Science.gov

Sample records for protection equipment instrumentation

  1. MGR COMPLIANCE PROGRAM GUIDANCE PACKAGE FOR RADIATION PROTECTION EQUIPMENT, INSTRUMENTATION AND FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2000-02-01

    This Compliance Program Guidance Package identifies the regulatory guidance and industry codes and standards addressing radiation protection equipment, instrumentation, and support facilities considered to be appropriate for radiation protection at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Included are considerations relevant to radiation monitoring instruments, calibration, contamination control and decontamination, respiratory protection equipment, and general radiation protection facilities. The scope of this Guidance Package does not include design guidance relevant to criticality monitoring, area radiation monitoring, effluent monitoring, and airborne radioactivity monitoring systems since they are considered to be the topics of specific design and construction requirements (i.e., ''fixed'' or ''built-in'' systems). This Guidance Package does not address radiation protection design issues; it addresses the selection and calibration of radiation monitoring instrumentation to the extent that the guidance is relevant to the operational radiation protection program. Radon and radon progeny monitoring instrumentation is not included in the Guidance Package since such naturally occurring radioactive materials do not fall within the NRC's jurisdiction at the MGR.

  2. Precision Instrument and Equipment Repairers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Ian

    2001-01-01

    Explains the job of precision instrument and equipment repairers, who work on cameras, medical equipment, musical instruments, watches and clocks, and industrial measuring devices. Discusses duties, working conditions, employment and earnings, job outlook, and skills and training. (JOW)

  3. Personal protective equipment

    MedlinePlus

    ... protective equipment. Available at: www.cdc.gov/niosh/ppe . Accessed October 27, 2015. Holland MG, Cawthon D. Personal protective equipment and decontamination of adults and children. Emerg Med Clin N ...

  4. Instrumentation and control systems, equipment location; instrumentation and control building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Instrumentation and control systems, equipment location; instrumentation and control building, instrumentation room, bays and console plan. Specifications No. Eng-04-353-55-72; drawing no. 60-09-12; sheet 110 of 148; file no. 1321/61. Stamped: Record drawing - as constructed. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Control Center, Test Area 1-115, near Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. Radiation protection and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation was found not to be an operational problem during the Apollo program. Doses received by the crewmen of Apollo missions 7 through 17 were small because no major solar-particle events occurred during those missions. One small event was detected by a radiation sensor outside the Apollo 12 spacecraft, but no increase in radiation dose to the crewmen inside the spacecraft was detected. Radiation protection for the Apollo program was focused on both the peculiarities of the natural space radiation environment and the increased prevalence of manmade radiation sources on the ground and onboard the spacecraft. Radiation-exposure risks to crewmen were assessed and balanced against mission gain to determine mission constraints. Operational radiation evaluation required specially designed radiation detection systems onboard the spacecraft in addition to the use of satellite data, solar observatory support, and other liaison. Control and management of radioactive sources and radiation-generating equipment was important in minimizing radiation exposure of ground-support personnel, researchers, and the Apollo flight and backup crewmen.

  6. Reliability and validity of instrumented soccer equipment.

    PubMed

    Akins, Jonathan S; Heebner, Nicholas R; Lovalekar, Mita; Sell, Timothy C

    2015-06-01

    Ankle ligament sprains are the most common injury in soccer. The high rate of these injuries demonstrates a need for novel data collection methodologies. Therefore, soccer shoes and shin guards were instrumented with inertial sensors to measure ankle joint kinematics in the field. The purpose of this study was to assess test-retest reliability and concurrent criterion validity of a kinematic assessment using the instrumented soccer equipment. Twelve soccer athletes performed athletic maneuvers in the laboratory and field during 2 sessions. In the laboratory, ankle joint kinematics were simultaneously measured with the instrumented equipment and a conventional motion analysis system. Reliability was assessed using ICC and validity was assessed using correlation coefficients and RMSE. While our design criteria of good test-retest reliability was not supported (ICC > .80), sagittal plane ICCs were mostly fair to good and similar to motion analysis results; and sagittal plane data were valid (r = .90-98; RMSE < 5°). Frontal and transverse plane data were not valid (r < .562; RMSE > 3°). Our results indicate that the instrumented soccer equipment can be used to measure sagittal plane ankle joint kinematics. Biomechanical studies support the utility of sagittal plane measures for lower extremity injury prevention.

  7. Reliability and validity of instrumented soccer equipment.

    PubMed

    Akins, Jonathan S; Heebner, Nicholas R; Lovalekar, Mita; Sell, Timothy C

    2015-06-01

    Ankle ligament sprains are the most common injury in soccer. The high rate of these injuries demonstrates a need for novel data collection methodologies. Therefore, soccer shoes and shin guards were instrumented with inertial sensors to measure ankle joint kinematics in the field. The purpose of this study was to assess test-retest reliability and concurrent criterion validity of a kinematic assessment using the instrumented soccer equipment. Twelve soccer athletes performed athletic maneuvers in the laboratory and field during 2 sessions. In the laboratory, ankle joint kinematics were simultaneously measured with the instrumented equipment and a conventional motion analysis system. Reliability was assessed using ICC and validity was assessed using correlation coefficients and RMSE. While our design criteria of good test-retest reliability was not supported (ICC > .80), sagittal plane ICCs were mostly fair to good and similar to motion analysis results; and sagittal plane data were valid (r = .90-98; RMSE < 5°). Frontal and transverse plane data were not valid (r < .562; RMSE > 3°). Our results indicate that the instrumented soccer equipment can be used to measure sagittal plane ankle joint kinematics. Biomechanical studies support the utility of sagittal plane measures for lower extremity injury prevention. PMID:25734398

  8. 14 CFR 135.179 - Inoperable instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inoperable instruments and equipment. 135... Aircraft and Equipment § 135.179 Inoperable instruments and equipment. (a) No person may take off an aircraft with inoperable instruments or equipment installed unless the following conditions are met: (1)...

  9. 14 CFR 121.303 - Airplane instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Airplane instruments and equipment. 121.303... Airplane instruments and equipment. (a) Unless otherwise specified, the instrument and equipment... airspeed limitation and item of related information in the Airplane Flight Manual and pertinent...

  10. 14 CFR 125.201 - Inoperable instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inoperable instruments and equipment. 125... CAPACITY OF 6,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 125.201 Inoperable instruments and equipment. (a) No person may take off...

  11. 14 CFR 121.628 - Inoperable instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inoperable instruments and equipment. 121... § 121.628 Inoperable instruments and equipment. (a) No person may take off an airplane with inoperable instruments or equipment installed unless the following conditions are met: (1) An approved Minimum...

  12. 14 CFR 121.303 - Airplane instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Airplane instruments and equipment. 121.303... Airplane instruments and equipment. (a) Unless otherwise specified, the instrument and equipment... airspeed limitation and item of related information in the Airplane Flight Manual and pertinent...

  13. 14 CFR 121.303 - Airplane instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Airplane instruments and equipment. 121.303... Airplane instruments and equipment. (a) Unless otherwise specified, the instrument and equipment... airspeed limitation and item of related information in the Airplane Flight Manual and pertinent...

  14. 14 CFR 121.303 - Airplane instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Airplane instruments and equipment. 121.303... Airplane instruments and equipment. (a) Unless otherwise specified, the instrument and equipment... airspeed limitation and item of related information in the Airplane Flight Manual and pertinent...

  15. 42 CFR 493.1252 - Standard: Test systems, equipment, instruments, reagents, materials, and supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY... storage of reagents and specimens, accurate and reliable test system operation, and test result reporting...) Temperature. (3) Humidity. (4) Protection of equipment and instruments from fluctuations and interruptions...

  16. About Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

    MedlinePlus

    ... evaluation or testing against specific viruses, such as Ebola or flu. If performance data has met FDA ... about the Flu What You Should Know about Ebola Q3. Should caregivers use PPE to help protect ...

  17. 41 CFR 50-204.7 - Personal protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... equipment. 50-204.7 Section 50-204.7 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... CONTRACTS General Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.7 Personal protective equipment. Protective equipment, including personal protective equipment for eyes, face, head, and extremities, protective...

  18. 14 CFR 91.1115 - Inoperable instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requiring recertification. (3) The approved Minimum Equipment List must: (i) Be prepared in accordance with... inoperable instruments and equipment and the information required by (a)(3)(ii) of this section must be... directive to be in operable condition unless the airworthiness directive provides otherwise. (3)...

  19. 14 CFR 91.1115 - Inoperable instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Ownership Operations Program Management § 91.1115 Inoperable instruments and equipment. (a) No person may... are met: (1) An approved Minimum Equipment List exists for that aircraft. (2) The program manager has been issued management specifications authorizing operations in accordance with an approved...

  20. 4. Interior view of instrumentation, controls, and monitoring equipment on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Interior view of instrumentation, controls, and monitoring equipment on east wall of the equipment room on the east side of the Signal Transfer Building (T-28A). - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Signal Transfer Building, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  1. 3. Interior view of instrumentation, controls, and monitoring equipment on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Interior view of instrumentation, controls, and monitoring equipment on north wall of the equipment room on the east side of the Signal Transfer Building (T-28A). - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Signal Transfer Building, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  2. 14 CFR 23.1451 - Fire protection for oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fire protection for oxygen equipment. 23... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1451 Fire protection for oxygen equipment. Oxygen equipment and lines... in, or escape from, any designated fire zone. (c) Be installed so that escaping oxygen cannot come...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1451 - Fire protection for oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fire protection for oxygen equipment. 23... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1451 Fire protection for oxygen equipment. Oxygen equipment and lines... in, or escape from, any designated fire zone. (c) Be installed so that escaping oxygen cannot come...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1451 - Fire protection for oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fire protection for oxygen equipment. 23... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1451 Fire protection for oxygen equipment. Oxygen equipment and lines... in, or escape from, any designated fire zone. (c) Be installed so that escaping oxygen cannot come...

  5. 14 CFR 23.1451 - Fire protection for oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire protection for oxygen equipment. 23... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1451 Fire protection for oxygen equipment. Oxygen equipment and lines... in, or escape from, any designated fire zone. (c) Be installed so that escaping oxygen cannot come...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1451 - Fire protection for oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fire protection for oxygen equipment. 23... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1451 Fire protection for oxygen equipment. Oxygen equipment and lines... in, or escape from, any designated fire zone. (c) Be installed so that escaping oxygen cannot come...

  7. 14 CFR 29.1439 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1439... eyes; and (3) That equipment must supply protective oxygen of 10 minutes duration per crewmember at...

  8. 14 CFR 29.1439 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1439... eyes; and (3) That equipment must supply protective oxygen of 10 minutes duration per crewmember at...

  9. 14 CFR 29.1439 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1439... eyes; and (3) That equipment must supply protective oxygen of 10 minutes duration per crewmember at...

  10. 14 CFR 29.1439 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 29.1439... eyes; and (3) That equipment must supply protective oxygen of 10 minutes duration per crewmember at...

  11. The Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Course: A Survey of Available Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leggett, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Reports results of a survey in which 110 universities were selected to respond to questions regarding approximate age and cost of the instruments used in three major areas: separations, spectroscopy, and electroanalysis. Respondents (N=41) also indicated which pieces of equipment were used in undergraduate courses or were used for research. (CS)

  12. 5. Interior view of instrumentation, controls, and monitoring equipment on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Interior view of instrumentation, controls, and monitoring equipment on north and east walls of the signal transfer room on the west side of the Signal Transfer Building (T-28A). - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Signal Transfer Building, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  13. 11. "INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS, EQUIPMENT LOCATION, TEST STAND TERMINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. "INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS, EQUIPMENT LOCATION, TEST STAND TERMINAL ROOM, PLANS AND SECTION." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-0912; sheet 106 of 148; file no. 1321/57. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. 14 CFR 29.1439 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... harmful gases while on flight deck duty; (2) That equipment must include— (i) Masks covering the eyes... eyes; and (3) That equipment must supply protective oxygen of 10 minutes duration per crewmember at...

  15. Lightning Protection and Instrumentation at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colon, Jose L.

    2005-01-01

    Lightning is a natural phenomenon, but can be dangerous. Prevention of lightning is a physical impossibility and total protection requires compromises on costs and effects, therefore prediction and measurements of the effects that might be produced by iightn:ing is a most at locat:ions where people or sensitive systems and equipment are exposed. This is the case of the launching pads for the Space Shuttle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This report summarizes lightring phenomena with a brief explanation of lightning generation and lightning activity as related to KSC. An analysis of the instrumentation used at the launching pads for measurements of lightning effects with alternatives to improve the protection system and up-grade the actual instrumentation system is indicated.

  16. 14 CFR 25.1439 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 25.1439.... (5) The equipment must supply protective oxygen of 15 minutes duration per crewmember at a pressure... leakage causing significant increase in the oxygen content of the local ambient atmosphere. If a...

  17. 30 CFR 77.704-7 - Protective equipment; inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND... protective equipment and clothing provided him in connection with work on high-voltage surface lines before using such equipment and clothing, and any equipment or clothing containing any defect or damage...

  18. 30 CFR 77.704-7 - Protective equipment; inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND... protective equipment and clothing provided him in connection with work on high-voltage surface lines before using such equipment and clothing, and any equipment or clothing containing any defect or damage...

  19. 30 CFR 77.704-7 - Protective equipment; inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND... protective equipment and clothing provided him in connection with work on high-voltage surface lines before using such equipment and clothing, and any equipment or clothing containing any defect or damage...

  20. 30 CFR 77.704-7 - Protective equipment; inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND... protective equipment and clothing provided him in connection with work on high-voltage surface lines before using such equipment and clothing, and any equipment or clothing containing any defect or damage...

  1. 30 CFR 77.704-7 - Protective equipment; inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND... protective equipment and clothing provided him in connection with work on high-voltage surface lines before using such equipment and clothing, and any equipment or clothing containing any defect or damage...

  2. Lightning protection devices for high frequencies equipments

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, J.

    1983-01-01

    Contents: Mechanism of a Lightning Stroke from Antenna to Ground; Principles of Protection Devices for Feeders; Electrical Characteristics of H.F. Protection Devices; Calculation of H.F. Protection Devices; Catalogue Devices for High Frequency Protection; Some Measurement Results for Tees; Measurement Results for Decoupling Line Devices; Installation of High Frequency Devices.

  3. 30 CFR 75.705-7 - Protective equipment; inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protective equipment; inspection. 75.705-7 Section 75.705-7 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 75.705-7 Protective equipment; inspection. Each person shall...

  4. 49 CFR 179.20 - Service equipment; protection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service equipment; protection systems. 179.20 Section 179.20 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... FOR TANK CARS General Design Requirements § 179.20 Service equipment; protection systems. If...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.95 - Criteria for personal protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criteria for personal protective equipment. 1926.95 Section 1926.95 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Personal Protective and Life Saving Equipment § 1926.95...

  6. 46 CFR 111.51-3 - Protection of vital equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protection of vital equipment. 111.51-3 Section 111.51-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Coordination of Overcurrent Protective Devices § 111.51-3 Protection of...

  7. 46 CFR 111.51-3 - Protection of vital equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection of vital equipment. 111.51-3 Section 111.51-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Coordination of Overcurrent Protective Devices § 111.51-3 Protection of...

  8. 46 CFR 111.51-3 - Protection of vital equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Protection of vital equipment. 111.51-3 Section 111.51-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Coordination of Overcurrent Protective Devices § 111.51-3 Protection of...

  9. 46 CFR 111.51-3 - Protection of vital equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Protection of vital equipment. 111.51-3 Section 111.51-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Coordination of Overcurrent Protective Devices § 111.51-3 Protection of...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.95 - Criteria for personal protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... construction for the work to be performed. (d) Payment for protective equipment. (1) Except as provided by... shoes, and normal work boots; or (ii) Ordinary clothing, skin creams, or other items, used solely...

  11. Instrumentation and Equipment for Three Independent Research Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Darlene Roth

    2012-03-29

    Completed in 2011, Albright's new Science Center includes three independent student and faculty research labs in Biology, Chemistry/Biochemistry, and Physics (separate from teaching labs). Providing independent research facilities, they eliminate disruptions in classrooms and teaching labs, encourage and accommodate increased student interest, and stimulate advanced research. The DOE grant of $369,943 enabled Albright to equip these advanced labs for 21st century science research, with much instrumentation shared among departments. The specialty labs will enable Albright to expand its student-faculty research program to meet growing interest, help attract superior science students, maximize faculty expertise, and continue exceeding its already high rates of acceptance for students applying for postgraduate education or pharmaceutical research positions. Biology instrumentation/equipment supports coursework and independent and collaborative research by students and faculty. The digital shaker, CO{sub 2} and water bath incubators (for controlled cell growth), balance, and micropipettes support cellular biology research in the advanced cell biology course and student-faculty research into heavy metal induction of heat shock proteins in cultured mammalian cells and the development of PCR markers from different populations of the native tree, Franklinia. The gravity convection oven and lyophilizer support research into physical and chemical analysis of floodplain sediments used in assessment of riparian restoration efforts. The Bio-Rad thermocycler permits fast and accurate DNA amplification as part of research into genetic diversity in small mammal populations and how those populations are affected by land-use practices and environmental management. The Millipore water deionizing system and glassware washer provide general support of the independent research lab and ensure quality control of coursework and interdisciplinary research at the intersection of biology

  12. 46 CFR 111.50-1 - Protection of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protection of equipment. 111.50-1 Section 111.50-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... electric equipment must meet the following listed subparts of this chapter: (a) Appliances, Subpart...

  13. 46 CFR 111.50-1 - Protection of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection of equipment. 111.50-1 Section 111.50-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... electric equipment must meet the following listed subparts of this chapter: (a) Appliances, Subpart...

  14. 46 CFR 111.50-1 - Protection of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Protection of equipment. 111.50-1 Section 111.50-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... electric equipment must meet the following listed subparts of this chapter: (a) Appliances, Subpart...

  15. 46 CFR 111.50-1 - Protection of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Protection of equipment. 111.50-1 Section 111.50-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS... electric equipment must meet the following listed subparts of this chapter: (a) Appliances, Subpart...

  16. Analysis of commercial equipment and instrumentation for Spacelab payloads, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Technical results are presented of a study to investigate analytically the feasibility of using commercially available laboratory equipment and instrumentation in the spacelab in support of various experiments. The feasibility is demonstrated by the breadth of application of commercial, airborne, and military equipment to experiment equipment requirements in the spacelab, and the cost effectiveness of utilizing this class of equipment instead of custom-built aerospace equipment typical of past designs. Equipment design and specifications are discussed.

  17. Personal protective equipment with integrated POF sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, J.; Schukar, M.; Krebber, K.; Pažoutová, H.; Demuth, J.; Santostefano, N.; Mäkinen, H.; Pietrowski, P.

    2013-05-01

    Within the EU project i-Protect fibre optic sensors for measuring heart rate, respiratory rate and skin temperature are being developed. The plastic optical fibre (POF) sensors are based on macrobending effects, photoplethysmography and fluorescence thermometry. The sensors and monitoring units are integrated into underwear and are communicating wireless via body area network and communication unit with the rescue command centre. All sensors can be removed from the underwear to allow washing the textile. First prototypes of the fibre optic sensors were tested in comparison to commercial reference sensors.

  18. Intelligent Processing Equipment Within the Environmental Protection Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greathouse, Daniel G.; Nalesnik, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    Protection of the environment and environmental remediation requires the cooperation, at all levels, of government and industry. Intelligent processing equipment, in addition to other artificial intelligence based tools, was used by the Environmental Protection Agency to provide personnel safety and improve the efficiency of those responsible for protection and remediation of the environment. These exploratory efforts demonstrate the feasibility and utility of expanding development and widespread use of these tools. A survey of current intelligent processing equipment applications in the Agency is presented and is followed by a brief discussion of possible uses in the future.

  19. Retrofitting tractors with rollover protective structures: perspective of equipment dealers.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, S M; Donham, K J; Leedom-Larson, K; Sanderson, W; Purschwitz, M

    2009-10-01

    This study was one of a cluster of studies that originated via requests for proposals from the NIOSH National Agricultural Tractor Safety Initiative. The present study design consisted of several steps: (1) formation of an advisory group, (2) development and testing of a standard paper self-responding survey instrument, (3) sample selection of farm equipment dealers, (4) administration of the survey, (5) assessment and analysis of the survey, and (6) in-person response panel of dealers (n = 80) to review results of the questionnaire for further definition and sharpening of the recommendations from the survey. A key finding is that most dealers do not currently sell or install ROPS retrofit kits. Barriers cited by dealers included (1) actual or perceived lack of farmer demand, (2) injury liability, (3) expensive freight for ordering ROPS, (4) lack of dealer awareness of the magnitude of deaths from tractor overturns and the high life-protective factor of ROPS, and (5) difficulty and incursion of non-recoverable expenses in locating and obtaining specific ROPS. Despite not currently selling or installing ROPS, dealers responded favorably about their future potential role in ROPS promotion and sales. Dealers were willing to further promote, sell, and install ROPS if there was demand from farmers. Recommendations include establishing a ROPS "clearing house" that dealers could contact to facilitate locating and obtaining ROPS orders from customers. Additional recommendations include education and social marketing targeting farm machinery dealers as well farmers, manufacturers, and policy makers. PMID:19967910

  20. NASA Developments in Personnel Protective Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John

    2015-01-01

    NASA has some unique and challenging PPE needs: there are credible threats to air quality (fire, ammonia leak, hydrazine leak)that require a contingency breathing apparatus that operates for many hours - but there is not enough space or up-mass to provide supplied air tanks. We cannot use "Scott Air Tanks" commonly used by firefighters and other first responders. NASA has developed a respirator based emergency breathing device. It uses a "one size fits everybody in the astronaut corps" hooded mask with excellent chemical permeability and fire resistance properties, and a filtering respirator cartridge that protects the wearer from ammonia leaks, hydrazine leaks, or products of combustion. If you need a small, lightweight emergency breathing system that lasts longer than a supplied air system, we should meet and learn if NASA sponsored technology development can help.

  1. Factors that prevent roughstock rodeo athletes from wearing protective equipment.

    PubMed

    Ross, David S; Ferguson, Alishia; Bosha, Phil; Cassas, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional survey design, this study sought to determine usage rates and barriers to the use of protective equipment in roughstock athletes. Between 2004 and 2006, amateur, collegiate, and professional roughstock athletes were surveyed using national organizational mailing lists. Findings revealed that during competition, 69% never wore a helmet. Barriers were a negative effect on performance and sport persona. Conversely, 88% always wore a vest. The perception that vest usage was required encouraged roughstock athletes to wear them. Mouthpiece use results were mixed; 58% always used and 21% never used a mouthpiece. Barriers were discomfort and frequent forgetfulness. Reported injury rate was high, with users noting fewer injuries to head and ribs than nonusers, and riders agreed that protective equipment prevented injury to the head, ribs, and mouth. However, equipment usage rates varied widely by type and seemed to be underutilized because the equipment affected performance, was uncomfortable, and "not cowboy." PMID:21068566

  2. Machine protection system for rotating equipment and method

    DOEpatents

    Lakshminarasimha, Arkalgud N.; Rucigay, Richard J.; Ozgur, Dincer

    2003-01-01

    A machine protection system and method for rotating equipment introduces new alarming features and makes use of full proximity probe sensor information, including amplitude and phase. Baseline vibration amplitude and phase data is estimated and tracked according to operating modes of the rotating equipment. Baseline vibration and phase data can be determined using a rolling average and variance and stored in a unit circle or tracked using short term average and long term average baselines. The sensed vibration amplitude and phase is compared with the baseline vibration amplitude and phase data. Operation of the rotating equipment can be controlled based on the vibration amplitude and phase.

  3. 14 CFR 91.213 - Inoperative instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... airplane, glider, lighter-than-air aircraft, powered parachute, or weight-shift-control aircraft, for which... small airplane, glider, or lighter-than-air aircraft for which a Master Minimum Equipment List has been... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Equipment,...

  4. 14 CFR 91.213 - Inoperative instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... airplane, glider, lighter-than-air aircraft, powered parachute, or weight-shift-control aircraft, for which... small airplane, glider, or lighter-than-air aircraft for which a Master Minimum Equipment List has been... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Equipment,...

  5. 14 CFR 91.213 - Inoperative instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... airplane, glider, lighter-than-air aircraft, powered parachute, or weight-shift-control aircraft, for which... small airplane, glider, or lighter-than-air aircraft for which a Master Minimum Equipment List has been... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Equipment,...

  6. 14 CFR 91.213 - Inoperative instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... airplane, glider, lighter-than-air aircraft, powered parachute, or weight-shift-control aircraft, for which... small airplane, glider, or lighter-than-air aircraft for which a Master Minimum Equipment List has been... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Equipment,...

  7. 14 CFR 91.213 - Inoperative instruments and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... airplane, glider, lighter-than-air aircraft, powered parachute, or weight-shift-control aircraft, for which... small airplane, glider, or lighter-than-air aircraft for which a Master Minimum Equipment List has been... (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Equipment,...

  8. Apollo experience report: Development flight instrumentation. [telemetry equipment for space flight test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, N. B.

    1974-01-01

    Development flight instrumentation was delivered for 25 Apollo vehicles as Government-furnished equipment. The problems and philosophies of an activity that was concerned with supplying telemetry equipment to a space-flight test program are discussed. Equipment delivery dates, system-design details, and flight-performance information for each mission also are included.

  9. 14 CFR 25.1439 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations: (1) The equipment must be designed to protect the appropriate crewmember from smoke, carbon... shall not cause any appreciable adverse effect on vision and must allow corrective glasses to be worn... leakage causing significant increase in the oxygen content of the local ambient atmosphere. If a...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1439 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Regulations: (1) The equipment must be designed to protect the appropriate crewmember from smoke, carbon... shall not cause any appreciable adverse effect on vision and must allow corrective glasses to be worn... leakage causing significant increase in the oxygen content of the local ambient atmosphere. If a...

  11. 10 CFR 850.29 - Protective clothing and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Protective clothing and equipment. 850.29 Section 850.29 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements... beryllium, regardless of measured exposure levels. (b) The responsible employer must comply with 29 CFR...

  12. 10 CFR 850.29 - Protective clothing and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Protective clothing and equipment. 850.29 Section 850.29 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements... beryllium, regardless of measured exposure levels. (b) The responsible employer must comply with 29 CFR...

  13. 10 CFR 850.29 - Protective clothing and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protective clothing and equipment. 850.29 Section 850.29 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements... beryllium, regardless of measured exposure levels. (b) The responsible employer must comply with 29 CFR...

  14. 10 CFR 850.29 - Protective clothing and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Protective clothing and equipment. 850.29 Section 850.29 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements... beryllium, regardless of measured exposure levels. (b) The responsible employer must comply with 29 CFR...

  15. 47 CFR 95.1123 - Protection of medical equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protection of medical equipment. 95.1123 Section 95.1123 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Wireless Medical Telemetry Service (WMTS) General Provisions §...

  16. 10 CFR 850.29 - Protective clothing and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Protective clothing and equipment. 850.29 Section 850.29 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements... beryllium, regardless of measured exposure levels. (b) The responsible employer must comply with 29 CFR...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.951 - Tools and protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... “air” test shall be performed for rubber gloves prior to use. (iv) Protective equipment of material... structures except where such use creates a greater hazard to the safety of the employees, in which case other... strength for the normal operating pressures, and (ii) Have an accumulator on the compressor to...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.951 - Tools and protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... “air” test shall be performed for rubber gloves prior to use. (iv) Protective equipment of material... structures except where such use creates a greater hazard to the safety of the employees, in which case other... strength for the normal operating pressures, and (ii) Have an accumulator on the compressor to...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.951 - Tools and protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... “air” test shall be performed for rubber gloves prior to use. (iv) Protective equipment of material... structures except where such use creates a greater hazard to the safety of the employees, in which case other... strength for the normal operating pressures, and (ii) Have an accumulator on the compressor to...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.951 - Tools and protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... “air” test shall be performed for rubber gloves prior to use. (iv) Protective equipment of material... structures except where such use creates a greater hazard to the safety of the employees, in which case other... strength for the normal operating pressures, and (ii) Have an accumulator on the compressor to...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.951 - Tools and protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... “air” test shall be performed for rubber gloves prior to use. (iv) Protective equipment of material... structures except where such use creates a greater hazard to the safety of the employees, in which case other... strength for the normal operating pressures, and (ii) Have an accumulator on the compressor to...

  2. 30 CFR 77.1503 - Augering equipment; overhead protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Auger Mining § 77.1503 Augering equipment; overhead protection. (a) Auger machines which are exposed to highwall hazards, together with all those parts of any coal elevating conveyors... connecting or disconnecting auger sections under a highwall, at least one person shall be assigned to...

  3. Development of a hand- transmitted vibration measurement instrument to perform tests in medical equipment according to the international standard IEC 60601-1-2005 Ed.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, F. F.; Moriya, H. T.; Moraes, J. C. T. B.

    2016-07-01

    According to the sub clause 9.6.3 of the international standard IEC 60601-1-2005, medical electrical equipment must provide means of protection against hazardous hand- transmitted vibrations. Compliance of this sub clause is checked by using a vibration measurement instrument in accordance with ISO 5349-1-2001 standard. The present article describes the development of a vibration measurement instrument to perform vibration measurements tests in medical equipments.

  4. 30 CFR 57.15006 - Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protective equipment and clothing for hazards... AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection Surface and Underground § 57.15006 Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants. Special protective equipment and special protective clothing shall...

  5. Fuzzy clustering of facial form for prototyping environmental protection equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, D.G.

    1994-07-01

    Emphasis on the human-to-aircraft interface has magnified in importance as the performance envelope of today`s aircraft has continued to expand. A major problem is that there has been a corresponding increase in the need for better fitting protection equipment and unfortunately it has become increasingly difficult for aircrew members to find equipment that will provide this level of fit. While protection equipment has, historically had poor fit characteristics, the issue has grown tremendously with the recent increase in the numbers of minorities and women. Fundamental to this problem are the archaic methods for sizing individual equipment and the methods for establishing a sizing system. This paper documents recent investigations by the author into developing new methods to overcome these problems. Research centered on the development of a new statistically based method for describing form and the application of fuzzy clustering using the new shape descriptors. A sizing system was developed from the application of the research, prototype masks were constructed and the hardware tested under flight conditions.

  6. 33 CFR 149.401 - What are the general requirements for firefighting and fire protection equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for firefighting and fire protection equipment? 149.401 Section 149.401 Navigation and Navigable..., CONSTRUCTION, AND EQUIPMENT Firefighting and Fire Protection Equipment § 149.401 What are the general requirements for firefighting and fire protection equipment? Each deepwater port must comply with...

  7. 33 CFR 149.401 - What are the general requirements for firefighting and fire protection equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for firefighting and fire protection equipment? 149.401 Section 149.401 Navigation and Navigable..., CONSTRUCTION, AND EQUIPMENT Firefighting and Fire Protection Equipment § 149.401 What are the general requirements for firefighting and fire protection equipment? Each deepwater port must comply with...

  8. 33 CFR 149.401 - What are the general requirements for firefighting and fire protection equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for firefighting and fire protection equipment? 149.401 Section 149.401 Navigation and Navigable..., CONSTRUCTION, AND EQUIPMENT Firefighting and Fire Protection Equipment § 149.401 What are the general requirements for firefighting and fire protection equipment? Each deepwater port must comply with...

  9. 33 CFR 149.401 - What are the general requirements for firefighting and fire protection equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for firefighting and fire protection equipment? 149.401 Section 149.401 Navigation and Navigable..., CONSTRUCTION, AND EQUIPMENT Firefighting and Fire Protection Equipment § 149.401 What are the general requirements for firefighting and fire protection equipment? Each deepwater port must comply with...

  10. 33 CFR 149.401 - What are the general requirements for firefighting and fire protection equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for firefighting and fire protection equipment? 149.401 Section 149.401 Navigation and Navigable..., CONSTRUCTION, AND EQUIPMENT Firefighting and Fire Protection Equipment § 149.401 What are the general requirements for firefighting and fire protection equipment? Each deepwater port must comply with...

  11. Personal protective equipment and decontamination of adults and children.

    PubMed

    Holland, Michael G; Cawthon, David

    2015-02-01

    Accurate identification of the hazardous material is essential for proper care. Efficient hospital security and triage must prevent contaminated victims from entering the emergency department (ED) and causing secondary contamination. The decontamination area should be located outside the ambulance entrance. Decontamination priorities are protection of the health care worker, utilization of Level C personal protective equipment, and proper decontamination of the exposed patient. Decontamination proceeds in a head-to-toe sequence. Run-off water is a hazardous waste. Hospital and Community Management Planning for these emergencies is essential for proper preparation and effective response to the hazardous materials incident.

  12. Personal protective equipment and decontamination of adults and children.

    PubMed

    Holland, Michael G; Cawthon, David

    2015-02-01

    Accurate identification of the hazardous material is essential for proper care. Efficient hospital security and triage must prevent contaminated victims from entering the emergency department (ED) and causing secondary contamination. The decontamination area should be located outside the ambulance entrance. Decontamination priorities are protection of the health care worker, utilization of Level C personal protective equipment, and proper decontamination of the exposed patient. Decontamination proceeds in a head-to-toe sequence. Run-off water is a hazardous waste. Hospital and Community Management Planning for these emergencies is essential for proper preparation and effective response to the hazardous materials incident. PMID:25455662

  13. Protective shield for an instrument probe

    DOEpatents

    Johnsen, Howard A.; Ross, James R.; Birtola, Sal R.

    2004-10-26

    A shield is disclosed that is particularly useful for protecting exposed optical elements at the end of optical probes used in the analysis of hazardous emissions in and around an industrial environment from the contaminating effects of those emissions. The instant invention provides a hood or cowl in the shape of a right circular cylinder that can be fitted over the end of such optical probes. The hood provides a clear aperture through which the probe can perform unobstructed analysis. The probe optical elements are protected from the external environment by passing a dry gas through the interior of the hood and out through the hood aperture in sufficient quantity and velocity to prevent any significant mixing between the internal and external environments. Additionally, the hood is provided with a cooling jacket to lessen the potential for damaging the probe due to temperature excursions.

  14. Anthropometric Procedures for Protective Equipment Sizing and Design

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This article presented four anthropometric theories (univariate, bivariate/probability distribution, multivariate, and shape-based methods) for protective equipment design decisions. Background While the significance of anthropometric information for product design is well recognized, designers continue to face challenges in selecting efficient anthropometric data processing methods and translating the acquired information into effective product designs. Methods For this study, 100 farm tractor operators, 3,718 respirator users, 951 firefighters, and 816 civilian workers participated in four studies on the design of tractor roll-over protective structures (ROPS), respirator test panels, fire truck cabs, and fall-arrest harnesses, respectively. Their anthropometry and participant-equipment interfaces were evaluated. Results Study 1 showed a need to extend the 90-cm vertical clearance for tractor ROPS in the current industrial standards to 98.3 to 101.3 cm. Study 2 indicated that current respirator test panel would have excluded 10% of the male firefighter population; a systematic adjustment to the boundaries of test panel cells was suggested. Study 3 provided 24 principal component analysis-based firefighter body models to facilitate fire truck cab design. Study 4 developed an improved gender-based fall-arrest harness sizing scheme to supplant the current unisex system. Conclusions This article presented four anthropometric approaches and a six-step design paradigm for ROPS, respirator test panel, fire truck cab, and fall-arrest harness applications, which demonstrated anthropometric theories and practices for defining protective equipment fit and sizing schemes. Applications The study provided a basis for equipment designers, standards writers, and industry manufacturers to advance anthropometric applications for product design and improve product efficacy. PMID:23516791

  15. 46 CFR 111.30-17 - Protection of instrument circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....30-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Switchboards § 111.30-17 Protection of instrument circuits. (a) Each... overload protection if it supplies: (1) An electric propulsion control; (2) A voltage regulator; (3) A...

  16. 46 CFR 111.30-17 - Protection of instrument circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....30-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Switchboards § 111.30-17 Protection of instrument circuits. (a) Each... overload protection if it supplies: (1) An electric propulsion control; (2) A voltage regulator; (3) A...

  17. 46 CFR 111.30-17 - Protection of instrument circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....30-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Switchboards § 111.30-17 Protection of instrument circuits. (a) Each... overload protection if it supplies: (1) An electric propulsion control; (2) A voltage regulator; (3) A...

  18. 46 CFR 111.30-17 - Protection of instrument circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....30-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Switchboards § 111.30-17 Protection of instrument circuits. (a) Each... overload protection if it supplies: (1) An electric propulsion control; (2) A voltage regulator; (3) A...

  19. 46 CFR 111.30-17 - Protection of instrument circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....30-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Switchboards § 111.30-17 Protection of instrument circuits. (a) Each... overload protection if it supplies: (1) An electric propulsion control; (2) A voltage regulator; (3) A...

  20. Planetary Protection Considerations For Exomars Meteorological Instrumentation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilletti, Adam

    2007-10-01

    Planetary protection requirements for Oxford University's contribution to the upcoming ESA ExoMars mission are discussed and the current methods being used to fulfil these requirements are detailed and reviewed. Oxford University is supplying temperature and wind sensors to the mission and since these will be exposed to the Martian environment there is a requirement that they are sterilised to stringent COSPAR standards adhered to by ESA. Typically dry heat microbial reduction (DHMR) is used to reduce spacecraft bioburden but the high temperatures involved are not compatible with the some hardware elements. Alternative, low-temperature sterilisation methods are reviewed and their applicability to spacecraft hardware discussed. The use of a commercially available, bench-top endotoxin tester in planetary protection is also discussed and data from preliminary tests performed at Oxford are presented. These devices, which utilise the immune response of horseshoe crabs to the presence of endotoxin, have the potential to reduce the time taken to determine bioburden by removing the need for conventional assaying -a lengthy and sometimes expensive process.

  1. 48 CFR 36.509 - Protection of existing vegetation, structures, equipment, utilities, and improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... vegetation, structures, equipment, utilities, and improvements. 36.509 Section 36.509 Federal Acquisition...-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.509 Protection of existing vegetation, structures, equipment... Existing Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements, in solicitations and...

  2. 48 CFR 36.509 - Protection of existing vegetation, structures, equipment, utilities, and improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... vegetation, structures, equipment, utilities, and improvements. 36.509 Section 36.509 Federal Acquisition...-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.509 Protection of existing vegetation, structures, equipment... Existing Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements, in solicitations and...

  3. 48 CFR 36.509 - Protection of existing vegetation, structures, equipment, utilities, and improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... vegetation, structures, equipment, utilities, and improvements. 36.509 Section 36.509 Federal Acquisition...-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.509 Protection of existing vegetation, structures, equipment... Existing Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements, in solicitations and...

  4. 48 CFR 36.509 - Protection of existing vegetation, structures, equipment, utilities, and improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... vegetation, structures, equipment, utilities, and improvements. 36.509 Section 36.509 Federal Acquisition...-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.509 Protection of existing vegetation, structures, equipment... Existing Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements, in solicitations and...

  5. 48 CFR 36.509 - Protection of existing vegetation, structures, equipment, utilities, and improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... vegetation, structures, equipment, utilities, and improvements. 36.509 Section 36.509 Federal Acquisition...-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.509 Protection of existing vegetation, structures, equipment... Existing Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements, in solicitations and...

  6. 14 CFR 23.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. (a) Each element of the oxygen system must have sufficient strength to withstand the maximum pressure and temperature,...

  7. 14 CFR 23.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. (a) Each element of the oxygen system must have sufficient strength to withstand the maximum pressure and temperature,...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. (a) Each element of the oxygen system must have sufficient strength to withstand the maximum pressure and temperature,...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. (a) Each element of the oxygen system must have sufficient strength to withstand the maximum pressure and temperature,...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture... Equipment Miscellaneous Equipment § 23.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. (a) Each element of the oxygen system must have sufficient strength to withstand the maximum pressure and temperature,...

  11. GLOVEBOX DISMANTLEMENT AND EQUIPMENT PROTECTION IN CONTAMINATED ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Akihiro; Stallings, Ellen; Wilburn, Dianne W.

    2003-02-27

    It has been revealed from the experiences of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities that even a small improvement in performance can result in significant risk reduction and cost savings. For example, Race Scan Ear Mic System, which was originally developed for communications between racecar drivers and crews in loud environments, has been successfully applied to D&D work and proved to enhance worker safety and communications. Glovebox dismantlement is an important and costly process in D&D activities of nuclear facilities. Adequate decontamination and size reduction of the gloveboxes are especially important in this activity because they have the potential to reduce risks and costs significantly. This paper presents some simple approaches to support D&D tasks and discusses their potential advantages. Examples discussed include: Repeated shear wiping of large pipes and ducts; Application of thin layers on radiological counters for uninterrupted use; and Partial use of robotics for glovebox dismantling. The paper also discusses schematics for protecting equipment interiors and/or glovebox inner surfaces from contamination, which may result in significant savings and waste minimization upon future dismantlement. Examples discussed include: Smart coating for contamination prevention; and Protecting equipment by geometrically simple cover.

  12. Contamination during doffing of personal protective equipment by healthcare providers

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seong Mi; Cha, Won Chul; Chae, Minjung Kathy; Jo, Ik Joon

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study, we aimed to describe the processes of both the donning and the doffing of personal protective equipment for Ebola and evaluate contamination during the doffing process. Methods We recruited study participants among physicians and nurses of the emergency department of Samsung Medical Center in Seoul, Korea. Participants were asked to carry out doffing and donning procedures with a helper after a 50-minute brief training and demonstration based on the 2014 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention protocol. Two separate cameras with high-density capability were set up, and the donning and doffing processes were video-taped. A trained examiner inspected all video recordings and coded for intervals, errors, and contaminations defined as the outside of the equipment touching the clinician’s body surface. Results Overall, 29 participants were enrolled. Twenty (68.9%) were female, and the mean age was 29.2 years. For the donning process, the average interval until the end was 234.2 seconds (standard deviation [SD], 65.7), and the most frequent errors occurred when putting on the outer gloves (27.5%), respirator (20.6%), and hood (20.6%). For the doffing process, the average interval until the end was 183.7 seconds (SD, 38.4), and the most frequent errors occurred during disinfecting the feet (37.9%), discarding the scrubs (17.2%), and putting on gloves (13.7%), respectively. During the doffing process, 65 incidences of contamination occurred (2.2 incidents/person). The most vulnerable processes were removing respirators (79.2%), removing the shoe covers (65.5%), and removal of the hood (41.3%). Conclusion A significant number of contaminations occur during the doffing process of personal protective equipment. PMID:27752591

  13. Suggested set-up and layout of instruments and equipment for advanced operative laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Winer, W K; Lyons, T L

    1995-02-01

    Crucial elements that ensure the organization and smoothness of a laparoscopic procedure are clear communication among well-trained endoscopy team members, properly maintained equipment, and a sensible layout of the instruments. The team consists of the surgeon, surgical assistant, circulator, scrub nurse, laser nurse, and anesthesiologist. To promote continuity and interaction and to ensure a systematic, pleasant pace for laparoscopic procedures, the team should establish a specific routine, as well as set-up and layout of tables, equipment, and instruments. Key ingredients for advanced operative laparoscopy to be performed with optimum efficiency and effectiveness are the best organization and placement of the equipment, instrumentation, and team in a particular setting in the operating room. PMID:9050565

  14. A Review of Instrumented Equipment to Investigate Head Impacts in Sport

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Contact, collision, and combat sports have more head impacts as compared to noncontact sports; therefore, such sports are uniquely suited to the investigation of head impact biomechanics. Recent advances in technology have enabled the development of instrumented equipment, which can estimate the head impact kinematics of human subjects in vivo. Literature pertaining to head impact measurement devices was reviewed and usage, in terms of validation and field studies, of such devices was discussed. Over the past decade, instrumented equipment has recorded millions of impacts in the laboratory, on the field, in the ring, and on the ice. Instrumented equipment is not without limitations; however, in vivo head impact data is crucial to investigate head injury mechanisms and further the understanding of concussion.

  15. A Review of Instrumented Equipment to Investigate Head Impacts in Sport.

    PubMed

    Patton, Declan A

    2016-01-01

    Contact, collision, and combat sports have more head impacts as compared to noncontact sports; therefore, such sports are uniquely suited to the investigation of head impact biomechanics. Recent advances in technology have enabled the development of instrumented equipment, which can estimate the head impact kinematics of human subjects in vivo. Literature pertaining to head impact measurement devices was reviewed and usage, in terms of validation and field studies, of such devices was discussed. Over the past decade, instrumented equipment has recorded millions of impacts in the laboratory, on the field, in the ring, and on the ice. Instrumented equipment is not without limitations; however, in vivo head impact data is crucial to investigate head injury mechanisms and further the understanding of concussion. PMID:27594780

  16. A Review of Instrumented Equipment to Investigate Head Impacts in Sport

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Contact, collision, and combat sports have more head impacts as compared to noncontact sports; therefore, such sports are uniquely suited to the investigation of head impact biomechanics. Recent advances in technology have enabled the development of instrumented equipment, which can estimate the head impact kinematics of human subjects in vivo. Literature pertaining to head impact measurement devices was reviewed and usage, in terms of validation and field studies, of such devices was discussed. Over the past decade, instrumented equipment has recorded millions of impacts in the laboratory, on the field, in the ring, and on the ice. Instrumented equipment is not without limitations; however, in vivo head impact data is crucial to investigate head injury mechanisms and further the understanding of concussion. PMID:27594780

  17. Plasma Decontamination of Space Equipment for Planetary Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Hubertus; Barczyk, Simon; Rettberg, Petra; Shimizu, Satoshi; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Klaempfl, Tobias; Morfill, Gregor; Zimmermann, Julia; Weber, Peter

    The search for extraterrestrial life is one of the most challenging science topics for the next decades. Space missions, like ExoMars, plan to land and search for biological remnants on planets and moons in our nearby Solar system. Planetary protection regulations defined by COSPAR prevent that during the mission biological contamination of the bodies occur through the space probes. Therefore decontamination of the probes and more general space equipment is necessary before the launch. The up-to-date accepted decontamination procedure originate from the old NASA Viking missions and use dry heat (T>110°C for 30h) - a technology not well suited for sensitive equipment nowadays. We investigated in a study financed by the German Space Agency* cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) as an alternative for such decontamination. It is well known that CAP can kill bacteria or spores within seconds or minutes, respectively, if the plasma is in direct contact with the treated sample. This procedure might also be quite aggressive to the treated surface materials. Therefore, we developed an afterglow CAP device specially designed for the soft treatment of space equipment. Afterglow plasma produced by a SMD device in air is transported into a “larger” treatment chamber where the samples are positioned. It could be shown that samples of different bacteria and spores, the latter defined by COSPAR as a means to show the effectiveness of the decontamination process, positioned on different materials (steel, Teflon, quartz) could be effectively inactivated. The surface materials were investigated after the plasma treatment to identify etching or deposition problems. The afterglow in the treatment chamber could even overcome obstacles (tubes of different height and diameter) which simulate more complicated structures of the relevant surfaces. Up to now, CAP looks like a quite promising alternative to decontaminate space equipment and need to be studied in greater detail in the near future

  18. Permeation Resistance of Personal Protective Equipment Materials to Monomethyhydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, J. M.; Williams, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    Permeation resistance was determined by measuring the breakthrough time and time-averaged vapor transmission rate of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) through two types of personal protective equipment (PPE). The two types of PPE evaluated were the totally encapsulating ILC Dover Chemturion Model 1212 chemical protective suit with accessories, and the FabOhio polyvinyl chloride (PVC) splash garment. Two exposure scenarios were simulated: (1) a saturated vapor exposure for 2 hours (h), and (2) a brief MMH 'splash' followed by a 2-h saturated vapor exposure. Time-averaged MMH concentrations inside the totally-encapsulating suit were calculated by summation of the area-weighted contributions made by each suit component. Results show that the totally encapsulating suit provides adequate protection at the new 10 ppb Threshold Limit Value Time-Weighted Average (TLV-TWA). The permeation resistance of the PVC splash garment to MMH was poorer than any of the totally encapsulating suit materials tested. Breakthrough occurred soon after initial vapor or 'splash' exposure.

  19. 30 CFR 77.403 - Mobile equipment; falling object protective structures (FOPS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mobile equipment; falling object protective... object protective structures (FOPS). (a) When necessary to protect the operator of the equipment, all... underground coal mines shall be provided with substantial falling object protective structures (FOPS)....

  20. Instrumentation and Quench Protection for LARP Nb3Sn Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, H.; Ambrosio, G.; Chlachidize, G.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, R. C.; Joseph, J.; Lietzke, A.; McInturff, A.; Muratore, J.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G. L.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer, P.; Wang, X.

    2008-08-17

    The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) is developing Nb{sub 3}Sn prototype quadrupoles for the LHC interaction region upgrades. Several magnets have been tested within this program and understanding of their behavior and performance is a primary goal. The instrumentation is consequently a key consideration, as is protection of the magnet during quenches. In all LARP magnets, the flexible circuits traces combine the instrumentation and the protection heaters. Their fabrication relies on printed circuit technology based on a laminate made of a 45-micron thick kapton sheet and a 25-micron thick foil of stainless steel. This paper reviews the protection heaters designs used in the TQ (Technology Quadrupole) and LR (Long Racetrack) series as well as the one used in LBNL HD2a high field dipole and presents the design of the traces for the Long Quadrupole (LQ), addressing challenges associated with the stored energy and the length of the magnet.

  1. 78 FR 4873 - Electrical Protective Equipment Standard and the Electric Power Generation, Transmission, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Electrical Protective Equipment Standard and the Electric Power... on Electrical Protective Equipment (29 CFR 1910.137) and Electric Power Generation, Transmission, and... Equipment Standard (29 CFR 1910.137) and the Electric Power Generation, Transmission, and...

  2. 30 CFR 75.705-8 - Protective equipment; testing and storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Protective equipment; testing and storage. (a) All rubber protective equipment used on work on energized high... schedule: (1) Rubber gloves, once each month; (2) Rubber sleeves, once every 3 months; (3) Rubber blankets... equipment, once a year. (b) Rubber gloves shall not be stored wrong side out. Blankets shall be rolled...

  3. 30 CFR 75.705-8 - Protective equipment; testing and storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Protective equipment; testing and storage. (a) All rubber protective equipment used on work on energized high... schedule: (1) Rubber gloves, once each month; (2) Rubber sleeves, once every 3 months; (3) Rubber blankets... equipment, once a year. (b) Rubber gloves shall not be stored wrong side out. Blankets shall be rolled...

  4. 30 CFR 75.518 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection. 75.518 Section 75.518 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Equipment-General § 75.518 Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection....

  5. 30 CFR 75.518 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection. 75.518 Section 75.518 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Equipment-General § 75.518 Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection....

  6. 30 CFR 75.518 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection. 75.518 Section 75.518 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Equipment-General § 75.518 Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection....

  7. 30 CFR 75.518 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection. 75.518 Section 75.518 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Equipment-General § 75.518 Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection....

  8. 48 CFR 52.237-2 - Protection of Government Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation. 52.237-2 Section 52.237-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.237-2 Protection of Government Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation...: Protection of Government Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation (APR 1984) The Contractor shall use...

  9. 48 CFR 52.237-2 - Protection of Government Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation. 52.237-2 Section 52.237-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.237-2 Protection of Government Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation...: Protection of Government Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation (APR 1984) The Contractor shall use...

  10. 48 CFR 52.237-2 - Protection of Government Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation. 52.237-2 Section 52.237-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.237-2 Protection of Government Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation...: Protection of Government Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation (APR 1984) The Contractor shall use...

  11. 48 CFR 52.237-2 - Protection of Government Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation. 52.237-2 Section 52.237-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.237-2 Protection of Government Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation...: Protection of Government Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation (APR 1984) The Contractor shall use...

  12. 48 CFR 52.237-2 - Protection of Government Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation. 52.237-2 Section 52.237-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.237-2 Protection of Government Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation...: Protection of Government Buildings, Equipment, and Vegetation (APR 1984) The Contractor shall use...

  13. 30 CFR 75.518 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Equipment-General § 75.518 Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection. Automatic... electric equipment and circuits against short circuit and overloads. Three-phase motors on all electric... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload...

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this one-year investigation is to perform a technology integration/search, thereby ensuring that the safest and most cost-effective options are developed and subsequently used during the deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) sites. Issues of worker health and safety are the main concern, followed by cost. Two lines of action were explored: innovative Personal Cooling Systems (PCS) and Personal Monitoring Equipment (PME). PME refers to sensors affixed to the worker that warn of an approaching heat stress condition, thereby preventing it. Three types of cooling systems were investigated: Pre-Chilled or Forced-Air System (PCFA), Umbilical Fluid-Chilled System (UFCS), and Passive Vest System (PVS). Of these, the UFCS leads the way. The PVS or Gel pack vest lagged due to a limited cooling duration. And the PCFA or chilled liquid air supply was cumbersome and required an expensive and complex recharge system. The UFCS in the form of the Personal Ice Cooling System (PICS) performed exceptionally. The technology uses a chilled liquid circulating undergarment and a Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) external pump and ice reservoir. The system is moderately expensive, but the recharge is low-tech and inexpensive enough to offset the cost. There are commercially available PME that can be augmented to meet the DOE's heat stress alleviation need. The technology is costly, in excess of $4,000 per unit. Workers easily ignore the alarm. The benefit to health & safety is indirect so can be overlooked. A PCS is a more justifiable expenditure.

  15. 46 CFR 28.330 - Galley hood and other fire protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... protection equipment. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a grease extraction hood complying with UL 710 above each grill, broiler, and deep fat fryer. (b) Each grease extraction hood must be equipped with...

  16. 46 CFR 28.330 - Galley hood and other fire protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... protection equipment. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a grease extraction hood complying with UL 710 above each grill, broiler, and deep fat fryer. (b) Each grease extraction hood must be equipped with...

  17. 46 CFR 28.330 - Galley hood and other fire protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... protection equipment. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a grease extraction hood complying with UL 710 above each grill, broiler, and deep fat fryer. (b) Each grease extraction hood must be equipped with...

  18. 30 CFR 56.15006 - Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and irritants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and reliable condition and used whenever hazards of process or environment, chemical hazards... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protective equipment and clothing for hazards... NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15006 Protective equipment and clothing for hazards and...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.97 - Electrical protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... properties of the insulating material itself, conduction current through the volume of the insulating equipment, and leakage current along the surface of the tool or equipment. The conduction current...

  20. 30 CFR 75.705-7 - Protective equipment; inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... connection with work on high-voltage surface lines before using such equipment and clothing, and any equipment or clothing containing any defect or damage shall be discarded and replaced with proper...

  1. 26 CFR 1.1286-2 - Stripped inflation-protected debt instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stripped inflation-protected debt instruments... Losses § 1.1286-2 Stripped inflation-protected debt instruments. Stripped inflation-protected debt instruments. If a Treasury Inflation-Protected Security is stripped under the Department of the...

  2. 26 CFR 1.1286-2 - Stripped inflation-protected debt instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stripped inflation-protected debt instruments... Losses § 1.1286-2 Stripped inflation-protected debt instruments. Stripped inflation-protected debt instruments. If a Treasury Inflation-Protected Security is stripped under the Department of the...

  3. Minimally invasive cardiac surgery in the adult: surgical instruments, equipment, and techniques.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, M; Uwabe, K; Hirota, J; Kawai, A; Endo, M; Koyanagi, H

    1998-09-01

    To clarify the special instruments and equipment used for minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS), we examined the initial experiences with MICS operations with ministernotomy or minithoracotomy at our institution. Fifty adult patients with congenital, valvular, and/or ischemic heart diseases underwent MICS operations, and all surgical procedures were completed without conversion to full sternotomy. The length of the skin incision was about 10 cm or less in all patients. Postoperative recovery was favorable, and the majority of the patients were discharged from the hospital around the end of the second postoperative week. In this series of patients, an oscillating bone saw, lifting type retractor, 2 blade spreader, cannula with a balloon, and right-angled aortic clamp among other items, were very useful for successfully performing various operations with MICS approaches and techniques. The associated results suggest that MICS with ministernotomy or minithoracotomy was feasible using special instruments and equipment and could be encouraged for adult patients with various cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Ground-based astronomical instrument for planetary protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Richard L.; Bennett, Dave; Bold, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    Planetary protection consists of the measurement and characterization of near-earth objects including earth threatening asteroids and earth orbiting debris. The Lockheed Martin STAR Labs in Palo Alto California is developing new astronomical instruments for use in planetary protection. The observation of asteroids is standard for astronomical facilities and there are available instruments designed with this specific science mission in mind. Orbital debris observation and characterization has a somewhat different set of requirements and includes large fields of view with simultaneous spectro-polarimetric data on multiple closely spaced objects. Orbital debris is comprised of spent rocket bodies, rocket fairing covers, paint chips, various satellite components, debris from satellite collisions and explosions and nonoperational satellites. The debris is present in all orbital planes from Low Earth orbit out to the geosynchronous graveyard orbit. We concentrate our effort on the geosynchronous and nearby orbits. This is because typical groundbased astronomical telescopes are built to track at sidereal rates and not at the 1 degree per second rates that are required to track low earth orbiting objects. The orbital debris materials include aluminum, mylar, solar cell materials, composite matrix material and other materials that are used in the fabrication of satellites and launch vehicles. These materials typically have spectral features in different wavebands than asteroids which are mostly composed of materials with molecular absorption bands such as in H2O. This will drive an orbital debris material identification instrument to wavebands and resolutions that are typically not used in asteroid observations.

  5. Farmers' use of personal protective equipment during handling of plant protection products: Determinants of implementation.

    PubMed

    Damalas, Christos A; Abdollahzadeh, Gholamhossein

    2016-11-15

    Understanding factors affecting the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) during handling of plant protection products (PPPs) is of major importance for the design of tailored interventions to minimize exposure among farmers. However, data regarding this issue are highly limited. Factors related to the use of PPE during handling of PPPs were explored in a survey of cotton farmers in northern Greece. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews with the farmers based on a questionnaire with structured items on the frequency of use of various personal protective devices during handling of PPPs. New evidence on patterns of PPE use and potential exposure of farmers to PPPs is provided. Most farmers (49.3%) showed potentially unsafe behaviour with respect to PPE use. Hat and boots were the most commonly used protective items during PPPs use, but most of the farmers surveyed reported low frequency of use for gloves, goggles, face mask, coveralls, and respirator. Especially the respirator was reported to be the least used PPE item amongst farmers. Farmers who perceived PPPs as harmful substances or those who had an episode of intoxication in the past reported more frequent use of several PPE items. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that the variable episode of intoxication in the past exerted the strongest positive influence on PPE use, followed by the perception of PPPs being hazardous substances, upper secondary education, previous training on PPPs (i.e., spraying equipment, application parameters, risks to human health and environment, safety issues) and farm size under cultivation. Old age exerted a significant negative influence on PPE use, namely, elderly farmers tended not to use PPE. Strategies to maximize the protection of applicators of PPPs from hazardous exposures still require innovation to achieve increased effectiveness. Emphasis on lifelong training and education of farmers about hazards and risks of PPPs is crucial for changing

  6. Farmers' use of personal protective equipment during handling of plant protection products: Determinants of implementation.

    PubMed

    Damalas, Christos A; Abdollahzadeh, Gholamhossein

    2016-11-15

    Understanding factors affecting the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) during handling of plant protection products (PPPs) is of major importance for the design of tailored interventions to minimize exposure among farmers. However, data regarding this issue are highly limited. Factors related to the use of PPE during handling of PPPs were explored in a survey of cotton farmers in northern Greece. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews with the farmers based on a questionnaire with structured items on the frequency of use of various personal protective devices during handling of PPPs. New evidence on patterns of PPE use and potential exposure of farmers to PPPs is provided. Most farmers (49.3%) showed potentially unsafe behaviour with respect to PPE use. Hat and boots were the most commonly used protective items during PPPs use, but most of the farmers surveyed reported low frequency of use for gloves, goggles, face mask, coveralls, and respirator. Especially the respirator was reported to be the least used PPE item amongst farmers. Farmers who perceived PPPs as harmful substances or those who had an episode of intoxication in the past reported more frequent use of several PPE items. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that the variable episode of intoxication in the past exerted the strongest positive influence on PPE use, followed by the perception of PPPs being hazardous substances, upper secondary education, previous training on PPPs (i.e., spraying equipment, application parameters, risks to human health and environment, safety issues) and farm size under cultivation. Old age exerted a significant negative influence on PPE use, namely, elderly farmers tended not to use PPE. Strategies to maximize the protection of applicators of PPPs from hazardous exposures still require innovation to achieve increased effectiveness. Emphasis on lifelong training and education of farmers about hazards and risks of PPPs is crucial for changing

  7. Chest Compression With Personal Protective Equipment During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Lu, Kai-Zhi; Yi, Bin; Chen, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Following a chemical, biological, radiation, and nuclear incident, prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) procedure is essential for patients who suffer cardiac arrest. But CPR when wearing personal protection equipment (PPE) before decontamination becomes a challenge for healthcare workers (HCW). Although previous studies have assessed the impact of PPE on airway management, there is little research available regarding the quality of chest compression (CC) when wearing PPE. A present randomized cross-over simulation study was designed to evaluate the effect of PPE on CC performance using mannequins. The study was set in one university medical center in the China. Forty anesthesia residents participated in this randomized cross-over study. Each participant performed 2 min of CC on a manikin with and without PPE, respectively. Participants were randomized into 2 groups that either performed CC with PPE first, followed by a trial without PPE after a 180-min rest, or vice versa. CPR recording technology was used to objectively quantify the quality of CC. Additionally, participants’ physiological parameters and subjective fatigue score values were recorded. With the use of PPE, a significant decrease of the percentage of effective compressions (41.3 ± 17.1% with PPE vs 67.5 ± 15.6% without PPE, P < 0.001) and the percentage of adequate compressions (67.7 ± 18.9% with PPE vs 80.7 ± 15.5% without PPE, P < 0.001) were observed. Furthermore, the increases in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and subjective fatigue score values were more obvious with the use of PPE (all P < 0.01). We found significant deterioration of CC performance in HCW with the use of a level-C PPE, which may be a disadvantage for enhancing survival of cardiac arrest. PMID:27057878

  8. 30 CFR 77.506 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short-circuit protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short-circuit protection. 77.506 Section 77.506 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.506 Electric equipment...

  9. 14 CFR 121.337 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., and, for other than chemical oxygen generator systems, the breathing gas supply is fully charged. Each... equipment (PBE) meeting the equipment, breathing gas, and communication requirements contained in paragraph... the flightcrew from the effects of smoke, carbon dioxide or other harmful gases or an oxygen...

  10. 14 CFR 121.337 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., and, for other than chemical oxygen generator systems, the breathing gas supply is fully charged. Each... equipment (PBE) meeting the equipment, breathing gas, and communication requirements contained in paragraph... the flightcrew from the effects of smoke, carbon dioxide or other harmful gases or an oxygen...

  11. 14 CFR 121.337 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., and, for other than chemical oxygen generator systems, the breathing gas supply is fully charged. Each... equipment (PBE) meeting the equipment, breathing gas, and communication requirements contained in paragraph... the flightcrew from the effects of smoke, carbon dioxide or other harmful gases or an oxygen...

  12. 14 CFR 121.337 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., and, for other than chemical oxygen generator systems, the breathing gas supply is fully charged. Each... equipment (PBE) meeting the equipment, breathing gas, and communication requirements contained in paragraph... the flightcrew from the effects of smoke, carbon dioxide or other harmful gases or an oxygen...

  13. 42 CFR 37.45 - Protection against radiation emitted by radiographic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Protection against radiation emitted by radiographic equipment. 37.45 Section 37.45 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN....45 Protection against radiation emitted by radiographic equipment. Except as otherwise specified...

  14. 14 CFR 25.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. 25.1453 Section 25.1453 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 25.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. Oxygen pressure tanks, and lines between...

  15. 14 CFR 25.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. 25.1453 Section 25.1453 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 25.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. Oxygen pressure tanks, and lines between...

  16. 14 CFR 25.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. 25.1453 Section 25.1453 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 25.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. Oxygen pressure tanks, and lines between...

  17. 14 CFR 25.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. 25.1453 Section 25.1453 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 25.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. Oxygen pressure tanks, and lines between...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1453 - Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. 25.1453 Section 25.1453 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... § 25.1453 Protection of oxygen equipment from rupture. Oxygen pressure tanks, and lines between...

  19. 46 CFR 28.330 - Galley hood and other fire protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Galley hood and other fire protection equipment. 28.330..., 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.330 Galley hood and other fire protection equipment. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a grease extraction hood complying with UL...

  20. 46 CFR 28.330 - Galley hood and other fire protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Galley hood and other fire protection equipment. 28.330..., 1991, and That Operate With More Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.330 Galley hood and other fire protection equipment. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with a grease extraction hood complying with UL...

  1. Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission scientific instrument protective enclosure design requirements and contamination controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Patricia A.; Hughes, David W.; Hedgeland, Randy J.; Chivatero, Craig J.; Studer, Robert J.; Kostos, Peter J.

    1994-01-01

    The Scientific Instrument Protective Enclosures were designed for the Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Missions to provide a beginning environment to a Scientific Instrument during ground and on orbit activities. The Scientific Instruments required very stringent surface cleanliness and molecular outgassing levels to maintain ultraviolet performance. Data from the First Servicing Mission verified that both the Scientific Instruments and Scientific Instrument Protective Enclosures met surface cleanliness level requirements during ground and on-orbit activities.

  2. 14 CFR 25.1439 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... altitude of 8,000 feet with a respiratory minute volume of 30 liters per minute BTPD. The equipment and system must be designed to prevent any inward leakage to the inside of the device and prevent any outward... oxygen system is used, a supply of 300 liters of free oxygen at 70 °F. and 760 mm. Hg. pressure...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1439 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... altitude of 8,000 feet with a respiratory minute volume of 30 liters per minute BTPD. The equipment and system must be designed to prevent any inward leakage to the inside of the device and prevent any outward... oxygen system is used, a supply of 300 liters of free oxygen at 70 °F. and 760 mm. Hg. pressure...

  4. 14 CFR 121.337 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requirements are as follows: (i) The equipment must supply breathing gas for 15 minutes at a pressure altitude... (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS AND OPERATORS FOR COMPENSATION OR HIRE: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS OPERATING... pressure are adequate for use; and (ii) For chemical oxygen generator systems, is serviceable and...

  5. 29 CFR 1918.106 - Payment for protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... pay for non-specialty safety-toe protective footwear (including steel-toe shoes or steel-toe boots... or her request, to use shoes or boots with built-in metatarsal protection, the employer is not required to reimburse the employee for the shoes or boots. (d) The employer is not required to pay for:...

  6. 29 CFR 1917.96 - Payment for protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... protective footwear (including steel-toe shoes or steel-toe boots) and non-specialty prescription safety... provides metatarsal guards and allows the employee, at his or her request, to use shoes or boots with built-in metatarsal protection, the employer is not required to reimburse the employee for the shoes...

  7. 10 CFR 20.1704 - Further restrictions on the use of respiratory protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Further restrictions on the use of respiratory protection... RADIATION Respiratory Protection and Controls To Restrict Internal Exposure in Restricted Areas § 20.1704 Further restrictions on the use of respiratory protection equipment. The Commission may...

  8. 10 CFR 20.1704 - Further restrictions on the use of respiratory protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Further restrictions on the use of respiratory protection... RADIATION Respiratory Protection and Controls To Restrict Internal Exposure in Restricted Areas § 20.1704 Further restrictions on the use of respiratory protection equipment. The Commission may...

  9. Leakage current measurement of protective equipment insulating materials used in electrical installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buică, G.; Dobra, R.; Păsculescu, D.; Tătar, A.

    2016-06-01

    This research describes the behaviour of equipment and safety devices during use in extreme environmental conditions, in order to establish the technical conditions and additional health and safety requirements during operation, to ensure the health and safety of users, regardless of conditions and working environment in which they are use. The studies have been conducted both on new equipment and means of protection used in electrical installations. There has been evaluated protective equipment made of insulating rubber, reinforced fiberglass or PVC. They have been followed the technical characteristics and protection against electric shock by measuring the leakage current of different insulating materials.

  10. 14 CFR 121.325 - Instruments and equipment for operations under IFR or over-the-top.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... under IFR or over-the-top. 121.325 Section 121.325 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Equipment Requirements § 121.325 Instruments and equipment for operations under IFR or over-the-top. No person may operate an airplane under IFR or over-the-top conditions under this part unless it is...

  11. 14 CFR 121.325 - Instruments and equipment for operations under IFR or over-the-top.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... under IFR or over-the-top. 121.325 Section 121.325 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Equipment Requirements § 121.325 Instruments and equipment for operations under IFR or over-the-top. No person may operate an airplane under IFR or over-the-top conditions under this part unless it is...

  12. 14 CFR 121.325 - Instruments and equipment for operations under IFR or over-the-top.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... under IFR or over-the-top. 121.325 Section 121.325 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Equipment Requirements § 121.325 Instruments and equipment for operations under IFR or over-the-top. No person may operate an airplane under IFR or over-the-top conditions under this part unless it is...

  13. 14 CFR 121.325 - Instruments and equipment for operations under IFR or over-the-top.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... under IFR or over-the-top. 121.325 Section 121.325 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Equipment Requirements § 121.325 Instruments and equipment for operations under IFR or over-the-top. No person may operate an airplane under IFR or over-the-top conditions under this part unless it is...

  14. 14 CFR 121.325 - Instruments and equipment for operations under IFR or over-the-top.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... under IFR or over-the-top. 121.325 Section 121.325 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Equipment Requirements § 121.325 Instruments and equipment for operations under IFR or over-the-top. No person may operate an airplane under IFR or over-the-top conditions under this part unless it is...

  15. Environmental Assessment for the Health Protection Instrument Calibration Facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to review the possible environmental consequences associated with the construction and operation of a Health Protection Instrument Calibration Facility on the Savannah River Site (SRS). The proposed replacement calibration facility would be located in B Area of SRS and would replace an inadequate existing facility currently located within A Area of SRS (Building 736-A). The new facility would provide laboratories, offices, test equipment and the support space necessary for the SRS Radiation Monitoring Instrument Calibration Program to comply with DOE Orders 5480.4 (Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards) and 5480.11 (Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers). The proposed facility would serve as the central site source for the evaluation, selection, inspection, testing, calibration, and maintenance of all SRS radiation monitoring instrumentation. The proposed facility would be constructed on a currently undeveloped portion in B Area of SRS. The exact plot associated with the proposed action is a 1.2 hectare (3 acre) tract of land located on the west side of SRS Road No. 2. The proposed facility would lie approximately 4.4 km (2.75 mi) from the nearest SRS site boundary. The proposed facility would also lie within the confines of the existing B Area, and SRS safeguards and security systems. Archaeological, ecological, and land use reviews have been conducted in connection with the use of this proposed plot of land, and a detailed discussion of these reviews is contained herein. Socioeconomic, operational, and accident analyses were also examined in relation to the proposed project and the findings from these reviews are also contained in this EA.

  16. Orion Flight Test-1 Thermal Protection System Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowal, T. John

    2011-01-01

    The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) was originally under development to provide crew transport to the International Space Station after the retirement of the Space Shuttle, and to provide a means for the eventual return of astronauts to the Moon. With the current changes in the future direction of the United States human exploration programs, the focus of the Orion project has shifted to the project s first orbital flight test, designated Orion Flight Test 1 (OFT-1). The OFT-1 is currently planned for launch in July 2013 and will demonstrate the Orion vehicle s capability for performing missions in low Earth orbit (LEO), as well as extensibility beyond LEO for select, critical areas. Among the key flight test objectives are those related to validation of the re-entry aerodynamic and aerothermal environments, and the performance of the thermal protection system (TPS) when exposed to these environments. A specific flight test trajectory has been selected to provide a high energy entry beyond that which would be experienced during a typical low Earth orbit return, given the constraints imposed by the possible launch vehicles. This trajectory resulted from a trade study that considered the relative benefit of conflicting objectives from multiple subsystems, and sought to provide the maximum integrated benefit to the re-entry state-of-the-art. In particular, the trajectory was designed to provide: a significant, measureable radiative heat flux to the windward surface; data on boundary transition from laminar to turbulent flow; and data on catalytic heating overshoot on non-ablating TPS. In order to obtain the necessary flight test data during OFT-1, the vehicle will need to have an adequate quantity of instrumentation. A collection of instrumentation is being developed for integration in the OFT-1 TPS. In part, this instrumentation builds upon the work performed for the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent and Landing Instrument (MEDLI) suite to instrument the

  17. 29 CFR 1918.106 - Payment for protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... worn off the job-site. (c) When the employer provides metatarsal guards and allows the employee, at his or her request, to use shoes or boots with built-in metatarsal protection, the employer is...

  18. 29 CFR 1917.96 - Payment for protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... provides metatarsal guards and allows the employee, at his or her request, to use shoes or boots with built-in metatarsal protection, the employer is not required to reimburse the employee for the shoes...

  19. 46 CFR 197.555 - Personal protective clothing and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.555 Personal protective clothing and..., tight-fitting eye goggles to limit dermal exposure to, and prevent eye contact with, liquid benzene....

  20. 46 CFR 197.555 - Personal protective clothing and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.555 Personal protective clothing and..., tight-fitting eye goggles to limit dermal exposure to, and prevent eye contact with, liquid benzene....

  1. 46 CFR 197.555 - Personal protective clothing and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.555 Personal protective clothing and..., tight-fitting eye goggles to limit dermal exposure to, and prevent eye contact with, liquid benzene....

  2. 46 CFR 197.555 - Personal protective clothing and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.555 Personal protective clothing and..., tight-fitting eye goggles to limit dermal exposure to, and prevent eye contact with, liquid benzene....

  3. 46 CFR 197.555 - Personal protective clothing and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.555 Personal protective clothing and..., tight-fitting eye goggles to limit dermal exposure to, and prevent eye contact with, liquid benzene....

  4. Considerations for selecting personal protective equipment for hazardous materials decontamination.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Jeff

    2002-09-01

    PPE is necessary to protect staff and to deliver rapid and efficient care to patients contaminated with HAZMAT chemicals. Planning for HAZMAT cases includes learning about the common chemicals in the area, what resources are available to care for victims, identifying a decontamination area, and providing PPE to protect employees and other patients. A customized service can be used to meet OSHA standards and reduce costs. Ongoing training will be an important part of any HAZMAT program.

  5. Considerations for selecting personal protective equipment for hazardous materials decontamination.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Jeff

    2002-09-01

    PPE is necessary to protect staff and to deliver rapid and efficient care to patients contaminated with HAZMAT chemicals. Planning for HAZMAT cases includes learning about the common chemicals in the area, what resources are available to care for victims, identifying a decontamination area, and providing PPE to protect employees and other patients. A customized service can be used to meet OSHA standards and reduce costs. Ongoing training will be an important part of any HAZMAT program. PMID:12685463

  6. The electrical ground support equipment for the ExoMars 2016 DREAMS scientific instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molfese, C.; Schipani, P.; Marty, L.; Esposito, F.; D'Orsi, S.; Mannetta, M.; Debei, S.; Bettanini, C.; Aboudan, A.; Colombatti, G.; Mugnuolo, R.; Marchetti, E.; Pirrotta, S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EGSE) of the Dust characterization, Risk assessment, and Environment Analyser on the Martian Surface (DREAMS) scientific instrument, an autonomous surface payload package to be accommodated on the Entry, Descendent and landing Module (EDM) of the ExoMars 2016 European Space Agency (ESA) mission. DREAMS will perform several kinds of measurements, such as the solar irradiance with different optical detectors in the UVA band (315-400nm), NIR band (700-1100nm) and in "total luminosity" (200 -1100 nm). It will also measure environmental parameters such as the intensity of the electric field, temperature, pressure, humidity, speed and direction of the wind. The EGSE is built to control the instrument and manage the data acquisition before the integration of DREAMS within the Entry, Descendent and landing Module (EDM) and then to retrieve data from the EDM Central Checkout System (CCS), after the integration. Finally it will support also the data management during mission operations. The EGSE is based on commercial off-the-shelf components and runs custom software. It provides power supply and simulates the spacecraft, allowing the exchange of commands and telemetry according to the protocol defined by the spacecraft prime contractor. This paper describes the architecture of the system, as well as its functionalities to test the DREAMS instrument during all development activities before the ExoMars 2016 launch.

  7. 42 CFR 37.45 - Protection against radiation emitted by radiographic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Protection against radiation emitted by radiographic equipment. 37.45 Section 37.45 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... against radiation emitted by radiographic equipment. Except as otherwise specified in § 37.41 and §...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.1000 - Rollover protective structures (ROPS) for material handling equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rollover protective structures (ROPS) for material handling... (ROPS) for material handling equipment. (a) Coverage. (1) This section applies to the following types of material handling equipment: To all rubber-tired, self-propelled scrapers, rubber-tired front-end...

  9. 29 CFR 1926.1000 - Rollover protective structures (ROPS) for material handling equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rollover protective structures (ROPS) for material handling... (ROPS) for material handling equipment. (a) Coverage. (1) This section applies to the following types of material handling equipment: To all rubber-tired, self-propelled scrapers, rubber-tired front-end...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.1000 - Rollover protective structures (ROPS) for material handling equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rollover protective structures (ROPS) for material handling... (ROPS) for material handling equipment. (a) Coverage. (1) This section applies to the following types of material handling equipment: To all rubber-tired, self-propelled scrapers, rubber-tired front-end...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.1000 - Rollover protective structures (ROPS) for material handling equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rollover protective structures (ROPS) for material handling... (ROPS) for material handling equipment. (a) Coverage. (1) This section applies to the following types of material handling equipment: To all rubber-tired, self-propelled scrapers, rubber-tired front-end...

  12. 48 CFR 52.236-9 - Protection of Existing Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements. 52.236-9 Section 52.236-9 Federal Acquisition... CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.236-9 Protection of Existing Vegetation, Structures... Existing Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements (APR 1984) (a) The Contractor...

  13. 48 CFR 52.236-9 - Protection of Existing Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements. 52.236-9 Section 52.236-9 Federal Acquisition... CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.236-9 Protection of Existing Vegetation, Structures... Existing Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements (APR 1984) (a) The Contractor...

  14. 48 CFR 52.236-9 - Protection of Existing Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements. 52.236-9 Section 52.236-9 Federal Acquisition... CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.236-9 Protection of Existing Vegetation, Structures... Existing Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements (APR 1984) (a) The Contractor...

  15. 48 CFR 52.236-9 - Protection of Existing Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements. 52.236-9 Section 52.236-9 Federal Acquisition... CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.236-9 Protection of Existing Vegetation, Structures... Existing Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements (APR 1984) (a) The Contractor...

  16. 48 CFR 52.236-9 - Protection of Existing Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements. 52.236-9 Section 52.236-9 Federal Acquisition... CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.236-9 Protection of Existing Vegetation, Structures... Existing Vegetation, Structures, Equipment, Utilities, and Improvements (APR 1984) (a) The Contractor...

  17. Systematic Application and Removal of Protective Equipment in the Assessment of Multiple Topographies of Self-Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, James W.; Fisher, Wayne W.; Pennington, Angela

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of systematic application and removal of protective equipment on three topographies of self-injurious behavior (SIB) exhibited by a girl who had been diagnosed with autism. Results showed that when protective equipment was applied, SIB decreased to near-zero levels. In addition, withdrawal of protective equipment for…

  18. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Electrical Equipment Hydrogen Hazard Protection

    SciTech Connect

    PHILIPP, B.L.

    2000-01-20

    This document explains that with the use of a helium purge and adequate control, the systems attached to the MCO in the CVDF are not in a flammable environment. Effective safeguards against ventilation failure are provided which reduces the flammability hazard classification within the protected enclosure to Unclassified. Intrinsically safe components are not required for this system.

  19. 29 CFR 1926.95 - Criteria for personal protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... steel-toe shoes or steel-toe boots) and non-specialty prescription safety eyewear, provided that the... and allows the employee, at his or her request, to use shoes or boots with built-in metatarsal protection, the employer is not required to reimburse the employee for the shoes or boots. (4) The...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.95 - Criteria for personal protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... steel-toe shoes or steel-toe boots) and non-specialty prescription safety eyewear, provided that the... and allows the employee, at his or her request, to use shoes or boots with built-in metatarsal protection, the employer is not required to reimburse the employee for the shoes or boots. (4) The...

  1. 40 CFR 156.212 - Personal protective equipment statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: (body protection statement); (glove statement, if applicable); (footwear statement, if applicable... shall be based on the more toxic (lower numbered) category. 2 For labeling language for chemical-resistant gloves, see paragraph (f) of this section. 3 For labeling language for respiratory...

  2. 40 CFR 156.212 - Personal protective equipment statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: (body protection statement); (glove statement, if applicable); (footwear statement, if applicable... shall be based on the more toxic (lower numbered) category. 2 For labeling language for chemical-resistant gloves, see paragraph (f) of this section. 3 For labeling language for respiratory...

  3. 40 CFR 156.212 - Personal protective equipment statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: (body protection statement); (glove statement, if applicable); (footwear statement, if applicable... shall be based on the more toxic (lower numbered) category. 2 For labeling language for chemical-resistant gloves, see paragraph (f) of this section. 3 For labeling language for respiratory...

  4. 40 CFR 170.240 - Personal protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., chemical-resistant gloves, chemical-resistant footwear, respiratory protection devices, chemical-resistant... and they shall not be worn for any other use. (4) Closed systems. If handling tasks are performed using properly functioning systems that enclose the pesticide to prevent it from contacting handlers...

  5. 40 CFR 170.240 - Personal protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., chemical-resistant gloves, chemical-resistant footwear, respiratory protection devices, chemical-resistant... and they shall not be worn for any other use. (4) Closed systems. If handling tasks are performed using properly functioning systems that enclose the pesticide to prevent it from contacting handlers...

  6. 40 CFR 170.240 - Personal protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., chemical-resistant gloves, chemical-resistant footwear, respiratory protection devices, chemical-resistant... and they shall not be worn for any other use. (4) Closed systems. If handling tasks are performed using properly functioning systems that enclose the pesticide to prevent it from contacting handlers...

  7. 40 CFR 170.240 - Personal protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., chemical-resistant gloves, chemical-resistant footwear, respiratory protection devices, chemical-resistant... and they shall not be worn for any other use. (4) Closed systems. If handling tasks are performed using properly functioning systems that enclose the pesticide to prevent it from contacting handlers...

  8. 30 CFR 57.9302 - Protection against moving or runaway railroad equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection against moving or runaway railroad equipment. 57.9302 Section 57.9302 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF..., Railroads, and Loading and Dumping Sites § 57.9302 Protection against moving or runaway railroad...

  9. 30 CFR 77.506 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short-circuit protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short-circuit protection. 77.506 Section 77.506 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... circuits; overload and short-circuit protection. Automatic circuit-breaking devices or fuses of the...

  10. 30 CFR 77.506 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short-circuit protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short-circuit protection. 77.506 Section 77.506 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... circuits; overload and short-circuit protection. Automatic circuit-breaking devices or fuses of the...

  11. 30 CFR 77.506 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short-circuit protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short-circuit protection. 77.506 Section 77.506 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... circuits; overload and short-circuit protection. Automatic circuit-breaking devices or fuses of the...

  12. 30 CFR 18.51 - Electrical protection of circuits and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES... requirements. (b) Each motor shall be protected by an automatic overcurrent device. One protective device will be acceptable when two motors of the same rating operate simultaneously and perform virtually...

  13. 30 CFR 18.51 - Electrical protection of circuits and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES... requirements. (b) Each motor shall be protected by an automatic overcurrent device. One protective device will be acceptable when two motors of the same rating operate simultaneously and perform virtually...

  14. 30 CFR 18.51 - Electrical protection of circuits and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES... requirements. (b) Each motor shall be protected by an automatic overcurrent device. One protective device will be acceptable when two motors of the same rating operate simultaneously and perform virtually...

  15. 30 CFR 18.51 - Electrical protection of circuits and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES... requirements. (b) Each motor shall be protected by an automatic overcurrent device. One protective device will be acceptable when two motors of the same rating operate simultaneously and perform virtually...

  16. 30 CFR 18.51 - Electrical protection of circuits and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES... requirements. (b) Each motor shall be protected by an automatic overcurrent device. One protective device will be acceptable when two motors of the same rating operate simultaneously and perform virtually...

  17. 30 CFR 77.506 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short-circuit protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short-circuit protection. 77.506 Section 77.506 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... circuits; overload and short-circuit protection. Automatic circuit-breaking devices or fuses of the...

  18. [Use of personal protective equipment for motorcycle taxi drivers: perception of risks and associated factors].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Jules Ramon Brito; Santos, Ninalva de Andrade; Sales, Zenilda Nogueira; Moreira, Ramon Missias; Boery, Rita Narriman Silva de Oliveira; Boery, Eduardo Nagib; Santos, Ramon Araújo dos; Mota, Tilson Nunes

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the practices and perceptions of motorcycle taxi drivers concerning the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), based on field research and an exploratory and descriptive qualitative approach. Thirty motorcycle taxi drivers from Jequié, Bahia State, Brazil, were interviewed. Data collection used a semi-structured interview and questionnaire. Data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. The results showed: Category 1 - risk perception, subcategory conditioning/determinant factors for the use of PPE; Category 2 - adherence, subcategory adherence to the use of personal protective equipment; Category 3 - PPE as a protective factor against traffic accidents, subcategories 1 - work-related accidents, 2 - use of PPE at the time of the accident, 3 - non-use of PPE at the time of the accident. Finally, motorcycle taxi drivers clearly have some knowledge of personal protective equipment and even acknowledge the importance of its use, despite not always using it properly. PMID:24896065

  19. Academic Research Equipment in Selected Science/Engineering Fields, 1982-83. An Analysis of Findings from the Baseline National Survey of Academic Research Instruments and Instrumentation Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgdorf, Kenneth; Hausman, Howard J.

    The analysis of data from the baseline cycle of the National Science Foundation instrumentation survey has two principal objectives, namely, to construct and examine a variety of quantitative statistical indicators describing major characteristics of the current national stock of academic research equipment and to document differences among…

  20. Survey of the use of personal protective equipment and prevalence of work related symptoms among dental staff.

    PubMed Central

    Allsopp, J; Basu, M K; Browne, R M; Burge, P S; Matthews, J B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Dental instruments such as the right angle or straight handpiece, air turbine, and ultrasonic scaler have the ability to produce dental aerosols containing water, saliva, microorganisms, blood, tooth particles, lubricating oil, and restorative materials. The purpose of this study was to find out whether personal protective equipment (mask, glasses) was used by dental personnel, and to investigate possible work related disease in the dental profession. METHODS: Cross sectional data were collected with a self administered questionnaire sent to 69 randomly chosen general dental practices in the West Midlands Region. All members of the dental team completed questionnaires (dentists (n = 122); nurses (n = 115); hygienists (n = 86); and receptionists (n = 74) and answered questions on use of personal protective equipment and the prevalence of upper and lower respiratory tract, eye, and skin symptoms (reported and work related). Reception staff were included as a low exposure, control group. Also, a longitudinal study of dental hygienists was carried out on 31 people who had taken part in a similar study five years earlier. RESULTS: Use of a face mask and glasses differed between clinical groups with hygienists and nurses being the most and least prevalent users respectively. Although several reported symptoms were significantly more prevalent among clinical staff, only one work related symptom (skin rashes or itchy or dry skin) was reported by the clinical staff more than by the non-clinical receptionists. Among female clinical staff, age < 35 years and atopy were the factors that predisposed to work related symptoms. Also, reported symptoms were related to duration of use of instruments that generated aerosols. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a low level of work related symptoms in dentistry, but highlights a group vulnerable to prolonged exposures to dental aerosols. It also supports the need for enforcement of the use of personal protective equipment among

  1. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  2. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  3. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  4. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  5. 30 CFR 57.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal. Protective clothing or equipment and face shields or goggles shall be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  6. Instrumentation, Equipment and Methods for the In Vivo Measurement of Radioactive Material in the Body

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Timothy P.

    2005-07-01

    The current applications for the in vivo measurement of radioactive material can be divided into three broad categories: (1) occupational exposure monitoring, (2) monitoring of the public, and (3) medical monitoring. The focus of this chapter is on occupational exposure monitoring that is part of an internal dosimetry program for monitoring workers for intakes and assessing the dose consequences of an intake. In the 1920's when electroscopes were first used to measure radium in the body of dial painters issues affecting the measurement accuracy were identified related to external contamination interferences, properly measuring the instrument background, need for measurement QC, microphonic interferences, shielding and others. The sophistication of the radiation detection instrumentation has evolved to the point where most systems today employ one or more detectors primarily either sodium iodide or germanium. Many different styles of detectors and cryostat designs are used at different facilities. However, the same issues identified in the 1920's are still issues today. The in vivo measurement systems are calibrated with anthropometric phantoms that simulate the body or parts of the body. Whole body phantoms, torso phantoms, lung phantoms, thyroid phantoms and skeletal phantoms are just some of the different types used.The systems are typically shielded with low background materials such as pre-World War II steel from battleships. Interferences can come from naturally occurring radioactive material, medically administered radiopharmaceuticals, equipment instability, non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation and other sources. These contribute to the uncertainties in measurement results that can range from 10% to 1000% or more depending on the measurement system, the energy of the radiation associated with the radionuclide to be measured, the accuracy of the phantom versus the person especially how well the distributions of activity match.

  7. Personal Protective Equipment for Filovirus Epidemics: A Call for Better Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Sprecher, Armand G.; Caluwaerts, An; Draper, Mike; Feldmann, Heinz; Frey, Clifford P.; Funk, Renée H.; Kobinger, Gary; Le Duc, James W.; Spiropoulou, Christina; Williams, Warren Jon

    2015-01-01

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) is an important part of worker protection during filovirus outbreaks. The need to protect against a highly virulent fluid-borne pathogen in the tropical environment imposes a heat stress on the wearer that is itself a safety risk. No evidence supports the choice of PPE employed in recent outbreaks, and standard testing procedures employed by the protective garment industry do not well simulate filovirus exposure. Further research is needed to determine the appropriate PPE for filoviruses and the heat stress that it imposes. PMID:25821225

  8. Personal Protective Equipment for Filovirus Epidemics: A Call for Better Evidence.

    PubMed

    Sprecher, Armand G; Caluwaerts, An; Draper, Mike; Feldmann, Heinz; Frey, Clifford P; Funk, Renée H; Kobinger, Gary; Le Duc, James W; Spiropoulou, Christina; Williams, Warren Jon

    2015-10-01

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) is an important part of worker protection during filovirus outbreaks. The need to protect against a highly virulent fluid-borne pathogen in the tropical environment imposes a heat stress on the wearer that is itself a safety risk. No evidence supports the choice of PPE employed in recent outbreaks, and standard testing procedures employed by the protective garment industry do not well simulate filovirus exposure. Further research is needed to determine the appropriate PPE for filoviruses and the heat stress that it imposes.

  9. Do community football players wear allocated protective equipment? Descriptive results from a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Braham, R A; Finch, C F

    2004-06-01

    Before protective equipment can be adopted as an effective sports safety intervention, its protective effects in reducing the incidence and severity of injury need to be demonstrated, Importantly, it also needs to be well accepted by the players. The Australian Football Injury Prevention Project (AFIPP) was a large scale community-based randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of headgear and mouthguards in preventing head/neck/dental injuries in Australian Football. A subcomponent of this study was to assess the extent to which community football players complied with the requirement to wear protective headgear and/or mouthguards, as this equipment is not compulsory in this sport. Three hundred and one community football players from 23 teams were randomly allocated to one of three protective equipment intervention arms or one control arm. Protective equipment usage was measured by a primary data collector at each training and game session during the 2001 playing season. Mouthguard use was higher than headgear use, with the highest usage for both being measured during games rather than training. Although many players use mouthguards, particularly in games, most do not wear headgear. Given the low adoption of headgear, other strategies to prevent head injuries need further investigation.

  10. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  11. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  12. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  13. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  14. 30 CFR 56.15007 - Protective equipment or clothing for welding, cutting, or working with molten metal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Protective equipment or clothing for welding... METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15007 Protective equipment or clothing for welding... be worn when welding, cutting, or working with molten metal....

  15. A description of factors affecting hazardous waste workers' use of respiratory protective equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.K.; Takaro, T.K.; Connon, C.; Ertell, K.; Pappas, G.; Barnhart, S.

    1999-07-01

    This article describes the first phase of a study that was designed to gain an understanding of hazardous waste workers' attitudes and beliefs about the use of respiratory protective equipment. Exploratory, open-ended interviews were conducted among 28 respirator users at a US Department of Energy facility. Subjects were asked to describe their knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about their risks to hazards at their worksites and to discuss their use of respiratory protective equipment. A detailed content analysis of the interviews resulted in the generation of a taxonomy of issues and concerns which fell into three general categories: (1) Knowledge, Beliefs, and Attitudes, (2) Physical and Psychological Effects, and (3) External Influences. Knowledge, Beliefs, and Attitudes included Training, Fit Testing, Medical Clearance, Work Exposures, Respirator Use, and Vulnerability to Disease. Physical and Psychological Effects included Somatic/Health Effects, Personal Comfort, Visual Effects, Fatigue, Communication, and Anxiety. External Influences included Structural Environment, Quality and Availability of Equipment, Other PPEs, Co-Worker Influence, Supervisor Influence, and Organizational Culture. The findings from this study have important implications to training and education programs. Effective respiratory protection programs depend on a knowledge of the factors that affect workers' use of equipment. This study suggests that efforts to assure equipment comfort and fit, to assist workers who see and hear less well as a result of their equipment, and to develop strategies to allay worker anxiety when wearing equipment should all be components of a program. An organizational culture that supports and abets the appropriate use of equipment is also a critical element in a successful program.

  16. Protective equipment for health care facility decontamination personnel: regulations, risks, and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Hick, John L; Hanfling, Dan; Burstein, Jonathan L; Markham, Joseph; Macintyre, Anthony G; Barbera, Joseph A

    2003-09-01

    After recent terrorist attacks, new attention has been focused on health care facility decontamination practices. This article reviews core issues related to the selection of appropriate personal protective equipment for health care facility decontamination personnel, with an emphasis on respiratory protection. Existing federal regulations focus primarily on scene response and not on issues specific to health care facility decontamination practices. Review of existing databases, relevant published literature, and individual case reports reveal some provider health risks, especially when the exposure involves organophosphate agents. However, reported risks from secondary exposure to contaminated patients at health care facilities are low. These risks should be adequately addressed with Level C personal protective equipment, including air-purifying respirator technologies, unless the facility determines that specific local threats require increased levels of protection. PMID:12944890

  17. Protective equipment as treatment for stereotypic hand mouthing: sensory extinction or punishment effects?

    PubMed

    Mazaleski, J L; Iwata, B A; Rodgers, T A; Vollmer, T R; Zarcone, J R

    1994-01-01

    We examined the effects of noncontingent and contingent protective equipment as treatment for self-injurious hand mouthing exhibited by 2 individuals with profound mental retardation. Results of a functional analysis assessment revealed that neither subject's self-injury was maintained by social reinforcement: One subject's self-injury was cyclical in nature; the other's occurred during all assessment conditions but most frequently when left alone. In the noncontingent-equipment condition, oven mitts were placed on the individual's hands at the beginning of a session and remained on throughout. In the contingent-equipment condition, the mitts were briefly placed on the individual's hands following occurrences of hand mouthing. For 1 subject, noncontingent mitts produced a large decrease in the rate of hand mouthing and contingent mitts produced similar results following a return to baseline. Hand mouthing was also reduced in the 2nd subject, but this individual was exposed only to the contingent-equipment condition (i.e., there was no prior history with the noncontingent-equipment condition). These results suggest either a punishment or a time-out interpretation rather than an extinction interpretation to account for the behavior-reducing effects of contingent protective equipment on self-injury. PMID:8063633

  18. Protective equipment as treatment for stereotypic hand mouthing: sensory extinction or punishment effects?

    PubMed

    Mazaleski, J L; Iwata, B A; Rodgers, T A; Vollmer, T R; Zarcone, J R

    1994-01-01

    We examined the effects of noncontingent and contingent protective equipment as treatment for self-injurious hand mouthing exhibited by 2 individuals with profound mental retardation. Results of a functional analysis assessment revealed that neither subject's self-injury was maintained by social reinforcement: One subject's self-injury was cyclical in nature; the other's occurred during all assessment conditions but most frequently when left alone. In the noncontingent-equipment condition, oven mitts were placed on the individual's hands at the beginning of a session and remained on throughout. In the contingent-equipment condition, the mitts were briefly placed on the individual's hands following occurrences of hand mouthing. For 1 subject, noncontingent mitts produced a large decrease in the rate of hand mouthing and contingent mitts produced similar results following a return to baseline. Hand mouthing was also reduced in the 2nd subject, but this individual was exposed only to the contingent-equipment condition (i.e., there was no prior history with the noncontingent-equipment condition). These results suggest either a punishment or a time-out interpretation rather than an extinction interpretation to account for the behavior-reducing effects of contingent protective equipment on self-injury.

  19. 30 CFR 77.704-8 - Protective equipment; testing and storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 77.704-8 Protective equipment; testing and storage. (a) All rubber... conducted in accordance with the following schedule: (1) Rubber gloves, once each month; (2) Rubber sleeves, once every 3 months; (3) Rubber blankets, once every 6 months; (4) Insulator hoods and line hose,...

  20. 30 CFR 77.704-8 - Protective equipment; testing and storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Grounding § 77.704-8 Protective equipment; testing and storage. (a) All rubber... conducted in accordance with the following schedule: (1) Rubber gloves, once each month; (2) Rubber sleeves, once every 3 months; (3) Rubber blankets, once every 6 months; (4) Insulator hoods and line hose,...

  1. 46 CFR 28.155 - Excess fire detection and protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Excess fire detection and protection equipment. 28.155 Section 28.155 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Requirements for All Vessels § 28.155 Excess fire detection...

  2. 46 CFR 28.155 - Excess fire detection and protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Excess fire detection and protection equipment. 28.155 Section 28.155 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Requirements for All Vessels § 28.155 Excess fire detection...

  3. 46 CFR 28.825 - Excess fire detection and protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Excess fire detection and protection equipment. 28.825 Section 28.825 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.825 Excess fire detection and...

  4. 46 CFR 28.825 - Excess fire detection and protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excess fire detection and protection equipment. 28.825 Section 28.825 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.825 Excess fire detection and...

  5. 46 CFR 28.155 - Excess fire detection and protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excess fire detection and protection equipment. 28.155 Section 28.155 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Requirements for All Vessels § 28.155 Excess fire detection...

  6. 46 CFR 28.825 - Excess fire detection and protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Excess fire detection and protection equipment. 28.825 Section 28.825 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.825 Excess fire detection and...

  7. 46 CFR 28.155 - Excess fire detection and protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Excess fire detection and protection equipment. 28.155 Section 28.155 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Requirements for All Vessels § 28.155 Excess fire detection...

  8. 46 CFR 28.155 - Excess fire detection and protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Excess fire detection and protection equipment. 28.155 Section 28.155 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL FISHING INDUSTRY VESSELS Requirements for All Vessels § 28.155 Excess fire detection...

  9. 42 CFR 37.43 - Protection against radiation emitted by roentgenographic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements in NCRP Report No. 33 “Medical X-ray... of X-rays and Gamma Rays of up to 10 MeV” (issued September 15, 1976). These documents are hereby... CFR part 1000). Where no applicable regulations exist, roentgenographic equipment, its use and...

  10. 42 CFR 37.43 - Protection against radiation emitted by roentgenographic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements in NCRP Report No. 33 “Medical X-ray... of X-rays and Gamma Rays of up to 10 MeV” (issued September 15, 1976). These documents are hereby... CFR part 1000). Where no applicable regulations exist, roentgenographic equipment, its use and...

  11. 42 CFR 37.43 - Protection against radiation emitted by roentgenographic equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements in NCRP Report No. 33 “Medical X-ray... of X-rays and Gamma Rays of up to 10 MeV” (issued September 15, 1976). These documents are hereby... CFR part 1000). Where no applicable regulations exist, roentgenographic equipment, its use and...

  12. Protective Equipment as Treatment for Stereotypic Hand Mouthing: Sensory Extinction or Punishment Effects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazaleski, Jodi L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study evaluated effects of noncontingent and contingent protective equipment as treatment for self-injurious hand mouthing by two women with profound mental retardation. Behavior change appeared to be effected in both conditions. Results suggest either a punishment or a timeout interpretation, rather than an extinction interpretation, for the…

  13. Analysis of commercial equipment and instrumentation for Spacelab payloads. Volume 3: Design analysis and trade studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of each selected equipment item, and suitability and cost analyses were documented by equipment item. Tradeoffs of alternative specification requirements are presented which include possible relaxation of vibration, material control, fungus and corrosion requirements for experiment equipment. An additional tradeoff was performed to determine whether it is cost effective to modify experiment equipment to be compatible with a 28-volt dc power source rather than the conventional 110-volt ac source. Programmatic analysis data are given which were used as the basis for the extension of results from the analyses of specific equipment items to the entire spacelab experiment program.

  14. The effects of undergarment composition worn beneath hockey protective equipment on high-intensity intermittent exercise.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Benjamin; Stachenfeld, Nina

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of undergarment composition worn beneath ice hockey protective equipment on thermal homeostasis and power output, during a cycle ergometer exercise protocol designed to simulate the energy expenditure of a hockey game. We hypothesized that the layers of protective equipment would negate the potential thermoregulatory benefits from synthetic "wicking" undergarments but that subjects may feel more comfortable because of the inherent low moisture retention of these fabrics. Eight men (age, 25.4 ± 1.3 year) performed a repeated sprint test before and after a simulated game under typical hockey conditions (12°C; 82% relative humidity). This test was completed twice while wearing full protective equipment and either synthetic (SYN) or cotton (COT) full-length undergarments. During the simulated game, skin temperatures (34.22 ± 0.20°C vs. 34.46 ± 0.16°C) and core temperatures (37.50 ± 0.13°C vs. 37.59 ± 0.14°C) were similar between SYN and COT, respectively. There were also no significant differences found in sweat loss as a percent of body mass, heart rate, plasma lactate, sprint power, or ratings of perceived exertion between SYN and COT, respectively. The SYN retained less water than COT (140 ± 30 vs. 310 ± 30 g; p < 0.05); however, clothing and protective equipment weight gains as a whole were unaffected by the fabric worn (470 ± 110 vs. 590 ± 80 g) for SYN and COT, respectively. There were minimal differences in thermal sensation and undergarment wetness ratings during the simulated game. Thermoregulation and performance was driven more by properties of the layered protective equipment with minimal effects from undergarment composition.

  15. 75 FR 69369 - Walking-Working Surfaces and Personal Protective Equipment (Fall Protection Systems)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ..., subparts D and I), published on May 24, 2010 (73 FR 28862). DATES: Informal public hearings: OSHA will hold... Equipment standard (73 FR 28862). OSHA invited written comments and requests for hearings on the proposed...), Secretary of Labor's Order 4- 2010 (75 FR 55355), and 29 CFR part 1911. ] Signed at Washington, DC,...

  16. Intercomparison of radiation protection instrumentation in a pulsed neutron field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caresana, M.; Denker, A.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Golnik, N.; Hohmann, E.; Leuschner, A.; Luszik-Bhadra, M.; Manessi, G.; Mayer, S.; Ott, K.; Röhrich, J.; Silari, M.; Trompier, F.; Volnhals, M.; Wielunski, M.

    2014-02-01

    In the framework of the EURADOS working group 11, an intercomparison of active neutron survey meters was performed in a pulsed neutron field (PNF). The aim of the exercise was to evaluate the performances of various neutron instruments, including commercially available rem-counters, personal dosemeters and instrument prototypes. The measurements took place at the cyclotron of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH. The cyclotron is routinely used for proton therapy of ocular tumours, but an experimental area is also available. For the therapy the machine accelerates protons to 68 MeV. The interaction of the proton beam with a thick tungsten target produces a neutron field with energy up to about 60 MeV. One interesting feature of the cyclotron is that the beam can be delivered in bursts, with the possibility to modify in a simple and flexible way the burst length and the ion current. Through this possibility one can obtain radiation bursts of variable duration and intensity. All instruments were placed in a reference position and irradiated with neutrons delivered in bursts of different intensity. The analysis of the instrument response as a function of the burst charge (the total electric charge of the protons in the burst shot onto the tungsten target) permitted to assess for each device the dose underestimation due to the time structure of the radiation field. The personal neutron dosemeters were exposed on a standard PMMA slab phantom and the response linearity was evaluated.

  17. Evaluation of the effectiveness of personal protective equipment against occupational exposure to N,N-dimethylformamide.

    PubMed

    Wang, S-M; Shih, T-S; Huang, Y-S; Chueh, M-R; Chou, J-S; Chang, H-Y

    2006-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the protective effectiveness of various personal protective equipment and the respective exposure contributions from respiratory and skin exposures of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) with a self-comparison study design. Two high-, four intermediate- and four low-DMF exposure workers from a synthetic leather factory were monitored in airborne DMF concentrations and N-methylformamide (NMF) concentrations in urine across four consecutive days. The workers were designated to wear no personal protective equipment on the first day. The barrier cream, rubber gloves and rubber gloves plus respirator were used on the second, third and fourth days, respectively. Person-to-personal observation was performed in the field to record all high and low exposure tasks during work for each subject. Protective effectiveness index (PEI) was used to evaluate different glove effectiveness. We concluded that the direct skin contact to the strong skin penetrates like DMF could be a more significant exposure source than the respiratory exposure in the actual occupational environment. The provision of protective equipment from skin exposure could be more important than that from respiratory exposure. The application of barrier cream could be as effective as wearing impermeable rubber gloves in the prevention from the skin penetrate in the occupational settings. PMID:16846682

  18. 30 CFR 75.518-1 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements. 75.518-1 Section 75.518-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.518-1 Electric equipment and circuits; overload...

  19. 30 CFR 75.518-1 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements. 75.518-1 Section 75.518-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.518-1 Electric equipment and circuits; overload...

  20. 30 CFR 75.518-1 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements. 75.518-1 Section 75.518-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.518-1 Electric equipment and circuits; overload...

  1. 30 CFR 75.518-1 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements. 75.518-1 Section 75.518-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.518-1 Electric equipment and circuits; overload...

  2. 30 CFR 75.518-1 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements. 75.518-1 Section 75.518-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY...-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.518-1 Electric equipment and circuits; overload...

  3. Planetary Protection Plan for an Antibody based instrument proposed for Mars2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Heather; Parro, Víctor

    The Signs Of Life Detector (SOLID) instrument is a high TRL level instrument proposed for the Mars 2020 instrument suite. In this presentation we describe the planetary protection instrument plan as if the instrument is classified as a life detection instrument compliant with Category IV(b) planetary protection mission requirements, NASA, ESA, and COSPAR policy. SOLID uses antibodies as a method for detecting organic and biomolecular components in soils. Due to the sensitive detection method, the scientific integrity of the instrument exceeds the planetary protection requirements. The instrument will be assembled and integrated in an ISO level 8 cleanroom or better (ISO 4 for the sample read out and fluidics components). Microbial reduction methods and assays employed are as follows: Wipe the outside and inside of the instrument with a mixture of isopropyl alcohol (70%) and water. Cell cultures will be the standard assay to determine enumeration of “viable” spores and other rapid assays such as LAL and ATP bioluminescence as secondary assays to verify the interior of the instrument is microbe free. SOLID’s design factors for contamination control include the following features: SOLID has the capability to heat the catchment tray to pyrolyze any Earth hitchhikers. There will also be an “air gap” of cm maintained between the sample acquisition device and the funnel inlet. This will prevent forward contamination of the sample collection device and reverse contamination of the detection unit. To mitigate false positives, SOLID will include anti-bodies for potential contaminants from organisms most commonly found in clean rooms. If selected for the Mars 2020 Rover, SOLID would be the first life detection instrument based on biomolecules sent by NASA, as such the planetary protection plan will set a precedence for future life detection instruments carrying biomolecules to other planetary bodies.

  4. Effects of chemical protective equipment on team process performance in small unit rescue operations.

    PubMed

    Grugle, Nancy L; Kleiner, Brian M

    2007-09-01

    In the event of a nuclear, biological, or chemical terrorist attack against civilians, both military and civilian emergency response teams must be able to respond and operate efficiently while wearing protective equipment. Chemical protective equipment protects the user by providing a barrier between the individual and hazardous environment. Unfortunately, the same equipment that is designed to support the user can potentially cause heat stress, reduced task efficiency, and reduced range-of-motion. Targeted Acceptable Responses to Generated Events of Tasks (TARGETS), an event-based team performance measurement methodology was used to investigate the effects of Mission Oriented Protective Posture (MOPP) on the behavioral processes underlying team performance during simulated rescue tasks. In addition, this study determined which team processes were related to team performance outcomes. Results of six primary analyses indicated that team process performance was not degraded by MOPP 4 on any rescue task and that the team processes critical for successful task performance are task-dependent. This article discusses the implications of these results with respect to the study design and the limitations of using an event-based team performance measurement methodology.

  5. 30 CFR 77.506-1 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... short circuit protection; minimum requirements. 77.506-1 Section 77.506-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY..., SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.506-1 Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum...

  6. 30 CFR 77.506-1 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-1 Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements. 77.506-1 Section 77.506-1 Mineral Resources MINE...

  7. 33 CFR 149.402 - What firefighting and fire protection equipment must be approved by the Coast Guard?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... protection equipment must be approved by the Coast Guard? 149.402 Section 149.402 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN... protection equipment must be approved by the Coast Guard? Except as permitted under § 149.403, §...

  8. 33 CFR 149.402 - What firefighting and fire protection equipment must be approved by the Coast Guard?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... protection equipment must be approved by the Coast Guard? 149.402 Section 149.402 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN... protection equipment must be approved by the Coast Guard? Except as permitted under § 149.403, §...

  9. 33 CFR 149.402 - What firefighting and fire protection equipment must be approved by the Coast Guard?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... protection equipment must be approved by the Coast Guard? 149.402 Section 149.402 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN... protection equipment must be approved by the Coast Guard? Except as permitted under § 149.403, §...

  10. 33 CFR 149.402 - What firefighting and fire protection equipment must be approved by the Coast Guard?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... protection equipment must be approved by the Coast Guard? 149.402 Section 149.402 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DEEPWATER PORTS DEEPWATER PORTS: DESIGN... protection equipment must be approved by the Coast Guard? Except as permitted under § 149.403, §...

  11. 30 CFR 77.506-1 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-1 Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements. 77.506-1 Section 77.506-1 Mineral Resources MINE...

  12. 30 CFR 77.506-1 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-1 Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements. 77.506-1 Section 77.506-1 Mineral Resources MINE...

  13. 30 CFR 77.506-1 - Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-1 Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electric equipment and circuits; overload and short circuit protection; minimum requirements. 77.506-1 Section 77.506-1 Mineral Resources MINE...

  14. Design concept of the electrical ground support equipment for the AIV and calibration of the Euclid NISP instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifoglio, Massimo; Bonoli, Carlotta; Bortoletto, Favio; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Butler, Chris. R.; Colodro-Conde, Carlos; Conforti, Vito; Corcione, Leonardo; Franceschi, Enrico; Gianotti, Fulvio; Ligori, Sebastiano; Maciaszek, Thierry; Morgante, Gianluca; Muñoz, Jacinto; Nicastro, Luciano; Prieto, Eric; Rebolo-López, Rafael; Riva, Mario; Spano, Paolo; Toledo-Moreo, Rafael; Valenziano, Luca; Villó, Isidro; Zerbi, Filippo Maria

    2012-09-01

    The Near Infrared Spectro-Photometer (NISP) on board the Euclid ESA mission will be developed and tested at various levels of integration using various test equipment which shall be designed and procured through a collaborative and coordinated effort. In this paper we describe the Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EGSE) which shall be required to support the assembly, integration, verification and testing (AIV/AIT) and calibration activities at instrument level before delivery to ESA, and at satellite level, when the NISP instrument is mounted on the spacecraft. We present the EGSE conceptual design as defined in order to be compliant with the AIV/AIT and calibration requirements. The proposed concept is aimed at maximizing the re-use in the EGSE configuration of the Test Equipment developed for subsystem level activities, as well as, at allowing a smooth transition from instrument level to satellite level, and, possibly, at Ground Segment level. This paper mainly reports the technical status at the end of the Definition phase and it is presented on behalf of the Euclid Consortium.

  15. Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szumski, Michał

    This chapter describes the most important features of capillary electrophoretic equipment. A presentation of the important developments in high voltage power supplies for chip CE is followed by preparation of fused silica capillaries for use in CE. Detection systems that are used in capillary electrophoresis are widely described. Here, UV-Vis absorbance measurements are discussed including different types of detection cells—also those less popular (u-shaped, Z-shaped, mirror-coated). Fluorescence detection and laser-induced fluorescence detection are the most sensitive detection systems. Several LIF setups, such as collinear, orthogonal, confocal, and sheath-flow cuvette, are presented from the point of view of the sensitivity they can provide. Several electrochemical detectors for CE, such as conductivity, amperometric, and potentiometric, are also shown and their constructions discussed. CE-MS and much less known CE (CEC)-NMR systems are also described. The examples of automation and robotized CE systems together with their potential fields of application are also presented.

  16. Report on the Desirability of Adopting an International Instrument for the Protection of Translators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This report contains the formal documents leading to the inclusion on the provisional agenda of UNESCO's 1972 General Conference of a discussion considering the desirability of adopting an instrument for the protection of translators. Included in the document is the "Preliminary Study of the Technical and Legal Aspects of Copyright Protection for…

  17. Contamination design of a Scientific Instrument Protective Enclosure for the Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgeland, Randy J.; Hansen, Patricia A.

    1993-01-01

    A Scientific Instrument Protective Enclosure (SIPE) was designed to accommodate second generation science instruments (SIs) for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) First Servicing Mission (FSM). One of the main design drivers for the SIPE is to provide a protective environment for the SIs against particulate and molecular contaminants that pose a viable threat to the SI performance. The focus of this paper will detail the methodology incorporated in the design of the SIPE to provide a controlled environment for SI protection at the launch site, during pre-launch/launch activities, and during on-orbit operations in the Shuttle bay.

  18. Health care worker protection in mass casualty respiratory failure: infection control, decontamination, and personal protective equipment.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Elizabeth L

    2008-02-01

    Maintenance of a safe and stable health care infrastructure is critical to an effective mass casualty disaster response. Both secondary contamination during chemical disasters and hospital-associated infections during epidemic illness can pose substantial threats to achieving this goal. Understanding basic principles of decontamination and infection control during responses to chemical and biologic disasters can help minimize the risks to patients and health care workers. Effective decontamination following toxic chemical exposure should include both removal of contaminated clothing and decontamination of the victim's skin. Wet decontamination is the most feasible strategy in a mass casualty situation and should be performed promptly by trained personnel. In the event of an epidemic, infection prevention and control measures are based on essential principles of hand hygiene and standard precautions. Expanded precautions should be instituted as needed to target contact, droplet, and airborne routes of infectious disease transmission. Specific equipment and measures for critical care delivery may serve to decrease risk to health care workers in the event of an epidemic. Their use should be considered in developing comprehensive disaster response plans.

  19. Using electrochemical protection to prolong service life of scrubbers and associated equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, W.W.; Dillie, E.R.

    1998-12-31

    Austenitic chromium-nickel-molybdenum-iron alloys (904L, 316L, 317L, etc.) used to construct Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers and associated equipment in coal fired generating stations can experience localized corrosion. The problem may be alleviated by using more costly materials such as higher grades of stainless steel or high nickel alloys. An alternative and more cost-effective method of prolonging equipment service life is the use of Papritection{reg_sign}, an electrochemical protection system (EP). Weight-loss coupon results in environments similar to FGD scrubbers have shown that the use of electrochemical protection prolongs the life of stainless steels in oxidizing acid-chloride environments by an average of 3 to 5 times. This paper discusses an EP system that was recently supplied to an electric power utility company to protect a 316L thin metallic lined (wallpapered) FGD scrubber reaction tank. Acidic effluent from the absorber section of the scrubber is piped into this reaction tank for limestone neutralization and hence formation of calcium sulfate. Inspection of the protected reaction tank after one year of operation as well as in-situ coupon test results indicated that the EP system was very effective in mitigating localized corrosion of the scrubber reaction tank. The results are presented in this paper.

  20. An observational study of protective equipment use among in-line skaters

    PubMed Central

    Warda, L.; Harlos, S.; Klassen, T.; Moffatt, M.; Buchan, N.; Koop, V.

    1998-01-01

    Objectives—To describe the patterns of protective equipment use by in-line skaters in Winnipeg, Manitoba and nearby rural communities. Methods—In-line skaters were observed for three months in 1996 at 190 urban and 30 rural sites selected using a formal sampling scheme. Age, gender, protective equipment use, skating companions, correct helmet use, and use of headphones were recorded. Results—Altogether 123 in-line skaters were observed at 61 sites, including one rural site. No skaters were observed at the remaining sites. There were 37 adults and 86 children; 56% were male. Helmet use was 12.2% (95% confidence interval (CI ) = 6.4% to 18.0%), wrist guard use was 16.3% (95% CI = 9.7% to 22.8%), knee pad use was 9.8% (95% CI = 5.2% to 16.4%), and elbow pad use was 7.3% (95% CI = 3.4% to 13.4%). Children were more likely to wear a helmet than teens 12–19 years of age (relative risk (RR) = 30, 95% CI = 4.01 to 225). Adults were more likely to wear wrist guards than children (RR = 4.32, 95% CI = 1.87 to 9.94). No gender differences were found. Incorrect helmet use was documented in four skaters; three skaters were wearing headphones. Conclusions—Low rates of protective equipment use were documented in our region, significantly lower than those reported in the literature. Barriers to equipment use are not known, and should be examined by further study. In-line skating safety programs should be developed, promoted, and evaluated. Teens should be targeted for future preventive efforts. PMID:9788090

  1. The influence of officer equipment and protection on short sprinting performance.

    PubMed

    Lewinski, William J; Dysterheft, Jennifer L; Dicks, Nathan D; Pettitt, Robert W

    2015-03-01

    As advances in protective equipment are made, it has been observed that the weight law enforcement officers must carry every day is greatly increasing. Many investigations have noted the health risks of these increases, yet none have looked at its effects on officer mobility. The primary purpose of this study was to examine the influence of both the weight of officer safety equipment, as well as a lateral focal point (FP), on the stride length, stride velocity, and acceleration of the first six strides of a short sprint. Twenty male law enforcement students performed two maximal effort sprint trials, in the participating college's gymnasium, from each of four starting positions: forwards (control position), backwards, 90° left, and 90° right. Subjects placed in the FP group (n = 9) were required to maintain focus on lateral FP during the 90° left and 90° right trials, and a forwards FP during the backwards trials. On a second testing date, subjects repeated the sprint tests while wearing a 9.07 kg weight belt, simulating officer equipment and protective gear. The belt averaged 11.47 ± 1.64% of subject body mass. A significant main effect of weight belt trials was found (F = 20.494, p < 0.01), in which significant decreases were found for velocity and acceleration. No other significant effects were found as a result of starting position or focal point and no significant interactions were found between independent variables. Conclusively, the results of this study show the increasing weights of duty gear and protective equipment have detrimental effects on officer velocity and acceleration, impeding their mobility, which may be dangerous in use of force or threatening situations.

  2. Image dissector control and data system, part 1. [instrument packages and equipment specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A general description of the image dissector control and data system is presented along with detailed design information, operating instructions, and maintenance and trouble-shooting procedures for the four instrumentation packages. The four instrumentation packages include a 90 inch telescope, a simplified telescope module for use on the 90 inch or other telescopes, a photographic plate scanner module which permits the scanning of astronomical photographic plates in the laboratory, and the lunar experiment package module.

  3. Heat flux instrumentation for Hyflite thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diller, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    Using Thermal Protection Tile core samples supplied by NASA, the surface characteristics of the FRCI, TUFI, and RCG coatings were evaluated. Based on these results, appropriate methods of surface preparation were determined and tested for the required sputtering processes. Sample sensors were fabricated on the RCG coating and adhesion was acceptable. Based on these encouraging results, complete Heat Flux Microsensors were fabricated on the RCG coating. The issue of lead attachment was addressed with the annnealing and welding methods developed at NASA Lewis. Parallel gap welding appears to be the best method of lead attachment with prior heat treatment of the sputtered pads. Sample Heat Flux Microsensors were submitted for testing in the NASA Ames arc jet facility. Details of the project are contained in two attached reports. One additional item of interest is contained in the attached AIAA paper, which gives details of the transient response of a Heat Flux Microsensors in a shock tube facility at Virginia Tech. The response of the heat flux sensor was measured to be faster than 10 micro-s.

  4. Factors Influencing the Safety Behavior of German Equestrians: Attitudes towards Protective Equipment and Peer Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Ikinger, Christina-Maria; Baldamus, Jana; Spiller, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary The handling and riding of horses can be quite dangerous. Although the use of protective gear among equestrians is increasing, a high number of incidents occur and the voluntary use of safety equipment is described as inconsistent to low. Therefore, this study looks at the safety behavior of German equestrians and at factors influencing this behavior to decrease the high number of horse-related injuries. The results reveal that attitudes towards safety products as well as the protective behavior of other horse owners and riding pupils from the stable are key factors that might alter the safety behavior of equestrians. Abstract Human interactions with horses entail certain risks. Although the acceptance and use of protective gear is increasing, a high number of incidents and very low or inconsistent voluntary use of safety equipment are reported. While past studies have examined factors influencing the use of safety gear, they have explored neither their influence on the overall safety behavior, nor their relative influence in relation to each other. The aim of the present study is to fill this gap. We conducted an online survey with 2572 participants. By means of a subsequent multiple regression analysis, we explored 23 different variables in view of their influence on the protective behavior of equestrians. In total, we found 17 variables that exerted a significant influence. The results show that both having positive or negative attitudes towards safety products as well as the protective behavior of other horse owners or riding pupils from the stable have the strongest influence on the safety behavior of German equestrians. We consider such knowledge to be important for both scientists and practitioners, such as producers of protective gear or horse sport associations who might alter safety behavior in such a way that the number of horse-related injuries decreases in the long term. PMID:26901229

  5. Heat flux instrumentation for HYFLITE thermal protection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diller, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    Tasks performed in this project were defined in a September 9, 1994 meeting of representatives of Vatell, NASA Lewis and Virginia Tech. The overall objective agreed upon in the meeting was 'to demonstrate the viability of thin film techniques for heat flux and temperature sensing in HYSTEP thermal protection systems'. We decided to attempt a combination of NASA's and Vatell's best heat flux sensor technology in a sensor which would be tested in the Vortek facility at Lewis early in 1995. The NASA concept for thermocouple measurement of surface temperature was adopted, and Vatell methods for fabrication of sensors on small diameter substrates of aluminum nitride were used to produce a sensor. This sensor was then encapsulated in a NARloy-Z housing. Various improvements to the Vatell substrate design were explored without success. The basic NASA and Vatell sensor layouts were analyzed by finite element modeling, in an attempt to better understand the effects of material properties, dimensions and thermal differential element location on sensor symmetry, bandwidth and sensitivity. This analysis showed that, as long as the thermal resistivity of the thermal differential element material is much larger (10X) than that of the substrate material, the simplest arrangement of layer is best. During calibration of the sensor produced in this project, undesirable side-effects of combining the heat flux and temperature sensor return leads were observed. The sensor did not cleanly separate the heat flux and temperature signals, as sensors with four leads have consistently done before. Task 7 and 8 discussed in the meeting will be performed with a continuation of funding in 1995. The following is a discussion of each of the tasks performed as outlined in the statement of work dated september 26, 1994. Task 1A was added to cover further investigation into the NASA sensor concept.

  6. A Design Philosophy for Instrumentation Equipment in a Dynamic Systems and Measurements Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nachtigal, Chester L.; And Others

    A program designed to increase studnet interest and provide motivation in a third-year systems and measurements laboratory in mechanical engineering is provided. The philosophy of the course, instructional techniques, equipment design (including schematics and photographs), suggested activities, and student reactions to the course are presented.…

  7. 42 CFR 493.1252 - Standard: Test systems, equipment, instruments, reagents, materials, and supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1252 Standard: Test systems, equipment... electrical current that adversely affect patient test results and test reports. (c) Reagents, solutions... proper use. (d) Reagents, solutions, culture media, control materials, calibration materials, and...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1252 - Standard: Test systems, equipment, instruments, reagents, materials, and supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1252 Standard: Test systems, equipment... electrical current that adversely affect patient test results and test reports. (c) Reagents, solutions... proper use. (d) Reagents, solutions, culture media, control materials, calibration materials, and...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1252 - Standard: Test systems, equipment, instruments, reagents, materials, and supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Quality System for Nonwaived Testing Analytic Systems § 493.1252 Standard: Test systems, equipment... electrical current that adversely affect patient test results and test reports. (c) Reagents, solutions... proper use. (d) Reagents, solutions, culture media, control materials, calibration materials, and...

  10. Corrosion of connectors used in equipment protecting against falls from a height

    PubMed Central

    Jachowicz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Connectors are commonly found in personal equipment protecting against falls from a height. They are typically used outdoors and exposed to atmospheric factors, which can result in corrosion. This article presents the results of a study involving exposure of connectors to experimental corrosive media – neutral salt spray (NSS), acid salt spray (ASS), and seawater mist (for elements made of carbon steel and non-ferrous metals) – and to experimental conditions simulating the processes of pitting, stress, and intercrystalline corrosion (for equipment made of s`tainless steel). The results indicate that the main effects of corrosion on connectors include impaired operation and reduced strength of their mobile elements. The article presents methods of testing connector operation developed for this purpose. Corrosive damage to connectors has been presented in relation to potential hazards for their users. PMID:26647950

  11. Corrosion of connectors used in equipment protecting against falls from a height.

    PubMed

    Jachowicz, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Connectors are commonly found in personal equipment protecting against falls from a height. They are typically used outdoors and exposed to atmospheric factors, which can result in corrosion. This article presents the results of a study involving exposure of connectors to experimental corrosive media - neutral salt spray (NSS), acid salt spray (ASS), and seawater mist (for elements made of carbon steel and non-ferrous metals) - and to experimental conditions simulating the processes of pitting, stress, and intercrystalline corrosion (for equipment made of s`tainless steel). The results indicate that the main effects of corrosion on connectors include impaired operation and reduced strength of their mobile elements. The article presents methods of testing connector operation developed for this purpose. Corrosive damage to connectors has been presented in relation to potential hazards for their users. PMID:26647950

  12. SPERTI Reactor Pit Building (PER605). Earth shielding protect adjacent Instrument ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SPERT-I Reactor Pit Building (PER-605). Earth shielding protect adjacent Instrument Cell (PER-606). Security fencing surrounds complex, to which gate entry is provided next to Guard House (PER-607). Note gravel road leading to control area. Earth-covered conduit leads from instrument cell to terminal building out of view. Photographer: R.G. Larsen. Date: June 22, 1955. INEEL negative no. 55-1701 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. Developing COSHH Essentials: dermal exposure, personal protective equipment and first aid.

    PubMed

    Garrod, A N I; Rajan-Sithamparanadarajah, R

    2003-10-01

    The 'control banding' approach in COSHH Essentials combines the potential for harm with the potential for exposure by inhalation to band measures to control exposure at source, as generic strategies. These are simply adapted to specific tasks and circumstances to produce specific control advice. Where it is not possible or practical to use this control advice, the control bands can suggest adequate respiratory protective equipment using 'protection factors'. Proposals in the paper enable the user to identify the right level of respiratory protective equipment (RPE), and to begin selecting suitable RPE. Selection is made through a formatted questionnaire, enabling the user to give the right facts to the supplier. COSHH Essentials applies mainly to exposure by inhalation. However, skin exposure is very common and uptake via the skin can be an important contributor to body dose. This paper examines the factors concerning skin exposure, and the options for banding the potential for harm to the skin or via the skin. Proposals have then been made for dermal exposure control. Planning for emergencies is an important facet of risk control. Proposals are outlined to band chemical hazards for emergency planning according to a minimum of information, i.e. the danger symbol on a product label.

  14. Developing COSHH Essentials: dermal exposure, personal protective equipment and first aid.

    PubMed

    Garrod, A N I; Rajan-Sithamparanadarajah, R

    2003-10-01

    The 'control banding' approach in COSHH Essentials combines the potential for harm with the potential for exposure by inhalation to band measures to control exposure at source, as generic strategies. These are simply adapted to specific tasks and circumstances to produce specific control advice. Where it is not possible or practical to use this control advice, the control bands can suggest adequate respiratory protective equipment using 'protection factors'. Proposals in the paper enable the user to identify the right level of respiratory protective equipment (RPE), and to begin selecting suitable RPE. Selection is made through a formatted questionnaire, enabling the user to give the right facts to the supplier. COSHH Essentials applies mainly to exposure by inhalation. However, skin exposure is very common and uptake via the skin can be an important contributor to body dose. This paper examines the factors concerning skin exposure, and the options for banding the potential for harm to the skin or via the skin. Proposals have then been made for dermal exposure control. Planning for emergencies is an important facet of risk control. Proposals are outlined to band chemical hazards for emergency planning according to a minimum of information, i.e. the danger symbol on a product label. PMID:14530184

  15. 14 CFR 121.323 - Instruments and equipment for operations at night.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... required by §§ 121.305 through 121.321 and 121.803: (a) Position lights. (b) An anti-collision light. (c) Two landing lights, except that only one landing light is required for nontransport category airplanes type certificated after December 31, 1964. (d) Instrument lights providing enough light to make...

  16. 42 CFR 493.1252 - Standard: Test systems, equipment, instruments, reagents, materials, and supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., reagents, materials, and supplies. 493.1252 Section 493.1252 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY..., instruments, reagents, materials, and supplies. (a) Test systems must be selected by the laboratory....

  17. System for measurement of headband force in hearing protection devices and audiometric equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llamas-Llamas, Osvaldo; Razo-Razo, Jose-Noe

    2002-11-01

    Application force influences audiometric results and hearing protection devices (HPD) attenuation performance. In HPD attenuation testing it is neccessary to know the application force. Audiometric studies are being conducted with standardized values of the application force. Design and results of a measurement device for bands and headbands application force are presented. Error analysis in the range from 1N to 30N is carried out and the associated measurement uncertainty is estimated. The device provides settings for test distances from 70 mm to 140 mm (vertical axis), and 115 mm to 195 mm (horizontal axis), as required in most of the available standards related with HPD and audiometric equipment.

  18. Intubation performance using different laryngoscopes while wearing chemical protective equipment: a manikin study

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, H; Zoremba, N; Rossaint, R; Deusser, K; Stoppe, C; Coburn, M; Rieg, A; Schälte, G

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to compare visualisation of the vocal cords and performance of intubation by anaesthetists using four different laryngoscopes while wearing full chemical protective equipment. Setting Medical simulation center of a university hospital, department of anaesthesiology. Participants 42 anaesthetists (15 females and 27 males) completed the trial. The participants were grouped according to their professional education as anaesthesiology residents with experience of <2 years or <5 years, or as anaesthesiology specialists with experience of >5 years. Interventions In a manikin scenario, participants performed endotracheal intubations with four different direct and indirect laryngoscopes (Macintosh (MAC), Airtraq (ATQ), Glidescope (GLS) and AP Advance (APA)), while wearing chemical protective gear, including a body suit, rubber gloves, a fire helmet and breathing apparatus. Primary and secondary outcome measures With respect to the manikin, setting time to complete ‘endotracheal intubation’ was defined as primary end point. Glottis visualisation (according to the Cormack-Lehane score (CLS) and impairments caused by the protective equipment, were defined as secondary outcome measures. Results The times to tracheal intubation were calculated using the MAC (31.4 s; 95% CI 26.6 to 36.8), ATQ (37.1 s; 95% CI 28.3 to 45.9), GLS (35.4 s; 95% CI 28.7 to 42.1) and APA (23.6 s; 95% CI 19.1 to 28.1), respectively. Intubation with the APA was significantly faster than with all the other devices examined among the total study population (p<0.05). A significant improvement in visualisation of the vocal cords was reported for the APA compared with the GLS. Conclusions Despite the restrictions caused by the equipment, the anaesthetists intubated the manikin successfully within adequate time. The APA outperformed the other devices in the time to intubation, and it has been evaluated as an easily manageable device for anaesthetists with varying

  19. 33 CFR 149.402 - What firefighting and fire protection equipment must be approved by the Coast Guard?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What firefighting and fire..., CONSTRUCTION, AND EQUIPMENT Firefighting and Fire Protection Equipment § 149.402 What firefighting and fire...) or (d), § 149.419(a)(1), or § 149.420 of this part, all required firefighting and fire...

  20. Personal Protective Equipment Use and Safety Behaviors among Farm Adolescents: Gender Differences and Predictors of Work Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Deborah B.; Browning, Steven R.; Westneat, Susan C.; Kidd, Pamela S.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Children on farms perform work that places them at risk for acute and chronic negative health outcomes. Despite strategies for preventing and reducing the risk of disease and injury, children's use of personal protective equipment and safety equipped farm machinery has generally remained unreported. Purpose: This paper reports the use of…

  1. Test plan for personnel protective equipment bubble suit decontamination feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Menkhaus, D.E.

    1990-08-01

    This test plan defines the details for performing a study to determine the feasibility of using a shower based system to decontaminate personnel protective equipment (PPE) bubble (encapsulation) suits worn by personnel as they are egressing a mixed-TRU contamination zone. The testing will be performed using an EPA rated Level A fully encapsulating suit. The person directly involved in the suit contamination and shower processes will be provided with Level A protection. This test plan provides a description of the test apparatus, provides details of the tests to be performed, defines the sampling procedures and controls, and defines the analytical methods for the samples collected. The test plan also discusses the data management and the reporting of the test result and the quality assurance and safety requirements for the study. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Novel Scanning Lens Instrument for Evaluating Fresnel Lens Performance: Equipment Development and Initial Results (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Herrero, R.; Miller, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.; Anton, I.; Sala, G.

    2013-07-01

    A system dedicated to the optical transmittance characterization of Fresnel lenses has been developed at NREL, in collaboration with the UPM. The system quantifies the optical efficiency of the lens by generating a performance map. The shape of the focused spot may also be analyzed to understand change in the lens performance. The primary instrument components (lasers and CCD detector) have been characterized to confirm their capability for performing optical transmittance measurements. Measurements performed on SoG and PMMA lenses subject to a variety of indoor conditions (e.g., UV and damp heat) identified differences in the optical efficiency of the evaluated lenses, demonstrating the ability of the Scanning Lens Instrument (SLI) to distinguish between the aged lenses.

  3. Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment in data centers?

    SciTech Connect

    Shehabi, Arman; Ganguly, Srirupa; Gundel, Lara A.; Horvath, Arpad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Tschudi, William; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Nazaroff, William W

    2009-06-05

    Economizer use in data centers is an energy efficiency strategy that could significantly limit electricity demand in this rapidly growing economic sector. Widespread economizer implementation, however, has been hindered by potential equipment reliability concerns associated with exposing information technology equipment to particulate matter of outdoor origin. This study explores the feasibility of using economizers in data centers to save energy while controlling particle concentrations with high-quality air filtration. Physical and chemical properties of indoor and outdoor particles were analyzed at an operating northern California data center equipped with an economizer under varying levels of air filtration efficiency. Results show that when improved filtration is used in combination with an economizer, the indoor/outdoor concentration ratios for most measured particle types were similar to levels when using conventional filtration without economizers. An energy analysis of the data center reveals that, even during the summer months, chiller savings from economizer use greatly outweigh any increase in fan power associated with improved filtration. These findings indicate that economizer use combined with improved filtration could reduce data center energy demand while providing a level of protection from particles of outdoor origin similar to that observed with conventional design.

  4. Development of Curricula for Nuclear Radiation Protection, Nuclear Instrumentation, and Nuclear Materials Processing Technologies. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Daniel M.

    A study was conducted to assist two-year postsecondary educational institutions in providing technical specialty courses for preparing nuclear technicians. As a result of project activities, curricula have been developed for five categories of nuclear technicians and operators: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and…

  5. Development of a respiratory protection survey instrument for occupational health nurses: an educational project.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Deborah; Burgel, Barbara J

    2013-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training outlined seven recommendations to improve the competency of occupational health nurses in respiratory protection. An advisory group was convened in December 2011, with stakeholder representation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare, American Nurses Association, and Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. The initial work of the advisory group included developing and administering a survey to assess current occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities relevant to respiratory protection. Development of the survey was led by a master's student and advisor who worked with the advisory group. The process of tool development and preliminary findings are presented in this article.

  6. Development of a respiratory protection survey instrument for occupational health nurses: an educational project.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Deborah; Burgel, Barbara J

    2013-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training outlined seven recommendations to improve the competency of occupational health nurses in respiratory protection. An advisory group was convened in December 2011, with stakeholder representation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare, American Nurses Association, and Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. The initial work of the advisory group included developing and administering a survey to assess current occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities relevant to respiratory protection. Development of the survey was led by a master's student and advisor who worked with the advisory group. The process of tool development and preliminary findings are presented in this article. PMID:23380641

  7. Management of ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses, part 1: physics, radiation protection, and radiation instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Doran M; Jenkins, Mark S; Sugarman, Stephen L; Glassman, Erik S

    2014-03-01

    Ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses are exceedingly rare; therefore, most physicians have never managed such conditions. When confronted with a possible radiation injury or illness, most physicians must seek specialty consultation. Protection of responders, health care workers, and patients is an absolute priority for the delivery of medical care. Management of ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses, as well as radiation protection, requires a basic understanding of physics. Also, to provide a greater measure of safety when working with radioactive materials, instrumentation for detection and identification of radiation is needed. Because any health care professional could face a radiation emergency, it is imperative that all institutions have emergency response plans in place before an incident occurs. The present article is an introduction to basic physics, ionizing radiation, radiation protection, and radiation instrumentation, and it provides a basis for management of the consequences of a radiologic or nuclear incident.

  8. Justification for Selecting Level A vs. Level B Personal Protective Equipment to Remediate a Room Containing Concentrated Acids, Bases and Radiological Constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Hylko, J. M.; Thompson, A. L.; Walter, J. F.; Deecke, T. A.

    2002-02-25

    Selecting the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) is based on providing an adequate level of employee protection relative to the task-specific conditions and hazards. PPE is categorized into four ensembles, based on the degree of protection afforded; e.g., Levels A (most restrictive), B, C, and D (least restrictive). What is often overlooked in preparing an ensemble is that the PPE itself can create significant worker hazards; i.e., the greater the level of PPE, the greater the associated risks. Furthermore, there is confusion as to whether a more ''conservative approach'' should always be taken since Level B provides the same level of respiratory protection as Level A but less skin protection. This paper summarizes the Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations addressing Level A versus Level B, and provides justification for selecting Level B over Level A without under-protecting the employee during a particular remediation scenario. The scenario consisted of an entry team performing (1) an initial entry into a room containing concentrated acids (e.g., hydrofluoric acid), bases, and radiological constituents; (2) sampling and characterizing container contents; and (3) retrieving characterized containers. The invasive nature of the hydrofluoric acid sampling and characterization scenario created a high potential for splash, immersion, and exposure to hazardous vapors, requiring additional skin protection. The hazards associated with this scenario and the chemical nature of hydrofluoric acid provided qualitative evidence to justify Level A. Once the hydrofluoric acid was removed from the room, PPE performance was evaluated against the remaining chemical inventory. If chemical breakthrough from direct contact was not expected to occur and instrument readings confirmed the absence of any hazardous vapors, additional skin protection afforded by wearing a vapor-tight, totally-encapsulated suit was not required. Therefore, PPE performance and

  9. Increasing dust-absorbing equipment operation efficiency using the automatic laser instrument for solid particle concentration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privalov, Vadim V.; Shemanin, Valery G.; Charty, Pavel V.

    2003-06-01

    The technological process of cement production, which side effect is dust generating and its exhausting to atmosphere, is not stopped as a rule when some faults were origin in dust-absorbing equipment (DAE). The analysis in reference one shows that longtime conducting of the technological process at DAE refusal or fault leads to its working efficiency reduction, which reveals itself in significant excess of nominal values of the dust output concentrations. The number of the most typical refusals and damages and algorithms of their searching were analyzed in work in reference 2 for the most wide-spread dust-absorber types: blanch and electrostatic filters. This work goal are the estimation of DAE working efficiency and choosing of the optimum way of its increasing with using of the automatic laser instrument for aerosol particles concentration measuring in the dust-air flows.

  10. Passive protection devices for high-voltage equipment: Design procedures and performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Serino, G.; Bonacina, G.; Bettinali, F.

    1995-12-31

    A 420 kV High-Voltage Alternating Current Circuit-Breaker, a typical element of an open-air electrical substation, is considered. Experimental tests carried out on such a piece of equipment by ISMES, under ENEL support, clearly pointed out its inability to withstand the seismic qualification level of highest severity indicated by the standards. The design of a seismic isolation system for the switch-gear composed of spring units and dampers is developed in this paper, and the dynamic earthquake response of the isolated circuit-breaker is compared numerically to the one obtained without the seismic protection system. The remarkable reduction of stresses in the porcelain insulators are shown, evidencing that this occurs to the detriment of a certain increment of displacements at the top of the apparatus.

  11. The effect of hyperhydration on physiological and perceived strain during treadmill exercise in personal protective equipment.

    PubMed

    Hostler, David; Gallagher, Michael; Goss, Fredric L; Seitz, Jennifer R; Reis, Steven E; Robertson, Robert J; Northington, William E; Suyama, Joe

    2009-03-01

    Work in personal protective equipment (PPE) impairs thermoregulation causing cardiovascular stress, increased core body temperature, and hypohydration. We examined the effect of pretreating first responders performing treadmill exercise in PPE with an infusion of normal saline on physiological and perceptual strain. Ten (eight males, two females) euhydrated subjects performed treadmill exercise on two occasions wearing a chemical resistant coverall, air purifying respirator, butyl gloves, and heavy boots. During the hyperhydration session, normal saline was rapidly infused through an arm vein prior to donning PPE. Exercise duration and maximum core temperature did not differ between euhydrated and hyperhydrated conditions. Perceptual strain index (PeSI) was higher than physiological strain index (PhSI) in the euhydrated condition (P = 0.002) but neither index differed between the control and experimental conditions. Intravenous hyperhydration did not reduce physiological stress, increase exercise, or influence perceptual strain time when compared to the euhydrated condition in moderately fit individuals. PMID:19037655

  12. Effect of base layer materials on physiological and perceptual responses to exercise in personal protective equipment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Denise L; Arena, Logan; DeBlois, Jacob P; Haller, Jeannie M; Hultquist, Eric M; Lefferts, Wesley K; Russell, Tim; Wu, Annie; Fehling, Patricia C

    2014-05-01

    Ten men (non-firefighters) completed a 110 min walking/recovery protocol (three 20-min exercise bouts, with recovery periods of 10, 20, and 20 min following successive bouts) in a thermoneutral laboratory while wearing firefighting personal protective equipment over one of four base layers: cotton, modacrylic, wool, and phase change material. There were no significant differences in changes in heart rate, core temperature, rating of perceived exertion, thermal discomfort, and thermal strain among base layers. Sticking to skin, coolness/hotness, and clothing humidity sensation were more favorable (p < 0.05) for wool compared with cotton; no significant differences were identified for the other 7 clothing sensations assessed. Separate materials performance testing of the individual base layers and firefighting ensembles (base layer + turnout gear) indicated differences in thermal protective performance and total heat loss among the base layers and among ensembles; however, differences in heat dissipation did not correspond with physiological responses during exercise or recovery.

  13. Measurement instruments for automatically monitoring the water chemistry of reactor coolant at nuclear power stations equipped with VVER reactors. Selection of measurement instruments and experience gained from their operation at Russian and foreign NPSs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yu. A.

    2007-12-01

    An analytical review is given of Russian and foreign measurement instruments employed in a system for automatically monitoring the water chemistry of the reactor coolant circuit and used in the development of projects of nuclear power stations equipped with VVER-1000 reactors and the nuclear station project AES 2006. The results of experience gained from the use of such measurement instruments at nuclear power stations operating in Russia and abroad are presented.

  14. Using reduced personal protective equipment in an endemically infected mouse colony.

    PubMed

    Baker, Samuel W; Prestia, Kevin A; Karolewski, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) frequently is used to reduce the risk of spreading adventitial diseases in rodent colonies. The PPE worn often reflects the historic practices of the research institution rather than published performance data. Standard PPE for a rodent facility typically consists of a disposable hair bonnet, gown, face mask, shoe covers, and gloves, which are donned on facility entry and removed on exiting. This study evaluated the effect of a reduced PPE protocol on disease spread within an endemically infected mouse colony. In the reduced protocol, only the parts of the wearer that came in direct contact with the mice or their environment were covered with PPE. To test the reduced PPE protocol, proven naïve mice were housed in a facility endemically infected with murine norovirus and mouse hepatitis virus for 12 wk. During that time, routine husbandry operations were conducted by using either the standard or reduced PPE protocols. All study mice remained free of virus antibody when reduced PPE was implemented. These results indicate that reduced PPE is adequate for disease containment when correct techniques for handling microisolation caging are used. Reducing the amount of PPE used in an animal facility affords considerable cost savings yet limits the risk of disease spread. PMID:24827569

  15. Using Reduced Personal Protective Equipment in an Endemically Infected Mouse Colony

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Samuel W; Prestia, Kevin A; Karolewski, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) frequently is used to reduce the risk of spreading adventitial diseases in rodent colonies. The PPE worn often reflects the historic practices of the research institution rather than published performance data. Standard PPE for a rodent facility typically consists of a disposable hair bonnet, gown, face mask, shoe covers, and gloves, which are donned on facility entry and removed on exiting. This study evaluated the effect of a reduced PPE protocol on disease spread within an endemically infected mouse colony. In the reduced protocol, only the parts of the wearer that came in direct contact with the mice or their environment were covered with PPE. To test the reduced PPE protocol, proven naïve mice were housed in a facility endemically infected with murine norovirus and mouse hepatitis virus for 12 wk. During that time, routine husbandry operations were conducted by using either the standard or reduced PPE protocols. All study mice remained free of virus antibody when reduced PPE was implemented. These results indicate that reduced PPE is adequate for disease containment when correct techniques for handling microisolation caging are used. Reducing the amount of PPE used in an animal facility affords considerable cost savings yet limits the risk of disease spread. PMID:24827569

  16. Ebola virus disease: The use of fluorescents as markers of contamination for personal protective equipment.

    PubMed

    Bell, Todd; Smoot, John; Patterson, Justin; Smalligan, Roger; Jordan, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The recent Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak has created interest in personal protective equipment (PPE) content and usage. PPE testing has historically been done by individual component, rather than as a bundle for contact isolation. Fluorescent agents are commonly used in training for infection control techniques. The purpose of our study was to compare 2 PPE bundles and to evaluate the feasibility of fluorescent markers as an assessment tool for PPE effectiveness. Eight healthcare providers volunteered for this preliminary study. Participants were randomized to 1 of 2 PPE bundles that meet current (October 20, 2014) CDC recommendations. One PPE bundle utilized commercial EVD-recommended components. The other PPE bundle used components already available at local hospitals or retail stores. Participants were also randomized to standard or high volume exposures (HVE) to simulate fluid splash. Each participant was assisted in PPE donning and doffing by an experienced trainer. A training mannequin was contaminated with fluorescent agents to simulate bodily fluids. Participants were then given clinical tasks to care for the EVD "patient." De-gowned participants were examined under "black light" for fluorescence indicative of contamination. One participant in each PPE arm had evidence of contamination. One of the contamination events was suspected during the patient care exercise. The other contamination event was not suspected until black light examination. In spite of a large difference in cost of PPE, the two bundle arms performed similarly. Bundle testing using fluorescent markers could help identify optimal PPE systems.

  17. Attitude towards personal protective equipment in the French nuclear fuel industry.

    PubMed

    Guseva Canu, Irina; Faust, Ségolène; Canioni, Pierre; Collomb, Philippe; Samson, Eric; Laurier, Dominique

    2013-06-01

    This descriptive cross-sectional study examines the compliance of workers from the European Gaseous Diffusion Uranium Enrichment Consortium (EURODIF) with personal protection equipment (PPE) in view of the various hazards in the nuclear fuel industry. The PPE inventory was drawn up by an industrial hygienist in charge of the PPE at EURODIF. Two hundred and twenty seven (10%) randomly selected, active and retired, EURODIF workers filled in a questionnaire on their attitudes towards PPE. Exposure data from the EURODIF job exposure matrix were used to examine whether PPE usage varies according to exposure level. The study suggests a PPE usage profile that varies depending on the hazards present and PPE available. Anti-uranium PPE and gloves were among the best rated, while anti-spray goggles were the least used. We found that, for most hazards known to cause cancer or irreversible health damage, PPE usage varied according to exposure (homogeneity test, p<0.05; trend test, p<0.05). The continuous use of PPE among workers should be encouraged through improvements to the PPE management system. A precise model of individual exposure can only be designed if the use and efficiency of PPE are taken into consideration.

  18. The Impact of Firefighter Personal Protective Equipment and Treadmill Protocol on Maximal Oxygen Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joo-Young; Bakri, Ilham; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Son, Su-Young; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of firefighter personal protective equipment (PPE) on the determination of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) while using two different treadmill protocols: a progressive incline protocol (PIP) and a progressive speed protocol (PSP), with three clothing conditions (Light-light clothing; Boots-PPE with rubber boots; Shoes-PPE with running shoes). Bruce protocol with Light was performed for a reference test. Results showed there was no difference in VO2max between Bruce Light, PIP Light, and PSP Light. However, VO2max was reduced in Boots and Shoes with shortened maximal performance time (7 and 6 min reduced for PIP Boots and Shoes, respectively; 11 and 9 min reduced for PSP Boots and Shoes, respectively), whereas the increasing rate of VO2 in Boots and Shoes during submaximal exercise was greater compared with Light. Wearing firefighter boots compared with wearing running shoes also significantly affected submaximal VO2 but not VO2max. These results suggest that firefighters’ maximal performance determined from a typical VO2max test without wearing PPE may overestimate the actual performance capability of firefighters wearing PPE. PMID:23668854

  19. Ebola virus disease: The use of fluorescents as markers of contamination for personal protective equipment.

    PubMed

    Bell, Todd; Smoot, John; Patterson, Justin; Smalligan, Roger; Jordan, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The recent Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak has created interest in personal protective equipment (PPE) content and usage. PPE testing has historically been done by individual component, rather than as a bundle for contact isolation. Fluorescent agents are commonly used in training for infection control techniques. The purpose of our study was to compare 2 PPE bundles and to evaluate the feasibility of fluorescent markers as an assessment tool for PPE effectiveness. Eight healthcare providers volunteered for this preliminary study. Participants were randomized to 1 of 2 PPE bundles that meet current (October 20, 2014) CDC recommendations. One PPE bundle utilized commercial EVD-recommended components. The other PPE bundle used components already available at local hospitals or retail stores. Participants were also randomized to standard or high volume exposures (HVE) to simulate fluid splash. Each participant was assisted in PPE donning and doffing by an experienced trainer. A training mannequin was contaminated with fluorescent agents to simulate bodily fluids. Participants were then given clinical tasks to care for the EVD "patient." De-gowned participants were examined under "black light" for fluorescence indicative of contamination. One participant in each PPE arm had evidence of contamination. One of the contamination events was suspected during the patient care exercise. The other contamination event was not suspected until black light examination. In spite of a large difference in cost of PPE, the two bundle arms performed similarly. Bundle testing using fluorescent markers could help identify optimal PPE systems. PMID:26793445

  20. Ebola virus disease: The use of fluorescents as markers of contamination for personal protective equipment

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Todd; Smoot, John; Patterson, Justin; Smalligan, Roger; Jordan, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The recent Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak has created interest in personal protective equipment (PPE) content and usage. PPE testing has historically been done by individual component, rather than as a bundle for contact isolation. Fluorescent agents are commonly used in training for infection control techniques. The purpose of our study was to compare 2 PPE bundles and to evaluate the feasibility of fluorescent markers as an assessment tool for PPE effectiveness. Eight healthcare providers volunteered for this preliminary study. Participants were randomized to 1 of 2 PPE bundles that meet current (October 20, 2014) CDC recommendations. One PPE bundle utilized commercial EVD-recommended components. The other PPE bundle used components already available at local hospitals or retail stores. Participants were also randomized to standard or high volume exposures (HVE) to simulate fluid splash. Each participant was assisted in PPE donning and doffing by an experienced trainer. A training mannequin was contaminated with fluorescent agents to simulate bodily fluids. Participants were then given clinical tasks to care for the EVD “patient.” De-gowned participants were examined under “black light” for fluorescence indicative of contamination. One participant in each PPE arm had evidence of contamination. One of the contamination events was suspected during the patient care exercise. The other contamination event was not suspected until black light examination. In spite of a large difference in cost of PPE, the two bundle arms performed similarly. Bundle testing using fluorescent markers could help identify optimal PPE systems. PMID:26793445

  1. Personal Protective Equipment for Infectious Disease Preparedness: A Human Factors Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Herlihey, Tracey A; Gelmi, Stefano; Flewwelling, Christopher J; Hall, Trevor N T; Bañez, Carleene; Morita, Plinio P; Beverley, Paul; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Hota, Susy

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify issues during donning and doffing of personal protective equipment (PPE) for infectious diseases and to inform PPE procurement criteria and design. DESIGN A mixed methods approach was used. Usability testing assessed the appropriateness, potential for errors, and ease of use of various combinations of PPE. A qualitative constructivist approach was used to analyze participant feedback. SETTING Four academic health sciences centers: 2 adult hospitals, 1 trauma center, and 1 pediatric hospital, in Toronto, Canada. PARTICIPANTS Participants (n=82) were representative of the potential users of PPE within Western healthcare institutions. RESULTS None of the tested combinations provided a complete solution for PPE. Environmental factors, such as anteroom layout, and the design of protocols and instructional material were also found to impact safety. The study identified the need to design PPE as a complete system, rather than mixing and matching components. CONCLUSIONS Healthcare institutions are encouraged to use human factors methods to identify risk and failure points with the usage of their selected PPE, and to modify on the basis of iterative evaluations with representative end users. Manufacturers of PPE should consider usability when designing the next generation of PPE. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:1022-1028. PMID:27291787

  2. A guide to the selection of personal protective equipment for use in responding to a release of chemical warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, C.B.

    1997-10-01

    Recognition by the US Army that a potential threat to the public from continued storage was potentially as great a threat as from transportation and the final demilitarization of chemical agents gave rise to the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP). CSEPP is a civilian community emergency preparedness program complementing the Department of Defense`s initiative to destroy domestic stockpiles of aged chemical warface munitions. An incident involving chemical warfare agents requires a unique hazardous materials (HAZMAT) response. As with any HAZMAT event, federal regulations prescribe that responders must be protected from exposure to the chemical agents. But unlike other HAZMAT events, special considerations govern the selection of personal protective equipment (PPE). PPE includes all clothing, respirators and detection equipment used to respond to a chemical release. PPE can differ depending on whether responders are military or civilian personnel. FEMA requested that ORNL create training materials for CSEPP participants. These training materials were to provide information on a variety of topics and answer questions that a typical CSEPP participant might ask, including the following: how did the Army select the CSEPP recommended ensemble (i.e., protective clothing, respiratory equipment, and detection equipment); how does the CSEPP participant know this ensemble is the right PPE for chemical warfare agents and will actually protect him; what are the concept of operations and work rules? Does one need to know what the CSEPP concept of operations and work rules include? This report describes the training document ORNL created.

  3. Factors Surgical Team Members Perceive Influence Choices of Wearing or Not Wearing Personal Protective Equipment during Operative/Invasive Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuming, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to certain bloodborne pathogens can prematurely end a person's life. Healthcare workers (HCWs), especially those who are members of surgical teams, are at increased risk of exposure to these pathogens. The proper use of personal protective equipment (PPE) during operative/invasive procedures reduces that risk. Despite this, some HCWs fail…

  4. Evaluation of RPE-Select: A Web-Based Respiratory Protective Equipment Selector Tool.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Nick; Rajan-Sithamparanadarajah, Bob; Atkinson, Robert

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the evaluation of an open-access web-based respiratory protective equipment selector tool (RPE-Select, accessible at http://www.healthyworkinglives.com/rpe-selector). This tool is based on the principles of the COSHH-Essentials (C-E) control banding (CB) tool, which was developed for the exposure risk management of hazardous chemicals in the workplace by small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) and general practice H&S professionals. RPE-Select can be used for identifying adequate and suitable RPE for dusts, fibres, mist (solvent, water, and oil based), sprays, volatile solids, fumes, gases, vapours, and actual or potential oxygen deficiency. It can be applied for substances and products with safety data sheets as well as for a large number of commonly encountered process-generated substances (PGS), such as poultry house dusts or welding fume. Potential international usability has been built-in by using the Hazard Statements developed for the Globally Harmonised System (GHS) and providing recommended RPE in picture form as well as with a written specification. Illustration helps to compensate for the variabilities in assigned protection factors across the world. RPE-Select uses easily understandable descriptions/explanations and an interactive stepwise flow for providing input/answers at each step. The output of the selection process is a report summarising the user input data and a selection of RPE, including types of filters where applicable, from which the user can select the appropriate one for each wearer. In addition, each report includes 'Dos' and 'Don'ts' for the recommended RPE. RPE-Select outcomes, based on up to 20 hypothetical use scenarios, were evaluated in comparison with other available RPE selection processes and tools, and by 32 independent users with a broad range of familiarities with industrial use scenarios in general and respiratory protection in particular. For scenarios involving substances having safety data sheets

  5. Evaluation of RPE-Select: A Web-Based Respiratory Protective Equipment Selector Tool

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Nick; Rajan-Sithamparanadarajah, Bob; Atkinson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the evaluation of an open-access web-based respiratory protective equipment selector tool (RPE-Select, accessible at http://www.healthyworkinglives.com/rpe-selector). This tool is based on the principles of the COSHH-Essentials (C-E) control banding (CB) tool, which was developed for the exposure risk management of hazardous chemicals in the workplace by small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) and general practice H&S professionals. RPE-Select can be used for identifying adequate and suitable RPE for dusts, fibres, mist (solvent, water, and oil based), sprays, volatile solids, fumes, gases, vapours, and actual or potential oxygen deficiency. It can be applied for substances and products with safety data sheets as well as for a large number of commonly encountered process-generated substances (PGS), such as poultry house dusts or welding fume. Potential international usability has been built-in by using the Hazard Statements developed for the Globally Harmonised System (GHS) and providing recommended RPE in picture form as well as with a written specification. Illustration helps to compensate for the variabilities in assigned protection factors across the world. RPE-Select uses easily understandable descriptions/explanations and an interactive stepwise flow for providing input/answers at each step. The output of the selection process is a report summarising the user input data and a selection of RPE, including types of filters where applicable, from which the user can select the appropriate one for each wearer. In addition, each report includes ‘Dos’ and ‘Don’ts’ for the recommended RPE. RPE-Select outcomes, based on up to 20 hypothetical use scenarios, were evaluated in comparison with other available RPE selection processes and tools, and by 32 independent users with a broad range of familiarities with industrial use scenarios in general and respiratory protection in particular. For scenarios involving substances having safety

  6. Theory and experiment of an inertia-type vertical isolation system for seismic protection of equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lyan-Ywan; Chen, Pei-Rong; Pong, Kuan-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Although it has been proven that seismic isolation is an effective technology for seismic protection of structures and equipment, most existing isolation systems are for mitigating horizontal ground motions, and in practice there are very few vertical isolation systems. Part of the reason is due to the conflict with regard to the demand for isolation stiffness. In other words, a vertical isolation system must have sufficient vertical rigidity to sustain the weight of the isolated object, while it must also have sufficient flexibility in order to elongate the vibration period under seismic excitation. In order to overcome this difficulty, a novel system is proposed in this study, called an inertia-type vertical isolation system (IVIS). The primary difference between the IVIS and a traditional system is that the former has an additional leverage mechanism with a counterweight. The counterweight will provide a static uplifting force and an extra dynamic inertia force, such that the effective vertical stiffness of the IVIS becomes higher in its static state and lower in the dynamic one. The theory underlying the IVIS is developed and verified experimentally by a seismic simulation test in this work. The results show that the IVIS leads to a less static settlement and at the same time a lower effective isolation frequency. The test results also demonstrate that the isolator displacement demand of the IVIS is only about 30-40 percent that of the traditional one in all kinds of earthquakes. With regard to the reduction of acceleration response, the IVIS is particularly effective for near-fault earthquakes or near-resonant excitations, but is less effective for far-field earthquakes with more high-frequency contents, as compared with the traditional system.

  7. Chest Compression With Personal Protective Equipment During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Crossover Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Lu, Kai-Zhi; Yi, Bin; Chen, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Following a chemical, biological, radiation, and nuclear incident, prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) procedure is essential for patients who suffer cardiac arrest. But CPR when wearing personal protection equipment (PPE) before decontamination becomes a challenge for healthcare workers (HCW). Although previous studies have assessed the impact of PPE on airway management, there is little research available regarding the quality of chest compression (CC) when wearing PPE.A present randomized cross-over simulation study was designed to evaluate the effect of PPE on CC performance using mannequins.The study was set in one university medical center in the China.Forty anesthesia residents participated in this randomized cross-over study.Each participant performed 2 min of CC on a manikin with and without PPE, respectively. Participants were randomized into 2 groups that either performed CC with PPE first, followed by a trial without PPE after a 180-min rest, or vice versa.CPR recording technology was used to objectively quantify the quality of CC. Additionally, participants' physiological parameters and subjective fatigue score values were recorded.With the use of PPE, a significant decrease of the percentage of effective compressions (41.3 ± 17.1% with PPE vs 67.5 ± 15.6% without PPE, P < 0.001) and the percentage of adequate compressions (67.7 ± 18.9% with PPE vs 80.7 ± 15.5% without PPE, P < 0.001) were observed. Furthermore, the increases in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and subjective fatigue score values were more obvious with the use of PPE (all P < 0.01).We found significant deterioration of CC performance in HCW with the use of a level-C PPE, which may be a disadvantage for enhancing survival of cardiac arrest. PMID:27057878

  8. 30 CFR 77.403-1 - Mobile equipment; rollover protective structures (ROPS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.403-1 Mobile equipment... surface coal mines or the surface work areas of underground coal mines shall be provided with rollover... complying with paragraph (d) (1) (iii) (A) of this section. Stresses shall not exceed the ultimate...

  9. Volatile Organic Compounds Off-gassing from Firefighters' Personal Protective Equipment Ensembles after Use.

    PubMed

    Fent, Kenneth W; Evans, Douglas E; Booher, Donald; Pleil, Joachim D; Stiegel, Matthew A; Horn, Gavin P; Dalton, James

    2015-01-01

    Firefighters' personal protective equipment (PPE) ensembles will become contaminated with various compounds during firefighting. Some of these compounds will off-gas following a response, which could result in inhalation exposure. This study was conducted to determine the magnitude and composition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated during controlled structure burns that subsequently off-gassed from the firefighters' PPE, and were systemically absorbed and exhaled in firefighters' breath. Three crews of five firefighters performed entry, suppression, and overhaul during a controlled burn. We used evacuated canisters to sample air inside the burn structure during active fire and overhaul. After each burn, we placed PPE from two firefighters inside clean enclosures and sampled the air using evacuated canisters over 15 min. Firefighters' exhaled breath was collected ∼1 hr before and 4-14 min after each burn. Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, the evacuated canister samples were analyzed for 64 VOCs and the exhaled breath samples were analyzed for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, and styrene (BTEXS). Fourteen of the same VOCs were detected off-gassing from PPE in 50% or more of the samples. Compared to background levels, we measured >5 fold increases in mean off-gas concentrations of styrene, benzene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, acetone, and cyclohexane. Several of the compounds detected off-gassing from PPE were also measured at concentrations above background during active fire and overhaul, including benzene, propene, and styrene. The overhaul and off-gas air concentrations were well below applicable short-term occupational exposure limits. Compared to pre-burn levels, we measured >2 fold increases in mean breath concentrations of benzene, toluene, and styrene after the burns. Air concentrations of BTEXS measured off-gassing from firefighters' used PPE and in firefighters' post-burn exhaled breath were significantly correlated. The firefighters

  10. Disinfection of football protective equipment using chlorine dioxide produced by the ICA TriNova system

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Anthony L; DuBois, John D; Tenney, Joel D

    2009-01-01

    Backround Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus outbreaks have occurred in individuals engaged in athletic activities such as wrestling and football. Potential disease reduction interventions include the reduction or elimination of bacteria on common use items such as equipment. Chlorine dioxide has a long history of use as a disinfectant. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the ability of novel portable chlorine dioxide generation devices to eliminate bacteria contamination of helmets and pads used by individuals engaged in football. Methods In field studies, the number of bacteria associated with heavily used football helmets and shoulder pads was determined before and after overnight treatment with chlorine dioxide gas. Bacteria were recovered using cotton swabs and plated onto trypticase soy agar plates. In laboratory studies, Staphylococcus aureus was applied directly to pads. The penetration of bacteria into the pads was determined by inoculating agar plates with portions of the pads taken from the different layers of padding. The ability to eliminate bacteria on the pad surface and underlying foam layers after treatment with chlorine dioxide was also determined. Results Rates of recovery of bacteria after treatment clearly demonstrated that chlorine dioxide significantly (p < 0.001) reduce and eliminated bacteria found on the surface of pads. For example, the soft surface of shoulder pads from a university averaged 2.7 × 103 recoverable bacteria colonies before chlorine dioxide treatment and 1.3 × 102 recoverable colonies after treatment. In addition, the gas was capable of penetrating the mesh surface layer and killing bacteria in the underlying foam pad layers. Here, 7 × 103 to 4.5 × 103 laboratory applied S. aureus colonies were recovered from underlying layers before treatment and 0 colonies were present after treatment. Both naturally occurring bacteria and S. aureus were susceptible to the treatment process

  11. Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites: Best Management Practice Case Study #12 - Laboratory/Medical Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Blakley, H.

    2011-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) built a successful water conservation program and reduced potable water use through a series of initiatives at EPA laboratories. The projects highlighted in this case study demonstrate EPA's ability to reduce water use in laboratory and medical equipment by implementing vacuum pump and steam sterilizer replacements and retrofits. Due to the success of the initial vacuum pump and steam sterilizer projects described here, EPA is implementing similar projects at several laboratories throughout the nation.

  12. 30 CFR 77.403-1 - Mobile equipment; rollover protective structures (ROPS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Labor: Safety and Health Regulations for Construction, 29 CFR 1926.1001 and 1926.1002. (f) Field welding... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.403-1 Mobile...

  13. Standard on fire protection for self-propelled and mobile surface mining equipment. 2001 ed.

    SciTech Connect

    2001-07-01

    Safeguard life and property against fire and related hazards in mines with the latest requirements in NFPA 121. This 2001 edition covers fire detection, suppression, ignition sources, fire risk assessment and maintenance of mining equipment systems. 4 apps.

  14. Maintenance of influenza virus infectivity on the surfaces of personal protective equipment and clothing used in healthcare settings

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Hiroko; Kajioka, Jitsuo; Watanabe, Mayumi; Nakano, Ryuichi; Hirose, Tatsuko; Ohta, Hiroshi; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The maintenance of infectivity of influenza viruses on the surfaces of personal protective equipment and clothing is an important factor in terms of controlling viral cross-infection in the environment and preventing contact infection. The aim of this study was to determine if laboratory-grown influenza A (H1N1) virus maintained infectivity on the surfaces of personal protective equipment and clothing used in healthcare settings. Methods Influenza A virus (0.5 mL) was deposited on the surface of a rubber glove, an N95 particulate respirator, a surgical mask made of non-woven fabric, a gown made of Dupont Tyvek, a coated wooden desk, and stainless steel. Each sample was left for 1, 8, and 24 h, and hemagglutination (HA) and 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50)/mL were measured. Results The HA titer of this influenza A virus did not decrease in any of the materials tested even after 24 h. The infectivity of influenza A virus measured by TCID50 was maintained for 8 h on the surface of all materials, with the exception of the rubber glove for which virus infectivity was maintained for 24 h. Conclusions Our results indicate that the replacement/renewal of personal protective equipment and clothing by healthcare professionals in cases of exposure to secretions and droplets containing viruses spread by patients is an appropriate procedure to prevent cross-infection. PMID:21432565

  15. Project FIRES [Firefighters' Integrated Response Equipment System]. Volume 2: Protective Ensemble Performance Standards, Phase 1B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeles, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    The design of the prototype protective ensemble was finalized. Prototype ensembles were fabricated and then subjected to a series of qualification tests which were based upon the protective ensemble performance standards PEPS requirements. Engineering drawings and purchase specifications were prepared for the new protective ensemble.

  16. Redesign and Reconstruction of the Equipment Protection Systems for the Upgrading Front Ends and Beamlines at BSRF

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong Shenshou; Tan Yinglei; Wu Xuehui

    2007-01-19

    The BEPC(Beijing Electron-Positron Collider) is upgraded to be BEPCII, a two-ring Electron-Positron collider. Due to the construction of the BEPCII and upgrade of the existing front ends and beamlines, all the existing EPSs(Equipment Protection Systems) have to be redesigned and reconstructed at BSRF. All the redesigned EPSs for the upgrading front ends and beamlines are a PLC- and SCADA-based equipment protection and control and monitoring system. The EPSs are used to protect BEPCII two storage rings vacuum against vacuum failures in a beamline, as well as to protect the front-end and beamline components from being damaged by synchrotron radiation. For the high-power wiggler beam lines, a fast movable mask is used to protect the blade of a fast-closing valve from damage when the fast-closing valve is triggered to close, which does not need to dump the electron beam running in BEPCII outer ring. In addition, all redesigned PLC- based EPSs are used to communicate with the same centralized monitoring computer to monitor a variety of parameters from all PLC- based EPS systems. The monitoring computer runs the SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) software with its own web server. Graphical HMI interfaces are used to display a few overall views of all front-end equipment operation status and the further detailed information for each EPS in a different pop-up window. On the web services, the SCADA-based centralized monitoring system provides a web browse function, etc. The design of the reconstructed systems is described in this paper.

  17. 40 CFR 201.22 - Measurement instrumentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Measurement instrumentation. 201.22 Section 201.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT; INTERSTATE RAIL CARRIERS...

  18. 40 CFR 201.22 - Measurement instrumentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Measurement instrumentation. 201.22 Section 201.22 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT; INTERSTATE RAIL CARRIERS...

  19. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of Indonesian farmers regarding the use of personal protective equipment against pesticide exposure.

    PubMed

    Yuantari, Maria G C; Van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Van Straalen, Nico M; Widianarko, Budi; Sunoko, Henna R; Shobib, Muhammad N

    2015-03-01

    The use of synthetic pesticides in tropical countries has increased over the years, following the intensification of agriculture. However, awareness among farmers of the importance of protecting themselves from hazards associated with pesticide application is still lacking, especially in Indonesia. This paper reports results of an inventory on knowledge and attitudes regarding pesticide use by melon farmers of a village in Central Java, Indonesia. The importance of using personal protective equipment such as hats, masks, goggles, boots, and gloves on agricultural land is known and well understood by the farmers. However, in practice, only 3.8 % were wearing glasses and 1.9 % were using boots. In fact, the masks used only consisted of a part of their shirt tied around the mouth. The farmers were not wearing long pants and shirts with long sleeves and used the same clothes for more than 1 day without washing. Almost no farmers used personal protective equipment that was standard, in good condition, and complete. Based on the results of statistical analysis, no significant relationship was found between knowledge and attitude on the required practices on the one hand and the use of personal protective equipment in practice on the other hand. This shows that improved knowledge and attitudes are not enough to change the behavior of farmers to work in a healthy and safe way. The gap between knowledge and practice needs to be bridged by a more interactive and participatory training model. It is therefore of paramount importance to develop a special toolkit for pesticide risk reduction which is developed in a participatory manner involving the farmers as the main actors through a series of focus group discussions and field simulations.

  20. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of Indonesian farmers regarding the use of personal protective equipment against pesticide exposure.

    PubMed

    Yuantari, Maria G C; Van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Van Straalen, Nico M; Widianarko, Budi; Sunoko, Henna R; Shobib, Muhammad N

    2015-03-01

    The use of synthetic pesticides in tropical countries has increased over the years, following the intensification of agriculture. However, awareness among farmers of the importance of protecting themselves from hazards associated with pesticide application is still lacking, especially in Indonesia. This paper reports results of an inventory on knowledge and attitudes regarding pesticide use by melon farmers of a village in Central Java, Indonesia. The importance of using personal protective equipment such as hats, masks, goggles, boots, and gloves on agricultural land is known and well understood by the farmers. However, in practice, only 3.8 % were wearing glasses and 1.9 % were using boots. In fact, the masks used only consisted of a part of their shirt tied around the mouth. The farmers were not wearing long pants and shirts with long sleeves and used the same clothes for more than 1 day without washing. Almost no farmers used personal protective equipment that was standard, in good condition, and complete. Based on the results of statistical analysis, no significant relationship was found between knowledge and attitude on the required practices on the one hand and the use of personal protective equipment in practice on the other hand. This shows that improved knowledge and attitudes are not enough to change the behavior of farmers to work in a healthy and safe way. The gap between knowledge and practice needs to be bridged by a more interactive and participatory training model. It is therefore of paramount importance to develop a special toolkit for pesticide risk reduction which is developed in a participatory manner involving the farmers as the main actors through a series of focus group discussions and field simulations. PMID:25716528

  1. DOE Fire Protection Handbook, Volume II. Fire effects and electrical and electronic equipment

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-18

    Electrical and electronic equipment, including computers, are used at critical facilities throughout the Department of Energy (DOE). Hughes Associates, Inc. was tasked to evaluate the potential thermal and nonthermal effects of a fire on the electrical and electronic equipment and methods to analyze, evaluate, and assist in controlling the potential effects. This report is a result of a literature review and analysis on the effects of fire on electrical equipment. It is directed at three objectives: (1) Provide a state-of-the-art review and analysis of thermal and nonthermal damage to electrical and electronic equipment; (2) Develop a procedure for estimating thermal and nonthermal damage considerations using current knowledge; and (3) Develop an R&D/T&E program to fill gaps in the current knowledge needed to further perfect the procedure. The literature review was performed utilizing existing electronic databases. Sources searched included scientific and engineering databases including Dialog, NTIS, SciSearch and NIST BFRL literature. Incorporated in the analysis is unpublished literature and conversations with members of the ASTM E-5.21, Smoke Corrosivity, and researchers in the electronics field. This report does not consider the effects of fire suppression systems or efforts. Further analysis of the potential impact is required in the future.

  2. 30 CFR 77.403-1 - Mobile equipment; rollover protective structures (ROPS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... installed in accordance with the recommendations of the ROPS manufacturer or designer. The coal mine operator shall exhibit certification from the ROPS manufacturer or designer in the form of a label attached to the equipment, indicating the manufacturer's or fabricator's name and address, the ROPS...

  3. 10 CFR 20.1703 - Use of individual respiratory protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... conditions of use. This must be demonstrated either by licensee testing or on the basis of reliable test... respirator use in the event of equipment malfunction, physical or psychological distress, procedural or... Administration (29 CFR 1910.134(i)(1)(ii)(A) through (E)). Grade D quality air criteria include— (1)...

  4. 10 CFR 20.1703 - Use of individual respiratory protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... conditions of use. This must be demonstrated either by licensee testing or on the basis of reliable test... respirator use in the event of equipment malfunction, physical or psychological distress, procedural or... Administration (29 CFR 1910.134(i)(1)(ii)(A) through (E)). Grade D quality air criteria include— (1)...

  5. 10 CFR 20.1703 - Use of individual respiratory protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... conditions of use. This must be demonstrated either by licensee testing or on the basis of reliable test... respirator use in the event of equipment malfunction, physical or psychological distress, procedural or... Administration (29 CFR 1910.134(i)(1)(ii)(A) through (E)). Grade D quality air criteria include— (1)...

  6. 10 CFR 20.1703 - Use of individual respiratory protection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... conditions of use. This must be demonstrated either by licensee testing or on the basis of reliable test... respirator use in the event of equipment malfunction, physical or psychological distress, procedural or... Administration (29 CFR 1910.134(i)(1)(ii)(A) through (E)). Grade D quality air criteria include— (1)...

  7. 15 CFR 2301.22 - Protection, acquisition, and substitution of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... document establishing that the Federal government has a priority lien on any facilities purchased with... project equipment without impediment to assure the sufficient continuity of operation of the facility; and nothing must prevent the Federal government from entering the property and reclaiming or securing...

  8. 15 CFR 2301.22 - Protection, acquisition, and substitution of equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... document establishing that the Federal government has a priority lien on any facilities purchased with... project equipment without impediment to assure the sufficient continuity of operation of the facility; and nothing must prevent the Federal government from entering the property and reclaiming or securing...

  9. 24 CFR 3280.804 - Disconnecting means and branch-circuit protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... paragraph (l) of this section. (l) When a home is provided with installed service equipment, the electrical... HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Electrical Systems § 3280.804 Disconnecting means and branch-circuit...

  10. 24 CFR 3280.804 - Disconnecting means and branch-circuit protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) When a home is provided with installed service equipment, the electrical nameplate required by § 3280... HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Electrical Systems § 3280.804 Disconnecting means and branch-circuit...

  11. 24 CFR 3280.804 - Disconnecting means and branch-circuit protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) When a home is provided with installed service equipment, the electrical nameplate required by § 3280... HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Electrical Systems § 3280.804 Disconnecting means and branch-circuit...

  12. 24 CFR 3280.804 - Disconnecting means and branch-circuit protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) When a home is provided with installed service equipment, the electrical nameplate required by § 3280... HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Electrical Systems § 3280.804 Disconnecting means and branch-circuit...

  13. 77 FR 72411 - The Standard on Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Shipyard Employment; Extension of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ...), hands and body (Sec. 1915.157), lifesaving equipment (Sec. 1915.158), personal fall arrest systems (Sec... Agency's functions, including whether the information is useful; The accuracy of OSHA's estimate of the.... Authority and Signature David Michaels, Ph.D., MPH, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety...

  14. 30 CFR 56.9302 - Protection against moving or runaway railroad equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Protection against moving or runaway railroad... MINES Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Safety Devices, Provisions, and Procedures for Roadways, Railroads, and Loading and Dumping Sites § 56.9302 Protection against moving or runaway railroad...

  15. 30 CFR 56.9302 - Protection against moving or runaway railroad equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protection against moving or runaway railroad... MINES Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Safety Devices, Provisions, and Procedures for Roadways, Railroads, and Loading and Dumping Sites § 56.9302 Protection against moving or runaway railroad...

  16. 30 CFR 56.9302 - Protection against moving or runaway railroad equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protection against moving or runaway railroad... MINES Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Safety Devices, Provisions, and Procedures for Roadways, Railroads, and Loading and Dumping Sites § 56.9302 Protection against moving or runaway railroad...

  17. 30 CFR 56.9302 - Protection against moving or runaway railroad equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protection against moving or runaway railroad... MINES Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Safety Devices, Provisions, and Procedures for Roadways, Railroads, and Loading and Dumping Sites § 56.9302 Protection against moving or runaway railroad...

  18. 30 CFR 57.9302 - Protection against moving or runaway railroad equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protection against moving or runaway railroad... LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND..., Railroads, and Loading and Dumping Sites § 57.9302 Protection against moving or runaway railroad...

  19. 30 CFR 57.9302 - Protection against moving or runaway railroad equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Protection against moving or runaway railroad... LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND..., Railroads, and Loading and Dumping Sites § 57.9302 Protection against moving or runaway railroad...

  20. 30 CFR 57.9302 - Protection against moving or runaway railroad equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protection against moving or runaway railroad... LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND..., Railroads, and Loading and Dumping Sites § 57.9302 Protection against moving or runaway railroad...

  1. 30 CFR 57.9302 - Protection against moving or runaway railroad equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protection against moving or runaway railroad... LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND..., Railroads, and Loading and Dumping Sites § 57.9302 Protection against moving or runaway railroad...

  2. 30 CFR 56.9302 - Protection against moving or runaway railroad equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection against moving or runaway railroad... MINES Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Safety Devices, Provisions, and Procedures for Roadways, Railroads, and Loading and Dumping Sites § 56.9302 Protection against moving or runaway railroad...

  3. Audit Report on "Management Controls over the Department's Excess Weapons Inventories and Selected Sensitive Equipment used by Protective Forces"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Since September 11, 2001, the Department of Energy has, on several occasions, revised its security posture based on identified threats and adversaries. These revisions in security posture have driven Departmental sites to upgrade their defensive and tactical equipment. Subsequent changes in the perceived threats have, in some cases, led to a reduction in the need for certain types of weapons, thus creating a pool of surplus equipment. These surplus weapons could potentially be used by other Department sites and Federal law enforcement agencies. Recent Office of Inspector General reports have raised concerns with the adequacy of controls related to defensive and tactical equipment. For example, our report on Management Controls Over Defense Related High Risk Property (OAS-M-08-06, April 2008) found that administrative controls over certain defense related high risk property were not sufficient for providing accountability over these items. Because of prior reported weaknesses in controls over defensive and tactical equipment, we initiated this audit to determine whether the Department and its contractors were properly managing excess weapons inventories and selected sensitive equipment used by protective forces. Our review disclosed that the Department was not always properly managing its inventories of excess weapons and selected sensitive equipment. We identified issues with the retention of unneeded weapons at many locations and with the identification and tracking of sensitive items. More specifically: Sites maintained large inventories of weapons that were no longer needed but had not been made available for use by either other Departmental sites or other Federal law enforcement agencies. For instance, at six of the locations included in our review we identified a total of 2,635 unneeded weapons with a total acquisition value of over $2.8 million that had not been officially declared as excess - an action that would have made them available for others to use

  4. Special article: personal protective equipment for care of pandemic influenza patients: a training workshop for the powered air purifying respirator.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, Bonnie M; Kerchberger, John P

    2010-10-01

    Virulent respiratory infectious diseases may present a life-threatening risk for health care professionals during aerosol-generating procedures, including endotracheal intubation. The 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) brings this concern to the immediate forefront. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have stated that, when performing or participating in aerosol-generating procedures on patients with virulent contagious respiratory diseases, health care professionals must wear a minimum of the N95 respirator, and they may wish to consider using the powered air purifying respirator (PAPR). For influenza and other diseases transmitted by both respiratory and contact modes, protective respirators must be combined with contact precautions. The PAPR provides 2.5 to 100 times greater protection than the N95, when used within the context of an Occupational Safety and Health Administration-compliant respiratory protection program. The relative protective capability of a respirator is quantified using the assigned protection factor. The level of protection designated by the APF can only be achieved with appropriate training and correct use of the respirator. Face seal leakage limits the protective capability of the N95 respirator, and fit testing does not assure the ability to maintain a tight face seal. The protective capability of the PAPR will be defeated by improper handling of contaminated equipment, incorrect assembly and maintenance, and improper don (put on) and doff (take off) procedures. Stress, discomfort, and physical encumbrance may impair performance. Acclimatization through training will mitigate these effects. Training in the use of PAPRs in advance of their need is strongly advised. "Just in time" training is unlikely to provide adequate preparation for groups of practitioners requiring specialized personal protective equipment during a pandemic. Employee health departments in hospitals may not presently have a PAPR training program in place

  5. Determinants of personal protective equipment (PPE) use in UK motorcyclists: exploratory research applying an extended theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Norris, Emma; Myers, Lynn

    2013-11-01

    Despite evident protective value of motorcycle personal protective equipment (PPE), no research has assessed considerations behind its uptake in UK riders. A cross-sectional online questionnaire design was employed, with riders (n=268) recruited from online motorcycle forums. Principal component analysis found four PPE behavioural outcomes. Theoretical factors of intentions, attitudes, injunctive and descriptive subjective norms, risk perceptions, anticipated regret, benefits and habit were also identified for further analysis. High motorcycle jacket, trousers and boots wear, middling high-visibility wear and low non-Personal Protective Equipment wear were found. Greater intentions, anticipated regret and perceived benefits were significantly associated with increased motorcycle jacket, trousers and boots wear, with habit presence and scooter use significantly associated with increased high-visibility wear. Lower intentions, anticipated regret and risk perceptions, being female, not holding a car licence and urban riding were significantly associated with increased non-PPE wear. A need for freedom of choice and mixed attitudes towards PPE use were evident in additional comments. PPE determinants in this sample provide a preliminary basis for future uptake interventions. Larger scale and qualitative research is needed to further investigate relevant constructs.

  6. Determinants of personal protective equipment (PPE) use in UK motorcyclists: exploratory research applying an extended theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Norris, Emma; Myers, Lynn

    2013-11-01

    Despite evident protective value of motorcycle personal protective equipment (PPE), no research has assessed considerations behind its uptake in UK riders. A cross-sectional online questionnaire design was employed, with riders (n=268) recruited from online motorcycle forums. Principal component analysis found four PPE behavioural outcomes. Theoretical factors of intentions, attitudes, injunctive and descriptive subjective norms, risk perceptions, anticipated regret, benefits and habit were also identified for further analysis. High motorcycle jacket, trousers and boots wear, middling high-visibility wear and low non-Personal Protective Equipment wear were found. Greater intentions, anticipated regret and perceived benefits were significantly associated with increased motorcycle jacket, trousers and boots wear, with habit presence and scooter use significantly associated with increased high-visibility wear. Lower intentions, anticipated regret and risk perceptions, being female, not holding a car licence and urban riding were significantly associated with increased non-PPE wear. A need for freedom of choice and mixed attitudes towards PPE use were evident in additional comments. PPE determinants in this sample provide a preliminary basis for future uptake interventions. Larger scale and qualitative research is needed to further investigate relevant constructs. PMID:24076303

  7. 30 CFR 75.705-8 - Protective equipment; testing and storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., once every 6 months; (4) Insulator hoods and line hose, once a year; and (5) Other electric protective... not in use, and line hose and insulator hoods shall be stored in their natural position and shape....

  8. 30 CFR 75.705-8 - Protective equipment; testing and storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., once every 6 months; (4) Insulator hoods and line hose, once a year; and (5) Other electric protective... not in use, and line hose and insulator hoods shall be stored in their natural position and shape....

  9. 30 CFR 75.705-8 - Protective equipment; testing and storage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., once every 6 months; (4) Insulator hoods and line hose, once a year; and (5) Other electric protective... not in use, and line hose and insulator hoods shall be stored in their natural position and shape....

  10. The development of technologies and devices for protection from noise generated by power equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, V. E.; Khomenok, L. A.; Yablonik, L. R.

    2010-01-01

    The main lines of currently conducted research and development activities on suppressing noise produced by power-generating equipment are presented. Matters related to preventing the occurrence of aeroacoustic self-excited vibrations, optimizing dissipative noise silencers, using structural methods for damping acoustic vibrations, suppressing low-frequency noise, and analyzing the effectiveness of soundproof coatings are considered. The process diagrams and parameters of devices for suppressing noise generated during discharge into the atmosphere of high-pressure gaseous media are discussed.

  11. The need for empirically derived permeation data for personal protective equipment: the death of Dr. Karen E. Wetterhahn.

    PubMed

    Blayney, M B

    2001-02-01

    Personal protective equipment (PPE) is an essential component in any occupational health and safety program. The appropriate selection and use of PPE can help prevent or limit exposure to hazardous materials. The inappropriate selection or use of PPE can lead to unnecessary exposure or --with extremely hazardous materials--serious harm including death. In 1997, Dr. Karen E. Wetterhahn died from mercury poisoning resulting from a single exposure to dimethylmercury almost a year before. Her death raised numerous questions as to how this tragedy occurred and what could be done to protect against a chemical as dangerous as dimethylmercury. This article provides a brief review of the case and discusses the glove permeation testing done during the course of the accident investigation. Using this case as an example, the author argues that all recommendations for PPE be based on empirical testing using accepted methods and that this information be readily available.

  12. Playing a Musical Instrument as a Protective Factor against Dementia and Cognitive Impairment: A Population-Based Twin Study

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Nancy L.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports that playing a musical instrument may benefit cognitive development and health at young ages. Whether playing an instrument provides protection against dementia has not been established. In a population-based cotwin control study, we examined the association between playing a musical instrument and whether or not the twins developed dementia or cognitive impairment. Participation in playing an instrument was taken from informant-based reports of twins' leisure activities. Dementia diagnoses were based on a complete clinical workup using standard diagnostic criteria. Among 157 twin pairs discordant for dementia and cognitive impairment, 27 pairs were discordant for playing an instrument. Controlling for sex, education, and physical activity, playing a musical instrument was significantly associated with less likelihood of dementia and cognitive impairment (odds ratio [OR] = 0.36 [95% confidence interval 0.13–0.99]). These findings support further consideration of music as a modifiable protective factor against dementia and cognitive impairment. PMID:25544932

  13. 40 CFR 201.22 - Measurement instrumentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Measurement instrumentation. 201.22... PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT; INTERSTATE RAIL CARRIERS Measurement Criteria § 201.22 Measurement instrumentation. (a) A sound level meter or alternate sound level...

  14. 40 CFR 201.22 - Measurement instrumentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Measurement instrumentation. 201.22... PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT; INTERSTATE RAIL CARRIERS Measurement Criteria § 201.22 Measurement instrumentation. (a) A sound level meter or alternate sound level...

  15. 40 CFR 201.22 - Measurement instrumentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Measurement instrumentation. 201.22... PROGRAMS NOISE EMISSION STANDARDS FOR TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT; INTERSTATE RAIL CARRIERS Measurement Criteria § 201.22 Measurement instrumentation. (a) A sound level meter or alternate sound level...

  16. 19 CFR 10.41 - Instruments; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Instruments; exceptions. 10.41 Section 10.41 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE... Traffic § 10.41 Instruments; exceptions. (a) Locomotives and other railroad equipment, trucks,...

  17. Evaluation of the efficiency of respiratory protective equipment based on the biological monitoring of styrene in fibreglass reinforced plastics industries.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shoji; Nishide, Tadashi; Horike, Tokushi; Kishimoto, Takumi; Kira, Shohei

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the efficiency of respiratory protective equipment in a fibreglass reinforced plastic factory by comparing results of environmental and biological monitoring of exposure to styrene. Five factories including 39 workers were investigated. Three types of respiratory protective equipment were tested: one was a half-mask air-purifying respirator equipped with a cartridge for organic solvents, another was a disposable gauze respirator impregnated with charcoal filter, and the third was a dust-proof respirator. The frequency of cartridge exchange of a half-mask respirator was twice a day only at one factory, and that was less than once a month at other factories. The site concentrations exceeded 20 ppm at 10 of the 82 sampling points (12.2%), and 22 of the 39 workers' (56.4%) personal exposure exceeded 20 ppm which is the current occupational exposure limit recommended by the Japan Society for Occupational Health. The efficiency of disposable gauze respirators and dust-proof respirators was low or rather zero. The average efficiency of half-mask respirators in which cartridges were exchanged twice a day and once a month was 83.6% and 46.6%, respectively. There was a significant disparity in the efficiency of the respirator depending on the frequency of cartridge exchange (p<0.05). Overall this study showed that even though a half-mask respirator is used and its cartridge is exchanged every half a day, workers exposed to a styrene concentration at or over 122 ppm are expected to inhale more than 20 ppm of styrene. PMID:15090688

  18. Protection of electrical and electronic equipment against lightning indirect effects on the Airbus A340 wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiller, Olaf

    1991-01-01

    The provisions applied to the Airbus A340 wing wiring against lightning indirect effects are presented. The construction and installation of the wiring's shielding systems are described, and the analysis and tests performed to determine the effectiveness of the measures taken are discussed. A first evaluation of the results of the theoretical analysis together with the provisional results of tests indicate a sufficient safety margin between required and achieved protection levels.

  19. Coatings for protection of equipment for biochemical processing of geothermal residues: Progress report FY`97

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.L.

    1997-11-01

    Thermal sprayed ethylene methacrylic acid (EMAA) and ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), spray-and-bake ETFE and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and brushable ceramic-epoxy coatings were evaluated for corrosion protection in a biochemical process to treat geothermal residues. Coupon, Atlas cell, peel strength, cathodic disbondment and abrasion tests were performed in aggressive environments including geothermal sludge, hypersaline brine and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus ferrooxidans) to determine suitability for protecting storage tanks and reaction vessels. It was found that all of the coatings were resistant to chemical attack and biodegradation at the test temperature of 55 C. The EMAA coatings protected 316L stainless steel from corrosion in coupon tests. However, corrosion of mild steel substrates thermal sprayed with EMAA and ETFE occurred in Atlas cell tests that simulated a lined reactor operating environment and this resulted in decreased adhesive strength. Peel tests to measure residual adhesion revealed that failure mode was dependent on exposure conditions. Abrasion tests showed that the ceramic-epoxy had good resistance to the abrasive effects of sludge. Thermal sprayed EMAA coatings also displayed abrasion resistance. Cathodic disbondment tests in brine at room temperature indicated that EMAA coatings are resistant to disbondment at applied potentials of {minus}780 to {minus}1,070 mV SCE for the test conditions and duration. Slight disbondment of one specimen occurred at a potential of {minus}1,500 mV SCE. The EMAA may be suited to use in conjunction with cathodic protection although further long-term, higher temperature testing would be needed.

  20. COATINGS FOR PROTECTION OF EQUIPMENT FOR BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSING OF GEOTHERMAL RESIDUES: PROGRESS REPORT FY 97

    SciTech Connect

    ALLAN,M.L.

    1997-11-01

    Thermal sprayed ethylene methacrylic acid (EMAA) and ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), spray-and-bake ETFE and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and brushable ceramic-epoxy coatings were evaluated for corrosion protection in a biochemical process to treat geothermal residues. The findings are also relevant to other moderate temperature brine environments where corrosion is a problem. Coupon, Atlas cell, peel strength, cathodic disbondment and abrasion tests were performed in aggressive environments including geothermal sludge, hypersaline brine and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobadus ferrooxidans) to determine suitability for protecting storage tanks and reaction vessels. It was found that all of the coatings were resistant to chemical attack and biodegradation at the test temperature of 55 C. The EMAA coatings protected 316L stainless steel from corrosion in coupon tests. However, corrosion of mild steel substrates thermal sprayed with EMAA and ETFE occurred in Atlas cell tests that simulated a lined reactor operating environment and this resulted in decreased adhesive strength. Peel tests to measure residual adhesion revealed that failure mode was dependent on exposure conditions. Long-term tests on the durability of ceramic-epoxy coatings in brine and bacteria are ongoing. Initial indications are that this coating has suitable characteristics. Abrasion tests showed that the ceramic-epoxy had good resistance to the abrasive effects of sludge. Thermal sprayed EMAA coatings also displayed abrasion resistance. Cathodic disbondment tests in brine at room temperature indicated that EMAA coatings are resistant to disbondment at applied potentials of {minus}780 to {minus}1,070 mV SCE for the test conditions and duration. Slight disbondment of one specimen occurred at a potential of {minus}1,500 mV SCE. The EMAA may be suited to use in conjunction with cathodic protection although further long-term, higher temperature testing would be needed.

  1. Automated space processing payloads study. Volume 3: Equipment development resource requirements. [instrument packages and the space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Facilities are described on which detailed preliminary design was undertaken and which may be used on early space shuttle missions in the 1979-1982 time-frame. The major hardware components making up each facility are identified, and development schedules for the major hardware items and the payload buildup are included. Cost data for the facilities, and the assumptions and ground rules supporting these data are given along with a recommended listing of supporting research and technology needed to ensure confidence in the ability to achieve successful development of the equipment and technology.

  2. Navy Safety Center data on the effects of fire protection systems on electrical equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Robert S.

    1991-04-01

    Records of the Navy Safety Center, Norfolk, VA were reviewed to find data relevant to inadvertant operation of installed fire extinguishing systems in civilian nuclear power plants. Navy data show the incidence of collateral fire or other damage by fresh water on operating electrical equipment in submarines and in shore facilities is about the same as the civilian experience, about 30 percent. Aboard surface ships, however, the collateral damage incidence in much lower, about 15 percent. With sea water, the collateral damage incidence is at least 75 percent. It is concluded that the fire extinguisher water has to be contaminated, as by rust in sprinkler systems or deposited salt spray, for most collateral damage to occur. Reasons for inadvertant operation (or advertant operation) of firex systems at shore facilities, submarines, and surface ships resemble those for nuclear power plants. Mechanical or electrical failures lead the list, followed by mishaps during maintenance. Detector and alarm system failures are significant problems at Navy shore facilities, and significant at nuclear power plants. Fixed halon and CO2 systems in shore facilities cause no collateral damage. Lists of individual Navy incidents with water and with halon and carbon dioxide are included as appendices.

  3. Development of a Digital Protection Relay Corresponding with a Multi-range Current Transformer for High Voltage Equipments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanayama, Tetsuya; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Hosotani, Koji; Fujita, Yoshito; Okitsu, Toshiyuki; Shirasuna, Hiroaki; Ookawa, Hisao; Sumitani, Kensaku; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi

    In the past, a current transformation ratio of a current transformer (CT) has been different for each facility corresponding with a rated current of a primary circuit in high voltage (6kV) equipments. By unifying specifications of a CT, there is no need to prepare a CT with various ratings corresponding with a capacity of a load facility, it becomes easier for consumers to modify facilities, and for manufacturers, it enables to standardize of a design and shorten a production period. Recently, it has been popular composition of a secondary circuit of a CT being connected with a digital protection relay bundled with protection and measurement functions not being connected with relays, meters and transducers separately. Because the composition enables to reduce a burden of a secondary circuit of a CT, reduction in size and weight of a CT is achieved and it also contributes to reduce a size of a cubicle and improve a mounting efficiency of a panel. We have developed a CT corresponding with a multi range input (a multi-range CT) and a digital protection relay utilizing its advantages which enable to standardize of a facility design and reduce a size of a cubicle, and report them in this paper.

  4. Protective Equipment and Player Characteristics Associated With the Incidence of Sport-Related Concussion in High School Football Players

    PubMed Central

    McGuine, Timothy A.; Hetzel, Scott; McCrea, Michael; Brooks, M. Alison

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of sport-related concussion (SRC) in high school football is well documented. However, limited prospective data are available regarding how player characteristics and protective equipment affect the incidence of SRC. Purpose To determine whether the type of protective equipment (helmet and mouth guard) and player characteristics affect the incidence of SRC in high school football players. Design Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods Certified athletic trainers (ATs) at each high school recorded the type of helmet worn (brand, model, purchase year, and recondition status) by each player as well as information regarding players’ demographics, type of mouth guard used, and history of SRC. The ATs also recorded the incidence and days lost from participation for each SRC. Incidence of SRC was compared for various helmets, type of mouth guard, history of SRC, and player demographics. Results A total of 2081 players (grades 9–12) enrolled during the 2012 and/or 2013 football seasons (2287 player-seasons) and participated in 134,437 football (practice or competition) exposures. Of these players, 206 (9%) sustained a total of 211 SRCs (1.56/1000 exposures). There was no difference in the incidence of SRC (number of helmets, % SRC [95% CI]) for players wearing Riddell (1171, 9.1% [7.6%–11.0%]), Schutt (680, 8.7% [6.7%–11.1%]), or Xenith (436, 9.2% [6.7%–12.4%]) helmets. Helmet age and recondition status did not affect the incidence of SRC. The rate of SRC (hazard ratio [HR]) was higher in players who wore a custom mouth guard (HR = 1.69 [95% CI, 1.20–2.37], P <.001) than in players who wore a generic mouth guard. The rate of SRC was also higher (HR = 1.96 [95% CI, 1.40–2.73], P <.001) in players who had sustained an SRC within the previous 12 months (15.1% of the 259 players [95% CI, 11.0%–20.1%]) than in players without a previous SRC (8.2% of the 2028 players [95% CI, 7.1%–9.5%]). Conclusion Incidence of SRC was similar

  5. Application of Spacesuit Glove Requirements Tools to Athletic and Personal Protective Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, Scott; Benson, Elizabeth; Melsoh, Miranda; Thompson, Shelby; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2010-01-01

    Despite decades of ongoing improvement, astronauts must still struggle with inhibited dexterity and accelerated fatigue due to the requirement of wearing a pressurized Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) glove. Recent research in the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center has focused on developing requirements for improvements in the design of the next generation of EVA glove. In the course of this research, it was decided to expand the scope of the testing to include a variety of commercially available athletic and consumer gloves to help provide a more recognizable comparison for investigators and designers to evaluate the current state of EVA glove mobility and strength. This comparison is being provided with the hope that innovative methods may help commercial development of gloves for various athletic and personal protective endeavors.

  6. The ground support equipment for the E-NIS instrument on-board the ESA-Euclid Dark Energy Mission in the baseline configuration presented in phase A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifoglio, Massimo; Gianotti, Fulvio; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Franceschi, Enrico; Nicastro, Luciano; Valenziano, Luca; Zerbi, Filippo Maria; Cimatti, Andrea

    2010-07-01

    Euclid is a high-precision survey mission to map the geometry of the Dark Universe. The Euclid Mission concept presented in the Assessment Phase Study Report1 was selected by ESA on February 2010 to undergo a competitive Definition Phase. Euclid is a candidate for launch in the first slice of the Cosmic Vision Plan (M1/M2), with a possible launch date of 2018. In this paper we refer to the instrument baseline configuration identified in the Assessment Phase. It consisted of a Korsch telescope with a primary mirror of 1.2 m diameter and a focal plane hosting 3 scientific instruments, each with a field of view of 0.5 deg2: (1) E-VIS: a CCD based optical imaging channel, (2) E-NIP: a NIR imaging photometry channel, and (3) E-NIS: a NIR slitless spectral channel. We present the conceptual design developed in the Assessment Phase study for the Ground Support Equipment required to support the assembly, integration and verification operations at instrument level for the E-NIS baseline configuration, with particular regards to the scientific and calibration activities.

  7. Piezoelectric Instruments of High Natural Frequency Vibration Characteristics and Protection Against Interference by Mass Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gohlka, Werner

    1943-01-01

    The exploration of the processes accompanying engine combustion demands quick-responding pressure-recording instruments, among which the piezoelectric type has found widespread use because of its especially propitious properties as vibration-recording instruments for high frequencies. Lacking appropriate test methods, the potential errors of piezoelectric recorders in dynamic measurements could only be estimated up to now. In the present report a test method is described by means of which the resonance curves of the piezoelectric pickup can be determined; hence an instrumental appraisal of the vibration characteristics of piezoelectric recorders is obtainable.

  8. National standards and code compliance for electrical equipment and instruments installed in hazardous locations for the cone penetrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bussell, J.H.

    1996-03-01

    The cone penetrometer is designed to measure the material properties of waste tank contents at the Hanford Site. The penetrometer system consists of a skid-mounted assembly, a penetrometer assembly (composed of a guide tube and a push rod), an active neutron moisture measurement probe, decontamination unit, and a support trailer containing a diesel-engine-driven hydraulic pump and a generator. The skid-mounted assembly is about 8 feet wide by 23 feet long and 15 feet high. Its nominal weight is about 40,000 pounds with the provisions to add up to 54,500 pounds of additional ballast. This document describes the cone penetrometer electrical instruments and how it complies with national standards.

  9. How Do I Know? A Guide to the Selection of Personal Protective Equipment for Use in Responding to A Release of Chemical Warfare Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, C.B.

    1999-05-01

    An incident involving chemical warfare agents requires a unique hazardous materials (HAZMAT) response. As with an HAZMAT event, federal regulations prescribe that responders must be protected from exposure to the chemical agents. But unlike other HAZMAT events, special considerations govern selection of personal protective equipment (PPE). PPE includes all clothing, respirators and monitoring devices used to respond to a chemical release. PPE can differ depending on whether responders are military or civilian personnel.

  10. Efficiency of radiation protection equipment in interventional radiology: a systematic Monte Carlo study of eye lens and whole body doses.

    PubMed

    Koukorava, C; Farah, J; Struelens, L; Clairand, I; Donadille, L; Vanhavere, F; Dimitriou, P

    2014-09-01

    Monte Carlo calculations were used to investigate the efficiency of radiation protection equipment in reducing eye and whole body doses during fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures. Eye lens doses were determined considering different models of eyewear with various shapes, sizes and lead thickness. The origin of scattered radiation reaching the eyes was also assessed to explain the variation in the protection efficiency of the different eyewear models with exposure conditions. The work also investigates the variation of eye and whole body doses with ceiling-suspended shields of various shapes and positioning. For all simulations, a broad spectrum of configurations typical for most interventional procedures was considered. Calculations showed that 'wrap around' glasses are the most efficient eyewear models reducing, on average, the dose by 74% and 21% for the left and right eyes respectively. The air gap between the glasses and the eyes was found to be the primary source of scattered radiation reaching the eyes. The ceiling-suspended screens were more efficient when positioned close to the patient's skin and to the x-ray field. With the use of such shields, the Hp(10) values recorded at the collar, chest and waist level and the Hp(3) values for both eyes were reduced on average by 47%, 37%, 20% and 56% respectively. Finally, simulations proved that beam quality and lead thickness have little influence on eye dose while beam projection, the position and head orientation of the operator as well as the distance between the image detector and the patient are key parameters affecting eye and whole body doses. PMID:24938591

  11. Disinfecting personal protective equipment with pulsed xenon ultraviolet as a risk mitigation strategy for health care workers.

    PubMed

    Jinadatha, Chetan; Simmons, Sarah; Dale, Charles; Ganachari-Mallappa, Nagaraja; Villamaria, Frank Charles; Goulding, Nicole; Tanner, Benjamin; Stachowiak, Julie; Stibich, Mark

    2015-04-01

    The doffing of personal protective equipment (PPE) after contamination with pathogens such as Ebola poses a risk to health care workers. Pulsed xenon ultraviolet (PX-UV) disinfection has been used to disinfect surfaces in hospital settings. This study examined the impact of PX-UV disinfection on an Ebola surrogate virus on glass carriers and PPE material to examine the potential benefits of using PX-UV to decontaminate PPE while worn, thereby reducing the pathogen load prior to doffing. Ultraviolet (UV) safety and coverage tests were also conducted. PX-UV exposure resulted in a significant reduction in viral load on glass carriers and PPE materials. Occupational Safety and Health Administration-defined UV exposure limits were not exceeded during PPE disinfection. Predoffing disinfection with PX-UV has potential as an additive measure to the doffing practice guidelines. The PX-UV disinfection should not be considered sterilization; all PPE should still be considered contaminated and doffed and disposed of according to established protocols.

  12. What do firefighters desire from the next generation of personal protective equipment? Outcomes from an international survey

    PubMed Central

    LEE, Joo-Young; PARK, Joonhee; PARK, Huiju; COCA, Aitor; KIM, Jung-Hyun; TAYLOR, Nigel A.S.; SON, Su-Young; TOCHIHARA, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate smart features required for the next generation of personal protective equipment (PPE) for firefighters in Australia, Korea, Japan, and the USA. Questionnaire responses were obtained from 167 Australian, 351 Japanese, 413 Korean, and 763 U.S. firefighters (1,611 males and 61 females). Preferences concerning smart features varied among countries, with 27% of Korean and 30% of U.S. firefighters identifying ‘a location monitoring system’ as the most important element. On the other hand, 43% of Japanese firefighters preferred ‘an automatic body cooling system’ while 21% of the Australian firefighters selected equally ‘an automatic body cooling system’ and ‘a wireless communication system’. When asked to rank these elements in descending priority, responses across these countries were very similar with the following items ranked highest: ‘a location monitoring system’, ‘an automatic body cooling system’, ‘a wireless communication system’, and ‘a vision support system’. The least preferred elements were ‘an automatic body warming system’ and ‘a voice recording system’. No preferential relationship was apparent for age, work experience, gender or anthropometric characteristics. These results have implications for the development of the next generation of PPE along with the international standardisation of the smart PPE. PMID:26027710

  13. Skin sites to predict deep-body temperature while wearing firefighters' personal protective equipment during periodical changes in air temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Siyeon; Lee, Joo-Young

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate stable and valid measurement sites of skin temperatures as a non-invasive variable to predict deep-body temperature while wearing firefighters' personal protective equipment (PPE) during air temperature changes. Eight male firefighters participated in an experiment which consisted of 60-min exercise and 10-min recovery while wearing PPE without self-contained breathing apparatus (7.75 kg in total PPE mass). Air temperature was periodically fluctuated from 29.5 to 35.5 °C with an amplitude of 6 °C. Rectal temperature was chosen as a deep-body temperature, and 12 skin temperatures were recorded. The results showed that the forehead and chest were identified as the most valid sites to predict rectal temperature (R(2) = 0.826 and 0.824, respectively) in an environment with periodically fluctuated air temperatures. This study suggests that particular skin temperatures are valid as a non-invasive variable when predicting rectal temperature of an individual wearing PPE in changing ambient temperatures. Practitioner Summary: This study should offer assistance for developing a more reliable indirect indicating system of individual heat strain for firefighters in real time, which can be used practically as a precaution of firefighters' heat-related illness and utilised along with physiological monitoring.

  14. Safety climate and use of personal protective equipment and safety medical devices among home care and hospice nurses.

    PubMed

    Leiss, Jack K

    2014-01-01

    Use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and safety medical devices is mandated for healthcare workers to reduce the risk of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) from exposure to patients' blood. Research has shown that a strong safety climate may promote increased use of PPE. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the association between safety climate and use of PPE among homecare/hospice nurses in North Carolina. To this end, a mail survey was conducted in 2006. The response rate, adjusted on the assumption that the proportion of eligible nurses from among those who did not return the questionnaire or could not be contacted was similar to the proportion among those who did return the questionnaire, was 69% (n=833 eligibles). The percentage of nurses who used the specified PPE was two to three times greater among nurses who had a strong safety climate. Safety climate was only weakly associated with using safety devices. These results suggest that improving safety climate may be a powerful tool for increasing use of PPE. PMID:25055845

  15. What do firefighters desire from the next generation of personal protective equipment? Outcomes from an international survey.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Young; Park, Joonhee; Park, Huiju; Coca, Aitor; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Taylor, Nigel A S; Son, Su-Young; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate smart features required for the next generation of personal protective equipment (PPE) for firefighters in Australia, Korea, Japan, and the USA. Questionnaire responses were obtained from 167 Australian, 351 Japanese, 413 Korean, and 763 U.S. firefighters (1,611 males and 61 females). Preferences concerning smart features varied among countries, with 27% of Korean and 30% of U.S. firefighters identifying 'a location monitoring system' as the most important element. On the other hand, 43% of Japanese firefighters preferred 'an automatic body cooling system' while 21% of the Australian firefighters selected equally 'an automatic body cooling system' and 'a wireless communication system'. When asked to rank these elements in descending priority, responses across these countries were very similar with the following items ranked highest: 'a location monitoring system', 'an automatic body cooling system', 'a wireless communication system', and 'a vision support system'. The least preferred elements were 'an automatic body warming system' and 'a voice recording system'. No preferential relationship was apparent for age, work experience, gender or anthropometric characteristics. These results have implications for the development of the next generation of PPE along with the international standardisation of the smart PPE. PMID:26027710

  16. The education and practice program for medical students with quantitative and qualitative fit test for respiratory protective equipment

    PubMed Central

    MYONG, Jun-Pyo; BYUN, JunSu; CHO, YounMo; SEO, Hye-Kyung; BAEK, Jung-Eun; KOO, Jung-Wan; KIM, Hyunwook

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis infection is prevalent in Korea and health care workers are vulnerable to tuberculosis infection in the hospital. The aims of this study were to develop and validate an education program that teaches senior medical students how to wear and choose the proper size and type of respiratory protective equipment (RPE), which may help reduce the risk of contracting Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) from patients. Overall, 50 senior medical students participated in this education program. Methods of choosing the proper type of RPE, performing a fit check of the RPE, and choosing a suitable mask size were taught by certified instructors using the real-time quantitative fit test (QNFT). The validity of education program was evaluated with qualitative fit test (QLFT) before and after the education as pass or fail. The education program was effective, as shown by the significantly pass rate (increased 30 to 74%) in the QLFT after the education program (p<0.05). Among study participants, changing mask size from medium to small significantly increased the pass rate (p<0.001). Incorporation of this program into the medical school curriculum may help reduce risk of MTB infection in medical students working in the hospital. PMID:26538001

  17. Chemical exposure reduction: Factors impacting on South African herbicide sprayers' personal protective equipment compliance and high risk work practices.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Rivas, Federico; Rother, Hanna-Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The high exposure risks of workers to herbicides in low- and middle-income countries is an important public health concern because of the potential resulting negative impacts on workers' health. This study investigated workers' personal protective equipment (PPE) compliance as a risk mitigation measure; particularly workers who apply herbicides for Working for Water (WfW) - a South African invasive alien vegetation control programme. The study aim was to understand workers' low PPE compliance by analysing their risk perceptions of herbicide use, working conditions and socio-cultural context. Research methods included ethnographic observations, informal interviews, visual media, questionnaires and a focus group. Study results indicated that low PPE compliance persists despite workers' awareness of herbicide exposure risks and as a result of the influence from workers' socio-cultural context (i.e. gender dynamics and social status), herbicide risk perceptions and working conditions (i.e. environmental and logistical). Interestingly, teams comprised of mostly women had the highest compliance rate. These findings highlighted that given the complexity of PPE compliance, especially in countries with several economic and social constraints, exposure reduction interventions should not rely solely on PPE use promotion. Instead, other control strategies requiring less worker input for effectiveness should be implemented, such as elimination and substitution of highly hazardous pesticides, and altering application methods. PMID:26093240

  18. Chemical exposure reduction: Factors impacting on South African herbicide sprayers' personal protective equipment compliance and high risk work practices.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Rivas, Federico; Rother, Hanna-Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The high exposure risks of workers to herbicides in low- and middle-income countries is an important public health concern because of the potential resulting negative impacts on workers' health. This study investigated workers' personal protective equipment (PPE) compliance as a risk mitigation measure; particularly workers who apply herbicides for Working for Water (WfW) - a South African invasive alien vegetation control programme. The study aim was to understand workers' low PPE compliance by analysing their risk perceptions of herbicide use, working conditions and socio-cultural context. Research methods included ethnographic observations, informal interviews, visual media, questionnaires and a focus group. Study results indicated that low PPE compliance persists despite workers' awareness of herbicide exposure risks and as a result of the influence from workers' socio-cultural context (i.e. gender dynamics and social status), herbicide risk perceptions and working conditions (i.e. environmental and logistical). Interestingly, teams comprised of mostly women had the highest compliance rate. These findings highlighted that given the complexity of PPE compliance, especially in countries with several economic and social constraints, exposure reduction interventions should not rely solely on PPE use promotion. Instead, other control strategies requiring less worker input for effectiveness should be implemented, such as elimination and substitution of highly hazardous pesticides, and altering application methods.

  19. Utility of a Novel Reflective Marker Visualized by Flash Photography for Assessment of Personnel Contamination During Removal of Personal Protective Equipment.

    PubMed

    Tomas, Myreen E; Cadnum, Jennifer L; Mana, Thriveen S C; Jencson, Annette L; Koganti, Sreelatha; Alhmidi, Heba; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Sunkesula, Venkata C K; Donskey, Curtis J

    2016-06-01

    In an experimental study, the frequency of contamination of healthcare personnel during removal of contaminated personal protective equipment (PPE) was similar for bacteriophage MS2 and a novel reflective marker visualized using flash photography. The reflective marker could be a useful tool to visualize and document personnel contamination during PPE removal. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:711-713. PMID:26976219

  20. Aircraft Instrument, Fire Protection, Warning, Communication, Navigation and Cabin Atmosphere Control System (Course Outline), Aviation Mechanics 3 (Air Frame): 9067.04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This document presents an outline for a 135-hour course designed to familiarize the student with manipulative skills and theoretical knowledge concerning aircraft instrument systems like major flight and engine instruments; fire protection and fire fighting systems; warning systems and navigation systems; aircraft cabin control systems, such as…

  1. Is the Global Solar UV Index an Effective Instrument for Promoting Sun Protection? A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Italia, Nadia; Rehfuess, Eva A.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is an important risk factor for skin cancer. The Global Solar Ultraviolet Index (UVI) was developed as a tool to visualize the amount of harmful radiation and to encourage people to use sun protection. We conducted a systematic review of the effectiveness of the UVI. We employed a comprehensive search strategy to…

  2. Development of an instrument to understand the child protective services decision-making process, with a focus on placement decisions.

    PubMed

    Dettlaff, Alan J; Christopher Graham, J; Holzman, Jesse; Baumann, Donald J; Fluke, John D

    2015-11-01

    When children come to the attention of the child welfare system, they become involved in a decision-making process in which decisions are made that have a significant effect on their future and well-being. The decision to remove children from their families is particularly complex; yet surprisingly little is understood about this decision-making process. This paper presents the results of a study to develop an instrument to explore, at the caseworker level, the context of the removal decision, with the objective of understanding the influence of the individual and organizational factors on this decision, drawing from the Decision Making Ecology as the underlying rationale for obtaining the measures. The instrument was based on the development of decision-making scales used in prior decision-making studies and administered to child protection caseworkers in several states. Analyses included reliability analyses, principal components analyses, and inter-correlations among the resulting scales. For one scale regarding removal decisions, a principal components analysis resulted in the extraction of two components, jointly identified as caseworkers' decision-making orientation, described as (1) an internal reference to decision-making and (2) an external reference to decision-making. Reliability analyses demonstrated acceptable to high internal consistency for 9 of the 11 scales. Full details of the reliability analyses, principal components analyses, and inter-correlations among the seven scales are discussed, along with implications for practice and the utility of this instrument to support the understanding of decision-making in child welfare.

  3. Lightning Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Kit-built airplanes are more affordable because they are assembled by the owner and do not require Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification. The Glasair III, is an advanced technology homebuilt, constructed of a fiberglass and graphite fiber composite material, and equipped with digital instruments. Both technologies make the airplane more susceptible to lightning effects. When Glasair manufacturer, Stoddard-Hamilton, decided that lightning protection would enable more extensive instrument flight and make the plane more marketable, they proposed a joint development program to NASA Langley Research Center (LAR). Under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, Langley contractors designed and tested a lightning protection system, and the Glasair III-LP became the first kit-built composite aircraft to be lightning tested and protection-verified under FAA guidelines for general aviation aircraft.

  4. Aging assessment of reactor instrumentation and protection system components. Aging-related operating experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Gehl, A.C.; Hagen, E.W.

    1992-07-01

    A study of the aging-related operating experiences throughout a five-year period (1984--1988) of six generic instrumentation modules (indicators, sensors, controllers, transmitters, annunciators, and recorders) was performed as a part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. The effects of aging from operational and environmental stressors were characterized from results depicted in Licensee Event Reports (LERs). The data are graphically displayed as frequency of events per plant year for operating plant ages from 1 to 28 years to determine aging-related failure trend patterns. Three main conclusions were drawn from this study: (1) Instrumentation and control (I&C) modules make a modest contribution to safety-significant events: 17% of LERs issued during 1984--1988 dealt with malfunctions of the six I&C modules studied, and 28% of the LERs dealing with these I&C module malfunctions were aging related (other studies show a range 25--50%); (2) Of the six modules studied, indicators, sensors, and controllers account for the bulk (83%) of aging-related failures; and (3) Infant mortality appears to be the dominant aging-related failure mode for most I&C module categories (with the exception of annunciators and recorders, which appear to fail randomly).

  5. Aerial monitoring and environmental protection: aerial photography as an instrument for checking landscape damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartara, Patrizia

    2009-09-01

    C.N.R. and University of Salento have realized a Geographical Information System for heritage management of the national territory (landscape) and historical urban settlements. Informations come from bibliography, archives, direct and systematic field survey, different kind of aerial photographs analysis, with the primary aim of knowledge for the establishment of an in existence Cultural Heritage Cadastre, focused to legal protection and exploitation of the sites, not last the correct territory planning.

  6. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart I of... - Non-Mandatory Guidelines for Hazard Assessment, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Selection...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... conjunction with engineering controls, guards, and safe work practices and procedures. 2. Assessment and..., insulators, electricians, machinists, mobile equipment mechanics and repairers, plumbers and ship...

  7. Pattern of use of personal protective equipments and measures during application of pesticides by agricultural workers in a rural area of Ahmednagar district, India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhoopendra; Gupta, Mudit Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Background: Pesticides, despite their known toxicity, are widely used in developing countries for agricultural purposes. Objectives: To find various patterns of hardware use for spraying of insecticides, prevalent storage practice adopted by the user, types of personal protective equipments used for the handling of chemicals; to detect dangerous practices and the extent to which safety norms being followed by the users during the application/treatments, and finally their knowledge concerning the risks of pesticides. Materials and Methods: The agriculture workers who had been involved in pesticide application for agricultural purpose were interviewed face-to-face to gain information on the following determinants of pesticide exposure: Types, treatment equipment, use of personal protection and safety measures during the application/treatments and knowledge of the risks of pesticide exposure. Results: Hundred workers, aged between 21 and 60 years old, were included. Pesticides were mostly applied with manual equipment using Knapsack (70%) and only 5% farmers were using Tractor-mounted sprayer. Workers frequently performed tasks involving additional exposure to pesticides (mixing chemicals, 66%, or washing equipment, 65%). Majority of the workers/applicators used no personal protection measures or used it defectively/partially. Most of the workers/respondents (77%) did not bother for safety and health risks of pesticide exposure. Conclusions: Workers involved in pesticide application use personal protection measures very poorly and defectively. Almost half of the applicators were not following right direction with respect to wind direction while spraying, thus it increase the risk of exposure. There is a clear need to develop specific training and prevention programs for these workers. The determinants of pesticide exposure in agricultural workers described in this study should be properly assessed in epidemiological studies of the health effects of pesticides on

  8. 30 CFR 57.14130 - Roll-over protective structures (ROPS) and seat belts for surface equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirement of SAE J386, “Operator Restraint System for Off-Road Work Machines” (1985, 1993, or 1997), or SAE...) Over-the-road type tractors that pull trailers or vans on highways; (iii) Equipment that is only... CFR 57.9088 (1986 edition) shall be considered in compliance with paragraphs (b) and (h) of...

  9. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart I of... - Non-Mandatory Guidelines for Hazard Assessment, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Selection...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... contact lenses must also wear appropriate eye and face protection devices in a hazardous environment. It... contact lens wearers. (g) Caution should be exercised in the use of metal frame protective devices in...). Glare Poor vision Spectacles with shaded or special-purpose lenses, as suitable. See notes (9),...

  10. Performance criteria guideline for three explosion protection methods of electrical equipment rated up to 15,000 volts AC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linley, L. J.; Luper, A. B.; Dunn, J. H.

    1982-12-01

    The Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, is reviewing explosion protection methods for use in gassy coal mines. This performance criteria guideline is an evaluation of three explosion protection methods of machines electrically powered with voltages up to 15,000 volts ac. A sufficient amount of basic research has been accomplished to verify that the explosion proof and pressurized enclosure methods can provide adequate explosion protection with the present state of the art up to 15,000 volts ac. This routine application of the potted enclosure as a stand alone protection method requires further investigation or development in order to clarify performance criteria and verification certification requirements. An extensive literature search, a series of high voltage tests, and a design evaluation of the three explosion protection methods indicate that the explosion proof, pressurized, and potted enclosures can all be used to enclose up to 15,000 volts ac.

  11. Performance criteria guideline for three explosion protection methods of electrical equipment rated up to 15,000 volts AC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linley, L. J.; Luper, A. B.; Dunn, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior, is reviewing explosion protection methods for use in gassy coal mines. This performance criteria guideline is an evaluation of three explosion protection methods of machines electrically powered with voltages up to 15,000 volts ac. A sufficient amount of basic research has been accomplished to verify that the explosion proof and pressurized enclosure methods can provide adequate explosion protection with the present state of the art up to 15,000 volts ac. This routine application of the potted enclosure as a stand alone protection method requires further investigation or development in order to clarify performance criteria and verification certification requirements. An extensive literature search, a series of high voltage tests, and a design evaluation of the three explosion protection methods indicate that the explosion proof, pressurized, and potted enclosures can all be used to enclose up to 15,000 volts ac.

  12. GRAAL - Griggs-type Apparatus equipped with Acoustics in the Laboratory: a new instrument to explore the rheology of rocks at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, A.; Champallier, R.; Precigout, J.; Pinquier, Y.; Ferrand, T. P.; Incel, S.; Hilairet, N.; Labrousse, L.; Renner, J.; Green, H. W., II; Stunitz, H.; Jolivet, L.

    2015-12-01

    Two new generation solid-medium Griggs-type apparatus have been set up at the Laboratoire de Géologie of ENS PARIS, and the Institut des Sciences de la Terre d'Orléans (ISTO). These new set-ups allow to perform controlled rock deformation experiments on large volume samples, up to 5 GPa and 1300°C. Careful pressure - stress calibration will be performed (using D-DIA and/or Paterson-type experiments as standards), strain-stress-pressure will be measured using modern techniques and state of the art salt assemblies. Focusing on rheology, the pressure vessel at ISTO has been designed in a goal of deforming large sample diameter (8 mm) at confining pressure of up to 3 GPa. Thanks to this large sample size, this new vessel will allow to explore the microstructures related to the deformation processes occurring at pressures of the deep lithosphere and in subduction zones. In this new apparatus, we moreover included a room below the pressure vessel in order to develop a basal load cell as close as possible to the sample. This new design, in progress, aims at significantly improving the accuracy of stress measurements in the Griggs-type apparatus. The ultimate goal is to set up a new technique able to routinely quantify the rheology of natural rocks between 0.5 and 5 GPa. Although fundamental to document the rheology of the lithosphere, such a technique is still missing in rock mechanics. Focusing on the evolution of physical and mechanical properties during mineral phase transformations, the vessel at ENS is equipped with continuous acoustic emission (AE) multi-sensor monitoring in order to "listen" to the sample during deformation. Indeed, these continuous recordings enable to detect regular AE like signals during dynamic crack propagation, as well as non-impulsive signals, which might be instrumental to identify laboratory analogs to non-volcanic tremor and low frequency earthquake signals. P and S elastic wave velocities will also be measured contemporaneously during

  13. Radiology Preparedness in Ebola Virus Disease: Guidelines and Challenges for Disinfection of Medical Imaging Equipment for the Protection of Staff and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Palmore, Tara N.; Folio, Les R.; Bluemke, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The overlap of early Ebola virus disease (EVD) symptoms (eg, fever, headache, abdominal pain, diarrhea, emesis, and fatigue) with symptoms of other more common travel-related diseases (eg, malaria, typhoid fever, pneumonia, and meningococcemia) may result in delayed diagnosis of EVD before isolation of infected patients. Radiology departments should consider policies for and approaches to decontamination of expensive and potentially easily damaged radiology equipment. In addition, the protection of radiology personnel must be considered during the work-up phase of undiagnosed EVD patients presenting to emergency departments. The purpose of this article is to consider the effect of EVD on radiology departments and imaging equipment, with particular consideration of guidelines currently available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that may be applicable to radiology. © RSNA, 2015 PMID:25654616

  14. Appropriate use of personal protective equipment among healthcare workers in public sector hospitals and primary healthcare polyclinics during the SARS outbreak in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Chia, S; Koh, D; Fones, C; Qian, F; Ng, V; Tan, B; Wong, K; Chew, W; Tang, H; Ng, W; Muttakin, Z; Emmanuel, S; Fong, N; Koh, G; Lim, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Singapore was affected by an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) from 25 February to 31 May 2003, with 238 probable cases and 33 deaths. Aims: To study usage of personal protective equipment (PPE) among three groups of healthcare workers (HCWs: doctors, nurses, and administrative staff), to determine if the appropriate PPE were used by the different groups and to examine the factors that may determine inappropriate use. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire survey of 14 554 HCWs in nine healthcare settings, which included tertiary care hospitals, community hospitals, and polyclinics, was carried out in May–July 2003. Only doctors, nurses, and clerical staff were selected for subsequent analysis. Results: A total of 10 236 valid questionnaires were returned (70.3% response); 873 doctors, 4404 nurses, and 921 clerical staff were studied. A total of 32.5% of doctors, 48.7% of nurses, and 77.1% of the administrative staff agreed that paper and/or surgical masks were "useful in protecting from contracting SARS". Among this group, 23.6% of doctors and 42.3% of nurses reported working with SARS patients. The view that a paper and/or surgical mask was adequate protection against SARS was held by 33.3% of doctors and 55.9% of nurses working at the A&E unit, 30.5% of doctors and 49.4% of nurses from medical wards, and 27.5% of doctors and 37.1% of nurses from intensive care units. Factors which predicted for agreement that paper and/or surgical masks were protective against SARS, included HCW's job title, reported contact with SARS patients, area of work, and Impact Events Scale scores. Conclusion: A variety of factors determine appropriate use of personal protective equipment by HCWs in the face of a major SARS outbreak. PMID:15961624

  15. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart I to... - Non-mandatory Compliance Guidelines for Hazard Assessment and Personal Protective Equipment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibility of the safety officer to exercise common sense and appropriate expertise to accomplish these tasks... selecting head protection, knowledge of potential electrical hazards is important. Class A helmets,...

  16. Project FIRES - Firefighters Integrated Response Equipment System. Volume 3: Protective Ensemble Design and Procurement Specification, Phase 1B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeles, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Each of the subsystems comprising the protective ensemble for firefighters is described. These include: (1) the garment system which includes turnout gear, helmets, faceshields, coats, pants, gloves, and boots; (2) the self-contained breathing system; (3) the lighting system; and (4) the communication system. The design selection rationale is discussed and the drawings used to fabricate the prototype ensemble are provided. The specifications presented were developed using the requirements and test method of the protective ensemble standard. Approximate retail prices are listed.

  17. 46 CFR 154.1335 - Pressure and vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pressure and vacuum protection. 154.1335 Section 154... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1335 Pressure and vacuum protection. (a) Each cargo tank must have the...) Has remote readouts at the cargo control station. (2) If vacuum protection is required under §...

  18. 46 CFR 154.1335 - Pressure and vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pressure and vacuum protection. 154.1335 Section 154... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1335 Pressure and vacuum protection. (a) Each cargo tank must have the...) Has remote readouts at the cargo control station. (2) If vacuum protection is required under §...

  19. 46 CFR 154.1335 - Pressure and vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pressure and vacuum protection. 154.1335 Section 154... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1335 Pressure and vacuum protection. (a) Each cargo tank must have the...) Has remote readouts at the cargo control station. (2) If vacuum protection is required under §...

  20. 46 CFR 154.1335 - Pressure and vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pressure and vacuum protection. 154.1335 Section 154... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1335 Pressure and vacuum protection. (a) Each cargo tank must have the...) Has remote readouts at the cargo control station. (2) If vacuum protection is required under §...

  1. 46 CFR 154.1335 - Pressure and vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pressure and vacuum protection. 154.1335 Section 154... Equipment Instrumentation § 154.1335 Pressure and vacuum protection. (a) Each cargo tank must have the...) Has remote readouts at the cargo control station. (2) If vacuum protection is required under §...

  2. The Possibility of Decreasing 50-Hz Electric Field Exposure near 400-kV Power Lines with Arc Flash Personal Protective Equipment.

    PubMed

    Korpinen, Leena; Pirkkalainen, Herkko; Heiskanen, Timo; Pääkkönen, Rauno

    2016-01-01

    Various guidelines for the protection of human beings against possible adverse effects resulting from exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) have been published with a view towards continual improvement; therefore, decreasing exposure is an important research area. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of decreasing electric field exposure with arc flash rated personal protective equipment (PPE), which in this case was a set of coveralls, and to compare the measurement results to calculations using the helmet-mask measuring system. We collected the data under a 400-kV power line. The test person stood on isolated aluminum paper, and the current between the ground and the aluminum paper was measured. When the test subject wore the arc flash PPE, the current to the ground was only 9.5% of the current measured when wearing normal clothes, which represents a clear decrease in exposure. PMID:27669278

  3. ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICE ON USING OF PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT IN RATTAN CRAFTSMEN AT TRADE VILLAGE, KIENXUONG DISTRICT, THAIBINH PROVINCE, VIETNAM

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Cong Dat; Siriwong, Wattasit; Robson, Mark G

    2010-01-01

    The knowledge, attitude and practice on using personal protective equipment (PPE) of rattan craftsmen to protect themselves from health effect related to sulfur dioxide exposure in Thuong Hien trade village at Kienxuong district, Thaibinh province, Vietnam was conducted using cross-sectional analytic study. The rattan craftsmen (n=403) were interviewed by face to face questionnaire. The results indicated that the level of good knowledge and good attitude was low equal 3.72% and 4.22% respectively. The prevalence of using respirator (face mask) was only 29.00 %. The intervention tools, therefore, should be developed for enhancing the knowledge and attitude while the training for using of respirator and other PPEs should be continuously offered for rattan craftsmen workers. PMID:21614140

  4. The Possibility of Decreasing 50-Hz Electric Field Exposure near 400-kV Power Lines with Arc Flash Personal Protective Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Korpinen, Leena; Pirkkalainen, Herkko; Heiskanen, Timo; Pääkkönen, Rauno

    2016-01-01

    Various guidelines for the protection of human beings against possible adverse effects resulting from exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) have been published with a view towards continual improvement; therefore, decreasing exposure is an important research area. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of decreasing electric field exposure with arc flash rated personal protective equipment (PPE), which in this case was a set of coveralls, and to compare the measurement results to calculations using the helmet-mask measuring system. We collected the data under a 400-kV power line. The test person stood on isolated aluminum paper, and the current between the ground and the aluminum paper was measured. When the test subject wore the arc flash PPE, the current to the ground was only 9.5% of the current measured when wearing normal clothes, which represents a clear decrease in exposure. PMID:27669278

  5. Improving eye safety in citrus harvest crews through the acceptance of personal protective equipment, community-based participatory research, social marketing, and community health workers.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Aguilar, J Antonio; Monaghan, Paul F; Bryant, Carol A; Esposito, Andrew; Wade, Mark; Ruiz, Omar; McDermott, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    For the last 10 years, the Partnership for Citrus Workers Health (PCWH) has been an evidence-based intervention program that promotes the adoption of protective eye safety equipment among Spanish-speaking farmworkers of Florida. At the root of this program is the systematic use of community-based preventive marketing (CBPM) and the training of community health workers (CHWs) among citrus harvester using popular education. CBPM is a model that combines the organizational system of community-based participatory research (CBPR) and the strategies of social marketing. This particular program relied on formative research data using a mixed-methods approach and a multilevel stakeholder analysis that allowed for rapid dissemination, effective increase of personal protective equipment (PPE) usage, and a subsequent impact on adoptive workers and companies. Focus groups, face-to-face interviews, surveys, participant observation, Greco-Latin square, and quasi-experimental tests were implemented. A 20-hour popular education training produced CHWs that translated results of the formative research to potential adopters and also provided first aid skills for eye injuries. Reduction of injuries is not limited to the use of safety glasses, but also to the adoption of timely intervention and regular eye hygiene. Limitations include adoption in only large companies, rapid decline of eye safety glasses without consistent intervention, technological limitations of glasses, and thorough cost-benefit analysis.

  6. Protective structures on the surface of zirconium components of light water reactor cores: Formation, testing, and prototype equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Gordeev, A. A.; Evsin, A. E. Ivanova, S. V.; Kaplevsky, A. S.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.

    2015-12-15

    The results of tests of plasma treatment of zirconium and deposition of protective yttrium coatings used as the methods of protection of zirconium components of light water reactor cores against hydrogenation are detailed. The amount of hydrogen in the treated sample exposed to superheated steam for 2500 h at temperature T = 400°C and pressure p = 1 atm was five times lower than the corresponding value for the untreated one. The amount of hydrogen in the sample coated with yttrium remained almost unchanged in 4000 h of exposure. A plasma method for rapid testing for hydrogen resistance is proposed. The hydrogenation rate provided by this method is 700 times higher than that in tests with superheated steam. The results of preliminary experiments confirm the possibility of constructing a unit for batch processing of the surfaces of fuel rod claddings.

  7. [Medical Equipment Maintenance Methods].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    Due to the high technology and the complexity of medical equipment, as well as to the safety and effectiveness, it determines the high requirements of the medical equipment maintenance work. This paper introduces some basic methods of medical instrument maintenance, including fault tree analysis, node method and exclusive method which are the three important methods in the medical equipment maintenance, through using these three methods for the instruments that have circuit drawings, hardware breakdown maintenance can be done easily. And this paper introduces the processing methods of some special fault conditions, in order to reduce little detours in meeting the same problems. Learning is very important for stuff just engaged in this area.

  8. A historical review of portable health physics instruments and their use in radiation protection programs at Hanford, 1944 through 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, W.P.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Kress, M.L.; Swinth, K.L.; Corbit, C.D.; Zuerner, L.V.; Fleming, D.M.; DeHaven, H.W.

    1989-09-01

    This historical review covers portable health physics instruments at Hanford from an applications viewpoint. The review provides information on specific instruments and on the general kinds of facility work environments in which the instruments have been and are being used. It provides a short, modestly technical explanation of the types of nuclear radiations, the way radiation units are quantified, and the types of nuclear radiations, the way radiation units are quantified, and the types of detection media used in portable health physics instruments. This document does not, however, cover the history of the entire Hanford program that was required to develop and/or modify the subject instruments. 11 refs., 34 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Uncovering high rates of unsafe injection equipment reuse in rural Cameroon: validation of a survey instrument that probes for specific misconceptions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Unsafe reuse of injection equipment in hospitals is an on-going threat to patient safety in many parts of Africa. The extent of this problem is difficult to measure. Standard WHO injection safety assessment protocols used in the 2003 national injection safety assessment in Cameroon are problematic because health workers often behave differently under the observation of visitors. The main objective of this study is to assess the extent of unsafe injection equipment reuse and potential for blood-borne virus transmission in Cameroon. This can be done by probing for misconceptions about injection safety that explain reuse without sterilization. These misconceptions concern useless precautions against cross-contamination, i.e. "indirect reuse" of injection equipment. To investigate whether a shortage of supply explains unsafe reuse, we compared our survey data against records of purchases. Methods All health workers at public hospitals in two health districts in the Northwest Province of Cameroon were interviewed about their own injection practices. Injection equipment supply purchase records documented for January to December 2009 were compared with self-reported rates of syringe reuse. The number of HIV, HBV and HCV infections that result from unsafe medical injections in these health districts is estimated from the frequency of unsafe reuse, the number of injections performed, the probability that reused injection equipment had just been used on an infected patient, the size of the susceptible population, and the transmission efficiency of each virus in an injection. Results Injection equipment reuse occurs commonly in the Northwest Province of Cameroon, practiced by 44% of health workers at public hospitals. Self-reported rates of syringe reuse only partly explained by records on injection equipment supplied to these hospitals, showing a shortage of syringes where syringes are reused. Injection safety interventions could prevent an estimated 14-336 HIV

  10. 40 CFR 792.61 - Equipment design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Equipment design. 792.61 Section 792.61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Equipment § 792.61 Equipment design. Equipment used in...

  11. 40 CFR 160.61 - Equipment design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Equipment design. 160.61 Section 160.61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Equipment § 160.61 Equipment design. Equipment used in the...

  12. Writing Instrument Profiles for Mastery of Instrumental Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Daniel; Fernandez, Jorge; Nalliah, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Because of the rapidly changing nature of chemical instrumentation, students must be trained in how to learn and understand new instruments. Toward this end, students are asked to create small instrument manuals, or instrument profiles, for the major pieces of equipment studied during an instrumental analysis course. This writing-intensive process…

  13. Moderate Thermal Strain in Healthcare Workers Wearing Personal Protective Equipment During Treatment and Care Activities in the Context of the 2014 Ebola Virus Disease Outbreak.

    PubMed

    Grélot, Laurent; Koulibaly, Fassou; Maugey, Nancy; Janvier, Frédéric; Foissaud, Vincent; Aletti, Marc; Savini, Hélène; Cotte, Jean; Dampierre, Henry; Granier, Hervé; Carmoi, Thierry; Sagui, Emmanuel

    2016-05-01

    The extent of thermal strain while wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) during care activities for Ebola virus disease patients has not yet been characterized. From January to March 2015, 25 French healthcare workers (HCWs) in Conakry, Guinea, volunteered to be monitored while wearing PPE using an ingestible thermal sensor. The mean (standard deviation) working ambient temperature and relative humidity were 29.6 °C (2.0 °C) and 65.4% (10.3%), respectively; the mean time wearing PPE was 65.7 (13.5) minutes; and the mean core body temperature increased by 0.46 °C (0.20 °C). Four HCWs reached or exceeded a mean core body temperature of ≥ 38.5 °C. HCWs wearing PPE for approximately 1 hour exhibited moderate but safe thermal strain. PMID:26655297

  14. rhBMP-2 protects against reoperation for pseudoarthrosis and/or instrumentation failure: A matched case-control study of 448 patients.

    PubMed

    Macki, Mohamed; Syeda, Sbaa; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Bydon, Ali; Witham, Timothy F; Sciubba, Daniel M; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Bydon, Mohamad; Gokaslan, Ziya

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this independent study is to determine the impact of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) on reoperation for pseudarthrosis and/or instrumentation failure. A nested case-control study of first-time posterolateral, instrumented fusion of the lumbar spine for degenerative spinal disease was undertaken. Cases of reoperation for pseudoarthrosis and/or instrumentation failure were assigned to controls, who did not experience the primary outcome measure at the time of reoperation. Cases and controls were matched on number of interspaces fused and inclusion of interbody. Predictors of reoperation for pseudoarthrosis and/or instrumentation failure were assessed with a conditional logistical regression controlling for rhBMP-2, age, obesity, and smoking. Of the 448 patients, 155 cases of reoperation for pseudoarthrosis and/or instrumentation were matched with 293 controls. Twenty-six percent of first-time surgeries included rhBMP-2, which was statistically more commonly used in the control cohort (33.11%) versus the case cohort (12.90%) (Unadjusted odds ratio [ORunadj]=0.28) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.16-0.49). Following a multivariate analysis controlling for age, obesity, and smoking, the rhBMP-2 recipients incurred a 73% lower odds of reoperation for pseudoarthrosis and/or instrumentation failure (95% CI, 0.15-0.48). Neither sarcomatous nor osseous neoplasm was detected in the study population. Mean follow up did not differ between the cases (81.57±standard deviation [SD] 4.98months) versus controls (74.75±2.49month) (ORunadj=1.01) (95% CI: 1.00-1.01). rhBMP-2 in lumbar fusion constructs protects against reoperation for pseudoarthrosis and/or instrumentation failure. However, the decision to include fusion supplements should be weighted between surgical determinants and clinical outcomes. PMID:27396376

  15. rhBMP-2 protects against reoperation for pseudoarthrosis and/or instrumentation failure: A matched case-control study of 448 patients.

    PubMed

    Macki, Mohamed; Syeda, Sbaa; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Bydon, Ali; Witham, Timothy F; Sciubba, Daniel M; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Bydon, Mohamad; Gokaslan, Ziya

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this independent study is to determine the impact of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) on reoperation for pseudarthrosis and/or instrumentation failure. A nested case-control study of first-time posterolateral, instrumented fusion of the lumbar spine for degenerative spinal disease was undertaken. Cases of reoperation for pseudoarthrosis and/or instrumentation failure were assigned to controls, who did not experience the primary outcome measure at the time of reoperation. Cases and controls were matched on number of interspaces fused and inclusion of interbody. Predictors of reoperation for pseudoarthrosis and/or instrumentation failure were assessed with a conditional logistical regression controlling for rhBMP-2, age, obesity, and smoking. Of the 448 patients, 155 cases of reoperation for pseudoarthrosis and/or instrumentation were matched with 293 controls. Twenty-six percent of first-time surgeries included rhBMP-2, which was statistically more commonly used in the control cohort (33.11%) versus the case cohort (12.90%) (Unadjusted odds ratio [ORunadj]=0.28) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.16-0.49). Following a multivariate analysis controlling for age, obesity, and smoking, the rhBMP-2 recipients incurred a 73% lower odds of reoperation for pseudoarthrosis and/or instrumentation failure (95% CI, 0.15-0.48). Neither sarcomatous nor osseous neoplasm was detected in the study population. Mean follow up did not differ between the cases (81.57±standard deviation [SD] 4.98months) versus controls (74.75±2.49month) (ORunadj=1.01) (95% CI: 1.00-1.01). rhBMP-2 in lumbar fusion constructs protects against reoperation for pseudoarthrosis and/or instrumentation failure. However, the decision to include fusion supplements should be weighted between surgical determinants and clinical outcomes.

  16. 14 CFR 121.345 - Radio equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radio equipment. 121.345 Section 121.345..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.345 Radio equipment. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless it is equipped with radio equipment required for the kind...

  17. 14 CFR 121.345 - Radio equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radio equipment. 121.345 Section 121.345..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.345 Radio equipment. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless it is equipped with radio equipment required for the kind...

  18. 14 CFR 121.345 - Radio equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Radio equipment. 121.345 Section 121.345..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.345 Radio equipment. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless it is equipped with radio equipment required for the kind...

  19. 14 CFR 121.345 - Radio equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Radio equipment. 121.345 Section 121.345..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.345 Radio equipment. (a) No person may operate an airplane unless it is equipped with radio equipment required for the kind...

  20. Technology Equipment Rooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William

    2001-01-01

    Examines telecommunications equipment room design features that allow for growth and can accommodate numerous equipment replacements and upgrades with minimal service disruption and with minimal cost. Considerations involving the central hub, power and lighting needs, air conditioning, and fire protection are discussed. (GR)

  1. What`s new in artificial lift. Part 2: Advances in electrical submersible pumping equipment and instrumentation/control, plus other new artificial lift developments

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.; Winkler, H.W.

    1996-04-01

    The Part 1 article presented last month discussed recent industry artificial lift innovations for sucker rod pumping, progressing cavity pumping and gas lift. Described in this presentation are 22 advances recently introduced by 15 different companies for electrical submersible pumping (ESP), and other new developments related to artificial lift field operations. ESP innovations include contributions ranging from new downhole pump equipment, gas separators and cables to various surface controllers/monitors. Other R and D contributions cover desangers, separators, fluid level measurements, chemical injection and well-heads.

  2. Personal protective equipment use among students with special health care needs reporting injuries in school-sponsored vocational, career, and technical education programs in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Eric; Shendell, Derek; Eggert, Brain C; Marcella, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    Students with special health care needs (SHCNs) and individualized education plans (IEPs) may be injured more often in vocational, career, and technical education (CTE) programs. No research to date considers personal protective equipment (PPE) use among students with SHCNs in school-based programs reporting injuries to agencies. Data from 1999 to 2011 on PPE use among injured students in CTE programs in public schools and private secondary schools for the disabled were analyzed; students with SHCNs were distinguished by IEP status within New Jersey Safe Schools surveilance data. Among students with IEPs using PPE, 36% of injuries occurred to body parts PPE was meant to protect. Likely injury types were cuts-lacerations and burns for students with IEPs using PPE and cuts-lacerations and sprains for students with IEPs not using PPE. Females with IEPs using PPE were injured less often than males across ages. Results suggested students with SHCNs with IEPs need further job-related training with increased emphasis on properly selecting and fitting PPE.

  3. On the early history of Dorpat Observatory and its instrumental equipment (German Title: Zur frühen Geschichte der Dorpater Sternwarte und ihrer instrumentellen Ausstattung )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oestmann, Günther

    Dorpat Observatory became famous in the first place through the scientific work of Wilhelm Struve, but this article deals with its little-known early history. The first astronomer appointed at Dorpat University, founded in 1802, was J.W.A. Pfaff, who had to make his first astronomical observations from an attic. From 1807 onward he could use an interim building. The instruments acquired before completion of the observatory in 1810 will he discussed, among them a reflecting telescope built by J.G.F. Schrader, which was never completed, however.

  4. Effect of health education intervention on the awareness and use of personal protective equipments among small scale electric arc welders in Ilorin, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adewoye, Kayode R.; Awoyemi, Ademola O.; Babatunde, Oluwole A.; Atoyebi, Oladele A.; Salami, Sarafadeen K.; Issa, Funsho Y.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Welding is associated with workplace hazards that can affect the health of those who engaged in it as they are exposed to harmful dust. Subjects and Methods: This was a health education intervention study carried out among self-employed electric arc welder. Data were collected using an interviewer administered questionnaire and health education intervention was carried out between the preintervention and postintervention stages. Epi-info version 3.5.1 software package was used for data analysis and Chi-square analysis was used to determine the statistical significance of observed differences between the study and control groups before the intervention and after intervention. Level of significance was set at a P < 0.05. Results: At the preintervention phase, 285 respondents were interviewed in each of the study and control groups, while 280 study respondents and 275 control respondents were available for the postintervention phase of the study. Before the intervention, 279 (97.9%) of the respondents in the study group were aware of eye goggles as a means of protection, 20 (7%) were aware of welding helmet, 206 (72.3%) were aware of hand gloves and 4 (1.4%) were aware of face mask. All showed a significant increase in awareness postintervention (P < 0.05) while there was no significant increase in awareness in the control group. Conclusion: Health education brought about a significant increase in awareness and use of personal protective equipment among the welders. There is a need for proper education of welders on workplace hazards, the types and use of different protective devices in other to safeguard their health. PMID:25006309

  5. A newly developed, portable, vacuum-chamber equipped XRF-instrument, designed for the sophisticated needs of the Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlir, K.; Frühmann, B.; Buzanich, G.; Griesser, M.; Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.; Grossmayer, B.; Smolek, S.

    2012-07-01

    In the analysis of artworks x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy gains a high significance because of the non-destructiveness of the method. It can provide valuable information of technologies and materials and support conservation and restoration efforts. This method is especially suitable for the study of the collections of the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna (KHM) with its affiliated institutions, because of the great diversity of the materials and objects with different art historical and ethnological background. Within a research project in cooperation of the Conservation Science Department of the KHM with the ATI (Atomic Institute of the Vienna University of Technology) and the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) a portable XRF instrument ("PART II") was designed and constructed, optimized to cope with the diverse analytical problems of a widespread museum collection as it is kept at the KHM. Beneath some technical improvements concerning the optimization of the design of the new instrument (regarding stability and accessibility to objects) with respect to its precursor model, a special focus was laid on the detection of light elements to be able to analyze chemical elements from sodium (Na) onwards. In this way the palette of materials that can be analyzed could be expanded to matters like glass and enamel. In this paper the advantages of the new facility will be discussed.

  6. THE COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF ALTERNATIVE INSTRUMENTS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION IN A SECOND-BEST SETTING. (R825313)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    This paper employs analytical and numerical general equilibrium models to examine the significance of pre-existing factor taxes for the costs of pollution reduction under a wide range of environmental policy instruments. Pre-existing taxes imply significantly ...

  7. 15 CFR 301.8 - Instructions for entering instruments through Customs and Border Protection under subheading 9810...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... defined in 19 CFR 101.1) that the instrument is entitled to duty-free classification under subheading 9810... complied with. (For further information, see 19 CFR 142.3 and 142.4 (TD-221).) (c) Late filing... accordance with 19 CFR part 174, or the necessary document substantiating duty-free entry is not produced...

  8. 15 CFR 301.8 - Instructions for entering instruments through Customs and Border Protection under subheading 9810...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... defined in 19 CFR 101.1) that the instrument is entitled to duty-free classification under subheading 9810... complied with. (For further information, see 19 CFR 142.3 and 142.4 (TD-221).) (c) Late filing... accordance with 19 CFR part 174, or the necessary document substantiating duty-free entry is not produced...

  9. 15 CFR 301.8 - Instructions for entering instruments through Customs and Border Protection under subheading 9810...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... defined in 19 CFR 101.1) that the instrument is entitled to duty-free classification under subheading 9810... complied with. (For further information, see 19 CFR 142.3 and 142.4 (TD-221).) (c) Late filing... accordance with 19 CFR part 174, or the necessary document substantiating duty-free entry is not produced...

  10. 15 CFR 301.8 - Instructions for entering instruments through Customs and Border Protection under subheading 9810...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... defined in 19 CFR 101.1) that the instrument is entitled to duty-free classification under subheading 9810... complied with. (For further information, see 19 CFR 142.3 and 142.4 (TD-221).) (c) Late filing... accordance with 19 CFR part 174, or the necessary document substantiating duty-free entry is not produced...

  11. 15 CFR 301.8 - Instructions for entering instruments through Customs and Border Protection under subheading 9810...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... defined in 19 CFR 101.1) that the instrument is entitled to duty-free classification under subheading 9810... complied with. (For further information, see 19 CFR 142.3 and 142.4 (TD-221).) (c) Late filing... accordance with 19 CFR part 174, or the necessary document substantiating duty-free entry is not produced...

  12. Performance study of protective clothing against hot water splashes: from bench scale test to instrumented manikin test.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Song, Guowen; Wang, Faming

    2015-03-01

    Hot liquid hazards existing in work environments are shown to be a considerable risk for industrial workers. In this study, the predicted protection from fabric was assessed by a modified hot liquid splash tester. In these tests, conditions with and without an air spacer were applied. The protective performance of a garment exposed to hot water spray was investigated by a spray manikin evaluation system. Three-dimensional body scanning technique was used to characterize the air gap size between the protective clothing and the manikin skin. The relationship between bench scale test and manikin test was discussed and the regression model was established to predict the overall percentage of skin burn while wearing protective clothing. The results demonstrated strong correlations between bench scale test and manikin test. Based on these studies, the overall performance of protective clothing against hot water spray can be estimated on the basis of the results of the bench scale hot water splashes test and the information of air gap size entrapped in clothing. The findings provide effective guides for the design and material selection while developing high performance protective clothing.

  13. Evaluation of the Methods of portective Treatment against microbiological damages and prolonged antimicrobic protection of the interior and the equipment of space objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshevaya, E.; Novikova, N.; Polycarpov, N.; Poddubko, S.; Shumilina, G.; Bragina, M.; Zarubina, K.; Tverskoy, V.; Akova, M. D.

    The researches which have been carried out onboard the orbital complex (? C) MIR, testify that environment of the manned space object may be considered as peculiar ecological niche for development of the microbial community generated by microorganisms of various physiological and taxonomic groups. As a result of vital activity of fungi during OC MIR operation zones of fungi growth on various elements of interior and equipment, cases of destruction of the materials and attributes of corrosion of metals were noted. Existing methods of development of microorganisms on a surface of constructional materials using sanitary treatment of the accessible surfaces with disinfectants, represent the big labour input for the crew. More radical solution of the problem is the development and use of methods of superficial modification of constructional materials and use of methods of superficial modification of constructional materials and treatment of their surface of varnish or paint, resistant to biocontamination and growth of the microorganisms. As a result of the conducted research, the following methods of protection of constructional materials against development of microorganisms were chosen: - fluorination, sylilition, radiating graft polymerization etc., resulting in formation of the functional groups having biocide action; For varnish and paint coverings - coverings on a basis stoichiometrical interpolymeric polyelectrolytic complexes, organosilicone coverings, etc. For testing of the biological effects of samples of the materials subjected to the different methods of surface modification, researches were carried out and experimental models of typical biodestructive processes of the constructional materials are developed considering microclimatic parameters of local zones (the increased temperature and humidity), resistance of the materials to the influence of fungi and increased radiating background influence. Biological testing testifying the efficiency of developed

  14. The effects of metabolic work rate and ambient environment on physiological tolerance times while wearing explosive and chemical personal protective equipment.

    PubMed

    Costello, Joseph T; Stewart, Kelly L; Stewart, Ian B

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the physiological tolerance times when wearing explosive and chemical (>35 kg) personal protective equipment (PPE) in simulated environmental extremes across a range of differing work intensities. Twelve healthy males undertook nine trials which involved walking on a treadmill at 2.5, 4, and 5.5 km·h(-1) in the following environmental conditions, 21, 30, and 37°C wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT). Participants exercised for 60 min or until volitional fatigue, core temperature reached 39°C, or heart rate exceeded 90% of maximum. Tolerance time, core temperature, skin temperature, mean body temperature, heart rate, and body mass loss were measured. Exercise time was reduced in the higher WBGT environments (WBGT37 < WBGT30 < WBGT21; P < 0.05) and work intensities (5.5 < 4 < 2.5 km·h(-1); P < 0.001). The majority of trials (85/108; 78.7%) were terminated due to participant's heart rate exceeding 90% of their maximum. A total of eight trials (7.4%) lasted the full duration. Only nine (8.3%) trials were terminated due to volitional fatigue and six (5.6%) due to core temperatures in excess of 39°C. These results demonstrate that physiological tolerance times are influenced by the external environment and workload and that cardiovascular strain is the limiting factor to work tolerance when wearing this heavy multilayered PPE.

  15. The effects of metabolic work rate and ambient environment on physiological tolerance times while wearing explosive and chemical personal protective equipment.

    PubMed

    Costello, Joseph T; Stewart, Kelly L; Stewart, Ian B

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the physiological tolerance times when wearing explosive and chemical (>35 kg) personal protective equipment (PPE) in simulated environmental extremes across a range of differing work intensities. Twelve healthy males undertook nine trials which involved walking on a treadmill at 2.5, 4, and 5.5 km·h(-1) in the following environmental conditions, 21, 30, and 37°C wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT). Participants exercised for 60 min or until volitional fatigue, core temperature reached 39°C, or heart rate exceeded 90% of maximum. Tolerance time, core temperature, skin temperature, mean body temperature, heart rate, and body mass loss were measured. Exercise time was reduced in the higher WBGT environments (WBGT37 < WBGT30 < WBGT21; P < 0.05) and work intensities (5.5 < 4 < 2.5 km·h(-1); P < 0.001). The majority of trials (85/108; 78.7%) were terminated due to participant's heart rate exceeding 90% of their maximum. A total of eight trials (7.4%) lasted the full duration. Only nine (8.3%) trials were terminated due to volitional fatigue and six (5.6%) due to core temperatures in excess of 39°C. These results demonstrate that physiological tolerance times are influenced by the external environment and workload and that cardiovascular strain is the limiting factor to work tolerance when wearing this heavy multilayered PPE. PMID:25866818

  16. The Effects of Metabolic Work Rate and Ambient Environment on Physiological Tolerance Times While Wearing Explosive and Chemical Personal Protective Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Costello, Joseph T.; Stewart, Kelly L.; Stewart, Ian B.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the physiological tolerance times when wearing explosive and chemical (>35 kg) personal protective equipment (PPE) in simulated environmental extremes across a range of differing work intensities. Twelve healthy males undertook nine trials which involved walking on a treadmill at 2.5, 4, and 5.5 km·h−1 in the following environmental conditions, 21, 30, and 37°C wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT). Participants exercised for 60 min or until volitional fatigue, core temperature reached 39°C, or heart rate exceeded 90% of maximum. Tolerance time, core temperature, skin temperature, mean body temperature, heart rate, and body mass loss were measured. Exercise time was reduced in the higher WBGT environments (WBGT37 < WBGT30 < WBGT21; P < 0.05) and work intensities (5.5 < 4 < 2.5 km·h−1; P < 0.001). The majority of trials (85/108; 78.7%) were terminated due to participant's heart rate exceeding 90% of their maximum. A total of eight trials (7.4%) lasted the full duration. Only nine (8.3%) trials were terminated due to volitional fatigue and six (5.6%) due to core temperatures in excess of 39°C. These results demonstrate that physiological tolerance times are influenced by the external environment and workload and that cardiovascular strain is the limiting factor to work tolerance when wearing this heavy multilayered PPE. PMID:25866818

  17. The moral universe of injecting drug users in the era of AIDS: sharing injecting equipment and the protection of moral standing.

    PubMed

    Plumridge, E; Chetwynd, J

    1998-12-01

    Recent work on HIV counselling suggests that the protection of the moral status of the recipient is a key factor in the successful uptake of advice. This study suggests it may be equally important in the uptake of health promotion messages. A discourse analysis of the talk of 20 young injecting drug users (IDUs) identified a contradiction between their asserted self-identity as careful and socially responsible injectors, and their admission of risky lending and borrowing of injecting equipment. This contradiction was resolved by the production of discourses of exoneration, differentially tailored to the moral implications of lending and of borrowing. Lenders argued a form of 'market morality' wherein it was the duty of each to accept the consequences of his/her decisions. Lenders were therefore morally exonerated since moral failure was the 'borrowers'. Borrowing was usually depicted as 'desperate measures' for which moral culpability was disavowed because of 'powerlessness'. The exception of routine borrowing, acknowledged as risky and against community norms, was accounted for in a nihilistic discourse of indifference to infection and death. The need for a 'counter discourse' around notions of community is discussed.

  18. 40 CFR 65.103 - Equipment identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Equipment identification. 65.103 Section 65.103 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Equipment Leaks § 65.103 Equipment identification. (a)...

  19. Instrument safety in explosive atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Bossert, J A

    1975-01-01

    The current "Energy Crisis" has dramatically increased our potential need for coal, the worlds most abundant fossil fuel. This will probably lead to a greater use of automation and instrumentation in the coal mining industry. The presence of methane in coal mines and in the coal itself plus the presence of coal dust, both of which can form an explosive atmosphere in air, means that the possibility of a gas or coal dust ignition must be considered when designing, purchasing and installing new equipment in this industry. In addition, many metallurgical processes involve the use of potentially explosive substances against which similar safety precautions must be taken. This paper outlines the various methods of protection currently in use and proposed for electrical instruments in explosive atmospheres, with particular emphasis on the work of the International Electrotechnical Commission.

  20. Equipment & New Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Adrian W., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    Presents information about equipment and new products such as the melting point instrument and TV-microscope coupler which are helpful in college science teaching. Descriptions of each product, how it operates, its prices, and address for ordering are presented. (HM)

  1. [Medical Equipment Maintenance Methods].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbin

    2015-09-01

    Due to the high technology and the complexity of medical equipment, as well as to the safety and effectiveness, it determines the high requirements of the medical equipment maintenance work. This paper introduces some basic methods of medical instrument maintenance, including fault tree analysis, node method and exclusive method which are the three important methods in the medical equipment maintenance, through using these three methods for the instruments that have circuit drawings, hardware breakdown maintenance can be done easily. And this paper introduces the processing methods of some special fault conditions, in order to reduce little detours in meeting the same problems. Learning is very important for stuff just engaged in this area. PMID:26904890

  2. Topics in Chemical Instrumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Galen W., Ed.

    1975-01-01

    Identifies a trend in analytical chemistry toward greater use of instruments and a need for an understanding of the basic principles involved in instrumentation. This need can be fulfilled using homebuilt equipment; examples are provided in the areas of electrolytic conductance and electronic coulometry. (GS)

  3. User Perceptions of ¡Protéjase!: An Intervention Designed to Increase Protective Equipment Use Among Mexican Immigrant and Mexican American Farmworkers

    PubMed Central

    Montiel-Ishino, Francisco A; Smyth, Joshua M; Murphy, Dennis J; Miranda, Patricia Y; Davis, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    Background Farmworkers’ exposures to pesticides are reduced when they wear personal protective equipment (PPE), and mobile health (mHealth) platforms can potentially deliver information to farmworkers to help promote PPE use. However, little is known about the feasibility of using mHealth platforms to promote farmworkers’ use of PPE. Objective The objective of the study was to describe the development and feasibility-testing of Protect Yourself! (¡Protéjase!), an intervention designed to increase PPE use. As the vast majority of farmworkers in the United States are from Mexico, we examined the intervention in a primarily Mexican-origin farmworker population. Methods ¡Protéjase was developed in several steps. First, we performed ethnographic observations to understand what prevents PPE use. Next, we developed program components that met the challenges uncovered in the ethnographic observations, seeking direct feedback from farmworkers on each component. Feasibility was assessed using surveys and focus groups. Material was provided in Spanish or English at the preference of the participant. Finally, we pilot tested each component of the intervention, including: (1) PPE that was provided to each worker for their personal use during the intervention trial, and (2) delivery of an application-based tool that promoted the use of PPE through daily individualized messaging. Results 55 farmworkers enrolled in the study, but only 41 of 55 (75%) completed the entire pilot intervention trial. Results focus on the evaluation of the intervention, and include only those who completed the entire trial. Among farmworkers who completed the entire intervention trial, all but two farmworkers were born in Mexico and were Spanish speaking. Still, all study participants self-identified as Mexican or Mexican-American. When asked what changes were needed in the intervention’s messaging or delivery to increase user satisfaction, 22 out of 41 participants (54%) felt that no changes

  4. Using Computer Vision and Depth Sensing to Measure Healthcare Worker-Patient Contacts and Personal Protective Equipment Adherence Within Hospital Rooms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junyang; Cremer, James F.; Zarei, Kasra; Segre, Alberto M.; Polgreen, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. We determined the feasibility of using computer vision and depth sensing to detect healthcare worker (HCW)-patient contacts to estimate both hand hygiene (HH) opportunities and personal protective equipment (PPE) adherence. Methods. We used multiple Microsoft Kinects to track the 3-dimensional movement of HCWs and their hands within hospital rooms. We applied computer vision techniques to recognize and determine the position of fiducial markers attached to the patient's bed to determine the location of the HCW's hands with respect to the bed. To measure our system's ability to detect HCW-patient contacts, we counted each time a HCW's hands entered a virtual rectangular box aligned with a patient bed. To measure PPE adherence, we identified the hands, torso, and face of each HCW on room entry, determined the color of each body area, and compared it with the color of gloves, gowns, and face masks. We independently examined a ground truth video recording and compared it with our system's results. Results. Overall, for touch detection, the sensitivity was 99.7%, with a positive predictive value of 98.7%. For gowned entrances, sensitivity was 100.0% and specificity was 98.15%. For masked entrances, sensitivity was 100.0% and specificity was 98.75%; for gloved entrances, the sensitivity was 86.21% and specificity was 98.28%. Conclusions. Using computer vision and depth sensing, we can estimate potential HH opportunities at the bedside and also estimate adherence to PPE. Our fine-grained estimates of how and how often HCWs interact directly with patients can inform a wide range of patient-safety research. PMID:26949712

  5. DATA SHARING REPORT CHARACTERIZATION OF POPULATION 7: PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT, DRY ACTIVE WASTE, AND MISCELLANEOUS DEBRIS, SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE PROJECT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    Harpenau, Evan M

    2013-10-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested that ORAU plan and implement a sampling and analysis campaign targeting certain URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) surveillance and maintenance (S&M) process inventory waste. Eight populations of historical and reoccurring S&M waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been identified in the Waste Handling Plan for Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE/OR/01-2565&D2 (WHP) (DOE 2012) for evaluation and processing to determine a final pathway for disposal. Population 7 (POP 7) consists of 56 containers of aged, low-level and potentially mixed S&M waste that has been staged in various locations around ORNL. Several of these POP 7 containers primarily contain personal protective equipment (PPE) and dry active waste (DAW), but may contain other miscellaneous debris. This data sharing report addresses the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) specified waste in a 13-container subpopulation (including eight steel boxes, three 55-gal drums, one sealand, and one intermodal) that lacked sufficient characterization data for possible disposal at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) using the approved Waste Lot (WL) 108.1 profile.

  6. Using Computer Vision and Depth Sensing to Measure Healthcare Worker-Patient Contacts and Personal Protective Equipment Adherence Within Hospital Rooms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junyang; Cremer, James F; Zarei, Kasra; Segre, Alberto M; Polgreen, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    Background.  We determined the feasibility of using computer vision and depth sensing to detect healthcare worker (HCW)-patient contacts to estimate both hand hygiene (HH) opportunities and personal protective equipment (PPE) adherence. Methods.  We used multiple Microsoft Kinects to track the 3-dimensional movement of HCWs and their hands within hospital rooms. We applied computer vision techniques to recognize and determine the position of fiducial markers attached to the patient's bed to determine the location of the HCW's hands with respect to the bed. To measure our system's ability to detect HCW-patient contacts, we counted each time a HCW's hands entered a virtual rectangular box aligned with a patient bed. To measure PPE adherence, we identified the hands, torso, and face of each HCW on room entry, determined the color of each body area, and compared it with the color of gloves, gowns, and face masks. We independently examined a ground truth video recording and compared it with our system's results. Results.  Overall, for touch detection, the sensitivity was 99.7%, with a positive predictive value of 98.7%. For gowned entrances, sensitivity was 100.0% and specificity was 98.15%. For masked entrances, sensitivity was 100.0% and specificity was 98.75%; for gloved entrances, the sensitivity was 86.21% and specificity was 98.28%. Conclusions.  Using computer vision and depth sensing, we can estimate potential HH opportunities at the bedside and also estimate adherence to PPE. Our fine-grained estimates of how and how often HCWs interact directly with patients can inform a wide range of patient-safety research.

  7. 46 CFR 129.370 - Equipment grounding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... INSTALLATIONS Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 129.370 Equipment grounding. (a) On a metallic vessel... instruments must be grounded. So must each secondary winding of instrument transformers. (c) Each...

  8. 46 CFR 129.370 - Equipment grounding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... INSTALLATIONS Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 129.370 Equipment grounding. (a) On a metallic vessel... instruments must be grounded. So must each secondary winding of instrument transformers. (c) Each...

  9. 46 CFR 129.370 - Equipment grounding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... INSTALLATIONS Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 129.370 Equipment grounding. (a) On a metallic vessel... instruments must be grounded. So must each secondary winding of instrument transformers. (c) Each...

  10. Academic Research Equipment and Equipment Needs in the Physical Sciences: 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westat, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This monograph is one in a series of analytical reports presenting findings from the National Science Foundation's 1989-90 National Survey of Academic Research Instruments and Instrumentation Needs. It describes recent national trends in academic research equipment and equipment needs in the physical sciences. It also documents equipment trends in…

  11. Assessment of Spatial Unevenness of Road Accidents Severity as Instrument of Preventive Protection from Emergency Situations in Road Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, A.; Petrova, D.

    2016-08-01

    Emergency situations in road complex are road traffic accidents (RA) with severe consequences. These are incidents connected with the death and injury of large number of people. The most common reasons for this are the collision of three or more cars, the collision of buses with trains at railroad crossings, the fall of the buses in the mountain gorge, and other similar cases. Is it possible to predict such events? How to build a preventive protection against such emergencies? We have to understand that emergencies in a road complex are qualitative expression of the quantitative processes that characterize the general state of road safety in the region. In this regard, at the level of state monitoring of emergency situations it is important to understand in general - in which region the situation is more complicated and in which is more favorable. This knowledge helps to more efficiently reallocate resources intended to solve the problems of road safety provision. The consequence of this is improvement of the quality of preventive protection from the emergencies in the road complex. The article presents quantitative values of severity of accidents in the Russian Federation regions and the Pareto chart distribution of cumulates of the accident severity for the Russian Federation. On the basis of the complex assessment of the spatial non-uniformity of the accident severity results it offers two important recommendations, implementation of which will alleviate the issue of formation of emergency situations in the road of the Russian Federation on the basis of the complex assessment of the spatial nonuniformity of the accident severity results.

  12. AORN Ergonomic Tool 6: lifting and carrying supplies and equipment in the perioperative setting.

    PubMed

    Waters, Thomas; Baptiste, Andrea; Short, Manon; Plante-Mallon, Lori; Nelson, Audrey

    2011-08-01

    Perioperative team members often are required to lift and carry heavy supplies and equipment into and around the OR; this includes lifting equipment such as hand tables, fluoroscopy boards, stirrups, Wilson frames, irrigation containers for lithotripsy, and heavy instrument pans. Lifting heavy objects creates considerable risk for musculoskeletal injuries to the back and shoulders. AORN Ergonomic Tool 6: Lifting and Carrying Supplies and Equipment in the Perioperative Setting can help caregivers evaluate lifting and carrying tasks and take measures to protect themselves from injury. Caregivers can use the revised National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health lifting equation to assess whether a specific lifting task can be performed safely.

  13. 14 CFR 25.1337 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 25.1337 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Instruments: Installation § 25.1337 Powerplant instruments. (a) Instruments and instrument lines. (1) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit...

  14. 40 CFR 90.322 - Calibration of other equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Calibration of other equipment. 90.322 Section 90.322 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Equipment Provisions § 90.322 Calibration of other equipment. Calibrate other test equipment used...

  15. 40 CFR 90.322 - Calibration of other equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Calibration of other equipment. 90.322 Section 90.322 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Equipment Provisions § 90.322 Calibration of other equipment. Calibrate other test equipment used...

  16. 40 CFR 90.322 - Calibration of other equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calibration of other equipment. 90.322 Section 90.322 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Equipment Provisions § 90.322 Calibration of other equipment. Calibrate other test equipment used...

  17. 40 CFR 90.322 - Calibration of other equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calibration of other equipment. 90.322 Section 90.322 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Equipment Provisions § 90.322 Calibration of other equipment. Calibrate other test equipment used...

  18. 40 CFR 90.322 - Calibration of other equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Calibration of other equipment. 90.322 Section 90.322 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Equipment Provisions § 90.322 Calibration of other equipment. Calibrate other test equipment used...

  19. 40 CFR 160.61 - Equipment design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equipment design. 160.61 Section 160... LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Equipment § 160.61 Equipment design. Equipment used in the generation... appropriate design and adequate capacity to function according to the protocol and shall be suitably...

  20. 40 CFR 792.61 - Equipment design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Equipment design. 792.61 Section 792... (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Equipment § 792.61 Equipment design. Equipment used in the... of appropriate design and adequate capacity to function according to the protocol and shall...

  1. MC and A instrumentation catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Neymotin, L.; Sviridova, V.

    1998-06-01

    In 1981 and 1985, two editions of a catalog of non-destructive nuclear measurement instrumentation, and material control and surveillance equipment, were published by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The last edition of the catalog included one hundred and twenty-five entries covering a wide range of devices developed in the US and abroad. More than ten years have elapsed since the publication of the more recent Catalog. Devices described in it have undergone significant modifications, and new devices have been developed. Therefore, in order to assist specialists in the field of Material Control and Accounting (MC and A), a new catalog has been created. Work on this instrumentation catalog started in 1997 as a cooperative effort of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), operated by Brookhaven Science Associates under contract to the US Department of Energy, and the All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics (VNIIA), subordinate institute of the Atomic Energy Ministry of the Russian Federation, within the collaborative US-Russia Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A) Program. Most of the equipment included in the Catalog are non-destructive assay (NDA) measurement devices employed for purposes of accounting, confirmation, and verification of nuclear materials. Other devices also included in the Catalog are employed in the detection and deterrence of unauthorized access to or removal of nuclear materials (material control: containment and surveillance). Equipment found in the Catalog comprises either: (1) complete devices or systems that can be used for MC and A applications; or (2) parts or components of complete systems, such as multi-channel analyzers, detectors, neutron generators, and software. All devices are categorized by their status of development--from prototype to serial production.

  2. Rotary mode system initial instrument calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, B.R.

    1994-10-01

    The attached report contains the vendor calibration procedures used for the initial instrument calibration of the rotary core sampling equipment. The procedures are from approved vendor information files.

  3. Solar Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A medical refrigeration and a water pump both powered by solar cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are among the line of solar powered equipment manufactured by IUS (Independent Utility Systems) for use in areas where conventional power is not available. IUS benefited from NASA technology incorporated in the solar panel design and from assistance provided by Kerr Industrial Applications Center.

  4. Telescope Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Renaissance Telescope for high resolution and visual astronomy has five 82-degree Field Tele-Vue Nagler Eyepieces, some of the accessories that contribute to high image quality. Telescopes and eyepieces are representative of a family of optical equipment manufactured by Tele-Vue Optics, Inc.

  5. Tailoring Instrumentation to the Operator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abplanalp, Glen H.; Menzenhauer, Fred C.

    1978-01-01

    This article provides guidelines in selecting appropriate instrumentation for water treatment facilities. Major areas of concern include: technical operating requirements of the process; equipment design and quality; installations; and mechanical aptitude of personnel. (CS)

  6. Experimenting with Woodwind Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    Simple experiments involving musical instruments of the woodwind family can be used to demonstrate the basic physics of vibrating air columns in resonance tubes using nothing more than straightforward measurements and data collection hardware and software. More involved experimentation with the same equipment can provide insight into the effects…

  7. 14 CFR 23.1381 - Instrument lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Instrument lights. 23.1381 Section 23.1381... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1381 Instrument lights. The instrument lights must— (a) Make each instrument and control easily readable and...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1381 - Instrument lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Instrument lights. 25.1381 Section 25.1381... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1381 Instrument lights. (a) The instrument lights must— (1) Provide sufficient illumination to make each instrument, switch and other...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1381 - Instrument lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Instrument lights. 23.1381 Section 23.1381... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1381 Instrument lights. The instrument lights must— (a) Make each instrument and control easily readable and...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1381 - Instrument lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Instrument lights. 25.1381 Section 25.1381... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1381 Instrument lights. (a) The instrument lights must— (1) Provide sufficient illumination to make each instrument, switch and other...

  11. 14 CFR 121.307 - Engine instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine instruments. 121.307 Section 121.307..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.307 Engine instruments. Unless the Administrator allows or requires different instrumentation for turbine engine...

  12. 14 CFR 121.307 - Engine instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engine instruments. 121.307 Section 121.307..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.307 Engine instruments. Unless the Administrator allows or requires different instrumentation for turbine engine...

  13. 14 CFR 23.1381 - Instrument lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Instrument lights. 23.1381 Section 23.1381... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1381 Instrument lights. The instrument lights must— (a) Make each instrument and control easily readable and...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1381 - Instrument lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Instrument lights. 23.1381 Section 23.1381... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1381 Instrument lights. The instrument lights must— (a) Make each instrument and control easily readable and...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1381 - Instrument lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Instrument lights. 23.1381 Section 23.1381... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 23.1381 Instrument lights. The instrument lights must— (a) Make each instrument and control easily readable and...

  16. 14 CFR 25.1381 - Instrument lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Instrument lights. 25.1381 Section 25.1381... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1381 Instrument lights. (a) The instrument lights must— (1) Provide sufficient illumination to make each instrument, switch and other...

  17. 14 CFR 25.1381 - Instrument lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Instrument lights. 25.1381 Section 25.1381... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1381 Instrument lights. (a) The instrument lights must— (1) Provide sufficient illumination to make each instrument, switch and other...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1381 - Instrument lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Instrument lights. 25.1381 Section 25.1381... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1381 Instrument lights. (a) The instrument lights must— (1) Provide sufficient illumination to make each instrument, switch and other...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1333 - Instrument systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Instrument systems. 25.1333 Section 25.1333... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Instruments: Installation § 25.1333 Instrument systems. For systems that operate the instruments required by § 25.1303(b) which are located at each...

  20. 14 CFR 29.1333 - Instrument systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Instrument systems. 29.1333 Section 29.1333... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Instruments: Installation § 29.1333 Instrument systems. For systems that operate the required flight instruments which are located at each pilot's...