Science.gov

Sample records for protects human retinal

  1. Somatostatin protects human retinal pericytes from inflammation mediated by microglia.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, Aurora; Arroba, Ana I; Beltramo, Elena; Valverde, Angela M; Porta, Massimo

    2017-11-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is usually considered a microvascular disease. However, involvement of the neuroretina in the early stages of DR has recently gained major credit. Inflammatory processes, leading to glial activation and neuronal apoptosis, develop early in the retina of diabetic subjects. Pericytes constitute a link between the vascular and the neural retina, play a central role in blood-retinal barrier maintenance, and may influence neuroinflammation. Somatostatin (SST) is a potent neuroprotective factor, which is down-regulated during early DR. In this paper, we have investigated the effects of the inflammatory signals triggered by the activation of microglia on inflammation and apoptosis/survival pathways in pericytes. Microglia cells (Bv-2) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or SST. Human retinal pericytes (HRP) were exposed to conditioned media (CM) collected from Bv-2 cells in physiological conditions and in the settings described above. A panel of inflammation, apoptosis and survival mediators was analyzed. HRP treated with LPS-CM showed a significant increase of pro-inflammatory (iNos and TNFα) and pro-apoptotic mediators (FasL, active caspase-8, tBid and Bax), and a concomitant decrease in pro-survival factors (BclxL and pAkt). SST added to LPS was able to counteract these effects in all conditions. In conclusion, SST is able to modulate apoptosis/survival pathways in HRP during microglia-mediated inflammation. These results demonstrate a crosstalk between microglia and retinal pericytes, evidencing a possible defensive role of microglia in the early phases of DR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Protective effects of human iPS-derived retinal pigment epithelium cell transplantation in the retinal dystrophic rat.

    PubMed

    Carr, Amanda-Jayne; Vugler, Anthony A; Hikita, Sherry T; Lawrence, Jean M; Gias, Carlos; Chen, Li Li; Buchholz, David E; Ahmado, Ahmad; Semo, Ma'ayan; Smart, Matthew J K; Hasan, Shazeen; da Cruz, Lyndon; Johnson, Lincoln V; Clegg, Dennis O; Coffey, Pete J

    2009-12-03

    Transformation of somatic cells with a set of embryonic transcription factors produces cells with the pluripotent properties of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). These induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have the potential to differentiate into any cell type, making them a potential source from which to produce cells as a therapeutic platform for the treatment of a wide range of diseases. In many forms of human retinal disease, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the underlying pathogenesis resides within the support cells of the retina, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). As a monolayer of cells critical to photoreceptor function and survival, the RPE is an ideally accessible target for cellular therapy. Here we report the differentiation of human iPS cells into RPE. We found that differentiated iPS-RPE cells were morphologically similar to, and expressed numerous markers of developing and mature RPE cells. iPS-RPE are capable of phagocytosing photoreceptor material, in vitro and in vivo following transplantation into the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) dystrophic rat. Our results demonstrate that iPS cells can be differentiated into functional iPS-RPE and that transplantation of these cells can facilitate the short-term maintenance of photoreceptors through phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments. Long-term visual function is maintained in this model of retinal disease even though the xenografted cells are eventually lost, suggesting a secondary protective host cellular response. These findings have identified an alternative source of replacement tissue for use in human retinal cellular therapies, and provide a new in vitro cellular model system in which to study RPE diseases affecting human patients.

  3. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides protected human retinal pigment epithelial cells against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lian; Lao, Wei; Ji, Qing-Shan; Yang, Zhi-Hao; Yu, Guo-Cheng; Zhong, Jing-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the protective effect and its mechanism of lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. METHODS ARPE-19 cells, a human retinal pigment epithelial cell lines, were exposed to different concentrations of H2O2 for 24h, then cell viability was measured by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay to get the properly concentration of H2O2 which can induce half apoptosis of APRE-19. With different concentrations of LBP pretreatment, the ARPE-19 cells were then exposed to appropriate concentration of H2O2, cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometric analysis. Expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bax were measured by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. RSULTS LBP significantly reduced the H2O2-induced ARPE-19 cells' apoptosis. LBP inhibited the H2O2-induced down-regulation of Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bax. CONCLUSION LBP could protect ARPE-19 cells from H2O2-induced apoptosis. The Bcl-2 family had relationship with the protective effects of LBP. PMID:25709900

  4. Melissa Officinalis L. Extracts Protect Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells against Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jeung, In Cheul; Jee, Donghyun; Rho, Chang-Rae; Kang, Seungbum

    2016-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the protective effect of ALS-L1023, an extract of Melissa officinalis L. (Labiatae; lemon balm) against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 cells). Methods: ARPE-19 cells were incubated with ALS-L1023 for 24 h and then treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed by flow cytometry. Caspase-3/7 activation and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) were measured to investigate the protective role of ALS-L1023 against apoptosis. The protective effect of ALS-L1023 against oxidative stress through activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) was evaluated by Western blot analysis. Results: ALS-L1023 clearly reduced H2O2-induced cell apoptosis and intracellular production of ROS. H2O2-induced oxidative stress increased caspase-3/7 activity and apoptotic PARP cleavage, which were significantly inhibited by ALS-L1023. Activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway was associated with the protective effect of ALS-L1023 on ARPE-19 cells. Conclusions: ALS-L1023 protected human RPE cells against oxidative damage. This suggests that ALS-L1023 has therapeutic potential for the prevention of dry age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26941573

  5. [Protective effect of blue light-absorbing IOLs on the human retinal pigment epithelium].

    PubMed

    Kernt, M; Hirneiss, C; Neubauer, A S; Lackerbauer, C A; Eibl, K H; Wolf, A; Ulbig, Mw; Kampik, A

    2010-02-01

    Primary human RPE cells were exposed to white light and either a SN60AT or SA60AT IOL was placed in the light beam. After 15-60 min of irradiation, viability, induction of apoptosis and cell death were determined in primary human RPE cells. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) and the anti-apoptotic XIAP protein and their mRNA were determined by RT-PCR, Western blot analysis and ELISA. Light exposure decreased cell viability depending on the duration of irradiation. Light-induced cell death and apoptosis as well as decrease of XIAP expression and cellular viability were significantly reduced by both the SN60AT and SA60AT IOL. In addition, these protective effects regarding light-induced cell damage were significantly stronger in the presence of the blue light-filtering SN60AT IOL compared to the SA60AT IOL. Both UV-filtering and blue light-absorbing IOLs reduce light-induced RPE damage. The blue light-absorbing IOL further reduced damage compared to the conventional IOL, which supports the hypothesis of possibly also preventing retinal damage in clinical use.

  6. Retinal Remodeling in Human Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B.W.; Pfeiffer, R.L.; Ferrell, W. D.; Watt, C.B.; Marmor, M.; Marc, R.E.

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies. PMID:27020758

  7. Retinal remodeling in human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Pfeiffer, R L; Ferrell, W D; Watt, C B; Marmor, M; Marc, R E

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies.

  8. Protection of retinal function by sulforaphane following retinal ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Ambrecht, Lindsay A; Perlman, Jay I; McDonnell, James F; Zhai, Yougang; Qiao, Liang; Bu, Ping

    2015-09-01

    Sulforaphane, a precursor of glucosinolate in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower, has been shown to protect brain ischemic injury. In this study, we examined the effect of systemic administration of sulforaphane on retinal ischemic reperfusion injury. Intraocular pressure was elevated in two groups of C57BL/6 mice (n = 8 per group) for 45 min to induce retinal ischemic reperfusion injury. Following retinal ischemic reperfusion injury, vehicle (1% DMSO saline) or sulforaphane (25 mg/kg/day) was administered intraperitoneally daily for 5 days. Scotopic electroretinography (ERG) was used to quantify retinal function prior to and one-week after retinal ischemic insult. Retinal morphology was examined one week after ischemic insult. Following ischemic reperfusion injury, ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced in the control mice. Sulforaphane treatment significantly attenuated ischemic-induced loss of retinal function as compared to vehicle treated mice. In vehicle treated mice, ischemic reperfusion injury produced marked thinning of the inner retinal layers, but the thinning of the inner retinal layers appeared significantly less with sulforaphane treatment. Thus, sulforaphane may be beneficial in the treatment of retinal disorders with ischemic reperfusion injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fisetin and luteolin protect human retinal pigment epithelial cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death and regulate inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hytti, Maria; Piippo, Niina; Korhonen, Eveliina; Honkakoski, Paavo; Kaarniranta, Kai; Kauppinen, Anu

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a clinical hallmark of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness among aged people in the Western world. Both inflammation and oxidative stress are known to play vital roles in the development of this disease. Here, we assess the ability of fisetin and luteolin, to protect ARPE-19 cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death and to decrease intracellular inflammation. We also compare the growth and reactivity of human ARPE-19 cells in serum-free and serum-containing conditions. The absence of serum in the culture medium did not prevent ARPE-19 cells from reaching full confluency but caused an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress-induced cell death. Both fisetin and luteolin protected ARPE-19 cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death. They also significantly decreased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines into the culture medium. The decrease in inflammation was associated with reduced activation of MAPKs and CREB, but was not linked to NF- κB or SIRT1. The ability of fisetin and luteolin to protect and repair stressed RPE cells even after the oxidative insult make them attractive in the search for treatments for AMD. PMID:26619957

  10. Bioactive compounds isolated from apple, tea, and ginger protect against dicarbonyl induced stress in cultured human retinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Chethan; Zhu, Yingdong; Sang, Shengmin; Ahmedna, Mohamed

    2016-02-15

    Methylglyoxal (MGO) is known to be a major precursor of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) which are linked to diabetes and its related complications. Naturally occurring bioactive compounds could play an important role in countering AGEs thereby minimizing the risk associated with their formation. In this study, eight specific bioactive compounds isolated from apple, tea and ginger were evaluated for their AGEs scavenging activity using Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial (H-RPE) cells treated with MGO. Among the eight specific compounds evaluated, (-)-epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG) from tea, phloretin in apple, and [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol from ginger were found to be most effective in preventing MGO-induced cytotoxicity in the epithelial cells. Investigation of possible underlying mechanisms suggests that that these compounds could act by modulating key regulative detoxifying enzymes via modifying nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) function. MGO-induced cytotoxicity led to increased levels of AGEs causing increase in Nε-(Carboxymethyl) lysine (CML) and glutathione (GSH) levels and over expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Data also showed that translocation of Nrf2 from cytosol to nucleus was inhibited, which decreased the expression of detoxifying enzyme like heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). The most potent bioactive compounds scavenged dicarbonyl compounds, inhibited AGEs formation and significantly reduced carbonyl stress by Nrf2 related pathway and restoration of HO-1 expression. These findings demonstrated the protective effect of bioactive compounds derived from food sources against MGO-induced carbonyl stress through activation of the Nrf2 related defense pathway, which is of significant importance for therapeutic interventions in complementary treatment/management of diabetes-related complications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  11. Apoptosis in human retinal degenerations.

    PubMed

    Xu, G Z; Li, W W; Tso, M O

    1996-01-01

    This paper examined the role of apoptosis in human retinal degenerations including pathologic myopia, age-related macular degeneration, serous retinal detachment, retinal lattice, and paving stone degenerations. Thirty-seven enucleated human eyes with 1 of the above-mentioned retinal degenerations were studied by histopathology and by TdT-mediated biotin-dUTP nicked-end labelling (TUNEL) technique. Tunnel labelling characteristic DNA fragmentation of apoptosis was observed in photoreceptor cells in 2 of the 4 eyes with pathologic myopia and in 4 of 16 eyes with age-related macular degeneration, 2 of which were exudative and 2 of which were atrophic. However, only a few scattered photoreceptor cells were labelled in 4 of 8 eyes with serous retinal detachment secondary to malignant melanoma of the choroid. Moreover, none of the photoreceptors cells in the 4 eyes with retinal lattice degeneration and 6 eyes with retinal paving stone degeneration were labelled. Apoptosis is 1 of the important pathways of photoreceptor cell degeneration in pathologic myopia and age-related macular degeneration.

  12. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    PubMed Central

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26503332

  13. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-10-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.

  14. Protective Effects of Human iPS-Derived Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells in Comparison with Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Human Neural Stem Cells on the Degenerating Retina in rd1 mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianan; Mandai, Michiko; Kamao, Hiroyuki; Hashiguchi, Tomoyo; Shikamura, Masayuki; Kawamata, Shin; Sugita, Sunao; Takahashi, Masayo

    2015-05-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of visual impairments characterized by progressive rod photoreceptor cell loss due to a genetic background. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) predominantly secreted by the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) has been reported to protect photoreceptors in retinal degeneration models, including rd1. In addition, clinical trials are currently underway outside Japan using human mesenchymal stromal cells and human neural stem cells to protect photoreceptors in RP and dry age-related macular degeneration, respectively. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the rescue effects of induced pluripotent stem (iPS)-RPE cells in comparison with those types of cells used in clinical trials on photoreceptor degeneration in rd1 mice. Cells were injected into the subretinal space of immune-suppressed 2-week-old rd1 mice. The results demonstrated that human iPS-RPE cells significantly attenuated photoreceptor degeneration on postoperative days (PODs) 14 and 21 and survived longer up to at least 12 weeks after operation than the other two types of graft cells with less immune responses and apoptosis. The mean PEDF concentration in the intraocular fluid in RPE-transplanted eyes was more than 1 µg/ml at PODs 14 and 21, and this may have contributed to the protective effect of RPE transplantation. Our findings suggest that iPS-RPE cells serve as a competent source to delay photoreceptor degeneration through stable survival in degenerating ocular environment and by releasing neuroprotective factors such as PEDF.

  15. Brilliant Blue G as protective agent against trypan blue toxicity in human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Awad, Doaa; Schrader, Imke; Bartok, Melinda; Sudumbrekar, Neeti; Mohr, Andreas; Gabel, Detlef

    2013-07-01

    Combinations of trypan blue (TB), Brilliant Blue G (BBG) and polyethyleneglycol had been shown before to be less toxic to ARPE retinal pigment epithelial cells than TB alone. We studied systematically the influence of combinations of dyes on cell damage. ARPE cells were exposed to TB (concentration range 0.025 to 1 %), BBG (0.0025 to 0.5 %), and combinations of the two dyes, dissolved in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), for periods between 5 and 60 min. Cell damage was monitored with the WST-1 assay. The effect of different salt concentration was measured in the same way. TB in concentrations of 0.075 % and higher was toxic to the cells already after 30 min incubation. BBG was toxic after 30 min in concentration of 0.1 % and higher, but had a protective effect on cells with incubation time of 5 min and concentrations up to 0.1 %. BBG at concentrations of 0.025 % protected against TB-induced damage at 5 min and 30 min incubation. Salt concentrations between 113 and 225 mM did not influence cell survival even after 30 min. In the presence of TB, propidium iodide bound strongly to the cells. BBG acts as a protecting agent against TB toxicity.

  16. N-Acetylcysteine Amide Protects Against Oxidative Stress–Induced Microparticle Release From Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Kyle A.; Yang, Dongli

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Oxidative stress is a major factor involved in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) apoptosis that underlies AMD. Drusen, extracellular lipid- and protein-containing deposits, are strongly associated with the development of AMD. Cell-derived microparticles (MPs) are small membrane-bound vesicles shed from cells. The purpose of this study was to determine if oxidative stress drives MP release from RPE cells, to assess whether these MPs carry membrane complement regulatory proteins (mCRPs: CD46, CD55, and CD59), and to evaluate the effects of a thiol antioxidant on oxidative stress–induced MP release. Methods Retinal pigment epithelium cells isolated from human donor eyes were cultured and treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to induce oxidative stress. Isolated MPs were fixed for transmission electron microscopy or processed for component analysis by flow cytometry, Western blot analysis, and confocal microscopy. Results Transmission electron microscopy showed that MPs ranged in diameter from 100 to 1000 nm. H2O2 treatment led to time- and dose-dependent elevations in MPs with externalized phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, known markers of MPs. These increases were strongly correlated to RPE apoptosis. Oxidative stress significantly increased the release of mCRP-positive MPs, which were prevented by a thiol antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA). Conclusions This is the first evidence that oxidative stress induces cultured human RPE cells to release MPs that carry mCRPs on their surface. The levels of released MPs are strongly correlated with RPE apoptosis. N-acetylcysteine amide prevents oxidative stress–induced effects. Our findings indicate that oxidative stress reduces mCRPs on the RPE surface through releasing MPs. PMID:26842754

  17. Cholecystokinin octapeptide antagonizes apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Yueling; Gu, Zhaohui; Hao, Lina; Du, Juan; Yang, Qian; Li, Suping; Wang, Liying; Gong, Shilei

    2014-07-15

    Although cholecystokinin octapeptide-8 is important for neurological function, its neuroprotective properties remain unclear. We speculated that cholecystokinin octapeptide-8 can protect human retinal pigment epithelial cells against oxidative injury. In this study, retinal pigment epithelial cells were treated with peroxynitrite to induce oxidative stress. Peroxynitrite triggered apoptosis in these cells, and increased the expression of Fas-associated death domain, Bax, caspa-se-8 and Bcl-2. These changes were suppressed by treatment with cholecystokinin octapeptide-8. These results suggest that cholecystokinin octapeptide-8 can protect human retinal pigment epithelial cells against apoptosis induced by peroxynitrite.

  18. Cholecystokinin octapeptide antagonizes apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Yueling; Gu, Zhaohui; Hao, Lina; Du, Juan; Yang, Qian; Li, Suping; Wang, Liying; Gong, Shilei

    2014-01-01

    Although cholecystokinin octapeptide-8 is important for neurological function, its neuroprotective properties remain unclear. We speculated that cholecystokinin octapeptide-8 can protect human retinal pigment epithelial cells against oxidative injury. In this study, retinal pigment epithelial cells were treated with peroxynitrite to induce oxidative stress. Peroxynitrite triggered apoptosis in these cells, and increased the expression of Fas-associated death domain, Bax, caspa-se-8 and Bcl-2. These changes were suppressed by treatment with cholecystokinin octapeptide-8. These results suggest that cholecystokinin octapeptide-8 can protect human retinal pigment epithelial cells against apoptosis induced by peroxynitrite. PMID:25221599

  19. Resveratrol protects against ultraviolet A-mediated inhibition of the phagocytic function of human retinal pigment epithelial cells via large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Shwu-Jiuan; Wu, Tsung-Tien

    2009-07-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the protective effect of resveratrol on human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell phagocytosis against ultraviolet irradiation damage. Cultured RPE cells were exposed to ultraviolet A (UVA, 20 minutes) irradiation, and treated with meclofenamic acid (30 microM, 20 minutes), paxilline (100 nM, 20 minutes) or resveratrol (10 microM, 20 minutes). Meclofenamic acid and resveratrol were given after exposure to UVA. Pretreatment with meclofenamic acid, resveratrol or paxilline before UVA irradiation was also performed. Fluorescent latex beads were then fed for 4 hours and the phagocytotic function was assessed by flow cytometry. UVA irradiation inhibited the phagocytic function of human RPE cells. The large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel activator meclofenamic acid ameliorated the damage caused by UVA irradiation. Pretreatment with resveratrol acid also provided protection against damage caused by UVA. Posttreatment with meclofenamic acid offered mild protection, whereas resveratrol did not. In conclusion, the red wine flavonoid resveratrol ameliorated UVA-mediated inhibition of human RPE phagocytosis. The underlying mechanism might involve the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels.

  20. Molecular pharmacodynamics of emixustat in protection against retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianye; Kiser, Philip D.; Badiee, Mohsen; Palczewska, Grazyna; Dong, Zhiqian; Golczak, Marcin; Tochtrop, Gregory P.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Emixustat is a visual cycle modulator that has entered clinical trials as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This molecule has been proposed to inhibit the visual cycle isomerase RPE65, thereby slowing regeneration of 11-cis-retinal and reducing production of retinaldehyde condensation byproducts that may be involved in AMD pathology. Previously, we reported that all-trans-retinal (atRAL) is directly cytotoxic and that certain primary amine compounds that transiently sequester atRAL via Schiff base formation ameliorate retinal degeneration. Here, we have shown that emixustat stereoselectively inhibits RPE65 by direct active site binding. However, we detected the presence of emixustat-atRAL Schiff base conjugates, indicating that emixustat also acts as a retinal scavenger, which may contribute to its therapeutic effects. Using agents that lack either RPE65 inhibitory activity or the capacity to sequester atRAL, we assessed the relative importance of these 2 modes of action in protection against retinal phototoxicity in mice. The atRAL sequestrant QEA-B-001-NH2 conferred protection against phototoxicity without inhibiting RPE65, whereas an emixustat derivative incapable of atRAL sequestration was minimally protective, despite direct inhibition of RPE65. These data indicate that atRAL sequestration is an essential mechanism underlying the protective effects of emixustat and related compounds against retinal phototoxicity. Moreover, atRAL sequestration should be considered in the design of next-generation visual cycle modulators. PMID:26075817

  1. Molecular pharmacodynamics of emixustat in protection against retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianye; Kiser, Philip D; Badiee, Mohsen; Palczewska, Grazyna; Dong, Zhiqian; Golczak, Marcin; Tochtrop, Gregory P; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-07-01

    Emixustat is a visual cycle modulator that has entered clinical trials as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This molecule has been proposed to inhibit the visual cycle isomerase RPE65, thereby slowing regeneration of 11-cis-retinal and reducing production of retinaldehyde condensation byproducts that may be involved in AMD pathology. Previously, we reported that all-trans-retinal (atRAL) is directly cytotoxic and that certain primary amine compounds that transiently sequester atRAL via Schiff base formation ameliorate retinal degeneration. Here, we have shown that emixustat stereoselectively inhibits RPE65 by direct active site binding. However, we detected the presence of emixustat-atRAL Schiff base conjugates, indicating that emixustat also acts as a retinal scavenger, which may contribute to its therapeutic effects. Using agents that lack either RPE65 inhibitory activity or the capacity to sequester atRAL, we assessed the relative importance of these 2 modes of action in protection against retinal phototoxicity in mice. The atRAL sequestrant QEA-B-001-NH2 conferred protection against phototoxicity without inhibiting RPE65, whereas an emixustat derivative incapable of atRAL sequestration was minimally protective, despite direct inhibition of RPE65. These data indicate that atRAL sequestration is an essential mechanism underlying the protective effects of emixustat and related compounds against retinal phototoxicity. Moreover, atRAL sequestration should be considered in the design of next-generation visual cycle modulators.

  2. Human Retinal Progenitor Cell Transplantation Preserves Vision*

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jing; Baranov, Petr; Patel, Sherrina; Ouyang, Hong; Quach, John; Wu, Frances; Qiu, Austin; Luo, Hongrong; Hicks, Caroline; Zeng, Jing; Zhu, Jing; Lu, Jessica; Sfeir, Nicole; Wen, Cindy; Zhang, Meixia; Reade, Victoria; Patel, Sara; Sinden, John; Sun, Xiaodong; Shaw, Peter; Young, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Cell transplantation is a potential therapeutic strategy for retinal degenerative diseases involving the loss of photoreceptors. However, it faces challenges to clinical translation due to safety concerns and a limited supply of cells. Human retinal progenitor cells (hRPCs) from fetal neural retina are expandable in vitro and maintain an undifferentiated state. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of hRPCs transplanted into a Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat model of retinal degeneration. At 12 weeks, optokinetic response showed that hRPC-grafted eyes had significantly superior visual acuity compared with vehicle-treated eyes. Histological evaluation of outer nuclear layer (ONL) characteristics such as ONL thickness, spread distance, and cell count demonstrated a significantly greater preservation of the ONL in hRPC-treated eyes compared with both vehicle-treated and control eyes. The transplanted hRPCs arrested visual decline over time in the RCS rat and rescued retinal morphology, demonstrating their potential as a therapy for retinal diseases. We suggest that the preservation of visual acuity was likely achieved through host photoreceptor rescue. We found that hRPC transplantation into the subretinal space of RCS rats was well tolerated, with no adverse effects such as tumor formation noted at 12 weeks after treatment. PMID:24407289

  3. Aerobic Exercise Protects Retinal Function and Structure from Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Eric C.; Han, Moon K.; Sellers, Jana T.; Chrenek, Micah A.; Hanif, Adam; Gogniat, Marissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic exercise is a common intervention for rehabilitation of motor, and more recently, cognitive function (Intlekofer and Cotman, 2013; Wood et al., 2012). While the underlying mechanisms are complex, BDNF may mediate much of the beneficial effects of exercise to these neurons (Ploughman et al., 2007; Griffin et al., 2011; Real et al., 2013). We studied the effects of aerobic exercise on retinal neurons undergoing degeneration. We exercised wild-type BALB/c mice on a treadmill (10 m/min for 1 h) for 5 d/week or placed control mice on static treadmills. After 2 weeks of exercise, mice were exposed to either toxic bright light (10,000 lux) for 4 h to induce photoreceptor degeneration or maintenance dim light (25 lux). Bright light caused 75% loss of both retinal function and photoreceptor numbers. However, exercised mice exposed to bright light had 2 times greater retinal function and photoreceptor nuclei than inactive mice exposed to bright light. In addition, exercise increased retinal BDNF protein levels by 20% compared with inactive mice. Systemic injections of a BDNF tropomyosin-receptor-kinase (TrkB) receptor antagonist reduced retinal function and photoreceptor nuclei counts in exercised mice to inactive levels, effectively blocking the protective effects seen with aerobic exercise. The data suggest that aerobic exercise is neuroprotective for retinal degeneration and that this effect is mediated by BDNF signaling. PMID:24523530

  4. Aerobic exercise protects retinal function and structure from light-induced retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Eric C; Han, Moon K; Sellers, Jana T; Chrenek, Micah A; Hanif, Adam; Gogniat, Marissa A; Boatright, Jeffrey H; Pardue, Machelle T

    2014-02-12

    Aerobic exercise is a common intervention for rehabilitation of motor, and more recently, cognitive function (Intlekofer and Cotman, 2013; Wood et al., 2012). While the underlying mechanisms are complex, BDNF may mediate much of the beneficial effects of exercise to these neurons (Ploughman et al., 2007; Griffin et al., 2011; Real et al., 2013). We studied the effects of aerobic exercise on retinal neurons undergoing degeneration. We exercised wild-type BALB/c mice on a treadmill (10 m/min for 1 h) for 5 d/week or placed control mice on static treadmills. After 2 weeks of exercise, mice were exposed to either toxic bright light (10,000 lux) for 4 h to induce photoreceptor degeneration or maintenance dim light (25 lux). Bright light caused 75% loss of both retinal function and photoreceptor numbers. However, exercised mice exposed to bright light had 2 times greater retinal function and photoreceptor nuclei than inactive mice exposed to bright light. In addition, exercise increased retinal BDNF protein levels by 20% compared with inactive mice. Systemic injections of a BDNF tropomyosin-receptor-kinase (TrkB) receptor antagonist reduced retinal function and photoreceptor nuclei counts in exercised mice to inactive levels, effectively blocking the protective effects seen with aerobic exercise. The data suggest that aerobic exercise is neuroprotective for retinal degeneration and that this effect is mediated by BDNF signaling.

  5. Comparison of A2E Cyto- and Phototoxicity with all-trans-Retinal in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells†

    PubMed Central

    Wielgus, Albert R.; Chignell, Colin F.; Ceger, Patricia; Roberts, Joan E.

    2010-01-01

    All-trans-retinal is the precursor of A2E, a fluorophore within lipofuscin, which accumulates in human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells and contributes to age-related macular degeneration. Here we have compared the in vitro dark cytotoxicity and visible-light-mediated photoreactivity of all-trans-retinal and A2E in hRPE cells. All-trans-retinal caused distinct cytotoxicity in hRPE cells measured with MTS and LDH assays. Significant increases in intracellular oxidized glutathione (GSSG), extracellular GSH and GSSG levels and lipid hydroperoxide production were observed in cells incubated in the dark with 25 and 50 μM all-trans-retinal. Light modified all-trans-retinal's harmful action and decreased extracellular glutathione and hydroperoxide levels. A2E (<25 μM) did not affect cell metabolism or cytoplasmic membrane integrity in the dark or when irradiated. 25 μM A2E raised the intracellular GSSG level in hRPE cells to a much smaller extent than 25 μM all-trans-retinal. A2E did not induce glutathione efflux or hydroperoxide generation in the dark or after irradiation. These studies support our previous conclusions that although A2E may be harmful at high concentrations or when oxidized, its phototoxic properties are insignificant compared to those of all-trans-retinal. The endogenous production of A2E may serve as a protective mechanism to prevent damage to the retina by free all-trans-retinal. PMID:20497365

  6. The Protective Effect of Brown-, Gray-, and Blue-Tinted Lenses against Blue LED Light-Induced Cell Death in A2E-Laden Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Il; Jang, Young Pyo

    2017-01-01

    A2E-laden ARPE-19 cells were exposed to a blue light to induce cytotoxicity, in order to investigate the protective effects of various tinted ophthalmic lenses against photo-induced cytotoxicity in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells laden with A2E, known to be among the etiologies of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Different-colored tinted lenses with varying levels of tint and different filtering characteristics, such as polarized, blue-cut, and photochromatic lenses, were placed over the cells, and the protective efficacies thereof were evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase assay. When tinted lenses were placed over ARPE-19 cells, there were different reductions in cytotoxicity according to the colors and tint levels. The level of protection afforded by brown-tinted lenses was 6.9, 36.1, and 49% with a tint level of 15, 50, and 80%, respectively. For gray-tinted lenses, the protective effect was 16.3, 35, and 43.4% for the corresponding degree of tint, respectively. In the case of blue-tinted lenses, a protective effect of 20% was observed with 80% tinted lenses, but 15 and 50% tinted lenses provided no significant protection. In addition, photochromic lenses showed a protective effect but blue-cut lenses and polarized lenses provided no significant protection. Tinted lenses significantly reduced cytotoxicity in RPE cells irradiated with blue light. The protection was more efficient in lenses with a brown or gray tint than in blue-tinted lenses. Tinted glasses may provide significant protection against potential blue-light-induced photochemical and photo-oxidative damage in RPE cells. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. SiC protective coating for photovoltaic retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xin; Kane, Sheryl; Cogan, Stuart; Lorach, Henri; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Theodore; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Objective. To evaluate plasma-enhanced, chemically vapor deposited (PECVD) amorphous silicon carbide (α-SiC:H) as a protective coating for retinal prostheses and other implantable devices, and to study their failure mechanisms in vivo. Approach. Retinal prostheses were implanted in rats sub-retinally for up to 1 year. Degradation of implants was characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Dissolution rates of SiC, SiN x and thermal SiO2 were measured in accelerated soaking tests in saline at 87 °C. Defects in SiC films were revealed and analyzed by selectively removing the materials underneath those defects. Main results. At 87 °C SiN x dissolved at 18.3 ± 0.3 nm d-1, while SiO2 grown at high temperature (1000 °C) dissolved at 0.104 ± 0.008 nm d-1. SiC films demonstrated the best stability, with no quantifiable change after 112 d. Defects in thin SiC films appeared primarily over complicated topography and rough surfaces. Significance. SiC coatings demonstrating no erosion in accelerated aging test for 112 d at 87 °C, equivalent to about 10 years in vivo, can offer effective protection of the implants. Photovoltaic retinal prostheses with PECVD SiC coatings exhibited effective protection from erosion during the 4 month follow-up in vivo. The optimal thickness of SiC layers is about 560 nm, as defined by anti-reflective properties and by sufficient coverage to eliminate defects.

  8. Choroidal γδ T cells in protection against retinal pigment epithelium and retinal injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenyang; Liang, Yuejin; Liu, Yin; Xu, Pei; Flamme-Wiese, Miles J; Sun, Deming; Sun, Jiaren; Mullins, Robert F; Chen, Yan; Cai, Jiyang

    2017-07-20

    γδ T cells located near the epithelial barrier are integral components of local inflammatory and innate immune responses. We have previously reported the presence of choroidal γδ T cells in a model of chronic degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The goals of the current study were to further define the functions of choroidal γδ T cells and to explore the underlying mechanisms of their action. Our data demonstrate that choroidal γδ T cells are activated by RPE injury in response to NaIO3 treatment, and that they express genes that encode immunosuppressive cytokines, such as IL-4 and IL-10. γδ T cell-deficient mice developed profound RPE and retinal damage at doses that caused minimal effects in wild-type mice, and adoptive transfer of γδ T cells prevented sensitization. Intravitreal injection of IL-4 and IL-10 ameliorated RPE toxicity that was induced by NaIO3Ex vivo coculture of γδ T cells with RPE explants activated the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines via an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-dependent mechanism. AhR deficiency abolished the protective effects of γδ T cells after adoptive transfer. Collectively, these findings define important roles for choroid γδ T cells in maintaining tissue homeostasis in the outer retina.-Zhao, Z., Liang, Y., Liu, Y., Xu, P., Flamme-Wiese, M. J., Sun, D., Sun, J., Mullins, R. F., Chen, Y., Cai, J. Choroidal γδ T cells in protection against retinal pigment epithelium and retinal injury. © FASEB.

  9. Protection of Retina by αB Crystallin in Sodium Iodate Induced Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Kannan, Ram; Spee, Christine; Sreekumar, Parameswaran G.; Dou, Guorui; Hinton, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in the developed world. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a critical site of pathology in AMD and αB crystallin expression is increased in RPE and associated drusen in AMD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of αB crystallin in sodium iodate (NaIO3)-induced retinal degeneration, a model of AMD in which the primary site of pathology is the RPE. Dose dependent effects of intravenous NaIO3 (20-70 mg/kg) on development of retinal degeneration (fundus photography) and RPE and retinal neuronal loss (histology) were determined in wild type and αB crystallin knockout mice. Absence of αB crystallin augmented retinal degeneration in low dose (20 mg/kg) NaIO3-treated mice and increased retinal cell apoptosis which was mainly localized to the RPE layer. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was observed with NaIO3 in mouse and human RPE which increased further after αB crystallin knockout or siRNA knockdown, respectively. NaIO3 upregulated AKT phosphorylation and peroxisome proliferator–activator receptor–γ (PPARγ) which was suppressed after αB crystallin siRNA knockdown. Further, PPARγ ligand inhibited NaIO3-induced ROS generation. Our data suggest that αB crystallin plays a critical role in protection of NaIO3-induced oxidative stress and retinal degeneration in part through upregulation of AKT phosphorylation and PPARγ expression. PMID:24874187

  10. Enhanced expression of glutathione-S-transferase A1-1 protects against oxidative stress in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fong-Qi; Alssadi, Rajiha; Morehead, Preston; Awasthi, Yogesh C; Godley, Bernard F

    2005-01-01

    Glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) play an important role in protection mechanisms against oxidative stress. We sought to determine whether over-expression of human GSTA1-1 in RPE cells is able to attenuate H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress. SV40-transformed human fetal RPE cells were stably transfected with pRC/hGSTA1-1 vector which carries a full-length of human GSTA1-1 cDNA. The control RPE cells were either non-transfected or transfected with control vector pRC. Expression of hGSTA1-1 protein in these cells was confirmed by Western blot and immunocytochemical analyses. The protective effects of hGSTA1-1 on cell viability and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage caused by H(2)O(2) were examined with MTT assay and quantitative PCR (QPCR), respectively. The hGSTA1-1 transfected RPE cells exhibited a similar morphology and growth rate as control RPE cells. Immunocytochemical analysis showed robust expression hGSTA1-1 in hGSTA1-1 transfected cells versus background staining in control cells. Western blotting of protein extracts from cells transfected with hGSTA1-1 revealed a 26 kDa protein band which corresponds to the size of recombinant mature hGSTA1-1. The active GST present in the hGSTA1-1 transfected cells was approximately three times higher than in control cells. The MTT assay showed a significantly greater viability of hGSTA1-1 cells in response to H(2)O(2) (100 and 200 microm) compared to control cells (p<0.05). QPCR indicated that mtDNA damage was significantly decreased in hGSTA1-1 cells than in control cells (p<0.05). Human GSTA1-1 transfection protect against RPE cell death and mtDNA damage caused by H(2)O(2), suggesting an important role of GST in protection against oxidative stress in RPE cells.

  11. The novel triterpenoid RTA 408 protects human retinal pigment epithelial cells against H2O2-induced cell injury via NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaobin; Ward, Keith; Xavier, Christy; Jann, Jamieson; Clark, Abbot F.; Pang, Iok-Hou; Wu, Hongli

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress-induced retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell damage is an important factor in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Previous studies have shown that RTA 408, a synthetic triterpenoid compound, potently activates Nrf2. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of RTA 408 in cultured RPE cells during oxidative stress and to determine the effects of RTA 408 on Nrf2 and its downstream target genes. Primary human RPE cells were pretreated with RTA 408 and then incubated in 200 μM H2O2 for 6 h. Cell viability was measured with the WST-8 assay. Apoptosis was quantitatively measured by annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining and Hoechst 33342 fluorescent staining. Reduced (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were measured using colorimetric assays. Nrf2 activation and its downstream effects on phase II enzymes were examined by Western blot. Treatment of RPE cells with nanomolar ranges (10 and 100 nM) of RTA 408 markedly attenuated H2O2-induced viability loss and apoptosis. RTA 408 pretreatment significantly protected cells from oxidative stress-induced GSH loss, GSSG formation and decreased ROS production. RTA 408 activated Nrf2 and increased the expression of its downstream genes, such as HO-1, NQO1, SOD2, catalase, Grx1, and Trx1. Consequently, the enzyme activities of NQO1, Grx1, and Trx1 were fully protected by RTA 408 pretreatment under oxidative stress. Moreover, knockdown of Nrf2 by siRNA significantly reduced the cytoprotective effects of RTA 408. In conclusion, our data suggest that RTA 408 protect primary human RPE cells from oxidative stress-induced damage by activating Nrf2 and its downstream genes. PMID:26773873

  12. The novel triterpenoid RTA 408 protects human retinal pigment epithelial cells against H2O2-induced cell injury via NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaobin; Ward, Keith; Xavier, Christy; Jann, Jamieson; Clark, Abbot F; Pang, Iok-Hou; Wu, Hongli

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress-induced retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell damage is an important factor in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Previous studies have shown that RTA 408, a synthetic triterpenoid compound, potently activates Nrf2. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of RTA 408 in cultured RPE cells during oxidative stress and to determine the effects of RTA 408 on Nrf2 and its downstream target genes. Primary human RPE cells were pretreated with RTA 408 and then incubated in 200μM H2O2 for 6h. Cell viability was measured with the WST-8 assay. Apoptosis was quantitatively measured by annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining and Hoechst 33342 fluorescent staining. Reduced (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were measured using colorimetric assays. Nrf2 activation and its downstream effects on phase II enzymes were examined by Western blot. Treatment of RPE cells with nanomolar ranges (10 and 100nM) of RTA 408 markedly attenuated H2O2-induced viability loss and apoptosis. RTA 408 pretreatment significantly protected cells from oxidative stress-induced GSH loss, GSSG formation and decreased ROS production. RTA 408 activated Nrf2 and increased the expression of its downstream genes, such as HO-1, NQO1, SOD2, catalase, Grx1, and Trx1. Consequently, the enzyme activities of NQO1, Grx1, and Trx1 were fully protected by RTA 408 pretreatment under oxidative stress. Moreover, knockdown of Nrf2 by siRNA significantly reduced the cytoprotective effects of RTA 408. In conclusion, our data suggest that RTA 408 protect primary human RPE cells from oxidative stress-induced damage by activating Nrf2 and its downstream genes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. SiC Protective Coating for Photovoltaic Retinal Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xin; Kane, Sheryl; Cogan, Stuart; Lorach, Henri; Galambos, Ludwig; Huie, Philip; Mathieson, Keith; Kamins, Theodore; Harris, James; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate PECVD SiC as a protective coating for retinal prostheses and other implantable devices, and to study their failure mechanisms in vivo. Approach Retinal prostheses were implanted in rats subretinally for up to 1 year. Degradation of implants was characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Dissolution rates of SiC, SiNx and thermal SiO2 were measured in accelerated soaking tests in saline at 87°C. Defects in SiC films were revealed and analyzed by selectively removing the materials underneath those defects. Main results At 87°C SiNx dissolved at 18.3±0.3nm/day, while SiO2 grown at high temperature (1000°C) dissolved at 1.04±0.08A/day. SiC films demonstrated the best stability, with no quantifiable change after 112 days. Defects in thin SiC films appeared primarily over complicated topography and rough surfaces. Significance SiC coatings demonstrating no erosion in accelerated aging test for 112 days at 87°C, equivalent to about 10 years in vivo, can offer effective protection of the implants. Photovoltaic retinal prostheses with PECVD SiC coatings exhibited effective protection from erosion during the 4-month follow-up in vivo. The optimal thickness of SiC layers is about 560nm, as defined by anti-reflective properties and by sufficient coverage to eliminate defects. PMID:27323882

  14. Long-term safety of human retinal progenitor cell transplantation in retinitis pigmentosa patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Chen, Shao Jun; Li, Shi Ying; Qu, Ling Hui; Meng, Xiao Hong; Wang, Yi; Xu, Hai Wei; Liang, Zhi Qing; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2017-09-29

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a common genetic disease that causes retinal degeneration and blindness for which there is currently no curable treatment available. Vision preservation was observed in retinitis pigmentosa animal models after retinal stem cell transplantation. However, long-term safety studies and visual assessment have not been thoroughly tested in retinitis pigmentosa patients. In our pre-clinical study, purified human fetal-derived retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) were transplanted into the diseased retina of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, a model of retinal degeneration. Based on these results, we conducted a phase I clinical trial to establish the safety and tolerability of transplantation of RPCs in eight patients with advanced retinitis pigmentosa. Patients were studied for 24 months. After RPC transplantation in RCS rats, we observed moderate recovery of vision and maintenance of the outer nuclear layer thickness. Most importantly, we did not find tumor formation or immune rejection. In the retinis pigmentosa patients given RPC injections, we also did not observe immunological rejection or tumorigenesis when immunosuppressive agents were not administered. We observed a significant improvement in visual acuity (P < 0.05) in five patients and an increase in retinal sensitivity of pupillary responses in three of the eight patients between 2 and 6 months after the transplant, but this improvement did not appear by 12 months. Our study for the first time confirmed the long-term safety and feasibility of vision repair by stem cell therapy in patients blinded by retinitis pigmentosa. WHO Trial Registration, ChiCTR-TNRC-08000193 . Retrospectively registered on 5 December 2008.

  15. Inferior retinal light exposure is more effective than superior retinal exposure in suppressing melatonin in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glickman, Gena; Hanifin, John P.; Rollag, Mark D.; Wang, Jenny; Cooper, Howard; Brainard, George C.

    2003-01-01

    Illumination of different areas of the human retina elicits differences in acute light-induced suppression of melatonin. The aim of this study was to compare changes in plasma melatonin levels when light exposures of equal illuminance and equal photon dose were administered to superior, inferior, and full retinal fields. Nine healthy subjects participated in the study. Plexiglass eye shields were modified to permit selective exposure of the superior and inferior halves of the retinas of each subject. The Humphrey Visual Field Analyzer was used both to confirm intact full visual fields and to quantify exposure of upper and lower visual fields. On study nights, eyes were dilated, and subjects were exposed to patternless white light for 90 min between 0200 and 0330 under five conditions: (1) full retinal exposure at 200 lux, (2) full retinal exposure at 100 lux, (3) inferior retinal exposure at 200 lux, (4) superior retinal exposure at 200 lux, and (5) a dark-exposed control. Plasma melatonin levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. ANOVA demonstrated a significant effect of exposure condition (F = 5.91, p < 0.005). Post hoc Fisher PLSD tests showed significant (p < 0.05) melatonin suppression of both full retinal exposures as well as the inferior retinal exposure; however, superior retinal exposure was significantly less effective in suppressing melatonin. Furthermore, suppression with superior retinal exposure was not significantly different from that of the dark control condition. The results indicate that the inferior retina contributes more to the light-induced suppression of melatonin than the superior retina at the photon dosages tested in this study. Findings suggest a greater sensitivity or denser distribution of photoreceptors in the inferior retina are involved in light detection for the retinohypothalamic tract of humans.

  16. Inferior retinal light exposure is more effective than superior retinal exposure in suppressing melatonin in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glickman, Gena; Hanifin, John P.; Rollag, Mark D.; Wang, Jenny; Cooper, Howard; Brainard, George C.

    2003-01-01

    Illumination of different areas of the human retina elicits differences in acute light-induced suppression of melatonin. The aim of this study was to compare changes in plasma melatonin levels when light exposures of equal illuminance and equal photon dose were administered to superior, inferior, and full retinal fields. Nine healthy subjects participated in the study. Plexiglass eye shields were modified to permit selective exposure of the superior and inferior halves of the retinas of each subject. The Humphrey Visual Field Analyzer was used both to confirm intact full visual fields and to quantify exposure of upper and lower visual fields. On study nights, eyes were dilated, and subjects were exposed to patternless white light for 90 min between 0200 and 0330 under five conditions: (1) full retinal exposure at 200 lux, (2) full retinal exposure at 100 lux, (3) inferior retinal exposure at 200 lux, (4) superior retinal exposure at 200 lux, and (5) a dark-exposed control. Plasma melatonin levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. ANOVA demonstrated a significant effect of exposure condition (F = 5.91, p < 0.005). Post hoc Fisher PLSD tests showed significant (p < 0.05) melatonin suppression of both full retinal exposures as well as the inferior retinal exposure; however, superior retinal exposure was significantly less effective in suppressing melatonin. Furthermore, suppression with superior retinal exposure was not significantly different from that of the dark control condition. The results indicate that the inferior retina contributes more to the light-induced suppression of melatonin than the superior retina at the photon dosages tested in this study. Findings suggest a greater sensitivity or denser distribution of photoreceptors in the inferior retina are involved in light detection for the retinohypothalamic tract of humans.

  17. The Oral Iron Chelator Deferiprone Protects against Iron Overload–Induced Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hadziahmetovic, Majda; Song, Ying; Wolkow, Natalie; Iacovelli, Jared; Grieco, Steven; Lee, Jennifer; Lyubarsky, Arkady; Pratico, Domenico; Connelly, John; Spino, Michael; Harris, Z. Leah

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Iron-induced oxidative stress may exacerbate age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Ceruloplasmin/Hephaestin double-knockout (DKO) mice with age-dependent retinal iron accumulation and some features of AMD were used to test retinal protection by the oral iron chelator deferiprone (DFP). Methods. Cultured retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells and mice were treated with DFP. Transferrin receptor mRNA (Tfrc), an indicator of iron levels, was quantified by qPCR. In mice, retinal oxidative stress was assessed by mass spectrometry, and degeneration by histology and electroretinography. Results. DFP at 60 μM decreased labile iron in ARPE-19 cells, increasing Tfrc and protecting 70% of cells against a lethal dose of H2O2. DFP 1 mg/mL in drinking water increased retinal Tfrc mRNA 2.7-fold after 11 days and also increased transferrin receptor protein. In DKOs, DFP over 8 months decreased retinal iron levels to 72% of untreated mice, diminished retinal oxidative stress to 70% of the untreated level, and markedly ameliorated retinal degeneration. DFP was not retina toxic in wild-type (WT) or DKO mice, as assessed by histology and electroretinography. Conclusions. Oral DFP was not toxic to the mouse retina. It diminished retinal iron levels and oxidative stress and protected DKO mice against iron overload–induced retinal degeneration. Further testing of DFP for retinal disease involving oxidative stress is warranted. PMID:21051716

  18. Protective Effect of Proanthocyanidins from Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae Rhamnoides L.) Seed against Visible Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Zhao, Liang; Huo, Yazhen; Zhou, Feng; Wu, Wei; Lu, Feng; Yang, Xue; Guo, Xiaoxuan; Chen, Peng; Deng, Qianchun; Ji, Baoping

    2016-05-02

    Dietary proanthocyanidins (PACs) as health-protective agents have become an important area of human nutrition research because of their potent bioactivities. We investigated the retinoprotective effects of PACs from sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) seed against visible light-induced retinal degeneration in vivo. Pigmented rabbits were orally administered sea buckthorn seed PACs (50 and 100 mg/kg/day) for 14 consecutive days of pre-illumination and seven consecutive days of post-illumination. Retinal function was quantified via electroretinography 7 days after light exposure. Retinal damage was evaluated by measuring the thickness of the full-thickness retina and outer nuclear layer 7 days after light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs significantly attenuated the destruction of electroretinograms and maintained the retinal structure. Increased retinal photooxidative damage was expressed by the depletion of glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities, the decrease of total antioxidant capacity level and the increase of malondialdehyde level. Light exposure induced a significant increase of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) and angiogenesis (VEGF) levels in retina. Light exposure upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and caspase-3 and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. However, sea buckthorn seed PACs ameliorated these changes induced by light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs mediated the protective effect against light-induced retinal degeneration via antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic mechanisms.

  19. Protective Effect of Proanthocyanidins from Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae Rhamnoides L.) Seed against Visible Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Zhao, Liang; Huo, Yazhen; Zhou, Feng; Wu, Wei; Lu, Feng; Yang, Xue; Guo, Xiaoxuan; Chen, Peng; Deng, Qianchun; Ji, Baoping

    2016-01-01

    Dietary proanthocyanidins (PACs) as health-protective agents have become an important area of human nutrition research because of their potent bioactivities. We investigated the retinoprotective effects of PACs from sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) seed against visible light-induced retinal degeneration in vivo. Pigmented rabbits were orally administered sea buckthorn seed PACs (50 and 100 mg/kg/day) for 14 consecutive days of pre-illumination and seven consecutive days of post-illumination. Retinal function was quantified via electroretinography 7 days after light exposure. Retinal damage was evaluated by measuring the thickness of the full-thickness retina and outer nuclear layer 7 days after light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs significantly attenuated the destruction of electroretinograms and maintained the retinal structure. Increased retinal photooxidative damage was expressed by the depletion of glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities, the decrease of total antioxidant capacity level and the increase of malondialdehyde level. Light exposure induced a significant increase of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) and angiogenesis (VEGF) levels in retina. Light exposure upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and caspase-3 and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. However, sea buckthorn seed PACs ameliorated these changes induced by light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs mediated the protective effect against light-induced retinal degeneration via antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic mechanisms. PMID:27144578

  20. KR-31378, a potassium-channel opener, induces the protection of retinal ganglion cells in rat retinal ischemic models.

    PubMed

    Choi, Anho; Choi, Jun-Sub; Yoon, Yone-Jung; Kim, Kyung-A; Joo, Choun-Ki

    2009-04-01

    KR-31378 is a newly developed K(ATP)-channel opener. To investigate the ability of KR-31378 to protect retinal ganglion cells (RGC), experiments were conducted using two retinal ischemia models. Retinal ischemia was induced by transient high intraocular pressure (IOP) for acute ischemia and by three episcleral vein occlusion for chronic retinal ischemia. KR-31378 was injected intraperitoneally and administered orally in the acute and chronic ischemia models, respectively. Under the condition of chronic ischemia, RGC density in the KR-31378-treated group was statistically higher than that in the non-treated group, and IOP was reduced. In the acute retinal ischemia model, 90% of RGC were degenerated after one week in non-treated retina, but, RGC in KR-31378-treated retina were protected from ischemic damage in a dose-dependent manner and showed inhibited glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. Furthermore, the KR-31378 protective effect was inhibited by glibenclamide treatment in acute ischemia. These findings indicate that systemic KR-31378 treatment may protect against ischemic injury-induced ganglion cell loss in glaucoma.

  1. Paraoxonase Enzyme Protects Retinal Pigment Epithelium from Chlorpyrifos Insult

    PubMed Central

    Jasna, Jagan Mohan; Anandbabu, Kannadasan; Bharathi, Subramaniam Rajesh; Angayarkanni, Narayanasamy

    2014-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) provides nourishment and protection to the eye. RPE dysfunction due to oxidative stress and inflammation is one of the major reason for many of the retinal disorders. Organophosphorus pesticides are widely used in the agricultural, industrial and household activities in India. However, their effects on the eye in the context of RPE has not been studied. In this study the defense of the ARPE19 cells exposed to Chlorpyrifos (1 nM to 100 µM) in terms of the enzyme paraoxonase (PON) was studied at 24 hr and 9 days of treatment. Chlorpyrifos was found to induce oxidative stress in the ARPE19 cells as seen by significant increase in ROS and decrease in glutathione (GSH) levels without causing cell death. Tissue resident Paraoxonase 2 (PON2) mRNA expression was elevated with chlorpyrifos exposure. The three enzymatic activities of PON namely, paraoxonase (PONase), arylesterase (PON AREase) and thiolactonase (PON HCTLase) were also found to be significantly altered to detoxify and as an antioxidant defense. Among the transcription factors regulating PON2 expression, SP1 was significantly increased with chlorpyrifos exposure. PON2 expression was found to be crucial as ARPE19 cells showed a significant loss in their ability to withstand oxidative stress when the cells were subjected to chlorpyrifos after silencing PON2 expression. Treatment with N-acetyl cysteine positively regulated the PON 2 expression, thus promoting the antioxidant defense put up by the cells in response to chlorpyrifos. PMID:24979751

  2. Pericytes derived from adipose-derived stem cells protect against retinal vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Thomas A; Clabough, Erin B D; Kao, David S; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N; Durham, Jennifer T; Zotter, Brendan C; Seaman, Scott A; Cronk, Stephen M; Rakoczy, Elizabeth P; Katz, Adam J; Herman, Ira M; Peirce, Shayn M; Yates, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Retinal vasculopathies, including diabetic retinopathy (DR), threaten the vision of over 100 million people. Retinal pericytes are critical for microvascular control, supporting retinal endothelial cells via direct contact and paracrine mechanisms. With pericyte death or loss, endothelial dysfunction ensues, resulting in hypoxic insult, pathologic angiogenesis, and ultimately blindness. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) differentiate into pericytes, suggesting they may be useful as a protective and regenerative cellular therapy for retinal vascular disease. In this study, we examine the ability of ASCs to differentiate into pericytes that can stabilize retinal vessels in multiple pre-clinical models of retinal vasculopathy. We found that ASCs express pericyte-specific markers in vitro. When injected intravitreally into the murine eye subjected to oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), ASCs were capable of migrating to and integrating with the retinal vasculature. Integrated ASCs maintained marker expression and pericyte-like morphology in vivo for at least 2 months. ASCs injected after OIR vessel destabilization and ablation enhanced vessel regrowth (16% reduction in avascular area). ASCs injected intravitreally before OIR vessel destabilization prevented retinal capillary dropout (53% reduction). Treatment of ASCs with transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1) enhanced hASC pericyte function, in a manner similar to native retinal pericytes, with increased marker expression of smooth muscle actin, cellular contractility, endothelial stabilization, and microvascular protection in OIR. Finally, injected ASCs prevented capillary loss in the diabetic retinopathic Akimba mouse (79% reduction 2 months after injection). ASC-derived pericytes can integrate with retinal vasculature, adopting both pericyte morphology and marker expression, and provide functional vascular protection in multiple murine models of retinal vasculopathy. The pericyte phenotype demonstrated by ASCs is

  3. Pericytes Derived from Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Protect against Retinal Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mendel, Thomas A.; Clabough, Erin B. D.; Kao, David S.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Durham, Jennifer T.; Zotter, Brendan C.; Seaman, Scott A.; Cronk, Stephen M.; Rakoczy, Elizabeth P.; Katz, Adam J.; Herman, Ira M.; Peirce, Shayn M.; Yates, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Retinal vasculopathies, including diabetic retinopathy (DR), threaten the vision of over 100 million people. Retinal pericytes are critical for microvascular control, supporting retinal endothelial cells via direct contact and paracrine mechanisms. With pericyte death or loss, endothelial dysfunction ensues, resulting in hypoxic insult, pathologic angiogenesis, and ultimately blindness. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) differentiate into pericytes, suggesting they may be useful as a protective and regenerative cellular therapy for retinal vascular disease. In this study, we examine the ability of ASCs to differentiate into pericytes that can stabilize retinal vessels in multiple pre-clinical models of retinal vasculopathy. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that ASCs express pericyte-specific markers in vitro. When injected intravitreally into the murine eye subjected to oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR), ASCs were capable of migrating to and integrating with the retinal vasculature. Integrated ASCs maintained marker expression and pericyte-like morphology in vivo for at least 2 months. ASCs injected after OIR vessel destabilization and ablation enhanced vessel regrowth (16% reduction in avascular area). ASCs injected intravitreally before OIR vessel destabilization prevented retinal capillary dropout (53% reduction). Treatment of ASCs with transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1) enhanced hASC pericyte function, in a manner similar to native retinal pericytes, with increased marker expression of smooth muscle actin, cellular contractility, endothelial stabilization, and microvascular protection in OIR. Finally, injected ASCs prevented capillary loss in the diabetic retinopathic Akimba mouse (79% reduction 2 months after injection). Conclusions/Significance ASC-derived pericytes can integrate with retinal vasculature, adopting both pericyte morphology and marker expression, and provide functional vascular protection in multiple murine models of

  4. Beneficial protective effect of pramipexole on light-induced retinal damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Shibagaki, Keiichi; Okamoto, Kazuyoshi; Katsuta, Osamu; Nakamura, Masatsugu

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the effects of pramipexole, a potent dopamine receptor D2/D3 agonist, on light-induced retinal damage in mice, H2O2-induced retinal pigment epithelium ARPE-19 cell injury in humans, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity in a cell-free system. Pramipexole (0.1 and 1 mg/kg body weight) was orally administered to mice 1 h before light exposure (5000 lux, 2 h). Electrophysiological and morphologic studies were performed to evaluate the effects of the pramipexole on light-induced retinal damage in mice. Pramipexole significantly prevented the reduction of the a- and b-wave electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes caused by light exposure in a dose-dependent manner. In parallel, damage to the inner and outer segments (IS/OS) of the photoreceptors, loss of photoreceptor nuclei, and the number of Tdt-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in the outer nuclear layer (ONL) caused by light exposure were notably ameliorated by pramipexole. Additionally, pramipexole suppressed H2O2-induced ARPE-19 cell death in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect of pramipexole was significant at concentrations of 10(-6) M or higher. Pramipexole also significantly prevented H2O2-induced activation of caspases-3/7 and the intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a concentration-dependent manner ranging from 10(-5) to 10(-3) M. Furthermore, pramipexole increased the scavenging activity toward a hydroxyl radical generated from H2O2 in a Fenton reaction. Our results suggest that pramipexole protects against light-induced retinal damage as an antioxidant and that it may be a novel and effective therapy for retinal degenerative disorders, such as dry age-related macular degeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Regulation of human retinal blood flow by endothelin-1.

    PubMed

    Polak, Kaija; Luksch, Alexandra; Frank, Barbara; Jandrasits, Kerstin; Polska, Elzbieta; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2003-05-01

    There is evidence from in vitro and animal studies that endothelin is a major regulator of retinal blood flow. We set out to characterize the role of the endothelin-system in the blood flow control of the human retina. Two studies in healthy subjects were performed. The study design was randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked, balanced, two-way crossover in protocol A and three way-way crossover in protocol B. In protocol A 18 healthy male subjects received intravenous endothelin-1 (ET-1) in a dose of 2.5 ng kg (-1)min(-1) for 30 min or placebo on two different study days and retinal vessel diameters were measured. In protocol B 12 healthy male subjects received ET-1 in stepwise increasing doses of 0, 1.25, 2.5 and 5 ng kg (-1)min(-1) (each infusion step over 20 min) in co-infusion with the specific ET(A)-receptor antagonist BQ123 (60 microg min (-1)) or placebo or BQ123 alone investigating retinal vessel diameters, retinal blood velocity and retinal blood flow. Measurements of retinal vessel size were done with the Zeiss retinal vessel analyzer. Measurements of blood velocities were done with bi-directional laser Doppler velocimetry. From these measurements retinal blood flow was calculated. In protocol A exogenous ET-1 tended to decrease retinal arterial diameter, but this effect was not significant versus placebo. No effect on retinal venous diameter was seen. In protocol B retinal venous blood velocity and retinal blood flow was significantly reduced after administration of exogenous ET-1. These effects were significantly blunted when BQ-123 was co-administered. By contrast, BQ-123 alone had no effect on retinal hemodynamic parameters. Concluding, BQ123 antagonizes the effects of exogenously administered ET-1 on retinal blood flow in healthy subjects. In addition, the results of the present study are compatible with the hypothesis that ET-1 exerts its vasoconstrictor effects in the retina mainly on the microvessels.

  6. Engineering Retina from Human Retinal Progenitors (Cell Lines)

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Retinal degeneration resulting in the loss of photoreceptors is the leading cause of blindness. Several therapeutic protocols are under consideration for treatment of this disease. Tissue replacement is one such strategy currently being explored. However, availability of tissues for transplant poses a major obstacle. Another strategy with great potential is the use of adult stem cells, which could be expanded in culture and then utilized to engineer retinal tissue. In this study, we have explored a spontaneously immortalized human retinal progenitor cell line for its potential in retinal engineering using rotary cultures to generate three-dimensional (3D) structures. Retinal progenitors cultured alone or cocultured with retinal pigment epithelial cells form aggregates. The aggregate size increases between days 1 and 10. The cells grown as a 3D culture rotary system, which promotes cell–cell interaction, retain a spectrum of differentiation capability. Photoreceptor differentiation in these cultures is confirmed by significant upregulation of rhodopsin and AaNat, an enzyme implicated in melatonin synthesis (immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis). Photoreceptor induction and differentiation is further attested to by the upregulation of rod transcription factor Nrl, Nr2e3, expression of interstitial retinal binding protein, and rhodopsin kinase by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Differentiation toward other cell lineages is confirmed by the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in amacrine cells, thy 1.1 expression in ganglion cells and calbindin, and GNB3 expression in cone cells. The capability of retinal progenitors to give rise to several retinal cell types when grown as aggregated cells in rotary culture offers hope that progenitor stem cells under appropriate culture conditions will be valuable to engineer retinal constructs, which could be further tested for their transplant potential. The fidelity with which this multipotential cell

  7. Efficacy and Safety of Human Retinal Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Semo, Ma'ayan; Haamedi, Nasrin; Stevanato, Lara; Carter, David; Brooke, Gary; Young, Michael; Coffey, Peter; Sinden, John; Patel, Sara; Vugler, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the long-term efficacy and safety of human retinal progenitor cells (hRPC) using established rodent models. Methods Efficacy of hRPC was tested initially in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) dystrophic rats immunosuppressed with cyclosporine/dexamethasone. Due to adverse effects of dexamethasone, this drug was omitted from a subsequent dose-ranging study, where different hRPC doses were tested for their ability to preserve visual function (measured by optokinetic head tracking) and retinal structure in RCS rats at 3 to 6 months after grafting. Safety of hRPC was assessed by subretinal transplantation into wild type (WT) rats and NIH-III nude mice, with analysis at 3 to 6 and 9 months after grafting, respectively. Results The optimal dose of hRPC for preserving visual function/retinal structure in dystrophic rats was 50,000 to 100,000 cells. Human retinal progenitor cells integrated/survived in dystrophic and WT rat retina up to 6 months after grafting and expressed nestin, vimentin, GFAP, and βIII tubulin. Vision and retinal structure remained normal in WT rats injected with hRPC and there was no evidence of tumors. A comparison between dexamethasone-treated and untreated dystrophic rats at 3 months after grafting revealed an unexpected reduction in the baseline visual acuity of dexamethasone-treated animals. Conclusions Human retinal progenitor cells appear safe and efficacious in the preclinical models used here. Translational Relevance Human retinal progenitor cells could be deployed during early stages of retinal degeneration or in regions of intact retina, without adverse effects on visual function. The ability of dexamethasone to reduce baseline visual acuity in RCS dystrophic rats has important implications for the interpretation of preclinical and clinical cell transplant studies. PMID:27486556

  8. Nitric oxide regulates retinal vascular tone in humans.

    PubMed

    Dorner, Guido T; Garhofer, Gerhard; Kiss, Barbara; Polska, Elzbieta; Polak, Kaija; Riva, Charles E; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the contribution of basal nitric oxide (NO) on retinal vascular tone in humans. In addition, we set out to elucidate the role of NO in flicker-induced retinal vasodilation in humans. Twelve healthy young subjects were studied in a three-way crossover design. Subjects received an intravenous infusion of either placebo or NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA; 3 or 6 mg/kg over 5 min), an inhibitor of NO synthase. Thereafter, diffuse luminance flicker was consecutively performed for 16, 32, and 64 s at a frequency of 8 Hz. The effect of L-NMMA on retinal arterial and venous diameter was assessed under resting conditions and during the hyperemic flicker response. Retinal vessel diameter was measured with a Zeiss retinal vessel analyzer. L-NMMA significantly reduced arterial diameter (3 mg/kg: -2%; 6 mg/kg: -4%, P < 0.001) and venous diameter (3 mg/kg: -5%; 6 mg/kg: -8%, P < 0.001). After placebo infusion, flicker induced a significant increase in retinal vessel diameter (P < 0.001). At a flicker duration of 64 s, arterial diameter increased by 4% and venous diameter increased by 3%. L-NMMA did not abolish these hyperemic responses but blunted venous vasodilation (P = 0.017) and arterial vasodilation (P = 0.02) in response to flicker stimulation. Our data indicate that NO contributes to basal retinal vascular tone in humans. In addition, NO appears to play a role in flicker-induced vasodilation of the human retinal vasculature.

  9. Human neural progenitor cells promote photoreceptor survival in retinal explants.

    PubMed

    Englund-Johansson, Ulrica; Mohlin, Camilla; Liljekvist-Soltic, Ingela; Ekström, Per; Johansson, Kjell

    2010-02-01

    Different types of progenitor and stem cells have been shown to provide neuroprotection in animal models of photoreceptor degeneration. The present study was conducted to investigate whether human neural progenitor cells (HNPCs) have neuroprotective properties on retinal explants models with calpain- and caspase-3-dependent photoreceptor cell death. In the first experiments, HNPCs in a feeder layer were co-cultured for 6 days either with postnatal rd1 mouse or normal rat retinas. Retinal histological sections were used to determine outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness, and to detect the number of photoreceptors with labeling for calpain activity, cleaved caspase-3 and TUNEL. The ONL thickness of co-cultured rat and rd1 retinas was found to be almost 10% and 40% thicker, respectively, compared to controls. Cell counts of calpain activity, cleaved caspase-3 and TUNEL labeled photoreceptors in both models revealed a 30-50% decrease when co-cultured with HNPCs. The results represent significant increases of photoreceptor survival in the co-cultured retinas. In the second experiments, for an identification of putative survival factors, or a combination of them, a growth factor profile was performed on conditioned medium. The relative levels of various growth factors were analyzed by densitometric measurements of growth factor array membranes. Following growth factors were identified as most potential survival factors; granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF), insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II), neurotrophic factor 3 (NT-3), placental growth factor (PIGF), transforming growth factors (TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-D). HNPCs protect both against calpain- and caspase-3-dependent photoreceptor cell death in the rd1 mouse and against caspase-3-dependent photoreceptor cell death in normal rat retinas in vitro. The protective effect is possibly achieved by a variety of

  10. FTY720 protects retinal ganglion cells in experimental glaucoma.

    PubMed

    You, Yuyi; Gupta, Vivek K; Li, Jonathan C; Al-Adawy, Nadia; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L

    2014-04-17

    To investigate the neuroprotective effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) analogue fingolimod (FTY720) in experimental glaucoma in rats. A unilateral chronic ocular hypertensive model was established by injections of microbeads into the anterior eye chamber of adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Fingolimod was administered to one group of rats intraperitoneally every week for 3 months. The scotopic threshold response (STR) was recorded to assess the function of the inner retina. Changes in cell density in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) were evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin staining on retinal sections and axonal count of the optic nerve was performed using Bielschowsky's silver staining. Effects of drug treatment on activation of Akt and Erk1/2 were evaluated using Western blotting by assessing phosphorylation levels of these proteins. The expression of S1P receptors in the optic nerve head region was also evaluated using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Administration of FTY720 reduced the loss of STR amplitude in glaucomatous eyes (P < 0.05). Counting and plotting the cell numbers/axonal density showed significant neural preservation in the GCL and the optic nerve (P < 0.05). An increased phosphorylation level of Akt and Erk1/2 following FTY720 administration was observed. Both S1P1 and S1P5 receptors were found to be expressed in the retina and the expression of S1P1R was upregulated in experimentally-induced glaucoma. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that FTY720 could act as a neuroprotective agent to protect retinal ganglion cells in experimental glaucoma. Administration of this drug significantly reduces the structural and functional loss of the inner retina elicited indicating that it may potentially be used to attenuate neuronal loss and optic nerve damage in glaucomatous patients. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  11. Protective effect of ascorbate in retinal light damage of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Organisciak, D.T.; Wang, H.M.; Li, Z.Y.; Tso, M.O.

    1985-11-01

    Cyclic light and dark-reared rats were exposed to intense visible light for various periods and then rhodopsin-measured following recovery in darkness for up to 14 days. Animals were injected with ascorbic acid or ascorbate derivatives at various doses prior to light exposure in green Plexiglas chambers. The results show that ascorbic acid administration elevates retinal ascorbate and reduces the loss of rhodopsin and photoreceptor cell nuclei resulting from intense light. When given in comparable doses, L-ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate, and dehydroascorbate were equally effective in preserving rhodopsin. The ascorbate protective effect in the retina is also dose dependent in both cyclic light and dark-reared rats and exhibits a requirement for the L-stereoisomer of the vitamin. Ascorbic acid is effective when administered before, but not after, light exposure, suggesting that protection from light damage in the retina occurs during the light period. In some experiments, rod outer segments were isolated from rats immediately after light exposure, lipids extracted, and fatty acid composition determined. As judged by the preservation of rod outer segment docosahexaenoic acid in rats given ascorbate, the vitamin may act in an antioxidative fashion by inhibiting oxidation of membrane lipids during intense light.

  12. Pharmacological protection of retinal pigmented epithelial cells by sulindac involves PPAR-α.

    PubMed

    Sur, Arunodoy; Kesaraju, Shailaja; Prentice, Howard; Ayyanathan, Kasirajan; Baronas-Lowell, Diane; Zhu, Danhong; Hinton, David R; Blanks, Janet; Weissbach, Herbert

    2014-11-25

    The retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) layer is one of the major ocular tissues affected by oxidative stress and is known to play an important role in the etiology of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the major cause of blinding in the elderly. In the present study, sulindac, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID), was tested for protection against oxidative stress-induced damage in an established RPE cell line (ARPE-19). Besides its established antiinflammatory activity, sulindac has previously been shown to protect cardiac tissue against ischemia/reperfusion damage, although the exact mechanism was not elucidated. As shown here, sulindac can also protect RPE cells from chemical oxidative damage or UV light by initiating a protective mechanism similar to what is observed in ischemic preconditioning (IPC) response. The mechanism of protection appears to be triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and involves known IPC signaling components such as PKG and PKC epsilon in addition to the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+) channel. Sulindac induced iNOS and Hsp70, late-phase IPC markers in the RPE cells. A unique feature of the sulindac protective response is that it involves activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α). We have also used low-passage human fetal RPE and polarized primary fetal RPE cells to validate the basic observation that sulindac can protect retinal cells against oxidative stress. These findings indicate a mechanism for preventing oxidative stress in RPE cells and suggest that sulindac could be used therapeutically for slowing the progression of AMD.

  13. Pharmacological protection of retinal pigmented epithelial cells by sulindac involves PPAR-α

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Arunodoy; Kesaraju, Shailaja; Prentice, Howard; Ayyanathan, Kasirajan; Baronas-Lowell, Diane; Zhu, Danhong; Hinton, David R.; Blanks, Janet; Weissbach, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    The retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) layer is one of the major ocular tissues affected by oxidative stress and is known to play an important role in the etiology of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the major cause of blinding in the elderly. In the present study, sulindac, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID), was tested for protection against oxidative stress-induced damage in an established RPE cell line (ARPE-19). Besides its established antiinflammatory activity, sulindac has previously been shown to protect cardiac tissue against ischemia/reperfusion damage, although the exact mechanism was not elucidated. As shown here, sulindac can also protect RPE cells from chemical oxidative damage or UV light by initiating a protective mechanism similar to what is observed in ischemic preconditioning (IPC) response. The mechanism of protection appears to be triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and involves known IPC signaling components such as PKG and PKC epsilon in addition to the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channel. Sulindac induced iNOS and Hsp70, late-phase IPC markers in the RPE cells. A unique feature of the sulindac protective response is that it involves activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α). We have also used low-passage human fetal RPE and polarized primary fetal RPE cells to validate the basic observation that sulindac can protect retinal cells against oxidative stress. These findings indicate a mechanism for preventing oxidative stress in RPE cells and suggest that sulindac could be used therapeutically for slowing the progression of AMD. PMID:25385631

  14. Phloroglucinol protects retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor against all-trans-retinal-induced toxicity and inhibits A2E formation.

    PubMed

    Cia, David; Cubizolle, Aurélie; Crauste, Céline; Jacquemot, Nathalie; Guillou, Laurent; Vigor, Claire; Angebault, Claire; Hamel, Christian P; Vercauteren, Joseph; Brabet, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    Among retinal macular diseases, the juvenile recessive Stargardt disease and the age-related degenerative disease arise from carbonyl and oxidative stresses (COS). Both stresses originate from an accumulation of all-trans-retinal (atRAL) and are involved in bisretinoid formation by condensation of atRAL with phosphatidylethanolamine (carbonyl stress) in the photoreceptor and its transformation into lipofuscin bisretinoids (oxidative stress) in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). As atRAL and bisretinoid accumulation contribute to RPE and photoreceptor cell death, our goal is to select powerful chemical inhibitors of COS. Here, we describe that phloroglucinol, a natural phenolic compound having anti-COS properties, protects both rat RPE and mouse photoreceptor primary cultures from atRAL-induced cell death and reduces hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 )-induced damage in RPE in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistic analyses demonstrate that the protective effect encompasses decrease in atRAL-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species and free atRAL levels. Moreover, we show that phloroglucinol reacts with atRAL to form a chromene adduct which prevents bisretinoid A2E synthesis in vitro. Taken together, these data show that the protective effect of phloroglucinol correlates with its ability to trap atRAL and to prevent its further transformation into deleterious bisretinoids. Phloroglucinol might be a good basis to develop efficient therapeutic derivatives in the treatment of retinal macular diseases.

  15. Automated spectroscopic imaging of oxygen saturation in human retinal vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, D.; Sueda, S.; Matsuoka, N.; Yoshinaga, Y.; Enaida, H.; Okada, T.; Ishibashi, T.

    2009-02-01

    A new automatic visualization procedure for the oxygen saturation imaging from multi-spectral imaging of human retinal vessels has been proposed. Two-wavelength retinal fundus images at 545 and 560 nm, which were oxygen insensitive and oxygen sensitive, respectively, were captured by CCD cameras simultaneously through a beam splitter and interference filters. We applied a morphological processing technique to presume a distribution of incident light including the vessel parts and an optical density (OD) image of each wavelength image. And the OD ratio (OD560/OD545) image was calculated as a relative indicator of oxygen saturation. Furthermore, processing of line convergence index filter was adopted to identify the retinal vessels. Clear difference between retinal arteries and veins was observed in the automated imaging method. In addition, the decrease of oxygen saturation in the retinal artery without breathing could be monitored by the ODR. This method is possible to be applied to real-time monitoring for oxygen saturation of retinal vessels.

  16. Oligomeric proanthocyanidin protects retinal ganglion cells against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Chanjuan; Lu, Dan; Shu, Xiaoming; Zhu, Lihong; Qi, Renbing; So, Kwok-Fai; Lu, Daxiang; Xu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The death of retinal ganglion cells is a hallmark of many optic neurodegenerative diseases such as glaucoma and retinopathy. Oxidative stress is one of the major reasons to cause the cell death. Oligomeric proanthocyanidin has many health beneficial effects including antioxidative and neuroprotective actions. Here we tested whether oligomeric proanthocyanidin may protect retinal ganglion cells against oxidative stress induced-apoptosis in vitro. Retinal ganglion cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide with or without oligomeric proanthocyanidin. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay showed that treating retinal ganglion cell line RGC-5 cells with 20 μmol/L oligomeric proanthocyanidin significantly decreased the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced death. Results of flow cytometry and Hoechst staining demonstrated that the death of RGC-5 cells was mainly caused by cell apoptosis. We further found that expression of pro-apoptotic Bax and caspase-3 were significantly decreased while anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 was greatly increased in H2O2 damaged RGC-5 cells with oligomeric proanthocyanidin by western blot assay. Furthermore, in retinal explant culture, the number of surviving retinal ganglion cells in H2O2-damaged retinal ganglion cells with oligomeric proanthocyanidin was significantly increased. Our studies thus demonstrate that oligomeric proanthocyanidin can protect oxidative stress-injured retinal ganglion cells by inhibiting apoptotic process. PMID:25206541

  17. Protective effect of clusterin on rod photoreceptor in rat model of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Baral, Erika; Yu, Wan-Qing; Craft, Cheryl Mae

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) begins with the death of rod photoreceptors and is slowly followed by a gradual loss of cones and a rearrangement of the remaining retinal neurons. Clusterin is a chaperone protein that protects cells and is involved in various pathophysiological stresses, including retinal degeneration. Using a well-established transgenic rat model of RP (rhodopsin S334ter), we investigated the effects of clusterin on rod photoreceptor survival. To investigate the role of clusterin in S334ter-line3 retinas, Voronoi analysis and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the geometry of rod distribution. Additionally, immunoblot analysis, Bax activation, STAT3 and Akt phosphorylation were used to evaluate the pathway involved in rod cell protection. In this study, clusterin (10μg/ml) intravitreal treatment produced robust preservation of rod photoreceptors in S334ter-line3 retina. The mean number of rods in 1mm2 was significantly greater in clusterin injected RP retinas (postnatal (P) 30, P45, P60, & P75) than in age-matched saline injected RP retinas (P<0.01). Clusterin activated Akt, STAT3 and significantly reduced Bax activity; in addition to inducing phosphorylated STAT3 in Müller cells, which suggests it may indirectly acts on photoreceptors. Thus, clusterin treatment may interferes with mechanisms leading to rod death by suppressing cell death through activation of Akt and STAT3, followed by Bax suppression. Novel insights into the pathway of how clusterin promotes the rod cell survival suggest this treatment may be a potential therapeutic strategy to slow progression of vision loss in human RP. PMID:28767729

  18. Protective Effect of Tang Wang One Decoction on the Retinal Vessels of Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Xinyun; Yang, Shufei; Qin, Yali; Yang, Chao; Deng, Tingting; Luo, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to determine the influence of Tang Wang One Decoction (TWOD) on the retinal vessels of diabetic rats. Methods. The hemorheology of diabetic rats was observed. Morphological studies of retinal vessels were conducted using optical microscopy and electron microscopy. Immunological histochemistry assay was used to measure the expression levels of MMP-9, occludin, and claudin-5. Results. Obvious pathological damage was observed in the retinal vessels of diabetic rats. TWOD positively affected the hemorheology and morphology of retinal vessels. The decoction also decreased the expression of MMP-9 and increased the expression of occludin and claudin-5. Conclusions. The results suggest that the retinal protective effects of TWOD might be related to downregulation of MMP-9 and upregulation of occludin and claudin-5. PMID:28367226

  19. Protective responses to sublytic complement in the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li Xuan; Toops, Kimberly A.; Lakkaraju, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a key site of injury in inherited and age-related macular degenerations. Abnormal activation of the complement system is a feature of these blinding diseases, yet how the RPE combats complement attack is poorly understood. The complement cascade terminates in the cell-surface assembly of membrane attack complexes (MACs), which promote inflammation by causing aberrant signal transduction. Here, we investigated mechanisms crucial for limiting MAC assembly and preserving cellular integrity in the RPE and asked how these are compromised in models of macular degeneration. Using polarized primary RPE and the pigmented Abca4−/− Stargardt disease mouse model, we provide evidence for two protective responses occurring within minutes of complement attack, which are essential for maintaining mitochondrial health in the RPE. First, accelerated recycling of the membrane-bound complement regulator CD59 to the RPE cell surface inhibits MAC formation. Second, fusion of lysosomes with the RPE plasma membrane immediately after complement attack limits sustained elevations in intracellular calcium and prevents mitochondrial injury. Cholesterol accumulation in the RPE, induced by vitamin A dimers or oxidized LDL, inhibits these defense mechanisms by activating acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), which increases tubulin acetylation and derails organelle traffic. Defective CD59 recycling and lysosome exocytosis after complement attack lead to mitochondrial fragmentation and oxidative stress in the RPE. Drugs that stimulate cholesterol efflux or inhibit ASMase restore both these critical safeguards in the RPE and avert complement-induced mitochondrial injury in vitro and in Abca4−/− mice, indicating that they could be effective therapeutic approaches for macular degenerations. PMID:27432952

  20. Retinal Remodeling and Metabolic Alterations in Human AMD.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bryan W; Pfeiffer, Rebecca L; Ferrell, William D; Watt, Carl B; Tucker, James; Marc, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive retinal degeneration resulting in central visual field loss, ultimately causing debilitating blindness. AMD affects 18% of Americans from 65 to 74, 30% older than 74 years of age and is the leading cause of severe vision loss and blindness in Western populations. While many genetic and environmental risk factors are known for AMD, we currently know less about the mechanisms mediating disease progression. The pathways and mechanisms through which genetic and non-genetic risk factors modulate development of AMD pathogenesis remain largely unexplored. Moreover, current treatment for AMD is palliative and limited to wet/exudative forms. Retina is a complex, heterocellular tissue and most retinal cell classes are impacted or altered in AMD. Defining disease and stage-specific cytoarchitectural and metabolic responses in AMD is critical for highlighting targets for intervention. The goal of this article is to illustrate cell types impacted in AMD and demonstrate the implications of those changes, likely beginning in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), for remodeling of the the neural retina. Tracking heterocellular responses in disease progression is best achieved with computational molecular phenotyping (CMP), a tool that enables acquisition of a small molecule fingerprint for every cell in the retina. CMP uncovered critical cellular and molecular pathologies (remodeling and reprogramming) in progressive retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We now applied these approaches to normal human and AMD tissues mapping progression of cellular and molecular changes in AMD retinas, including late-stage forms of the disease.

  1. The molecular basis of human retinal and vitreoretinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Berger, Wolfgang; Kloeckener-Gruissem, Barbara; Neidhardt, John

    2010-09-01

    During the last two to three decades, a large body of work has revealed the molecular basis of many human disorders, including retinal and vitreoretinal degenerations and dysfunctions. Although belonging to the group of orphan diseases, they affect probably more than two million people worldwide. Most excitingly, treatment of a particular form of congenital retinal degeneration is now possible. A major advantage for treatment is the unique structure and accessibility of the eye and its different components, including the vitreous and retina. Knowledge of the many different eye diseases affecting retinal structure and function (night and colour blindness, retinitis pigmentosa, cone and cone rod dystrophies, photoreceptor dysfunctions, as well as vitreoretinal traits) is critical for future therapeutic development. We have attempted to present a comprehensive picture of these disorders, including biological, clinical, genetic and molecular information. The structural organization of the review leads the reader through non-syndromic and syndromic forms of (i) rod dominated diseases, (ii) cone dominated diseases, (iii) generalized retinal degenerations and (iv) vitreoretinal disorders, caused by mutations in more than 165 genes. Clinical variability and genetic heterogeneity have an important impact on genetic testing and counselling of affected families. As phenotypes do not always correlate with the respective genotypes, it is of utmost importance that clinicians, geneticists, counsellors, diagnostic laboratories and basic researchers understand the relationships between phenotypic manifestations and specific genes, as well as mutations and pathophysiologic mechanisms. We discuss future perspectives.

  2. Distributions of elements in the human retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ulshafer, R J; Allen, C B; Rubin, M L

    1990-01-01

    Distributions of elements above the atomic number of sodium were mapped in the retinal pigment epithelia of eight human eyes. X-ray energy spectra and maps were collected from cryofixed, freeze-dried, and epoxy-embedded tissues using energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis. All eyes had high concentrations of phosphorus in the nuclei of retinal pigment epithelial cells. Melanosomes were rich in sulfur, zinc, calcium, and iron. Lipofuscin and cytoplasm contained only phosphorus and sulfur in detectable amounts. Drusen, when present, contained phosphorus and calcium. Six eyes had a prominent aluminum peak recorded from melanosomes, nuclei, and Bruch's membrane. In one pair of 90-year-old eyes, small, electron-dense deposits surrounded many melanosomes and contained mercury and selenium. Retinal pigment epithelial melanosomes may bind and accumulate metals and other potentially toxic ions over time, preventing them from reaching the neural retina.

  3. Induction of phase 2 genes by sulforaphane protects retinal pigment epithelial cells against photooxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiangqun; Talalay, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelial cell (RPE cell) layer protects the photoreceptors of the retina against oxidative stress. The decline of this capacity is believed to be a major factor in the impairment of vision in age-related macular degeneration. Exposure of human adult RPE cells to UV light at predominantly 320–400 nm (UVA light) in the presence of all-trans-retinaldehyde results in photooxidative cytotoxicity. Significant protection of RPE cells was obtained by prior treatment with phase 2 gene inducers, such as the isothiocyanate sulforaphane or a bis-2-hydroxybenzylideneacetone Michael reaction acceptor. The degree of protection was correlated with the potencies of these inducers in elevating cytoprotective glutathione levels and activities of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase. In embryonic fibroblasts derived from mice in which the genes for the transcription factor Nrf2, the repressor Keap1, or both Nrf2 and Keap1 were disrupted, the magnitude of resistance to photooxidative damage paralleled the basal levels of glutathione and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase in each cell type. Demonstration of protection of RPE cells against photooxidative damage by induction of phase 2 proteins may shed light on the role of oxidative injury in ocular disease. Moreover, the finding that dietary inducers provide indirect antioxidant protection suggests novel strategies for preventing chronic degenerative diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration. PMID:15229324

  4. Microvascular network topology of the human retinal vessels.

    PubMed

    Schröder, S; Brab, M; Schmid-Schönbein, G W; Reim, M; Schmid-Schönbein, H

    1990-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of blood flow in the human retinal vessels requires a detailed picture of the microvascular network topology. In order to lay the foundation for a quantitative microcirculatory network analysis of the human retina, a novel technique for tissue preparation and network characterization was developed. After injection of hydrogen peroxide into the human bulb, the microvasculature was filled with oxygen produced by endothelial catalase and visualized after embedding in a mixture of cedar oil and gum damar. The vessel topology was documented in the form of photomicrographs, which permitted complete reconstruction of the microvasculature on transparent overlays. By considering the complete capillary system it was possible to divide the retinal network into dichotomous, asymmetric arteriolar and venular trees. The Strahler ordering method, which considers both dichotomous and side branching configurations, was selected and applied to analyze the retinal vascular trees, using the capillaries as the zero order reference vessels. The number of vessel segments was found to be an approximate logarithmic function of the order number, in accordance with Horton's law. Vessel lengths within each order were found to be log-normal distributed, and median lengths for different orders could be approximated by a 2nd degree polynomial curve. Diameters within each order could be approximated by a Gaussian distribution, and the mean values for different orders could be expressed by an exponential curve. These data provide the basis for conductance, pressure and flow computations within the retinal microvessels.

  5. Overexpression of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Augments Their Protection on Retinal Cells In Vitro and Attenuates Retinal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury In Vivo against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Du, GaiPing; Wang, DaJiang; Zhou, Jin; Jiang, Guomin

    2017-01-01

    Retinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, involving several ocular diseases, seriously threatens human ocular health, mainly treated by attenuating I/R-induced oxidative stress. Currently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could restore I/R-injured retina through paracrine secretion. Additionally, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) could ameliorate oxidative stress and thus retinal apoptosis, but the expression of HO-1 in MSC is limited. Here, we hypothesized that overexpression of HO-1 in MSC (MSC-HO-1) may significantly improve their retina-protective potentials. The overexpression of HO-1 in MSC was achieved by lentivirus transduction. Then, MSC or MSC-HO-1 was cocultured with retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5) in H2O2-simulated oxidative condition and their protection on RGC-5 was systemically valuated in vitro. Compared with MSC, MSC-HO-1 significantly attenuated H2O2-induced injury of RGC-5, including decrease in cellular ROS level and apoptosis, activation of antiapoptotic proteins p-Akt and Bcl-2, and blockage of proapoptotic proteins cleaved caspase 3 and Bax. In retinal I/R rats model, compared with control MSC, MSC-HO-1-treated retina significantly retrieved its structural thickness, reduced cell apoptosis, markedly attenuated retinal oxidative stress level, and largely regained the activities of typical antioxidant enzymes, SOD and CAT. Therefore, it could be concluded that overexpression of HO-1 provides a promising strategy to enhance the MSC-based therapy for I/R-related retinal injury. PMID:28255307

  6. The protective effect of prophylactic ozone administration against retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Kal, Ali; Kal, Oznur; Akillioglu, Ishak; Celik, Esin; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Gonul, Saban; Solmaz, Merve; Onal, Ozkan

    2017-03-01

    Retinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is associated with many ocular diseases. Retinal IR injury leads to the death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), loss of retinal function and ultimately vision loss. The aim of this study was to show the protective effects of prophylactic ozone administration against retinal IR injury. A sham group (S) (n = 7) was administered physiological saline (PS) intraperitoneally (i.p.) for 7 d. An ischemia reperfusion (IR) group (n = 7) was subjected to retinal ischemia followed by reperfusion for 2 h. An ozone group (O) (n = 7) was administered 1 mg/kg of ozone i.p. for 7 d. In the ozone + IR (O + IR) group (n = 7), 1 mg/kg of ozone was administered i.p. for 7 d before the IR procedure and at 8 d, the IR injury was created (as in IR group). The rats were anesthetized after second hour of reperfusion and their intracardiac blood was drawn completely and they were sacrificed. Blood samples were sent to a laboratory for analysis of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), malondialdehyde (MDA), total oxidant score (TOS) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). The degree of retinal injury was evaluated according to changes in retinal cells and necrotic and apoptotic cells using the TUNEL method. Data were evaluated statistically with the Kruskal-Wallis test. The number of RGCs and the inner retinal thickness were significantly decreased after ischemia, and treatment with ozone significantly inhibited retinal ischemic injury. In the IR group, the degree of retinal injury was found to be the highest. In the O + IR group, retinal injury was found to be decreased in comparison to the IR group. In the ozone group without retinal IR injury, the retinal injury score was the lowest. The differences in the antioxidant parameters SOD, GSH-Px and TAC were increased in the ozone group and the lowest in the IR group. The oxidant parameters MDA and TOS were found to be the highest in the IR group and

  7. Structure and Conformation of the Carotenoids in Human Retinal Macular Pigment.

    PubMed

    Arteni, Ana-Andreea; Fradot, Mathias; Galzerano, Denise; Mendes-Pinto, Maria M; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Robert, Bruno; Pascal, Andrew A

    2015-01-01

    Human retinal macular pigment (MP) is formed by the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin (including the isomer meso-zeaxanthin). MP has several functions in improving visual performance and protecting against the damaging effects of light, and MP levels are used as a proxy for macular health-specifically, to predict the likelihood of developing age-related macular degeneration. While the roles of these carotenoids in retinal health have been the object of intense study in recent years, precise mechanistic details of their protective action remain elusive. We have measured the Raman signals originating from MP carotenoids in ex vivo human retinal tissue, in order to assess their structure and conformation. We show that it is possible to distinguish between lutein and zeaxanthin, by their excitation profile (related to their absorption spectra) and the position of their ν1 Raman mode. In addition, analysis of the ν4 Raman band indicates that these carotenoids are present in a specific, constrained conformation in situ, consistent with their binding to specific proteins as postulated in the literature. We discuss how these conclusions relate to the function of these pigments in macular protection. We also address the possibilities for a more accurate, consistent measurement of MP levels by Raman spectroscopy.

  8. Structure and Conformation of the Carotenoids in Human Retinal Macular Pigment

    PubMed Central

    Arteni, Ana-Andreea; Fradot, Mathias; Galzerano, Denise; Mendes-Pinto, Maria M.; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge; Robert, Bruno; Pascal, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Human retinal macular pigment (MP) is formed by the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin (including the isomer meso-zeaxanthin). MP has several functions in improving visual performance and protecting against the damaging effects of light, and MP levels are used as a proxy for macular health–specifically, to predict the likelihood of developing age-related macular degeneration. While the roles of these carotenoids in retinal health have been the object of intense study in recent years, precise mechanistic details of their protective action remain elusive. We have measured the Raman signals originating from MP carotenoids in ex vivo human retinal tissue, in order to assess their structure and conformation. We show that it is possible to distinguish between lutein and zeaxanthin, by their excitation profile (related to their absorption spectra) and the position of their ν1 Raman mode. In addition, analysis of the ν4 Raman band indicates that these carotenoids are present in a specific, constrained conformation in situ, consistent with their binding to specific proteins as postulated in the literature. We discuss how these conclusions relate to the function of these pigments in macular protection. We also address the possibilities for a more accurate, consistent measurement of MP levels by Raman spectroscopy. PMID:26313550

  9. All-trans-retinal dimer formation alleviates the cytotoxicity of all-trans-retinal in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Yanli; Cai, Xianhui; Xia, Qingqing; Chen, Jingmeng; Liao, Yi; Liu, Zuguo; Wu, Yalin

    2016-09-14

    Effective clearance of all-trans-retinal (atRAL) from retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is important for avoiding its cytotoxicity. However, the metabolism of atRAL in RPE cells is poorly clarified. The present study was designed to analyze metabolic products of atRAL and to compare the cytotoxicity of atRAL versus its derivative all-trans-retinal dimer (atRAL-dimer) in human RPE cells. We found that all-trans-retinol (atROL) and a mixture of atRAL condensation metabolites including atRAL-dimer and A2E were generated after incubating RPE cells with atRAL for 6h, and the amount of atRAL-dimer was significantly higher than that of A2E. In the eyes of Rdh8(-/-) Abca4(-/-) mice, a mouse model with defects in retinoid cycle that displays some symbolic characteristics of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the level of atRAL-dimer was increased compared to wild-type mice, and was even much greater than that of A2E & isomers. The cytotoxicity of atRAL-dimer was reduced compared with its precursor atRAL. The latter could provoke intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, increase the mRNA expression of several oxidative stress related genes (Nrf2, HO-1, and γ-GCSh), and induce ΔΨm loss in RPE cells. By contrast, the abilities of atRAL-dimer to induce intracellular ROS and oxidative stress were much weaker versus that of concentration-matched atRAL, and atRAL-dimer exhibited no toxic effect on mitochondrial function at higher concentrations. In conclusion, the formation of atRAL-dimer during atRAL metabolic process ameliorates the cytotoxicity of atRAL by reducing oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Inhibition of the oxidative stress-induced miR-23a protects the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells from apoptosis through the upregulation of glutaminase and glutamine uptake.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan-Dan; Zhong, Bin-Wu; Zhang, Hai-Xia; Zhou, Hong-Yan; Luo, Jie; Liu, Yang; Xu, Gui-Chun; Luan, Chun-Sheng; Fang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    The degeneration of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells in the sub retinal pigment epithelial space and choroid is an initial pathological characteristic for the age-related macular degeneration which is the leading cause of severe vision loss in old people. Moreover, oxidative stress is implicated as a major inducer of RPE cell death. Here, we assessed the correlation between the H2O2-induced RPE cell death and glutamine metabolism. We found under low glutamine supply (20 %), the ARPE-19 cells were more susceptive to H2O2-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the glutamine uptake and the glutaminase (GLS) were suppressed by H2O2 treatments. Moreover, we observed miR-23a was upregulated by H2O2 treatments and overexpression of miR-23a significantly sensitized ARPE-19 cells to H2O2. Importantly, Western blotting and luciferase assay demonstrated GLS1 is a direct target of miR-23a in RPE cells. Inhibition of the H2O2-induced miR-23a by antagomiR protected the RPE cells from the oxidative stress-induced cell death. In addition, recovery of GLS1 expression in miR-23a overexpressed RPE cells rescued the H2O2-induced cell death. This study illustrated a mechanism for the protection of the oxidative-induced RPE cell death through the recovery of glutamine metabolism by inhibition of miR-23a, contributing to the discovery of novel targets and the developments of therapeutic strategies for the prevention of RPE cells from oxidative stress.

  11. Topography of retinal recovery processes in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mazinani, Babac E; Merx, Elke; Plange, Niklas; Walter, Peter; Roessler, Gernot F

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine retinal recovery processes to pographically by the application of three flash sequences with specific interstimulus intervals. Methods Twelve healthy subjects underwent multifocal electroretinography with a light-emitting diode stimulator. Every flash sequence consisted of three flashes with 25 msec between the first and the second flash and 35 msec between the second and the third flash. The interval between the third and the first flash of the next step was 85 msec. The interstimulus interval-dependent amplitude reductions of the multifocal electroretinographic response for these three intervals yielded three data points that were used to determine the complete curve of the recovery kinetics. Results Amplitude reductions were higher with shorter interstimulus intervals. The mean half-life periods of the recovery kinetics for the different concentric rings and all subjects were: ring 1, 29.3±5.9 msec; ring 2, 24.2±6.4 msec; ring 3, 23±4.1 msec; ring 4, 23.1±4.6 msec; and ring 5, 22.3±4.4 msec. The differences between the first and all other rings were statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion The kinetics of the amplitude recovery after short interstimulus intervals showed a spatial distribution, with faster recovery toward the macular periphery. PMID:25349472

  12. Construction of a plasmid for human brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its effect on retinal pigment epithelial cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Bo-jing; Wu, Zhi-zhong; Chong, Wei-hua; Li, Gen-lin

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the protective functions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in retinitis pigmentosa. However, a BDNF-based therapy for retinitis pigmentosa is not yet available. To develop an efficient treatment for fundus disease, an eukaryotic expression plasmid was generated and used to transfect human 293T cells to assess the expression and bioactivity of BDNF on acute retinal pigment epithelial-19 (ARPE-19) cells, a human retinal epithelial cell line. After 96 hours of co-culture in a Transwell chamber, ARPE-19 cells exposed to BDNF secreted by 293T cells were more viable than ARPE-19 cells not exposed to secreted BDNF. Western blot assay showed that Bax levels were downregulated and that Bcl-2 levels were upregulated in human ARPE-19 cells exposed to BDNF. Furthermore, 293T cells transfected with the BDNF gene steadily secreted the protein. The powerful anti-apoptotic function of this BDNF may be useful for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa and other retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:28197196

  13. miR-146a Attenuates Inflammatory Pathways Mediated by TLR4/NF-κB and TNFα to Protect Primary Human Retinal Microvascular Endothelial Cells Grown in High Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Eun-Ah; Steinle, Jena J.

    2016-01-01

    Pathological mechanisms underlying diabetic retinopathy are still not completely understood. Increased understanding of potential cellular pathways responsive to hyperglycemia is essential to develop novel therapeutic strategies for diabetic retinopathy. A growing body of evidence shows that microRNA (miRNA) play important roles in pathological mechanisms involved in diabetic retinopathy, as well as possessing potential as novel therapeutic targets. The hypothesis of this study was that miR-146a plays a key role in attenuating hyperglycemia-induced inflammatory pathways through reduced TLR4/NF-κB and TNFα signaling in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (REC). We cultured human REC in normal (5 mM) glucose or transferred to high glucose medium (25 mM) for 3 days. Transfection was performed on REC with miRNA mimic (hsa-miR-146a-5p). Our results demonstrate that miR-146a expression was decreased in human REC cultured in high glucose. Overexpression of miR-146a using mimics reduced the levels of TLR4/NF-κB and TNFα in REC cultured in high glucose. Both MyD88-dependent and -independent signaling were decreased by miR-146a overexpression in REC in high glucose conditions. The results suggest that miR-146a is a potential therapeutic target for reducing inflammation in REC through inhibition of TLR4/NF-κB and TNFα. Our study will contribute to understanding of diabetic retinal pathology, as well as providing important clues to develop therapeutics for clinical applications. PMID:26997759

  14. Effects of Retinal Eccentricity on Human Manual Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovici, Alexandru; Zaal, Peter M. T.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of viewing a primary flight display at different retinal eccentricities on human manual control behavior and performance. Ten participants performed a pitch tracking task while looking at a simplified primary flight display at different horizontal and vertical retinal eccentricities, and with two different controlled dynamics. Tracking performance declined at higher eccentricity angles and participants behaved more nonlinearly. The visual error rate gain increased with eccentricity for single-integrator-like controlled dynamics, but decreased for double-integrator-like dynamics. Participants' visual time delay was up to 100 ms higher at the highest horizontal eccentricity compared to foveal viewing. Overall, vertical eccentricity had a larger impact than horizontal eccentricity on most of the human manual control parameters and performance. Results might be useful in the design of displays and procedures for critical flight conditions such as in an aerodynamic stall.

  15. Thioredoxin-like 6 protects retinal cell line from photooxidative damage by upregulating NF-kappaB activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Wei; Tan, Bao Zhen; Sun, Miao; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2008-08-01

    Apoptosis is the common pathway to photoreceptor cell death in many eye diseases including age-related macular degeneration which affects more than 8 million individuals in the United States alone. RdCVF, a truncated mouse thioredoxin is specifically expressed by rod photoreceptor cells and prevents the apoptosis of cone cells. However the protective mechanism of RdCVF and the implications of its human homologue, thioredoxin-like 6 (TXNL6), on the apoptosis of retinal cells remain unknown. In this study, we examined the function of TXNL6 and investigated its mechanism of protection using a cone photoreceptor cell line, 661W. We found that the photooxidative stress-induced degradation of NF-kappaB proteins is rescued by overexpression of TXNL6, which enabled the NF-kappaB transactivation activity. Furthermore, the overexpression of TXNL6 rescued the photooxidative stress-induced apoptosis of 661W cells. Interestingly, this protective effect was significantly blocked by NF-kappaB specific inhibitors demonstrating that TXNL6 exerts its protective effect against apoptosis via NF-kappaB. Taken together, our study shows that the TXNL6 probably protects retinal cells from photooxidative damage-induced apoptosis via upregulation of NF-kappaB activity. The identification of TXNL6 and the demonstration of its protective mechanism offer new insights into treatment possibilities for photoreceptor cell degradation.

  16. Haemoglobin and vascular function in the human retinal vascular bed.

    PubMed

    Ritt, Martin; Harazny, Joanna M; Schmidt, Stephanie; Raff, Ulrike; Ott, Christian; Michelson, Georg; Schmieder, Roland E

    2013-04-01

    Haemoglobin is a potential nitric oxide (NO) scavenger. Haemoglobin is associated with blood viscosity and the red blood cell free layer width of microvessels that impact on shear stress in the microcirculation. We hypothesized that haemoglobin modulates retinal vascular function. In 139 nondiabetic male patients with haemoglobin levels within the normal range, the vasodilatatory response of retinal capillary blood flow (RCF) to flicker light exposure and the vasoconstrictor response of RCF to infusion of NO synthase inhibitor N-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) were assessed. The latter, because of the selective nature of L-NMMA, reflects a parameter of basal NO activity of retinal vasculature. Examinations of retinal parameters were performed noninvasively and in vivo using scanning laser Doppler flowmetry. Patients with haemoglobin greater or equal the median revealed reduced increase of RCF to flicker light exposure (2.83 ± 12 vs. 9.52 ± 14 (%), P adjusted = 0.002), and greater decrease of RCF to L-NMMA infusion (-7.35 ± 13 vs. -0.92 ± 14 (%), P adjusted = 0.008), compared with patients with haemoglobin below the median. Haemoglobin was negatively related to the percentage change of RCF to flicker light exposure (r = -0.249, P = 0.004) and to L-NMMA infusion (r = -0.201, P = 0.018). In multiple linear regression analysis haemoglobin was an independent determinant of the percentage change of RCF to flicker light exposure (model 1: ß = -0.278, P = 0.003 and model 2: ß = -0.283, P = 0.002) and to L-NMMA infusion (model 1: ß = -0.256, P = 0.005 and model 2: ß = -0.269, P = 0.004). Haemoglobin emerged as an independent determinant of vascular function in the human retinal vascular bed.

  17. Retinal Remodeling and Metabolic Alterations in Human AMD

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Bryan W.; Pfeiffer, Rebecca L.; Ferrell, William D.; Watt, Carl B.; Tucker, James; Marc, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive retinal degeneration resulting in central visual field loss, ultimately causing debilitating blindness. AMD affects 18% of Americans from 65 to 74, 30% older than 74 years of age and is the leading cause of severe vision loss and blindness in Western populations. While many genetic and environmental risk factors are known for AMD, we currently know less about the mechanisms mediating disease progression. The pathways and mechanisms through which genetic and non-genetic risk factors modulate development of AMD pathogenesis remain largely unexplored. Moreover, current treatment for AMD is palliative and limited to wet/exudative forms. Retina is a complex, heterocellular tissue and most retinal cell classes are impacted or altered in AMD. Defining disease and stage-specific cytoarchitectural and metabolic responses in AMD is critical for highlighting targets for intervention. The goal of this article is to illustrate cell types impacted in AMD and demonstrate the implications of those changes, likely beginning in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), for remodeling of the the neural retina. Tracking heterocellular responses in disease progression is best achieved with computational molecular phenotyping (CMP), a tool that enables acquisition of a small molecule fingerprint for every cell in the retina. CMP uncovered critical cellular and molecular pathologies (remodeling and reprogramming) in progressive retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We now applied these approaches to normal human and AMD tissues mapping progression of cellular and molecular changes in AMD retinas, including late-stage forms of the disease. PMID:27199657

  18. Development of Retinal Layers in Prenatal Human Retina.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Anita

    2016-01-01

    To determine the developmental sequence of retinal layers to provide information on where in utero pathologic events might affect retinal development. Qualitative and quantitative descriptive research. A histology collection of human eyes from fetal week (Fwk) 8 to postnatal (P) 10 weeks was analyzed. The length of the nasal and temporal retina was measured along the horizontal meridian in 20 eyes. The location of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and outer plexiform layer (OPL) was identified at each age, and its length measured. The human eye retinal length increased from 5.19 mm at Fwk 8 to 20.92 mm at midgestation to 32.88 mm just after birth. The IPL appeared in the presumptive fovea at Fwk 8, reached the eccentricity of the optic nerve by Fwk 12, and was present to both nasal and temporal peripheral edges by Fwk 18-21. By contrast, the OPL developed slowly. A short OPL was first present in the Fwk 11 fovea and did not reach the eccentricity of the optic nerve until midgestation. The OPL reached the retinal edges by Fwk 30. Laminar development of both IPL and OPL occurred before vascular formation. In human fetal retina, the IPL reached the far peripheral edge of the retina by midgestation and the OPL by late gestation. Only very early in utero events could affect IPL lamination in the central retina, but events occurring after Fwk 20 in the peripheral retina would overlap OPL laminar development in outer retina. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional expression of SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) protects retinal dopaminergic cells from neurotoxin-induced degeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingling; Li, Ping; Carr, Aprell; Wang, Xiaokai; DeLaPaz, April; Sun, Lei; Lee, Eric; Tomei, Erika; Li, Lei

    2013-01-11

    We previously isolated a dominant mutation, night blindness b (nbb), which causes a late onset of retinal dopaminergic cell degeneration in zebrafish. In this study, we cloned the zebrafish nbb locus. Sequencing results revealed that nbb is a homolog of the vertebrate SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil). The Stil gene has been shown to play important roles in the regulation of vertebrate embryonic neural development and human cancer cell proliferation. In this study, we demonstrate that functional expression of Stil is also required for neural survival. In zebrafish, decreased expression of Stil resulted in increased toxic susceptibility of retinal dopaminergic cells to 6-hydroxydopamine. Increases in Stil-mediated Shh signaling transduction (i.e. by knocking down the Shh repressor Sufu) prevented dopaminergic cell death induced by neurotoxic insult. The data suggest that the oncogene Stil also plays important roles in neural protection.

  20. Office for Human Research Protections

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A A Print Share Office for Human Research Protections The Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) provides leadership in the protection of ... welfare, and wellbeing of human subjects involved in research conducted or supported by the U.S. Department of ...

  1. Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid (TUDCA) Protects Photoreceptors from Cell Death after Experimental Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Mantopoulos, Dimosthenis; Murakami, Yusuke; Comander, Jason; Thanos, Aristomenis; Roh, Miin; Miller, Joan W.; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Detachment of photoreceptors from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium is seen in various retinal disorders such as retinal detachment and age-related macular degeneration and leads to loss of photoreceptors and vision. Pharmacologic inhibition of photoreceptor cell death may prevent this outcome. This study tests whether systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) can protect photoreceptors from cell death after experimental retinal detachment in rodents. Methodology/Principal Findings Retinal detachment was created in rats by subretinal injection of hyaluronic acid. The animals were treated daily with vehicle or TUDCA (500 mg/kg). TUNEL staining was used to evaluate cell death. Photoreceptor loss was evaluated by measuring the relative thickness of the outer nuclear layer (ONL). Macrophage recruitment, oxidative stress, cytokine levels, and caspase levels were also quantified. Three days after detachment, TUDCA decreased the number of TUNEL-positive cells compared to vehicle (651±68/mm2 vs. 1314±68/mm2, P = 0.001) and prevented the reduction of ONL thickness ratio (0.84±0.03 vs. 0.65±0.03, P = 0.002). Similar results were obtained after 5 days of retinal detachment. Macrophage recruitment and expression levels of TNF-a and MCP-1 after retinal detachment were not affected by TUDCA treatment, whereas increases in activity of caspases 3 and 9 as well as carbonyl-protein adducts were almost completely inhibited by TUDCA treatment. Conclusions/Significance Systemic administration of TUDCA preserved photoreceptors after retinal detachment, and was associated with decreased oxidative stress and caspase activity. TUDCA may be used as a novel therapeutic agent for preventing vision loss in diseases that are characterized by photoreceptor detachment. PMID:21961034

  2. Functional annotation of the human retinal pigment epithelium transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Booij, Judith C; van Soest, Simone; Swagemakers, Sigrid MA; Essing, Anke HW; Verkerk, Annemieke JMH; van der Spek, Peter J; Gorgels, Theo GMF; Bergen, Arthur AB

    2009-01-01

    Background To determine level, variability and functional annotation of gene expression of the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), the key tissue involved in retinal diseases like age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Macular RPE cells from six selected healthy human donor eyes (aged 63–78 years) were laser dissected and used for 22k microarray studies (Agilent technologies). Data were analyzed with Rosetta Resolver, the web tool DAVID and Ingenuity software. Results In total, we identified 19,746 array entries with significant expression in the RPE. Gene expression was analyzed according to expression levels, interindividual variability and functionality. A group of highly (n = 2,194) expressed RPE genes showed an overrepresentation of genes of the oxidative phosphorylation, ATP synthesis and ribosome pathways. In the group of moderately expressed genes (n = 8,776) genes of the phosphatidylinositol signaling system and aminosugars metabolism were overrepresented. As expected, the top 10 percent (n = 2,194) of genes with the highest interindividual differences in expression showed functional overrepresentation of the complement cascade, essential in inflammation in age-related macular degeneration, and other signaling pathways. Surprisingly, this same category also includes the genes involved in Bruch's membrane (BM) composition. Among the top 10 percent of genes with low interindividual differences, there was an overrepresentation of genes involved in local glycosaminoglycan turnover. Conclusion Our study expands current knowledge of the RPE transcriptome by assigning new genes, and adding data about expression level and interindividual variation. Functional annotation suggests that the RPE has high levels of protein synthesis, strong energy demands, and is exposed to high levels of oxidative stress and a variable degree of inflammation. Our data sheds new light on the molecular composition of BM, adjacent to the RPE, and is useful for

  3. Calcium buffer proteins are specific markers of human retinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kántor, Orsolya; Mezey, Szilvia; Adeghate, Jennifer; Naumann, Angela; Nitschke, Roland; Énzsöly, Anna; Szabó, Arnold; Lukáts, Ákos; Németh, János; Somogyvári, Zoltán; Völgyi, Béla

    2016-07-01

    Ca(2+)-buffer proteins (CaBPs) modulate the temporal and spatial characteristics of transient intracellular Ca(2+)-concentration changes in neurons in order to fine-tune the strength and duration of the output signal. CaBPs have been used as neurochemical markers to identify and trace neurons of several brain loci including the mammalian retina. The CaBP content of retinal neurons, however, varies between species and, thus, the results inferred from animal models cannot be utilised directly by clinical ophthalmologists. Moreover, the shortage of well-preserved human samples greatly impedes human retina studies at the cellular and network level. Our purpose has therefore been to examine the distribution of major CaBPs, including calretinin, calbindin-D28, parvalbumin and the recently discovered secretagogin in exceptionally well-preserved human retinal samples. Based on a combination of immunohistochemistry, Neurolucida tracing and Lucifer yellow injections, we have established a database in which the CaBP marker composition can be defined for morphologically identified cell types of the human retina. Hence, we describe the full CaBP make-up for a number of human retinal neurons, including HII horizontal cells, AII amacrine cells, type-1 tyrosine-hydroxylase-expressing amacrine cells and other lesser known neurons. We have also found a number of unidentified cells whose morphology remains to be characterised. We present several examples of the colocalisation of two or three CaBPs with slightly different subcellular distributions in the same cell strongly suggesting a compartment-specific division of labour of Ca(2+)-buffering by CaBPs. Our work thus provides a neurochemical framework for future ophthalmological studies and renders new information concerning the cellular and subcellular distribution of CaBPs for experimental neuroscience.

  4. Probing human red cone opsin activity with retinal analogues.

    PubMed

    Kono, Masahiro; Crouch, Rosalie K

    2011-03-25

    Retinal analogues have been used to probe the chromophore binding pocket and function of the rod visual pigment rhodopsin. Despite the high homology between rod and cone visual pigment proteins, conclusions drawn from rhodopsin studies should not necessarily be extrapolated to cone visual pigment proteins. In this study, the effects of full-length and truncated retinal analogues on the human red cone opsin's ability to activate transducin, the G protein in visual transduction, were assessed. The result with beta-ionone (6) confirms that a covalent bond is not necessary to deactivate the red cone opsin. In addition, several small compounds were found able to deactivate this opsin. However, as the polyene chain is extended in a trans configuration beyond the 9-carbon position, the analogues became agonists up to all-trans-retinal (3). The 22-carbon analogue (2) appeared to be neither an agonist nor an inverse agonist. Although the all-trans-C17 (5) analogue was an agonist, the 9-cis-C17 (11) compound was an inverse agonist, a result that differs from that with rhodopsin. These results suggest that the red cone opsin has a more open structure in the chromophore binding region than rhodopsin and its activation or deactivation as a G-protein receptor may be less selective than rhodopsin.

  5. Analysis of the scattering performance of human retinal tissue layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dan; Gao, Zhisan; Ye, Haishui; Yuan, Qun

    2017-02-01

    Human retina is different from other ocular tissues, such as cornea, crystalline lens and vitreous because of high scattering performance. As an anisotropic tissue, we cannot neglect its impact on the polarization state of the scattered light. In this paper, Mie scattering and radiative transfer theory are applied to analyze the polarization state of backscattered light from four types of retinal tissues, including neural retina, retinal pigment epithelial (RPE), choroid and sclera. The results show that the most backscattered zones in different depths have almost the same electrical fields of Jones vector, which represents the polarization state of light, whether neural retina layer is under normal incidence or oblique incidence. Very little change occurs in the polarization of backscattered light compared to that of the incident light. Polarization distribution of backward scattered light from neural retina layer doesn't make apparent effects on polarization phase shifting in spectral domain OCT because its thickness is far less than photon mean free path, while other retinal tissues do not meet this rule.

  6. An experimental comparison of human and bovine rhodopsin provides insight into the molecular basis of retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Morrow, James M; Castiglione, Gianni M; Dungan, Sarah Z; Tang, Portia L; Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Hauser, Frances E; Chang, Belinda S W

    2017-03-30

    Rhodopsin is the visual pigment that mediates dim-light vision in vertebrates and is a model system for the study of retinal disease. The majority of rhodopsin experiments are performed using bovine rhodopsin; however, recent evidence suggests that significant functional differences exist among mammalian rhodopsins. In this study, we identify differences in both thermal decay and light-activated retinal release rates between bovine and human rhodopsin and perform mutagenesis studies to highlight two clusters of substitutions that contribute to these differences. We also demonstrate that the retinitis pigmentosa-associated mutation G51A behaves differently in human rhodopsin compared to bovine rhodopsin and determine that the thermal decay rate of an ancestrally reconstructed mammalian rhodopsin displays an intermediate phenotype compared to the two extant pigments. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute hypoglycemia decreases central retinal function in the human eye.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mukhtar I; Barlow, Robert B; Weinstock, Ruth S

    2011-07-15

    The goal of this pilot study was to assess the effects of acute hypoglycemia on retinal function and contrast sensitivity in individuals with and without diabetes. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic and euglycemic clamp procedures were performed in subjects without diabetes (n=7) and with controlled type 1 diabetes (n=5). Mean age was 28 years, and none had retinal disease. During euglycemia (glucose 95-110 mg/dl) and acute hypoglycemia (glucose 50-55 mg/dl), contrast sensitivity was measured and spatial retinal responses were recorded with multifocal electroretinograms (mfERG), a rapid technique for mapping sensitivity from the foveal, macular and peripheral areas of the retina. During hypoglycemia, retinal responses (mfERG P1 wave) were decreased in both type 1 diabetes subjects and subjects without diabetes. The dominant effect was in the amplitude of the responses in the central macular retina, not in their temporal properties. Responses from the central region, central 10(0), were on average 1.8-fold lower than those from the periphery for both groups. All diabetes subjects and 3/7 without diabetes reported central scotoma. Decreases in mfERG amplitude were accompanied by decreases in contrast sensitivity. These changes were immediately reversed with the restoration of euglycemia. Overall, this study demonstrates that the acute effects of hypoglycemia in the human eye predominantly involve central vision, and these visual effects originate, at least in part, in the retina. The association between low blood glucose levels and impaired central vision underscores the importance of avoiding when possible and promptly treating hypoglycemia, particularly in individuals with diabetes. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Cytotoxic Effects of Curcumin in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hollborn, Margrit; Chen, Rui; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas; Kohen, Leon

    2013-01-01

    Backround Curcumin from turmeric is an ingredient in curry powders. Due to its antiinflammatory, antioxidant and anticarcinogenic effects, curcumin is a promising drug for the treatment of cancer and retinal diseases. We investigated whether curcumin alters the viability and physiological properties of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro. Methodology/Principal Findings Cellular proliferation was investigated with a bromodeoxy-uridine immunoassay, and chemotaxis was investigated with a Boyden chamber assay. Cell viability was determined by trypan blue exclusion. Apoptosis and necrosis rates were determined with a DNA fragmentation ELISA. Gene expression was determined by real-time PCR, and secretion of VEGF and bFGF was examined with ELISA. The phosphorylation level of proteins was revealed by Western blotting. The proliferation of RPE cells was slightly increased by curcumin at 10 µM and strongly reduced by curcumin above 50 µM. Curcumin at 50 µM increased slightly the chemotaxis of the cells. Curcumin reduced the expression and secretion of VEGF under control conditions and abolished the VEGF secretion induced by PDGF and chemical hypoxia. Whereas low concentrations of curcumin stimulated the expression of bFGF and HGF, high concentrations caused downregulation of both factors. Curcumin decreased dose-dependently the viability of RPE cells via induction of early necrosis (above 10 µM) and delayed apoptosis (above 1 µM). The cytotoxic effect of curcumin involved activation of caspase-3 and calpain, intracellular calcium signaling, mitochondrial permeability, oxidative stress, increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and decreased phosphorylation of Akt protein. Conclusion It is concluded that curcumin at concentrations described to be effective in the treatment of tumor cells and in inhibiting death of retinal neurons (∼10 µM) has adverse effects on RPE cells. It is suggested that, during the intake of curcumin as concomitant therapy of

  9. (R)-α-Lipoic Acid Protects Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells from Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Voloboueva, Ludmila A.; Liu, Jiankang; Suh, Jung H.; Ames, Bruce N.; Miller, Sheldon S.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine whether (R)-α-lipoic acid (LA) protects cultured human fetal retinal pigment epithelial (hfRPE) cells against oxidative injury and identify the pathways that may mediate protection. METHODS Cultured hfRPE cells were pretreated with various concentrations of LA for 14 to 16 hours followed by treatment with a chemical oxidant, tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BuOOH; 0.8 mM, 3 hours). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cell viability were measured using H2DCF and MTT assays, respectively. RPE cells were evaluated with fluorescent dyes (SYTOX Orange and SYTO Green; Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR), which differentiate between live and dead cells. Apoptosis was visualized by using the TUNEL assay. Changes in mitochondrial membrane potential were detected by JC-1 dye. Intracellular levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were measured by HPLC. Regulation of γ-glutamylcysteine ligase (GCL), the rate-controlling enzyme of GSH production, was assayed by RT-PCR. RESULTS Pretreatment of hfRPE cells with LA, 0.2 mM and 0.5 mM, significantly reduced the levels of t-BuOOH-induced intra-cellular ROS, by 23% and 49%, respectively. LA (0.5 mM) prevented oxidant-induced cell death and apoptosis and also increased the viability of oxidant-treated hfRPE cells from 38% to 90% of control. LA upregulated the mRNA expression of GCL, and was protective against t-BuOOH-induced decreases in both mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular levels of GSH and GSH/GSSG. CONCLUSIONS The present study suggests that the protective effect of LA involves multiple pathways and that LA could be effective against age-associated increase in oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in RPE cells. PMID:16249512

  10. Selenium Protects Retinal Cells from Cisplatin-Induced Alterations in Carbohydrate Residues

    PubMed Central

    Akşit, Dilek; Yazıcı, Alper; Akşit, Hasan; Sarı, Esin S.; Yay, Arzu; Yıldız, Onur; Kılıç, Adil; Ermiş, Sıtkı S.; Seyrek, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Investigate alterations in the expression and localization of carbohydrate units in rat retinal cells exposed to cisplatin toxicity. Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate putative protective effects of selenium on retinal cells subjected to cisplatin. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: Eighteen healthy Wistar rats were divided into three equal groups: 1. Control, 2. Cisplatin and 3. Cisplatin+selenium groups. After anesthesia, the right eye of each rat was enucleated. Results: Histochemically, retinal cells of control groups reacted with α-2,3-bound sialic acid-specific Maackia amurensis lectin (MAA) strongly, while cisplatin reduced the staining intensity for MAA. However, selenium administration alleviated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for MAA in retinal cells. The staining intensity for N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc residues) specific Griffonia simplicifolia-1 (GSL–1) was relatively slight in control animals and cisplatin reduced this slight staining for GSL-1 further. Selenium administration mitigated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for GSL-1. A diffuse staining for N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) specific wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was observed throughout the retina of the control animals. In particular, cells localized in the inner plexiform and photoreceptor layers are reacted strongly with WGA. Compared to the control animals, binding sites for WGA in the retina of rats given cisplatin were remarkably decreased. However, the retinal cells of rats given selenium reacted strongly with WGA. Conclusion: Cisplatin reduces α-2,3-bound sialic acid, GlcNAc and GalNAc residues in certain retinal cells. However, selenium alleviates the reducing effect of cisplatin on carbohydrate residues in retinal cells. PMID:27606141

  11. In vivo dynamics of retinal injury and repair in the rhodopsin mutant dog model of human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Cideciyan, Artur V; Jacobson, Samuel G; Aleman, Tomas S; Gu, Danian; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Sumaroka, Alexander; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2005-04-05

    Genetic and environmental factors modify the severity of human neurodegenerations. Retinal degenerations caused by rhodopsin gene mutations show severity differences within and between families and even within regions of the same eye. Environmental light is thought to contribute to this variation. In the naturally occurring dog model of the human disorder, we found that modest light levels, as used in routine clinical practice, dramatically accelerated the neurodegeneration. Dynamics of acute retinal injury (consisting of abnormal intraretinal light scattering) were visualized in vivo in real time with high-resolution optical imaging. Long term consequences included fast or slow retinal degeneration or repair of injury depending on the dose of light exposure. These experiments provide a platform to study mechanisms of neuronal injury, repair, compensation, and degeneration. The data also argue for a gene-specific clinical trial of light reduction in human rhodopsin disease.

  12. In vivo dynamics of retinal injury and repair in the rhodopsin mutant dog model of human retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Cideciyan, Artur V.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Gu, Danian; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Acland, Gregory M.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors modify the severity of human neurodegenerations. Retinal degenerations caused by rhodopsin gene mutations show severity differences within and between families and even within regions of the same eye. Environmental light is thought to contribute to this variation. In the naturally occurring dog model of the human disorder, we found that modest light levels, as used in routine clinical practice, dramatically accelerated the neurodegeneration. Dynamics of acute retinal injury (consisting of abnormal intraretinal light scattering) were visualized in vivo in real time with high-resolution optical imaging. Long term consequences included fast or slow retinal degeneration or repair of injury depending on the dose of light exposure. These experiments provide a platform to study mechanisms of neuronal injury, repair, compensation, and degeneration. The data also argue for a gene-specific clinical trial of light reduction in human rhodopsin disease. PMID:15784735

  13. Transcriptome analysis and molecular signature of human retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Strunnikova, N.V.; Maminishkis, A.; Barb, J.J.; Wang, F.; Zhi, C.; Sergeev, Y.; Chen, W.; Edwards, A.O.; Stambolian, D.; Abecasis, G.; Swaroop, A.; Munson, P.J.; Miller, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a polarized cell layer critical for photoreceptor function and survival. The unique physiology and relationship to the photoreceptors make the RPE a critical determinant of human vision. Therefore, we performed a global expression profiling of native and cultured human fetal and adult RPE and determined a set of highly expressed ‘signature’ genes by comparing the observed RPE gene profiles to the Novartis expression database (SymAtlas: http://wombat.gnf.org/index.html) of 78 tissues. Using stringent selection criteria of at least 10-fold higher expression in three distinct preparations, we identified 154 RPE signature genes, which were validated by qRT-PCR analysis in RPE and in an independent set of 11 tissues. Several of the highly expressed signature genes encode proteins involved in visual cycle, melanogenesis and cell adhesion and Gene ontology analysis enabled the assignment of RPE signature genes to epithelial channels and transporters (ClCN4, BEST1, SLCA20) or matrix remodeling (TIMP3, COL8A2). Fifteen RPE signature genes were associated with known ophthalmic diseases, and 25 others were mapped to regions of disease loci. An evaluation of the RPE signature genes in a recently completed AMD genomewide association (GWA) data set revealed that TIMP3, GRAMD3, PITPNA and CHRNA3 signature genes may have potential roles in AMD pathogenesis and deserve further examination. We propose that RPE signature genes are excellent candidates for retinal diseases and for physiological investigations (e.g. dopachrome tautomerase in melanogenesis). The RPE signature gene set should allow the validation of RPE-like cells derived from human embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells for cell-based therapies of degenerative retinal diseases. PMID:20360305

  14. LRP2 Acts as SHH Clearance Receptor to Protect the Retinal Margin from Mitogenic Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Christ, Annabel; Christa, Anna; Klippert, Julia; Eule, J Corinna; Bachmann, Sebastian; Wallace, Valerie A; Hammes, Annette; Willnow, Thomas E

    2015-10-12

    During forebrain development, LRP2 promotes morphogen signaling as an auxiliary SHH receptor. However, in the developing retina, LRP2 assumes the opposing function, mediating endocytic clearance of SHH and antagonizing morphogen action. LRP2-mediated clearance prevents spread of SHH activity from the central retina into the retinal margin to protect quiescent progenitor cells in this niche from mitogenic stimuli. Loss of LRP2 in mice increases the sensitivity of the retinal margin for SHH, causing expansion of the retinal progenitor cell pool and hyperproliferation of this tissue. Our findings document the ability of LRP2 to act, in a context-dependent manner, as activator or inhibitor of the SHH pathway. Our current findings uncovered LRP2 activity as the molecular mechanism imposing quiescence of the retinal margin in the mammalian eye and suggest SHH-induced proliferation of the retinal margin as cause of the large eye phenotype observed in mouse models and patients with LRP2 defects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Persimmon Leaves (Diospyros kaki) Extract Protects Optic Nerve Crush-Induced Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ryul Ahn, Hong; Kim, Kyung-A; Kang, Suk Woo; Lee, Joo Young; Kim, Tae-Jin; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2017-04-20

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death is part of many retinal diseases. Here, we report that the ethanol extract of Diospyros kaki (EEDK) exhibits protective properties against retinal degeneration, both in vitro and in vivo. Upon exposure to cytotoxic compounds, RGC-5 cells showed approximately 40% cell viability versus the control, while pre-treatment with EEDK markedly increased cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. Further studies revealed that cell survival induced by EEDK was associated with decreased levels of apoptotic proteins, such as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, p53, and cleaved caspase-3. In addition to apoptotic pathways, we demonstrated that expression levels of antioxidant-associated proteins, such as superoxide dismutase-1, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase-1, were positively modulated by EEDK. In a partial optic nerve crush mouse model, EEDK had similar ameliorating effects on retinal degeneration resulting from mechanical damages. Therefore, our results suggest that EEDK may have therapeutic potential against retinal degenerative disorders, such as glaucoma.

  16. Persimmon Leaves (Diospyros kaki) Extract Protects Optic Nerve Crush-Induced Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ryul Ahn, Hong; Kim, Kyung-A; Kang, Suk Woo; Lee, Joo Young; Kim, Tae-Jin; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death is part of many retinal diseases. Here, we report that the ethanol extract of Diospyros kaki (EEDK) exhibits protective properties against retinal degeneration, both in vitro and in vivo. Upon exposure to cytotoxic compounds, RGC-5 cells showed approximately 40% cell viability versus the control, while pre-treatment with EEDK markedly increased cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. Further studies revealed that cell survival induced by EEDK was associated with decreased levels of apoptotic proteins, such as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, p53, and cleaved caspase-3. In addition to apoptotic pathways, we demonstrated that expression levels of antioxidant-associated proteins, such as superoxide dismutase-1, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase-1, were positively modulated by EEDK. In a partial optic nerve crush mouse model, EEDK had similar ameliorating effects on retinal degeneration resulting from mechanical damages. Therefore, our results suggest that EEDK may have therapeutic potential against retinal degenerative disorders, such as glaucoma. PMID:28425487

  17. Naturally occurring rhodopsin mutation in the dog causes retinal dysfunction and degeneration mimicking human dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Kijas, James W; Cideciyan, Artur V; Aleman, Tomas S; Pianta, Michael J; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Miller, Brian J; Jacobson, Samuel G; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Acland, Gregory M

    2002-04-30

    Rhodopsin is the G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by light and initiates the transduction cascade leading to night (rod) vision. Naturally occurring pathogenic rhodopsin (RHO) mutations have been previously identified only in humans and are a common cause of dominantly inherited blindness from retinal degeneration. We identified English Mastiff dogs with a naturally occurring dominant retinal degeneration and determined the cause to be a point mutation in the RHO gene (Thr4Arg). Dogs with this mutant allele manifest a retinal phenotype that closely mimics that in humans with RHO mutations. The phenotypic features shared by dog and man include a dramatically slowed time course of recovery of rod photoreceptor function after light exposure and a distinctive topographic pattern to the retinal degeneration. The canine disease offers opportunities to explore the basis of prolonged photoreceptor recovery after light in RHO mutations and determine whether there are links between the dysfunction and apoptotic retinal cell death. The RHO mutant dog also becomes the large animal needed for preclinical trials of therapies for a major subset of human retinopathies.

  18. Naturally occurring rhodopsin mutation in the dog causes retinal dysfunction and degeneration mimicking human dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kijas, James W.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Pianta, Michael J.; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Miller, Brian J.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Acland, Gregory M.

    2002-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by light and initiates the transduction cascade leading to night (rod) vision. Naturally occurring pathogenic rhodopsin (RHO) mutations have been previously identified only in humans and are a common cause of dominantly inherited blindness from retinal degeneration. We identified English Mastiff dogs with a naturally occurring dominant retinal degeneration and determined the cause to be a point mutation in the RHO gene (Thr4Arg). Dogs with this mutant allele manifest a retinal phenotype that closely mimics that in humans with RHO mutations. The phenotypic features shared by dog and man include a dramatically slowed time course of recovery of rod photoreceptor function after light exposure and a distinctive topographic pattern to the retinal degeneration. The canine disease offers opportunities to explore the basis of prolonged photoreceptor recovery after light in RHO mutations and determine whether there are links between the dysfunction and apoptotic retinal cell death. The RHO mutant dog also becomes the large animal needed for preclinical trials of therapies for a major subset of human retinopathies. PMID:11972042

  19. The expression of retinal cell markers in human retinal pigment epithelial cells and their augmentation by the synthetic retinoid fenretinide

    PubMed Central

    Vugler, Anthony A.; Yu, Lu; Semo, Maayan; Coffey, Pete; Moss, Stephen E.; Greenwood, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose In several species the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) has the potential to transdifferentiate into retinal cells to regenerate functional retinal tissue after injury. However, this capacity for regeneration is lost in mammals. The synthetic retinoic acid derivative, fenretinide [N(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide], induces a neuronal-like phenotype in the human adult retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19). These changes are characterized by the appearance of neural-like processes and the expression of neuronal markers not normally associated with RPE cells. Here we assess whether fenretinide can induce a neuroretinal cell phenotype in ARPE-19 cells, by examining retinal cell marker expression. Methods ARPE-19 cells were treated daily with culture medium containing either 3 μM fenretinide or dimethyl sulfoxide as a control for 7 days. Cells were processed for immunocytochemistry, western blotting, and for analysis by PCR to examine the expression of a panel of RPE, neural, and retinal-associated cellular markers, including classical and non-canonical opsins. Results Treatment with fenretinide for 7 days induced the formation of neuronal-like processes in ARPE-19 cells. Fenretinide induced the expression of the cone long wavelength sensitive opsin (OPN1lw) but not rhodopsin (RHO), while decreasing the expression of RPE cell markers. Many of the neuronal and retinal specific markers examined were expressed in both control and fenretinide treated cells, including those involved in photoreceptor cell development and the multipotency of neural retinal progenitor cells. Interestingly, ARPE-19 cells also expressed both photoreceptor specific and non-specific canonical opsins. Conclusions The expression of retinal-associated markers and loss of RPE cell markers in control ARPE-19 cells suggests that these cells might have dedifferentiated from an RPE cell phenotype under standard culture conditions. The expression of molecules, such as the transcription

  20. The expression of retinal cell markers in human retinal pigment epithelial cells and their augmentation by the synthetic retinoid fenretinide.

    PubMed

    Carr, Amanda-Jayne; Vugler, Anthony A; Yu, Lu; Semo, Maayan; Coffey, Pete; Moss, Stephen E; Greenwood, John

    2011-01-01

    In several species the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) has the potential to transdifferentiate into retinal cells to regenerate functional retinal tissue after injury. However, this capacity for regeneration is lost in mammals. The synthetic retinoic acid derivative, fenretinide [N(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide], induces a neuronal-like phenotype in the human adult retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19). These changes are characterized by the appearance of neural-like processes and the expression of neuronal markers not normally associated with RPE cells. Here we assess whether fenretinide can induce a neuroretinal cell phenotype in ARPE-19 cells, by examining retinal cell marker expression. ARPE-19 cells were treated daily with culture medium containing either 3 μM fenretinide or dimethyl sulfoxide as a control for 7 days. Cells were processed for immunocytochemistry, western blotting, and for analysis by PCR to examine the expression of a panel of RPE, neural, and retinal-associated cellular markers, including classical and non-canonical opsins. Treatment with fenretinide for 7 days induced the formation of neuronal-like processes in ARPE-19 cells. Fenretinide induced the expression of the cone long wavelength sensitive opsin (OPN1lw) but not rhodopsin (RHO), while decreasing the expression of RPE cell markers. Many of the neuronal and retinal specific markers examined were expressed in both control and fenretinide treated cells, including those involved in photoreceptor cell development and the multipotency of neural retinal progenitor cells. Interestingly, ARPE-19 cells also expressed both photoreceptor specific and non-specific canonical opsins. The expression of retinal-associated markers and loss of RPE cell markers in control ARPE-19 cells suggests that these cells might have dedifferentiated from an RPE cell phenotype under standard culture conditions. The expression of molecules, such as the transcription factors paired box 6 gene (PAX6), sex

  1. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Katherine P.; Hung, Sandy S. C.; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y.; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E.; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Cook, Anthony L.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  2. Consumption of Polyphenol-Rich Zingiber Zerumbet Rhizome Extracts Protects against the Breakdown of the Blood-Retinal Barrier and Retinal Inflammation Induced by Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Hong, Tang-Yao; Tzeng, Yu-Cheng; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Liu, I-Min

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates the amelioration of diabetic retinopathy (DR) by Zingiber zerumbet rhizome ethanol extracts (ZZRext) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ-diabetic rats). ZZRext contains high phenolic and flavonoid contents. STZ-diabetic rats were treated orally with ZZRext (200, 300 mg/kg per day) for three months. Blood-retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown and increased vascular permeability were found in diabetic rats, with downregulation of occludin, and claudin-5. ZZRext treatment effectively preserved the expression of occludin, and claudin-5, leading to less BRB breakdown and less vascular permeability. Retinal histopathological observation showed that the disarrangement and reduction in thickness of retinal layers were reversed in ZZRext-treated diabetic rats. Retinal gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, vascular endothelial growth factor, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 were all decreased in ZZRext-treated diabetic rats. Moreover, ZZRext treatment not only inhibited the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation, but also downregulated the protein expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in diabetic retina. In conclusion, the results suggest that the retinal protective effects of ZZRext occur through improved retinal structural change and inhibiting retinal inflammation. The antiretinopathy property of ZZRext might be related to the downregulation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB signal transduction induced by diabetes. PMID:26389948

  3. αB-Crystallin Protects Retinal Tissue during Staphylococcus aureus- Induced Endophthalmitis▿

    PubMed Central

    Whiston, Emily A.; Sugi, Norito; Kamradt, Merideth C.; Sack, Coralynn; Heimer, Susan R.; Engelbert, Michael; Wawrousek, Eric F.; Gilmore, Michael S.; Ksander, Bruce R.; Gregory, Meredith S.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial infections of the eye highlight a dilemma that is central to all immune-privileged sites. On the one hand, immune privilege limits inflammation to prevent bystander destruction of normal tissue and loss of vision. On the other hand, bacterial infections require a robust inflammatory response for rapid clearance of the pathogen. We demonstrate that the retina handles this dilemma, in part, by activation of a protective heat shock protein. During Staphylococcus aureus-induced endophthalmitis, the small heat shock protein αB-crystallin is upregulated in the retina and prevents apoptosis during immune clearance of the bacteria. In the absence of αB-crystallin, mice display increased retinal apoptosis and retinal damage. We found that S. aureus produces a protease capable of cleaving αB-crystallin to a form that coincides with increased retinal apoptosis and tissue destruction. We conclude that αB-crystallin is important in protecting sensitive retinal tissue during destructive inflammation that occurs during bacterial endophthalmitis. PMID:18227158

  4. Rod photoreceptors protect from cone degeneration-induced retinal remodeling and restore visual responses in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Carole J.; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Fadool, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Humans are largely dependent upon cone-mediated vision. However, death or dysfunction of rods, the predominant photoreceptor subtype, results in secondary loss of cones, remodeling of retinal circuitry and blindness. The changes in circuitry may contribute to the vision deficit and undermine attempts at restoring sight. We exploit zebrafish larvae as a genetic model to specifically characterize changes associated with photoreceptor degenerations in a cone-dominated retina. Photoreceptors form synapses with two types of second order neurons, bipolar cells and horizontal cells. Using cell-specific reporter gene expression and immunolabeling for postsynaptic glutamate receptors, significant remodeling is observed following cone degeneration in the pde6cw59 larval retina but not rod degeneration in the Xops:mCFPq13 line. In adults, rods and cones are present in approximately equal numbers, and in pde6cw59 mutants glutamate receptor expression and synaptic structures in the outer plexiform layer are preserved, and visual responses are gained in these once-blind fish. We propose that the abundance of rods in the adult protects the retina from cone degeneration-induced remodeling. We test this hypothesis by genetically manipulating the number of rods in larvae. We show that an increased number and uniform distribution of rods in lor/tbx2bp22bbtl or six7 morpholino-injected larvae protect from pde6cw59-induced secondary changes. The observations that remodeling is a common consequence of photoreceptor death across species, and that in zebrafish a small number of surviving photoreceptors afford protection from degeneration-induced changes provides a model for systematic analysis of factors that slow or even prevent the secondary deteriorations associated with neural degenerative disease. PMID:23365220

  5. Rod photoreceptors protect from cone degeneration-induced retinal remodeling and restore visual responses in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Saade, Carole J; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Fadool, James M

    2013-01-30

    Humans are largely dependent upon cone-mediated vision. However, death or dysfunction of rods, the predominant photoreceptor subtype, results in secondary loss of cones, remodeling of retinal circuitry, and blindness. The changes in circuitry may contribute to the vision deficit and undermine attempts at restoring sight. We exploit zebrafish larvae as a genetic model to specifically characterize changes associated with photoreceptor degenerations in a cone-dominated retina. Photoreceptors form synapses with two types of second-order neurons, bipolar cells, and horizontal cells. Using cell-specific reporter gene expression and immunolabeling for postsynaptic glutamate receptors, significant remodeling is observed following cone degeneration in the pde6c(w59) larval retina but not rod degeneration in the Xops:mCFP(q13) line. In adults, rods and cones are present in approximately equal numbers, and in pde6c(w59) mutants glutamate receptor expression and synaptic structures in the outer plexiform layer are preserved, and visual responses are gained in these once blind fish. We propose that the abundance of rods in the adult protects the retina from cone degeneration-induced remodeling. We test this hypothesis by genetically manipulating the number of rods in larvae. We show that an increased number and uniform distribution of rods in lor/tbx2b(p25bbtl) or six7 morpholino-injected larvae protect from pde6c(w59)-induced secondary changes. The observations that remodeling is a common consequence of photoreceptor death across species, and that in zebrafish a small number of surviving photoreceptors afford protection from degeneration-induced changes, provides a model for systematic analysis of factors that slow or even prevent the secondary deteriorations associated with neural degenerative disease.

  6. Office for Human Research Protections

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections. International Learn how OHRP promotes ... Recent Announcements "Institutional Review Board (IRB) Written Procedures: Guidance for Institutions and ...

  7. Naturally occurring antibodies to bovine and human retinal S antigen: a comparison between uveitis patients and healthy volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, J V; Stott, D I; Hercus, K M

    1989-01-01

    The antibody responses to human and bovine retinal S antigen in the sera of patients with uveitis from various causes were compared with those of a group of healthy volunteers who were fully screened for signs of eye disease. Antiretinal antibodies were found with equal frequency and through the same range of titres in patients and controls, irrespective of the nature or activity of the uveitis. These findings were confirmed by spectrotypic analysis of sera from patients and controls where the predominant serum antibody response was polyclonal. In a small group of patients with retinal vasculitis there was an additional monoclonal response, indicating clonal expansion of a single lymphocyte subset. The prevalence of serum antibodies to retinal antigens in the normal population may indicate a protective role for 'natural' autoantibodies, as has recently been suggested for autoimmune diseases generally. Images PMID:2930762

  8. Comparison between PACAP- and enriched environment-induced retinal protection in MSG-treated newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Peter; Atlasz, Tamas; Szabadfi, Krisztina; Horvath, Gabor; Griecs, Monika; Farkas, Jozsef; Matkovits, Attila; Toth, Gabor; Lubics, Andrea; Tamas, Andrea; Gabriel, Robert; Reglodi, Dora

    2011-01-10

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptors occur throughout the nervous system, including the retina. PACAP exerts diverse actions in the eye: it influences ocular blood flow, contraction of the ciliary muscle, and has retinoprotective effects. This effect has been proven in different models of retinal degeneration. We have previously shown that PACAP protects against monosodium-glutamate (MSG)-induced damage in neonatal rats. The beneficial effects of enriched environment, another neuroprotective strategy, have long been known. Environmental enrichment has been shown to decrease different neuronal injuries. It also influences the development of the visual system. We have recently demonstrated that significant neuroprotection can be achieved in MSG-induced retinal degeneration in animals kept in an enriched environment. Combination of neuroprotective strategies often results in increased protection. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare the two neuroprotective strategies alone and in combination therapy. We found that both PACAP and environmental enrichment led to a similar degree of retinal protection, but the two treatments together did not lead to increased protection: their effects were not additive.

  9. Protective effect of halothane anesthesia on retinal light damage: inhibition of metabolic rhodopsin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Keller, C; Grimm, C; Wenzel, A; Hafezi, F; Remé, C

    2001-02-01

    To determine whether the volatile anesthetic halothane protects against light-induced photoreceptor degeneration in the rodent retina. Albino mice and rats were anesthetized with halothane and exposed to high levels of white or blue light. Nonanesthetized animals served as controls. Retinal morphology was assessed by light microscopy, and apoptosis of photoreceptor cells was verified by detection of fragmented genomic DNA and in situ staining of apoptotic nuclei (TUNEL assay). Rhodopsin regeneration after bleaching was determined by measuring rhodopsin levels in retinas of mice or rats at different time points in darkness. Halothane anesthesia reversibly inhibited metabolic rhodopsin regeneration and thus prevented rhodopsin from absorbing high numbers of photons during light exposure. Consequently, photoreceptors of mice and rats anesthetized with halothane were completely protected against degeneration induced by white light. In remarkable contrast, however, halothane anesthesia did not protect against blue-light-induced photoreceptor cell death. After the initial bleach, halothane impeded photon absorption by rhodopsin by inhibiting metabolic rhodopsin regeneration. Apparently, the rhodopsin-mediated uptake of the critical number of photons to initiate white light-induced retinal degeneration was prevented. In contrast, halothane did not protect the retina against blue light. Blue light can efficiently restore functional rhodopsin from bleaching intermediates through a process termed photoreversal of bleaching. This process does not depend on the visual cycle via the pigment epithelium but nevertheless enables rhodopsin molecules to absorb the critical number of photons required to induce retinal degeneration.

  10. Curcumin Protects Retinal Cells from Light- and Oxidant Stress-induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Md Nawajes A.; Patlolla, Jagan M.R.; Zheng, Lixin; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Tran, Julie-Thu A.; Wicker, Lea; Kasus-Jacobi, Anne; Elliott, Michael H.; Rao, Chinthalapally V.; Anderson, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease that has potential involvement of inflammatory and oxidative stress-related pathways in its pathogenesis. In search of effective therapeutic agents, we tested curcumin, a naturally-occurring compound with known anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties, in rat model of light induced retinal degeneration (LIRD) and in retina derived cell lines. We hypothesized that any compound effective against LIRD, which involves significant oxidative stress and inflammation, would be a candidate for further characterization for its potential application in AMD. We observed significant retinal neuroprotection in rats fed diets supplemented with curcumin (0.2% in diet) for 2 weeks. The mechanism of retinal protection from LIRD by curcumin involves inhibition of NF-κB activation and down-regulation of cellular inflammatory genes. When tested on retina-derived cell lines (661W and ARPE-19), pre-treatment of curcumin protected these cells from H2O2-induced cell death by up-regulating cellular protective enzymes, such as HO-1, thioredoxin. Since, curcumin with its pleiotropic activities can modulate the expression and activation of many cellular regulatory proteins such as NF-κB, AKT, NRF2 and growth factors, which in turn inhibit cellular inflammatory responses and protect cells; we speculate that curcumin would be an effective nutraceutical compound for preventive and augmentative therapy of AMD. PMID:19121385

  11. Protective effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on retinal injury induced by argon laser photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Zhang, C. P.; San, Q.; Wang, C. Z.; Yang, Z. F.; Kang, H. X.; Qian, H. W.

    2010-12-01

    Laser photocoagulation treatment is often complicated by a side effect of visual impairment, which is caused by the unavoidable laser-induced retinal destruction. At present no specific is found to cure this retinopathy. The aim of this study was to observe the neuroprotective effect of bFGF on laser-induced retinal injury. Chinchilla rabbits were divided into three groups and argon laser lesions were created in the retinas. Then bFGF or dexamethasone, a widely used ophthalmic preparation, or saline was given severally by retrobulbar injection. The retinal lesions were evaluated histologically and morphometrically, and visual function was examined by ERG. The results showed that bFGF administration better preserved morphology of retinal photoreceptors and significantly diminished the area of the lesions. Furthermore, bFGF promoted the restoration of the ERG b-wave amplitude. In rabbits treated with dexamethasone, however, the lesions showed almost no ameliorative changes. This is the first study to investigate the potential role of bFGF as a remedial agent in laser photocoagulation treatment. These findings suggest that bFGF has significant neuroprotective properties in the retina and this type of neuroprotection may be of clinical significance in reducing iatrogenic laser-induced retinal injuries in humans.

  12. Identical mutation in a novel retinal gene causes progressive rod-cone degeneration in dogs and retinitis pigmentosa in humans.

    PubMed

    Zangerl, Barbara; Goldstein, Orly; Philp, Alisdair R; Lindauer, Sarah J P; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E; Mullins, Robert F; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Ripoll, Daniel; Felix, Jeanette S; Stone, Edwin M; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2006-11-01

    Progressive rod-cone degeneration (prcd) is a late-onset, autosomal recessive photoreceptor degeneration of dogs and a homolog for some forms of human retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Previously, the disease-relevant interval was reduced to a 106-kb region on CFA9, and a common phenotype-specific haplotype was identified in all affected dogs from several different breeds and breed varieties. Screening of a canine retinal EST library identified partial cDNAs for novel candidate genes in the disease-relevant interval. The complete cDNA of one of these, PRCD, was cloned in dog, human, and mouse. The gene codes for a 54-amino-acid (aa) protein in dog and human and a 53-aa protein in the mouse; the first 24 aa, coded for by exon 1, are highly conserved in 14 vertebrate species. A homozygous mutation (TGC --> TAC) in the second codon shows complete concordance with the disorder in 18 different dog breeds/breed varieties tested. The same homozygous mutation was identified in a human patient from Bangladesh with autosomal recessive RP. Expression studies support the predominant expression of this gene in the retina, with equal expression in the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptor, and ganglion cell layers. This study provides strong evidence that a mutation in the novel gene PRCD is the cause of autosomal recessive retinal degeneration in both dogs and humans.

  13. Multimodal Delivery of Isogenic Mesenchymal Stem Cells Yields Synergistic Protection from Retinal Degeneration and Vision Loss.

    PubMed

    Bakondi, Benjamin; Girman, Sergey; Lu, Bin; Wang, Shaomei

    2017-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that subretinal injection (SRI) of isogenic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) reduced the severity of retinal degeneration in Royal College of Surgeons rats in a focal manner. In contrast, intravenous MSC infusion (MSC(IV) ) produced panoptic retinal rescue. By combining these treatments, we now show that MSC(IV) supplementation potentiates the MSC(SRI) -mediated rescue of photoreceptors and visual function. Electrophysiological recording from superior colliculi revealed 3.9-fold lower luminance threshold responses (LTRs) and 22% larger functional rescue area from combined treatment compared with MSC(SRI) alone. MSC(IV) supplementation of sham (saline) injection also improved LTRs 3.4-fold and enlarged rescue areas by 27% compared with saline alone. We confirmed the involvement of MSC chemotaxis for vision rescue by modulating C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 activity before MSC(IV) but without increased retinal homing. Rather, circulating platelets and lymphocytes were reduced 3 and 7 days after MSC(IV) , respectively. We demonstrated MSC(SRI) -mediated paracrine support of vision rescue by SRI of concentrated MSC-conditioned medium and assessed function by electroretinography and optokinetic response. MSC-secreted peptides increased retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) metabolic activity and clearance of photoreceptor outer segments ex vivo, which was partially abrogated by antibody blockade of trophic factors in concentrated MSC-conditioned medium, or their cognate receptors on RPE. These data support multimodal mechanisms for MSC-mediated retinal protection that differ by administration route and synergize when combined. Thus, using MSC(IV) as adjuvant therapy might improve cell therapies for retinal dystrophy and warrants further translational evaluation. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:444-457.

  14. Transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal tissue in two primate models of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Hiroshi; Mandai, Michiko; Matsushita, Keizo; Kuwahara, Atsushi; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Nakano, Tokushige; Assawachananont, Juthaporn; Kimura, Toru; Saito, Koichi; Terasaki, Hiroko; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Sasai, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Masayo

    2016-01-01

    Retinal transplantation therapy for retinitis pigmentosa is increasingly of interest due to accumulating evidence of transplantation efficacy from animal studies and development of techniques for the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells into retinal tissues or cells. In this study, we aimed to assess the potential clinical utility of hESC-derived retinal tissues (hESC-retina) using newly developed primate models of retinal degeneration to obtain preparatory information regarding the potential clinical utility of these hESC-retinas in transplantation therapy. hESC-retinas were first transplanted subretinally into nude rats with or without retinal degeneration to confirm their competency as a graft to mature to form highly specified outer segment structure and to integrate after transplantation. Two focal selective photoreceptor degeneration models were then developed in monkeys by subretinal injection of cobalt chloride or 577-nm optically pumped semiconductor laser photocoagulation. The utility of the developed models and a practicality of visual acuity test developed for monkeys were evaluated. Finally, feasibility of hESC-retina transplantation was assessed in the developed monkey models under practical surgical procedure and postoperational examinations. Grafted hESC-retina was observed differentiating into a range of retinal cell types, including rod and cone photoreceptors that developed structured outer nuclear layers after transplantation. Further, immunohistochemical analyses suggested the formation of host–graft synaptic connections. The findings of this study demonstrate the clinical feasibility of hESC-retina transplantation and provide the practical tools for the optimization of transplantation strategies for future clinical applications. PMID:26699487

  15. Taurine inhibits interleukin-6 expression and release induced by ultraviolet B exposure to human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Dayang, Wu; Jinsong, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The massive uptake of compatible osmolytes is a self-protective response shared by retina exposed to hypertonic stress and ultraviolet stress. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of taurine against ultraviolet damage in human retinal pigment epithelium cells. Real-time PCR, radioimmunoassay, ELISA and immunoassay were used to measure osmolyte uptake and IL-6 expression. Compared with normotonic stress, hypertonic stress led to an induction of osmolyte uptake including betaine, myoinositol and taurine. UVB exposure upregulated osmolyte transporter mRNA expression and increased osmolyte uptake respectively. Especially, taurine suppressed UVB-induced IL-6 mRNA expression significantly. The accumulation of IL-6 in UVB-exposed human retinal pigment epithelial cells supernatant was much slower when the cells were preincubated with taurine. Moreover, taurine suppressed IL-6 concentration in aqueous humour. The effect of compatible osmolyte taurine on IL-6 expression and release may play an important role in cell resistance and adaption to UVB exposure.

  16. High-speed adaptive optics line scan confocal retinal imaging for human eye.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Gu, Boyu; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yuhua

    2017-01-01

    Continuous and rapid eye movement causes significant intraframe distortion in adaptive optics high resolution retinal imaging. To minimize this artifact, we developed a high speed adaptive optics line scan confocal retinal imaging system. A high speed line camera was employed to acquire retinal image and custom adaptive optics was developed to compensate the wave aberration of the human eye's optics. The spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio were assessed in model eye and in living human eye. The improvement of imaging fidelity was estimated by reduction of intra-frame distortion of retinal images acquired in the living human eyes with frame rates at 30 frames/second (FPS), 100 FPS, and 200 FPS. The device produced retinal image with cellular level resolution at 200 FPS with a digitization of 512×512 pixels/frame in the living human eye. Cone photoreceptors in the central fovea and rod photoreceptors near the fovea were resolved in three human subjects in normal chorioretinal health. Compared with retinal images acquired at 30 FPS, the intra-frame distortion in images taken at 200 FPS was reduced by 50.9% to 79.7%. We demonstrated the feasibility of acquiring high resolution retinal images in the living human eye at a speed that minimizes retinal motion artifact. This device may facilitate research involving subjects with nystagmus or unsteady fixation due to central vision loss.

  17. High-speed adaptive optics line scan confocal retinal imaging for human eye

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yuhua

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Continuous and rapid eye movement causes significant intraframe distortion in adaptive optics high resolution retinal imaging. To minimize this artifact, we developed a high speed adaptive optics line scan confocal retinal imaging system. Methods A high speed line camera was employed to acquire retinal image and custom adaptive optics was developed to compensate the wave aberration of the human eye’s optics. The spatial resolution and signal to noise ratio were assessed in model eye and in living human eye. The improvement of imaging fidelity was estimated by reduction of intra-frame distortion of retinal images acquired in the living human eyes with frame rates at 30 frames/second (FPS), 100 FPS, and 200 FPS. Results The device produced retinal image with cellular level resolution at 200 FPS with a digitization of 512×512 pixels/frame in the living human eye. Cone photoreceptors in the central fovea and rod photoreceptors near the fovea were resolved in three human subjects in normal chorioretinal health. Compared with retinal images acquired at 30 FPS, the intra-frame distortion in images taken at 200 FPS was reduced by 50.9% to 79.7%. Conclusions We demonstrated the feasibility of acquiring high resolution retinal images in the living human eye at a speed that minimizes retinal motion artifact. This device may facilitate research involving subjects with nystagmus or unsteady fixation due to central vision loss. PMID:28257458

  18. Multifunctional PEG Retinylamine Conjugate Provides Prolonged Protection against Retinal Degeneration in Mice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A polyethylene glycol (PEG) retinylamine (Ret-NH2) conjugate PEG-GFL-NH-Ret with a glycine-phenylalanine-leucine (GFL) spacer was synthesized for controlled oral delivery of Ret-NH2 to treat retinal degenerative diseases, including Stargardt disease (STGD) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The peptide spacer was introduced for sustained release of the drug by digestive enzymes in the gastrointestinal tract. The pharmacokinetics experiments showed that the PEG conjugate could control the sustained drug release after oral administration and had much lower nonspecific liver drug accumulation than the free drug in wild-type female C57BL mice. In the mean time, the conjugate maintained the same concentration of Ret-NH2 in the eye as the free drug. Also, PEG-GFL-NH-Ret at a Ret-NH2 equivalent dose of 25 mg/kg produced complete protection of Abca4–/–Rdh8–/– mouse retinas against light-induced retinal degeneration for 3 days after oral administration, as revealed by OCT retina imaging, whereas free Ret-NH2 did not provide any protection under identical conditions. The polymer conjugate PEG-GFL-NH-Ret has great potential for controlled delivery of Ret-NH2 to the eye for effective protection against retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:25390360

  19. Apelin-36 is protective against N-methyl-D-aspartic-acid-induced retinal ganglion cell death in the mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kenji; Murakami, Yuta; Sawada, Shohei; Ushikubo, Hiroko; Mori, Asami; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2016-11-15

    Retinal ganglion cell death in glaucoma is caused at least in part by a large Ca(2+) influx through N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors. Apelin is a peptide originally found in the tissue extracts of bovine stomach. Recent studies have been shown that apelin protects against the ischemic-reperfused injury in the brain. We examined whether apelin had protective effects on the NMDA-induced retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death using B6.Cg-TgN(Thy1-CFP)23Jrs/J transgenic mice, which express the enhanced cyan fluorescent protein in RGCs in the retina, in vivo. The mice were anesthetized by ketamine and xylazine, and NMDA (40 nmol/eye) was intravitreally injected. We evaluated the effects of apelin-13, [Glp(1)]-apelin-13, a potent agonist of apelin receptor, and apelin-36 on the NMDA-induced retinal ganglion cell death. NMDA-induced retinal ganglion cell loss was clearly seen 7 days after NMDA injection. Intravitreal apelin-36 (0.33 nmol/eye), but not apelin-13 (1 nmol/eye) nor [Glp(1)]-apelin-13 (1 nmol/eye), simultaneously injected with NMDA significantly reduced the cell loss. The protective effect of apelin-36 was not reduced by ML221 (0.1 nmol/eye; 5-[(4-Nitrobenzoyl)oxy]-2-[(2-pyrimidinylthio)methyl]-4H-pyran-4-one), an apelin receptor antagonist, GF109203X (0.03 nmol/eye), a protein kinase C inhibitor, U0126 (0.2 nmol/eye), a MAPK/ERK kinase inhibitor, LY294002 (0.1 nmol/eye), a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor, Akti 1/2 (0.05 nmol/eye), an Akt inhibitor, or 4,5,6,7-tetrabromobenzotriazole (0.2 nmol/eye), a casein kinase-2 inhibitor. In addition, human apelin-36 did not affect the kainic-acid (20 nmol/eye)-induced ganglion cell death. The present study suggests that apelin-36 protects against the NMDA-induced ganglion cell death independently of the activation of apelin receptor in the murine retina in vivo.

  20. Human amniotic fluid promotes retinal pigmented epithelial cells' trans-differentiation into rod photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Shima; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Davari, Maliheh; Jahromi, Fatemeh Sanie; Samie, Shahram; Rezaie-Kanavi, Mozhgan; Pakravesh, Jalil; Deezagi, Abdolkhalegh

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of human amniotic fluid (HAF) on retinal pigmented epithelial cells growth and trans-differentiation into retinal neurons, retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells were isolated from neonatal human cadaver eye globes and cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium-F12 supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Confluent monolayer cultures were trypsinized and passaged using FBS-containing or HAF-containing media. Amniotic fluid samples were received from pregnant women in the first trimester of gestation. Cell proliferation and death enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to assess the effect of HAF on RPE cell growth. Trans-differentiation into rod photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells was also studied using immunocytochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction techniques. Primary cultures of RPE cells were successfully established under FBS-containing or HAF-containing media leading to rapid cell growth and proliferation. When RPE cells were moved to in vitro culture system, they began to lose their differentiation markers such as pigmentation and RPE65 marker and trans-differentiated neural-like cells followed by spheroid colonies pertaining to stem/progenitor cells were morphologically detected. Immunocytochemistry (ICC) analysis of HAF-treated cultures showed a considerable expression of Rhodopsin gene (30% Rhodopsin-positive cells) indicating trans-differentiation of RPE cells to rod photoreceptors. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed an HAF-dose-dependant expression of Thy-1 gene (RGC marker) and significant promoting effect of HAF on RGCs generation. The data presented here suggest that HAF possesses invaluable stimulatory effect on RPE cells growth and trans-differentiation into retinal neurons. It can be regarded as a newly introduced enriched supplement in serum-free kinds of media used in neuro-retinal regeneration studies.

  1. [Study of blue light induced DNA damage of retinal pigment epithelium(RPE) cells and the protection of vitamin C].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian Wei; Ren, Guo Liang; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Zhu, Xi; Lin, Hai Yan; Zhou, Ji Lin

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate protection of vitamin C on blue light-induced DNA damage of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. The cultured RPE cells were divided into 3 groups: Control group (no blue light exposure), blue light exposure group (blue light exposure for 20 minutes) and blue light exposure + vitamin C group (blue light exposure + 100 mumol/L vitamin C). Travigen's comet assay kit and Euclid comet assay software were used to assay the DNA damage levels. The DNA percentage in the tail of electrophoretogram in the three groups were 18.44%, 54.42% and 32.43% respectively (p < 0.01). Tail moments were 8.2, 48.3, and 18.4 respectively (p < 0.01). Blue light could induce DNA damage to RPE cells but vitamin C could protect the RPE cells from the blue light-induced DNA damage.

  2. Predicting the Incidence of Human Cataract through Retinal Imaging Technology.

    PubMed

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Sun, Han-Ying; Liu, Hsiang-Jui; Lue, Jiann-Hwa; Yeh, Shang-Min

    2015-11-19

    With the progress of science, technology and medicine, the proportion of elderly people in society has gradually increased over the years. Thus, the medical care and health issues of this population have drawn increasing attention. In particular, among the common medical problems of the elderly, the occurrence of cataracts has been widely observed. In this study, we developed retinal imaging technology by establishing a human eye module with ray tracing. Periodic hole arrays with different degrees were constructed on the anterior surface of the lens to emulate the eyesight decline caused by cataracts. Then, we successfully predicted the incidence of cataracts among people with myopia ranging from -3.0 D to -9.0 D. Results show that periodic hole arrays cause severe eyesight decline when they are centralized in the visual center. However, the wide distribution of these arrays on the anterior surface of the lens would not significantly affect one's eyesight.

  3. Transcriptome of the human retina, retinal pigmented epithelium and choroid

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lifeng; Kazmierkiewicz, Krista L; Bowman, Anita S; Li, Mingyao; Curcio, Christine A; Stambolian, Dwight E

    2015-01-01

    The retina and its adjacent supporting tissues -- retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and choroid -- are critical structures in human eyes required for normal visual perception. Abnormal changes in these layers have been implicated in diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. With the advent of high-throughput methods, such as serial analysis of gene expression, cDNA microarray, and RNA sequencing, there is unprecedented opportunity to facilitate our understanding of the normal retina, RPE, and choroid. This information can be used to identify dysfunction in age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. In this review, we describe the current status in our understanding of these transcriptomes through the use of high throughput techniques. PMID:25645700

  4. Hydroxycinnamic acids in Crepidiastrum denticulatum protect oxidative stress-induced retinal damage.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hong Ryul; Lee, Hee Ju; Kim, Kyung-A; Kim, Chul Young; Nho, Chu Won; Jang, Holim; Pan, Cheol-Ho; Lee, Chang Yong; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2014-02-12

    We investigated the effects of an ethanol extract of C. denticulatum (EECD) in a mouse model of glaucoma established by optic nerve crush (ONC), and found that EECD significantly protected against retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death caused by ONC. Furthermore, EECD effectively protected against N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced damage to the rat retinas. In vitro, EECD attenuated transformed retinal ganglion cell (RGC-5) death and significantly blunted the up-regulation of apoptotic proteins and mRNA level induced by 1-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine combined with glutamate, reduced reactive oxygen species production by radical species, and inhibited lipid peroxidation. The major EECD components were found to be chicoric acid and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (3,5-DCQA) that have shown beneficial effects on retinal degeneration both in vitro and in vivo studies. Thus, EECD could be used as a natural neuroprotective agent for glaucoma, and chicoric acid and 3,5-DCQA as mark compounds for the development of functional food.

  5. Human aldose reductase and human small intestine aldose reductase are efficient retinal reductases: consequences for retinoid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Crosas, Bernat; Hyndman, David J; Gallego, Oriol; Martras, Sílvia; Parés, Xavier; Flynn, T Geoffrey; Farrés, Jaume

    2003-08-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductases that catalyse the reduction of a variety of carbonyl compounds, such as carbohydrates, aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes and steroids. We have studied the retinal reductase activity of human aldose reductase (AR), human small-intestine (HSI) AR and pig aldehyde reductase. Human AR and HSI AR were very efficient in the reduction of all- trans -, 9- cis - and 13- cis -retinal ( k (cat)/ K (m)=1100-10300 mM(-1).min(-1)), constituting the first cytosolic NADP(H)-dependent retinal reductases described in humans. Aldehyde reductase showed no activity with these retinal isomers. Glucose was a poor inhibitor ( K (i)=80 mM) of retinal reductase activity of human AR, whereas tolrestat, a classical AKR inhibitor used pharmacologically to treat diabetes, inhibited retinal reduction by human AR and HSI AR. All- trans -retinoic acid failed to inhibit both enzymes. In this paper we present the AKRs as an emergent superfamily of retinal-active enzymes, putatively involved in the regulation of retinoid biological activity through the assimilation of retinoids from beta-carotene and the control of retinal bioavailability.

  6. Failure of ascorbate to protect against broadband blue light-induced retinal damage in rat.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Chen, E; Söderberg, P G

    1999-10-01

    Excessive generation of free radicals due to light absorption is proposed as the most likely mechanism for photochemical retinal damage. The observed reduction of green light-induced retinal injury after ascorbate treatment is believed to be an antioxidative effect. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible protection of ascorbate against blue light-induced photoreceptor damage. Cyclic light-reared albino rats were injected intraperitoneally with either ascorbate (1 mg/g body weight) or, as placebo, physiological saline 24 h before and just prior to exposure to blue light. After 20-22 h of dark adaptation, two groups of the rats were exposed in pairs to the blue light (400-480 nm) for 6 h at an average irradiance of 0.7 W/m(2) in the cage. Six days after light exposure, all rats were killed and retinal samples were analyzed. Diffuse blue light irradiation resulted in an uneven distribution of damage in the retina. As judged from the pathological changes in the retina irradiated, no microscopic difference was observed between the two groups. The preserved thickness of the outer nuclear layer was on average 61.3% in the ascorbate-treated and 66.4% in the placebo-treated group. The photoreceptor loss was not significantly different between the two groups. The ascorbate did not protect the retina from blue-light induced damage. This favors the assumption that the mechanisms for blue light-induced retinal damage might differ from that for green light.

  7. Phototoxicity and cytotoxicity of fullerol in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wielgus, Albert R.; Zhao, Baozhong; Chignell, Colin F.; Hu, Dan-Ning; Roberts, Joan E.

    2010-01-01

    The water-soluble nanoparticle hydroxylated fullerene [fullerol, nano-C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22-26}] has several clinical applications including use as a drug carrier to bypass the blood ocular barriers. We have previously found that fullerol is both cytotoxic and phototoxic to human lens epithelial cells (HLE B-3) and that the endogenous antioxidant lutein blocked some of this phototoxicity. In the present study we have found that fullerol induces cytotoxic and phototoxic damage to human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Accumulation of nano-C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22-26} in the cells was confirmed spectrophotometrically at 405 nm, and cell viability, cell metabolism and membrane permeability were estimated using trypan blue, MTS and LDH assays, respectively. Fullerol was cytotoxic toward hRPE cells maintained in the dark at concentrations higher than 10 muM. Exposure to an 8.5 J.cm{sup -2} dose of visible light in the presence of > 5 muM fullerol induced TBARS formation and early apoptosis, indicating phototoxic damage in the form of lipid peroxidation. Pretreatment with 10 and 20 muM lutein offered some protection against fullerol photodamage. Using time resolved photophysical techniques, we have now confirmed that fullerol produces singlet oxygen with a quantum yield of PHI = 0.05 in D{sub 2}O and with a range of 0.002-0.139 in various solvents. As our previous studies have shown that fullerol also produces superoxide in the presence of light, retinal phototoxic damage may occur through both type I (free radical) and type II (singlet oxygen) mechanisms. In conclusion, ocular exposure to fullerol, particularly in the presence of sunlight, may lead to retinal damage.

  8. Retinal blood flow during hyperoxia in humans revisited: concerted results using different measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Barbara; Polska, Elzbieta; Dorner, Guido; Polak, Kaija; Findl, Oliver; Mayrl, Gabriele Fuchsjäger; Eichler, Hans-Georg; Wolzt, Michael; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2002-07-01

    Retinal vasculature shows pronounced vasoconstriction in response to hyperoxia, which appears to be related to the constant oxygen demand of the retina. However, the exact amount of blood flow reduction and the exact time course of this phenomenon are still a matter of debate. We set out to investigate the retinal response to hyperoxia using innovative techniques for the assessment of retinal hemodynamics. In a total of 48 healthy volunteers we studied the effect of 100% O(2) breathing on retinal blood flow using two methods. Red blood cell movement in larger retinal veins was quantified with combined laser Doppler velocimetry and retinal vessel size measurement. Retinal white blood cell movement was quantified with the blue field entoptic technique. The time course of retinal vasoconstriction in response to hyperoxia was assessed by continuous vessel size determination using the Zeiss retinal vessel analyzer. The response to hyperoxia as measured with combined laser Doppler velocimetry and vessel size measurement was almost twice as high as that observed with the blue field technique. Vasoconstriction in response to 100% O(2) breathing occurred within the first 5 min and no counterregulatory or adaptive mechanisms were observed. Based on these results we hypothesize that hyperoxia-induced vasoconstriction differentially affects red and white blood cell movement in the human retina. This hypothesis is based on the complex interactions between red and white blood cells in microcirculation, which have been described in detail for other vascular beds.

  9. Protective effects of catalase on retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baihua; Tang, Luosheng

    2011-11-01

    Retinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury causes profound tissue damage, especially retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. The aims of the study were to investigate whether catalase (CAT) has a neuroprotective effect on RGC after I/R injury in rats, and to determine the possible antioxidant mechanism. Wistar female rats were randonmized into four groups: normal control group (Control group), retinal I/R with vehicle group (I/R with vehicle group), retinal I/R with AAV-CAT group (I/R with AAV-CAT group), and normal retina with AAV-CAT group (normal with AAV-CAT group). One eye of each rat was pretreated with recombinant adeno-associated virus containing catalase gene (I/R with AAV-CAT group or normal with AAV-CAT group) and recombinant adeno-associated virus containing GFP gene (I/R with vehicle group) by intravitreal injection 21 days before initiation of I/R injury. Retinal I/R injury was induced by elevating intraocular pressure to 100mmHg for 1h. The number of RGC and inner plexiform layer (IPL) thickness were measured by fluorogold retrograde labeling and hematoxylin and eosin staining at 6h, 24h, 72 h and 5d after injury. Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), the number of RGC, IPL thickness, malondialdehyde(MDA), 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), CAT activity and nitrotyrosine were measured by fluorescence staining, immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis at 5 days after injury. Electroretinographic (ERG) evaluation was also used. Pretreatment of AAV-CAT significantly decreased the levels of H(2)O(2), MDA, 8-OHdG and nitrotyrosine, increased the catalase activity, and prevented the reduction of a- and b- waves in the I/R with AAV-CAT group compare with the I/R with vehicle group (p<0.01). Catalase attenuated the I/R-induced damage of RGC and IPL and retinal function. Therefore, catalase can protect the rat retina from I/R-induced injury by enhancing the antioxidative ability and reducing oxidative stress, which suggests that catalase may be

  10. Retinal Pre-Conditioning by CD59a Knockout Protects against Light-Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brooks; Zhao, Liangliang; Bhuyan, Rupak; Bandyopadhyay, Mausumi; Lyubarsky, Arkady; Yu, Chen; Li, Yafeng; Kanu, Levi; Miwa, Takashi; Song, Wen-Chao; Finnemann, Silvia C.; Rohrer, Bärbel; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2016-01-01

    Complement dysregulation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but the specific mechanisms are incompletely understood. Complement also potentiates retinal degeneration in the murine light damage model. To test the retinal function of CD59a, a complement inhibitor, CD59a knockout (KO) mice were used for light damage (LD) experiments. Retinal degeneration and function were compared in WT versus KO mice following light damage. Gene expression changes, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and glial cell activation were also compared. At baseline, the ERG responses and rhodopsin levels were lower in CD59aKO compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Following LD, the ERG responses were better preserved in CD59aKO compared to WT mice. Correspondingly, the number of photoreceptors was higher in CD59aKO retinas than WT controls after LD. Under normal light conditions, CD59aKO mice had higher levels than WT for GFAP immunostaining in Müller cells, mRNA and protein levels of two ER-stress markers, and neurotrophic factors. The reduction in photon capture, together with the neurotrophic factor upregulation, may explain the structural and functional protection against LD in the CD59aKO. PMID:27893831

  11. Retinal Pre-Conditioning by CD59a Knockout Protects against Light-Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Song, Delu; Wilson, Brooks; Zhao, Liangliang; Bhuyan, Rupak; Bandyopadhyay, Mausumi; Lyubarsky, Arkady; Yu, Chen; Li, Yafeng; Kanu, Levi; Miwa, Takashi; Song, Wen-Chao; Finnemann, Silvia C; Rohrer, Bärbel; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2016-01-01

    Complement dysregulation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but the specific mechanisms are incompletely understood. Complement also potentiates retinal degeneration in the murine light damage model. To test the retinal function of CD59a, a complement inhibitor, CD59a knockout (KO) mice were used for light damage (LD) experiments. Retinal degeneration and function were compared in WT versus KO mice following light damage. Gene expression changes, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and glial cell activation were also compared. At baseline, the ERG responses and rhodopsin levels were lower in CD59aKO compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Following LD, the ERG responses were better preserved in CD59aKO compared to WT mice. Correspondingly, the number of photoreceptors was higher in CD59aKO retinas than WT controls after LD. Under normal light conditions, CD59aKO mice had higher levels than WT for GFAP immunostaining in Müller cells, mRNA and protein levels of two ER-stress markers, and neurotrophic factors. The reduction in photon capture, together with the neurotrophic factor upregulation, may explain the structural and functional protection against LD in the CD59aKO.

  12. Long-Term Protection of Genetically Ablated Rabbit Retinal Degeneration by Sustained Transscleral Unoprostone Delivery.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Nobuhiro; Koyanagi, Eri; Izumida, Yasuko; Liu, Junjun; Katsuyama, Aya; Kaji, Hirokazu; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko; Osumi, Noriko; Kondo, Mineo; Terasaki, Hiroko; Mashima, Yukihiko; Nakazawa, Toru; Abe, Toshiaki

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the long-term protective effects of transscleral unoprostone (UNO) against retinal degeneration in transgenic (Tg) rabbits (Pro347Leu rhodopsin mutation). The UNO release devices (URDs) were implanted into the sclerae of Tg rabbits and ERG, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and ophthalmic examinations were conducted for 40 weeks. Unoprostone metabolites in retina, choroid/RPE, aqueous humor, and plasma from wild-type (Wt) rabbits were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry evaluated the retinal distribution of big potassium (BK) channels, and RT-PCR evaluated the expressions of BK channels and m-opsin at 1 week after URD treatment. The URD released UNO at a rate of 10.2 ±1.0 μg/d, and the release rate and amount of UNO decreased during 32 weeks. Higher ERG amplitudes were observed in the URD-treated Tg rabbits compared with the placebo-URD, or nontreated controls. At 24 weeks after implantation into the URD-treated Tg rabbits, OCT images showed preservation of retinal thickness, and histologic examinations (44 weeks) showed greater thickness of outer nuclear layers. Unoprostone was detected in the retina, choroid, and plasma of Wt rabbits. Retina/plasma ratio of UNO levels were 38.0 vs. 0.68 ng UNO*hour/mL in the URD-treated group versus control (topical UNO), respectively. Big potassium channels were observed in cone, cone ON-bipolar, and rod bipolar cells. Reverse-transcriptase PCR demonstrated BK channels and m-opsins increased in URD-treated eyes. In Tg rabbits, URD use slowed the decline of retinal function for more than 32 weeks, and therefore provides a promising tool for long-term treatment of RP.

  13. Tempol protects against intravitreous indocyanine green-induced retinal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Sebastian; Voykov, Bogomil; Willmann, Gabriel; Fiedorowicz, Michal; Rejdak, Robert; Gekeler, Florian; May, C Albrecht; Schatz, Andreas; Schuettauf, Frank

    2012-11-01

    Indocyanine green (ICG) has been widely used as a vital dye for macular surgery. However, ICG can be toxic to retinal cells. Here we evaluate whether tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl), a free radical scavenger, can protect against ICG-induced retinal damage in rats. Brown Norway rats received intravitreal injections of ICG 0.5 % or BSS as controls. Tempol (20 mg/kg BW) or PBS as a control was administered intraperitoneally 24 h and 30 min before ICG and once daily for 7 consecutive days. Tempol was detected in the retina using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. One week after ICG injections, the effects of tempol on retinal toxicity were assessed by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) back-labeling and by light microscopy. Electroretinography (ERG) was performed after 1 and 2 weeks. ICG administration reduced RGC numbers by 17 % (1,943 ± 45 vs. 2,342 ± 31 RGCs/mm(2)). Tempol treatment rescued RGCs in a significant manner (2,258 ± 36, p < 0.01) and diminished morphological changes detected by light microscopy. ICG-injected eyes showed a significant reduction of ERG potentials only in PBS-treated animals (V(max) 530 ± 145 µV vs. 779 ± 179 µV, p = 0.0052), but not in the tempol-treated group. Tempol significantly attenuates ICG-induced toxicity in rat retinas and may therefore be considered for further evaluation as accompanying treatment in ICG-assisted chromovitrectomy.

  14. Dietary Supplement Enriched in Antioxidants and Omega-3 Protects from Progressive Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ramchani-Ben Othman, Khaoula; Cercy, Christine; Amri, Mohamed; Doly, Michel; Ranchon-Cole, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we have evaluated one of the dietary supplements enriched with antioxidants and fish oil used in clinical care for patient with age-related macular degeneration. Rats were orally fed by a gastric canula daily with 0.2 ml of water or dietary supplement until they were sacrificed. After one week of treatment, animals were either sacrificed for lipid analysis in plasma and retina, or used for evaluation of rod-response recovery by electroretinography (ERG) followed by their sacrifice to measure rhodopsin content, or used for progressive light-induced retinal degeneration (PLIRD). For PLIRD, animals were transferred to bright cyclic light for one week. Retinal damage was quantified by ERG, histology and detection of apoptotic nuclei. Animals kept in dim-cyclic-light were processed in parallel. PLIRD induced a thinning of the outer nuclear layer and a reduction of the b-wave amplitude of the ERG in the water group. Retinal structure and function were preserved in supplemented animals. Supplement induced a significant increase in omega-3 fatty acids in plasma by 168% for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 142% for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and 19% for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and a decrease in the omega-6 fatty acids, DPA by 28%. In the retina, supplement induced significant reduction of linolenic acid by 67% and an increase in EPA and DPA by 80% and 72%, respectively, associated with significant decrease in omega-6 DPA by 42%. Supplement did not affect rhodopsin content or rod-response recovery. The present data indicate that supplement rapidly modified the fatty acid content and induced an accumulation of EPA in the retina without affecting rhodopsin content or recovery. In addition, it protected the retina from oxidative stress induced by light. Therefore, this supplement might be beneficial to slow down progression of certain retinal degeneration. PMID:26042773

  15. miRNA-141 attenuates UV-induced oxidative stress via activating Keap1-Nrf2 signaling in human retinal pigment epithelium cells and retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Bo; Li, Ke-Ran; Yi, Nan; Li, Xiu-Miao; Wang, Feng; Xue, Bo; Pan, Ying-Shun; Yao, Jin; Jiang, Qin; Wu, Zhi-Feng

    2017-01-04

    Activation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling could protect cells from ultra violet (UV) radiation. We aim to provoke Nrf2 activation via downregulating its inhibitor Keap1 by microRNA-141 ("miR-141"). In both human retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPEs) and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), forced-expression of miR-141 downregulated Keap1, causing Nrf2 stabilization, accumulation and nuclear translocation, which led to transcription of multiple antioxidant-responsive element (ARE) genes (HO1, NOQ1 and GCLC). Further, UV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cell death were significantly attenuated in miR-141-expressing RPEs and RGCs. On the other hand, depletion of miR-141 via expressing its inhibitor antagomiR-141 led to Keap1 upregulation and Nrf2 degradation, which aggravated UV-induced death of RPEs and RGCs. Significantly, Nrf2 shRNA knockdown almost abolished miR-141-mediated cytoprotection against UV in RPEs. These results demonstrate that miR-141 targets Keap1 to activate Nrf2 signaling, which protects RPEs and RGCs from UV radiation.

  16. Transplantation of Human Neural Progenitor Cells Expressing IGF-1 Enhances Retinal Ganglion Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Caiwei; Sun, Yu; Liao, Tiffany; Beattie, Ursula; López, Francisco J.; Chen, Dong Feng; Lashkari, Kameran

    2015-01-01

    We have previously characterized human neuronal progenitor cells (hNP) that can adopt a retinal ganglion cell (RGC)-like morphology within the RGC and nerve fiber layers of the retina. In an effort to determine whether hNPs could be used a candidate cells for targeted delivery of neurotrophic factors (NTFs), we evaluated whether hNPs transfected with an vector that expresses IGF-1 in the form of a fusion protein with tdTomato (TD), would increase RGC survival in vitro and confer neuroprotective effects in a mouse model of glaucoma. RGCs co-cultured with hNPIGF-TD cells displayed enhanced survival, and increased neurite extension and branching as compared to hNPTD or untransfected hNP cells. Application of various IGF-1 signaling blockers or IGF-1 receptor antagonists abrogated these effects. In vivo, using a model of glaucoma we showed that IOP elevation led to reductions in retinal RGC count. In this model, evaluation of retinal flatmounts and optic nerve cross sections indicated that only hNPIGF-TD cells effectively reduced RGC death and showed a trend to improve optic nerve axonal loss. RT-PCR analysis of retina lysates over time showed that the neurotrophic effects of IGF-1 were also attributed to down-regulation of inflammatory and to some extent, angiogenic pathways. This study shows that neuronal progenitor cells that hone into the RGC and nerve fiber layers may be used as vehicles for local production and delivery of a desired NTF. Transplantation of hNPIGF-TD cells improves RGC survival in vitro and protects against RGC loss in a rodent model of glaucoma. Our findings have provided experimental evidence and form the basis for applying cell-based strategies for local delivery of NTFs into the retina. Application of cell-based delivery may be extended to other disease conditions beyond glaucoma. PMID:25923430

  17. Sodium-calcium exchanger in cultured human retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Mangini, N J; Haugh-Scheidt, L; Valle, J E; Cragoe, E J; Ripps, H; Kennedy, B G

    1997-12-01

    Regulation of intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) by an Na+/Ca2+ exchanger was studied in cultures of human retinal pigment epithelial cells using Ca(2+)-indicator dyes (fura-2 and fluo-3) and digital fluorescence imaging. Mean resting [Ca2+]i of cultured RPE in a control Ringer solution was 189 +/- 16 nM. Replacing extracellular Na+ with N-methyl-D-glucamine elicited a two-fold rise in [Ca2+]i; the magnitude of the [Na+]o-free-induced rise in [Ca2+]i varied as a function of extracellular [Ca2+]. The [Na+]o-free response was not significantly affected by the Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine, or by pretreatment with thapsigargin which depletes intracellular Ca2+ stores. By contrast, the [Na+]o-free-induced rise in [Ca2+]i was significantly reduced by CBDMB, an amiloride derivative that is highly selective for Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibition. These findings indicate that removal of extracellular Na+ promotes net [Ca2+]i gain via Na+/Ca2+ exchange. Western and Northern blot analyses, respectively, confirmed the presence of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger protein and mRNA in cultures of human RPE. Specifically, Western blot analysis of whole cell lysates of cultured RPE using a polyclonal antibody made against the canine cardiac exchanger identified a major band at approximately 126 kD. Northern blot analysis of total human RPE RNA using a restriction fragment cRNA probe coding for the canine cardiac Na+/Ca2+ exchanger showed that the major exchanger-related transcript was approximately 6.8 kb. In sum, our findings demonstrate the presence of a cardiac-exchanger-related transcript was approximately 6.8 kb. In sum, our findings demonstrate the presence of a cardiac-type Na+/Ca2+ exchanger in cultures of human RPE.

  18. Protective Effect of Total Flavones from Hippophae rhamnoides L. against Visible Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration in Pigmented Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Huang, Fenghong; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Di; Wang, Ou; Guo, Xiaoxuan; Lu, Feng; Yang, Xue; Ji, Baoping; Deng, Qianchun

    2016-01-13

    Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) flavones have been used as candidate functional food ingredients because of their bioactivities, such as treating cardiovascular disorders, lowering plasma cholesterol level, and regulating immune function. However, the protective effects of sea buckthorn flavones against retinal degeneration remain unclear to date. This study investigated the protective effects of total flavones from H. rhamnoides (TFH) against visible light-induced retinal damage and explored the related mechanisms in pigmented rabbits. Rabbits were treated with TFH (250 and 500 mg/kg) for 2 weeks pre-illumination and 1 week post-illumination until sacrifice. Retinal function was quantified by performing electroretinography 1 day before and 1, 3, and 7 days after light exposure (18000 lx for 2 h). Retinal degeneration was evaluated by measuring the thickness of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) and performing the TUNEL assay 7 days after light exposure. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry were used to explore the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic mechanisms of TFH during visible light-induced retinal degeneration. Light exposure produced a degenerative effect primarily on the ONL, inner nuclear layer (INL), and ganglion cell layer (GCL). TFH significantly attenuated the destruction of electroretinograms caused by light damage, maintained ONL thickness, and decreased the number of TUNEL-positive cells in the INL and GCL. TFH ameliorated the retinal oxidative stress (GSH-Px, CAT, T-AOC, and MDA), inflammation (IL-1β and IL-6), angiogenesis (VEGF), and apoptosis (Bax, Bcl2, and caspase-3) induced by light exposure. Therefore, TFH exhibited protective effects against light-induced retinal degeneration by increasing the antioxidant defense mechanisms, suppressing pro-inflammatory and angiogenic cytokines, and inhibiting retinal cell apoptosis.

  19. Induction of oxidative and nitrosative stresses in human retinal pigment epithelial cells by all-trans-retinal.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Kai; Zhou, Fanfan; Zhu, Ling

    2016-10-15

    Delayed clearance of free form all-trans-retinal (atRAL) is estimated be the key cause of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells injury during the pathogenesis of retinopathies such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are far from clear. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity effect and underlying molecular mechanism of atRAL on human retinal pigment epithelium ARPE-19 cells. The results indicated that atRAL could cause cell dysfunction by inducing oxidative and nitrosative stresses in ARPE-19 cells. The oxidative stress induced by atRAL was mediated through up-regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, activating mitochondrial-dependent and MAPKs signaling pathways, and finally resulting in apoptosis of ARPE-19 cells. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin could partly attenuated ROS generation, indicating that NADPH oxidase activity was involved in atRAL-induced oxidative stress in ARPE-19 cells. The nitrosative stress induced by atRAL was mainly reflected in increasing nitric oxide (NO) production, enhancing iNOS, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions, and promoting monocyte adhesion. Furthermore, above effects could be dramatically blocked by using a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitor SN50, indicated that atRAL-induced oxidative and nitrosative stresses were mediated by NF-κB. The results provide better understanding of atRAL-induced toxicity in human RPE cells. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Protecting human subjects in research.

    PubMed

    Orticio, Lily P

    2009-01-01

    The quest for advancing scientific knowledge through human experimentations using vulnerable groups is traced back to ancient history, when Herophilus performed vivisections on prisoners. The violation of the rights of human subjects through the 20th century led to the formulation of the Nuremberg Code in 1947 and the Declaration of Helsinki in 1964. In the United States, the most infamous was the Tuskegee public health study that resulted in the enactment of the National Research Act that authorized the creation of the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects in Biomedical and Behavioral Research in 1974. In spite of existing federal regulations, the system of protecting human subjects is still flawed. Transparency of conflict ofinterest, clarity, and strict adherence to institutional guidelines are critical in safeguarding the rights and safety of human subjects and the integrity of research. Education on ethics and emerging complex ethical issues, global awareness, and governmental cooperation and sanctions are important steps in addressing the inadequacies in protecting the most vulnerable populations in experimentations worldwide. Investigators must always remember that the primary safeguards of protecting human life rest in their hands.

  1. Cytotoxicity of triamcinolone acetonide on human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Sheng; Wu, Chao-Liang; Tseng, Sung-Huei; Kuo, Pao-Ying; Tseng, Shih-Ya

    2007-06-01

    To investigate the toxic effects of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) suspensions on human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Cultured human RPE cells were exposed for up to 2 hours to one of seven solutions: control (balanced salt solution, BSS; Alcon Laboratories, Ft. Worth TX), commercial TA suspension (cTA), cTA from which the vehicle (which contains the preservative benzyl alcohol) had been removed (vehicle-removed TA, -vTA), vehicle of the cTA (V), or a 1:10 dilution (in BSS; Alcon) of cTA, -vTA or V. Solution effects were evaluated by phase-contrast microscopy of cells stained in situ with trypan blue and in vitro by trypan blue exclusion assay. RPE cell function was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The mechanism of TA toxicity was studied by acridine orange-ethidium bromide staining and epifluorescence microscopy, and ultrastructural changes were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of vehicle-removed solutions (-vTA and 1:10 -vTA) were similar to those of the control solution. Exposure for 1 hour or longer to a vehicle-containing solution (cTA and V) resulted in similar and significant degrees of cell damage that were dose and time dependent. The major mechanism of cell death was necrosis, and the early ultrastructural change was swelling of organelles in the cytoplasm. Preserved commercial TA suspensions damaged human RPE cells, but vehicle-free solutions did not. The authors suggest removing the vehicle as completely as possible from TA solutions before they are administered intravitreally. Furthermore, they recommend that a commercial formulation of preservative-free TA suspension be made available for intraocular use.

  2. Retinal and post-retinal contributions to the quantum efficiency of the human eye revealed by electrical neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Manasseh, Gibran; de Balthasar, Chloe; Sanguinetti, Bruno; Pomarico, Enrico; Gisin, Nicolas; de Peralta, Rolando Grave; Andino, Sara L Gonzalez

    2013-01-01

    The retina is one of the best known quantum detectors with rods able to reliably respond to single photons. However, estimates on the number of photons eliciting conscious perception, based on signal detection theory, are systematically above these values after discounting by retinal losses. One possibility is that there is a trade-off between the limited motor resources available to living systems and the excellent reliability of the visual photoreceptors. On this view, the limits to sensory thresholds are not set by the individual reliability of the receptors within each sensory modality (as often assumed) but rather by the limited central processing and motor resources available to process the constant inflow of sensory information. To investigate this issue, we reproduced the classical experiment from Hetch aimed to determine the sensory threshold in human vision. We combined a careful physical control of the stimulus parameters with high temporal/spatial resolution recordings of EEG signals and behavioral variables over a relatively large sample of subjects (12). Contrarily to the idea that the limits to visual sensitivity are fully set by the statistical fluctuations in photon absorption on retinal photoreceptors we observed that the state of ongoing neural oscillations before any photon impinges the retina helps to determine if the responses of photoreceptors have access to central conscious processing. Our results suggest that motivational and attentional off-retinal mechanisms play a major role in reducing the QE efficiency of the human visual system when compared to the efficiency of isolated retinal photoreceptors. Yet, this mechanism might subserve adaptive behavior by enhancing the overall multisensory efficiency of the whole system composed by diverse reliable sensory modalities.

  3. Retinal and post-retinal contributions to the quantum efficiency of the human eye revealed by electrical neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Manasseh, Gibran; de Balthasar, Chloe; Sanguinetti, Bruno; Pomarico, Enrico; Gisin, Nicolas; de Peralta, Rolando Grave; Andino, Sara L. Gonzalez

    2013-01-01

    The retina is one of the best known quantum detectors with rods able to reliably respond to single photons. However, estimates on the number of photons eliciting conscious perception, based on signal detection theory, are systematically above these values after discounting by retinal losses. One possibility is that there is a trade-off between the limited motor resources available to living systems and the excellent reliability of the visual photoreceptors. On this view, the limits to sensory thresholds are not set by the individual reliability of the receptors within each sensory modality (as often assumed) but rather by the limited central processing and motor resources available to process the constant inflow of sensory information. To investigate this issue, we reproduced the classical experiment from Hetch aimed to determine the sensory threshold in human vision. We combined a careful physical control of the stimulus parameters with high temporal/spatial resolution recordings of EEG signals and behavioral variables over a relatively large sample of subjects (12). Contrarily to the idea that the limits to visual sensitivity are fully set by the statistical fluctuations in photon absorption on retinal photoreceptors we observed that the state of ongoing neural oscillations before any photon impinges the retina helps to determine if the responses of photoreceptors have access to central conscious processing. Our results suggest that motivational and attentional off-retinal mechanisms play a major role in reducing the QE efficiency of the human visual system when compared to the efficiency of isolated retinal photoreceptors. Yet, this mechanism might subserve adaptive behavior by enhancing the overall multisensory efficiency of the whole system composed by diverse reliable sensory modalities. PMID:24302913

  4. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs) as a chronic experimental model for investigation of retinal ganglion cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Andrew; Hopes, Marina; Wright, Phillip; Broadway, David C; Sanderson, Julie

    2016-02-01

    There is a growing need for models of human diseases that utilise native, donated human tissue in order to model disease processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies. In this paper we assessed the suitability of adult human retinal explants as a potential model of chronic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration. Our results confirmed that RGC markers commonly used in rodent studies (NeuN, βIII Tubulin and Thy-1) were appropriate for labelling human RGCs and followed the expected differential expression patterns across, as well as throughout, the macular and para-macular regions of the retina. Furthermore, we showed that neither donor age nor post-mortem time (within 24 h) significantly affected the initial expression levels of RGC markers. In addition, the feasibility of using human post mortem donor tissue as a long-term model of RGC degeneration was determined with RGC protein being detectable up to 4 weeks in culture with an associated decline in RGC mRNA and significant, progressive, apoptotic labelling of NeuN(+) cells. Differences in RGC apoptosis might have been influenced by medium compositions indicating that media constituents could play a role in supporting axotomised RGCs. We propose that using ex vivo human explants may prove to be a useful model for testing the effectiveness of neuroprotective strategies.

  5. Infrared imaging of sub-retinal structures in the human ocular fundus.

    PubMed

    Elsner, A E; Burns, S A; Weiter, J J; Delori, F C

    1996-01-01

    The interaction of infrared light with the human ocular fundus, particularly sub-retinal structures, was studied in vivo. Visible and infra-red wavelengths and a scanning laser ophthalmoscope were used to acquire digital images of the human fundus. The contrast and reflectance of selected retinal and sub-retinal features were computed for a series of wavelengths or modes of imaging. Near infrared light provides better visibility than visible light for sub-retinal features. Sub-retinal deposits appear light and thickened; the optic nerve head, retinal vessels, and choroidal vessels appear dark. Contrast and visibility of features increases with increasing wavelength from 795 to 895 nm. Optimizing the mode of imaging improves the visibility of some structures. This new quantitative basis for near infrared imaging techniques can be applied to a wide range of imaging modalities for the study of pathophysiology and treatment in diseases affecting the retinal pigment epithelium and Bruch's membrane, such as age-related macular degeneration.

  6. Lithium chloride protects retinal neurocytes from nutrient deprivation by promoting DNA non-homologous end-joining

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang Jing; Li Fan; Liu Xuan; Liu Zhiping; Lin Jianxian; Ge Yihong; Kaminski, Joseph M.; Summers, James Bradley; Wang Zhichong; Ge Jian Yu Keming

    2009-03-13

    Lithium chloride is a therapeutic agent for treatment of bipolar affective disorders. Increasing numbers of studies have indicated that lithium has neuroprotective effects. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the actions of lithium have not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to investigate whether lithium chloride produces neuroprotective function by improving DNA repair pathway in retinal neurocyte. In vitro, the primary cultured retinal neurocytes (85.7% are MAP-2 positive cells) were treated with lithium chloride, then cultured with serum-free media to simulate the nutrient deprived state resulting from ischemic insult. The neurite outgrowth of the cultured cells increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner when exposed to different levels of lithium chloride. Genomic DNA electrophoresis demonstrated greater DNA integrity of retinal neurocytes when treated with lithium chloride as compared to the control. Moreover, mRNA and protein levels of Ligase IV (involved in DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway) in retinal neurocytes increased with lithium chloride. The end joining activity assay was performed to determine the role of lithium on NHEJ in the presence of extract from retinal neurocytes. The rejoining levels in retinal neurocytes treated with lithium were significantly increased as compared to the control. Furthermore, XRCC4, the Ligase IV partner, and the transcriptional factor, CREB and CTCF, were up-regulated in retinal cells after treating with 1.0 mM lithium chloride. Therefore, our data suggest that lithium chloride protects the retinal neural cells from nutrient deprivation in vitro, which may be similar to the mechanism of cell death in glaucoma. The improvement in DNA repair pathway involving in Ligase IV might have an important role in lithium neuroprotection. This study provides new insights into the neural protective mechanisms of lithium chloride.

  7. A method and technical equipment for an acute human trial to evaluate retinal implant technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornig, Ralf; Laube, Thomas; Walter, Peter; Velikay-Parel, Michaela; Bornfeld, Norbert; Feucht, Matthias; Akguel, Harun; Rössler, Gernot; Alteheld, Nils; Lütke Notarp, Dietmar; Wyatt, John; Richard, Gisbert

    2005-03-01

    This paper reports on methods and technical equipment to investigate the epiretinal stimulation of the retina in blind human subjects in acute trials. Current is applied to the retina through a thin, flexible microcontact film (microelectrode array) with electrode diameters ranging from 50 to 360 µm. The film is mounted in a custom-designed surgical tool that is hand-held by the surgeon during stimulation. The eventual goal of the work is the development of a chronically implantable retinal prosthesis to restore a useful level of vision to patients who are blind with outer retinal degenerations, specifically retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration.

  8. Small Molecules that Protect Mitochondrial Function from Metabolic Stress Decelerate Loss of Photoreceptor Cells in Murine Retinal Degeneration Models.

    PubMed

    Beeson, Craig; Lindsey, Chris; Nasarre, Cecile; Bandyopadhyay, Mausumi; Perron, Nathan; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2016-01-01

    One feature common to many of the pathways implicated in retinal degeneration is increased metabolic stress leading to impaired mitochondrial function. We found that exposure of cells to calcium ionophores or oxidants as metabolic stressors diminish maximal mitochondrial capacity. A library of 50,000 structurally diverse "drug-like" molecules was screened for protection against loss of calcium-induced loss of mitochondrial capacity in 661W rod-derived cells and C6 glioblastomas. Initial protective hits were then tested for protection against IBMX-induced loss of mitochondrial capacity as measured via respirometry. Molecules that protected mitochondria were then evaluated for protection of rod photoreceptor cells in retinal explants from rd1 mice. Two of the molecules attenuated loss of photoreceptor cells in the rd1 model. In the 661W cells, exposure to calcium ionophore or tert-butylhydroperoxide caused mitochondrial fragmentation that was blocked with the both compounds. Our studies have identified molecules that protect mitochondria and attenuate loss of photoreceptors in models of retinal degeneration suggesting that they could be good leads for development of therapeutic drugs for treatment of a wide variety of retinal dystrophies.

  9. The Protective Role of PAC1-Receptor Agonist Maxadilan in BCCAO-Induced Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Vaczy, A; Reglodi, D; Somoskeoy, T; Kovacs, K; Lokos, E; Szabo, E; Tamas, A; Atlasz, T

    2016-10-01

    A number of studies have proven that pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is protective in neurodegenerative diseases. Permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) causes severe degeneration in the rat retina. In our previous studies, protective effects were observed with PACAP1-38, PACAP1-27, and VIP but not with their related peptides, glucagon, or secretin in BCCAO. All three PACAP receptors (PAC1, VPAC1, VPAC2) appear in the retina. Molecular and immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the retinoprotective effects are most probably mainly mediated by the PAC1 receptor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the retinoprotective effects of a selective PAC1-receptor agonist maxadilan in BCCAO-induced retinopathy. Wistar rats were used in the experiment. After performing BCCAO, the right eye was treated with intravitreal maxadilan (0.1 or 1 μM), while the left eye was injected with vehicle. Sham-operated rats received the same treatment. Two weeks after the operation, retinas were processed for standard morphometric and molecular analysis. Intravitreal injection of 0.1 or 1 μM maxadilan caused significant protection in the thickness of most retinal layers and the number of cells in the GCL compared to the BCCAO-operated eyes. In addition, 1 μM maxadilan application was more effective than 0.1 μM maxadilan treatment in the ONL, INL, IPL, and the entire retina (OLM-ILM). Maxadilan treatment significantly decreased cytokine expression (CINC-1, IL-1α, and L-selectin) in ischemia. In summary, our histological and molecular analysis showed that maxadilan, a selective PAC1 receptor agonist, has a protective role in BCCAO-induced retinal degeneration, further supporting the role of PAC1 receptor conveying the retinoprotective effects of PACAP.

  10. Compound 49b Regulates ZO-1 and Occludin Levels in Human Retinal Endothelial Cells and in Mouse Retinal Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Youde; Liu, Li; Steinle, Jena J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether Epac1 is key to Compound 49b's regulation of zonula occluden 1 (ZO-1) and occludin levels in human retinal endothelial cells (REC) and in an Epac1 vascular-specific conditional knockout mouse retina. Methods Primary REC were grown in normal (5 mM) or high glucose (25 mM). Some cells were treated with a novel β-adrenergic receptor agonist, Compound 49b. Additional dishes were treated with Epac1 siRNA or Compound 49b + Epac1 siRNA. Protein levels of ZO-1, occludin, VEGF, and protein kinase C zeta (PKCz) were measured by Western blotting. Cell permeability was measured in REC grown in normal or high glucose and treated with Compound 49b, a specific Epac 1 agonist (8-CPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP), or VEGF. Epac1 floxed and cdh5-Cre mice were bred to generate Epac1 knockout mice in vascular endothelial cells. Immunofluorescence was done on retinal flatmounts from the floxed and Cre-Lox mice for occludin and ZO-1. Western blotting was also done for both proteins in whole retinal lysates from the mice. Results High glucose significantly reduced ZO-1 and occludin protein levels, which was associated with reduced cell adhesion. Compound 49b increased endothelial cell barrier protein levels through active Epac1. Knockout of Epac1 in vascular endothelial cells substantially reduced ZO-1 and occludin staining in retinal flatmounts, as well as protein levels. Conclusions Compound 49b increased ZO-1 and occludin protein levels, likely leading to decreased permeability. PMID:28114578

  11. Protective effect of sulforaphane against retinal degeneration in the Pde6(rd10) mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kai; Yu, Minzhong

    2017-09-22

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited diseases characterized by the death of rod photoreceptors, followed by the death of cone photoreceptors, progressively leading to partial or complete blindness. Currently no specific treatment is available for RP patients. Sulforaphane (SFN) has been confirmed to be an effective antioxidant in the treatment of many diseases. In this study, we tested the therapeutic effects of SFN against photoreceptor degeneration in Pde6b(rd10) mice. rd10 mice and C57/BL6 wild-type (WT) mice were treated with SFN and saline, respectively, from P6 to P20. Electroretinography (ERG), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling and western blot were tested, respectively, at P21 for the analysis of retinal function, retinal cell apoptosis or death and the protein express of GRP78/BiP (TUNEL) as a marker of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Compared with the saline group, the SFN-treated group showed significantly higher ERG a-wave and b-wave amplitudes, less photoreceptor death, and the downregulation of GRP78/BiP. Our data showed that SFN ameliorated the retinal degeneration of rd10 mice, which is possibly related to the downregulation of GRP78 expression.

  12. Regional variation in human retinal vessel oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Shahidi, A M; Patel, S R; Flanagan, J G; Hudson, C

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate regional differences in oxygen saturation of blood in first degree retinal vessels using a novel non-flash hyperspectral retinal camera (Photon etc Inc). Nine healthy individuals (mean age 24.4 ± 3.6 yrs, 5 males) were imaged at 548, 569, 586, 600, 605 and 610 nm wavelengths. Optical density values were extracted with the aid of Image-J software for blood oxygen saturation (SO2) determination. Arteriolar and venular SO2 were measured at three locations (ranging 1-3 optic nerve head radii) from the disc margin along the vessels in the superior and inferior temporal quadrants. Retinal SO2 was significantly higher in the superior temporal arteriole and venule as compared to the inferior temporal vessels (p = 0.033 and p = 0.032 for arterioles and venules, respectively). SO2 was not significantly different between the three measurement sites for any of the given vessels imaged (p > 0.05). In conclusion, greater SO2 values were found in the superior temporal first degree retinal arterioles and venules in young healthy individuals than in the equivalent inferior vessels. However, there were no detectable differences in retinal SO2 along each of the major vessels, a finding that is consistent with the concept of these vessels not contributing primarily to gas exchange. Moreover, the SO2 was consistently higher in the arterioles than in the equivalent venules (p < 0.0001).

  13. Investigation of the Protective Effects of Taurine against Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Retinal Changes via Electroretinogram and Retinal Histology with New Zealand White Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Shang-Min; Chen, Yi-Chen; Lin, Shiun-Long

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective role of orally administered taurine against diabetic retinal changes via electroretinogram (ERG) and retinal histology on rabbits. Rabbits were randomly assigned into groups: Group I (vehicle administration only); Group II (diabetes: induced by 100 mg/kg alloxan injection); Group III (diabetes and fed with 200 mg/kg taurine); and Group IV (diabetes and fed with 400 mg/kg taurine). The body weight and blood glucose levels of the rabbits were monitored weekly. The ERG was measured on weeks 5 and 15. Retinal histology was analyzed in the end of the experiment. Results revealed that a taurine supplement significantly ameliorates the alloxan-induced hyperglycemia and protects the retina from electrophysiological changes. Group II showed a significant (P < 0.05) change in the mean scotopic b-wave amplitude when compared to that of Group I, whereas the diabetic rabbits treated with taurine (Group III and IV) were analogous to Group I. Histologically, the amount of Bipolar and Müller cells showed no difference (P > 0.05) between all groups and when compared with those of Group I. Our study provides solid evidences that taurine possesses an antidiabetic activity, reduced loss of body weight, and less electrophysiological changes of the diabetic retina. PMID:25298779

  14. Apelin Protects Primary Rat Retinal Pericytes from Chemical Hypoxia-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Tao, Yong; Feng, Jing; Jiang, Yan Rong

    2015-01-01

    Pericytes are a population of cells that participate in normal vessel architecture and regulate permeability. Apelin, as the endogenous ligand of G protein-coupled receptor APJ, participates in a number of physiological and pathological processes. To date, the effect of apelin on pericyte is not clear. Our study aimed to investigate the potential protection mechanisms of apelin, with regard to primary rat retinal pericytes under hypoxia. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that pericytes colocalized with APJ in the fibrovascular membranes dissected from proliferative diabetic retinopathy patients. In the in vitro studies, we first demonstrated that the expression of apelin/APJ was upregulated in pericytes under hypoxia, and apelin increased pericytes proliferation and migration. Moreover, knockdown of apelin in pericyte was achieved via lentivirus-mediated RNA interference. After the inhibition of apelin, pericytes proliferation was inhibited significantly in hypoxia culture condition. Furthermore, exogenous recombinant apelin effectively prevented hypoxia-induced apoptosis through downregulating active-caspase 3 expression and increasing the ratio of B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2)/Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax) in pericytes. These results suggest that apelin suppressed hypoxia-induced pericytes injury, which indicated that apelin could be a potential therapeutic target for retinal angiogenic diseases. PMID:26491547

  15. Protective Effects of Melatonin on Retinal Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Experimental Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tingting; Cai, Jiyang; Fan, Jiawen; Zhang, Xiaozhe

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are important pathogenic factors contributing to the etiology of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Melatonin is an endogenous hormone that exhibits a variety of biological effects including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. The goals of this study were to determine whether melatonin could ameliorate retinal injury and to explore the potential mechanisms. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of STZ (60 mg/kg) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Melatonin (10 mg kg−1 daily, i.p.) was administered from the induction of diabetes and continued for up to 12 weeks, after which the animals were sacrificed and retinal samples were collected. The retina of diabetic rats showed depletion of glutathione and downregulation of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL). Melatonin significantly upregulated GCL by retaining Nrf2 in the nucleus and stimulating Akt phosphorylation. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and proteins, including interleukin 1β, TNF-α, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), was inhibited by melatonin through the NF-κB pathway. At 12 weeks, melatonin prevented the significant decrease in the ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes under the diabetic condition. Our results suggest potent protective functions of melatonin in diabetic retinopathy. In addition to being a direct antioxidant, melatonin can exert receptor-mediated signaling effects to attenuate inflammation and oxidative stress of the retina. PMID:27143993

  16. Progressive outer retinal necrosis: manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lo, Phey Feng; Lim, Rongxuan; Antonakis, Serafeim N; Almeida, Goncalo C

    2015-05-06

    We present the case of a 54-year-old man who developed progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) as an initial manifestation of HIV infection without any significant risk factors for infection with HIV. PORN is usually found as a manifestation of known AIDS late in the disease. Our patient presented with transient visual loss followed by decrease in visual acuity and facial rash. Subsequent investigation revealed anterior chamber tap positive for varicella zoster virus (VZV), as well as HIV positivity, with an initial CD4 count of 48 cells/µL. Systemic and intravitreal antivirals against VZV, and highly active antiretroviral therapy against HIV were started, which halted further progression of retinal necrosis. This case highlights the importance of suspecting PORN where there is a rapidly progressive retinitis, and also testing the patient for HIV, so appropriate treatment can be started.

  17. Progressive outer retinal necrosis: manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Phey Feng; Lim, Rongxuan; Antonakis, Serafeim N; Almeida, Goncalo C

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 54-year-old man who developed progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) as an initial manifestation of HIV infection without any significant risk factors for infection with HIV. PORN is usually found as a manifestation of known AIDS late in the disease. Our patient presented with transient visual loss followed by decrease in visual acuity and facial rash. Subsequent investigation revealed anterior chamber tap positive for varicella zoster virus (VZV), as well as HIV positivity, with an initial CD4 count of 48 cells/µL. Systemic and intravitreal antivirals against VZV, and highly active antiretroviral therapy against HIV were started, which halted further progression of retinal necrosis. This case highlights the importance of suspecting PORN where there is a rapidly progressive retinitis, and also testing the patient for HIV, so appropriate treatment can be started. PMID:25948844

  18. Nerve growth factor protects against palmitic acid-induced injury in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Pan-shi; Tang, Shu; Zhang, Hai-feng; Guo, Yuan-yuan; Zeng, Zhi-wen; Wen, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports an important role for nerve growth factor (NGF) in diabetic retinopathy. We hypothesized that NGF has a protective effect on rat retinal ganglion RGC-5 cells injured by palmitic acid (PA), a metabolic factor implicated in the development of diabetes and its complications. Our results show that PA exposure caused apoptosis of RGC-5 cells, while NGF protected against PA insult in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, NGF significantly attenuated the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in RGC-5 cells. Pathway inhibitor tests showed that the protective effect of NGF was completely reversed by LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor), Akt VIII inhibitor, and PD98059 (ERK1/2 inhibitor). Western blot analysis revealed that NGF induced the phosphorylation of Akt/FoxO1 and ERK1/2 and reversed the PA-evoked reduction in the levels of these proteins. These results indicate that NGF protects RGC-5 cells against PA-induced injury through anti-oxidation and inhibition of apoptosis by modulation of the PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. PMID:28123432

  19. Characterization of single-file flow through human retinal parafoveal capillaries using an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Johnny; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Roorda, Austin

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy was used to noninvasively acquire videos of single-file flow through live human retinal parafoveal capillaries. Videos were analyzed offline to investigate capillary flow dynamics. Certain capillaries accounted for a clear majority of leukocyte traffic (Leukocyte-Preferred-Paths, LPPs), while other capillaries primarily featured plasma gap flow (Plasma-Gap-Capillaries, PGCs). LPPs may serve as a protective mechanism to prevent inactivated leukocytes from entering exchange capillaries, and PGCs may serve as relief valves to minimize flow disruption due to the presence of a leukocyte in a neighboring LPP. PMID:21483603

  20. Hybrid vitronectin-mimicking polycaprolactone scaffolds for human retinal progenitor cell differentiation and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lawley, Elodie; Baranov, Petr; Young, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Many advances have been made in an attempt to treat retinal degenerative diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. The irreversible loss of photoreceptors is common to both, and currently no restorative clinical treatment exists. It has been shown that retinal progenitor and photoreceptor precursor cell transplantation can rescue the retinal structure and function. Importantly, retinal progenitor cells can be collected from the developing neural retina with further expansion and additional modification in vitro, and the delivery into the degenerative host can be performed as a single-cell suspension injection or as a complex graft transplantation. Previously, we have described several polymer scaffolds for culture and transplantation of retinal progenitor cells of both mouse and human origin. This tissue engineering strategy increases donor cell survival and integration. We have also shown that biodegradable poly(ɛ-caprolactone) induces mature photoreceptor differentiation from human retinal progenitor cells. However, poor adhesive properties limit its use, and therefore it requires additional surface modification. The aim of this work was to study vitronectin-mimicking oligopeptides (Synthemax II-SC) poly(ɛ-caprolactone) films and their effects on human retinal progenitor cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Here, we show that the incorporation of vitronectin-mimicking oligopeptide into poly(ɛ-caprolactone) leads to dose-dependent increases in cell adhesion; the optimum dose identified as 30 µg/ml. Inhibition of human retinal progenitor cells proliferation was seen on poly(ɛ-caprolactone) and was maintained with the hybrid scaffold. This has been shown to be beneficial for driving cell differentiation. Additionally, we observed equal expression of Nrl, rhodopsin, recoverin, and rod outer membrane 1 after differentiation on the hybrid scaffold as compared to the standard fibronectin coating of poly

  1. Politics and Human Welfare: Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients in South Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKendrick, B. W.; Leketi, M.

    1990-01-01

    The study found that apartheid impacted the sociopsychological and physical circumstances of 12 African and 11 White people with retinitis pigmentosa in South Africa. Findings are discussed in terms of onset of condition, effects on subjects' lives, knowledge of social services, and needs unmet by existing services. (JDD)

  2. Politics and Human Welfare: Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients in South Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKendrick, B. W.; Leketi, M.

    1990-01-01

    The study found that apartheid impacted the sociopsychological and physical circumstances of 12 African and 11 White people with retinitis pigmentosa in South Africa. Findings are discussed in terms of onset of condition, effects on subjects' lives, knowledge of social services, and needs unmet by existing services. (JDD)

  3. Imipramine protects retinal ganglion cells from oxidative stress through the tyrosine kinase receptor B signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ming-lei; Liu, Guo-hua; Guo, Jin; Yu, Shu-juan; Huang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration is irreversible in glaucoma and tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB)-associated signaling pathways have been implicated in the process. In this study, we attempted to examine whether imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant, may protect hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced RGC degeneration through the activation of the TrkB pathway in RGC-5 cell lines. RGC-5 cell lines were pre-treated with imipramine 30 minutes before exposure to H2O2. Western blot assay showed that in H2O2 -damaged RGC-5 cells, imipramine activated TrkB pathways through extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase/TrkB phosphorylation. TUNEL staining assay also demonstrated that imipramine ameliorated H2O2 -induced apoptosis in RGC-5 cells. Finally, TrkB-IgG intervention was able to reverse the protective effect of imipramine on H2O2 -induced RGC-5 apoptosis. Imipramine therefore protects RGCs from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through the TrkB signaling pathway. PMID:27127489

  4. The relative distribution of retinal and choroidal blood in the human retina.

    PubMed

    Sisak, I; Blumenthal, E Z

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a model is presented to explain the relative distribution of retinal and choroidal blood to the human retina. According to this model the retina between the inner limiting membrane and the outer limiting membrane is metabolically controlled and nourished by the retinal vasculature, through Muller cells. The retina between the outer limiting membrane and Bruch's membrane is nourished by the choroidal vasculature, through the retinal pigment epithelium. Muller cells have the ability of metabolic uptake from the interphotoreceptor space as demonstrated in pathological situations suchs as central retinal artery occlusion, when both the Muller cell and the photoreceptor nuclei survive. This demonstrates an overlap existing between the two distributions. Neural elements in the retina depend on Muller cells and RPE for metabolic support. It is only reasonable to expect that the cleavage plane between the two blood supplies is the outer limiting membrane, the outer limit of the Muller cell. In this model both the photoreceptor nuclei (the outer nuclear layer) and the foveal retina are assumed to be supplied by retinal. and not choroidal, vasculature. One consequence is that after long standing retinal detachment the photoreceptor outer segments degenerate (since they become deprived of choroidal blood supply) but the outer nuclear layer, nourished by the Muller cell, continues to survive.

  5. Pharmacological Inhibition of Caspase-2 Protects Axotomised Retinal Ganglion Cells from Apoptosis in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vigneswara, Vasanthy; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Ahmed, Zubair

    2012-01-01

    Severing the axons of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) by crushing the optic nerve (ONC) causes the majority of RGC to degenerate and die, primarily by apoptosis. We showed recently that after ONC in adult rats, caspase-2 activation occurred specifically in RGC while no localisation of caspase-3 was observed in ganglion cells but in cells of the inner nuclear layer. We further showed that inhibition of caspase-2 using a single injection of stably modified siRNA to caspase-2 protected almost all RGC from death at 7 days, offering significant protection for up to 1 month after ONC. In the present study, we confirmed that cleaved caspase-2 was localised and activated in RGC (and occasional neurons in the inner nuclear layer), while TUNEL+ RGC were also observed after ONC. We then investigated if suppression of caspase-2 using serial intravitreal injections of the pharmacological inhibitor z-VDVAD-fmk (z-VDVAD) protected RGC from death for 15 days after ONC. Treatment of eyes with z-VDVAD suppressed cleaved caspase-2 activation by >85% at 3–4 days after ONC. Increasing concentrations of z-VDVAD protected greater numbers of RGC from death at 15 days after ONC, up to a maximum of 60% using 4000 ng/ml of z-VDVAD, compared to PBS treated controls. The 15-day treatment with 4000 ng/ml of z-VDVAD after ONC suppressed levels of cleaved caspase-2 but no significant changes in levels of cleaved caspase-3, -6, -7 or -8 were detected. Although suppression of caspase-2 protected 60% of RGC from death, RGC axon regeneration was not promoted. These results suggest that caspase-2 specifically mediates death of RGC after ONC and that suppression of caspase-2 may be a useful therapeutic strategy to enhance RGC survival not only after axotomy but also in diseases where RGC death occurs such as glaucoma and optic neuritis. PMID:23285297

  6. Salidroside protects retinal endothelial cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced injury via modulating oxidative status and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kai; Wang, Xulei; Zhu, Jie; Cao, Guiqun; Zhang, Kang; Su, Zhiguang

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress can cause injury in retinal endothelial cells. Salidroside is a strong antioxidative and cytoprotective supplement in Chinese traditional medicine. In this study, we investigated the effects of salidroside on H2O2-induced primary retinal endothelial cells injury. Salidroside decreased H2O2-induced cell death, and efficiently suppressed cellular ROS production, malondialdehyde generation, and cell apoptosis induced by H2O2 treatment. Salidroside induced the intracellular mRNA expression, protein expression, and enzymatic activities of catalase and Mn-SOD and increased the ratio of Bcl2/Bax. Our results demonstrated that salidroside protected retinal endothelial cells against oxidative injury through increasing the Bcl2/Bax signaling pathway and activation of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. This finding presents salidroside as an attractive agent with potential to attenuate retinopathic diseases.

  7. Autophagy and mitochondrial alterations in human retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by ethanol: implications of 4-hydroxy-nonenal

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Bellver, M; Bonet-Ponce, L; Barcia, J M; Garcia-Verdugo, J M; Martinez-Gil, N; Saez-Atienzar, S; Sancho-Pelluz, J; Jordan, J; Galindo, M F; Romero, F J

    2014-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium has a crucial role in the physiology and pathophysiology of the retina due to its location and metabolism. Oxidative damage has been demonstrated as a pathogenic mechanism in several retinal diseases, and reactive oxygen species are certainly important by-products of ethanol (EtOH) metabolism. Autophagy has been shown to exert a protective effect in different cellular and animal models. Thus, in our model, EtOH treatment increases autophagy flux, in a concentration-dependent manner. Mitochondrial morphology seems to be clearly altered under EtOH exposure, leading to an apparent increase in mitochondrial fission. An increase in 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence and accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, such as 4-hydroxy-nonenal (4-HNE), among others were confirmed. The characterization of these structures confirmed their nature as aggresomes. Hence, autophagy seems to have a cytoprotective role in ARPE-19 cells under EtOH damage, by degrading fragmented mitochondria and 4-HNE aggresomes. Herein, we describe the central implication of autophagy in human retinal pigment epithelial cells upon oxidative stress induced by EtOH, with possible implications for other conditions and diseases. PMID:25032851

  8. Progesterone Attenuates Microglial-Driven Retinal Degeneration and Stimulates Protective Fractalkine-CX3CR1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Roche, Sarah L; Wyse-Jackson, Alice C; Gómez-Vicente, Violeta; Lax, Pedro; Ruiz-Lopez, Ana M; Byrne, Ashleigh M; Cuenca, Nicolás; Cotter, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a degenerative disease leading to photoreceptor cell loss. Mouse models of RP, such as the rd10 mouse (B6.CXBl-Pde6brd10/J), have enhanced our understanding of the disease, allowing for development of potential therapeutics. In 2011, our group first demonstrated that the synthetic progesterone analogue 'Norgestrel' is neuroprotective in two mouse models of retinal degeneration, including the rd10 mouse. We have since elucidated several mechanisms by which Norgestrel protects stressed photoreceptors, such as upregulating growth factors. This study consequently aimed to further characterize Norgestrel's neuroprotective effects. Specifically, we sought to investigate the role that microglia might play; for microglial-derived inflammation has been shown to potentiate neurodegeneration. Dams of post-natal day (P) 10 rd10 pups were given a Norgestrel-supplemented diet (80mg/kg). Upon weaning, pups remained on Norgestrel. Tissue was harvested from P15-P50 rd10 mice on control or Norgestrel-supplemented diet. Norgestrel-diet administration provided significant retinal protection out to P40 in rd10 mice. Alterations in microglial activity coincided with significant protection, implicating microglial changes in Norgestrel-induced neuroprotection. Utilizing primary cultures of retinal microglia and 661W photoreceptor-like cells, we show that rd10 microglia drive neuronal cell death. We reveal a novel role of Norgestrel, acting directly on microglia to reduce pro-inflammatory activation and prevent neuronal cell death. Norgestrel effectively suppresses cytokine, chemokine and danger-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP) expression in the rd10 retina. Remarkably, Norgestrel upregulates fractalkine-CX3CR1 signaling 1 000-fold at the RNA level, in the rd10 mouse. Fractalkine-CX3CR1 signaling has been shown to protect neurons by regulating retinal microglial activation and migration. Ultimately, these results present Norgestrel as a promising

  9. Progesterone Attenuates Microglial-Driven Retinal Degeneration and Stimulates Protective Fractalkine-CX3CR1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Vicente, Violeta; Lax, Pedro; Ruiz-Lopez, Ana M.; Byrne, Ashleigh M.; Cuenca, Nicolás; Cotter, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a degenerative disease leading to photoreceptor cell loss. Mouse models of RP, such as the rd10 mouse (B6.CXBl-Pde6brd10/J), have enhanced our understanding of the disease, allowing for development of potential therapeutics. In 2011, our group first demonstrated that the synthetic progesterone analogue ‘Norgestrel’ is neuroprotective in two mouse models of retinal degeneration, including the rd10 mouse. We have since elucidated several mechanisms by which Norgestrel protects stressed photoreceptors, such as upregulating growth factors. This study consequently aimed to further characterize Norgestrel’s neuroprotective effects. Specifically, we sought to investigate the role that microglia might play; for microglial-derived inflammation has been shown to potentiate neurodegeneration. Dams of post-natal day (P) 10 rd10 pups were given a Norgestrel-supplemented diet (80mg/kg). Upon weaning, pups remained on Norgestrel. Tissue was harvested from P15-P50 rd10 mice on control or Norgestrel-supplemented diet. Norgestrel-diet administration provided significant retinal protection out to P40 in rd10 mice. Alterations in microglial activity coincided with significant protection, implicating microglial changes in Norgestrel-induced neuroprotection. Utilizing primary cultures of retinal microglia and 661W photoreceptor-like cells, we show that rd10 microglia drive neuronal cell death. We reveal a novel role of Norgestrel, acting directly on microglia to reduce pro-inflammatory activation and prevent neuronal cell death. Norgestrel effectively suppresses cytokine, chemokine and danger-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP) expression in the rd10 retina. Remarkably, Norgestrel upregulates fractalkine-CX3CR1 signaling 1 000-fold at the RNA level, in the rd10 mouse. Fractalkine-CX3CR1 signaling has been shown to protect neurons by regulating retinal microglial activation and migration. Ultimately, these results present Norgestrel as a

  10. Synergistic protective effects of escin and low‑dose glucocorticoids against vascular endothelial growth factor‑induced blood‑retinal barrier breakdown in retinal pigment epithelial and umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fenglan; Man, Xuejing; Yu, Huajun; Liu, Limei; Li, Yuanbin

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that escin possesses glucocorticoid (GC)‑like anti‑edematous and anti‑inflammatory effects. The present study was designed to investigate whether escin exhibits synergistic protective effects against blood‑retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown when combined with GC in an in vitro monolayer BRB model, based on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The results showed that low concentrations of escin and triamcinolone acetonide (TA) administered separately did not affect BRB trans‑endothelial (epithelium) resistance (TEER). However, when administered together, escin and TA significantly inhibited reduced BRB TEER following treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Furthermore, low‑concentrations of escin and TA administered together significantly increased the expression levels of occludin and ZO‑1. This demonstrates that escin and GC have synergistic protective effects against BRB breakdown, and the molecular mechanisms may be related to the upregulation of occludin and ZO‑1 expression. The combination of escin with GC indicates a potential beneficial strategy for the treatment of breakdown of the BRB.

  11. CNTF Gene Therapy Confers Lifelong Neuroprotection in a Mouse Model of Human Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Daniel M; Barnard, Alun R; Singh, Mandeep S; Martin, Chris; Lee, Edward J; Davies, Wayne I L; MacLaren, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    The long-term outcome of neuroprotection as a therapeutic strategy for preventing cell death in neurodegenerative disorders remains unknown, primarily due to slow disease progression and the inherent difficulty of assessing neuronal survival in vivo. Employing a murine model of retinal disease, we demonstrate that ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) confers life-long protection against photoreceptor degeneration. Repetitive retinal imaging allowed the survival of intrinsically fluorescent cone photoreceptors to be quantified in vivo. Imaging of the visual cortex and assessment of visually-evoked behavioral responses demonstrated that surviving cones retain function and signal correctly to the brain. The mechanisms underlying CNTF-mediated neuroprotection were explored through transcriptome analysis, revealing widespread upregulation of proteolysis inhibitors, which may prevent cellular/extracellular matrix degradation and complement activation in neurodegenerative diseases. These findings provide insights into potential novel therapeutic avenues for diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, for which CNTF has been evaluated unsuccessfully in clinical trials. PMID:25896245

  12. Tetramethylpyrazine nitrone protects retinal ganglion cells against N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaopeng; Yu, Yankun; Xiang, Zongqin; Wu, Huisu; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Wang, Yuqiang; So, Kwok-Fai; Zhang, Zaijun; Xu, Ying

    2017-02-03

    Adding a free radical-scavenging nitrone moiety on tetramethylpyrazine, we have previously synthesized a chemical named 2-[[(1,1-dimethylethyl)oxidoimino]-methyl]-3,5,6-trimethylpyrazine (tetramethylpyrazine nitrone, or TBN) and proved its neuroprotective effect but with limited understanding of its mechanism. Here we ask if TBN protects retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) against excitotoxicity induced by NMDA and explore the underlying mechanism. NMDA was intravitreally injected to induce RGC injury in rats, followed by daily intraperitoneal administrations of TBN. Measurements of TBN concentration at different times after intraperitoneal administration showed that more than 200 μM TBN reached the aqueous humor quickly. Then RGCs' survival was evaluated by quantifying Brn3-positive cells, and retinal functions were examined by electroretinogram and visual behaviors. TBN significantly increased the survival of RGCs after NMDA insult, recovered the amplitude of photopic negative responses to flash, and restored the visual behavior. Furthermore, TBN inhibited the apoptotic process, as indicated by the elevated ratios of cleaved caspase-3/caspase-3 and of Bax/Bcl-2, and decreased the level of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, TBN reduced RGC's calcium overload induced by NMDA or by KCl. Whole-cell patch recording from RGCs further showed that TBN slightly but significantly inhibited L-type calcium channels, but had little effect on T-type calcium channel or NMDA-, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid(AMPA)-induced current. Thus our data indicate that TBN alleviates NMDA-elicited injury of rat RGCs both morphologically and functionally, possibly by inhibiting the L-type calcium channel thus reducing Ca(2+) overload and by directly scavenging free radicals. Therefore, TBN may be a novel candidate for treating excitotoxicity-related visual disorders such as glaucoma.

  13. Losartan Treatment Protects Retinal Ganglion Cells and Alters Scleral Remodeling in Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Pitha, Ian F.; Nguyen, Cathy; Steinhart, Matthew R.; Nguyen, Thao D.; Pease, Mary Ellen; Oglesby, Ericka N.; Berlinicke, Cynthia A.; Mitchell, Katherine L.; Kim, Jessica; Jefferys, Joan J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if oral losartan treatment decreases the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death caused by experimental intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation in mice. Methods We produced IOP increase in CD1 mice and performed unilateral optic nerve crush. Mice received oral losartan, spironolactone, enalapril, or no drug to test effects of inhibiting angiotensin receptors. IOP was monitored by Tonolab, and blood pressure was monitored by tail cuff device. RGC loss was measured in masked axon counts and RGC bodies by β-tubulin labeling. Scleral changes that could modulate RGC injury were measured including axial length, scleral thickness, and retinal layer thicknesses, pressure-strain behavior in inflation testing, and study of angiotensin receptors and pathways by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Results Losartan treatment prevented significant RGC loss (median loss = 2.5%, p = 0.13), while median loss with water, spironolactone, and enalapril treatments were 26%, 28% and 43%; p < 0.0001). The lower RGC loss with losartan was significantly less than the loss with spironolactone or enalapril (regression model p = 0.001; drug treatment group term p = 0.01). Both losartan and enalapril significantly lowered blood pressure (p< 0.001), but losartan was protective, while enalapril led to worse than water-treated RGC loss. RGC loss after crush injury was unaffected by losartan treatment (difference from control p = 0.9). Survival of RGC in cell culture was not prolonged by sartan treatment. Axonal transport blockade after 3 day IOP elevations was less in losartan-treated than in control glaucoma eyes (p = 0.007). Losartan inhibited effects of glaucoma, including reduction in extracellular signal-related kinase activity and modification of glaucoma-related changes in scleral thickness and creep under controlled IOP. Conclusions The neuroprotective effect of losartan in mouse glaucoma is associated with adaptive changes

  14. A compensatory mechanism protects retinal mitochondria from initial insult in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Santos, Julia M; Tewari, Shikha; Kowluru, Renu A

    2012-11-01

    In the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy, an increase in retinal oxidative stress precedes mitochondrial dysfunction and capillary cell apoptosis. This study is designed to understand the mechanism responsible for the protection of mitochondria damage in the early stages of diabetic retinopathy. After 15 days-12 months of streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats, retina was analyzed for mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) damage by extended length PCR. DNA repair enzyme and replication machinery were quantified in the mitochondria, and the binding of mitochondrial transcriptional factor A (TFAM) with mtDNA was analyzed by ChIP. Key parameters were confirmed in the retinal endothelial cells incubated in 20mM glucose for 6-96h. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) were increased within 15 days of diabetes, mtDNA damage was observed at 6 months of diabetes. After 15 days of diabetes DNA repair/replication enzymes were significantly increased in the mitochondria, but at 2 months, their mitochondrial accumulation started to come down, and mtDNA copy number and binding of TFAM with mtDNA became significantly elevated. However, at 6 months of diabetes, the repair/replication machinery became subnormal and mtDNA copy number significantly decreased. A similar temporal relationship was observed in endothelial cells exposed to high glucose. Thus, in the early stages of diabetes, increased mtDNA biogenesis and repair compensates for the ROS-induced damage, but, with sustained insult, this mechanism is overwhelmed, and mtDNA and electron transport chain (ETC) are damaged. The compromised ETC propagates a vicious cycle of ROS and the dysfunctional mitochondria fuels loss of capillary cells by initiating their apoptosis.

  15. Losartan Treatment Protects Retinal Ganglion Cells and Alters Scleral Remodeling in Experimental Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Harry A; Pitha, Ian F; Welsbie, Derek S; Nguyen, Cathy; Steinhart, Matthew R; Nguyen, Thao D; Pease, Mary Ellen; Oglesby, Ericka N; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Mitchell, Katherine L; Kim, Jessica; Jefferys, Joan J; Kimball, Elizabeth C

    2015-01-01

    To determine if oral losartan treatment decreases the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death caused by experimental intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation in mice. We produced IOP increase in CD1 mice and performed unilateral optic nerve crush. Mice received oral losartan, spironolactone, enalapril, or no drug to test effects of inhibiting angiotensin receptors. IOP was monitored by Tonolab, and blood pressure was monitored by tail cuff device. RGC loss was measured in masked axon counts and RGC bodies by β-tubulin labeling. Scleral changes that could modulate RGC injury were measured including axial length, scleral thickness, and retinal layer thicknesses, pressure-strain behavior in inflation testing, and study of angiotensin receptors and pathways by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Losartan treatment prevented significant RGC loss (median loss = 2.5%, p = 0.13), while median loss with water, spironolactone, and enalapril treatments were 26%, 28% and 43%; p < 0.0001). The lower RGC loss with losartan was significantly less than the loss with spironolactone or enalapril (regression model p = 0.001; drug treatment group term p = 0.01). Both losartan and enalapril significantly lowered blood pressure (p< 0.001), but losartan was protective, while enalapril led to worse than water-treated RGC loss. RGC loss after crush injury was unaffected by losartan treatment (difference from control p = 0.9). Survival of RGC in cell culture was not prolonged by sartan treatment. Axonal transport blockade after 3 day IOP elevations was less in losartan-treated than in control glaucoma eyes (p = 0.007). Losartan inhibited effects of glaucoma, including reduction in extracellular signal-related kinase activity and modification of glaucoma-related changes in scleral thickness and creep under controlled IOP. The neuroprotective effect of losartan in mouse glaucoma is associated with adaptive changes in the sclera expressed at the

  16. First-in-Human Trial of a Novel Suprachoroidal Retinal Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Ayton, Lauren N.; Blamey, Peter J.; Guymer, Robyn H.; Luu, Chi D.; Nayagam, David A. X.; Sinclair, Nicholas C.; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Yeoh, Jonathan; McCombe, Mark F.; Briggs, Robert J.; Opie, Nicholas L.; Villalobos, Joel; Dimitrov, Peter N.; Varsamidis, Mary; Petoe, Matthew A.; McCarthy, Chris D.; Walker, Janine G.; Barnes, Nick; Burkitt, Anthony N.; Williams, Chris E.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Allen, Penelope J.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal visual prostheses (“bionic eyes”) have the potential to restore vision to blind or profoundly vision-impaired patients. The medical bionic technology used to design, manufacture and implant such prostheses is still in its relative infancy, with various technologies and surgical approaches being evaluated. We hypothesised that a suprachoroidal implant location (between the sclera and choroid of the eye) would provide significant surgical and safety benefits for patients, allowing them to maintain preoperative residual vision as well as gaining prosthetic vision input from the device. This report details the first-in-human Phase 1 trial to investigate the use of retinal implants in the suprachoroidal space in three human subjects with end-stage retinitis pigmentosa. The success of the suprachoroidal surgical approach and its associated safety benefits, coupled with twelve-month post-operative efficacy data, holds promise for the field of vision restoration. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01603576 PMID:25521292

  17. First-in-human trial of a novel suprachoroidal retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Ayton, Lauren N; Blamey, Peter J; Guymer, Robyn H; Luu, Chi D; Nayagam, David A X; Sinclair, Nicholas C; Shivdasani, Mohit N; Yeoh, Jonathan; McCombe, Mark F; Briggs, Robert J; Opie, Nicholas L; Villalobos, Joel; Dimitrov, Peter N; Varsamidis, Mary; Petoe, Matthew A; McCarthy, Chris D; Walker, Janine G; Barnes, Nick; Burkitt, Anthony N; Williams, Chris E; Shepherd, Robert K; Allen, Penelope J

    2014-01-01

    Retinal visual prostheses ("bionic eyes") have the potential to restore vision to blind or profoundly vision-impaired patients. The medical bionic technology used to design, manufacture and implant such prostheses is still in its relative infancy, with various technologies and surgical approaches being evaluated. We hypothesised that a suprachoroidal implant location (between the sclera and choroid of the eye) would provide significant surgical and safety benefits for patients, allowing them to maintain preoperative residual vision as well as gaining prosthetic vision input from the device. This report details the first-in-human Phase 1 trial to investigate the use of retinal implants in the suprachoroidal space in three human subjects with end-stage retinitis pigmentosa. The success of the suprachoroidal surgical approach and its associated safety benefits, coupled with twelve-month post-operative efficacy data, holds promise for the field of vision restoration. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01603576.

  18. Synergistic protective effects of escin and low‑dose glucocorticoids on blood‑retinal barrier breakdown in a rat model of retinal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fenglan; Li, Yuanbin; Zhang, Leiming; Mu, Guoying

    2013-05-01

    Escin, a natural mixture of triterpenoid saponins isolated from the seed of the horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum), has been demonstrated to possess glucocorticoid (GC)‑like anti‑edematous and anti‑inflammatory effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether escin exhibits synergistic protective effects on blood‑retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown when combined with GCs in a rat model of retinal ischemia. Low concentrations of escin and triamcinolone acetonide (TA) alone did not affect BRB permeability. However, when administered together, low‑dose escin and TA significantly reduced BRB permeability following ischemia. Furthermore, low‑dose escin and TA alone did not affect the expression of occludin in the ischemic retina; however, when administered together, they significantly increased occludin expression in the ganglion cell layer of the ischemic retina. This indicates that escin and GCs have synergistic protective effects on BRB breakdown and the molecular mechanisms may be correlated with the upregulation of occludin. Therefore, the administration of escin may allow a reduction in the dose of GCs for the treatment of macular edema. The combination of escin with GCs is potentially a beneficial treatment method for BRB breakdown and warrants further investigation.

  19. Protective effect of magnesium acetyltaurate against NMDA-induced retinal damage involves restoration of minerals and trace elements homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Jafri, Azliana Jusnida Ahmad; Arfuzir, Natasha Najwa Nor; Lambuk, Lidawani; Iezhitsa, Igor; Agarwal, Renu; Agarwal, Puneet; Razali, Norhafiza; Krasilnikova, Anna; Kharitonova, Maria; Demidov, Vasily; Serebryansky, Evgeny; Skalny, Anatoly; Spasov, Alexander; Yusof, Ahmad Pauzi Md; Ismail, Nafeeza Mohd

    2017-01-01

    .0001) compared to vehicle injected group. This was accompanied with significant increase of Ca/Mg and Na/K ratios, 3 and 1.27 times respectively, compared to control group. The trace elements such as Cu, Fe and Zn also showed a significant increase amounting to 3.3 (p<0.001), 2.3 (p<0.0001) and 3 (p<0.0001) times respectively compared to control group. Se was increased by 60% (p<0.005). Pre-treatment with MgAT abolished effect of NMDA on minerals and trace elements more effectively than co- and post-treatment. Similar observations were made for retinal oxidative stress, retinal morphology and retinal cell apoptosis. In conclusion, current study demonstrated the protective effect of MgAT against NMDA-induced oxidative stress and retinal cell apoptosis. This effect of MgAT was associated with restoration of retinal concentrations of minerals and trace elements. Further studies are warranted to explore the precise molecular targets of MgAT. Nevertheless, MgAT seems a potential candidate in the management of diseases involving NMDA-induced excitotoxicity.

  20. Contacting co-culture of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells alters barrier function of human embryonic stem cell derived retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Skottman, H; Muranen, J; Lähdekorpi, H; Pajula, E; Mäkelä, K; Koivusalo, L; Koistinen, A; Uusitalo, H; Kaarniranta, K; Juuti-Uusitalo, K

    2017-10-01

    Here we evaluated the effects of human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (hREC) on mature human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. The hESC-RPE cells (Regea08/017, Regea08/023 or Regea11/013) and hREC (ACBRI 181) were co-cultured on opposite sides of transparent membranes for up to six weeks. Thereafter barrier function, small molecule permeability, localization of RPE and endothelial cell marker proteins, cellular fine structure, and growth factor secretion of were evaluated. After co-culture, the RPE specific CRALBP and endothelial cell specific von Willebrand factor were appropriately localized. In addition, the general morphology, pigmentation, and fine structure of hESC-RPE cells were unaffected. Co-culture increased the barrier function of hESC-RPE cells, detected both with TEER measurements and cumulative permeability of FD4 - although the differences varied among the cell lines. Co-culturing significantly altered VEGF and PEDF secretion, but again the differences were cell line specific. The results of this study showed that co-culture with hREC affects hESC-RPE functionality. In addition, co-culture revealed drastic cell line specific differences, most notably in growth factor secretion. This model has the potential to be used as an in vitro outer blood-retinal barrier model for drug permeability testing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. CYTOMEGALOVIRUS RETINITIS ASSOCIATED WITH OCCLUSIVE VASCULOPATHY IN AN ELDERLY, HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS-NEGATIVE MAN.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Kareem; Doan, Thuy; Stewart, Jay M; Shantha, Jessica; Gonzales, John; Acharya, Nisha; Cunningham, Emmett T

    2017-09-20

    To present a case of cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis associated with occlusive vasculopathy presenting as sudden unilateral loss of vision in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative elderly man. Clinical case report and literature review. An 84-year-old Chinese man with diabetes mellitus and primary open-angle glaucoma was seen in consultation by our uveitis service for evaluation of sudden vision loss in the right eye. Examination revealed an occlusive retinal vasculopathy. An extensive diagnostic workup was performed, including fluorescein angiography, serologic testing for infectious etiologies including syphilis and tuberculosis and a temporal artery biopsy. The patient was treated with high-dose oral prednisone, after which the biopsy returned negative for giant-cell arteritis. Three weeks after initial presentation, the patient was noted to have a new area of retinitis in the temporal periphery. An anterior chamber paracentesis was performed, and the fluid was sent for directed polymerase chain reaction testing, which returned positive for CMV. Human immunodeficiency virus testing was negative. He was treated with oral valganciclovir and intravitreal foscarnet injections and the infection subsequently resolved. Cytomegalovirus infection can be associated with occlusive vasculopathy in human immunodeficiency virus-negative individuals. The diagnosis of CMV retinitis should be considered in patients with human immunodeficiency virus-negative who have other conditions that may compromise immune function, particularly advanced age, diabetes mellitus, malignancy, or use of immunosuppressive agents.

  2. Protective effects of the compounds isolated from the seed of Psoralea corylifolia on oxidative stress-induced retinal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung-A; Shim, Sang Hee; Ahn, Hong Ryul; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2013-06-01

    The mechanism underlying glaucoma remains controversial, but apoptosis caused by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to play a role in its pathogenesis. We investigated the effects of compounds isolated from Psoralea corylifolia on oxidative stress-induced cell death in vitro and in vivo. Transformed retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5) were treated with L-buthione-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) and glutamate in the presence or with pre-treatment with compound 6, bakuchiol isolated from P. corylifolia. We observed reduced cell death in cells pre-treated with bakuchiol. Moreover, bakuchiol inhibited the oxidative stress-induced decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, ΔΨm). Furthermore, while intracellular Ca{sup 2+} was high in RGC-5 cells after exposure to oxidative stress, bakuchiol reduced these levels. In an in vivo study, in which rat retinal damage was induced by intravitreal injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), bakuchiol markedly reduced translocation of AIF and release of cytochrome c, and inhibited up-regulation of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved PARP. The survival rate of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) 7 days after optic nerve crush (ONC) in mice was significantly decreased; however, bakuchiol attenuated the loss of RGCs. Moreover, bakuchiol attenuated ONC-induced up-regulation of apoptotic proteins, including cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved caspase-9. Bakuchiol also significantly inhibited translocation of mitochondrial AIF into the nuclear fraction and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into the cytosol. These results demonstrate that bakuchiol isolated from P. corylifolia has protective effects against oxidative stress-induced retinal damage, and may be considered as an agent for treating or preventing retinal degeneration. - Highlights: • Psoralea corylifolia have neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. • Bakuchiol attenuated the increase of apoptotic proteins induced by oxidative

  3. All-trans-retinal forms a visible-absorbing pigment with human rod opsin.

    PubMed

    Brueggemann, L I; Sullivan, J M

    2001-04-10

    Rhodopsin activation elicits transmembrane currents due to electrostatic events associated with conformational changes. We employed the sensitive rhodopsin early receptor current approach to reevaluate whether all-trans-retinal can form a visual pigment with rod opsin apoprotein. An opsin shift above 440 nm is induced in the action spectrum of charge motions caused by visible flashes in cells expressing human rod opsin and regenerated with all-trans-retinal, compared to cells without opsin. Near-ultraviolet stimulation of opsin regenerated with all-trans-retinal promotes charge motions similar to those arising from the meta-II signaling state while photochemically regenerating a pigment with ground state charge motion properties. These results indicate that all-trans-retinal can form a visual pigment with opsin, through both protonated and unprotonated Schiff base linkages and likely within the native ligand binding pocket at lysine-296. The agonist effects of all-trans-retinal may relate to its structural accommodation within the core of opsin, similar to other G-protein-coupled receptors.

  4. Characterization of Three-Dimensional Retinal Tissue Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Adherent Monolayer Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ratnesh K.; Mallela, Ramya K.; Cornuet, Pamela K.; Reifler, Aaron N.; Chervenak, Andrew P.; West, Michael D.; Wong, Kwoon Y.; Nasonkin, Igor O.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy of retinal degenerative conditions is a promising modality to treat blindness, but requires new strategies to improve the number of functionally integrating cells. Grafting semidifferentiated retinal tissue rather than progenitors allows preservation of tissue structure and connectivity in retinal grafts, mandatory for vision restoration. Using human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we derived retinal tissue growing in adherent conditions consisting of conjoined neural retina and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and evaluated cell fate determination and maturation in this tissue. We found that deriving such tissue in adherent conditions robustly induces all eye field genes (RX, PAX6, LHX2, SIX3, SIX6) and produces four layers of pure populations of retinal cells: RPE (expressing NHERF1, EZRIN, RPE65, DCT, TYR, TYRP, MITF, PMEL), early photoreceptors (PRs) (coexpressing CRX and RCVRN), inner nuclear layer neurons (expressing CALB2), and retinal ganglion cells [RGCs, expressing BRN3B and Neurofilament (NF) 200]. Furthermore, we found that retinal progenitors divide at the apical side of the hESC-derived retinal tissue (next to the RPE layer) and then migrate toward the basal side, similar to that found during embryonic retinogenesis. We detected synaptogenesis in hESC-derived retinal tissue, and found neurons containing many synaptophysin-positive boutons within the RGC and PR layers. We also observed long NF200-positive axons projected by RGCs toward the apical side. Whole-cell recordings demonstrated that putative amacrine and/or ganglion cells exhibited electrophysiological responses reminiscent of those in normal retinal neurons. These responses included voltage-gated Na+ and K+ currents, depolarization-induced spiking, and responses to neurotransmitter receptor agonists. Differentiation in adherent conditions allows generation of long and flexible pieces of 3D retinal tissue suitable for isolating transplantable slices of tissue for

  5. RPE65: Role in the visual cycle, human retinal disease, and gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xue; Conley, Shannon M.; Naash, Muna I.

    2010-01-01

    RPE65 is an isomerohydrolase expressed in retinal pigment epithelium. It is critical for the regeneration of the visual pigment necessary for both rod and cone-mediated vision. Mutations in human RPE65 cause Leber’s congenital amaurosis and other forms of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa which are associated with early-onset blindness. Several RPE65 animal models including two different mouse models and a naturally occurring canine model have been thoroughly characterized to determine the mechanisms that underlie RPE65 associated retinal dystrophies. More recently, substantial effort has gone into designing gene therapies for these diseases. Based on several encouraging reports from animal models, at least three clinical trials are currently underway for the treatment of LCA using modified AAV vectors carrying the RPE65 cDNA and have reported positive preliminary results. PMID:19373675

  6. RPE65: role in the visual cycle, human retinal disease, and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xue; Conley, Shannon M; Naash, Muna I

    2009-06-01

    RPE65 is an isomerohydrolase expressed in retinal pigment epithelium. It is critical for the regeneration of the visual pigment necessary for both rod and cone-mediated vision. Mutations in human RPE65 cause Leber's congenital amaurosis and other forms of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa which are associated with early-onset blindness. Several RPE65 animal models including two different mouse models and a naturally occurring canine model have been thoroughly characterized to determine the mechanisms that underlie RPE65 associated retinal dystrophies. More recently, substantial effort has gone into designing gene therapies for these diseases. Based on several encouraging reports from animal models, at least three clinical trials are currently underway for the treatment of LCA using modified AAV vectors carrying the RPE65 cDNA and have reported positive preliminary results.

  7. Neuroprotectin D1/protectin D1 stereoselective and specific binding with human retinal pigment epithelial cells and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Marcheselli, Victor L; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Arita, Makoto; Hong, Song; Antony, Rajee; Sheets, Kristopher; Winkler, Jeremy W; Petasis, Nicos A; Serhan, Charles N; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2010-01-01

    Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, derived from the neuroectoderm, biosynthesize the novel lipid mediator neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1) from docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in response to oxidative stress or to neurotrophins, and in turn, elicits cytoprotection. Here, we report the identification of a 16,17-epoxide-containing intermediate in the biosynthesis of NPD1 in ARPE-19 cells from 17S-hydro-(peroxy)-docosahexaenoic acid. We prepared and isolated tritium-labeled NPD1 ([(3)H]-NPD1) and demonstrate specific and high-affinity stereoselective binding to ARPE-19 cells (K(d)=31.3+/-13.1 pmol/mg of cell protein). The stereospecific NPD1 interactions with these cells in turn gave potent protection against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis, and other structurally related compounds were weak competitors of NPD1 specific binding. This [(3)H]-NPD1/PD1 also displayed specific and selective high affinity binding with isolated human neutrophils (K(d) approximately 25 nM). Neither resolvin E1 nor lipoxin A(4) competed for [(3)H]-NPD1/PD1 specific binding with human neutrophils. Together, these results provide evidence for stereoselective specific binding of NPD1/PD1 with retinal pigment epithelial cells as well as human neutrophils. Moreover, they suggest specific receptors for this novel mediator in both the immune and visual systems. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Retinal images in the human eye with implanted intraocular lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zając, Marek; Siedlecki, Damian; Nowak, Jerzy

    2007-04-01

    A typical proceeding in cataract is based on the removal of opaque crystalline lens and inserting in its place the artificial intraocular lens (IOL). The quality of retinal image after such procedure depends, among others, on the parameters of the IOL, so the design of the implanted lens is of great importance. An appropriate choice of the IOL material, especially in relation to its biocompatibility, is often considered. However the parameter, which is often omitted during the IOL design is its chromatic aberration. In particular lack of its adequacy to the chromatic aberration of a crystalline lens may cause problems. In order to fit better chromatic aberration of the eye with implanted IOL to that of the healthy eye we propose a hybrid - refractive-diffractive IOL. It can be designed in such way that the total longitudinal chromatic aberration of an eye with implanted IOL equals the total longitudinal chromatic aberration of a healthy eye. In this study we compare the retinal image quality calculated numerically on the basis of the well known Liou-Brennan eye model with typical IOL implanted with that obtained if the IOL is done as hybrid (refractive-diffractive) design.

  9. Human conjunctival microvasculature assessed with a retinal function imager (RFI)

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Ye, Yufeng; DeBuc, Delia Cabrera; Lam, Byron L; Rundek, Tatjana; Tao, Aizhu; Shao, Yilei; Wang, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    The conjunctival and cerebral vasculatures share similar embryological origins, with similar structural and physiological characteristics. Tracking the conjunctival microvasculature may provide useful information for predicting the onset, progression and prognosis of both systemic and central nervous system (CNS) vascular diseases. The bulbar conjunctival vasculature was imaged using a retinal function imager (RFI, Optical Imaging Ltd, Rehovot, Israel). Hemoglobin in red blood cells was used as an intrinsic motion-contrast agent in the generation of detailed noninvasive capillary-perfusion maps (nCPMs) and the calculation of the blood flow velocity. Five healthy subjects were imaged under normal conditions and again under the stress condition of wearing a contact lens. The retina was also imaged in one eye of one subject for comparison. The nCPMs showed the conjunctival microvasculature in exquisite detail, which appeared as clear as the retinal nCPMs. The blood flow velocities in the temporal conjunctival microvasculature were 0.86 ± 0.08 (mean ± SD, mm/s) for the bare eye and 0.99 ± 0.11 mm/s with contact lens wear. It is feasible to use RFI for imaging the conjunctival vasculature. PMID:23084966

  10. Human conjunctival microvasculature assessed with a retinal function imager (RFI).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Ye, Yufeng; DeBuc, Delia Cabrera; Lam, Byron L; Rundek, Tatjana; Tao, Aizhu; Shao, Yilei; Wang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    The conjunctival and cerebral vasculatures share similar embryological origins, with similar structural and physiological characteristics. Tracking the conjunctival microvasculature may provide useful information for predicting the onset, progression and prognosis of both systemic and central nervous system (CNS) vascular diseases. The bulbar conjunctival vasculature was imaged using a retinal function imager (RFI, Optical Imaging Ltd, Rehovot, Israel). Hemoglobin in red blood cells was used as an intrinsic motion-contrast agent in the generation of detailed noninvasive capillary-perfusion maps (nCPMs) and the calculation of the blood flow velocity. Five healthy subjects were imaged under normal conditions and again under the stress condition of wearing a contact lens. The retina was also imaged in one eye of one subject for comparison. The nCPMs showed the conjunctival microvasculature in exquisite detail, which appeared as clear as the retinal nCPMs. The blood flow velocities in the temporal conjunctival microvasculature were 0.86±0.08 (mean±SD, mm/s) for the bare eye and 0.99±0.11 mm/s with contact lens wear. It is feasible to use RFI for imaging the conjunctival vasculature. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Detection of Anatomic Structures in Human Retinal Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Chaum, Edward; Muthusamy Govindasamy, Vijaya Priya; Karnowski, Thomas Paul

    2007-01-01

    The widespread availability of electronic imaging devices throughout the medical community is leading to a growing body of research on image processing and analysis to diagnose retinal disease such as diabetic retinopathy (DR). Productive computer-based screening of large, at-risk populations at low cost requires robust, automated image analysis. In this paper we present results for the automatic detection of the optic nerve and localization of the macula using digital red-free fundus photography. Our method relies on the accurate segmentation of the vasculature of the retina followed by the determination of spatial features describing the density,average thickness, and average orientation of the vasculature in relation to the position of the optic nerve. Localization of the macula follows using knowledge of the optic nerve location to detect the horizontal raphe of the retina using a geometric model of the vasculature. We report 90.4% detection performance for the optic nerve and 92.5% localization performance for the macula for red-free fundus images representing a population of 345 images corresponding to 269 patients with 18 different pathologies associated with DR and other common retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration.

  12. Inner Retinal Oxygen Extraction Fraction in Response to Light Flicker Stimulation in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Felder, Anthony E.; Wanek, Justin; Blair, Norman P.; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Light flicker has been shown to stimulate retinal neural activity, increase blood flow, and alter inner retinal oxygen metabolism (MO2) and delivery (DO2). The purpose of the study was to determine the change in MO2 relative to DO2 due to light flicker stimulation in humans, as assessed by the inner retinal oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). Methods An optical imaging system, based on a modified slit lamp biomicroscope, was developed for simultaneous measurements of retinal vascular diameter (D) and oxygen saturation (SO2). Retinal images were acquired in 20 healthy subjects before and during light flicker stimulation. Arterial and venous D (DA and DV) and SO2 (SO2A and SO2V) were quantified within a circumpapillary region. Oxygen extraction fraction was defined as the ratio of MO2 to DO2 and was calculated as (SO2A − SO2V)/SO2A. Reproducibility of measurements was assessed. Results Coefficients of variation and intraclass correlation coefficients of repeated measurements were <5% and ≥0.83, respectively. During light flicker stimulation, DA, DV , and SO2V significantly increased (P ≤ 0.004). Oxygen extraction fraction was 0.37 ± 0.08 before light flicker and significantly decreased to 0.31 ± 0.07 during light flicker (P = 0.001). Conclusions Oxygen extraction fraction before and during light flicker stimulation is reported in human subjects for the first time. Oxygen extraction fraction decreased during light flicker stimulation, indicating the change in DO2 exceeded that of MO2. This technology is potentially useful for the detection of changes in OEF response to light flicker in physiological and pathological retinal conditions. PMID:26469748

  13. Inner Retinal Oxygen Extraction Fraction in Response to Light Flicker Stimulation in Humans.

    PubMed

    Felder, Anthony E; Wanek, Justin; Blair, Norman P; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2015-10-01

    Light flicker has been shown to stimulate retinal neural activity, increase blood flow, and alter inner retinal oxygen metabolism (MO2) and delivery (DO2). The purpose of the study was to determine the change in MO2 relative to DO2 due to light flicker stimulation in humans, as assessed by the inner retinal oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). An optical imaging system, based on a modified slit lamp biomicroscope, was developed for simultaneous measurements of retinal vascular diameter (D) and oxygen saturation (SO2). Retinal images were acquired in 20 healthy subjects before and during light flicker stimulation. Arterial and venous D (DA and DV) and SO2 (SO2A and SO2V) were quantified within a circumpapillary region. Oxygen extraction fraction was defined as the ratio of MO2 to DO2 and was calculated as (SO2A - SO2V)/SO2A. Reproducibility of measurements was assessed. Coefficients of variation and intraclass correlation coefficients of repeated measurements were <5% and ≥0.83, respectively. During light flicker stimulation, DA, DV , and SO2V significantly increased (P ≤ 0.004). Oxygen extraction fraction was 0.37 ± 0.08 before light flicker and significantly decreased to 0.31 ± 0.07 during light flicker (P = 0.001). Oxygen extraction fraction before and during light flicker stimulation is reported in human subjects for the first time. Oxygen extraction fraction decreased during light flicker stimulation, indicating the change in DO2 exceeded that of MO2. This technology is potentially useful for the detection of changes in OEF response to light flicker in physiological and pathological retinal conditions.

  14. Escin activates AKT-Nrf2 signaling to protect retinal pigment epithelium cells from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaijun; Jiang, Yiqian; Wang, Wei; Ma, Jian; Chen, Min

    2015-12-25

    Here we explored the anti-oxidative and cytoprotective potentials of escin, a natural triterpene-saponin, against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. We showed that escin remarkably attenuated H2O2-induced death and apoptosis of established (ARPE-19) and primary murine RPE cells. Meanwhile, ROS production and lipid peroxidation by H2O2 were remarkably inhibited by escin. Escin treatment in RPE cells resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by transcription of anti-oxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes, including HO-1, NQO-1 and SRXN-1. Knockdown of Nrf2 through targeted shRNAs/siRNAs alleviated escin-mediated ARE gene transcription, and almost abolished escin-mediated anti-oxidant activity and RPE cytoprotection against H2O2. Reversely, escin was more potent against H2O2 damages in Nrf2-over-expressed ARPE-19 cells. Further studies showed that escin-induced Nrf2 activation in RPE cells required AKT signaling. AKT inhibitors (LY294002 and perifosine) blocked escin-induced AKT activation, and dramatically inhibited Nrf2 phosphorylation, its cytosol accumulation and nuclear translocation in RPE cells. Escin-induced RPE cytoprotection against H2O2 was also alleviated by the AKT inhibitors. Together, these results demonstrate that escin protects RPE cells from oxidative stress possibly through activating AKT-Nrf2 signaling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Serum Response Factor Protects Retinal Ganglion Cells Against High-Glucose Damage.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; Wang, Liang; Zhao, Junhong; Zhang, Hongbing; Tian, Ying; Liang, Houcheng; Ma, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    Serum response factor (SRF), which encodes the MADS-box family of related proteins, is a common transcription factor related to the expression of genes associated with cell survival. However, SRF's role in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after high-glucose injury remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the protective role of SRF after high-glucose injury and its underlying mechanism. The in vitro RGC model subjected to high glucose was established by employing a 50 mmol/L glucose culture environment. As detected by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot, SRF was significantly upregulated in RGCs treated with high glucose. Overexpression of SRF significantly promoted survival among RGCs exposed to high glucose and inhibited RGC apoptosis. Knockdown of SRF exerted an inverse effect. Moreover, SRF upregulation enhanced expression of an antioxidant protein, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2), via control of the Fos-related antigen 1 (Fra-1). SRF upregulation also affected RGC survival after high-glucose treatment. Our findings showed that overexpression of SRF promoted survival of RGCs after high-glucose injury by regulating Fra-1 and Nrf2.

  16. Edible wild vegetable, Gymnaster koraiensis protects retinal ganglion cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-A; Kang, Kui Dong; Lee, Eun Ha; Nho, Chu Won; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2011-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether Gymnaster koraiensis is effective at blunting the negative influence of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on the retinas of rats and on oxidative stress induced cell death in transformed retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5). The ethyl acetate fraction of G. koraiensis (EAGK) and the isolated compound, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (3,5-DCQA), were shown to significantly attenuate the negative effect of H(2)O(2) on the RGC-5 cells tested by various procedures. The inclusion of EAGK or 3,5-DCQA in the culture reduced the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and replenished the reduced glutathione levels caused by various radical species such as H(2)O(2,) O(2)()(-) or ()OH. Moreover, EAGK or 3,5-DCQA inhibited lipid peroxidation caused by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in rat brain homogenates. From in vivo experiments, the presence of NMDA in the retina affected the thickness of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) in positive ganglion cells. EAGK or 3,5-DCQA protected the thinning of the IPL and increased TUNEL positive cells in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). Our results clearly demonstrate the neuroprotective effect of EAGK both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, 3,5-DCQA is suggested to be the active compound of EAGK. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Resveratrol reduces oxidation and proliferation of human retinal pigment epithelial cells via extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    King, Robert E; Kent, Kyle D; Bomser, Joshua A

    2005-01-15

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that moderate wine consumption and antioxidant-rich diets may protect against age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss among the elderly. Development of AMD and other retinal diseases, such as proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), is associated with oxidative stress in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a cell layer responsible for maintaining the health of the retina by providing structural and nutritional support. We hypothesize that resveratrol, a red wine polyphenol, may be responsible, in part, for the health benefits of moderate red wine consumption on retinal disease. To test this hypothesis, the antioxidant and antiproliferative effects of resveratrol were examined in a human RPE cell line (designated ARPE-19). Cell proliferation was determined using the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assay, intracellular oxidation was assessed by dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, and activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade was measured by immunoblotting. Treatment with 50 and 100 micromol/L resveratrol significantly reduced proliferation of RPE cells by 10% and 25%, respectively (P<0.05). This reduction in proliferation was not associated with resveratrol-induced cytotoxicity. Resveratrol (100 micromol/L) inhibited basal and H2O2-induced intracellular oxidation and protected RPE cells from H2O2-induced cell death. The observed reduction in cell proliferation was associated with inhibition of mitogen activated protein kinase/ERK (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2) activities at concentrations of resveratrol as low as 5 micromol/L. These results suggest that resveratrol can reduce oxidative stress and hyperproliferation of the RPE.

  18. Protective effects of PF-4708671 against N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-induced retinal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ikumi; Aoki, Yuto; Ushikubo, Hiroko; Asano, Daiki; Mori, Asami; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2016-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), protects against N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA)-induced retinal damage in rats. Rapamycin inhibits mTOR activity, thereby preventing the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, which is a downstream target of S6 kinase. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether PF-4708671, an inhibitor of S6 kinase, protects against NMDA-induced retinal injury. Intravitreal injection of NMDA (200 nmol/eye) caused cell loss in the ganglion cell layer and neuroinflammatory responses, such as an increase in the number of CD45-positive leukocytes and Iba1-positive microglia. Surprisingly, simultaneous injection of PF-4708671 (50 nmol/eye) with NMDA significantly attenuated these responses without affecting phosphorylated S6 levels. These results suggest that PF-4708671 and rapamycin likely protect against NMDA-induced retinal damage via distinct pathways. The neuroprotective effect of PF-4708671 is unlikely to be associated with inhibition of the S6 kinase, even though PF-4708671 is reported to be a S6 kinase inhibitor.

  19. Research on the liquid crystal adaptive optics system for human retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Tong, Shoufeng; Song, Yansong; Zhao, Xin

    2013-12-01

    The blood vessels only in Human eye retinal can be observed directly. Many diseases that are not obvious in their early symptom can be diagnosed through observing the changes of distal micro blood vessel. In order to obtain the high resolution human retinal images,an adaptive optical system for correcting the aberration of the human eye was designed by using the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and the Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator(LCLSM) .For a subject eye with 8m-1 (8D)myopia, the wavefront error is reduced to 0.084 λ PV and 0.12 λRMS after adaptive optics(AO) correction ,which has reached diffraction limit.The results show that the LCLSM based AO system has the ability of correcting the aberration of the human eye efficiently,and making the blurred photoreceptor cell to clearly image on a CCD camera.

  20. Erythropoietin (EPO) protects against high glucose-induced apoptosis in retinal ganglional cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunxiao; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yanping; Li, Ping; Cao, Zhihong; Cao, Yu

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect and mechanism of EPO on the apoptosis induced by high levels of glucose in retinal ganglial cells (RGCs). High glucose-induced apoptosis model was established in RGCs isolated from SD rats (1-3 days old) and identified with Thy1.1 mAb and MAP-2 pAb. The apoptosis was determined by Hochest assay. The levels of ROS were quantitated by staining the cells with dichloro-dihydro-fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) and measure by flow cytometry. The SOD, GSH-Px, CAT activities, and levels of T-AOC and MDA were determined by ELISA. Change in mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) was also assessed by flow cytometry, and expressions of Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3, caspase-9, and cytochrome C were assessed by western blotting. The RGCs treated with high glucose levels exhibited significantly increased apoptotic rate and concentrations of ROS and MDA. Pretreatment of the cells with EPO caused a significant blockade of the high glucose-induced increase in ROS and MDA levels and apoptotic rate. EPO also increased the activities of SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT, and recovered the levels of T-AOC levels. As a consequence, the mitochondrial membrane potential was improved and Cyt c release into the cytoplasm was prevented which led to significantly suppressed up-regulation of Bax reducing the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. The expressions of caspase-3 and caspase-9 induced by high glucose exposure were also ameliorated in the RGCs treated with EPO. The protective effect of EPO against apoptosis was mediated through its antioxidant action. Thus, it blocked the generation of pro-apoptotic proteins and apoptotic degeneration of the RGCs by preventing the mitochondrial damage.

  1. Retinal ganglion cell protection with geranylgeranylacetone, a heat shock protein inducer, in a rat glaucoma model.

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, Joseph; Ishii, Yoko; Kwong, Jacky M K

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the effects of geranylgeranylacetone (GCA) on the expression of inducible (HSP72) and constitutive (HSC70) heat shock proteins (HSPs) on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a rat model of glaucoma. METHODS: Adult Wistar rats were given intraperitoneal injections of GGA, 200 mg/kg daily. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining for HSP72 and HSC70 were performed after 1, 3, and 7 days of GGA administration. After 7 days of GGA pretreatment, intraocular pressure (IOP) was elevated unilaterally by repeated trabecular argon laser photocoagulation 5 days after intracameral injection of india ink. After the first laser photocoagulation, CGA was given twice a week. RGC survival was evaluated after 5 weeks of IOP elevation. Immunohistochemistry and TdT-mediated biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) were performed after 1 week of IOP elevation. Quercetin, an inhibitor of HSP expression, was also administered to a separate group. RESULTS: There was increased expression of HSP72 in RGCs at 3 and 7 days after GGA administration, but HSC70 was unchanged. After 5 weeks of IOP elevation, there was 27% +/- 6% loss of RGCs. The administration of GGA significantly reduced the loss of RGCs, lessened optic nerve damage, decreased the number of TUNEL-positive cells in the RGC layer, and increased HSP72. Quercetin administration abolished these protective effects. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that systemic administration of GGA protects RGCs from glaucomatous damage in a rat model and suggest a novel pathway for netroprotection for patients with glaucoma. PMID:14971562

  2. Molecular mechanisms of retinal ganglion cell degeneration in glaucoma and future prospects for cell body and axonal protection

    PubMed Central

    Munemasa, Yasunari; Kitaoka, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma, which affects more than 70 million people worldwide, is a heterogeneous group of disorders with a resultant common denominator; optic neuropathy, eventually leading to irreversible blindness. The clinical manifestations of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), the most common subtype of glaucoma, include excavation of the optic disc and progressive loss of visual field. Axonal degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and apoptotic death of their cell bodies are observed in glaucoma, in which the reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) is known to slow progression of the disease. A pattern of localized retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) defects in glaucoma patients indicates that axonal degeneration may precede RGC body death in this condition. The mechanisms of degeneration of neuronal cell bodies and their axons may differ. In this review, we addressed the molecular mechanisms of cell body death and axonal degeneration in glaucoma and proposed axonal protection in addition to cell body protection. The concept of axonal protection may become a new therapeutic strategy to prevent further axonal degeneration or revive dying axons in patients with preperimetric glaucoma. Further study will be needed to clarify whether the combination therapy of axonal protection and cell body protection will have greater protective effects in early or progressive glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON). PMID:23316132

  3. Activation of glucocorticoid receptors in Müller glia is protective to retinal neurons and suppresses microglial reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Gallina, Donika; Zelinka, Christopher Paul; Cebulla, Colleen; Fischer, Andy J.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive microglia and macrophages are prevalent in damaged retinas. Glucocorticoid signaling is known to suppress inflammation and the reactivity of microglia and macrophages. In the vertebrate retina, the glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) is known to be activated and localized to the nuclei of Müller glia (Gallina et al., 2014). Accordingly, we investigated how signaling through GCR influences the survival of neurons using the chick retina in vivo as a model system. We applied intraocular injections of GCR agonist or antagonist, assessed microglial reactivity, and the survival of retinal neurons following different damage paradigms. Microglial reactivity was increased in retinas from eyes that were injected with vehicle, and this reactivity was decreased by GCR-agonist dexamethasone (Dex) and increased by GCR-antagonist RU486. We found that activation of GCR suppresses the reactivity of microglia and inhibited the loss of retinal neurons resulting from excitotoxicity. We provide evidence that the protection-promoting effects of Dex were maintained when the microglia were selectively ablated. Similarly, intraocular injections of Dex protected ganglion cells from colchicine-treatment and protected photoreceptors from damage caused by retinal detachment. We conclude that activation of GCR promotes the survival of ganglion cells in colchicine-damaged retinas, promotes the survival of amacrine and bipolar cells in excitotoxin-damaged retinas, and promotes the survival of photoreceptors in detached retinas. We propose that suppression of microglial reactivity is secondary to activation of GCR in Müller glia, and this mode of signaling is an effective means to lessen the damage and vision loss resulting from different types of retinal damage. PMID:26272753

  4. Early light deprivation effects on human cone-driven retinal function.

    PubMed

    Esposito Veneruso, Paolo; Ziccardi, Lucia; Magli, Giulia; Parisi, Vincenzo; Falsini, Benedetto; Magli, Adriano

    2017-03-01

    To assess whether the early light deprivation induced by congenital cataract may influence the cone-driven retinal function in humans. Forty-one patients affected by congenital cataract (CC) who had undergone uncomplicated cataract extraction surgery and intraocular lens implant, and 14 healthy subjects (HS) were enrolled. All patients underwent complete ophthalmological and orthoptic evaluations and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) measurement; light-adapted full-field electroretinograms (ERG) and photopic negative responses (PhNR) were recorded to obtain a reliable measurement of the outer/inner retinal function and of the retinal ganglion cells' function respectively. Mean values of light-adapted ERG a- and b-wave and PhNR amplitude of CC eyes were significantly reduced and photopic ERG b-wave implicit time mean values were significantly delayed when compared to HS ones. When studying photopic ERG mean amplitudes at 5 ms, significant differences were found when comparing CC and control eyes. In CC eyes, statistically significant correlations were found between a- and b- wave amplitudes and PhNR amplitudes. No significant correlations were found between ERG parameters and BCVA, as well as between the age of CC patients at surgery and the time elapsed from lens extraction. No significant differences were found when functional parameters of bilateral and unilateral congenital cataract (uCC) eyes were compared, however uCC eyes showed significant differences when compared with contralateral healthy eyes. We found a significant impairment of cone-driven retinal responses in patients with a history of congenital cataract. These changes might result from the long-lasting effects of early light deprivation on the cone retinal pathways. Our findings support the relevance of retinal involvement in deficits induced by early light deprivation. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 12-Hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 120 ps Pulsed Laser Light

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    years or younger, either sex, with no mitigating ocular or retinal pathology such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, retinitis pigmentosa , etc. Donor: The...USAFA TR 2004-01 Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 12-hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 120 ps Pulsed...TR 2004-01 This article, "Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 12-hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 120 ps

  6. In vitro ultraviolet–induced damage in human corneal, lens, and retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Hyun-Yi; Sivak, Jacob G.; Jones, Lyndon W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to develop suitable in vitro methods to detect ocular epithelial cell damage when exposed to UV radiation, in an effort to evaluate UV-absorbing ophthalmic biomaterials. Methods Human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC), lens epithelial cells (HLEC), and retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19) were cultured and Ultraviolet A/Ultraviolet B (UVA/UVB) blocking filters and UVB-only blocking filters were placed between the cells and a UV light source. Cells were irradiated with UV radiations at various energy levels with and without filter protections. Cell viability after exposure was determined using the metabolic dye alamarBlue and by evaluating for changes in the nuclei, mitochondria, membrane permeability, and cell membranes of the cells using the fluorescent dyes Hoechst 33342, rhodamine 123, calcein AM, ethidium homodimer-1, and annexin V. High-resolution images of the cells were taken with a Zeiss 510 confocal laser scanning microscope. Results The alamarBlue assay results of UV-exposed cells without filters showed energy level-dependent decreases in cellular viability. However, UV treated cells with 400 nm LP filter protection showed the equivalent viability to untreated control cells at all energy levels. Also, UV irradiated cells with 320 nm LP filter showed lower cell viability than the unexposed control cells, yet higher viability than UV-exposed cells without filters in an energy level-dependent manner. The confocal microscopy results also showed that UV radiation can cause significant dose-dependent degradations of nuclei and mitochondria in ocular cells. The annexin V staining also showed an increased number of apoptotic cells after UV irradiation. Conclusions The findings suggest that UV-induced HCEC, HLEC, and ARPE-19 cell damage can be evaluated by bioassays that measure changes in the cell nuclei, mitochondria, cell membranes, and cell metabolism, and these assay methods provide a valuable in vitro model for evaluating the

  7. Generation of highly enriched populations of optic vesicle-like retinal cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ohlemacher, Sarah K; Iglesias, Clara L; Sridhar, Akshayalakshmi; Gamm, David M; Meyer, Jason S

    2015-02-02

    The protocol outlined below is used to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into retinal cell types through a process that faithfully recapitulates the stepwise progression observed in vivo. From pluripotency, cells are differentiated to a primitive anterior neural fate, followed by progression into two distinct populations of retinal progenitors and forebrain progenitors, each of which can be manually separated and purified. The hPSC-derived retinal progenitors are found to self-organize into three-dimensional optic vesicle-like structures, with each aggregate possessing the ability to differentiate into all major retinal cell types. The ability to faithfully recapitulate the stepwise in vivo development in a three-dimensional cell culture system allows for the study of mechanisms underlying human retinogenesis. Furthermore, this methodology allows for the study of retinal dysfunction and disease modeling using patient-derived cells, as well as high-throughput pharmacological screening and eventually patient-specific therapies.

  8. The heat-shock response co-inducer arimoclomol protects against retinal degeneration in rhodopsin retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Parfitt, D A; Aguila, M; McCulley, C H; Bevilacqua, D; Mendes, H F; Athanasiou, D; Novoselov, S S; Kanuga, N; Munro, P M; Coffey, P J; Kalmar, B; Greensmith, L; Cheetham, M E

    2014-05-22

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited diseases that cause blindness due to the progressive death of rod and cone photoreceptors in the retina. There are currently no effective treatments for RP. Inherited mutations in rhodopsin, the light-sensing protein of rod photoreceptor cells, are the most common cause of autosomal-dominant RP. The majority of mutations in rhodopsin, including the common P23H substitution, lead to protein misfolding, which is a feature in many neurodegenerative disorders. Previous studies have shown that upregulating molecular chaperone expression can delay disease progression in models of neurodegeneration. Here, we have explored the potential of the heat-shock protein co-inducer arimoclomol to ameliorate rhodopsin RP. In a cell model of P23H rod opsin RP, arimoclomol reduced P23H rod opsin aggregation and improved viability of mutant rhodopsin-expressing cells. In P23H rhodopsin transgenic rat models, pharmacological potentiation of the stress response with arimoclomol improved electroretinogram responses and prolonged photoreceptor survival, as assessed by measuring outer nuclear layer thickness in the retina. Furthermore, treated animal retinae showed improved photoreceptor outer segment structure and reduced rhodopsin aggregation compared with vehicle-treated controls. The heat-shock response (HSR) was activated in P23H retinae, and this was enhanced with arimoclomol treatment. Furthermore, the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is induced in P23H transgenic rats, was also enhanced in the retinae of arimoclomol-treated animals, suggesting that arimoclomol can potentiate the UPR as well as the HSR. These data suggest that pharmacological enhancement of cellular stress responses may be a potential treatment for rhodopsin RP and that arimoclomol could benefit diseases where ER stress is a factor.

  9. Norbixin Protects Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Cells and Photoreceptors against A2E-Mediated Phototoxicity In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Elodie; Brazhnikova, Elena; Lesage, Laëtitia; Balducci, Christine; Guibout, Louis; Feraille, Laurence; Elena, Pierre-Paul; Sahel, José-Alain; Veillet, Stanislas; Lafont, René

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E, a toxic by-product of the visual pigment cycle) in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a major cause of visual impairment in the elderly. Photooxidation of A2E results in retinal pigment epithelium degeneration followed by that of associated photoreceptors. Present treatments rely on nutrient supplementation with antioxidants. 9’-cis-Norbixin (a natural diapocarotenoid, 97% purity) was prepared from Bixa orellana seeds. It was first evaluated in primary cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelium cells challenged with A2E and illuminated with blue light, and it provided an improved photo-protection as compared with lutein or zeaxanthin. In Abca4-/- Rdh8-/- mice (a model of dry AMD), intravitreally-injected norbixin maintained the electroretinogram and protected photoreceptors against light damage. In a standard rat blue-light model of photodamage, norbixin was at least equally as active as phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone, a free radical spin-trap. Chronic experiments performed with Abca4-/- Rdh8-/- mice treated orally for 3 months with norbixin showed a reduced A2E accumulation in the retina. Norbixin appears promising for developing an oral treatment of macular degeneration. A drug candidate (BIO201) with 9’-cis-norbixin as the active principle ingredient is under development, and its potential will be assessed in a forthcoming clinical trial. PMID:27992460

  10. Norbixin Protects Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Cells and Photoreceptors against A2E-Mediated Phototoxicity In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Valérie; Monteiro, Elodie; Brazhnikova, Elena; Lesage, Laëtitia; Balducci, Christine; Guibout, Louis; Feraille, Laurence; Elena, Pierre-Paul; Sahel, José-Alain; Veillet, Stanislas; Lafont, René

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E, a toxic by-product of the visual pigment cycle) in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a major cause of visual impairment in the elderly. Photooxidation of A2E results in retinal pigment epithelium degeneration followed by that of associated photoreceptors. Present treatments rely on nutrient supplementation with antioxidants. 9'-cis-Norbixin (a natural diapocarotenoid, 97% purity) was prepared from Bixa orellana seeds. It was first evaluated in primary cultures of porcine retinal pigment epithelium cells challenged with A2E and illuminated with blue light, and it provided an improved photo-protection as compared with lutein or zeaxanthin. In Abca4-/- Rdh8-/- mice (a model of dry AMD), intravitreally-injected norbixin maintained the electroretinogram and protected photoreceptors against light damage. In a standard rat blue-light model of photodamage, norbixin was at least equally as active as phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone, a free radical spin-trap. Chronic experiments performed with Abca4-/- Rdh8-/- mice treated orally for 3 months with norbixin showed a reduced A2E accumulation in the retina. Norbixin appears promising for developing an oral treatment of macular degeneration. A drug candidate (BIO201) with 9'-cis-norbixin as the active principle ingredient is under development, and its potential will be assessed in a forthcoming clinical trial.

  11. CO2-induced ion and fluid transport in human retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Adijanto, Jeffrey; Banzon, Tina; Jalickee, Stephen; Wang, Nam S; Miller, Sheldon S

    2009-06-01

    In the intact eye, the transition from light to dark alters pH, [Ca2+], and [K] in the subretinal space (SRS) separating the photoreceptor outer segments and the apical membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In addition to these changes, oxygen consumption in the retina increases with a concomitant release of CO2 and H2O into the SRS. The RPE maintains SRS pH and volume homeostasis by transporting these metabolic byproducts to the choroidal blood supply. In vitro, we mimicked the transition from light to dark by increasing apical bath CO2 from 5 to 13%; this maneuver decreased cell pH from 7.37 +/- 0.05 to 7.14 +/- 0.06 (n = 13). Our analysis of native and cultured fetal human RPE shows that the apical membrane is significantly more permeable (approximately 10-fold; n = 7) to CO2 than the basolateral membrane, perhaps due to its larger exposed surface area. The limited CO2 diffusion at the basolateral membrane promotes carbonic anhydrase-mediated HCO3 transport by a basolateral membrane Na/nHCO3 cotransporter. The activity of this transporter was increased by elevating apical bath CO2 and was reduced by dorzolamide. Increasing apical bath CO2 also increased intracellular Na from 15.7 +/- 3.3 to 24.0 +/- 5.3 mM (n = 6; P < 0.05) by increasing apical membrane Na uptake. The CO2-induced acidification also inhibited the basolateral membrane Cl/HCO3 exchanger and increased net steady-state fluid absorption from 2.8 +/- 1.6 to 6.7 +/- 2.3 microl x cm(-2) x hr(-1) (n = 5; P < 0.05). The present experiments show how the RPE can accommodate the increased retinal production of CO2 and H(2)O in the dark, thus preventing acidosis in the SRS. This homeostatic process would preserve the close anatomical relationship between photoreceptor outer segments and RPE in the dark and light, thus protecting the health of the photoreceptors.

  12. Coenzyme Q10 instilled as eye drops on the cornea reaches the retina and protects retinal layers from apoptosis in a mouse model of kainate-induced retinal damage.

    PubMed

    Lulli, Matteo; Witort, Ewa; Papucci, Laura; Torre, Eugenio; Schipani, Christian; Bergamini, Christian; Dal Monte, Massimo; Capaccioli, Sergio

    2012-12-17

    To evaluate if coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) can protect retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from apoptosis and, when instilled as eye drops on the cornea, if it can reach the retina and exert its antiapoptotic activity in this area in a mouse model of kainate (KA)-induced retinal damage. Rat primary or cultured RGCs were subjected to glutamate (50 μM) or chemical hypoxia (Antimycin A, 200 μM) or serum withdrawal (FBS, 0.5%) in the presence or absence of CoQ10 (10 μM). Cell viability was evaluated by light microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses. Apoptosis was evaluated by caspase 3/7 activity and mitochondrion depolarization tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester analysis. CoQ10 transfer to the retina following its instillation as eye drops on the cornea was quantified by HPLC. Retinal protection by CoQ10 (10 μM) eye drops instilled on the cornea was then evaluated in a mouse model of KA-induced excitotoxic retinal cell apoptosis by cleaved caspase 3 immunohistofluorescence, caspase 3/7 activity assays, and quantification of inhibition of RGC loss. CoQ10 significantly increased viable cells by preventing RGC apoptosis. Furthermore, when topically applied as eye drops to the cornea, it reached the retina, thus substantially increasing local CoQ10 concentration and protecting retinal layers from apoptosis. The ability of CoQ10 eye drops to protect retinal cells from apoptosis in the mouse model of KA-induced retinal damage suggests that topical CoQ10 may be evaluated in designing therapies for treating apoptosis-driven retinopathies.

  13. Visible-Light Resin Curing Units: Retinal Hazards and Protective Lenses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-01

    identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP , Retinal hazards; Blue-light hazard; Thermal hazard; Protec- 06 05 \\tive lenses; Dental curing units... Dental Clinics. Transmission Profile Measurements The spectral transmission profiles from 380 nm to 900 nm were measured for each lens using a Cary Model...recent dental literature and advertisements. The photochemical (blue light) hazard was the first mentioned as a separate and unique mechanism of retinal

  14. Heme Oxygenase-1 Protects Retinal Endothelial Cells against High Glucose- and Oxidative/Nitrosative Stress-Induced Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Castilho, Áurea F.; Aveleira, Célia A.; Leal, Ermelindo C.; Simões, Núria F.; Fernandes, Carolina R.; Meirinhos, Rita I.; Baptista, Filipa I.; Ambrósio, António F.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of visual loss and blindness, characterized by microvascular dysfunction. Hyperglycemia is considered the major pathogenic factor for the development of diabetic retinopathy and is associated with increased oxidative/nitrosative stress in the retina. Since heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an enzyme with antioxidant and protective properties, we investigated the potential protective role of HO-1 in retinal endothelial cells exposed to high glucose and oxidative/nitrosative stress conditions. Retinal endothelial cells were exposed to elevated glucose, nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed by MTT assay, Hoechst staining, TUNEL assay and Annexin V labeling. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected by the oxidation of 2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. The content of HO-1 was assessed by immunobloting and immunofluorescence. HO activity was determined by bilirubin production. Long-term exposure (7 days) of retinal endothelial cells to elevated glucose decreased cell viability and had no effect on HO-1 content. However, a short-time exposure (24 h) to elevated glucose did not alter cell viability, but increased both the levels of intracellular ROS and HO-1 content. Moreover, the inhibition of HO with SnPPIX unmasked the toxic effect of high glucose and revealed the protection conferred by HO-1. Oxidative/nitrosative stress conditions increased cell death and HO-1 protein levels. These effects of elevated glucose and HO inhibition on cell death were confirmed in primary endothelial cells (HUVECs). When cells were exposed to oxidative/nitrosative stress conditions there was also an increase in retinal endothelial cell death and HO-1 content. The inhibition of HO enhanced ROS production and the toxic effect induced by exposure to H2O2 and NOC-18 (NO donor). Overexpression of HO-1 prevented the toxic effect induced by H2O2 and NOC-18. In conclusion, HO-1

  15. Cortical reorganization after long-term adaptation to retinal lesions in humans.

    PubMed

    Chung, Susana T L

    2013-11-13

    Single-unit recordings demonstrated that the adult mammalian visual cortex is capable of reorganizing after induced retinal lesions. In humans, whether the adult cortex is capable of reorganizing has only been studied using functional magnetic resonance imaging, with equivocal results. Here, we exploited the phenomenon of visual crowding, a major limitation on object recognition, to show that, in humans with long-standing retinal (macular) lesions that afflict the fovea and thus use their peripheral vision exclusively, the signature properties of crowding are distinctly different from those of the normal periphery. Crowding refers to the inability to recognize objects when the object spacing is smaller than the critical spacing. Critical spacing depends only on the retinal location of the object, scales linearly with its distance from the fovea, and is approximately two times larger in the radial than the tangential direction with respect to the fovea, thus demonstrating the signature radial-tangential anisotropy of the crowding zone. Using retinal imaging combined with behavioral measurements, we mapped out the crowding zone at the precise peripheral retinal locations adopted by individuals with macular lesions as the new visual reference loci. At these loci, the critical spacings are substantially smaller along the radial direction than expected based on the normal periphery, resulting in a lower scaling of critical spacing with the eccentricity of the peripheral locus and a loss in the signature radial-tangential anisotropy of the crowding zone. These results imply a fundamental difference in the substrate of cortical processing in object recognition following long-term adaptation to macular lesions.

  16. RPGR-Associated Retinal Degeneration in Human X-Linked RP and a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei Chieh; Wright, Alan F.; Roman, Alejandro J.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Manson, Forbes D.; Gewaily, Dina Y.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Sadigh, Sam; Limberis, Maria P.; Bell, Peter; Wilson, James M.; Swaroop, Anand; Jacobson, Samuel G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. We investigated the retinal disease due to mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene in human patients and in an Rpgr conditional knockout (cko) mouse model. Methods. XLRP patients with RPGR-ORF15 mutations (n = 35, ages at first visit 5–72 years) had clinical examinations, and rod and cone perimetry. Rpgr-cko mice, in which the proximal promoter and first exon were deleted ubiquitously, were back-crossed onto a BALB/c background, and studied with optical coherence tomography and electroretinography (ERG). Retinal histopathology was performed on a subset. Results. Different patterns of rod and cone dysfunction were present in patients. Frequently, there were midperipheral losses with residual rod and cone function in central and peripheral retina. Longitudinal data indicated that central rod loss preceded peripheral rod losses. Central cone-only vision with no peripheral function was a late stage. Less commonly, patients had central rod and cone dysfunction, but preserved, albeit abnormal, midperipheral rod and cone vision. Rpgr-cko mice had progressive retinal degeneration detectable in the first months of life. ERGs indicated relatively equal rod and cone disease. At late stages, there was greater inferior versus superior retinal degeneration. Conclusions. RPGR mutations lead to progressive loss of rod and cone vision, but show different patterns of residual photoreceptor disease expression. Knowledge of the patterns should guide treatment strategies. Rpgr-cko mice had onset of degeneration at relatively young ages and progressive photoreceptor disease. The natural history in this model will permit preclinical proof-of-concept studies to be designed and such studies should advance progress toward human therapy. PMID:22807293

  17. Nuclear receptor NR2E3 gene mutations distort human retinal laminar architecture and cause an unusual degeneration.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Samuel G; Sumaroka, Alexander; Aleman, Tomas S; Cideciyan, Artur V; Schwartz, Sharon B; Roman, Alejandro J; McInnes, Roderick R; Sheffield, Val C; Stone, Edwin M; Swaroop, Anand; Wright, Alan F

    2004-09-01

    Mutations in the nuclear receptor gene, NR2E3, cause a disorder of human retinal photoreceptor development characterized by hyperfunction and excess of the minority S (short wavelength or blue) cone photoreceptor type, but near absence of function of the majority rod receptor. NR2E3 disease can also progress to blindness. How the human retina accommodates mis-specified types and numbers of neurons and advances to retinal degeneration are unknown. We studied the retinal organization in vivo of patients with NR2E3 mutations. Early human NR2E3 disease with S cone hyperfunction showed thickened retinal layers within an otherwise normally structured retina. With visual loss, however, lamination was coarse and there was a strikingly thick and bulging appearance to the retina, localized to an annulus encircling the central fovea. This pattern was not found in other retinal degenerations. The abnormal laminar retinal architecture of early NR2E3 disease may be due in part to larger cells with an S cone phenotype in place of rods that failed to differentiate. The later-stage dysplastic appearance suggests a previously unrecognized proliferative response in human retinal degeneration.

  18. Constituents of Bile, Bilirubin and TUDCA, Protect Against Oxidative Stress-Induced Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Oveson, Brian C.; Iwase, Takeshi; Hackett, Sean F.; Lee, Sun Young; Usui, Shinichi; Sedlak, Thomas W.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Campochiaro, Peter A.; Sung, Jennifer U.

    2014-01-01

    Two constituents of bile, bilirubin and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), have antioxidant activity. However, bilirubin can also cause damage to some neurons and glial cells, particularly immature neurons. In this study, we tested the effects of bilirubin and TUDCA in two models in which oxidative stress contributes to photoreceptor cell death, prolonged light exposure and rd10+/+ mice. In albino BALB/c mice, intraperitoneal (IP) injection of 5 mg/kg of bilirubin or 500 mg/kg of TUDCA prior to exposure to 5,000 lux of white light for 8 hours significantly reduced loss of rod and cone function assessed by electroretinograms (ERGs). Both treatments also reduced light-induced accumulation of superoxide radicals in the outer retina, rod cell death assessed by outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness, and disruption of cone inner and outer segments. In rd10+/+ mice, IP injections of 5 or 50 mg/kg of bilirubin or 500 mg/kg of TUDCA every 3 days starting at postnatal day (P) 6, caused significant preservation of cone cell number and cone function at P50. Rods were not protected at P50, but both bilirubin and TUDCA provided modest preservation of ONL thickness and rod function at P30. These data suggest that correlation of serum bilirubin levels with rate of vision loss in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) could provide a useful strategy to test the hypothesis that cones die from oxidative damage in patients with RP. If proof-of-concept is established, manipulation of bilirubin levels and administration of TUDCA could be tested in interventional trials. PMID:21054389

  19. Escin activates AKT-Nrf2 signaling to protect retinal pigment epithelium cells from oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kaijun; Jiang, Yiqian; Wang, Wei; Ma, Jian; Chen, Min

    2015-12-25

    Here we explored the anti-oxidative and cytoprotective potentials of escin, a natural triterpene-saponin, against hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. We showed that escin remarkably attenuated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced death and apoptosis of established (ARPE-19) and primary murine RPE cells. Meanwhile, ROS production and lipid peroxidation by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} were remarkably inhibited by escin. Escin treatment in RPE cells resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by transcription of anti-oxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes, including HO-1, NQO-1 and SRXN-1. Knockdown of Nrf2 through targeted shRNAs/siRNAs alleviated escin-mediated ARE gene transcription, and almost abolished escin-mediated anti-oxidant activity and RPE cytoprotection against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Reversely, escin was more potent against H{sub 2}O{sub 2} damages in Nrf2-over-expressed ARPE-19 cells. Further studies showed that escin-induced Nrf2 activation in RPE cells required AKT signaling. AKT inhibitors (LY294002 and perifosine) blocked escin-induced AKT activation, and dramatically inhibited Nrf2 phosphorylation, its cytosol accumulation and nuclear translocation in RPE cells. Escin-induced RPE cytoprotection against H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was also alleviated by the AKT inhibitors. Together, these results demonstrate that escin protects RPE cells from oxidative stress possibly through activating AKT-Nrf2 signaling.

  20. Vitamin B1 (thiamine) uptake by human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells: mechanism and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Veedamali S; Mohammed, Zainab M; Molina, Andres; Marchant, Jonathan S; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Said, Hamid M

    2007-01-01

    Retinal abnormality and visual disturbances occur in thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anaemia (TRMA), an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the human thiamine transporter-1 (hTHTR-1). Human retinal pigment epithelial cells play a pivotal role in supplying thiamine to the highly metabolically active retina but nothing is known about the mechanism, regulation or biological processes involved in thiamine transport in these cells. To address these issues, we used human-derived retinal pigment epithelial ARPE-19 cells to characterize the thiamine uptake process. Thiamine uptake is energy- and temperature-dependent, pH-sensitive, Na+-independent, saturable at both the nanomolar (apparent Km, 30 ± 5 nm) and the micromolar (apparent Km, 1.72 ± 0.3 μm) concentration ranges, specific for thiamine and sensitive to sulfhydryl group inhibition. The diuretic amiloride caused a concentration-dependent inhibition in thiamine uptake, whereas the anti-trypanosomal drug, melarsoprol, failed to affect the uptake process. Both hTHTR-1 and hTHTR-2 are expressed in ARPE-19 cells as well as in native human retinal tissue with expression of the former being significantly higher than that of the latter. Uptake of thiamine was adaptively regulated by extracellular substrate level via transcriptionally mediated mechanisms that involve both hTHTR-1 and hTHTR-2; it was also regulated by an intracellular Ca2+–calmodulin-mediated pathway. Confocal imaging of living ARPE-19 cells expressing TRMA-associated hTHTR-1 mutants (D93H, S143F and G172D) showed various expression phenotypes. These results demonstrate for the first time the existence of a specialized and regulated uptake process for thiamine in a cellular model of human retinal pigment epithelia that involves hTHTR-1 and hTHTR-2. Further, clinically relevant mutations in hTHTR-1 lead to impaired cell surface expression or function of the transporter in retinal epithelial ARPE-19 cells. PMID:17463047

  1. Adaptive optics OCT using 1060nm swept source and dual deformable lenses for human retinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Yifan; Lee, Sujin; Cua, Michelle; Miao, Dongkai; Bonora, Stefano; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2016-03-01

    Adaptive optics concepts have been applied to the advancement of biological imaging and microscopy. In particular, AO has also been very successfully applied to cellular resolution imaging of the retina, enabling visualization of the characteristic mosaic patterns of the outer retinal layers using flood illumination fundus photography, Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy (SLO), and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). Despite the high quality of the in vivo images, there has been a limited uptake of AO imaging into the clinical environment. The high resolution afforded by AO comes at the price of limited field of view and specialized equipment. The implementation of a typical adaptive optics imaging system results in a relatively large and complex optical setup. The wavefront measurement is commonly performed using a Hartmann-Shack Wavefront Sensor (HS-WFS) placed at an image plane that is optically conjugated to the eye's pupil. The deformable mirror is also placed at a conjugate plane, relaying the wavefront corrections to the pupil. Due to the sensitivity of the HS-WFS to back-reflections, the imaging system is commonly constructed from spherical mirrors. In this project, we present a novel adaptive optics OCT retinal imaging system with significant potential to overcome many of the barriers to integration with a clinical environment. We describe in detail the implementation of a compact lens based wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) 1060nm swept source OCT human retinal imaging system with dual deformable lenses, and present retinal images acquired in vivo from research volunteers.

  2. Characterization of human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal analysis.

    PubMed

    Tălu, Stefan; Vlăduţiu, Cristina; Lupaşcu, Carmen A

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal geometry and lacunarity parameters. Multifractal analysis using a box counting algorithm was carried out for a set of 12 segmented and skeletonized human retinal images, corresponding to both normal (6 images) and amblyopia states of the retina (6 images). It was found that the microvascular geometry of the human retina network represents geometrical multifractals, characterized through subsets of regions having different scaling properties that are not evident in the fractal analysis. Multifractal analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a higher average of the generalized dimensions (Dq ) for q=0, 1, 2 indicating a higher degree of the tree-dimensional complexity associated with the human retinal microvasculature network whereas images of healthy subjects show a lower value of generalized dimensions indicating normal complexity of biostructure. On the other hand, the lacunarity analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a lower average of the lacunarity parameter Λ than the corresponding values for normal images (segmented and skeletonized versions). The multifractal and lacunarity analysis may be used as a non-invasive predictive complementary tool to distinguish amblyopic subjects from healthy subjects and hence this technique could be used for an early diagnosis of patients with amblyopia.

  3. Characterization of human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tălu, Stefan; Vlăduţiu, Cristina; Lupaşcu, Carmen A.

    2015-01-01

    AIM To characterize the human retinal vessel arborisation in normal and amblyopic eyes using multifractal geometry and lacunarity parameters. METHODS Multifractal analysis using a box counting algorithm was carried out for a set of 12 segmented and skeletonized human retinal images, corresponding to both normal (6 images) and amblyopia states of the retina (6 images). RESULTS It was found that the microvascular geometry of the human retina network represents geometrical multifractals, characterized through subsets of regions having different scaling properties that are not evident in the fractal analysis. Multifractal analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a higher average of the generalized dimensions (Dq) for q=0, 1, 2 indicating a higher degree of the tree-dimensional complexity associated with the human retinal microvasculature network whereas images of healthy subjects show a lower value of generalized dimensions indicating normal complexity of biostructure. On the other hand, the lacunarity analysis of the amblyopia images (segmented and skeletonized versions) show a lower average of the lacunarity parameter Λ than the corresponding values for normal images (segmented and skeletonized versions). CONCLUSION The multifractal and lacunarity analysis may be used as a non-invasive predictive complementary tool to distinguish amblyopic subjects from healthy subjects and hence this technique could be used for an early diagnosis of patients with amblyopia. PMID:26558216

  4. A protocol for the culture and differentiation of highly polarized human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sonoda, Shozo; Spee, Christine; Barron, Ernesto; Ryan, Stephen J; Kannan, Ram; Hinton, David R

    2009-01-01

    We provide our detailed, standardized in vitro protocol for culture and differentiation of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells into a highly polarized, functional monolayer. Disruption of polarized RPE function plays an important role in the pathogenesis of common blinding disorders of the retina. The availability of this polarized RPE monolayer allows for reproducible evaluation of RPE function, modeling of RPE dysfunction in retinal disease, and in vitro evaluation of novel therapies. The protocol, which takes approximately 6 weeks, describes the culture of RPE from human fetal donor eyes, and the differentiation of these cells into a polarized monolayer with high transepithelial resistance, and morphologic characteristics that mimic the RPE monolayer in vivo. By modifying the procedure for initial isolation of pure RPE cells, and culture conditions used in existing protocols, we have established a standardized protocol that provides highly reproducible RPE monolayers from the same donor eye. PMID:19373231

  5. Degradation in the degree of polarization in human retinal nerve fiber layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Biwei; Wang, Bingqing; Rylander, Henry G.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Using a fiber-based swept-source (SS) polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) system, we investigate the degree of polarization (DOP) of light backscattered from the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in normal human subjects. Algorithms for processing data were developed to analyze the deviation in phase retardation and intensity of backscattered light in directions parallel and perpendicular to the nerve fiber axis (fast and slow axes of RNFL). Considering superior, inferior, and nasal quadrants, we observe the strongest degradation in the DOP with increasing RNFL depth in the temporal quadrant. Retinal ganglion cell axons in normal human subjects are known to have the smallest diameter in the temporal quadrant, and the greater degradation observed in the DOP suggests that higher polarimetric noise may be associated with neural structure in the temporal RNFL. The association between depth degradation in the DOP and RNFL structural properties may broaden the utility of PS-OCT as a functional imaging technique.

  6. Does the adult human ciliary body epithelium contain "true" retinal stem cells?

    PubMed

    Frøen, Rebecca; Johnsen, Erik O; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Facskó, Andrea; Petrovski, Goran; Moe, Morten C

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports of retinal stem cells being present in several locations of the adult eye have sparked great hopes that they may be used to treat the millions of people worldwide who suffer from blindness as a result of retinal disease or injury. A population of proliferative cells derived from the ciliary body epithelium (CE) has been considered one of the prime stem cell candidates, and as such they have received much attention in recent years. However, the true nature of these cells in the adult human eye has still not been fully elucidated, and the stem cell claim has become increasingly controversial in light of new and conflicting reports. In this paper, we will try to answer the question of whether the available evidence is strong enough for the research community to conclude that the adult human CE indeed harbors stem cells.

  7. Remote Ischemic Preconditioning Protects Retinal Photoreceptors: Evidence From a Rat Model of Light-Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Brandli, Alice; Johnstone, Daniel M; Stone, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    To test whether remote ischemic preconditioning (RIP) is protective to photoreceptors, in a light damage model, and to identify mechanisms involved. A pressure cuff was used to induce ischemia (2 × 5 minutes) in one hind limb of 4- to 6-month-old albino Sprague-Dawley rats raised in dim, cyclic light (12 hours 5 lux, 12 hours dark). Immediately following the ischemia, rats were exposed to bright continuous light (1000 lux) for 24 hours. After 7-day survival in dim, cyclic light conditions, retinal function was assessed using the flash electroretinogram (ERG) and retinal structure was examined for photoreceptor survival and death, as well as for stress. Messenger RNA and protein expression of growth factors and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) receptors was also assessed at 7-day survival. Bright light exposure reduced the amplitude of the a- and b-waves of the ERG, upregulated the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) by Müller cells, increased the number of dying (TUNEL+) photoreceptors, and reduced the number of surviving photoreceptors. Remote ischemic preconditioning mitigated all of these bright light-induced effects. Remote ischemic preconditioning-induced protection was associated with increased retinal expression of BDNF and its low-affinity receptor NGFR. The present study provides evidence, for the first time, that RIP protects photoreceptors against bright light-induced photoreceptor degeneration. This observation is consistent with previous reports of RIP-induced protection of the inner retina and of other vital organs. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor may play a role in mediating the RIP-induced neuroprotection through activation of NGFR.

  8. Hydroxytyrosol protects against oxidative damage by simultaneous activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and phase II detoxifying enzyme systems in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lu; Liu, Zhongbo; Feng, Zhihui; Hao, Jiejie; Shen, Weili; Li, Xuesen; Sun, Lijuan; Sharman, Edward; Wang, Ying; Wertz, Karin; Weber, Peter; Shi, Xianglin; Liu, Jiankang

    2010-11-01

    Studies in this laboratory have previously shown that hydroxytyrosol, the major antioxidant polyphenol in olives, protects ARPE-19 human retinal pigment epithelial cells from oxidative damage induced by acrolein, an environmental toxin and endogenous end product of lipid oxidation, that occurs at increased levels in age-related macular degeneration lesions. A proposed mechanism for this is that protection by hydroxytyrosol against oxidative stress is conferred by the simultaneous activation of two critically important pathways, viz., induction of phase II detoxifying enzymes and stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Cultured ARPE-19 cells were pretreated with hydroxytyrosol and challenged with acrolein. The protective effects of hydroxytyrosol on key factors of mitochondrial biogenesis and phase II detoxifying enzyme systems were examined. Hydroxytyrosol treatment simultaneously protected against acrolein-induced inhibition of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PPARGC1α) in ARPE-19 cells. The activation of Nrf2 led to activation of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including γ-glutamyl-cysteinyl-ligase, NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate)-quinone-oxidoreductase 1, heme-oxygenase-1, superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxin and thioredoxin as well as other antioxidant enzymes, while the activation of PPARGC1α led to increased protein expression of mitochondrial transcription factor A, uncoupling protein 2 and mitochondrial complexes. These results suggest that hydroxytyrosol is a potent inducer of phase II detoxifying enzymes and an enhancer of mitochondrial biogenesis. Dietary supplementation of hydroxytyrosol may contribute to eye health by preventing the degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial cells induced by oxidative stress. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Delivery of antioxidant enzyme genes to protect against ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury to retinal microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baihua; Caballero, Sergio; Seo, Soojung; Grant, Maria B; Lewin, Alfred S

    2009-12-01

    Retinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury results in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of this study was to investigate whether delivery of the manganese superoxide dismutase gene (SOD2) or the catalase gene (CAT) could rescue the retinal vascular damage induced by I/R in mice. I/R injury to the retina was induced in mice by elevating intraocular pressure for 2 hours, and reperfusion was established immediately afterward. One eye of each mouse was pretreated with plasmids encoding manganese superoxide dismutase or catalase complexed with cationic liposomes and delivered by intravitreous injection 48 hours before initiation of the procedure. Superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide, and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein modifications were measured by fluorescence staining, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis 1 day after the I/R injury. At 7 days after injury, retinal vascular cell apoptosis and acellular capillaries were quantitated. Superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide, and 4-HNE protein modifications increased at 24 hours after I/R injury. Administration of plasmids encoding SOD2 or CAT significantly reduced levels of superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide, and 4-HNE. Retinal vascular cell apoptosis and acellular capillary numbers increased greatly by 7 days after the injury. Delivery of SOD2 or CAT inhibited the I/R-induced apoptosis of retinal vascular cell and retinal capillary degeneration. Delivery of antioxidant genes inhibited I/R-induced retinal capillary degeneration, apoptosis of vascular cells, and ROS production, suggesting that antioxidant gene therapy might be a treatment for I/R-related disease.

  10. Delivery of Antioxidant Enzyme Genes to Protect against Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Injury to Retinal Microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baihua; Caballero, Sergio; Seo, Soojung; Grant, Maria B.; Lewin, Alfred S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Retinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury results in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of this study was to investigate whether delivery of the manganese superoxide dismutase gene (SOD2) or the catalase gene (CAT) could rescue the retinal vascular damage induced by I/R in mice. Methods I/R injury to the retina was induced in mice by elevating intraocular pressure for 2 hours, and reperfusion was established immediately afterward. One eye of each mouse was pretreated with plasmids encoding manganese superoxide dismutase or catalase complexed with cationic liposomes and delivered by intravitreous injection 48 hours before initiation of the procedure. Superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide, and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein modifications were measured by fluorescence staining, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis 1 day after the I/R injury. At 7 days after injury, retinal vascular cell apoptosis and acellular capillaries were quantitated. Results Superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide, and 4-HNE protein modifications increased at 24 hours after I/R injury. Administration of plasmids encoding SOD2 or CAT significantly reduced levels of superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide, and 4-HNE. Retinal vascular cell apoptosis and acellular capillary numbers increased greatly by 7 days after the injury. Delivery of SOD2 or CAT inhibited the I/R-induced apoptosis of retinal vascular cell and retinal capillary degeneration. Conclusions Delivery of antioxidant genes inhibited I/R-induced retinal capillary degeneration, apoptosis of vascular cells, and ROS production, suggesting that antioxidant gene therapy might be a treatment for I/R-related disease. PMID:19628743

  11. Comparative study of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) as a treatment for retinal dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Riera, Marina; Fontrodona, Laura; Albert, Silvia; Ramirez, Diana Mora; Seriola, Anna; Salas, Anna; Muñoz, Yolanda; Ramos, David; Villegas-Perez, Maria Paz; Zapata, Miguel Angel; Raya, Angel; Ruberte, Jesus; Veiga, Anna; Garcia-Arumi, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Retinal dystrophies (RD) are major causes of familial blindness and are characterized by progressive dysfunction of photoreceptor and/or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. In this study, we aimed to evaluate and compare the therapeutic effects of two pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-based therapies. We differentiated RPE from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and transplanted them into the subretinal space of the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat. Once differentiated, cells from either source of PSC resembled mature RPE in their morphology and gene expression profile. Following transplantation, both hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells maintained the expression of specific RPE markers, lost their proliferative capacity, established tight junctions, and were able to perform phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments. Remarkably, grafted areas showed increased numbers of photoreceptor nuclei and outer segment disk membranes. Regardless of the cell source, human transplants protected retina from cell apoptosis, glial stress and accumulation of autofluorescence, and responded better to light stimuli. Altogether, our results show that hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells survived, migrated, integrated, and functioned as RPE in the RCS rat retina, providing preclinical evidence that either PSC source could be of potential benefit for treating RD. PMID:27006969

  12. Filtering blue light reduces light-induced oxidative stress, senescence and accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Kernt, Marcus; Walch, Axel; Neubauer, Aljoscha S; Hirneiss, Christoph; Haritoglou, Christos; Ulbig, Michael W; Kampik, Anselm

    2012-01-01

    Cumulative light exposure is significantly associated with ageing and the progression of age-related macular degeneration. To prevent the retina from blue-light damage in pseudophakia, blue light-absorbing intraocular lenses have been developed. This study compares the possible protective effects of a blue light-absorbing intraocular lens to an untinted ultraviolet-absorbing intraocular lens with regard to light-induced oxidative stress and senescence of human retinal pigment epithelium. As primary human retinal pigment epithelium cells were exposed to white light, either an ultraviolet- and blue light-absorbing intraocular lens or ultraviolet-absorbing intraocular lens was placed in the light beam. After 60 min of irradiation, cells were investigated by electron microscopy for viability, induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species, and senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Expression and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3 and their mRNA were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Light exposure induced structural damage, decreased retinal pigment epithelium cell viability, and increased reactive oxygen species, senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity and matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3 expression and secretion. Although both types of intraocular lens significantly reduced these effects, the protective effects of the ultraviolet- and blue light-absorbing intraocular lens were significantly stronger than those of the ultraviolet-absorbing intraocular lens. The ultraviolet- and blue light-absorbing intraocular lens demonstrated significantly better protection against light-induced oxidative stress, senescence and structural damage than the ultraviolet-absorbing intraocular lens. These in vitro findings support the hypothesis that the ultraviolet- and blue light-absorbing intraocular lens may prevent retinal damage in clinical use. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and

  13. Canine and Human Visual Cortex Intact and Responsive Despite Early Retinal Blindness from RPE65 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Geoffrey K; Komáromy, András M; Cideciyan, Artur V; Brainard, David H; Aleman, Tomas S; Roman, Alejandro J; Avants, Brian B; Gee, James C; Korczykowski, Marc; Hauswirth, William W; Acland, Gregory M; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Aguirre, Geoffrey K

    2007-01-01

    Background RPE65 is an essential molecule in the retinoid-visual cycle, and RPE65 gene mutations cause the congenital human blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Somatic gene therapy delivered to the retina of blind dogs with an RPE65 mutation dramatically restores retinal physiology and has sparked international interest in human treatment trials for this incurable disease. An unanswered question is how the visual cortex responds after prolonged sensory deprivation from retinal dysfunction. We therefore studied the cortex of RPE65-mutant dogs before and after retinal gene therapy. Then, we inquired whether there is visual pathway integrity and responsivity in adult humans with LCA due to RPE65 mutations (RPE65-LCA). Methods and Findings RPE65-mutant dogs were studied with fMRI. Prior to therapy, retinal and subcortical responses to light were markedly diminished, and there were minimal cortical responses within the primary visual areas of the lateral gyrus (activation amplitude mean ± standard deviation [SD] = 0.07% ± 0.06% and volume = 1.3 ± 0.6 cm3). Following therapy, retinal and subcortical response restoration was accompanied by increased amplitude (0.18% ± 0.06%) and volume (8.2 ± 0.8 cm3) of activation within the lateral gyrus (p < 0.005 for both). Cortical recovery occurred rapidly (within a month of treatment) and was persistent (as long as 2.5 y after treatment). Recovery was present even when treatment was provided as late as 1–4 y of age. Human RPE65-LCA patients (ages 18–23 y) were studied with structural magnetic resonance imaging. Optic nerve diameter (3.2 ± 0.5 mm) was within the normal range (3.2 ± 0.3 mm), and occipital cortical white matter density as judged by voxel-based morphometry was slightly but significantly altered (1.3 SD below control average, p = 0.005). Functional magnetic resonance imaging in human RPE65-LCA patients revealed cortical responses with a markedly diminished activation volume (8.8 ± 1.2 cm3

  14. Combined transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cells and human retinal progenitor cells into the subretinal space of RCS rats.

    PubMed

    Qu, Linghui; Gao, Lixiong; Xu, Haiwei; Duan, Ping; Zeng, Yuxiao; Liu, Yong; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2017-03-15

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is one of hereditary retinal diseases characterized by the loss of photoreceptors. Cell transplantation has been clinically applied to treat RP patients. Human retinal progenitor cells (HRPCs) and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs) are the two commonly and practically used stem cells for transplantation. Since combined transplantation could be a promising way to integrate the advantages of both stem cell types, we transplanted HRPCs and HBMSCs into the subretinal space (SRS) of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats. We report that HRPCs/HBMSCs combined transplantation maintains the electroretinogram results much better than HRPCs or HBMSCs single transplantations. The thickness of outer nuclear layer also presented a better outcome in the combined transplantation. Importantly, grafted cells in the combination migrated better, both longitudinally and latitudinally, than single transplantation. The photoreceptor differentiation of grafted cells in the retina of RCS rats receiving combined transplantation also showed a higher ratio than single transplantation. Finally, activation of microglia and the gliosis of Müller cells were more effectively suppressed in combined transplantation, indicating better immunomodulatory and anti-gliosis effects. Taken together, combining the transplantation of HRPCs and HBMSCs is a more effective strategy in stem cell-based therapy for retinal degenerative diseases.

  15. Potential suppression of the high glucose and insulin-induced retinal neovascularization by Sirtuin 3 in the human retinal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xin-Bang; You, Zhi-Peng; Wu, Chen; Huang, Jun

    2017-01-08

    Retinal neovascularization generally play roles in the formation of various severe eye diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. The regulation of neovascularization-related pathways by Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3), a major mitochondrial NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, give us a cue that Sirt3 may participate in the retinal neovascularization. However, the mechanism remains unclear. Here, we established a retinal neovascularization model by using human retinal endothelial cells (HRECs) under the induction of high glucose and insulin (HGI). With this model, Sirt3-expressing lentivirus was constructed and then used to investigate the effect of Sirt3 overexpression on the expression of migration-, neovascularization- and autophagy-related genes. After the treatment of HGI on HRECs, the mRNA and protein levels of migration-related genes, including matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9, were significantly upregulated. Meanwhile, angiogenesis-related genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were promoted at both mRNA and protein levels. However, HGI had no clear effect on the mRNA and protein levels of microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), an autophagy-related gene. When Sirt3 was overexpressed by lentivirus infection after HGI, the upregulation of MMP-2, MMP-9, VEGF, HIF-1α, and IGF-1 were suppressed at both transcription and translation levels. At the same time, LC3 mRNA and LC3-II protein increased. These results suggest that Sirt3 may inhibit retinal neovascularization by regulating the migration-, neovascularization- and autophagy-related factors expression. Thus we argue that Sirt3 may be a potential candidate drug for curing various eye diseases induced by retinal neovascularization.

  16. New medium used in the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to retinal cells is comparable to fetal human eye tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaobing; Xiong, Kai; Lin, Cong; Lv, Lei; Chen, Jing; Xu, Chongchong; Wang, Songtao; Gu, Dandan; Zheng, Hua; Yu, Hurong; Li, Yan; Xiao, Honglei; Zhou, Guomin

    2015-06-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have the potential to differentiate along the retinal lineage. However, most induction systems are dependent on multiple small molecular compounds such as Dkk-1, Lefty-A, and retinoic acid. In the present study, we efficiently differentiated hPSCs into retinal cells using a retinal differentiation medium (RDM) without the use of small molecular compounds. This novel differentiation system recapitulates retinal morphogenesis in humans, i.e. hPSCs gradually differentiate into optic vesicle-shaped spheres, followed by optic cup-shaped spheres and, lastly, retinal progenitor cells. Furthermore, at different stages, hPSC-derived retinal cells mirror the transcription factor expression profiles seen in their counterparts during human embryogenesis. Most importantly, hinge epithelium was found between the hPSC-derived neural retina (NR) and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These data suggest that our culture system provides a new method for generating hPSC-derived retinal cells that, for the first time, might be used in human transplantation.

  17. Human iPSC derived disease model of MERTK-associated retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Lukovic, Dunja; Artero Castro, Ana; Delgado, Ana Belen Garcia; Bernal, María de los Angeles Martín; Luna Pelaez, Noelia; Díez Lloret, Andrea; Perez Espejo, Rocío; Kamenarova, Kunka; Fernández Sánchez, Laura; Cuenca, Nicolás; Cortón, Marta; Avila Fernandez, Almudena; Sorkio, Anni; Skottman, Heli; Ayuso, Carmen; Erceg, Slaven; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) represents a genetically heterogeneous group of retinal dystrophies affecting mainly the rod photoreceptors and in some instances also the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells of the retina. Clinical symptoms and disease progression leading to moderate to severe loss of vision are well established and despite significant progress in the identification of causative genes, the disease pathology remains unclear. Lack of this understanding has so far hindered development of effective therapies. Here we report successful generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from skin fibroblasts of a patient harboring a novel Ser331Cysfs*5 mutation in the MERTK gene. The patient was diagnosed with an early onset and severe form of autosomal recessive RP (arRP). Upon differentiation of these iPSC towards RPE, patient-specific RPE cells exhibited defective phagocytosis, a characteristic phenotype of MERTK deficiency observed in human patients and animal models. Thus we have created a faithful cellular model of arRP incorporating the human genetic background which will allow us to investigate in detail the disease mechanism, explore screening of a variety of therapeutic compounds/reagents and design either combined cell and gene- based therapies or independent approaches. PMID:26263531

  18. A new approach to optic disc detection in human retinal images using the firefly algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rahebi, Javad; Hardalaç, Fırat

    2016-03-01

    There are various methods and algorithms to detect the optic discs in retinal images. In recent years, much attention has been given to the utilization of the intelligent algorithms. In this paper, we present a new automated method of optic disc detection in human retinal images using the firefly algorithm. The firefly intelligent algorithm is an emerging intelligent algorithm that was inspired by the social behavior of fireflies. The population in this algorithm includes the fireflies, each of which has a specific rate of lighting or fitness. In this method, the insects are compared two by two, and the less attractive insects can be observed to move toward the more attractive insects. Finally, one of the insects is selected as the most attractive, and this insect presents the optimum response to the problem in question. Here, we used the light intensity of the pixels of the retinal image pixels instead of firefly lightings. The movement of these insects due to local fluctuations produces different light intensity values in the images. Because the optic disc is the brightest area in the retinal images, all of the insects move toward brightest area and thus specify the location of the optic disc in the image. The results of implementation show that proposed algorithm could acquire an accuracy rate of 100 % in DRIVE dataset, 95 % in STARE dataset, and 94.38 % in DiaRetDB1 dataset. The results of implementation reveal high capability and accuracy of proposed algorithm in the detection of the optic disc from retinal images. Also, recorded required time for the detection of the optic disc in these images is 2.13 s for DRIVE dataset, 2.81 s for STARE dataset, and 3.52 s for DiaRetDB1 dataset accordingly. These time values are average value.

  19. Classification of Human Retinal Microaneurysms Using Adaptive Optics Scanning Light Ophthalmoscope Fluorescein Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Dubow, Michael; Pinhas, Alexander; Shah, Nishit; Cooper, Robert F.; Gan, Alexander; Gentile, Ronald C.; Hendrix, Vernon; Sulai, Yusufu N.; Carroll, Joseph; Chui, Toco Y. P.; Walsh, Joseph B.; Weitz, Rishard; Dubra, Alfredo; Rosen, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Microaneurysms (MAs) are considered a hallmark of retinal vascular disease, yet what little is known about them is mostly based upon histology, not clinical observation. Here, we use the recently developed adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) fluorescein angiography (FA) to image human MAs in vivo and to expand on previously described MA morphologic classification schemes. Methods. Patients with vascular retinopathies (diabetic, hypertensive, and branch and central retinal vein occlusion) were imaged with reflectance AOSLO and AOSLO FA. Ninety-three MAs, from 14 eyes, were imaged and classified according to appearance into six morphologic groups: focal bulge, saccular, fusiform, mixed, pedunculated, and irregular. The MA perimeter, area, and feret maximum and minimum were correlated to morphology and retinal pathology. Select MAs were imaged longitudinally in two eyes. Results. Adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope fluorescein angiography imaging revealed microscopic features of MAs not appreciated on conventional images. Saccular MAs were most prevalent (47%). No association was found between the type of retinal pathology and MA morphology (P = 0.44). Pedunculated and irregular MAs were among the largest MAs with average areas of 4188 and 4116 μm2, respectively. Focal hypofluorescent regions were noted in 30% of MAs and were more likely to be associated with larger MAs (3086 vs. 1448 μm2, P = 0.0001). Conclusions. Retinal MAs can be classified in vivo into six different morphologic types, according to the geometry of their two-dimensional (2D) en face view. Adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope fluorescein angiography imaging of MAs offers the possibility of studying microvascular change on a histologic scale, which may help our understanding of disease progression and treatment response. PMID:24425852

  20. Classification of human retinal microaneurysms using adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope fluorescein angiography.

    PubMed

    Dubow, Michael; Pinhas, Alexander; Shah, Nishit; Cooper, Robert F; Gan, Alexander; Gentile, Ronald C; Hendrix, Vernon; Sulai, Yusufu N; Carroll, Joseph; Chui, Toco Y P; Walsh, Joseph B; Weitz, Rishard; Dubra, Alfredo; Rosen, Richard B

    2014-03-04

    Microaneurysms (MAs) are considered a hallmark of retinal vascular disease, yet what little is known about them is mostly based upon histology, not clinical observation. Here, we use the recently developed adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) fluorescein angiography (FA) to image human MAs in vivo and to expand on previously described MA morphologic classification schemes. Patients with vascular retinopathies (diabetic, hypertensive, and branch and central retinal vein occlusion) were imaged with reflectance AOSLO and AOSLO FA. Ninety-three MAs, from 14 eyes, were imaged and classified according to appearance into six morphologic groups: focal bulge, saccular, fusiform, mixed, pedunculated, and irregular. The MA perimeter, area, and feret maximum and minimum were correlated to morphology and retinal pathology. Select MAs were imaged longitudinally in two eyes. Adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope fluorescein angiography imaging revealed microscopic features of MAs not appreciated on conventional images. Saccular MAs were most prevalent (47%). No association was found between the type of retinal pathology and MA morphology (P = 0.44). Pedunculated and irregular MAs were among the largest MAs with average areas of 4188 and 4116 μm(2), respectively. Focal hypofluorescent regions were noted in 30% of MAs and were more likely to be associated with larger MAs (3086 vs. 1448 μm(2), P = 0.0001). Retinal MAs can be classified in vivo into six different morphologic types, according to the geometry of their two-dimensional (2D) en face view. Adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope fluorescein angiography imaging of MAs offers the possibility of studying microvascular change on a histologic scale, which may help our understanding of disease progression and treatment response.

  1. Safety and Efficacy of Human Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Therapy for Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Leow, S. N.; Luu, Chi D.; Hairul Nizam, M. H.; Mok, P. L.; Ruhaslizan, R.; Wong, H. S.; Wan Abdul Halim, Wan Haslina; Ng, M. H.; Ruszymah, B. H. I.; Chowdhury, S. R.; Bastion, M. L. C.; Then, K. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the safety and efficacy of subretinal injection of human Wharton’s Jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hWJ-MSCs) on retinal structure and function in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats. Methods RCS rats were divided into 2 groups: hWJ-MSCs treated group (n = 8) and placebo control group (n = 8). In the treatment group, hWJ-MSCs from healthy donors were injected into the subretinal space in one eye of each rat at day 21. Control group received saline injection of the same volume. Additional 3 animals were injected with nanogold-labelled stem cells for in vivo tracking of cells localisation using a micro-computed tomography (microCT). Retinal function was assessed by electroretinography (ERG) 3 days before the injection and repeated at days 15, 30 and 70 after the injection. Eyes were collected at day 70 for histology, cellular and molecular studies. Results No retinal tumor formation was detected by histology during the study period. MicroCT scans showed that hWJ-MSCs stayed localised in the eye with no systemic migration. Transmission electron microscopy showed that nanogold-labelled cells were located within the subretinal space. Histology showed preservation of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) in the treated group but not in the control group. However, there were no significant differences in the ERG responses between the groups. Confocal microscopy showed evidence of hWJ-MSCs expressing markers for photoreceptor, Müller cells and bipolar cells. Conclusions Subretinal injection of hWJ-MSCs delay the loss of the ONL in RCS rats. hWJ-MSCs appears to be safe and has potential to differentiate into retinal-like cells. The potential of this cell-based therapy for the treatment of retinal dystrophies warrants further studies. PMID:26107378

  2. Analysis of normal human retinal vascular network architecture using multifractal geometry

    PubMed Central

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Călugăru, Dan Mihai; Lupaşcu, Carmen Alina; Nicoară, Simona Delia

    2017-01-01

    AIM To apply the multifractal analysis method as a quantitative approach to a comprehensive description of the microvascular network architecture of the normal human retina. METHODS Fifty volunteers were enrolled in this study in the Ophthalmological Clinic of Cluj-Napoca, Romania, between January 2012 and January 2014. A set of 100 segmented and skeletonised human retinal images, corresponding to normal states of the retina were studied. An automatic unsupervised method for retinal vessel segmentation was applied before multifractal analysis. The multifractal analysis of digital retinal images was made with computer algorithms, applying the standard box-counting method. Statistical analyses were performed using the GraphPad InStat software. RESULTS The architecture of normal human retinal microvascular network was able to be described using the multifractal geometry. The average of generalized dimensions (Dq) for q=0, 1, 2, the width of the multifractal spectrum (Δα=αmax − αmin) and the spectrum arms' heights difference (|Δf|) of the normal images were expressed as mean±standard deviation (SD): for segmented versions, D0=1.7014±0.0057; D1=1.6507±0.0058; D2=1.5772±0.0059; Δα=0.92441±0.0085; |Δf|= 0.1453±0.0051; for skeletonised versions, D0=1.6303±0.0051; D1=1.6012±0.0059; D2=1.5531±0.0058; Δα=0.65032±0.0162; |Δf|= 0.0238±0.0161. The average of generalized dimensions (Dq) for q=0, 1, 2, the width of the multifractal spectrum (Δα) and the spectrum arms' heights difference (|Δf|) of the segmented versions was slightly greater than the skeletonised versions. CONCLUSION The multifractal analysis of fundus photographs may be used as a quantitative parameter for the evaluation of the complex three-dimensional structure of the retinal microvasculature as a potential marker for early detection of topological changes associated with retinal diseases. PMID:28393036

  3. Effects of proinflammatory cytokines on the claudin-19 rich tight junctions of human retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shaomin; Gan, Geliang; Rao, Veena S; Adelman, Ron A; Rizzolo, Lawrence J

    2012-07-27

    Chronic, subclinical inflammation contributes to the pathogenesis of several ocular diseases, including age-related macular degeneration. Proinflammatory cytokines affect tight junctions in epithelia that lack claudin-19, but in the retinal pigment epithelium claudin-19 predominates. We examined the effects of cytokines on the tight junctions of human fetal RPE (hfRPE). hfRPE was incubated with interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), interferon-gamma (IFNγ), or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), alone or in combination. Permeability and selectivity of the tight junctions were assessed using nonionic tracers and electrophysiology. Claudins, occludin, and ZO-1 were examined using PCR, immunoblotting, and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Only TNFα consistently reduced transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) >80%. A serum-free medium revealed two effects of TNFα: (1) decreased TER was observed only when TNFα was added to the apical side of the monolayer, and (2) expression of TNFα receptors and inhibitors of apoptosis were induced from either side of the monolayer. In untreated cultures, tight junctions were slightly cation selective, and this was affected minimally by TNFα. The results were unexplained by effects on claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-19, occludin, and ZO-1, but changes in the morphology of the junctions and actin cytoskeleton may have a role. Claudin-19-rich tight junctions have low permeability for ionic and nonionic solutes, and are slightly cation-selective. Claudin-19 is not a direct target of TNFα. TNFα may protect RPE from apoptosis, but makes the monolayer leaky when it is presented to the apical side of the monolayer. Unlike other epithelia, IFNγ failed to augment the effect of TNFα on tight junctions.

  4. Effects of Proinflammatory Cytokines on the Claudin-19 Rich Tight Junctions of Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shaomin; Gan, Geliang; Rao, Veena S.; Adelman, Ron A.; Rizzolo, Lawrence J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Chronic, subclinical inflammation contributes to the pathogenesis of several ocular diseases, including age-related macular degeneration. Proinflammatory cytokines affect tight junctions in epithelia that lack claudin-19, but in the retinal pigment epithelium claudin-19 predominates. We examined the effects of cytokines on the tight junctions of human fetal RPE (hfRPE). Methods. hfRPE was incubated with interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), interferon-gamma (IFNγ), or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), alone or in combination. Permeability and selectivity of the tight junctions were assessed using nonionic tracers and electrophysiology. Claudins, occludin, and ZO-1 were examined using PCR, immunoblotting, and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Results. Only TNFα consistently reduced transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) >80%. A serum-free medium revealed two effects of TNFα: (1) decreased TER was observed only when TNFα was added to the apical side of the monolayer, and (2) expression of TNFα receptors and inhibitors of apoptosis were induced from either side of the monolayer. In untreated cultures, tight junctions were slightly cation selective, and this was affected minimally by TNFα. The results were unexplained by effects on claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-19, occludin, and ZO-1, but changes in the morphology of the junctions and actin cytoskeleton may have a role. Conclusions. Claudin-19–rich tight junctions have low permeability for ionic and nonionic solutes, and are slightly cation-selective. Claudin-19 is not a direct target of TNFα. TNFα may protect RPE from apoptosis, but makes the monolayer leaky when it is presented to the apical side of the monolayer. Unlike other epithelia, IFNγ failed to augment the effect of TNFα on tight junctions. PMID:22761260

  5. Ginsenoside Rg-1 protects retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells from cobalt chloride (CoCl2) and hypoxia assaults.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke-Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Qing; Yao, Jin; Zhao, Yu-Xia; Duan, Jing; Cao, Cong; Jiang, Qin

    2013-01-01

    Severe retinal ischemia causes persistent visual impairments in eye diseases. Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are located near the choroidal capillaries, and are easily affected by ischemic or hypoxia. Ginsenoside Rg-1 has shown significant neuroprotective effects. This study was performed to test the cytoprotective effect of ginsenoside Rg-1 in RPE cells against hypoxia and cobalt chloride (CoCl2) assaults, and to understand the underlying mechanisms. We found that Rg-1 pre-administration significantly inhibited CoCl2- and hypoxia-induced RPE cell death and apoptosis. Reactive oxygen specisis (ROS)-dependent p38 and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases (JNK) MAPK activation was required for CoCl2-induced RPE cell death, and Rg-1 pre-treatment significantly inhibited ROS production and following p38/JNK activation. Further, CoCl2 suppressed pro-survival mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activation in RPE cells through activating of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), while Rg-1 restored mTORC1 activity through inhibiting AMPK activation. CoCl2-induced AMPK activation was also dependent on ROS production, and anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prevented AMPK activation and RPE cell death by CoCl2. Our results indicated that Rg-1 could be further investigated as a novel cell-protective agent for retinal ischemia.

  6. Gene therapy rescues photoreceptor blindness in dogs and paves the way for treating human X-linked retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Beltran, William A; Cideciyan, Artur V; Lewin, Alfred S; Iwabe, Simone; Khanna, Hemant; Sumaroka, Alexander; Chiodo, Vince A; Fajardo, Diego S; Román, Alejandro J; Deng, Wen-Tao; Swider, Malgorzata; Alemán, Tomas S; Boye, Sanford L; Genini, Sem; Swaroop, Anand; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2012-02-07

    Hereditary retinal blindness is caused by mutations in genes expressed in photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium. Gene therapy in mouse and dog models of a primary retinal pigment epithelium disease has already been translated to human clinical trials with encouraging results. Treatment for common primary photoreceptor blindness, however, has not yet moved from proof of concept to the clinic. We evaluated gene augmentation therapy in two blinding canine photoreceptor diseases that model the common X-linked form of retinitis pigmentosa caused by mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene, which encodes a photoreceptor ciliary protein, and provide evidence that the therapy is effective. After subretinal injections of adeno-associated virus-2/5-vectored human RPGR with human IRBP or GRK1 promoters, in vivo imaging showed preserved photoreceptor nuclei and inner/outer segments that were limited to treated areas. Both rod and cone photoreceptor function were greater in treated (three of four) than in control eyes. Histopathology indicated normal photoreceptor structure and reversal of opsin mislocalization in treated areas expressing human RPGR protein in rods and cones. Postreceptoral remodeling was also corrected: there was reversal of bipolar cell dendrite retraction evident with bipolar cell markers and preservation of outer plexiform layer thickness. Efficacy of gene therapy in these large animal models of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa provides a path for translation to human treatment.

  7. Nuclear Factor (Erythroid-Derived)-Related Factor 2-Associated Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Protection under Blue Light-Induced Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Kei; Kaneko, Hiroki; Kataoka, Keiko; Kimoto, Reona; Hwang, Shiang-Jyi; Ye, Fuxiang; Nagasaka, Yosuke; Tsunekawa, Taichi; Matsuura, Toshiyuki; Nonobe, Norie; Ito, Yasuki; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. It is a matter of increasing concern that exposure to light-emitting diodes (LED), particularly blue light (BL), damages retinal cells. This study aimed to investigate the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) damage caused by BL and to elucidate the role of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the pathogenesis of BL-induced RPE damage. Methods. ARPE-19, a human RPE cell line, and mouse primary RPE cells from wild-type and Nrf2 knockout (Nrf2(-/-)) mice were cultured under blue LED exposure (intermediate wavelength, 450 nm). Cell death rate and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were measured. TUNEL staining was performed to detect apoptosis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed on NRF2 mRNA, and western blotting was performed to detect Nrf2 proteins in the nucleus or cytoplasm of RPE cells. Results. BL exposure increased cell death rate and ROS generation in ARPE-19 cells in a time-dependent manner; cell death was caused by apoptosis. Moreover, BL exposure induced NRF2 mRNA upregulation and Nrf2 nuclear translocation in RPE. Cell death rate was significantly higher in RPE cells from Nrf2(-/-) mice than from wild-type mice. Conclusions. The Nrf2 pathway plays an important role in protecting RPE cells against BL-induced oxidative stress.

  8. Nuclear Factor (Erythroid-Derived)-Related Factor 2-Associated Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Protection under Blue Light-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Keiko; Kimoto, Reona; Hwang, Shiang-Jyi; Nagasaka, Yosuke; Tsunekawa, Taichi; Nonobe, Norie; Ito, Yasuki; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. It is a matter of increasing concern that exposure to light-emitting diodes (LED), particularly blue light (BL), damages retinal cells. This study aimed to investigate the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) damage caused by BL and to elucidate the role of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the pathogenesis of BL-induced RPE damage. Methods. ARPE-19, a human RPE cell line, and mouse primary RPE cells from wild-type and Nrf2 knockout (Nrf2−/−) mice were cultured under blue LED exposure (intermediate wavelength, 450 nm). Cell death rate and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were measured. TUNEL staining was performed to detect apoptosis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed on NRF2 mRNA, and western blotting was performed to detect Nrf2 proteins in the nucleus or cytoplasm of RPE cells. Results. BL exposure increased cell death rate and ROS generation in ARPE-19 cells in a time-dependent manner; cell death was caused by apoptosis. Moreover, BL exposure induced NRF2 mRNA upregulation and Nrf2 nuclear translocation in RPE. Cell death rate was significantly higher in RPE cells from Nrf2−/− mice than from wild-type mice. Conclusions. The Nrf2 pathway plays an important role in protecting RPE cells against BL-induced oxidative stress. PMID:27774118

  9. Retinitis Pigmentosa

    MedlinePlus

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Retinitis Pigmentosa What is retinitis pigmentosa? What are the symptoms? ... is available? What treatment is available? What is retinitis pigmentosa? Retinitis pigmentosa, also known as RP, refers to ...

  10. Alginate as a cell culture substrate for growth and differentiation of human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Razeih; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Samiei, Shahram; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Davari, Maliheh; Nazemroaya, Fatemeh; Bagheri, Abouzar; Deezagi, Abdolkhalegh

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells' behavior in alginate beads that establish 3D environment for cellular growth and mimic extracellular matrix versus the conventional 2D monolayer culture. RPE cells were encapsulated in alginate beads by dripping alginate cell suspension into CaCl2 solution. Beads were suspended in three different media including Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM)/F12 alone, DMEM/F12 supplemented with 10 % fetal bovine serum (FBS), and DMEM/F12 supplemented with 30 % human amniotic fluid (HAF). RPE cells were cultivated on polystyrene under the same conditions as controls. Cell phenotype, cell proliferation, cell death, and MTT assay, immunocytochemistry, and real-time RT-PCR were performed to evaluate the effect of alginate on RPE cells characteristics and integrity. RPE cells can survive and proliferate in alginate matrixes. Immunocytochemistry analysis exhibited Nestin, RPE65, and cytokeratin expressions in a reasonable number of cultured cells in alginate beads. Real-time PCR data demonstrated high levels of Nestin, CHX10, RPE65, and tyrosinase gene expressions in RPE cells immobilized in alginate when compared to 2D monolayer culture systems. The results suggest that alginate can be used as a reliable scaffold for maintenance of RPE cells' integrity and in vitro propagation of human retinal progenitor cells for cell replacement therapies in retinal diseases.

  11. Generation of retinal pigment epithelial cells from human embryonic stem cell-derived spherical neural masses.

    PubMed

    Cho, Myung Soo; Kim, Sang Jin; Ku, Seung-Yup; Park, Jung Hyun; Lee, Haksup; Yoo, Dae Hoon; Park, Un Chul; Song, Seul Ae; Choi, Young Min; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2012-09-01

    Dysfunction and loss of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are major pathologic changes observed in various retinal degenerative diseases such as aged-related macular degeneration. RPE generated from human pluripotent stem cells can be a good candidate for RPE replacement therapy. Here, we show the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) toward RPE with the generation of spherical neural masses (SNMs), which are pure masses of hESCs-derived neural precursors. During the early passaging of SNMs, cystic structures arising from opened neural tube-like structures showed pigmented epithelial morphology. These pigmented cells were differentiated into functional RPE by neuroectodermal induction and mechanical purification. Most of the differentiated cells showed typical RPE morphologies, such as a polygonal-shaped epithelial monolayer, and transmission electron microscopy revealed apical microvilli, pigment granules, and tight junctions. These cells also expressed molecular markers of RPE, including Mitf, ZO-1, RPE65, CRALBP, and bestrophin. The generated RPE also showed phagocytosis of isolated bovine photoreceptor outer segment and secreting pigment epithelium-derived factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Functional RPE could be generated from SNM in our method. Because SNMs have several advantages, including the capability of expansion for long periods without loss of differentiation capability, easy storage and thawing, and no need for feeder cells, our method for RPE differentiation may be used as an efficient strategy for generating functional RPE cells for retinal regeneration therapy.

  12. Generation of 3D retina-like structures from a human retinal cell line in a NASA bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Kamla; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Ellerson, Debra; Layne, Dione; Kumar, Ravindra; Hunt, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Replacement of damaged cells is a promising approach for treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP); however, availability of donor tissue for transplantation remains a major obstacle. Key factors for successful engineering of a tissue include the identification of a neural cell line that is: homogeneous but can be expanded to give rise to multiple cells types; is nontumorigenic, yet capable of secreting neurotrophic factors; and is able to form three-dimensional (3D), differentiated structures. The goal of this study was to test the feasibility of tissue engineering from a multipotential human retinal cell line using a NASA-developed bioreactor. A multipotential human retinal precursor cell line was used to generate 3D structures. In addition, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells were cocultured with neural cells to determine if 3D retinal structures could be generated in the bioreactor with cells grown on laminin-coated cytodex 3 beads. Cell growth, morphology, and differentiation were monitored by light and scanning electron microscopy, Western blot analysis, and analysis of glucose use and lactate production. The neuronal retinal precursor cell line cultured in a bioreactor gave rise to most retinal cell types seen in monolayer culture. They formed composite structures with cell-covered beads associated with one another in a tissue-like array. The beginning of layering and/or separation of cell types was observed. The neuronal cell types previously seen in monolayer cultures were also seen in the bioreactor. Some of the retinal cells differentiate into photoreceptors in the bioreactor with well-developed outer segment-like structures, a process that is critical for retinal function. Moreover, the neuronal cells that were generated resembled their in vivo phenotype more closely than those grown under other conditions. Outer segments were almost never seen in the monolayer cultures, even in the presence of photoreceptor

  13. Human CRB1-Associated Retinal Degeneration: Comparison with the rd8 Crb1-Mutant Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Tomas S.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Aguirre, Geoffrey K.; Huang, Wei Chieh; Mullins, Cristina L.; Roman, Alejandro J.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Olivares, Melani B.; Tsai, Frank F.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Vandenberghe, Luk H.; Limberis, Maria P.; Stone, Edwin M.; Bell, Peter; Wilson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the human disease due to CRB1 mutations and compare results with the Crb1-mutant rd8 mouse. Methods. Twenty-two patients with CRB1 mutations were studied. Function was assessed with perimetry and electroretinography (ERG) and retinal structure with optical coherence tomography (OCT). Cortical structure and function were quantified with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Rd8 mice underwent ERG, OCT, and retinal histopathology. Results. Visual acuities ranged from 20/25 to light perception. Rod ERGs were not detectable; small cone signals were recordable. By perimetry, small central visual islands were separated by midperipheral scotomas from far temporal peripheral islands. The central islands were cone mediated, whereas the peripheral islands retained some rod function. With OCT, there were small foveal islands of thinned outer nuclear layer (ONL) surrounded by thick delaminated retina with intraretinal hyperreflective lesions. MRI showed structurally normal optic nerves and only subtle changes to occipital lobe white and gray matter. Functional MRI indicated that whole-brain responses from patients were of reduced amplitude and spatial extent compared with those of normal controls. Rd8 mice had essentially normal ERGs; OCT and histopathology showed patchy retinal disorganization with pseudorosettes more pronounced in ventral than in dorsal retina. Photoreceptor degeneration was associated with dysplastic regions. Conclusions. CRB1 mutations lead to early-onset severe loss of vision with thickened, disorganized, nonseeing retina. Impaired peripheral vision can persist in late disease stages. Rd8 mice also have a disorganized retina, but there is sufficient photoreceptor integrity to produce largely normal retinal function. Differences between human and mouse diseases will complicate proof-of-concept studies intended to advance treatment initiatives. PMID:21757580

  14. Salvianolic Acid B (Sal B) Protects Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells from Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death by Activating Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaobin; Xavier, Christy; Jann, Jamieson; Wu, Hongli

    2016-11-03

    Protein glutathionylation, defined as the formation of protein mixed disulfides (PSSG) between cysteine residues and glutathione (GSH), can lead to cell death. Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1) is a thiol repair enzyme which catalyzes the reduction of PSSG. Therefore, Grx1 exerts strong anti-apoptotic effects by improving the redox state, especially in times of oxidative stress. However, there is currently no compound that is identified as a Grx1 activator. In this study, we identified and characterized Salvianolic acid B (Sal B), a natural compound, as a Grx1 inducer, which potently protected retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from oxidative injury. Our results showed that treatment with Sal B protected primary human RPE cells from H₂O₂-induced cell damage. Interestingly, we found Sal B pretreatment upregulated Grx1 expression in RPE cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the key transcription factor that regulates the expression of Grx1, was activated in Sal B treated RPE cells. Further investigation showed that knockdown of Grx1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly reduced the protective effects of Sal B. We conclude that Sal B protects RPE cells against H₂O₂-induced cell injury through Grx1 induction by activating Nrf2 pathway, thus preventing lethal accumulation of PSSG and reversing oxidative damage.

  15. Salvianolic Acid B (Sal B) Protects Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells from Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death by Activating Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaobin; Xavier, Christy; Jann, Jamieson; Wu, Hongli

    2016-01-01

    Protein glutathionylation, defined as the formation of protein mixed disulfides (PSSG) between cysteine residues and glutathione (GSH), can lead to cell death. Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1) is a thiol repair enzyme which catalyzes the reduction of PSSG. Therefore, Grx1 exerts strong anti-apoptotic effects by improving the redox state, especially in times of oxidative stress. However, there is currently no compound that is identified as a Grx1 activator. In this study, we identified and characterized Salvianolic acid B (Sal B), a natural compound, as a Grx1 inducer, which potently protected retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from oxidative injury. Our results showed that treatment with Sal B protected primary human RPE cells from H2O2-induced cell damage. Interestingly, we found Sal B pretreatment upregulated Grx1 expression in RPE cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the key transcription factor that regulates the expression of Grx1, was activated in Sal B treated RPE cells. Further investigation showed that knockdown of Grx1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly reduced the protective effects of Sal B. We conclude that Sal B protects RPE cells against H2O2-induced cell injury through Grx1 induction by activating Nrf2 pathway, thus preventing lethal accumulation of PSSG and reversing oxidative damage. PMID:27827892

  16. Enhanced neurotrophin synthesis and molecular differentiation in non-transformed human retinal progenitor cells cultured in a rotating bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravindra; Dutt, Kamla

    2006-01-01

    One approach to the treatment of retinal diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa, is to replace diseased or degenerating cells with healthy cells. Even if all of the problems associated with tissue transplant were to be resolved, the availability of tissue would remain an ongoing problem. We have previously shown that transformed human retinal cells can be grown in a NASA-developed horizontally rotating culture vessel (bioreactor) to form three-dimensional-like structures with the expression of several retinal specific proteins. In this study, we have investigated growth of non-transformed human retinal progenitors (retinal stem cells) in a rotating bioreactor. This rotating culture vessel promotes cell-cell interaction between similar and dissimilar cells. We cultured retinal progenitors (Ret 1-4) alone or as a co-culture with human retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE, D407) in this system to determine if 3D structures can be generated from non-transformed progenitors. Our second goal was to determine if the formation of 3D structures correlates with the upregulation of neurotrophins, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGFalpha), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), and brain-delivered neurotrophic factor (BDNF). These factors have been implicated in progenitor cell proliferation, commitment, differentiation, and survival. We also investigated the expression of the following retinal specific proteins in this system: neuron specific enolase (NSE); tyrosine hydroxylase (TH); D(2)D(3), D(4) receptors; protein kinase-C alpha (PKCalpha), and calbindin. The 3D structures generated were characterized by phase and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Retinal progenitors, cultured alone or as a co-culture in the rotating bioreactor, formed 3D structures with some degree of differentiation, accompanied by the upregulation of bFGF, CNTF, and TGFalpha. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which is expressed in vivo in RPE (D407), was

  17. Zerumbone, a Phytochemical of Subtropical Ginger, Protects against Hyperglycemia-Induced Retinal Damage in Experimental Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Tzeng, Yu-Cheng; Liu, I-Min

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most ordinary and specific microvascular complication of diabetes, is a disease of the retina. Zerumbone (ZER) is a monocyclic sesquiterpene compound, and based on reports, it is the predominant bioactive compound from the rhizomes of Zingiber zerumbet. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the protective effect of zerumbone against DR in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. STZ-diabetic rats were treated with ZER (40 mg/kg) once a day orally for 8 weeks. ZER administration significantly (p < 0.05) lowered the levels of plasma glucose (32.5% ± 5.7% lower) and glycosylated hemoglobin (29.2% ± 3.4% lower) in STZ-diabetic rats. Retinal histopathological observations indicated that disarrangement and reduction in thickness of retinal layers were reversed in ZER-treated diabetic rats. ZER downregulated both the elevated levels of advanced glycosylated end products (AGEs) and the higher levels of the receptors for AGEs (RAGE) in retinas of diabetic rats. What’s more, ZER significantly (p < 0.05) ameliorated diabetes-induced upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6. ZER also attenuated overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and suppressed activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and apoptosis in the retinas of STZ-diabetic rats. Our results suggest ZER possesses retinal protective effects, which might be associated with the blockade of the AGEs/RAGE/NF-κB pathway and its anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:27463726

  18. Zerumbone, a Phytochemical of Subtropical Ginger, Protects against Hyperglycemia-Induced Retinal Damage in Experimental Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Tzeng, Yu-Cheng; Liu, I-Min

    2016-07-25

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most ordinary and specific microvascular complication of diabetes, is a disease of the retina. Zerumbone (ZER) is a monocyclic sesquiterpene compound, and based on reports, it is the predominant bioactive compound from the rhizomes of Zingiber zerumbet. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the protective effect of zerumbone against DR in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. STZ-diabetic rats were treated with ZER (40 mg/kg) once a day orally for 8 weeks. ZER administration significantly (p < 0.05) lowered the levels of plasma glucose (32.5% ± 5.7% lower) and glycosylated hemoglobin (29.2% ± 3.4% lower) in STZ-diabetic rats. Retinal histopathological observations indicated that disarrangement and reduction in thickness of retinal layers were reversed in ZER-treated diabetic rats. ZER downregulated both the elevated levels of advanced glycosylated end products (AGEs) and the higher levels of the receptors for AGEs (RAGE) in retinas of diabetic rats. What's more, ZER significantly (p < 0.05) ameliorated diabetes-induced upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6. ZER also attenuated overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and suppressed activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and apoptosis in the retinas of STZ-diabetic rats. Our results suggest ZER possesses retinal protective effects, which might be associated with the blockade of the AGEs/RAGE/NF-κB pathway and its anti-inflammatory activity.

  19. From confluent human iPS cells to self-forming neural retina and retinal pigmented epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Reichman, Sacha; Terray, Angélique; Slembrouck, Amélie; Nanteau, Céline; Orieux, Gaël; Habeler, Walter; Nandrot, Emeline F.; Sahel, José-Alain; Monville, Christelle; Goureau, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Progress in retinal-cell therapy derived from human pluripotent stem cells currently faces technical challenges that require the development of easy and standardized protocols. Here, we developed a simple retinal differentiation method, based on confluent human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC), bypassing embryoid body formation and the use of exogenous molecules, coating, or Matrigel. In 2 wk, we generated both retinal pigmented epithelial cells and self-forming neural retina (NR)-like structures containing retinal progenitor cells (RPCs). We report sequential differentiation from RPCs to the seven neuroretinal cell types in maturated NR-like structures as floating cultures, thereby revealing the multipotency of RPCs generated from integration-free hiPSCs. Furthermore, Notch pathway inhibition boosted the generation of photoreceptor precursor cells, crucial in establishing cell therapy strategies. This innovative process proposed here provides a readily efficient and scalable approach to produce retinal cells for regenerative medicine and for drug-screening purposes, as well as an in vitro model of human retinal development and disease. PMID:24912154

  20. Cellular Senescence Is Associated With Human Retinal Microaneurysm Formation During Aging.

    PubMed

    López-Luppo, Mariana; Catita, Joana; Ramos, David; Navarro, Marc; Carretero, Ana; Mendes-Jorge, Luísa; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura; Rodriguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Nacher, Victor; Ruberte, Jesus

    2017-06-01

    Microaneurysms are present in healthy old-age human retinas. However, to date, no age-related pathogenic mechanism has been implicated in their formation. Here, cellular senescence, a hallmark of aging and several age-related diseases, has been analyzed in the old-age human retina and in the retina of a progeric mouse. Retinas were obtained from 17 nondiabetic donors and from mice deficient in Bmi1. Cellular senescence was analyzed by immunohistochemistry, senescent-associated β-galactosidase activity assay, Sudan black B staining, conventional transmission electron microscopy, and immunoelectronmicroscopy. Neurons, but not neuroglia, and blood vessels undergo cellular senescence in the old-age human retina. The canonical senescence markers p16, p53, and p21 were up-regulated and coexisted with apoptosis in old-age human microaneurysms. Senescent endothelial cells were discontinuously covered by fibronectin, and p16 colocalized with the β1 subunit of fibronectin receptor α5β1 integrin under the endothelial cellular membrane, suggesting anoikis as a mechanism involved in endothelial cell apoptosis. In a progeric mouse model deficient in Bmi1, where p21 was overexpressed, the retinal blood vessels displayed an aging phenotype characterized by enlarged caveolae and lipofuscin accumulation. Although mouse retina is not prone to develop microaneurysms, Bmi1-deficient mice presented abundant retinal microaneurysms. Together, these results uncover cellular senescence as a player during the formation of microaneurysms in old-age human retinas.

  1. Protective effects of 7,8-dihydroxyflavone on retinal ganglion and RGC-5 cells against excitotoxic and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vivek K; You, Yuyi; Li, Jonathan C; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L

    2013-01-01

    A preferential loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is observed in glaucoma and optic neuritis. Loss of tropomyosin-related kinase receptor B (TrkB)-mediated signaling has been implicated in this degeneration. Our study indicates that 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8 DHF) robustly upregulates the TrkB signaling in the primary rat RGCs and the retinal neuronal precursor RGC-5 cell line by promoting phosphorylation of TrkB receptor, leading to enhanced TrkB receptor tyrosine kinase activity. The flavonoid derivative 7,8 DHF acts a potent TrkB agonist and upregulates the downstream AKT and MAPK/ERK survival signaling pathways in a TrkB-dependent manner in both primary rat RGCs as well as the RGC-5 cell line. Excitotoxicity and oxidative injury have been alleged in the specific RGC degeneration in various forms of glaucoma. A novel finding of this study is that treatment with 7,8 DHF protects these cells significantly from excitotoxic and oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and cell death. 7,8 DHF also promotes neuritogenesis by stimulating neurite outgrowth, suggesting a possible therapeutic strategy for protection of RGCs in various optic neuropathies.

  2. The protective effects of bilberry and lingonberry extracts against UV light-induced retinal photoreceptor cell damage in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kenjirou; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Junji; Kakino, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Saori; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2013-10-30

    Bilberry extract (B-ext) and lingonberry extract (L-ext) are currently used as health supplements. We investigated the protective mechanisms of the B-ext and L-ext against ultraviolet A (UVA)-induced retinal photoreceptor cell damage. Cultured murine photoreceptor (661W) cells were exposed to UVA following treatment with B-ext and L-ext and their main constituents (cyanidin, delphinidin, malvidin, trans-resveratrol, and procyanidin). B-ext, L-ext, and constituents improved cell viability and suppressed ROS generation. Phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and protein kinase B (Akt) were analyzed by Western blotting. B-ext and cyanidin inhibited phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, and B-ext also inhibited phosphorylation of JNK by UVA. L-ext, trans-resveratrol, and procyanidin alleviated the reduction of phosphorylated Akt levels by UVA. Finally, a cotreatment with B-ext and L-ext showed an additive effect on cell viability. Our findings suggest that both B-ext and L-ext endow protective effects against UVA-induced retinal damage.

  3. Two-photon polymerization for production of human iPSC-derived retinal cell grafts.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Kristan S; Wiley, Luke A; Kaalberg, Emily E; Collins, Malia M; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2017-03-25

    Recent advances in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology have paved the way for the production of patient-specific neurons that are ideal for autologous cell replacement for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In the case of retinal degeneration and associated photoreceptor cell therapy, polymer scaffolds are critical for cellular survival and integration; however, prior attempts to materialize this concept have been unsuccessful in part due to the materials' inability to guide cell alignment. In this work, we used two-photon polymerization to create 180 μm wide non-degradable prototype photoreceptor scaffolds with varying pore sizes, slicing distances, hatching distances and hatching types. Hatching distance and hatching type were significant factors for the error of vertical pore diameter, while slicing distance and hatching type most affected the integrity and geometry of horizontal pores. We optimized printing parameters in terms of structural integrity and printing time in order to create 1 mm wide scaffolds for cell loading studies. We fabricated these larger structures directly on a porous membrane with 3 µm diameter pores and seeded them with human iPSC-derived retinal progenitor cells. After two days in culture, cells nested in and extended neuronal processes parallel to the vertical pores of the scaffolds, with maximum cell loading occurring in 25 μm diameter pores. These results highlight the feasibility of using this technique as part of an autologous stem cell strategy for restoring vision to patients affected with retinal degenerative diseases.

  4. Nicotine promotes blood retinal barrier damage in a model of human diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Maugeri, Grazia; D'Amico, Agata Grazia; Rasà, Daniela Maria; La Cognata, Valentina; Saccone, Salvatore; Federico, Concetta; Cavallaro, Sebastiano; D'Agata, Velia

    2017-10-01

    More than 1 billion world's population actively smokes tobacco containing the bioactive component nicotine (NT). The biological role of this molecule is mediated through the activation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors, widely distributed in various human tissues including retinal pigmented epithelium. The long-term assumption of NT contributes to several diseases development such as diabetic retinopathy. The major complication of this pathology is the diabetic macular edema (DME), characterized by macular area thinning and blood-retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown. Retinal hyperglycemic/hypoxic microenvironment represents one of the main factors favoring DME progression by eliciting the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) expression. The latter induce new vessels formation by stimulating cellular secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The etiology of DME is multifactorial, but little is known about the risk factors linked to cigarette smoking, in particular to nicotine's contribution. In the present study, we have investigated the NT role in a model, in vitro, of DME, by evaluating its effect on outer BRB permeability and HIFs/VEGF expression following exposure to hyperglycemic/hypoxic insult. Our results have demonstrated that this compound alters outer BRB integrity exposed to high glucose and low oxygen pressure microenvironment by upregulating HIF-1α/HIF-2α, VEGF expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. These data have suggested that NT may play a negative role in active smokers affected by DME. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Human retinal imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography guided by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Shu, Xiao; Fawzi, Amani A.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2015-01-01

    We achieved human retinal imaging using visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) guided by an integrated scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO). We adapted a spectral domain OCT configuration and used a supercontinuum laser as the illumating source. The center wavelength was 564 nm and the bandwidth was 115 nm, which provided a 0.97 µm axial resolution measured in air. We characterized the sensitivity to be 86 dB with 226 µW incidence power on the pupil. We also integrated an SLO that shared the same optical path of the vis-OCT sample arm for alignment purposes. We demonstrated the retinal imaging from both systems centered at the fovea and optic nerve head with 20° × 20° and 10° × 10° field of view. We observed similar anatomical structures in vis-OCT and NIR-OCT. The contrast appeared different from vis-OCT to NIR-OCT, including slightly weaker signal from intra-retinal layers, and increased visibility and contrast of anatomical layers in the outer retina. PMID:26504622

  6. Transplantation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Cells into the Subretinal Space of a Non-Human Primate

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jennifer R.; Lamba, Deepak A.; Klesert, Todd R.; Torre, Anna La; Hoshino, Akina; Taylor, Russell J.; Jayabalu, Anu; Engel, Abbi L.; Khuu, Thomas H.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Neitz, Maureen; Neitz, Jay; Reh, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of retinal cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to survive, integrate into the host retina, and mediate light responses in murine mouse models. Our aim is to determine whether these cells can also survive and integrate into the retina of a nonhuman primate, Saimiri sciureus, following transplantation into the subretinal space. Methods hESCs were differentiated toward retinal neuronal fates using our previously published technique and cultured for 60 to 70 days. Differentiated cells were further treated with 20 μM N-[N-(3,5-Difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) for a period of 5 days immediately prior to subretinal transplantation. Differentiated cells were labeled with a lentivirus expressing GFP. One million cells (10,000 cells/μL) were injected into the submacular space into a squirrel monkey eye, using an ab externo technique. Results RetCam imaging demonstrated the presence and survival of human donor cells 3 months after transplantation in the S. sciureus eye. Injected cells consolidated in the temporal macula. GFP+ axonal projections were observed to emanate from the central consolidation of cells at 1 month, with some projecting into the optic nerve by 3 months after transplantation. Conclusions Human ES cell-derived retinal neurons injected into the submacular space of a squirrel monkey survive at least 3 months postinjection without immunosuppression. Some donor cells appeared to integrate into the host inner retina, and numerous donor axonal projections were noted throughout, with some projecting into the optic nerve. Translational Relevance These data illustrate the feasibility of hESC-derived retinal cell replacement in the nonhuman primate eye. PMID:28516002

  7. IGFBP-3 inhibits TNF-α production and TNFR-2 signaling to protect against retinal endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuhua; Steinle, Jena J

    2014-09-01

    In models of diabetic retinopathy, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) protects against tumor necrosis factors-alpha (TNF-α)-mediated apoptosis of retinal microvascular endothelial cells (REC), but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Our current findings suggest that at least two discrete but complimentary pathways contribute to the protective effects of IGFBP-3; 1) IGFBP-3 directly activates the c-Jun kinase/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3/TNF-α converting enzyme (c-Jun/TIMP-3/TACE), pathway, which in turn inhibits TNF-α production; 2) IGFBP-3 acts through the IGFBP-3 receptor, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), to inhibit signaling of TNF-α receptor 2 (TNFR2). Combined, these two IGFBP-3 pathways substantially reduce REC apoptosis and offer potential targets for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy.

  8. Reliability and Agreement Between Metrics of Cone Spacing in Adaptive Optics Images of the Human Retinal Photoreceptor Mosaic.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Daniela; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Mariotti, Letizia; Devaney, Nicholas; Serrao, Sebastiano; Lombardo, Marco

    2017-06-01

    To assess reliability and agreement among three metrics used to evaluate the distribution of cell distances in adaptive optics (AO) images of the cone mosaic. Using an AO flood illumination retinal camera, we acquired images of the cone mosaic in 20 healthy subjects and 12 patients with retinal diseases. The three spacing metrics studied were the center-to-center spacing (Scc), the local cone spacing (LCS), and the density recovery profile distance (DRPD). Each metric was calculated in sampling areas of different sizes (64 × 64 μm and 204 × 204 μm) across the parafovea. Both Scc and LCS were able to discriminate between healthy subjects and patients with retinal diseases; DRPD did not reliably detect any abnormality in the distribution of cell distances in patients with retinal diseases. The agreement between Scc and LCS was high in healthy subjects (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] ≥ 0.79) and moderate in patients with retinal diseases (ICC ≤ 0.51). The DRPD had poor agreement with Scc (ICC ≤ 0.47) and LCS (ICC ≤ 0.37). The correlation between the spacing metrics of the two sampling areas was greater in healthy subjects than in patients with retinal diseases. The Scc and LCS provided interchangeable estimates of cone distance in AO retinal images of healthy subjects but could not be used interchangeably when investigating retinal diseases with significant cell reflectivity loss (≥30%). The DRPD was unreliable for describing cell distance in a human retinal cone mosaic and did not correlate with Scc and LCS. Caution is needed when comparing spacing metrics evaluated in sampling areas of different sizes.

  9. Photoreceptor protection via blockade of BET epigenetic readers in a murine model of inherited retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Li, Jun; Fu, Yingmei; Zhang, Mengxue; Wang, Bowen; Ouellette, Jonathan; Shahi, Pawan K; Pattnaik, Bikash R; Watters, Jyoti J; Wong, Wai T; Guo, Lian-Wang

    2017-01-19

    The bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) family proteins (BET2, BET3, and BET4) "read" (bind) histone acetylation marks via two distinct bromodomains (Brom1 and Brom2) facilitating transcriptional activation. These epigenetic "readers" play crucial roles in pathogenic processes such as inflammation. The role of BETs in influencing the degenerative process in the retina is however unknown. We employed the rd10 mouse model (Pde6b (rd10) mutation) of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) to examine the involvement of BET proteins in retinal neurodegeneration. Inhibition of BET activity by intravitreal delivery of JQ1, a BET-specific inhibitor binding both Brom1 and Brom2, ameliorated photoreceptor degeneration and improved electroretinographic function. Rescue effects of JQ1 were related to the suppression of retinal microglial activation in vivo, as determined by decreased immunostaining of activation markers (IBA1, CD68, TSPO) and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of inflammatory cytokines in microglia purified from rd10 retinas. JQ1 pre-treatment also suppressed microglial activation in vitro, decreasing microglial proliferation, migration, and mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, MCP-1, IL-1β, IL-6, and RANTES). Expression of BET2, but not BET3 and BET4, was significantly elevated during photoreceptor degeneration at postnatal day (PN)24 in retinas of rd10 mice relative to age-matched wild-type controls. siRNA knockdown of BET2 but not BET4, and the inhibitor of Brom2 (RVX208) but not of Brom1 (Olinone), decreased microglial activation. These findings indicate that BET inhibition rescues photoreceptor degeneration likely via the suppression of microglial activation and implicates BET interference as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of degenerative retinal diseases.

  10. Treatment Paradigms for Retinal and Macular Diseases Using 3-D Retina Cultures Derived From Human Reporter Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Kaewkhaw, Rossukon; Swaroop, Manju; Homma, Kohei; Nakamura, Jutaro; Brooks, Matthew; Kaya, Koray Dogan; Chaitankar, Vijender; Michael, Sam; Tawa, Gregory; Zou, Jizhong; Rao, Mahendra; Zheng, Wei; Cogliati, Tiziana; Swaroop, Anand

    2016-04-01

    We discuss the use of pluripotent stem cell lines carrying fluorescent reporters driven by retinal promoters to derive three-dimensional (3-D) retina in culture and how this system can be exploited for elucidating human retinal biology, creating disease models in a dish, and designing targeted drug screens for retinal and macular degeneration. Furthermore, we realize that stem cell investigations are labor-intensive and require extensive resources. To expedite scientific discovery by sharing of resources and to avoid duplication of efforts, we propose the formation of a Retinal Stem Cell Consortium. In the field of vision, such collaborative approaches have been enormously successful in elucidating genetic susceptibility associated with age-related macular degeneration.

  11. Treatment Paradigms for Retinal and Macular Diseases Using 3-D Retina Cultures Derived From Human Reporter Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Kaewkhaw, Rossukon; Swaroop, Manju; Homma, Kohei; Nakamura, Jutaro; Brooks, Matthew; Kaya, Koray Dogan; Chaitankar, Vijender; Michael, Sam; Tawa, Gregory; Zou, Jizhong; Rao, Mahendra; Zheng, Wei; Cogliati, Tiziana; Swaroop, Anand

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the use of pluripotent stem cell lines carrying fluorescent reporters driven by retinal promoters to derive three-dimensional (3-D) retina in culture and how this system can be exploited for elucidating human retinal biology, creating disease models in a dish, and designing targeted drug screens for retinal and macular degeneration. Furthermore, we realize that stem cell investigations are labor-intensive and require extensive resources. To expedite scientific discovery by sharing of resources and to avoid duplication of efforts, we propose the formation of a Retinal Stem Cell Consortium. In the field of vision, such collaborative approaches have been enormously successful in elucidating genetic susceptibility associated with age-related macular degeneration. PMID:27116668

  12. Baicalein protects against retinal ischemia by antioxidation, antiapoptosis, downregulation of HIF-1α, VEGF, and MMP-9 and upregulation of HO-1.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hsiao-Ming; Chuang, Min-Jay; Liu, Jorn-Hon; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Ho, Li-Kang; Pan, Wynn H T; Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Liu, Chi-Ming; Tsai, Shen-Kou; Kong, Chi-Woon; Lee, Shou-Dong; Chen, Mi-Mi; Chao, Fang-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Retinal ischemia-associated ocular disorders are vision threatening. This study examined whether the flavonoid baicalein is able to protect against retinal ischemia/reperfusion. Using rats, the intraocular pressure was raised to 120 mmHg for 60 min to induce retinal ischemia. In vitro, an ischemic-like insult, namely oxidative stress, was established by incubating dissociated retinal cells with 100 μM ascorbate and 5 μM FeSO4 (iron) for 1 h. The rats or the dissociated cells had been pretreated with baicalein (in vivo: 0.05 or 0.5 nmol; in vitro: 100 μM), vehicle (1% ethanol), or trolox (in vivo: 5 nmol; in vitro: 100 μM or 1 mM). The effects of these treatments on the retina or the retinal cells were evaluated by electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining, Western blotting, or in vitro dichlorofluorescein assay. In addition, real-time-polymerase chain reaction was used to assess the retinal expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). The retinal changes after ischemia included a decrease in the electroretinogram b-wave amplitude, a loss of choline acetyltransferase immunolabeling amacrine cell bodies/neuronal processes, an increase in vimentin immunoreactivity, which is a marker for Müller cells, an increase in apoptotic cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer linked to a decrease in the Bcl-2 protein, and changes in the mRNA levels of HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP-9, and HO-1. Of clinical importance, the ischemic detrimental effects were concentration dependently and/or significantly (0.05 nmol and/or 0.5 nmol) altered when baicalein was applied 15 min before retinal ischemia. Most of all, 0.5 nmol baicalein significantly reduced the upregulation of MMP-9; in contrast, 5 nmol trolox only had a weak attenuating effect. In dissociated retinal cells subjected to ascorbate

  13. Claudin-19 and the Barrier Properties of the Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shaomin; Rao, Veena S.; Adelman, Ron A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) separates photoreceptors from choroidal capillaries, but in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) capillaries breach the RPE barrier. Little is known about human RPE tight junctions or the effects of serum on the retinal side of the RPE. Methods. Cultured human fetal RPE (hfRPE) was assessed by the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and the transepithelial diffusion of methylated polyethylene glycol (mPEG). Claudins and occludin were monitored by quantitative RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence. Results. Similar to freshly isolated hfRPE, claudin-19 mRNA was 25 times more abundant than claudin-3. Other detectable claudin mRNAs were found in even lesser amounts, as little as 3000 times less abundant than claudin-19. Claudin-1 and claudin-10b were detected only in subpopulations of cells, whereas others were undetectable. Knockdown of claudin-19 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) eliminated the TER. siRNAs for other claudins had minimal effects. Serum affected tight junctions only when presented to the retinal side of the RPE. The TER increased 2 times, and the conductance of K+ relative to Na+ decreased without affecting the permeability of mPEG. These effects correlated with increased steady-state levels of occludin. Conclusions. Fetal human RPE is a claudin-19–dominant epithelium that has regional variations in claudin-expression. Apical serum decreases RPE permeability, which might be a defense mechanism that would retard the spread of edema due to AMD. PMID:21071746

  14. Quercetin and cyanidin-3-glucoside protect against photooxidation and photodegradation of A2E in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Kim, Hye Jin; Sparrow, Janet R

    2017-07-01

    A family of photoreactive retinaldehyde-derived molecules accumulate in retinal pigment epithelial cells with age; this accumulation is implicated in some retinal diseases. One of these compounds is the diretinal fluorophore A2E. Here we compared polyphenols for their ability to suppress the photooxidation and photodegradation of A2E. In cells that had accumulated A2E and were irradiated with short-wavelength light, quercetin, cyanidin-3-glucoside, ferulic acid and chlorogenic acid diminished cellular levels of reactive oxygen species, but only quercetin and cyanidin-3-glucoside promoted cell viability. By chromatographic quantitation, quercetin and cyanidin-3-glucoside reduced the consumption of A2E by photooxidation in both cell- and cell-free assays. With ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, quercetin and cyanidin-3-glucoside also inhibited the formation of photooxidized-A2E species. While photodegradation of A2E is known to result in the release of reactive carbonyls, we demonstrated that quercetin and cyanidin-3-glucoside decreased the formation of methylglyoxal adducts in the cells, and reduced the expression of mRNA encoding receptor for advanced glycation end products. These polyphenols also protected glutathione from reaction with photooxidized A2E. In rod outer segments incubated with all-trans-retinal to generate bisretinoid, followed by irradiation, quercetin and cyanidin-3-glucoside reduced release of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal. In conclusion, quercetin and cyanidin-3-glucoside can guard against photooxidative processes in retina. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Human retinal pigment epithelial lysis of extracellular matrix: functional urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, collagenase, and elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Elner, Susan G

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To show (1) human retinal pigment epithelial (HRPE) expression of functional urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR; CD87), (2) HRPE secretion of collagenase and elastase, (3) uPAR-dependent HRPE migration, and (4) uPAR expression in diseased human retinal tissue. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry for uPAR was performed on cultured HRPE cells and in sections of human retina. Double-immunofluorescent staining of live human RPE cells with anti-CR3 antibody (CD11b) was performed to demonstrate the physical proximity of this beta 2 integrin with uPAR and determine whether associations were dependent on RPE confluence and polarity. Extracellular proteolysis by HRPE uPAR was evaluated using fluorescent bodipy-BSA and assessed for specificity by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) inhibition. The effect of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) on uPAR expression was assessed. Collagenase and elastase secretion by unstimulated and IL-1-stimulated HRPE cells was measured by 3H-labelled collagen and elastin cleavage. HRPE-associated collagenase was also assessed by cleavage of fluorescent DQ-collagen and inhibited by phenanthroline. Using an extracellular matrix assay, the roles of uPAR and collagenase in HRPE migration were assessed. RESULTS: Immunoreactive uPAR was detected on cultured HRPE cells and increased by IL-1. On elongated, live HRPE cells, uPAR dissociated from CD11b (CR3) and translocated to anterior poles of migrating cells. Extracellular proteolysis was concentrated at sites of uPAR expression and specifically inhibited by PAI-1. Cultured HRPE cells secreted substantial, functional collagenase and elastase. IL-1 upregulated uPAR, collagenase, and elastase activities. Specific inhibition of uPAR, and to a lesser degree collagenase, reduced HRPE migration in matrix/gel assays. Immunoreactive uPAR was present along the HRPE basolateral membrane in retinal sections and in sections of diseased retinal tissue. CONCLUSIONS: HRPE cells express functional u

  16. Hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimer-based gene vectors for transgene delivery to human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Kambhampati, Siva P.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Wu, Tony; Song, Eric; Hanes, Justin; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2015-02-01

    Ocular gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of numerous blinding disorders. Despite the significant progress in the field of viral and non-viral gene delivery to the eye, significant obstacles remain in the way of achieving high-level transgene expression without adverse effects. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases and is a key target for a number of gene-based therapeutics. In this study, we addressed the inherent drawbacks of non-viral gene vectors and combined different approaches to design an efficient and safe dendrimer-based gene-delivery platform for delivery to human RPE cells. We used hydroxyl-terminated polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers functionalized with various amounts of amine groups to achieve effective plasmid compaction. We further used triamcinolone acetonide (TA) as a nuclear localization enhancer for the dendrimer-gene complex and achieved significant improvement in cell uptake and transfection of hard-to-transfect human RPE cells. To improve colloidal stability, we further shielded the gene vector surface through incorporation of PEGylated dendrimer along with dendrimer-TA for DNA complexation. The resultant complexes showed improved stability while minimally affecting transgene delivery, thus improving the translational relevance of this platform.Ocular gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of numerous blinding disorders. Despite the significant progress in the field of viral and non-viral gene delivery to the eye, significant obstacles remain in the way of achieving high-level transgene expression without adverse effects. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases and is a key target for a number of gene-based therapeutics. In this study, we addressed the inherent drawbacks of non-viral gene vectors and combined different approaches to design an efficient and safe dendrimer-based gene-delivery platform for delivery to human RPE

  17. Derivation and characterization of the human embryonic stem cell line CR-4: Differentiation to human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mazzilli, John L; Domozhirov, Aleksey Y; Mueller-Ortiz, Stacey L; Garcia, Charles A; Wetsel, Rick A; Zsigmond, Eva M

    2017-01-01

    The CR-4 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from the inner cell mass of a developing blastocyst. This cell line has been adapted to grow in feeder-free conditions and is especially well-suited for differentiation to retinal pigment epithelium. The line demonstrates a normal human 46,XX female karyotype. Pluripotency was assessed through qRT-PCR for expression of NANOG, OCT-4, and SOX-2. A teratoma assay was performed and results were positive for all three germ layers. Testing for Mycoplasma was negative. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Establishment of a blue light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Su, G; Cai, S J; Gong, X; Wang, L L; Li, H H; Wang, L M

    2016-06-24

    To establish a blue-light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Fourth-generation human RPE cells were randomly divided into two groups. In group A, cells were exposed to blue light (2000 ± 500 lux) for 0 (control), 3, 6, 9, and 12 h, and cell culture was stopped after 12 h. In group B, cells were exposed to blue light at the same intensity and time periods, but cell culture was stopped after 24 h. TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay was performed to determine the most suitable illuminating time with apoptotic index. Flow cytometry was used to determine apoptotic ratio of RPEs. In group A, the apoptotic index of cells that received 6, 9 and 12 h of blue light was higher than that of control. The apoptotic index of cells receiving 9 and 12 h was higher than that of 6 h (P = 0.000). In group B, the apoptotic index and RPE cell apoptosis ratio of cells exposed to 6, 9 and 12 h of blue light were higher than that of 3 h (P = 0.000); and cells receiving 9 and 12 h had higher values than that of 6 h. This study demonstrated that the best conditions to establish a blue light damage model of human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro are 2000 ± 500 lux light intensity for 6 h, with 24 h of cell culture post-exposure.

  19. Protection by an oral disubstituted hydroxylamine derivative against loss of retinal ganglion cell differentiation following optic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, James D; Duong-Polk, Karen X; Dai, Yi; Nguyen, Duy H; Leung, Christopher K; Weinreb, Robert N

    2013-01-01

    Thy-1 is a cell surface protein that is expressed during the differentiation of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Optic nerve injury induces progressive loss in the number of RGCs expressing Thy-1. The rate of this loss is fastest during the first week after optic nerve injury and slower in subsequent weeks. This study was undertaken to determine whether oral treatment with a water-soluble N-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine derivative (OT-440) protects against loss of Thy-1 promoter activation following optic nerve crush and whether this effect targets the earlier quick phase or the later slow phase. The retina of mice expressing cyan fluorescent protein under control of the Thy-1 promoter (Thy1-CFP mice) was imaged using a blue-light confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (bCSLO). These mice then received oral OT-440 prepared in cream cheese or dissolved in water, or plain vehicle, for two weeks and were imaged again prior to unilateral optic nerve crush. Treatments and weekly imaging continued for four more weeks. Fluorescent neurons were counted in the same defined retinal areas imaged at each time point in a masked fashion. When the counts at each time point were directly compared, the numbers of fluorescent cells at each time point were greater in the animals that received OT-440 in cream cheese by 8%, 27%, 52% and 60% than in corresponding control animals at 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks after optic nerve crush. Similar results were obtained when the vehicle was water. Rate analysis indicated the protective effect of OT-440 was greatest during the first two weeks and was maintained in the second two weeks after crush for both the cream cheese vehicle study and water vehicle study. Because most of the fluorescent cells detected by bCSLO are RGCs, these findings suggest that oral OT-440 can either protect against or delay early degenerative responses occurring in RGCs following optic nerve injury.

  20. [Aging and retinal vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hitoshi

    2007-03-01

    Ocular vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, and age-related macular degeneration, whose population increases along with aging, have become leading causes of severe visual disturbance. Macular edema and serous retinal detachment are associated with abnormal vascular leakage and tractional retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma is caused by retinal neovascularization. Such ocular vascular diseases are caused by vascular cell aging and vascular damage associated with lifestyle-related diseases including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. In the present study, we investigated molecular mechanisms in such vascular deficiencies using vascular cell biology methodology, and we propose novel strategies for the treatment of such vascular diseases. Along with aging, oxidative stress and physical stress, such as mechanical stretch, continuously and directly insult vascular cells. Such stress induces apoptosis by intracellular signaling through stress kinases in cultured retinal vascular cells. Inhibition of such stress kinases could be an effective treatment to protect the vascular cells against age-related damage. In a retinal vascular developmental model, pericyte loss causes pathology mimicking macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Angiopoietin 1 (Ang 1) secreted by pericytes suppresses oxidative stress-induced intracellular signaling through stress kinases linked to cell apoptosis and normalizes such retinal pathology. This suggests that the paracrine action of Ang 1 in the pericytes is necessary to sustain normal retinal vasculature, and that Ang 1-triggered intracellular signaling is useful for the treatment of vascular cell pathology associated with pericyte loss. In diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, retinal vessels regress along with retinal vascular cell apoptosis, and the retina becomes ischemic followed by pathological retinal neovascularization. VEGF has been

  1. Vaccination for protection of retinal ganglion cells against death from glutamate cytotoxicity and ocular hypertension: Implications for glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schori, Hadas; Kipnis, Jonathan; Yoles, Eti; Woldemussie, Elizabeth; Ruiz, Guadalupe; Wheeler, Larry A.; Schwartz, Michal

    2001-03-01

    Our group recently demonstrated that autoimmune T cells directed against central nervous system-associated myelin antigens protect neurons from secondary degeneration. We further showed that the synthetic peptide copolymer 1 (Cop-1), known to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, can be safely substituted for the natural myelin antigen in both passive and active immunization for neuroprotection of the injured optic nerve. Here we attempted to determine whether similar immunizations are protective from retinal ganglion cell loss resulting from a direct biochemical insult caused, for example, by glutamate (a major mediator of degeneration in acute and chronic optic nerve insults) and in a rat model of ocular hypertension. Passive immunization with T cells reactive to myelin basic protein or active immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-derived peptide, although neuroprotective after optic nerve injury, was ineffective against glutamate toxicity in mice and rats. In contrast, the number of surviving retinal ganglion cells per square millimeter in glutamate-injected retinas was significantly larger in mice immunized 10 days previously with Cop-1 emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant than in mice injected with PBS in the same adjuvant (2,133 ± 270 and 1,329 ± 121, respectively, mean ± SEM; P < 0.02). A similar pattern was observed when mice were immunized on the day of glutamate injection (1,777 ± 101 compared with 1,414 ± 36; P <0.05), but not when they were immunized 48h later. These findings suggest that protection from glutamate toxicity requires reinforcement of the immune system by antigens that are different from those associated with myelin. The use of Cop-1 apparently circumvents this antigen specificity barrier. In the rat ocular hypertension model, which simulates glaucoma, immunization with Cop-1 significantly reduced the retinal ganglion cell loss from 27.8%±6.8% to 4.3%±1.6%, without affecting the intraocular pressure

  2. Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper Protects the Retina From Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration by Inducing Bcl-xL in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ruiping; Tang, Wenyi; Lei, Boya; Ding, Xinyi; Jiang, Cheng; Xu, Gezhi

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in a light-induced retinal degeneration model and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Intravitreal injection of recombinant GILZ-overexpressing lentivirus (OE-GILZ-rLV) and short hairpin RNA targeting GILZ recombinant lentivirus (shRNA-GILZ-rLV) was performed to up- and downregulate retinal GILZ, respectively. Three days after stable transduction, rats were exposed to continuous bright light (5000 lux) for 2 days. Retinal function was assessed by full-field electroretinography (ERG), and the retinal structure was examined for photoreceptor survival and death in rats kept under a 12-hour light:2-hour dark cycle following light exposure. The expression levels of retinal Bcl-xL, caspase-9, and caspase-3 were examined by Western blotting or real-time PCR at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after light exposure. Exposure to bright light downregulated retinal GILZ in parallel with the downregulation of Bcl-xL and the upregulation of active caspase-3. Overexpression of retinal GILZ attenuated the decrease of Bcl-xL and the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after bright light exposure, respectively. GILZ silencing aggravated the downregulation of Bcl-xL induced by bright light exposure. Bright light exposure reduced the amplitude of ERG, increased the number of apoptotic photoreceptor cells, and decreased retinal thickness; and GILZ overexpression could attenuate all these effects. Overexpression of GILZ by OE-GILZ-rLV transduction protected the retina from light-induced cellular damage by activating antiapoptotic pathways.

  3. Protective effects of triptolide on retinal ganglion cells in a rat model of chronic glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Dongmei; Wu, Lingling; Li, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study the effects of triptolide, a Chinese herb extract, on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a rat model of chronic glaucoma. Methods Eighty Wistar rats were randomly divided into triptolide group (n=40) and normal saline (NS) group (n=40). Angle photocoagulation was used to establish the model of glaucoma, with right eye as laser treated eye and left eye as control eye. Triptolide group received triptolide intraperitoneally daily, while NS group received NS. Intraocular pressure (IOP), anti-CD11b immunofluorescent stain in retina and optic nerve, RGCs count with Nissel stain and microglia count with anti-CD11b immunofluorescence stain in retina flat mounts, retinal tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α mRNA detection by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, and double immunofluorescent labeling with anti-TNF-α and anti-CD11b in retinal frozen section were performed. Results Mean IOP of the laser treated eyes significantly increased 3 weeks after photocoagulation (P<0.05), with no statistical difference between the two groups (P>0.05). RGCs survival in the laser treated eyes was significantly improved in the triptolide group than the NS group (P<0.05). Microglia count in superficial retina of the laser treated eyes was significantly less in the triptolide group (30.40±4.90) than the NS group (35.06±7.59) (P<0.05). TNF-α mRNA expression in the retina of the laser treated eyes in the triptolide group decreased by 60% compared with that in the NS group (P<0.01). The double immunofluorescent labeling showed that TNF-α was mainly distributed around the microglia. Conclusion Triptolide improved RGCs survival in this rat model of chronic glaucoma, which did not depend on IOP decrease but might be exerted by inhibiting microglia activities and reducing TNF-α secretion. PMID:26604697

  4. Human pericyte-endothelial cell interactions in co-culture models mimicking the diabetic retinal microvascular environment.

    PubMed

    Tarallo, Sonia; Beltramo, Elena; Berrone, Elena; Porta, Massimo

    2012-12-01

    Pericytes regulate vascular tone, perfusion pressure and endothelial cell (EC) proliferation in capillaries. Thiamine and benfotiamine counteract high glucose-induced damage in vascular cells. We standardized two human retinal pericyte (HRP)/EC co-culture models to mimic the diabetic retinal microvascular environment. We aimed at evaluating the interactions between co-cultured HRP and EC in terms of proliferation/apoptosis and the possible protective role of thiamine and benfotiamine against high glucose-induced damage. EC and HRP were co-cultured in physiological glucose and stable or intermittent high glucose, with or without thiamine/benfotiamine. No-contact model: EC were plated on a porous membrane suspended into the medium and HRP on the bottom of the same well. Cell-to-cell contact model: EC and HRP were plated on the opposite sides of the same membrane. Proliferation (cell counts and DNA synthesis), apoptosis and tubule formation in Matrigel were assessed. In the no-contact model, stable high glucose reduced proliferation of co-cultured EC/HRP and EC alone and increased co-cultured EC/HRP apoptosis. In the contact model, both stable and intermittent high glucose reduced co-cultured EC/HRP proliferation and increased apoptosis. Stable high glucose had no effects on HRP in separate cultures. Both EC and HRP proliferated better when co-cultured. Thiamine and benfotiamine reversed high glucose-induced damage in all cases. HRP are sensitive to soluble factors released by EC when cultured in high glucose conditions, as suggested by conditioned media assays. In the Matrigel models, addition of thiamine and benfotiamine re-established the high glucose-damaged interactions between EC/HRP and stabilized microtubules.

  5. Epiretinal transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells rescues retinal and vision function in a rat model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Tzameret, Adi; Sher, Ifat; Belkin, Michael; Treves, Avraham J; Meir, Amilia; Nagler, Arnon; Levkovitch-Verbin, Hani; Rotenstreich, Ygal; Solomon, Arieh S

    2015-09-01

    Vision incapacitation and blindness associated with incurable retinal degeneration affect millions of people worldwide. In this study, 0.25×10(6) human bone marrow stem cells (hBM-MSCs) were transplanted epiretinally in the right eye of Royal College Surgeons (RCS) rats at the age of 28 days. Epiretinally transplanted cells were identified as a thin layer of cells along vitreous cavity, in close proximity to the retina or attached to the lens capsule, up to 6 weeks following transplantation. Epiretinal transplantation delayed photoreceptor degeneration and rescued retinal function up to 20 weeks following cell transplantation. Visual functions remained close to normal levels in epiretinal transplantation rats. No inflammation or any other adverse effects were observed in transplanted eyes. Our findings suggest that transplantation of hBM-MSCs as a thin epiretinal layer is effective for treatment of retinal degeneration in RCS rats, and that transplanting the cells in close proximity to the retina enhances hBM-MSC therapeutic effect compared with intravitreal injection.

  6. Protection of cone photoreceptor M-opsin degradation with 9-cis-β-carotene-rich alga Dunaliella bardawil in Rpe65(-/-) mouse retinal explant culture.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Taku; Nakazawa, Mitsuru; Kudo, Takashi; Hirano, Satoshi; Suzuki, Kaori; Ishiguro, Sei-ichi

    2014-12-01

    RPE65, a retinal pigment epithelium-specific 65-kDa protein, plays a critical role in the visual cycle of the eye. Rpe65(-/-) mice develop vision loss due to a lack of 11-cis-retinal, degradation of M-opsin and mislocalization of S-opsin. Several studies have suggested that 9-cis-β-carotene, a precursor of 9-cis-retinal and all-trans-retinal, could have therapeutic applications in vision loss. We therefore examined whether Dunaliella bardawil, a 9-cis-β-carotene-rich alga, protects against the degradation of M-opsin using Rpe65(-/-) mouse retinal explant cultures. The eyes of three-week-old Rpe65(-/-) and C57BL/6 J mice were enucleated, and the corneas were removed. The eyecups were incubated with culture medium in the absence or presence of D. bardawil for 6 h to 4 days. Localizations of M-opsin proteins in the retina were observed immunohistochemically. Expression levels of M-opsin, S-opsin and rhodopsin proteins were evaluated by Western blot analysis. In C57BL/6 J mouse retina, no change was observed in localization and expression levels of M-opsin in the explant culture system. In Rpe65(-/-) mouse retina, the amount of M-opsin protein was decreased in the photoreceptor outer segment after 6 h to 4 days of culture. However, the presence of D. bardawil significantly ameliorated this decrease. In contrast, expression levels of S-opsin and rhodopsin were unchanged in the presence of the explant culture. These results demonstrate that D. bardawil treatment protects against M-opsin degradation in Rpe65(-/-) mouse retina and suggest that D. bardawil has therapeutic potential for retinal degeneration caused by Rpe65 gene mutation, such as Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa.

  7. Enhanced functional integration of human photoreceptor precursors into human and rodent retina in an ex vivo retinal explant model system.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Anat; Laver, Christopher R J; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl Y; Liu, Ran R; Gregory-Evans, Kevin

    2015-06-01

    Retinal disease is the major cause of irreversible blindness in developed countries. Transplantation of photoreceptor precursor cells (PPCs) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is a promising and widely applicable approach for the treatment of these blinding conditions. Previously, it has been shown that after transplantation into the degenerating retina, the percentage of PPCs that undergo functional integration is low. The factors that inhibit PPC engraftment remain largely unknown, in part, because so many adverse factors could be at play during in vivo experiments. To advance our knowledge in overcoming potential adverse effects and optimize PPC transplantation, we have developed a novel ex vivo system. Harvested neural retina was placed directly on top of cultured retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from a number of different sources. To mimic PPC transplantation into the subretinal space, hESC-derived PPCs were inserted between the retinal explant and underlying RPE. Explants cocultured with hESC-derived RPE maintained normal gross morphology and viability for up to 2 weeks, whereas the explants cultured on ARPE19 and RPE-J failed by 7 days. Furthermore, the proportion of PPCs expressing ribbon synapse-specific proteins BASSOON and RIBEYE was significantly higher when cocultured with hESC-derived RPE (20% and 10%, respectively), than when cocultured with ARPE19 (only 6% and 2%, respectively). In the presence of the synaptogenic factor thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), the proportion of BASSOON-positive and RIBEYE-positive PPCs cocultured with hESC-derived RPE increased to ∼30% and 15%, respectively. These data demonstrate the utility of an ex vivo model system to define factors, such as TSP-1, which could influence integration efficiency in future in vivo experiments in models of retinal degeneration.

  8. Degradation in the degree of polarization in human retinal nerve fiber layer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Biwei; Wang, Bingqing; Rylander, Henry G.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Using a fiber-based swept-source (SS) polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) system, we investigate the degree of polarization (DOP) of light backscattered from the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) in normal human subjects. Algorithms for processing data were developed to analyze the deviation in phase retardation and intensity of backscattered light in directions parallel and perpendicular to the nerve fiber axis (fast and slow axes of RNFL). Considering superior, inferior, and nasal quadrants, we observe the strongest degradation in the DOP with increasing RNFL depth in the temporal quadrant. Retinal ganglion cell axons in normal human subjects are known to have the smallest diameter in the temporal quadrant, and the greater degradation observed in the DOP suggests that higher polarimetric noise may be associated with neural structure in the temporal RNFL. The association between depth degradation in the DOP and RNFL structural properties may broaden the utility of PS-OCT as a functional imaging technique. PMID:24390374

  9. Structural and functional human retinal imaging with a fiber-based visible light OCT ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Shau Poh; Bernucci, Marcel; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2016-01-01

    The design of a multi-functional fiber-based Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) system for human retinal imaging with < 2 micron axial resolution in tissue is described. A detailed noise characterization of two supercontinuum light sources with different pulse repetition rates is presented. The higher repetition rate and lower noise source is found to enable a sensitivity of 96 dB with 0.15 mW light power at the cornea and a 98 microsecond exposure time. Using a broadband (560 ± 50 nm), 90/10, fused single-mode fiber coupler designed for visible wavelengths, the sample arm is integrated into an ophthalmoscope platform, similar to current clinical OCT systems. To demonstrate the instrument’s range of operation, in vivo structural retinal imaging is also shown at 0.15 mW exposure with 10,000 and 70,000 axial scans per second (the latter comparable to commercial OCT systems), and at 0.03 mW exposure and 10,000 axial scans per second (below maximum permissible continuous exposure levels). Lastly, in vivo spectroscopic imaging of anatomy, saturation, and hemoglobin content in the human retina is also demonstrated. PMID:28101421

  10. Bestrophin 1 is indispensable for volume regulation in human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Milenkovic, Andrea; Brandl, Caroline; Milenkovic, Vladimir M; Jendryke, Thomas; Sirianant, Lalida; Wanitchakool, Potchanart; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Reiff, Charlotte M; Horling, Franziska; Schrewe, Heinrich; Schreiber, Rainer; Kunzelmann, Karl; Wetzel, Christian H; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2015-05-19

    In response to cell swelling, volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs) participate in a process known as regulatory volume decrease (RVD). Only recently, first insight into the molecular identity of mammalian VRACs was obtained by the discovery of the leucine-rich repeats containing 8A (LRRC8A) gene. Here, we show that bestrophin 1 (BEST1) but not LRRC8A is crucial for volume regulation in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in RPE derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) exhibit an outwardly rectifying chloride current with characteristic functional properties of VRACs. This current is severely reduced in hiPSC-RPE cells derived from macular dystrophy patients with pathologic BEST1 mutations. Disruption of the orthologous mouse gene (Best1(-/-)) does not result in obvious retinal pathology but leads to a severe subfertility phenotype in agreement with minor endogenous expression of Best1 in murine RPE but highly abundant expression in mouse testis. Sperm from Best1(-/-) mice showed reduced motility and abnormal sperm morphology, indicating an inability in RVD. Together, our data suggest that the molecular identity of VRACs is more complex--that is, instead of a single ubiquitous channel, VRACs could be formed by cell type- or tissue-specific subunit composition. Our findings provide the basis to further examine VRAC diversity in normal and diseased cell physiology, which is key to exploring novel therapeutic approaches in VRAC-associated pathologies.

  11. Type VII Collagen Expression in the Human Vitreoretinal Interface, Corpora Amylacea and Inner Retinal Layers.

    PubMed

    Wullink, Bart; Pas, Hendri H; Van der Worp, Roelofje J; Kuijer, Roel; Los, Leonoor I

    2015-01-01

    Type VII collagen, as a major component of anchoring fibrils found at basement membrane zones, is crucial in anchoring epithelial tissue layers to their underlying stroma. Recently, type VII collagen was discovered in the inner human retina by means of immunohistochemistry, while proteomic investigations demonstrated type VII collagen at the vitreoretinal interface of chicken. Because of its potential anchoring function at the vitreoretinal interface, we further assessed the presence of type VII collagen at this site. We evaluated the vitreoretinal interface of human donor eyes by means of immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy, and Western blotting. Firstly, type VII collagen was detected alongside vitreous fibers6 at the vitreoretinal interface. Because of its known anchoring function, it is likely that type VII collagen is involved in vitreoretinal attachment. Secondly, type VII collagen was found within cytoplasmic vesicles of inner retinal cells. These cells resided most frequently in the ganglion cell layer and inner plexiform layer. Thirdly, type VII collagen was found in astrocytic cytoplasmic inclusions, known as corpora amylacea. The intraretinal presence of type VII collagen was confirmed by Western blotting of homogenized retinal preparations. These data add to the understanding of vitreoretinal attachment, which is important for a better comprehension of common vitreoretinal attachment pathologies.

  12. Chromatic aberration correction of the human eye for retinal imaging in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Enrique J.; Unterhuber, Angelika; Považay, Boris; Hermann, Boris; Artal, Pablo; Drexler, Woflgang

    2006-06-01

    An achromatizing lens has been designed for the human eye in the near infrared range, from 700 to 900 nm, for retinal imaging purposes. Analysis of the performance of the lens, including tolerance to misalignments, has been mathematically accomplished by using an existing eye model. The calculations have shown a virtually perfect correction of the ocular longitudinal chromatic aberration, while still keeping a high optical quality. Ocular aberrations in five subjects have been measured with and without the achromatizing lens by using a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor and a broad bandwidth femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser in the spectral range of interest with a set of interference filters, studying the benefits and limits in the use of the achromatizing lens. Ocular longitudinal chromatic aberration has been experimentally demonstrated to be fully corrected by the proposed lens, with no induction of any other parasitic aberration. The practical implementation of the achromatizing lens for Ophthalmoscopy, specifically for optical coherence tomography where the use of polychromatic light sources in the near infrared portion of the spectrum is mandatory, has been considered. The potential benefits of using this lens in combination with adaptive optics to achieve a full aberration correction of the human eye for retinal imaging have also been discussed.

  13. Chromatic aberration correction of the human eye for retinal imaging in the near infrared.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Enrique J; Unterhuber, Angelika; Povazay, Boris; Hermann, Boris; Artal, Pablo; Drexler, Woflgang

    2006-06-26

    An achromatizing lens has been designed for the human eye in the near infrared range, from 700 to 900 nm, for retinal imaging purposes. Analysis of the performance of the lens, including tolerance to misalignments, has been mathematically accomplished by using an existing eye model. The calculations have shown a virtually perfect correction of the ocular longitudinal chromatic aberration, while still keeping a high optical quality. Ocular aberrations in five subjects have been measured with and without the achromatizing lens by using a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor and a broad bandwidth femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser in the spectral range of interest with a set of interference filters, studying the benefits and limits in the use of the achromatizing lens. Ocular longitudinal chromatic aberration has been experimentally demonstrated to be fully corrected by the proposed lens, with no induction of any other parasitic aberration. The practical implementation of the achromatizing lens for Ophthalmoscopy, specifically for optical coherence tomography where the use of polychromatic light sources in the near infrared portion of the spectrum is mandatory, has been considered. The potential benefits of using this lens in combination with adaptive optics to achieve a full aberration correction of the human eye for retinal imaging have also been discussed.

  14. Hydroxyl PAMAM dendrimer-based gene vectors for transgene delivery to human retinal pigment epithelial cells†

    PubMed Central

    Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Kambhampati, Siva P.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Wu, Tony; Song, Eric; Hanes, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Ocular gene therapy holds promise for the treatment of numerous blinding disorders. Despite the significant progress in the field of viral and non-viral gene delivery to the eye, significant obstacles remain in the way of achieving high-level transgene expression without adverse effects. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in the pathogenesis of retinal diseases and is a key target for a number of gene-based therapeutics. In this study, we addressed the inherent drawbacks of non-viral gene vectors and combined different approaches to design an efficient and safe dendrimer-based gene-delivery platform for delivery to human RPE cells. We used hydroxyl-terminated polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers functionalized with various amounts of amine groups to achieve effective plasmid compaction. We further used triamcinolone acetonide (TA) as a nuclear localization enhancer for the dendrimer-gene complex and achieved significant improvement in cell uptake and transfection of hard-to-transfect human RPE cells. To improve colloidal stability, we further shielded the gene vector surface through incorporation of PEGylated dendrimer along with dendrimer-TA for DNA complexation. The resultant complexes showed improved stability while minimally affecting transgene delivery, thus improving the translational relevance of this platform. PMID:25213606

  15. Protecting the retinal neurons from glaucoma: lowering ocular pressure is not enough.

    PubMed

    Pascale, Alessia; Drago, Filippo; Govoni, Stefano

    2012-07-01

    The retina is theater of a number of biochemical reactions allowing, within its layers, the conversion of light impulses into electrical signals. The axons of the last neuronal elements, the ganglion cells, form the optic nerve and transfer the signals to the brain. Therefore, an appropriate cellular communication, not only within the different retinal cells, but also between the retina itself and the other brain structures, is fundamental. One of the most diffuse pathologies affecting retinal function and communication, which thus reverberates in the whole visual system, is glaucoma. This insidious disease is characterized by a progressive optic nerve degeneration and sight loss which may finally lead to irreversible blindness. Nevertheless, the progressive nature of this pathology offers an opportunity for therapeutic intervention. To better understand the cellular processes implicated in the development of glaucoma useful to envision a targeted pharmacological strategy, this manuscript first examines the complex cellular and functional organization of the retina and subsequently identifies the targets sensitive to neurodegeneration. Within this context, high ocular pressure represents a key risk factor. However, recent literature findings highlight the concept that lowering ocular pressure is not enough to prevent/slow down glaucomatous damage, suggesting the importance of combining the hypotensive treatment with other pharmacological approaches, such as the use of neuroprotectants. Therefore, this important and more novel aspect is extensively considered in this review, also emphasizing the idea that the neuroprotective strategy should be extended to the entire visual system and not restricted to the retina. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Trimetazidine protects retinal ganglion cells from acute glaucoma via the Nrf2/Ho-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wan, Peixing; Su, Wenru; Zhang, Yingying; Li, Zhidong; Deng, Caibin; Zhuo, Yehong

    2017-09-15

    Acute glaucoma is one of the leading causes of irreversible vision impairment characterized by the rapid elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP) and consequent retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation have been considered critical for the pathogenesis of RGC death in acute glaucoma. Trimetazidine (TMZ), an anti-ischemic drug, possesses antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties, contributing to its therapeutic potential in tissue damage. However, the role of TMZ in acute glaucoma and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we report that treatment with TMZ significantly attenuated retinal damage and RGC death in mice with acute glaucoma, with a significant decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammatory cytokine production in the retina. Furthermore, TMZ treatment directly decreased ROS production and rebalanced the intracellular redox state, thus contributing to the survival of RGCs in vitro TMZ treatment also reduced the production of inflammatory cytokines in vitro Mechanistically, the TMZ-mediated inhibition of apoptosis and inflammatory cytokine production in RGCs occurred via the regulation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2/heme oxygenase 1/caspase-8 pathway. Moreover, the TMZ-mediated neuroprotection in acute glaucoma was abrogated when an HO-1 inhibitor, SnPP, was used. Our findings identify potential mechanisms of RGC apoptosis and propose a novel therapeutic agent, TMZ, which exerts a precise neuroprotective effect against acute glaucoma. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in preconditioning-induced protection of retinal ganglion cells in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanli; Zhang, Lihong; Gidday, Jeffrey M

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated in a mouse model of glaucoma that endogenous epigenetic mechanisms can be activated by a repetitive hypoxic preconditioning (RHP) stimulus to provide robust retinal ganglion cell (RGC) protection. Although we also provided evidence that RHP prevents or delays the apoptotic demise of the RGC soma, the mechanisms responsible for signaling this epigenetic response, as well as the effectors of the glaucoma-tolerant phenotype at the somatic and axonal levels, remain unidentified. In the present study, we used conditional mutant mice lacking hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in RGCs (HIF-1α RGC-knockout [KO] mice) to test the hypothesis that RHP-mediated activation of this transcription factor in these cells protects them from glaucomatous injury. Adult HIF-1α RGC-KO mice, generated by mating floxed HIF-1α mice with math5-Cre mice, were used. Experimental glaucoma was induced unilaterally in the HIF-1α RGC-KO mice and matched wild-types by elevating the intraocular pressure to 16-20 mmHg for 3 consecutive weeks, secondary to episcleral vein ligation. Mice of each genotype were randomized to either an RHP protocol (six total exposures to systemic hypoxia [11% oxygen], interspersed over a 2-week period, completed 3 days before ligation surgery) or to an untreated group. RGC soma and axon injury was quantified with Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN) immunohistochemistry in retinal flat mounts and SMI32 immunohistochemistry in cross sections of the post-laminar optic nerve, respectively. HIF-1α RGC-KO mice exhibited normal retinal function and morphology, and crosses of math5-Cre mice with floxed ROSA26 reporter mice confirmed Cre recombinase activity was confined to the RGC axons and soma. Untreated wild-type mice exhibited a 30±2% loss of RGC soma and a 31±3% loss of RGC axons after 3 weeks of intraocular hypertension (both p<0.05 versus fellow eye). The 90% and 81% improvement in soma and axon survival, respectively, observed in the wild

  18. Gene therapy with brain-derived neurotrophic factor as a protection: retinal ganglion cells in a rat glaucoma model.

    PubMed

    Martin, Keith R G; Quigley, Harry A; Zack, Donald J; Levkovitch-Verbin, Hana; Kielczewski, Jennifer; Valenta, Danielle; Baumrind, Lisa; Pease, Mary Ellen; Klein, Ronald L; Hauswirth, William W

    2003-10-01

    To develop a modified adenoassociated viral (AAV) vector capable of efficient transfection of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and to test the hypothesis that use of this vector to express brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) could be protective in experimental glaucoma. Ninety-three rats received one unilateral, intravitreal injection of either normal saline (n = 30), AAV-BDNF-woodchuck hepatitis posttranscriptional regulatory element (WPRE; n = 30), or AAV-green fluorescent protein (GFP)-WPRE (n = 33). Two weeks later, experimental glaucoma was induced in the injected eye by laser application to the trabecular meshwork. Survival of RGCs was estimated by counting axons in optic nerve cross sections after 4 weeks of glaucoma. Transgene expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and direct visualization of GFP. The density of GFP-positive cells in retinal wholemounts was 1,828 +/- 299 cells/mm(2) (72,273 +/- 11,814 cells/retina). Exposure to elevated intraocular pressure was similar in all groups. Four weeks after initial laser treatment, axon loss was 52.3% +/- 27.1% in the saline-treated group (n = 25) and 52.3% +/- 24.2% in the AAV-GFP-WPRE group (n = 30), but only 32.3% +/- 23.0% in the AAV-BDNF-WPRE group (n = 27). Survival in AAV-BDNF-WPRE animals increased markedly and the difference was significant compared with those receiving either AAV-GFP-WPRE (P = 0.002, t-test) or saline (P = 0.006, t-test). Overexpression of the BDNF gene protects RGC as estimated by axon counts in a rat glaucoma model, further supporting the potential feasibility of neurotrophic therapy as a complement to the lowering of IOP in the treatment of glaucoma.

  19. Quantitative Autofluorescence and Cell Density Maps of the Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Ach, Thomas; Huisingh, Carrie; McGwin, Gerald; Messinger, Jeffrey D.; Zhang, Tianjiao; Bentley, Mark J.; Gutierrez, Danielle B.; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Smith, R. Theodore; Sloan, Kenneth R.; Curcio, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Lipofuscin (LF) accumulation within RPE cells is considered pathogenic in AMD. To test whether LF contributes to RPE cell loss in aging and to provide a cellular basis for fundus autofluorescence (AF) we created maps of human RPE cell number and histologic AF. Methods. Retinal pigment epithelium–Bruch's membrane flat mounts were prepared from 20 donor eyes (10 ≤ 51 and 10 > 80 years; postmortem: ≤4.2 hours; no retinal pathologies), preserving foveal position. Phalloidin-binding RPE cytoskeleton and LF-AF (488-nm excitation) were imaged at up to 90 predefined positions. Maps were assembled from 83,330 cells in 1470 locations. From Voronoi regions representing each cell, the number of neighbors, cell area, and total AF intensity normalized to an AF standard was determined. Results. Highly variable between individuals, RPE-AF increases significantly with age. A perifoveal ring of high AF mirrors rod photoreceptor topography and fundus-AF. Retinal pigment epithelium cell density peaks at the fovea, independent of age, yet no net RPE cell loss is detectable. The RPE monolayer undergoes considerable lifelong re-modeling. The relationship of cell size and AF, a surrogate for LF concentration, is orderly and linear in both groups. Autofluorescence topography differs distinctly from the topography of age-related rod loss. Conclusions. Digital maps of quantitative AF, cell density, and packing geometry provide metrics for cellular-resolution clinical imaging and model systems. The uncoupling of RPE LF content, cell number, and photoreceptor topography in aging challenges LF's role in AMD. PMID:25034602

  20. Minimization of Retinal Slip Cannot Explain Human Smooth-Pursuit Eye Movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Beutter, Brent R.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Existing models assume that pursuit attempts a direct minimization of retinal image motion or "slip" (e.g. Robinson et al., 1986; Krauzlis & Weisberger, 1989). Using occluded line-figure stimuli, we have previously shown that humans can accurately pursue stimuli for which perfect tracking does not zero retinal slip (Neurologic ARCO). These findings are inconsistent with the standard control strategy of matching eye motion to a target-motion signal reconstructed by adding retinal slip and eye motion, but consistent with a visual front-end which estimates target motion via a global spatio-temporal integration for pursuit and perception. Another possible explanation is that pursuit simply attempts to minimize slip perpendicular to the segments (and neglects parallel "sliding" motion). To resolve this, 4 observers (3 naive) were asked to pursue the center of 2 types of stimuli with identical velocity-space descriptions and matched motion energy. The line-figure "diamond" stimulus was viewed through 2 invisible 3 deg-wide vertical apertures (38 cd/m2 equal to background) such that only the sinusoidal motion of 4 oblique line segments (44 cd/m2 was visible. The "cross" was identical except that the segments exchanged positions. Two trajectories (8's and infinity's) with 4 possible initial directions were randomly interleaved (1.25 cycles, 2.5s period, Ax = Ay = 1.4 deg). In 91% of trials, the diamond appeared rigid. Correspondingly, pursuit was vigorous (mean Again: 0.74) with a V/H aspect ratio approx. 1 (mean: 0.9). Despite a valid rigid solution, the cross however appeared rigid in 8% of trials. Correspondingly, pursuit was weaker (mean Hgain: 0.38) with an incorrect aspect ratio (mean: 1.5). If pursuit were just minimizing perpendicular slip, performance would be the same in both conditions.

  1. Mutation of CERKL, a Novel Human Ceramide Kinase Gene, Causes Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP26)

    PubMed Central

    Tuson, Miquel; Marfany, Gemma; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser

    2004-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the main cause of adult blindness, is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive loss of photoreceptors through apoptosis. Up to now, 39 genes and loci have been implicated in nonsyndromic RP, yet the genetic bases of >50% of the cases, particularly of the recessive forms, remain unknown. Previous linkage analysis in a Spanish consanguineous family allowed us to define a novel autosomal recessive RP (arRP) locus, RP26, within an 11-cM interval (17.4 Mb) on 2q31.2-q32.3. In the present study, we further refine the RP26 locus down to 2.5 Mb, by microsatellite and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) homozygosity mapping. After unsuccessful mutational analysis of the nine genes initially reported in this region, a detailed gene search based on expressed-sequence-tag data was undertaken. We finally identified a novel gene encoding a ceramide kinase (CERKL), which encompassed 13 exons. All of the patients from the RP26 family bear a homozygous mutation in exon 5, which generates a premature termination codon. The same mutation was also characterized in another, unrelated, Spanish pedigree with arRP. Human CERKL is expressed in the retina, among other adult and fetal tissues. A more detailed analysis by in situ hybridization on adult murine retina sections shows expression of Cerkl in the ganglion cell layer. Ceramide kinases convert the sphingolipid metabolite ceramide into ceramide-1-phosphate, both key mediators of cellular apoptosis and survival. Ceramide metabolism plays an essential role in the viability of neuronal cells, the membranes of which are particularly rich in sphingolipids. Therefore, CERKL deficiency could shift the relative levels of the signaling sphingolipid metabolites and increase sensitivity of photoreceptor and other retinal cells to apoptotic stimuli. This is the first genetic report suggesting a direct link between retinal neurodegeneration in RP and sphingolipid-mediated apoptosis. PMID

  2. Noninvasive Measurements and Analysis of Blood Velocity Profiles in Human Retinal Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhangyi; Song, Hongxin; Chui, Toco Yuen Ping; Petrig, Benno L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To quantitatively model the changes in blood velocity profiles for different cardiac phases in human retinal vessels. Methods. An adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was used to measure blood velocity profiles in three healthy subjects. Blood velocity was measured by tracking erythrocytes moving across a scanning line. From the radial position of the cells within the lumen, the blood velocity profile was computed. The cardiac pulsatility was recorded with a cardiac signal monitor. Results. The shape of the blood velocity profile in retinal arteries changed systematically during the cardiac cycle, with the flattest profile occurring during the diastolic phase. The measured blood velocity profiles were typically flatter than the commonly assumed parabolic shape. The flatness increased with decreasing vessel size. For the large veins (>80 μm), the ratio of the centerline velocity to the cross-sectional average velocity was between 1.50 and 1.65. This ratio decreased to 1.36 in the smallest vein studied (32 μm). Velocity profiles downstream from a venous confluence showed two peaks at 120 μm from the confluence, but a single velocity peak 500 μm downstream from the confluence. Conclusions. The cardiac cycle influences the blood flow velocity profiles systematically in retinal arteries but not in veins. Parabolic flow was not found in even the largest vessels studied, and deviations from parabolic flow increased in smaller vessels. The measurements are sensitive enough to measure the dual-humped blood velocity profile at a vein confluence. PMID:21467177

  3. Protection of the retina by rapid diffusion of hydrogen: administration of hydrogen-loaded eye drops in retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Oharazawa, Hideaki; Igarashi, Tsutomu; Yokota, Takashi; Fujii, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Hisaharu; Machide, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Ohta, Shigeo; Ohsawa, Ikuroh

    2010-01-01

    Retinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury by transient elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP) is known to induce neuronal damage through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Study results have indicated that molecular hydrogen (H(2)) is an efficient antioxidant gas that selectively reduces the hydroxyl radical (*OH) and suppresses oxidative stress-induced injury in several organs. This study was conducted to explore the neuroprotective effect of H(2)-loaded eye drops on retinal I/R injury. Retinal ischemia was induced in rats by raising IOP for 60 minutes. H(2)-loaded eye drops were prepared by dissolving H(2) gas into a saline to saturated level and administered to the ocular surface continuously during the ischemia and/or reperfusion periods. One day after I/R injury, apoptotic cells in the retina were quantified, and oxidative stress was evaluated by markers such as 4-hydroxynonenal and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine. Seven days after I/R injury, retinal damage was quantified by measuring the thickness of the retina. When H(2)-loaded eye drops were continuously administered, H(2) concentration in the vitreous body immediately increased and I/R-induced *OH level decreased. The drops reduced the number of retinal apoptotic and oxidative stress marker-positive cells and prevented retinal thinning with an accompanying activation of Müller glia, astrocytes, and microglia. The drops improved the recovery of retinal thickness by >70%. H(2) has no known toxic effects on the human body. Thus, the results suggest that H(2)-loaded eye drops are a highly useful neuroprotective and antioxidative therapeutic treatment for acute retinal I/R injury.

  4. Photochemistry and Photocytotoxicity of Alkaloids from Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) 3. Effect on Human Lens and Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chignell, C.F.; Sik, R.H.; Watson, M.A.; Wielgus, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    The dried root or rhizome of Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) contains several alkaloids including berberine, hydrastine, palmatine and lesser amounts of canadine and hydrastinine. Preparations derived from Goldenseal have been used to treat skin and eye ailments. Berberine, the major alkaloid in Goldenseal root powder, has been used in eye drops to treat trachoma, a disease characterized by keratoconjunctivitis. Berberine and palmatine are also present in extracts from Berberis amurensis Ruprecht (Berberidaceae) which are used to treat ocular disorders. We have previously shown that Goldenseal alkaloids are phototoxic to keratinocytes (Chem Res Toxicol. 14, 1529, 2001; ibid 19, 739, 2006) and now report their effect on human lens and retinal pigment epithelial cells. Human lens epithelial cells (HLE-B3) were severely damaged when incubated with berberine (25 μM) and exposed to UVA (5 J/cm2). Under the same conditions palmatine was less phototoxic and hydrastine, canadine and hydrastinine were inactive. Moderate protection against berberine phototoxicity was afforded by the antioxidants ascorbate (2 mM) and N-acetylcysteine (5 mM). When exposed to UVA (5 J/cm2) both berberine (10 μM) and palmatine (10 μM) caused mild DNA damage as determined by the alkaline Comet assay which measures single strand breaks. Berberine and palmatine are the only Goldenseal alkaloids with appreciable absorption above 400 nm. Because light at wavelengths below 400 nm is cut off by the anterior portion of the human eye only berberine and palmatine were tested for phototoxicity to human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Although berberine did damage hRPE cells when irradiated with visible light (λ>400 nm) approximately ten times higher concentrations were required to produce the same amount of damage as seen in lens cells. Palmatine was not phototoxic to hRPE cells. Neither berberine nor palmatine photodamaged RPE DNA. Infusions of Goldenseal are estimated to contain ∼1 m

  5. Wavefront sensorless adaptive optics OCT with the DONE algorithm for in vivo human retinal imaging [Invited].

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Hans R G W; Heisler, Morgan; Ju, Myeong Jin; Wahl, Daniel; Bliek, Laurens; Kalkman, Jeroen; Bonora, Stefano; Jian, Yifan; Verhaegen, Michel; Sarunic, Marinko V

    2017-04-01

    In this report, which is an international collaboration of OCT, adaptive optics, and control research, we demonstrate the Data-based Online Nonlinear Extremum-seeker (DONE) algorithm to guide the image based optimization for wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WFSL-AO) OCT for in vivo human retinal imaging. The ocular aberrations were corrected using a multi-actuator adaptive lens after linearization of the hysteresis in the piezoelectric actuators. The DONE algorithm succeeded in drastically improving image quality and the OCT signal intensity, up to a factor seven, while achieving a computational time of 1 ms per iteration, making it applicable for many high speed applications. We demonstrate the correction of five aberrations using 70 iterations of the DONE algorithm performed over 2.8 s of continuous volumetric OCT acquisition. Data acquired from an imaging phantom and in vivo from human research volunteers are presented.

  6. SC79 protects retinal pigment epithelium cells from UV radiation via activating Akt-Nrf2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi-Qing; Huang, Wei; Li, Ke-Ran; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Cao, Guo-Fan; Cao, Cong; Jiang, Qin

    2016-09-13

    Excessive Ultra-violet (UV) radiation causes oxidative damages and apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Here we tested the potential activity of SC79, a novel small molecule activator of Akt, against the process. We showed that SC79 activated Akt in primary and established (ARPE-19 line) RPE cells. It protected RPE cells from UV damages possibly via inhibiting cell apoptosis. Akt inhibition, via an Akt specific inhibitor (MK-2206) or Akt1 shRNA silence, almost abolished SC79-induced RPE cytoprotection. Further studies showed that SC79 activated Akt-dependent NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling and inhibited UV-induced oxidative stress in RPE cells. Reversely, Nrf2 shRNA knockdown or S40T mutation attenuated SC79-induced anti-UV activity. For the in vivo studies, we showed that intravitreal injection of SC79 significantly protected mouse retina from light damages. Based on these results, we suggest that SC79 protects RPE cells from UV damages possibly via activating Akt-Nrf2 signaling axis.

  7. SC79 protects retinal pigment epithelium cells from UV radiation via activating Akt-Nrf2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Guo-fan; Cao, Cong; Jiang, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Excessive Ultra-violet (UV) radiation causes oxidative damages and apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Here we tested the potential activity of SC79, a novel small molecule activator of Akt, against the process. We showed that SC79 activated Akt in primary and established (ARPE-19 line) RPE cells. It protected RPE cells from UV damages possibly via inhibiting cell apoptosis. Akt inhibition, via an Akt specific inhibitor (MK-2206) or Akt1 shRNA silence, almost abolished SC79-induced RPE cytoprotection. Further studies showed that SC79 activated Akt-dependent NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling and inhibited UV-induced oxidative stress in RPE cells. Reversely, Nrf2 shRNA knockdown or S40T mutation attenuated SC79-induced anti-UV activity. For the in vivo studies, we showed that intravitreal injection of SC79 significantly protected mouse retina from light damages. Based on these results, we suggest that SC79 protects RPE cells from UV damages possibly via activating Akt-Nrf2 signaling axis. PMID:27517753

  8. Protection of Human Subjects: Proposed Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Register, 1974

    1974-01-01

    In the Federal Register of May 30, 1974, regulations were published as Part 46 of Title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations providing generally for the protection of human subjects involved in research, development, or related activities supported by Department of Health, Education, and Welfare grants or contracts. This notice of proposed…

  9. Dendritic and synaptic protection: is it enough to save the retinal ganglion cell body and axon?

    PubMed

    Morquette, Junie Barbara; Di Polo, Adriana

    2008-06-01

    Glaucoma and other optic neuropathies have been traditionally viewed as diseases of the optic nerve that lead to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration. Accordingly, the primary aim of neuroprotective strategies has been to preserve RGC axons and soma. RGCs are complex and highly polarized central neurons, and their pathologic response in disease is likely to be an integration of signals from all cellular compartments-axons, soma, dendrites, and synaptic contacts. We focus on the role of dendrites and dendritic spines in normal neuronal function, neurologic disorders, and glaucoma. The need to understand the mechanisms underlying RGC dendrite and synapse degeneration in glaucoma and other optic neuropathies is compelling, as it may provide insight into novel therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss.

  10. Experimental Study of the Biological Properties of Human Embryonic Stem Cell–Derived Retinal Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jingzhi; Zhou, Peng-Yi; Peng, Guang-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases are among the leading causes of blindness worldwide, and cell replacement is considered as a promising therapeutic. However, the resources of seed cells are scarce. To further explore this type of therapy, we adopted a culture system that could harvest a substantial quantity of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) within a relatively short period of time. Furthermore, we transplanted these RPCs into the subretinal spaces of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats. We quantified the thickness of the treated rats’ outer nuclear layers (ONLs) and explored the visual function via electroretinography (ERG). It was found that the differentiated cells expressed RPC markers and photoreceptor progenitor markers. The transplanted RPCs survived for at least 12 weeks, resulting in beneficial effects on the morphology of the host retina, and led to a significant improvement in the visual function of the treated animals. These therapeutic effects suggest that the hESCs-derived RPCs could delay degeneration of the retina and partially restore visual function. PMID:28205557

  11. Visual Field Defects and Retinal Ganglion Cell Losses in Human Glaucoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Harwerth, Ronald S.; Quigley, Harry A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective The depth of visual field defects are correlated with retinal ganglion cell densities in experimental glaucoma. This study was to determine whether a similar structure-function relationship holds for human glaucoma. Methods The study was based on retinal ganglion cell densities and visual thresholds of patients with documented glaucoma (Kerrigan-Baumrind, et al.) The data were analyzed by a model that predicted ganglion cell densities from standard clinical perimetry, which were then compared to histologic cell counts. Results The model, without free parameters, produced accurate and relatively precise quantification of ganglion cell densities associated with visual field defects. For 437 sets of data, the unity correlation for predicted vs. measured cell densities had a coefficient of determination of 0.39. The mean absolute deviation of the predicted vs. measured values was 2.59 dB, the mean and SD of the distribution of residual errors of prediction was -0.26 ± 3.22 dB. Conclusions Visual field defects by standard clinical perimetry are proportional to neural losses caused by glaucoma. Clinical Relevance The evidence for quantitative structure-function relationships provides a scientific basis of interpreting glaucomatous neuropathy from visual thresholds and supports the application of standard perimetry to establish the stage of the disease. PMID:16769839

  12. Electrophysiological characterization of ionic transport by the retinal exchanger expressed in human embryonic kidney cells.

    PubMed Central

    Navanglone, A; Rispoli, G; Gabellini, N; Carafoli, E

    1997-01-01

    The retinal Na+:Ca2+, K+exchanger cDNA was transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells by transfection with plasmid DNA. The correct targeting of the expressed protein to the plasma membrane was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. The reverse exchange offrent (Ca2+ imported per Na+ extruded) was measured in whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments after intracellular perfusion with Na+ (Na+i, 128 mM) and extracellular perfusion with Ca2+ (Ca2o+, 1 mM) and Ko+ (20 mM). As expected, the exchange current was suppressed by removing Ca2o+. Surprisingly, however, it was also abolished by increasing Na+o to almost abolish the Na+ gradient, and it was almost unaffected by the removal of Ko+. Apparently, then, at variance with the exchanger in the rod outer segment, the retinal exchanger expressed in 293 cells acts essentially as a Na+:Ca2+ exchanger and does not require K+ for its electrogenic activity. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9199770

  13. Intracellular delivery of dendrimer triamcinolone acetonide conjugates into microglial and human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Siva P.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Mastorakos, Panagiotis; Oh, Yumin; Lutty, Gerard A.; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2016-01-01

    Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) is a potent, intermediate-acting, steroid that has anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic activity. Intravitreal administration of TA has been used for diabetic macular edema, proliferative diabetic retinopathy and exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the hydrophobicity, lack of solubility, and the side effects limit its effectiveness in the treatment of retinal diseases. In this study, we explore a PAMAM dendrimer-TA conjugate (D-TA) as a potential strategy to improve intracellular delivery and efficacy of TA to target cells. The conjugates were prepared with a high drug payload (~21%) and were readily soluble in saline. Compared to free TA, D-TA demonstrated a significantly improved toxicity profile in two important target [microglial and human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)] cells. The D-TA was ~100-fold more effective than free TA in its anti-inflammatory activity (measured in microglia), and in suppressing VEGF production (in hypoxic RPE cells). Dendrimer-based delivery may improve the efficacy of TA towards both its key targets of inflammation and VEGF production, with significant clinical implications. PMID:25701805

  14. Human Milk Glycoproteins Protect Infants Against Human Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Breastfeeding protects the neonate against pathogen infection. Major mechanisms of protection include human milk glycoconjugates functioning as soluble receptor mimetics that inhibit pathogen binding to the mucosal cell surface, prebiotic stimulation of gut colonization by favorable microbiota, immunomodulation, and as a substrate for bacterial fermentation products in the gut. Human milk proteins are predominantly glycosylated, and some biological functions of these human milk glycoproteins (HMGPs) have been reported. HMGPs range in size from 14 kDa to 2,000 kDa and include mucins, secretory immunoglobulin A, bile salt-stimulated lipase, lactoferrin, butyrophilin, lactadherin, leptin, and adiponectin. This review summarizes known biological roles of HMGPs that may contribute to the ability of human milk to protect neonates from disease. PMID:23697737

  15. Human milk glycoproteins protect infants against human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Newburg, David S

    2013-08-01

    Breastfeeding protects the neonate against pathogen infection. Major mechanisms of protection include human milk glycoconjugates functioning as soluble receptor mimetics that inhibit pathogen binding to the mucosal cell surface, prebiotic stimulation of gut colonization by favorable microbiota, immunomodulation, and as a substrate for bacterial fermentation products in the gut. Human milk proteins are predominantly glycosylated, and some biological functions of these human milk glycoproteins (HMGPs) have been reported. HMGPs range in size from 14 kDa to 2,000 kDa and include mucins, secretory immunoglobulin A, bile salt-stimulated lipase, lactoferrin, butyrophilin, lactadherin, leptin, and adiponectin. This review summarizes known biological roles of HMGPs that may contribute to the ability of human milk to protect neonates from disease.

  16. Are Pharmaceutical Patents Protected By Human Rights?

    PubMed Central

    Millum, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The International Bill of Rights enshrines a right to health, which includes a right to access essential medicines. This right frequently appears to conflict with the intellectual property regime that governs pharmaceutical patents. However, there is also a human right that protects creative works, including scientific productions. Does this right support intellectual property protections, even when they may negatively affect health? This article examines the recent attempt by the Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights to resolve this issue and argues that it fails. This is problematic because it means defenders of the present patent regime can continue using human rights documents to support their position. I offer a new framework for resolving the problem by examining the values that underlie human rights. PMID:18974405

  17. Human subjects research handbook: Protecting human research subjects. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-30

    This handbook serves as a guide to understanding and implementing the Federal regulations and US DOE Orders established to protect human research subjects. Material in this handbook is directed towards new and continuing institutional review board (IRB) members, researchers, institutional administrators, DOE officials, and others who may be involved or interested in human subjects research. It offers comprehensive overview of the various requirements, procedures, and issues relating to human subject research today.

  18. The human fetal retinal pigment epithelium: A target tissue for thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Duncan, K G; Bailey, K R; Baxter, J D; Schwartz, D M

    1999-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (T(3)) has previously been shown to regulate visual function in experimental animals and humans. To determine if T(3) exerts direct effects on retinal function, cultured human fetal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells were tested for the presence of thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) and T(3) responses. Using TR-isoform-specific reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction techniques, mRNA was detected for alpha1, alpha2 and beta1 TR isoforms. Immunohistochemistry using a polyclonal antibody that simultaneously recognizes alpha1, alpha2 and beta1 TRs showed nuclear staining of the fetal RPE. Specific binding of (125)I-T(3) to RPE cell nuclear extracts was detected, and Scatchard analysis revealed a K(d) of 110 pM. To determine if RPE cells can respond to T(3), hyaluronic acid (HA) levels in cell culture media were measured after 2, 4 or 6 days of growth in medium containing 10(-7) M T(3). T(3) inhibited accumulation of HA in the cell culture medium of RPE cells. This effect was not evident at 2 days, but at 4 days there was 42.8% less HA in cell culture medium of RPE cells grown in 10(-7) M T(3) (p < 0.01, t test). The effect persisted through 6 days, when there was 46.3% less HA in cell culture medium of RPE cells grown in 10(-7) M T(3) (p < 0.001, t test). The data indicate that human fetal RPE cells are a direct target for thyroid hormones.

  19. MicroRNA-29 regulates high-glucose-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells through PTEN.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaohui; Zhou, Xiyuan; Liu, Danning; Yun, Lixia; Zhang, Lina; Chen, Xiaohai; Chai, Qinghe; Li, Langen

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia or high-glucose (HG)-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a characteristic process in diabetic retinopathy. In our study, we examined whether microRNA-29 (miR-29) may regulate HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis. Human RPE cell line, ARPE-19 cells, was treated with various high concentration of glucose in vitro. HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis was examined by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and miR-29 gene expression by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). miR-29 was then downregulated in RPE cells, and its effect on HG-induced apoptosis was examined by TUNEL assay and western blot assay on caspase-7 protein. Association of miR-29 on its downstream target, PTEN, in HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis was evaluated by dual-luciferase assay and qRT-PCR. PTEN was silenced in RPE cells. The effects of PTEN downregulation on miR-29-mediated HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis were also examined by TUNEL and western blot assays. HG induced significant apoptosis in RPE cells in a dose-dependent manner. miR-29 was upregulated by HG in RPE cells. miR-29 downregulation protected HG-induced apoptosis and reduced the production of caspase-7 protein in RPE cells. PTEN was shown to be directly downregulated by HG and then upregulated by miR-29 downregulation in RPE cells. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated PTEN downregulation reversed the protective effect of miR-29 downregulation on HG-induced RPE cell apoptosis. This study demonstrates that miR-29, through inverse association of PTEN, plays an important role in the process of HG-induced apoptosis in RPE cells.

  20. Harnessing the Potential of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells and Gene Editing for the Treatment of Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ovando-Roche, Patrick; Georgiadis, Anastasios; Smith, Alexander J; Pearson, Rachael A; Ali, Robin R

    2017-01-01

    A major cause of visual disorders is dysfunction and/or loss of the light-sensitive cells of the retina, the photoreceptors. To develop better treatments for patients, we need to understand how inherited retinal disease mutations result in the dysfunction of photoreceptors. New advances in the field of stem cell and gene editing research offer novel ways to model retinal dystrophies in vitro and present opportunities to translate basic biological insights into therapies. This brief review will discuss some of the issues that should be taken into account when carrying out disease modelling and gene editing of retinal cells. We will discuss (i) the use of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) for disease modelling and cell therapy; (ii) the importance of using isogenic iPSC lines as controls; (iii) CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing of iPSCs; and (iv) in vivo gene editing using AAV vectors. Ground-breaking advances in differentiation of iPSCs into retinal organoids and methods to derive mature light sensitive photoreceptors from iPSCs. Furthermore, single AAV systems for in vivo gene editing have been developed which makes retinal in vivo gene editing therapy a real prospect. Genome editing is becoming a valuable tool for disease modelling and in vivo gene editing in the retina.

  1. Three-dimensional pointwise comparison of human retinal optical property at 845 and 1060 nm using optical frequency domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yueli; Burnes, Daina L.; de Bruin, Martijn; Mujat, Mircea; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2009-03-01

    To compare the optical properties of the human retina, 3-D volumetric images of the same eye are acquired with two nearly identical optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems at center wavelengths of 845 and 1060 nm using optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI). To characterize the contrast of individual tissue layers in the retina at these two wavelengths, the 3-D volumetric data sets are carefully spatially matched. The relative scattering intensities from different layers such as the nerve fiber, photoreceptor, pigment epithelium, and choroid are measured and a quantitative comparison is presented. OCT retinal imaging at 1060 nm is found to have a significantly better depth penetration but a reduced contrast between the retinal nerve fiber, the ganglion cell, and the inner plexiform layers compared to the OCT retinal imaging at 845 nm.

  2. Three-dimensional pointwise comparison of human retinal optical property at 845 and 1060 nm using optical frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yueli; Burnes, Daina L; de Bruin, Martijn; Mujat, Mircea; de Boer, Johannes F

    2009-01-01

    To compare the optical properties of the human retina, 3-D volumetric images of the same eye are acquired with two nearly identical optical coherence tomography (OCT) systems at center wavelengths of 845 and 1060 nm using optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI). To characterize the contrast of individual tissue layers in the retina at these two wavelengths, the 3-D volumetric data sets are carefully spatially matched. The relative scattering intensities from different layers such as the nerve fiber, photoreceptor, pigment epithelium, and choroid are measured and a quantitative comparison is presented. OCT retinal imaging at 1060 nm is found to have a significantly better depth penetration but a reduced contrast between the retinal nerve fiber, the ganglion cell, and the inner plexiform layers compared to the OCT retinal imaging at 845 nm.

  3. Conditioned Medium from Early-Outgrowth Bone Marrow Cells Is Retinal Protective in Experimental Model of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Diego A.; Papadimitriou, Alexandros; Gilbert, Richard E.; Thai, Kerri; Zhang, Yanling; Rosales, Mariana A. B.; Lopes de Faria, José B.; Lopes de Faria, Jacqueline M.

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells were demonstrated to improve organ function, but the lack of cell retention within injured organs suggests that the protective effects are due to factors released by the cells. Herein, we tested cell therapy using early outgrowth cells (EOCs) or their conditioned media (CM) to protect the retina of diabetic animal models (type 1 and type 2) and assessed the mechanisms by in vitro study. Control and diabetic (db/db) mice (8 weeks of age) were randomized to receive a unique intravenous injection of 5×105EOCs or 0.25 ml thrice weekly tail-vein injections of 10x concentrated CM and Wystar Kyoto rats rendered diabetic were randomized to receive 0.50 ml thrice weekly tail-vein injections of 10x concentrated CM. Four weeks later, the animals were euthanized and the eyes were enucleated. Rat retinal Müller cells (rMCs) were exposed for 24 h to high glucose (HG), combined or not with EOC-conditioned medium (EOC-CM) from db/m EOC cultures. Diabetic animals showed increase in diabetic retinopathy (DR) and oxidative damage markers; the treatment with EOCs or CM infusions significantly reduced this damage and re-established the retinal function. In rMCs exposed to diabetic milieu conditions (HG), the presence of EOC-CM reduced reactive oxygen species production by modulating the NADPH-oxidase 4 system, thus upregulating SIRT1 activity and deacetylating Lys-310-p65-NFκB, decreasing GFAP and VEGF expressions. The antioxidant capacity of EOC-CM led to the prevention of carbonylation and nitrosylation posttranslational modifications on the SIRT1 molecule, preserving its activity. The pivotal role of SIRT1 on the mode of action of EOCs or their CM was also demonstrated on diabetic retina. These findings suggest that EOCs are effective as a form of systemic delivery for preventing the early molecular markers of DR and its conditioned medium is equally protective revealing a novel possibility for cell-free therapy for the treatment of DR. PMID:26836609

  4. Protective Effects of Panax notoginseng Saponins against High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Injury in Rat Retinal Capillary Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yue; Qiao, Yuan; Huang, Jianmei

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of visual loss and blindness, is characterized by microvascular dysfunction. Hyperglycemia is considered the major pathogenic factor for diabetic retinopathy and is associated with increased oxidative stress in the retina. In this study, we investigated the potential protective effects of Panax notoginseng Saponins (PNS) in retinal capillary endothelial cells (RCECs) exposed to high glucose conditions. We found a pronounced increase in cell viability in rat RCECs incubated with both PNS and high glucose (30 mM) for 48 h or 72 h. The increased viability was accompanied by reduced intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2−), decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lowered malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. PNS also increased the activities of total superoxide dismutase (SOD), MnSOD, catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX). The glutathione (GSH) content also increased after PNS treatment. Furthermore, PNS reduced NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. These results indicate that PNS exerts a protective effect against high glucose-induced injury in RCECs, which may be partially attributed to its antioxidative function. PMID:27019662

  5. Increased production of omega-3 fatty acids protects retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shanshan; Shi, Zhe; Su, Huanxing; So, Kwok-Fai; Cui, Qi

    2016-07-01

    Injury to the central nervous system causes progressive degeneration of injured axons, leading to loss of the neuronal bodies. Neuronal survival after injury is a prerequisite for successful regeneration of injured axons. In this study, we investigated the effects of increased production of omega-3 fatty acids and elevation of cAMP on retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and axonal regeneration after optic nerve (ON) crush injury in adult mice. We found that increased production of omega-3 fatty acids in mice enhanced RGC survival, but not axonal regeneration, over a period of 3 weeks after ON injury. cAMP elevation promoted RGC survival in wild type mice, but no significant difference in cell survival was seen in mice over-producing omega-3 fatty acids and receiving intravitreal injections of CPT-cAMP, suggesting that cAMP elevation protects RGCs after injury but does not potentiate the actions of the omega-3 fatty acids. The observed omega-3 fatty acid-mediated neuroprotection is likely achieved partially through ERK1/2 signaling as inhibition of this pathway by PD98059 hindered, but did not completely block, RGC protection. Our study thus enhances our current understanding of neural repair after CNS injury, including the visual system.

  6. Spatial and Spectral Characterization of Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium Fluorophore Families by Ex Vivo Hyperspectral Autofluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ben Ami, Tal; Tong, Yuehong; Bhuiyan, Alauddin; Huisingh, Carrie; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Ach, Thomas; Curcio, Christine A.; Smith, R. Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Discovery of candidate spectra for abundant fluorophore families in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) by ex vivo hyperspectral imaging. Methods Hyperspectral autofluorescence emission images were captured between 420 and 720 nm (10-nm intervals), at two excitation bands (436–460, 480–510 nm), from three locations (fovea, perifovea, near-periphery) in 20 normal RPE/Bruch's membrane (BrM) flatmounts. Mathematical factorization extracted a BrM spectrum (S0) and abundant lipofuscin/melanolipofuscin (LF/ML) spectra of RPE origin (S1, S2, S3) from each tissue. Results Smooth spectra S1 to S3, with perinuclear localization consistent with LF/ML at all three retinal locations and both excitations in 14 eyes (84 datasets), were included in the analysis. The mean peak emissions of S0, S1, and S2 at λex 436 nm were, respectively, 495 ± 14, 535 ± 17, and 576 ± 20 nm. S3 was generally trimodal, with peaks at either 580, 620, or 650 nm (peak mode, 650 nm). At λex 480 nm, S0, S1, and S2 were red-shifted to 526 ± 9, 553 ± 10, and 588 ± 23 nm, and S3 was again trimodal (peak mode, 620 nm). S1 often split into two spectra, S1A and S1B. S3 strongly colocalized with melanin. There were no significant differences across age, sex, or retinal location. Conclusions There appear to be at least three families of abundant RPE fluorophores that are ubiquitous across age, retinal location, and sex in this sample of healthy eyes. Further molecular characterization by imaging mass spectrometry and localization via super-resolution microscopy should elucidate normal and abnormal RPE physiology involving fluorophores. Translational Relevance Our results help establish hyperspectral autofluorescence imaging of the human retinal pigment epithelium as a useful tool for investigating retinal health and disease. PMID:27226929

  7. Regulation of plasminogen activation by TGF-β in cultured human retinal endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wileman, S.; Booth, N.; Moore, N.; Redmill, B.; Forrester, J.; Knott, R.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Regulation of plasmin mediated extracellular matrix degradation by vascular endothelial cells is important in the development of angiogenesis. The aim was to determine whether transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) affected the regulation of components of the plasminogen system by human retinal endothelial cells, in order to define more clearly the role of TGF-β in retinal angiogenesis in the context of diabetes mellitus.
METHODS—Human retinal endothelial cells (HREC) were isolated from donor eyes and used between passages 4-8. The cells were cultured in medium supplemented with 2, 5, 15, or 25 mM glucose, plus or minus TGF-β (1 ng/ml). The concentrations of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA), and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) in cell conditioned medium were determined by ELISA and the level of PAI-1 mRNA was determined using northern hybridisation. Cell associated plasminogen activity was determined using a clot lysis assay and a chromogenic assay.
RESULTS—Under basal conditions (5 mM glucose), HREC produced PAI-1, t-PA, and trace amounts of u-PA. Cell surface plasminogen activation observed by lysis of fibrin or by cleavage of chromogenic substrate, was mediated by t-PA. Glucose at varying concentrations (2-25 mM) had no significant effect on t-PA mediated clot lysis. In contrast, treatment with TGF-β resulted in increased synthesis of PAI-1 protein and mRNA. The increased expression of the PAI-1 mRNAs by TGF-β did not occur uniformly, the 2.3 kb mRNA transcript was preferentially increased in comparison with the 3.2 kb mRNA (p<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS—These data demonstrate that TGF-β increases PAI-1 and decreases cell associated lysis. This is sufficient to decrease the normal lytic potential of HREC.

 PMID:10729302

  8. Ginsenoside Rb1 protects rat retinal ganglion cells against hypoxia and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaochun; Chen, Juying; Huang, Wendong; Zeng, Zhi; Yang, Yongfei; Zhu, Banghao

    2013-11-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the effect of ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1) on apoptosis induced by hypoxia and oxidative stress in a retinal ganglion cell line (RGC-5). The underlying mechanism was also investigated. RGC-5 cells were pretreated with 10 µmol/l Rb1 for 24 h and exposed to 400 µmol/l cobalt chloride (CoCl2) for 48 h or 600 µmol/l H2O2 for 24 h. The percentage of cells actively undergoing apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry with Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining. The expression of caspases was determined using western blot analysis. CoCl2 and H2O2 treatments significantly increased the apoptotic percentages to 24.5 and 21.63%, respectively. Pretreatment of Rb1 reduced the total apoptotic percentages to 15.12 and 12.03%, respectively. The expression of cleaved caspase-3, -9 and -8 was increased in the CoCl2-treated group, however, caspase-3 was not increased in the H2O2-treated group. Pretreatment of Rb1 reduced the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and -9 in the CoCl2-treated group, but reduced only cleaved caspase-9 in the H2O2-treated group. These results suggest that Rb1 may prevent RGC-5 cells from apoptosis against hypoxia and oxidative stress via the mitochondrial pathway.

  9. Comparative gene expression study and pathway analysis of the human iris- and the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    ten Brink, Jacoline B.; Moerland, Perry D.; Heine, Vivi M.; Bergen, Arthur A.

    2017-01-01

    Background The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a neural monolayer lining the back of the eye. Degeneration of the RPE leads to severe vision loss in, so far incurable, diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and some forms of retinitis pigmentosa. A promising future replacement therapy may be autologous iris epithelial cell transdifferentiation into RPE in vitro and, subsequently, transplantation. In this study we compared the gene expression profiles of the iris epithelium (IE) and the RPE. Methods We collected both primary RPE- and IE cells from 5 freshly frozen human donor eyes, using respectively laser dissection microscopy and excision. We performed whole-genome expression profiling using 44k Agilent human microarrays. We investigated the gene expression profiles on both gene and functional network level, using R and the knowledge database Ingenuity. Results The major molecular pathways related to the RPE and IE were quite similar and yielded basic neuro-epithelial cell functions. Nonetheless, we also found major specific differences: For example, genes and molecular pathways, related to the visual cycle and retinol biosynthesis are significantly higher expressed in the RPE than in the IE. Interestingly, Wnt and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR-) signaling pathways are much higher expressed in the IE than in the RPE, suggesting, respectively, a possible pluripotent and high detoxification state of the IE. Conclusions This study provides a valuation of the similarities and differences between the expression profiles of the RPE and IE. Our data combined with that of the literature, represent a most comprehensive perspective on transcriptional variation, which may support future research in the development of therapeutic transplantation of IE. PMID:28827822

  10. Comparative gene expression study and pathway analysis of the human iris- and the retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Bennis, Anna; Ten Brink, Jacoline B; Moerland, Perry D; Heine, Vivi M; Bergen, Arthur A

    2017-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a neural monolayer lining the back of the eye. Degeneration of the RPE leads to severe vision loss in, so far incurable, diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and some forms of retinitis pigmentosa. A promising future replacement therapy may be autologous iris epithelial cell transdifferentiation into RPE in vitro and, subsequently, transplantation. In this study we compared the gene expression profiles of the iris epithelium (IE) and the RPE. We collected both primary RPE- and IE cells from 5 freshly frozen human donor eyes, using respectively laser dissection microscopy and excision. We performed whole-genome expression profiling using 44k Agilent human microarrays. We investigated the gene expression profiles on both gene and functional network level, using R and the knowledge database Ingenuity. The major molecular pathways related to the RPE and IE were quite similar and yielded basic neuro-epithelial cell functions. Nonetheless, we also found major specific differences: For example, genes and molecular pathways, related to the visual cycle and retinol biosynthesis are significantly higher expressed in the RPE than in the IE. Interestingly, Wnt and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR-) signaling pathways are much higher expressed in the IE than in the RPE, suggesting, respectively, a possible pluripotent and high detoxification state of the IE. This study provides a valuation of the similarities and differences between the expression profiles of the RPE and IE. Our data combined with that of the literature, represent a most comprehensive perspective on transcriptional variation, which may support future research in the development of therapeutic transplantation of IE.

  11. Retinal mechanisms determine the subadditive response to polychromatic light by the human circadian system.

    PubMed

    Figueiro, Mariana G; Bierman, Andrew; Rea, Mark S

    2008-06-20

    Light is the major synchronizer of circadian rhythms to the 24-h solar day. The intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) play a central role in circadian regulation but cones also provide, albeit indirectly, input to these cells. In humans, spectrally opponent blue versus yellow (b-y) bipolar cells lying distal to the ganglion cell layer were hypothesized to provide direct input to the ipRGCs and therefore, the circadian system should exhibit subadditivity to some types of polychromatic light. Ten subjects participated in a within-subjects 3-night protocol. Three experimental conditions were employed that provided the same total irradiance at both eyes: (1) one unit of blue light (lambda(max)=450 nm, 0.077 W/m(2)) to the left eye plus one unit of green light (lambda(max)=525 nm, 0.211 W/m(2)) to the right eye, (2) one unit of blue light to the right eye plus one unit of green light to the left eye, and (3) 1/2 unit of blue light plus 1/2 unit of green light to both eyes. The first two conditions did not differ significantly in melatonin suppression while the third condition had significantly less melatonin suppression than conditions 1 and 2. Furthermore, the magnitudes of suppression were well predicted by a previously published model of circadian phototransduction incorporating spectral opponency. As was previously demonstrated, these results show that the human circadian system exhibits a subadditive response to certain polychromatic light spectra. This study demonstrates for the first time that subadditivity is due to spectrally opponent (color) retinal neurons.

  12. Characterization of the effects of retinal pigment epithelium-conditioned media on porcine and aged human retina.

    PubMed

    Kolomeyer, A M; Sugino, I K; Zarbin, M A

    2013-06-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells produce neurotrophic factors that rescue photoreceptors from degeneration. Previously, we showed that conditioned medium (CM) from fetal vs adult RPE cells resulted in significantly better porcine retinal preservation, and possessed significantly higher levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). This study aimed to further describe the effects of human fetal RPE-CM on porcine and aged human retina, and to characterize its effects biochemically. RPE-CM was harvested from passage-2 fetal RPE, 7 days after passage, 24-hours after exposure to basal medium. After culture in RPE-CM, porcine retinal morphology was assessed with confocal microscopy. The effects of RPE-CM on porcine and aged human retina survival were assessed by cytotoxicity and apoptosis biochemical assays. To characterize RPE-CM biochemically, effects of heating, digesting with proteinase-K, dilution, concentration, and fractionation were tested. Recombinant proteins and neutralizing antibodies were used to identify proteins that might contribute to the salutary effects of RPE-CM on porcine retina. Culturing porcine retina in RPE-CM significantly preserved outer nuclear layer width and the number of nuclei in cross-section, and significantly decreased photoreceptor axon retraction. RPE-CM decreased porcine retinal death by 17-34 % (p<0.05) compared to basal medium. Human retina from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and non-AMD donors responded similarly after culture in RPE-CM. Heating, proteinase-K digestion, and dilution significantly diminished RPE-CM-mediated preservation of porcine retina, whereas concentrating RPE-CM significantly enhanced its preservation of porcine retina. Molecular cut filtration identified retina-preserving activity in the 3-100 kDa filtrate. PEDF or HGF at 90 % receptor occupancy significantly improved retinal preservation over 48 h of culture compared to basal medium. Neutralizing PEDF in

  13. 48 CFR 1552.223-70 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection of human... 1552.223-70 Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in 1523.303-70, insert the following contract clause when the contract involves human test subjects. Protection of Human Subjects (APR 1984) (a)...

  14. 48 CFR 1352.235-70 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection of human... Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1335.006(a), insert the following provision: Protection of Human Subjects (APR 2010) (a) Research involving human subjects is not permitted under this...

  15. 48 CFR 1552.223-70 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Protection of human... 1552.223-70 Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in 1523.303-70, insert the following contract clause when the contract involves human test subjects. Protection of Human Subjects (APR 1984) (a)...

  16. 48 CFR 1352.235-70 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection of human... Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1335.006(a), insert the following provision: Protection of Human Subjects (APR 2010) (a) Research involving human subjects is not permitted under this...

  17. 48 CFR 1552.223-70 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Protection of human... 1552.223-70 Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in 1523.303-70, insert the following contract clause when the contract involves human test subjects. Protection of Human Subjects (APR 1984) (a) The...

  18. 48 CFR 1352.235-70 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Protection of human... Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1335.006(a), insert the following provision: Protection of Human Subjects (APR 2010) (a) Research involving human subjects is not permitted under this award...

  19. 48 CFR 1352.235-70 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protection of human... Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1335.006(a), insert the following provision: Protection of Human Subjects (APR 2010) (a) Research involving human subjects is not permitted under this award...

  20. 48 CFR 1552.223-70 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Protection of human... 1552.223-70 Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in 1523.303-70, insert the following contract clause when the contract involves human test subjects. Protection of Human Subjects (APR 1984) (a) The...

  1. 48 CFR 1552.223-70 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protection of human... 1552.223-70 Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in 1523.303-70, insert the following contract clause when the contract involves human test subjects. Protection of Human Subjects (APR 1984) (a) The...

  2. [An updated review of methods for human retinal oximetry measurements and current applications].

    PubMed

    Ben-Zion, Itay; Harris, Alon; Weizman, Yosi; Ehrlich, Rita; Rechtman, Ehud

    2008-10-01

    The concept of retinal oximetry is based on physical properties that have been recognized since the 18th century. Attempts to non-invasively quantify the oxygen saturation of blood within the retinal vasculature date back to the 1950's. There are different techniques in existence for the measurement of retinal oxygenation, the leading ones are: photographic, digital, spectroscopy and the pulse methods. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. Current data from studies on retinal oximetry is presented, for both the healthy retina and in diseases such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. It is clear that a thorough understanding of retinal oxygen tension is vital to our understanding of normal retinal physiology and the pathophysiology of degenerative eye diseases.

  3. Somatostatin receptor activation (sst(1) -sst(5) ) differentially influences human retinal pigment epithelium cell viability.

    PubMed

    Papadaki, Thekla; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis; Pallikaris, Ioannis; Thermos, Kyriaki

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the differential effects of somatostatin and its receptors (sst(1-5) ) on the viability of cultured human retinal pigment epithelium (hRPE) cells. MTT [3 (4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2, 5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide], APO Percentage(TM) and trypan blue assays were performed to assess the mechanisms via which somatostatin (10(-10) -10(-4) m) and selective receptor (sst(1-5) ) ligands (10(-12) -10(-4) m) affect cell viability. The effect of orthovanadate (phosphatase inhibitor, 10(-7) -10(-5) m) on somatostatin's (10(-5) m) actions was examined, and western blot analysis was employed to determine the presence of ssts and phosphotyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 in human RPE cells. Somatostatin and selective ligands for the five somatostatin receptor subtypes (sst(1-5) ) decreased cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. The observed decrease in cell number was partly because of apoptosis via the activation of sst(1) and sst(5) receptors. Activation of sst(2) , sst(3) and sst(4) receptors led to inhibition of cell growth that did not involve apoptosis, but rather antiproliferative actions. SHP-1 was found in the human RPE cells and sodium orthovanadate reversed somatostatin's actions. This study provides new information regarding the involvement of ssts in human RPE cell viability and suggests that a pathway involving the phosphotyrosine phosphatase may mediate somatostatin's actions. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Acta Ophthalmol.

  4. Oncostatin M protects rod and cone photoreceptors and promotes regeneration of cone outer segment in a rat model of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xin; Li, Yiwen; Huang, Deqiang; Wang, Zhengying; Luo, Lingyu; Song, Ying; Zhao, Lian; Wen, Rong

    2011-03-30

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of photoreceptor degenerative disorders that lead to loss of vision. Typically, rod photoreceptors degenerate first, resulting in loss of night and peripheral vision. Secondary cone degeneration eventually affects central vision, leading to total blindness. Previous studies have shown that photoreceptors could be protected from degeneration by exogenous neurotrophic factors, including ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a member of the IL-6 family of cytokines. Using a transgenic rat model of retinal degeneration (the S334-ter rat), we investigated the effects of Oncostatin M (OSM), another member of the IL-6 family of cytokines, on photoreceptor protection. We found that exogenous OSM protects both rod and cone photoreceptors. In addition, OSM promotes regeneration of cone outer segments in early stages of cone degeneration. Further investigation showed that OSM treatment induces STAT3 phosphorylation in Müller cells but not in photoreceptors, suggesting that OSM not directly acts on photoreceptors and that the protective effects of OSM on photoreceptors are mediated by Müller cells. These findings support the therapeutic strategy using members of IL-6 family of cytokines for retinal degenerative disorders. They also provide evidence that activation of the STAT3 pathway in Müller cells promotes photoreceptor survival. Our work highlights the importance of Müller cell-photoreceptor interaction in the retina, which may serve as a model of glia-neuron interaction in general.

  5. Protective effect of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) on the recovery of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced retinal damage in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Varga, Balazs; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Bombicz, Mariann; Haines, David; Szabo, Adrienn Monika; Kemeny-Beke, Adam; Antal, Miklos; Vecsernyes, Miklos; Juhasz, Bela; Tosaki, Arpad

    2013-07-01

    The present study demonstrates capacity of α-MSH to augment recovery from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced retinal damage in vivo and correlation of its protective effects with expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Used techniques include ocular ischemia and reperfusion, electroretinography, histology, electron microscopy, and molecular-biological techniques. The results demonstrate the α-MSH-mediated inhibition of I/R-induced functional deterioration of the retina. Outcomes suggest that the protective effects of α-MSH occur mainly through HO-1-dependent pathways but HO-1-independent mechanisms may also contribute to protection. The observation that post-ischemic treatment with α-MSH exhibits therapeutic efficacy in the same range as pre-ischemic treatment, is a novel result. This outcome suggests a highly conserved protective role for α-MSH as a major stress response mechanism--and offers the possibility for development of novel therapeutic strategies utilizing this hormone, in particular in treatment of conditions resulting from I/R injury, such as deterioration of retinal microcirculation. The merit of the study lies in the fact that I/R injury contribute significantly to the severity of retinopathies. However, currently there are no evidence-based treatments for retinal I/R injury available for clinical use. Our finding suggests that α-MSH may have a very wide range of uses in the prevention of I/R-mediated pathologies.

  6. Baclofen Protects Primary Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells from Chemical Hypoxia-Induced Apoptosis Through the Akt and PERK Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Pingping; Wu, Qiang; Hu, Jianyan; Li, Tingting; Gao, Fengjuan

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) consume large quantities of energy to convert light information into a neuronal signal, which makes them highly susceptible to hypoxic injury. This study aimed to investigate the potential protection by baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist of RGCs against hypoxia-induced apoptosis. Cobalt chloride (CoCl2) was applied to mimic hypoxia. Primary rat RGCs were subjected to CoCl2 with or without baclofen treatment, and RNA interference techniques were used to knock down the GABAB2 gene in the primary RGCs. The viability and apoptosis of RGCs were assessed using cell viability and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assays, Hoechst staining, and flow cytometry. The expression of cleaved caspase-3, bcl-2, bax, Akt, phospho-Akt, protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK), phospho-PERK, eIF2α, phospho-eIF2α, ATF-4 and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) were measured using western blotting. GABAB2 mRNA expression was determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis. Our study revealed that CoCl2 significantly induced RGC apoptosis and that baclofen reversed these effects. CoCl2-induced reduction of Akt activity was also reversed by baclofen. Baclofen prevented the activation of the PERK pathway and the increase in CHOP expression induced by CoCl2. Knockdown of GABAB2 and the inactivation of the Akt pathway by inhibitors reduced the protective effect of baclofen on CoCl2-treated RGCs. Taken together, these results demonstrate that baclofen protects RGCs from CoCl2-induced apoptosis by increasing Akt activity and by suppressing the PERK pathway and CHOP activation. PMID:27867349

  7. Poly(trimethylene carbonate) as an elastic biodegradable film for human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sorkio, Anni; Haimi, Suvi; Verdoold, Vincent; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Grijpma, Dirk; Skottman, Heli

    2017-01-04

    Human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (hESC-RPE) cell therapies show tremendous potential for the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. A tissue engineering approach, where cells are delivered to the subretinal space on a biodegradable carrier as a sheet, shows great promise for these RPE cell therapies. The aim of the present study was to assess whether a flexible, elastic and biodegradable poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) film promotes the formation of functional hESC-RPE and performs better than often used biodegradable poly(d,l-lactide) (PDLLA) film. Human ESC-RPE maturation and functionality on PTMC films was assessed by cell proliferation assays, RPE-specific gene and protein expression, phagocytic activity and growth factor secretion. It is demonstrated that the mechanical properties of PTMC films have close resemblance to those of the native Bruch's membrane and support the formation hESC-RPE monolayer in serum-free culture conditions with high degree of functionality. In contrast, use of PDLLA films did not lead to the formation of confluent monolayers of hESC-RPE cells and had unsuitable mechanical properties for retinal application. In conclusion, the present study indicates that flexible and elastic biodegradable PTMC films show potential for retinal tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Lutein Activates the Transcription Factor Nrf2 in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Frede, Katja; Ebert, Franziska; Kipp, Anna P; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Baldermann, Susanne

    2017-07-26

    The degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium caused by oxidative damage is a stage of development in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The carotenoid lutein is a major macular pigment that may reduce the incidence and progression of AMD, but the underlying mechanism is currently not fully understood. Carotenoids are known to be direct antioxidants. However, carotenoids can also activate cellular pathways resulting in indirect antioxidant effects. Here, we investigate the influence of lutein on the activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) target genes in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 cells) using lutein-loaded Tween40 micelles. The micelles were identified as a suitable delivery system since they were nontoxic in APRE-19 cells up to 0.04% Tween40 and led to a cellular lutein accumulation of 62 μM ± 14 μM after 24 h. Lutein significantly enhanced Nrf2 translocation to the nucleus 1.5 ± 0.4-fold compared to that of unloaded micelles after 4 h. Furthermore, lutein treatment for 24 h significantly increased the transcripts of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) by 1.7 ± 0.1-fold, glutamate-cysteine ligase regulatory subunit (GCLm) by 1.4 ± 0.1-fold, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) by 1.8 ± 0.3-fold. Moreover, we observed a significant enhancement of NQO1 activity by 1.2 ± 0.1-fold. Collectively, this study indicates that lutein not only serves as a direct antioxidant but also activates Nrf2 in ARPE-19 cells.

  9. Imaging human retinal pigment epithelium cells using adaptive optics optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Turner, Timothy L.; Miller, Donald T.

    2016-03-01

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are vital to health of the outer retina, but are often compromised in ageing and major ocular diseases that lead to blindness. Early manifestation of RPE disruption occurs at the cellular level, and while biomarkers at this scale hold considerable promise, RPE cells have proven extremely challenging to image in the living human eye. We present a novel method based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) equipped with adaptive optics (AO) that overcomes the associated technical obstacles. The method takes advantage of the 3D resolution of AO-OCT, but more critically sub-cellular segmentation and registration that permit organelle motility to be used as a novel contrast mechanism. With this method, we successfully visualized RPE cells and characterized their 3D reflectance profile in every subject and retinal location (3° and 7° temporal to the fovea) imaged to date. We have quantified RPE packing geometry in terms of cell density, cone-to-RPE ratio, and number of nearest neighbors using Voronoi and power spectra analyses. RPE cell density (cells/mm2) showed no significant difference between 3° (4,892+/-691) and 7° (4,780+/-354). In contrast, cone-to- RPE ratio was significantly higher at 3° (3.88+/-0.52:1) than 7° (2.31+/- 0.23:1). Voronoi analysis also showed most RPE cells have six nearest neighbors, which was significantly larger than the next two most prevalent associations: five and seven. Averaged across the five subjects, prevalence of cells with six neighbors was 51.4+/-3.58% at 3°, and 54.58+/-3.01% at 7°. These results are consistent with histology and in vivo studies using other imaging modalities.

  10. Low-Oxygen Culture Conditions Extend the Multipotent Properties of Human Retinal Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Budd A.; Young, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Development of an effective cell-based therapy is highly dependent upon having a reproducible cell source suitable for transplantation. One potential source, isolated from the developing fetal neural retina, is the human retinal progenitor cell (hRPC). One limiting factor for the use of hRPCs is their in vitro expansion limit. As such, the aim of this study was to determine whether culturing hRPCs under 3% O2 would support their proliferative capacity while maintaining multipotency. Methods: To determine the effect of low oxygen on the ability of hRPCs to self-renew, rates of proliferation and apoptosis, telomerase activity, and expression of proliferative, stemness, and differentiation markers were assessed for hRPCs cultured in 3% and 20% oxygen conditions. Results: Culture under 3% oxygen increases the proliferation rate and shifts the proliferation limit of hRPCs to greater 40 divisions. This increased capacity for proliferation is correlated with an upregulation of Ki67, CyclinD1, and telomerase activity and a decrease in p53 expression and apoptosis. Increased expression of cMyc, Klf4, Oct4, and Sox2 in 3% O2 is correlated with stabilization of both HIF1α and HIF2α. The eye field development markers Pax6, Sox2, and Otx2 are present in hRPCs up to passage 16 in 3% O2. Following in vitro differentiation hRPCs expanded in the 3% O2 were able to generate specialized retinal cells, including rods and cones. Conclusions: Low-oxygen culture conditions act to maintain both multipotency and self-renewal properties of hRPCs in vitro. The extended expansion limits permit the development of a clinical-grade reagent for transplantation. PMID:24320879

  11. Dissociation of retinal and headcentric disparity signals in dorsal human cortex

    PubMed Central

    Arnoldussen, David M.; Goossens, Jeroen; van Den Berg, Albert V.

    2015-01-01

    Recent fMRI studies have shown fusion of visual motion and disparity signals for shape perception (Ban et al., 2012), and unmasking camouflaged surfaces (Rokers et al., 2009), but no such interaction is known for typical dorsal motion pathway tasks, like grasping and navigation. Here, we investigate human speed perception of forward motion and its representation in the human motion network. We observe strong interaction in medial (V3ab, V6) and lateral motion areas (MT+), which differ significantly. Whereas the retinal disparity dominates the binocular contribution to the BOLD activity in the anterior part of area MT+, headcentric disparity modulation of the BOLD response dominates in area V3ab and V6. This suggests that medial motion areas not only represent rotational speed of the head (Arnoldussen et al., 2011), but also translational speed of the head relative to the scene. Interestingly, a strong response to vergence eye movements was found in area V1, which showed a dependency on visual direction, just like vertical-size disparity. This is the first report of a vertical-size disparity correlate in human striate cortex. PMID:25759642

  12. Effects of light-emitting diode radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Eva; Bonnin-Arias, Cristina; Pérez-Carrasco, María Jesús; Muñoz de Luna, Javier; Vázquez, Daniel; Sánchez-Ramos, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Human visual system is exposed to high levels of natural and artificial lights of different spectra and intensities along lifetime. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are the basic lighting components in screens of PCs, phones and TV sets; hence it is so important to know the implications of LED radiations on the human visual system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of LEDs radiations on human retinal pigment epithelial cells (HRPEpiC). They were exposed to three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles, using blue-468 nm, green-525 nm, red-616 nm and white light. Cellular viability of HRPEpiC was evaluated by labeling all nuclei with DAPI; Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined by H2DCFDA staining; mitochondrial membrane potential was quantified by TMRM staining; DNA damage was determined by H2AX histone activation, and apoptosis was evaluated by caspases-3,-7 activation. It is shown that LED radiations decrease 75-99% cellular viability, and increase 66-89% cellular apoptosis. They also increase ROS production and DNA damage. Fluorescence intensity of apoptosis was 3.7% in nonirradiated cells and 88.8%, 86.1%, 83.9% and 65.5% in cells exposed to white, blue, green or red light, respectively. This study indicates three light-darkness (12 h/12 h) cycles of exposure to LED lighting affect in vitro HRPEpiC.

  13. Course for undergraduate students: analysis of the retinal image quality of a human eye model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Mar Pérez, Maria; Yebra, Ana; Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Ghinea, Razvan; Ionescu, Ana M.; Cardona, Juan C.

    2014-07-01

    In teaching of Vision Physics or Physiological Optics, the knowledge and analysis of the aberration that the human eye presents are of great interest, since this information allows a proper evaluation of the quality of the retinal image. The objective of the present work is that the students acquire the required competencies which will allow them to evaluate the optical quality of the human visual system for emmetropic and ammetropic eye, both with and without the optical compensation. For this purpose, an optical system corresponding to the Navarro-Escudero eye model, which allows calculating and evaluating the aberration of this eye model in different ammetropic conditions, was developed employing the OSLO LT software. The optical quality of the visual system will be assessed through determinations of the third and fifth order aberration coefficients, the impact diagram, wavefront analysis, calculation of the Point Spread Function and the Modulation Transfer Function for ammetropic individuals, with myopia or hyperopia, both with or without the optical compensation. This course is expected to be of great interest for student of Optics and Optometry Sciences, last courses of Physics or medical sciences related with human vision.

  14. Transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells as a thin subretinal layer ameliorates retinal degeneration in a rat model of retinal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Tzameret, Adi; Sher, Ifat; Belkin, Michael; Treves, Avraham J; Meir, Amilia; Nagler, Arnon; Levkovitch-Verbin, Hani; Barshack, Iris; Rosner, Mordechai; Rotenstreich, Ygal

    2014-01-01

    Vision incapacitation and blindness associated with retinal degeneration affect millions of people worldwide. Cell based therapy and specifically transplantation of human adult bone marrow-derived stem cells (hBM-MSCs) present possible treatment strategy. Subretinal transplantation of human or rat BM-MSCs was shown previously to improve retinal function in Royal College Surgeons (RCS) rats. In those studies cells were transplanted via a transscleral-transchoroidal approach, creating a localized subretinal bleb. Limited number of cells could be injected and photoreceptor rescue was restricted to areas in proximity to the injection site. Here we describe a new surgical method for subretinal transplantation that facilitates uniform distribution of transplanted cells as a thin layer along most of the subretinal space. We assessed the therapeutic effect of hBM-MSCs on RCS rats when transplanted either subretinally or intravitreally. We also examined whether a second transplantation can prolong the therapeutic effect. A cell suspension of 2.5 × 10(6) cells in 5 μl was injected subretinally or intravitreally in RCS rats at 28 days postnatal. In the subretinal group, hBM-MSCs were transplanted posterior to the limbus in the superotemporal part of the eye through a longitudinal triangular scleral tunnel reaching the choroid. In the intravitreal group, the cells were injected into the superotemporal part of the vitreous cavity. In cross sections of subretinally transplanted eyes, removed 2 h following transplantation, hBM-MSCs were distributed as a near-homogenous thin layer along most of the subretinal space. In some animals the cells were also detected in the choroid. In the intravitreal injection group, hBM-MSCs were clustered in the vitreous cavity. Transplanted cells could be detected up to 2 weeks after transplantation but not at later time points. Retinal function and structure were assessed by electroretinogram (ERG) and histology analysis, respectively. Six

  15. Protected areas as frontiers for human migration.

    PubMed

    Zommers, Zinta; MacDonald, David W

    2012-06-01

    Causes of human population growth near protected areas have been much debated. We conducted 821 interviews in 16 villages around Budongo Forest Reserve, Masindi district, Uganda, to explore the causes of human migration to protected areas and to identify differences in forest use between migrant and nonmigrant communities. We asked subjects for information about birthplace, migration, household assets, household activities, and forest use. Interview subjects were categorized as nonmigrants (born in one of the interview villages), socioeconomic migrants (chose to emigrate for economic or social reasons) from within Masindi district (i.e., local migrants) and from outside the Masindi district (i.e., regional migrants), or forced migrants (i.e., refugees or internally displaced individuals who emigrated as a result of conflict, human rights abuses, or natural disaster). Only 198 respondents were born in interview villages, indicating high rates of migration between 1998 and 2008. Migrants were drawn to Budongo Forest because they thought land was available (268 individuals) or had family in the area (161 individuals). A greater number of regional migrants settled in villages near Lake Albert than did forced and local migrants. Migration category was also associated with differences in sources of livelihood. Of forced migrants 40.5% earned wages through labor, whereas 25.5% of local and 14.5% of regional migrants engaged in wage labor. Migrant groups appeared to have different effects on the environment. Of respondents that hunted, 72.7% were regional migrants. Principal component analyses indicated households of regional migrants were more likely to be associated with deforestation. Our results revealed gaps in current models of human population growth around protected areas. By highlighting the importance of social networks and livelihood choices, our results contribute to a more nuanced understanding of causes of migration and of the environmental effects of

  16. Protections for Subjects in Human Research with Pesticides

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    All pesticide research using human subjects must meet our strict protective standards before we would consider using them in evaluating pesticides. EPA's regulation “Protections for Subjects in Human Research” was promulgated in 2006 and amended in 2013.

  17. Baicalein Protects Against Retinal Ischemia by Antioxidation, Antiapoptosis, Downregulation of HIF-1α, VEGF, and MMP-9 and Upregulation of HO-1

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Min-Jay; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Ho, Li-Kang; Pan, Wynn H.T.; Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Liu, Chi-Ming; Tsai, Shen-Kou; Kong, Chi-Woon; Lee, Shou-Dong; Chen, Mi-Mi; Chao, Fang-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose Retinal ischemia-associated ocular disorders are vision threatening. This study examined whether the flavonoid baicalein is able to protect against retinal ischemia/reperfusion. Methods Using rats, the intraocular pressure was raised to 120 mmHg for 60 min to induce retinal ischemia. In vitro, an ischemic-like insult, namely oxidative stress, was established by incubating dissociated retinal cells with 100 μM ascorbate and 5 μM FeSO4 (iron) for 1 h. The rats or the dissociated cells had been pretreated with baicalein (in vivo: 0.05 or 0.5 nmol; in vitro: 100 μM), vehicle (1% ethanol), or trolox (in vivo: 5 nmol; in vitro: 100 μM or 1 mM). The effects of these treatments on the retina or the retinal cells were evaluated by electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) staining, Western blotting, or in vitro dichlorofluorescein assay. In addition, real-time-polymerase chain reaction was used to assess the retinal expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Results The retinal changes after ischemia included a decrease in the electroretinogram b-wave amplitude, a loss of choline acetyltransferase immunolabeling amacrine cell bodies/neuronal processes, an increase in vimentin immunoreactivity, which is a marker for Müller cells, an increase in apoptotic cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer linked to a decrease in the Bcl-2 protein, and changes in the mRNA levels of HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP-9, and HO-1. Of clinical importance, the ischemic detrimental effects were concentration dependently and/or significantly (0.05 nmol and/or 0.5 nmol) altered when baicalein was applied 15 min before retinal ischemia. Most of all, 0.5 nmol baicalein significantly reduced the upregulation of MMP-9; in contrast, 5 nmol trolox only had a weak

  18. The influences of purple sweet potato anthocyanin on the growth characteristics of human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Min; Lu, Xiaoling; Hao, Lei; Wu, Tao; Zhao, Huanjiao; Wang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Background Anthocyanins have been proven to be beneficial to the eyes. However, information is scarce about the effects of purple sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas, L.) anthocyanin (PSPA), a class of anthocyanins derived from purple sweet potato roots, on visual health. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether PSPA could have influences on the growth characteristics (cellular morphology, survival, and proliferation) of human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, which perform essential functions for the visual process. Methods The RPE cell line D407 was used in the present study. The cytotoxicity of PSPA was assessed by MTT assay. Then, cellular morphology, viability, cell cycle, Ki67expression, and PI3K/MAPK activation of RPE cells treated with PSPA were determined. Results PSPA exhibited dose-dependent promotion of RPE cell proliferation at concentrations ranging from 10 to 1,000 µg/ml. RPE cells treated with PSPA demonstrated a predominantly polygonal morphology in a mosaic arrangement, and colony-like cells displayed numerous short apical microvilli and typical ultrastructure. PSPA treatment also resulted in a better platform growing status, statistically higher viability, an increase in the S-phase, and more Ki67+ cells. However, neither pAkt nor pERK were detected in either group. Conclusions We found that PSPA maintained high cell viability, boosted DNA synthesis, and preserved a high percentage of continuously cycling cells to promote cell survival and division without changing cell morphology. This paper lays the foundation for further research about the damage-protective activities of PSPA on RPE cells or human vision. PMID:26070791

  19. Hydrostatic Pressure Does Not Cause Detectable Changes in Survival of Human Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Andrew; Aldarwesh, Amal; Rhodes, Jeremy D.; Broadway, David C.; Everitt, Claire; Sanderson, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a major risk factor for glaucoma. One consequence of raised IOP is that ocular tissues are subjected to increased hydrostatic pressure (HP). The effect of raised HP on stress pathway signaling and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival in the human retina was investigated. Methods A chamber was designed to expose cells to increased HP (constant and fluctuating). Accurate pressure control (10-100mmHg) was achieved using mass flow controllers. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs) from donor eyes (<24h post mortem) were cultured in serum-free DMEM/HamF12. Increased HP was compared to simulated ischemia (oxygen glucose deprivation, OGD). Cell death and apoptosis were measured by LDH and TUNEL assays, RGC marker expression by qRT-PCR (THY-1) and RGC number by immunohistochemistry (NeuN). Activated p38 and JNK were detected by Western blot. Results Exposure of HORCs to constant (60mmHg) or fluctuating (10-100mmHg; 1 cycle/min) pressure for 24 or 48h caused no loss of structural integrity, LDH release, decrease in RGC marker expression (THY-1) or loss of RGCs compared with controls. In addition, there was no increase in TUNEL-positive NeuN-labelled cells at either time-point indicating no increase in apoptosis of RGCs. OGD increased apoptosis, reduced RGC marker expression and RGC number and caused elevated LDH release at 24h. p38 and JNK phosphorylation remained unchanged in HORCs exposed to fluctuating pressure (10-100mmHg; 1 cycle/min) for 15, 30, 60 and 90min durations, whereas OGD (3h) increased activation of p38 and JNK, remaining elevated for 90min post-OGD. Conclusions Directly applied HP had no detectable impact on RGC survival and stress-signalling in HORCs. Simulated ischemia, however, activated stress pathways and caused RGC death. These results show that direct HP does not cause degeneration of RGCs in the ex vivo human retina. PMID:25635827

  20. Hydrostatic pressure does not cause detectable changes in survival of human retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Andrew; Aldarwesh, Amal; Rhodes, Jeremy D; Broadway, David C; Everitt, Claire; Sanderson, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a major risk factor for glaucoma. One consequence of raised IOP is that ocular tissues are subjected to increased hydrostatic pressure (HP). The effect of raised HP on stress pathway signaling and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival in the human retina was investigated. A chamber was designed to expose cells to increased HP (constant and fluctuating). Accurate pressure control (10-100 mmHg) was achieved using mass flow controllers. Human organotypic retinal cultures (HORCs) from donor eyes (<24 h post mortem) were cultured in serum-free DMEM/HamF12. Increased HP was compared to simulated ischemia (oxygen glucose deprivation, OGD). Cell death and apoptosis were measured by LDH and TUNEL assays, RGC marker expression by qRT-PCR (THY-1) and RGC number by immunohistochemistry (NeuN). Activated p38 and JNK were detected by Western blot. Exposure of HORCs to constant (60 mmHg) or fluctuating (10-100 mmHg; 1 cycle/min) pressure for 24 or 48 h caused no loss of structural integrity, LDH release, decrease in RGC marker expression (THY-1) or loss of RGCs compared with controls. In addition, there was no increase in TUNEL-positive NeuN-labelled cells at either time-point indicating no increase in apoptosis of RGCs. OGD increased apoptosis, reduced RGC marker expression and RGC number and caused elevated LDH release at 24 h. p38 and JNK phosphorylation remained unchanged in HORCs exposed to fluctuating pressure (10-100 mmHg; 1 cycle/min) for 15, 30, 60 and 90 min durations, whereas OGD (3 h) increased activation of p38 and JNK, remaining elevated for 90 min post-OGD. Directly applied HP had no detectable impact on RGC survival and stress-signalling in HORCs. Simulated ischemia, however, activated stress pathways and caused RGC death. These results show that direct HP does not cause degeneration of RGCs in the ex vivo human retina.

  1. Bestrophin-1 influences transepithelial electrical properties and Ca2+ signaling in human retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Kinnick, Tyson R.; Stanton, J. Brett; Johnson, Adiv A.; Lynch, Ronald M.; Marmorstein, Lihua Y.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in BEST1, encoding Bestrophin-1 (Best1), cause Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) and other inherited retinal degenerative diseases. Best1 is an integral membrane protein localized to the basolateral plasma membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Data from numerous in vitro and in vivo models have demonstrated that Best1 regulates intracellular Ca2+ levels. Although it is known from in vitro and crystal structure data that Best1 is also a calcium-activated anion channel, evidence for Best1 functioning as a channel in human RPE is lacking. To assess Best1-associated channel activity in the RPE, we examined the transepithelial electrical properties of fetal human RPE (fhRPE) cells, which express endogenous Best1. Methods Using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, we overexpressed Best1 and the BVMD mutant Best1W93C in fhRPE cells and assessed resting transepithelial potential (TEP), transepithelial resistance, short circuit current (Isc), and intracellular Ca2+ levels. Cl- currents were directly measured in transfected HEK293 cells using whole-cell patch clamp. Results Best1W93C showed ablated Cl- currents and, when co-expressed, suppressed the channel activity of Best1 in HEK293 cells. In fhRPE, overexpression of Best1 increased TEP and Isc, while Best1W93C diminished TEP and Isc. Substitution of Cl- in the bath media resulted in a significant reduction of Isc in monolayers overexpressing Best1, but no significant Isc change in monolayers expressing Best1W93C. We removed Ca2+ as a limit on transepithelial electrical properties by treating cells with ionomycin, and found that changes in Isc and TEP for monolayers expressing Best1 were absent in monolayers expressing Best1W93C. Similarly, inhibition of calcium-activated anion channels with niflumic acid reduced both Isc and TEP of control and Best1 monolayers, but did not notably affect Best1W93C monolayers. Stimulation with extracellular ATP induced an increase in TEP in control

  2. Retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal dystrophy caused by the loss of photoreceptors and characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination. Prevalence of non syndromic RP is approximately 1/4,000. The most common form of RP is a rod-cone dystrophy, in which the first symptom is night blindness, followed by the progressive loss in the peripheral visual field in daylight, and eventually leading to blindness after several decades. Some extreme cases may have a rapid evolution over two decades or a slow progression that never leads to blindness. In some cases, the clinical presentation is a cone-rod dystrophy, in which the decrease in visual acuity predominates over the visual field loss. RP is usually non syndromic but there are also many syndromic forms, the most frequent being Usher syndrome. To date, 45 causative genes/loci have been identified in non syndromic RP (for the autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and digenic forms). Clinical diagnosis is based on the presence of night blindness and peripheral visual field defects, lesions in the fundus, hypovolted electroretinogram traces, and progressive worsening of these signs. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, but is not usually performed due to the tremendous genetic heterogeneity of the disease. Genetic counseling is always advised. Currently, there is no therapy that stops the evolution of the disease or restores the vision, so the visual prognosis is poor. The therapeutic approach is restricted to slowing down the degenerative process by sunlight protection and vitaminotherapy, treating the complications (cataract and macular edema), and helping patients to cope with the social and psychological impact of blindness. However, new therapeutic strategies are emerging from intensive research (gene therapy, neuroprotection, retinal prosthesis). PMID:17032466

  3. 76 FR 54408 - Human Subjects Research Protections: Enhancing Protections for Research Subjects and Reducing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... Menikoff, M.D., J.D., Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP), Department of Health and Human Services... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Parts 50 and 56 Human Subjects Research Protections: Enhancing Protections for Research Subjects...

  4. Protective action of nipradilol mediated through S-nitrosylation of Keap1 and HO-1 induction in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Koriyama, Yoshiki; Kamiya, Marie; Takadera, Tsuneo; Arai, Kunizo; Sugitani, Kayo; Ogai, Kazuhiro; Kato, Satoru

    2012-12-01

    Nipradilol (Nip), which has α1- and β-adrenoceptor antagonist and nitric oxide (NO)-donating properties, has clinically been used as an anti-glaucomatous agent in Japan. NO mediates cellular signaling pathways that regulate physiological functions. The major signaling mechanisms mediated by NO are cGMP-dependent signaling and protein S-nitrosylation-dependent signalings. Nip has been described as having neuroprotective effects through cGMP-dependent pathway in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). However, the effect seems to be partial. On the other hand, whether Nip can prevent cell death through S-nitrosylation is not yet clarified. In this study, we therefore focused on the neuroprotective mechanism of Nip through S-nitrosylation. Nip showed a dramatic neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress-induced death of RGC-5 cells. However, denitro-nipradilol, which does not have NO-donating properties, was not protective against oxidative stress. Furthermore, an NO scavenger significantly reversed the protective action of Nip against oxidative stress. In addition, we demonstrated that α1- or β-adrenoceptor antagonists (prazosin or timolol) did not show any neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress in RGC-5 cells. We also demonstrated that Nip induced the expression of the NO-dependent antioxidant enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). S-nitrosylation of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein by Nip was shown to contribute to the translocation of NF-E2-related factor 2 to the nucleus, and triggered transcriptional activation of HO-1. Furthermore, RGC death and levels of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE) were increased after optic nerve injury in vivo. Pretreatment with Nip significantly suppressed RGC death and accumulation of 4HNE after injury through an HO-1 activity-dependent mechanism. These data demonstrate a novel neuroprotective action of Nip against oxidative stress-induced RGC death in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Modeling human retinal development with patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells reveals multiple roles for visual system homeobox 2.

    PubMed

    Phillips, M Joseph; Perez, Enio T; Martin, Jessica M; Reshel, Samantha T; Wallace, Kyle A; Capowski, Elizabeth E; Singh, Ruchira; Wright, Lynda S; Clark, Eric M; Barney, Patrick M; Stewart, Ron; Dickerson, Sarah J; Miller, Michael J; Percin, E Ferda; Thomson, James A; Gamm, David M

    2014-06-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have been shown to differentiate along the retinal lineage in a manner that mimics normal mammalian development. Under certain culture conditions, hiPSCs form optic vesicle-like structures (OVs), which contain proliferating progenitors capable of yielding all neural retina (NR) cell types over time. Such observations imply conserved roles for regulators of retinogenesis in hiPSC-derived cultures and the developing embryo. However, whether and to what extent this assumption holds true has remained largely uninvestigated. We examined the role of a key NR transcription factor, visual system homeobox 2 (VSX2), using hiPSCs derived from a patient with microphthalmia caused by an R200Q mutation in the VSX2 homeodomain region. No differences were noted between (R200Q)VSX2 and sibling control hiPSCs prior to OV generation. Thereafter, (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs displayed a significant growth deficit compared to control hiPSC-OVs, as well as increased production of retinal pigmented epithelium at the expense of NR cell derivatives. Furthermore, (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs failed to produce bipolar cells, a distinctive feature previously observed in Vsx2 mutant mice. (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs also demonstrated delayed photoreceptor maturation, which could be overcome via exogenous expression of wild-type VSX2 at early stages of retinal differentiation. Finally, RNAseq analysis on isolated hiPSC-OVs implicated key transcription factors and extracellular signaling pathways as potential downstream effectors of VSX2-mediated gene regulation. Our results establish hiPSC-OVs as versatile model systems to study retinal development at stages not previously accessible in humans and support the bona fide nature of hiPSC-OV-derived retinal progeny.

  6. Modeling human retinal development with patient-specific iPS cells reveals multiple roles for VSX2

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M. Joseph; Perez, Enio T.; Martin, Jessica M.; Reshel, Samantha T.; Wallace, Kyle A.; Capowski, Elizabeth E.; Singh, Ruchira; Wright, Lynda S.; Clark, Eric M.; Barney, Patrick M.; Stewart, Ron; Dickerson, Sarah J.; Miller, Michael J.; Percin, E. Ferda; Thomson, James A.; Gamm, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have been shown to differentiate along the retinal lineage in a manner that mimics normal mammalian development. Under certain culture conditions hiPSCs form optic vesicle-like structures (OVs), which contain proliferating progenitors capable of yielding all neural retina (NR) cell types over time. Such observations imply conserved roles for regulators of retinogenesis in hiPSC-derived cultures and the developing embryo. However, whether and to what extent this assumption holds true has remained largely uninvestigated. We examined the role of a key NR transcription factor, Visual System Homeobox 2 (VSX2), using hiPSCs derived from a patient with microphthalmia caused by an R200Q mutation in the VSX2 homeodomain region. No differences were noted between (R200Q)VSX2 and sibling control hiPSCs prior to OV generation. Thereafter, (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs displayed a significant growth deficit compared to control hiPSC-OVs, as well as increased production of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) at the expense of NR cell derivatives. Furthermore, (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs failed to produce bipolar cells, a distinctive feature previously observed in Vsx2 mutant mice. (R200Q)VSX2 hiPSC-OVs also demonstrated delayed photoreceptor maturation, which could be overcome via exogenous expression of wildtype VSX2 at early stages of retinal differentiation. Finally, RNAseq analysis on isolated hiPSC-OVs implicated key transcription factors and extracellular signaling pathways as potential downstream effectors of VSX2-mediated gene regulation. Our results establish hiPSC-OVs as versatile model systems to study retinal development at stages not previously accessible in humans, and support the bona fide nature of hiPSC-OV-derived retinal progeny. PMID:24532057

  7. 48 CFR 1252.223-72 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) policies and procedures for the protection of human subjects... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection of human....223-72 Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in (TAR) 48 CFR 1223.7000(b), insert the...

  8. 34 CFR 75.681 - Protection of human research subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Protection of human research subjects. 75.681 Section... Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Other Requirements for Certain Projects § 75.681 Protection of human research subjects. If a grantee uses a human subject in a research project, the grantee shall protect...

  9. 34 CFR 75.681 - Protection of human research subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection of human research subjects. 75.681 Section... Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Other Requirements for Certain Projects § 75.681 Protection of human research subjects. If a grantee uses a human subject in a research project, the grantee shall protect...

  10. 48 CFR 252.235-7004 - Protection of Human Subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection of Human... of Provisions And Clauses 252.235-7004 Protection of Human Subjects. As prescribed in 235.072(e), use the following clause: Protection of Human Subjects (JUL 2009) (a) Definitions. As used in this...

  11. 48 CFR 252.235-7004 - Protection of Human Subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protection of Human... of Provisions And Clauses 252.235-7004 Protection of Human Subjects. As prescribed in 235.072(e), use the following clause: Protection of Human Subjects (JUL 2009) (a) Definitions. As used in this...

  12. 48 CFR 1252.223-72 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Protection of human....223-72 Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in (TAR) 48 CFR 1223.7000(b), insert the following clause: Protection of Human Subjects (APR 2005) The Contractor shall comply with the National...

  13. 34 CFR 75.681 - Protection of human research subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Protection of human research subjects. 75.681 Section... Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Other Requirements for Certain Projects § 75.681 Protection of human research subjects. If a grantee uses a human subject in a research project, the grantee shall protect the...

  14. 48 CFR 252.235-7004 - Protection of Human Subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Protection of Human... of Provisions And Clauses 252.235-7004 Protection of Human Subjects. As prescribed in 235.072(e), use the following clause: Protection of Human Subjects (JUL 2009) (a) Definitions. As used in this clause...

  15. 48 CFR 1252.223-72 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protection of human....223-72 Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in (TAR) 48 CFR 1223.7000(b), insert the following clause: Protection of Human Subjects (APR 2005) The Contractor shall comply with the National Highway...

  16. 34 CFR 75.681 - Protection of human research subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Protection of human research subjects. 75.681 Section... Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Other Requirements for Certain Projects § 75.681 Protection of human research subjects. If a grantee uses a human subject in a research project, the grantee shall protect the...

  17. 34 CFR 75.681 - Protection of human research subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Protection of human research subjects. 75.681 Section... Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Other Requirements for Certain Projects § 75.681 Protection of human research subjects. If a grantee uses a human subject in a research project, the grantee shall protect the...

  18. 48 CFR 252.235-7004 - Protection of Human Subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Protection of Human... of Provisions And Clauses 252.235-7004 Protection of Human Subjects. As prescribed in 235.072(e), use the following clause: Protection of Human Subjects (JUL 2009) (a) Definitions. As used in this clause...

  19. 48 CFR 1252.223-72 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) policies and procedures for the protection of human subjects... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Protection of human....223-72 Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in (TAR) 48 CFR 1223.7000(b), insert the...

  20. 48 CFR 1252.223-72 - Protection of human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) policies and procedures for the protection of human subjects... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Protection of human....223-72 Protection of human subjects. As prescribed in (TAR) 48 CFR 1223.7000(b), insert the...

  1. Retinal iron homeostasis in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, Delu; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is essential for life, but excess iron can be toxic. As a potent free radical creator, iron generates hydroxyl radicals leading to significant oxidative stress. Since iron is not excreted from the body, it accumulates with age in tissues, including the retina, predisposing to age-related oxidative insult. Both hereditary and acquired retinal diseases are associated with increased iron levels. For example, retinal degenerations have been found in hereditary iron overload disorders, like aceruloplasminemia, Friedreich's ataxia, and pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. Similarly, mice with targeted mutation of the iron exporter ceruloplasmin and its homolog hephaestin showed age-related retinal iron accumulation and retinal degeneration with features resembling human age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Post mortem AMD eyes have increased levels of iron in retina compared to age-matched healthy donors. Iron accumulation in AMD is likely to result, in part, from inflammation, hypoxia, and oxidative stress, all of which can cause iron dysregulation. Fortunately, it has been demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo studies that iron in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and retina is chelatable. Iron chelation protects photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) in a variety of mouse models. This has therapeutic potential for diminishing iron-induced oxidative damage to prevent or treat AMD. PMID:23825457

  2. Potential Role of Exercise in Retinal Health.

    PubMed

    Pardue, Machelle T; Chrenek, Micah A; Schmidt, Robin H; Nickerson, John M; Boatright, Jeffrey H

    2015-01-01

    For many patients suffering vision loss due to retinal degeneration, the potential exists for therapeutic intervention to halt or delay disease progression. Proposed molecular, pharmacological, and surgical treatments are expensive and complicated. Finding low-cost interventions to sustain vision and thereby quality of life is vitally important. This chapter reviews findings from animal model and human subject studies indicating that physical exercise has direct, beneficial effects on regions of the central nervous system and is protective against neurodegenerative disease, including recent data from animal models showing similar effects for retina and vision. Potential local and systemic mechanistic pathways for exercise-induced retinal neuroprotection are discussed.

  3. Photocoagulation of human retinal pigment epithelium in vitro: unravelling the effects on ARPE-19 by transcriptomics and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Tababat-Khani, Poya; de la Torre, Carolina; Canals, Francesc; Bennet, Hedvig; Simo, Rafael; Hernandez, Cristina; Fex, Malin; Agardh, Carl-David; Hansson, Ola; Agardh, Elisabet

    2015-06-01

    Despite the extensive use of retinal photocoagulation for ischaemia and vascular leakage in retinal vascular disease, the molecular mechanisms behind its clinical beneficial effects are still poorly understood. One important target of laser irradiation is the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In this study, we aimed at identifying the isolated effects of photocoagulation of RPE at both the mRNA and protein expression levels. Human ARPE-19 cells were exposed to photocoagulation. Gene expression and protein expression were compared to untreated cells using microarray and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Genes and proteins queried by microarray and mass spectrometry were subjected to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database pathway analyses. Laser irradiation resulted in an induction of the cytoprotective heat-shock protein subfamily Hsp70 as well as in a suppression of the vascular permeability factor carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9). These expression patterns were evident at both the mRNA and protein levels. KEGG pathway analyses revealed genes and proteins involved in cellular turnover, repair and inflammation. By characterizing the transcriptional and translational effects of laser coagulation on the RPE cells in culture, we have revealed responses, which might contribute to some of the beneficial effects obtained by photocoagulation for ischaemia and vascular leakage in retinal vascular disease. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Cytokine regulation of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production by human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Crane, I J; Kuppner, M C; Mckillop-Smith, S; Wallace, C A; Forrester, J V

    1999-01-01

    GM-CSF is an important regulator of macrophage, granulocyte and dendritic cell behaviour and function. These cell types have been implicated in the retinal damage characteristic of endogenous posterior uveitis. Dendritic cells in the choroid have access to retinal antigens processed by the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells of the blood–retinal barrier and are thought to be candidates for the presentation of antigen in uveoretinitis. We therefore investigated the production of GM-CSF and its regulation in human RPE cells. IL-1β, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) all stimulated GM-CSF production by RPE cells and a combination of these cytokines increased GM-CSF production over five-fold compared with that with the individual cytokines alone. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) rapidly down-regulated these responses. IFN-γ did not appear to be acting directly on IL-1β or via the synthesis of another protein. GM-CSF mRNA expression showed the same pattern of response to these cytokines, indicating transcriptional or pre-transcriptional regulation, and there was no evidence that IFN-γ was acting by destabilizing GM-CSF mRNA. These results are generally important in understanding the ways in which cytokine regulation differs between different cell types and also more specifically for determining ways in which a cytokine with a significant role in the development of autoimmune uveoretinitis may be manipulated. PMID:9933455

  5. Differential expression of TYRP1 in adult human retinal pigment epithelium and uveal melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    QIU, CHUN; LI, PENG; BI, JIANJUN; WU, QING; LU, LINNA; QIAN, GUANXIANG; JIA, RENBING; JIA, RONG

    2016-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most frequently occurring primary intraocular malignancy in adults. Tyrosinase (TYR) is a copper-containing enzyme and a type I membrane protein that is involved in the generation of melanin, the main pigment in vertebrates. TYR-related protein 1 (TYRP1) is regarded to have a crucial role in the immunotherapy of melanoma. As biomarkers, the TYR-related proteins, TYRP1 and TYRP2, exhibit specific expression in melanocytes, while also contributing to melanin synthesis within melanosomes. In the present study, the differential expression of TYRP1 was investigated at the mRNA, protein and morphological levels in four human UM cell lines (SP6.5, OM431, OCM1 and OCM290) and the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line, using polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, immunocytochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. It was found that SP6.5 cells expressed the highest level of TYRP1, in comparison to SP6.5 OCM1 and OM431 cells, which produced less TYRP1, and OCM290 cells, which produced almost no TYRP1. No TYRP1 protein expression was identified in the RPE cell line. These findings indicate the potential use of TYRP1 in the development of therapy for UM. PMID:27073483

  6. A novel Bruch's membrane-mimetic electrospun substrate scaffold for human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ping; Wu, Kun-Chao; Zhu, Ying; Xiang, Lue; Li, Chong; Chen, Deng-Long; Chen, Feng; Xu, Guotong; Wang, Aijun; Li, Min; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2014-12-01

    Various artificial membranes have been used as scaffolds for retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE) for monolayer reconstruction, however, long-term cell viability and functionality are still largely unknown. This study aimed to construct an ultrathin porous nanofibrous film to mimic Bruch's membrane, and in particular to investigate human RPE cell responses to the resultant substrates. An ultrathin porous nanofibrous membrane was fabricated by using regenerated wild Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin (RWSF), polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatin (Gt) and displayed a thickness of 3-5 μm, with a high porosity and an average fiber diameter of 166 ± 85 nm. Human RPE cells seeded on the RWSF/PCL/Gt membranes showed a higher cell growth rate (p < 0.05), and a typical expression pattern of RPE signature genes, with reduced expression of inflammatory mediators. With long-term cultivation on the substrates, RPE cells exhibited characteristic polygonal morphology and development of apical microvilli. Immunocytochemisty demonstrated RPE-specific expression profiles in cells after 12-weeks of co-culture on RWSF/PCL/Gt membranes. Interestingly, the cells on the RWSF/PCL/Gt membranes functionally secreted polarized PEDF and phagocytosed labeled porcine POS. Furthermore, RWSF/PCL/Gt membranes transplanted subsclerally exhibited excellent biocompatibility without any evidence of inflammation or rejection. In conclusion, we established a novel RWSF-based substrate for growth of RPE cells with excellent cytocompatibility in vitro and biocompatibility in vivo for potential use as a prosthetic Bruch's membrane for RPE transplantation.

  7. Coupling of human delta-opioid receptor to retinal rod transducin in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Varga, E V; Stropova, D; Kim, T; Wang, M; Roeske, W R; Yamamura, H I

    2000-01-01

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to identify the pertussis toxin (Ptx)-sensitive G protein alpha-subunit pool in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and mouse fibroblast (B82) cells. We detected the presence of mRNA for G(ialpha2), G(ialpha3), and G(oalpha) in both cell lines. G(ialpha1) and G(alphaz) mRNAs were not detected. We also found a homolog of the retinal rod transducin (G(talpha1)) in CHO, and the mouse cone transducin (G(talpha2)) in B82 cells. The presence of the transducin alpha-subunit proteins in CHO and B82 cells was confirmed by immunoprecipitation with specific antibodies. To test the interaction of heterologously expressed receptors with transducin in CHO cells, a Ptx-insensitive (C347S) rod transducin mutant was transfected into a CHO cell line stably expressing the human delta-opioid receptor (hDOR/CHO). (+)-4-[(alphaR)-alpha-((2S,2R)-4-allyl-2, 5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide, a selective delta-opioid receptor agonist, stimulated guanosine-5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate binding by 293 +/- 36% after Ptx pretreatment in the mutant cell line with an EC(50) value of 54 +/- 32 nM, showing that transducin can functionally couple to the human delta-opioid receptors in these cells.

  8. Electric impedance of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Onnela, Niina; Savolainen, Virpi; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Vaajasaari, Hanna; Skottman, Heli; Hyttinen, Jari

    2012-02-01

    The barrier properties of epithelium are conventionally defined by transepithelial resistance (TER). TER provides information about the tightness of the epithelium. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) provides additional information regarding cell membrane properties, such as changes in electric capacitance and possible parallel or serial pathways that may correlate with the morphology of the cell layer. This study presents EIS of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell model of the putative RPE differentiated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-RPE). The generally utilized RPE cell model, ARPE-19, was used as immature control. The measured EIS was analyzed by fitting an equivalent electrical circuit model describing the resistive and capacitive properties of the RPE. Our results indicated that TER of hESC-RPE cells was close to the values of human RPE presented in the literature. This provides evidence that the stem cell-derived RPE in vitro can reach high-barrier function. Furthermore, hESC-RPE cells produced impedance spectra that can be modeled by the equivalent circuit of one time constant. ARPE-19 cells produced low-barrier properties, that is, an impedance spectra that suggested poor maturation of ARPE-19 cells. To conclude, EIS could give us means for non-invasively estimating the functionality and maturation of differentiated-RPE cells.

  9. Differentiation of human ESCs to retinal ganglion cells using a CRISPR engineered reporter cell line

    PubMed Central

    Sluch, Valentin M.; Davis, Chung-ha O.; Ranganathan, Vinod; Kerr, Justin M.; Krick, Kellin; Martin, Russ; Berlinicke, Cynthia A.; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Diamond, Jeffrey S.; Mao, Hai-Quan; Zack, Donald J.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) injury and cell death from glaucoma and other forms of optic nerve disease is a major cause of irreversible vision loss and blindness. Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived RGCs could provide a source of cells for the development of novel therapeutic molecules as well as for potential cell-based therapies. In addition, such cells could provide insights into human RGC development, gene regulation, and neuronal biology. Here, we report a simple, adherent cell culture protocol for differentiation of hPSCs to RGCs using a CRISPR-engineered RGC fluorescent reporter stem cell line. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting of the differentiated cultures yields a highly purified population of cells that express a range of RGC-enriched markers and exhibit morphological and physiological properties typical of RGCs. Additionally, we demonstrate that aligned nanofiber matrices can be used to guide the axonal outgrowth of hPSC-derived RGCs for in vitro optic nerve-like modeling. Lastly, using this protocol we identified forskolin as a potent promoter of RGC differentiation. PMID:26563826

  10. Retinal oximetry in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Rilvén, Sandra; Torp, Thomas Lee; Grauslund, Jakob

    2017-03-01

    The retinal oximeter is a new tool for non-invasive measurement of retinal oxygen saturation in humans. Several studies have investigated the associations between retinal oxygen saturation and retinal diseases. In the present systematic review, we examine whether there are associations between retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. We used PubMed and Embase to search for retinal oxygen saturation and retinal ischaemic diseases. Three separate searches identified a total of 79 publications. After two levels of manual screening, 10 studies were included: six about diabetic retinopathy (DR) and four about retinal vein occlusion. No studies about retinal artery occlusion were included. In diabetes, all studies found that increases in retinal venous oxygen saturation (rvSatO2 ) were associated with present as well as increasing levels of DR. Four of six studies also found increased retinal arterial oxygen saturation (raSatO2 ) in patients with DR. In patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), all studies found that rvSatO2 was reduced, but raSatO2 remained unchanged. Branch retinal vein occlusion was not associated with changes in retinal oxygen saturation, but this was based on a single study. In conclusion, DR is associated with increased rvSatO2 and might also be related to increased raSatO2 . Central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) is correlated with increased rvSatO2 but unrelated to raSatO2 . Prospective studies are needed to expand these findings. These would tell whether retinal oximetry could be a potential tool for screening or a biomarker of treatment outcome in patients with ischaemic retinal diseases.

  11. Protective effects of NSP-116, a novel imidazolyl aniline derivative, against light-induced retinal damage in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Hiroshi; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Inoue, Yuki; Uchida, Seiichi; Moroe, Hiroko; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Hara, Hideaki

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the protective effects of NSP-116 [4-(4-acetylpiperazin-1-yl)-2-(1H-imidazol-1-yl) aniline], a novel imidazolyl aniline derivative, against light-induced photoreceptor cell damage. In an in vitro experiment, murine photoreceptor (661W) cells were damaged by exposure to light for 24h. Viability of 661W cells after light exposure was assessed by Hoechst 33342/Propidium iodide nuclear staining and a tetrazolium salt (WST-8) assay. Intracellular radical production in 661W cells was evaluated using the reactive oxygen species (ROS) sensitive probe 5-(and 6)-chloromethyl-2, 7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate acetyl ester (CM-H2DCFDA). NSP-116 significantly suppressed light-induced cell death and ROS production in 661W cells. In an in vivo mouse experiment, retinal damage was induced by exposure to white light at 8000lx for 3h after dark adaptation. Retinal damage was evaluated by recording the electroretinogram and measuring the outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness at 5 days after light exposure. Single oral administration of NSP-116 before light exposure protected retinal function and ONL thinning after light exposure. Furthermore, the effect of NSP-116 on lipid peroxidation was evaluated using thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) assay in porcine retina, and was found to decrease the production of TBARS. Electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements showed that NSP-116 exhibited radical scavenging activities against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, superoxide anion radical (∙O2(-)), and hydroxyl radical (∙OH). These findings suggest that NSP-116 has protective effects against light-induced photoreceptor degeneration in vitro and in vivo as a free radical scavenger, and it may be a novel therapeutic agent for retinal degenerative disorders, such as dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of Lead Hammerhead Ribozyme Candidates against Human Rod Opsin mRNA for Retinal Degeneration Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmaksoud, Heba E.; Yau, Edwin H.; Zuker, Michael; Sullivan, Jack M.

    2011-01-01

    To identify lead candidate allele-independent hammerhead ribozymes (hhRz) for the treatment of autosomal dominant mutations in the human rod opsin (RHO) gene, we tested a series of hhRzs for potential to significantly knockdown human RHO gene expression in a human cell expression system. Multiple computational criteria were used to select target mRNA regions likely to be single stranded and accessible to hhRz annealing and cleavage. Target regions are tested for accessibility in a human cell culture expression system where the hhRz RNA and target mRNA and protein are coexpressed. The hhRz RNA is embedded in an adenoviral VAI RNA chimeric RNA of established structure and properties which are critical to the experimental paradigm. The chimeric hhRz-VAI RNA is abundantly transcribed so that the hhRzs are expected to be in great excess over substrate mRNA. HhRz-VAI traffics predominantly to the cytoplasm to colocalize with the RHO mRNA target. Colocalization is essential for second-order annealing reactions. The VAI chimera protects the hhRz RNA from degradation and provides for a long half life. With cell lines chosen for high transfection efficiency and a molar excess of hhRz plasmid over target plasmid, the conditions of this experimental paradigm are specifically designed to evaluate for regions of accessibility of the target mRNA in cellulo. Western analysis was used to measure the impact of hhRz expression on RHO protein expression. Three lead candidate hhRz designs were identified that significantly knockdown target protein expression relative to control (p < 0.05). Successful lead candidates (hhRz CUC↓ 266, hhRz CUC↓ 1411, hhRz AUA↓ 1414) targeted regions of human RHO mRNA that were predicted to be accessible by a bioinformatics approach, whereas regions predicted to be inaccessible supported no knockdown. The maximum opsin protein level knockdown is approximately 30% over a 48 hr paradigm of testing. These results validate a rigorous computational

  13. Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    36) However, vascularization of the RPE is not known to occur in human diseases of photoreceptor degeneration, such as retinitis pigmentosa ...A.C. (1986) Retinitis pigmentosa and retinal neovascularization. Ophthalmology 91, 1599- 1603. Figure la: Control rat retina, 8 weeks of age, central...TITLE (Include Security Classification) Intracellular Signalling in Retinal Ischemia 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Burns, Margaret Sue; Bellhorn, Roy William

  14. Ocular inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum stress are attenuated by supplementation with grape polyphenols in human retinal pigmented epithelium cells and in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung-Heun; Shil, Pollob Kumar; Zhu, Ping; Gu, Liwei; Li, Qiuhong; Chung, Soonkyu

    2014-06-01

    Inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are common denominators for vision-threatening diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. Based on our previous study, supplementation with muscadine grape polyphenols (MGPs) alleviated systemic insulin resistance and proinflammatory responses. In this study, we hypothesized that MGPs would also be effective in attenuating ocular inflammation and ER stress. We tested this hypothesis using the human retinal pigmented epithelium (ARPE-19) cells and C57BL/6 mice. In ARPE-19 cells, tumor necrosis factor-α-induced proinflammatory gene expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 was decreased by 35.0%, 68.8%, and 62.5%, respectively, with MGP pretreatment, which was primarily due to the diminished mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and subsequent reduction of nuclear factor κ-B activation. Consistently, acute ocular inflammation and leukocyte infiltration were almost completely dampened (>95%) by MGP supplementation (100-200 mg/kg body weight) in C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, MGPs reduced inflammation-mediated loss of tight junctions and retinal permeability. To further investigate the protective roles of MGPs against ER stress, ARPE-19 cells were stimulated with thapsigargin. Pretreatment with MGPs significantly decreased the following: 1) ER stress-mediated vascular endothelial growth factor secretion (3.47 ± 0.06 vs. 1.58 ± 0.02 μg/L, P < 0.0001), 2) unfolded protein response, and 3) early apoptotic cell death (64.4 ± 6.85 vs. 33.7 ± 4.32%, P = 0.0003). Collectively, we have demonstrated that MGP is effective in attenuating ocular inflammation and ER stress. Our work also suggests that MGP may provide a novel dietary strategy to prevent vision-threatening retinal diseases. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  15. Photobiomodulation with 670 nm light increased phagocytosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Fuma, Shinichiro; Murase, Hiromi; Kuse, Yoshiki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Photobiomodulation is the treatment with light in the far-red to near-infrared region of the spectrum and has been reported to have beneficial effects in various animal models of disease, including an age-related macular degeneration (AMD) mouse model. Previous reports have suggested that phagocytosis is reduced by age-related increased oxidative stress in AMD. Therefore, we investigated whether photobiomodulation improves phagocytosis caused by oxidative stress in the human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cell line. Methods ARPE-19 cells and human primary retinal pigment epithelium (hRPE) cells were incubated and irradiated with near-infrared light (670 nm LED light, 2,500 lx, twice a day, 250 s/per time) for 4 d. Next, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and photoreceptor outer segments (POS) labeled using a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye were added to the cell culture, and phagocytosis was evaluated by measuring the fluorescence intensity. Furthermore, cell death was observed by double staining with Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide after photobiomodulation. CM-H2DCFDA, JC-1 dye, and CCK-8 were added to the cell culture to investigate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell viability, respectively. We also investigated the expression of phagocytosis-related proteins, such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Mer tyrosine kinase (MerTK). Results Oxidative stress inhibited phagocytosis, and photobiomodulation increased the oxidative stress-induced hypoactivity of phagocytosis in ARPE-19 cells and hRPE cells. Furthermore, H2O2 and photobiomodulation did not affect cell death in this experimental condition. Photobiomodulation reduced ROS production but did not affect cell viability or mitochondrial membrane potential. The expression of phosphorylated MerTK increased, but phosphorylated FAK was not affected by photobiomodulation. Conclusions These findings indicate that near-infrared light photobiomodulation (670 nm) may

  16. Aquaporin expression and function in human pluripotent stem cell-derived retinal pigmented epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Delporte, Christine; Grégoire, Francoise; Perret, Jason; Huhtala, Heini; Savolainen, Virpi; Nymark, Soile; Hyttinen, Jari; Uusitalo, Hannu; Willermain, Francois; Skottman, Heli

    2013-05-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs), a family of transmembrane water channel proteins, are essential for allowing passive water transport through retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. Even though human native RPE cells and immortalized human RPEs have been shown to express AQPs, the expression of AQPs during the differentiation in stem cell-derived RPE remains to be elucidated. In human embryonic (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs)-derived RPE cells, the expression of several AQPs was determined by quantitative real-time PCR and the localization of AQP1 was assessed with confocal microscopy. The functionality of AQP water channels was determined by cell volume assay in hESC-derived RPE cells. AQP1, AQP3, AQP4, AQP5, AQP6, AQP7, AQP10, AQP11, and AQP12 were expressed in hESC- and hiPSC-derived RPE cells. Furthermore, the expression of AQP1 and AQP11 genes were significantly upregulated during the maturation of both hESC and iPSC into RPE. Confocal microscopy shows the expression of AQP1 at the apical plasma membrane of polarized cobblestone hESC- and hiPSC-derived RPE cells. Lastly, aquaporin inhibitors significantly reduced AQP functionality in hESC-RPE cells. hESC-RPE and hiPSC-RPE cells express several AQP genes, which are functional in mature hESC-derived RPE cells. The localization of AQP1 on the apical plasma membrane in mature RPE cells derived from both hESC and hiPSC suggests its functionality. These data propose that hESC- and hiPSC-derived RPE cells, grown and differentiated under serum-free conditions, resemble their native counterpart in the human eye.

  17. Human cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein has secondary thermal 9-cis-retinal isomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Bolze, Christin S; Helbling, Rachel E; Owen, Robin L; Pearson, Arwen R; Pompidor, Guillaume; Dworkowski, Florian; Fuchs, Martin R; Furrer, Julien; Golczak, Marcin; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Cascella, Michele; Stocker, Achim

    2014-01-08

    Cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP) chaperones 11-cis-retinal to convert opsin receptor molecules into photosensitive retinoid pigments of the eye. We report a thermal secondary isomerase activity of CRALBP when bound to 9-cis-retinal. UV/vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy were used to characterize the product as 9,13-dicis-retinal. The X-ray structure of the CRALBP mutant R234W:9-cis-retinal complex at 1.9 Å resolution revealed a niche in the binding pocket for 9-cis-aldehyde different from that reported for 11-cis-retinal. Combined computational, kinetic, and structural data lead us to propose an isomerization mechanism catalyzed by a network of buried waters. Our findings highlight a specific role of water molecules in both CRALBP-assisted specificity toward 9-cis-retinal and its thermal isomerase activity yielding 9,13-dicis-retinal. Kinetic data from two point mutants of CRALBP support an essential role of Glu202 as the initial proton donor in this isomerization reaction.

  18. Human Cellular Retinaldehyde-Binding Protein Has Secondary Thermal 9-cis-Retinal Isomerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bolze, Christin S.; Helbling, Rachel E.; Owen, Robin L.; Pearson, Arwen R.; Pompidor, Guillaume; Dworkowski, Florian; Fuchs, Martin R.; Furrer, Julien; Golczak, Marcin; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP) chaperones 11-cis-retinal to convert opsin receptor molecules into photosensitive retinoid pigments of the eye. We report a thermal secondary isomerase activity of CRALBP when bound to 9-cis-retinal. UV/VIS and 1H-NMR spectroscopy were used to characterize the product as 9,13-dicis-retinal. The X-ray structure of the CRALBP mutant R234W:9-cis-retinal complex at 1.9 Å resolution revealed a niche in the binding-pocket for 9-cis-aldehyde different from that reported for 11-cis-retinal. Combined computational, kinetic, and structural data lead us to propose an isomerization mechanism catalyzed by a network of buried waters. Our findings highlight a specific role of water molecules in both CRALBP-assisted specificity towards 9-cis-retinal and its thermal isomerase activity yielding 9,13-dicis-retinal. Kinetic data from two point mutants of CRALBP support an essential role of Glu202 as the initial proton donor in this isomerization reaction. PMID:24328211

  19. Pharmacotherapies for Retinal Detachment.

    PubMed

    Wubben, Thomas J; Besirli, Cagri G; Zacks, David N

    2016-07-01

    Retinal detachment is an important cause of visual loss. Currently, surgical techniques, including vitrectomy, scleral buckle, and pneumatic retinopexy, are the only means to repair retinal detachment and restore vision. However, surgical failure rates may be as high as 20%, and visual outcomes continue to vary secondary to multiple processes, including postoperative cystoid macular edema, epiretinal membrane formation, macular folds, and, ultimately, photoreceptor death. Therefore, pharmacotherapies are being sought to aid the success rates of modern surgical techniques and reduce or slow the degeneration of photoreceptors during retinal detachment. This review discusses potential therapeutic avenues that aid in retinal reattachment, reduce the rate of retinal redetachment by limiting proliferative vitreoretinopathy, and protect against photoreceptor cell death.

  20. Multifractal geometry in analysis and processing of digital retinal photographs for early diagnosis of human diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Tălu, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine a quantitative assessment of the human retinal vascular network architecture for patients with diabetic macular edema (DME). Multifractal geometry and lacunarity parameters are used in this study. A set of 10 segmented and skeletonized human retinal images, corresponding to both normal (five images) and DME states of the retina (five images), from the DRIVE database was analyzed using the Image J software. Statistical analyses were performed using Microsoft Office Excel 2003 and GraphPad InStat software. The human retinal vascular network architecture has a multifractal geometry. The average of generalized dimensions (Dq) for q = 0, 1, 2 of the normal images (segmented versions), is similar to the DME cases (segmented versions). The average of generalized dimensions (Dq) for q = 0, 1 of the normal images (skeletonized versions), is slightly greater than the DME cases (skeletonized versions). However, the average of D2 for the normal images (skeletonized versions) is similar to the DME images. The average of lacunarity parameter, Λ, for the normal images (segmented and skeletonized versions) is slightly lower than the corresponding values for DME images (segmented and skeletonized versions). The multifractal and lacunarity analysis provides a non-invasive predictive complementary tool for an early diagnosis of patients with DME.

  1. Murine Ccl2/Cx3cr1 Deficiency Results in Retinal Lesions Mimicking Human Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tuo, Jingsheng; Bojanowski, Christine M.; Zhou, Min; Shen, Defen; Ross, Robert J.; Rosenberg, Kevin I.; Cameron, D. Joshua; Yin, Chunyue; Kowalak, Jeffrey A.; Zhuang, Zhengping; Zhang, Kang; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Senescent Ccl2-/- mice are reported to develop cardinal features of human age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Loss-of-function single-nucleotide polymorphisms within CX3CR1 are also found to be associated with AMD. The authors generated Ccl2-/-/Cx3cr1-/- mice to establish a more characteristic and reproducible AMD model. Methods Single Ccl2- and Cx3cr1-deficient mice were crossbred to obtain Ccl2-/-/Cx3cr1-/- mice. Funduscopy, histopathology, retinal A2E quantification, proteomics, RT-PCR gene expression assay, immunochemistry, and Western blotting were used to examine the retina and to evaluate gene expression within the retinal tissue. Results By 6 weeks of age, all Ccl2-/-/Cx3cr1-/- mice developed AMD-like retinal lesions, including drusen, retinal pigment epithelium alteration, and photoreceptor degeneration. Furthermore, choroidal neovascularization occurred in 15% of the mice. These degenerative lesions progressed with age. A2E, a major lipofuscin fluorophore that accumulated during AMD progression, was significantly higher in the Ccl2-/-/Cx3cr1-/- retina than in the wild-type retina. Complement cofactor was higher in the Ccl2-/-/Cx3cr1-/- RPE. Proteomics data indicated that four proteins were differentially expressed in Ccl2-/-/Cx3cr1-/- retina compared with control. One of these proteins, ERp29, an endoplasmic reticulum protein, functions as an escort chaperone and in protein folding. Conclusions The authors concluded that Ccl2-/-/Cx3cr1-/- mice develop a broad spectrum of AMD abnormalities with early onset and high penetrance. These observations implicate certain chemokines and endoplasmic reticulum proteins in AMD pathogenesis. Similar to the mechanism of neurodegeneration caused by dysfunction of endoplasmic reticulum proteins, decreased chaperoning may cause misfolded protein accumulation, leading to drusen formation and retinal degeneration. PMID:17652758

  2. Protective Effect of Fucoxanthin Isolated from Laminaria japonica against Visible Light-Induced Retinal Damage Both in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixiang; Liu, Meng; Zhang, Xichun; Chen, Qingchou; Chen, Haixiu; Sun, Lechang; Liu, Guangming

    2016-01-20

    With increasingly serious eye exposure to light stresses, such as light-emitting diodes, computers, and widescreen mobile phones, efficient natural compounds for preventing visible light-induced retinal damages are becoming compelling needs in the modern society. Fucoxanthin, as the main light absorption system in marine algae, may possess an outstanding bioactivity in vision protection because of its filtration of blue light and excellent antioxidative activity. In this work, both in vitro and in vivo simulated visible light-induced retinal damage models were employed. The in vitro results revealed that fucoxanthin exhibited better bioactivities than lutein, zeaxanthin, and blueberry anthocyanins in inhibiting overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor, resisting senescence, improving phagocytic function, and clearing intracellular reactive oxygen species in retinal pigment epithelium cells. The in vivo experiment also confirmed the superiority of fucoxanthin than lutein in protecting retina against photoinduced damage. This excellent bioactivity may be attributed to its unique structural features, including allenic, epoxide, and acetyl groups. Fucoxanthin is expected to be an important ocular nutrient in the future.

  3. 75 FR 59264 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections AGENCY: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Secretary, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health. ACTION..., notice is hereby given that the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections...

  4. 77 FR 37408 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Office of the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION..., notice is hereby given that the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections...

  5. 77 FR 58383 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Office of the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services. ACTION..., notice is hereby given that the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections...

  6. Cell-Deposited Matrix Improves Retinal Pigment Epithelium Survival on Aged Submacular Human Bruch's Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sugino, Ilene K.; Gullapalli, Vamsi K.; Sun, Qian; Wang, Jianqiu; Nunes, Celia F.; Cheewatrakoolpong, Noounanong; Johnson, Adam C.; Degner, Benjamin C.; Hua, Jianyuan; Liu, Tong; Chen, Wei; Li, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether resurfacing submacular human Bruch's membrane with a cell-deposited extracellular matrix (ECM) improves retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) survival. Methods. Bovine corneal endothelial (BCE) cells were seeded onto the inner collagenous layer of submacular Bruch's membrane explants of human donor eyes to allow ECM deposition. Control explants from fellow eyes were cultured in medium only. The deposited ECM was exposed by removing BCE. Fetal RPE cells were then cultured on these explants for 1, 14, or 21 days. The explants were analyzed quantitatively by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Surviving RPE cells from explants cultured for 21 days were harvested to compare bestrophin and RPE65 mRNA expression. Mass spectroscopy was performed on BCE-ECM to examine the protein composition. Results. The BCE-treated explants showed significantly higher RPE nuclear density than did the control explants at all time points. RPE expressed more differentiated features on BCE-treated explants than on untreated explants, but expressed very little mRNA for bestrophin or RPE65. The untreated young (<50 years) and African American submacular Bruch's membrane explants supported significantly higher RPE nuclear densities (NDs) than did the Caucasian explants. These differences were reduced or nonexistent in the BCE-ECM-treated explants. Proteins identified in the BCE-ECM included ECM proteins, ECM-associated proteins, cell membrane proteins, and intracellular proteins. Conclusions. Increased RPE survival can be achieved on aged submacular human Bruch's membrane by resurfacing the latter with a cell-deposited ECM. Caucasian eyes seem to benefit the most, as cell survival is the worst on submacular Bruch's membrane in these eyes. PMID:21398292

  7. A new immunodeficient pigmented retinal degenerate rat strain to study transplantation of human cells without immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Magdalene J.; Aramant, Robert B.; Jones, Melissa K.; Ferguson, Dave L.; Bryda, Elizabeth C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to develop an immunodeficient rat model of retinal degeneration (RD nude rats) that will not reject transplanted human cells. Methods SD-Tg(S334ter)3Lav females homozygous for a mutated mouse rhodopsin transgene were mated with NTac:NIH-Whn (NIH nude) males homozygous for the Foxn1rnu allele. Through selective breeding, a new stock, SD-Foxn1 Tg(S334ter)3Lav (RD nude) was generated such that all animals were homozygous for the Foxn1rnu allele and either homo- or hemizygous for the S334ter transgene. PCR-based assays for both the Foxn1rnu mutation and the S334ter transgene were developed for accurate genotyping. Immunodeficiency was tested by transplanting sheets of hESC-derived neural progenitor cells to the subretinal space of RD nude rats, and, as a control, NIH nude rats. Rats were killed between 8 and 184 days after surgery, and eye sections were analyzed for human, neuronal, and glial markers. Results After transplantation to RD nude and to NIH nude rats, hESC-derived neural progenitor cells differentiated to neuronal and glial cells, and migrated extensively from the transplant sheets throughout the host retina. Migration was more extensive in RD nude than in NIH nude rats. Already 8 days after transplantation, donor neuronal processes were found in the host inner plexiform layer. In addition, host glial cells extended processes into the transplants. The host retina showed the same photoreceptor degeneration pattern as in the immunocompetent SD-Tg(S334ter)3Lav rats. Recipients survived well after surgery. Conclusions This new rat model is useful for testing the effect of human cell transplantation on the restoration of vision without interference of immunosuppression. PMID:24817311

  8. Monocarboxylate transporter mediated uptake of moxifloxacin on human retinal pigmented epithelium cells

    PubMed Central

    Barot, Megha; Gokulgandhi, Mitan R.; Agrahari, Vibhuti; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This work was aim to determine in vitro interaction of moxifloxacin with monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) using a human retinal pigment epithelium cells (ARPE-19). Methods In vitro moxifloxacin uptakes were performed at 37°C across ARPE-19 cells. Concentration-dependent uptake of moxifloxacin was performed to delineate moxifloxacin kinetics with MCT. Effects of MCT substrates, MCT inhibitors, pH and metabolic inhibitors on moxifloxacin uptake were conducted to delineate mechanism of moxifloxacin influx via MCT. Key findings Moxifloxacin uptake was found to exhibit saturable kinetics (Km = 1.56 ± 0.32 μM and Vmax = 0.58 ± 0.16 μM/min/mg protein). Higher uptake of moxifloxacin was observed at acidic pH. MCT substrates such as salisylic acid, ofloxacin and L-lactic acid significantly inhibited the uptake of moxifloxacin. Furthermore, moxifloxacin uptake was significantly reduced in the presence of metabolic and MCT inhibitors. Overall, this study demonstrated an interaction of moxifloxacin with Na+ and H+-coupled transporter, most likely MCT1. Conclusions Apart from the lipophilicity, we anticipate that lowest vitreal half-life of intravitreal moxifloxacin compared with other fluoroquinolones may be due to its interaction with MCT. This information might be crucial in clinical settings and can be further explored to improve vitreous half-life and therapeutic efficacy of moxifloxacin. PMID:24102496

  9. Plasticity of the human visual system after retinal gene therapy in patients with Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Ashtari, Manzar; Zhang, Hui; Cook, Philip A; Cyckowski, Laura L; Shindler, Kenneth S; Marshall, Kathleen A; Aravand, Puya; Vossough, Arastoo; Gee, James C; Maguire, Albert M; Baker, Chris I; Bennett, Jean

    2015-07-15

    Much of our knowledge of the mechanisms underlying plasticity in the visual cortex in response to visual impairment, vision restoration, and environmental interactions comes from animal studies. We evaluated human brain plasticity in a group of patients with Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA), who regained vision through gene therapy. Using non-invasive multimodal neuroimaging methods, we demonstrated that reversing blindness with gene therapy promoted long-term structural plasticity in the visual pathways emanating from the treated retina of LCA patients. The data revealed improvements and normalization along the visual fibers corresponding to the site of retinal injection of the gene therapy vector carrying the therapeutic gene in the treated eye compared to the visual pathway for the untreated eye of LCA patients. After gene therapy, the primary visual pathways (for example, geniculostriate fibers) in the treated retina were similar to those of sighted control subjects, whereas the primary visual pathways of the untreated retina continued to deteriorate. Our results suggest that visual experience, enhanced by gene therapy, may be responsible for the reorganization and maturation of synaptic connectivity in the visual pathways of the treated eye in LCA patients. The interactions between the eye and the brain enabled improved and sustained long-term visual function in patients with LCA after gene therapy.

  10. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of bacterial magnetosomes against human retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lei; Lv, Xiujuan; Zhang, Tongwei; Jia, Peina; Yan, Ruiying; Li, Shuli; Zou, Ruitao; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming

    2016-06-01

    A variety of nanomaterials have been developed for ocular diseases. The ability of these nanomaterials to pass through the blood-ocular barrier and their biocompatibility are essential characteristics that must be considered. Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) are a type of biogenic magnetic nanomaterials synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria. Due to their unique biomolecular membrane shell and narrow size distribution of approximately 30 nm, BMs can pass through the blood-brain barrier. The similarity of the blood-ocular barrier to the blood-brain barrier suggests that BMs have great potential as treatments for ocular diseases. In this work, BMs were isolated from magnetotactic bacteria and evaluated in various cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies in human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells. The BMs entered ARPE-19 cells by endocytosis after a 6-h incubation and displayed much lower cytotoxicity than chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs exhibited significantly higher genotoxicity than BMs and promoted the expression of Bax (the programmed cell death acceleration protein) and the induction of greater cell necrosis. In BM-treated cells, apoptosis tended to be suppressed via increased expression of the Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, BMs display excellent biocompatibility and potential for use in the treatment of ocular diseases.

  11. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of bacterial magnetosomes against human retinal pigment epithelium cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Lei; Lv, Xiujuan; Zhang, Tongwei; Jia, Peina; Yan, Ruiying; Li, Shuli; Zou, Ruitao; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming

    2016-06-01

    A variety of nanomaterials have been developed for ocular diseases. The ability of these nanomaterials to pass through the blood-ocular barrier and their biocompatibility are essential characteristics that must be considered. Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) are a type of biogenic magnetic nanomaterials synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria. Due to their unique biomolecular membrane shell and narrow size distribution of approximately 30 nm, BMs can pass through the blood-brain barrier. The similarity of the blood-ocular barrier to the blood-brain barrier suggests that BMs have great potential as treatments for ocular diseases. In this work, BMs were isolated from magnetotactic bacteria and evaluated in various cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies in human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells. The BMs entered ARPE-19 cells by endocytosis after a 6-h incubation and displayed much lower cytotoxicity than chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs exhibited significantly higher genotoxicity than BMs and promoted the expression of Bax (the programmed cell death acceleration protein) and the induction of greater cell necrosis. In BM-treated cells, apoptosis tended to be suppressed via increased expression of the Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, BMs display excellent biocompatibility and potential for use in the treatment of ocular diseases.

  12. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of bacterial magnetosomes against human retinal pigment epithelium cells

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Lei; Lv, Xiujuan; Zhang, Tongwei; Jia, Peina; Yan, Ruiying; Li, Shuli; Zou, Ruitao; Xue, Yuhua; Dai, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A variety of nanomaterials have been developed for ocular diseases. The ability of these nanomaterials to pass through the blood-ocular barrier and their biocompatibility are essential characteristics that must be considered. Bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) are a type of biogenic magnetic nanomaterials synthesized by magnetotactic bacteria. Due to their unique biomolecular membrane shell and narrow size distribution of approximately 30 nm, BMs can pass through the blood-brain barrier. The similarity of the blood-ocular barrier to the blood-brain barrier suggests that BMs have great potential as treatments for ocular diseases. In this work, BMs were isolated from magnetotactic bacteria and evaluated in various cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies in human retinal pigment epithelium (ARPE-19) cells. The BMs entered ARPE-19 cells by endocytosis after a 6-h incubation and displayed much lower cytotoxicity than chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). MNPs exhibited significantly higher genotoxicity than BMs and promoted the expression of Bax (the programmed cell death acceleration protein) and the induction of greater cell necrosis. In BM-treated cells, apoptosis tended to be suppressed via increased expression of the Bcl-2 protein. In conclusion, BMs display excellent biocompatibility and potential for use in the treatment of ocular diseases. PMID:27246808

  13. Low Power Laser Irradiation Stimulates the Proliferation of Adult Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qing; Uygun, Basak; Banerjee, Ipsita; Nahmias, Yaakov; Zhang, Quan; Berthiaume, François; Latina, Mark; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of low power laser irradiation on the proliferation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Adult human RPE cells were artificially pigmented by preincubation with sepia melanin, and exposed to a single sublethal laser pulse (590 nm, 1 µs, <200 mJ/cm2). DNA synthesis, cell number, and growth factor activity in irradiated RPE cells were subsequently monitored. The effect of sublethal laser irradiation on the “wound” healing response of an RPE monolayer in an in vitro scratch assay was also investigated. Single pulsed laser irradiation increased DNA synthesis in pigmented RPE cells measured 6 h post-treatment. In the scratch assay, laser irradiation increased the rates of cell proliferation and wound closure. Conditioned medium, collected 48 h following laser treatment, increased cell proliferation of unirradiated cells. Irradiation increased RPE cell secretion of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-B chain, and increased mRNA levels of several growth factors and their receptors, including PDGF, transforming growth factor-β1, basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, insulin-like growth factor, as well as heat shock proteins. This demonstrates, for the first time, that low power single pulsed laser irradiation stimulates the proliferation of RPE cells, and upregulates growth factors that are mitogenic for RPE cells. PMID:26740823

  14. Human cadaver retina model for retinal heating during corneal surgery with a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Fan, Zhongwei; Yun, Jin; Zhao, Tianzhuo; Yan, Ying; Kurtz, Ron M.; Juhasz, Tibor

    2014-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers are widely used in everyday clinical procedures to perform minimally invasive corneal refractive surgery. The intralase femtosecond laser (AMO Corp. Santa Ana, CA) is a common example of such a laser. In the present study a numerical simulation was developed to quantify the temperature rise in the retina during femtosecond intracorneal surgery. Also, ex-vivo retinal heating due to laser irradiation was measured with an infrared thermal camera (Fluke Corp. Everett, WA) as a validation of the simulation. A computer simulation was developed using Comsol Multiphysics to calculate the temperature rise in the cadaver retina during femtosecond laser corneal surgery. The simulation showed a temperature rise of less than 0.3 degrees for realistic pulse energies for the various repetition rates. Human cadaver retinas were irradiated with a 150 kHz Intralase femtosecond laser and the temperature rise was measured withan infrared thermal camera. Thermal camera measurements are in agreement with the simulation. During routine femtosecond laser corneal surgery with normal clinical parameters, the temperature rise is well beneath the threshold for retina damage. The simulation predictions are in agreement with thermal measurements providing a level of experimental validation.

  15. Heat shock response and thermal resistance in cultured human retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Wakakura, M; Foulds, W S

    1993-01-01

    The heat shock response was examined in cultured human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) using indirect immunofluorescence. Mild head shock (39.5-40 degrees C for 1 hr) caused no changes in cell morphology and cells continued to produce the intermediate filament proteins, cytokeratin (keratin) and vimentin. In addition, cells subjected to mild heat shock demonstrated the presence of a heat shock protein (HSP-90). After severe heat shock (45.5-46 degrees C for 1 hr) most cells showed marked morphological changes and, in addition, HSP-90 and/or stress-induced 40 kDa protein production was significantly enhanced. The expression of vimentin was relatively well preserved whereas that of keratin was markedly reduced. When the more severe grade of heat shock was preceded by mild heat shock 20-24 hr earlier, the subsequent severe heat shock resulted in less marked morphological change than in cells not preconditioned and, in addition, the expression of both vimentin and keratin was relatively well preserved. Mildly heat shocked cells appeared to gain thermal resistance supporting the theory that the concomitant synthetic capacity for HSP and normal cellular proteins contributes to thermal resistance. In doubly heat shocked cells, however, HSP-90 expression was not enhanced. The discrepancy between the expression of HSP and thermal resistance is discussed.

  16. Geldanamycin increases 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE)-induced cell death in human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Ryhänen, Tuomas; Karjalainen, Hannu M; Lammi, Mikko J; Suuronen, Tiina; Huhtala, Anne; Kontkanen, Matti; Teräsvirta, Markku; Uusitalo, Hannu; Salminen, Antero

    Development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is associated with functional abnormalities and cell death in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells attributable to oxidative stress. To minimize the adverse effects of oxidative stress, cells activate their defence systems, e.g., via increased expression of heat shock protein (Hsp), activation of stress sensitive AP-1 and NF-kappaB transcription factors. In this study, we examined the accumulation of Hsp70 protein, activation of AP-1 and NF-kappaB transcription factors in human ARPE-19 cells subjected to a 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE)-induced oxidative stress. In addition, the influence of Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GA) was studied in HNE-treated cells. Mitochondrial metabolic activity and apoptosis were determined to evaluate cell death in the ARPE-19 cells. The ARPE-19 cells showed increased accumulation of Hsp70 protein before of the cytotoxic hallmarks appearing in response to HNE. In contrast, increased DNA-binding activities of AP-1 or NF-kappaB transcription factors were not seen under HNE insults. Interestingly, GA significantly increased cell death in the HNE-treated cells, which was involved in caspase-3 independent apoptosis. This study reveals that the Hsps have an important role in the cytoprotection of RPE cells subjected to HNE-derived oxidative stress.

  17. Concurrent expression of heme oxygenase-1 and p53 in human retinal pigment epithelial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Yull; Jo, Hong Jae; Kim, Kang Mi; Song, Ju Dong; Chung, Hun Taeg; Park, Young Chul

    2008-01-25

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-responsive protein that is known to regulate cellular functions such as cell proliferation, inflammation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the effects of HO activity on the expression of p53 in the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line ARPE-19. Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) induced the expression of both HO-1 and p53 without significant toxicity to the cells. In addition, the blockage of HO activity with the iron chelator DFO or with HO-1 siRNA inhibited the CoPP-induced expression of p53. Similarly, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), an inhibitor of HO, suppressed p53 expression in ARPE-19 cells, although ZnPP increased the level of HO-1 protein while inhibiting HO activity. Also, CoPP-induced p53 expression was not affected by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these results, we conclude that HO activity is involved in the regulation of p53 expression in a ROS-independent mechanism, and also suggest that the expression of p53 in ARPE-19 cells is associated with heme metabolites such as biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and iron produced by the activity of HO.

  18. Defining the proteome of human iris, ciliary body, retinal pigment epithelium, and choroid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingbo; Kirby, David; Dufresne, Craig; Chen, Yan; Turner, Randi; Ferri, Sara; Edward, Deepak P; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Semba, Richard D

    2016-04-01

    The iris is a fine structure that controls the amount of light that enters the eye. The ciliary body controls the shape of the lens and produces aqueous humor. The retinal pigment epithelium and choroid (RPE/choroid) are essential in supporting the retina and absorbing light energy that enters the eye. Proteins were extracted from iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid tissues of eyes from five individuals and fractionated using SDS-PAGE. After in-gel digestion, peptides were analyzed using LC-MS/MS on an Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer. In iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid, we identified 2959, 2867, and 2755 nonredundant proteins with peptide and protein false-positive rates of <0.1% and <1%, respectively. Forty-three unambiguous protein isoforms were identified in iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid. Four "missing proteins" were identified in ciliary body based on ≥2 proteotypic peptides. The mass spectrometric proteome database of the human iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid may serve as a valuable resource for future investigations of the eye in health and disease. The MS proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PXD001424 and PXD002194.

  19. αvβ5 Integrin/FAK/PGC-1α Pathway Confers Protective Effects on Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Roggia, Murilo F.; Ueta, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the mechanism of the induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) by photoreceptor outer segments (POS) and its effects on retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Methods PGC-1α upregulation by POS was confirmed in ARPE-19 cells and in RPE ex vivo. To elucidate the mechanism, siRNAs against β5 integrin, CD36, Mer tyrosine kinase (MerTK), and Atg5, blocking antibodies against CD36 and MerTK, and a specific inhibitor for focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were used. We examined the effect of POS-induced PGC-1α upregulation on the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial biogenesis, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) after H2O2 treatment, and lysosomal activity. Lysosomal activity was evaluated through transcriptional factor EB and its target genes, and the activity of cathepsin D. Lipid metabolism after POS treatment was assessed using Oil Red O and BODIPY C11. RPE phenotypes of PGC-1α-deficient mice were examined. Results POS-induced PGC-1α upregulation was suppressed by siRNA against β5 integrin and a FAK inhibitor. siRNAs and blocking antibodies against CD36 and MerTK enhanced the effect of POS on PGC-1α. The upregulation of PGC-1α increased the levels of mRNA for antioxidant enzymes and stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis, decreased ROS levels, and reduced SA-β-gal staining in H2O2-treated ARPE-19 cells. PGC-1α was critical for lysosomal activity and lipid metabolism after POS treatment. PGC-1α-deficient mice demonstrated an accumulation of type 2 lysosomes in RPE, thickening of Bruch’s membrane, and poor choriocapillaris vasculature. Conclusions The binding, but not the internalization of POS confers protective effects on RPE cells through the αvβ5 integrin/FAK/PGC-1α pathway. PMID:26244551

  20. Viral-mediated RdCVF and RdCVFL expression protects cone and rod photoreceptors in retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Leah C.; Dalkara, Deniz; Luna, Gabriel; Fisher, Steven K.; Clérin, Emmanuelle; Sahel, Jose-Alain; Léveillard, Thierry; Flannery, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of nucleoredoxin-like 1 (Nxnl1) results in 2 isoforms of the rod-derived cone viability factor. The truncated form (RdCVF) is a thioredoxin-like protein secreted by rods that promotes cone survival, while the full-length isoform (RdCVFL), which contains a thioredoxin fold, is involved in oxidative signaling and protection against hyperoxia. Here, we evaluated the effects of these different isoforms in 2 murine models of rod-cone dystrophy. We used adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express these isoforms in mice and found that both systemic and intravitreal injection of engineered AAV vectors resulted in RdCVF and RdCVFL expression in the eye. Systemic delivery of AAV92YF vectors in neonates resulted in earlier onset of RdCVF and RdCVFL expression compared with that observed with intraocular injection using the same vectors at P14. We also evaluated the efficacy of intravitreal injection using a recently developed photoreceptor-transducing AAV variant (7m8) at P14. Systemic administration of AAV92YF-RdCVF improved cone function and delayed cone loss, while AAV92YF-RdCVFL increased rhodopsin mRNA and reduced oxidative stress by-products. Intravitreal 7m8-RdCVF slowed the rate of cone cell death and increased the amplitude of the photopic electroretinogram. Together, these results indicate different functions for Nxnl1 isoforms in the retina and suggest that RdCVF gene therapy has potential for treating retinal degenerative disease. PMID:25415434

  1. Utilization of scanning laser ophthalmoscopy in laser-induced bilateral human retinal nerve fiber layer damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwick, Harry; Gagliano, Donald A.; Ruiz, S.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a military laser accident case where bilateral Q-switched laser exposure resulted in bilateral macular damage with immediate visual acuity loss in one eye (OS) and delayed visual acuity loss in the other exposed eye (OD), where retinal damage appeared more parafoveal. At 6 weeks post exposure, OS had recovered to 20/17 and OD had dropped to 20/100 Snellen activity. Retinal nerve fiber damage was observed in both eyes at this time. Contrast sensitivity measurements made in OS were suppressed across all spatial frequencies, even though Snellen acuity measured in the normal range. More severe high spatial frequency loss in contrast was measured in the right eye as well as low spatial frequency loss. Both OS and OD revealed a parafoveal preferred retinal locus with scanning laser ophthalmoscopy contrast sensitivity measurements, suggesting parafoveal retinal compensatory processes.

  2. Osmotic Induction of Angiogenic Growth Factor Expression in Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reichenbach, Andreas; Wiedemann, Peter; Kohen, Leon; Bringmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Although systemic hypertension is a risk factor of age-related macular degeneration, antihypertensive medications do not affect the risk of the disease. One condition that induces hypertension is high intake of dietary salt resulting in increased blood osmolarity. In order to prove the assumption that, in addition to hypertension, high osmolarity may aggravate neovascular retinal diseases, we determined the effect of extracellular hyperosmolarity on the expression of angiogenic cytokines in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Hyperosmolarity was induced by the addition of 100 mM NaCl or sucrose to the culture medium. Hypoxia and oxidative stress were induced by the addition of the hypoxia mimetic CoCl2 and H2O2, respectively. Alterations in gene expression were determined with real-time RT-PCR. Secretion of bFGF was evaluated by ELISA. Cell viability was determined by trypan blue exclusion. Nuclear factor of activated T cell 5 (NFAT5) expression was knocked down with siRNA. Hyperosmolarity induced transcriptional activation of bFGF, HB-EGF, and VEGF genes, while the expression of other cytokines such as EGF, PDGF-A, TGF-β1, HGF, and PEDF was not or moderately altered. Hypoxia induced increased expression of the HB-EGF, EGF, PDGF-A, TGF-β1, and VEGF genes, but not of the bFGF gene. Oxidative stress induced gene expression of HB-EGF, but not of bFGF. The hyperosmotic expression of the bFGF gene was dependent on the activation of p38α/β MAPK, JNK, PI3K, and the transcriptional activity of NFAT5. The hyperosmotic expression of the HB-EGF gene was dependent on the activation of p38α/β MAPK, ERK1/2, and JNK. The hyperosmotic expression of bFGF, HB-EGF, and VEGF genes was reduced by inhibitors of TGF-β1 superfamily activin receptor-like kinase receptors and the FGF receptor kinase, respectively. Hyperosmolarity induced secretion of bFGF that was reduced by inhibition of autocrine/paracrine TGF-β1

  3. Novel serum proteomic signatures in a non-human primate model of retinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Dunmire, Jeffrey J.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Hart, Michael L.; Wakim, Bassam T.; Chomyk, Anthony M.; Scott, Sarah E.; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To identify candidate protein biomarkers in sera indicative of acute retinal injury. Methods We used laser photocoagulation as a model of acute retinal injury in Rhesus macaques. In a paired-control study design, we collected serum from each animal (n=6) at 4 h, 1 day, and 3 days following a mock procedure and then again following retinal laser treatment that produced mild lesions. Samples were fractionated by isoelectric focusing, digested with trypsin, and analyzed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Spectral counting was used to determine relative protein abundances and identify proteins with statistically significant differences between control and treated sera. Results Mild retinal injury was confirmed by fundus photography and histological examination. The average number of total proteins detected by LC-MS/MS was 908±82 among samples from all three time points. Following statistical analysis and employing stringent filtering criteria, a total of 19 proteins were identified as being significantly more abundant in sera following laser-induced retinal injury, relative to control sera. Many of the proteins detected were unique to one time point. However, four proteins (phosphoglycerate kinase 1, keratin 18, Lewis alpha-3-fucosyltransferase, and ephrin receptor A2) showed differences that were significant at both 4 h and 1 day after laser treatment, followed by a decrease to baseline levels by day 3. Conclusions A serum biomarker response to mild retinal laser injury was demonstrated in a primate model. Among the proteins detected with highest significant differences, most are upregulated within 24 h, and their appearance in the serum is transient. It is conceivable that a panel of these proteins could provide a means for detecting the acute-phase response to retinal injury. Further investigation of these candidate biomarkers and their correlation to retinal damage is warranted. PMID:21527995

  4. Role of the Retinal Vascular Endothelial Cell in Ocular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Arpita S.; Appukuttan, Binoy; Wilmarth, Phillip A.; Pan, Yuzhen; Stempel, Andrew J.; Chipps, Timothy J.; Benedetti, Eric E.; Zamora, David O.; Choi, Dongseok; David, Larry L.; Smith, Justine R.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal endothelial cells line the arborizing microvasculature that supplies and drains the neural retina. The anatomical and physiological characteristics of these endothelial cells are consistent with nutritional requirements and protection of a tissue critical to vision. On the one hand, the endothelium must ensure the supply of oxygen and other nutrients to the metabolically active retina, and allow access to circulating cells that maintain the vasculature or survey the retina for the presence of potential pathogens. On the other hand, the endothelium contributes to the blood-retinal barrier that protects the retina by excluding circulating molecular toxins, microorganisms, and pro-inflammatory leukocytes. Features required to fulfill these functions may also predispose to disease processes, such as retinal vascular leakage and neovascularization, and trafficking of microbes and inflammatory cells. Thus, the retinal endothelial cell is a key participant in retinal ischemic vasculopathies that include diabetic retinopathy and retinopathy of prematurity, and retinal inflammation or infection, as occurs in posterior uveitis. Using gene expression and proteomic profiling, it has been possible to explore the molecular phenotype of the human retinal endothelial cell and contribute to understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases. In addition to providing support for the involvement of well-characterized endothelial molecules, profiling has the power to identify new players in retinal pathologies. Findings may have implications for the design of new biological therapies. Additional progress in this field is anticipated as other technologies, including epigenetic profiling methods, whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing, and metabolomics, are used to study the human retinal endothelial cell. PMID:22982179

  5. Regulation of estrogen receptors and MMP-2 expression by estrogens in human retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Marin-Castaño, Maria E; Elliot, Sharon J; Potier, Mylen; Karl, Michael; Striker, Liliane J; Striker, Gary E; Csaky, Karl G; Cousins, Scott W

    2003-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is characterized by progressive thickening and accumulation of various lipid-rich extracellular matrix (ECM) deposits under the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). ECM dysregulation probably contributes to the pathologic course of ARMD. By activating estrogen receptors (ERs), estrogens regulate the expression of genes relevant in the turnover of ECM, among them matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2. Estrogen deficiency may predispose to dysregulated synthesis and degradation of ECM, leading to accumulation of collagens and other proteins between the RPE and its basement membrane. The purposes in the current study were to confirm the expression of ERs in human RPE, to elucidate whether these ERs are functional, and to test whether 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) regulates expression of ERs and MMP-2. Expression of ERs was examined in freshly isolated human RPE monolayer and in cultured human RPE cells, by using total RNA for RT-PCR and protein extracts for Western blot analysis. Supernatants were collected from freshly isolated human RPE and from cultured human RPE to assess MMP-2 activity by zymography and protein expression by Western blot. The transcriptional activity of ERs was studied in transfection experiments with an estrogen-responsive reporter construct. All these studies were preformed in the presence or absence of E(2) (10(-11) and 10(-7) M). Human RPE isolated from female and male individuals expressed both ER subtypes alpha and beta at the mRNA and protein levels. Treatment of cultured RPE cells with 10(-10) M E(2) increased expression of mRNA and protein of both receptor subtypes. E(2) (10(-10) M) also increased MMP-2 activity (approximately 2.2-fold) and protein expression (approximately 2.5-fold). In contrast, there was no change in ER levels and MMP-2 activity at higher E(2) concentrations (10(-8) M), compared with baseline. Preincubation of cells with 10(-7) M pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC), an inhibitor of nuclear

  6. Gene Therapy for Retinitis Pigmentosa Caused by MFRP Mutations: Human Phenotype and Preliminary Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Dinculescu, Astra; Estreicher, Jackie; Zenteno, Juan C.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Huang, Wei Chieh; Roman, Alejandro J.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Li, Qiuhong; Deng, Wen-Tao; Min, Seok-Hong; Chiodo, Vince A.; Neeley, Andy; Liu, Xuan; Shu, Xinhua; Matias-Florentino, Margarita; Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; Boye, Sanford L.; Cideciyan, Artur V.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of degenerations of the retina, can be due to mutations in the MFRP (membrane-type frizzled-related protein) gene. A patient with RP with MFRP mutations, one of which is novel and the first splice site mutation reported, was characterized by noninvasive retinal and visual studies. The phenotype, albeit complex, suggested that this retinal degeneration may be a candidate for gene-based therapy. Proof-of-concept studies were performed in the rd6 Mfrp mutant mouse model. The fast-acting tyrosine-capsid mutant AAV8 (Y733F) vector containing the small chicken β-actin promoter driving the wild-type mouse Mfrp gene was used. Subretinal vector delivery on postnatal day 14 prevented retinal degeneration. Treatment rescued rod and cone photoreceptors, as assessed by electroretinography and retinal histology at 2 months of age. This AAV-mediated gene delivery also resulted in robust MFRP expression predominantly in its normal location within the retinal pigment epithelium apical membrane and its microvilli. The clinical features of MFRP-RP and our preliminary data indicating a response to gene therapy in the rd6 mouse suggest that this form of RP is a potential target for gene-based therapy. PMID:22142163

  7. Gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa caused by MFRP mutations: human phenotype and preliminary proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Dinculescu, Astra; Estreicher, Jackie; Zenteno, Juan C; Aleman, Tomas S; Schwartz, Sharon B; Huang, Wei Chieh; Roman, Alejandro J; Sumaroka, Alexander; Li, Qiuhong; Deng, Wen-Tao; Min, Seok-Hong; Chiodo, Vince A; Neeley, Andy; Liu, Xuan; Shu, Xinhua; Matias-Florentino, Margarita; Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; Boye, Sanford L; Cideciyan, Artur V; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G

    2012-04-01

    Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of degenerations of the retina, can be due to mutations in the MFRP (membrane-type frizzled-related protein) gene. A patient with RP with MFRP mutations, one of which is novel and the first splice site mutation reported, was characterized by noninvasive retinal and visual studies. The phenotype, albeit complex, suggested that this retinal degeneration may be a candidate for gene-based therapy. Proof-of-concept studies were performed in the rd6 Mfrp mutant mouse model. The fast-acting tyrosine-capsid mutant AAV8 (Y733F) vector containing the small chicken β-actin promoter driving the wild-type mouse Mfrp gene was used. Subretinal vector delivery on postnatal day 14 prevented retinal degeneration. Treatment rescued rod and cone photoreceptors, as assessed by electroretinography and retinal histology at 2 months of age. This AAV-mediated gene delivery also resulted in robust MFRP expression predominantly in its normal location within the retinal pigment epithelium apical membrane and its microvilli. The clinical features of MFRP-RP and our preliminary data indicating a response to gene therapy in the rd6 mouse suggest that this form of RP is a potential target for gene-based therapy.

  8. An overview of Leber congenital amaurosis: a model to understand human retinal development.

    PubMed

    Koenekoop, Robert K

    2004-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis is a congenital retinal dystrophy described almost 150 years ago. Today, Leber congenital amaurosis is proving instrumental in our understanding of the molecular events that determine normal and aberrant retinal development. Six genes have been shown to be mutated in Leber congenital amaurosis, and they participate in a wide variety of retinal pathways: retinoid metabolism (RPE65), phototransduction (GUCY2D), photoreceptor outer segment development (CRX), disk morphogenesis (RPGRIP1), zonula adherens formation (CRB1), and cell-cycle progression (AIPL1). Longitudinal studies of visual performance show that most Leber congenital amaurosis patients remain stable, some deteriorate, and rare cases exhibit improvements. Histopathological analyses reveal that most cases have extensive degenerative retinal changes, some have an entirely normal retinal architecture, whereas others have primitive, poorly developed retinas. Animal models of Leber congenital amaurosis have greatly added to understanding the impact of the genetic defects on retinal cell death, and response to rescue. Gene therapy for RPE65 deficient dogs partially restored sight, and provides the first real hope of treatment for this devastating blinding condition.

  9. Regulation of molecular clock oscillations and phagocytic activity via muscarinic Ca2+ signaling in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ikarashi, Rina; Akechi, Honami; Kanda, Yuzuki; Ahmad, Alsawaf; Takeuchi, Kouhei; Morioka, Eri; Sugiyama, Takashi; Ebisawa, Takashi; Ikeda, Masaaki; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Vertebrate eyes are known to contain circadian clocks, however, the intracellular mechanisms regulating the retinal clockwork remain largely unknown. To address this, we generated a cell line (hRPE-YC) from human retinal pigmental epithelium, which stably co-expressed reporters for molecular clock oscillations (Bmal1-luciferase) and intracellular Ca2+ concentrations (YC3.6). The hRPE-YC cells demonstrated circadian rhythms in Bmal1 transcription. Also, these cells represented circadian rhythms in Ca2+-spiking frequencies, which were canceled by dominant-negative Bmal1 transfections. The muscarinic agonist carbachol, but not photic stimulation, phase-shifted Bmal1 transcriptional rhythms with a type-1 phase response curve. This is consistent with significant M3 muscarinic receptor expression and little photo-sensor (Cry2 and Opn4) expression in these cells. Moreover, forskolin phase-shifted Bmal1 transcriptional rhythm with a type-0 phase response curve, in accordance with long-lasting CREB phosphorylation levels after forskolin exposure. Interestingly, the hRPE-YC cells demonstrated apparent circadian rhythms in phagocytic activities, which were abolished by carbachol or dominant-negative Bmal1 transfection. Because phagocytosis in RPE cells determines photoreceptor disc shedding, molecular clock oscillations and cytosolic Ca2+ signaling may be the driving forces for disc-shedding rhythms known in various vertebrates. In conclusion, the present study provides a cellular model to understand molecular and intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying human retinal circadian clocks. PMID:28276525

  10. HUMAN RETINAL ENDOTHELIAL CELLS AND ASTROCYTES CULTURED ON 3-D SCAFFOLDS FOR OCULAR DRUG DISCOVERY AND DEVELOPMENT.

    PubMed

    Beharry, Kay D; Cai, Charles L; Valencia, Gloria B; Lazzaro, Douglas; Valencia, Arwin M; Salomone, Fabrizio; Aranda, Jacob V

    2017-09-15

    Topical ocular ketorolac improves the outcomes of severe retinopathy of prematurity and when administered with systemic caffeine, decreases the severity of oxygen-induced retinopathy. We tested the hypothesis that co-cultures of human retinal endothelial cells (HRECs) and human retinal astrocytes (HRAs) on 3-dimensional (3-D) hydrogel scaffolds is a more representative biomimetic paradigm of the blood-retinal-barrier (BRB) than 2-D cultures, and should be utilized for preclinical drug discovery and development. Mono- and co-cultures of HRECs and HRAs were treated with standard doses of ketorolac, ibuprofen, and/or caffeine, and exposed to hyperoxia, intermittent hypoxia (IH), or normoxia on 2-D surfaces or 3-D biodegradable hydrogel scaffolds (AlgiMatrix or Geltrex). Media and cells were collected at 72hours post treatment for arachidonic acid metabolites. Cells cultured on 3-D scaffolds exhibited less oxidative stress and variability in drug responses. HRAs enhanced the responses of HRECs to drugs and changes in oxygen environment. PGE2 and PGI2 were the predominant prostanoids produced in response to IH, reflecting COX-2 immunoreactivity. We conclude that HRECs and HRAs co-cultured on 3-D scaffolds may recapitulate drug responses of the dynamic BRB and therefore should be implemented for preclinical ocular drug discovery and development. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. The small tellurium-based compound SAS suppresses inflammation in human retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Livnat, Tami; Halpert, Gilad; Jawad, Shayma; Nisgav, Yael; Azar-Avivi, Shirley; Liu, Baoying; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Weinberger, Dov; Sredni, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pathological angiogenesis and chronic inflammation greatly contribute to the development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in chorioretinal diseases involving abnormal contact between retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and endothelial cells (ECs), associated with Bruch’s membrane rupture. We explored the ability of the small organotellurium compound octa-O-bis-(R,R)-tartarate ditellurane (SAS) to mitigate inflammatory processes in human RPE cells. Methods Cell adhesion assays and analyses of gene and protein expression were used to examine the effect of SAS on ARPE-19 cells or primary human RPE cells that were grown alone or in an RPE-EC co-culture. Results Adhesion assays showed that SAS inhibited αv integrins expressed on RPE cells. Co-cultures of RPE cells with ECs significantly reduced the gene expression of PEDF, as compared to RPE cells cultured alone. Both SAS and the anti-αvβ3 antibody LM609 significantly enhanced the production of PEDF at both mRNA and protein levels in RPE cells. RPE cells co-cultured with EC exhibited increased gene expression of CXCL5, COX1, MMP2, IGF1, and IL8, all of which are involved in both angiogenesis and inflammation. The enhanced expression of these genes was greatly suppressed by SAS, but interestingly, remained unaffected by LM609. Zymography assay showed that SAS reduced the level of MMP-2 activity in RPE cells. We also found that SAS significantly suppressed IL-1β-induced IL-6 expression and secretion from RPE cells by reducing the protein levels of phospho-IkappaBalpha (pIκBα). Conclusions Our results suggest that SAS is a promising anti-inflammatory agent in RPE cells, and may be an effective therapeutic approach for controlling chorioretinal diseases. PMID:27293373

  12. Multi-Level Communication of Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells via Tunneling Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Wittig, Dierk; Wang, Xiang; Walter, Cindy; Gerdes, Hans-Hermann; Funk, Richard H. W.; Roehlecke, Cora

    2012-01-01

    Background Tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) may offer a very specific and effective way of intercellular communication. Here we investigated TNTs in the human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell line ARPE-19. Morphology of TNTs was examined by immunostaining and scanning electron microscopy. To determine the function of TNTs between cells, we studied the TNT-dependent intercellular communication at different levels including electrical and calcium signalling, small molecular diffusion as well as mitochondrial re-localization. Further, intercellular organelles transfer was assayed by FACS analysis. Methodology and Principal Findings Microscopy showed that cultured ARPE-19 cells are frequently connected by TNTs, which are not attached to the substratum. The TNTs were straight connections between cells, had a typical diameter of 50 to 300 nm and a length of up to 120 µm. We observed de novo formation of TNTs by diverging from migrating cells after a short time of interaction. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed characteristic features of TNTs. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that TNTs between ARPE-19 cells contain F-actin but no microtubules. Depolymerisation of F-actin, induced by addition of latrunculin-B, led to disappearance of TNTs. Importantly, these TNTs could function as channels for the diffusion of small molecules such as Lucifer Yellow, but not for large molecules like Dextran Red. Further, organelle exchange between cells via TNTs was observed by microscopy. Using Ca2+ imaging we show the intercellular transmission of calcium signals through TNTs. Mechanical stimulation led to membrane depolarisation, which expand through TNT connections between ARPE-19 cells. We further demonstrate that TNTs can mediate electrical coupling between distant cells. Immunolabelling for Cx43 showed that this gap junction protein is interposed at one end of 44% of TNTs between ARPE-19 cells. Conclusions and Significance Our observations indicate that human RPE cell line ARPE

  13. Human retinal light sensitivity and melatonin rhythms following four days in near darkness.

    PubMed

    Danilenko, Konstantin V; Plisov, Igor L; Wirz-Justice, Anna; Hebert, Marc

    2009-01-01

    The rods in the retina are responsible for night vision, whereas the cone system enables day vision. We studied whether rod function in humans exhibits an endogenous circadian rhythm and if changes occur in conditions of prolonged darkness. Seven healthy subjects (mean age+/-SD: 25.6+/-12.3 yr) completed a 4.5-day protocol during which they were kept in complete darkness (days 1 and 4) and near darkness (<0.1 lux red light, days 2 and 3). Electroretinography (ERG) and saliva collections were done at intervals of at least 3 h for 27 h on days 1 and 4. Full-field ERGs were recorded over 10 low-intensity green light flashes known to test predominantly rod function. As a circadian marker, salivary melatonin concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The ERG data showed that rod responsiveness to light progressively diminished in darkness (significantly lower a- and b-wave amplitudes, longer