho-AKT, pho-GSK, pho-mTOR, and pho-p70s6k induced by SPC, hence abrogating the anti-apoptotic effect of sevoflurane and reducing SPC-mediated protection of heart from I/R injury. As such, this study proved that PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway plays an important role in SPC induced cardiac protection against I/R injury. PMID:25471136

  4. Protective Effect of Tempol on Acute Kidney Injury Through PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gensheng; Wang, Qiaoling; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Renjun; Xu, Minze; Wang, Huiping; Wang, Lei; Wilcox, Christopher S.; Liu, Ruisheng; Lai, En Yin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Tempol is a protective antioxidant against ischemic injury in many animal models. The molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) is a master transcription factor during oxidative stress, which is enhanced by activation of protein kinase C (PKC) pathway. Another factor, tubular epithelial apoptosis, is mediated by activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (PKB, Akt) signaling pathway during renal ischemic injury. We tested the hypothesis that tempol activates PKC or PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 pathways to transcribe many genes that coordinate endogenous antioxidant defense. Methods The right renal pedicle was clamped for 45 minutes and the left kidney was removed to study renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in C57BL/6 mice. The response was assessed from serum parameters, renal morphology and renal expression of PKC, phosphorylated-PKC (p-PKC), Nrf2, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), Akt, phosphorylated-Akt (p-Akt), pro-caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-3 in groups of sham and I/R mice given vehicle, or tempol (50 or 100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection). Results The serum malondialdehyde (MDA, marker of reactive oxygen species) doubled and the BUN and creatinine increased 5- to 10-fold after I/R injury. Tempol (50 or 100 mg/kg) prevented the increases in MDA but only tempol (50 mg/kg) lessened the increases in BUN and creatinine and moderated the acute tubular necrosis. I/R did not change expression of PKC or p-PKC but reduced renal expression of Nrf2, p-Akt, HO-1 and pro-caspase-3 and increased cleaved caspase-3. Tempol (50 mg/kg) prevented these changes produced by I/R whereas tempol (100 mg/kg) had lesser or inconsistent effects. Conclusion Tempol (50 mg/kg) prevents lipid peroxidation and attenuates renal damage after I/R injury. The beneficial pathway apparently is not dependent on upregulation or phosphorylation of PKC, at lower tempol doses, does implicate upregulation of Akt with expression

  5. Growth-hormone-induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 signaling causes gigantism, inflammation, and premature death but protects mice from aggressive liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Friedbichler, Katrin; Themanns, Madeleine; Mueller, Kristina M; Schlederer, Michaela; Kornfeld, Jan-Wilhelm; Terracciano, Luigi M; Kozlov, Andrey V; Haindl, Susanne; Kenner, Lukas; Kolbe, Thomas; Mueller, Mathias; Snibson, Kenneth J; Heim, Markus H; Moriggl, Richard

    2012-03-01

    Persistently high levels of growth hormone (GH) can cause liver cancer. GH activates multiple signal-transduction pathways, among them janus kinase (JAK) 2-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 5). Both hyperactivation and deletion of STAT5 in hepatocytes have been implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); nevertheless, the role of STAT5 in the development of HCC as a result of high GH levels remains enigmatic. Thus, we crossed a mouse model of gigantism and inflammatory liver cancer caused by hyperactivated GH signaling (GH(tg) ) to mice with hepatic deletion of STAT5 (STAT5(Δhep) ). Unlike GH(tg) mice, GH(tg) STAT5(Δhep) animals did not display gigantism. Moreover, the premature mortality, which was associated with chronic inflammation, as well as the pathologic alterations of hepatocytes observed in GH(tg) mice, were not observed in GH(tg) animals lacking STAT5. Strikingly, loss of hepatic STAT5 proteins led to enhanced HCC development in GH(tg) mice. Despite reduced chronic inflammation, GH(tg) STAT5(Δhep) mice displayed earlier and more advanced HCC than GH(tg) animals. This may be attributed to the combination of increased peripheral lipolysis, hepatic lipid synthesis, loss of hepatoprotective mediators accompanied by aberrant activation of tumor-promoting c-JUN and STAT3 signaling cascades, and accumulation of DNA damage secondary to loss of cell-cycle control. Thus, HCC was never observed in STAT5(Δhep) mice. As a result of their hepatoprotective functions, STAT5 proteins prevent progressive fatty liver disease and the formation of aggressive HCC in the setting of hyperactivated GH signaling. At the same time, they play a key role in controlling systemic inflammation and regulating organ and body size. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  6. Kallikrein/kinin protects against myocardial apoptosis after ischemia/reperfusion via Akt-glycogen synthase kinase-3 and Akt-Bad.14-3-3 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2005-03-04

    Our previous study has shown that human tissue kallikrein protected against ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial injury. In the present study, we investigated the protective role of local kallikrein gene delivery in ischemia/reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and its signaling mechanisms in promoting cardiomyocyte survival. Adenovirus carrying the human tissue kallikrein gene was delivered locally into the heart using a catheter-based technique. Expression and localization of recombinant human kallikrein in rat myocardium after gene transfer were determined immunohistochemically. Kallikrein gene delivery markedly reduced reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis identified by both in situ nick end-labeling and DNA fragmentation. Delivery of the kallikrein gene increased phosphorylation of Src, Akt, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta, and Bad(Ser-136) but reduced caspase-3 activation in rat myocardium after reperfusion. The protective effect of kallikrein on apoptosis and its signaling mediators was blocked by icatibant and dominant-negative Akt, indicating a kinin B2 receptor-Akt-mediated event. Similarly, kinin or transduction of kallikrein in cultured cardiomyocytes promoted cell viability and attenuated apoptosis induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation. The effect of kallikrein on cardiomyocyte survival was blocked by dominant-negative Akt and a constitutively active mutant of GSK-3beta, but it was facilitated by constitutively active Akt, catalytically inactive GSK-3beta, lithium, and caspase-3 inhibitor. Moreover, kallikrein promoted Bad.14-3-3 complex formation and inhibited Akt-GSK-3beta-dependent activation of caspase-3, whereas caspase-3 administration caused reduction of the Bad.14-3-3 complex, indicating an interaction between Akt-GSK-caspase-3 and Akt-Bad.14-3-3 signaling pathways. In conclusion, kallikrein/kinin protects against cardiomyocyte apoptosis in vivo and in vitro via Akt-Bad.14-3-3 and Akt-GSK-3beta-caspase-3 signaling pathways.

  7. Astrocyte-conditioned medium protecting hippocampal neurons in primary cultures against corticosterone-induced damages via PI3-K/Akt signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ze-Hua; Yang, Ru; Fu, Xin; Wang, Yan-Qing; Wu, Gen-Cheng

    2006-10-09

    Prolonged or excessive exposure to corticosterone leads to neuronal damages in the brain regions, including hippocampus. We reported that astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM) protected the neurons of the primary hippocampal cultures against the corticosterone-induced damages. Corticosterone added to the cultures resulted in a significant number of TUNEL-positive cells. However, corticosterone-induced TUNEL labeling was suppressed as for ACM-cultured neurons. To delineate the molecular basis underlying the neuroprotection of ACM, we assessed the activation of ERK1/2 and (PI3-K)/Akt signal pathways in response to corticosterone-induced neuronal damages. Western blot test revealed that corticosterone increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PI3-K/Akt in hippocampal neurons grown in Neurobasal medium supplemented with B27 and 500 microm L-glutamine (NBM+). Interestingly, the increase of phospho-ERK1/2 and Akt levels was much pronounced and the time course of phosphorylation was altered in ACM, suggesting that both signaling pathways might participate in ACM protection. Furthermore, the selective inhibitor of Akt, rather than ERK1/2, blocked the neuroprotective activity against corticosterone in ACM-cultured neurons. In summary, our data showed that ACM had a potent neuroprotective effect in cultured neurons. PI3-K/Akt signal pathway, but not ERK1/2, was involved in the protective activity against the corticosterone-induced damages.

  8. Nuclear import of influenza B virus nucleoprotein: Involvement of an N-terminal nuclear localization signal and a cleavage-protection motif

    SciTech Connect

    Wanitchang, Asawin; Narkpuk, Jaraspim; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2013-08-15

    The nucleoprotein of influenza B virus (BNP) shares several characteristics with its influenza A virus counterpart (ANP), including localization in the host's nucleus. However, while the nuclear localization signal(s) (NLS) of ANP are well characterized, little is known about those of BNP. In this study, we showed that the fusion protein bearing the BNP N-terminus fused with GFP (N70–GFP) is exclusively nuclear, and identified a highly conserved KRXR motif spanning residues 44–47 as a putative NLS. In addition, we demonstrated that residues 3–15 of BNP, though not an NLS, are also crucial for nuclear import. Results from mutational analyses of N70–GFP and the full-length BNP suggest that this region may be required for protection of the N-terminus from proteolytic cleavage. Altogether, we propose that the N-terminal region of BNP contains the NLS and cleavage-protection motif, which together drive its nuclear localization. - Highlights: • The N-terminal region of BNP is required for nuclear accumulation. • The conserved motif at position 44–47 is a putative nuclear localization signal. • The first 15 amino acids of BNP may function as a cleavage-protection motif. • BNP may get access to the nucleus via a mechanism distinct from ANP.

  9. Type I IFN Inhibits Alternative Macrophage Activation during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection and Leads to Enhanced Protection in the Absence of IFN-γ Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Jeremy; McNab, Finlay W.; Torrado, Egídio; Cardoso, Filipa; Machado, Henrique; Castro, Flávia; Cardoso, Vânia; Gaifem, Joana; Wu, Xuemei; Appelberg, Rui; Castro, António Gil; O’Garra, Anne; Saraiva, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis causes ∼1.5 million deaths every year, thus remaining a leading cause of death from infectious diseases in the world. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that type I IFN plays a detrimental role in tuberculosis pathogenesis, likely by interfering with IFN-γ–dependent immunity. In this article, we reveal a novel mechanism by which type I IFN may confer protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in the absence of IFN-γ signaling. We show that production of type I IFN by M. tuberculosis–infected macrophages induced NO synthase 2 and inhibited arginase 1 gene expression. In vivo, absence of both type I and type II IFN receptors led to strikingly increased levels of arginase 1 gene expression and protein activity in infected lungs, characteristic of alternatively activated macrophages. This correlated with increased lung bacterial burden and pathology and decreased survival compared with mice deficient in either receptor. Increased expression of other genes associated with alternatively activated macrophages, as well as increased expression of Th2-associated cytokines and decreased TNF expression, were also observed. Thus, in the absence of IFN-γ signaling, type I IFN suppressed the switching of macrophages from a more protective classically activated phenotype to a more permissive alternatively activated phenotype. Together, our data support a model in which suppression of alternative macrophage activation by type I IFN during M. tuberculosis infection, in the absence of IFN-γ signaling, contributes to host protection. PMID:27849167

  10. Intestinal Epithelium-Specific MyD88 Signaling Impacts Host Susceptibility to Infectious Colitis by Promoting Protective Goblet Cell and Antimicrobial Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Ganive; Stahl, Martin; Sham, Ho Pan; Crowley, Shauna M.; Morampudi, Vijay; Dalwadi, Udit; Ma, Caixia; Jacobson, Kevan

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), including secretory goblet cells, form essential physiochemical barriers that separate luminal bacteria from underlying immune cells in the intestinal mucosa. IECs are common targets for enteric bacterial pathogens, with hosts responding to these microbes through innate toll-like receptors that predominantly signal through the MyD88 adaptor protein. In fact, MyD88 signaling confers protection against several enteric bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Citrobacter rodentium. Since IECs are considered innately hyporesponsive, it is unclear whether MyD88 signaling within IECs contributes to this protection. We infected mice lacking MyD88 solely in their IECs (IEC-Myd88−/−) with S. Typhimurium. Compared to wild-type (WT) mice, infected IEC-Myd88−/− mice suffered accelerated tissue damage, exaggerated barrier disruption, and impaired goblet cell responses (Muc2 and RELMβ). Immunostaining revealed S. Typhimurium penetrated the IECs of IEC-Myd88−/− mice, unlike in WT mice, where they were sequestered to the lumen. When isolated crypts were assayed for their antimicrobial actions, crypts from IEC-Myd88−/− mice were severely impaired in their antimicrobial activity against S. Typhimurium. We also examined whether MyD88 signaling in IECs impacted host defense against C. rodentium, with IEC-Myd88−/− mice again suffering exaggerated tissue damage, impaired goblet cell responses, and reduced antimicrobial activity against C. rodentium. These results demonstrate that MyD88 signaling within IECs plays an important protective role at early stages of infection, influencing host susceptibility to infection by controlling the ability of the pathogen to reach and survive at the intestinal mucosal surface. PMID:24958710

  11. The citrus flavonoid naringenin confers protection in a murine endotoxaemia model through AMPK-ATF3-dependent negative regulation of the TLR4 signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Ning; Fan, Shijun; Zheng, Xinchuan; Yang, Yongjun; Zhu, Yuanfeng; Lu, Yongling; Chen, Qian; Zhou, Hong; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Excessive activation of the TLR4 signalling pathway is critical for inflammation-associated disorders, while negative regulators play key roles in restraining TLR4 from over-activation. Naringenin is a citrus flavonoid with remarkable anti-inflammatory activity, but the mechanisms underlying its inhibition of LPS/TLR4 signalling are less clear. This study investigated the molecular targets and therapeutic effects of naringenin in vitro and in vivo. In LPS-stimulated murine macrophages, naringenin suppressed the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, TLR4, inducible NO synthase (iNOS), cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX2) and NADPH oxidase-2 (NOX2). Naringenin also inhibited NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. However, it did not affect the IRF3 signalling pathway or interferon production, which upregulate activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), an inducible negative regulator of TLR4 signalling. Naringenin was demonstrated to directly increase ATF3 expression. Inhibition of AMPK and its upstream calcium-dependent signalling reduced ATF3 expression and dampened the anti-inflammatory activity of naringenin. In murine endotoxaemia models, naringenin ameliorated pro-inflammatory reactions and improved survival. Furthermore, it induced AMPK activation in lung tissues, which was required for ATF3 upregulation and the enhanced anti-inflammatory activity. Overall, this study reveals a novel mechanism of naringenin through AMPK-ATF3-dependent negative regulation of the LPS/TLR4 signalling pathway, which thereby confers protection against murine endotoxaemia. PMID:28004841

  12. Pycnogenol Protects Against Rotenone-Induced Neurotoxicity in PC12 Cells Through Regulating NF-κB-iNOS Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Chang, Chongwang; Zhou, Jie; Zhao, Tianzhi; Wang, Chao; Li, Chen; Gao, Guodong

    2015-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by dopaminergic neurons degeneration and oxidative damage may underlie this process. However, there are still no efficient drugs to cure the disease. Pycnogenol (PYC) isolated from the procyanidin-rich French maritime pine (Pinus maritime) bark has shown various antioxidant activities in previous studies. In this study, we explored its effect against rotenone (Rot)-induced neurotoxicity and the underlying mechanisms in PC12 cells. Using Rot-induced cell model of PD, we found that PYC treatment significantly increased cell viability and decreased cell apoptosis in Rot-treated PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, data showed that PYC markedly reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-nitric oxide (NO) signaling in Rot-treated PC12 cells. Pretreatment with the iNOS-specific inhibitor significantly attenuated Rot-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, PYC was found to be capable of reducing Rot-induced NF-κB activation. Blocking NF-κB signaling with its inhibitor mimicked the biological effect of PYC on Rot-induced iNOS and NO expression levels, as well as neurotoxicity in PC12 cells, suggesting that the NF-κB-iNOS signaling pathway was likely to participate in the PYC-mediated protective progress. Our results suggest that PYC protects against Rot-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells, and the mechanism may be associated with the downregulation of NF-κB-iNOS signaling pathway.

  13. Protective Effect of Curcumin by Modulating BDNF/DARPP32/CREB in Arsenic-Induced Alterations in Dopaminergic Signaling in Rat Corpus Striatum.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pranay; Dhuriya, Yogesh K; Gupta, Richa; Shukla, Rajendra K; Yadav, Rajesh S; Dwivedi, Hari N; Pant, Aditya B; Khanna, Vinay K

    2016-12-13

    Earlier, protective role of curcumin in arsenic-induced dopamine (DA)-D2 receptor dysfunctions in corpus striatum has been demonstrated by us. In continuation to that, the present study is focused to decipher the molecular mechanisms associated with alterations in dopaminergic signaling on arsenic exposure in corpus striatum and assess the protective efficacy of curcumin. Exposure to arsenic (20 mg/kg, body weight p.o. for 28 days) in rats resulted to decrease the expression of presynaptic proteins-tyrosine hydroxylase and VMAT2 while no effect was observed on the expression of DAT in comparison to controls. A significant decrease in the expression of DA-D2 receptors associated with alterations in the expression of PKA, pDARPP32 (Thr 34), and PP1 α was clearly evident on arsenic exposure. Expression of BDNF and pGSK3β in corpus striatum was found decreased in arsenic-exposed rats. Simultaneous treatment with curcumin (100 mg/kg, body weight p.o. for 28 days) resulted to protect arsenic-induced alterations in the expression of DA-D2 receptors, PKA, pDARPP32, pCREB, and pPP1α. Neuroprotective efficacy of curcumin can possibly be attributed to its antioxidant potential which significantly protected arsenic-induced mitochondrial dysfunctions by modulating the ROS generation and apoptosis. Modulation in the expression of BDNF and pGSK3β in corpus striatum by curcumin exhibits the importance of neuronal survival pathway in arsenic-induced dopaminergic dysfunctions. Interestingly, curcumin was also found to protect arsenic-induced ultrastructural changes in corpus striatum. The results exhibit that curcumin modulates BDNF/DARPP32/CREB in arsenic-induced alterations in dopaminergic signaling in rat corpus striatum.

  14. Mammalian target of rapamycin cell signaling pathway contributes to the protective effects of ischemic postconditioning against stroke.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rong; Wang, Peng; Cheng, Michelle; Sapolsky, Robert; Ji, Xunming; Zhao, Heng

    2014-09-01

    Whether the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is protective against brain injury from stroke or is detrimental is controversial, and whether it is involved in the protective effects of ischemic postconditioning (IPC) against stroke is unreported. Our study focuses on the protective role of mTOR against neuronal injury after stroke with and without IPC. We used both an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation model with a mixed neuronal culture and hypoxic postconditioning, as well as an in vivo stroke model with IPC. Rapamycin, a specific pharmacological inhibitor of mTOR, and mTOR short hairpin RNA lentiviral vectors were used to inhibit mTOR activity. A lentiviral vector expressing S6K1, a downstream molecule of mTOR, was used to confirm the protective effects of mTOR. Infarct sizes were measured and protein levels were examined by Western blot. We report that stroke resulted in reduced levels of phosphorylated proteins in the mTOR pathway, including S6K1, S6, and 4EBP1, and that IPC increased these proteins. mTOR inhibition, both by the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and by mTOR short hairpin RNA, worsened ischemic outcomes in vitro and in vivo and abolished the protective effects of hypoxic postconditioning and IPC on neuronal death in vitro and brain injury size in vivo. Overexpression of S6K1 mediated by lentiviral vectors significantly attenuated brain infarction. mTOR plays a crucial protective role in brain damage after stroke and contributes to the protective effects of IPC. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Canonical Wnt signaling protects hippocampal neurons from Aβ oligomers: role of non-canonical Wnt-5a/Ca2+ in mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Alvarez, Carmen; Arrázola, Macarena S.; Godoy, Juan A.; Ordenes, Daniela; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of age-related dementia. The disease is characterized by a progressive loss of cognitive abilities, severe neurodegeneration, synaptic loss and mitochondrial dysfunction. The Wnt signaling pathway participates in the development of the central nervous system and growing evidence indicates that Wnts also regulate the function of the adult nervous system. We report here, that indirect activation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling using Bromoindirubin-30-Oxime (6-BIO), an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β, protects hippocampal neurons from amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers with the concomitant blockade of neuronal apoptosis. More importantly, activation with Wnt-5a, a non-canonical Wnt ligand, results in the modulation of mitochondrial dynamics, preventing the changes induced by Aβ oligomers (Aβo) in mitochondrial fission-fusion dynamics and modulates Bcl-2 increases induced by oligomers. The canonical Wnt-3a ligand neither the secreted Frizzled-Related Protein (sFRP), a Wnt scavenger, did not prevent these effects. In contrast, some of the Aβ oligomer effects were blocked by Ryanodine. We conclude that canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls neuronal survival, and that non-canonical Wnt/Ca2+signaling modulates mitochondrial dysfunction. Since mitochondrial dysfunction is present in neurodegenerative diseases, the therapeutic possibilities of the activation of Wnt signaling are evident. PMID:23805073

  16. Canonical Wnt signaling protects hippocampal neurons from Aβ oligomers: role of non-canonical Wnt-5a/Ca(2+) in mitochondrial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Silva-Alvarez, Carmen; Arrázola, Macarena S; Godoy, Juan A; Ordenes, Daniela; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of age-related dementia. The disease is characterized by a progressive loss of cognitive abilities, severe neurodegeneration, synaptic loss and mitochondrial dysfunction. The Wnt signaling pathway participates in the development of the central nervous system and growing evidence indicates that Wnts also regulate the function of the adult nervous system. We report here, that indirect activation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling using Bromoindirubin-30-Oxime (6-BIO), an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β, protects hippocampal neurons from amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers with the concomitant blockade of neuronal apoptosis. More importantly, activation with Wnt-5a, a non-canonical Wnt ligand, results in the modulation of mitochondrial dynamics, preventing the changes induced by Aβ oligomers (Aβo) in mitochondrial fission-fusion dynamics and modulates Bcl-2 increases induced by oligomers. The canonical Wnt-3a ligand neither the secreted Frizzled-Related Protein (sFRP), a Wnt scavenger, did not prevent these effects. In contrast, some of the Aβ oligomer effects were blocked by Ryanodine. We conclude that canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls neuronal survival, and that non-canonical Wnt/Ca(2+)signaling modulates mitochondrial dysfunction. Since mitochondrial dysfunction is present in neurodegenerative diseases, the therapeutic possibilities of the activation of Wnt signaling are evident.

  17. Hydrogen-rich medium protects mouse embryonic fibroblasts from oxidative stress by activating LKB1-AMPK-FoxO1 signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihyun; Yang, Goowon; Kim, Young-Joo; Tran, Quynh Hoa; Choe, Wonchae; Kang, Insug; Kim, Sung Soo; Ha, Joohun

    2017-09-23

    Persistent oxidative stress is recognized as a major cause of many pathological conditions as well as ageing. However, most clinical trials of dietary antioxidants have failed to produce successful outcomes in treating oxidative stress-induced diseases. Molecular hydrogen (H2) has recently received considerable attention as a therapeutic agent owing to its novel antioxidant properties, a selective scavenger of hydroxyl and peroxynitrite radicals. Beyond this, numerous reports support that H2 can modulate the activity of various cellular signal pathways. However, its effect on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signal pathway, a central regulator of energy hemostasis, has remained almost elusive. Here, we report that hydrogen-rich medium activated LKB1-AMPK signal pathway without ATP depletion, which in turn induced FoxO1-dependent transcription of manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Moreover, hydrogen-rich media effectively reduced the level of reactive oxygen species in cells treated with hydrogen peroxide and protected these cells from apoptosis in an AMPK-dependent manner. These results suggest that the LKB1-AMPK-FoxO1 signaling pathway is a critical mediator of the antioxidant properties of H2, further supporting the idea that H2 acts as a signaling molecule to serve various physiological functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ku86 is not required for protection of signal ends or for formation of nonstandard V(D)J recombination products.

    PubMed Central

    Han, J O; Steen, S B; Roth, D B

    1997-01-01

    Ku, a heterodimer of 70- and 86-kDa subunits, serves as the DNA binding component of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Cells deficient for the 86-kDa subunit of Ku (Ku86-deficient cells) lack Ku DNA end-binding activity and are severely defective for formation of the standard V(D)J recombination products, i.e., signal and coding joints. It has been widely hypothesized that Ku is required for protection of broken DNA ends generated during V(D)J recombination. Here we report the first analysis of V(D)J recombination intermediates in a Ku-deficient cell line. We find that full-length, ligatable signal ends are abundant in these cells. These data show that Ku86 is not required for the protection or stabilization of signal ends, suggesting that other proteins may perform this function. The presence of high levels of signal ends in Ku-deficient cells prompted us to investigate whether these ends could participate in joining reactions. We show that nonstandard V(D)J recombination products (hybrid joints), which involve joining a signal end to a coding end, form with similar efficiencies in Ku-deficient and wild-type fibroblasts. These data support the surprising conclusion that Ku is not required for some types of V(D)J joining events. We propose a novel RAG-mediated joining mechanism, analogous to disintegration reactions performed by retroviral integrases, to explain how formation of hybrid joints can bypass the requirement for Ku and DNA-PK. PMID:9121473

  19. Raloxifene activates G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1/Akt signaling to protect dopamine neurons in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mice.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Mélanie; Morissette, Marc; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2014-10-01

    Raloxifene, used in the clinic, is reported to protect brain dopaminergic neurons in mice. Raloxifene was shown to mediate an effect through the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1). We investigated if raloxifene neuroprotective effect in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated male mice is mediated through GPER1 by using its antagonist G15. Striatal concentrations of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid to dopamine ratio as well as dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 showed that raloxifene neuroprotection of dopaminergic neurons was blocked by G15. Protection by raloxifene was accompanied by activation of striatal Akt signaling (but not ERK1/2 signaling) and increased Bcl-2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels; these effects were abolished by coadministration with G15. The effect of raloxifene was not mediated through increased levels of 17β-estradiol. MPTP mice had decreased plasma testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and 3β-diol levels; this was prevented in raloxifene-treated MPTP mice. Our results suggest that raloxifene acted through GPER1 to mediate Akt activation, increase Bcl-2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, and protection of dopaminergic neurons and plasma androgens.

  20. Fibroblast-induced switching to the mesenchymal-like phenotype and PI3K/mTOR signaling protects melanoma cells from BRAF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Seip, Kotryna; Nygaard, Vigdis; Haugen, Mads H.; Engesæter, Birgit Ø.; Mælandsmo, Gunhild M.; Prasmickaite, Lina

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge on how tumor-associated stroma influences efficacy of anti-cancer therapy just started to emerge. Here we show that lung fibroblasts reduce melanoma sensitivity to the BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi) vemurafenib only if the two cell types are in close proximity. In the presence of fibroblasts, the adjacent melanoma cells acquire de-differentiated mesenchymal-like phenotype. Upon treatment with BRAFi, such melanoma cells maintain high levels of phospho ribosomal protein S6 (pS6), i.e. active mTOR signaling, which is suppressed in the BRAFi sensitive cells without stromal contacts. Inhibitors of PI3K/mTOR in combination with BRAFi eradicate pS6high cell subpopulations and potentiate anti-cancer effects in melanoma protected by the fibroblasts. mTOR and BRAF co-inhibition also delayed the development of early-stage lung metastases in vivo. In conclusion, we demonstrate that upon influence from fibroblasts, melanoma cells undergo a phenotype switch to the mesenchymal state, which can support PI3K/mTOR signaling. The lost sensitivity to BRAFi in such cells can be overcome by co-targeting PI3K/mTOR. This knowledge could be explored for designing BRAFi combination therapies aiming to eliminate both stroma-protected and non-protected counterparts of metastases. PMID:26918352

  1. Reduced silent information regulator 1 signaling exacerbates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in type 2 diabetic rats and the protective effect of melatonin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liming; Liang, Hongliang; Dong, Xiaochao; Zhao, Guolong; Jin, Zhenxiao; Zhai, Mengen; Yang, Yang; Chen, Wensheng; Liu, Jincheng; Yi, Wei; Yang, Jian; Yi, Dinghua; Duan, Weixun; Yu, Shiqiang

    2015-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) increases myocardial oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Melatonin confers cardioprotective effect by suppressing oxidative damage. However, the effect and mechanism of melatonin on myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (MI/R) injury in type 2 diabetic state are still unknown. In this study, we developed high-fat diet-fed streptozotocin (HFD-STZ) rat, a well-known type 2 diabetic model, to evaluate the effect of melatonin on MI/R injury with a focus on silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) signaling, oxidative stress, and PERK/eIF2α/ATF4-mediated ER stress. HFD-STZ treated rats were exposed to melatonin treatment in the presence or the absence of sirtinol (a SIRT1 inhibitor) and subjected to MI/R surgery. Compared with nondiabetic animals, type 2 diabetic rats exhibited significantly decreased myocardial SIRT1 signaling, increased apoptosis, enhanced oxidative stress, and ER stress. Additionally, further reduced SIRT1 signaling, aggravated oxidative damage, and ER stress were found in diabetic animals subjected to MI/R surgery. Melatonin markedly reduced MI/R injury by improving cardiac functional recovery and decreasing myocardial apoptosis in type 2 diabetic animals. Melatonin treatment up-regulated SIRT1 expression, reduced oxidative damage, and suppressed PERK/eIF2α/ATF4 signaling. However, these effects were all attenuated by SIRT1 inhibition. Melatonin also protected high glucose/high fat cultured H9C2 cardiomyocytes against simulated ischemia-reperfusion injury-induced ER stress by activating SIRT1 signaling while SIRT1 siRNA blunted this action. Taken together, our study demonstrates that reduced cardiac SIRT1 signaling in type 2 diabetic state aggravates MI/R injury. Melatonin ameliorates reperfusion-induced oxidative stress and ER stress via activation of SIRT1 signaling, thus reducing MI/R damage and improving cardiac function.

  2. SIRT1 protects rat lung tissue against severe burn-induced remote ALI by attenuating the apoptosis of PMVECs via p38 MAPK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiaozhi; Fan, Lei; He, Ting; Jia, Wenbin; Yang, Longlong; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Yang; Shi, Jihong; Su, Linlin; Hu, Dahai

    2015-01-01

    Silent information regulator type-1 (SIRT1) has been reported to be involved in the cardiopulmonary protection. However, its role in the pathogenesis of burn-induced remote acute lung injury (ALI) is currently unknown. The present study aims to investigate the role of SIRT1 in burn-induced remote ALI and the involved signaling pathway. We observed that SIRT1 expression in rat lung tissue after burn injury appeared an increasing trend after a short period of suppression. The upregulation of SIRT1 stimulated by resveratrol exhibited remission of histopathologic changes, reduction of cell apoptosis, and downregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines in rat pulmonary tissues suffering from severe burn. We next used primary pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) challenged by burn serum (BS) to simulate in vivo rat lung tissue after burn injury, and found that BS significantly suppressed SIRT1 expression, increased cell apoptosis, and activated p38 MAPK signaling. The use of resveratrol reversed these effects, while knockdown of SIRT1 by shRNA further augmented BS-induced increase of cell apoptosis and activation of p38 MAPK. Taken together, these results indicate that SIRT1 might protect lung tissue against burn-induced remote ALI by attenuating PMVEC apoptosis via p38 MAPK signaling, suggesting its potential therapeutic effects on the treatment of ALI. PMID:25992481

  3. Glucosamine hydrochloride exerts a protective effect against unilateral ureteral obstruction-induced renal fibrosis by attenuating TGF-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinah; Lee, So-Young; Ooshima, Akira; Yang, Kyung-Min; Kang, Jin Muk; Kim, Young-Woong; Kim, Seong-Jin

    2013-11-01

    Renal fibrosis is a common consequence of unilateral ureteral obstruction, which provides a useful model to investigate the pathogenesis of obstructive nephropathy and progressive renal fibrosis. Transforming growth factor (TGF-β1) has been recognized as a key mediator in renal fibrosis by stimulating matrix-producing fibrogenic cells and promoting extracellular matrix deposition. Therefore, considerable efforts have been made to regulate TGF-β signaling for antifibrotic therapy. Here, we investigated the mode of action of glucosamine hydrochloride (GS-HCl) on TGF-β1-induced renal fibrosis. In the obstructed kidneys and TGF-β1-treated renal cells, GS-HCl significantly decreased renal expression of α-smooth muscle actin, collagen I, and fibronectin. By investigating the inhibitory mechanism of GS-HCl on renal fibrosis, we found that GS-HCl suppressed TGF-β signaling by inhibiting N-linked glycosylation of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβRII), leading to an inefficient trafficking of TβRII to the membrane surface. Defective N-glycosylation of TβRII further suppressed the TGF-β1-binding to TβRII, thereby decreasing TGF-β signaling. Notably, GS-HCl treatment significantly reduced TGF-β1-induced up-regulation of Smad2/3 phosphorylation and transcriptional activity in vivo and in vitro. Taken together, GS-HCl-mediated regulation of TGF-β signaling exerted an antifibrotic effect, thereby ameliorating renal fibrosis. Our study suggests that GS-HCl would be a promising agent for therapeutic intervention for preventing TGF-β1-induced renal fibrosis in kidney diseases. Glucosamine-mediated attenuation of TGF-β signaling ameliorates renal fibrosis in vivo TGF-β1-induced fibrogenic action is reduced by glucosamine in vitro N-glycosylation of the type II TGF-β receptor is suppressed by glucosamine Glucosamine-induced defective N-glycosylation of TβRII decreases TGF-β signaling.

  4. Vaccine adjuvants aluminum and monophosphoryl lipid A provide distinct signals to generate protective cytotoxic memory CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Megan K. L.; McKee, Amy S.; David, Alexandria; Wang, Jieru; Mason, Robert; Kappler, John W.; Marrack, Philippa

    2011-01-01

    Vaccines can greatly reduce the spread of and deaths from many infectious diseases. However, many infections have no successful vaccines. Better understanding of the generation of protective CD8 memory T cells by vaccination is essential for the rational design of new vaccines that aim to prime cellular immune responses. Here we demonstrate that the combination of two adjuvants that are currently licensed for use in humans can be used to prime long-lived memory CD8 T cells that protect mice from viral challenge. The universally used adjuvant, aluminum salts, primed long-lived memory CD8 T cells; however, effective cytotoxic T-cell differentiation occurred only in the presence of an additional adjuvant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL). MPL-induced IL-6 was required for cytotoxic differentiation. The IL-6 acted by inducing granzyme B production and reducing expression of inhibitory molecule PD1 on the surface of the primed CD8 T cells. CD8 memory T cells generated by antigen delivered with both aluminum salts and MPL provided significant protection from influenza A challenge. These adjuvants could be used in human vaccines to prime protective memory CD8 T cells. PMID:21518876

  5. On the subjective evaluation of the interference protection ratios' measurements for co-channel FM-TV signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groumpos, P. P.; Whyte, W.

    1983-01-01

    Results of subjective measurements made to determine the relationship between the image impairment grade and the wanted-signal to interference power ratios (C/I) for co-channel FM television signals are presented. The variation of C/I ratio with picture impairment grade is investigated for three different noise levels. The assessment of impairment grade due to thermal noise only and to picture content is also investigated. A statistical analysis for performed experiments is presented. The results presented here may be used by communication system designers to determine the required system characteristics.

  6. Fault tolerance in space-based digital signal processing and switching systems: Protecting up-link processing resources, demultiplexer, demodulator, and decoder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redinbo, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Fault tolerance features in the first three major subsystems appearing in the next generation of communications satellites are described. These satellites will contain extensive but efficient high-speed processing and switching capabilities to support the low signal strengths associated with very small aperture terminals. The terminals' numerous data channels are combined through frequency division multiplexing (FDM) on the up-links and are protected individually by forward error-correcting (FEC) binary convolutional codes. The front-end processing resources, demultiplexer, demodulators, and FEC decoders extract all data channels which are then switched individually, multiplexed, and remodulated before retransmission to earth terminals through narrow beam spot antennas. Algorithm based fault tolerance (ABFT) techniques, which relate real number parity values with data flows and operations, are used to protect the data processing operations. The additional checking features utilize resources that can be substituted for normal processing elements when resource reconfiguration is required to replace a failed unit.

  7. Tenuigenin exhibits protective effects against LPS-induced acute kidney injury via inhibiting TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haiyan; Hu, Zhansheng; Di, Xingwei; Zhang, Qiuhong; Zhou, Rongbin; Du, Hongyang

    2016-11-15

    Tenuigenin (TNG) has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the protective effects of TNG on lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) are still not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects and mechanism of TGN on LPS-induced AKI in mice. The kidney histological change, levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and creatinine were measured to assess the protective effects of TNG on LPS-induced AKI. The levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in serum and kidney tissues were detected by ELISA. The extent of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) p65 and the expression of Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) were detected by western blot analysis. The results showed that TNG markedly attenuated the histological alterations, BUN and creatinine levels in kidney. TNG also suppressed LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 production. Furthermore, the expression of TLR4 and NF-κB activation induced by LPS were markedly inhibited by TNG. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that TNG protected against LPS-induced AKI by inhibiting TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

  8. BNC Protects H9c2 Cardiomyoblasts from H2O2-Induced Oxidative Injury through ERK1/2 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Zhao, Ye; Tang, Shihuan; Wang, Lan; Liang, Rixin

    2013-01-01

    Buchang naoxintong capsule (BNC) is a traditional Chinese medicine approved for the treatment of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. However, little is known about the specific protective function or mechanism by which BNC protects against myocardial injury. This research was designed to investigate the cardioprotective effects of BNC in vitro model of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced H9c2 rat cardiomyoblasts. BNC intestinal absorption liquid was used in this study instead of drug-containing serum or extracting solution. Our study revealed that BNC preconditioning enhanced antioxidant function by increasing the activities of total-antioxygen capacity, total-superoxide dismutase, and catalase and by decreasing the production of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde. BNC preconditioning also activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) and inhibited apoptosis-related proteins such as poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3. Additionally, preincubation with BNC reduced intracellular Ca2+ concentration, improved mitochondrial membrane potential, and decreased the apoptosis rate of H9c2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. These data demonstrated that BNC protects H9c2 cardiomyoblasts from H2O2-induced oxidative injury by increasing antioxidant abilities, activating ERK1/2, and blocking Ca2+-dependent and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Based on our results, the potency of BNC for protecting H9c2 cells from oxidative damage is comparable to that of trimetazidine. PMID:24223618

  9. Protective effect of higenamine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis through heme oxygenase-1 and PI3K/Akt/Nrf-2 signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Wenjiang; Chen, Jianmin; Wu, Yu; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Yuansheng

    2016-01-01

    Existing in Ranunculaceae Aconitum and tomato, with the chemical name 1-phydroxybenzyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahy-droisoquinoline, higenamine is widely distributed in China. Higenamine's anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-apoptotic effects have been identified in previous studies. The present study attempted to determine the protective effect of higenamine against collagen-induced arthritis through heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and PI3K/Akt/Nrf-2 signaling pathways. A type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) model was established and clinical arthritis scores were used to appraise the curative effect of higenamine. Inflammatory reactions, oxidative damage and caspase-3/9 activation were detected using specific ELISA kits. In addition, western blotting was used to evaluate the expression of HO-1, Akt and Nrf-2 protein in CII-induced CIA mice. In CII-induced CIA mice, the clinical arthritis scores, inflammatory reactions, oxidation damage and caspase-3/9 activation were increased and activated. The results demonstrated that treatment with higenamine significantly reduced the elevation of clinical arthritis scores (P<0.01), and suppressed the promotion of inflammatory reactions, oxidation damage and caspase-3/9 activation. Furthermore, higenamine significantly increased HO-1 protein expression (P<0.01) and upregulated the PI3K/Akt/Nrf-2 signal pathway in CII-induced CIA mice. Collectively, it is concluded that higenamine protects against CII-induced CIA through the induction of HO-1 and the upregulation of the PI3K/Akt/Nrf-2 signaling pathway. In conclusion, higenamine may be a beneficial drug for protecting against CIA. PMID:27882125

  10. Tetramethylpyrazine Protects Against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation-Induced Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells Injury via Rho/Rho-kinase Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Qian, Chen; Wang, Ning; Lin, Chenyu; Wang, Yan; Wang, Guangyun; Piao, Xinxin

    2017-05-01

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP, also known as Ligustrazine), which is isolated from Chinese Herb Medicine Ligustium wollichii Franchat (Chuan Xiong), has been widely used in China for the treatment of ischemic stroke by Chinese herbalists. Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) are the integral parts of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), protecting BMECs against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) which is important for the treatment of ischemic stroke. Here, we investigated the protective mechanisms of TMP, focusing on OGD-injured BMECs and the Rho/Rho-kinase (Rho-associated kinases, ROCK) signaling pathway. The model of OGD-injured BMECs was established in this study. BMECs were identified by von Willebrand factor III staining and exposed to fasudil, or TMP at different concentrations (14.3, 28.6, 57.3 µM) for 2 h before 24 h of OGD injury. The effect of each treatment was examined by cell viability assays, measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and transendothelial electric resistance and western blot analysis (caspase-3, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), RhoA, Rac1). Our results show that TMP significantly attenuated apoptosis and the permeability of BMECs induced by OGD. In addition, TMP could notably down-regulate the characteristic proteins in Rho/ROCK signaling pathway such as RhoA and Rac1, which triggered abnormal changes of eNOS and ROS, respectively. Altogether, our results show that TMP has a strong protective effect against OGD-induced BMECs injury and suggest that the mechanism might be related to the inhibition of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway.

  11. TGF-β1 protects intestinal integrity and influences Smads and MAPK signal pathways in IPEC-J2 after TNF-α challenge.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Kan; Cao, Shuting; Jiao, Lefei; Song, Zehe; Lu, Jianjun; Hu, Caihong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of TGF-β1 on intestinal epithelial barrier, as well as canonical Smad and MAPK signal pathways involved in these protection processes by a IPEC-J2 model stimulated with TNF-α. IPEC-J2 monolayers were treated without or with TNF-α in the absence or presence of TGF-β1. The results showed that TGF-β1 pretreatment ameliorated TNF-α-induced intestinal epithelial barrier disturbances as indicated by decrease of transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and increase of paracellular permeability. TGF-β1 also dramatically alleviated TNF-α-induced alteration of TJ proteins ZO-1 and occludin. Moreover, TGF-β1 pretreatment increased TβRII protein expression in IPEC-J2 monolayers challenged with TNF-α. In addition, a significant increase of Smad4 and Smad7 mRNA was also observed in the TGF-β1 pretreatment after TNF-α challenge compared with the control group. Furthermore, TGF-β1 pretreatment enhanced smad2 protein activation. These results indicated that the canonical Smad signaling pathway was activated by TGF-β1 pretreatment. Finally, TGF-β1 pretreatment decreased the ratios of the phosphorylated to total JNK and p38 (p-JNK/JNK and p-p38/p38) and increased the ratio of ERK (p-ERK/ERK). Anti-TGF-β1 Abs reduced these TGF-β1 effects. These results indicated that TGF-β1 protects intestinal integrity and influences Smad and MAPK signal pathways in IPEC-J2 after TNF-α challenge.

  12. Thioredoxin-interacting protein deficiency induces Akt/Bcl-xL signaling and pancreatic beta-cell mass and protects against diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junqin; Hui, Simon T.; Couto, Francesca M.; Mungrue, Imran N.; Davis, Dawn B.; Attie, Alan D.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Davis, Roger A.; Shalev, Anath

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cell loss through apoptosis represents a key factor in the pathogenesis of diabetes; however, no effective approaches to block this process and preserve endogenous beta-cell mass are currently available. To study the role of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP), a proapoptotic beta-cell factor we recently identified, we used HcB-19 (TXNIP nonsense mutation) and beta-cell-specific TXNIP knockout (bTKO) mice. Interestingly, HcB-19 mice demonstrate increased adiposity, but have lower blood glucose levels and increased pancreatic beta-cell mass (as assessed by morphometry). Moreover, HcB-19 mice are resistant to streptozotocin-induced diabetes. When intercrossed with obese, insulin-resistant, and diabetic mice, double-mutant BTBRlepob/obtxniphcb/hcb are even more obese, but are protected against diabetes and beta-cell apoptosis, resulting in a 3-fold increase in beta-cell mass. Beta-cell-specific TXNIP deletion also enhanced beta-cell mass (P<0.005) and protected against diabetes, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL) revealed a ∼50-fold reduction in beta-cell apoptosis in streptozotocin-treated bTKO mice. We further discovered that TXNIP deficiency induces Akt/Bcl-xL signaling and inhibits mitochondrial beta-cell death, suggesting that these mechanisms may mediate the beta-cell protective effects of TXNIP deficiency. These results suggest that lowering beta-cell TXNIP expression could serve as a novel strategy for the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes by promoting endogenous beta-cell survival.—Chen, J., Hui, S. T., Couto, F. M., Mungrue, I. N., Davis, D. B., Attie, A. D., Lusis, A. J., Davis, R. A., Shalev, A. Thioredoxin-interacting protein deficiency induces Akt/Bcl-xL signaling and pancreatic beta-cell mass and protects against diabetes. PMID:18552236

  13. Targeted loss of GHR signaling in mouse skeletal muscle protects against high-fat diet-induced metabolic deterioration.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Archana; Wu, YingJie; Sun, Hui; Li, Xiaosong; Jeddy, Zuha; Liu, Chengyu; Schwartz, Gary J; Yakar, Shoshana; LeRoith, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) exerts diverse tissue-specific metabolic effects that are not revealed by global alteration of GH action. To study the direct metabolic effects of GH in the muscle, we specifically inactivated the growth hormone receptor (ghr) gene in postnatal mouse skeletal muscle using the Cre/loxP system (mGHRKO model). The metabolic state of the mGHRKO mice was characterized under lean and obese states. High-fat diet feeding in the mGHRKO mice was associated with reduced adiposity, improved insulin sensitivity, lower systemic inflammation, decreased muscle and hepatic triglyceride content, and greater energy expenditure compared with control mice. The obese mGHRKO mice also had an increased respiratory exchange ratio, suggesting increased carbohydrate utilization. GH-regulated suppressor of cytokine signaling-2 (socs2) expression was decreased in obese mGHRKO mice. Interestingly, muscles of both lean and obese mGHRKO mice demonstrated a higher interleukin-15 and lower myostatin expression relative to controls, indicating a possible mechanism whereby GHR signaling in muscle could affect liver and adipose tissue function. Thus, our study implicates skeletal muscle GHR signaling in mediating insulin resistance in obesity and, more importantly, reveals a novel role of muscle GHR signaling in facilitating cross-talk between muscle and other metabolic tissues.

  14. Inhibition of insulin/IGF-1 receptor signaling protects from mitochondria-mediated kidney failure

    PubMed Central

    Ising, Christina; Koehler, Sybille; Brähler, Sebastian; Merkwirth, Carsten; Höhne, Martin; Baris, Olivier R; Hagmann, Henning; Kann, Martin; Fabretti, Francesca; Dafinger, Claudia; Bloch, Wilhelm; Schermer, Bernhard; Linkermann, Andreas; Brüning, Jens C; Kurschat, Christine E; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Wiesner, Rudolf J; Langer, Thomas; Benzing, Thomas; Brinkkoetter, Paul Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and alterations in energy metabolism have been implicated in a variety of human diseases. Mitochondrial fusion is essential for maintenance of mitochondrial function and requires the prohibitin ring complex subunit prohibitin-2 (PHB2) at the mitochondrial inner membrane. Here, we provide a link between PHB2 deficiency and hyperactive insulin/IGF-1 signaling. Deletion of PHB2 in podocytes of mice, terminally differentiated cells at the kidney filtration barrier, caused progressive proteinuria, kidney failure, and death of the animals and resulted in hyperphosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein (S6RP), a known mediator of the mTOR signaling pathway. Inhibition of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling system through genetic deletion of the insulin receptor alone or in combination with the IGF-1 receptor or treatment with rapamycin prevented hyperphosphorylation of S6RP without affecting the mitochondrial structural defect, alleviated renal disease, and delayed the onset of kidney failure in PHB2-deficient animals. Evidently, perturbation of insulin/IGF-1 receptor signaling contributes to tissue damage in mitochondrial disease, which may allow therapeutic intervention against a wide spectrum of diseases. PMID:25643582

  15. The GTPase-activating protein GIT2 protects against colitis by negatively regulating Toll-like receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Juncheng; Wei, Chao; Wang, Min; Qiu, Xiao; Li, Yang; Yuan, Yanzhi; Jin, Chaozhi; Leng, Ling; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xiaoming; He, Fuchu

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase-interactor 2 (GIT2) regulates thymocyte positive selection, neutrophil-direction sensing, and cell motility during immune responses by regulating the activity of the small GTPases ADP ribosylation factors (Arfs) and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1). Here, we show that Git2-deficient mice were more susceptible to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis, Escherichia coli, or endotoxin-shock challenge, and a dramatic increase in proinflammatory cytokines was observed in Git2 knockout mice and macrophages. GIT2 is a previously unidentified negative regulator of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-induced NF-κB signaling. The ubiquitination of TNF receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is critical for the activation of NF-κB. GIT2 terminates TLR-induced NF-κB and MAPK signaling by recruiting the deubiquitinating enzyme Cylindromatosis to inhibit the ubiquitination of TRAF6. Finally, we show that the susceptibility of Git2-deficient mice to DSS-induced colitis depends on TLR signaling. Thus, we show that GIT2 is an essential terminator of TLR signaling and that loss of GIT2 leads to uncontrolled inflammation and severe organ damage. PMID:24879442

  16. Targeted Loss of GHR Signaling in Mouse Skeletal Muscle Protects Against High-Fat Diet–Induced Metabolic Deterioration

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Archana; Wu, YingJie; Sun, Hui; Li, Xiaosong; Jeddy, Zuha; Liu, Chengyu; Schwartz, Gary J.; Yakar, Shoshana; LeRoith, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) exerts diverse tissue-specific metabolic effects that are not revealed by global alteration of GH action. To study the direct metabolic effects of GH in the muscle, we specifically inactivated the growth hormone receptor (ghr) gene in postnatal mouse skeletal muscle using the Cre/loxP system (mGHRKO model). The metabolic state of the mGHRKO mice was characterized under lean and obese states. High-fat diet feeding in the mGHRKO mice was associated with reduced adiposity, improved insulin sensitivity, lower systemic inflammation, decreased muscle and hepatic triglyceride content, and greater energy expenditure compared with control mice. The obese mGHRKO mice also had an increased respiratory exchange ratio, suggesting increased carbohydrate utilization. GH-regulated suppressor of cytokine signaling-2 (socs2) expression was decreased in obese mGHRKO mice. Interestingly, muscles of both lean and obese mGHRKO mice demonstrated a higher interleukin-15 and lower myostatin expression relative to controls, indicating a possible mechanism whereby GHR signaling in muscle could affect liver and adipose tissue function. Thus, our study implicates skeletal muscle GHR signaling in mediating insulin resistance in obesity and, more importantly, reveals a novel role of muscle GHR signaling in facilitating cross-talk between muscle and other metabolic tissues. PMID:22187377

  17. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway and has a protective effect in a rat model of status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    SAN, YONG-ZHI; LIU, YU; ZHANG, YU; SHI, PING-PING; ZHU, YU-LAN

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) has a protective role in several neurological diseases. The present study investigated the effect of the PPAR-γ agonist, pioglitazone, on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in a rat model of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced status epilepticus (SE). The investigation proceeded in two stages. First, the course of activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in PTZ-induced SE was examined to determine the time-point of peak activity, as reflected by phopshorylated (p)-mTOR/mTOR and p-S6/S6 ratios. Subsequently, pioglitazone was administrated intragastrically to investigate its effect on the mTOR signaling pathway, through western blot and immunochemical analyses. The levels of the interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 inflammatory cytokines were detected using ELISA, and neuronal loss was observed via Nissl staining. In the first stage of experimentation, the mTOR signaling pathway was activated, and the p-mTOR/mTOR and p-S6/S6 ratios peaked on the third day. Compared with the vehicle treated-SE group, pretreatment with pioglitazone was associated with the loss of fewer neurons, lower levels of IL-1β and IL-6, and inhibition of the activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. Therefore, the mTOR signaling pathway was activated in the PTZ-induced SE rat model, and the PPAR-γ agonist, pioglitazone, had a neuroprotective effect, by inhibiting activation of the mTOR pathway and preventing the increase in the levels of IL-1β and IL-6. PMID:25891824

  18. Resveratrol preconditioning protects hepatocytes against hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury via Toll-like receptor 4/nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    He, Diao; Guo, Zhen; Pu, Jun-Liang; Zheng, Dao-Feng; Wei, Xu-Fu; Liu, Rui; Tang, Cheng-Yong; Wu, Zhong-Jun

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effect of resveratrol against hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury (HIRI) and explore the potential underlying mechanism. Resveratrol-pretreated BRL-3A (rat liver) cells and rats underwent hypoxia/reoxygenation and hepatic ischemia/reperfusion, respectively. BRL-3A cell damage was evaluated, and the mRNA and protein expression of related signal molecules was assessed in cell model. The protein expression of related signal molecules was also assessed in rat model. Inflammatory cytokines levels were determined in the cell supernatant and rat serum while rat liver function and hepatocyte apoptosis were assessed. The results revealed that resveratrol significantly enhanced cell viability, inhibited cell apoptosis, and decreased levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-(IL)-1β in the cell supernatant. In addition, resveratrol ameliorated elevated Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and the depressed inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB)-α caused by hypoxia/reoxygenation stimulation in BRL-3A cells. Moreover, resveratrol inhibited the translocation of NF-κB p65 after the stimulation of hypoxia/reoxygenation in BRL-3A cells. In vivo assays revealed that resveratrol reduced levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and liver pathological changes, while it alleviated hepatocyte apoptosis, negatively mediated the production of TNF-α and IL-1β in serum, and reversed TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway caused by hepatic ischemia/reperfusion stimulation in liver tissues. The results indicate that resveratrol protected hepatocytes against HIRI, which may be mediated in part via the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

  19. Protective effect of tanshinone IIA against cardiac hypertrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats through inhibiting the Cys-C/Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Chen, Hua-Wen; Pi, Li-Juan; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Da-Qian

    2017-02-07

    The study aimed to investigate the protective effect of tanshinone IIA against cardiac hypertrophy in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) through the Cys-C/Wnt signaling pathway. Thirty SHRs were randomly divided into cardiac hypertrophy, low- and high-dose tanshinone IIA groups. Ten Wistar-Kyoto rats were selected as control group. The systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart weight (HW), left ventricular weight (LVW) and body weight (BW) of all rats were recorded. HE staining and qRT-PCR were applied to observe the morphology of myocardial tissue and mRNA expressions of COL1A1 and COL3A1. ELISA and Western blotting were used to measure the serum asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), nitric oxide (NO) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) levels, and the expressions of the Cys-C/Wnt signaling pathway-related proteins, eNOS and Nox4. Compared with the cardiac hypertrophy group, the SBP, HW/BW, LVW/BW, swelling degree of myocardial cells, COL1A1 and COL3A1 mRNA expressions, serum cTnI and ADMA levels, and the Cys-C/Wnt signaling pathway-related proteins and Nox4 expressions in the low- and high-dose tanshinone IIA groups were decreased, but the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), phosphorylated eNOS (Ser1177) and NO expressions were increased. No significant difference was found between the low- and high-dose tanshinone IIA groups. Our study indicated a protective effect of tanshinone IIA against cardiac hypertrophy in SHRs through inhibiting the Cys-C/Wnt signaling pathway.

  20. Tongxinluo Protects against Hypertensive Kidney Injury in Spontaneously-Hypertensive Rats by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Activating Forkhead Box O1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei-min; Kong, Jing; Gong, Yan; Liu, Xiao-qiong; Yang, Rui-xue; Zhao, Yu-xia

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is an independent risk factor for the progression of chronic renal failure, and oxidative stress plays a critical role in hypertensive renal damage. Forkbox O1(FoxO1) signaling protects cells against oxidative stress and may be a useful target for treating oxidative stress-induced hypertension. Tongxinluo is a traditional Chinese medicine with cardioprotective and renoprotective functions. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of Tongxinluo in hypertensive renal damage in spontaneously hypertensive rats(SHRs)and elucidate the possible involvement of oxidative stress and FoxO1 signaling in its molecular mechanisms. SHRs treated with Tongxinluo for 12 weeks showed a reduction in systolic blood pressure. In addition to increasing creatinine clearance, Tongxinluo decreased urinary albumin excretion, oxidative stress injury markers including malondialdehyde and protein carbonyls, and expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits and its activity in SHR kidneys. While decreasing phosphorylation of FoxO1, Tongxinluo also inhibited the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and p38 and enhanced manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in SHR kidneys. Furthermore, histology revealed attenuation of glomerulosclerosis and renal podocyte injury, while Tongxinluo decreased the expression of α-smooth muscle actin, extracellular matrixprotein, transforming growth factor β1 and small mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3,and improved tubulointerstitial fibrosis in SHR kidneys. Finally, Tongxinluo inhibited inflammatory cell infiltration as well as expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6. In conclusion, Tongxinluo protected SHRs against hypertension-induced renal injury by exerting antioxidant, antifibrotic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms of these effects may involve inhibition of oxidative stress and functional activation of Fox

  1. ER signaling is activated to protect human HaCaT keratinocytes from ER stress induced by environmental doses of UVB

    SciTech Connect

    Mera, Kentaro; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Tada, Ko-ichi; Kawai, Kazuhiro; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Maruyama, Ikuro; Kanekura, Takuro

    2010-06-25

    Proteins are folded properly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Various stress such as hypoxia, ischemia and starvation interfere with the ER function, causing ER stress, which is defined by the accumulation of unfolded protein (UP) in the ER. ER stress is prevented by the UP response (UPR) and ER-associated degradation (ERAD). These signaling pathways are activated by three major ER molecules, ATF6, IRE-1 and PERK. Using HaCaT cells, we investigated ER signaling in human keratinocytes irradiated by environmental doses of ultraviolet B (UVB). The expression of Ero1-L{alpha}, an upstream signaling molecule of ER stress, decreased at 1-4 h after 10 mJ/cm{sup 2} irradiation, indicating that the environmental dose of UVB-induced ER stress in HaCaT cells, without growth retardation. Furthermore, expression of intact ATF6 was decreased and it was translocated to the nuclei. The expression of XBP-1, a downstream molecule of IRE-1, which is an ER chaperone whose expression is regulated by XBP-1, and UP ubiquitination were induced by 10 mJ/cm{sup 2} UVB at 4 h. PERK, which regulates apoptosis, was not phosphorylated. Our results demonstrate that UVB irradiation generates UP in HaCaT cells and that the UPR and ERAD systems are activated to protect cells from UVB-induced ER stress. This is the first report to show ER signaling in UVB-irradiated keratinocytes.

  2. The fast track to canonical Wnt signaling in MC3T3-E1 cells protected by substance P against serum deprivation-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianguo; Nie, Jiping; Fu, Su; Liu, Song; Wu, Jianqun; Cui, Liang; Zhang, Yongtao; Yu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The canonical Wnt pathway is vital to bone physiology by increasing bone mass through elevated osteoblast survival. Although investigated extensively in stem cells, its role in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells has not been completely determined. To explore how this pathway is regulated by different conditions, we assessed the anti-apoptotic effects of substance P on the canonical Wnt pathway in MC3T3-E1 cells by treating cells with serum deprivation or serum starving with "substance P," a neuropeptide demonstrated to promote bone growth and stimulate Wnt signaling. The results showed that serum deprivation both induced apoptosis and activated Wnt signal transduction while substance P further stimulated the Wnt pathway via the NK-1 receptor but protected the cells from apoptotic death. Fast-tracking of Wnt signaling by substance P was also noted. These results indicate that nutritional deprivation and substance P synergistically activated the canonical Wnt pathway, a finding that helps to reveal the role of Wnt signaling in bone physiology affected by nutritional deprivation and neuropeptide substance P.

  3. Signaling When (and When Not) to Be Cautious and Self-Protective: Impulsive and Reflective Trust in Close Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Sandra L.; Pinkus, Rebecca T.; Holmes, John G.; Harris, Brianna; Gomillion, Sarah; Aloni, Maya; Derrick, Jaye L.; Leder, Sadie

    2011-01-01

    A dual process model is proposed to explain how automatic evaluative associations to the partner (i.e., impulsive trust) and deliberative expectations of partner caring (i.e., reflective trust) interact to govern self-protection in romantic relationships. Experimental and correlational studies of dating and marital relationships supported the model. Subliminally conditioning more positive evaluative associations to the partner increased confidence in the partner’s caring, suggesting that trust has an impulsive basis. Being high on impulsive trust (i.e., more positive evaluative associations to the partner on the IAT) also reduced the automatic inclination to distance in response to doubts about the partner’s trustworthiness. It similarly reduced self-protective behavioral reactions to these reflective trust concerns. The studies further revealed that the effects of impulsive trust depend on working memory capacity: Being high on impulsive trust inoculated against reflective trust concerns for people low on working memory capacity. PMID:21443370

  4. Tartary buckwheat flavonoids protect hepatic cells against high glucose-induced oxidative stress and insulin resistance via MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Hou, Zuoxu; Liu, Dongyang; Yang, Xingbin

    2016-03-01

    Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in chronic complication of diabetes. In this study, the protective effect of purified tartary buckwheat flavonoids (TBF) fraction against oxidative stress induced by a high-glucose challenge, which causes insulin resistance, was investigated on hepatic HepG2 cells. Oxidative status, phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), nuclear factor E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) and p-(Ser307)-IRS-1 expression, and glucose uptake were evaluated. Results suggest that treatment of HepG2 cells with TBF alone improved glucose uptake and antioxidant enzymes, and activated Nrf2, and attenuated the IRS-1 Ser307 phosphorylation, and enhanced total levels of IRS-1. Furthermore, the high glucose-induced changes in antioxidant defences, Nrf2, p-MAPKs, p-IRS1 Ser307, and IRS-1 levels, and glucose uptake were also significantly inhibited by pre-treatment with TBF. Interestingly, the selective MAPK inhibitors significantly enhanced the TBF-mediated protection by inducing changes in the redox status, glucose uptake, p-(Ser307) and total IRS-1 levels. This report firstly showed that TBF could recover the redox status of insulin-resistant HepG2 cells, suggesting that TBF significantly protected the cells against high glucose-induced oxidative stress, and these beneficial effects of TBF on redox balance and insulin resistance were mediated by targeting MAPKs.

  5. Sestrin2 integrates Akt and mTOR signaling to protect cells against energetic stress-induced death

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Sahra, I; Dirat, B; Laurent, K; Puissant, A; Auberger, P; Budanov, A; Tanti, J-F; Bost, F

    2013-01-01

    The phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) pathway has a central role in cancer cell metabolism and proliferation. More importantly, it is one of the cardinal pro-survival pathways mediating resistance to apoptosis. The role of Akt in response to an energetic stress is presently unclear. Here, we show that Sestrin2 (Sesn2), also known as Hi95, a p53 target gene that protects cells against oxidative and genotoxic stresses, participates in the protective role of Akt in response to an energetic stress induced by 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). Sesn2 is upregulated in response to an energetic stress such as 2-DG and metformin, and mediates the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), the major cellular regulator of energy metabolism. The increase of Sesn2 is independent of p53 but requires the anti-apoptotic pathway, PI3K/Akt. Inhibition of Akt, as well as loss of Sesn2, sensitizes cells to 2-DG-induced apoptosis. In addition, the rescue of Sesn2 partially reverses the pro-apoptotic effects of 2-DG. In conclusion, we identify Sesn2 as a new energetic stress sensor, which appears to be protective against energetic stress-induced apoptosis that integrates the pro-survival function of Akt and the negative regulation of mTOR. PMID:23238567

  6. The Microbiota Protects against Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Intestinal Injury through Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain-Containing Protein 2 (NOD2) Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Chanona, Ernesto; Mühlbauer, Marcus; Jobin, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2), an intracellular pattern recognition receptor, induces autophagy on detection of muramyl dipeptide (MDP), a component of microbial cell walls. The role of bacteria and NOD2 signaling toward ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)–induced intestinal injury response is unknown. Herein, we report that I/R-induced intestinal injury in germ-free (GF) C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice is worse than in conventionally derived mice. More important, microbiota-mediated protection against I/R-induced intestinal injury is abrogated in conventionally derived Nod2−/− mice and GF Nod2−/− mice. Also, WT mice raised in specific pathogen-free (SPF) conditions fared better against I/R-induced injury than SPF Nod2−/− mice. Moreover, SPF WT mice i.p. administered 10 mg/kg MDP were protected against injury compared with mice administered the inactive enantiomer, l-MDP, an effect lost in Nod2−/− mice. However, MDP administration failed to protect GF mice from I/R-induced intestinal injury compared with control, a phenomenon correlating with undetectable Nod2 mRNA level in the epithelium of GF mice. More important, the autophagy-inducer rapamycin protected Nod2−/− mice against I/R-induced injury and increased the levels of LC3+ puncta in injured tissue of Nod2−/− mice. These findings demonstrate that NOD2 protects against I/R and promotes wound healing, likely through the induction of the autophagy response. PMID:25204845

  7. Activation of Estrogen Response Element-Independent ERα Signaling Protects Female Mice From Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Yasrebi, Ali; Rivera, Janelle A; Krumm, Elizabeth A; Yang, Jennifer A; Roepke, Troy A

    2017-02-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) regulates central and peripheral mechanisms that control energy and glucose homeostasis predominantly through estrogen receptor α (ERα) acting via receptor binding to estrogen response elements (EREs). ERα signaling is also involved in mediating the effects of E2 on diet-induced obesity (DIO), although the roles of ERE-dependent and -independent ERα signaling in reducing the effects of DIO remain largely unknown. We hypothesize that ERE-dependent ERα signaling is necessary to ameliorate the effects of DIO. We addressed this question using ERα knockout (KO) and ERα knockin/knockout (KIKO) female mice, the latter expressing an ERα that lacks a functional ERE binding domain. Female mice were ovariectomized, fed a low-fat diet (LFD) or a high-fat diet (HFD), and orally dosed with vehicle or estradiol benzoate (EB) (300 μg/kg). After 9 weeks, body composition, glucose and insulin tolerance, peptide hormone and inflammatory cytokine levels, and hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and liver gene expression were assessed. EB reduced body weight and body fat in wild-type (WT) female mice, regardless of diet, and in HFD-fed KIKO female mice, in part by reducing energy intake and feeding efficiency. EB reduced fasting glucose levels in KIKO mice fed both diets but augmented glucose tolerance only in HFD-fed KIKO female mice. Plasma insulin and interleukin 6 were elevated in KIKO and KO female mice compared with LFD-fed WT female mice. Expression of arcuate neuropeptide and receptor genes and liver fatty acid biosynthesis genes was altered by HFD and by EB through ERE-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Therefore, ERE-independent signaling mechanisms in both the brain and peripheral organs mediate, in part, the effects of E2 during DIO. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society.

  8. Endothelin-1 protects human melanocytes from UV-induced DNA damage by activating JNK and p38 signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    von Koschembahr, Anne M; Swope, Viki B; Starner, Renny J; Abdel-Malek, Zalfa A

    2015-04-01

    Endothelin-1 is a paracrine factor with mitogenic, melanogenic and survival effects on cultured human melanocytes. We report that endothelin-1 signalling reduced the generation and enhanced the repair of ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced DNA photoproducts, and inhibited apoptosis of human melanocytes, without increasing cAMP levels, melanin content or proliferation. Treatment with endothelin-1 activated the MAP kinases JNK and p38, as evidenced by phosphorylation of their target, activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2). Endothelin-1 also enhanced the phosphorylation of JNK, p38 and ATF-2 by UV. The effects of endothelin-1 were dependent on increasing intracellular calcium mobilization by endothelin B receptor signalling. Activation of both JNK and p38 was required for reducing DNA photoproducts, but only JNK partially contributed to the survival effect of endothelin-1. ATF-2 activation depended mainly on JNK, yet was not sufficient for the effect of endothelin-1 on UV-induced DNA damage, suggesting the requirement for other JNK and p38 targets for this effect. Our results underscore the significance of endothelin-1 and endothelin B receptor signalling in reducing the genotoxic effects of UV via activating JNK and p38, hence restoring genomic stability of melanocytes.

  9. Vanillin Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Inflammation-Mediated Cell Death by Inhibiting ERK1/2, P38 and the NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xuan; Liu, Dian-Feng; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Dong; Xu, Shi-Yao; Chen, Guang-Xin; Huang, Bing-Xu; Ren, Wen-Zhi; Wang, Wei; Fu, Shou-Peng; Liu, Ju-Xiong

    2017-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a very important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). After activation, microglia produce pro-inflammatory mediators that damage surrounding neurons. Consequently, the inhibition of microglial activation might represent a new therapeutic approach of PD. Vanillin has been shown to protect dopaminergic neurons, but the mechanism is still unclear. Herein, we further study the underlying mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PD models. In vivo, we firstly established rat models of PD by unilateral injection of LPS into substantia nigra (SN), and then examined the role of vanillin in motor dysfunction, microglial activation and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. In vitro, murine microglial BV-2 cells were treated with vanillin prior to the incubation of LPS, and then the inflammatory responses and the related signaling pathways were analyzed. The in vivo results showed that vanillin markedly improved the motor dysfunction, suppressed degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and inhibited microglial over-activation induced by LPS intranigral injection. The in vitro studies demonstrated that vanillin reduces LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), IL-1β, and IL-6 through regulating ERK1/2, p38 and NF-κB signaling. Collectively, these data indicated that vanillin has a role in protecting dopaminergic neurons via inhibiting inflammatory activation. PMID:28208679

  10. Vanillin Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Inflammation-Mediated Cell Death by Inhibiting ERK1/2, P38 and the NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuan; Liu, Dian-Feng; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Dong; Xu, Shi-Yao; Chen, Guang-Xin; Huang, Bing-Xu; Ren, Wen-Zhi; Wang, Wei; Fu, Shou-Peng; Liu, Ju-Xiong

    2017-02-12

    Neuroinflammation plays a very important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). After activation, microglia produce pro-inflammatory mediators that damage surrounding neurons. Consequently, the inhibition of microglial activation might represent a new therapeutic approach of PD. Vanillin has been shown to protect dopaminergic neurons, but the mechanism is still unclear. Herein, we further study the underlying mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PD models. In vivo, we firstly established rat models of PD by unilateral injection of LPS into substantia nigra (SN), and then examined the role of vanillin in motor dysfunction, microglial activation and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. In vitro, murine microglial BV-2 cells were treated with vanillin prior to the incubation of LPS, and then the inflammatory responses and the related signaling pathways were analyzed. The in vivo results showed that vanillin markedly improved the motor dysfunction, suppressed degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and inhibited microglial over-activation induced by LPS intranigral injection. The in vitro studies demonstrated that vanillin reduces LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), IL-1β, and IL-6 through regulating ERK1/2, p38 and NF-κB signaling. Collectively, these data indicated that vanillin has a role in protecting dopaminergic neurons via inhibiting inflammatory activation.

  11. Squamosamide derivative FLZ protected dopaminergic neuron by activating Akt signaling pathway in 6-OHDA-induced in vivo and in vitro Parkinson's disease models.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiu-Qi; Kong, Xiang-Chen; Kong, Li-Bing; Wu, Liang-Yu; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Dan

    2014-02-14

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease affecting up to 80% of dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway. FLZ, a novel synthetic squamosamide derivative from a Chinese herb, has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in experimental PD models. In this study, we carried out a set of in vitro and in vivo experiments to address the neuroprotective effect of FLZ and related mechanism. The results showed that FLZ significantly improved motor dysfunction and dopaminergic neuronal loss of rats injured by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The beneficial effects of FLZ attributed to the elevation of dopaminergic neuron number, dopamine level and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity. Mechanistic study showed that FLZ protected TH activity and dopaminergic neurons through decreasing α-synuclein (α-Syn) expression and the interaction between α-Syn and TH. Further studies indicated the involvement of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway in the protective effect of FLZ since it showed that blocking PI3K/Akt signaling pathway prevented the expression of α-Syn and attenuated the neuroprotection of FLZ. In addition, FLZ treatment reduced the expression of RTP801, an important protein involved in the pathogenesis of PD. Taken together, these results revealed that FLZ suppressed α-Syn expression and elevated TH activity in dopaminergic neuron through activating Akt survival pathway in 6-OHDA-induced PD models. The data also provided evidence that FLZ had potent neuroprotecive effects and might become a new promising agent for PD treatment.

  12. Protective Effect of Amygdalin on LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Inhibiting NF-κB and NLRP3 Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ao; Pan, Weiyun; Lv, Juan; Wu, Hui

    2017-03-16

    The acute lung injury (ALI) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Amygdalin is derived from the bitter apricot kernel, an efficacious Chinese herbal medicine. Although amygdalin is used by many cancer patients as an antitumor agent, there is no report about the effect of amygdalin on acute lung injury. Here we explored the protective effect of amygdalin on ALI using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced murine model by detecting the lung wet/dry ratio, the myeloperoxidase (MPO) in lung tissues, inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), inflammatory cytokines production, as well as NLRP3 and NF-κB signaling pathways. The results showed that amygdalin significantly reduced LPS-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells and the production of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in the BALF. The activity of MPO and lung wet/dry ratio were also attenuated by amygdalin. Furthermore, the western blotting analysis showed that amygdalin remarkably inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB and NLRP3 activation. These findings indicate that amygdalin has a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice. The mechanism may be related to the inhibition of NF-κB and NLRP3 signaling pathways.

  13. Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells Promote Endothelial Cell Morphogenesis and Protect Endothelial Cells against Ischemia via HIF-1α-regulated VEGF Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roitbak, Tamara; Li, Lu; Cunningham, Lee Anna

    2010-01-01

    Vascular cells provide a neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) niche that regulates expansion and differentiation of NSPCs within germinal zones of embryonic and adult brain under both physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we examined NSPC-endothelial cell (NSPC-EC) interaction under conditions of ischemia, both in vitro and following intracerebral transplantation. In culture, embryonic mouse NSPCs supported capillary morphogenesis and protected ECs from cell death induced by serum-starvation or by transient oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). NSPCs constitutively expressed hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) transcription factor and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), both of which were increased approximately 2-fold following exposure of NSPCs to OGD. The protective effects of NSPCs on endothelial cells under conditions of serum starvation and hypoxia were blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of VEGF signaling, SU 1498 and Flt1-Fc. Following intracerebral transplantation, NSPCs continued to express HIF-1α and VEGF, and promoted microvascular density following focal ischemia. HIF-1α was constitutively expressed by NSPCs in both the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of adult brain. These studies support a role for NSPCs in stabilization of vasculature during ischemia, mediated via HIF-1α-VEGF signaling pathways, and suggest therapeutic application of NSPCs to promote revascularization and repair following brain injury. PMID:18478024

  14. All‐trans retinoic acid protects against doxorubicin‐induced cardiotoxicity by activating the ERK2 signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liang; Luo, Cheng; Chen, Cong; Wang, Xun; Shi, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Doxorubicin is a powerful antineoplastic agent for treating a wide range of cancers. However, doxorubicin cardiotoxicity of the heart has largely limited its clinical use. All‐trans retinoic acid (ATRA) plays an important role in many cardiac biological processes, but its protective effects on doxorubicin‐induced cardiotoxicity remain unknown. Here, we studied the effect of ATRA on doxorubicin cardiotoxicity and the underlying mechanisms. Experimental Approaches Cellular viability assays, Western blotting and mitochondrial respiration analyses were employed to evaluate the cellular response to ATRA in H9c2 cells and primary cardiomyocytes. Quantitative PCR and gene knockdown were performed to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms of ATRA's effects on doxorubicin cardiotoxicity. Key Results ATRA significantly inhibited doxorubicin‐induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells and primary cardiomyocytes. ATRA was more effective against doxorubicin cardiotoxicity than resveratrol and dexrazoxane. ATRA also suppressed reactive oxygen species generation and restored expression levels of mRNA and proteins in the phase II detoxifying enzyme system: nuclear factor‐E2‐related factor 2, manganese superoxide dismutase, haem oxygenase‐1, and mitochondrial function (mitochondrial membrane integrity, mitochondrial DNA copy numbers and mitochondrial respiration capacity, biogenesis and dynamics). Both a ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) and ERK2 siRNA, but not ERK1 siRNA, abolished the protective effect of ATRA against doxorubicin‐induced toxicity in H9c2 cells. Remarkably, ATRA did not compromise the anticancer efficacy of doxorubicin in gastric carcinoma cells. Conclusions and Implications ATRA protected cardiomyocytes against doxorubicin‐induced toxicity, by activating the ERK2 pathway, without compromising its anticancer efficacy. Therefore, ATRA is a promising candidate as a cardioprotective agent against doxorubicin cardiotoxicity. PMID:26507774

  15. 17β-ESTRADIOL MEDIATED PROTECTION AGAINST VASCULAR LEAK FOLLOWING HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK: ROLE OF ESTROGEN RECEPTORS AND APOPTOTIC SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Ed W.; Tharakan, Binu; Hunter, Felicia A.; Smythe, W. Roy

    2010-01-01

    Vascular hyperpermeability is a clinical complication associated with hemorrhagic shock (HS) and occurs mainly due to the disruption of the adherens junctional complex. The objective of this study was to understand the role of 17β-estradiol in HS-induced hyperpermeability particularly focusing on estrogen receptors. In male Sprague-Dawley rats, HS was induced by withdrawing blood to reduce the mean arterial pressure (MAP) to 40 mmHg for 1 hour followed by 1 hour of resuscitation. to 90 mmHg. The study groups were; 17β-estradiol, tamoxifen, fulvestrant plus 17β-estradiol, propyl pyrazole triol plus 17β-estradiol, and diarylpropionitrite plus 17β-estradiol. Intravital microscopy was utilized to study changes in mesenteric post-capillary venules. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species formation was studied in vivo utilizing dihydrorhodamine 123. The mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) was studied using the fluorescent cationic probe JC- 1. The mesenteric microvasculature was analyzed for cytochrome c levels by ELISA and caspase-3 activity by a fluorometric assay. Our results demonstrated that 17β-estradiol attenuated HS-induced hyperpermeability. Fulvestrant reversed this protective effect (p<0.05). Tamoxifen 5 mg/kg attenuated HS-induced hyperpermeability where as 10 mg/kg induced permeability (p<0.05). Both α and β estrogen receptor agonists inhibited HS-induced hyperpermeability (p<0.05). 17β-Estradiol decreased HS-induced ROS formation and restored MTP. 17β-Estradiol decreased both cytosolic cytochrome c level and activation of caspase-3 (p<0.05). These findings suggest that 17β-estradiol protects the microvasculature following HS and that this protection may be mediated through the α and β estrogen receptors. PMID:20160663

  16. Protective effect of bioflavonoid myricetin enhances carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and insulin signaling molecules in streptozotocin–cadmium induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of myricetin by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin signaling molecules and renal function markers in streptozotocin (STZ)–cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. After myricetin treatment schedule, blood and tissue samples were collected to determine plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin and renal function markers, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver and insulin signaling molecules in the pancreas and skeletal muscle. A significant increase of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin, glycogen phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and a significant decrease of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen and glycogen synthase with insulin signaling molecule expression were found in the STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. The administration of myricetin significantly normalizes the carbohydrate metabolic products like glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glycogen phosphorylase and gluconeogenic enzymes and renal function markers with increase insulin, glycogen, glycogen synthase and insulin signaling molecule expression like glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor-2 (IRS-2) and protein kinase B (PKB). Based on the data, the protective effect of myricetin was confirmed by its histological annotation of the pancreas, liver and kidney tissues. These findings suggest that myricetin improved carbohydrate metabolism which subsequently enhances glucose utilization and renal function in STZ–Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. - Highlights: • Diabetic rats are more susceptible to cadmium nephrotoxicity. • Cadmium plays as a cumulative

  17. Asiatic acid enhances Nrf2 signaling to protect HepG2 cells from oxidative damage through Akt and ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhimin; Ci, Xinxin; Huang, Jingbo; Liu, Qinmei; Yu, Qinlei; Zhou, Junfeng; Deng, Xuming

    2017-04-01

    Asiatic acid (AA), a natural triterpene isolated from the plant Centella asiatica, have antioxidative potential, but the molecular mechanism of AA against oxidative stress remains unclear. Our study was performed to investigate the antioxidative effect of AA against oxidative stress and the antioxidative mechanism in tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) -stimulated the HepG2 cells. The results showed that AA suppressed t-BHP-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Additionally, AA activated the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signal, which was closely related to induction Nrf2 nuclear translocation, reduction the expression of Keap1 and up-regulation the activity of the antioxidant response element (ARE). Meanwhile, activation of Nrf2 signal upregulated the protein expressions of antioxidant genes, including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H: quinone oxidase (NQO-1), and glutamyl cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC). Excitingly, Knockout of Nrf2 almost abolished AA-mediated antioxidant activity and cytoprotection against t-BHP. Further studies showed the mechanism underlying that AA induced Nrf2 activation in HepG2 cells via Akt and ERK signal activation. We found Akt and ERK inhibitors treatment attenuated AA-mediated Nrf2 nuclear translocation. Furthermore, treatment with either Akt or ERK inhibitor also decreased AA-mediated cytoprotection against t-BHP-induced cellular damage. Collectively, these results presented in this study indicate that AA has the protective effect against t-BHP-induced cellular damage and oxidative stress by modulating Nrf2 signaling through activating the signals of Akt and ERK.

  18. Delta-Tocotrienol Protects Mouse and Human Hematopoietic Progenitors from Gamma-Irradiation Through Erk/mTOR Signaling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    rice bran oil protected mice from a lethal dose of total body "-irradiation and resulted in 100% 30-day survival compared with 18% survival in vehicle...phosphorylation of its downstream effector 4EBP-1. These alterations were associated with activation of mRNA translation regulator eIF4E and ribosomal protein S6...activation of mRNA translation regulator eIF4E and ribosomal protein S6, which is responsible for cell survival and growth. Inhibition of Erk1/2

  19. Orexin-A Protects Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells Against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Neurotoxicity: Involvement of PKC and PI3K Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Pasban-Aliabadi, Hamzeh; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Abbasnejad, Mehdi

    2017-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by progressive and selective death of dopaminergic neurons. Multifunctional neuropeptide orexin-A is involved in many biological events of the body. It has been shown that orexin-A has protective effects in neurodegenerative disease such as PD. However, its cellular mechanisms have not yet been fully clarified. Here, we investigated the intracellular signaling pathway of orexin-A neuroprotection in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced SH-SY5H cells damage as an in vitro model of PD. The cells were incubated with 150 μM 6-OHDA, and the viability was examined by 3-[4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl]-2,5-diphenyl-2-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular calcium were measured by fluorescent probes. Western blotting was also used to determine cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2), nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2), and HSP70 protein levels. The data showed that 6-OHDA has decreasing effects on cell viability, Nrf2, and HSP70 protein expression and increases the level of mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular calcium, and COX-2 protein. Orexin-A (500 pM) significantly attenuated the 6-OHDA-induced cell damage. Furthermore, Orexin-A significantly prevented the mentioned effects of 6-OHDA on SH-SY5Y cells. Orexin 1 receptor antagonist (SB3344867), PKC, and PI3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors (chelerythrin and LY294002, respectively) could suppress the orexin-A neuroprotective effect. In contrast, blockage of PKA by a selective inhibitor (KT5720) had no effects on the orexin protection. The results suggest that orexin-A protective effects against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity are performed via its receptors, PKC and PI3K signaling pathways.

  20. Protection of Nrf2 against arsenite-induced oxidative damage is regulated by the cyclic guanosine monophosphate-protein kinase G signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chengzhi; Jiang, Xuejun; Gu, Shiyan; Lai, Yanhao; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Zunzhen

    2016-10-24

    Arsenite has been shown to induce a variety of oxidative damage in mammalian cells. However, the mechanisms underlying cellular responses to its adverse effects remain unknown. We previously showed that the level of Nrf2, a nuclear transcription factor significantly increased in arsenite-treated human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells suggesting that Nrf2 is involved in responding to arsenite-induced oxidative damage. To explore how Nrf2 can impact arsenite-induced oxidative damage, in this study, we examined Nrf2 activation and its regulation upon cellular arsenite exposure as well as its effects on arsenite-induced oxidative damage in HBE cells. We found that Nrf2 mRNA and protein levels were significantly increased by arsenite in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, we showed that over-expression of Nrf2 significantly reduced the level of arsenite-induced oxidative damage in HBE cells including DNA damage, chromosomal breakage, lipid peroxidation and depletion of antioxidants. This indicates a protective role of Nrf2 against arsenite toxicity. This was further supported by the fact that activation of Nrf2 by its agonists, tertiary butylhydroquinone (t-BHQ) and sulforaphane (SFN) resulted in the same protective effects against arsenite toxicity. Moreover, we demonstrated that arsenite-induced activation of Nrf2 was mediated by the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-protein kinase G (PKG) signaling pathway. This is the first evidence showing that Nrf2 protects against arsenite-induced oxidative damage through the cGMP-PKG pathway. Our study suggests that activation of Nrf2 through the cGMP-PKG signaling pathway in HBE cells may be developed as a new strategy for prevention of arsenite toxicity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2016.

  1. Metformin protects the brain against ischemia/reperfusion injury through PI3K/Akt1/JNK3 signaling pathways in rats.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xu-Hua; Zhu, Guo-Ji; Geng, De-Qin; Zhang, Han-Zhi; He, Juan-Mei; Guo, Ai-Zhen; Ma, Lin-Lin; Yu, De-Hua

    2017-03-01

    Although Metformin, a first-line antidiabetic drug, can ameliorate ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) induced brain damage, but how metformin benefits injured hippocampus and the mechanisms are still largely unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective mechanisms of metformin against ischemic brain damage induced by cerebral I/R and to explore whether the Akt-mediated down-regulation of the phosphorylation of JNK3 signaling pathway contributed to the protection provided by metformin. Transient global brain ischemia was induced by 4-vessel occlusion in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The open field tasks and Morris water maze were used to assess the effect of metformin on anxiety-like behavioral and cognitive impairment after I/R. Cresyl Violet staining was used to examine the survival of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Immunoblotting was performed to measure the phosphorylation of Akt1, JNK3, c-Jun and the expression of cleaved caspase-3. Through ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) rat model, we found that metformin could attenuate the deficits of hippocampal related behaviors and inhibit cell apoptosis. The western blot data showed that metformin could promote the activation of Akt1 and reduce the phosphorylation of JNK3 and c-Jun as well as elevation of cleaved caspase-3 in I/R brains. PI3K inhibitor reversed all the protective effects, further indicating that metformin protect hippocampus from ischemic damage through PI3K/Akt1/JNK3/c-Jun signaling pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 5-Aminolevulinic acid with sodium ferrous citrate induces autophagy and protects cardiomyocytes from hypoxia-induced cellular injury through MAPK-Nrf-2-HO-1 signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingyi; Zhu, Ping; Fujino, Masayuki; Nishio, Yoshiaki; Chen, Jimei; Ito, Hidenori; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru; Zhao, Lingling; Zhuang, Jian; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2016-10-28

    Hypoxia causes cardiac disease via oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. 5-Aminolevulinic acid in combination with sodium ferrous citrate (ALA/SFC) has been shown to up-regulate heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and decrease macrophage infiltration and renal cell apoptosis in renal ischemia injury mice. However, its underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ALA/SFC could protect cardiomyocytes from hypoxia-induced apoptosis by autophagy via HO-1 signaling. Murine atrial cardiomyocyte HL-1 cells were pretreated with ALA/SFC and then exposed to hypoxia. ALA/SFC pretreatment significantly attenuated hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, reactive oxygen species production, and mitochondrial injury, while it increased cell viability and autophagy levels. HO-1 expression by ALA/SFC was associated with up-regulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf-2, whereas Nrf-2 siRNA dramatically reduced HO-1 expression. ERK1/2, p38, and SAPK/JNK pathways were activated by ALA/SFC and their specific inhibitors significantly reduced ALA/SFC-mediated HO-1 upregulation. Silencing of either Nrf-2 or HO-1and LY294002, inhibitor of autophagy, abolished the protective ability of ALA/AFC against hypoxia-induced injury and reduced ALA/SFC-induced autophagy. Taken together, our data suggest that ALA/SFC induces autophagy via activation of MAPK/Nrf-2/HO-1 signaling pathway to protect cardiomyocytes from hypoxia-induced apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Protection afforded by quercetin against H2O2-induced apoptosis on PC12 cells via activating PI3K/Akt signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Sun, Lejin; Liu, Zhene; Wang, Hongxia; Xu, Cunli

    2016-01-01

    Cell damage and apoptosis induced by oxidative stress have been involved in various neurodegenerative diseases. This study aims to explore the neuro-protective effects of quercetin on PC12 cells apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and the underlying mechanisms. The cell viability was detected, as well as the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, and the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) of the cells in control, H(2)O(2) and quercetin groups. It finally turned out that quercetin might protect PC12 cells against the negative effect of H(2)O(2) by decreasing of LDH release, ROS concentration and MDA level and regaining the GSH-Px and SOD activities. To investigate the mechanism, LY294002 was introduced, the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and Akt phosphorylation (p-Akt) were examined by Western blot analysis. The data showed that LY294002 almost had the same effects with H(2)O(2), which was also significantly reversed by quercetin could enhance Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and adjust the p-Akt expression, which indicated quercetin might protect PC12 cells against the negative effect of H(2)O(2) via activating the PI3K/Akt signal pathway.

  4. Galactose protects hepatocytes against TNF-α-induced apoptosis by promoting activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway in acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanmin; Zhu, Liuluan; Liang, Shuntao; Yao, Shanshan; Li, Rui; Liu, Sanhai; Ma, Yaluan; Zhou, Xiaobing; Zhang, Jinliang; Zeng, Hui; Wang, Xianbo

    2015-05-01

    Saccharides are reported to protect hepatocytes from acute liver injury through distinct mechanisms. To date, the protective role of galactose against acute liver injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and D-galactosamine (D-GalN) has been attributed to competition with D-GalN. Here, we showed that in addition to its effects on LPS/D-GalN and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)/D-GalN models, galactose improves hepatic injury in mice challenged with LPS alone or TNF-α/actinomycin D. Consistent with this result, galactose enhanced the viability of TNF-α-stimulated Chang Liver and Hu7.5 hepatic cell lines. Specifically, galactose prevented TNF-α-induced apoptosis of hepatocytes through promoting phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65. Additionally, galactose enhanced expression of the anti-apoptotic genes, c-IAP1 and A20, and inhibited cleavage of caspase-8 and caspase-3. These findings collectively suggest that galactose prevents TNF-α-induced liver injury through activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Considering that monosaccharides protect against liver injury via distinct mechanisms, these compounds may represent a promising clinical approach to treat acute liver failure.

  5. Mechanism of protection of bystander cells by exogenous carbon monoxide: impaired response to damage signal of radiation-induced bystander effect.

    PubMed

    Han, W; Yu, K N; Wu, L J; Wu, Y C; Wang, H Z

    2011-05-10

    A protective effect of exogenous carbon monoxide (CO), generated by CO releasing molecule ticarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer (CORM-2), on the bystander cells from the toxicity of radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) was revealed in our previous study. In the present work, a possible mechanism of this CO effect was investigated. The results from medium transfer experiments showed that α-particle irradiated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells would release nitric oxide (NO), which was detected with specific NO fluorescence probe, to induce p53 binding protein 1 (BP1) formation in the cell population receiving the medium, and the release peak was found to be at 1h post irradiation. Treating the irradiated or bystander cells separately with CO (CORM-2) demonstrated that CO was effective in the bystander cells but not the irradiated cells. Measurements of NO production and release with a specific NO fluorescence probe also showed that CO treatment did not affect the production and release of NO by irradiated cells. Protection of CO on cells to peroxynitrite, an oxidizing free radical from NO, suggested that CO might protect bystander cells via impaired response of bystander cells to NO, a RIBE signal in our research system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. RhoA signaling in cardiomyocytes protects against stress-induced heart failure but facilitates cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lauriol, Jessica; Keith, Kimberly; Jaffré, Fabrice; Couvillon, Anthony; Saci, Abdel; Goonasekera, Sanjeewa A; McCarthy, Jason R; Kessinger, Chase W; Wang, Jianxun; Ke, Qingen; Kang, Peter M; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Carpenter, Christopher; Kontaridis, Maria I

    2014-10-21

    The Ras-related guanosine triphosphatase RhoA mediates pathological cardiac hypertrophy, but also promotes cell survival and is cardioprotective after ischemia/reperfusion injury. To understand how RhoA mediates these opposing roles in the myocardium, we generated mice with a cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of RhoA. Under normal conditions, the hearts from these mice showed functional, structural, and growth parameters similar to control mice. Additionally, the hearts of the cardiomyocyte-specific, RhoA-deficient mice subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC)-a procedure that induces pressure overload and, if prolonged, heart failure-exhibited a similar amount of hypertrophy as those of the wild-type mice subjected to TAC. Thus, neither normal cardiac homeostasis nor the initiation of compensatory hypertrophy required RhoA in cardiomyocytes. However, in response to chronic TAC, hearts from mice with cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of RhoA showed greater dilation, with thinner ventricular walls and larger chamber dimensions, and more impaired contractile function than those from control mice subjected to chronic TAC. These effects were associated with aberrant calcium signaling, as well as decreased activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and AKT. In addition, hearts from mice with cardiomyocyte-specific RhoA deficiency also showed less fibrosis in response to chronic TAC, with decreased transcriptional activation of genes involved in fibrosis, including myocardin response transcription factor (MRTF) and serum response factor (SRF), suggesting that the fibrotic response to stress in the heart depends on cardiomyocyte-specific RhoA signaling. Our data indicated that RhoA regulates multiple pathways in cardiomyocytes, mediating both cardioprotective (hypertrophy without dilation) and cardio-deleterious effects (fibrosis).

  7. Resveratrol protects against spinal cord injury by activating autophagy and inhibiting apoptosis mediated by the SIRT1/AMPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haosen; Chen, Shurui; Gao, Kai; Zhou, Zipeng; Wang, Chen; Shen, Zhaoliang; Guo, Yue; Li, Zhuo; Wan, Zhanghui; Liu, Chang; Mei, Xifan

    2017-04-21

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition with few effective treatments. Resveratrol, a polyphenolic compound, has exhibited neuroprotective effects in many neurodegenerative diseases. However, the explicit effect and mechanism of resveratrol on SCI is still unclear. Adenosine 5' monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), the downstream protein, play key roles in metabolizing of energy, resisting of resistance, and cellular protein homeostasis. In this study, we determined the effects of resveratrol on SCI and their potential relationship with SIRT1/AMPK signaling pathway, autophagy and apoptosis. To determine the effect of resveratrol on SCI recovery, a spinal cord contusion model was employed. Rats received treatment with resveratrol or DMSO immediately following contusion. We determined that Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scores were significantly higher for injured rats treated with resveratrol. Nissl and HE staining revealed that resveratrol treatment significantly reduced the loss of motor neurons and lesion size in the spinal cord of injured rats when compared to vehicle-treated animals. Spinal cord tissue was assessed by Western blot, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical analyses 7days after injury for changes in expression of SIRT1/AMPK signaling pathway, autophagy and apoptosis proteins. Expression of SIRT1, p-AMPK, Beclin-1, LC3-B, and Bcl-2 was elevated in resveratrol-treated animals, whereas expression of p62, Cleaved Caspase-3, Caspase-9, and Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax) was inhibited. Immunofluorescence analysis of primary neurons treated with resveratrol alone or in combination with Compound C (AMPK inhibitor) or EX527 (SIRT1 inhibitor) revealed that treatment with the inhibitors blocks the increased LC3-B expression in cells and increases the portion of TUNEL-positive cells. Taken together, these results suggest that resveratrol exerts neuroprotective effects

  8. p47phox-Nox2-dependent ROS Signaling Inhibits Early Bone Development in Mice but Protects against Skeletal Aging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Ran; Lazarenko, Oxana P; Blackburn, Michael L; Mercer, Kelly E; Badger, Thomas M; Ronis, Martin J J

    2015-06-05

    Bone remodeling is age-dependently regulated and changes dramatically during the course of development. Progressive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been suspected to be the leading cause of many inflammatory and degenerative diseases, as well as an important factor underlying many effects of aging. In contrast, how reduced ROS signaling regulates inflammation and remodeling in bone remains unknown. Here, we utilized a p47(phox) knock-out mouse model, in which an essential cytosolic co-activator of Nox2 is lost, to characterize bone metabolism at 6 weeks and 2 years of age. Compared with their age-matched wild type controls, loss of Nox2 function in p47(phox-/-) mice resulted in age-related switch of bone mass and strength. Differences in bone mass were associated with increased bone formation in 6-week-old p47(phox-/-) mice but decreased in 2-year-old p47(phox-/-) mice. Despite decreases in ROS generation in bone marrow cells and p47(phox)-Nox2 signaling in osteoblastic cells, 2-year-old p47(phox-/-) mice showed increased senescence-associated secretory phenotype in bone compared with their wild type controls. These in vivo findings were mechanistically recapitulated in ex vivo cell culture of primary fetal calvarial cells from p47(phox-/-) mice. These cells showed accelerated cell senescence pathway accompanied by increased inflammation. These data indicate that the observed age-related switch of bone mass in p47(phox)-deficient mice occurs through an increased inflammatory milieu in bone and that p47(phox)-Nox2-dependent physiological ROS signaling suppresses inflammation in aging.

  9. Curcumin protects ANIT-induced cholestasis through signaling pathway of FXR-regulated bile acid and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Tang, Xiaowen; Ding, Lili; zhou, Yue; Yang, Qiaoling; Gong, Junting; Wang, Guangyun; Wang, Zhengtao; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Cholestasis is a clinically significant symptom and widely associated with liver diseases, however, there are very few effective therapies for cholestasis. Danning tablet (DNT, a Chinese patent medicine preparation) has been clinically used to treat human liver and gallbladder diseases for more than 20 years in China. However, which ingredients of DNT contributed to this beneficial effect and their mechanistic underpinnings have been largely unknown. In the present study, we discovered that DNT not only demonstrated greater benefits for cholecystitis patients after cholecystectomy surgery in clinic but also showed protective effect against alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT)-induced cholestasis model in rodent. Curcumin, one major compound derived from DNT, exerted the protective effect against cholestasis through farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which has been focused as potential therapeutic targets for treating cholestasis. The underlying mechanism of curcumin against cholestasis was restoring bile acid homeostasis and antagonizing inflammatory responses in a FXR-dependent manner and in turn contributed to overall cholestasis attenuation. Collectively, curcumin can be served as a potential treatment option for liver injury with cholestasis. PMID:27624003

  10. Signaling when (and when not) to be cautious and self-protective: impulsive and reflective trust in close relationships.

    PubMed

    Murray, Sandra L; Pinkus, Rebecca T; Holmes, John G; Harris, Brianna; Gomillion, Sarah; Aloni, Maya; Derrick, Jaye L; Leder, Sadie

    2011-09-01

    A dual process model is proposed to explain how automatic evaluative associations to the partner (i.e., impulsive trust) and deliberative expectations of partner caring (i.e., reflective trust) interact to govern self-protection in romantic relationships. Experimental and correlational studies of dating and marital relationships supported the model. Subliminally conditioning more positive evaluative associations to the partner increased confidence in the partner's caring, suggesting that trust has an impulsive basis. Being high on impulsive trust (i.e., more positive evaluative associations to the partner on the Implicit Association Test; Zayas & Shoda, 2005) also reduced the automatic inclination to distance in response to doubts about the partner's trustworthiness. It similarly reduced self-protective behavioral reactions to these reflective trust concerns. The studies further revealed that the effects of impulsive trust depend on working memory capacity: Being high on impulsive trust inoculated against reflective trust concerns for people low on working memory capacity. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Protective Effects of Quercetin on Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury via the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Handong; Gao, Yongyue; Li, Liwen; Tang, Chao; Wen, Guodao; Zhou, Yuan; Zhou, Mengliang; Mao, Lei; Fan, Youwu

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the protective effect of quercetin administration against oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in mitochondrial biogenesis. Recently, quercetin has been proved to have a protective effect against mitochondria damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, its precise role and underlying mechanisms in traumatic brain injury are not yet fully understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of quercetin on the potential mechanism of these effects in a weight-drop model of TBI in male mice that were treated with quercetin or vehicle via intraperitoneal injection administrated 30 min after TBI. In this experiment, ICR mice were divided into four groups: A sham group, TBI group, TBI + vehicle group, and TBI + quercetin group. Brain samples were collected 24 h later for analysis. Quercetin treatment resulted in an upregulation of Nrf2 expression and cytochrome c, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels were restored by quercetin treatment. Quercetin markedly promoted the translocation of Nrf2 protein from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. These observations suggest that quercetin improves mitochondrial function in TBI models, possibly by activating the Nrf2 pathway. PMID:27780244

  12. Protective Effects of Quercetin on Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury via the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Handong; Gao, Yongyue; Li, Liwen; Tang, Chao; Wen, Guodao; Zhou, Yuan; Zhou, Mengliang; Mao, Lei; Fan, Youwu

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the protective effect of quercetin administration against oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in mitochondrial biogenesis. Recently, quercetin has been proved to have a protective effect against mitochondria damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, its precise role and underlying mechanisms in traumatic brain injury are not yet fully understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of quercetin on the potential mechanism of these effects in a weight-drop model of TBI in male mice that were treated with quercetin or vehicle via intraperitoneal injection administrated 30 min after TBI. In this experiment, ICR mice were divided into four groups: A sham group, TBI group, TBI + vehicle group, and TBI + quercetin group. Brain samples were collected 24 h later for analysis. Quercetin treatment resulted in an upregulation of Nrf2 expression and cytochrome c, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels were restored by quercetin treatment. Quercetin markedly promoted the translocation of Nrf2 protein from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. These observations suggest that quercetin improves mitochondrial function in TBI models, possibly by activating the Nrf2 pathway.

  13. Resveratrol exerts protective effects on anoxia/reoxygenation injury in cardiomyocytes via miR-34a/Sirt1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, B; Ma, S; Wang, Y-B; Xu, B; Zhao, H; He, Y-Y; Li, C-W; Zhang, J; Cao, Y-K; Feng, Q-Z

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the regulation of resveratrol (RV) on miR-34a alteration due to ARI and further studied the involvement of miR-34a/Sirt1 signaling pathway in ROS generation and cell survival after ARI. In-vitro anoxia and reoxygenation injury (ARI) model based on rat heart-derived H9c2 cells was established. The expression of miR-34a and Sirt1 in H9c2 cells with or without RV pretreatment was measured. Flow cytometric analysis of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, CCK-8 assay of cell viability and Western blot analysis of active caspase-3 expression were performed to study the role of miR-34a/Sirt1 signaling pathway in RV modulated ARI injury protection. Pretreatment with RV substantially restored Sirt1 expression in cardiomyocytes in a dose-dependent manner in the in-vitro ARI model. MiR-34a level was significantly increased due to ARI. But pretreatment with RV significantly suppressed its upregulation. MiR-34a overexpression significantly reduced the effect of RV on restoring Sirt1 expression in ARI. Both miR-34a overexpression and Sirt1 knockdown significantly reduced the effect of RV on reducing ROS generation and also abrogated the effect of RV on enhancing cell viability and reducing cell apoptosis. The present study demonstrated that RV has a suppressive effect on miR-34a upregulation in ARI and the miR-34a/Sirt1 axis is an important signaling pathway modulating the protective effect of RV on cardiomyocytes in ARI. Nonetheless, future in vivo studies are required to validate this mechanism.

  14. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway mediates acupuncture-induced dopaminergic neuron protection and motor function improvement in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Nam; Kim, Seung-Tae; Doo, Ah-Reum; Park, Ji-Yeun; Moon, Woongjoon; Chae, Younbyoung; Yin, Chang Shik; Lee, Hyejung; Park, Hi-Joon

    2011-10-01

    It has been reported that acupuncture treatment reduced dopaminergic neuron degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD) models. However, the mechanistic pathways underlying, such neuroprotection, are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the effects and the underlying mechanism of acupuncture in a mouse model of PD using 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). First, we observed that MPTP-induced impairment of Akt activation, but not MPTP-induced c-Jun activation, was effectively restored by acupuncture treatment in the substantia nigra. Furthermore, we demonstrated for the first time that the brain-specific blockade of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway, by intranasal administration of LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, significantly blocked acupuncture-induced dopaminergic neuron protection and motor function improvement. Our results provide evidence that PI3K/Akt signaling pathway may play a central role in the mechanism underlying acupuncture-induced benefits in Parkinsonian mice.

  15. Ginsenoside Rb1 protects against ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial injury via energy metabolism regulation mediated by RhoA signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuan-Chen; Pan, Chun-Shui; Yan, Li; Li, Lin; Hu, Bai-He; Chang, Xin; Liu, Yu-Ying; Fan, Jing-Yu; Sun, Kai; -Li, Quan; Han, Jing-Yan

    2017-03-22

    Cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury remains a challenge for clinicians. Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1) has been reported to have the ability to attenuate I/R injury, but its effect on energy metabolism during cardiac I/R and the underlying mechanism remain unknown. In this study, we detected the effect of Rb1 on rat myocardial blood flow, myocardial infarct size, cardiac function, velocity of venule red blood cell, myocardial structure and apoptosis, energy metabolism and change in RhoA signaling pathway during cardiac I/R injury. In addition, the binding affinity of RhoA to Rb1 was detected using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Results showed that Rb1 treatment at 5 mg/kg/h protected all the cardiac injuries induced by I/R, including damaged myocardial structure, decrease in myocardial blood flow, impaired heart function and microcirculation, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, myocardial infarction and release of myocardial cTnI. Rb1 also inhibited the activation of RhoA signaling pathway and restored the production of ATP during cardiac I/R. Moreover, SPR assay showed that Rb1 was able to bind to RhoA in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that Rb1 may prevent I/R-induced cardiac injury by regulation of RhoA signaling pathway, and may serve as a potential regime to improve percutaneous coronary intervention outcome.

  16. Adora2b adenosine receptor signaling protects during acute kidney injury via inhibition of neutrophil-dependent TNF-α release1

    PubMed Central

    Grenz, Almut; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Bauerle, Jessica D.; Tak, Eunyoung; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Clambey, Eric T.

    2012-01-01

    Renal ischemia is among the leading causes of acute kidney injury (AKI). Previous studies have shown that extracellular adenosine is a prominent tissue-protective cue elicited during ischemia, including signaling events through the A2B adenosine receptor (Adora2b). To investigate the functional role of Adora2b signaling in cytokine-mediated inflammatory pathways, we screened wild-type and Adora2b-deficient mice undergoing renal ischemia for expression of a range of inflammatory cytokines. These studies demonstrated a selective and robust increase of TNF-α levels in Adora2b-deficient mice following renal ischemia and reperfusion. Based on these findings, we next sought to understand the contribution of TNF-α on ischemic AKI through a combination of loss- and gain-of-function studies. Loss of TNF-α, either through antibody blockade or study of TNF-α deficient animals resulted in significantly attenuated tissue injury and improved kidney function following renal ischemia. Conversely, transgenic mice with over-expression of TNF-α had significantly pronounced susceptibility to AKI. Furthermore, neutrophil depletion or reconstitution of Adora2b−/− mice with TNF-α deficient neutrophils rescued their phenotype. In total, these data demonstrate a critical role of adenosine signaling in constraining neutrophil-dependent production of TNF-α, and implicate therapies targeting TNF-α in the treatment of ischemic AKI. PMID:23028059

  17. Ginsenoside Rb1 protects against ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial injury via energy metabolism regulation mediated by RhoA signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuan-Chen; Pan, Chun-Shui; Yan, Li; Li, Lin; Hu, Bai-He; Chang, Xin; Liu, Yu-Ying; Fan, Jing-Yu; Sun, Kai; -Li, Quan; Han, Jing-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury remains a challenge for clinicians. Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1) has been reported to have the ability to attenuate I/R injury, but its effect on energy metabolism during cardiac I/R and the underlying mechanism remain unknown. In this study, we detected the effect of Rb1 on rat myocardial blood flow, myocardial infarct size, cardiac function, velocity of venule red blood cell, myocardial structure and apoptosis, energy metabolism and change in RhoA signaling pathway during cardiac I/R injury. In addition, the binding affinity of RhoA to Rb1 was detected using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Results showed that Rb1 treatment at 5 mg/kg/h protected all the cardiac injuries induced by I/R, including damaged myocardial structure, decrease in myocardial blood flow, impaired heart function and microcirculation, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, myocardial infarction and release of myocardial cTnI. Rb1 also inhibited the activation of RhoA signaling pathway and restored the production of ATP during cardiac I/R. Moreover, SPR assay showed that Rb1 was able to bind to RhoA in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that Rb1 may prevent I/R-induced cardiac injury by regulation of RhoA signaling pathway, and may serve as a potential regime to improve percutaneous coronary intervention outcome. PMID:28327605

  18. Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) signaling in injured neurons facilitates protection and survival.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Elwood, Fiona; Britschgi, Markus; Villeda, Saul; Zhang, Hui; Ding, Zhaoqing; Zhu, Liyin; Alabsi, Haitham; Getachew, Ruth; Narasimhan, Ramya; Wabl, Rafael; Fainberg, Nina; James, Michelle L; Wong, Gordon; Relton, Jane; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2013-01-14

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) and interleukin-34 (IL-34) are functional ligands of the CSF1 receptor (CSF1R) and thus are key regulators of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. We discovered that systemic administration of human recombinant CSF1 ameliorates memory deficits in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. CSF1 and IL-34 strongly reduced excitotoxin-induced neuronal cell loss and gliosis in wild-type mice when administered systemically before or up to 6 h after injury. These effects were accompanied by maintenance of cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) signaling in neurons rather than in microglia. Using lineage-tracing experiments, we discovered that a small number of neurons in the hippocampus and cortex express CSF1R under physiological conditions and that kainic acid-induced excitotoxic injury results in a profound increase in neuronal receptor expression. Selective deletion of CSF1R in forebrain neurons in mice exacerbated excitotoxin-induced death and neurodegeneration. We conclude that CSF1 and IL-34 provide powerful neuroprotective and survival signals in brain injury and neurodegeneration involving CSF1R expression on neurons.

  19. Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) signaling in injured neurons facilitates protection and survival

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jian; Elwood, Fiona; Britschgi, Markus; Villeda, Saul; Zhang, Hui; Ding, Zhaoqing; Zhu, Liyin; Alabsi, Haitham; Getachew, Ruth; Narasimhan, Ramya; Wabl, Rafael; Fainberg, Nina; James, Michelle L.; Wong, Gordon; Relton, Jane; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) and interleukin-34 (IL-34) are functional ligands of the CSF1 receptor (CSF1R) and thus are key regulators of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. We discovered that systemic administration of human recombinant CSF1 ameliorates memory deficits in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. CSF1 and IL-34 strongly reduced excitotoxin-induced neuronal cell loss and gliosis in wild-type mice when administered systemically before or up to 6 h after injury. These effects were accompanied by maintenance of cAMP responsive element–binding protein (CREB) signaling in neurons rather than in microglia. Using lineage-tracing experiments, we discovered that a small number of neurons in the hippocampus and cortex express CSF1R under physiological conditions and that kainic acid–induced excitotoxic injury results in a profound increase in neuronal receptor expression. Selective deletion of CSF1R in forebrain neurons in mice exacerbated excitotoxin-induced death and neurodegeneration. We conclude that CSF1 and IL-34 provide powerful neuroprotective and survival signals in brain injury and neurodegeneration involving CSF1R expression on neurons. PMID:23296467

  20. Exendin-4 Protects MIN6 Cells from t-BHP-Induced Apoptosis via IRE1-JNK-Caspase-3 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Jia; Wang, Lin-Xi; Wang, Yan-Ping; Chen, Zhou; Liu, Xiao-Ying; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Li-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to explore the effect of exendin-4 on t-BHP-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β cells and the mechanism of action. Methods. Murine MIN6 pancreatic β cells were treated with exendin-4 in the presence or absence of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). Cell survival was assessed by MTT staining. The percentage of apoptotic cells was determined by fluorescence microscopy analysis after Hoechst/PI staining and flow cytometric assay after Annexin V-FITC/PI staining. The activity of caspase-3 was determined using a caspase-3 activity kit. Expression of P-IRE1α, IRE1α, C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), P-JNK, C-JUN, and P-C-JUN was detected by western blotting. Results. Exendin-4 was found to inhibit t-BHP-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells by downregulating caspase-3 activity. Exendin-4 also inhibited the endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane protein IRE1, the apoptosis-related signaling molecule JNK, and c-Jun activation. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that exendin-4 ultimately reduces t-BHP-induced β-cell apoptosis. IRE1-JNK-c-Jun signaling is involved in the exendin-4-mediated modulation of β-cell apoptosis.

  1. Tim-4 protects mice against lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock by suppressing the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liyun; Zhao, Peiqing; Xu, Yong; Gao, Lishuang; Wang, Hongxing; Jia, Xiaoxia; Ma, Hongxin; Liang, Xiaoxong; Ma, Chunxong; Gao, Lifen

    2016-11-01

    Endotoxic shock is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in hospital patients, creating an urgent need to explore the mechanisms involved in sepsis. Our previous studies showed that T-cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-4 (Tim-4) attenuated the inflammatory response through regulating the functions of macrophages. However, the mechanism by which Tim-4 does this has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we found that Tim-4 expression was increased in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxic shock. Interestingly, the survival rate of mice in the Tim-4 overexpression group was higher than that of the control group after LPS administration. To investigate the function of Tim-4 in LPS-induced inflammation, we further demonstrated that Tim-4 attenuated LPS-induced endotoxic shock by inhibiting cytokine production by macrophages. Blocking expression of Tim-4 and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signal inhibition showed that Tim-4 inhibited cytokine production via NF-κB signaling pathway. This study indicates that Tim-4 may exert its immune modulation by regulating inflammatory factor secretion and might act as a novel potential target for inflammatory diseases, especially endotoxic shock.

  2. Capacity Estimation Model for Signalized Intersections under the Impact of Access Point

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Li, Peng; Zhou, Xizhao

    2016-01-01

    Highway Capacity Manual 2010 provides various factors to adjust the base saturation flow rate for the capacity analysis of signalized intersections. No factors, however, is considered for the potential change of signalized intersections capacity caused by the access point closeing to the signalized intersection. This paper presented a theoretical model to estimate the lane group capacity at signalized intersections with the consideration of the effects of access points. Two scenarios of access point locations, upstream or downstream of the signalized intersection, and impacts of six types of access traffic flow are taken into account. The proposed capacity model was validated based on VISSIM simulation. Results of extensive numerical analysis reveal the substantial impact of access point on the capacity, which has an inverse correlation with both the number of major street lanes and the distance between the intersection and access point. Moreover, among the six types of access traffic flows, the access traffic flow 1 (right-turning traffic from major street), flow 4 (left-turning traffic from access point), and flow 5 (left-turning traffic from major street) cause a more significant effect on lane group capacity than others. Some guidance on the mitigation of the negative effect is provided for practitioners. PMID:26726998

  3. Capacity Estimation Model for Signalized Intersections under the Impact of Access Point.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Li, Peng; Zhou, Xizhao

    2016-01-01

    Highway Capacity Manual 2010 provides various factors to adjust the base saturation flow rate for the capacity analysis of signalized intersections. No factors, however, is considered for the potential change of signalized intersections capacity caused by the access point closeing to the signalized intersection. This paper presented a theoretical model to estimate the lane group capacity at signalized intersections with the consideration of the effects of access points. Two scenarios of access point locations, upstream or downstream of the signalized intersection, and impacts of six types of access traffic flow are taken into account. The proposed capacity model was validated based on VISSIM simulation. Results of extensive numerical analysis reveal the substantial impact of access point on the capacity, which has an inverse correlation with both the number of major street lanes and the distance between the intersection and access point. Moreover, among the six types of access traffic flows, the access traffic flow 1 (right-turning traffic from major street), flow 4 (left-turning traffic from access point), and flow 5 (left-turning traffic from major street) cause a more significant effect on lane group capacity than others. Some guidance on the mitigation of the negative effect is provided for practitioners.

  4. P120-Catenin Protects Endplate Chondrocytes From Intermittent Cyclic Mechanical Tension Induced Degeneration by Inhibiting the Expression of RhoA/ROCK-1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Guang; Ma, Ming-Ming; Zheng, Quan; Shen, Xiang; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Shu-Feng; Xu, Jia-Jia; Wang, Chuan-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Ling

    2016-08-15

    signaling pathway, but over-expression of E-cadherin cannot do it. P120-catenin protects endplate chondrocytes from ICMT Induced degeneration by inhibiting the expression of RhoA/ROCK-1 signaling pathway. N/A.

  5. Environmental enrichment protects against stress-induced anxiety: Role of glucocorticoid receptor, ERK, and CREB signaling in the basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Novaes, Leonardo S; Dos Santos, Nilton Barreto; Batalhote, Rafaela F P; Malta, Marília Brinati; Camarini, Rosana; Scavone, Cristoforo; Munhoz, Carolina Demarchi

    2017-02-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is an experimental animal model that enhances an animal's opportunity to interact with sensory, motor, and social stimuli, compared to standard laboratory conditions. A prominent benefit of EE is the reduction of stress-induced anxiety. The relationship between stress and the onset of anxiety-like behavior has been widely investigated in experimental research, showing a clear correlation with structural changes in the hippocampus and basolateral amygdala (BLA). However, the mechanisms by which EE exerts its protective roles in stress and anxiety remain unclear, and it is not known whether EE reduces the effects of acute stress on animal behavior shortly following the cessation of stress. We found that EE can prevent the emergence of anxiety-like symptoms in rats measured immediately after acute restraint stress (1 h) and this effect is not due to changes in systemic release of corticosterone. Rather, we found that stress promotes a rapid increase in the nuclear translocation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in the BLA, an effect prevented by previous EE exposure. Furthermore, we observed a reduction of ERK (a MAPK protein) and CREB activity in the BLA promoted by both EE and acute stress. Finally, we found that EE decreases the expression of the immediate-early gene EGR-1 in the BLA, indicating a possible reduction of neuronal activity in this region. Hyperactivity of BLA neurons has been reported to accompany anxiety-like behavior and changes in this process may be one of the mechanism by which EE exerts its protective effects against stress-induced anxiety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Neuropeptide Y signal peptide Pro7 substitution protects against coronary artery atherosclerosis: the Helsinki Sudden Death Study.

    PubMed

    Ilveskoski, Erkki; Viiri, Leena E; Mikkelsson, Jussi; Pörsti, Ilkka; Lehtimäki, Terho; Karhunen, Pekka J

    2008-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has a single nucleotide polymorphism at T1128C, leading to change of Leucine7 to Proline7. The Leu7Pro substitution has been linked to cardiovascular disease, but it is unknown whether the Pro7 allele is associated with increased or decreased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of the Leu7Pro polymorphism with coronary atherosclerosis and its consequences. We studied two autopsy series comprising 700 unselected middle-aged Caucasian men (Helsinki Sudden Death Study) who had died suddenly out of hospital. Areas of coronary artery atherosclerosis, narrowings of coronary arteries, and presence of myocardial infarction and/or coronary thrombosis were analyzed. All information including CHD risk factor data was obtained from 410 men. NPY genotype distribution was Leu7/Leu7=89.8%, Leu7/Pro7=10.0% and Pro7/Pro7=0.2%). Although the Pro7 allele was associated with reported hypertension (p=0.03), the men carrying Pro7 allele had lower area of fatty streaks (p=0.04), fibrotic lesions (p=0.07) and complicated lesions (p=0.004) in the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery and also less severe LAD narrowings (p=0.04) than men with the Leu7/Leu7 genotype. Supporting a protective role for the Pro7 allele against atherosclerosis, only 1 out of 46 men (2%) with coronary thrombosis carried the Pro7 allele (p=0.08 compared to men dying of other causes). This association weakened (OR 0.18 for Pro7 versus Leu7/Leu7, p=0.16) when adjusted for all available CHD risk factors. NPY Pro7 substitution protects middle-aged men from coronary artery atherosclerosis and might decrease the risk of acute coronary events.

  7. l-carnitine protects human hepatocytes from oxidative stress-induced toxicity through Akt-mediated activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinlian; Zhang, Yanli; Luan, Haiyun; Chen, Xuehong; Han, Yantao; Wang, Chunbo

    2016-05-01

    In our previous study, l-carnitine was shown to have cytoprotective effect against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced injury in human normal HL7702 hepatocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the protective effect of l-carnitine was associated with the nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NFE2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) pathway. Our results showed that pretreatment with l-carnitine augmented Nrf2 nuclear translocation, DNA binding activity and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in H2O2-treated HL7702 cells, although l-carnitine treatment alone had no effect on them. Analysis using Nrf2 siRNA demonstrated that Nrf2 activation was involved in l-carnitine-induced HO-1 expression. In addition, l-carnitine-mediated protection against H2O2 toxicity was abrogated by Nrf2 siRNA, indicating the important role of Nrf2 in l-carnitine-induced cytoprotection. Further experiments revealed that l-carnitine pretreatment enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt in H2O2-treated cells. Blocking Akt pathway with inhibitor partly abrogated the protective effect of l-carnitine. Moreover, our finding demonstrated that the induction of Nrf2 translocation and HO-1 expression by l-carnitine directly correlated with the Akt pathway because Akt inhibitor showed inhibitory effects on the Nrf2 translocation and HO-1 expression. Altogether, these results demonstrate that l-carnitine protects HL7702 cells against H2O2-induced cell damage through Akt-mediated activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  8. Resveratrol, a polyphenol phytoalexin, protects cardiomyocytes against anoxia/reoxygenation injury via the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui; Lin, Guosheng; Wan, Weiguo; Li, Xuyon; Zeng, Bin; Yang, Bo; Huang, Congxin

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies indicate resveratrol pretreatment can protect cardiomyocytes. However, it is largely unknown whether resveratrol protects cardiomyocytes when applied at reperfusion. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether resveratrol given at reoxygenation could protect cardiomyocytes under the anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R) condition and to examine the underlying mechanism. In this study, primary cultures of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were randomly distributed into three groups: control group, A/R group (cultured cardiomyocytes were subjected to 3 h anoxia followed by 2 h reoxygenation), and the resveratrol group (cardiomyocytes were subjected to 3 h anoxia/2 h reoxygenation, and 5, 10 or 20 µM resveratrol was applied 5 min after reoxygenation). In order to evaluate cardiomyocyte damage, cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, caspase-3 activity, and apoptosis were analyzed by the cell counting kit (CCK)-8 assay, colorimetric method and flow cytometry, respectively. The mRNA and protein expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were detected by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 protein and I-κBα protein levels were also examined by western blot analysis. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the culture medium were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We found that resveratrol prevented a reduction in cell viability, decreased the amount of LDH release, attenuated apoptotic cells and decreased caspase-3 activity induced by A/R in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, resveratrol treatment significantly attenuated the TLR4 expression, inhibited NF-κB activation and reduced the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β caused by A/R injury in the culture medium. Treatment with resveratrol shortly after the onset of reoxygenation improves cell survival and attenuates A/R-induced inflammatory response. This protection mechanism is possibly related to the TLR4

  9. Resveratrol, a polyphenol phytoalexin, protects cardiomyocytes against anoxia/reoxygenation injury via the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, CUI; LIN, GUOSHENG; WAN, WEIGUO; LI, XUYON; ZENG, BIN; YANG, BO; HUANG, CONGXIN

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies indicate resveratrol pretreatment can protect cardiomyocytes. However, it is largely unknown whether resveratrol protects cardiomyocytes when applied at reperfusion. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether resveratrol given at reoxygenation could protect cardiomyocytes under the anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R) condition and to examine the underlying mechanism. In this study, primary cultures of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were randomly distributed into three groups: control group, A/R group (cultured cardiomyocytes were subjected to 3 h anoxia followed by 2 h reoxygenation), and the resveratrol group (cardiomyocytes were subjected to 3 h anoxia/2 h reoxygenation, and 5, 10 or 20 μM resveratrol was applied 5 min after reoxygenation). In order to evaluate cardiomyocyte damage, cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, caspase-3 activity, and apoptosis were analyzed by the cell counting kit (CCK)-8 assay, colorimetric method and flow cytometry, respectively. The mRNA and protein expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were detected by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 protein and I-κBα protein levels were also examined by western blot analysis. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the culture medium were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We found that resveratrol prevented a reduction in cell viability, decreased the amount of LDH release, attenuated apoptotic cells and decreased caspase-3 activity induced by A/R in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, resveratrol treatment significantly attenuated the TLR4 expression, inhibited NF-κB activation and reduced the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β caused by A/R injury in the culture medium. Treatment with resveratrol shortly after the onset of reoxygenation improves cell survival and attenuates A/R-induced inflammatory response. This protection mechanism is possibly related to the TLR4

  10. SDF-1/CXCR4 mediates acute protection of cardiac function through myocardial STAT3 signaling following global ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunyan; Gu, Hongmei; Zhang, Wenjun; Manukyan, Mariuxi C.; Shou, Weinian

    2011-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1) has been reported to mediate cardioprotection through the mobilization of stem cells into injured tissue and an increase in local angiogenesis after myocardial infarction. However, little is known regarding whether SDF-1 induces acute protection following global myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and if so, by what molecular mechanism. SDF-1 binding to its cognate receptor CXCR4 has been shown to activate STAT3 in a variety of cells. STAT3 is a cardioprotective factor and may mediate SDF-1/CXCR4-induced acute protection. We hypothesized that SDF-1 would improve myocardial function through CXCR4-increased STAT3 activation following acute I/R. Isolated mouse hearts were subjected to 25-min global ischemia/40-min reperfusion and divided into groups of 1) vehicle; 2) SDF-1; 3) AMD3100, a CXCR4 inhibitor; 4) SDF-1 + AMD3100; 5) Stattic, a STAT3 inhibitor; 6) SDF-1 + Stattic; 7) cardiomyocyte-restricted ablation of STAT3 (STAT3KO); 8) STAT3KO + SDF-1; 9) Ly294002, an inhibitor of the Akt pathway; and 10) SDF-1 + Ly294002. Reagents were infused into hearts within 5 min before ischemia. SDF-1 administration significantly improved postischemic myocardial functional recovery in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, pretreatment with SDF-1 reduced cardiac apoptotic signaling and increased myocardial STAT3 activation following acute I/R. Inhibition of the SDF-1 receptor CXCR4 neutralized these protective effects by SDF-1 in hearts subjected to I/R. Notably, inhibition of the STAT3 pathway or use of STAT3KO hearts abolished SDF-1-induced acute protection following myocardial I/R. Our results represent the first evidence that the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis upregualtes myocardial STAT3 activation and, thereby, mediates acute cardioprotection in response to global I/R. PMID:21821779

  11. Ginkgolide B protects against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity: enhancement of Akt-Nrf2-HO-1 signaling and reduction of NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weijun; Hu, Juan; Cheng, Ying; Wang, Junli; Zhang, Xiaotong; Xu, Min

    2015-05-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug for the treatment of various cancers. However, the ototoxicity severely limited its maximum dose. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of Ginkgolide B (GB), a major component of Ginkgo biloba extracts, on cisplatin-induced ototoxicity and to elucidate the molecular mechanism in vitro and in vivo. In HEI-OC1 auditory cells, GB concentration-dependently inhibited the reduction of cell viability and increase in apoptosis exerted by cisplatin. Cisplatin-activated mitochondrial apoptotic molecular events were significantly inhibited by GB. In addition, GB notably suppressed the increase in NOX2 and p47(phox) expression and the decrease in nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cisplatin-exposed cells. Inhibition of Nrf2 using SiRNA and blockage of HO-1 by zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) suppressed the protective effects of GB. Moreover, GB prevented cisplatin-induced reduction of Akt phosphorylation and LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3 K/Akt signaling, blocked the anti-apoptotic effect of GB in cisplatin-treated cells. Furthermore, the protective effect of GB was tested in cisplatin-exposed rats. GB treatment markedly protected animals against cisplatin-induced hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. Inhibition of Akt and HO-1 significantly suppressed the improvement in hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction in GB-treated rats. We demonstrate that GB decreases ROS generation through reducing NOX2 expression and enhancing activity through Akt-Nrf2-HO-1 pathway, resulting in inhibition of mitochondrial apoptosis and final reduction of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Our findings have gained an insight into the mechanism of GB-exerted protective effect against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

  12. Salvianolic acid B protects against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by inducing Nrf2 and phase II detoxification gene expression via activation of the PI3K and PKC signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Musen; Zhai, Xiaohan; Wang, Guangzhi; Tian, Xiaofeng; Gao, Dongyan; Shi, Lei; Wu, Hang; Fan, Qing; Peng, Jinyong; Liu, Kexin; Yao, Jihong

    2015-02-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is used drugs worldwide for treating pain and fever. However, APAP overdose is the principal cause of acute liver failure in Western countries. Salvianolic acid B (SalB), a major water-soluble compound extracted from Radix Salvia miltiorrhiza, has well-known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions. We aimed to evaluate the ability of SalB to protect against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity by inducing nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) expression. SalB pretreatment ameliorated acute liver injury caused by APAP, as indicated by blood aspartate transaminase levels and histological findings. Moreover, SalB pretreatment increased the expression of Nrf2, Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and glutamate-l-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC). Furthermore, the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin and the GCLC inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine reversed the protective effect of SalB. Additionally, siRNA-mediated depletion of Nrf2 reduced the induction of HO-1 and GCLC by SalB, and SalB pretreatment activated the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways. Both inhibitors (PI3K and PKC) blocked the protective effect of SalB against APAP-induced cell death, abolishing the SalB-induced Nrf2 activation and decreasing HO-1 and GCLC expression. These results indicated that SalB induces Nrf2, HO-1 and GCLC expression via activation of the PI3K and PKC pathways, thereby protecting against APAP-induced liver injury.

  13. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 4 (SOCS4) protects against severe cytokine storm and enhances viral clearance during influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Kedzierski, Lukasz; Linossi, Edmond M; Kolesnik, Tatiana B; Day, E Bridie; Bird, Nicola L; Kile, Benjamin T; Belz, Gabrielle T; Metcalf, Donald; Nicola, Nicos A; Kedzierska, Katherine; Nicholson, Sandra E

    2014-05-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are key regulators of innate and adaptive immunity. There is no described biological role for SOCS4, despite broad expression in the hematopoietic system. We demonstrate that mice lacking functional SOCS4 protein rapidly succumb to infection with a pathogenic H1N1 influenza virus (PR8) and are hypersusceptible to infection with the less virulent H3N2 (X31) strain. In SOCS4-deficient animals, this led to substantially greater weight loss, dysregulated pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production in the lungs and delayed viral clearance. This was associated with impaired trafficking of influenza-specific CD8 T cells to the site of infection and linked to defects in T cell receptor activation. These results demonstrate that SOCS4 is a critical regulator of anti-viral immunity.

  14. Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 4 (SOCS4) Protects against Severe Cytokine Storm and Enhances Viral Clearance during Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kedzierski, Lukasz; Linossi, Edmond M.; Kolesnik, Tatiana B.; Day, E. Bridie; Bird, Nicola L.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Metcalf, Donald; Nicola, Nicos A.; Kedzierska, Katherine; Nicholson, Sandra E.

    2014-01-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are key regulators of innate and adaptive immunity. There is no described biological role for SOCS4, despite broad expression in the hematopoietic system. We demonstrate that mice lacking functional SOCS4 protein rapidly succumb to infection with a pathogenic H1N1 influenza virus (PR8) and are hypersusceptible to infection with the less virulent H3N2 (X31) strain. In SOCS4-deficient animals, this led to substantially greater weight loss, dysregulated pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production in the lungs and delayed viral clearance. This was associated with impaired trafficking of influenza-specific CD8 T cells to the site of infection and linked to defects in T cell receptor activation. These results demonstrate that SOCS4 is a critical regulator of anti-viral immunity. PMID:24809749

  15. Protective effect of tea polyphenols on renal ischemia/reperfusion injury via suppressing the activation of TLR4/NF-κB p65 signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Wei; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Ling; Li, Xu; Yu, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Hong-Tao; Tan, Bin-Bin; Jiang, Lian-Hao; Wang, Ya-Xin; Liang, Yu; Zhang, Xiu-Shan; Wang, Wen-Sheng; Liu, Hai-Gen

    2014-05-25

    Tea polyphenols (TP) was investigated in rats for its protective effect on renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (RIRI). Rats were randomized into groups as follows: (I) sham group (n=10); (II) RIRI group (n=10); (III) RIRI+TP (100mg/kg) group (n=5); (IV) RIRI+TP (200mg/kg) group (n=5); (V) RIRI+TP+ Astragalus mongholicus aqueous extract (AMAE) (300 mg/kg+100mg/kg) group (n=5). For the IRI+TP groups, rats were orally given with tea polyphenols (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg body weight) once daily 10 days before induction of ischemia, followed by renal IRI. For the sham group and RIRI group, rats were orally given with equal volume of saline once daily 10 days before induction of ischemia, followed by renal IRI. Results showed that tea polyphenol pretreatment significantly suppressed ROS level and MDA release. On the other hand, in rats subjected to ischemia-reperfusion, the activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) showed recovery, whereas the levels of urea nitrogen and serum creatinine were reduced by administration of tea polyphenols orally for 10 days prior to ischemia-reperfusion. Moreover, tea polyphenol pretreatment significantly decreased TLR4 and NF-κB p65 protein expression levels in RIRI rats. At the same time, tea polyphenol pretreatment attenuated the increased level of serum IL-1β, IL-6, ICAM-1 and TNF-α, and enhanced IL-10 production in RIRI rats. Furthermore, tea polyphenol pretreatment significantly decreased renal epithelial tubular cell apoptosis induced by renal ischemia/reperfusion, alleviating renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. These results cumulatively indicate that tea polyphenol pretreatment could suppress the TLR4/NF-κB p65 signaling pathway, protecting renal tubular epithelial cells against ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis, which implies that antioxidants may be a potential and effective agent for prevention of the

  16. Direct and indirect inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase by salicylic acid and anthocyanidins reactivates intercellular ROS signaling and allows for synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Scheit, Katrin; Bauer, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Salicylic acid and anthocyanidins are known as plant-derived antioxidants, but also can provoke paradoxically seeming prooxidant effects in vitro. These prooxidant effects are connected to the potential of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins to induce apoptosis selectively in tumor cells in vitro and to inhibit tumor growth in animal models. Several epidemiological studies have shown that salicylic acid and its prodrug acetylsalicylic acid are tumor-preventive for humans. The mechanism of salicylic acid- and anthocyanidin-dependent antitumor effects has remained enigmatic so far. Extracellular apoptosis-inducing reactive oxygen species signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl signaling pathway specifically induces apoptosis in transformed cells. Tumor cells have acquired resistance against intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling through expression of membrane-associated catalase. Here, we show that salicylic acid and anthocyanidins inactivate tumor cell protective catalase and thus reactive apoptosis-inducing intercellular reactive oxygen species signaling of tumor cells and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis Salicylic acid inhibits catalase directly through its potential to transform compound I of catalase into the inactive compound II. In contrast, anthocyanidins provoke a complex mechanism for catalase inactivation that is initiated by anthocyanidin-mediated inhibition of NO dioxygenase. This allows the formation of extracellular singlet oxygen through the reaction between H(2)O(2) and peroxynitrite, amplification through a caspase8-dependent step and subsequent singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of catalase. The combination of salicylic acid and anthocyanidins allows for a remarkable synergistic effect in apoptosis induction. This effect may be potentially useful to elaborate novel therapeutic approaches and crucial for the interpretation of epidemiological results related to the antitumor effects of secondary plant compounds.

  17. Protective effect of bioflavonoid myricetin enhances carbohydrate metabolic enzymes and insulin signaling molecules in streptozotocin-cadmium induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Neelamegam; Ashokkumar, Natarajan

    2014-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of myricetin by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin signaling molecules and renal function markers in streptozotocin (STZ)-cadmium (Cd) induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. After myricetin treatment schedule, blood and tissue samples were collected to determine plasma glucose, insulin, hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin and renal function markers, carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the liver and insulin signaling molecules in the pancreas and skeletal muscle. A significant increase of plasma glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, urea, uric acid, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), urinary albumin, glycogen phosphorylase, glucose-6-phosphatase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and a significant decrease of plasma insulin, hemoglobin, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glycogen and glycogen synthase with insulin signaling molecule expression were found in the STZ-Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats. The administration of myricetin significantly normalizes the carbohydrate metabolic products like glucose, glycated hemoglobin, glycogen phosphorylase and gluconeogenic enzymes and renal function markers with increase insulin, glycogen, glycogen synthase and insulin signaling molecule expression like glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4), insulin receptor-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor-2 (IRS-2) and protein kinase B (PKB). Based on the data, the protective effect of myricetin was confirmed by its histological annotation of the pancreas, liver and kidney tissues. These findings suggest that myricetin improved carbohydrate metabolism which subsequently enhances glucose utilization and renal function in STZ-Cd induced diabetic nephrotoxic rats.

  18. To signal or not to signal: that should not be the question.

    PubMed

    Faw, Harold W

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present research was to examine rates of turn signal use, a positive and potentially valuable means by which drivers can communicate. A second purpose was to explore factors that might impact these rates, including the modeling influence of other drivers. A series of observations involving more than 5600 vehicles making turns were recorded at a variety of intersections in British Columbia, Canada. Though the occurrence of signal use varied widely, ranging from a low of 54% to a high of 95%, the overall rate was 76%. Drivers used turn signals significantly less often when making right as compared with left turns, when traffic volume was higher, and when a designated turning lane was provided. In addition, compared with drivers following another vehicle not using signals, those following a vehicle with turn signals on were significantly more likely to activate their turn signals, suggesting a possible modeling effect. Both internal and external influences on turn signal use by drivers were considered. External factors explored in this research included direction of turn, traffic volume, intersection configuration, and the example of other drivers. It was concluded that the practice of signaling turns merits more research attention, since consistent use of signals is a potential contributor to enhanced safety for all road users. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Protective Effect of Decursin Extracted from Angelica gigas in Male Infertility via Nrf2/HO-1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Bae, Woong Jin; Ha, U Syn; Choi, Jin Bong; Kim, Kang Sup; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Wang, Zhiping; Hwang, Sung Yeoun; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Higher testicular temperature results in altered spermatogenesis due to heat-related oxidative stress. We examined the effects of decursin extracted from Angelica gigas Nakai on antioxidant activity in vitro and in a cryptorchidism-induced infertility rat model. TM3 Leydig cell viability was measured based on oxidative stress according to treatment. Either distilled water or AG 400 mg/kg of A. gigas extract was administered orally for 4 weeks after unilateral cryptorchidism was induced. After 1, 2, and 4 weeks, six rats from the control group and six rats from treatment group were sacrificed. Testicular weight, semen quality, antioxidant activities, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein, and mRNA expression of Nrf2-regulated genes were analyzed. Treatment with A. gigas extract (1) protected TM3 cells against oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner, (2) improved the mean weight of the cryptorchid testis, (3) maintained sperm counts, motility, and spermatogenic cell density, (4) decreased levels of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and increased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), (5) significantly increased Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and (6) significantly decreased apoptosis. This study suggests that decursin extracted from A. gigas is a supplemental agent that can reduce oxidative stress by Nrf2-mediated upregulation of HO-1 in rat experimentally induced unilateral cryptorchidism and may improve cryptorchidism-induced infertility.

  20. Protective Effect of Decursin Extracted from Angelica gigas in Male Infertility via Nrf2/HO-1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Woong Jin; Ha, U. Syn; Choi, Jin Bong; Kim, Kang Sup; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Wang, Zhiping; Hwang, Sung Yeoun; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Higher testicular temperature results in altered spermatogenesis due to heat-related oxidative stress. We examined the effects of decursin extracted from Angelica gigas Nakai on antioxidant activity in vitro and in a cryptorchidism-induced infertility rat model. TM3 Leydig cell viability was measured based on oxidative stress according to treatment. Either distilled water or AG 400 mg/kg of A. gigas extract was administered orally for 4 weeks after unilateral cryptorchidism was induced. After 1, 2, and 4 weeks, six rats from the control group and six rats from treatment group were sacrificed. Testicular weight, semen quality, antioxidant activities, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein, and mRNA expression of Nrf2-regulated genes were analyzed. Treatment with A. gigas extract (1) protected TM3 cells against oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner, (2) improved the mean weight of the cryptorchid testis, (3) maintained sperm counts, motility, and spermatogenic cell density, (4) decreased levels of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and increased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), (5) significantly increased Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and (6) significantly decreased apoptosis. This study suggests that decursin extracted from A. gigas is a supplemental agent that can reduce oxidative stress by Nrf2-mediated upregulation of HO-1 in rat experimentally induced unilateral cryptorchidism and may improve cryptorchidism-induced infertility. PMID:27034737

  1. Redox signaling via the molecular chaperone BiP protects cells against endoplasmic reticulum-derived oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Pareja, Kristeen A; Kaiser, Chris A; Sevier, Carolyn S

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has emerged as a potentially significant source of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recent studies suggest that levels of ROS generated as a byproduct of oxidative folding rival those produced by mitochondrial respiration. Mechanisms that protect cells against oxidant accumulation within the ER have begun to be elucidated yet many questions still remain regarding how cells prevent oxidant-induced damage from ER folding events. Here we report a new role for a central well-characterized player in ER homeostasis as a direct sensor of ER redox imbalance. Specifically we show that a conserved cysteine in the lumenal chaperone BiP is susceptible to oxidation by peroxide, and we demonstrate that oxidation of this conserved cysteine disrupts BiP's ATPase cycle. We propose that alteration of BiP activity upon oxidation helps cells cope with disruption to oxidative folding within the ER during oxidative stress. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03496.001 PMID:25053742

  2. Inhibition of TGF-beta signaling by an ALK5 inhibitor protects rats from dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    de Gouville, Anne-Charlotte; Boullay, Valerie; Krysa, Gael; Pilot, Julia; Brusq, Jean-Marie; Loriolle, Florence; Gauthier, Jean-Michel; Papworth, Stephen A; Laroze, Alain; Gellibert, Françoise; Huet, Stephane

    2005-05-01

    1 Chronic liver disease is characterized by an exacerbated accumulation of matrix, causing progressive fibrosis, which may lead to cirrhosis. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), a well-known profibrotic cytokine, transduces its signal through the ALK5 ser/thr kinase receptor, and increases transcription of different genes including PAI-1 and collagens. The identification of GW6604 (2-phenyl-4-(3-pyridin-2-yl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)pyridine), an ALK5 inhibitor, allowed us to evaluate the therapeutic potential of inhibiting TGF-beta pathway in different models of liver disease. 2 A cellular assay was used to identify GW6604 as a TGF-beta signaling pathway inhibitor. This ALK5 inhibitor was then tested in a model of liver hepatectomy in TGF-beta-overexpressing transgenic mice, in an acute model of liver disease and in a chronic model of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced liver fibrosis. 3 In vitro, GW6604 inhibited autophosphorylation of ALK5 with an IC(50) of 140 nM and in a cellular assay inhibited TGF-beta-induced transcription of PAI-1 (IC(50): 500 nM). In vivo, GW6604 (40 mg kg(-1) p.o.) increased liver regeneration in TGF-beta-overexpressing mice, which had undergone partial hepatectomy. In an acute model of liver disease, GW6604 reduced by 80% the expression of collagen IA1. In a chronic model of DMN-induced fibrosis where DMN was administered for 6 weeks and GW6604 dosed for the last 3 weeks (80 mg kg(-1) p.o., b.i.d.), mortality was prevented and DMN-induced elevations of mRNA encoding for collagen IA1, IA2, III, TIMP-1 and TGF-beta were reduced by 50-75%. Inhibition of matrix genes overexpression was accompanied by reduced matrix deposition and reduction in liver function deterioration, as assessed by bilirubin and liver enzyme levels. 4 Our results suggest that inhibition of ALK5 could be an attractive new approach to treatment of liver fibrotic diseases by both preventing matrix deposition and promoting hepatocyte regeneration.

  3. Phase diagram of a non-signalized T-shaped intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echab, H.; Lakouari, N.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we investigated a non-signalized T-shaped intersection using the cellular automata model under the open boundary condition. Two different priority rules at intersection are introduced (Rule 1, Rule 2) to eliminate the jam-packed state. Phase diagram and its variation with the ratios of right and/or left turning vehicles are investigated. The space-time and the density profiles are also studied. The simulation results indicate that the system does not show the same performance under different priority rules, where Rule 1 (resp. Rule 2) can be better than Rule 2 (resp. Rule 1) according to the ratios of turning vehicles.

  4. Inhibition of histamine-mediated signaling confers significant protection against severe malaria in mouse models of disease

    PubMed Central

    Beghdadi, Walid; Porcherie, Adeline; Schneider, Bradley S.; Dubayle, David; Peronet, Roger; Huerre, Michel; Watanabe, Takeshi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Louis, Jacques; Mécheri, Salaheddine

    2008-01-01

    From the inoculation of Plasmodium sporozoites via Anopheles mosquito bites to the development of blood-stage parasites, a hallmark of the host response is an inflammatory reaction characterized by elevated histamine levels in the serum and tissues. Given the proinflammatory and immunosuppressive activities associated with histamine, we postulated that this vasoactive amine participates in malaria pathogenesis. Combined genetic and pharmacologic approaches demonstrated that histamine binding to H1R and H2R but not H3R and H4R increases the susceptibility of mice to infection with Plasmodium. To further understand the role of histamine in malaria pathogenesis, we used histidine decarboxylase–deficient (HDC−/−) mice, which are free of histamine. HDC−/− mice were highly resistant to severe malaria whether infected by mosquito bites or via injection of infected erythrocytes. HDC−/− mice displayed resistance to two lethal strains: Plasmodium berghei (Pb) ANKA, which triggers cerebral malaria (CM), and Pb NK65, which causes death without neurological symptoms. The resistance of HDC−/− mice to CM was associated with preserved blood–brain barrier integrity, the absence of infected erythrocyte aggregation in the brain vessels, and a lack of sequestration of CD4 and CD8 T cells. We demonstrate that histamine-mediated signaling contributes to malaria pathogenesis. Understanding the basis for these biological effects of histamine during infection may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to alleviate the severity of malaria. PMID:18227221

  5. Protective Effect of Saccharomyces boulardii on Deoxynivalenol-Induced Injury of Porcine Macrophage via Attenuating p38 MAPK Signal Pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chao; Wang, Kun; Zhou, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Xue-Dong; Wu, Jin-E

    2017-05-01

    The aims of our study were to evaluate the effects of Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) on deoxynivalenol (DON)-induced injury in porcine alveolar macrophage cells (PAMCs) and to explore the underlying mechanisms. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, flow cytometric analysis, ELISA, qRT-PCR, and western blot were performed to assess whether S. boulardii could prevent DON-induced injury by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signal pathway. The results showed that pretreatment with 8 μM DON could decrease the viability of PAMC and significantly increase the apoptosis rate of PAMC, whereas S. boulardii could rescue apoptotic PAMC cells induced by DON. Further experiments revealed that S. boulardii effectively reversed DON-induced cytotoxicity via downregulating the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-lβ. In addition, S. boulardii significantly alleviated DON-induced phosphorylation and mRNA expression of p38 and further increased the expression of apoptosis regulation genes Bcl-xl and Bcl-2 and inhibited the activation of Bax. Our results suggest that S. boulardii could suppress DON-induced p38 MAPK pathway activation and reduce the expression of downstream inflammatory cytokines, as well as promote the expression of anti-apoptotic genes to inhibit apoptosis induced by DON in PAMC.

  6. From cell protection to death: may Ca2+ signals explain the chameleonic attributes of the mammalian prion protein?

    PubMed

    Sorgato, M Catia; Bertoli, Alessandro

    2009-02-06

    It is now accepted that a conformational change of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) generates the prion, the infectious agent responsible for lethal neurodegenerative disorders, named transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, or prion diseases. The mechanisms of prion-associated neurodegeneration are still obscure, as is the cell role of PrP(C), although increasing evidence attributes to PrP(C) important functions in cell survival. Such a behavioral dichotomy thus enables the prion protein to switch from a benign role under normal conditions, to the execution of neurons during disease. By reviewing data from models of prion disease and PrP(C)-null paradigms, which suggest a relation between the prion protein and Ca(2+) homeostasis, here we discuss the possibility that Ca(2+) is the factor behind the enigma of the pathophysiology of PrP(C). Ca(2+) features in almost all processes of cell signaling, and may thus tell us much about a protein that pivots between health and disease.

  7. Daucosterol protects neurons against oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion-mediated injury by activating IGF1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li-hua; Yuan, Xiao-lin; Yang, Nian-yun; Ren, Li; Zhao, Feng-ming; Luo, Ban-xin; Bian, Yao-yao; Xu, Jian-ya; Lu, Da-xiang; Zheng, Yuan-yuan; Zhang, Chuan-juan; Diao, Yuan-ming; Xia, Bao-mei; Chen, Gang

    2015-08-01

    We previously reported that daucosterol (a sterolin) up-regulates the expression of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF1)(1) protein in neural stem cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of daucosterol on the survival of cultured cortical neurons after neurons were subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation and simulated reperfusion (OGD/R)(2), and determined the corresponding molecular mechanism. The results showed that post-treatment of daucosterol significantly reduced neuronal loss, as well as apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity, displaying the neuroprotective activity. We also found that daucosterol increased the expression level of IGF1 protein, diminished the down-regulation of p-AKT(3) and p-GSK-3β(4), thus activating the AKT(5) signal pathway. Additionally, it diminished the down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1(6) and Bcl-2(7), and decreased the expression level of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax(8), thus raising the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax. The neuroprotective effect of daucosterol was inhibited in the presence of picropodophyllin (PPP)(9), the inhibitor of insulin-like growth factor I receptors (IGF1R)(10). Our study provided information about daucosterol as an efficient and inexpensive neuroprotectants, to which the IGF1-like activity of daucosterol contributes. Daucosterol could be potentially developed as a medicine for ischemic stroke treatment.

  8. Hyperbaric oxygen protects mandibular condylar chondrocytes from interleukin-1β-induced apoptosis via the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hang; Wu, Gaoyi; Sun, Qi; Dong, Yabing; Zhao, Huaqiang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Mandibular condylar chondrocyte apoptosis is mainly responsible for the development and progression of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) generally serves an agent that induces chondrocyte apoptosis. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment increases proteoglycan synthesis in vivo. We explore the protective effect of HBO on IL-1β-induced mandibular condylar chondrocyte apoptosis in rats and the potential molecular mechanisms. Methods: Chondrocytes were isolated from the TMJ of 3-4-week old Sprague-Dawley rats. The Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay was used to determine cell viability. The phosphorylated phosphoinositide-3 kinase (p-PI3K), phosphorylated AKT (p-Akt), type II collagen (COL2), and aggrecan (AGG) content was detected by immunofluorescence, immunocytochemistry and western blotting. The expression of Pi3k, Akt, Col2 and Agg mRNA was measured using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Results: HBO inhibited the cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by IL-1β (10 ng/mL) in the mandibular condylar chondrocytes. HBO also decreased the IL-1β activity that decreased p-PI3K and p-AKT levels, and increased COL2 and AGG expression, with the net effect of suppressing extracellular matrix degradation. Conclusions: These data suggest that HBO may protect mandibular condylar chondrocytes against IL-1β-induced apoptosis via the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, and that it may promote the expression of mandibular condylar chondrocyte extracellular matrix through the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. PMID:27904712

  9. Transforming Growth Factor β1/SMAD Signaling Pathway Activation Protects the Intestinal Epithelium from Clostridium difficile Toxin A-Induced Damage.

    PubMed

    Tinoco-Veras, Christianne Maria; Santos, Ana Angélica Q A; Stipursky, Joice; Meloni, Marcelo; Araujo, Ana Paula Bérgamo; Foschetti, Danielle Abreu; López-Ureña, Diana; Quesada-Gómez, Carlos; Leitão, Renata F C; Gomes, Flávia Carvalho Alcantara; Brito, Gerly Anne de Castro

    2017-10-01

    Clostridium difficile, the main cause of diarrhea in hospitalized patients, produces toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB), which affect intestinal epithelial cell survival, proliferation, and migration and induce an intense inflammatory response. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic cytokine affecting enterocyte and immune/inflammatory responses. However, it has been shown that exposure of intestinal epithelium to a low concentration of TcdA induces the release of TGF-β1, which has a protective effect on epithelial resistance and a TcdA/TGF-β signaling pathway interaction. The activation of this pathway in vivo has not been elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the TGF-β1 pathway in TcdA-induced damage in a rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6) and in a mouse model of an ileal loop. TcdA increased the expression of TGF-β1 and its receptor, TβRII, in vitro and in vivo TcdA induced nuclear translocation of the transcription factors SMAD2/3, a hallmark of TGF-β1 pathway activation, both in IEC cells and in mouse ileal tissue. The addition of recombinant TGF-β1 (rTGF-β) prevented TcdA-induced apoptosis/necrosis and restored proliferation and repair activity in IEC-6 cells in the presence of TcdA. Together, these data show that TcdA induces TGF-β1 signaling pathway activation and suggest that this pathway might play a protective role against the effect of C. difficile-toxin. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Protects Myocardial Cells from Apoptosis via the Janus-Activated Kinase 2/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 Pathway in Rats with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bao-Xin; Li, Jie; Li, Hua; Wu, Sui-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the potential mechanisms underlying the protective effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) and carbamylated EPO (CEPO) against myocardial cell apoptosis in epilepsy. Rats were given an intra-amygdala injection of kainic acid to induce epilepsy. Groups of rats were treated with rhEPO or CEPO before induction of epilepsy, whereas additional rats were given a caudal vein injection of AG490, a selective inhibitor of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2). At different time points after seizure onset, electroencephalogram changes were recorded, and myocardium samples were taken for the detection of myocardial cell apoptosis and expression of JAK2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5), caspase-3, and bcl-xl mRNAs and proteins. Induction of epilepsy significantly enhanced myocardial cell apoptosis and upregulated the expression of caspase-3 and bcl-xl proteins and JAK2 and STAT5a at both the mRNA and protein levels. Pretreatment with either rhEPO or CEPO reduced the number of apoptotic cells, upregulated bcl-xl expression, and downregulated caspase-3 expression in the myocardium of epileptic rats. Both myocardial JAK2 and STAT5a mRNAs, as well as phosphorylated species of JAK2 and STAT5a, were upregulated in epileptic rats in response to rhEPO-but not to CEPO-pretreatment. AG490 treatment increased apoptosis, upregulated caspase-3 protein expression, and downregulated bcl-xl protein expression in the myocardium of epileptic rats. These results indicate that myocardial cell apoptosis may contribute to myocardial injury in epilepsy. EPO protects myocardial cells from apoptosis via the JAK2/STAT5 pathway in rats with experimental epilepsy, whereas CEPO exerts antiapoptotic activity perhaps via a pathway independent of JAK2/STAT5 signaling.

  11. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Protects Myocardial Cells from Apoptosis via the Janus-Activated Kinase 2/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 Pathway in Rats with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bao-Xin; Li, Jie; Li, Hua; Wu, Sui-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential mechanisms underlying the protective effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) and carbamylated EPO (CEPO) against myocardial cell apoptosis in epilepsy. Methods Rats were given an intra-amygdala injection of kainic acid to induce epilepsy. Groups of rats were treated with rhEPO or CEPO before induction of epilepsy, whereas additional rats were given a caudal vein injection of AG490, a selective inhibitor of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2). At different time points after seizure onset, electroencephalogram changes were recorded, and myocardium samples were taken for the detection of myocardial cell apoptosis and expression of JAK2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5), caspase-3, and bcl-xl mRNAs and proteins. Results Induction of epilepsy significantly enhanced myocardial cell apoptosis and upregulated the expression of caspase-3 and bcl-xl proteins and JAK2 and STAT5a at both the mRNA and protein levels. Pretreatment with either rhEPO or CEPO reduced the number of apoptotic cells, upregulated bcl-xl expression, and downregulated caspase-3 expression in the myocardium of epileptic rats. Both myocardial JAK2 and STAT5a mRNAs, as well as phosphorylated species of JAK2 and STAT5a, were upregulated in epileptic rats in response to rhEPO—but not to CEPO—pretreatment. AG490 treatment increased apoptosis, upregulated caspase-3 protein expression, and downregulated bcl-xl protein expression in the myocardium of epileptic rats. Conclusions These results indicate that myocardial cell apoptosis may contribute to myocardial injury in epilepsy. EPO protects myocardial cells from apoptosis via the JAK2/STAT5 pathway in rats with experimental epilepsy, whereas CEPO exerts antiapoptotic activity perhaps via a pathway independent of JAK2/STAT5 signaling. PMID:26649078

  12. Disruption of Early Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Signaling Prevents Classical Activation of Dendritic Cells in Lung-Associated Lymph Nodes and Development of Protective Immunity against Cryptococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jintao; Eastman, Alison J.; Flaczyk, Adam; Neal, Lori M.; Zhao, Guolei; Carolan, Jacob; Malachowski, Antoni N.; Stolberg, Valerie R.; Yosri, Mohammed; Chensue, Stephen W.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Osterholzer, John J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α) therapies have been increasingly used to treat inflammatory diseases and are associated with increased risk of invasive fungal infections, including Cryptococcus neoformans infection. Using a mouse model of cryptococcal infection, we investigated the mechanism by which disruption of early TNF-α signaling results in the development of nonprotective immunity against C. neoformans. We found that transient depletion of TNF-α inhibited pulmonary fungal clearance and enhanced extrapulmonary dissemination of C. neoformans during the adaptive phase of the immune response. Higher fungal burdens in TNF-α-depleted mice were accompanied by markedly impaired Th1 and Th17 responses in the infected lungs. Furthermore, early TNF-α depletion also resulted in disrupted transcriptional initiation of the Th17 polarization program and subsequent upregulation of Th1 genes in CD4+ T cells in the lung-associated lymph nodes (LALN) of C. neoformans-infected mice. These defects in LALN T cell responses were preceded by a dramatic shift from a classical toward an alternative activation of dendritic cells (DC) in the LALN of TNF-α-depleted mice. Taken together, our results indicate that early TNF-α signaling is required for optimal DC activation, and the initial Th17 response followed by Th1 transcriptional prepolarization of T cells in the LALN, which further drives the development of protective immunity against cryptococcal infection in the lungs. Thus, administration of anti-TNF-α may introduce a particularly greater risk for newly acquired fungal infections that require generation of protective Th1/Th17 responses for their containment and clearance. PMID:27406560

  13. Protective properties of sesamin against fluoride-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in kidney of carp (Cyprinus carpio) via JNK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jinling; Chen, Jianjie; Xie, Lingtian; Wang, Jundong; Feng, Cuiping; Song, Jing

    2015-10-01

    Sesamin, a major lignan derived from sesame seeds, has been reported to have many benefits and medicinal properties. However, its protective effects against fluoride-induced injury in kidney of fish have not been clarified. Previously we found that fluoride exposure caused damage and apoptosis in the kidneys of the common carp, Cyprinus carpio. In this study, the effects of sesamin on renal oxidative stress and apoptosis in fluoride-exposed fish were determined. The results showed that sesamin alleviated significantly fluoride-induced renal damage and apoptosis of carp in a dose-dependent manner, indicated by the histopathological examination and ultrastructural observation. Moreover, treatment with sesamin also inhibited significantly fluoride-induced remarkable enhancement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and oxidative stress, such as the increase of lipid peroxidation level and the depletion of intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH) level in kidney. To explore the underlying mechanisms of sesamin action, we found that activities of caspase-3 were notably inhibited by treatment with sesamin in the kidney of fluoride-exposed fish. Sesamin decreased the levels of p-JNK protein in kidney, which in turn inactivated pro-apoptotic signaling events by restoring the balance between mitochondrial pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bax proteins and by decreasing the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c in kidney of fluoride-exposed fish. JNK was also involved in the mitochondrial extrinsic apoptotic pathways of sesamin effects against fluoride-induced renal injury by regulating the levels of p-c-Jun, necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Bak proteins. These findings indicated that sesamin could protect kidney against fluoride-induced apoptosis by the oxidative stress downstream-mediated change in the inactivation of JNK signaling pathway. Taken together, sesamin plays an important role in maintaining renal health and preventing kidney from toxic damage induced by

  14. The protective role of liquiritin in high fructose-induced myocardial fibrosis via inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Jin-Jin; Sun, Li-Li; Li, Shuang-Zhan

    2016-12-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy has been known as an important complication of diabetes and characterized by persistent diastolic dysfunction, resulting in myocardial fibrosis, which is associated inflammatory response and oxidative stress. Liquiritin is a major constituent of Glycyrrhiza Radix, possessing various pharmacological activities and exhibiting various positive biological effects, including anti-cancer, anti-oxidative and neuroprotective effects. Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory properties and protective effects of lquiritin in high fructose-induced mice and cardiomyocytes to clarify the potential mechanism. The mice were divided into the control mice, 30% high fructose-induced mice, 10mg/kg liquiritin-treaed mice after fructose feeding and 20mg/kg liquiritin-treaed mice after fructose feeding. Liquiritin effectively reduced the lipid accumulation and insulin resistance induced by fructose feeding. In comparison to high fructose-feeding control mice, liquiritin-treated mice developed less myocardial fibrosis with lower expression of Collagen type I, Collagen type II and alpha smooth muscle-actin (α-SMA). In addition, liquiritin significantly reduced the inflammatory cytokine release and NF-κB phosphorylation through IKKα/IκBα signaling pathway suppression. Further, Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), including p38, ERK1/2 and JNK, was up-regulated for fructose stimulation, which was inactivated by liquiritin treatment in vivo and in vitro studies. Our data indicates that liquiritin has a protective effect against high fructose-induced myocardial fibrosis via suppression of NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways, and liquiritin may be a promising candidate for diabetes-related myocardial fibrosis treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. Transient carotid ischemia as a remote conditioning stimulus for myocardial protection in anesthetized rabbits: Insights into intracellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Andreadou, Ioanna; Bibli, Sofia-Iris; Mastromanolis, Emmanuel; Zoga, Anastasia; Efentakis, Panagiotis; Papaioannou, Nikolaos; Farmakis, Dimitrios; Kremastinos, Dimitrios Th; Iliodromitis, Efstathios K

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of perconditioning (Perc) applied at different time points along with the role of RISK, SAFE, STAT5 and eNOS pathways. Anesthetized rabbits were subjected to 30-min ischemia/3-hour reperfusion. Perc, consisted of 4 cycles of 1-min ischemia/reperfusion, was applied in the carotid artery at different time points. Perc was started and ended during ischemia, started during ischemia and ended at the beginning of reperfusion, started at the end of ischemia and ended at reperfusion and started and ended during reperfusion. The PI3K inhibitor wortmannin, or the JAK-2 inhibitor AG490, was also applied and the infarct size was assessed. In another series assigned to the previous groups, the phosphorylation of Akt, PI3K, ERKs1/2, GSK3β, STAT3, and STAT5 was evaluated. All Perc groups had smaller infarction compared to those without Perc, independently of PI3K or JAK-2 inhibition. STAT5 was the only molecule that was phosphorylated in parallel with cardioprotection. Since Src and angiotensin II mediate the STAT5 pathway, we administered the Scr inhibitor PP1 and the angiotensin II receptor antagonist valsartan. PP1 and valsartan prevented STAT5 phosphorylation, but did not abrogate the effect of Perc. Furthermore, the NOS inhibitor L-NAME was administered and abrogated the infarct size limiting effect of Perc. In parallel, the expression of cleaved caspase-3 was elevated only in the control and Perc-A-L-NAME groups. Perc reduces infarction independently of RISK, SAFE and STAT5 pathways. Src kinase and angiotensin II play a predominant role in STAT5 activation. eNOS may protect the myocardium through inhibition of apoptosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Quercetin protects against aluminium induced oxidative stress and promotes mitochondrial biogenesis via activation of the PGC-1α signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deep Raj; Sunkaria, Aditya; Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Sharma, Reeta Kumari; Verma, Deepika; Priyanka, Kumari; Bal, Amanjit; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2015-12-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the protective effect of quercetin administration against aluminium-induced oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of PGC-1α and its downstream targets, i.e. NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam in mitochondrial biogenesis. Aluminium lactate (10mg/kg b.wt./day) was administered intragastrically to rats, which were pre-treated with quercetin 6h before aluminium (10mg/kg b.wt./day, intragastrically) for 12 weeks. We found a decrease in ROS levels, mitochondrial DNA oxidation and citrate synthase activity in the hippocampus (HC) and corpus striatum (CS) regions of rat brain treated with quercetin. Besides this an increase in the mRNA levels of the mitochondrial encoded subunits - ND1, ND2, ND3, Cyt b, COX1, COX3 and ATPase6 along with increased expression of nuclear encoded subunits COX4, COX5A and COX5B of electron transport chain (ETC). In quercetin treated group an increase in the mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial content in both the regions of rat brain was observed. The PGC-1α was up regulated in quercetin treated rats along with NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam, which act downstream from PGC-1α. Electron microscopy results revealed a significant decrease in the mitochondrial cross-section area, mitochondrial perimeter length and increase in mitochondrial number in case of quercetin treated rats as compared to aluminium treated ones. Therefore it seems quercetin increases mitochondrial biogenesis and makes it an almost ideal flavanoid to control or limit the damage that has been associated with the defective mitochondrial function seen in many neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lung endothelial barrier protection by iloprost in the two-hit models of VILI involves inhibition of Rho signaling

    PubMed Central

    Birukova, Anna A.; Fu, Panfeng; Xing, Junjie; Cokic, Ivan; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation at high tidal volume may cause pulmonary capillary leakage and acute lung inflammation culminating in ventilator-induced lung injury. Iloprost is a stable synthetic analogue of prostaglandin I2 used for treatment of pulmonary hypertension, which also showed endothelium-dependent anti-edemagenic effects in the models of lung injury. To test the hypothesis that iloprost may attenuate lung inflammation and lung endothelial barrier disruption caused by pathologic lung distension and coagulation system component thrombin, we used cell and animal two-hit models of ventilator-induced lung injury. Mice received triple injection of iloprost (2 μg/kg, intravenous instillation) at 0, 40 and 80 min after onset of high tidal volume (HTV) mechanical ventilation (30 ml/kg, 4 hrs) combined with administration of thrombin receptor activating peptide 6 (TRAP6, 3 × 10−7 mol/mouse, intratracheal instillation). After 4 hrs of ventilation, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), histological analysis, and measurements of Evans blue accumulation in the lung tissue lung were performed. Effects of iloprost on endothelial barrier dysfunction were further assessed in pulmonary endothelial cells (EC) exposed to thrombin and pathologic (18%) cyclic stretch. Combination of HTV and TRAP6 enhanced accumulation of neutrophils in BAL fluid and lung parenchyma, increased BAL protein content and endothelial permeability judged by Evans blue extravasation in the lung tissue. These effects were markedly attenuated by iloprost. Application of 18% cyclic stretch to pulmonary EC enhanced thrombin-induced EC paracellular gap formation and Rho-GTPase-mediated phosphorylation of regulatory myosin light chains and myosin phosphatase. Iloprost markedly inhibited Rho-kinase mediated site-specific phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase, and prevented cyclic stretch- and thrombin-induced endothelial monolayer disruption. This study characterizes for the first time the protective effects of

  18. Pregnancy in Obese Mice Protects Selectively against Visceral Adiposity and Is Associated with Increased Adipocyte Estrogen Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Pedroni, Silvia M. A.; Turban, Sophie; Kipari, Tiina; Dunbar, Donald R.; McInnes, Kerry; Saunders, Philippa T. K.; Morton, Nicholas M.; Norman, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal obesity is linked with increased adverse pregnancy outcomes for both mother and child. The metabolic impact of excessive fat within the context of pregnancy is not fully understood. We used a mouse model of high fat (HF) feeding to induce maternal obesity to identify adipose tissue-mediated mechanisms driving metabolic dysfunction in pregnant and non-pregnant obese mice. As expected, chronic HF-feeding for 12 weeks preceding pregnancy increased peripheral (subcutaneous) and visceral (mesenteric) fat mass. However, unexpectedly at late gestation (E18.5) HF-fed mice exhibited a remarkable normalization of visceral but not peripheral adiposity, with a 53% reduction in non-pregnant visceral fat mass expressed as a proportion of body weight (P<0.001). In contrast, in control animals, pregnancy had no effect on visceral fat mass proportion. Obesity exaggerated glucose intolerance at mid-pregnancy (E14.5). However by E18.5, there were no differences, in glucose tolerance between obese and control mice. Transcriptomic analysis of visceral fat from HF-fed dams at E18.5 revealed reduced expression of genes involved in de novo lipogenesis (diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 2 - Dgat2) and inflammation (chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 - Ccl2) and upregulation of estrogen receptor α (ERα) compared to HF non pregnant. Attenuation of adipose inflammation was functionally confirmed by a 45% reduction of CD11b+CD11c+ adipose tissue macrophages (expressed as a proportion of all stromal vascular fraction cells) in HF pregnant compared to HF non pregnant animals (P<0.001). An ERα selective agonist suppressed both de novo lipogenesis and expression of lipogenic genes in adipocytes in vitro. These data show that, in a HF model of maternal obesity, late gestation is associated with amelioration of visceral fat hypertrophy, inflammation and glucose intolerance, and suggest that these effects are mediated in part by elevated visceral adipocyte ERα signaling. PMID:24732937

  19. Protective effect of curcumin on acute airway inflammation of allergic asthma in mice through Notch1-GATA3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chong, Lei; Zhang, Weixi; Nie, Ying; Yu, Gang; Liu, Liu; Lin, Li; Wen, Shunhang; Zhu, Lili; Li, Changchong

    2014-10-01

    Curcumin, a natural product derived from the plant Curcuma longa, has been found to have anti-inflammatory, antineoplastic and antifibrosis effects. It has been reported that curcumin attenuates allergic airway inflammation in mice through inhibiting NF-κB and its downstream transcription factor GATA3. It also has been proved the antineoplastic effect of curcumin through down-regulating Notch1 receptor and its downstream nuclear transcription factor NF-κB levels. In this study, we aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin on acute allergic asthma and its underlying mechanisms. 36 male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups (normal, asthma, asthma+budesonide and asthma+curcumin groups). BALF (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) and lung tissues were analyzed for airway inflammation and the expression of Notch1, Notch2, Notch3, Notch4 and the downstream transcription factor GATA3. Our findings showed that the levels of Notch1 and Notch2 receptors were up-regulated in asthma group, accompanied by the increased expression of GATA3. But the expression of Notch2 receptor was lower than Notch1 receptor. Curcumin pretreatment improved the airway inflammatory cells infiltration and reversed the increasing levels of Notch1/2 receptors and GATA3. Notch3 receptor was not expressed in all of the four groups. Notch4 receptor protein and mRNA expression level in the four groups had no significant differences. The results of the present study suggested that Notch1 and Notch2 receptor, major Notch1 receptor, played an important role in the development of allergic airway inflammation and the inhibition of Notch1-GATA3 signaling pathway by curcumin can prevent the development and deterioration of the allergic airway inflammation. This may be a possible therapeutic option of allergic asthma.

  20. In Brachypodium a complex signaling is actuated to protect cells from proteotoxic stress and facilitate seed filling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Jin; Zemelis-Durfee, Starla; Wilkerson, Curtis; Brandizzi, Federica

    2017-07-01

    A conserved UPR machinery is required for Brachypodium ER stress resistance and grain filling. Human and livestock diets depend on the accumulation of cereal storage proteins and carbohydrates, including mixed-linkage glucan (MLG), in the endosperm during seed development. Storage proteins and proteins responsible for the production of carbohydrates are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Unfavorable conditions during growth that hamper the ER biosynthetic capacity, such as heat, can cause a potentially lethal condition known as ER stress, which activates the unfolded protein response (UPR), a signaling response designed to mitigate ER stress. The UPR relies primarily on a conserved ER-associated kinase and ribonuclease, IRE1, which splices the mRNA of a transcription factor (TF), such as bZIP60 in plants, to produce an active TF that controls the expression of ER resident chaperones. Here, we investigated activation of the UPR in Brachypodium, as a model to study the UPR in seeds of a monocotyledon species, as well as the consequences of heat stress on MLG deposition in seeds. We identified a Brachypodium bZIP60 orthologue and determined a positive correlation between bZIP60 splicing and ER stress induced by chemicals and heat. Each stress condition led to transcriptional modulation of several BiP genes, supporting the existence of condition-specific BiP regulation. Finally, we found that the UPR is elevated at the early stage of seed development and that MLG production is negatively affected by heat stress via modulation of MLG synthase accumulation. We propose that successful accomplishment of seed filling is strongly correlated with the ability of the plant to sustain ER stress via the UPR.

  1. Caloric restriction protects against electrical kindling of the amygdala by inhibiting the mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Phillips-Farfán, Bryan V.; Rubio Osornio, María del Carmen; Custodio Ramírez, Verónica; Paz Tres, Carlos; Carvajal Aguilera, Karla G.

    2015-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to possess antiepileptic properties; however its mechanism of action is poorly understood. CR might inhibit the activity of the mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling cascade, which seems to participate crucially in the generation of epilepsy. Thus, we investigated the effect of CR on the mTOR pathway and whether CR modified epilepsy generation due to electrical amygdala kindling. The former was studied by analyzing the phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, protein kinase B and the ribosomal protein S6. The mTOR cascade is regulated by energy and by insulin levels, both of which may be changed by CR; thus we investigated if CR altered the levels of energy substrates in the blood or the level of insulin in plasma. Finally, we studied if CR modified the expression of genes that encode proteins participating in the mTOR pathway. CR increased the after-discharge threshold and tended to reduce the after-discharge duration, indicating an anti-convulsive action. CR diminished the phosphorylation of protein kinase B and ribosomal protein S6, suggesting an inhibition of the mTOR cascade. However, CR did not change glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate or insulin levels; thus the effects of CR were independent from them. Interestingly, CR also did not modify the expression of any investigated gene. The results suggest that the anti-epileptic effect of CR may be partly due to inhibition of the mTOR pathway. PMID:25814935

  2. KLF15 protects against isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy via regulation of cell death and inhibition of Akt/mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Guo, Yudong; Liu, Xiaofeng; Du, Yongjian

    2017-03-20

    Increasing evidence indicate that the Krüppel-like factor KLF15, a member of Cys2/His2 zinc-finger DNA-binding proteins, attenuates cardiac hypertrophy. However, the role of KLF15 in cardiovascular system is largely unknown and the exact molecular mechanism of its protective function is not fully elucidated. In the present study, we established a mouse model of cardiac hypertrophy and found that KLF15 expression was down-regulated in hypertrophic hearts. To evaluate the roles of KLF15 in cardiac hypertrophy, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing KLF15 of KLF15 knockdown mice and subsequently induced cardiac hypertrophy. The results indicated that KLF15 overexpression protects mice from ISO-induced cardiac hypertrophy, with reduced ratios of heart weight (HW)/body weight (BW) and cross-sectional area. We also observed that KLF15 overexpression attenuated cardiac fibrosis, inhibited apoptosis and induced autophagy in cardiomyocytes compared with KLF15 knockdown mice. More importantly, we found that the KLF15 overexpression inhibited the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Taken together, our findings imply that KLF15 possesses potential anti-hypertrophic and anti-fibrotic functions, possibly via regulation of cell death pathways and the inhibition of Akt/mTOR axis. KLF15 may constitute an efficient candidate drug for the treatment of heart failure and other cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Protective effects of kolaviron and gallic acid against cobalt-chloride-induced cardiorenal dysfunction via suppression of oxidative stress and activation of the ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Akinrinde, Akinleye Stephen; Omobowale, Olutayo; Oyagbemi, Ademola; Asenuga, Ebunoluwa; Ajibade, Temitayo

    2016-12-01

    Cobalt (Co) toxicity is a potential public health problem due to recent renewed use of Co in orthopedic implants, dietary supplements, and blood doping in athletes and horses. We investigated the protective roles of kolaviron (KV), a bi-flavonoid of Garcinia kola, and gallic acid (GA) on cobalt chloride (CoCl2)-induced cardiorenal damage in rats. CoCl2 caused significant increases (p < 0.05) in serum creatine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate transaminase (AST), xanthine oxidase (XO), urea, creatinine, malondialdehyde, H2O2, nitric oxide, as well as C-reactive protein expression, along with significant (p < 0.05) reduction in cardiac and renal expression of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione S-transferase. KV and GA prevented the toxic effects of CoCl2 by stimulating ERK expression and reversing Co-induced biochemical changes. Administration of CoCl2 alone did not significantly alter ECG patterns in the rats, although co-treatment with KV (200 mg/kg) produced QT-segment prolongation and also appeared to potentiate Co hypotension. Histopathology of the heart and kidneys of rats treated with KV and GA confirmed the biochemical data. KV and GA thus protected against cardiac and renal damage in Co intoxication via antioxidant and (or) cell survival mechanisms, possibly involving ERK activation.

  4. Fucoidan protects ARPE-19 cells from oxidative stress via normalization of reactive oxygen species generation through the Ca²⁺-dependent ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Haiyan; Wang, Qingfa; Liang, Hongyan; Jiang, Xiaofeng

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) and it is the main cause of loss of vision. In previous years, interest in the biological activities of marine organisms has intensified. The effect of fucoidan from the seaweed Fucus vesiculosus on the molecular mechanisms of numerous diseases has been studied, while to date, its effect on DR was yet to be investigated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of fucoidan in DR. The human retinal pigment epithelial cell line ARPE‑19 was exposed to high D‑glucose in the presence or absence of fucoidan. Cell viability was monitored using MTT and lactate dehydrogenase assays. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured using fluorescence spectrophotometry. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry using Annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate staining. Ca2+ influx was measured with a calcium imaging system and the activation of the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) protein was evaluated using western blot analysis. The non‑toxic fucoidan protected ARPE‑19 cells from high glucose‑induced cell death and normalized high glucose‑induced generation of ROS. Fucoidan also inhibited high glucose‑induced cell apoptosis, as well as the Ca2+ influx and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in ARPE‑19 cells. Taken together, these findings indicated that fucoidan protects ARPE‑19 cells against high glucose‑induced oxidative damage via normalization of ROS generation through the Ca2+‑dependent ERK signaling pathway.

  5. Salvianolic acid B protects against paraquat-induced pulmonary injury by mediating Nrf2/Nox4 redox balance and TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Cao, Bo; Zhang, Di; Xiao, Na; Chen, Hong; Li, Guo-Qiang; Peng, Shou-Chun; Wei, Lu-Qing

    2016-10-15

    The present study was aimed at exploring the protective effects of Salvianolic acid B (SalB) against paraquat (PQ)-induced lung injury in mice. Lung fibrotic injuries were induced in mice by a single intragastrical administration of 300mg/kg PQ, then the mice were administrated with 200mg/kg, 400mg/kg SalB, 100mg/kg vitamin C (Vit C) and dexamethasone (DXM) for 14days. PQ-triggered structure distortion, collagen overproduction, excessive inflammatory infiltration, pro-inflammatory cytokine release, and oxidative stress damages in lung tissues and mortality of mice were attenuated by SalB in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, SalB was noted to enhance the expression and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and reduce expression of the reactive oxygen species-generating enzyme Nox4 [NADPH (reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase-4]. SalB also inhibited the increasing expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and the phosphorylation of its downstream target Smad3 which were enhanced by PQ. These results suggest that SalB may exert protective effects against PQ-induced lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis. Its mechanisms involve the mediation of Nrf2/Nox4 redox balance and TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Naoxintong Protects Primary Neurons from Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reoxygenation Induced Injury through PI3K-Akt Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pei; Zhu, Jinqiang; Yan, Chen; Li, Lin; Zhang, Han; Zhang, Meng; Gao, Xiumei

    2016-01-01

    Naoxintong capsule (NXT), developed from Buyang Huanwu Decoction, has shown the neuroprotective effects in cerebrovascular diseases, but the neuroprotection mechanisms of NXT on ischemia/reperfusion injured neurons have not yet been well known. In this study, we established the oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) induced neurons injury model and treat the neurons with cerebrospinal fluid containing NXT (BNC) to investigate the effects of NXT on OGD/R induced neurons injury and potential mechanisms. BNC improved neuron viability and decreased apoptotic rate induced by OGD/R. BNC attenuated OGD/R induced cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ overload, ROS generation, intracellular NO levels and nNOS mRNA increase, and cytochrome-c release when compared with OGD/R group. BNC significantly inhibited both mPTP opening and ΔΨm depolarization. BNC increased Bcl-2 expression and decreased Bax expression, upregulated the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, downregulated caspase-3 mRNA and caspase-9 mRNA expression, and decreased cleaved caspase-3 expression and caspase-3 activity. BNC increased phosphorylation of Akt following OGD/R, while LY294002 attenuated BNC induced increase of phosphorylated Akt expression. Our study demonstrated that NXT protected primary neurons from OGD/R induced injury by inhibiting calcium overload and ROS generation, protecting mitochondria, and inhibiting mitochondrial apoptotic pathway which was mediated partially by PI3K-Akt signaling pathway activation. PMID:26949405

  7. Protection by taurine against INOS-dependent DNA damage in heavily exercised skeletal muscle by inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Hiromichi; Okita, Shinya; Kato, Toshihiro; Naka, Toru; Kawanishi, Shosuke; Ohnishi, Shiho; Oshida, Yoshiharu; Ma, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Taurine protects against tissue damage in a variety of models involving inflammation, especially the muscle. We set up a heavy exercise bout protocol for rats consisting of climbing ran on a treadmill to examine the effect of an intraabdominal dose of taurine (300 mg/kg/day) administered 1 h before heavy exercise for ten consecutive days. Each group ran on the treadmill at 20 m/min, 25% grade, for 20 min or until exhaustion within 20 min once each 10 days. Exhaustion was the point when an animal was unable to right itself when placed on its side. The muscle damage was associated with an increased accumulation of 8-nitroguanine and 8-OHdG in the nuclei of skeletal muscle cells. The immunoreactivities for NF-κB and iNOS were also increased in the exercise group. Taurine ameliorated heavy exercise-induced muscle DNA damage to a significant extent since it reduced the accumulation of 8-nitroguanine and 8-OHdG, possibly by down-regulating the expression of iNOS through a modulatory action on NF-κB signaling pathway. This study demonstrates for the first time that taurine can protect against intense exercise-induced nitrosative inflammation and ensuing DNA damage in the skeletal muscle of rats by preventing iNOS expression and the nitrosative stress generated by heavy exercise.

  8. Protective effect of butin against ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial injury in diabetic mice: involvement of the AMPK/GSK-3β/Nrf2 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jialin; Guan, Yue; Mu, Fei; Guo, Chao; Zhang, Enhu; Yin, Ying; Wei, Guo; Zhu, Yanrong; Cui, Jia; Cao, Jinyi; Weng, Yan; Wang, Yanhua; Xi, Miaomiao; Wen, Aidong

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation contributes to development of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). This study was designed to determine the effect of an antioxidant butin (BUT) on ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial injury in diabetic mice. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) was induced in C57/BL6J diabetes mice. Infarct size and cardiac function were detected. For in vitro study, H9c2 cells were used. To clarify the mechanisms, proteases inhibitors or siRNA were used. Proteins levels were investigated by Western blotting. In diabetes MI/R model, BUT significantly alleviated myocardial infarction and improved heart function, together with prevented diabetes-induced cardiac oxidative damage. The expression of Nrf2, AMPK, AKT and GSK-3β were significantly increased by BUT. Furthermore, in cultured H9c2 cardiac cells silencing Nrf2 gene with its siRNA abolished the BUT’s prevention of I/R-induced myocardial injury. Inhibition of AMPK and AKT signaling by relative inhibitor or specific siRNA decreased the level of BUT-induced Nrf2 expression, and diminished the protective effects of BUT. The interplay relationship between GSK-3β and Nrf2 was also verified with relative overexpression and inhibitors. Our findings indicated that BUT protected against I/R-induced ROS-mediated apoptosis by upregulating the AMPK/Akt/GSK-3β pathway, which further activated Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzymes in diabetic cardiomyocytes exposed to I/R. PMID:28128361

  9. Phytoestrogen Genistein Protects Against Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction in Vascular Endothelial Cells Through PKA-Mediated Suppression of RhoA Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhenquan; Zhen, Wei; Velayutham Anandh Babu, Pon

    2013-01-01

    The soy-derived phytoestrogen genistein has received attention for its potential to improve vascular function, but its mechanism remains unclear. Here, we report that genistein at physiologically relevant concentrations (0.1–10 μM) significantly inhibited thrombin-induced increase in endothelial monolayer permeability. Genistein also reduced the formation of stress fibers by thrombin and suppressed thrombin-induced phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) on Ser19/Thr18 in endothelial cells (ECs). Genistein had no effect on resting intracellular [Ca2+] or thrombin-induced increase in Ca2+ mobilization. Addition of the inhibitors of endothelial nitric oxide synthase or estrogen receptor did not alter the protective effect of genistein. RhoA is a small GTPase that plays an important role in actin-myosin contraction and endothelial barrier dysfunction. RhoA inhibitor blocked the protective effect of genistein on endothelial permeability and also ablated thrombin-induced MLC-phosphorylation in ECs. Inhibition of PKA significantly attenuated the effect of genistein on thrombin-induced EC permeability, MLC phosphorylation, and RhoA membrane translocation in ECs. Furthermore, thrombin diminished cAMP production in ECs, which were prevented by treatment with genistein. These findings demonstrated that genistein improves thrombin-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction in ECs through PKA-mediated suppression of RhoA signaling. PMID:23254196

  10. A Novel Role for Interleukin-27 (IL-27) as Mediator of Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Protection Mediated via Differential Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) Protein Signaling and Induction of Antibacterial and Anti-inflammatory Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Diegelmann, Julia; Olszak, Torsten; Göke, Burkhard; Blumberg, Richard S.; Brand, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    The role of the Th17 cell inhibiting cytokine IL-27 in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease is contradictory. Its effects on the intestinal barrier have so far not been investigated, which was the aim of this study. We show that intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) express both IL-27 receptor subunits IL-27RA and gp130. The IL-27 receptor expression is up-regulated in intestinal inflammation and during bacterial infection. IL-27 activates ERK and p38 MAPKs as well as Akt, STAT1, STAT3, and STAT6 in IEC. IL-27 significantly enhances cell proliferation and IEC restitution. These functions of IL-27 are dependent on the activation of STAT3 and STAT6 signaling pathways. As analyzed by microarray, IL-27 modulates the expression of 428 target genes in IEC (316 up and 112 down; p < 0.05). IL-27 as well as its main target genes are up-regulated in colonic tissue and IEC isolated from mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. The IL-27-induced expression of the anti-bacterial gene deleted in malignant brain tumor 1 (DMBT1) is mediated by p38 and STAT3 signaling, whereas the activation of the anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial gene indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1) is dependent on STAT1 signal transduction. IL-27-induced indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase enzymatic activity leads to growth inhibition of intestinal bacteria by causing local tryptophan depletion. For the first time, we characterize IL-27 as a mediator of intestinal epithelial barrier protection mediated via transcriptional activation of anti-inflammatory and antibacterial target genes. PMID:22069308

  11. C33(S), a novel PDE9A inhibitor, protects against rat cardiac hypertrophy through upregulating cGMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan-Xia; Li, Zhuo-Ming; Cai, Si-Dong; Li, Jing-Yan; He, Ping; Huang, Yi; Feng, Guo-Shuai; Luo, Hai-Bin; Chen, Shao-Rui; Liu, Pei-Qing

    2017-09-01

    Phosphodiesterase-9A (PDE9A) expression is upregulated during cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Accumulating evidence suggests that PDE9A might be a promising therapeutic target for heart diseases. The present study sought to investigate the effects and underlying mechanisms of C33(S), a novel selective PDE9A inhibitor, on cardiac hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs) with PE (100 μmol/L) or ISO (1 μmol/L) induced cardiac hypertrophy characterized by significantly increased cell surface areas and increased expression of fetal genes (ANF and BNP). Furthermore, PE or ISO significantly increased the expression of PDE9A in the cells; whereas knockdown of PDE9A significantly alleviated PE-induced hypertrophic responses. Moreover, pretreatment with PDE9A inhibitor C33(S) (50 and 500 nmol/L) or PF-7943 (2 μmol/L) also alleviated the cardiac hypertrophic responses in PE-treated NRCMs. Abdominal aortic constriction (AAC)-induced cardiac hypertrophy and ISO-induced heart failure were established in SD rats. In ISO-treated rats, oral administration of C33(S) (9, 3, and 1 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), for 3 consecutive weeks) significantly increased fractional shortening (43.55%±3.98%, 54.79%±1.95%, 43.98%±7.96% vs 32.18%±6.28%), ejection fraction (72.97%±4.64%, 84.29%±1.56%, 73.41%±9.37% vs 49.17%±4.20%) and cardiac output (60.01±9.11, 69.40±11.63, 58.08±8.47 mL/min vs 48.97±2.11 mL/min) but decreased the left ventricular internal diameter, suggesting that the transition to heart failure was postponed by C33(S). We further revealed that C33(S) significantly elevated intracellular cGMP levels, phosphorylation of phospholamban (PLB) and expression of SERCA2a in PE-treated NRCMs in vitro and in ISO-induced heart failure model in vivo. Our results demonstrate that C33(S) effectively protects against cardiac hypertrophy and postpones the transition to heart failure, suggesting that it is a promising agent in the treatment of

  12. Nebula/DSCR1 Upregulation Delays Neurodegeneration and Protects against APP-Induced Axonal Transport Defects by Restoring Calcineurin and GSK-3β Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jillian L.; Chang, Karen T.

    2013-01-01

    Post-mortem brains from Down syndrome (DS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients show an upregulation of the Down syndrome critical region 1 protein (DSCR1), but its contribution to AD is not known. To gain insights into the role of DSCR1 in AD, we explored the functional interaction between DSCR1 and the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which is known to cause AD when duplicated or upregulated in DS. We find that the Drosophila homolog of DSCR1, Nebula, delays neurodegeneration and ameliorates axonal transport defects caused by APP overexpression. Live-imaging reveals that Nebula facilitates the transport of synaptic proteins and mitochondria affected by APP upregulation. Furthermore, we show that Nebula upregulation protects against axonal transport defects by restoring calcineurin and GSK-3β signaling altered by APP overexpression, thereby preserving cargo-motor interactions. As impaired transport of essential organelles caused by APP perturbation is thought to be an underlying cause of synaptic failure and neurodegeneration in AD, our findings imply that correcting calcineurin and GSK-3β signaling can prevent APP-induced pathologies. Our data further suggest that upregulation of Nebula/DSCR1 is neuroprotective in the presence of APP upregulation and provides evidence for calcineurin inhibition as a novel target for therapeutic intervention in preventing axonal transport impairments associated with AD. PMID:24086147

  13. N-acetylcysteine amide protects renal proximal tubular epithelial cells against iohexol-induced apoptosis by blocking p38 MAPK and iNOS signaling.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xuezhong; Celsi, Gianni; Carlsson, Katarina; Norgren, Svante; Chen, Ming

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is still poorly understood and apoptosis via oxidative stress has been proposed as one possible mechanism. We therefore studied the apoptotic signaling mechanism in CIN and also tested whether the new antioxidant N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA) could prevent CIN. LLC-PK1 cells were exposed to a widely used contrast agent, iohexol (IH). Cytotoxicity was assessed with morphology and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Cell death was analyzed by the DNA content analysis and PARP cleavage. Protein expression was assessed with Western blotting. We observed cell death with apoptotic features in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Initiation of IH-induced apoptosis was mediated by upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 and Mcl-1, which was preceded by p38 MAPK activation and iNOS induction. Inhibitors of p38 MAPK and iNOS partially abolished IH-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, we found pretreatment with NACA partially protected cells from IH-induced death by reverting the expression of Bcl-2, Mc1-1 and Bax expression through inhibition of p38 MAPK and iNOS pathway. This study demonstrates that apoptosis occurs during CIN. Apoptosis is associated with activations of p38 MAPK and iNOS. Pretreatment with the antioxidant NACA could prevent IH-induced cell death by blocking the p38 MAPK/iNOS signaling pathway. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. PME-1 protects extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway activity from protein phosphatase 2A-mediated inactivation in human malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Puustinen, Pietri; Junttila, Melissa R; Vanhatupa, Sari; Sablina, Anna A; Hector, Melissa E; Teittinen, Kaisa; Raheem, Olayinka; Ketola, Kirsi; Lin, Shujun; Kast, Juergen; Haapasalo, Hannu; Hahn, William C; Westermarck, Jukka

    2009-04-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activity is regulated by the antagonist function of activating kinases and inactivating protein phosphatases. Sustained ERK pathway activity is commonly observed in human malignancies; however, the mechanisms by which the pathway is protected from phosphatase-mediated inactivation in the tumor tissue remain obscure. Here, we show that methylesterase PME-1-mediated inhibition of the protein phosphatase 2A promotes basal ERK pathway activity and is required for efficient growth factor response. Mechanistically, PME-1 is shown to support ERK pathway signaling upstream of Raf, but downstream of growth factor receptors and protein kinase C. In malignant gliomas, PME-1 expression levels correlate with both ERK activity and cell proliferation in vivo. Moreover, PME-1 expression significantly correlates with disease progression in human astrocytic gliomas (n=222). Together, these observations identify PME-1 expression as one mechanism by which ERK pathway activity is maintained in cancer cells and suggest an important functional role for PME-1 in the disease progression of human astrocytic gliomas.

  15. Nebula/DSCR1 upregulation delays neurodegeneration and protects against APP-induced axonal transport defects by restoring calcineurin and GSK-3β signaling.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jillian L; Chang, Karen T

    2013-01-01

    Post-mortem brains from Down syndrome (DS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients show an upregulation of the Down syndrome critical region 1 protein (DSCR1), but its contribution to AD is not known. To gain insights into the role of DSCR1 in AD, we explored the functional interaction between DSCR1 and the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which is known to cause AD when duplicated or upregulated in DS. We find that the Drosophila homolog of DSCR1, Nebula, delays neurodegeneration and ameliorates axonal transport defects caused by APP overexpression. Live-imaging reveals that Nebula facilitates the transport of synaptic proteins and mitochondria affected by APP upregulation. Furthermore, we show that Nebula upregulation protects against axonal transport defects by restoring calcineurin and GSK-3β signaling altered by APP overexpression, thereby preserving cargo-motor interactions. As impaired transport of essential organelles caused by APP perturbation is thought to be an underlying cause of synaptic failure and neurodegeneration in AD, our findings imply that correcting calcineurin and GSK-3β signaling can prevent APP-induced pathologies. Our data further suggest that upregulation of Nebula/DSCR1 is neuroprotective in the presence of APP upregulation and provides evidence for calcineurin inhibition as a novel target for therapeutic intervention in preventing axonal transport impairments associated with AD.

  16. TLR3 signaling in macrophages is indispensable for the protective immunity of invariant natural killer T cells against enterovirus 71 infection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kai; Yang, Juhao; Luo, Kaiming; Yang, Chunhui; Zhang, Na; Xu, Ruifeng; Chen, Jianxia; Jin, Mingfei; Xu, Bin; Guo, Nining; Wang, Jianrong; Chen, Zuolong; Cui, Ying; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Yan; Deng, Chaoyang; Bai, Li; Ge, Baoxue; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Shen, Hao; Yang, Chun-Fu; Leng, Qibin

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the most virulent pathogen among enteroviruses that cause hand, foot and mouth disease in children but rarely in adults. The mechanisms that determine the age-dependent susceptibility remain largely unclear. Here, we found that the paucity of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells together with immaturity of the immune system was related to the susceptibility of neonatal mice to EV71 infection. iNKT cells were crucial antiviral effector cells to protect young mice from EV71 infection before their adaptive immune systems were fully mature. EV71 infection led to activation of iNKT cells depending on signaling through TLR3 but not other TLRs. Surprisingly, iNKT cell activation during EV71 infection required TLR3 signaling in macrophages, but not in dendritic cells (DCs). Mechanistically, interleukin (IL)-12 and endogenous CD1d-restricted antigens were both required for full activation of iNKT cells. Furthermore, CD1d-deficiency led to dramatically increased viral loads in central nervous system and more severe disease in EV71-infected mice. Altogether, our results suggest that iNKT cells may be involved in controlling EV71 infection in children when their adaptive immune systems are not fully developed, and also imply that iNKT cells might be an intervention target for treating EV71-infected patients.

  17. Lycium barbarum Polysaccharides Protect against Trimethyltin Chloride-Induced Apoptosis via Sonic Hedgehog and PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathways in Mouse Neuro-2a Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wanyun; Pan, Xiaoqi; Li, Tao; Zhang, Changchun; Shi, Nian

    2016-01-01

    Trimethyltin chloride (TMT) is a classic neurotoxicant that can cause severe neurodegenerative diseases. Some signaling pathways involving cell death play pivotal roles in the central nervous system. In this study, the role of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and PI3K/Akt pathways in TMT-induced apoptosis and protective effect of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) on mouse neuro-2a (N2a) cells were investigated. Results showed that TMT treatment significantly enhanced apoptosis, upregulated proapoptotic Bax, downregulated antiapoptotic Bcl-2 expression, and increased caspase-3 activity in a dose-dependent manner in N2a cells. TMT induced oxidative stress in cells, performing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) excessive generation, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity reduction. TMT significantly decreased phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and inhibited Shh and PI3K/Akt pathways. However, the addition of LBP upregulated GSK-3β phosphorylation, activated Shh and PI3K/Akt pathways, and eventually reduced apoptosis and oxidative stress caused by TMT. The interaction between Shh and PI3K/Akt pathways was clarified by specific PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or Shh inhibitor GDC-0449. Moreover, LY294002 and GDC-0449 pretreatment both induced phosphorylated GSK-3β downregulation and significantly promoted apoptosis induced by TMT. These results suggest that LBP could reduce TMT-induced N2a cells apoptosis by regulating GSK-3β phosphorylation, Shh, and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways.

  18. Protective Effects of Celastrol on Diabetic Liver Injury via TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB Signaling Pathway in Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Han, Li-ping; Li, Chun-jun; Sun, Bei; Xie, Yun; Guan, Yue; Ma, Ze-jun; Chen, Li-ming

    2016-01-01

    Immune and inflammatory pathways play a central role in the pathogenesis of diabetic liver injury. Celastrol is a potent immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory agent. So far, there is no evidence regarding the mechanism of innate immune alterations of celastrol on diabetic liver injury in type 2 diabetic animal models. The present study was aimed at investigating protective effects of celastrol on the liver injury in diabetic rats and at elucidating the possible involved mechanisms. We analyzed the liver histopathological and biochemical changes and the expressions of TLR4 mediated signaling pathway. Compared to the normal control group, diabetic rats were found to have obvious steatohepatitis and proinflammatory cytokine activities were significantly upregulated. Celastrol-treated diabetic rats show reduced hepatic inflammation and macrophages infiltration. The expressions of TLR4, MyD88, NF-κB, and downstream inflammatory factors IL-1β and TNFα in the hepatic tissue of treated rats were downregulated in a dose-dependent manner. We firstly found that celastrol treatment could delay the progression of diabetic liver disease in type 2 diabetic rats via inhibition of TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling cascade pathways and its downstream inflammatory effectors. PMID:27057550

  19. Human Amnion-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Protect Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells against Oxidative Stress-Mediated Dysfunction via ERK1/2 MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuli; Ma, Junchi; Du, Yifei; Miao, Jing; Chen, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that bone is especially sensitive to oxidative stress, causing bone loss in the elderly. Previous studies indicated that human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HAMSCs), obtained from human amniotic membranes, exerted osteoprotective effects in vivo. However, the potential of HAMSCs as seed cells against oxidative stress-mediated dysfunction is unknown. In this study, we systemically investigated their antioxidative and osteogenic effects in vitro. Here, we demonstrated that HAMSCs signi cantly promoted the proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of H2O2-induced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs), and down-regulated the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. Further, our results suggest that activation of the ERK1/2 MAPK signal transduction pathway is essential for both HAMSCs-mediated osteogenic and protective effects against oxidative stress-induced dysfunction in HBMSCs. U0126, a highly selective inhibitor of extracellular ERK1/2 MAPK signaling, significantly suppressed the antioxidative and osteogenic effects in HAMSCs. In conclusion, by modulating HBMSCs, HAMSCs show a strong potential in treating oxidative stress- mediated bone deficiency. PMID:26743906

  20. Schisandra Lignan Extract Protects against Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Liver Injury in Mice by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Regulating the NF-κB and JNK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qingshan; Zhan, Qi; Li, Ying; Sun, Sen; Zhao, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Schisandra chinensis (S. chinensis) is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine widely used for the treatment of liver disease, whose main active components are lignans. However, the action mechanisms of the lignans in S. chinensis remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect and related molecular mechanism of Schisandra lignan extract (SLE) against carbon tetrachloride- (CCl4-) induced acute liver injury in mice. Different doses of SLE at 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg were administered daily by gavage for 5 days before CCl4 treatment. The results showed that SLE significantly decreased the activities of serum ALT/AST and reduced liver pathologic changes induced by CCl4. Pretreatment with SLE not only decreased the content of MDA but increased SOD, GSH, and GSH-Px activities in the liver, suggesting that SLE attenuated CCl4-induced oxidative stress. The expression levels of inflammatory cytokines TNF-a, IL-1β, and IL-6 were decreased after oral administration of SLE, probably because lignans inhibited the NF-κB activity. Additionally, SLE also inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis by suppressing JNK activation and regulating Bcl-2/Bax signaling pathways. In conclusion, these results suggested that SLE prevented CCl4-induced liver injury through a combination of antioxidative stress, anti-inflammation, and antihepatocyte apoptosis and alleviated inflammation and apoptosis by regulating the NF-κB, JNK, and Bcl-2/Bax signaling pathways. PMID:28246539

  1. Quercetin induces protective autophagy in gastric cancer cells: involvement of Akt-mTOR- and hypoxia-induced factor 1α-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kui; Liu, Rui; Li, Jingyi; Mao, Jiali; Lei, Yunlong; Wu, Jinhua; Zeng, Jun; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Hong; Chen, Lijuan; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan

    2011-09-01

    Quercetin, a dietary antioxidant present in fruits and vegetables, is a promising cancer chemopreventive agent that inhibits tumor promotion by inducing cell cycle arrest and promoting apoptotic cell death. In this study, we examined the biological activities of quercetin against gastric cancer. Our studies demonstrated that exposure of gastric cancer cells AGS and MKN28 to quercetin resulted in pronounced pro-apoptotic effect through activating the mitochondria pathway. Meanwhile, treatment with quercetin induced appearance of autophagic vacuoles, formation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs), conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, recruitment of LC3-II to the autophagosomes as well as activation of autophagy genes, suggesting that quercetin initiates the autophagic progression in gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, either administration of autophagic inhibitor chloroquine or selective ablation of atg5 or beclin 1 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) could augment quercetin-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that autophagy plays a protective role against quercetin-induced apoptosis. Moreover, functional studies revealed that quercetin activated autophagy by modulation of Akt-mTOR signaling and hypoxia-induced factor 1α (HIF-1α) signaling. Finally, a xenograft model provided additional evidence for occurrence of quercetin-induced apoptosis and autophagy in vivo. Together, our studies provided new insights regarding the biological and anti-proliferative activities of quercetin against gastric cancer, and may contribute to rational utility and pharmacological study of quercetin in future anti-cancer research.

  2. Diethyl hexyl phthalate-induced changes in insulin signaling molecules and the protective role of antioxidant vitamins in gastrocnemius muscle of adult male rat

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Chinnapaiyan; Khan, Adam Ismail; Balaji, Venkataraman; Selvaraj, Jayaraman; Balasubramanian, Karundevi

    2011-12-15

    Diethyl hexyl phthalate (DEHP) is an endocrine disruptor, it influences various organ systems in human beings and experimental animals. DEHP reduced the serum testosterone and increased the blood glucose, estradiol, T{sub 3} and T{sub 4} in rats. However, the effect of DEHP on insulin signaling and glucose oxidation in skeletal muscle is not known. Adult male albino rats were divided into four groups: Group I: Control; Groups II and III: DEHP treated (dissolved in olive oil at a dose of 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight, respectively, once daily through gastric intubation for 30 days); and Group IV: DEHP (100 mg/kg body weight) plus vitamins E (50 mg/kg body weight) and C (100 mg/kg body weight) dissolved in olive oil and distilled water, respectively, once daily through gastric intubation for 30 days. On completion of treatment, animals were euthanized and perfused (whole body); gastrocnemius muscle was dissected out and subjected to assessment of various parameters. DEHP treatment increased the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, hydroxyl radical levels and lipid peroxidation which disrupt the membrane integrity and insulin receptor. DEHP impaired the insulin signal transduction, glucose uptake and oxidation through decreased expression of plasma membrane GLUT4, which may partly be responsible for the elevation of fasting blood glucose level. The present study suggests that DEHP exposure affects glucose oxidation in skeletal muscle and is mediated through enhanced lipid peroxidation, impaired insulin signaling and GLUT4 expression in plasma membrane. Antioxidant vitamins (C and E) have a protective role against the adverse effect of DEHP. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DEHP treatment significantly decreased serum insulin and testosterone levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased ROS and decreased glucose uptake were observed in DEHP treated animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired insulin signaling in gastrocnemius muscle was observed in DEHP treatment. Black

  3. Heme oxygenase 1 plays role of neuron-protection by regulating Nrf2-ARE signaling post intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao-Ping; Wu, Dan; Zhou, Jun; Chen, Zhi-Ying; Bao, Bing; Xie, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) could be activated in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and trigger the expression of ARE regulated heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) subsequently. This study aims to explore neuroprotection of HO-1 protein in regulating the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway in ICH. In this study, the femoral artery injection method was used to establish the ICH model. The zinc porphyrin-9 (ZPP-IX) was used to inhibit the HO-1 expression in ICH rats. The ICH rats were randomly divided into 3 groups, ICH group, ZPP-IX (10 mg/kg) + ICH group and DMSO (10 mg/kg) + ICH group. Neurological scores were evaluated for the 3 groups. Double immunofluorescence staining method was employed to observe the co-expression of HO-1, Nrf2, NF-κB and TNF-α and CD11b in glia cells. Western blot and RT-PCR assay were used to detect the total Nrf2, binding Nrf2, HO-1, NF-κB and TNF-α expression. The results indicated that ZPP-IX could aggravate the neurological dyafunstions of ICH rats. The HO-1 level in ZPP-IX group was significantly decreased compared to the ICH group (P < 0.05). The binding-Nrf2 protein was significantly increased in ZPP-IX group compared to ICH group (P < 0.05). The NF-κB and TNF-α level were significantly increased in ZPP-IX group compared to ICH group (P < 0.05). The ZPP-IX significantly inhibited the HO-1 and Nrf2, and enhanced NF-κB and TNF-α co-expressing with the CD11b compared to the ICH group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, HO-1 protein regulates the Nrf2-ARE pathway in ICH model by inhibiting the Nrf2 entering nucleus and activating the NF-κB and TNF-α expression.

  4. Heme oxygenase 1 plays role of neuron-protection by regulating Nrf2-ARE signaling post intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiao-Ping; Wu, Dan; Zhou, Jun; Chen, Zhi-Ying; Bao, Bing; Xie, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) could be activated in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and trigger the expression of ARE regulated heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) subsequently. This study aims to explore neuroprotection of HO-1 protein in regulating the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway in ICH. In this study, the femoral artery injection method was used to establish the ICH model. The zinc porphyrin-9 (ZPP-IX) was used to inhibit the HO-1 expression in ICH rats. The ICH rats were randomly divided into 3 groups, ICH group, ZPP-IX (10 mg/kg) + ICH group and DMSO (10 mg/kg) + ICH group. Neurological scores were evaluated for the 3 groups. Double immunofluorescence staining method was employed to observe the co-expression of HO-1, Nrf2, NF-κB and TNF-α and CD11b in glia cells. Western blot and RT-PCR assay were used to detect the total Nrf2, binding Nrf2, HO-1, NF-κB and TNF-α expression. The results indicated that ZPP-IX could aggravate the neurological dyafunstions of ICH rats. The HO-1 level in ZPP-IX group was significantly decreased compared to the ICH group (P < 0.05). The binding-Nrf2 protein was significantly increased in ZPP-IX group compared to ICH group (P < 0.05). The NF-κB and TNF-α level were significantly increased in ZPP-IX group compared to ICH group (P < 0.05). The ZPP-IX significantly inhibited the HO-1 and Nrf2, and enhanced NF-κB and TNF-α co-expressing with the CD11b compared to the ICH group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, HO-1 protein regulates the Nrf2-ARE pathway in ICH model by inhibiting the Nrf2 entering nucleus and activating the NF-κB and TNF-α expression. PMID:26617723

  5. Recipient T cell TIM-3 and hepatocyte galectin-9 signalling protects mouse liver transplants against ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanxing; Ji, Haofeng; Zhang, Yu; Shen, Xiuda; Gao, Feng; He, Xiangyi; Li, Gabriella A; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W

    2015-03-01

    By binding to T cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (TIM-3) on activated Th1 cells, galectin-9 (Gal-9) negatively regulates Th1-type alloimmunity. Although T cells contribute to hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), it is unknown whether negative T cell-dependent TIM-3 co-stimulation may rescue IR-stressed orthotopic liver transplants from innate immunity-driven inflammation. We used wild type (WT) and TIM-3 transgenic (Tg) mice (C57BL/6) as liver donors and recipients in a clinically-relevant model of hepatic cold storage (20 h at 4°C in UW solution) and syngeneic orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Orthotopic liver transplants in WT or TIM-3Tg→TIM-3Tg groups were resistant against IR-stress, evidenced by preserved hepatocellular function (serum ALT levels) and liver architecture (Suzuki's score). In contrast, orthotopic liver transplants in WT or TIM-3Tg→WT groups were susceptible to IRI. TIM-3 induction in circulating CD4+ T cells of the recipient: (1) depressed T-bet/IFN-γ, while amplifying GATA3 and IL-4/IL-10 expression in orthotopic liver transplants; (2) promoted T cell exhaustion (PD-1, LAG-3) phenotype; and (3) depressed neutrophil and macrophage infiltration/function in orthotopic liver transplants. In parallel studies, we documented for the first time that Gal-9, a natural TIM-3 ligand, was produced primarily by and released from IR-stressed hepatocytes, both in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, exogenous recombinant Gal-9 (rGal-9) potentiated liver resistance against IRI by depressing T cell activation and promoting apoptosis of CD4+ T cells. Harnessing TIM-3/Gal-9 signalling at the T cell-hepatocyte interface facilitates homeostasis in IR-stressed orthotopic liver transplants. Enhancing anti-oxidant hepatocyte Gal-9 potentiates liver IR-resistance. Negative regulation by recipient TIM-3+CD4+ cells provides evidence for cytoprotective functions of a discrete T cell subset, which should be spared when applying T cell-targeted immunosuppression in

  6. Protective effects of resveratrol on postmenopausal osteoporosis: regulation of SIRT1-NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jing; Liu, Shuai; Ma, Sai; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Qi, Wei; Cao, Pengchong; Wang, Zheng; Lei, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis severely jeopardizes human health. Seeking for therapeutic drugs without side effects is of great necessity. Our study was designed to investigate whether resveratrol, an agonist of SIRT1, could have favorable effect on osteoporosis and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Rat osteoporosis model (ovariectomy group, OVX) was established by bilateral ovariectomy. Three different doses of resveratrol were used: 5 mg/kg/d (low-dosed, RES(LD)), 25 mg/kg/d (medium-dosed, RES(MD)), and 45 mg/kg/d (high-dosed, RES(HD)). Results showed that RES(LD) did not show any significant effect on OVX alterations, while RES(MD) and RES(HD) significantly elevated the decreased bone mineral density induced by osteoporosis (RES(MD) 0.205 ± 0.023, RES(HD) 0.214 ± 0.053 vs. OVX 0.165 ± 0.050 g/cm(2) respectively; P < 0.05). Serum markers alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin were moderately restored by resveratrol. Moreover, resveratrol improved bone structure in OVX rats, demonstrated by hematoxylin-eosin staining and micro-computed tomographic results. In vitro results revealed that resveratrol promoted osteoblast differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells, evidenced by the increase of ALP generation and mRNA expression of collagen 1 (P < 0.05; RES(MD), RES(HD) vs. control group). SIRT1 gene silencing by siRNA transfection blocked these beneficial effects of resveratrol (P < 0.05; RES + SIRT1(KD) vs. RES(HD)). Western blot results showed that resveratrol activated SIRT1 and subsequently suppressed the activity of NF-κB with decreased expression level of p-IκBα and NF-κB p65 (P < 0.05). Our findings verified the effects of specific dosed resveratrol on postmenopausal osteoporosis through osteoblast differentiation via SIRT1-NF-κB signaling pathway. This study suggested the therapeutic potential of resveratrol against osteoporosis and stressed the importance of effective doses.

  7. δ-Opioid receptor (DOR) signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate intermittent hypoxia induced protection of canine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Juan A; Williams, Arthur G; Sun, Jie; Gonzalez, Leticia; Downey, H Fred; Caffrey, James L; Mallet, Robert T

    2016-03-01

    Intermittent, normobaric hypoxia confers robust cardioprotection against ischemia-induced myocardial infarction and lethal ventricular arrhythmias. δ-Opioid receptor (DOR) signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in cardioprotective phenomena, but their roles in intermittent hypoxia are unknown. This study examined the contributions of DOR and ROS in mediating intermittent hypoxia-induced cardioprotection. Mongrel dogs completed a 20 day program consisting of 5-8 daily, 5-10 min cycles of moderate, normobaric hypoxia (FIO2 0.095-0.10), with intervening 4 min room air exposures. Subsets of dogs received the DOR antagonist naltrindole (200 μg/kg, sc) or antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (250 mg/kg, po) before each hypoxia session. Twenty-four hours after the last session, the left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded for 60 min and then reperfused for 5 h. Arrhythmias detected by electrocardiography were scored according to the Lambeth II conventions. Left ventricles were sectioned and stained with 2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazolium-chloride, and infarct sizes were expressed as percentages of the area at risk (IS/AAR). Intermittent hypoxia sharply decreased IS/AAR from 41 ± 5 % (n = 12) to 1.8 ± 0.9 % (n = 9; P < 0.001) and arrhythmia score from 4.1 ± 0.3 to 0.7 ± 0.2 (P < 0.001) vs. non-hypoxic controls. Naltrindole (n = 6) abrogated the cardioprotection with IS/AAR 35 ± 5 % and arrhythmia score 3.7 ± 0.7 (P < 0.001 vs. untreated intermittent hypoxia). N-acetylcysteine (n = 6) interfered to a similar degree, with IS/AAR 42 ± 3 % and arrhythmia score 4.7 ± 0.3 (P < 0.001 vs. untreated intermittent hypoxia). Without the intervening reoxygenations, hypoxia (n = 4) was not cardioprotective (IS/AAR 50 ± 8 %; arrhythmia score 4.5 ± 0.5; P < 0.001 vs. intermittent hypoxia). Thus DOR, ROS and cyclic reoxygenation were obligatory participants in the gradually evolving cardioprotection produced by intermittent hypoxia.

  8. TIEG1 deficiency confers enhanced myocardial protection in the infarcted heart by mediating the Pten/Akt signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Mingqiu; Hu, Pengfei; Cai, Zhaobin; Fang, Tianfu; Zhang, Jiancheng; Lu, Ming

    2017-01-01

    that the absence of TIEG1 plays a cardioprotective role in ischaemic heart disease by promoting changes in Pten/Akt signalling. PMID:28204828

  9. Recipient T-Cell TIM-3 and Hepatocyte Galectin-9 Signaling Protects Mouse Liver Transplants Against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanxing; Ji, Haofeng; Zhang, Yu; Shen, Xiuda; Gao, Feng; He, Xiangyi; Li, Gabriella A.; Busuttil, Ronald W.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims By binding to T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (TIM-3) on activated Th1 cells, Galectin-9 (Gal-9) negatively regulates Th1-type alloimmunity. Although T cells contribute to hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), it is unknown whether negative T cell-dependent TIM-3 costimulation may rescue IR-stressed orthotopic liver transplants (OLT) from innate immunity-driven inflammation. Methods We used WT and TIM-3Tg mice (C57BL6) as liver donors and recipients in a clinically-relevant model of hepatic cold storage (20h at 4°C in UW solution) and syngeneic OLT. Results OLTs in WT or TIM-3Tg->TIM-3Tg groups were resistant against IR- stress, evidenced by preserved hepatocellular function (sALT levels) and liver architecture (Suzuki’s score). In contrast, OLTs in WT or TIM-3Tg->WT groups were susceptible to IRI. TIM-3 induction in recipient circulating CD4+ T cells: 1/ depressed Tbet/IFN-γ, while amplifying GATA3 and IL-4/IL-10 expression in OLTs; 2/ promoted T cell exhaustion (PD-1, LAG-3) phenotype; and 3/ depressed neutrophil and macrophage infiltration/function in OLTs. In parallel studies, we have documented, for the first time that Gal-9, a natural TIM-3 ligand, was produced primarily by and released from IR-stressed hepatocytes, both in-vivo and in-vitro. Moreover, exogenous rGal-9 potentiated liver resistance against IRI by depressing T cell activation and promoting apoptosis of CD4+ T cells. Conclusion Harnessing TIM-3–Gal-9 signaling at T cell–hepatocyte interface facilitates homeostasis in IR-stressed OLTs. Enhancing anti-oxidant hepatocyte Gal-9 potentiates liver IR-resistance. Negative regulation by recipient TIM-3+CD4+ cells provides evidence for cytoprotective functions of a discrete T cell subset, which should be spared when applying T cell-targeted immunosuppression in transplant recipients. PMID:25450716

  10. Toll-Like Receptor 3 Signaling via TRIF Contributes to a Protective Innate Immune Response to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Totura, Allison L.; Whitmore, Alan; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Schäfer, Alexandra; Katze, Michael G.; Heise, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are sensors that recognize molecular patterns from viruses, bacteria, and fungi to initiate innate immune responses to invading pathogens. The emergence of highly pathogenic coronaviruses severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a concern for global public health, as there is a lack of efficacious vaccine platforms and antiviral therapeutic strategies. Previously, it was shown that MyD88, an adaptor protein necessary for signaling by multiple TLRs, is a required component of the innate immune response to mouse-adapted SARS-CoV infection in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that TLR3−/−, TLR4−/−, and TRAM−/− mice are more susceptible to SARS-CoV than wild-type mice but experience only transient weight loss with no mortality in response to infection. In contrast, mice deficient in the TLR3/TLR4 adaptor TRIF are highly susceptible to SARS-CoV infection, showing increased weight loss, mortality, reduced lung function, increased lung pathology, and higher viral titers. Distinct alterations in inflammation were present in TRIF−/− mice infected with SARS-CoV, including excess infiltration of neutrophils and inflammatory cell types that correlate with increased pathology of other known causes of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), including influenza virus infections. Aberrant proinflammatory cytokine, chemokine, and interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) signaling programs were also noted following infection of TRIF−/− mice that were similar to those seen in human patients with poor disease outcome following SARS-CoV or MERS-CoV infection. These findings highlight the importance of TLR adaptor signaling in generating a balanced protective innate immune response to highly pathogenic coronavirus infections. PMID:26015500

  11. A novel mouse model of Campylobacter jejuni gastroenteritis reveals key pro-inflammatory and tissue protective roles for Toll-like receptor signaling during infection.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Martin; Ries, Jenna; Vermeulen, Jenny; Yang, Hong; Sham, Ho Pan; Crowley, Shauna M; Badayeva, Yuliya; Turvey, Stuart E; Gaynor, Erin C; Li, Xiaoxia; Vallance, Bruce A

    2014-07-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major source of foodborne illness in the developed world, and a common cause of clinical gastroenteritis. Exactly how C. jejuni colonizes its host's intestines and causes disease is poorly understood. Although it causes severe diarrhea and gastroenteritis in humans, C. jejuni typically dwells as a commensal microbe within the intestines of most animals, including birds, where its colonization is asymptomatic. Pretreatment of C57BL/6 mice with the antibiotic vancomycin facilitated intestinal C. jejuni colonization, albeit with minimal pathology. In contrast, vancomycin pretreatment of mice deficient in SIGIRR (Sigirr(-/-)), a negative regulator of MyD88-dependent signaling led to heavy and widespread C. jejuni colonization, accompanied by severe gastroenteritis involving strongly elevated transcription of Th1/Th17 cytokines. C. jejuni heavily colonized the cecal and colonic crypts of Sigirr(-/-) mice, adhering to, as well as invading intestinal epithelial cells. This infectivity was dependent on established C. jejuni pathogenicity factors, capsular polysaccharides (kpsM) and motility/flagella (flaA). We also explored the basis for the inflammatory response elicited by C. jejuni in Sigirr(-/-) mice, focusing on the roles played by Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and 4, as these innate receptors were strongly stimulated by C. jejuni. Despite heavy colonization, Tlr4(-/-)/Sigirr(-/-) mice were largely unresponsive to infection by C. jejuni, whereas Tlr2(-/-)/Sigirr(-/-) mice developed exaggerated inflammation and pathology. This indicates that TLR4 signaling underlies the majority of the enteritis seen in this model, whereas TLR2 signaling had a protective role, acting to promote mucosal integrity. Furthermore, we found that loss of the C. jejuni capsule led to increased TLR4 activation and exaggerated inflammation and gastroenteritis. Together, these results validate the use of Sigirr(-/-) mice as an exciting and relevant animal model for

  12. A Novel Mouse Model of Campylobacter jejuni Gastroenteritis Reveals Key Pro-inflammatory and Tissue Protective Roles for Toll-like Receptor Signaling during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Martin; Yang, Hong; Sham, Ho Pan; Crowley, Shauna M.; Badayeva, Yuliya; Turvey, Stuart E.; Gaynor, Erin C.; Li, Xiaoxia; Vallance, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major source of foodborne illness in the developed world, and a common cause of clinical gastroenteritis. Exactly how C. jejuni colonizes its host's intestines and causes disease is poorly understood. Although it causes severe diarrhea and gastroenteritis in humans, C. jejuni typically dwells as a commensal microbe within the intestines of most animals, including birds, where its colonization is asymptomatic. Pretreatment of C57BL/6 mice with the antibiotic vancomycin facilitated intestinal C. jejuni colonization, albeit with minimal pathology. In contrast, vancomycin pretreatment of mice deficient in SIGIRR (Sigirr−/−), a negative regulator of MyD88-dependent signaling led to heavy and widespread C. jejuni colonization, accompanied by severe gastroenteritis involving strongly elevated transcription of Th1/Th17 cytokines. C. jejuni heavily colonized the cecal and colonic crypts of Sigirr−/− mice, adhering to, as well as invading intestinal epithelial cells. This infectivity was dependent on established C. jejuni pathogenicity factors, capsular polysaccharides (kpsM) and motility/flagella (flaA). We also explored the basis for the inflammatory response elicited by C. jejuni in Sigirr−/− mice, focusing on the roles played by Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and 4, as these innate receptors were strongly stimulated by C. jejuni. Despite heavy colonization, Tlr4−/−/Sigirr−/− mice were largely unresponsive to infection by C. jejuni, whereas Tlr2−/−/Sigirr−/− mice developed exaggerated inflammation and pathology. This indicates that TLR4 signaling underlies the majority of the enteritis seen in this model, whereas TLR2 signaling had a protective role, acting to promote mucosal integrity. Furthermore, we found that loss of the C. jejuni capsule led to increased TLR4 activation and exaggerated inflammation and gastroenteritis. Together, these results validate the use of Sigirr−/− mice as an exciting and relevant animal

  13. Cardiac Fibroblast-Specific Activating Transcription Factor 3 Protects Against Heart Failure by Suppressing MAP2K3-p38 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Yulin; Li, Zhenya; Zhang, Congcong; Li, Ping; Wu, Yina; Wang, Chunxiao; Lau, Wayne Bond; Ma, Xin-Liang; Du, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Background -Hypertensive ventricular remodeling is a common cause of heart failure. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating ventricular remodeling remain poorly understood. Methods -We used a discovery-driven/nonbiased approach to indentify increased ATF3 expression in hypertensive heart. We employed loss/gain of function approaches to understand the role of ATF3 in heart failure. We also examine the mechanisms through transcriptome, CHIP-seq analysis and in vivo and vitro experiments. Results -ATF3 expression increased in murine hypertensive heart and human hypertrophic heart. Cardiac fibroblast cells are the primary cell type expressing high ATF3 levels in response to hypertensive stimuli. ATF3 knockout (ATF3KO) markedly exaggerated hypertensive ventricular remodeling, a state rescued by lentivirus-mediated/miRNA-aided cardiac fibroblast-selective ATF3 overexpression. Conversely, conditional cardiac fibroblast cell-specific ATF3 transgenic overexpression significantly ameliorated ventricular remodeling and heart failure. We identified Map2K3 as a novel ATF3 target. ATF3 binds with the Map2K3 promoter, recruiting HDAC1, resulting in Map2K3 gene-associated histone deacetylation, thereby inhibiting Map2K3 expression. Genetic Map2K3 knockdown rescued the pro-fibrotic/hypertrophic phenotype in ATF3KO cells. Finally, we demonstrated that p38 is the downstream molecule of Map2K3 mediating the pro-fibrotic/hypertrophic effects in ATF3KO animals. Inhibition of p38 signaling reduced TGF-β signaling-related pro-fibrotic and hypertrophic gene expression, and blocked exaggerated cardiac remodeling in ATF3KO cells. Conclusions -Our study provides the first evidence that ATF3 upregulation in cardiac fibroblasts in response to hypertensive stimuli protects heart by suppressing Map2K3 expression and subsequent p38-TGF-β signaling. These results suggest that positive modulation of cardiac fibroblast ATF3 may represent a novel therapeutic approach against hypertensive

  14. [Role of calcium signal in apoptosis and protective mechanism of colon cancer cell line SW480 in response to 5-aminolevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiang-Hua; Shi, De; Zhao, Yu; Chen, Zu-Lin

    2006-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for tumors is based on the tumor-selective accumulation of a photosensitizer, followed by irradiation with visible light, which induces cell death and apoptosis. As an important second messenger, free calcium is involved in the regulation of several cellular processes. However, the role of calcium signal in the cells after PDT is less clear. This study was to explore the role of calcium signal in apoptosis and protective mechanism of colon cancer cell line SW480 in response to 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-PDT. SW480 cells were divided into control group, light group, ALA group, and ALA-PDT group. Cell apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay. The changes of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Intracellular cAMP and cGMP concentrations were detected by radioimmunoassay. The expression of calmodulin in SW480 cells was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression of protein products and phosphorylated protein products of MEK and ERK1/2 was detected by Western blot. Apoptosis indexes of SW480 cells at 30 min and 60 min after PDT were (25.26+/-5.04)% and (50.45+/-7.85)%, respectively. CLSM revealed that intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was 100.00+/-19.83 at 10 min after PDT, but 185.40+/-18.90 at 20 min after PDT (P<0.01). cAMP concentration of ALA-PDT group was (3.215+/-0.245) pmol/L at 30 min after irradiation, which was significantly higher than those of other groups (P<0.001). The relative contents of CaM gene of ALA-PDT group at 30, 60 and 90 min after PDT were significantly higher than those of control group, light group, and ALA group (12.60+/-1.84, 11.39+/-1.13, and 12.77+/-1.35 vs. 3.97+/-0.29, 4.28+/-0.39, and 4.51+/-0.44, P<0.001). ERK pathway of SW480 cells was activated after ALA-PDT. Calcium signal plays an important role in ALA-PDT-induced apoptosis of SW480 cells, and can induce protective mechanism of SW480 cells by activating ERK

  15. σ-1 receptor stimulation protects against pressure-induced damage through InsR-MAPK signaling in human trabecular meshwork cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Bo; Li, Hongyi; Sun, Xian; Qu, Wei; Yang, Binbin; Cheng, Fang; Shi, Liping; Yuan, Huiping

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of the σ-1 receptor (Sig-1R) agonist (+)-pentazocin (PTZ) on pressure-induced apoptosis and death of human trabecular meshwork cells (hTMCs). The expression levels of Sig-1R and insulin receptor (InsR) were examined in hTMCs. Cells were cultured under a pressure of 0, 20, 40, 60 and 80 mmHg for 48 h, and under 80 mmHg for 44 h, after which the cells were treated with (+)-PTZ (20 µM), N-(2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl)-N-methyl-2-(dimethylamino) ethylamine (BD-1063; 20 µM) administered 30 min prior to (+)-PTZ, or BD-1063 (20 µM) and then exposed to 80 mmHg again until the 48 h time-point. The changes of the cells were observed by optical and electron microscopy, the apoptosis and death of hTMCs were detected by ethidium bromide/acridine orange dual staining assay and the expression of Sig-1R and InsR by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), an important downstream protein of the InsR-mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway, was also detected by western blot analysis when (+)-PTZ and BD-1063 were added to the 80 mmHg-treated cells. Sig-1Rs and InsRs were expressed in hTMCs. The apoptosis and death of hTMCs increased from 40 mmHg with 50% cell death when the pressure was at 80 mmHg and the structure of the cells noticeably changed. The expression of Sig-1R and InsR increased along with the elevation of pressure. (+)-PTZ decreased the apoptosis and death of hTMCs and increased the expression of Sig-1R and InsR, and the phosphorylation of ERK. Such effects were blocked by BD-1063. The present study suggested that Sig-1R agonist (+)-PTZ can protect hTMCs from pressure-induced apoptosis and death by activating InsR and the MAPK signal pathway. PMID:28560459

  16. Baicalein protects C6 glial cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis through regulation of the Nrf2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Ok; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Park, Cheol; Hong, Su Hyun; Kim, Gi-Young; Hwang, Hye-Jin; Cho, Eun-Ju; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Baicalein, a flavonoid originally obtained from the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has been reported to possess various biological properties. Although several studies have demonstrated the anti-oxidative activity of baicalein, its neuroprotective mechanisms have not been clearly established. The present study aimed to detect the effects of baicalein against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced neuronal damage in C6 glial cells and to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. The results demonstrated that baicalein effectively inhibited H2O2-induced growth and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. We noted that Baicalein also attenuated the H2O2‑induced formation of comet tail, phosphorylation of p-γH2A.X, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP or ΔΨm), and changes to apoptosis‑related protein expression, which suggests that it can prevent H2O2‑induced cellular DNA damage and apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, treatment with baicalein effectively induced the expression of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Moreover, the protective effects of baicalein against H2O2‑induced DNA damage and apoptosis were abolished by zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) IX, a HO-1 inhibitor, and auranofin, a TrxR inhibitor. In addition, we noted that the cytoprotective effects of baicalein were attenuated by transient transfection with Nrf2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). The findings of our present study suggest that baicalein enhances cellular antioxidant defense capacity through the inhibition of ROS generation and the activation of the Nrf2 signaling pathway, thus protecting C6 cells from H2O2-induced neuronal damage.

  17. Protective and anti‑angiopathy effects of ginsenoside Re against diabetes mellitus via the activation of p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 and JNK signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yawei; Wan, Xuesi; Shao, Nan; Ye, Runyi; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Yunjian

    2016-11-01

    The present study aimed to determine the protective and anti-angiopathy effects of ginsenoside (GSS) on Wistar rats with diabetes mellitus (DM). Diabetic angiopathy occurs during the early stage of diabetes, and in type 1 DM (T1DM) and type 2 DM (T2DM). In the present study, early DM, T1DM and T2DM were induced by treatment with a high‑sucrose‑high‑fat diet, alloxan monohydrate or streptozocin, respectively. The levels of blood glucose, insulin, lipid metabolism markers [total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high‑density lipoprotein (HDL) and lipoprotein(a) (Lp‑a)], and endothelial cell function markers [endothelin, nitric oxide, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and interleukin‑6 (IL‑6)] were determined following treatment with GSS. In addition, oral glucose tolerance test and insulin tolerance test were performed. The phosphorylation levels of p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (JNK) were detected in aorta samples harvested from T2DM rats by western blot analysis. The present study determined that GSS treatment effectively decreased the levels of blood glucose, TC, TG, Lp‑a, VEGF, IL‑6, phosphorylated (p)‑p38, p‑ERK1/2 and p‑JNK; however, treatment with GSS increased insulin and HDL levels. Therefore, it is possible that GSS exerts protective and anti‑angiopathy effects against the early stage of diabetes, T1DM and T2DM in vivo via the activation of p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 and JNK signaling.

  18. Cannabidiol protects against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury by attenuating inflammatory signaling and response, oxidative/nitrative stress, and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Rajesh, Mohanraj; Horváth, Béla; Bátkai, Sándor; Park, Ogyi; Tanashian, Galin; Gao, Rachel Y; Patel, Vivek; Wink, David A.; Liaudet, Lucas; Haskó, György; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pál

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is a pivotal mechanism of liver damage following liver transplantation or hepatic surgery. We have investigated the effects of cannabidiol(CBD), the non-psychotropic constituent of marijuana, in a mouse model of hepatic I/R injury. I/R triggered time-dependent increases/changes in markers of liver injury (serum transaminases), hepatic oxidative/nitrative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, nitrotyrosine content/staining, gp91phox and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA), mitochondrial dysfunction (decreased complex I activity), inflammation (tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase 2, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α/2, inter-cellular adhesion molecule 1 mRNA levels, tissue neutrophil infiltration, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-KB) activation), stress signaling (p38MAPK and JNK) and cell death (DNA fragmentation, PARP activity, and TUNEL). CBD significantly reduced the extent of liver inflammation, oxidative/nitrative stress and cell death, and also attenuated the bacterial endotoxin-triggered NF-KB activation and TNF-α production in isolated Kupffer cells, likewise the adhesion molecules expression in primary human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells stimulated with TNF-α, and attachment of human neutrophils to the activated endothelium. These protective effects were preserved in CB2 knockout mice and were not prevented by CB1/2 antagonists in vitro. Thus, CBD may represent a novel, protective strategy against I/R injury by attenuating key inflammatory pathways and oxidative/nitrative tissue injury, independent from classical CB1/2 receptors. PMID:21362471

  19. Carvacrol protects neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells against Fe2+-induced apoptosis by suppressing activation of MAPK/JNK-NF-κB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhen-wen; Xie, Zheng-xing; Wang, Bao-feng; Zhong, Zhi-hong; Chen, Xiao-yan; Sun, Yu-hao; Sun, Qing-fang; Yang, Guo-yuan; Bian, Liu-guan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Carvacrol (2-methyl-5-isopropylphenol), a phenolic monoterpene in the essential oils of the genera Origanum and Thymus, has been shown to exert a variety of therapeutic effects. Here we examined whether carvacrol protected neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells against Fe2+-induced apoptosis and explored the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were incubated with Fe2+ for 24 h, and the cell viability was assessed with CCK-8 assay. TUNEL assay and flow cytometric analysis were performed to evaluate cell apoptosis. The mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NF-κB p65 were determined using qPCR. The expression of relevant proteins was determined using Western blot analysis or immunofluorescence staining. Results: Treatment of SH-SY5Y cells with Fe2+ (50–200 μmol/L) dose-dependently decreased the cell viability, which was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with carvacrol (164 and 333 μmol/L). Treatment with Fe2+ increased the Bax level and caspase-3 activity, and decreased the Bcl-2 level, resulting in cell apoptosis. Furthermore, treatment with Fe2+ significantly increased the gene expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, and induced the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Treatment with Fe2+ also significantly increased the phosphorylation of p38, ERK, JNK and IKK in the cells. Pretreatment with carvacrol significantly inhibited Fe2+-induced activation of NF-κB, expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and cell apoptosis. Moreover, pretreatment with carvacrol inhibited Fe2+-induced phosphorylation of JNK and IKK, but not p38 and ERK in the cells. Conclusion: Carvacrol protects neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells against Fe2+-induced apoptosis, which may result from suppressing the MAPK/JNK-NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:26592517

  20. Protective effects of sea buckthorn polysaccharide extracts against LPS/d-GalN-induced acute liver failure in mice via suppressing TLR4-NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Zhang, Wei; Dong, Shichao; Song, Liang; Zhao, Shimin; Wu, Chunyan; Wang, Xue; Liu, Fang; Xie, Jiming; Wang, Jinling; Wang, Yuzhen

    2015-12-24

    Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) berries have been traditionally used to treat gastric disorders, cardiovascular problems, and liver injuries in oriental medicinal system. This study aimed to explore the protective effects and mechanisms of the polysaccharide extracts of Sea buckthorn (HRP) berries against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and d-galactosamine hydrochloride (d-GalN)-induced acute liver failure in mice. HRP was isolated by hot-water extraction and characterized by HPLC and infrared spectrum analysis. The total carbohydrate, uronic acid and protein contents of HRP were measured by a spectrophotometric method. Mice were orally administrated with HRP (50, 100, 200mg/kg) once daily for 14 consecutive days prior to the challenge with LPS (50 μg/kg) and d-GalN (300 mg/kg). Animals of positive control group were intraperitoneally injected with dexamethasone (10mg/kg). Mice were sacrificed at 8h after LPS/d-GalN injection. Pretreatment with HRP significantly inhibited LPS/d-GalN-induced increases in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, which were accompanied by alleviated liver injuries and reduced production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). HRP was also found to reduce malondialdehyde (MDA) content and to restore superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activities. Furthermore, HRP supplementation dose-dependently inhibited the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK), phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK), and phosphorylated mitogen activated protein kinase 38 (p-p38 MAPK) in the liver of LPS/d-GalN challenged mice. Pretreatment with HRP also inhibited LPS/d-GalN-induced activation and translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). This study indicates that pretreatment with HRP protects against LPS/d-GalN-induced liver injury in mice via suppressing the TLR4-NF-κB signaling pathway. Sea

  1. Protective effect of ginkgolide B against acute spinal cord injury in rats and its correlation with the Jak/STAT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Song, Yongxing; Zeng, Zhongyou; Jin, Caiyi; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ding, Baoyue; Zhang, Feng

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the correlation between ginkgolide B (GB) and the JAK/STAT signaling pathway and to explore its regulating effect on secondary cell apoptosis following spinal cord injury (SCI), to elucidate the protective mechanism GB against acute SCI. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a sham-operated group, an SCI group, an SCI + GB group, an SCI + methylprednisolone (MP) group, and an SCI + specific JAK inhibitor AG490 group. A rat model of acute SCI was established using the modified Allen's method. At 4 h, 12 h, 1 day, 3 days, 7 days and 14 days after injury, injured T10 spinal cord specimens were harvested. GB significantly increased inclined plane test scores and Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scale scores in SCI rats from postoperative day 3 to day 14. The effect was equal to that of the positive control drug, MP. Western blot analysis showed that JAK(2) was significantly phosphorylated from 4 h after SCI, peaked at 12 h and gradually decreased thereafter, accompanied by phosphorylation of STAT(3) with a similar time course. GB was shown to significantly inhibit the phosphorylation of JAK(2) and STAT(3) in rats with SCI. It significantly increased the ratio of B cell CLL/lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2)/Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) protein expression at 24 h, led to an obvious down-regulation of caspase-3 gene and protein expression at 3 days, and significantly decreased the cell apoptosis index at each time point after SCI. This effect was similar to that obtained with the JAK-specific inhibitor, AG490. Our experimental findings indicated that GB can protect rats against acute SCI, and that its underlying mechanism may be related to the inhibition of JAK/STAT signaling pathway activation, improvement of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, decreased caspase-3 gene and protein expression and further inhibition of secondary cell apoptosis following SCI.

  2. [PI 3 K/Akt signaling pathway contributed to the protective effect of acupuncture intervention on epileptic seizure-induced injury of hippocampal pyramidal cells in epilepsy rats].

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Ang, Wen-Ping; Shen, De-Kai; Liu, Xiang-Guo; Yang, Yong-Qing; Ma, Yun

    2013-02-01

    To observe the protective effect of acupuncture stimulation on pyramidal cells in hippocampal CA 1 and CA 3 regions and to analyze the involvement of phosphatidy linositol-3-kinase (PI 3 K)/protein kinase B(PKB or Akt) signaling pathway in the acupuncture effect in epilepsy rats. A total of 120 SD rats were randomly divided into normal control group, model group, LY 294002 (a specific antagonist for PI 3 K/Akt signaling) group, acupuncture+ LY 294002 group and acupuncture group (n = 24 in each group, 12 for H. E. staining, and 12 for electron microscope observation). Epilepsy model was established by intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, 5 microL). Manual acupuncture stimulation was applied to "Baihui" (GV 20) and "Dazhui" (GV 14) once daily for 5 days. Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO, 5 microL, a control solvent) was given to rats of the normal, model and acupuncture groups, and LY294002 (5 microL, dissolved in DMSO) given to rats of the LY 294002 and acupuncture+ LY 294002 groups by lateral ventricular injection. Four hours and 24 h after modeling, the hippocampus tissues were sampled for observing pathological changes of CA 1 and CA 3 regions after H. E. staining under light microscope and for checkin ultrastructural changes of the pyramidal cells under transmission electron microscope. In comparison with the normal control group, the numbers of pyramidal cells of hippocampal CA 3 region in the model group were decreased significantly 4 h and 24 h after epileptic seizure (P < 0.01). While compared to the model group, the pyramidal cells of hippocampal CA 3 region in the acupuncture group were increased considerably in the number at both 4 h and 24 h after seizure (P < 0.01). No significant differences were found between the LY 294002 and model groups, and between the acupuncture+ LY 294002 and model groups in the numbers of pyramidal cells at 4 h and 24 h after seizure (P > 0.05). Findings of the light microscope and electron microscope showed that the

  3. Andrographolide protects liver cells from H2O2 induced cell death by upregulation of Nrf-2/HO-1 mediated via adenosine A2a receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Smriti P K; Khole, Swati; Jagadish, Nidhi; Ghosh, Debjani; Gadgil, Vijay; Sinkar, Vilas; Ghaskadbi, Saroj S

    2016-11-01

    Andrographolide, principle constituent of Andrographis paniculata Nees is used in traditional medicine in Southeast Asia and is known to exhibit various biological activities. Its antioxidant activity is due to its ability to activate one of the antioxidant enzymes, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which is regulated transcriptionally through Nrf-2. However, molecular mechanism underlying activation of Nrf-2/HO-1 has not yet been clearly understood. Protective effect of andrographolide against H2O2 induced cell death, reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation was observed in HepG2 cells. Ability of andrographolide to modulate G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) mediated signalling was determined using in silico docking and gene expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR, confocal microscopy and western blot analysis. We clearly show that andrographolide via adenosine A2A receptor signalling leads to activation of p38 MAP kinase, resulting in upregulation of Nrf-2, its translocation to nucleus and activation of HO-1. Additionally, it activates adenylate cyclase resulting in cAMP formation which in turn activates protein kinase A leading to inhibition of GSK-3β by phosphorylation. Inactivated GSK-3β leads to retention of Nrf-2 in the nucleus leading to sustained expression of HO-1 by binding to its antioxidant response element (ARE). Thus, andrographolide probably by binding to adenosine A2a receptor activates Nrf-2 transcription and also inhibits its exclusion from the nucleus by inactivating GSK-3β, together resulting in activation of HO-1. We speculate that andrographolide can be used as a therapeutic drug to combat oxidative stress implicated in pathogenesis of various diseases such as diabetes, osteoporosis, neurodegenerative diseases etc. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. IL-13 but not IL-4 signaling via IL-4Rα protects mice from papilloma formation during DMBA/TPA two-step skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rothe, Michael; Quarcoo, David; Chashchina, Anna A; Bozrova, Svetlana V; Qin, Zhihai; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Blankenstein, Thomas; Kammertoens, Thomas; Drutskaya, Marina S

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) was shown to be tumor-promoting in full carcinogenesis studies using 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA). Because heretofore the role of IL-4 in DMBA/TPA (9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benz-anthracene/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) two-stage carcinogenesis was not studied, we performed such experiments using either IL-4−/− or IL-4Rα−/− mice. We found that IL-4Rα−/− but not IL-4−/− mice have enhanced papilloma formation, suggesting that IL-13 may be involved. Indeed, IL-13−/− mice developed more papillomas after exposure to DMBA/TPA than their heterozygous IL-13-competent littermate controls. However, when tested in a full carcinogenesis experiment, exposure of mice to 25 μg of MCA, both IL-13−/− and IL-13+/− mice led to the same incidence of tumors. While IL-4 enhances MCA carcinogenesis, it does not play a measurable role in our DMBA/TPA carcinogenesis experiments. Conversely, IL-13 does not affect MCA carcinogenesis but protects mice from DMBA/TPA carcinogenesis. One possible explanation is that IL-4 and IL-13, although they share a common IL-4Rα chain, regulate signaling in target cells differently by employing distinct JAK/STAT-mediated signaling pathways downstream of IL-13 or IL-4 receptor complexes, resulting in different inflammatory transcriptional programs. Taken together, our results indicate that the course of DMBA/TPA- and MCA-induced carcinogenesis is affected differently by IL-4 versus IL-13-mediated inflammatory cascades. PMID:24403255

  5. Electroacupuncture at ST36 Protects ICC Networks via mSCF/Kit-ETV1 Signaling in the Stomach of Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lugao; Zhu, Beibei

    2017-01-01

    Background. Electroacupuncture (EA) at ST36 has been used to regulate gastric motility and effectively improve gastric emptying in diabetic patients. Nevertheless, the specific mechanisms underlying the efficacy of this treatment remain unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the variations of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and explore the changes in mSCF/KIT-ETV1 signaling in the antrum and corpus of diabetic mice after treatment with EA. Methods. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomized into five groups: control group, diabetic group (DM), diabetic-plus-sham EA group (SEA), diabetic-plus-low-frequency EA group (LEA), and diabetic-plus-high-frequency EA group (HEA). The expression levels of Ano1, c-Kit, and ETV1 were assessed by immunofluorescence in the antrum and corpus. Western blotting and PCR methods were further used to evaluate c-Kit, mSCF, and ETV1 expression. Results. (1) c-Kit and Ano1 were obviously decreased in the DM group, but c-Kit reduced much more than Ano1. (2) The mSCF, c-Kit, and ETV1 mRNA and protein levels were obviously decreased in the DM group in both the antrum and the corpus (P < 0.01), but they were significantly elevated in the LEA and HEA groups (P < 0.01). Conclusions. Ano1 is a reliable marker to detect ICC changes in diabetes; low- and high-frequency EA at acupoint ST36 can protect the networks of ICC possibly via normal activation of mSCF/KIT-ETV1 signaling. PMID:28203258

  6. The Role of Nutrients in Protecting Mitochondrial Function and Neurotransmitter Signaling: Implications for the Treatment of Depression, PTSD, and Suicidal Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Zhu, Ming; Bao, Hongkun; Li, Bai; Dong, Yilong; Xiao, Chunjie; Zhang, Grace Y.; Henter, Ioline; Rudorfer, Matthew; Vitiello, Benedetto

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have linked severe stress to the development of major depressive disorder (MDD), and suicidal behaviors. Furthermore, recent preclinical studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that in rodents, chronic stress and the stress hormone cortisol has caused oxidative damage to mitochondrial function and membrane lipids in the brain. Mitochondria play a key role in synaptic neurotransmitter signaling by providing adenosine triphosphate (ATP), mediating lipid and protein synthesis, buffering intracellular calcium, and regulating apoptotic and resilience pathways. Membrane lipids are similarly essential to central nervous system (CNS) function, because cholesterol, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and sphingolipids form a lipid raft region, a special lipid region on the membrane that mediates neurotransmitter signaling through G-protein coupled receptors and ion channels. Low serum cholesterol levels, low antioxidant capacity, and abnormal early morning cortisol levels are biomarkers consistently associated with both depression and suicidal behaviors. In this review, we summarize the manner in which nutrients can protect against oxidative damage to mitochondria and lipids in the neuronal circuits associated with cognitive and affective behaviors. These nutrients include ω3 fatty acids, antioxidants (vitamin C and zinc), members of the vitamin B family (Vitamin B12 and folic acid) and magnesium. Accumulating data have shown that these nutrients can enhance neurocognitive function, and may have therapeutic benefits for depression and suicidal behaviors. A growing body of studies suggests the intriguing possibility that regular consumption of these nutrients may help prevent the onset of mood disorders and suicidal behaviors in vulnerable individuals, or significantly augment the therapeutic effect of available antidepressants. These findings have important implications for the health of both military and civilian populations. PMID:25365455

  7. C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) signaling protects neonatal male mice with hypoxic-ischemic hippocampal damage from developing spatial learning deficits.

    PubMed

    Pimentel-Coelho, Pedro M; Michaud, Jean-Philippe; Rivest, Serge

    2015-06-01

    Chemokines are a family of cytokines involved in the chemotaxis of leukocytes and other target cells by binding to specific G-protein-coupled receptors on their membranes. As such, the activation of C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) is involved in the mobilization of "inflammatory" monocytes from bone marrow and in their recruitment to the brain under inflammatory/pathological conditions. In this study, we investigated whether CCR2 signaling could affect the progression of learning deficits and hippocampal damage in a model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury. Postnatal day 3 wild-type (WT) and CCR2 knockout (KO) mice of both sexes were subjected to the Rice-Vannucci model of neonatal hypoxia-ischemia and were followed for up to 14 weeks. HI CCR2 KO male mice were the only animals to exhibit long-term spatial learning deficits in the T-water maze task, compared to their corresponding sham-operated controls. CCR2 KO mouse pups of both sexes had a lower number of circulating monocytes, although only HI CCR2 KO male mice exhibited reduced numbers of activated macrophages/microglia in the damaged hippocampus, compared to WT mice. However, no differences were observed in hippocampal atrophy between HI CCR2 KO and HI WT mice. These results suggest that CCR2 signaling can protect neona