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Sample records for protects mammalian cells

  1. Delivery of Antibody Mimics into Mammalian Cells via Anthrax Toxin Protective Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiaoli; Rabideau, Amy E; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2014-01-01

    Antibody mimics have significant scientific and therapeutic utility for the disruption of protein–protein interactions inside cells; however, their delivery to the cell cytosol remains a major challenge. Here we show that protective antigen (PA), a component of anthrax toxin, efficiently transports commonly used antibody mimics to the cytosol of mammalian cells when conjugated to the N-terminal domain of LF (LFN). In contrast, a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) was not able to deliver any of these antibody mimics into the cell cytosol. The refolding and binding of a transported tandem monobody to Bcr-Abl (its protein target) in chronic myeloid leukemia cells were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. We also observed inhibition of Bcr-Abl kinase activity and induction of apoptosis caused by the monobody. In a separate case, we show disruption of key interactions in the MAPK signaling pathway after PA-mediated delivery of an affibody binder that targets hRaf-1. We show for the first time that PA can deliver bioactive antibody mimics to disrupt intracellular protein–protein interactions. This technology adds a useful tool to expand the applications of these modern agents to the intracellular milieu. PMID:25250705

  2. Triclabendazole protects yeast and mammalian cells from oxidative stress: identification of a potential neuroprotective compound.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Joo; Burlet, Elodie; Wang, Shaoxiao; Xu, Baoshan; Huang, Shile; Galiano, Floyd J; Witt, Stephan N

    2011-10-14

    The Prestwick and NIH chemical libraries were screened for drugs that protect baker's yeast from sugar-induced cell death (SICD). SICD is triggered when stationary-phase yeast cells are transferred from spent rich medium into water with 2% glucose and no other nutrients. The rapid, apoptotic cell death occurs because reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulate. We found that triclabendazole, which is used to treat liver flukes in cattle and man, partially protects against SICD. Characterization of triclabendazole revealed that it also protects yeast cells from death induced by the Parkinson's disease-related protein alpha-synuclein (α-syn), which is known to induce the accumulation of ROS. PMID:21946065

  3. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins.

  4. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R.; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. PMID:27043629

  5. EGA Protects Mammalian Cells from Clostridium difficile CDT, Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Sadi, Mirko; Popoff, Michel R; Schwan, Carsten; Aktories, Klaus; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic bacteria Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum produce the binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins CDT, iota and C2, respectively. These toxins are composed of a transport component (B) and a separate enzyme component (A). When both components assemble on the surface of mammalian target cells, the B components mediate the entry of the A components via endosomes into the cytosol. Here, the A components ADP-ribosylate G-actin, resulting in depolymerization of F-actin, cell-rounding and eventually death. In the present study, we demonstrate that 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA), a compound that protects cells from multiple toxins and viruses, also protects different mammalian epithelial cells from all three binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. In contrast, EGA did not inhibit the intoxication of cells with Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, indicating a possible different entry route for this toxin. EGA does not affect either the binding of the C2 toxin to the cells surface or the enzyme activity of the A components of CDT, iota and C2, suggesting that this compound interferes with cellular uptake of the toxins. Moreover, for C2 toxin, we demonstrated that EGA inhibits the pH-dependent transport of the A component across cell membranes. EGA is not cytotoxic, and therefore, we propose it as a lead compound for the development of novel pharmacological inhibitors against clostridial binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins. PMID:27043629

  6. Differential chemical protection of mammalian cells from the exotoxins of Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Middlebrook, J L; Dorland, R B

    1977-01-01

    Many drugs or chemicals had markedly different effects on the cytotoxicity induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PE) or Corynebacterium diphtheriae exotoxin (DE). The glycolytic inhibitor NaF protected cells from DE but potentiated the cytotoxicity of PE. Another energy inhibitor, salicylic acid, also protected cells from DE but had no effect with PE. Colchicine and colcemid did not affect the cytotoxicity of either toxin. Cytochalasin B exhibited a modest protection from DE but no effect with PE. Ouabain, a specific inhibitor of the Na+, K+-dependent adenosine 5'-triphosphatase (ATPase), did not affect the cytotoxicity of either toxin. Ruthenium red, a specific inhibitor of the Ca2+, Mg2+,-dependent ATPase, conferred marked protection from DE-induced cytotoxicity but did not affect PE-induced cytotoxicity. A number of local anesthetics were tested, and they too presented differential results with PE and DE. Most chemicals that affected toxin-induced cytotoxicity had little or no influence on the in vitro adenosine 5'-diphosphate-ribosylation catalyzed by either toxin. This work presents further evidence that PE and DE have different mechanisms of intoxication and suggests that these differences lie in the attachment or internalization stages of intoxication. PMID:141424

  7. Low temperature protects mammalian cells from apoptosis initiated by various stimuli in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Toshiharu; Itoh, Katsuhiko; Liu Yu; Higashitsuji, Hiroaki; Sumitomo, Yasuhiko; Sakamaki, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Jun . E-mail: jfujita@virus.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2005-10-01

    Mild hypothermia shows protective effects on patients with brain damage and cardiac arrest. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects, we examined the effects of low temperature (32 deg. C) on cells exposed to a variety of stress in vitro. We found that 32 deg. C suppressed induction of apoptosis by cytotoxic stimuli such as adriamycin, etoposide, thapsigargin, NaCl, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and anti-Fas antibody. In adriamycin-treated BALB/3T3 cells, the down-shift in temperature from 37 deg. C to 32 deg. C increased the Bcl-xL protein level and decreased the mRNA level of Puma and mitochondrial translocation of Bax, suppressing caspase-9-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, the protein level and stability of p53 were decreased, and its nuclear export was increased concomitant with Mdm2 mRNA upregulation. The low temperature effect was not observed in p53 {sup -/-}/Mdm2 {sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts, suggesting that the effect is mediated by suppression of the p53 pathway. In contrast, while thapsigargin-induced apoptosis was suppressed by the low temperature, no effect on the p53 protein level was observed. Furthermore, the survival rate of p53 {sup -/-}/Mdm2 {sup -/-} cells exposed to thapsigargin was increased when cultured at 32 deg. C compared with 37 deg. C. In conclusion, mild hypothermia protects cells from a variety of stress by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms.

  8. Protection against UVA-induced photooxidative damage in mammalian cell lines expressing increased levels of metallothionein

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, E.J. Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL . Dept. of Biology); Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J. ); Roth, R.M. . Dept. of Biology)

    1990-01-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is an endogenous low molecular weight protein that is inducible in a variety of eukaryotic cells and has the ability to selectivity bind heavy metal ions such as zinc and the cadmium. Although the exact physiological role of MT is still not understood, there is strong evidence that MT is involved in providing cellular resistance against the damaging effects of heavy metals and in the regulation of intracellular zinc and copper. Recently, it has been demonstrated that MT can scavenge radiation-induced reactive oxygen intermediates in vitro, specifically hydroxyl and superoxide radicals, and because of these observations it has been suggested that MT may provide protection against radiation-induced oxidative stress in vivo. Cell lines expressing increased levels of MT have demonstrated resistance to ionizing radiation, to ultraviolet radiation, and also to various DNA damaging agents including melphalan and cis-diaminedichloroplatinum. It is therefore important to gain some insight into the relationship between cellular MT content and cellular resistance to radiation and other DNA damaging agents. In this study we investigated the role of MT in providing protection against monochromatic 365-nm UVA radiation, which is known to generate intracellular reactive oxygen species that are involved in both DNA damage and cell killing. For this purpose, we used zinc acetate, a potent inducer of MT, to elevate MT levels in V79 Chinese hamster fibroblasts prior to UVA exposure and determined cell survival for uninduced and induced cultures. In order to eliminate any zinc effects other than MT induction, we also isolated and characterized cadmium chloride-resistant clones of V79 cells that have increased steady-state levels of both MT mRNA and protein, and we examined their survival characteristics against 365-nm radiation in the absence of zinc acetate. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Baculovirus Stimulates Antiviral Effects in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gronowski, Ann M.; Hilbert, David M.; Sheehan, Kathleen C. F.; Garotta, Gianni; Schreiber, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    Herein, we report that Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus, a member of the Baculoviridae family, is capable of stimulating antiviral activity in mammalian cells. Baculoviruses are not pathogenic to mammalian cells. Nevertheless, live baculovirus is shown here to induce interferons (IFN) from murine and human cell lines and induces in vivo protection of mice from encephalomyocarditis virus infection. Monoclonal antibodies specific for the baculovirus envelope gp67 neutralize baculovirus-dependent IFN production. Moreover, UV treatment of baculovirus eliminates both infectivity and IFN-inducing activity. In contrast, the IFN-inducing activity of the baculovirus was unaffected by DNase or RNase treatment. These data demonstrate that IFN production can be induced in mammalian cells by baculovirus even though the cells fail to serve as a natural host for an active viral infection. Baculoviruses, therefore, provide a novel model in which to study at least one alternative mechanism for IFN induction in mammalian cells. PMID:10559307

  10. Stem Cells in Mammalian Gonads.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji; Ding, Xinbao; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells have great value in clinical application because of their ability to self-renew and their potential to differentiate into many different cell types. Mammalian gonads, including testes for males and ovaries for females, are composed of germline and somatic cells. In male mammals, spermatogonial stem cells maintain spermatogenesis which occurs continuously in adult testis. Likewise, a growing body of evidence demonstrated that female germline stem cells could be found in mammalian ovaries. Meanwhile, prior studies have shown that somatic stem cells exist in both testes and ovaries. In this chapter, we focus on mammalian gonad stem cells and discuss their characteristics as well as differentiation potentials.

  11. Mammalian Cell-Derived Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Like Particles Protect the Lower as well as the Upper Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Walpita, Pramila; Johns, Lisa M.; Tandon, Ravi; Moore, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is a leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in children less than one year of age and in USA alone, between 85,000 and 144,000 infants are hospitalized every year. To date, there is no licensed vaccine. We have evaluated vaccine potential of mammalian cell-derived native RSV virus-like particles (RSV VLPs) composed of the two surface glycoproteins G and F, and the matrix protein M. Results of in vitro testing showed that the VLPs were functionally assembled and immunoreactive, and that the recombinantly expressed F protein was cleaved intracellularly similarly to the virus-synthesized F protein to produce the F1 and F2 subunits; the presence of the F1 fragment is critical for vaccine development since all the neutralizing epitopes present in the F protein are embedded in this fragment. Additional in vitro testing in human macrophage cell line THP-1 showed that both virus and the VLPs were sensed by TLR-4 and induced a Th1-biased cytokine response. Cotton rats vaccinated with RSV VLPs adjuvanted with alum and monophosphoryl lipid A induced potent neutralizing antibody response, and conferred protection in the lower as well as the upper respiratory tract based on substantial virus clearance from these sites. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first VLP/virosome vaccine study reporting protection of the lower as well as the upper respiratory tract: Prevention from replication in the nose is an important consideration if the target population is infants < 6 months of age. This is because continued virus replication in the nose results in nasal congestion and babies at this age are obligate nose breathers. In conclusion, these results taken together suggest that our VLPs show promise to be a safe and effective vaccine for RSV. PMID:26172453

  12. Polysome analysis of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    He, Shan L; Green, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    To assess the global translational level of mammalian cells (see similar protocols for bacteria and yeast on Analysis of polysomes from bacteria, Polysome Profile Analysis - Yeast and Polysome analysis for determining mRNA and ribosome association in Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

  13. Mammalian Cell Culture Simplified.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A tissue culture experiment that does not require elaborate equipment and that can be used to teach sterile technique, the principles of animal cell line maintenance, and the concept of cell growth curves is described. The differences between cancerous and normal cells can be highlighted. The procedure is included. (KR)

  14. Radiation protection of in vitro mammalian cells: effects of hydroxyl radical scavengers on the slopes and shoulders of survival curves

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, D.; Walton, H.L. )

    1991-05-01

    We have tested several chemical compounds, characterized and widely used as hydroxyl radical (.OH) scavengers, for their effects on the radiation sensitivity of Chinese hamster V79 cells irradiated in air or nitrogen. Our purpose is to reexamine the proposed relationship between the level of protection and the rates at which the scavengers react with .OH. We found that the additives can have two apparently independent effects on the shape of survival curves: a reduction in sensitivity (i.e., 'protection,' a decrease in the value of k) and an increase in the size of the shoulder of the survival curve (an increase in the value of Dq). We measured intracellular scavenger concentrations, and, using these values in our analysis, we found that neither of the two effects is correlated with the rates at which the scavengers react with .OH. Although these results could mean that .OH do not cause lethal damage, the interpretation we believe most probably correct is that these scavengers protect in multiple ways. The protection would occur in addition to or instead of simple .OH removal.

  15. Myocardial ischemic protection in natural mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Kudej, Raymond K; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F

    2015-03-01

    Hibernating myocardium is an important clinical syndrome protecting the heart with chronic myocardial ischemia, named for its assumed resemblance to hibernating mammals in winter. However, the effects of myocardial ischemic protection have never been studied in true mammalian hibernation, which is a unique strategy for surviving extreme winter environmental stress. The goal of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that ischemic stress may also be protected in woodchucks as they hibernate in winter. Myocardial infarction was induced by coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion in naturally hibernating woodchucks in winter with and without hibernation and in summer, when not hibernating. The ischemic area at risk was similar among groups. Myocardial infarction was significantly less in woodchucks in winter, whether hibernating or not, compared with summer, and was similar to that resulting after ischemic preconditioning. Whereas several genes were up or downregulated in both hibernating woodchuck and with ischemic preconditioning, one mechanism was unique to hibernation, i.e., activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). When CREB was upregulated in summer, it induced protection similar to that observed in the woodchuck heart in winter. The cardioprotection in hibernation was also mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase, rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase. Thus, the hibernating woodchuck heart is a novel model to study cardioprotection for two major reasons: (1) powerful cardioprotection occurs naturally in winter months in the absence of any preconditioning stimuli, and (2) it resembles ischemic preconditioning, but with novel mechanisms, making this model potentially useful for clinical translation.

  16. Myocardial ischemic protection in natural mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Kudej, Raymond K; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F

    2015-03-01

    Hibernating myocardium is an important clinical syndrome protecting the heart with chronic myocardial ischemia, named for its assumed resemblance to hibernating mammals in winter. However, the effects of myocardial ischemic protection have never been studied in true mammalian hibernation, which is a unique strategy for surviving extreme winter environmental stress. The goal of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that ischemic stress may also be protected in woodchucks as they hibernate in winter. Myocardial infarction was induced by coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion in naturally hibernating woodchucks in winter with and without hibernation and in summer, when not hibernating. The ischemic area at risk was similar among groups. Myocardial infarction was significantly less in woodchucks in winter, whether hibernating or not, compared with summer, and was similar to that resulting after ischemic preconditioning. Whereas several genes were up or downregulated in both hibernating woodchuck and with ischemic preconditioning, one mechanism was unique to hibernation, i.e., activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). When CREB was upregulated in summer, it induced protection similar to that observed in the woodchuck heart in winter. The cardioprotection in hibernation was also mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase, rather than inducible nitric oxide synthase. Thus, the hibernating woodchuck heart is a novel model to study cardioprotection for two major reasons: (1) powerful cardioprotection occurs naturally in winter months in the absence of any preconditioning stimuli, and (2) it resembles ischemic preconditioning, but with novel mechanisms, making this model potentially useful for clinical translation. PMID:25613166

  17. Producing Newborn Synchronous Mammalian Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Helmstetter, Charles E.; Thornton, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    A method and bioreactor for the continuous production of synchronous (same age) population of mammalian cells have been invented. The invention involves the attachment and growth of cells on an adhesive-coated porous membrane immersed in a perfused liquid culture medium in a microgravity analog bioreactor. When cells attach to the surface divide, newborn cells are released into the flowing culture medium. The released cells, consisting of a uniform population of synchronous cells are then collected from the effluent culture medium. This invention could be of interest to researchers investigating the effects of the geneotoxic effects of the space environment (microgravity, radiation, chemicals, gases) and to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies involved in research on aging and cancer, and in new drug development and testing.

  18. Mammalian cell cultivation in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmünder, Felix K.; Suter, Robert N.; Kiess, M.; Urfer, R.; Nordau, C.-G.; Cogoli, A.

    Equipment used in space for the cultivation of mammalian cells does not meet the usual standard of earth bound bioreactors. Thus, the development of a space worthy bioreactor is mandatory for two reasons: First, to investigate the effect on single cells of the space environment in general and microgravity conditions in particular, and second, to provide researchers on long term missions and the Space Station with cell material. However, expertise for this venture is not at hand. A small and simple device for animal cell culture experiments aboard Spacelab (Dynamic Cell Culture System; DCCS) was developed. It provides 2 cell culture chambers, one is operated as a batch system, the other one as a perfusion system. The cell chambers have a volume of 200 μl. Medium exchange is achieved with an automatic osmotic pump. The system is neither mechanically stirred nor equipped with sensors. Oxygen for cell growth is provided by a gas chamber that is adjacent to the cell chambers. The oxygen gradient produced by the growing cells serves to maintain the oxygen influx by diffusion. Hamster kidney cells growing on microcarriers were used to test the biological performance of the DCCS. On ground tests suggest that this system is feasible.

  19. Suspension culture of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Birch, J R; Arathoon, R

    1990-01-01

    Mammalian cell suspension culture systems are being used increasingly in the biotechnology industry. This is due to their many advantages including simplicity and homogeneity of culture. Suspension systems are very adaptable (e.g., for microcarrier, microencapsulation, or other methods of culture). Their engineering is thoroughly understood and standardized at large scale, and automation and cleaning procedures are well established. Suspension systems offer the possibility of quick implementation of production protocols due to their ability to be scaled easily once the basic culture parameters are understood. The only main disadvantage of the suspension culture systems to date is their inapplicability for the production of human vaccines from either primary cell lines or from normal human diploid cell lines (Hayflick et al., 1987 and references therein). One of the great advantages of suspension culture is the opportunity it provides to study interactions of metabolic and production phenomena in chemostat or turbidostat steady-state systems. Furthermore, in suspension culture systems from which cell number and cell mass measurements are easy to obtain, rigorous and quantitative estimations of the effects of growth conditions or perturbations of metabolic homeostasis can be made. Such studies can speed up the development of optimal processes. With our increasing understanding of factors influencing expression in mammalian cells (Cohen and Levinson, 1988; Santoro et al., 1988) and the direct application of new methods in suspension culture (Rhodes and Birch, 1988), its usefulness and importance is likely to increase in the future. In this chapter, we have described some of the potential uses of the various suspension culture systems and have covered most of the established technology and literature. Due to the rapid developments and needs in the biotechnology industry and the versatility of suspension culture systems, it is probable that many more variations on this

  20. 40 CFR 799.9530 - TSCA in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false TSCA in vitro mammalian cell gene... MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS Health Effects Test Guidelines § 799.9530 TSCA in vitro mammalian cell gene.... The in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation test can be used to detect gene mutations induced...

  1. 40 CFR 799.9530 - TSCA in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false TSCA in vitro mammalian cell gene... MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS Health Effects Test Guidelines § 799.9530 TSCA in vitro mammalian cell gene.... The in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation test can be used to detect gene mutations induced...

  2. 40 CFR 799.9530 - TSCA in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false TSCA in vitro mammalian cell gene... MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS Health Effects Test Guidelines § 799.9530 TSCA in vitro mammalian cell gene.... The in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation test can be used to detect gene mutations induced...

  3. 40 CFR 799.9530 - TSCA in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false TSCA in vitro mammalian cell gene... MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS Health Effects Test Guidelines § 799.9530 TSCA in vitro mammalian cell gene.... The in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation test can be used to detect gene mutations induced...

  4. Optimal Protective Hypothermia in Arrested Mammalian Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Villet, Outi M.; Ge, Ming; Sekhar, Laigam N.; Corson, Marshall A.; Tylee, Tracy S.; Fan, Lu-Ping; Yao, Lin; Zhu, Chun; Olson, Aaron K.; Buroker, Norman E.; Xu, Cheng-Su; Anderson, David L.; Soh, Yong-Kian; Wang, Elise; Chen, Shi-Han; Portman, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic hypothermia recommendations have been reported, but the information supporting them is sparse, and reveals a need for the data of target therapeutic hypothermia (TTH) from well-controlled experiments. The core temperature ≤35°C is considered as hypothermia, and 29°C is a cooling injury threshold in pig heart in vivo. Thus, an optimal protective hypothermia (OPH) should be in the range 29–35°C. This study was conducted with a pig cardiopulmonary bypass preparation to decrease the core temperature to 29–35°C range at 20 minutes before and 60 minutes during heart arrest. The left ventricular (LV) developed pressure, maximum of the first derivative of LV (dP/dtmax), cardiac power, heart rate, cardiac output, and myocardial velocity (Vmax) were recorded continuously via an LV pressure catheter and an aortic flow probe. At 20 minutes of off-pump during reperfusion after 60 minutes arrest, 17 hypothermic hearts showed that the recovery of Vmax and dP/dtmax established sigmoid curves that consisted of two plateaus: a good recovery plateau at 29–30.5°C, the function recovered to baseline level (BL) (Vmax=118.4%±3.9% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=120.7%±3.1% of BL, n=6); another poor recovery plateau at 34–35°C (Vmax=60.2%±2.8% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=28.0%±5.9% of BL, p<0.05, n=6; ), which are similar to the four normothermia arrest (37°C) hearts (Vmax=55.9%±4.8% of BL, LV dP/dtmax=24.5%±2.1% of BL, n=4). The 32–32.5°C arrest hearts showed moderate recovery (n=5). A point of inflection (around 30.5–31°C) existed at the edge of a good recovery plateau followed by a steep slope. The point presented an OPH that should be the TTH. The results are concordant with data in the mammalian hearts, suggesting that the TTH should be initiated to cool core temperature at 31°C. PMID:25514569

  5. Simplified Bioreactor For Growing Mammalian Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F.

    1995-01-01

    Improved bioreactor for growing mammalian cell cultures developed. Designed to support growth of dense volumes of mammalian cells by providing ample, well-distributed flows of nutrient solution with minimal turbulence. Cells relatively delicate and, unlike bacteria, cannot withstand shear forces present in turbulent flows. Bioreactor vessel readily made in larger sizes to accommodate greater cell production quantities. Molding equipment presently used makes cylinders up to 30 centimeters long. Alternative sintered plastic techniques used to vary pore size and quantity, as necessary.

  6. Engineered Trehalose Permeable to Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abazari, Alireza; Meimetis, Labros G.; Budin, Ghyslain; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Weissleder, Ralph; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose is a naturally occurring disaccharide which is associated with extraordinary stress-tolerance capacity in certain species of unicellular and multicellular organisms. In mammalian cells, presence of intra- and extracellular trehalose has been shown to confer improved tolerance against freezing and desiccation. Since mammalian cells do not synthesize nor import trehalose, the development of novel methods for efficient intracellular delivery of trehalose has been an ongoing investigation. Herein, we studied the membrane permeability of engineered lipophilic derivatives of trehalose. Trehalose conjugated with 6 acetyl groups (trehalose hexaacetate or 6-O-Ac-Tre) demonstrated superior permeability in rat hepatocytes compared with regular trehalose, trehalose diacetate (2-O-Ac-Tre) and trehalose tetraacetate (4-O-Ac-Tre). Once in the cell, intracellular esterases hydrolyzed the 6-O-Ac-Tre molecules, releasing free trehalose into the cytoplasm. The total concentration of intracellular trehalose (plus acetylated variants) reached as high as 10 fold the extracellular concentration of 6-O-Ac-Tre, attaining concentrations suitable for applications in biopreservation. To describe this accumulation phenomenon, a diffusion-reaction model was proposed and the permeability and reaction kinetics of 6-O-Ac-Tre were determined by fitting to experimental data. Further studies suggested that the impact of the loading and the presence of intracellular trehalose on cellular viability and function were negligible. Engineering of trehalose chemical structure rather than manipulating the cell, is an innocuous, cell-friendly method for trehalose delivery, with demonstrated potential for trehalose loading in different types of cells and cell lines, and can facilitate the wide-spread application of trehalose as an intracellular protective agent in biopreservation studies. PMID:26115179

  7. Autophagosome formation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Burman, Chloe; Ktistakis, Nicholas T

    2010-12-01

    Autophagy is a fundamental intracellular trafficking pathway conserved from yeast to mammals. It is generally thought to play a pro-survival role, and it can be up regulated in response to both external and intracellular factors, including amino acid starvation, growth factor withdrawal, low cellular energy levels, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, hypoxia, oxidative stress, pathogen infection, and organelle damage. During autophagy initiation a portion of the cytosol is surrounded by a flat membrane sheet known as the isolation membrane or phagophore. The isolation membrane then elongates and seals itself to form an autophagosome. The autophagosome fuses with normal endocytic traffic to mature into a late autophagosome, before fusing with lysosomes. The molecular machinery that enables formation of an autophagosome in response to the various autophagy stimuli is almost completely identified in yeast and-thanks to the observed conservation-is also being rapidly elucidated in higher eukaryotes including mammals. What are less clear and currently under intense investigation are the mechanism by which these various autophagy components co-ordinate in order to generate autophagosomes. In this review, we will discuss briefly the fundamental importance of autophagy in various pathophysiological states and we will then review in detail the various players in early autophagy. Our main thesis will be that a conserved group of heteromeric protein complexes and a relatively simple signalling lipid are responsible for the formation of autophagosomes in mammalian cells.

  8. From cell protection to death: may Ca2+ signals explain the chameleonic attributes of the mammalian prion protein?

    PubMed

    Sorgato, M Catia; Bertoli, Alessandro

    2009-02-01

    It is now accepted that a conformational change of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) generates the prion, the infectious agent responsible for lethal neurodegenerative disorders, named transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, or prion diseases. The mechanisms of prion-associated neurodegeneration are still obscure, as is the cell role of PrP(C), although increasing evidence attributes to PrP(C) important functions in cell survival. Such a behavioral dichotomy thus enables the prion protein to switch from a benign role under normal conditions, to the execution of neurons during disease. By reviewing data from models of prion disease and PrP(C)-null paradigms, which suggest a relation between the prion protein and Ca(2+) homeostasis, here we discuss the possibility that Ca(2+) is the factor behind the enigma of the pathophysiology of PrP(C). Ca(2+) features in almost all processes of cell signaling, and may thus tell us much about a protein that pivots between health and disease.

  9. Hacking the genetic code of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Dirk

    2009-07-01

    A genetic shuttle: The highlighted article, which was recently published by Schultz, Geierstanger and co-workers, describes a straightforward scheme for enlarging the genetic code of mammalian cells. An orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair specific for a new amino acid can be evolved in E. coli and subsequently transferred into mammalian cells. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated by adding a photocaged lysine derivative to the genetic repertoire of a human cell line. PMID:19533721

  10. Hacking the genetic code of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Dirk

    2009-07-01

    A genetic shuttle: The highlighted article, which was recently published by Schultz, Geierstanger and co-workers, describes a straightforward scheme for enlarging the genetic code of mammalian cells. An orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pair specific for a new amino acid can be evolved in E. coli and subsequently transferred into mammalian cells. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated by adding a photocaged lysine derivative to the genetic repertoire of a human cell line.

  11. Protecting effects specifically from low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells challenge the concept of linearity

    SciTech Connect

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Bond, V.P.; Sondhaus, C.A.; Altman, K.I.

    1998-12-31

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced changes in intracellular signaling that induce mechanisms of DNA damage control different from those operating at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that by use of microdosimetric concepts, the energy deposited in cell mass can be related to the occurrence of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive.

  12. Autofluorescence of viable cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Aubin, J E

    1979-01-01

    The autofluorescence other than intrinsic protein emission of viable cultured mammalian cells has been investigated. The fluorescence was found to originate in discrete cytoplasmic vesicle-like regions and to be absent from the nucleus. Excitation and emission spectra of viable cells revealed at least two distinct fluorescent species. Comparison of cell spectra with spectra of known cellular metabolites suggested that most, if not all, of the fluorescence arises from intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and riboflavin and flavin coenzymes. Various changes in culture conditions did not affect the observed autofluorescence intensity. A multiparameter flow system (MACCS) was used to compare the fluorescence intensities of numerous cultured mammalian cells.

  13. Modification of radiosensitivity of mammalian cells by cyclic nucleotides. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, D.; Prasad, K.N.

    1981-07-06

    Some in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) may be one of the important factors in determining the radiosensitivity of certain mammalian cells; however, the role of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) in radiosensitivity of mammalian cells is completely unknown. Recent data also suggest that the mechanism of radiation protection afforded by moderate hypoxia and SH-containing compounds may involve an alteration in the intracellular level of cyclic AMP. At least one in vivo study shows that cyclic AMP protects hair follicles and gut epithelial cells against radiation damage; however, it does not protect lymphosarcoma and breast carcinoma in mice. If a similar phenomenon is found in humans, an elevation of the intracellular level of cyclic AMP during radiation exposure may improve the effectiveness of radiation therapy in those cases where the radiation damage of normal tissue becomes the limiting factor for a continuation of the therapy program.

  14. Basic techniques in mammalian cell tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Katy; May, Kristin M

    2015-03-02

    Cultured mammalian cells are used extensively in cell biology studies. It requires a number of special skills in order to be able to preserve the structure, function, behavior, and biology of the cells in culture. This unit describes the basic skills required to maintain and preserve cell cultures: maintaining aseptic technique, preparing media with the appropriate characteristics, passaging, freezing and storage, recovering frozen stocks, and counting viable cells.

  15. Genomics in mammalian cell culture bioprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Wuest, Diane M.; Harcum, Sarah W.; Lee, Kelvin H.

    2013-01-01

    Explicitly identifying the genome of a host organism including sequencing, mapping, and annotating its genetic code has become a priority in the field of biotechnology with aims at improving the efficiency and understanding of cell culture bioprocessing. Recombinant protein therapeutics, primarily produced in mammalian cells, constitute a $108 billion global market. The most common mammalian cell line used in biologic production processes is the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, and although great improvements have been made in titer production over the past 25 years, the underlying molecular and physiological factors are not well understood. Confident understanding of CHO bioprocessing elements (e.g. cell line selection, protein production, and reproducibility of process performance and product specifications) would significantly improve with a well understood genome. This review describes mammalian cell culture use in bioprocessing, the importance of obtaining CHO cell line genetic sequences, and the current status of sequencing efforts. Furthermore, transcriptomic techniques and gene expression tools are presented, and case studies exploring genomic techniques and applications aimed to improve mammalian bioprocess performance are reviewed. Finally, future implications of genomic advances are surmised. PMID:22079893

  16. Freezing mammalian cells for production of biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Seth, Gargi

    2012-03-01

    Cryopreservation techniques utilize very low temperatures to preserve the structure and function of living cells. Various strategies have been developed for freezing mammalian cells of biological and medical significance. This paper highlights the importance and application of cryopreservation for recombinant mammalian cells used in the biopharmaceutical industry to produce high-value protein therapeutics. It is a primer that aims to give insight into the basic principles of cell freezing for the benefit of biopharmaceutical researchers with limited or no prior experience in cryobiology. For the more familiar researchers, key cell banking parameters such as the cell density and hold conditions have been reviewed to possibly help optimize their specific cell freezing protocols. It is important to understand the mechanisms underlying the freezing of complex and sensitive cellular entities as we implement best practices around the techniques and strategies used for cryopreservation. PMID:22226818

  17. Synthetic therapeutic gene circuits in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Haifeng; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-08-01

    In the emerging field of synthetic biology, scientists are focusing on designing and creating functional devices, systems, and organisms with novel functions by engineering and assembling standardised biological building blocks. The progress of synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of functional gene networks that can reprogram metabolic activities in mammalian cells and provide new therapeutic opportunities for future gene- and cell-based therapies. In this review, we describe the most recent advances in synthetic mammalian gene networks designed for biomedical applications, including how these synthetic therapeutic gene circuits can be assembled to control signalling networks and applied to treat metabolic disorders, cancer, and immune diseases. We conclude by discussing the various challenges and future prospects of using synthetic mammalian gene networks for disease therapy.

  18. Inkjet printing of viable mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Jin, Joyce; Gregory, Cassie; Hickman, J J James J; Boland, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the use of a commercial thermal printer to deposit Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) and embryonic motoneuron cells into pre-defined patterns. These experiments were undertaken to verify the biocompatibility of thermal inkjet printing of mammalian cells and the ability to assemble them into viable constructs. Using a modified Hewlett Packard (HP) 550C computer printer and an HP 51626a ink cartridge, CHO cells and rat embryonic motoneurons were suspended separately in a concentrated phosphate buffered saline solution (3 x). The cells were subsequently printed as a kind of "ink" onto several "bio-papers" made from soy agar and collagen gel. The appearance of the CHO cells and motoneurons on the bio-papers indicated an healthy cell morphology. Furthermore, the analyses of the CHO cell viability showed that less than 8% of the cells were lysed during printing. These data indicate that mammalian cells can be effectively delivered by a modified thermal inkjet printer onto biological substrates and that they retain their ability to function. The computer-aided inkjet printing of viable mammalian cells holds potential for creating living tissue analogs, and may eventually lead to the construction of engineered human organs.

  19. Cell-surface remodelling during mammalian erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Wraith, D C; Chesterton, C J

    1982-10-15

    Current evidence suggests that the major cell-surface modification occurring during mammalian erythropoiesis could be generated by two separate mechanisms: either selective loss of membrane proteins during enucleation or endocytosis at the subsequent reticulocyte and erythrocyte stages. The former idea was tested by collecting developing rabbit erythroid cells before and after the enucleation step and comparing their cell-surface protein composition via radiolabelling and electrophoresis. Few changes were observed. Our data thus lend support to the endocytosis mechanism.

  20. [Telomere Recombination in Normal Mammalian Cells].

    PubMed

    Zhdanova, N S; Rubtsov, N B

    2016-01-01

    Two mechanisms of telomere length maintenance are known to date. The first includes the use of a special enzymatic telomerase complex to solve the problems that arise during the replication of linear DNA in a normal diploid and part of tumor cells. Alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), which is based on the homologous recombination of telomere DNA, represents the second mechanism. Until recently, ALT was assumed to be expressed only in 15-20% of tumors lacking active telomerase and, together with telomerase reactivation represented one of two possibilities to overcome the replicative senescence observed in somatic mammalian cells due to aging or during cell culturing in vitro. Previously described sporadic cases of combinations of the two mechanisms of telomere length maintenance in several cell lines in vitro were attributed to the experimental design rather than to a real biological phenomenon, since active cellular division without active telomerase was considered to be the "gold standard" of ALT. The present review describes the morphological and functional reorganizations of mammalian telomeres observed with ALT activation, as well as recently observed,and well-documented cases of combinations between ALT-like and telomerase-dependent mechanisms in mammalian cells. The possible role of telomere recombination in telomerase-dependent cells is discussed.

  1. Chlorpromazine inhibits mitosis of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Boder, G B; Paul, D C; Williams, D C

    1983-09-01

    Chlorpromazine (CPZ) at minimally effective concentrations accumulates mammalian cells in mitosis without lethal effects on the cells. Star-metaphase morphology similar to effects seen with classical antimitotic compounds probably results from the preferential action of CPZ on a specific class of microtubules--the pole-to-pole microtubules of the mitotic spindle. At CPZ concentrations of 8 X 10(-6) M, flow cytometry indicates no effect of CPZ on the progress of cells through phases of the cell cycle other than mitosis (M). These results suggest a possible mechanism for toxic side effects of CPZ in man such as granulocytopenia and light sensitization.

  2. Peroxisome biogenesis in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujiki, Yukio; Okumoto, Kanji; Mukai, Satoru; Honsho, Masanori; Tamura, Shigehiko

    2014-01-01

    To investigate peroxisome assembly and human peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBDs) such as Zellweger syndrome, thirteen different complementation groups (CGs) of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutants defective in peroxisome biogenesis have been isolated and established as a model research system. Successful gene-cloning studies by a forward genetic approach utilized a rapid functional complementation assay of CHO cell mutants led to isolation of human peroxin (PEX) genes. Search for pathogenic genes responsible for PBDs of all 14 CGs is now completed together with the homology search by screening the human expressed sequence tag database using yeast PEX genes. Peroxins are divided into three groups: (1) peroxins including Pex3p, Pex16p, and Pex19p, are responsible for peroxisome membrane biogenesis via classes I and II pathways; (2) peroxins that function in matrix protein import; (3) those such as three forms of Pex11p, Pex11pα, Pex11pβ, and Pex11pγ, are involved in peroxisome proliferation where DLP1, Mff, and Fis1 coordinately function. In membrane assembly, Pex19p forms complexes in the cytosol with newly synthesized PMPs including Pex16p and transports them to the receptor Pex3p, whereby peroxisomal membrane is formed (Class I pathway). Pex19p likewise forms a complex with newly made Pex3p and translocates it to the Pex3p receptor, Pex16p (Class II pathway). In matrix protein import, newly synthesized proteins harboring peroxisome targeting signal type 1 or 2 are recognized by Pex5p or Pex7p in the cytoplasm and are imported to peroxisomes via translocation machinery. In regard to peroxisome-cytoplasmic shuttling of Pex5p, Pex5p initially targets to an 800-kDa docking complex consisting of Pex14p and Pex13p and then translocates to a 500-kDa RING translocation complex. At the terminal step, Pex1p and Pex6p of the AAA family mediate the export of Pex5p, where Cys-ubiquitination of Pex5p is essential for the Pex5p exit. PMID:25177298

  3. Synthesis of phycocyanobilin in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Konrad; Engesser, Raphael; Timmer, Jens; Nagy, Ferenc; Zurbriggen, Matias D; Weber, Wilfried

    2013-10-11

    The chromophore 3-Z phycocyanobilin (PCB, (2R,3Z)-8,12-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-18-ethyl-3-ethylidene-2,7,13,17-tetramethyl-2,3-dihydrobilin-1,19(21H,24H)-dione) mediates red and far-red light perception in natural and synthetic biological systems. Here we describe a PCB synthesis strategy in mammalian cells. We optimize the production by co-localizing the biocatalysts to the substrate source, by coordinating the availability of the biocatalysts and by reducing the degradation of the reaction product. We show that the resulting PCB levels of 2 μM are sufficient to sustain the functionality of red light-responsive optogenetic tools suitable for the light-inducible control of gene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:23963496

  4. Micromotion of mammalian cells measured electrically.

    PubMed Central

    Giaever, I; Keese, C R

    1991-01-01

    Motility is a fundamental property of mammalian cells that normally is observed in tissue culture by time lapse microscopy where resolution is limited by the wavelength of light. This paper examines a powerful electrical technique by which cell motion is quantitatively measured at the nanometer level. In this method, the cells are cultured on small evaporated gold electrodes carrying weak ac currents. A large change in the measured electrical impedance of the electrodes is observed when cells attach and spread on these electrodes. When the impedance is tracked as a function of time, fluctuations are observed that are a direct measure of cell motion. Surprisingly, these fluctuations continue even when the cell layer becomes confluent. By comparing the measured impedance with a theoretical model, it is clear that under these circumstances the average motions of the cell layer of 1 nm can be inferred from the measurements. We refer to this aspect of cell motility as micromotion. PMID:1881923

  5. Space radiation effects on plant and mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, C.; De Micco, V.; Macaeva, E.; Quintens, R.

    2014-11-01

    The study of the effects of ionizing radiation on organisms is related to different research aims. The current review emphasizes the studies on the effects of different doses of sparsely and densely ionizing radiation on living organisms, with the final purpose of highlighting specific and common effects of space radiation in mammals and plants. This topic is extremely relevant in the context of radiation protection from space environment. The response of different organisms to ionizing radiation depends on the radiation quality/dose and/or the intrinsic characteristics of the living system. Macromolecules, in particular DNA, are the critical targets of radiation, even if there is a strong difference between damages encountered by plant and mammalian cells. The differences in structure and metabolism between the two cell types are responsible for the higher resistance of the plant cell compared with its animal counterpart. In this review, we report some recent findings from studies performed in Space or on Earth, simulating space-like levels of radiation with ground-based facilities, to understand the effect of ionizing radiation on mammalian and plant cells. In particular, our attention is focused on genetic alterations and repair mechanisms in mammalian cells and on structures and mechanisms conferring radioresistance to plant cells.

  6. Actin dynamics in living mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ballestrem, C; Wehrle-Haller, B; Imhof, B A

    1998-06-01

    The actin cytoskeleton maintains the cellular architecture and mediates cell movements. To explore actin cytoskeletal dynamics, the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was fused to human &bgr ;-actin. The fusion protein was incorporated into actin fibers which became depolymerized upon cytochalasin B treatment. This functional EGFP-actin construct enabled observation of the actin cytoskeleton in living cells by time lapse fluorescence microscopy. Stable expression of the construct was obtained in mammalian cell lines of different tissue origins. In stationary cells, actin rich, ring-like structured 'actin clouds' were observed in addition to stress fibers. These ruffle-like structures were found to be involved in the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. In migratory cells, EGFP-actin was found in the advancing lamellipodium. Immobile actin spots developed in the lamellipodium and thin actin fibers formed parallel to the leading edge. Thus EGFP-actin expressed in living cells unveiled structures involved in the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton.

  7. Dual roles for cholesterol in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang; Rychnovsky, Scott D; Belani, Jitendra D; Hobbs, Helen H; Cohen, Jonathan C; Rawson, Robert B

    2005-10-11

    The structural features of sterols required to support mammalian cell growth have not been fully defined. Here, we use mutant CHO cells that synthesize only small amounts of cholesterol to test the capacity of various sterols to support growth. Sterols with minor modifications of the side chain (e.g., campesterol, beta-sitosterol, and desmosterol) supported long-term growth of mutant cells, but sterols with more complex modifications of the side chain, the sterol nucleus, or the 3-hydroxy group did not. After 60 days in culture, the exogenous sterol comprised >90% of cellular sterols. Inactivation of residual endogenous synthesis with the squalene epoxidase inhibitor NB-598 prevented growth in beta-sitosterol and greatly reduced growth in campesterol. Growth of cells cultured in beta-sitosterol and NB-598 was restored by adding small amounts of cholesterol to the medium. Surprisingly, enantiomeric cholesterol also supported cell growth, even in the presence of NB-598. Thus, sterols fulfill two roles in mammalian cells: (i) a bulk membrane requirement in which phytosterols can substitute for cholesterol and (ii) other processes that specifically require small amounts of cholesterol but are not enantioselective. PMID:16199524

  8. Drosophila grim induces apoptosis in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Clavería, C; Albar, J P; Serrano, A; Buesa, J M; Barbero, J L; Martínez-A, C; Torres, M

    1998-01-01

    Genetic studies have shown that grim is a central genetic switch of programmed cell death in Drosophila; however, homologous genes have not been described in other species, nor has its mechanism of action been defined. We show here that grim expression induces apoptosis in mouse fibroblasts. Cell death induced by grim in mammalian cells involves membrane blebbing, cytoplasmic loss and nuclear DNA fragmentation. Grim-induced apoptosis is blocked by both natural and synthetic caspase inhibitors. We found that grim itself shows caspase-dependent proteolytic processing of its C-terminus in vitro. Grim-induced death is antagonized by bcl-2 in a dose-dependent manner, and neither Fas signalling nor p53 are required for grim pro-apoptotic activity. Grim protein localizes both in the cytosol and in the mitochondria of mouse fibroblasts, the latter location becoming predominant as apoptosis progresses. These results show that Drosophila grim induces death in mammalian cells by specifically acting on mitochondrial apoptotic pathways executed by endogenous caspases. These findings advance our knowledge of the mechanism by which grim induces apoptosis and show the conservation through evolution of this crucial programmed cell death pathway. PMID:9857177

  9. Fundamentals of Expression in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Expression of proteins in mammalian cells is a key technology important for many functional studies on human and higher eukaryotic genes. Studies include the mapping of protein interactions, solving protein structure by crystallization and X-ray diffraction or solution phase NMR and the generation of antibodies to enable a range of studies to be performed including protein detection in vivo. In addition the production of therapeutic proteins and antibodies, now a multi billion dollar industry, has driven major advances in cell line engineering for the production of grams per liter of active proteins and antibodies. Here the key factors that need to be considered for successful expression in HEK293 and CHO cells are reviewed including host cells, expression vector design, transient transfection methods, stable cell line generation and cultivation conditions. PMID:27165328

  10. Mammalian cell cryopreservation by using liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Serrano, M Concepción; Nardecchia, Stefania; Gutiérrez, María C; Ferrer, M Luisa; del Monte, Francisco

    2015-02-18

    Liquid marbles (LMs) are nonsticky droplets covered by micro- or nanometrically scaled particles and obtained by simply rolling small amounts of a liquid in a very hydrophobic powder. Since pioneer work by Aussillous and Quéré, a wide palette of hydrophobic materials for the preparation of LMs, as well as potential applications, have been reported. Because of the bioinspired origin of this concept, the applicability of LMs in biomedicine is gaining increasing attention, with remarkable advances in their use as microbioreactors for blood typing, drug screening, and tumor growth, among others. Herein, we explore the novel use of LMs as a biotechnological tool for the cryopreservation of mammalian cells as an alternative to conventional methods, which typically require the use of cryopreservant agents that commonly associate with some degree of cell toxicity. Murine L929 fibroblasts, a reference cell line for cytotoxicity studies, and poly(tetrafluoroethylene), a hydrophobic polymer widely used in cardiovascular surgery, were selected for the preparation of the cell-containing LMs. Our results reveal that there is a safe range of droplet volumes and cell densities that can be successfully used to cryopreserve mammalian cell lines and recover them after thawing without significantly affecting major cellular parameters such as adhesion, morphology, viability, proliferation, and cell cycle. We envision that progress in the exploration of cell-containing LMs could also open their impact as microreactors for the miniaturization of cytotoxicity procedures of drugs and materials in which powerful tools for cell evaluation such as flow cytometry could be used because of the elevated amount of cells handled.

  11. Optogenetics for gene expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Konrad; Naumann, Sebastian; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2015-02-01

    Molecular switches that are controlled by chemicals have evolved as central research instruments in mammalian cell biology. However, these tools are limited in terms of their spatiotemporal resolution due to freely diffusing inducers. These limitations have recently been addressed by the development of optogenetic, genetically encoded, and light-responsive tools that can be controlled with the unprecedented spatiotemporal precision of light. In this article, we first provide a brief overview of currently available optogenetic tools that have been designed to control diverse cellular processes. Then, we focus on recent developments in light-controlled gene expression technologies and provide the reader with a guideline for choosing the most suitable gene expression system.

  12. Focusing on RISC assembly in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Junmei; Wei Na; Chalk, Alistair; Wang Jue; Song, Yutong; Yi Fan; Qiao Renping; Sonnhammer, Erik L.L.; Wahlestedt, Claes; Liang Zicai Du, Quan

    2008-04-11

    RISC (RNA-induced silencing complex) is a central protein complex in RNAi, into which a siRNA strand is assembled to become effective in gene silencing. By using an in vitro RNAi reaction based on Drosophila embryo extract, an asymmetric model was recently proposed for RISC assembly of siRNA strands, suggesting that the strand that is more loosely paired at its 5' end is selectively assembled into RISC and results in target gene silencing. However, in the present study, we were unable to establish such a correlation in cell-based RNAi assays, as well as in large-scale RNAi data analyses. This suggests that the thermodynamic stability of siRNA is not a major determinant of gene silencing in mammalian cells. Further studies on fork siRNAs showed that mismatch at the 5' end of the siRNA sense strand decreased RISC assembly of the antisense strand, but surprisingly did not increase RISC assembly of the sense strand. More interestingly, measurements of melting temperature showed that the terminal stability of fork siRNAs correlated with the positions of the mismatches, but not gene silencing efficacy. In summary, our data demonstrate that there is no definite correlation between siRNA stability and gene silencing in mammalian cells, which suggests that instead of thermodynamic stability, other features of the siRNA duplex contribute to RISC assembly in RNAi.

  13. Superoxide radical and iron modulate aconitase activity in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gardner, P R; Raineri, I; Epstein, L B; White, C W

    1995-06-01

    Aconitase is a member of a family of iron-sulfur-containing (de)hydratases whose activities are modulated in bacteria by superoxide radical (O2-.)-mediated inactivation and iron-dependent reactivation. The inactivation-reactivation of aconitase(s) in cultured mammalian cells was explored since these reactions may impact important and diverse aconitase functions in the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Conditions which increase O2-. production including exposure to the redox-cycling agent phenazine methosulfate (PMS), inhibitors of mitochondrial ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase, or hyperoxia inactivated aconitase in mammalian cells. Overproduction of mitochondrial Mn-superoxide dismutase protected aconitase from inactivation by PMS or inhibitors of ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase, but not from normobaric hyperoxia. Aconitase activity was reactivated (t1/2 of 12 +/- 3 min) upon removal of PMS. The iron chelator deferoxamine impaired reactivation and increased net inactivation of aconitase by O2-.. The ability of ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase-generated O2-. to inactivate aconitase in several cell types correlated with the fraction of the aconitase activity localized in mitochondria. Extracellular O2-. generated with xanthine oxidase did not affect aconitase activity nor did exogenous superoxide dismutase decrease aconitase inactivation by PMS. The results demonstrate a dynamic and cyclical O2-.-mediated inactivation and iron-dependent reactivation of the mammalian [4Fe-4S] aconitases under normal and stress conditions and provide further evidence for the membrane compartmentalization of O2-.. PMID:7768942

  14. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis.

  15. Desiccation response of mammalian cells: anhydrosignaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zebo; Tunnacliffe, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Dehydration through evaporation, or air drying, is expected to have both similarities and differences to osmostress. Both stresses involve water loss, but the degree of dehydration will ultimately be more severe during desiccation. Despite the severity of desiccation stress, there are examples of organisms that can survive almost complete water loss, including resurrection plants and plant seeds, certain invertebrates among the nematodes, brine shrimps, tardigrades and bdelloid rotifers, and many microorganisms, including bakers' yeast. During desiccation, these organisms enter a state of suspended animation, a process known as anhydrobiosis ("life without water"). For other organisms, desiccation is lethal, but there is considerable interest in using what is known about anhydrobiosis to confer desiccation tolerance on sensitive cell types, such as mammalian cells. Success with this approach, which we have termed anhydrobiotic engineering, will require a more complete knowledge of the mechanisms of desiccation tolerance and the sensing and response of nontolerant organisms to extreme dehydration. With this goal in mind, we have attempted to characterize the response of human tissue culture cells to desiccation and to compare this response with osmotic upshift. This chapter describes some of the methods used to begin to uncover the response to evaporative water loss in human cell cultures.

  16. Mammalian cells defective in DNA mismatch correction

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, P.; Aquilina, G.; Hess, P.

    1994-12-31

    Mammalian cells counteract the cytotoxicity of methylating agents, including some used in antitumor chemotherapy, by removing the methylated base, O{sup 6}-methylguanine (O{sup 6}-meG) from their DNA. This removal is normally effected by a specific DNA repair enzyme (O{sup 6}-meG-DNA methyltransferase) that is expressed constitutively. In addition, an alternative type of resistance to methylating agents can be acquired after exposure of cells to the drug. This acquired resistance is highly specific for O{sup 6}-meG and is unusual in that alkylation of DNA is normal and there is no increase in the rate of repair of O{sup 6}-meG or any other damaged base. Instead, the cell is able to tolerate the presence of the usually cytotoxic O{sup 6}-meG and to replicate its DNA normally. The ambiguity of base pairing by O{sup 6}-meG and the observation that tolerant cells are also cross-resistant to the structurally similar 6-thioguanine in DNA has led to the suggestion that the cytotoxicity of O{sup 6}-meG (and 6-thioguanine) arises from ineffective attempts at DNA mismatch correction. This model postulates that tolerance arises as a consequence of loss of this important pathway.

  17. Production of cell surface and secreted glycoproteins in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Seiradake, Elena; Zhao, Yuguang; Lu, Weixian; Aricescu, A Radu; Jones, E Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian protein expression systems are becoming increasingly popular for the production of eukaryotic secreted and cell surface proteins. Here we describe methods to produce recombinant proteins in adherent or suspension human embryonic kidney cell cultures, using transient transfection or stable cell lines. The protocols are easy to scale up and cost-efficient, making them suitable for protein crystallization projects and other applications that require high protein yields. PMID:25502196

  18. Genome exposure and regulation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Puck, T T; Webb, P; Johnson, R

    1998-09-01

    A method of measurement of exposed DNA (i.e. hypersensitive to DNase I hydrolysis) as opposed to sequestered (hydrolysis resistant) DNA in isolated nuclei of mammalian cells is described. While cell cultures exhibit some differences in behavior from day to day, the general pattern of exposed and sequestered DNA is satisfactorily reproducible and agrees with results previously obtained by other methods. The general pattern of DNA hydrolysis exhibited by all cells tested consists of a curve which at first rises sharply with increasing DNase I, and then becomes almost horizontal, indicating that roughly about half of the nuclear DNA is highly sequestered. In 4 cases where transformed cells (Raszip6, CHO, HL60 and PC12) were compared, each with its more normal homolog (3T3, and the reverse transformed versions of CHO, HL60 and PC12, achieved by dibutyryl cyclic AMP [DBcAMP], retinoic acid, and nerve growth factor [NGF] respectively), the transformed form displayed less genome exposure than the nontransformed form at every DNase I dose tested. When Ca++ was excluded from the hydrolysis medium in both the Raszip6-3T3 and the CHO-DBcAMP systems, the normal cell forms lost their increased exposure reverting to that of the transformed forms. Therefore Ca++ appears necessary for maintenance of the DNA in the more highly exposed state characteristic of the nontransformed phenotype. LiCl increases the DNA exposure of all transformed cells tested. Dextran sulfate and heparin each can increase the DNA exposure of several different cancers. Colcemid prevents the increase of exposure of CHO by DBcAMP but it must be administered before or simultaneously with the latter compound. Measurements on mouse biopsies reveal large differences in exposure in different normal tissues. Thus, the exposure from adult liver cells was greater than that of adult brain, but both fetal liver and fetal brain had significantly greater exposure than their adult counterparts. Exposure in normal human

  19. Programmed cell senescence during mammalian embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Espín, Daniel; Cañamero, Marta; Maraver, Antonio; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Contreras, Julio; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Rodríguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Ruberte, Jesús; Collado, Manuel; Serrano, Manuel

    2013-11-21

    Cellular senescence disables proliferation in damaged cells, and it is relevant for cancer and aging. Here, we show that senescence occurs during mammalian embryonic development at multiple locations, including the mesonephros and the endolymphatic sac of the inner ear, which we have analyzed in detail. Mechanistically, senescence in both structures is strictly dependent on p21, but independent of DNA damage, p53, or other cell-cycle inhibitors, and it is regulated by the TGF-β/SMAD and PI3K/FOXO pathways. Developmentally programmed senescence is followed by macrophage infiltration, clearance of senescent cells, and tissue remodeling. Loss of senescence due to the absence of p21 is partially compensated by apoptosis but still results in detectable developmental abnormalities. Importantly, the mesonephros and endolymphatic sac of human embryos also show evidence of senescence. We conclude that the role of developmentally programmed senescence is to promote tissue remodeling and propose that this is the evolutionary origin of damage-induced senescence.

  20. Spontaneous Cell Competition in Immortalized Mammalian Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Penzo-Méndez, Alfredo I.; Chen, Yi-Ju; Li, Jinyang; Witze, Eric S.; Stanger, Ben Z.

    2015-01-01

    Cell competition is a form of cell-cell interaction by which cells compare relative levels of fitness, resulting in the active elimination of less-fit cells, “losers,” by more-fit cells, “winners.” Here, we show that in three routinely-used mammalian cell lines – U2OS, 3T3, and MDCK cells – sub-clones arise stochastically that exhibit context-dependent competitive behavior. Specifically, cell death is elicited when winner and loser sub-clones are cultured together but not alone. Cell competition and elimination in these cell lines is caspase-dependent and requires cell-cell contact but does not require de novo RNA synthesis. Moreover, we show that the phenomenon involves differences in cellular metabolism. Hence, our study demonstrates that cell competition is a common feature of immortalized mammalian cells in vitro and implicates cellular metabolism as a mechanism by which cells sense relative levels of “fitness.” PMID:26200654

  1. Profiling Signaling Peptides in Single Mammalian Cells Using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Churchill, James D.; Greenough, William T.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2008-01-01

    The peptide content of individual mammalian cells is profiled using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Both enzymatic and non-enzymatic procedures, including a glycerol cell stabilization method, are reported for the isolation of individual mammalian cells in a manner compatible with MALDI MS measurements. Guided microdeposition of MALDI matrix allows samples to be created with suitable analyte-to-matrix ratios. More than fifteen peptides are observed in individual rat intermediate pituitary cells. The combination of accurate mass data, expected cleavages by proteolytic enzymes, and post-source decay sequencing allows identification of fourteen of these peptides as pro-opiomelanocortin prohormone-derived molecules. These protocols permit the classification of individual mammalian cells by peptide profile, the elucidation of cell-specific prohormone processing, and the discovery of new signaling peptides on a cell-to-cell basis in a wide variety of mammalian cell types. PMID:17037931

  2. Anti-apoptotic potential of insect cellular and viral IAPs in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, C J; Ekert, P G; Uren, A G; Holmgreen, S P; Vaux, D L

    1998-07-01

    IAPs were identified as baculoviral proteins that could inhibit the apoptotic response of insect cells to infection. Of the viral IAPs, OpIAP and CpIAP can inhibit apoptosis, whereas AcIAP cannot. OpIAP and some mammalian homologues can inhibit mammalian cell death. Two mammalian IAPs bind to TNFRII associated factors (TRAFs), but the significance of this is unclear. Here we show that Drosophila cellular IAPs and two baculoviral IAPs (OpIAP and CpIAP) can inhibit mammalian cell death induced by overexpression of Caspases 1 and 2. IAPs must act on conserved components of the apoptotic mechanism, but as none of these IAPs could bind TRAF proteins, TRAFs are not likely to be important for IAP mediated apoptosis inhibition. As OpIAP protected against death induced by ligation of TNF receptor family members, but not by factor nor serum withdrawal from dependent cells, it can inhibit certain apoptotic pathways without affecting others.

  3. [Application of capillary electrophoresis in analysis of intact mammalian cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Qu, Feng; Lou, Beilei

    2012-02-01

    Cell is the basic structural and functional unit of human body. The research of cells' structure, function and behavior is very important. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a powerful tool for the separation and analysis, the application of which in cell analysis has progressed significantly. In this paper, the developments of CE applied in the intact mammalian cell analysis are reviewed, which consist of cell population and single cell analysis. The erythrocyte, boar sperm, HeLa cells, SH-SY5Y cells, Caco-2 cells, K562 cells and rat cerebellar granule cells are involved in this review. The methods and conditions for the intact mammalian cell analysis are summarized. In addition, the problems caused by the breakage, aggregation, sedimentation, adsorption and electrophoretic heterogeneity of the cell in the intact mammalian cell analysis by CE are discussed, and the corresponding solutions are introduced. Also, the future research trends are presented. Forty nine papers in all are reviewed.

  4. Hypergravity signal transduction and gene expression in cultured mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumei, Y.; Whitson, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted during space flight and with clinostats and centrifuges, suggesting that gravity effects the proliferation and differentiation of mammalian cells in vitro. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which mammalian cells respond to changes in gravitational stress. This paper summarizes studies designed to clarify the effects of hypergravity on the cultured human HeLa cells and to investigate the mechanism of hypergravity signal transduction in these cells.

  5. Interaction of cultured mammalian cells with [125I] diphtheria toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Bonventre, P F; Saelinger, C B; Ivins, B; Woscinski, C; Amorini, M

    1975-01-01

    The characteristics of cell adsorption and pinocytotic uptake of diphtheria toxin by several mammalian cell types were studied. Purified toxin iodinated by a solid-state lactoperoxidase method provided preparations of high specific activity and unaltered biological activity. Dephtheria toxin-sensitive HEp-2 cells and guinea pig macrophage cultures were compared with resistant mouse L-929 cells. At 37 C the resistant cells in monolayer adsorbed and internalized [125I] toxin to a greater extent than did the HEp-2 cell cultures; no significant differences were observed at 5 C. Ammonium chloride protection levels did not alter uptake of toxin by either L-929 OR HEp-2 cells. Biological activity of the iodinated toxin, however, was negated provided the presence of ammonium chloride was maintained. The ammonium salt appears to maintain toxin in a state amenable to antitoxin neutralization. Guinea pig macrophages internalized iodinated toxin to a level 10 times greater than the established cell lines. In spite of the increased uptake of toxin by the endocytic cells, ammonium chloride prevented expression of toxicity. In an artificial system, toxin adsorbed to polystyrene latex spheres and internalized by guinea pig macrophages during phagocytosis did express biological activity. Ammonium chloride afforded some but not total protection against toxin present in the phagocytic vacuoles. The data suggest that two mechanisms of toxin uptake by susceptible cells may be operative. Toxin taken into the cell by a pinocytotic process probably is not ordinarily of physiological significance since it is usually degraded by lysosomal enzymes before it can reach cytoplasmic constituents on which it acts. When large quantities of toxin are pinocytized, toxicity may be expressed before enzymatic degradation is complete. A more specific uptake involving direct passage of the toxin through the plasma membrane may be the mechanism leading to cell death in the majority of instances. PMID

  6. Small non-coding RNAs, mammalian cells, and viruses: regulatory interactions?

    PubMed

    Yeung, Man Lung; Benkirane, Monsef; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2007-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that mammalian cells can use small non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) to regulate physiological viral infections. Here, we comment on several lines of evidence that support this concept. We discuss how viruses may in turn protect, suppress, evade, modulate, or adapt to the host cell's ncRNA regulatory schema. PMID:17937800

  7. Rakkyo fructan as a cryoprotectant for serum-free cryopreservation of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Akiko; Mizui, Shinya; Chida, Yasuhito; Shimizu, Masafumi; Terada, Satoshi; Ohura, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Kyo-Ichi; Yasukawa, Saori; Moriyama, Nobuyuki

    2014-07-01

    Cryopreservation refers to the long-term storage of mammalian cells. Mammalian serum is generally used as a cryoprotectant, but is associated with problems including the risk of contamination by pathogens and quality control issues. Therefore, a serum-free cryopreservation method needs to be established. In this study, we focused on rakkyo fructan, a fructose polymer, derived from the Japanese shallot as an alternative factor to serum. Fructan contributes to tolerance to frost and dehydration in plants by stabilizing the plant membrane. However, whether fructan protects mammalian cells against freezing stress remains unknown. The ability of rakkyo fructan to be an alternative cryoprotectant to fetal bovine serum (FBS) was examined in the present study. 2E3-O, a mouse hybridoma, was preserved in rakkyo fructan, was highly viable after being defrosted, and then proliferated rapidly. When rakkyo fructan was combined with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), its ability to protect the hybridoma against freezing stress was improved. The rakkyo fructan and DMSO mixture was used in the cryopreservation of the mammalian cell lines CHO-DP12, a producer of recombinant antibodies, and HepG2, human hepatoma cells frequently tested in bio-artificial livers. Following the freezing and thawing processes, CHO-DP12 cells retained their ability to produce recombinant antibodies and as did HepG2 cells for albumin and mRNA expression of cytochrome P450 enzymes. These results indicate that rakkyo fructan is a promising cryoprotectant that prevents mammalian cells from freezing stress similar to FBS.

  8. Rakkyo fructan as a cryoprotectant for serum-free cryopreservation of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Akiko; Mizui, Shinya; Chida, Yasuhito; Shimizu, Masafumi; Terada, Satoshi; Ohura, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Kyo-Ichi; Yasukawa, Saori; Moriyama, Nobuyuki

    2014-07-01

    Cryopreservation refers to the long-term storage of mammalian cells. Mammalian serum is generally used as a cryoprotectant, but is associated with problems including the risk of contamination by pathogens and quality control issues. Therefore, a serum-free cryopreservation method needs to be established. In this study, we focused on rakkyo fructan, a fructose polymer, derived from the Japanese shallot as an alternative factor to serum. Fructan contributes to tolerance to frost and dehydration in plants by stabilizing the plant membrane. However, whether fructan protects mammalian cells against freezing stress remains unknown. The ability of rakkyo fructan to be an alternative cryoprotectant to fetal bovine serum (FBS) was examined in the present study. 2E3-O, a mouse hybridoma, was preserved in rakkyo fructan, was highly viable after being defrosted, and then proliferated rapidly. When rakkyo fructan was combined with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), its ability to protect the hybridoma against freezing stress was improved. The rakkyo fructan and DMSO mixture was used in the cryopreservation of the mammalian cell lines CHO-DP12, a producer of recombinant antibodies, and HepG2, human hepatoma cells frequently tested in bio-artificial livers. Following the freezing and thawing processes, CHO-DP12 cells retained their ability to produce recombinant antibodies and as did HepG2 cells for albumin and mRNA expression of cytochrome P450 enzymes. These results indicate that rakkyo fructan is a promising cryoprotectant that prevents mammalian cells from freezing stress similar to FBS. PMID:24485744

  9. Fruits and vegetables protect against the genotoxicity of heterocyclic aromatic amines activated by human xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes expressed in immortal mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Platt, K L; Edenharder, R; Aderhold, S; Muckel, E; Glatt, H

    2010-12-21

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) can be formed during the cooking of meat and fish at elevated temperatures and are associated with an increased risk for cancer. On the other hand, epidemiological findings suggest that foods rich in fruits and vegetables can protect against cancer. In the present study three teas, two wines, and the juices of 15 fruits and 11 vegetables were investigated for their protective effect against the genotoxic effects of 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). To closely mimic the enzymatic activation of these HAAs in humans, genetically engineered V79 Chinese hamster fibroblasts were employed that express human cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase (hCYP) 1A2 (responsible for the first step of enzymatic activation) and human N(O)-acetyltransferase (hNAT) 2*4 or human sulfotransferase (hSULT)1A1*1 (responsible for the second step of enzymatic activation): V79-hCYP1A2-hNAT2*4 for IQ activation and V79-hCYP1A2-hSULT1A1*1 for PhIP activation. HAA genotoxicity was determined by use of the comet assay. Black, green and rooibos tea moderately reduced the genotoxicity of IQ (IC(50)=0.8-0.9%), whereas red and white wine were less active. From the fruit juices, sweet cherry juice exhibited the highest inhibitory effect on IQ genotoxicity (IC(50)=0.17%), followed by juices from kiwi fruit, plum and blueberry (IC(50)=0.48-0.71%). The juices from watermelon, blackberry, strawberry, black currant, and Red delicious apple showed moderate suppression, whereas sour cherry, grapefruit, red currant, and pineapple juices were only weakly active. Granny Smith apple juice and orange juice proved inactive. Of the vegetable juices, strong inhibition of IQ genotoxicity was only seen with spinach and onion juices (IC(50)=0.42-0.54%). Broccoli, cauliflower, beetroot, sweet pepper, tomato, chard, and red-cabbage juices suppressed IQ genotoxicity only moderately, whereas cucumber juice was

  10. Incorporation of mammalian actin into microfilaments in plant cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Paves, Heiti; Truve, Erkki

    2004-01-01

    Background Actin is an ancient molecule that shows more than 90% amino acid homology between mammalian and plant actins. The regions of the actin molecule that are involved in F-actin assembly are largely conserved, and it is likely that mammalian actin is able to incorporate into microfilaments in plant cells but there is no experimental evidence until now. Results Visualization of microfilaments in onion bulb scale epidermis cells by different techniques revealed that rhodamine-phalloidin stained F-actin besides cytoplasm also in the nuclei whereas GFP-mouse talin hybrid protein did not enter the nuclei. Microinjection of fluorescently labeled actin was applied to study the presence of nuclear microfilaments in plant cells. Ratio imaging of injected fluorescent rabbit skeletal muscle actin and phalloidin staining of the microinjected cells showed that mammalian actin was able to incorporate into plant F-actin. The incorporation occurred preferentially in the nucleus and in the perinuclear region of plant cells whereas part of plant microfilaments, mostly in the periphery of cytoplasm, did not incorporate mammalian actin. Conclusions Microinjected mammalian actin is able to enter plant cell's nucleus, whereas incorporation of mammalian actin into plant F-actin occurs preferentially in the nucleus and perinuclear area. PMID:15102327

  11. Amino acids in the cultivation of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Andrew; Keusgen, Michael; von Hagen, Jörg

    2016-05-01

    Amino acids are crucial for the cultivation of mammalian cells. This importance of amino acids was realized soon after the development of the first cell lines, and a solution of a mixture of amino acids has been supplied to cultured cells ever since. The importance of amino acids is further pronounced in chemically defined mammalian cell culture media, making the consideration of their biological and chemical properties necessary. Amino acids concentrations have been traditionally adjusted to their cellular consumption rates. However, since changes in the metabolic equilibrium of amino acids can be caused by changes in extracellular concentrations, metabolomics in conjunction with flux balance analysis is being used in the development of culture media. The study of amino acid transporters is also gaining importance since they control the intracellular concentrations of these molecules and are influenced by conditions in cell culture media. A better understanding of the solubility, stability, dissolution kinetics, and interactions of these molecules is needed for an exploitation of these properties in the development of dry powdered chemically defined media for mammalian cells. Due to the complexity of these mixtures however, this has proven to be challenging. Studying amino acids in mammalian cell culture media will help provide a better understanding of how mammalian cells in culture interact with their environment. It would also provide insight into the chemical behavior of these molecules in solutions of complex mixtures, which is important in the understanding of the contribution of individual amino acids to protein structure. PMID:26832172

  12. Optimizing transient recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Ralph F; Wall, Vanessa E; Esposito, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    Transient gene expression (TGE) in mammalian cells has become a routine process for expressing recombinant proteins in cell lines such as human embryonic kidney 293 and Chinese hamster ovary cells. The rapidly increasing need for recombinant proteins requires further improvements in TGE technology. While a great deal of focus has been directed toward optimizing the secretion of antibodies and other naturally secreted targets, much less work has been done on ways to improve cytoplasmic expression in mammalian cells. The benefits to protein production in mammalian cells, particularly for eukaryotic proteins, should be very significant - glycosylation and other posttranslational modifications will likely be native or near-native, solubility and protein folding would likely improve overexpression in heterologous hosts, and expression of proteins in their proper intracellular compartments is much more likely to occur. Improvements in this area have been slow, however, due to limited development of the cell culture processes needed for low-cost, higher-throughput expression in mammalian cells, and the relatively low diversity of DNA vectors for protein production in these systems. Here, we describe how the use of recombinational cloning, coupled with improvements in transfection protocols which increase speed and lower cost, can be combined to make mammalian cells much more amenable for routine recombinant protein expression. PMID:21987258

  13. Amino acids in the cultivation of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Andrew; Keusgen, Michael; von Hagen, Jörg

    2016-05-01

    Amino acids are crucial for the cultivation of mammalian cells. This importance of amino acids was realized soon after the development of the first cell lines, and a solution of a mixture of amino acids has been supplied to cultured cells ever since. The importance of amino acids is further pronounced in chemically defined mammalian cell culture media, making the consideration of their biological and chemical properties necessary. Amino acids concentrations have been traditionally adjusted to their cellular consumption rates. However, since changes in the metabolic equilibrium of amino acids can be caused by changes in extracellular concentrations, metabolomics in conjunction with flux balance analysis is being used in the development of culture media. The study of amino acid transporters is also gaining importance since they control the intracellular concentrations of these molecules and are influenced by conditions in cell culture media. A better understanding of the solubility, stability, dissolution kinetics, and interactions of these molecules is needed for an exploitation of these properties in the development of dry powdered chemically defined media for mammalian cells. Due to the complexity of these mixtures however, this has proven to be challenging. Studying amino acids in mammalian cell culture media will help provide a better understanding of how mammalian cells in culture interact with their environment. It would also provide insight into the chemical behavior of these molecules in solutions of complex mixtures, which is important in the understanding of the contribution of individual amino acids to protein structure.

  14. Synchronization of mammalian cell cultures by serum deprivation.

    PubMed

    Langan, Thomas J; Chou, Richard C

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian cells are amenable to study the regulation of cell cycle progression in vitro by shifting them into the same phase of the cycle. Procedures to arrest cultured cells in specific phases of the cell cycle may be termed in vitro synchronization. The procedure described here was developed for the study of primary astrocytes and a glioma cell line, but is applicable to other mammalian cells. Its application allows astrocytes to reenter the cell cycle from a state of quiescence (G(0)), and then, under carefully defined experimental conditions, to move together into subsequent phases such as the G(1) and S phases. A number of methods have been established to synchronize mammalian cell cultures, which include physical separation by centrifugal elutriation and mitotic shake off or chemically induced cell cycle arrest. Yet, there are intrinsic limitations associated with these methods. In the present protocol, we describe a simple, reliable, and reversible procedure to synchronize astrocyte and glioma cultures from newborn rat brain by serum deprivation. The procedure is similar, and generally applicable, to other mammalian cells. This protocol consists essentially of two parts: (1) proliferation of astrocytes under optimal conditions in vitro until reaching desired confluence; and (2) synchronization of cultures by serum downshift and arrested in the G(0) phase of the cell cycle. This procedure has been extended to the examination of cell cycle control in astroglioma cells and astrocytes from injured adult brain. It has also been employed in precursor cloning studies in developmental biology, suggesting wide applicability.

  15. Cis-Suppression to Arrest Protein Aggregation in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gregoire, Simpson; Zhang, Shaojie; Costanzo, Joseph; Wilson, Kelly; Fernandez, Erik J.; Kwon, Inchan

    2015-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation are implicated in numerous human diseases and significantly lower production yield of proteins expressed in mammalian cells. Despite the importance of understanding and suppressing protein aggregation in mammalian cells, a protein design and selection strategy to modulate protein misfolding/aggregation in mammalian cells has not yet been reported. In this work, we address the particular challenge presented by mutation-induced protein aggregation in mammalian cells. We hypothesize that an additional mutation(s) can be introduced in an aggregation-prone protein variant, spatially near the original mutation, to suppress misfolding and aggregation (cis-suppression). As a model protein, we chose human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase mutant (SOD1A4V) containing an alanine to valine mutation at residue 4, associated with the familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We used the program RosettaDesign to identify Phe20 in SOD1A4V as a key residue responsible for SOD1A4V conformational destabilization. This information was used to rationally develop a pool of candidate mutations at the Phe20 site. After two rounds of mammalian-cell based screening of the variants, three novel SOD1A4V variants with a significantly reduced aggregation propensity inside cells were selected. The enhanced stability and reduced aggregation propensity of the three novel SOD1A4V variants were verified using cell fractionation and in vitro stability assays. PMID:24114411

  16. Chemical sporulation and germination: cytoprotective nanocoating of individual mammalian cells with a degradable tannic acid-FeIII complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Juno; Cho, Hyeoncheol; Choi, Jinsu; Kim, Doyeon; Hong, Daewha; Park, Ji Hun; Yang, Sung Ho; Choi, Insung S.

    2015-11-01

    Individual mammalian cells were coated with cytoprotective and degradable films by cytocompatible processes maintaining the cell viability. Three types of mammalian cells (HeLa, NIH 3T3, and Jurkat cells) were coated with a metal-organic complex of tannic acid (TA) and ferric ion, and the TA-FeIII nanocoat effectively protected the coated mammalian cells against UV-C irradiation and a toxic compound. More importantly, the cell proliferation was controlled by programmed formation and degradation of the TA-FeIII nanocoat, mimicking the sporulation and germination processes found in nature.Individual mammalian cells were coated with cytoprotective and degradable films by cytocompatible processes maintaining the cell viability. Three types of mammalian cells (HeLa, NIH 3T3, and Jurkat cells) were coated with a metal-organic complex of tannic acid (TA) and ferric ion, and the TA-FeIII nanocoat effectively protected the coated mammalian cells against UV-C irradiation and a toxic compound. More importantly, the cell proliferation was controlled by programmed formation and degradation of the TA-FeIII nanocoat, mimicking the sporulation and germination processes found in nature. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, LSCM images, and SEM and TEM images. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05573c

  17. Cell type-specific transcriptome profiling in mammalian brains

    PubMed Central

    LoVerso, Peter R.; Cui, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A mammalian brain contains numerous types of cells. Advances in neuroscience in the past decade allow us to identify and isolate neural cells of interest from mammalian brains. Recent developments in high-throughput technologies, such as microarrays and next-generation sequencing (NGS), provide detailed information on gene expression in pooled cells on a genomic scale. As a result, many novel genes have been found critical in cell type-specific transcriptional regulation. These differentially expressed genes can be used as molecular signatures, unique to a particular class of neural cells. Use of this gene expression-based approach can further differentiate neural cell types into subtypes, potentially linking some of them with neurological diseases. In this article, experimental techniques used to purify neural cells are described, followed by a review on recent microarray- or NGS-based transcriptomic studies of common neural cell types. The future prospects of cell type-specific research are also discussed. PMID:27100485

  18. Mammalian genes induce partially reprogrammed pluripotent stem cells in non-mammalian vertebrate and invertebrate species

    PubMed Central

    Rosselló, Ricardo Antonio; Chen, Chun-Chun; Dai, Rui; Howard, Jason T; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Jarvis, Erich D

    2013-01-01

    Cells are fundamental units of life, but little is known about evolution of cell states. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are once differentiated cells that have been re-programmed to an embryonic stem cell-like state, providing a powerful platform for biology and medicine. However, they have been limited to a few mammalian species. Here we found that a set of four mammalian transcription factor genes used to generate iPSCs in mouse and humans can induce a partially reprogrammed pluripotent stem cell (PRPSCs) state in vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms, in mammals, birds, fish, and fly, which span 550 million years from a common ancestor. These findings are one of the first to show cross-lineage stem cell-like induction, and to generate pluripotent-like cells for several of these species with in vivo chimeras. We suggest that the stem-cell state may be highly conserved across a wide phylogenetic range. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00036.001 PMID:24015354

  19. Stem cell potential of the mammalian gonad

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chia-Feng; Barsoum, Ivraym; Gupta, Rupesh; Hofmann, Marie-Claude; Yao, Humphrey Hung-Chang

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells have enormous potential for therapeutic application because of their ability to self-renew and differentiate into different cell types. Gonads, which consist of somatic cells and germ cells, are the only organs capable of transmitting genetic materials to the offspring. Germ-line stem cells and somatic stem cells have been found in the testis; however, the presence of stem cells in the ovary remains controversial. In this review, we discuss studies focusing on whether stem cell properties are present in the different cell types of male and female gonads and their implications on stem cell research. PMID:19482665

  20. METHYLATION OF SODIUM ARSENITE BY VARIOUS MAMMALIAN CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Methylation of Sodium Arsenite by various Mammalian Cells

    Methylation of arsenite (As 3-1) is thought to play an important role in the carcinogenicity of arsenic. AIM: I. Characterization of methylation of arsenite in primary rodent and transformed human cell lines. ...

  1. Electroporation for the efficient transfection of mammalian cells with DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, G; Hayakawa, H; Berg, P

    1987-01-01

    A simple and reproducible procedure for the introduction of DNA into mammalian cells by electroporation is described. The parameters involving the cells, the DNA, and the electric field are investigated. The procedure has been applied to a broad range of animal cells. It is capable of transforming more than 1% of the viable cells to the stable expression of a selectable marker. Images PMID:3029703

  2. Patents in therapeutic recombinant protein production using mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Picanco-Castro, Virginia; de Freitas, Marcela Cristina Correa; Bomfim, Aline de Sousa; de Sousa Russo, Elisa Maria

    2014-01-01

    The industrial production of recombinant proteins preferentially requires the generation of stable cell lines expressing proteins in a quick, relatively facile, and a reproducible manner. Different methods are used to insert exogenous DNA into the host cell, and choosing the appropriate producing cell is of paramount importance for the efficient production and quality of the recombinant protein. This review addresses the advances in recombinant protein production in mammalian cell lines, according to key patents from the last 30 years.

  3. Genetic Code Expansion of Mammalian Cells with Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kalyn A; Deiters, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    The expansion of the genetic code of mammalian cells enables the incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins. This is achieved by adding components to the protein biosynthetic machinery, specifically an engineered aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA pair. The unnatural amino acids are chemically synthesized and supplemented to the growth medium. Using this methodology, fundamental new chemistries can be added to the functional repertoire of the genetic code of mammalian cells. This protocol outlines the steps necessary to incorporate a photocaged lysine into proteins and showcases its application in the optical triggering of protein translocation to the nucleus.

  4. Cytotoxic responses to 405nm light exposure in mammalian and bacterial cells: Involvement of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Praveen; Maclean, Michelle; MacGregor, Scott J; Anderson, John G; Grant, M Helen

    2016-06-01

    Light at wavelength 405 nm is an effective bactericide. Previous studies showed that exposing mammalian cells to 405 nm light at 36 J/cm(2) (a bactericidal dose) had no significant effect on normal cell function, although at higher doses (54 J/cm(2)), mammalian cell death became evident. This research demonstrates that mammalian and bacterial cell toxicity induced by 405 nm light exposure is accompanied by reactive oxygen species production, as detected by generation of fluorescence from 6-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. As indicators of the resulting oxidative stress in mammalian cells, a decrease in intracellular reduced glutathione content and a corresponding increase in the efflux of oxidised glutathione were observed from 405 nm light treated cells. The mammalian cells were significantly protected from dying at 54 J/cm(2) in the presence of catalase, which detoxifies H2O2. Bacterial cells were significantly protected by sodium pyruvate (H2O2 scavenger) and by a combination of free radical scavengers (sodium pyruvate, dimethyl thiourea (OH scavenger) and catalase) at 162 and 324 J/cm(2). Results therefore suggested that the cytotoxic mechanism of 405 nm light in mammalian cells and bacteria could be oxidative stress involving predominantly H2O2 generation, with other ROS contributing to the damage.

  5. Regeneration of hair cells in the mammalian vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; You, Dan; Chen, Yan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-06-01

    Hair cells regenerate throughout the lifetime of non-mammalian vertebrates, allowing these animals to recover from hearing and balance deficits. Such regeneration does not occur efficiently in humans and other mammals. Thus, balance deficits become permanent and is a common sensory disorder all over the world. Since Forge and Warchol discovered the limited spontaneous regeneration of vestibular hair cells after gentamicininduced damage in mature mammals, significant efforts have been exerted to trace the origin of the limited vestibular regeneration in mammals after hair cell loss. Moreover, recently many strategies have been developed to promote the hair cell regeneration and subsequent functional recovery of the vestibular system, including manipulating the Wnt, Notch and Atoh1. This article provides an overview of the recent advances in hair cell regeneration in mammalian vestibular epithelia. Furthermore, this review highlights the current limitations of hair cell regeneration and provides the possible solutions to regenerate functional hair cells and to partially restore vestibular function.

  6. Photothermal nanoblade for large cargo delivery into mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Teslaa, Tara; Kalim, Sheraz; French, Christopher T.; Maghadam, Shahriar; Wall, Randolph; Miller, Jeffery F.; Witte, Owen N.; Teitell, Michael A.; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2011-01-01

    It is difficult to achieve controlled cutting of elastic, mechanically fragile, and rapidly resealing mammalian cell membranes. Here, we report a photothermal nanoblade that utilizes a metallic nanostructure to harvest short laser pulse energy and convert it into a highly localized explosive vapor bubble, which rapidly punctures a lightly-contacting cell membrane via high-speed fluidic flows and induced transient shear stress. The cavitation bubble pattern is controlled by the metallic structure configuration and laser pulse duration and energy. Integrating the metallic nanostructure with a micropipette, the nanoblade generates a micron-sized membrane access port for delivering highly concentrated cargo (5×108 live bacteria/ml) with high efficiency (46%) and cell viability (>90%) into mammalian cells. Additional biologic and inanimate cargo over 3-orders of magnitude in size including DNA, RNA, 200 nm polystyrene beads to 2 μm bacteria have also been delivered into multiple mammalian cell types. Overall, the photothermal nanoblade is a new approach for delivering difficult to transfer cargo into mammalian cells. PMID:21247066

  7. Fungal Cell Gigantism during Mammalian Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Oscar; García-Rodas, Rocío; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between fungal pathogens with the host frequently results in morphological changes, such as hyphae formation. The encapsulated pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is not considered a dimorphic fungus, and is predominantly found in host tissues as round yeast cells. However, there is a specific morphological change associated with cryptococcal infection that involves an increase in capsule volume. We now report another morphological change whereby gigantic cells are formed in tissue. The paper reports the phenotypic characterization of giant cells isolated from infected mice and the cellular changes associated with giant cell formation. C. neoformans infection in mice resulted in the appearance of giant cells with cell bodies up to 30 µm in diameter and capsules resistant to stripping with γ-radiation and organic solvents. The proportion of giant cells ranged from 10 to 80% of the total lung fungal burden, depending on infection time, individual mice, and correlated with the type of immune response. When placed on agar, giant cells budded to produce small daughter cells that traversed the capsule of the mother cell at the speed of 20–50 m/h. Giant cells with dimensions that approximated those in vivo were observed in vitro after prolonged culture in minimal media, and were the oldest in the culture, suggesting that giant cell formation is an aging-dependent phenomenon. Giant cells recovered from mice displayed polyploidy, suggesting a mechanism by which gigantism results from cell cycle progression without cell fission. Giant cell formation was dependent on cAMP, but not on Ras1. Real-time imaging showed that giant cells were engaged, but not engulfed by phagocytic cells. We describe a remarkable new strategy for C. neoformans to evade the immune response by enlarging cell size, and suggest that gigantism results from replication without fission, a phenomenon that may also occur with other fungal pathogens. PMID:20585557

  8. Fungal cell gigantism during mammalian infection.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Oscar; García-Rodas, Rocío; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Casadevall, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between fungal pathogens with the host frequently results in morphological changes, such as hyphae formation. The encapsulated pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is not considered a dimorphic fungus, and is predominantly found in host tissues as round yeast cells. However, there is a specific morphological change associated with cryptococcal infection that involves an increase in capsule volume. We now report another morphological change whereby gigantic cells are formed in tissue. The paper reports the phenotypic characterization of giant cells isolated from infected mice and the cellular changes associated with giant cell formation. C. neoformans infection in mice resulted in the appearance of giant cells with cell bodies up to 30 microm in diameter and capsules resistant to stripping with gamma-radiation and organic solvents. The proportion of giant cells ranged from 10 to 80% of the total lung fungal burden, depending on infection time, individual mice, and correlated with the type of immune response. When placed on agar, giant cells budded to produce small daughter cells that traversed the capsule of the mother cell at the speed of 20-50 m/h. Giant cells with dimensions that approximated those in vivo were observed in vitro after prolonged culture in minimal media, and were the oldest in the culture, suggesting that giant cell formation is an aging-dependent phenomenon. Giant cells recovered from mice displayed polyploidy, suggesting a mechanism by which gigantism results from cell cycle progression without cell fission. Giant cell formation was dependent on cAMP, but not on Ras1. Real-time imaging showed that giant cells were engaged, but not engulfed by phagocytic cells. We describe a remarkable new strategy for C. neoformans to evade the immune response by enlarging cell size, and suggest that gigantism results from replication without fission, a phenomenon that may also occur with other fungal pathogens.

  9. Aptazyme-based riboswitches and logic gates in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yoko; Yokobayashi, Yohei

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes a screening strategy to engineer synthetic riboswitches that can chemically regulate gene expression in mammalian cells. Riboswitch libraries are constructed by randomizing the key nucleotides that couple the molecular recognition function of an aptamer with the self-cleavage activity of a ribozyme. The allosteric ribozyme (aptazyme) candidates are cloned in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of a reporter gene mRNA. The plasmid-encoded riboswitch candidates are transfected into a mammalian cell line to screen for the desired riboswitch function. Furthermore, multiple aptazymes can be cloned into the 3' UTR of a desired gene to obtain a logic gate response to multiple chemical signals. This screening strategy complements other methods to engineer robust mammalian riboswitches to control gene expression. PMID:25967059

  10. PepGMV Rep-Protein Expression in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chapa-Oliver, Angela María; Mejía-Teniente, Laura; García-Gasca, Teresa; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon Gerardo; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo

    2012-01-01

    The Geminiviruses genome is a small, single strand DNA that replicates in the plant cell nucleus. Analogous to animal DNA viruses, Geminiviruses depend on the host replication machinery to amplify their genomes and only supply the factors required to initiate their replication. Consequently, Geminiviruses remove the cell-cycle arrest and induce the host replication machinery using an endocycle process. They encode proteins, such as the conserved replication-associated proteins (Rep) that interact with retinoblastoma-like proteins in plants and alter the cell division cycle in yeasts. Therefore, the aim of this work is to analyze the impact of Pepper Golden Mosaic Virus (PepGMV) Rep protein in mammalian cells. Results indicate that the pTracer-SV40:Rep construction obtained in this work can be used to analyze the Rep protein effect in mammalian cells in order to compare the cell cycle regulation mechanisms in plants and animals. PMID:23170183

  11. Evidence of turnover of mammalian Merkel cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nafstad, P H

    1987-01-01

    The Merkel cells in the snout of the pig and the lips of the sheep were studied by transmission electron microscopy. They were subdivided into three main subgroups that are believed to represent different stages in the life cycle of the cells. A final dermal disintegration of the cells is proposed. The observations are discussed in relation to earlier reports on the avian Merkel cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:3654361

  12. Movement of Naegleria fowleri stimulated by mammalian cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cline, M; Carchman, R; Marciano-Cabral, F

    1986-02-01

    Naegleria fowleri amebae, but not those of N. australiensis, N. gruberi, or N. lovaniensis, demonstrated enhanced motility when placed in proximity to mammalian cells. Amebae of nonpathogenic species of Naegleria, however, were more motile in cell culture medium than the amebae of N. fowleri. The locomotory response of highly pathogenic mouse-passaged N. fowleri amebae to nerve cells was greater than axenically cultured amebae. The enhanced mobility elicited by whole nerve cells or disrupted nerve cells was not directed migration but chemokinetic. Naegleria fowleri responded to disrupted neuroblastoma cells more vigorously than to disrupted African green monkey kidney (Vero) cells.

  13. Techniques for mammalian cell tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Mary C

    2006-11-01

    This appendix opens with detailed discussions on the latest principles of sterile technique and preparation of culture media. Step-by-step protocols describe trypsinizing and subculturing monolayer cultures, passaging suspension cultures, freezing and thawing cells, counting cells using a hemacytometer, and preparing cells for transport. PMID:18428384

  14. Techniques for mammalian cell tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Mary C

    2006-05-01

    This appendix opens with detailed discussions on the latest principles of sterile technique and preparation of culture media. Step-by-step protocols describe trypsinizing and subculturing monolayer cultures, passaging suspension cultures, freezing and thawing cells, counting cells using a hemacytometer, and preparing cells for transport. PMID:18265370

  15. Techniques for mammalian cell tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Mary C

    2006-05-01

    This unit opens with detailed discussions on the latest principles of sterile technique and preparation of culture media. Step-by-step protocols describe trypsinizing and subculturing monolayer cultures, passaging suspension cultures, freezing and thawing cells, counting cells using a hemacytometer, and preparing cells for transport. PMID:18770828

  16. Techniques for mammalian cell tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Mary C

    2006-12-01

    This appendix opens with detailed discussions on the latest principles of sterile technique and preparation of culture media. Step-by-step protocols describe trypsinizing and subculturing monolayer cultures, passaging suspension cultures, freezing and thawing cells, counting cells using a hemacytometer, and preparing cells for transport. PMID:18429293

  17. Induced DNA repair pathway in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Overberg, R.

    1985-01-01

    The survival of cultured rat kangaroo cells (PtK-2) and human xeroderma pigmentosum cells incubated with 5 ..mu..M cycloheximide subsequent to ultraviolet irradiation is lower than that of cells incubated without cycloheximide. The drop in survival is considerably larger than that produced by incubation of unirradiated cells with cycloheximide. The phenomenon was also observed when PtK-2 cells were incubated with emetine, another protein synthesis inhibitor, or with 5,6-dichloro-1-..beta..-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a RNA synthesis inhibitor. PtK cells which received a preliminary UV treatment followed by an incubation period without cycloheximide and then a second irradiation and 24 hour incubation with cycloheximide, survived the effects of the second irradiation better than cells which were incubated in the presence of cycloheximide after the first and second UV irradiation. The application of cycloheximide for 24 hours after UV irradiation of PtK cells resulted in one-half as many 6-thioguanine resistant cells as compared to the number of 6-thioguanine resistant cells found when cycloheximide was not used. These experiments indicate that a UV-inducible cycloheximide-sensitive DNA repair pathway is present in PtK and xeroderma pigmentosum cells, which is error-prone in PtK cells.

  18. A mechanical model for guided motion of mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitter, P.; Beck, K. L.; Lenz, P.

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a generic, purely mechanical model for environment-sensitive motion of mammalian cells that is applicable to chemotaxis, haptotaxis, and durotaxis as modes of motility. It is able to theoretically explain all relevant experimental observations, in particular, the high efficiency of motion, the behavior on inhomogeneous substrates, and the fixation of the lagging pole during motion. Furthermore, our model predicts that efficiency of motion in following a gradient depends on cell geometry (with more elongated cells being more efficient).

  19. METHYLATION OF ARSENITE BY SOME MAMMALIAN CELL LINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    THIS ABSTRACT WAS SUBMITTED ELECTRONICALLY;. SPACE CONSTRAINTS WERE SEVERE)

    Methylation of Arsenite by Some Mammalian Cell Lines.

    Methylation of arsenite is thought to play an important role in the carcinogenicity of arsenic.
    Aim 1: Determine if there is diffe...

  20. PEROXIDASE-MEDIATED MAMMALIAN CELL CYTOTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Edelson, Paul J.; Cohn, Zanvil A.

    1973-01-01

    Lactoperoxidase, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and iodide is cytotoxic for human and mouse lymphoid cells, and human erythrocytes. Myeloperoxidase, in amounts equivalent to 1.5 x 106 neutrophils, readily replaces lactoperoxidase, and allows the substitution of the iodide ion by chloride. The myeloperoxidase-mediated reaction is rapid, and highly efficient, leading to 85–90% cell death in 90 min, as measured by 51chromium release and dye exclusion. The mixture of granulocytes. monocytes, and lymphocytes present in an inflammatory exudate, and the intimate cell-to-cell association characteristic of cytotoxic phenomena may provide the in vivo requirements for such a system. PMID:4717124

  1. Notch signaling in mammalian hair cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Slowik, Amber D.; Bermingham-McDonogh, Olivia

    2014-01-01

    In the inner ear, Notch signaling has been shown to have two key developmental roles. The first occurs early in otic development and defines the prosensory domains that will develop into the six sensory organs of the inner ear. The second role occurs later in development and establishes the mosaic-like pattern of the mechanosensory hair cells and their surrounding support cells through the more well-characterized process of lateral inhibition. These dual developmental roles have inspired several different strategies to regenerate hair cells in the mature inner ear organs. These strategies include (1) modulation of Notch signaling in inner ear stem cells in order to increase hair cell yield, (2) activation of Notch signaling in order to promote the formation of ectopic sensory regions in normally non-sensory regions within the inner ear, and (3) inhibition of Notch signaling to disrupt lateral inhibition and allow support cells to transdifferentiate into hair cells. In this review, we summarize some of the promising studies that have used these various strategies for hair cell regeneration through modulation of Notch signaling and some of the challenges that remain in developing therapies based on hair cell regeneration. PMID:25328289

  2. Markers of epidermal stem cell subpopulations in adult mammalian skin.

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Kai; Watt, Fiona M

    2014-10-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer of mammalian skin and comprises a multilayered epithelium, the interfollicular epidermis, with associated hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and eccrine sweat glands. As in other epithelia, adult stem cells within the epidermis maintain tissue homeostasis and contribute to repair of tissue damage. The bulge of hair follicles, where DNA-label-retaining cells reside, was traditionally regarded as the sole epidermal stem cell compartment. However, in recent years multiple stem cell populations have been identified. In this review, we discuss the different stem cell compartments of adult murine and human epidermis, the markers that they express, and the assays that are used to characterize epidermal stem cell properties.

  3. Equipment for large-scale mammalian cell culture.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Sadettin S

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides information on commonly used equipment in industrial mammalian cell culture, with an emphasis on bioreactors. The actual equipment used in the cell culture process can vary from one company to another, but the main steps remain the same. The process involves expansion of cells in seed train and inoculation train processes followed by cultivation of cells in a production bioreactor. Process and equipment options for each stage of the cell culture process are introduced and examples are provided. Finally, the use of disposables during seed train and cell culture production is discussed. PMID:24429549

  4. Equipment for large-scale mammalian cell culture.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Sadettin S

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides information on commonly used equipment in industrial mammalian cell culture, with an emphasis on bioreactors. The actual equipment used in the cell culture process can vary from one company to another, but the main steps remain the same. The process involves expansion of cells in seed train and inoculation train processes followed by cultivation of cells in a production bioreactor. Process and equipment options for each stage of the cell culture process are introduced and examples are provided. Finally, the use of disposables during seed train and cell culture production is discussed.

  5. Asymmetric partitioning of transfected DNA during mammalian cell division

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Le, Nhung; Denoth-Lippuner, Annina; Barral, Yves; Kroschewski, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Foreign DNA molecules and chromosomal fragments are generally eliminated from proliferating cells, but we know little about how mammalian cells prevent their propagation. Here, we show that dividing human and canine cells partition transfected plasmid DNA asymmetrically, preferentially into the daughter cell harboring the young centrosome. Independently of how they entered the cell, most plasmids clustered in the cytoplasm. Unlike polystyrene beads of similar size, these clusters remained relatively immobile and physically associated to endoplasmic reticulum-derived membranes, as revealed by live cell and electron microscopy imaging. At entry of mitosis, most clusters localized near the centrosomes. As the two centrosomes split to assemble the bipolar spindle, predominantly the old centrosome migrated away, biasing the partition of the plasmid cluster toward the young centrosome. Down-regulation of the centrosomal proteins Ninein and adenomatous polyposis coli abolished this bias. Thus, we suggest that DNA clustering, cluster immobilization through association to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, initial proximity between the cluster and centrosomes, and subsequent differential behavior of the two centrosomes together bias the partition of plasmid DNA during mitosis. This process leads to their progressive elimination from the proliferating population and might apply to any kind of foreign DNA molecule in mammalian cells. Furthermore, the functional difference of the centrosomes might also promote the asymmetric partitioning of other cellular components in other mammalian and possibly stem cells. PMID:27298340

  6. Sex determination in mammalian germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Cassy M; Bowles, Josephine

    2015-01-01

    Germ cells are the precursors of the sperm and oocytes and hence are critical for survival of the species. In mammals, they are specified during fetal life, migrate to the developing gonads and then undergo a critical period during which they are instructed, by the soma, to adopt the appropriate sexual fate. In a fetal ovary, germ cells enter meiosis and commit to oogenesis, whereas in a fetal testis, they avoid entry into meiosis and instead undergo mitotic arrest and mature toward spermatogenesis. Here, we discuss what we know so far about the regulation of sex-specific differentiation of germ cells, considering extrinsic molecular cues produced by somatic cells, as well as critical intrinsic changes within the germ cells. This review focuses almost exclusively on our understanding of these events in the mouse model. PMID:25791730

  7. Regulation of cystathionine γ-lyase in mammalian cells by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maoxian; Guo, Zhanyun; Wang, Shilong

    2014-02-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), an endogenous signaling molecule in mammalian cells, shows a variety of biological effects. Cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) is a key enzyme in the trans-sulfuration pathway responsible for the production of endogenous H2S. Whether CSE expression is regulated by hypoxia in mammalian cells remains largely unknown. This study revealed that these regulatory effects changed with time at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Hypoxia regulated CSE expression in mammalian cells in a complex manner; CSE transcription went through a down-regulation and recovery period, while CSE mRNA and protein levels increased during hypoxia. Taken together, the results suggest that CSE can respond to hypoxia through transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation, and CSE expression can be up-regulated by hypoxia to a certain extent. Therefore, the up-regulation of CSE expression during hypoxia may be useful for increasing the production and concentration of H2S in mammalian cells and indirectly protecting cells from hypoxia.

  8. Overexpression of membrane proteins in mammalian cells for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Andréll, Juni

    2013-01-01

    The number of structures of integral membrane proteins from higher eukaryotes is steadily increasing due to a number of innovative protein engineering and crystallization strategies devised over the last few years. However, it is sobering to reflect that these structures represent only a tiny proportion of the total number of membrane proteins encoded by a mammalian genome. In addition, the structures determined to date are of the most tractable membrane proteins, i.e., those that are expressed functionally and to high levels in yeast or in insect cells using the baculovirus expression system. However, some membrane proteins that are expressed inefficiently in these systems can be produced at sufficiently high levels in mammalian cells to allow structure determination. Mammalian expression systems are an under-used resource in structural biology and represent an effective way to produce fully functional membrane proteins for structural studies. This review will discuss examples of vertebrate membrane protein overexpression in mammalian cells using a variety of viral, constitutive or inducible expression systems. PMID:22963530

  9. Live-cell imaging of mammalian RNAs with Spinach2

    PubMed Central

    Strack, Rita L.; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to monitor RNAs of interest in living cells is crucial to understanding the function, dynamics, and regulation of this important class of molecules. In recent years, numerous strategies have been developed with the goal of imaging individual RNAs of interest in living cells, each with their own advantages and limitations. This chapter provides an overview of current methods of live-cell RNA imaging, including a detailed discussion of genetically encoded strategies for labeling RNAs in mammalian cells. This chapter then focuses on the development and use of “RNA mimics of GFP” or Spinach technology for tagging mammalian RNAs, and includes a detailed protocol for imaging 5S and CGG60 RNA with the recently described Spinach2 tag. PMID:25605384

  10. Universal Area Distributions in the Monolayers of Confluent Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilk, Gary; Iwasa, Masatomo; Fuller, Patrick E.; Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2014-04-01

    When mammalian cells form confluent monolayers completely filling a plane, these apparently random "tilings" show regularity in the statistics of cell areas for various types of epithelial and endothelial cells. The observed distributions are reproduced by a model which accounts for cell growth and division, with the latter treated stochastically both in terms of the sizes of the dividing cells as well as the sizes of the "newborn" ones—remarkably, the modeled and experimental distributions fit well when all free parameters are estimated directly from experiments.

  11. Photooxidative damage to mammalian cells and proteins by visible light

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, L.; Kellogg, E.W. III

    1980-01-01

    In the present article, studies carried out in our laboratory on the effects of visible irradiation and O/sub 2/ in a variety of target systems ranging from cultured mammalian cells to purified catalase are reviewed. We will relate these studies of photooxidative damage to a scheme for the propagation of intracellular damage which traces a number of the possible pro-oxidant and anti-oxidant pathways found in the cell.

  12. Regulation of mammalian brain cell volume.

    PubMed

    Law, R O

    1994-02-01

    Maintenance of brain cell volume is of crucial importance for normal central nervous system (CNS) function. This review considers volume regulation primarily in response to disturbances of body fluid osmolality. Brain cells counter the tendency to swell or shrink by appropriate adjustment of their internal osmotic potential. This is achieved by loss or uptake of inorganic ions and low molecular weight organic solutes (osmolytes). The latter comprise mainly amino acids, myoinositol, choline, and methylamines. Taurine may be of particular importance in volume control, especially in young animals. Brain cell volume regulation, however, is only one contributory factor to maintenance of constant brain volume (water content), and operates in parallel with important alterations in bulk fluid and electrolyte movement across the blood-brain barrier and between the interstitium and cerebrospinal fluid, which themselves moderate the requirement for transient alteration in cell volume during acute osmotic imbalance. Although altered cerebral content of inorganic ions and osmolytes are usually regarded as responses, respectively, to acute and chronic osmotic disturbances, osmolytes (especially taurine) may also participate in short-term cell volume regulation. PMID:8301256

  13. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes on Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michelle; Ahmed, Asma; Black, Melanie; Kawamoto, Nicole; Lucas, Jessica; Pagala, Armie; Pham, Tram; Stankiewicz, Sara; Chen, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Carbon Nanotubes possess extraordinary electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Research on applying the carbon nanotubes for ultrasensitive detection, disease diagnosis, and drug delivery is rapidly developing. While the fundamental and technological findings on carbon nanotubes show great promise, it is extremely important to investigate the effect of the carbon nanotubes on human health. In our experiments, we introduce purified carbon nanotubes in suspension to ovary cells cultured from Hamsters. These cells are chosen since they show robust morphological changes associated with cytotoxicity that can easily be observed under a light microscope. We will discuss the toxicity of carbon nanotubes by characterizing the cell morphology and viability as a function of time and the concentration of carbon nanotube suspension.

  14. The effects of selenium on glutathione peroxidase activity and radioprotection in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, A.M.; Murray, J.L.; Dale, P.; Tritz, R.; Grdina, D.J.

    1995-09-05

    The media of representative mammalian cell lines were supplemented with low levels of selenium in the form of sodium selenite in order to investigate the effects of selenium on mammalian cells. Following incubation in 30 nM sodium selenite, these cells were assayed for changes in glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. The cells examined included NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblasts, PC12 rat sympathetic precursor cells, SupT-1 human lymphocytes, MCF-7{sup adr} human breast carcinoma cells and AA8 Chinese hamster ovary cells. Selenium supplementation resulted in a marginal increase in GPx activity for the NIH 3T3, MCF-7{sup adr} and Supt-1 cells but stimulated GPx activity approximately 5-fold in PC12 and AA8 cells. AA8 cells were selected to evaluate whether selenium supplementation was radioprotective against {sup 60}cobalt gamma irradiation. Protection against radiation-induced mutation was measured by evaluating mutation frequency at the hprt locus. In this assay, preincubation of AA8 CHO cells significantly protected these cells from exposure to 8 Gy.

  15. Engineering Gene Circuits for Mammalian Cell-Based Applications.

    PubMed

    Ausländer, Simon; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic gene switches are basic building blocks for the construction of complex gene circuits that transform mammalian cells into useful cell-based machines for next-generation biotechnological and biomedical applications. Ligand-responsive gene switches are cellular sensors that are able to process specific signals to generate gene product responses. Their involvement in complex gene circuits results in sophisticated circuit topologies that are reminiscent of electronics and that are capable of providing engineered cells with the ability to memorize events, oscillate protein production, and perform complex information-processing tasks. Microencapsulated mammalian cells that are engineered with closed-loop gene networks can be implanted into mice to sense disease-related input signals and to process this information to produce a custom, fine-tuned therapeutic response that rebalances animal metabolism. Progress in gene circuit design, in combination with recent breakthroughs in genome engineering, may result in tailored engineered mammalian cells with great potential for future cell-based therapies. PMID:27194045

  16. Glycosaminoglycan receptors facilitate infection of mammalian cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A growing list of viruses has been reported to use more than one receptor for binding and internalization during infection of the host cell. Sialic acid residues or glycosaminoglycans, such as heparin sulfate, frequently function in this scenario, as a first contact, charge based, low affinity bindi...

  17. Passive versus active local microrheology in mammalian cells and amoebae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere, C.; Gazeau, F.; Marion, S.; Bacri, J.-C.; Wilhelm, C.

    2004-12-01

    We compare in this paper the rotational magnetic microrheology detailed by Marion et al [18] and Wilhelm et al [19] to the passive tracking microrheology. The rotational microrheology has been designed to explore, using magnetic rotating probes, the local intracellular microenvironment of living cells in terms of viscoelasticity. Passive microrheology techniques is based on the analysis of spontaneous diffusive motions of Brownian probes. The dependence of mean square displacement (MSD) with the time then directly reflects the type of movement (sub-, hyper- or diffusive motions). Using the same intracellular probes, we performed two types of measurements (active and passive). Based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, one should obtain the same information from the both techniques in a thermally equilibrium system. Interestingly, our measurements differ, and the discordances directly inform on active biological processes, which add to thermally activated fluctuations in our out-of equilibrium systems. In both cell models used, mammalian Hela cells and amoebae Entamoeba Histolytica, a hyper-diffusive regime at a short time is observed, which highlights the presence of an active non-thermal driving force, acting on the probe. However, the nature of this active force in mammalian cells and amoebae is different, according to their different phenotypes. In mammalian cells active processes are governed by the transport, via molecular motors, on the microtubule network. In amoebae, which are highly motile cells free of microtubule network, the active processes are dominated by strong fluxes of cytoplasm driven by extension of pseudopodia, in random directions, leading to an amplitude of motion one order of magnitude higher than for mammalian cells. Figs 7, Refs 32.

  18. Isolation of genomic DNA from mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, J R; Vance, J M

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes simple, cost-effective preparation of DNA from whole blood or cultured cells that yields high-molecular-weight DNA suitable for both Southern blotting and the polymerase chain reaction. Preparation time may be shortened by substituting a high-salt precipitation procedure for the dialysis step; however, this results in a smaller average fragment size. The isolation of DNA from buccal swabs, collected from the inside of the cheek, is also described. The DNA is suitable for PCR analysis. Preparation of buffered phenol for DNA extraction is described in a support protocol. This unit describes simple, cost-effective preparation of DNA from whole blood or cultured cells that yields high-molecular-we. PMID:18428220

  19. Metabolic flux rewiring in mammalian cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jamey D.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous cell lines (CCLs) engage in “wasteful” glucose and glutamine metabolism that leads to accumulation of inhibitory byproducts, primarily lactate and ammonium. Advances in techniques for mapping intracellular carbon fluxes and profiling global changes in enzyme expression have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular drivers underlying these metabolic alterations. However, recent studies have revealed that CCLs are not necessarily entrenched in a glycolytic or glutaminolytic phenotype, but instead can shift their metabolism toward increased oxidative metabolism as nutrients become depleted and/or growth rate slows. Progress to understand dynamic flux regulation in CCLs has enabled the development of novel strategies to force cultures into desirable metabolic phenotypes, by combining fed-batch feeding strategies with direct metabolic engineering of host cells. PMID:23726154

  20. Optimizing RNA interference for application in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Medema, René H

    2004-01-01

    Over the last 2 years, the scientific community has rapidly embraced novel technologies that allow gene silencing in vertebrates. Ease of application, cost effectiveness and the possibilities for genome-wide reverse genetics have quickly turned this approach into a widely accepted, almost mandatory asset for a self-respecting laboratory in life sciences. This review discusses some of the recent technological developments that allow the application of RNAi (RNA interference) in mammalian cells. In addition, the advantages of applying RNAi to study cell cycle events and the emerging approaches to perform mutational analysis by complementation in mammalian cells are evaluated. In addition, common pitfalls and drawbacks of RNAi will be reviewed, as well as the possible ways to get around these shortcomings of gene silencing by small interfering RNA. PMID:15056071

  1. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  2. Cytoprotective silica coating of individual mammalian cells through bioinspired silicification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juno; Choi, Jinsu; Park, Ji Hun; Kim, Mi-Hee; Hong, Daewha; Cho, Hyeoncheol; Yang, Sung Ho; Choi, Insung S

    2014-07-28

    The cytoprotective coating of physicochemically labile mammalian cells with a durable material has potential applications in cell-based sensors, cell therapy, and regenerative medicine, as well as providing a platform for fundamental single-cell studies in cell biology. In this work, HeLa cells in suspension were individually coated with silica in a cytocompatible fashion through bioinspired silicification. The silica coating greatly enhanced the resistance of the HeLa cells to enzymatic attack by trypsin and the toxic compound poly(allylamine hydrochloride), while suppressing cell division in a controlled fashion. This bioinspired cytocompatible strategy for single-cell coating was also applied to NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and Jurkat cells.

  3. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M.; Chen, D.S.

    1993-02-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  4. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. ); Chen, D.S. . Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  5. Engineering considerations for process development in mammalian cell cultivation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hu; Wang, Weixiang; Quan, Chunshan; Fan, Shengdi

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian cell cultivation plays a great role in producing protein therapeutics in the last decades. Many engineering parameters are considered for optimization during process development in mammalian cell cultivation, only shear and mixing are especially highlighted in this paper. It is believed that shear stress due to agitation has been over-estimated to damage cells, but shear may result in nonlethal physiological responses. There is no cell damage in the regions where bubbles form, break up and coalescence, but shear stress becomes significant in the wake of rising bubbles and causes great damage to cells in bubble burst regions. Mixing is not sufficient to provide homogeneous dissolved oxygen tension, pH, CO2 and nutrients in large-scale bioreactors, which can bring severe problems for cell growth, product formation and process control. Scale-down reactors have been developed to address mixing and shear problems for parallel operations. Engineering characterization in conventional and recently developed scale-down bioreactors has been briefly introduced. Process challenges for cultivation of industrial cell lines in high cell densities as well as cultivation of stem cells and other human cells for regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and gene therapy are prospected. Important techniques, such as micromanipulation and nanomanipulation (optical tweezers) for single cell analysis, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for shear and mixing characterization, and miniaturized bioreactors, are being developed to address those challenges. PMID:19929819

  6. Mammalian neural stem-cell renewal: nature versus nurture.

    PubMed

    Arsenijevic, Yvan

    2003-02-01

    Recent data show that the final events of mammalian brain organogenesis may depend in part on the direct control of neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and survival. Environmental and intrinsic factors play a role throughout development and during adulthood to regulate NSC proliferation. The NSCs acquire new competences throughout development, including adulthood, and this change in competence is region-specific. The factors controlling NSC survival, undifferentiated state, proliferation, and cell-cycle number are beginning to be identified, but the links between them remain unclear. However, current knowledge should help to formulate an understanding of how a stem cell can generate a new stem cell. PMID:12668902

  7. Moving beyond science to protect a mammalian migration corridor.

    PubMed

    Berger, Joel; Cain, Steven L

    2014-10-01

    As the discipline of conservation biology evolves and practitioners grow increasingly concerned about how to put results into achievable conservation, it is still unclear the extent to which science drives conservation outcomes, especially across rural landscapes. We addressed this issue by examining the role of science in the protection of a biological corridor. Our focus is on a North American endemic mammal reliant on long distance migration as an adaptive strategy, the pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) of the southern Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. The role of science in realizing policy change, while critical as a first step, was surprisingly small relative to the role of other human dimensions. In a case study, we strategically addressed a variety of conservation needs beyond science, first by building a partnership between government and private interests and then by enhancing interest in migratory phenomena across a landscape with divergent political ideologies and economic bases. By developing awareness and even people's pride in the concept of corridor conservation, we achieved local, state, and federal acceptance for protection of a 70 km long, 2 km wide pathway for the longest terrestrial migrant in the contiguous United States. Key steps included conducting and publishing research that defined the migration corridor; fostering a variety of media coverage at local, regional, and national levels; conducting public outreach through stakeholder workshops, meetings, and presentations; and meeting with and gaining the support of elected officials. All these contributed to the eventual policy change that created the first federally protected migration corridor in the United States, which in turn stimulated additional conservation actions. On the basis of our experience, we believe conservation scientists can and should step beyond traditional research roles to assist with on-the-ground conservation by engaging in aspects of conservation that involve local

  8. Moving beyond science to protect a mammalian migration corridor.

    PubMed

    Berger, Joel; Cain, Steven L

    2014-10-01

    As the discipline of conservation biology evolves and practitioners grow increasingly concerned about how to put results into achievable conservation, it is still unclear the extent to which science drives conservation outcomes, especially across rural landscapes. We addressed this issue by examining the role of science in the protection of a biological corridor. Our focus is on a North American endemic mammal reliant on long distance migration as an adaptive strategy, the pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) of the southern Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. The role of science in realizing policy change, while critical as a first step, was surprisingly small relative to the role of other human dimensions. In a case study, we strategically addressed a variety of conservation needs beyond science, first by building a partnership between government and private interests and then by enhancing interest in migratory phenomena across a landscape with divergent political ideologies and economic bases. By developing awareness and even people's pride in the concept of corridor conservation, we achieved local, state, and federal acceptance for protection of a 70 km long, 2 km wide pathway for the longest terrestrial migrant in the contiguous United States. Key steps included conducting and publishing research that defined the migration corridor; fostering a variety of media coverage at local, regional, and national levels; conducting public outreach through stakeholder workshops, meetings, and presentations; and meeting with and gaining the support of elected officials. All these contributed to the eventual policy change that created the first federally protected migration corridor in the United States, which in turn stimulated additional conservation actions. On the basis of our experience, we believe conservation scientists can and should step beyond traditional research roles to assist with on-the-ground conservation by engaging in aspects of conservation that involve local

  9. Regulation of the Embryonic Cell Cycle During Mammalian Preimplantation Development.

    PubMed

    Palmer, N; Kaldis, P

    2016-01-01

    The preimplantation development stage of mammalian embryogenesis consists of a series of highly conserved, regulated, and predictable cell divisions. This process is essential to allow the rapid expansion and differentiation of a single-cell zygote into a multicellular blastocyst containing cells of multiple developmental lineages. This period of development, also known as the germinal stage, encompasses several important developmental transitions, which are accompanied by dramatic changes in cell cycle profiles and dynamics. These changes are driven primarily by differences in the establishment and enforcement of cell cycle checkpoints, which must be bypassed to facilitate the completion of essential cell cycle events. Much of the current knowledge in this area has been amassed through the study of knockout models in mice. These mouse models are powerful experimental tools, which have allowed us to dissect the relative dependence of the early embryonic cell cycles on various aspects of the cell cycle machinery and highlight the extent of functional redundancy between members of the same gene family. This chapter will explore the ways in which the cell cycle machinery, their accessory proteins, and their stimuli operate during mammalian preimplantation using mouse models as a reference and how this allows for the usually well-defined stages of the cell cycle to be shaped and transformed during this unique and critical stage of development. PMID:27475848

  10. SNAP25 Expression in Mammalian Retinal Horizontal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Arlene A.; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut; Morgans, Catherine W.; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal cells mediate inhibitory feedforward and feedback lateral interactions in the outer retina at photoreceptor terminals and bipolar cell dendrites; however, the mechanisms that underlie synaptic transmission from mammalian horizontal cells are poorly understood. The localization of a vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter (VGAT) to horizontal cell processes in primate and rodent retinae suggested that mammalian horizontal cells release transmitter in a vesicular manner. Toward determining whether the molecular machinery for vesicular transmitter release is present in horizontal cells, we investigated the expression of SNAP25 (synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa), a key SNARE protein, by immunocytochemistry with cell type-specific markers in the retinae of mouse, rat, rabbit, and monkey. Different commercial antibodies to SNAP25 were tested on vertical sections of retina. We report the robust expression of SNAP25 in both plexiform layers. Double labeling with SNAP25 and calbindin antibodies demonstrated that horizontal cell processes and their endings in photoreceptor triad synapses were strongly labeled for both proteins in mouse, rat, rabbit, and monkey retinae. Double labeling with parvalbumin antibodies in monkey retina verified SNAP25 immunoreactivity in all horizontal cells. Pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy in rabbit retina confirmed expression of SNAP25 in lateral elements within photoreceptor triad synapses. The SNAP25 immunoreactivity in the plexiform layers and outer nuclear layer fell into at least three patterns depending on the antibody, suggesting a differential distribution of SNAP25 isoforms. The presence of SNAP25a and SNAP25b isoforms in mouse retina was established by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. SNAP25 expression in mammalian horizontal cells along with other SNARE proteins is consistent with vesicular exocytosis. PMID:21280047

  11. Tractable mammalian cell infections with protozoan-primed bacteria.

    PubMed

    Drennan, Samuel L; Lama, Amrita; Doron, Ben; Cambronne, Eric D

    2013-04-02

    Many intracellular bacterial pathogens use freshwater protozoans as a natural reservoir for proliferation in the environment. Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' pneumonia, gains a pathogenic advantage over in vitro cultured bacteria when first harvested from protozoan cells prior to infection of mammalian macrophages. This suggests that important virulence factors may not be properly expressed in vitro. We have developed a tractable system for priming L. pneumophila through its natural protozoan host Acanthamoeba castellanii prior to mammalian cell infection. The contribution of any virulence factor can be examined by comparing intracellular growth of a mutant strain to wild-type bacteria after protozoan priming. GFP-expressing wild-type and mutant L. pneumophila strains are used to infect protozoan monolayers in a priming step and allowed to reach late stages of intracellular growth. Fluorescent bacteria are then harvested from these infected cells and normalized by spectrophotometry to generate comparable numbers of bacteria for a subsequent infection into mammalian macrophages. For quantification, live bacteria are monitored after infection using fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and by colony plating. This technique highlights and relies on the contribution of host cell-dependent gene expression by mimicking the environment that would be encountered in a natural acquisition route. This approach can be modified to accommodate any bacterium that uses an intermediary host as a means for gaining a pathogenic advantage.

  12. mRNA stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J

    1995-01-01

    This review concerns how cytoplasmic mRNA half-lives are regulated and how mRNA decay rates influence gene expression. mRNA stability influences gene expression in virtually all organisms, from bacteria to mammals, and the abundance of a particular mRNA can fluctuate manyfold following a change in the mRNA half-life, without any change in transcription. The processes that regulate mRNA half-lives can, in turn, affect how cells grow, differentiate, and respond to their environment. Three major questions are addressed. Which sequences in mRNAs determine their half-lives? Which enzymes degrade mRNAs? Which (trans-acting) factors regulate mRNA stability, and how do they function? The following specific topics are discussed: techniques for measuring eukaryotic mRNA stability and for calculating decay constants, mRNA decay pathways, mRNases, proteins that bind to sequences shared among many mRNAs [like poly(A)- and AU-rich-binding proteins] and proteins that bind to specific mRNAs (like the c-myc coding-region determinant-binding protein), how environmental factors like hormones and growth factors affect mRNA stability, and how translation and mRNA stability are linked. Some perspectives and predictions for future research directions are summarized at the end. PMID:7565413

  13. Construction of photoenergetic mitochondria in cultured mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y.; Wada, Takeyoshi; Kino, Kuniki; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2013-01-01

    The proton motive force (PMF) is bio-energetically important for various cellular reactions to occur. We developed PMF-photogenerating mitochondria in cultured mammalian cells. An archaebacterial rhodopsin, delta-rhodopsin, which is a light-driven proton pump derived from Haloterrigena turkmenica, was expressed in the mitochondria of CHO-K1 cells. The constructed stable CHO-K1 cell lines showed suppression of cell death induced by rotenone, a pesticide that inhibits mitochondrial complex I activity involved in PMF generation through the electron transport chain. Delta-rhodopsin was also introduced into the mitochondria of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The constructed stable SH-SY5Y cell lines showed suppression of dopaminergic neuronal cell death induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an inducer of Parkinson's disease models, which acts through inhibition of complex I activity. These results suggest that the light-activated proton pump functioned as a PMF generator in the mitochondria of mammalian cells, and suppressed cell death induced by inhibition of respiratory PMF generation. PMID:23567447

  14. Expression and stabilization of bacterial luciferase in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Stacey S.; Dionisi, Hebe M.; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2004-06-01

    Current mammalian bioreporters using either firefly luciferase (luc) or GFP constructs require lysis and/or exogenous excitation to evoke a measurable response. Consequently, these cells cannot serve as continuous, on-line monitoring devices for in vivo imaging. Bacterial luciferase, lux, produces a photonic reaction that is cyclic, resulting in autonomous signal generation without the requirement for exogenous substrates or external activation. Therefore, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporters are the only truly autonomous light-generating sensors in existence. Unfortunately, the bacterial lux system has not yet been efficiently expressed in mammalian cells. In this research, three approaches for optimal expression of the a and b subunits of the bacterial luciferase protein were compared and reporter signal stability was evaluated from stably transfected human embryonic kidney cells. Maximum light levels were obtained from cells expressing the luciferase subunits linked with an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). Cells harboring this construct produced bioluminescence equaling 2.6 X 106 photons/sec compared to 7.2 X 104 photons/sec obtained from cells expressing the luciferase from a dual promoter vector and 3.5 X 104 photons/sec from a Lux fusion protein. Furthermore, the bioluminescence levels remained stable for more than forty cell passages (5 months) in the absence of antibiotic selection. After this time, bioluminescence signals dropped at a rate of approximately 5% per cell passage. These data indicate that mammalian cell lines can be engineered to efficiently express the bacterial lux system, thus lending themselves to possible long-term continuous monitoring or imaging applications in vivo.

  15. Mutagenesis and differentiation induction in mammalian cells by environmental chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, J.; Huberman, E.

    1980-01-01

    These studies indicate that in agreement with the somatic mutation hypothesis, chemical carcinogens: (1) are mutagenic for mammalian cells as tested in the cell-mediated assay; (2) the degree of mutagenicity is correlated with their degree of carcinogenicity; (3) that at least in cases when analyzed carefully the metabolites responsible for mutagenesis are also responsible for initiating the carcinogenic event; and (4) that a cell organ type specificity can be established using the cell-mediated assay. Studies with HL-60 cells and HO melanoma cells and those of others suggest that tumor-promoting phorbol diesters can alter cell differentiation in various cell types and that the degree of the observed alteration in the differentiation properties may be related to the potency of the phorbol esters. Thus these and similar systems may serve as models for both studies and identification of certain types of tumor promoting agents. (ERB)

  16. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Mammalian Endangered Species.

    PubMed

    Ben-Nun, Inbar Friedrich; Montague, Susanne C; Houck, Marlys L; Ryder, Oliver; Loring, Jeanne F

    2015-01-01

    For some highly endangered species there are too few reproductively capable animals to maintain adequate genetic diversity, and extraordinary measures are necessary to prevent their extinction. Cellular reprogramming is a means to capture the genomes of individual animals as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which may eventually facilitate reintroduction of genetic material into breeding populations. Here, we describe a method for generating iPSCs from fibroblasts of mammalian endangered species.

  17. Direct patterning of mammalian cells in an ultrasonic heptagon stencil.

    PubMed

    Bernassau, A L; Gesellchen, F; Macpherson, P G A; Riehle, M; Cumming, D R S

    2012-06-01

    We describe the construction of a ultrasonic device suitable for micro patterning particles and cells for tissue engineering applications. The device is formed by seven transducers shaped into a heptagon cavity. By exciting two and three transducers simultaneously, lines or hexagonal shapes can be formed with beads and cells. Furthermore, phase control of the transducers allows shifting the standing waves and thus patterning at different positions on a surface in a controlled manner. The paper discusses direct patterning of mammalian cells by ultrasound "stencil". PMID:22327813

  18. Metabolic flux and the regulation of mammalian cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Locasale, Jason W.; Cantley, Lewis C.

    2011-01-01

    The study of normal mammalian cell growth and the defects that contribute to disease pathogenesis constitutes a fundamental avenue of research that links metabolism to cell growth. Here we visit several aspects of this metabolism, emphasizing recent advances in our understanding of how alterations in glucose metabolism affect cytosolic and mitochondrial redox potential and ATP generation. These alterations drive cell growth not only through supporting biosynthesis, energy metabolism, and maintaining redox potential but also through initiating signaling mechanisms that are still poorly characterized. The evolutionary basis of these additional layers of growth control is also discussed. PMID:21982705

  19. Toxic effects of Karenia mikimotoi extracts on mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Yan, Tian; Yu, Rencheng; Zhou, Mingjiang

    2011-07-01

    Karenia is one of the most harmful and representative red tide genus in a temperate zone. Blooms caused by this genus have resulted in massive fish death in the South China Sea and the East China Sea. However, the potential effects of this dinoflagellate on human health through the transfer of toxins via marine food webs, and the mechanisms of toxicity, are still unknown. Therefore, we examined the toxic effects of a strain of K. mikimotoi (isolated from the South China Sea) on the proliferation and morphology of four mammalian cell lines (two normal cell lines and two cancer cell lines). In addition, we carried out a preliminary investigation on the mechanism of toxicity of the alga. The results show that the polar lipid-soluble component of K. mikimotoi significantly inhibited proliferation of the four cell lines, and resulted in the cells becoming spherical, swollen and damaged. The result of Annexin V and PI double-staining confirmed that cell membranes were disrupted. The malonaldehyde (MDA) contents in the medium of the four cell lines treated with the polar-lipid extracts all increased significantly, which indicates that the polar-lipid toxins produced by K. mikimotoi could adversely affect mammalian cells by inducing lipid peroxidation. We conclude that K. mikimotoi is a potential threat to human health, and the comprehensive effect of this dinoflagellate and its mechanisms should be investigated further.

  20. Retinoic Acid Stimulates Regeneration of Mammalian Auditory Hair Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Philippe P.; Malgrange, Brigitte; Staecker, Hinrich; Moonen, Gustave; van de Water, Thomas R.

    1993-04-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss resulting from the loss of auditory hair cells is thought to be irreversible in mammals. This study provides evidence that retinoic acid can stimulate the regeneration in vitro of mammalian auditory hair cells in ototoxic-poisoned organ of Corti explants in the rat. In contrast, treatment with retinoic acid does not stimulate the formation of extra hair cells in control cultures of Corti's organ. Retinoic acid-stimulated hair cell regeneration can be blocked by cytosine arabinoside, which suggests that a period of mitosis is required for the regeneration of auditory hair cells in this system. These results provide hope for a recovery of hearing function in mammals after auditory hair cell damage.

  1. Recombinant protein production from stable mammalian cell lines and pools.

    PubMed

    Hacker, David L; Balasubramanian, Sowmya

    2016-06-01

    We highlight recent developments for the production of recombinant proteins from suspension-adapted mammalian cell lines. We discuss the generation of stable cell lines using transposons and lentivirus vectors (non-targeted transgene integration) and site-specific recombinases (targeted transgene integration). Each of these methods results in the generation of cell lines with protein yields that are generally superior to those achievable through classical plasmid transfection that depends on the integration of the transfected DNA by non-homologous DNA end-joining. This is the main reason why these techniques can also be used for the generation of stable cell pools, heterogenous populations of recombinant cells generated by gene delivery and genetic selection without resorting to single cell cloning. This allows the time line from gene transfer to protein production to be reduced.

  2. Markers of Epidermal Stem Cell Subpopulations in Adult Mammalian Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kretzschmar, Kai; Watt, Fiona M.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer of mammalian skin and comprises a multilayered epithelium, the interfollicular epidermis, with associated hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and eccrine sweat glands. As in other epithelia, adult stem cells within the epidermis maintain tissue homeostasis and contribute to repair of tissue damage. The bulge of hair follicles, where DNA-label-retaining cells reside, was traditionally regarded as the sole epidermal stem cell compartment. However, in recent years multiple stem cell populations have been identified. In this review, we discuss the different stem cell compartments of adult murine and human epidermis, the markers that they express, and the assays that are used to characterize epidermal stem cell properties. PMID:24993676

  3. Recombinant protein production from stable mammalian cell lines and pools.

    PubMed

    Hacker, David L; Balasubramanian, Sowmya

    2016-06-01

    We highlight recent developments for the production of recombinant proteins from suspension-adapted mammalian cell lines. We discuss the generation of stable cell lines using transposons and lentivirus vectors (non-targeted transgene integration) and site-specific recombinases (targeted transgene integration). Each of these methods results in the generation of cell lines with protein yields that are generally superior to those achievable through classical plasmid transfection that depends on the integration of the transfected DNA by non-homologous DNA end-joining. This is the main reason why these techniques can also be used for the generation of stable cell pools, heterogenous populations of recombinant cells generated by gene delivery and genetic selection without resorting to single cell cloning. This allows the time line from gene transfer to protein production to be reduced. PMID:27322762

  4. [Results of mammalian cell culture exposure on artificial earth satellites].

    PubMed

    Sushkov, F V; Portugalov, V V; Rudneva, S V; Bobkova, N N; Iordanishvili, E K

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an exposure of cells of the Syrian hamster strain VNK-21 to space flight effects. In contrast to the cell culture kept in a thermostat at 29 degrees C, the cell culture that was maintained in thermally uncontrolled conditions developed noticeable structural and physiological changes induced by suboptimal temperatures. It was concluded that a 6-day exposure to weightlessness exerted no adverse effect on mammalian cells in vitro and produced no stable structural or physiological changes. Some changes that were detected in the cell culture--faster ageing, stable tendency to an increase of the number of cells with enlarged nuclei, an increase of the mitotic index at an early stage of cultivation--need further investigation.

  5. Mammalian designer cells: Engineering principles and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mingqi; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Biotechnology is a widely interdisciplinary field focusing on the use of living cells or organisms to solve established problems in medicine, food production and agriculture. Synthetic biology, the science of engineering complex biological systems that do not exist in nature, continues to provide the biotechnology industry with tools, technologies and intellectual property leading to improved cellular performance. One key aspect of synthetic biology is the engineering of deliberately reprogrammed designer cells whose behavior can be controlled over time and space. This review discusses the most commonly used techniques to engineer mammalian designer cells; while control elements acting on the transcriptional and translational levels of target gene expression determine the kinetic and dynamic profiles, coupling them to a variety of extracellular stimuli permits their remote control with user-defined trigger signals. Designer mammalian cells with novel or improved biological functions not only directly improve the production efficiency during biopharmaceutical manufacturing but also open the door for cell-based treatment strategies in molecular and translational medicine. In the future, the rational combination of multiple sets of designer cells could permit the construction and regulation of higher-order systems with increased complexity, thereby enabling the molecular reprogramming of tissues, organisms or even populations with highest precision.

  6. Mutagenicity of hydralazine in mammalian cells and bacteria.

    PubMed

    McQueen, C A; Way, B M; Queener, S M

    1993-01-01

    The genotoxicity of hydralazine (HDZ), an antihypertensive agent, was evaluated in mammalian cells and bacteria. The formation of mutants at the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus in an adult rat liver cell line ARL 18 was determined. Bacterial mutagenicity was assessed in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA100 and TA102. The latter strain was chosen because it has A:T bases at the reversion site and HDZ has been reported to interact with thymidine. HDZ was mutagenic to ARL 18 cells with a concentration-dependent increase in mutants observed at 5 x 10(-6) to 5 x 10(-4) M. At 5 x 10(-4) M HDZ, there were 110 mutants/10(6) colony-forming cells compared to 129 for cells exposed to 10(-4) M benzo(a)pyrene, a known genotoxin. Bacterial mutants were observed with HDZ in both strains in the absence of an activating system. HDZ also induced mutants in the presence of S-9 from Aroclor-induced rat liver or uninduced rabbit liver. These results were consistent with previous reports of the mutagenicity of HDZ in TA100 and extend the observations to TA102, a strain designed to detect oxidative damage. This study also provides the first evidence of the mutagenicity of HDZ in mammalian cells. These data support the genotoxicity of HDZ in in vitro systems.

  7. Stochastic mRNA synthesis in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Raj, Arjun; Peskin, Charles S; Tranchina, Daniel; Vargas, Diana Y; Tyagi, Sanjay

    2006-10-01

    Individual cells in genetically homogeneous populations have been found to express different numbers of molecules of specific proteins. We investigated the origins of these variations in mammalian cells by counting individual molecules of mRNA produced from a reporter gene that was stably integrated into the cell's genome. We found that there are massive variations in the number of mRNA molecules present in each cell. These variations occur because mRNAs are synthesized in short but intense bursts of transcription beginning when the gene transitions from an inactive to an active state and ending when they transition back to the inactive state. We show that these transitions are intrinsically random and not due to global, extrinsic factors such as the levels of transcriptional activators. Moreover, the gene activation causes burst-like expression of all genes within a wider genomic locus. We further found that bursts are also exhibited in the synthesis of natural genes. The bursts of mRNA expression can be buffered at the protein level by slow protein degradation rates. A stochastic model of gene activation and inactivation was developed to explain the statistical properties of the bursts. The model showed that increasing the level of transcription factors increases the average size of the bursts rather than their frequency. These results demonstrate that gene expression in mammalian cells is subject to large, intrinsically random fluctuations and raise questions about how cells are able to function in the face of such noise. PMID:17048983

  8. Apple Derived Cellulose Scaffolds for 3D Mammalian Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Modulevsky, Daniel J.; Lefebvre, Cory; Haase, Kristina; Al-Rekabi, Zeinab; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    There are numerous approaches for producing natural and synthetic 3D scaffolds that support the proliferation of mammalian cells. 3D scaffolds better represent the natural cellular microenvironment and have many potential applications in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that 3D cellulose scaffolds produced by decellularizing apple hypanthium tissue can be employed for in vitro 3D culture of NIH3T3 fibroblasts, mouse C2C12 muscle myoblasts and human HeLa epithelial cells. We show that these cells can adhere, invade and proliferate in the cellulose scaffolds. In addition, biochemical functionalization or chemical cross-linking can be employed to control the surface biochemistry and/or mechanical properties of the scaffold. The cells retain high viability even after 12 continuous weeks of culture and can achieve cell densities comparable with other natural and synthetic scaffold materials. Apple derived cellulose scaffolds are easily produced, inexpensive and originate from a renewable source. Taken together, these results demonstrate that naturally derived cellulose scaffolds offer a complementary approach to existing techniques for the in vitro culture of mammalian cells in a 3D environment. PMID:24842603

  9. A recombinant vaccine expressing a mammalian Mycobacterium sp. antigen is immunostimulatory but not protective in striped bass.

    PubMed

    Pasnik, David J; Vemulapalli, Ramesh; Smith, Stephen A; Schurig, Gerhardt G

    2003-09-15

    A recombinant vaccine was constructed for piscine mycobacteriosis utilizing a Brucella abortus strain RB51 vector expressing a mammalian Mycobacterium sp. 85A antigen. Juvenile striped bass were inoculated with the resulting construct at doses equivalent to 10(6), 10(7), 10(8), 10(9), and 10(10) colony-forming units/fish. Blood and tissue samples from these fish demonstrated significant specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses towards the 85A antigen in a dose-dependent manner. However, survival studies determined that inoculated fish failed to demonstrate cross-protective responses after live Mycobacterium marinum challenge 70 days post-inoculation.

  10. Carbon nanotube fibers are compatible with Mammalian cells and neurons.

    PubMed

    Dubin, R A; Callegari, G; Kohn, J; Neimark, A

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrate the biocompatibility of carbon nanotube fibers (CNFs) fabricated from single-wall carbon nanotubes. Produced by a particle-coagulation spinning process, CNFs are "hair-like" conductive microwires, which uniquely combine properties of porous nanostructured scaffolds, high-area electrodes, and permeable microfluidic conduits. We report that CNFs are nontoxic and support the attachment, spreading, and growth of mammalian cells and the extension of processes from neurons in vitro. Our findings suggest that CNF may be employed for an electrical interfacing of nerve cells and external devices. PMID:18334451

  11. High-throughput physically based approach for mammalian cell encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiashing; Wu, Po-Chen; Huang, Chi-Hui; Yang, Chung-Yao; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2013-10-01

    Herein, we wish to tear down the traditional boundaries between physics and life sciences by demonstrating a physically based, flow-focusing method to encapsulate mammalian cells into alginate-based microspheres in a very short period of time. We paid particular attention to the physical properties of the alginate solution as it was critical to create a physiologically relevant environment within the alginate microspheres. The cells we cultured when re-culturing them on Petri dishes could still be maintained for at least 4 days after microsphere encapsulation. We believe that this study would provide interesting insight in biophysics, polymer physics, and applied physics.

  12. A new method for the encapsulation of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Merten, O W; Dautzenberg, H; Palfi, G E

    1991-10-01

    A new encapsulation method was developed for the cultivation of mammalian cells. The capsules were produced using a solution of sodium cellulose sulphate (CS)(1.5%) and poly-dimethyl-diallyl-ammonium chloride (PDMDAAC). When CS droplets fell into the precipitation bath consisting of a 2% solution of PDMDAAC, immediately a membrane at the interphase was built up. The influences of varying encapsulation process parameters on capsule characteristics, cell growth, and monoclonal antibody production were tested. This new method showed advantages when compared to other methods mainly due to time simplicity of the whole process. PMID:1367907

  13. Prokaryotic arsenate reductase enhances arsenate resistance in Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Tao, Xuanyu; Wu, Gaofeng; Li, Xiangkai; Liu, Pu

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a well-known heavy metal toxicant in the environment. Bioremediation of heavy metals has been proposed as a low-cost and eco-friendly method. This article described some of recent patents on transgenic plants with enhanced heavy metal resistance. Further, to test whether genetic modification of mammalian cells could render higher arsenic resistance, a prokaryotic arsenic reductase gene arsC was transfected into human liver cancer cell HepG2. In the stably transfected cells, the expression level of arsC gene was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Results showed that arsC was expressed in HepG2 cells and the expression was upregulated by 3 folds upon arsenate induction. To further test whether arsC has function in HepG2 cells, the viability of HepG2-pCI-ArsC cells exposed to arsenite or arsenate was compared to that of HepG2-pCI cells without arsC gene. The results indicated that arsC increased the viability of HepG2 cells by 25% in arsenate, but not in arsenite. And the test of reducing ability of stably transfected cells revealed that the concentration of accumulated trivalent arsenic increased by 25% in HepG2-pCI-ArsC cells. To determine the intracellular localization of ArsC, a fusion vector with fluorescent marker pEGFP-N1-ArsC was constructed and transfected into.HepG2. Laser confocal microscopy showed that EGFP-ArsC fusion protein was distributed throughout the cells. Taken together, these results demonstrated that prokaryotic arsenic resistant gene arsC integrated successfully into HepG2 genome and enhanced arsenate resistance of HepG2, which brought new insights of arsenic detoxification in mammalian cells.

  14. Mammalian RAD51 paralogs protect nascent DNA at stalled forks and mediate replication restart.

    PubMed

    Somyajit, Kumar; Saxena, Sneha; Babu, Sharath; Mishra, Anup; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2015-11-16

    Mammalian RAD51 paralogs are implicated in the repair of collapsed replication forks by homologous recombination. However, their physiological roles in replication fork maintenance prior to fork collapse remain obscure. Here, we report on the role of RAD51 paralogs in short-term replicative stress devoid of DSBs. We show that RAD51 paralogs localize to nascent DNA and common fragile sites upon replication fork stalling. Strikingly, RAD51 paralogs deficient cells exhibit elevated levels of 53BP1 nuclear bodies and increased DSB formation, the latter being attributed to extensive degradation of nascent DNA at stalled forks. RAD51C and XRCC3 promote the restart of stalled replication in an ATP hydrolysis dependent manner by disengaging RAD51 and other RAD51 paralogs from the halted forks. Notably, we find that Fanconi anemia (FA)-like disorder and breast and ovarian cancer patient derived mutations of RAD51C fails to protect replication fork, exhibit under-replicated genomic regions and elevated micro-nucleation. Taken together, RAD51 paralogs prevent degradation of stalled forks and promote the restart of halted replication to avoid replication fork collapse, thereby maintaining genomic integrity and suppressing tumorigenesis.

  15. cDNA expression cloning in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, B J

    2001-05-01

    This unit contains protocols for expression cloning in mammalian cells. Either calcium phosphate- or liposome-mediated transfection of mammalian cells, or virus infection and liposome-mediated transfection are used to screen pools derived from a cDNA library. cDNA pools are prepared for cloning from library-transformed E. coli grown in liquid culture medium or on antibiotic-containing selection plates. Results of screening assays for expression can be detected using autoradiography of dishes of cultured cells to identify clones, direct visualization of radiolabeled cells on emulsion-coated and developed chamber slides, detection and quantification of gene activity by a functional (transport) assay with scintillation counting, or detection using a filter-based assay for binding of radioligand to membranes or whole cells. The most critical step of any cDNA cloning project is the establishment of the screening protocol. Therefore, the bioassay for the gene product must be established prior to executing any of these protocols, including construction of the cDNA library. PMID:18428491

  16. Isolation of Lysosomes from Mammalian Tissues and Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Carmen; Pérez-Jiménez, Eva; Lahuerta, Marcos; Knecht, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes participate within the cells in the degradation of organelles, macromolecules, and a wide variety of substrates. In any study on specific roles of lysosomes, both under physiological and pathological conditions, it is advisable to include methods that allow their reproducible and reliable isolation. However, purification of lysosomes is a difficult task, particularly in the case of cultured cells. This is mainly because of the heterogeneity of these organelles, along with their low number and high fragility. Also, isolation methods, while disrupting plasma membranes, have to preserve the integrity of lysosomes, as the breakdown of their membranes releases enzymes that could damage all cell organelles, including themselves. The protocols described below have been routinely used in our laboratory for the specific isolation of lysosomes from rat liver, NIH/3T3, and other cultured cells, but can be adapted to other mammalian tissues or cell lines. PMID:27613045

  17. Enhanced Production of Docosahexaenoic Acid in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guiming; Jiang, Xudong; Ou, Qin; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Mingfu; Sun, Guozhi; Wang, Zhao; Sun, Jie; Ge, Tangdong

    2014-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), one of the important polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) with pharmaceutical and nutraceutical effects, may be obtained through diet or synthesized in vivo from dietary a-linolenic acid (ALA). However, the acumulation of DHA in human body or other mammals relies on the intake of high dose of DHA for a certain period of time, and the bioconversion of dietary ALA to DHA is very limited. Therefore the mammalian cells are not rich in DHA. Here, we report a new technology for increased prodution of DHA in mammalian cells. By using transient transfection method, Siganus canaliculatus Δ4 desaturase was heterologously expressed in chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and simultaneously, mouse Δ6-desaturase and Δ5-desaturase were overexpressed. The results demonstrated that the overexpression of Δ6/Δ5-desaturases significantly enhanced the ability of transfected cells to convert the added ALA to docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) which in turn get converted into DHA directly and efficiently by the heterologously expressed Δ4 desaturase. This technology provides the basis for potential utility of these gene constructs in the creation of transgenic livestock for increased production of DHA/related products to meet the growing demand of this important PUFA. PMID:24788769

  18. Regulation of Autophagy by Glucose in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moruno, Félix; Pérez-Jiménez, Eva; Knecht, Erwin

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process that contributes to maintain cell homeostasis. Although it is strongly regulated by many extracellular factors, induction of autophagy is mainly produced by starvation of nutrients. In mammalian cells, the regulation of autophagy by amino acids, and also by the hormone insulin, has been extensively investigated, but knowledge about the effects of other autophagy regulators, including another nutrient, glucose, is more limited. Here we will focus on the signalling pathways by which environmental glucose directly, i.e., independently of insulin and glucagon, regulates autophagy in mammalian cells, but we will also briefly mention some data in yeast. Although glucose deprivation mainly induces autophagy via AMPK activation and the subsequent inhibition of mTORC1, we will also comment other signalling pathways, as well as evidences indicating that, under certain conditions, autophagy can be activated by glucose. A better understanding on how glucose regulates autophagy not only will expand our basic knowledge of this important cell process, but it will be also relevant to understand common human disorders, such as cancer and diabetes, in which glucose levels play an important role. PMID:24710481

  19. Transient transfection of mammalian cells using a violet diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Mapa, Maria Leilani; Angus, Liselotte; Ploschner, Martin; Dholakia, Kishan; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate the first use of the violet diode laser for transient mammalian cell transfection. In contrast to previous studies, which showed the generation of stable cell lines over a few weeks, we develop a methodology to transiently transfect cells with an efficiency of up to ~40%. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells are exposed to a tightly focused 405-nm laser in the presence of plasmid DNA encoding for a mitochondrial targeted red fluorescent protein. We report transfection efficiencies as a function of laser power and exposure time for our system. We also show, for the first time, that a continuous wave laser source can be successfully applied to selective gene silencing experiments using small interfering RNA. This work is a major step towards an inexpensive and portable phototransfection system.

  20. Shear stress induced stimulation of mammalian cell metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintire, L. V.; Frangos, J. A.; Eskin, S. G.

    1988-01-01

    A flow apparatus was developed for the study of the metabolic response of anchorage dependent cells to a wide range of steady and pulsatile shear stresses under well controlled conditions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers were subjected to steady shear stresses of up to 24 dynes/sq cm, and the production of prostacyclin was determined. The onset of flow led to a burst in prostacyclin production which decayed to a long term steady state rate (SSR). The SSR of cells exposed to flow was greater than the basal release level, and increased linearly with increasing shear stress. It is demonstrated that shear stresses in certain ranges may not be detrimental to mammalian cell metabolism. In fact, throughout the range of shear stresses studied, metabolite production is maximized by maximizing shear stress.

  1. Manufacture of biopharmaceutical proteins by mammalian cell culture systems.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, W R

    1990-01-01

    In the last several years, dramatic advances have been in the development of new biopharmaceuticals including monoclonal antibodies for diagnosis and treatment and such genetically engineered proteins as tPA, Factor VIIIc, erythropoietin and soluble CD4, an anti-AIDS protein. Currently, there are several hundred such candidate drugs in human clinical trials. In most cases, these protein-based drugs will require manufacture by mammalian cell culture due to the inability of lower organisms to properly glycosylate, fold, make correct disulfide bonds and secrete active biomolecular forms. The need for large scale production from cell culture will greatly increase as more of the products in clinical trials are approved for commercial production. This will require significant reduction in manufacturing costs per gram, concomitant with increased capacity to hundreds or perhaps even thousands of kilograms annually. As an example, Invitron's multi-reactor manufacturing facility has operated at greater than one-half million liters per year and has experience with more than 250 mammalian cell lines for producing protein drug products.

  2. Undetectable histone O-GlcNAcylation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Jessica; Daou, Salima; Zamorano, Natalia; Iannantuono, Nicholas V G; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Mashtalir, Nazar; Bonneil, Eric; Wurtele, Hugo; Thibault, Pierre; Affar, El Bachir

    2015-01-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a posttranslational modification catalyzed by the O-Linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) and reversed by O-GlcNAcase (OGA). Numerous transcriptional regulators, including chromatin modifying enzymes, transcription factors, and co-factors, are targeted by O-GlcNAcylation, indicating that this modification is central for chromatin-associated processes. Recently, OGT-mediated O-GlcNAcylation was reported to be a novel histone modification, suggesting a potential role in directly coordinating chromatin structure and function. In contrast, using multiple biochemical approaches, we report here that histone O-GlcNAcylation is undetectable in mammalian cells. Conversely, O-GlcNAcylation of the transcription regulators Host Cell Factor-1 (HCF-1) and Ten-Eleven Translocation protein 2 (TET2) could be readily observed. Our study raises questions on the occurrence and abundance of O-GlcNAcylation as a histone modification in mammalian cells and reveals technical complications regarding the detection of genuine protein O-GlcNAcylation. Therefore, the identification of the specific contexts in which histone O-GlcNAcylation might occur is still to be established. PMID:26075789

  3. TISdb: a database for alternative translation initiation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ji; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2014-01-01

    Proper selection of the translation initiation site (TIS) on mRNAs is crucial for the production of desired protein products. Recent studies using ribosome profiling technology uncovered a surprising variety of potential TIS sites in addition to the annotated start codon. The prevailing alternative translation reshapes the landscape of the proteome in terms of diversity and complexity. To identify the hidden coding potential of the transcriptome in mammalian cells, we developed global translation initiation sequencing (GTI-Seq) that maps genome-wide TIS positions at nearly a single nucleotide resolution. To facilitate studies of alternative translation, we created a database of alternative TIS sites identified from human and mouse cell lines based on multiple GTI-Seq replicates. The TISdb, available at http://tisdb.human.cornell.edu, includes 6991 TIS sites from 4961 human genes and 9973 TIS sites from 5668 mouse genes. The TISdb website provides a simple browser interface for query of high-confidence TIS sites and their associated open reading frames. The output of search results provides a user-friendly visualization of TIS information in the context of transcript isoforms. Together, the information in the database provides an easy reference for alternative translation in mammalian cells and will support future investigation of novel translational products.

  4. Some physiological properties of identified mammalian neuroglial cells

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, M. J.; Gerschenfeld, H. M.

    1969-01-01

    Mammalian glial cells were identified and studied in the optic nerves of anaesthetized rats. Cells with membrane potentials of 77-85 mV were located in the optic nerve with capillary micropipettes. These were shown to be neuroglia by iontophoretic injection of a fluorescent dye through the recording electrode, followed by histological verification of the location of the dye. No distinction was made between astroglia and oligodendroglia. Neuroglial cells gave no impulse activity. Their membrane potential was studied in isolated optic nerves by varying the ionic composition of the bathing fluid. The glial membrane potential depends predominantly on a transmembrane gradient of potassium ions. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:5821876

  5. Surface modified gold nanowires for mammalian cell transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chiung-Wen; Lai, Jun-Jung; Wei, Kung Hwa; Chen, Peilin

    2008-01-01

    Aminothiol modified gold nanowires have been used as vectors for the delivery of plasmid DNA into two different types of mammalian cells: 3T3 and HeLa. It was measured that positively charged gold nanowires with a diameter of 200 nm and a length around 5 µm were capable of carrying 1 pg of plasmid DNA per nanowire into cells. Compared with other transfection reagents, the gold nanowires exhibited the highest transfection efficiency while almost no cytotoxicity was observed. In addition, it has been shown that individual nanowires can be visualized with sub-micrometer resolution, which may allow the use of functionalized multi-segment nanowires as local probes for the investigation of the microenvironment inside cells.

  6. Intracellular protein degradation in mammalian cells: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Erwin; Aguado, Carmen; Cárcel, Jaime; Esteban, Inmaculada; Esteve, Juan Miguel; Ghislat, Ghita; Moruno, José Félix; Vidal, José Manuel; Sáez, Rosana

    2009-08-01

    In higher organisms, dietary proteins are broken down into amino acids within the digestive tract but outside the cells, which incorporate the resulting amino acids into their metabolism. However, under certain conditions, an organism loses more nitrogen than is assimilated in the diet. This additional loss was found in the past century to come from intracellular proteins and started an intensive research that produced an enormous expansion of the field and a dispersed literature. Therefore, our purpose is to provide an updated summary of the current knowledge on the proteolytic machinery involved in intracellular protein degradation and its physiological and pathological relevance, especially addressed to newcomers in the field who may find further details in more specialized reviews. However, even providing a general overview, this is an extremely wide field and, therefore, we mainly focus on mammalian cells, while other cells will be mentioned only for comparison purposes.

  7. Conformal coating of mammalian cells immobilized onto magnetically driven beads.

    PubMed

    Khademhosseini, Ali; May, Michael H; Sefton, Michael V

    2005-01-01

    A novel cell bead system, comprising a magnetic core, a spherical annulus of agarose-immobilized cells, all conformally coated within a synthetic polymer, is proposed as a means of immunoisolating mammalian cells in a system that provides a balance between low total implant volume, retrievability, and diffusion limitations. A successful immunoisolation system could be used to transplant cells without eliciting an inappropriate host response. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were immobilized at the periphery of large (approximately 2 mm) agarose beads containing inert magnetic cores (< or = 1 mm) and coated in a hydroxyethyl methacrylate-methyl methacrylate (HEMA-MMA) copolymer by interfacial precipitation. The beads were coated in liquid gradients containing polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG) or bromooctane. Although many cells were adversely affected by the coating process, the cells that did survive (30-50% of those loaded into the beads) remained viable for a period of at least 2 weeks. This viability was much higher than achieved previously because of a number of factors, such as the aqueous agarose, the hydrophobic bromooctane intermediate layer, and faster coating times that minimize the exposure of the cells to organic solvents. Also, a mathematical model was used to describe oxygen transport within the annular agarose beads. These results provide evidence that the proposed geometry and the fabrication approach may be useful for a variety of applications that involve cell encapsulation.

  8. Optical injection of mammalian cells using a microfluidic platform

    PubMed Central

    Marchington, Robert F.; Arita, Yoshihiko; Tsampoula, Xanthi; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2010-01-01

    The use of a focused laser beam to create a sub-micron hole in the plasma membrane of a cell (photoporation), for the selective introduction of membrane impermeable substances (optical injection) including nucleic acids (optical transfection), is a powerful technique most commonly applied to treat single cells. However, particularly for femtosecond photoporation, these studies have been limited to low throughput, small-scale studies, because they require sequential dosing of individual cells. Herein, we describe a microfluidic photoporation system for increased throughput and automated optical injection of cells. Hydrodynamic focusing is employed to direct a flow of single-file cells through a focused femtosecond laser beam for photoporation. Upon traversing the beam, a number of transient pores potentially open across the extracellular membrane, which allows the uptake of the surrounding fluid media into the cytoplasm, also containing the chosen injection agent. The process is entirely automated and a rate of 1 cell/sec could readily be obtained, enabling several thousand cells to be injected per hour using this system. The efficiency of optically injecting propidium iodide into HEK293 mammalian cells was found to be 42 ± 8%, or 28 ± 4% taking into account the requirement of post-injection viability, as tested using Calcein AM. This work now opens the way for combining photoporation with microfluidic analyses, sorting, purification or on-chip cell culture studies. PMID:21258487

  9. Interplay between autophagy and programmed cell death in mammalian neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyung Min; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian neural stem cells (NSCs) are of particular interest because of their role in brain development and function. Recent findings suggest the intimate involvement of programmed cell death (PCD) in the turnover of NSCs. However, the underlying mechanisms of PCD are largely unknown. Although apoptosis is the best-defined form of PCD, accumulating evidence has revealed a wide spectrum of PCD encompassing apoptosis, autophagic cell death (ACD) and necrosis. This mini-review aims to illustrate a unique regulation of PCD in NSCs. The results of our recent studies on autophagic death of adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN) cells are also discussed. HCN cell death following insulin withdrawal clearly provides a reliable model that can be used to analyze the molecular mechanisms of ACD in the larger context of PCD. More research efforts are needed to increase our understanding of the molecular basis of NSC turnover under degenerating conditions, such as aging, stress and neurological diseases. Efforts aimed at protecting and harnessing endogenous NSCs will offer novel opportunities for the development of new therapeutic strategies for neuropathologies. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(8): 383-390] PMID:23977985

  10. Drosophila homolog of the mammalian jun oncogene is expressed during embryonic development and activates transcription in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, K; Chaillet, J R; Perkins, L A; Halazonetis, T D; Perrimon, N

    1990-01-01

    By means of low-stringency cross-species hybridization to Southern DNA blots, human c-jun sequences were used to identify a unique Drosophila melanogaster locus (Djun). The predicted DJun protein is highly homologous to members of the mammalian Jun family in both the DNA binding and leucine zipper regions. Djun was mapped by in situ hybridization to position 46E of the second chromosome. It encodes a 1.7-kilobase transcript constitutively expressed at all developmental stages. Functionally, Djun in cooperation with mouse c-fos can trans-activate activator protein 1 DNA binding site when introduced into mammalian cells. Taken together, these data suggest that Djun, much like its mammalian homolog, may activate transcription of genes involved in regulation of cell growth, differentiation, and development. Furthermore, the identification of Djun allows one to exploit the genetics of Drosophila to identify genes in signal transduction pathways involving Djun and thus c-jun. Images PMID:1696724

  11. CRISPR Technology for Genome Activation and Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Dan; Qi, Lei S

    2016-01-01

    Targeted modulation of transcription is necessary for understanding complex gene networks and has great potential for medical and industrial applications. CRISPR is emerging as a powerful system for targeted genome activation and repression, in addition to its use in genome editing. This protocol describes how to design, construct, and experimentally validate the function of sequence-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for sequence-specific repression (CRISPRi) or activation (CRISPRa) of transcription in mammalian cells. In this technology, the CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is catalytically deactivated (dCas9) to provide a general platform for RNA-guided DNA targeting of any locus in the genome. Fusion of dCas9 to effector domains with distinct regulatory functions enables stable and efficient transcriptional repression or activation in mammalian cells. Delivery of multiple sgRNAs further enables activation or repression of multiple genes. By using scaffold RNAs (scRNAs), different effectors can be recruited to different genes for simultaneous activation of some and repression of others. The CRISPRi and CRISPRa methods provide powerful tools for sequence-specific control of gene expression on a genome-wide scale to aid understanding gene functions and for engineering genetic regulatory systems. PMID:26729910

  12. Garcinielliptone FC: antiparasitic activity without cytotoxicity to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana P; Silva, Marcos P; Oliveira, Cristiano G; Monteiro, Daniela C; Pinto, Pedro L; Mendonça, Ronaldo Z; Costa Júnior, Joaquim S; Freitas, Rivelilson M; de Moraes, Josué

    2015-06-01

    Garcinielliptone FC (GFC) is a natural prenylated benzophenone found in the seeds of Platonia insignis Mart. (Clusiaceae), a native Brazilian plant. It has been chemically characterized and it is known that GFC has several biological activities such as antioxidant and vasorelaxant properties. In this study, we report the in vitro effect of GFC against the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni, the parasite responsible for schistosomiasis mansoni. The anti-S. mansoni activity and cytotoxicity toward mammalian cells were determined for the compound. GFC⩾6.25 μM showed antischistosomal activity and confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis demonstrated several morphological alterations on the tegument of worms, and a correlation between viability and tegumental damage was observed. In addition, at sub-lethal concentrations of GFC (⩽3.125 μM), the number of S. mansoni eggs was reduced. More importantly, GFC exhibited no activity toward mammalian cells and, therefore, there is an appreciable selectivity of this compound against the helminths. In conclusion, these findings indicate the potential of GFC as an antiparasitic agent. PMID:25553916

  13. CRISPR Technology for Genome Activation and Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Dan; Qi, Lei S

    2016-01-04

    Targeted modulation of transcription is necessary for understanding complex gene networks and has great potential for medical and industrial applications. CRISPR is emerging as a powerful system for targeted genome activation and repression, in addition to its use in genome editing. This protocol describes how to design, construct, and experimentally validate the function of sequence-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for sequence-specific repression (CRISPRi) or activation (CRISPRa) of transcription in mammalian cells. In this technology, the CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is catalytically deactivated (dCas9) to provide a general platform for RNA-guided DNA targeting of any locus in the genome. Fusion of dCas9 to effector domains with distinct regulatory functions enables stable and efficient transcriptional repression or activation in mammalian cells. Delivery of multiple sgRNAs further enables activation or repression of multiple genes. By using scaffold RNAs (scRNAs), different effectors can be recruited to different genes for simultaneous activation of some and repression of others. The CRISPRi and CRISPRa methods provide powerful tools for sequence-specific control of gene expression on a genome-wide scale to aid understanding gene functions and for engineering genetic regulatory systems.

  14. RNAi pathway participates in chromosome segregation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuan; Wang, Xiaolin; Liu, Xu; Cao, Shuhuan; Shan, Ge

    2015-01-01

    The RNAi machinery is a mighty regulator in a myriad of life events. Despite lines of evidence that small RNAs and components of the RNAi pathway may be associated with structure and behavior of mitotic chromosomes in diverse organisms, a direct role of the RNAi pathway in mammalian mitotic chromosome segregation remains elusive. Here we report that Dicer and AGO2, two central components of the mammalian RNAi pathway, participate in the chromosome segregation. Knockdown of Dicer or AGO2 results in a higher incidence of chromosome lagging, and this effect is independent from microRNAs as examined with DGCR8 knockout cells. Further investigation has revealed that α-satellite RNA, a noncoding RNA derived from centromeric repeat region, is managed by AGO2 under the guidance of endogenous small interference RNAs (ASAT siRNAs) generated by Dicer. Furthermore, the slicer activity of AGO2 is essential for the chromosome segregation. Level and distribution of chromosome-associated α-satellite RNA have crucial regulatory effect on the localization of centromeric proteins such as centromere protein C1 (CENPC1). With these results, we also provide a paradigm in which the RNAi pathway participates in vital cellular events through the maintenance of level and distribution of noncoding RNAs in cells. PMID:27462427

  15. Cell lineage analysis of the mammalian female germline.

    PubMed

    Reizel, Yitzhak; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Adar, Rivka; Elbaz, Judith; Jinich, Adrian; Chapal-Ilani, Noa; Maruvka, Yosef E; Nevo, Nava; Marx, Zipora; Horovitz, Inna; Wasserstrom, Adam; Mayo, Avi; Shur, Irena; Benayahu, Dafna; Skorecki, Karl; Segal, Eran; Dekel, Nava; Shapiro, Ehud

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental aspects of embryonic and post-natal development, including maintenance of the mammalian female germline, are largely unknown. Here we employ a retrospective, phylogenetic-based method for reconstructing cell lineage trees utilizing somatic mutations accumulated in microsatellites, to study female germline dynamics in mice. Reconstructed cell lineage trees can be used to estimate lineage relationships between different cell types, as well as cell depth (number of cell divisions since the zygote). We show that, in the reconstructed mouse cell lineage trees, oocytes form clusters that are separate from hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, both in young and old mice, indicating that these populations belong to distinct lineages. Furthermore, while cumulus cells sampled from different ovarian follicles are distinctly clustered on the reconstructed trees, oocytes from the left and right ovaries are not, suggesting a mixing of their progenitor pools. We also observed an increase in oocyte depth with mouse age, which can be explained either by depth-guided selection of oocytes for ovulation or by post-natal renewal. Overall, our study sheds light on substantial novel aspects of female germline preservation and development.

  16. Cell Lineage Analysis of the Mammalian Female Germline

    PubMed Central

    Elbaz, Judith; Jinich, Adrian; Chapal-Ilani, Noa; Maruvka, Yosef E.; Nevo, Nava; Marx, Zipora; Horovitz, Inna; Wasserstrom, Adam; Mayo, Avi; Shur, Irena; Benayahu, Dafna; Skorecki, Karl; Segal, Eran; Dekel, Nava; Shapiro, Ehud

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental aspects of embryonic and post-natal development, including maintenance of the mammalian female germline, are largely unknown. Here we employ a retrospective, phylogenetic-based method for reconstructing cell lineage trees utilizing somatic mutations accumulated in microsatellites, to study female germline dynamics in mice. Reconstructed cell lineage trees can be used to estimate lineage relationships between different cell types, as well as cell depth (number of cell divisions since the zygote). We show that, in the reconstructed mouse cell lineage trees, oocytes form clusters that are separate from hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, both in young and old mice, indicating that these populations belong to distinct lineages. Furthermore, while cumulus cells sampled from different ovarian follicles are distinctly clustered on the reconstructed trees, oocytes from the left and right ovaries are not, suggesting a mixing of their progenitor pools. We also observed an increase in oocyte depth with mouse age, which can be explained either by depth-guided selection of oocytes for ovulation or by post-natal renewal. Overall, our study sheds light on substantial novel aspects of female germline preservation and development. PMID:22383887

  17. Cooperative nutrient accumulation sustains growth of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Son, Sungmin; Stevens, Mark M; Chao, Hui Xiao; Thoreen, Carson; Hosios, Aaron M; Schweitzer, Lawrence D; Weng, Yaochung; Wood, Kris; Sabatini, David; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Manalis, Scott

    2015-01-01

    The coordination of metabolic processes to allow increased nutrient uptake and utilization for macromolecular synthesis is central for cell growth. Although studies of bulk cell populations have revealed important metabolic and signaling requirements that impact cell growth on long time scales, whether the same regulation influences short-term cell growth remains an open question. Here we investigate cell growth by monitoring mass accumulation of mammalian cells while rapidly depleting particular nutrients. Within minutes following the depletion of glucose or glutamine, we observe a growth reduction that is larger than the mass accumulation rate of the nutrient. This indicates that if one particular nutrient is depleted, the cell rapidly adjusts the amount that other nutrients are accumulated, which is consistent with cooperative nutrient accumulation. Population measurements of nutrient sensing pathways involving mTOR, AKT, ERK, PKA, MST1, or AMPK, or pro-survival pathways involving autophagy suggest that they do not mediate this growth reduction. Furthermore, the protein synthesis rate does not change proportionally to the mass accumulation rate over these time scales, suggesting that intracellular metabolic pools buffer the growth response. Our findings demonstrate that cell growth can be regulated over much shorter time scales than previously appreciated. PMID:26620632

  18. Evolving proteins in mammalian cells using somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Tsien, Roger Y

    2006-01-01

    We describe a new method to mutate target genes through somatic hypermutation (SHM) and to evolve proteins directly in living mammalian cells. Target genes are expressed under the control of an inducible promoter in a B-cell line that hypermutates its immunoglobulin (Ig) V genes constitutively. Mutations can be introduced into the target gene through SHM upon transcription. Mutant genes are then expressed and selected or screened for desired properties in cells. Identified cells are subjected to another round of mutation and selection or screening. This process can be iterated easily for numerous rounds, and multiple reinforcing mutations can be accumulated to produce desirable phenotypes. This approach bypasses labor-intensive in vitro mutagenesis and samples a large protein sequence space. In this protocol a monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1.2) was evolved in Ramos cells to afford a mutant (mPlum) with far-red emission. This method can be adapted to evolve other eukaryotic proteins and to be used in other cells able to perform SHM. For each round of evolution, it takes approximately 1 d to mutate the target gene, approximately 0.5-1 d to select or screen, and 2-4 d to propagate the cells for the next round depending on how many cells are collected. PMID:17406421

  19. Gene transfer into mammalian cells by particle bombardment.

    PubMed

    Heiser, W C

    1994-03-01

    Using COS-7 and Chinese hamster ovary cells as model systems, I have examined the efficiency of gene transfer into mammalian cells by particle bombardment. The most important parameters affecting transformation efficiency are the size of the particles, the target distance, and the extent of chamber vacuum. The size of the cell culture plate also affects transformation efficiency. Factors which have little effect on transformation efficiency are the helium pressure, the gap distance, and the macrocarrier travel distance. Compared to several other gene transfer techniques, particle bombardment has the advantage of requiring a low amount of DNA and a low number of cells for successful expression, measured as either transient or stable. I also describe transformation of several murine cell lines which have not been successfully transformed, or have been transformed at only low levels using other methods. These cell lines include preadipocytes (BMS-2), macrophages (J774), and transformed pre-B cells (38B9 and 70Z/3). Compared to transformation by electroporation, lipofection, and diethylaminoethyl dextran, particle bombardment was found to give 50- to 240-fold higher levels of transient expression as measured by luciferase activity in cell extracts. PMID:8203746

  20. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of urban particulate matter in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Dumax-Vorzet, Audrey F; Tate, M; Walmsley, Richard; Elder, Rhod H; Povey, Andrew C

    2015-09-01

    Ambient air particulate matter (PM)-associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been linked to a variety of altered cellular outcomes. In this study, three different PM samples from diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), urban dust standard reference material SRM1649a and air collected in Manchester have been tested for their ability to oxidise DNA in a cell-free assay, to increase intracellular ROS levels and to induce CYP1A1 gene expression in mammalian cells. In addition, the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of PM were assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and alkaline comet assay, respectively. All PM samples catalysed the Fenton reaction in a cell-free assay, but only DEP resulted in the generation of ROS as measured by dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate oxidation in mammalian cells. However, there was no evidence that increased ROS was a consequence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism via CYP1A1 induction as urban dust, the Manchester dust samples but not DEP-induced CYP1A1 expression. Urban dust was more cytotoxic in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) than the other PM samples and also induced expression of GADD45a in the GreenScreen Human Cell assay without S9 activation suggesting the presence of a direct-acting genotoxicant. Urban dust and DEP produced comparable levels of DNA damage, as assessed by the alkaline comet assay, in MEFs at higher levels than those induced by Manchester PM. In conclusion, results from the cytotoxic and genotoxic assays are not consistent with ROS production being the sole determinant of PM-induced toxicity. This suggests that the organic component can contribute significantly to this toxicity and that further work is required to better characterise the extent to which ROS and organic components contribute to PM-induced toxicity.

  1. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of urban particulate matter in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Dumax-Vorzet, Audrey F.; Tate, M.; Walmsley, Richard; Elder, Rhod H.; Povey, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Ambient air particulate matter (PM)-associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been linked to a variety of altered cellular outcomes. In this study, three different PM samples from diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), urban dust standard reference material SRM1649a and air collected in Manchester have been tested for their ability to oxidise DNA in a cell-free assay, to increase intracellular ROS levels and to induce CYP1A1 gene expression in mammalian cells. In addition, the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of PM were assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and alkaline comet assay, respectively. All PM samples catalysed the Fenton reaction in a cell-free assay, but only DEP resulted in the generation of ROS as measured by dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate oxidation in mammalian cells. However, there was no evidence that increased ROS was a consequence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism via CYP1A1 induction as urban dust, the Manchester dust samples but not DEP-induced CYP1A1 expression. Urban dust was more cytotoxic in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) than the other PM samples and also induced expression of GADD45a in the GreenScreen Human Cell assay without S9 activation suggesting the presence of a direct-acting genotoxicant. Urban dust and DEP produced comparable levels of DNA damage, as assessed by the alkaline comet assay, in MEFs at higher levels than those induced by Manchester PM. In conclusion, results from the cytotoxic and genotoxic assays are not consistent with ROS production being the sole determinant of PM-induced toxicity. This suggests that the organic component can contribute significantly to this toxicity and that further work is required to better characterise the extent to which ROS and organic components contribute to PM-induced toxicity. PMID:26113525

  2. Computing in mammalian cells with nucleic acid strand exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, Benjamin; Chen, Yuan-Jyue; Zurla, Chiara; Pochekailov, Sergii; Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Santangelo, Philip J.; Seelig, Georg

    2016-03-01

    DNA strand displacement has been widely used for the design of molecular circuits, motors, and sensors in cell-free settings. Recently, it has been shown that this technology can also operate in biological environments, but capabilities remain limited. Here, we look to adapt strand displacement and exchange reactions to mammalian cells and report DNA circuitry that can directly interact with a native mRNA. We began by optimizing the cellular performance of fluorescent reporters based on four-way strand exchange reactions and identified robust design principles by systematically varying the molecular structure, chemistry and delivery method. Next, we developed and tested AND and OR logic gates based on four-way strand exchange, demonstrating the feasibility of multi-input logic. Finally, we established that functional siRNA could be activated through strand exchange, and used native mRNA as programmable scaffolds for co-localizing gates and visualizing their operation with subcellular resolution.

  3. Engineering of ribozyme-based riboswitches for mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Markus; Ausländer, David; Fussenegger, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Artificial RNA riboswitches--apart from protein-based gene regulation systems, which have been known about for a long time--have become increasingly important in biotechnology and synthetic biology. Aptamer-controlled hammerhead ribozymes (so-called aptazymes) have been shown to be a versatile platform for the engineering of novel gene regulators. Since aptazymes are cis-acting elements that are located in the untranslated regions of a gene of interest, their application does not need any further protein co-factor. This presents the opportunity to simplify complex gene networks while simultaneously expanding the repertoire of available parts. Nevertheless, the generation of novel aptazymes requires a functional aptamer-ribozyme connection, which can be difficult to engineer. This article describes a novel approach for using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) in order to identify functional aptazymes in bacteria and their subsequent transfer into mammalian cells. PMID:22305857

  4. Computing in mammalian cells with nucleic acid strand exchange

    PubMed Central

    Pochekailov, Sergii; Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Santangelo, Philip J.; Seelig, Georg

    2015-01-01

    DNA strand displacement has been widely used for the design of molecular circuits, motors, and sensors in cell-free settings. Recently, it has been shown that this technology can also operate in biological environments, but capabilities remain limited. Here, we look to adapt strand displacement and exchange reactions to mammalian cells and report DNA circuitry that can directly interact with a native mRNA. We began by optimizing the cellular performance of fluorescent reporters based on four-way strand exchange reactions and identified robust design principles by systematically varying the molecular structure, chemistry and delivery method. Next, we developed and tested AND and OR logic gates based on four-way strand exchange, demonstrating the feasibility of multi-input logic. Finally, we established that functional siRNA could be activated through strand exchange, and used native mRNA as programmable scaffolds for co-localizing gates and visualizing their operation with subcellular resolution. PMID:26689378

  5. The fungicide mancozeb induces toxic effects on mammalian granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Paro, Rita; Tiboni, Gian Mario; Buccione, Roberto; Rossi, Gianna; Cellini, Valerio; Canipari, Rita; Cecconi, Sandra

    2012-04-15

    The ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate mancozeb is a widely used fungicide with low reported toxicity in mammals. In mice, mancozeb induces embryo apoptosis, affects oocyte meiotic spindle morphology and impairs fertilization rate even when used at very low concentrations. We evaluated the toxic effects of mancozeb on the mouse and human ovarian somatic granulosa cells. We examined parameters such as cell morphology, induction of apoptosis, and p53 expression levels. Mouse granulosa cells exposed to mancozeb underwent a time- and dose-dependent modification of their morphology, and acquired the ability to migrate but not to proliferate. The expression level of p53, in terms of mRNA and protein content, decreased significantly in comparison with unexposed cells, but no change in apoptosis was recorded. Toxic effects could be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of ethylenthiourea (ETU), the main mancozeb catabolite, which was found in culture medium. Human granulosa cells also showed dose-dependent morphological changes and reduced p53 expression levels after exposure to mancozeb. Altogether, these results indicate that mancozeb affects the somatic cells of the mammalian ovarian follicles by inducing a premalignant-like status, and that such damage occurs to the same extent in both mouse and human GC. These results further substantiate the concept that mancozeb should be regarded as a reproductive toxicant. PMID:22369882

  6. The Mammalian Cell Cycle Regulates Parvovirus Nuclear Capsid Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Riolobos, Laura; Domínguez, Carlos; Kann, Michael; Almendral, José M.

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown whether the mammalian cell cycle could impact the assembly of viruses maturing in the nucleus. We addressed this question using MVM, a reference member of the icosahedral ssDNA nuclear parvoviruses, which requires cell proliferation to infect by mechanisms partly understood. Constitutively expressed MVM capsid subunits (VPs) accumulated in the cytoplasm of mouse and human fibroblasts synchronized at G0, G1, and G1/S transition. Upon arrest release, VPs translocated to the nucleus as cells entered S phase, at efficiencies relying on cell origin and arrest method, and immediately assembled into capsids. In synchronously infected cells, the consecutive virus life cycle steps (gene expression, proteins nuclear translocation, capsid assembly, genome replication and encapsidation) proceeded tightly coupled to cell cycle progression from G0/G1 through S into G2 phase. However, a DNA synthesis stress caused by thymidine irreversibly disrupted virus life cycle, as VPs became increasingly retained in the cytoplasm hours post-stress, forming empty capsids in mouse fibroblasts, thereby impairing encapsidation of the nuclear viral DNA replicative intermediates. Synchronously infected cells subjected to density-arrest signals while traversing early S phase also blocked VPs transport, resulting in a similar misplaced cytoplasmic capsid assembly in mouse fibroblasts. In contrast, thymidine and density arrest signals deregulating virus assembly neither perturbed nuclear translocation of the NS1 protein nor viral genome replication occurring under S/G2 cycle arrest. An underlying mechanism of cell cycle control was identified in the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated VPs trimeric assembly intermediates, which accessed a non-conserved route distinct from the importin α2/β1 and transportin pathways. The exquisite cell cycle-dependence of parvovirus nuclear capsid assembly conforms a novel paradigm of time and functional coupling between cellular and virus life

  7. Gold Nanoparticles Enhanced Electroporation for Mammalian Cell Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Yingbo; Huang, Shuyan; Liao, Wei-Ching; Lu, Yang; Wang, Shengnian

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation figured prominently as an effective nonviral gene delivery approach for its balance on the transfection efficiency and cell viability, no restrictions of probe or cell type, and operation simplicity. The commercial electroporation systems have been widely adopted in the past two decades while still carry drawbacks associated with the high applied electric voltage, unsatisfied delivery efficiency, and/or low cell viability. By adding highly conductive gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in electroporation solution, we demonstrated enhanced electroporation performance (i.e. better DNA delivery efficiency and higher cell viability) on mammalian cells from two different aspects: the free, naked AuNPs reduce the resistance of the electroporation solution so that the local pulse strength on cells was enhanced; targeting AuNPs (e.g., Tf-AuNPs) were brought to the cell membrane to work as virtual microelectrodes to porate cells with limited area from many different sites. The enhancement was confirmed with leukemia cells in both a commercial batch electroporation system and a home-made flow-through system using pWizGFP plasmid DNA probes. Such enhancement depends on the size, concentration, and the mixing ratio of free AuNPs/Tf-AuNPs. An equivalent mixture of free AuNPs and Tf-AuNPs exhibited the best enhancement with the transfection efficiency increased 2-3 folds at minimum sacrifice of cell viability. This new delivery concept, the combination of nanoparticles and electroporation technologies, may stimulate various in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications which rely on the efficient delivery of nucleic acids, anticancer drugs, or other therapeutic materials. PMID:24749393

  8. Gold nanoparticles enhanced electroporation for mammalian cell transfection.

    PubMed

    Zu, Yingbo; Huang, Shuyan; Liao, Wei-Ching; Lu, Yang; Wang, Shengnian

    2014-06-01

    Electroporation figured prominently as an effective nonviral gene delivery approach for its balance on the transfection efficiency and cell viability, no restrictions of probe or cell type, and operation simplicity. The commercial electroporation systems have been widely adopted in the past two decades while still carry drawbacks associated with the high applied electric voltage, unsatisfied delivery efficiency, and/or low cell viability. By adding highly conductive gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in electroporation solution, we demonstrated enhanced electroporation performance (i.e., better DNA delivery efficiency and higher cell viability) on mammalian cells from two different aspects: the free, naked AuNPs reduce the resistance of the electroporation solution so that the local pulse strength on cells was enhanced; targeting AuNPs (e.g., Tf-AuNPs) were brought to the cell membrane to work as virtual microelectrodes to porate cells with limited area from many different sites. The enhancement was confirmed with leukemia cells in both a commercial batch electroporation system and a home-made flow-through system using pWizGFP plasmid DNA probes. Such enhancement depends on the size, concentration, and the mixing ratio of free AuNPs/Tf-AuNPs. An equivalent mixture of free AuNPs and Tf-AuNPs exhibited the best enhancement with the transfection efficiency increased 2-3 folds at minimum sacrifice of cell viability. This new delivery concept, the combination of nanoparticles and electroporation technologies, may stimulate various in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications which rely on the efficient delivery of nucleic acids, anticancer drugs, or other therapeutic materials.

  9. Radioimmunotherapy of Cryptococcus neoformans spares bystander mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Ruth A; Jiang, Zewei; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Casadevall, Arturo; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Aim Previously, we showed that radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for cryptococcal infections using radioactively labeled antibodies recognizing the cryptococcal capsule reduced fungal burden and prolonged survival of mice infected with Cryptococcus neoformans. Here, we investigate the effects of RIT on bystander mammalian cells. Materials & methods Heat-killed C. neoformans bound to anticapsular antibodies, unlabeled or labeled with the β-emitter rhenium-188 (16.9-h half-life) or the α-emitter bismuth-213 (46-min half-life), was incubated with macrophage-like J774.16 cells or epithelial-like Chinese hamster ovary cells. Lactate dehydrogenase activity, crystal violet uptake, reduction of tetrazolium dye (2,3)-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfenyl)-(2H)-terazolium-5-carboxanilide and nitric oxide production were measured. Results The J774.16 and Chinese hamster ovary cells maintained membrane integrity, viability and metabolic activity following exposure to radiolabeled C. neoformans. Conclusion RIT of C. neoformans is a selective therapy with minimal effects on host cells and these results are consistent with observations that RIT-treated mice with cryptococcal infection lacked RIT-related pathological changes in lungs and brain tissues. PMID:24020737

  10. The effect of ascetic acid on mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mariana, Oana C; Trujillo, Antoinette; Sanders, Claire K; Burnett, Kassidy S; Freyer, James P; Mourant, Judith R

    2010-01-01

    Effects of the contrast agent, acetic acid, on mammalian cells are studied using light scattering measurements, viability and fluorescence pH assays. Results depend on whether cells are in PBS or are live and metabolizing. Acetic acid is a contrast agent used to aid the detection of cancerous and precancerous lesions of the uterine cervix. Typically 3% or 5% acetic acid is applied to the swface of the cervix and areas of the tissue that turn 'acetowhite' are considered more likely to be precancerous. The mechanism of action of acetic acid has never been understood in detail, although there are several hypotheses. One is that a decrease in pH causes cytokeratins in epithelial cells to polymerize. We will present data demonstrating that this is not the sole mechanism of acetowhitening. Another hypothesis is that a decrease in pH in the nucleus causes deacetylation of the histones which in turn results in a dense chromatin structure. Relevant to this hypothesis we have measured the internal pH of cells. Additional goals of this work are to understand what physical changes result in acetowhitening, to understand why there is variation in how cells respond to acetic acid, and to investigate how acetowhitening affects the light scatter properties measured by a fiber-optic probe we have developed for cervical cancer diagnostics.

  11. The fungicide mancozeb induces toxic effects on mammalian granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paro, Rita; Tiboni, Gian Mario; Buccione, Roberto; Rossi, Gianna; Cellini, Valerio; Canipari, Rita; Cecconi, Sandra

    2012-04-15

    The ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate mancozeb is a widely used fungicide with low reported toxicity in mammals. In mice, mancozeb induces embryo apoptosis, affects oocyte meiotic spindle morphology and impairs fertilization rate even when used at very low concentrations. We evaluated the toxic effects of mancozeb on the mouse and human ovarian somatic granulosa cells. We examined parameters such as cell morphology, induction of apoptosis, and p53 expression levels. Mouse granulosa cells exposed to mancozeb underwent a time- and dose-dependent modification of their morphology, and acquired the ability to migrate but not to proliferate. The expression level of p53, in terms of mRNA and protein content, decreased significantly in comparison with unexposed cells, but no change in apoptosis was recorded. Toxic effects could be attributed, at least in part, to the presence of ethylenthiourea (ETU), the main mancozeb catabolite, which was found in culture medium. Human granulosa cells also showed dose-dependent morphological changes and reduced p53 expression levels after exposure to mancozeb. Altogether, these results indicate that mancozeb affects the somatic cells of the mammalian ovarian follicles by inducing a premalignant-like status, and that such damage occurs to the same extent in both mouse and human GC. These results further substantiate the concept that mancozeb should be regarded as a reproductive toxicant. Highlights: ► The fungicide mancozeb affects oocyte spindle morphology and fertilization rate. ► We investigated the toxic effects of mancozeb on mouse and human granulosa cells. ► Granulosa cells modify their morphology and expression level of p53. ► Mancozeb induces a premalignant-like status in exposed cells.

  12. Polydimethylsiloxane SlipChip for mammalian cell culture applications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Wen; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) SlipChip for in vitro cell culture applications, multiple-treatment assays, cell co-cultures, and cytokine detection assays. The PDMS SlipChip is composed of two PDMS layers with microfluidic channels on each surface that are separated by a thin silicone fluid (Si-fluid) layer. The integration of Si-fluid enables the two PDMS layers to be slid to different positions; therefore, the channel patterns can be re-arranged for various applications. The SlipChip design significantly reduces the complexity of sample handling, transportation, and treatment processes. To apply the developed SlipChip for cell culture applications, human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (A549) and lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) were cultured to examine the biocompatibility of the developed PDMS SlipChip. Moreover, embryonic pluripotent stem cells (ES-D3) were also cultured in the device to evaluate the retention of their stemness in the device. The experimental results show that cell morphology, viability and proliferation are not affected when the cells are cultured in the SlipChip, indicating that the device is highly compatible with mammalian cell culture. In addition, the stemness of the ES-D3 cells was highly retained after they were cultured in the device, suggesting the feasibility of using the SlipChip for stem cell research. Various cell experiments, such as simultaneous triple staining of cells and co-culture of MRC-5 with A549 cells, were also performed to demonstrate the functionalities of the PDMS SlipChip. Furthermore, we used a cytokine detection assay to evaluate the effect of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) treatment on the cytokine secretion of A549 cells using the SlipChip. The developed PDMS SlipChip provides a straightforward and effective platform for various on-chip in vitro cell cultures and consequent analysis, which is promising for a number of cell biology studies and biomedical applications. PMID:26381390

  13. Hypoxia-mediated regulation of gene expression in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Shu-Ching; Claffey, Kevin P.

    1998-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying oxygen sensing in mammalian cells has been extensively investigated in the areas of glucose transport, glycolysis, erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and catecholamine metabolism. Expression of functionally operative representative proteins in these specific areas, such as the glucose transporter 1, glycolytic enzymes, erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor and tyrosine hydroxylase are all induced by hypoxia. Recent studies demonstrated that both transcriptional activation and post-transcriptional mechanisms are important to the hypoxia-mediated regulation of gene expression. In this article, the cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors involved in the transcriptional activation of gene expression will be reviewed. In addition, the mechanisms of post-transcriptional mRNA stabilization will also be addressed. We will discuss whether these two processes of regulation of hypoxia-responsive genes are mechanistically linked and co-operative in nature. PMID:10319016

  14. Systematic Transfer of Prokaryotic Sensors and Circuits to Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotic regulatory proteins respond to diverse signals and represent a rich resource for building synthetic sensors and circuits. The TetR family contains >105 members that use a simple mechanism to respond to stimuli and bind distinct DNA operators. We present a platform that enables the transfer of these regulators to mammalian cells, which is demonstrated using human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The repressors are modified to include nuclear localization signals (NLS) and responsive promoters are built by incorporating multiple operators. Activators are also constructed by modifying the protein to include a VP16 domain. Together, this approach yields 15 new regulators that demonstrate 19- to 551-fold induction and retain both the low levels of crosstalk in DNA binding specificity observed between the parent regulators in Escherichia coli, as well as their dynamic range of activity. By taking advantage of the DAPG small molecule sensing mediated by the PhlF repressor, we introduce a new inducible system with 50-fold induction and a threshold of 0.9 μM DAPG, which is comparable to the classic Dox-induced TetR system. A set of NOT gates is constructed from the new repressors and their response function quantified. Finally, the Dox- and DAPG- inducible systems and two new activators are used to build a synthetic enhancer (fuzzy AND gate), requiring the coordination of 5 transcription factors organized into two layers. This work introduces a generic approach for the development of mammalian genetic sensors and circuits to populate a toolbox that can be applied to diverse applications from biomanufacturing to living therapeutics. PMID:25360681

  15. Systematic transfer of prokaryotic sensors and circuits to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Brynne C; Siciliano, Velia; Ghodasara, Amar; Wroblewska, Liliana; Clancy, Kevin; Trefzer, Axel C; Chesnut, Jonathan D; Weiss, Ron; Voigt, Christopher A

    2014-12-19

    Prokaryotic regulatory proteins respond to diverse signals and represent a rich resource for building synthetic sensors and circuits. The TetR family contains >10(5) members that use a simple mechanism to respond to stimuli and bind distinct DNA operators. We present a platform that enables the transfer of these regulators to mammalian cells, which is demonstrated using human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The repressors are modified to include nuclear localization signals (NLS) and responsive promoters are built by incorporating multiple operators. Activators are also constructed by modifying the protein to include a VP16 domain. Together, this approach yields 15 new regulators that demonstrate 19- to 551-fold induction and retain both the low levels of crosstalk in DNA binding specificity observed between the parent regulators in Escherichia coli, as well as their dynamic range of activity. By taking advantage of the DAPG small molecule sensing mediated by the PhlF repressor, we introduce a new inducible system with 50-fold induction and a threshold of 0.9 μM DAPG, which is comparable to the classic Dox-induced TetR system. A set of NOT gates is constructed from the new repressors and their response function quantified. Finally, the Dox- and DAPG- inducible systems and two new activators are used to build a synthetic enhancer (fuzzy AND gate), requiring the coordination of 5 transcription factors organized into two layers. This work introduces a generic approach for the development of mammalian genetic sensors and circuits to populate a toolbox that can be applied to diverse applications from biomanufacturing to living therapeutics.

  16. Helium Ion Microscopy Visualizes Lipid Nanodomains in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Matthias; Frese, Natalie; Beyer, André; Heimann, Peter; Widera, Darius; Mönkemöller, Viola; Huser, Thomas; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2015-11-18

    Cell membranes are composed of 2D bilayers of amphipathic lipids, which allow a lateral movement of the respective membrane components. These components are arranged in an inhomogeneous manner as transient micro- and nanodomains, which are believed to be crucially involved in the regulation of signal transduction pathways in mammalian cells. Because of their small size (diameter 10-200 nm), membrane nanodomains cannot be directly imaged using conventional light microscopy. Here, direct visualization of cell membrane nanodomains by helium ion microscopy (HIM) is presented. It is shown that HIM is capable to image biological specimens without any conductive coating and that HIM images clearly allow the identification of nanodomains in the ultrastructure of membranes with 1.5 nm resolution. The shape of these nanodomains is preserved by fixation of the surrounding unsaturated fatty acids while saturated fatty acids inside the nanodomains are selectively removed. Atomic force microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, 3D structured illumination microscopy, and direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy provide additional evidence that the structures in the HIM images of cell membranes originate from membrane nanodomains. The nanodomains observed by HIM have an average diameter of 20 nm and are densely arranged with a minimal nearest neighbor distance of ≈ 15 nm.

  17. Helium Ion Microscopy Visualizes Lipid Nanodomains in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Matthias; Frese, Natalie; Beyer, André; Heimann, Peter; Widera, Darius; Mönkemöller, Viola; Huser, Thomas; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Gölzhäuser, Armin

    2015-11-18

    Cell membranes are composed of 2D bilayers of amphipathic lipids, which allow a lateral movement of the respective membrane components. These components are arranged in an inhomogeneous manner as transient micro- and nanodomains, which are believed to be crucially involved in the regulation of signal transduction pathways in mammalian cells. Because of their small size (diameter 10-200 nm), membrane nanodomains cannot be directly imaged using conventional light microscopy. Here, direct visualization of cell membrane nanodomains by helium ion microscopy (HIM) is presented. It is shown that HIM is capable to image biological specimens without any conductive coating and that HIM images clearly allow the identification of nanodomains in the ultrastructure of membranes with 1.5 nm resolution. The shape of these nanodomains is preserved by fixation of the surrounding unsaturated fatty acids while saturated fatty acids inside the nanodomains are selectively removed. Atomic force microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, 3D structured illumination microscopy, and direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy provide additional evidence that the structures in the HIM images of cell membranes originate from membrane nanodomains. The nanodomains observed by HIM have an average diameter of 20 nm and are densely arranged with a minimal nearest neighbor distance of ≈ 15 nm. PMID:26436577

  18. In vitro assessment of biopersistence using mammalian cell systems.

    PubMed Central

    Jaurand, M C

    1994-01-01

    Biopersistence of fibers in the respiratory airways is a concept including both the physical durability of the fibers and their chemical stability. Physical durability results from several events of diverse origins: fiber epuration by the lung clearance mechanisms, internalization by scavenger cells and fiber splitting. Fibers residing in the lung milieu will be attacked and modified chemically, structurally, and physically (size and shape). Fiber toxicity, which is very likely to be dependent on physical fiber characteristics, will also be dependent on the duration of the fiber's stay in the tissue. Biopersistence, therefore, will be a key issue in determining fiber toxicity. So far, few in vitro systems have been used to study parameters involved in biopersistence. However, examples exist of investigations of fiber phagocytosis by mammalian cells in culture, either by macrophages, or epithelial or mesothelial cells, and studies have also been reported of the fate of internalized fibers in relation to fiber dimensions and chemical stability, especially within macrophages and mesothelial cells. The methods will be presented and discussed to determine to what extent the development of in vitro biophysical models could help in determining those parameters, known or thought to be relevant to fiber persistence. PMID:7882956

  19. Specific repertoire of olfactory receptor genes in the male germ cells of several mammalian species

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderhaeghen, P.; Schurmans, S.; Vassart, G.; Parmentier, M.

    1997-02-01

    Olfactory receptors constitute the largest family among G protein-coupled receptors, with up to 1000 members expected. We have previously shown that genes belonging to this family were expressed in the male germ line from both dog and human. We have subsequently demonstrated the presence of one of the corresponding olfactory receptor proteins during dog spermatogenesis and in mature sperm cells. In this study, we investigated whether the unexpected pattern of expression of olfactory receptors in the male germ line was conserved in other mammalian species. Using reverse transcription-PCR with primers specific for the olfactory receptor gene family, about 20 olfactory receptor cDNA fragments were cloned from the testis of each mammalian species tested. As a whole, they displayed no sequence specificity compared to other olfactory receptors, but highly homologous, possibly orthologous, genes were amplified from different species. Finally, their pattern of expression, as determined by RNase protection assay, revealed that many but not all of these receptors were expressed predominantly in testis. The male germ line from each mammalian species tested is thus characterized by a specific repertoire of olfactory receptors, which display a pattern of expression suggestive of their potential implication in the control of sperm maturation, migration, or fertilization. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Origin of bistability underlying mammalian cell cycle entry.

    PubMed

    Yao, Guang; Tan, Cheemeng; West, Mike; Nevins, Joseph R; You, Lingchong

    2011-04-26

    Precise control of cell proliferation is fundamental to tissue homeostasis and differentiation. Mammalian cells commit to proliferation at the restriction point (R-point). It has long been recognized that the R-point is tightly regulated by the Rb-E2F signaling pathway. Our recent work has further demonstrated that this regulation is mediated by a bistable switch mechanism. Nevertheless, the essential regulatory features in the Rb-E2F pathway that create this switching property have not been defined. Here we analyzed a library of gene circuits comprising all possible link combinations in a simplified Rb-E2F network. We identified a minimal circuit that is able to generate robust, resettable bistability. This minimal circuit contains a feed-forward loop coupled with a mutual-inhibition feedback loop, which forms an AND-gate control of the E2F activation. Underscoring its importance, experimental disruption of this circuit abolishes maintenance of the activated E2F state, supporting its importance for the bistability of the Rb-E2F system. Our findings suggested basic design principles for the robust control of the bistable cell cycle entry at the R-point. PMID:21525871

  1. Origin of bistability underlying mammalian cell cycle entry

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Guang; Tan, Cheemeng; West, Mike; Nevins, Joseph R; You, Lingchong

    2011-01-01

    Precise control of cell proliferation is fundamental to tissue homeostasis and differentiation. Mammalian cells commit to proliferation at the restriction point (R-point). It has long been recognized that the R-point is tightly regulated by the Rb–E2F signaling pathway. Our recent work has further demonstrated that this regulation is mediated by a bistable switch mechanism. Nevertheless, the essential regulatory features in the Rb–E2F pathway that create this switching property have not been defined. Here we analyzed a library of gene circuits comprising all possible link combinations in a simplified Rb–E2F network. We identified a minimal circuit that is able to generate robust, resettable bistability. This minimal circuit contains a feed-forward loop coupled with a mutual-inhibition feedback loop, which forms an AND-gate control of the E2F activation. Underscoring its importance, experimental disruption of this circuit abolishes maintenance of the activated E2F state, supporting its importance for the bistability of the Rb–E2F system. Our findings suggested basic design principles for the robust control of the bistable cell cycle entry at the R-point. PMID:21525871

  2. Flexible and dynamic nucleosome fiber in living mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Tadasu; Kaizu, Kazunari; Pack, Chan-Gi; Tamura, Sachiko; Tani, Tomomi; Hihara, Saera; Nagai, Takeharu; Takahashi, Koichi; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Genomic DNA is organized three dimensionally within cells as chromatin and is searched and read by various proteins by an unknown mechanism; this mediates diverse cell functions. Recently, several pieces of evidence, including our cryomicroscopy and synchrotron X-ray scattering analyses, have demonstrated that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibers without a 30-nm chromatin fiber (i.e., a polymer melt-like structure). This melt-like structure implies a less physically constrained and locally more dynamic state, which may be crucial for protein factors to scan genomic DNA. Using a combined approach of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, Monte Carlo computer simulations, and single nucleosome imaging, we demonstrated the flexible and dynamic nature of the nucleosome fiber in living mammalian cells. We observed local nucleosome fluctuation (~50 nm movement/30 ms) caused by Brownian motion. Our in vivo/in silico results suggest that local nucleosome dynamics facilitate chromatin accessibility and play a critical role in the scanning of genome information.

  3. Ski represses BMP signaling in Xenopus and mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    kluo@lbl.gov

    2001-05-16

    The bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) play important roles in vertebrate development. In Xenopus, BMPs act as epidermal inducers and also as negative regulators of neurogenesis. Antagonism of BMP signaling results in neuralization. BMPs signal through the cell-surface receptors and downstream Smad molecules. Upon stimulation with BMP, Smad1, Smad5, and Smad8 are phosphorylated by the activated BMP receptors, form a complex with Smad4, and translocate into the nucleus, where they regulate the expression of BMP target genes. Here, we show that the Ski oncoprotein can block BMP signaling and the expression of BMP-responsive genes in both Xenopus and mammalian cells by directly interacting with and repressing the activity of BMP-specific Smad complexes. This ability to antagonize BMP signaling results in neuralization by Ski in the Xenopus embryo and blocking of osteoblast differentiation of murine W-20-17 cells. Thus, Ski is able to repress the activity of all receptor-associated Smads and may regulate vertebrate development by modulating the signaling activity of transforming growth factor-{beta} family members.

  4. Robust syntaxin-4 immunoreactivity in mammalian horizontal cell processes

    PubMed Central

    HIRANO, ARLENE A.; BRANDSTÄTTER, JOHANN HELMUT; VILA, ALEJANDRO; BRECHA, NICHOLAS C.

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal cells mediate inhibitory feed-forward and feedback communication in the outer retina; however, mechanisms that underlie transmitter release from mammalian horizontal cells are poorly understood. Toward determining whether the molecular machinery for exocytosis is present in horizontal cells, we investigated the localization of syntaxin-4, a SNARE protein involved in targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane, in mouse, rat, and rabbit retinae using immunocytochemistry. We report robust expression of syntaxin-4 in the outer plexiform layer of all three species. Syntaxin-4 occurred in processes and tips of horizontal cells, with regularly spaced, thicker sandwich-like structures along the processes. Double labeling with syntaxin-4 and calbindin antibodies, a horizontal cell marker, demonstrated syntaxin-4 localization to horizontal cell processes; whereas, double labeling with PKC antibodies, a rod bipolar cell (RBC) marker, showed a lack of co-localization, with syntaxin-4 immunolabeling occurring just distal to RBC dendritic tips. Syntaxin-4 immunolabeling occurred within VGLUT-1-immunoreactive photoreceptor terminals and underneath synaptic ribbons, labeled by CtBP2/RIBEYE antibodies, consistent with localization in invaginating horizontal cell tips at photoreceptor triad synapses. Vertical sections of retina immunostained for syntaxin-4 and peanut agglutinin (PNA) established that the prominent patches of syntaxin-4 immunoreactivity were adjacent to the base of cone pedicles. Horizontal sections through the OPL indicate a one-to-one co-localization of syntaxin-4 densities at likely all cone pedicles, with syntaxin-4 immunoreactivity interdigitating with PNA labeling. Pre-embedding immuno-electron microscopy confirmed the subcellular localization of syntaxin-4 labeling to lateral elements at both rod and cone triad synapses. Finally, co-localization with SNAP-25, a possible binding partner of syntaxin-4, indicated co-expression of these SNARE proteins in

  5. Hollow fibers - Their applications to the study of mammalian cell function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Angeline, M.; Harkness, J.; Chu, M.; Grindleland, R.

    1984-01-01

    The use of hollow fiber technology in cell culture and transplantation is examined. The morphologies of encapsulated pituitary cells before and after implantation into the rat are defined. Implantation experiments using hollow fibers to study mammalian cell functions are described. Consideration is given to examining somatotroph, prolactin, prostrate, fibroblast, and retinal cell functions. These experiments demonstrate that hollow fiber technology is applicable for studying mammalian cell functions.

  6. Genetic changes in Mammalian cells transformed by helium cells

    SciTech Connect

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. . Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche); Yang, T.C.; Roots, R. )

    1990-11-01

    Midterm Syrian Hamster embryo (SHE) cells were employed to study high LET-radiation induced tumorigenesis. Normal SHE cells (secondary passage) were irradiated with accelerated helium ions at an incident energy of 22 MeV/u (9--10 keV/{mu}m). Transformed clones were isolated after growth in soft agar of cells obtained from the foci of the initial monolayer plated postirradiation. To study the progression process of malignant transformation, the transformed clones were followed by monolayer subculturing for prolonged periods of time. Subsequently, neoplasia tests in nude mice were done. In this work, however, we have focused on karyotypic changes in the banding patterns of the chromosomes during the early part of the progressive process of cell transformation for helium ion-induced transformed cells. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Non-cell-autonomous effects of vector-expressed regulatory RNAs in mammalian heart cells.

    PubMed

    Kizana, E; Cingolani, E; Marbán, E

    2009-09-01

    In mammalian cells, small regulatory RNA molecules are able to modulate gene expression in a cell-autonomous manner. In contrast, this mechanism of gene regulation can occur systemically in plants and nematodes. The existence of similar cell-to-cell transmission in mammalian cells has been explored, but generalizibilty and mechanistic insights have remained elusive. Here, we show that small regulatory RNA molecules are capable of a non-cell-autonomous effect between primary cardiac myocytes through a gap-junction-dependent mechanism. Co-culture experiments showed that both Dicer-processed small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and Drosha-processed microRNAs (miRNAs) were capable of target gene knockdown and physiological effects in a non-cell-autonomous manner. Target gene siRNA molecules were detected in recipient cells, indicating transfer of the primary effector molecule. All of these effects were abrogated by dominant-negative molecular suppression of gap junction function. Our results show that both siRNAs and miRNAs are capable of a non-cell-autonomous effect between mammalian cells through gap junctions. The recognition of this biological process raises the novel therapeutic prospect of a bystander effect after gene transfer to tissues bearing gap junctions and for cell engineering with a view to creating regulatory RNA donor cells that exert their influence throughout a syncytium. PMID:19516277

  8. FDA-approved drugs that protect mammalian neurons from glucose toxicity slow aging dependent on cbp and protect against proteotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lublin, Alex; Isoda, Fumiko; Patel, Harshil; Yen, Kelvin; Nguyen, Linda; Hajje, Daher; Schwartz, Marc; Mobbs, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Screening a library of drugs with known safety profiles in humans yielded 30 drugs that reliably protected mammalian neurons against glucose toxicity. Subsequent screening demonstrated that 6 of these 30 drugs increase lifespan in C. elegans: caffeine, ciclopirox olamine, tannic acid, acetaminophen, bacitracin, and baicalein. Every drug significantly reduced the age-dependent acceleration of mortality rate. These protective effects were blocked by RNAi inhibition of cbp-1 in adults only, which also blocks protective effects of dietary restriction. Only 2 drugs, caffeine and tannic acid, exhibited a similar dependency on DAF-16. Caffeine, tannic acid, and bacitracin also reduced pathology in a transgenic model of proteotoxicity associated with Alzheimer's disease. These results further support a key role for glucose toxicity in driving age-related pathologies and for CBP-1 in protection against age-related pathologies. These results also provide novel lead compounds with known safety profiles in human for treatment of age-related diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and diabetic complications.

  9. Firefly luciferase gene: structure and expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    de Wet, J R; Wood, K V; DeLuca, M; Helinski, D R; Subramani, S

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the luciferase gene from the firefly Photinus pyralis was determined from the analysis of cDNA and genomic clones. The gene contains six introns, all less than 60 bases in length. The 5' end of the luciferase mRNA was determined by both S1 nuclease analysis and primer extension. Although the luciferase cDNA clone lacked the six N-terminal codons of the open reading frame, we were able to reconstruct the equivalent of a full-length cDNA using the genomic clone as a source of the missing 5' sequence. The full-length, intronless luciferase gene was inserted into mammalian expression vectors and introduced into monkey (CV-1) cells in which enzymatically active firefly luciferase was transiently expressed. In addition, cell lines stably expressing firefly luciferase were isolated. Deleting a portion of the 5'-untranslated region of the luciferase gene removed an upstream initiation (AUG) codon and resulted in a twofold increase in the level of luciferase expression. The ability of the full-length luciferase gene to activate cryptic or enhancerless promoters was also greatly reduced or eliminated by this 5' deletion. Assaying the expression of luciferase provides a rapid and inexpensive method for monitoring promoter activity. Depending on the instrumentation employed to detect luciferase activity, we estimate this assay to be from 30- to 1,000-fold more sensitive than assaying chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression. Images PMID:3821727

  10. Experimental Design to Evaluate Directed Adaptive Mutation in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiaro, Christopher R; May, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Background We describe the experimental design for a methodological approach to determine whether directed adaptive mutation occurs in mammalian cells. Identification of directed adaptive mutation would have profound practical significance for a wide variety of biomedical problems, including disease development and resistance to treatment. In adaptive mutation, the genetic or epigenetic change is not random; instead, the presence and type of selection influences the frequency and character of the mutation event. Adaptive mutation can contribute to the evolution of microbial pathogenesis, cancer, and drug resistance, and may become a focus of novel therapeutic interventions. Objective Our experimental approach was designed to distinguish between 3 types of mutation: (1) random mutations that are independent of selective pressure, (2) undirected adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces a general increase in the mutation rate, and (3) directed adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces targeted mutations that specifically influence the adaptive response. The purpose of this report is to introduce an experimental design and describe limited pilot experiment data (not to describe a complete set of experiments); hence, it is an early report. Methods An experimental design based on immortalization of mouse embryonic fibroblast cells is presented that links clonal cell growth to reversal of an inactivating polyadenylation site mutation. Thus, cells exhibit growth only in the presence of both the countermutation and an inducing agent (doxycycline). The type and frequency of mutation in the presence or absence of doxycycline will be evaluated. Additional experimental approaches would determine whether the cells exhibit a generalized increase in mutation rate and/or whether the cells show altered expression of error-prone DNA polymerases or of mismatch repair proteins. Results We performed the initial stages of characterizing our system

  11. From protozoa to mammalian cells: a new paradigm in the life cycle of intracellular bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Harb, O S; Gao, L Y; Abu Kwaik, Y

    2000-06-01

    It is becoming apparent that several intracellular bacterial pathogens of humans can also survive within protozoa. This interaction with protozoa may protect these pathogens from harsh conditions in the extracellular environment and enhance their infectivity in mammals. This relationship has been clearly established in the case of the interaction between Legionella pneumophila and its protozoan hosts. In addition, the adaptation of bacterial pathogens to the intracellular life within the primitive eukaryotic protozoa may have provided them with the means to infect the more evolved mammalian cells. This is evident from the existence of several similarities, at both the phenotypic and the molecular levels, between the infection of mammalian and protozoan cells by L. pneumophila. Thus, protozoa appear to play a central role in the transition of bacteria from the environment to mammals. In essence, protozoa may be viewed as a 'biological gym', within which intracellular bacterial pathogens train for their encounters with the more evolved mammalian cells. Thus, intracellular bacterial pathogens have benefited from the structural and biochemical conservation of cellular processes in eukaryotes. The interaction of intracellular bacterial pathogens and protozoa highlights this conservation and may constitute a simplified model for the study of these pathogens and the evolution of cellular processes in eukaryotes. Furthermore, in addition to being environmental reservoirs for known intracellular pathogens of humans and animals, protozoa may be sources of emerging pathogenic bacteria. It is thus critical to re-examine the relationship between bacteria and protozoa to further our understanding of current human bacterial pathogenesis and, possibly, to predict the appearance of emerging pathogens. PMID:11200426

  12. Imaging local Ca2+ signals in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lock, Jeffrey T; Ellefsen, Kyle L; Settle, Bret; Parker, Ian; Smith, Ian F

    2015-01-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ ions regulate numerous aspects of cellular activity in almost all cell types, controlling processes as wide-ranging as gene transcription, electrical excitability and cell proliferation. The diversity and specificity of Ca2+ signaling derives from mechanisms by which Ca2+ signals are generated to act over different time and spatial scales, ranging from cell-wide oscillations and waves occurring over the periods of minutes to local transient Ca2+ microdomains (Ca2+ puffs) lasting milliseconds. Recent advances in electron multiplied CCD (EMCCD) cameras now allow for imaging of local Ca2+ signals with a 128 x 128 pixel spatial resolution at rates of >500 frames sec(-1) (fps). This approach is highly parallel and enables the simultaneous monitoring of hundreds of channels or puff sites in a single experiment. However, the vast amounts of data generated (ca. 1 Gb per min) render visual identification and analysis of local Ca2+ events impracticable. Here we describe and demonstrate the procedures for the acquisition, detection, and analysis of local IP3-mediated Ca2+ signals in intact mammalian cells loaded with Ca2+ indicators using both wide-field epi-fluorescence (WF) and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. Furthermore, we describe an algorithm developed within the open-source software environment Python that automates the identification and analysis of these local Ca2+ signals. The algorithm localizes sites of Ca2+ release with sub-pixel resolution; allows user review of data; and outputs time sequences of fluorescence ratio signals together with amplitude and kinetic data in an Excel-compatible table. PMID:25867132

  13. Cellular track model of biological damage to mammalian cell cultures from galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Nealy, John E.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1991-01-01

    The assessment of biological damage from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a current interest for exploratory class space missions where the highly ionizing, high-energy, high-charge ions (HZE) particles are the major concern. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values determined by ground-based experiments with HZE particles are well described by a parametric track theory of cell inactivation. Using the track model and a deterministic GCR transport code, the biological damage to mammalian cell cultures is considered for 1 year in free space at solar minimum for typical spacecraft shielding. Included are the effects of projectile and target fragmentation. The RBE values for the GCR spectrum which are fluence-dependent in the track model are found to be more severe than the quality factors identified by the International Commission on Radiological Protection publication 26 and seem to obey a simple scaling law with the duration period in free space.

  14. Spontaneous slow replication fork progression elicits mitosis alterations in homologous recombination-deficient mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Therese; Magdalou, Indiana; Barascu, Aurélia; Técher, Hervé; Debatisse, Michelle; Lopez, Bernard S

    2014-01-14

    Homologous recombination deficient (HR(-)) mammalian cells spontaneously display reduced replication fork (RF) movement and mitotic extra centrosomes. We show here that these cells present a complex mitotic phenotype, including prolonged metaphase arrest, anaphase bridges, and multipolar segregations. We then asked whether the replication and the mitotic phenotypes are interdependent. First, we determined low doses of hydroxyurea that did not affect the cell cycle distribution or activate CHK1 phosphorylation but did slow the replication fork movement of wild-type cells to the same level than in HR(-) cells. Remarkably, these low hydroxyurea doses generated the same mitotic defects (and to the same extent) in wild-type cells as observed in unchallenged HR(-) cells. Reciprocally, supplying nucleotide precursors to HR(-) cells suppressed both their replication deceleration and mitotic extra centrosome phenotypes. Therefore, subtle replication stress that escapes to surveillance pathways and, thus, fails to prevent cells from entering mitosis alters metaphase progression and centrosome number, resulting in multipolar mitosis. Importantly, multipolar mitosis results in global unbalanced chromosome segregation involving the whole genome, even fully replicated chromosomes. These data highlight the cross-talk between chromosome replication and segregation, and the importance of HR at the interface of these two processes for protection against general genome instability.

  15. Bacillus thuringiensis membrane-damaging toxins acting on mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Celandroni, Francesco; Salvetti, Sara; Senesi, Sonia; Ghelardi, Emilia

    2014-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is widely used as a biopesticide in forestry and agriculture, being able to produce potent species-specific insecticidal toxins and considered nonpathogenic to other animals. More recently, however, repeated observations are documenting the association of this microorganism with various infectious diseases in humans, such as food-poisoning-associated diarrheas, periodontitis, bacteremia, as well as ocular, burn, and wound infections. Similar to B. cereus, B. thuringiensis produces an array of virulence factors acting against mammalian cells, such as phosphatidylcholine- and phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC and PI-PLC), hemolysins, in particular hemolysin BL (HBL), and various enterotoxins. The contribution of some of these toxins to B. thuringiensis pathogenicity has been studied in animal models of infection, following intravitreous, intranasal, or intratracheal inoculation. These studies lead to the speculation that the activities of PC-PLC, PI-PLC, and HBL are responsible for most of the pathogenic properties of B. thuringiensis in nongastrointestinal infections in mammals. This review summarizes data regarding the biological activity, the genetic basis, and the structural features of these membrane-damaging toxins.

  16. Vitamin H-regulated transgene expression in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Wilfried; Bacchus, William; Daoud-El Baba, Marie; Fussenegger, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Although adjustable transgene expression systems are considered essential for future therapeutic and biopharmaceutical manufacturing applications, the currently available transcription control modalities all require side-effect-prone inducers such as immunosupressants, hormones and antibiotics for fine-tuning. We have designed a novel mammalian transcription-control system, which is reversibly fine-tuned by non-toxic vitamin H (also referred to as biotin). Ligation of vitamin H, by engineered Escherichia coli biotin ligase (BirA), to a synthetic biotinylation signal fused to the tetracycline-dependent transactivator (tTA), enables heterodimerization of tTA to a streptavidin-linked transrepressor domain (KRAB), thereby abolishing tTA-mediated transactivation of specific target promoters. As heterodimerization of tTA to KRAB is ultimately conditional upon the presence of vitamin H, the system is vitamin H responsive. Transgenic Chinese hamster ovary cells, engineered for vitamin H-responsive gene expression, showed high-level, adjustable and reversible production of a human model glycoprotein in bench-scale culture systems, bioreactor-based biopharmaceutical manufacturing scenarios, and after implantation into mice. The vitamin H-responsive expression systems showed unique band pass filter-like regulation features characterized by high-level expression at low (0–2 nM biotin), maximum repression at intermediate (100–1000 nM biotin), and high-level expression at increased (>100 000 nM biotin) biotin concentrations. Sequential ON-to-OFF-to-ON, ON-to-OFF and OFF-to-ON expression profiles with graded expression transitions can all be achieved by simply increasing the level of a single inducer molecule without exchanging the culture medium. These novel expression characteristics mediated by an FDA-licensed inducer may foster advances in therapeutic cell engineering and manufacturing of difficult-to-produce protein therapeutics. PMID:17827215

  17. Microencapsulation for the Therapeutic Delivery of Drugs, Live Mammalian and Bacterial Cells, and Other Biopharmaceutics: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Saha, Shyamali; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Kahouli, Imen; Prakash, Satya

    2013-01-01

    Microencapsulation is a technology that has shown significant promise in biotherapeutics, and other applications. It has been proven useful in the immobilization of drugs, live mammalian and bacterial cells and other cells, and other biopharmaceutics molecules, as it can provide material structuration, protection of the enclosed product, and controlled release of the encapsulated contents, all of which can ensure efficient and safe therapeutic effects. This paper is a comprehensive review of microencapsulation and its latest developments in the field. It provides a comprehensive overview of the technology and primary goals of microencapsulation and discusses various processes and techniques involved in microencapsulation including physical, chemical, physicochemical, and other methods involved. It also summarizes the state-of-the-art successes of microencapsulation, specifically with regard to the encapsulation of microorganisms, mammalian cells, drugs, and other biopharmaceutics in various diseases. The limitations and future directions of microencapsulation technologies are also discussed. PMID:26555963

  18. Engineered mammalian RNAi can elicit antiviral protection that negates the requirement for the interferon response

    PubMed Central

    Bouhaddou, Mehdi; Sachs, David; tenOever, Benjamin Robert

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY While the intrinsic antiviral cell defenses of many kingdoms utilize pathogen-specific small RNAs, the antiviral response of chordates is primarily protein-based and not uniquely tailored to the incoming microbe. In an effort to explain this evolutionary bifurcation, we determined whether antiviral RNA interference (RNAi) was sufficient to replace the protein-based type I interferon (IFN-I) system of mammals. To this end, we recreated an RNAi-like response in mammals and determined its effectiveness to combat influenza A virus in vivo in the presence and absence of the canonical IFN-I system. Mammalian antiviral RNAi, elicited by either host- or virus-derived small RNAs, effectively attenuated virus and prevented disease independently of the innate immune response. These data find that chordates could have utilized RNAi as their primary antiviral cell defense and suggest that the IFN-I system emerged as a result of natural selection imposed by ancient pathogens. PMID:26549455

  19. Freezing-induced uptake of trehalose into mammalian cells facilitates cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Sieme, Harald; Wolkers, Willem F

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if membrane-impermeable molecules are taken up by fibroblasts when exposing the cells to membrane phase transitions and/or freezing-induced osmotic forces. The membrane-impermeable fluorescent dye lucifer yellow (LY) was used to visualize and quantify uptake during endocytosis, and after freezing-thawing. In addition, trehalose uptake after freezing and thawing was studied. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies showed that fibroblasts display a minor non-cooperative phase transition during cooling at suprazero temperatures, whereas cells display strong highly cooperative fluid-to-gel membrane phase transitions during freezing, both in the absence and presence of protectants. Cells do not show uptake of LY upon passing the suprazero membrane phase transition at 30-10°C, whereas after freezing and thawing cells show intracellular LY equally distributed within the cell. Both, LY and trehalose are taken up by fibroblasts after freezing and thawing with loading efficiencies approaching 50%. When using 250 mM extracellular trehalose during cryopreservation, intracellular concentrations greater than 100 mM were determined after thawing. A plot of cryosurvival versus the cooling rate showed a narrow inverted-'U'-shaped curve with an optimal cooling rate of 40°C min(-1). Diluting cells cryopreserved with trehalose in isotonic cell culture medium resulted in a loss of cell viability, which was attributed to intracellular trehalose causing an osmotic imbalance. Taken together, mammalian cells can be loaded with membrane-impermeable compounds, including the protective agent trehalose, by subjecting the cells to freezing-induced osmotic stress. PMID:27003129

  20. Expression in mammalian cells of a gene from Streptomyces alboniger conferring puromycin resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Vara, J A; Portela, A; Ortín, J; Jiménez, A

    1986-01-01

    The gene encoding a puromycin N-acetyl transferase from Streptomyces alboniger has been cloned next to the SV40 early promoter in a mammalian cells-Escherichia coli shuttle vector. When this construction was introduced into VERO cells it expressed the relevant enzymic activity. Moreover, the puromycin N-acetyl transferase gene has been used as a dominant marker for the selection of transformed mammalian cells able to grow in the presence of the antibiotic. PMID:3714487

  1. Growth inhibition and DNA damage induced by Cre recombinase in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Loonstra, A; Vooijs, M; Beverloo, H B; Allak, B A; van Drunen, E; Kanaar, R; Berns, A; Jonkers, J

    2001-07-31

    The use of Cre/loxP recombination in mammalian cells has expanded rapidly. We describe here that Cre expression in cultured mammalian cells may result in a markedly reduced proliferation and that this effect is dependent on the endonuclease activity of Cre. Chromosome analysis after Cre expression revealed numerous chromosomal aberrations and an increased number of sister chromatid exchanges. Titration experiments in mouse embryo fibroblasts with a ligand-regulatable Cre-ER(T) show that toxicity is dependent on the level of Cre activity. Prolonged, low levels of Cre activity permit recombination without concomitant toxicity. This urges for a careful titration of Cre activity in conditional gene modification in mammalian cells.

  2. Functional expression of mammalian receptors and membrane channels in different cells.

    PubMed

    Eifler, Nora; Duckely, Myriam; Sumanovski, Lazar T; Egan, Terrance M; Oksche, Alexander; Konopka, James B; Lüthi, Anita; Engel, Andreas; Werten, Paul J L

    2007-08-01

    In native tissues, the majority of medically important membrane proteins is only present at low concentrations, making their overexpression in recombinant systems a prerequisite for structural studies. Here, we explore the commonly used eukaryotic expression systems-yeast, baculovirus/insect cells (Sf9) and Semliki Forest Virus (SFV)/mammalian cells-for the expression of seven different eukaryotic membrane proteins from a variety of protein families. The expression levels, quality, biological activity, localization and solubility of all expressed proteins are compared in order to identify the advantages of one system over the other. SFV-transfected mammalian cell lines provide the closest to native environment for the expression of mammalian membrane proteins, and they exhibited the best overall performance. But depending on the protein, baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells performed almost as well as mammalian cells. The lowest expression levels for the proteins tested here were obtained in yeast.

  3. Diffusional water permeability of mammalian red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Benga, G; Borza, T

    1995-12-01

    An extensive programme of comparative nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of the membrane diffusional permeability for water (Pd) and of the activation energy (Ea,d) of this process in red blood cells (RBCs) from 21 mammalian species was carried out. On the basis of Pd, these species could be divided into three groups. First, the RBC's from humans, cow, sheep and "large" kangaroos (Macropus giganteus and Macropus rufus) had Pd values approximately 5 x 10(-3) cm/s at 25 degrees and 7 x 10(-3) cm/s at 37 degrees C. The RBCs from other marsupial species, mouse, rat, guinea pig and rabbit, had Pd values roughly twice higher, whereas echidna RBCs were twice lower than human RBCs. The value of Ea,d was in most cases correlated with the values of Pd. A value of Ea,d approximately 26 kJ/mol was found for the RBCs from humans and the species having similar Pd values. Low values of Ea,d (ranging from 15 to 22 kJ/mol) appeared to be associated with relatively high values of Pd. The highest values of Ea,d (33 kJ/mol) was found in echidna RBCs. This points to specialized channels for water diffusion incorporated in membrane proteins; a relatively high water permeability of the RBC membrane could be due to a greater number of channel proteins. There are, however, situations where a very high water permeability of RBCs is associated with a high value of Ea,d (above 25 kJ/mol) as in the case of RBCs from mouse, rat and tree kangaroo. Moreover, it was found that Pd in different species was positively correlated to the RBC membrane phosphatidylcholine and negatively correlated to the sphingomyelin content. This suggests that in addition to the number of channel proteins, other factors are involved in the water permeability of the RBC membrane.

  4. Gold Nanoparticles Electroporation Enhanced Polyplex Delivery to Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shuyan; Deshmukh, Harshavardhan; Rajagopalan, Kartik Kumar; Wang, Shengnian

    2015-01-01

    Non-viral methods have been explored as the replacement of viral systems for their low toxicity and immunogenicity. However, they have yet to reach levels competitive to their viral counterparts. In this paper, we combined physical and chemical methods to improve the performance of polyplex delivery of DNA and siRNA. Specifically, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were used to carry polyplex (a chemical approach) while electroporation (a physical approach) was applied for fast and direct cytosolic delivery. In this hybrid approach, cationic polymer molecules condense and/or protect genetic probes as usual while AuNPs help fix polycations to reduce their cytotoxicity and promote the transfection efficiency of electroporation. AuNPs of various sizes were first coated with polyethylenimine (PEI), which were further conjugated with DNA plasmids or siRNA molecules to form AuNPs-polyplex. The hybrid nanoparticles were then mixed with cells and introduced into cell cytosol by electroporation. The delivery efficiency was evaluated with both model anchor cells (i.e., NIH 3T3) and suspension cells (i.e., K562), together with their impact on cell viability. We found that AuNP-polyplex showed 1.5~2 folds improvement on the transfection efficiency with no significant increase of toxicity when compared to free plasmid delivery by electroporation alone. Such a combination of physical and chemical delivery concept may stimulate further exploration in the delivery of various therapeutic materials for both in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:24777715

  5. Gold nanoparticles electroporation enhanced polyplex delivery to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuyan; Deshmukh, Harshavardhan; Rajagopalan, Kartik Kumar; Wang, Shengnian

    2014-07-01

    Nonviral methods have been explored as the replacement of viral systems for their low toxicity and immunogenicity. However, they have yet to reach levels competitive to their viral counterparts. In this paper, we combined physical and chemical methods to improve the performance of polyplex delivery of DNA and small interfering RNA. Specifically, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were used to carry polyplex (a chemical approach) while electroporation (a physical approach) was applied for fast and direct cytosolic delivery. In this hybrid approach, cationic polymer molecules condense and/or protect genetic probes as usual while AuNPs help fix polycations to reduce their cytotoxicity and promote the transfection efficiency of electroporation. AuNPs of various sizes were first coated with polyethylenimine, which were further conjugated with DNA plasmids or small interfering RNA molecules to form AuNPs-polyplex. The hybrid nanoparticles were then mixed with cells and introduced into cell cytosol by electroporation. The delivery efficiency was evaluated with both model anchor cells (i.e., NIH/3T3) and suspension cells (i.e., K562), together with their impact on cell viability. We found that AuNP-polyplex showed 1.5∼2 folds improvement on the transfection efficiency with no significant increase of toxicity when compared to free plasmid delivery by electroporation alone. Such a combination of physical and chemical delivery concept may stimulate further exploration in the delivery of various therapeutic materials for both in vitro and in vivo applications.

  6. Membrane penetrating peptides greatly enhance baculovirus transduction efficiency into mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hong-Zhang; Wu, Carol P.; Chao, Yu-Chan; Liu, Catherine Yen-Yen

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Ligation of CTP with GP64 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} Fusion of PTD with VP39 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} CTP and PTD-carrying viruses improve the transduction of co-transduced baculoviruses. {yields} Virus entry and gene expression can be separate events in different cell types. -- Abstract: The baculovirus group of insect viruses is widely used for foreign gene introduction into mammalian cells for gene expression and protein production; however, the efficiency of baculovirus entry into mammalian cells is in general still low. In this study, two recombinant baculoviruses were engineered and their ability to improve viral entry was examined: (1) cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) was fused with baculovirus envelope protein, GP64, to produce a cytoplasmic membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-CTP); and (2) the protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV TAT protein was fused with the baculovirus capsid protein VP39 to form a nuclear membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-PTD). Transduction experiments showed that both viruses had better transduction efficiency than vE, a control virus that only expresses EGFP in mammalian cells. Interestingly, vE-CTP and vE-PTD were also able to improve the transduction efficiency of a co-transduced baculovirus, resulting in higher levels of gene expression. Our results have described new routes to further enhance the development of baculovirus as a tool for gene delivery into mammalian cells.

  7. A cell-permeable fluorescent polymeric thermometer for intracellular temperature mapping in mammalian cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Teruyuki; Fukuda, Nanaho; Uchiyama, Seiichi; Inada, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    Changes in intracellular temperatures reflect the activity of the cell. Thus, the tool to measure intracellular temperatures could provide valuable information about cellular status. We previously reported a method to analyze the intracellular temperature distribution using a fluorescent polymeric thermometer (FPT) in combination with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Intracellular delivery of the FPT used in the previous study required microinjection. We now report a novel FPT that is cell permeable and highly photostable, and we describe the application of this FPT to the imaging of intracellular temperature distributions in various types of mammalian cell lines. This cell-permeable FPT displayed a temperature resolution of 0.05°C to 0.54°C within the range from 28°C to 38°C in HeLa cell extracts. Using our optimized protocol, this cell-permeable FPT spontaneously diffused into HeLa cells within 10 min of incubation and exhibited minimal toxicity over several hours of observation. FLIM analysis confirmed a temperature difference between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and heat production near the mitochondria, which were also detected previously using the microinjected FPT. We also showed that this cell-permeable FPT protocol can be applied to other mammalian cell lines, COS7 and NIH/3T3 cells. Thus, this cell-permeable FPT represents a promising tool to study cellular states and functions with respect to temperature.

  8. Relation Between the Cell Volume and the Cell Cycle Dynamics in Mammalian cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magno, A. C. G.; Oliveira, I. L.; Hauck, J. V. S.

    2016-08-01

    The main goal of this work is to add and analyze an equation that represents the volume in a dynamical model of the mammalian cell cycle proposed by Gérard and Goldbeter (2011) [1]. The cell division occurs when the cyclinB/Cdkl complex is totally degraded (Tyson and Novak, 2011)[2] and it reaches a minimum value. At this point, the cell is divided into two newborn daughter cells and each one will contain the half of the cytoplasmic content of the mother cell. The equations of our base model are only valid if the cell volume, where the reactions occur, is constant. Whether the cell volume is not constant, that is, the rate of change of its volume with respect to time is explicitly taken into account in the mathematical model, then the equations of the original model are no longer valid. Therefore, every equations were modified from the mass conservation principle for considering a volume that changes with time. Through this approach, the cell volume affects all model variables. Two different dynamic simulation methods were accomplished: deterministic and stochastic. In the stochastic simulation, the volume affects every model's parameters which have molar unit, whereas in the deterministic one, it is incorporated into the differential equations. In deterministic simulation, the biochemical species may be in concentration units, while in stochastic simulation such species must be converted to number of molecules which are directly proportional to the cell volume. In an effort to understand the influence of the new equation a stability analysis was performed. This elucidates how the growth factor impacts the stability of the model's limit cycles. In conclusion, a more precise model, in comparison to the base model, was created for the cell cycle as it now takes into consideration the cell volume variation

  9. Baculovirus as versatile vectors for protein expression in insect and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kost, Thomas A; Condreay, J Patrick; Jarvis, Donald L

    2005-05-01

    Today, many thousands of recombinant proteins, ranging from cytosolic enzymes to membrane-bound proteins, have been successfully produced in baculovirus-infected insect cells. Yet, in addition to its value in producing recombinant proteins in insect cells and larvae, this viral vector system continues to evolve in new and unexpected ways. This is exemplified by the development of engineered insect cell lines to mimic mammalian cell glycosylation of expressed proteins, baculovirus display strategies and the application of the virus as a mammalian-cell gene delivery vector. Novel vector design and cell engineering approaches will serve to further enhance the value of baculovirus technology.

  10. Algal autolysate medium to label proteins for NMR in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Fuccio, Carmelo; Luchinat, Enrico; Barbieri, Letizia; Neri, Sara; Fragai, Marco

    2016-04-01

    In-cell NMR provides structural and functional information on proteins directly inside living cells. At present, the high costs of the labeled media for mammalian cells represent a limiting factor for the development of this methodology. Here we report a protocol to prepare a homemade growth medium from Spirulina platensis autolysate, suitable to express uniformly labeled proteins inside mammalian cells at a reduced cost-per-sample. The human proteins SOD1 and Mia40 were overexpressed in human cells grown in (15)N-enriched S. platensis algal-derived medium, and high quality in-cell NMR spectra were obtained. PMID:27106902

  11. Differential Effects of Paromomycin on Ribosomes of Leishmania mexicana and Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Marisa M.; Malchiodi, Emilio L.; Algranati, Israel D.

    2011-01-01

    Paromomycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic having low mammalian cell toxicity, is one of the drugs currently used in the chemotherapy of cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. In order to understand the mode of action of this antibiotic at the molecular level, we have investigated the effects of paromomycin on protein synthesis in Leishmania and its mammalian hosts. We were able to demonstrate that in vivo protein synthesis in the promastigote stage of the parasite and its proliferation rate are markedly inhibited by paromomycin while being only slightly affected by other aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as streptomycin and neomycin B. Furthermore, both in vitro polypeptide synthesis induced by poly(U) as mRNA and accuracy of translation are significantly decreased by paromomycin in cell-free systems containing ribosomal particles of Leishmania promastigotes. Conversely, when ribosomes from mammalian cells are used instead of the protozoan particles, polyphenylalanine synthesis is only barely reduced by the antibiotic and the translation misreading remains almost unaltered. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of the interaction between paromomycin and protozoan or mammalian cell ribosomal RNAs shows a strong binding of antibiotic to the parasite ribosomal decoding site and practically no interaction with the mammalian cell counterpart. Our results indicating differential effects of paromomycin on the translation processes of the Leishmania parasite and its mammalian hosts can explain the therapeutic efficiency of this antibiotic as an antileishmaniasis agent. PMID:20956601

  12. Mechanism for multiplicity of steady states with distinct cell concentration in continuous culture of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Yongky, Andrew; Lee, Jongchan; Le, Tung; Mulukutla, Bhanu Chandra; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2015-07-01

    Continuous culture for the production of biopharmaceutical proteins offers the possibility of steady state operations and thus more consistent product quality and increased productivity. Under some conditions, multiplicity of steady states has been observed in continuous cultures of mammalian cells, wherein with the same dilution rate and feed nutrient composition, steady states with very different cell and product concentrations may be reached. At those different steady states, cells may exhibit a high glycolysis flux with high lactate production and low cell concentration, or a low glycolysis flux with low lactate and high cell concentration. These different steady states, with different cell concentration, also have different productivity. Developing a mechanistic understanding of the occurrence of steady state multiplicity and devising a strategy to steer the culture toward the desired steady state is critical. We establish a multi-scale kinetic model that integrates a mechanistic intracellular metabolic model and cell growth model in a continuous bioreactor. We show that steady state multiplicity exists in a range of dilution rate in continuous culture as a result of the bistable behavior in glycolysis. The insights from the model were used to devise strategies to guide the culture to the desired steady state in the multiple steady state region. The model provides a guideline principle in the design of continuous culture processes of mammalian cells.

  13. Baculoviruses deficient in ie1 gene function abrogate viral gene expression in transduced mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Efrose, Rodica; Swevers, Luc; Iatrou, Kostas

    2010-10-25

    One of the newest niches for baculoviruses-based technologies is their use as vectors for mammalian cell transduction and gene therapy applications. However, an outstanding safety issue related to such use is the residual expression of viral genes in infected mammalian cells. Here we show that infectious baculoviruses lacking the major transcriptional regulator, IE1, can be produced in insect host cells stably transformed with IE1 expression constructs lacking targets of homologous recombination that could promote the generation of wt-like revertants. Such ie1-deficient baculoviruses are unable to direct viral gene transcription to any appreciable degree and do not replicate in normal insect host cells. Most importantly, the residual viral gene expression, which occurs in mammalian cells infected with wt baculoviruses is reduced 10 to 100 fold in cells infected with ie1-deficient baculoviruses. Thus, ie1-deficient baculoviruses offer enhanced safety features to baculovirus-based vector systems destined for use in gene therapy applications.

  14. Color reduction of melanin by lysosomal and peroxisomal enzymes isolated from mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Jun; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Yoon, Jihee; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-02-01

    Lysosomes and peroxisomes are organelles with many functions in all eukaryotic cells. Lysosomes contain hydrolytic enzymes (lysozyme) that degrade molecules, whereas peroxisomes contain enzymes such as catalase that convert hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to water and oxygen and neutralize toxicity. In contrast, melanin is known as a helpful element to protect the skin against harmful ultraviolet rays. However, a high quantity of melanin leads to hyperpigmentation or skin cancer in human. New materials have already been discovered to inhibit tyrosinase in melanogenesis; however, melanin reduction does not suggest their preparation. In this study, we report that the color intensity because of melanin decreased by the cellular activation of lysosomes and peroxisomes. An increase in the superficial intensity of lysosome and peroxisome activities of HeLa cells was observed. In addition, a decrease in the amount of melanin has also been observed in mammalian cells without using any other chemical, showing that the process can work in vivo for treating melanin. Therefore, the results of this study indicate that the amount of melanin decreases by the lysosome and peroxisome activity after entering the cells, and functional organelles are effective in color reduction. This mechanism can be used in vivo for treating melanin.

  15. Fundamental aspects of the freezing of cells, with emphasis on mammalian ova and embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, P.

    1980-01-01

    The problem in cryobiology is how to cool cells to -196/sup 0/C and return them to normal temperatures without killing them. One important factor is the presence of a protective additive like glycerol or dimethyl sulfoxide. Mammalian cells rarely survive freezing to below -40/sup 0/C in its absence. In the presence of an additive, survival is critically dependent on the cooling rate. Supraoptimal rates and suboptimal rates are both damaging. Death at supraoptimal rates is the result of the formation of intracellular ice and its recrystallization during warming. Death at suboptimal rates is a consequence of the major alterations in aqueous solutions produced by ice formation. The chief effects are a major reduction in the fraction of the solution remaining unfrozen at a given temperature and a major increase in the solute concentration of that fraction. The introduction of molar concentrations of additive greatly reduces both the fraction frozen and the concentration of electrolytes in the unfrozen channels and in the cell interior. Usually, freezing either kills cells outright or it results in survivors that retain full capacity to function. But there is the possibility that in some cases survivors may in fact be impaired genetically or physiologically. All evidence indicates that genetic damage does not occur. But there are clear examples in which freezing does induce nonlethal physiological damage. (ERB)

  16. AMMONIA REMOVAL FROM MAMMALIAN CELL CULTURE MEDIUM BY ION-EXCHANGE MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolites such as ammonia and lactic acid formed during mammalian cell culture can frequently be toxic to the cells themselves beyond a threshold concentration of the metabolites. Cell culture conducted in the presence of such accumulated metabolites is therefore limited in pro...

  17. Adenovirus transcriptional regulatory regions are conserved in mammalian cells and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kornuc, M; Altman, R; Harrich, D; Garcia, J; Chao, J; Kayne, P; Gaynor, R

    1988-01-01

    The adenovirus early region 3 (E3) promoter is an early viral promoter which is strongly induced by the adenovirus transactivator protein E1A. DNase I footprinting with HeLa cell extracts has identified four factor-binding domains which appear to be involved in basal and E1A-induced transcriptional regulation. These binding domains may bind TATA region-binding factors (site I), the CREB/ATF protein (site II), the AP-1 protein (site III), and nuclear factor I/CTF (site IV). Recently, it has been shown that the DNA-binding domain of transcription factor AP-1 has homology with the yeast transcription factor GCN4 and that the yeast transactivator protein GAL4 is able to stimulate transcription in HeLa cells from promoters containing GAL4-binding sites. These results suggest an evolutionary conservation of both transcription factors and the mechanisms responsible for transcriptional activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eucaryotic organisms. To determine whether similar patterns of transcriptional regulation were seen with the E3 promoter in HeLa and yeast cells, the E3 promoter fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene was cloned into a high-copy-number plasmid and stably introduced into yeast cells. S1 analysis revealed that similar E3 promoter mRNA start sites were found in yeast and HeLa cells. DNase I footprinting with partially purified yeast extracts revealed that four regions of the E3 promoter were protected. Several of these regions were similar to binding sites determined by using HeLa cell extracts. Oligonucleotide mutagenesis of these binding domains indicated their importance in the transcriptional regulation of the E3 promoter in yeast cells. These results suggest that similar cellular transcription factor-binding sites may be involved in the regulation of promoters in both yeast and mammalian cells. Images PMID:2975753

  18. Adenovirus transcriptional regulatory regions are conserved in mammalian cells and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kornuc, M; Altman, R; Harrich, D; Garcia, J; Chao, J; Kayne, P; Gaynor, R

    1988-09-01

    The adenovirus early region 3 (E3) promoter is an early viral promoter which is strongly induced by the adenovirus transactivator protein E1A. DNase I footprinting with HeLa cell extracts has identified four factor-binding domains which appear to be involved in basal and E1A-induced transcriptional regulation. These binding domains may bind TATA region-binding factors (site I), the CREB/ATF protein (site II), the AP-1 protein (site III), and nuclear factor I/CTF (site IV). Recently, it has been shown that the DNA-binding domain of transcription factor AP-1 has homology with the yeast transcription factor GCN4 and that the yeast transactivator protein GAL4 is able to stimulate transcription in HeLa cells from promoters containing GAL4-binding sites. These results suggest an evolutionary conservation of both transcription factors and the mechanisms responsible for transcriptional activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eucaryotic organisms. To determine whether similar patterns of transcriptional regulation were seen with the E3 promoter in HeLa and yeast cells, the E3 promoter fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene was cloned into a high-copy-number plasmid and stably introduced into yeast cells. S1 analysis revealed that similar E3 promoter mRNA start sites were found in yeast and HeLa cells. DNase I footprinting with partially purified yeast extracts revealed that four regions of the E3 promoter were protected. Several of these regions were similar to binding sites determined by using HeLa cell extracts. Oligonucleotide mutagenesis of these binding domains indicated their importance in the transcriptional regulation of the E3 promoter in yeast cells. These results suggest that similar cellular transcription factor-binding sites may be involved in the regulation of promoters in both yeast and mammalian cells.

  19. Silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and toxic effects toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Peetsch, Alexander; Greulich, Christina; Braun, Dieter; Stroetges, Christian; Rehage, Heinz; Siebers, Bettina; Köller, Manfred; Epple, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Spherical silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles were synthesized in a co-precipitation route from calcium nitrate/silver nitrate and ammonium phosphate in a continuous process and colloidally stabilized by carboxymethyl cellulose. Nanoparticles with 0.39 wt% silver content and a diameter of about 50-60 nm were obtained. The toxic effects toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells were determined by viability tests and determination of the minimal inhibitory and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC). Three mammalian cells lines, i.e. human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and blood peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC, monocytes and T-lymphocytes), and two prokaryotic strains, i.e. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were used. Silver-doped calcium phosphate nanoparticles and silver acetate showed similar effect toward mammalian and prokaryotic cells with toxic silver concentrations in the range of 1-3 μg mL(-1).

  20. Engineering and Identifying Supercharged Proteins for Macromolecule Delivery into Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, David B.; Cronican, James J.; Liu, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Supercharged proteins are a class of engineered or naturally occurring proteins with unusually high net positive or negative theoretical charge. Both supernegatively and superpositively charged proteins exhibit a remarkable ability to withstand thermally or chemically induced aggregation. Superpositively charged proteins are also able to penetrate mammalian cells. Associating cargo with these proteins, such as plasmid DNA, siRNA, or other proteins, can enable the functional delivery of these macromolecules into mammalian cells both in vitro and in vivo. The potency of functional delivery in some cases can exceed that of other current methods for macromolecule delivery, including the use of cell-penetrating peptides such as Tat, and adenoviral delivery vectors. This chapter summarizes methods for engineering supercharged proteins, optimizing cell penetration, identifying naturally occurring supercharged proteins, and using these proteins for macromolecule delivery into mammalian cells. PMID:22230574

  1. EPR characterization of molecular targets for NO · in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guissani, A.; Henry, Y. A.

    1997-02-01

    First some elementary properties of nitric oxide NO · are presented: NO · is synthesized in mammalian cells from L-arginine, the reaction being catalyzed by the enzyme NO-synthase. The EPR spectroscopy of NO-complexes is shown; the formation of paramagnetic complexes with some metalloproteins including haemoglobin enables the EPR detection of such complexes. EPR-detectable targets for NO · in mammalian cells are then (rapidly) described, including first their detection (after induction of NO-synthases) through interaction of NO · with specific metalloenzymes, then NO · localization, the fact that the induction of NO-synthases in a generator cell such as a macrophage gives the same metabolic effects in target cells, and finally the implication of NO · in pathological states, where the inducible L-arginine-NO pathway plays an important role. It is concluded that EPR spectroscopy enables the unambiguous detection of such specific molecular targets for NO ·; in mammalian cells.

  2. Fully-automated roller bottle handling system for large scale culture of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kunitake, R; Suzuki, A; Ichihashi, H; Matsuda, S; Hirai, O; Morimoto, K

    1997-01-20

    A fully automatic and continuous cell culture system based on roller bottles is described in this paper. The system includes a culture rack storage station for storing a large number of roller bottles filled with culture medium and inoculated with mammalian cells, mass-handling facility for extracting completed cultures from the roller bottles, and replacing the culture medium. The various component units of the system were controlled either by a general-purpose programmable logic controller or a dedicated controller. The system provided four subsequent operation modes: cell inoculation, medium change, harvesting, and medium change. The operator could easily select and change the appropriate mode from outside of the aseptic area. The development of the system made large-scale production of mammalian cells, and manufacturing and stabilization of high quality products such as erythropoietin possible under total aseptic control, and opened up the door for industrial production of physiologically active substances as pharmaceutical drugs by mammalian cell culture.

  3. Coenzyme Q10 protects hair cells against aminoglycoside.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Kazuma; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Mikuriya, Takefumi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Kanagawa, Eiju; Hara, Hirotaka; Shimogori, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the production of free radicals is associated with sensory cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. Many researchers have reported that antioxidant reagents protect sensory cells in the inner ear, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an antioxidant that is consumed as a health food in many countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CoQ10 in mammalian vestibular hair cell death induced by aminoglycoside. Cultured utricles of CBA/CaN mice were divided into three groups (control group, neomycin group, and neomycin + CoQ10 group). In the neomycin group, utricles were cultured with neomycin (1 mM) to induce hair cell death. In the neomycin + CoQ10 group, utricles were cultured with neomycin and water-soluble CoQ10 (30-0.3 µM). Twenty-four hours after exposure to neomycin, the cultured tissues were fixed, and vestibular hair cells were labeled using an anti-calmodulin antibody. Significantly more hair cells survived in the neomycin + CoQ10 group than in the neomycin group. These data indicate that CoQ10 protects sensory hair cells against neomycin-induced death in the mammalian vestibular epithelium; therefore, CoQ10 may be useful as a protective drug in the inner ear. PMID:25265538

  4. a Study of Biophysical Mechanisms of Damage by Ionizing Radiation to Mammalian Cells in Vitro.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Zhang

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. An extensive survey made of published survival data of damage by ionizing radiation to mammalian cells in vitro has led to the new conclusion that the damage is determined by the specific ionization or the mean free path between ionizing events along the charged particle tracks. The optimum damage is observed when the mean free path is equivalent to the DNA double strand spacing of 1.8 nm. Therefore, the biological mechanism of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells in vitro is intra track dominant. A 100 keV electron accelerator has been constructed and commissioned to produce a broad beam irradiation field of greater than 1 cm diameter. The fluence rate may be adjusted from 10^8cm^ {-2}sec^{-1} downwards to enable further development as a chronic irradiation facility. Another new feature of the accelerator is that it incorporates a differential vacuum system which permits irradiation of the monolayer cell cultures to be carried out in normal pressure. Experiments of irradiation to Chinese hamster cells, by ^{241}Am alpha particles at low fluence rate, have supplied satisfactory data for testing a new DNA-rupture model which is under development. For V79 cells irradiated at a low fluence rate of 10^5cm^{ -2}min^{-1}, when survival data were fitted into the model, new biophysical parameters were extracted and a proposal was made that the repair phenomenon of cellular survival at very low doses is determined by three time factors: the irradiation time, the damage fixation time and the repair time. The values obtained were 3-4 hours for the mean repair time, and more than 10 hours for the damage to be considered permanent. Details of the monolayer cell culture technique developed and used in the present experiments are described. Consideration has been given to the significance of the results obtained from the study in radiation protection and in radiotherapy. In future studies it is recommended that more

  5. Phototransfection of mammalian cells using femtosecond laser pulses: optimization and applicability to stem cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mthunzi, Patience; Dholakia, Kishan; Gunn-Moore, Frank

    2010-07-01

    Recently, femtosecond laser pulses have been utilized for the targeted introduction of genetic matter into mammalian cells. This rapidly expanding and developing novel optical technique using a tightly focused laser light beam is called phototransfection. Extending previous studies [Stevenson et al., Opt. Express 14, 7125-7133 (2006)], we show that femtosecond lasers can be used to phototransfect a range of different cell lines, and specifically that this novel technology can also transfect mouse embryonic stem cell colonies with ~25% efficiency. Notably, we show the ability of differentiating these cells into the extraembryonic endoderm using phototransfection. Furthermore, we present two new findings aimed at optimizing the phototransfection method and improving applicability: first, the influence of the cell passage number on the transfection efficiency is explored and, second, the ability to enhance the transfection efficiency via whole culture treatments. Our results should encourage wider uptake of this methodology.

  6. Tobacco smoke as inducer for gas phase-controlled transgene expression in mammalian cells and mice.

    PubMed

    Weber, Wilfried; Spielmann, Manuela; Daoud El-Baba, Marie; Keller, Bettina; Aubel, Dominique; Fussenegger, Martin

    2005-06-30

    Capitalizing on components evolved to metabolize ethanol in Aspergillus nidulans, we previously designed the first molecular gas-gene expression interface using gaseous acetaldehyde as the major inducer. This fungus-derived acetaldehyde-inducible gene regulation (AIR) system operated perfectly and enabled precise and reversible transgene expression dosing in a variety of mammalian cells. We now validate the use of mainstream cigarette smoke typically containing acetaldehyde at regulation-effective nontoxic concentrations as a noninvasive modality to adjust transgene transcription in mammalian cells and mice. Indeed, tobacco smoke-induced expression fine-tuning of AIR-driven transgenes was successful in mammalian cells. Even mice implanted with cells transgenic for AIR-controlled SEAP (human secreted alkaline phosphatase) production showed serum SEAP levels correlating with inhaled tobacco smoke doses. Tobacco smoke-controlled gene expression may foster clinical opportunities as well as advances in understanding smoke-related pathologies.

  7. A dual molecular analogue tuner for dissecting protein function in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Brosh, Ran; Hrynyk, Iryna; Shen, Jessalyn; Waghray, Avinash; Zheng, Ning; Lemischka, Ihor R.

    2016-01-01

    Loss-of-function studies are fundamental for dissecting gene function. Yet, methods to rapidly and effectively perturb genes in mammalian cells, and particularly in stem cells, are scarce. Here we present a system for simultaneous conditional regulation of two different proteins in the same mammalian cell. This system harnesses the plant auxin and jasmonate hormone-induced degradation pathways, and is deliverable with only two lentiviral vectors. It combines RNAi-mediated silencing of two endogenous proteins with the expression of two exogenous proteins whose degradation is induced by external ligands in a rapid, reversible, titratable and independent manner. By engineering molecular tuners for NANOG, CHK1, p53 and NOTCH1 in mammalian stem cells, we have validated the applicability of the system and demonstrated its potential to unravel complex biological processes. PMID:27230261

  8. A lectin-based cell microarray approach to analyze the mammalian granulosa cell surface glycosylation profile.

    PubMed

    Accogli, Gianluca; Desantis, Salvatore; Martino, Nicola Antonio; Dell'Aquila, Maria Elena; Gemeiner, Peter; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-10-01

    The high complexity of glycome, the repertoire of glycans expressed in a cell or in an organism, is difficult to analyze and the use of new technologies has accelerated the progress of glycomics analysis. In the last decade, the microarray approaches, and in particular glycan and lectin microarrays, have provided new insights into evaluation of cell glycosylation status. Here we present a cell microarray method based on cell printing on microarray slides for the analysis of the glycosylation pattern of the cell glycocalyx. In order to demonstrate the reliability of the developed method, the glycome profiles of equine native uncultured mural granulosa cells (uGCs) and in vitro cultured mural granulosa cells (cGCs) were determined and compared. The method consists in the isolation of GCs, cell printing into arrays on microarray slide, incubation with a panel of biotinylated lectins, reaction with fluorescent streptavidin and signal intensity detection by a microarray scanner. Cell microarray technology revealed that glycocalyx of both uGCs and cGCs contains N-glycans, sialic acid terminating glycans, N-acetylglucosamine and O-glycans. The comparison of uGCs and cGCs glycan signals indicated an increase in the expression of sialic acids, N-acetylglucosamine, and N-glycans in cGCs. Glycan profiles determined by cell microarray agreed with those revealed by lectin histochemistry. The described cell microarray method represents a simple and sensitive procedure to analyze cell surface glycome in mammalian cells.

  9. Regulation of mammalian cell differentiation by long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenqian; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-11-01

    Differentiation of specialized cell types from stem and progenitor cells is tightly regulated at several levels, both during development and during somatic tissue homeostasis. Many long non-coding RNAs have been recognized as an additional layer of regulation in the specification of cellular identities; these non-coding species can modulate gene-expression programmes in various biological contexts through diverse mechanisms at the transcriptional, translational or messenger RNA stability levels. Here, we summarize findings that implicate long non-coding RNAs in the control of mammalian cell differentiation. We focus on several representative differentiation systems and discuss how specific long non-coding RNAs contribute to the regulation of mammalian development.

  10. The Nucleocapsid Protein of Coronaviruses Acts as a Viral Suppressor of RNA Silencing in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lei; Wang, Haiying; Ji, Yanxi; Yang, Jie; Xu, Shan; Huang, Xingyu; Wang, Zidao; Qin, Lei; Tien, Po; Zhou, Xi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA interference (RNAi) is a process of eukaryotic posttranscriptional gene silencing that functions in antiviral immunity in plants, nematodes, and insects. However, recent studies provided strong supports that RNAi also plays a role in antiviral mechanism in mammalian cells. To combat RNAi-mediated antiviral responses, many viruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSR) to facilitate their replication. VSRs have been widely studied for plant and insect viruses, but only a few have been defined for mammalian viruses currently. We identified a novel VSR from coronaviruses, a group of medically important mammalian viruses including Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and showed that the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of coronaviruses suppresses RNAi triggered by either short hairpin RNAs or small interfering RNAs in mammalian cells. Mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) is closely related to SARS-CoV in the family Coronaviridae and was used as a coronavirus replication model. The replication of MHV increased when the N proteins were expressed in trans, while knockdown of Dicer1 or Ago2 transcripts facilitated the MHV replication in mammalian cells. These results support the hypothesis that RNAi is a part of the antiviral immunity responses in mammalian cells. IMPORTANCE RNAi has been well known to play important antiviral roles from plants to invertebrates. However, recent studies provided strong supports that RNAi is also involved in antiviral response in mammalian cells. An important indication for RNAi-mediated antiviral activity in mammals is the fact that a number of mammalian viruses encode potent suppressors of RNA silencing. Our results demonstrate that coronavirus N protein could function as a VSR through its double-stranded RNA binding activity. Mutational analysis of N protein allowed us to find out the critical residues for the VSR activity. Using the MHV-A59 as the coronavirus replication model, we showed that ectopic

  11. Auxin induces cell proliferation in an experimental model of mammalian renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cernaro, Valeria; Medici, Maria Antonietta; Leonello, Giuseppa; Buemi, Antoine; Kohnke, Franz Heinrich; Villari, Antonino; Santoro, Domenico; Buemi, Michele

    2015-06-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is the main auxin produced by plants and plays a key role in the plant growth and development. This hormone is also present in humans where it is considered as a uremic toxin deriving from tryptophan metabolism. However, beyond this peculiar aspect, the involvement of auxin in human pathophysiology has not been further investigated. Since it is a growth hormone, we evaluated its proliferative properties in an in vitro model of mammalian renal tubular epithelial cells. We employed an experimental model of renal tubular epithelial cells belonging to the LLC-PK1 cell line that is derived from the kidney of healthy male pig. Growth effects of auxin against LLC-PK1 cell lines were determined by a rapid colorimetric assay. Increasing concentrations of auxin (to give a final concentration from 1 to 1000 ng/mL) were added and microplates were incubated for 72 h. Each auxin concentration was assayed in four wells and repeated four times. Cell proliferation significantly increased, compared to control cells, 72 h after addition of auxin to cultured LLC-PK1 cells. Statistically significant values were observed when 100 ng/mL (p < 0.01) and 1000 ng/mL (p < 0.05) were used. In conclusion, auxin influences cell growth not only in plants, where its role is well documented, but also in mammalian cell lines. This observation opens new scenarios in the field of tissue regeneration and may stimulate a novel line of research aiming at investigating whether this hormone really influences human physiology and pathophysiology and in particular, kidney regeneration.

  12. Exposure of Mammalian Cells to Air-Pollutant Mixtures at the Air-Liquid Interface

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been widely accepted that exposure of mammalian cells to air-pollutant mixtures at the air-liquid interface is a more realistic approach than exposing cell under submerged conditions. The VITROCELL systems, are commercially available systems for air-liquid interface expo...

  13. Studies on the mechanisms of mammalian cell killing by a freeze-thaw cycle: conditions that prevent cell killing using nucleated freezing

    SciTech Connect

    Shier, W.T.

    1988-04-01

    Normally a freeze-thaw cycle is a very efficient method of killing mammalian cells. However, this report describes conditions that prevent killing of cultured mammalian cells by nucleated freezing at -24 degrees C. Optimal protection from cell killing at -24 degrees C was obtained in isotonic solutions containing an organic cryoprotectant such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO; 10%, v/v), a saccharide such as sucrose over a broad concentration range from 50 to 150 mM, and glucose. Glycerol was also an effective cryoprotectant but other organic solvents were ineffective, although in some cases they appeared to protect cell membranes, while not protecting other vital components. A wide variety of saccharide structures were effective at protecting cells from freeze-thaw killing, with trehalose being particularly effective. The degree of resistance to killing by a freeze-thaw cycle under these conditions varied widely among different cell lines. If toxicity of DMSO was responsible for this variability of cryoprotection, it must have been due to short-term, not longer term, toxicity of DMSO. Studies on the mechanism by which cells are protected from killing under these conditions indicated that neither vitrification of the medium nor the concentrating of components during freezing were involved. One model not eliminated by the mechanistic studies proposes that the organic solvent cryoprotectant component acts by fluidizing membranes under the thawing conditions, so that any holes produced by ice crystals propagating through membranes can reseal during the thawing process. In this model one of the mechanisms by which the saccharide component could act is by entering the cells and stabilizing vital intracellular components. Consistent with this, a freeze-thaw cycle promoted the uptake of labeled sucrose into cultured cells.

  14. Distinct transcriptional responses elicited by unfolded nuclear or cytoplasmic protein in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Yusuke; Chen, Ling-chun; Chu, Bernard W; Swigut, Tomek; Wandless, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells possess a variety of signaling pathways that prevent accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins. Chief among these is the heat shock response (HSR), which is assumed to respond to unfolded proteins in the cytosol and nucleus alike. In this study, we probe this axiom further using engineered proteins called ‘destabilizing domains’, whose folding state we control with a small molecule. The sudden appearance of unfolded protein in mammalian cells elicits a robust transcriptional response, which is distinct from the HSR and other known pathways that respond to unfolded proteins. The cellular response to unfolded protein is strikingly different in the nucleus and the cytosol, although unfolded protein in either compartment engages the p53 network. This response provides cross-protection during subsequent proteotoxic stress, suggesting that it is a central component of protein quality control networks, and like the HSR, is likely to influence the initiation and progression of human pathologies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07687.001 PMID:26314864

  15. Transient inactivation of Rb and ARF yields regenerative cells from postmitotic mammalian muscle.

    PubMed

    Pajcini, Kostandin V; Corbel, Stephane Y; Sage, Julien; Pomerantz, Jason H; Blau, Helen M

    2010-08-01

    An outstanding biological question is why tissue regeneration in mammals is limited, whereas urodele amphibians and teleost fish regenerate major structures, largely by cell cycle reentry. Upon inactivation of Rb, proliferation of postmitotic urodele skeletal muscle is induced, whereas in mammalian muscle this mechanism does not exist. We postulated that a tumor suppressor present in mammals but absent in regenerative vertebrates, the Ink4a product ARF (alternative reading frame), is a regeneration suppressor. Concomitant inactivation of Arf and Rb led to mammalian muscle cell cycle reentry, loss of differentiation properties, and upregulation of cytokinetic machinery. Single postmitotic myocytes were isolated by laser micro-dissection-catapulting, and transient suppression of Arf and Rb yielded myoblast colonies that retained the ability to differentiate and fuse into myofibers upon transplantation in vivo. These results show that differentiation of mammalian cells is reversed by inactivation of Arf and Rb and support the hypothesis that Arf evolved at the expense of regeneration. PMID:20682446

  16. Establishment of a system for monitoring endoplasmic reticulum redox state in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanekura, Kohsuke; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Merksamer, Philip I.; Papa, Feroz R.; Urano, Fumihiko

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) performs a critical role in the oxidative folding of nascent proteins such that perturbations to ER homeostasis may lead to protein misfolding and subsequent pathological processes. Among the mechanisms for maintaining ER homeostasis is a redox regulation, which is a critical determinant of the fate of ER stressed cells. Here we report the establishment of a system for monitoring ER redox state in mammalian cells. The new ER redox sensing system was developed based on the previously described monitoring system in yeast. Our system could successfully monitor the dynamic ER redox state in mammalian cells. Using this system, we find that manipulation of ER oxidases changes ER redox state. The mammalian ER redox sensing system could be used to study the mechanisms of ER redox regulation and provide a foundation for an approach to develop novel therapeutic modalities for human diseases related to dysregulated ER homeostasis including diabetes, neurodegeneration and Wolfram syndrome. PMID:24042438

  17. Novel insights into mammalian embryonic neural stem cell division: focus on microtubules.

    PubMed

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Huttner, Wieland B

    2015-12-01

    During stem cell divisions, mitotic microtubules do more than just segregate the chromosomes. They also determine whether a cell divides virtually symmetrically or asymmetrically by establishing spindle orientation and the plane of cell division. This can be decisive for the fate of the stem cell progeny. Spindle defects have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders, yet the role of spindle orientation for mammalian neurogenesis has remained controversial. Here we explore recent advances in understanding how the microtubule cytoskeleton influences mammalian neural stem cell division. Our focus is primarily on the role of spindle microtubules in the development of the cerebral cortex. We also highlight unique characteristics in the architecture and dynamics of cortical stem cells that are tightly linked to their mode of division. These features contribute to setting these cells apart as mitotic "rule breakers," control how asymmetric a division is, and, we argue, are sufficient to determine the fate of the neural stem cell progeny in mammals.

  18. Cell-surface arylsulfatase A and B on sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatocytes, and Kupffer cells in mammalian livers.

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga-Nakatsubo, Keiko; Kusunoki, Shinichiro; Kawakami, Hayato; Akasaka, Koji; Akimoto, Yoshihiro

    2009-06-01

    Arylsulfatase A (ARSA) and B (ARSB) have been regarded as lysosomal enzymes because of their hydrolytic activity on synthetic aromatic substrates and the lysosomal localization of their enzymatic activity. Using sea urchin embryos, we previously demonstrated that the bulk of ARS is located on the cell surface of the epithelium, colocalizing with sulfated polysaccharides, and that it does not exhibit enzymatic activity. To examine whether ARSA and ARSB exist on the cell surface in mammalian tissues, we raised antibodies against ARSA and ARSB and examined immunohistochemically their localization in the liver using light and electron microscopy. Here we show that mammalian ARSA and ARSB exist on the cell surface of sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatocytes, and sinusoidal macrophages (Kupffer cells), as well as in the lysosome. They are also colocalized with heparan sulfate proteoglycan. These results suggest that ARSA and ARSB also may function in the cell surface of mammals. This is the first report to show cell-surface localization of ARS in mammalian somatic cells. The extracellular localization of ARS will provide new insight for human ARS deficiency disorders, such as metachromatic leukodystrophy and mucopolysaccharidosis VI.

  19. Analysis of mRNA nuclear export kinetics in mammalian cells by microinjection.

    PubMed

    Gueroussov, Serge; Tarnawsky, Stefan P; Cui, Xianying A; Mahadevan, Kohila; Palazzo, Alexander F

    2010-12-04

    In eukaryotes, messenger RNA (mRNA) is transcribed in the nucleus and must be exported into the cytoplasm to access the translation machinery. Although the nuclear export of mRNA has been studied extensively in Xenopus oocytes and genetically tractable organisms such as yeast and the Drosophila derived S2 cell line, few studies had been conducted in mammalian cells. Furthermore the kinetics of mRNA export in mammalian somatic cells could only be inferred indirectly. In order to measure the nuclear export kinetics of mRNA in mammalian tissue culture cells, we have developed an assay that employs the power of microinjection coupled with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). These assays have been used to demonstrate that in mammalian cells, the majority of mRNAs are exported in a splicing dependent manner, or in manner that requires specific RNA sequences such as the signal sequence coding region (SSCR). In this assay, cells are microinjected with either in vitro synthesized mRNA or plasmid DNA containing the gene of interest. The microinjected cells are incubated for various time points then fixed and the sub-cellular localization of RNA is assessed using FISH. In contrast to transfection, where transcription occurs several hours after the addition of nucleic acids, microinjection of DNA or mRNA allows for rapid expression and allows for the generation of precise kinetic data.

  20. Z-DNA-forming sequences generate large-scale deletions in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guliang; Christensen, Laura A.; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous chromosomal breakages frequently occur at genomic hot spots in the absence of DNA damage and can result in translocation-related human disease. Chromosomal breakpoints are often mapped near purine–pyrimidine Z-DNA-forming sequences in human tumors. However, it is not known whether Z-DNA plays a role in the generation of these chromosomal breakages. Here, we show that Z-DNA-forming sequences induce high levels of genetic instability in both bacterial and mammalian cells. In mammalian cells, the Z-DNA-forming sequences induce double-strand breaks nearby, resulting in large-scale deletions in 95% of the mutants. These Z-DNA-induced double-strand breaks in mammalian cells are not confined to a specific sequence but rather are dispersed over a 400-bp region, consistent with chromosomal breakpoints in human diseases. This observation is in contrast to the mutations generated in Escherichia coli that are predominantly small deletions within the repeats. We found that the frequency of small deletions is increased by replication in mammalian cell extracts. Surprisingly, the large-scale deletions generated in mammalian cells are, at least in part, replication-independent and are likely initiated by repair processing cleavages surrounding the Z-DNA-forming sequence. These results reveal that mammalian cells process Z-DNA-forming sequences in a strikingly different fashion from that used by bacteria. Our data suggest that Z-DNA-forming sequences may be causative factors for gene translocations found in leukemias and lymphomas and that certain cellular conditions such as active transcription may increase the risk of Z-DNA-related genetic instability. PMID:16473937

  1. Some process control/design considerations in the development of a microgravity mammalian cell bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goochee, Charles F.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose is to review some of the physical/metabolic factors which must be considered in the development of an operating strategy for a mammalian cell bioreactor. Emphasis is placed on the dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide requirements of growing mammalian epithelial cells. Literature reviews concerning oxygen and carbon dioxide requirements are discussed. A preliminary, dynamic model which encompasses the current features of the NASA bioreactor is presented. The implications of the literature survey and modeling effort on the design and operation of the NASA bioreactor are discussed.

  2. Methylated DNA-binding protein is present in various mammalian cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Supakar, P.C.; Weist, D.; Zhang, D.; Inamdar, N.; Zhang, Xianyang; Khan, R.; Ehrlich, M. ); Ehrlich, K.C. )

    1988-08-25

    A DNA-binding protein from human placenta, methylated DNA-binding protein (MDBP), binds to certain DNA sequences only when they contain 5-methylcytosine (m{sup 5}C) residues at specific positions. The authors found a very similar DNA-binding activity in nuclear extracts of rat tissues, calf thymus, human embryonal carcinoma cells, HeLa cells, and mouse LTK cells. Like human placental MDBP, the analogous DNA-binding proteins from the above mammalian cell lines formed a number of different low-electrophoretic-mobility complexes with a 14-bp MDBP-specific oligonucleotide duplex. All of these complexes exhibited the same DNA methylation specificity and DNA sequence specificity. Although MDBP activity was found in various mammalian cell types, it was not detected in extracts of cultured mosquito cells and so may be associated only with cells with vertebrate-type DNA methylation.

  3. Study of radiation effects on mammalian cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, W. K.

    1968-01-01

    Radiation effect on single cells and cell populations of Chinese hamster lung tissue is studied in vitro. The rate and position as the cell progresses through the generation cycle shows division delay, changes in some biochemical processes in the cell, chromosomal changes, colony size changes, and loss of reproductive capacity.

  4. Rheological properties of mammalian cell culture suspensions: Hybridoma and HeLa cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Ryu, D D; Ballica, R

    1993-03-25

    Data on viscous (eta') and elastic (eta'') components of the complex viscosity versus oscillatory angular frequency (0.01 to 4.0 rad/s) with increasing strains were obtained for hybridoma cell (62'D3) and HeLa cell (S3) suspensions in PBS at 0.9 (mL/mL) cell volume fraction using a Weissenberg rheogoniometer equipped with two parallel plate geometry at ambient temperature. Both cell suspensions exhibited shear thinning behavior. From the measured viscoelastic properties, the yield stress was calculated. Hybridoma cell suspension (15 microm as the mean diameter of cells) showed the yield stress at 550 dyne/cm(2) that was 1.8 times higher than the value of HeLa cell suspension (22 microm mean diameter) as measured at the oscillatory angular frequency, 4.0 rad/s. The apparent viscosities of HeLa cell suspension at four concentrations and varying steady shear rate were also determined using the Brookfield rotational viscometer. The yield stress to steady shear test was about 130 dyne/cm(2) for HeLa cell suspension at 0.9 (mL/mL) cell volume fraction. The apparent viscosity was in the range about 1 approximately 1000 Poise depending on the cell concentration and shear rate applied. A modified semiempirical Mooney equation, eta = eta(0) exp[K gamma(.)(-beta)phi(c)(1 - K'' sigmaphi(c) /D)] was derived based on the cell concentration, the cell morphology, and the steady shear rate. The beta, shear rate index, was estimated as 0.159 in the range of shear rate, 0.16 to 22.1 s(-1), for the cell volume fractions from 0.6 to 0.9 (mL/mL). In this study, the methods of determining the shear sensitivity and the viscous and the elastic components of mammalian cell suspensions are described under the steady shear field.

  5. A general design strategy for protein-responsive riboswitches in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ausländer, Simon; Stücheli, Pascal; Rehm, Charlotte; Ausländer, David; Hartig, Jörg S; Fussenegger, Martin

    2014-11-01

    RNAs are ideal for the design of gene switches that can monitor and program cellular behavior because of their high modularity and predictable structure-function relationship. We have assembled an expression platform with an embedded modular ribozyme scaffold that correlates self-cleavage activity of designer ribozymes with transgene translation in bacteria and mammalian cells. A design approach devised to screen ribozyme libraries in bacteria and validate variants with functional tertiary stem-loop structures in mammalian cells resulted in a designer ribozyme with a protein-binding nutR-boxB stem II and a selected matching stem I. In a mammalian expression context, this designer ribozyme exhibited dose-dependent translation control by the N-peptide, had rapid induction kinetics and could be combined with classic small molecule-responsive transcription control modalities to construct complex, programmable genetic circuits. PMID:25282610

  6. Ice-Binding Protein Derived from Glaciozyma Can Improve the Viability of Cryopreserved Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Jun; Shim, Hye Eun; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Kang, Yong-Cheol; Hur, Young Baek

    2015-12-28

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) can inhibit ice recrystallization (IR), a major cause of cell death during cryopreservation. IBPs are hypothesized to improve cell viability after cryopreservation by alleviating the cryoinjury caused by IR. In our previous studies, we showed that supplementation of the freezing medium with the recombinant IBP of the Arctic yeast Glaciozyma sp. (designated as LeIBP) could reduce post-thaw hemolysis of human red blood cells and increase the survival of cryopreserved diatoms. Here, we showed that LeIBP could improve the viability of cryopreserved mammalian cells. Human cervical cancer cells (HeLa), mouse fibroblasts (NIH/3T3), human preosteoblasts (MC3T3-E1), Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1), and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were evaluated. These mammalian cells were frozen in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/fetal bovine serum (FBS) solution with or without 0.1 mg/ml LeIBP at a cooling rate of -1°C/min in a -80°C freezer overnight. The minimum effective concentration (0.1 mg/ml) of LeIBP was determined, based on the viability of HeLa cells after treatment with LeIBP during cryopreservation and the IR inhibition assay results. The post-thaw viability of mammalian cells was examined. In all cases, cell viability was significantly enhanced by more than 10% by LeIBP supplementation in 5% DMSO/5% FBS: viability increased by 20% for HeLa cells, 28% for NIH/3T3 cells, 21% for MC3T3-E1, 10% for CHO-K1, and 20% for HaCaT. Furthermore, addition of LeIBP reduced the concentrations of toxic DMSO and FBS down to 5%. Therefore, we demonstrated that LeIBP can increase the viability of cryopreserved mammalian cells by inhibiting IR.

  7. Baculovirus infection of nondividing mammalian cells: mechanisms of entry and nuclear transport of capsids.

    PubMed

    van Loo, N D; Fortunati, E; Ehlert, E; Rabelink, M; Grosveld, F; Scholte, B J

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the infection pathway of Autographa californica multinuclear polyhedrosis virus (baculovirus) in mammalian cells. By titration with a baculovirus containing a green fluorescent protein cassette, we found that several, but not all, mammalian cell types can be infected efficiently. In contrast to previous suggestions, our data show that the asialoglycoprotein receptor is not required for efficient infection. We demonstrate for the first time that this baculovirus can infect nondividing mammalian cells, which implies that the baculovirus is able to transport its genome across the nuclear membrane of mammalian cells. Our data further show that the virus enters via endocytosis, followed by an acid-induced fusion event, which releases the nucleocapsid into the cytoplasm. Cytochalasin D strongly reduces the infection efficiency but not the delivery of nucleocapsids to the cytoplasm, suggesting involvement of actin filaments in cytoplasmic transport of the capsids. Electron microscopic analysis shows the cigar-shaped nucleocapsids located at nuclear pores of nondividing cells. Under these conditions, we observed the viral genome, major capsid protein, and electron-dense capsids inside the nucleus. This suggests that the nucleocapsid is transported through the nuclear pore. This mode of transport seems different from viruses with large spherical capsids, such as herpes simplex virus and adenovirus, which are disassembled before nuclear transport of the genome. The implications for the application of baculovirus or its capsid proteins in gene therapy are discussed.

  8. Gene transfer into mammalian somatic cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, N S

    1992-01-01

    Direct gene transfer into mammalian somatic tissues in vivo is a developing technology with potential application for human gene therapy. During the past 2 years, extensive progress and numerous breakthroughs have been made in this area of research. Genetically engineered retroviral vectors have been used successfully to infect live animals, effecting foreign gene expression in liver, blood vessels, and mammary tissues. Recombinant adenovirus and herpes simplex virus vectors have been utilized effectively for in vivo gene transfer into lung and brain tissues, respectively. Direct injection or particle bombardment of DNA has been demonstrated to provide a physical means for in situ gene transfer, while carrier-mediated DNA delivery techniques have been extended to target specific organs for gene expression. These technological developments in conjunction with the initiation of the NIH human gene therapy trials have marked a milestone in developing new medical treatments for various genetic diseases and cancer. Various in vivo gene transfer techniques should also provide new tools for basic research in molecular and developmental genetics.

  9. Nano particles insertion into individual mammalian cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waleed, Muhammad; Kim, Jung-Dae; Lee, Yong-Gu

    2012-01-01

    Transfection is the process of introducing DNA into cells so that the introduced DNA will function and produce proteins. This technique is useful to study the function of various DNA sequences and in the future may lead to gene therapy for curing genetic diseases. Currently, a number of techniques are available for both population and individual cells transfection. Although individual cells transfection is less commonly used than the population transfection, it has benefits because it allows controlled single cell analysis. In this paper, we present a new laser assisted transfection method for individual cells. In this technique, two lasers are used to perform the transfection procedure and third laser is used to detect the position of DNA coated nanoparticle which is inserted in the cell. This technique has relatively high transfection efficiency and good post-transfection cell viability.

  10. Analyses of protein corona on bare and silica-coated gold nanorods against four mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Minakshi; Yi, Dong Kee; An, Seong Soo A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the toxic effects of gold nanorods (AuNRs). Here, a comprehensive study was performed by examining the effects of bare (uncoated) AuNRs and AuNRs functionalized with silica (SiO2-AuNRs) against various mammalian cell lines, including cervical cancer cells, fibroblast cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and neuroblastoma cells. The interactions between AuNRs and mammalian cells were investigated with cell viability and mortality assays. Dihydrorhodamine-123 assay was carried out for evaluating reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, along with mass spectroscopy analysis for determining the composition of the protein corona. Our results suggest that even the lowest concentrations of AuNRs (0.7 μg/mL) induced ROS production leading to cell mortality. On the other hand, cellular viability and ROS production were maintained even at a higher concentration of SiO2-coated AuNRs (12 μg/mL). The increased production of ROS by AuNRs seemed to cause the toxicity observed in all four mammalian cell types. The protein corona on the bare AuNRs did not appear to reduce ROS generation; however, different compositions of the protein corona on bare and SiO2-coated AuNRs may affect cellular behavior differently. Therefore, it was determined that SiO2-coated AuNRs would be more advantageous than bare AuNRs for cellular applications.

  11. Effect of Gravity on the Mammalian Cell Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y.; Gonda, Steven

    1995-01-01

    The effect of human cell immersed in culture liquid under a micro-gravity environment has been investigated. The study is based on the numerical simulation of the configuration of human cell affected by the time dependent variation of gravity acceleration ranging from 10(exp -3) to 2 g(sub o) (g(sub o) = 9.81 m/s(exp 2)) in 15 seconds. Both the free floating cell and the cell contacted to the upper and lower inclined walls imposed by the time-dependent reduced gravity acceleration are considered in this study. The results show that the cell configuration changes from spherical to horizontally elongated ellipsoid for both the free floating cell and the cell sitting on the lower inclined wall while the cell configuration varies from spherical to vertically elongated ellipsoid for the cell hanging to the upper inclined wall when the gravity acceleration increases. Experimental observations, carried out of human cells exposed to the variation of gravity levels, show that the results of experimental observations agree exactly with the theoretical model computation described in this paper. These results sre significant for humans exposed to the micro-gravity environment.

  12. Cell migration in the normal and pathological postnatal mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Canoll, Peter; Goldman, James E.

    2009-01-01

    In the developing brain, cell migration is a crucial process for structural organization, and is therefore highly regulated to allow the correct formation of complex networks, wiring neurons, and glia. In the early postnatal brain, late developmental processes such as the production and migration of astrocyte and oligodendrocyte progenitors still occur. Although the brain is completely formed and structured few weeks after birth, it maintains a degree of plasticity throughout life, including axonal remodeling, synaptogenesis, but also neural cell birth, migration and integration. The subventricular zone (SVZ) and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus (DG) are the two main neurogenic niches in the adult brain. Neural stem cells reside in these structures and produce progenitors that migrate toward their ultimate location: the olfactory bulb and granular cell layer of the DG respectively. The aim of this review is to synthesize the increasing information concerning the organization, regulation and function of cell migration in a mature brain. In a normal brain, protein involved in cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions together with secreted proteins acting as chemoattractant or chemorepellant play key roles in the regulation of neural progenitor cell migration. In addition, recent data suggest that gliomas arise from the transformation of neural stem cells or progenitor cells and that glioma cell infiltration recapitulates key aspects of glial progenitor migration. Thus, we will consider glioma migration in the context of progenitor migration. Finally, many observations show that brain lesions and neurological diseases trigger neural stem/progenitor cell activation and migration towards altered structures. The factors involved in such cell migration/recruitment are just beginning to be understood. Inflammation which has long been considered as thoroughly disastrous for brain repair is now known to produce some positive effects on stem/progenitor cell recruitment via

  13. YAP/TAZ enhance mammalian embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a Tead-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Dasol; Byun, Sung-Hyun; Park, Soojeong; Kim, Juwan; Kim, Inhee; Ha, Soobong; Kwon, Mookwang; Yoon, Keejung

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian brain development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Here we show that YAP/TAZ enhance embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a cell autonomous fashion using diverse experimental approaches. Introduction of retroviral vectors expressing YAP or TAZ into the mouse embryonic brain induced cell localization in the ventricular zone (VZ), which is the embryonic neural stem cell niche. This change in cell distribution in the cortical layer is due to the increased stemness of infected cells; YAP-expressing cells were colabeled with Sox2, a neural stem cell marker, and YAP/TAZ increased the frequency and size of neurospheres, indicating enhanced self-renewal- and proliferative ability of neural stem cells. These effects appear to be TEA domain family transcription factor (Tead)–dependent; a Tead binding-defective YAP mutant lost the ability to promote neural stem cell characteristics. Consistently, in utero gene transfer of a constitutively active form of Tead2 (Tead2-VP16) recapitulated all the features of YAP/TAZ overexpression, and dominant negative Tead2-EnR resulted in marked cell exit from the VZ toward outer cortical layers. Taken together, these results indicate that the Tead-dependent YAP/TAZ signaling pathway plays important roles in neural stem cell maintenance by enhancing stemness of neural stem cells during mammalian brain development. - Highlights: • Roles of YAP and Tead in vivo during mammalian brain development are clarified. • Expression of YAP promotes embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in vivo in a cell autonomous fashion. • Enhancement of neural stem cell characteristics by YAP depends on Tead. • Transcriptionally active form of Tead alone can recapitulate the effects of YAP. • Transcriptionally repressive form of Tead severely reduces stem cell characteristics.

  14. TALE activators regulate gene expression in a position- and strand-dependent manner in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Uhde-Stone, Claudia; Cheung, Edna; Lu, Biao

    2014-01-24

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are a class of transcription factors that are readily programmable to regulate gene expression. Despite their growing popularity, little is known about binding site parameters that influence TALE-mediated gene activation in mammalian cells. We demonstrate that TALE activators modulate gene expression in mammalian cells in a position- and strand-dependent manner. To study the effects of binding site location, we engineered TALEs customized to recognize specific DNA sequences located in either the promoter or the transcribed region of reporter genes. We found that TALE activators robustly activated reporter genes when their binding sites were located within the promoter region. In contrast, TALE activators inhibited the expression of reporter genes when their binding sites were located on the sense strand of the transcribed region. Notably, this repression was independent of the effector domain utilized, suggesting a simple blockage mechanism. We conclude that TALE activators in mammalian cells regulate genes in a position- and strand-dependent manner that is substantially different from gene activation by native TALEs in plants. These findings have implications for optimizing the design of custom TALEs for genetic manipulation in mammalian cells.

  15. Lessons from nature for preservation of mammalian cells, tissues, and organs.

    PubMed

    Brockbank, Kelvin G M; Campbell, Lia H; Greene, Elizabeth D; Brockbank, Matthew C G; Duman, John G

    2011-03-01

    The study of mechanisms by which animals tolerate environmental extremes may provide strategies for preservation of living mammalian materials. Animals employ a variety of compounds to enhance their survival, including production of disaccharides, glycerol, and antifreeze compounds. The cryoprotectant glycerol was discovered before its role in amphibian survival. In the last decade, trehalose has made an impact on freezing and drying methods for mammalian cells. Investigation of disaccharides was stimulated by the variety of organisms that tolerate dehydration stress by accumulation of disaccharides. Several methods have been developed for the loading of trehalose into mammalian cells, including inducing membrane lipid-phase transitions, genetically engineered pores, endocytosis, and prolonged cell culture with trehalose. In contrast, the many antifreeze proteins (AFPs) identified in a variety of organisms have had little impact. The first AFPs to be discovered were found in cold water fish; their AFPs have not found a medical application. Insect AFPs function by similar mechanisms, but they are more active and recombinant AFPs may offer the best opportunity for success in medical applications. For example, in contrast to fish AFPs, transgenic organisms expressing insect AFPs exhibit reduced ice nucleation. However, we must remember that nature's survival strategies may include production of AFPs, antifreeze glycolipids, ice nucleators, polyols, disaccharides, depletion of ice nucleators, and partial desiccation in synchrony with the onset of winter. We anticipate that it is only by combining several natural low temperature survival strategies that the full potential benefits for mammalian cell survival and medical applications can be achieved. PMID:21191664

  16. Low levels of aflatoxin B1, ricin and milk enhance recombinant protein production in mammalian cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changing the optimal tissue culture medium by adding low levels of environmental stress such as 1 µM of the fungal toxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), 1 ng of the castor bean protein toxin ricin in transduced mammalian cells or 1% reconstituted milk enhances transcription and increases production of the foll...

  17. Fluorescent mimics of cholesterol that rapidly bind surfaces of living mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hymel, David; Cai, Sutang; Sun, Qi; Henkhaus, Rebecca S; Perera, Chamani; Peterson, Blake R

    2015-10-01

    Mammalian cells acquire cholesterol, a critical membrane constituent, through multiple mechanisms. We synthesized mimics of cholesterol, fluorescent N-alkyl-3β-cholesterylamine-glutamic acids, that are rapidly incorporated into cellular plasma membranes compared with analogous cholesteryl amides, ethers, esters, carbamates, and a sitosterol analogue. This process was inhibited by ezetimibe, indicating a receptor-mediated uptake pathway. PMID:26287483

  18. Engineering Escherichia coli into a Protein Delivery System for Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens encode type 3 secretion systems, sophisticated nanomachines that deliver proteins directly into the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. These systems present attractive opportunities for therapeutic protein delivery applications; however, their utility has been limited by their inherent pathogenicity. Here, we report the reengineering of a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli with a tunable type 3 secretion system that can efficiently deliver heterologous proteins into mammalian cells, thereby circumventing the need for virulence attenuation. We first introduced a 31 kB region of Shigella flexneri DNA that encodes all of the information needed to form the secretion nanomachine onto a plasmid that can be directly propagated within E. coli or integrated into the E. coli chromosome. To provide flexible control over type 3 secretion and protein delivery, we generated plasmids expressing master regulators of the type 3 system from either constitutive or inducible promoters. We then constructed a Gateway-compatible plasmid library of type 3 secretion sequences to enable rapid screening and identification of sequences that do not perturb function when fused to heterologous protein substrates and optimized their delivery into mammalian cells. Combining these elements, we found that coordinated expression of the type 3 secretion system and modified target protein substrates produces a nonpathogenic strain that expresses, secretes, and delivers heterologous proteins into mammalian cells. This reengineered system thus provides a highly flexible protein delivery platform with potential for future therapeutic applications. PMID:25853840

  19. Engineering Escherichia coli into a protein delivery system for mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Analise Z; Spears, William E; Du, Juan; Tan, Kah Yong; Wagers, Amy J; Lesser, Cammie F

    2015-05-15

    Many Gram-negative pathogens encode type 3 secretion systems, sophisticated nanomachines that deliver proteins directly into the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. These systems present attractive opportunities for therapeutic protein delivery applications; however, their utility has been limited by their inherent pathogenicity. Here, we report the reengineering of a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli with a tunable type 3 secretion system that can efficiently deliver heterologous proteins into mammalian cells, thereby circumventing the need for virulence attenuation. We first introduced a 31 kB region of Shigella flexneri DNA that encodes all of the information needed to form the secretion nanomachine onto a plasmid that can be directly propagated within E. coli or integrated into the E. coli chromosome. To provide flexible control over type 3 secretion and protein delivery, we generated plasmids expressing master regulators of the type 3 system from either constitutive or inducible promoters. We then constructed a Gateway-compatible plasmid library of type 3 secretion sequences to enable rapid screening and identification of sequences that do not perturb function when fused to heterologous protein substrates and optimized their delivery into mammalian cells. Combining these elements, we found that coordinated expression of the type 3 secretion system and modified target protein substrates produces a nonpathogenic strain that expresses, secretes, and delivers heterologous proteins into mammalian cells. This reengineered system thus provides a highly flexible protein delivery platform with potential for future therapeutic applications. PMID:25853840

  20. Transplantation of prokaryotic two-component signaling pathways into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jonathan; Mailand, Erik; Swaminathan, Krishna Kumar; Schreiber, Joerg; Angelici, Bartolomeo; Benenson, Yaakov

    2014-11-01

    Signaling pathway engineering is a promising route toward synthetic biological circuits. Histidine-aspartate phosphorelays are thought to have evolved in prokaryotes where they form the basis for two-component signaling. Tyrosine-serine-threonine phosphorelays, exemplified by MAP kinase cascades, are predominant in eukaryotes. Recently, a prokaryotic two-component pathway was implemented in a plant species to sense environmental trinitrotoluene. We reasoned that "transplantation" of two-component pathways into mammalian host could provide an orthogonal and diverse toolkit for a variety of signal processing tasks. Here we report that two-component pathways could be partially reconstituted in mammalian cell culture and used for programmable control of gene expression. To enable this reconstitution, coding sequences of histidine kinase (HK) and response regulator (RR) components were codon-optimized for human cells, whereas the RRs were fused with a transactivation domain. Responsive promoters were furnished by fusing DNA binding sites in front of a minimal promoter. We found that coexpression of HKs and their cognate RRs in cultured mammalian cells is necessary and sufficient to strongly induce gene expression even in the absence of pathways' chemical triggers in the medium. Both loss-of-function and constitutive mutants behaved as expected. We further used the two-component signaling pathways to implement two-input logical AND, NOR, and OR gene regulation. Thus, two-component systems can be applied in different capacities in mammalian cells and their components can be used for large-scale synthetic gene circuits.

  1. [Transcription complexes in subnuclear fractions isolated from mammalian cells: ultrastructural study].

    PubMed

    Puvion-Dutilleul, F; Bachellerie, J P; Bernadac, A; Zalta, J P

    1977-02-21

    Miller Beatty's technique was adapted to the study of definite chromatin fractions (nucleolar and nonnucleolar chromatin) isolated from Mammalian cells. The ultrastructural organization of the transcriptional complexes obtained depended on the nuclear compartment studied. In isolated nucleoli, there were "Christmas-tree"-like figures. In nonnucleolar chromatin, the figures were different from the former by the internal structure of the RNP fibrils being synthesized.

  2. Rapid measurement of mitotic spindle orientation in cultured mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Decarreau, Justin; Driver, Jonathan; Asbury, Charles; Wordeman, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Summary Factors that influence the orientation of the mitotic spindle are important for the maintenance of stem cell populations and in cancer development. However, screening for these factors requires rapid quantification of alterations of the angle of the mitotic spindle in cultured cell lines. Here we describe a method to image mitotic cells and rapidly score the angle of the mitotic spindle using a simple MATLAB application to analyze a stack of Z-images. PMID:24633791

  3. An improved method of electroporation for introducing biologically active foreign genes into cultured mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsuka, Masaaki; Orita, Satoshi; Yagi, Takashi; Kakunaga, Takeo )

    1988-09-01

    The authors have developed a modified, reproducible, and efficient method for introducing cloned genes into mammalian cells by using an electric field followed by treatment with sodium butyrate. Transfection frequencies with plasmid pSV2-neo, consisting of an antibiotic (G418) resistance gene and simian virus 40 (SV40) early promoter, by electroporation were higher than those by calcium phosphate DNA precipitation. Treatment with sodium butyrate following electroporation significantly increased the frequency of transfection in various types of cell lines and primary cultured cells including human skin fibroblasts. Treatment with sodium butyrate also increased the transient expression of the gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase when the gene was introduced into BALB/c 3T3 cells by eletroporation. Electroporation combined with sodium butyrate treatment is an improved method for stable and transient biochemical transformation of foreign genes in cultured mammalian cells.

  4. Large scale production of a mammalian cell derived quadrivalent hepatitis C virus like particle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Earnest-Silveira, L; Christiansen, D; Herrmann, S; Ralph, S A; Das, S; Gowans, E J; Torresi, J

    2016-10-01

    A method for the large-scale production of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived hepatitis C virus-like particles (HCV VLPs) is described. The HCV core E1 and E2 coding sequences of genotype 1a, 1b, 2a or 3a were co-expressed in Huh7 cell factories using a recombinant adenoviral expression system. The structural proteins self-assembled into VLPs that were purified from Huh7 cell lysates by iodixanol ultracentrifugation and Stirred cell ultrafiltration. Electron microscopy, revealed VLPs of the different genotypes that are morphologically similar. Our results show that it is possible to produce large quantities of individual HCV genotype VLPs with relative ease thus making this approach an alternative for the manufacture of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived HCV VLP vaccine.

  5. Large scale production of a mammalian cell derived quadrivalent hepatitis C virus like particle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Earnest-Silveira, L; Christiansen, D; Herrmann, S; Ralph, S A; Das, S; Gowans, E J; Torresi, J

    2016-10-01

    A method for the large-scale production of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived hepatitis C virus-like particles (HCV VLPs) is described. The HCV core E1 and E2 coding sequences of genotype 1a, 1b, 2a or 3a were co-expressed in Huh7 cell factories using a recombinant adenoviral expression system. The structural proteins self-assembled into VLPs that were purified from Huh7 cell lysates by iodixanol ultracentrifugation and Stirred cell ultrafiltration. Electron microscopy, revealed VLPs of the different genotypes that are morphologically similar. Our results show that it is possible to produce large quantities of individual HCV genotype VLPs with relative ease thus making this approach an alternative for the manufacture of a quadrivalent mammalian cell derived HCV VLP vaccine. PMID:27373602

  6. Cancer stem cells in the mammalian central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, G J

    2005-12-01

    Malignant tumours intrinsic to the central nervous system (CNS) are among the most difficult of neoplasms to treat effectively. The major biological features of these tumours that preclude successful therapy include their cellular heterogeneity, which renders them highly resistant to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and the propensity of the component tumour cells to invade, diffusely, the contiguous nervous tissues. The tumours are classified according to perceived cell of origin, gliomas being the most common generic group. In the 1970s transplacental administration of the potent neurocarcinogen, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), enabled investigation of the sequential development of brain and spinal neoplasms by electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. The significance of the primitive cells of the subependymal plate in cellular origin and evolution of a variety of glial tumours was thereby established. Since then, the development of new cell culture methods, including the in vitro growth of neurospheres and multicellular tumour spheroids, and new antigenic markers of stem cells and glial/neuronal cell precursor cells, including nestin, Mushashi-1 and CD133, have led to a reappraisal of the histological classification and origins of CNS tumours. Moreover, neural stem cells may also provide new vectors in exciting novel therapeutic strategies for these tumours. In addition to the gliomas, stem cells may have been identified in paediatric tumours including cerebellar medulloblastoma, thought to be of external granule cell neuronal derivation. Interestingly, while the stem cell marker CD133 is expressed in these primitive neuroectodermal tumours (PNETs), the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan neuronal/glial 2 (NG2), which appears to denote increased proliferative, but reduced migratory activity in adult gliomas, is rarely expressed. This is in contrast to the situation in the histologically similar supratentorial PNETs. A possible functional 'switch' between

  7. Action of x-rays on mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    PUCK, T T; MARCUS, P I

    1956-05-01

    The effects of x-irradiation have been quantitatively studied on single cells of a human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) under conditions such that 100 per cent of the unirradiated cells reproduce in isolation to form macroscopic colonies. This technique eliminates complexities due to interactions of members of large cell populations. Survival of single cells (defined as the ability to form a macroscopic colony within 15 days) yields a typical 2 hit curve when plotted against x-ray dose. The initial shoulder extends to about 75 r, after which a linear logarithmic survival rate is obtained, in which the dose needed to reduce survivors to 37 per cent is 96 r. This radiation sensitivity is tens to hundreds of times greater than that of any microorganism for which the equivalent function bas been studied. Evidence, though not proof, is presented that the lethal effect is due to a radiation-induced genetic defect which, however, cannot be a simple single gene inactivation. The locus of the action could be chromosomal. Beginning at doses of 100 r, or possibly earlier, growth-delaying effects of radiation are visible. Cells in which the ability to reproduce has been destroyed by doses below 800 r, can still multiply several times. At higher doses even a single cell division is precluded. A large proportion of the cells killed by radiation at any dose gives rise to one or more giant cells. These metabolize actively, grow to huge proportions but never reproduce under the experimental conditions employed. Methods of preparing large populations of giant cells are described. These giants are particularly susceptible to virus action. Some of the irradiated cells disappear from the plate, presumably by disintegration. This action of radiation is by far the least efficient, since even after 10,000 r, 5 to 10 per cent of the original cell inoculum is recoverable as giants. PMID:13319584

  8. Immediate X-ray-inducible responses from mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boothman, D.A.; Majmudar, G.; Johnson, T.

    1994-04-01

    It has been nearly 6 years since we reported the induction of new proteins in human normal and tumor cells after ionizing radiation. Since that time there has been an explosion of new data and ideas from a number of laboratories regarding the immediate responses of human cells to ionizing radiation. The data are, however, extremely difficult to interpret since researchers are using confluence-arrested, log-phase, normal or tumor cells, and are exposing these to a variety of doses of ionizing radiation. It is especially difficult to interpret data from cells that are exposed to supralethal doses of ionizing radiation. Thus this session of the workshop entitled {open_quotes}Molecular, Genetic, and Cellular Basis of Radioresistance at Low Doses: A Case of Inducible Repair?{close_quotes} concentrated on inducible responses (both late and immediate) of human cells exposed to physiological doses of ionizing radiation. A major focus of future research in this field must be directed toward the function(s) of these inducible proteins and the expression of genes in DNA repair, cell cycle progression (especially radiation-induced cell progression delays) and/or cell death, including apoptosis. 32 refs.

  9. Electroporation of Functional Bacterial Effectors into Mammalian Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Mihai, Cosmin; Orr, Galya; Savchenko, Alexei; Skarina, Tatiana; Cui, Hong; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Brown, Roslyn N.

    2015-01-19

    Electroporation was used to insert purified bacterial virulence effector proteins directly into living eukaryotic cells. Protein localization was monitored by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. This method allows for studies on trafficking, function, and protein-protein interactions using active exogenous proteins, avoiding the need for heterologous expression in eukaryotic cells.

  10. Biological effects of Trichoderma harzianum peptaibols on mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Joanna; Ritieni, Alberto; Mikkola, Raimo; Grigoriev, Pavel A; Pócsfalvi, Gabriella; Andersson, Maria A; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja S

    2004-08-01

    Trichoderma species isolated from water-damaged buildings were screened for toxicity by using boar sperm cells as indicator cells. The crude methanolic cell extract from Trichoderma harzianum strain ES39 inhibited the boar sperm cell motility at a low exposure concentration (50% effective concentration, 1 to 5 microg [dry weight] ml of extended boar semen(-1)). The same exposure concentration depleted the boar sperm cells of NADH(2). Inspection of the exposed boar sperm cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed damage to the plasma membrane. By using the black lipid membrane technique, it was shown that the semipurified metabolites (eluted from a SepPak C(18) cartridge) of T. harzianum strain ES39 induced voltage-dependent conductivity. The high-performance liquid chromatography-purified metabolites of T. harzianum strain ES39 dissipated the mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsi(m)) of human lung epithelial carcinoma cells (cell line A549). The semipurified metabolites (eluted from a SepPak C(18) cartridge) of T. harzianum strain ES39 were analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS). Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization and nanoflow electrospray ionization MS revealed five major peptaibols, each of which contained 18 residues and had a mass ranging from 1,719 to 1,775 Da. Their partial amino acid sequences were determined by collision-induced dissociation tandem MS.

  11. Bluetongue virus mammalian cell surface receptors: Role of glycosaminologycans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Binding and infection rates of bluetongue virus (BTV) on glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and glucosaminoglycan deficient and wild type CHO cell lines and bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were determined in the presence or absence of GAG and sialic acid antagonists. Data showed that virus binding ...

  12. Heterologous expression of the lipid transfer protein CERT increases therapeutic protein productivity of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Florin, Lore; Pegel, Antje; Becker, Eric; Hausser, Angelika; Olayioye, Monilola A; Kaufmann, Hitto

    2009-04-20

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the introduction of transgenes regulating protein transport or affecting post-translational modifications can further improve industrial processes for the production of therapeutic proteins in mammalian cells. Our study on improving therapeutic protein production in CHO cells by heterologous expression of the ceramide transfer protein (CERT) was initiated by the recent discovery that CERT is involved in protein kinase D (PKD)-dependent protein transport from the Golgi to the plasma membrane. We generated a set of CHO DG44 cell lines by stable integration of constructs expressing either CERT wild-type or CERT S132A, a mutant conferring increased lipid transfer activity, or a mock plasmid. CHO cells expressing heterologous CERT demonstrated significantly higher specific productivities of the therapeutic protein HSA when grown in inoculum suspension cultures. This effect translated into significantly increased overall HSA titers in a fed-batch format where cells are grown in chemically defined serum-free media. Furthermore, we could show that CERT also enhanced monoclonal antibody secretion in two IgG production cell lines with different basal productivities. The data demonstrate the potential of CERT engineering to improve mammalian cell culture production processes to yield high amounts of a therapeutic protein product of desired quality. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing a bottle neck in recombinant protein secretion at the Golgi complex in mammalian cells. PMID:19428735

  13. Bacterial IMPDH gene used for the selection of mammalian cell transfectants.

    SciTech Connect

    Baccam, M.; Huberman, E.; Energy Systems

    2003-06-01

    Stable cell transfection is used for the expression of exogenous genes or cDNAs in eukaryotic cells. Selection of these transfectants requires a dominant selectable marker. A variety of such markers has been identified and is currently in use. However, many of these are not suitable for all cell types or require unique conditions. Here we describe a simple and versatile dominant selectable marker that involves bacterial IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH), an enzyme essential for the replication of mammalian and bacterial cells. Although IMPDH is evolutionarily conserved, the bacterial enzyme is orders of magnitude more resistant to the toxic effect of the drug mycophenolic acid, which is an IMPDH inhibitor. We have demonstrated that transfection of human, monkey or Chinese hamster cell lines with an expression vector containing bacterial IMPDH and mycophenolic acid treatment resulted in the selection of colonies with a strikingly increased resistance to mycophenolic acid toxicity. Analysis of cells derived from these colonies indicated that the acquisition of this resistance was associated with bacterial IMPDH protein expression. As a proof of principle, we showed that mammalian cell transfection with a hicistronic IMPDH/GFP expression vector and mycophenolic acid treatment can he used to successfully select transfectants that express the fluorescent protein. These results indicate that bacterial IMPDH is a practical dominant selectable marker that can be used for the selection of transfectants that express exogenous genes or cDNAs in mammalian cells.

  14. Robust synchronization of coupled circadian and cell cycle oscillators in single mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Bieler, Jonathan; Cannavo, Rosamaria; Gustafson, Kyle; Gobet, Cedric; Gatfield, David; Naef, Felix

    2014-07-15

    Circadian cycles and cell cycles are two fundamental periodic processes with a period in the range of 1 day. Consequently, coupling between such cycles can lead to synchronization. Here, we estimated the mutual interactions between the two oscillators by time-lapse imaging of single mammalian NIH3T3 fibroblasts during several days. The analysis of thousands of circadian cycles in dividing cells clearly indicated that both oscillators tick in a 1:1 mode-locked state, with cell divisions occurring tightly 5 h before the peak in circadian Rev-Erbα-YFP reporter expression. In principle, such synchrony may be caused by either unidirectional or bidirectional coupling. While gating of cell division by the circadian cycle has been most studied, our data combined with stochastic modeling unambiguously show that the reverse coupling is predominant in NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, temperature, genetic, and pharmacological perturbations showed that the two interacting cellular oscillators adopt a synchronized state that is highly robust over a wide range of parameters. These findings have implications for circadian function in proliferative tissues, including epidermis, immune cells, and cancer.

  15. A Novel Cell-Associated Protection Assay Demonstrates the Ability of Certain Antibiotics To Protect Ocular Surface Cell Lines from Subsequent Clinical Staphylococcus aureus Challenge▿†

    PubMed Central

    Wingard, J. B.; Romanowski, E. G.; Kowalski, R. P.; Mah, F. S.; Ling, Y.; Bilonick, R. A.; Shanks, R. M. Q.

    2011-01-01

    In vivo effectiveness of topical antibiotics may depend on their ability to associate with epithelial cells to provide continued protection, but this contribution is not measured by standard antibiotic susceptibility tests. We report a new in vitro method that measures the ability of test antibiotics azithromycin (AZM), erythromycin (ERY), tetracycline (TET), and bacitracin (BAC) to associate with mammalian cells and to protect these cells from destruction by bacteria. Mammalian cell lines were grown to confluence using antibiotic-free medium and then incubated in medium containing a single antibiotic (0 to 512 μg/ml). After incubation, the cells were challenged with Staphylococcus aureus ocular isolates, without antibiotics added to the culture medium. Epithelial cell layer integrity was assessed by gentian violet staining, and the minimum cell layer protective concentration (MCPC) of an antibiotic sufficient to protect the mammalian cells from S. aureus was determined. Staining was also quantified and analyzed. Bacterial viability was determined by culture turbidity and growth on agar plates. Preincubation of Chang and human corneal limbal epithelial cells with AZM, ERY, and TET at ≥64 μg/ml provided protection against AZM-susceptible S. aureus strains, with increasing protection at higher concentrations. TET toxicity was demonstrated at >64 μg/ml, whereas AZM displayed toxicity to one cell line at 512 μg/ml. BAC failed to show consistent protection at any dose, despite bacterial susceptibility to BAC as determined by traditional antibiotic susceptibility testing. A range of antibiotic effectiveness was displayed in this cell association assay, providing data that may be considered in addition to traditional testing when determining therapeutic dosing regimens. PMID:21628536

  16. [EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT CLASSES OF PLANT HORMONES ON MAMMALIAN CELLS].

    PubMed

    Vildanova, M S; Smirnova, E A

    2016-01-01

    Plant hormones are signal molecules of different chemical structure, secreted by plant cells and acting at low concentrations as regulators of plant growth and differentiation. Certain plant hormones are similar to animal hormones or can be produced by animal cells. A number of studies show that the effect of biologically active components of plant origin including plant/phytohormones is much wider than was previously thought, but so far there are no objective criteria for assessing the influence of phytohormones on the physiological state of animal cells. Presented in the survey data show that plant hormones, which have different effects on plant growth and development (jasmonic, abscisic and gibberellic acids), are not neutral to the cells of animal origin, and animal cells response to them may be either positive or negative. PMID:27220246

  17. Measurements of scattering and absorption in mammalian cell suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Mourant, J.R.; Johnson, T.M.; Freyer, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    During the past several years a range of spectroscopies, including fluorescence and elastic-scatter spectroscopy, have been investigated for optically based detection of cancer and other tissue pathologies. Both elastic-scatter and fluorescence signals depend, in part, on scattering and absorption properties of the cells in the tissue. Therefore an understanding of the scattering and absorption properties of cells is a necessary prerequisite for understanding and developing these techniques. Cell suspensions provide a simple model with which to begin studying the absorption and scattering properties of cells. In this study we have made preliminary measurements of the scattering and absorption properties of suspensions of mouse mammary carcinoma cells (EMT6) over a broad wavelength range (380 nm to 800 nm).

  18. Studying the Nucleated Mammalian Cell Membrane by Single Molecule Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Wu, Jiazhen; Gao, Jing; Liu, Shuheng; Jiang, Junguang; Jiang, Shibo; Wang, Hongda

    2014-01-01

    The cell membrane plays a key role in compartmentalization, nutrient transportation and signal transduction, while the pattern of protein distribution at both cytoplasmic and ectoplasmic sides of the cell membrane remains elusive. Using a combination of single-molecule techniques, including atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), to study the structure of nucleated cell membranes, we found that (1) proteins at the ectoplasmic side of the cell membrane form a dense protein layer (4 nm) on top of a lipid bilayer; (2) proteins aggregate to form islands evenly dispersed at the cytoplasmic side of the cell membrane with a height of about 10–12 nm; (3) cholesterol-enriched domains exist within the cell membrane; (4) carbohydrates stay in microdomains at the ectoplasmic side; and (5) exposed amino groups are asymmetrically distributed on both sides. Based on these observations, we proposed a Protein Layer-Lipid-Protein Island (PLLPI) model, to provide a better understanding of cell membrane structure, membrane trafficking and viral fusion mechanisms. PMID:24806512

  19. InXy and SeXy, compact heterologous reporter proteins for mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Fluri, David A; Kelm, Jens M; Lesage, Guillaume; Baba, Marie Daoud-El; Fussenegger, Martin

    2007-10-15

    Mammalian reporter proteins are essential for gene-function analysis, drugscreening initiatives and as model product proteins for biopharmaceutical manufacturing. Bacillus subtilis can maintain its metabolism by secreting Xylanase A (XynA), which converts xylan into shorter xylose oligosaccharides. XynA is a family 11 xylanase monospecific for D-xylose containing substrates. Mammalian cells transgenic for constitutive expression of wild-type xynA showed substantial secretion of this prokaryotic enzyme. Deletion analysis confirmed that a prokaryotic signal sequence encoded within the first 81 nucleotides was compatible with the secretory pathway of mammalian cells. Codon optimization combined with elimination of the prokaryotic signal sequence resulted in an exclusively intracellular mammalian Xylanase A variant (InXy) while replacement by an immunoglobulin-derived secretion signal created an optimal secreted Xylanase A derivative (SeXy). A variety of chromogenic and fluorescence-based assays adapted for use with mammalian cells detected InXy and SeXy with high sensitivity and showed that both reporter proteins resisted repeated freeze/thaw cycles, remained active over wide temperature and pH ranges, were extremely stable in human serum stored at room temperature and could independently be quantified in samples also containing other prominent reporter proteins such as the human placental alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) and the Bacillus stearothermophilus-derived secreted alpha-amylase (SAMY). Glycoprofiling revealed that SeXy produced in mammalian cells was N- glycosylated at four different sites, mutation of which resulted in impaired secretion. SeXy was successfully expressed in a variety of mammalian cell lines and primary cells following transient transfection and transduction with adeno-associated virus particles (AAV) engineered for constitutive SeXy expression. Intramuscular injection of transgenic AAVs into mice showed significant SeXy levels in the bloodstream

  20. Protein Expression in Insect and Mammalian Cells Using Baculoviruses in Wave Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Kadwell, Sue H; Overton, Laurie K

    2016-01-01

    Many types of disposable bioreactors for protein expression in insect and mammalian cells are now available. They differ in design, capacity, and sensor options, with many selections available for either rocking platform, orbitally shaken, pneumatically mixed, or stirred-tank bioreactors lined with an integral disposable bag (Shukla and Gottschalk, Trends Biotechnol 31(3):147-154, 2013). WAVE Bioreactors™ were among the first disposable systems to be developed (Singh, Cytotechnology 30:149-158, 1999). Since their commercialization in 1999, Wave Bioreactors have become routinely used in many laboratories due to their ease of operation, limited utility requirements, and protein expression levels comparability to traditional stirred-tank bioreactors. Wave Bioreactors are designed to use a presterilized Cellbag™, which is attached to a rocking platform and inflated with filtered air provided by the bioreactor unit. The Cellbag can be filled with medium and cells and maintained at a set temperature. The rocking motion, which is adjusted through angle and rock speed settings, provides mixing of oxygen (and CO2, which is used to control pH in mammalian cell cultures) from the headspace created in the inflated Cellbag with the cell culture medium and cells. This rocking motion can be adjusted to prevent cell shear damage. Dissolved oxygen and pH can be monitored during scale-up, and samples can be easily removed to monitor other parameters. Insect and mammalian cells grow very well in Wave Bioreactors (Shukla and Gottschalk, Trends Biotechnol 31(3):147-154, 2013). Combining Wave Bioreactor cell growth capabilities with recombinant baculoviruses engineered for insect or mammalian cell expression has proven to be a powerful tool for rapid production of a wide range of proteins. PMID:26820862

  1. Protein Expression in Insect and Mammalian Cells Using Baculoviruses in Wave Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Kadwell, Sue H; Overton, Laurie K

    2016-01-01

    Many types of disposable bioreactors for protein expression in insect and mammalian cells are now available. They differ in design, capacity, and sensor options, with many selections available for either rocking platform, orbitally shaken, pneumatically mixed, or stirred-tank bioreactors lined with an integral disposable bag (Shukla and Gottschalk, Trends Biotechnol 31(3):147-154, 2013). WAVE Bioreactors™ were among the first disposable systems to be developed (Singh, Cytotechnology 30:149-158, 1999). Since their commercialization in 1999, Wave Bioreactors have become routinely used in many laboratories due to their ease of operation, limited utility requirements, and protein expression levels comparability to traditional stirred-tank bioreactors. Wave Bioreactors are designed to use a presterilized Cellbag™, which is attached to a rocking platform and inflated with filtered air provided by the bioreactor unit. The Cellbag can be filled with medium and cells and maintained at a set temperature. The rocking motion, which is adjusted through angle and rock speed settings, provides mixing of oxygen (and CO2, which is used to control pH in mammalian cell cultures) from the headspace created in the inflated Cellbag with the cell culture medium and cells. This rocking motion can be adjusted to prevent cell shear damage. Dissolved oxygen and pH can be monitored during scale-up, and samples can be easily removed to monitor other parameters. Insect and mammalian cells grow very well in Wave Bioreactors (Shukla and Gottschalk, Trends Biotechnol 31(3):147-154, 2013). Combining Wave Bioreactor cell growth capabilities with recombinant baculoviruses engineered for insect or mammalian cell expression has proven to be a powerful tool for rapid production of a wide range of proteins.

  2. Use of baculovirus BacMam vectors for expression of ABC drug transporters in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Suneet; Schwartz, Candice; Kapoor, Khyati; Kouanda, Abdul; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2012-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporters ABCB1 [P-glycoprotein (Pgp)] and ABCG2 are expressed in many tissues including those of the intestines, the liver, the kidney and the brain and are known to influence the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of therapeutic drugs. In vitro studies involving their functional characteristics provide important information that allows improvements in drug delivery or drug design. In this study, we report use of the BacMam (baculovirus-based expression in mammalian cells) expression system to express and characterize the function of Pgp and ABCG2 in mammalian cell lines. BacMam-Pgp and BacMam-ABCG2 baculovirus-transduced cell lines showed similar cell surface expression (as detected by monoclonal antibodies with an external epitope) and transport function of these transporters compared to drug-resistant cell lines that overexpress the two transporters. Transient expression of Pgp was maintained in HeLa cells for up to 72 h after transduction (48 h after removal of the BacMam virus). These BacMam-baculovirus-transduced mammalian cells expressing Pgp or ABCG2 were used for assessing the functional activity of these transporters. Crude membranes isolated from these cells were further used to study the activity of these transporters by biochemical techniques such as photo-cross-linking with transport substrate and adenosine triphosphatase assays. In addition, we show that the BacMam expression system can be exploited to coexpress both Pgp and ABCG2 in mammalian cells to determine their contribution to the transport of a common anticancer drug substrate. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the BacMam-baculovirus-based expression system can be used to simultaneously study the transport function and biochemical properties of ABC transporters. PMID:22041108

  3. The Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Mammalian Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biaglow, John E.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the effects of radiation on dividing cells and factors influencing these effects; also briefly reviews the radical mechanism for radiation damage. Emphasizes the importance of oxygen in radiation effects. (CS)

  4. IMAC capture of recombinant protein from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams

    PubMed Central

    Kinna, Alexander; Tolner, Berend; Rota, Enrique Miranda; Titchener‐Hooker, Nigel; Nesbeth, Darren

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fusion‐tag affinity chromatography is a key technique in recombinant protein purification. Current methods for protein recovery from mammalian cells are hampered by the need for feed stream clarification. We have developed a method for direct capture using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) of hexahistidine (His6) tagged proteins from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams. The process employs radial flow chromatography with 300–500 μm diameter agarose resin beads that allow free passage of cells but capture His‐tagged proteins from the feed stream; circumventing expensive and cumbersome centrifugation and/or filtration steps. The method is exemplified by Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell expression and subsequent recovery of recombinant His‐tagged carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA); a heavily glycosylated and clinically relevant protein. Despite operating at a high NaCl concentration necessary for IMAC binding, cells remained over 96% viable after passage through the column with host cell proteases and DNA detected at ∼8 U/mL and 2 ng/μL in column flow‐through, respectively. Recovery of His‐tagged CEA from unclarified feed yielded 71% product recovery. This work provides a basis for direct primary capture of fully glycosylated recombinant proteins from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 130–140. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26174988

  5. IMAC capture of recombinant protein from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams.

    PubMed

    Kinna, Alexander; Tolner, Berend; Rota, Enrique Miranda; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel; Nesbeth, Darren; Chester, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Fusion-tag affinity chromatography is a key technique in recombinant protein purification. Current methods for protein recovery from mammalian cells are hampered by the need for feed stream clarification. We have developed a method for direct capture using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) of hexahistidine (His6) tagged proteins from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams. The process employs radial flow chromatography with 300-500 μm diameter agarose resin beads that allow free passage of cells but capture His-tagged proteins from the feed stream; circumventing expensive and cumbersome centrifugation and/or filtration steps. The method is exemplified by Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell expression and subsequent recovery of recombinant His-tagged carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA); a heavily glycosylated and clinically relevant protein. Despite operating at a high NaCl concentration necessary for IMAC binding, cells remained over 96% viable after passage through the column with host cell proteases and DNA detected at ∼ 8 U/mL and 2 ng/μL in column flow-through, respectively. Recovery of His-tagged CEA from unclarified feed yielded 71% product recovery. This work provides a basis for direct primary capture of fully glycosylated recombinant proteins from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams.

  6. Overexpression of YY1 increases the protein production in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Tastanova, Aizhan; Schulz, Alexandra; Folcher, Marc; Tolstrup, Anne; Puklowski, Anja; Kaufmann, Hitto; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-02-10

    The production of therapeutic antibodies using mammalian cells remains a high-priority in the biopharmaceutical manufacturing industry. Bioengineers have targeted different cellular processes, including transcription, translation, secretion and post-translational modifications, to overcome the metabolic bottlenecks limiting production capacity and create high-producing mammalian cell lines. The polycomb group (PcG) proteins belong to a family of chromatin regulators with important roles in multicellular development. By overexpressing and screening genes from the PcG family, we have identified an epigenetic key player for biopharmaceutical manufacturing enhancement: the transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1). The overexpression of YY1 led to an increase in the production of several product genes (SEAP, VEGF165, IgG including Rituximab), provided that human YY1 (hYY1) was expressed in human cells (HeLa, HT-1080, HEK-293T, FreeStyle™ 293-F) and Chinese hamster ovary cell-derived YY1 (cYY1) was expressed in CHO cells (CHO-K1, CHO-easyC, FreeStyle™ CHO-S, CHO-B13-24, CHO-IgG1). Ectopic expression of cYY1 in the stable CHO-derived IgG producer cell lines CHO-B13-24 and CHO-IgG1 increased the antibody titer up to 6-fold, suggesting that epigenetic engineering of mammalian production cell lines could become a new strategy to improve the manufacturing of complex protein pharmaceuticals. PMID:26686315

  7. Effect of radiofrequency radiation in cultured mammalian cells: A review.

    PubMed

    Manna, Debashri; Ghosh, Rita

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile phone related technologies will continue to increase in the foreseeable future worldwide. This has drawn attention to the probable interaction of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation with different biological targets. Studies have been conducted on various organisms to evaluate the alleged ill-effect on health. We have therefore attempted to review those work limited to in vitro cultured cells where irradiation conditions were well controlled. Different investigators have studied varied endpoints like DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, cellular morphology and viability to weigh the genotoxic effect of such radiation by utilizing different frequencies and dose rates under various irradiation conditions that include continuous or pulsed exposures and also amplitude- or frequency-modulated waves. Cells adapt to change in their intra and extracellular environment from different chemical and physical stimuli through organized alterations in gene or protein expression that result in the induction of stress responses. Many studies have focused on such effects for risk estimations. Though the effects of microwave radiation on cells are often not pronounced, some investigators have therefore combined radiofrequency radiation with other physical or chemical agents to observe whether the effects of such agents were augmented or not. Such reports in cultured cellular systems have also included in this review. The findings from different workers have revealed that, effects were dependent on cell type and the endpoint selection. However, contradictory findings were also observed in same cell types with same assay, in such cases the specific absorption rate (SAR) values were significant.

  8. Novel optical methodologies in studying mechanical signal transduction in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; McIntire, L. V.

    1999-01-01

    For the last 3 decades evidence has been accumulating that some types of mammalian cells respond to their mechanically active environment by altering their morphology, growth rate, and metabolism. The study of such responses is very important in understanding, physiological and pathological conditions ranging from bone formation to atherosclerosis. Obtaining this knowledge has been the goal for an active research area in bioengineering termed cell mechanotransduction. The advancement of optical methodologies used in cell biology research has given the tools to elucidate cellular mechanisms that would otherwise be impossible to visualize. Combined with molecular biology techniques, they give engineers invaluable tools in understanding the chemical pathways involved in mechanotransduction. Herein we briefly review the current knowledge on mechanical signal transduction in mammalian cells, focusing on the application of novel optical techniques in the ongoing research.

  9. The NS3 protein of rice hoja blanca virus suppresses RNA silencing in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schnettler, Esther; Hemmes, Hans; Goldbach, Rob; Prins, Marcel

    2008-01-01

    The NS3 protein of the tenuivirus rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV) has previously been shown to represent the viral RNA interference (RNAi) suppressor and is active in both plant and insect cells by binding short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in vitro. Using a firefly luciferase-based silencing assay it is described here that NS3 is also active in mammalian cells. This activity is independent of the inducer molecule used. Using either synthetic siRNAs or a short hairpin RNA construct, NS3 was able to significantly suppress the RNAi-mediated silencing of luciferase expression in both monkey (Vero) and human (HEK293) cells. These results support the proposed mode of action of NS3 to act by sequestering siRNAs, the key molecules of the RNAi pathway conserved in all eukaryotes. The possible applications of this protein in modulating RNAi and investigating the proposed antiviral RNAi response in mammalian cell systems are discussed. PMID:18089758

  10. Electrical characteristics of mammalian cells on porous supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guo

    2003-10-01

    The quantification of epithelial barrier functions by measuring the trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TER) and using the Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) has been complicated by the current flowing inside the narrow space underneath cells. This thesis work, by examining the electrical characteristics of epithelial cells on porous supports, is aimed to tackle this problem. A mathematical model has been constructed to quantify the impedance from the various sources within a cell/electrode system. This model presents three cell-related parameters, alpha, Rb and Cm: alpha stands for the impedance contribution from the above-mentioned current underneath cells, Rb is an equivalent representation of epithelial barrier functions and Cm denotes the capacitive impedance of cell membranes. Analysis of the three parameters as well as the electrode impedance (Z e) has revealed two experimental approaches to reduce or eliminate the complication of alpha to the deduction of Rb: lowering alpha down to zero or lowering both Ze and alpha. The experimental realization of the first approach has been studied by examining the electrical characteristics of the African green monkey kidney (BS-C-1) and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK-II) cells on porous filters of mixed esters of cellulose or nitrocellulose. A unique setup featuring a plastic/filter/plastic triple-layer structure was constructed to measure the impedance of cells on filters. With the extremely low alpha, all the electrical characteristics can be explained by using an equivalent circuit and Rb can be directly obtained from the resistance difference in the low frequency range. The second approach has been experimentally investigated by examining the electrical characteristics of BS-C-1 cells on porous/rough electrodes, i.e. the gold ECIS electrodes electrochemically coated with conducting polypyrrole/heparin composites or platinum black. Ze and alpha, especially the former, were found to be significantly

  11. Mammalian mediator 19 mediates H1299 lung adenocarcinoma cell clone conformation, growth, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu-Lu; Guo, Shu-Liang; Ma, Su-Ren; Luo, Yong-Ai

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian mediator (MED) is a multi-protein coactivator that has been identified by several research groups. The involvement of the MED complex subunit 19 (MED 19) in the metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma cell line (H1299), which expresses the MED 19 subunit, was here investigated. When MED 19 expression was decreased by RNA interference H1299 cells demonstrated reduced clone formation, arrest in the S phase of the cell cycle, and lowered metastatic capacity. Thus, MED 19 appears to play important roles in the biological behavior of non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. These findings may be important for the development of novel lung carcinoma treatments.

  12. Atomic Force Microscopy to Study Mechanics of Living Mitotic Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P.; Hyman, Anthony A.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2011-08-01

    While biochemical pathways within mitotic cells have been intensively studied, the mechanics of dividing cells is only poorly understood. In our recent report, an experimental system combining fluorescence and atomic force microscopy was set up to study dynamics of mitotic rounding of mammalian cells. We show that cells have a rounding pressure that increases upon mitotic entry. Using specific inhibitors or perturbations, we revealed biological processes required for force generation that underpin the cell rounding shape change during mitosis. The significance of the finding and an outlook are discussed.

  13. Alkyltransferase-mediated toxicity of bis-electrophiles in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalapila, Aley G.; Pegg, Anthony E.

    2009-01-01

    The primary function of O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) is to maintain genomic integrity in the face of damage by both endogenous and exogenous alkylating agents. However, paradoxically, bacterial and mammalian AGTs have been shown to increase cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of dihaloalkanes and other bis-electrophiles when expressed in bacterial cells. We have extended these studies to mammalian cells using CHO cells that lack AGT expression and CHO cells stably transfected with a plasmid that expresses human AGT. The cytotoxicity of 1,2-dibromoethane, dibromomethane and epibromohydrin was significantly increased by the presence of AGT but cytotoxicity of butadiene diepoxide was not affected. Mutations caused by these agents were assessed using hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) as a reporter gene. There was a small (c. 2–3-fold) but statistically significant AGT-mediated increase in mutations caused by 1,2-dibromoethane, dibromomethane and epibromohydrin. Analysis of the mutation spectrum induced by 1,2-dibromoethane showed that the presence of AGT also altered the types of mutations with an increase in total base substitution mutants due to a rise in transversions at both G:C and A:T sites. AGT expression also led to mutations arising from the transcribed strand, which were not seen in cells lacking AGT. Although the frequency of deletion mutations was decreased by AGT expression, the formation of large deletions (≥3 exons) was increased. This work demonstrates that interaction of AGT with some bis-electrophiles can cause mutagenicity and diminished cell survival in mammalian cells. It is consistent with the hypothesis that DNA-AGT cross-links, which have been characterized in experiments with purified AGT protein and such bis-electrophiles, can be formed in mammalian cells. PMID:19941875

  14. Magnetic Carbon nanoparticles enabled efficient photothermal alteration of mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Nelson; Thomas, Patrick; Yu, Lingfeng; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2011-03-01

    While cw near-infrared (NIR) laser beams have been finding widespread application in photothermal therapy of cancer and pulsed NIR laser microbeams are recently being used for optoporation of exogeneous impermeable materials into cells. Since, carbon nanomaterials are very good in photothermal conversion, we utilized carbon nanoparticles (CNP) doped with Fe, so that they can be localized in a defined area by two fold selectivity, (i) external magnetic field for retention of the CNP in targeted area and (ii) surface functionalization for binding the targeted cells. Here, we report efficient photothermal therapy as well as poration of cells using magnetic CNPs with very low power continuous wave laser beam. Localization of CNPs on cell membrane under application of magnetic field was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. At different power levels, cells could be damaged or microinjected with fluorescence protein-encoding plasmids or impermeable dyes. Monte Carlo simulation showed that the dose of NIR laser beam is sufficient to elicit response for magnetic CNP based photothermal treatment at significant depth. The results of our study suggest that magnetic CNP based photothermal alteration is a viable approach to remotely guide treatments offering high efficiency with significantly reduced cytotoxicity.

  15. Effect of radiofrequency radiation in cultured mammalian cells: A review.

    PubMed

    Manna, Debashri; Ghosh, Rita

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile phone related technologies will continue to increase in the foreseeable future worldwide. This has drawn attention to the probable interaction of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation with different biological targets. Studies have been conducted on various organisms to evaluate the alleged ill-effect on health. We have therefore attempted to review those work limited to in vitro cultured cells where irradiation conditions were well controlled. Different investigators have studied varied endpoints like DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, cellular morphology and viability to weigh the genotoxic effect of such radiation by utilizing different frequencies and dose rates under various irradiation conditions that include continuous or pulsed exposures and also amplitude- or frequency-modulated waves. Cells adapt to change in their intra and extracellular environment from different chemical and physical stimuli through organized alterations in gene or protein expression that result in the induction of stress responses. Many studies have focused on such effects for risk estimations. Though the effects of microwave radiation on cells are often not pronounced, some investigators have therefore combined radiofrequency radiation with other physical or chemical agents to observe whether the effects of such agents were augmented or not. Such reports in cultured cellular systems have also included in this review. The findings from different workers have revealed that, effects were dependent on cell type and the endpoint selection. However, contradictory findings were also observed in same cell types with same assay, in such cases the specific absorption rate (SAR) values were significant. PMID:27053138

  16. A systems approach to analyze transcription factors in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Soler, Eric; Andrieu-Soler, Charlotte; Boer, Ernie de; Bryne, Jan Christian; Thongjuea, Supat; Rijkers, Erikjan; Demmers, Jeroen; van IJcken, Wilfred; Grosveld, Frank

    2011-02-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in the development of multicellular organisms. The sequential actions of critical TFs direct cells to adopt defined differentiation pathways leading to functional, fully differentiated tissues. Here, we describe a generic experimental pipeline that integrates biochemistry, genetics and next generation sequencing with bioinformatics to characterize TF complexes composition, function and target genes at a genome-wide scale. We show an application of this experimental pipeline which aims to unravel the molecular events taking place during hematopoietic cell differentiation. PMID:20705139

  17. Mammalian cell transfection: the present and the future

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Kyung

    2010-01-01

    Transfection is a powerful analytical tool enabling study of the function of genes and gene products in cells. The transfection methods are broadly classified into three groups; biological, chemical, and physical. These methods have advanced to make it possible to deliver nucleic acids to specific subcellular regions of cells by use of a precisely controlled laser-microcope system. The combination of point-directed transfection and mRNA transfection is a new way of studying the function of genes and gene products. However, each method has its own advantages and disadvantages so the optimum method depends on experimental design and objective. PMID:20549496

  18. Deamination of 5-methylcytosine residues in Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Gromenko, E V; Spirin, P V; Kubareva, E A; Romanova, E A; Prassolov, V S; Shpanchenko, O V; Dontsova, O A

    2009-10-01

    DNA demethylation in mammalia occurs after fertilization and during embryogenesis and accompanies cell aging and cancer transformation. With the help of the primer extension reaction, MALDI MS and DNA cleavage by thymine DNA glycosylase deamination of 5-methylcytosine residues has been shown to take place when the model methylated DNA duplexes are treated with nuclear extracts from the cell lines CHO, HeLa, and Skov3. The hypothesis that deamination of 5-methylcytosine is the first stage of demethylation in mammalia has been postulated.

  19. Deamination of 5-Methylcytosine Residues in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gromenko, E.V.; Spirin, P.V.; Kubareva, E.A.; Romanova, E.A.; Prassolov, V.S.; Shpanchenko, O.V.

    2009-01-01

    DNA demethylation in mammalia occurs after fertilization and during embryogenesis and accompanies cell aging and cancer transformation. With the help of the primer extension reaction, MALDI MS and DNA cleavage by thymine DNA glycosylase deamination of 5-methylcytosine residues has been shown to take place when the model methylated DNA duplexes are treated with nuclear extracts from the cell lines CHO, HeLa, and Skov3. The hypothesis that deamination of 5-methylcytosine is the first stage of demethylation in mammalia has been postulated. PMID:22649624

  20. On the origins of the universal dynamics of endogenous granules in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Vanapalli, Siva A; Li, Yixuan; Mugele, Frieder; Duits, Michel H G

    2009-12-01

    Endogenous granules (EGs) that consist of lipid droplets and mitochondria have been commonly used to assess intracellular mechanical properties via multiple particle tracking microrheology (MPTM). Despite their widespread use, the nature of interaction of EGs with the cytoskeletal network and the type of forces driving their dynamics--both of which are crucial for the interpretation of the results from MPTM technique--are yet to be resolved. In this report, we study the dynamics of endogenous granules in mammalian cells using particle tracking methods. We find that the ensemble dynamics of EGs is diffusive in three types of mammalian cells (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts), thereby suggesting an apparent universality in their dynamical behavior. Moreover, in a given cell, the amplitude of the mean-squared displacement for EGs is an order of magnitude larger than that of injected particles. This observation along with results from ATP depletion and temperature intervention studies suggests that cytoskeletal active forces drive the dynamics of EGs. To elucidate the dynamical origin of the diffusive-like nonthermal motion, we consider three active force generation mechanisms--molecular motor transport, actomyosin contractility and microtubule polymerization forces. We test these mechanisms using pharmacological interventions. Experimental evidence and model calculations suggest that EGs are intimately linked to microtubules and that microtubule polymerization forces drive their dynamics. Thus, endogenous granules could serve as non-invasive probes for microtubule network dynamics in mammalian cells.

  1. Mammalian Cells with Altered Forms of RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Chan, V. L.; Whitmore, G. F.; Siminovitch, Louis

    1972-01-01

    Mutants of Chinese hamster ovary cells that are resistant to α-amanitin can be isolated. At least some of these mutants contain an altered form of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II, as indicated by its resistance to α-amanitin. These results indicate that mutation to α-amanitin resistance involves a change of a structural gene. PMID:4508306

  2. Characterization of baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus infection in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Masayuki; Hamazaki, Hiroyuki; Miyano-Kurosaki, Naoko; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    The baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) is used as a vector in many gene therapy studies. Wild-type AcMNPV infects many mammalian cell types in vitro, but does not replicate. We investigated the dynamics of AcMNPV genomic DNA in infected mammalian cells and used flow cytometric analysis to demonstrate that recombinant baculovirus containing a cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter/enhancer with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed high levels of GFP in Huh-7 cells, but not B16, Raw264.7, or YAC-1 cells. The addition of butyrate, a deacetylase inhibitor, markedly enhanced the percentage of GFP-expressing Huh-7 and B16 cells, but not Raw264.7 and YAC-1 cells. The addition of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, a DNA methylation inhibitor, had no enhancing effect. Polymerase chain reaction analysis using AcMNPV-gp64-specific primers indicated that AcMNPV infected not only Huh-7 and B16 cells, but also Raw264.7 and YAC-1 cells in vitro. The genomic DNA was detected in Huh-7 and B16 cells 96 h after infection. Genomic AcMNPV DNA in YAC-1 cells was not transported to the nucleus. Luciferase assay indicated that AcMNPV p35 gene mRNA and p35 promoter activity were clearly expressed only in Huh-7 and B16 cells. These results suggest that viral genomic DNA expression is restricted by different host cell factors, such as degradation, deacetylation, and inhibition of nuclear transport, depending on the mammalian cell type. PMID:16545777

  3. Characterization of baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus infection in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kitajima, Masayuki; Hamazaki, Hiroyuki; Miyano-Kurosaki, Naoko; Takaku, Hiroshi . E-mail: hiroshi.takaku@it-chiba.ac.jp

    2006-05-05

    The baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV) is used as a vector in many gene therapy studies. Wild-type AcMNPV infects many mammalian cell types in vitro, but does not replicate. We investigated the dynamics of AcMNPV genomic DNA in infected mammalian cells and used flow cytometric analysis to demonstrate that recombinant baculovirus containing a cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter/enhancer with green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed high levels of GFP in Huh-7 cells, but not B16, Raw264.7, or YAC-1 cells. The addition of butyrate, a deacetylase inhibitor, markedly enhanced the percentage of GFP-expressing Huh-7 and B16 cells, but not Raw264.7 and YAC-1 cells. The addition of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, a DNA methylation inhibitor, had no enhancing effect. Polymerase chain reaction analysis using AcMNPV-gp64-specific primers indicated that AcMNPV infected not only Huh-7 and B16 cells, but also Raw264.7 and YAC-1 cells in vitro. The genomic DNA was detected in Huh-7 and B16 cells 96 h after infection. Genomic AcMNPV DNA in YAC-1 cells was not transported to the nucleus. Luciferase assay indicated that AcMNPV p35 gene mRNA and p35 promoter activity were clearly expressed only in Huh-7 and B16 cells. These results suggest that viral genomic DNA expression is restricted by different host cell factors, such as degradation, deacetylation, and inhibition of nuclear transport, depending on the mammalian cell type.

  4. Mechanisms of 5-aminolevulic acid ester uptake in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Lorena; Batlle, Alcira; Di Venosa, Gabriela; Battah, Sinan; Dobbin, Paul; MacRobert, Alexander J; Casas, Adriana

    2006-01-01

    The porphyrin precursor 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is being widely used in photodynamic therapy of cancer. Improvement in ALA delivery has been sought through the use of ALA derivatives, in particular the esterification of ALA with aliphatic alcohols, which in certain cases can improve cellular penetration and selectivity. ALA uptake systems appear to be distinctive for each cell type. The LM3 mammary adenocarcinoma cell line takes ALA up by BETA transporters. In this work, we investigated ALA derivative transport systems through the inhibition of radiolabelled ALA uptake in the LM3 cells. We also performed inhibition studies of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) uptake. The more lipohilic ALA derivatives hexyl-ALA and undecanoyl-ALA inhibit ALA uptake, whereas methyl-ALA, R, S-ALA-2-(hydroxymethyl)tetrahydropyranyl ester and the dendron aminomethane tris methyl 5-ALA does not inhibit ALA uptake. A similar pattern was found for GABA, except that the dendron inhibited GABA uptake. However, hexyl-ALA and undecanoyl-ALA are not taken up by BETA transporters, but by simple diffusion, although they still inhibit ALA uptake by binding to the cell membrane. These results show that different modifications to the ALA molecule lead to different uptake mechanisms. Whereas ALA is taken up by BETA transporters, none of the ALA derivatives shares the same mechanism. Knowledge of the mechanisms of ALA derivatives entry into the cells is essential to understand and improve ALA-mediated PDT and to the design of new ALA derivatives that may be taken up at a higher rate than ALA. PMID:16432502

  5. Strategy for choosing extraction procedures for NMR-based metabolomic analysis of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Estelle; Tea, Illa; Loaëc, Gregory; Giraudeau, Patrick; Akoka, Serge

    2011-10-01

    Metabolomic analysis of mammalian cells can be applied across multiple fields including medicine and toxicology. It requires the acquisition of reproducible, robust, reliable, and homogeneous biological data sets. Particular attention must be paid to the efficiency and reliability of the extraction procedure. Even though a number of recent studies have dealt with optimizing a particular protocol for specific matrices and analytical techniques, there is no universal method to allow the detection of the entire cellular metabolome. Here, we present a strategy for choosing extraction procedures from adherent mammalian cells for the global NMR analysis of the metabolome. After the quenching of cells, intracellular metabolites are extracted from the cells using one of the following solvent systems of varying polarities: perchloric acid, acetonitrile/water, methanol, methanol/water, and methanol/chloroform/water. The hydrophilic metabolite profiles are analysed using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We propose an original geometric representation of metabolites reflecting the efficiency of extraction methods. In the case of NMR-based analysis of mammalian cells, this methodology demonstrates that a higher portion of intracellular metabolites are extracted by using methanol or methanol/chloroform/water. The preferred method is evaluated in terms of biological variability for studying metabolic changes caused by the phenotype of four different human breast cancer cell lines, showing that the selected extraction procedure is a promising tool for metabolomic and metabonomic studies of mammalian cells. The strategy proposed in this paper to compare extraction procedures is applicable to NMR-based metabolomic studies of various systems.

  6. Role of inorganic polyphosphate in mammalian cells: from signal transduction and mitochondrial metabolism to cell death.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Plamena R; Baev, Artyom Y; Berezhnov, Alexey V; Abramov, Andrey Y

    2016-02-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is a polymer compromised of linearly arranged orthophosphate units that are linked through high-energy phosphoanhydride bonds. The chain length of this polymer varies from five to several thousand orthophosphates. PolyP is distributed in the most of the living organisms and plays multiple functions in mammalian cells, it is important for blood coagulation, cancer, calcium precipitation, immune response and many others. Essential role of polyP is shown for mitochondria, from implication into energy metabolism and mitochondrial calcium handling to activation of permeability transition pore (PTP) and cell death. PolyP is a gliotransmitter which transmits the signal in astrocytes via activation of P2Y1 receptors and stimulation of phospholipase C. PolyP-induced calcium signal in astrocytes can be stimulated by different lengths of this polymer but only long chain polyP induces mitochondrial depolarization by inhibition of respiration and opening of the PTP. It leads to induction of astrocytic cell death which can be prevented by inhibition of PTP with cyclosporine A. Thus, medium- and short-length polyP plays role in signal transduction and mitochondrial metabolism of astrocytes and long chain of this polymer can be toxic for the cells. PMID:26862186

  7. Analysis of simple sequence repeats in mammalian cell cycle genes.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Seema; Wills, Christopher; Metzgar, David

    2014-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), or microsatellites are hyper-mutable and can lead to disorders. Here we explore SSR distribution in cell cycle-associated genes [grouped into: checkpoint; regulation; replication, repair, and recombination (RRR); and transition] in humans and orthologues of eight mammals. Among the gene groups studied, transition genes have the highest SSR density. Trinucleotide repeats are not abundant and introns have higher repeat density than exons. Many repeats in human genes are conserved; however, CG motifs are conserved only in regulation genes. SSR variability in cell cycle genes represents a genetic Achilles' heel, yet SSRs are common in all groups of genes. This tolerance many be due to i) positions in introns where they do not disrupt gene function, ii) essential roles in regulation, iii) specific value of adaptability, and/or iv) lack of negative selection pressure. Present study may be useful for further exploration of their medical relevance and potential functionality.

  8. [Selective localization of neptunium-237 in nuclei of mammalian cells].

    PubMed

    Galle, P; Boulahdour, H; Metivier, H

    1992-01-01

    After injection in the rat of soluble neptunium salt, the distribution of this element was studied at the subcellular level by electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. Abnormal structures have been observed by electron microscopy in the nuclei of hepatocytes, and the same structures have also been observed in the nuclei of the proximal tubules cells of the kidney. These structures are formed of clusters of very small and dense particles, several nanometers in diameter. The clusters are localized in the central part of the nuclei and they are separate from nucleoli and heterochromatin. Electron probe X-ray analysis of this cluster have shown that they contain neptunium associated with phosphorus. In the cell containing neptunium inclusions, other non specific lesions are also observed (nuclear pycnosis, mitochondrial depletion).

  9. CRISPR transcriptional repression devices and layered circuits in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Samira; Beal, Jacob; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R; Huh, Jin; Hall, Richard N; Xie, Zhen; Li, Yinqing; Weiss, Ron

    2014-01-01

    A key obstacle to creating sophisticated genetic circuits has been the lack of scalable device libraries. Here we present a modular transcriptional repression architecture based on clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system and examine approaches for regulated expression of guide RNAs in human cells. Subsequently we demonstrate that CRISPR regulatory devices can be layered to create functional cascaded circuits, which provide a valuable toolbox for engineering purposes. PMID:24797424

  10. CRISPR transcriptional repression devices and layered circuits in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Samira; Beal, Jacob; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R; Huh, Jin; Hall, Richard N; Xie, Zhen; Li, Yinqing; Weiss, Ron

    2014-07-01

    A key obstacle to creating sophisticated genetic circuits has been the lack of scalable device libraries. Here we present a modular transcriptional repression architecture based on clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system and examine approaches for regulated expression of guide RNAs in human cells. Subsequently we demonstrate that CRISPR regulatory devices can be layered to create functional cascaded circuits, which provide a valuable toolbox for engineering purposes. PMID:24797424

  11. Constitutive properties of adult mammalian cardiac muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zile, M. R.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Koide, M.; Cowles, B. A.; Gharpuray, V.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes in the constitutive properties of the cardiac muscle cell play a causative role in the development of diastolic dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiocytes from normal and pressure-hypertrophied cats were embedded in an agarose gel, placed on a stretching device, and subjected to a change in stress (sigma), and resultant changes in cell strain (epsilon) were measured. These measurements were used to examine the passive elastic spring, viscous damping, and myofilament activation. The passive elastic spring was assessed in protocol A by increasing the sigma on the agarose gel at a constant rate to define the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship. Viscous damping was assessed in protocol B from the loop area between the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship during an increase and then a decrease in sigma. In both protocols, myofilament activation was minimized by a reduction in [Ca2+]i. Myofilament activation effects were assessed in protocol C by defining cardiocyte sigma versus epsilon during an increase in sigma with physiological [Ca2+]i. In protocol A, the cardiocyte sigma-versus-epsilon relationship was similar in normal and hypertrophied cells. In protocol B, the loop area was greater in hypertrophied than normal cardiocytes. In protocol C, the sigma-versus-epsilon relation in hypertrophied cardiocytes was shifted to the left compared with normal cells. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in viscous damping and myofilament activation in combination may cause pressure-hypertrophied cardiocytes to resist changes in shape during diastole and contribute to diastolic dysfunction.

  12. Method for culturing mammalian cells in a horizontally rotated bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Trinh, Tinh T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A bio-reactor system where cell growth microcarrier beads are suspended in a zero head space fluid medium by rotation about a horizontal axis and where the fluid is continuously oxygenated from a tubular membrane which rotates on a shaft together with rotation of the culture vessel. The oxygen is continuously throughput through the membrane and disbursed into the fluid medium along the length of the membrane.

  13. Mutagenic effects of thiram in mammalian somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Paschin YuV; Bakhitova, L M

    1985-03-01

    The dimethylthiocarbamate fungicide thiram has been found to be a potent and direct inducer of point mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus in Chinese hamster cells in vitro. It also increased the incidence of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow of mice given a single ip dose of 100 mg/kg. Both the in vitro and the in vivo mutagenic responses were observed with doses of thiram that were cytotoxic.

  14. Processing and intracellular sorting of anglerfish and rat preprosomatostatins in mammalian endocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Sevarino, K A; Ventimiglia, R; Stork, P

    1990-09-01

    Rat preprosomatostatin (rPPSS) is processed to two distinct end products in a tissue-specific manner. The analogous end products in anglerfish are derived from separate precursors, anglerfish preprosomatostatins-1 and -2 (a(1)PPSS and a(II)PPSS). This report reviews experiments demonstrating that in mammalian cells, the cell of expression, not precursor structure, determines the processing fate of the preprosomatostatins. A fusion precursor of a(II)PPSS and rPPSS was expressed in mammalian cell lines to determine that the amino-terminal 78 residues of rPPSS contain a sorting signal that directs the precursor into a regulated secretory pathway wherein proteolytic processing occurs. Preliminary studies of rPPSS pro-region mutations are presented that attempt to further localize this sorting signal. PMID:1976215

  15. Heavy ion induced DNA-DSB in yeast and mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loebrich, M.; Ikpeme, S.; Kiefer, J.

    1994-01-01

    Molecular changes at the DNA are assumed to be the main cause for radiation effects in a number of organisms. During the course of the last decades techniques have been developed for measuring DNA double-strand breaks (dsb), generally assumed to be the most critical DNA lesions. The outcome of all those different approaches portrays a collection of data useful for a theoretical description of radiation action mechanisms. However, in the case of heavy ion induced DNA dsb the picture is not quite clear yet and further projects and strategies have to be developed. The biological systems studied in our group are yeast and mammalian cells. While in the case of yeast cells technical and methodical reasons highlight these organisms mammalian cells reach greater importance when dsb repair studies are performed. In both types of organisms the technique of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is applied, although with different modifications and evaluation procedures mainly due to the different genome sizes.

  16. A novel bio-functional material based on mammalian cell aggresomes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carmona, Escarlata; Mendoza, Rosa; Ruiz-Cánovas, Eugènia; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Abasolo, Ibane; Schwartz, Simó; Villaverde, Antonio; Corchero, José Luis

    2015-09-01

    Aggresomes are protein aggregates found in mammalian cells when the intracellular protein degradation machinery is over-titered. Despite that they abound in cells producing recombinant proteins of biomedical and biotechnological interest, the physiological roles of these protein clusters and the functional status of the embedded proteins remain basically unexplored. In this work, we have determined for the first time that, like in bacterial inclusion bodies, deposition of recombinant proteins into aggresomes does not imply functional inactivation. As a model, human α-galactosidase A (GLA) has been expressed in mammalian cells as enzymatically active, mechanically stable aggresomes showing higher thermal stability than the soluble GLA version. Since aggresomes are easily produced and purified, we propose these particles as novel functional biomaterials with potential as carrier-free, self-immobilized catalyzers in biotechnology and biomedicine.

  17. Different intracellular distribution of avian reovirus core protein sigmaA in cells of avian and mammalian origin

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez-Iglesias, Lorena; Lostale-Seijo, Irene; Martinez-Costas, Jose; Benavente, Javier

    2012-10-25

    A comparative analysis of the intracellular distribution of avian reovirus (ARV) core protein sigmaA in cells of avian and mammalian origin revealed that, whereas the viral protein accumulates in the cytoplasm and nucleolus of avian cells, most sigmaA concentrates in the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells in tight association with the insoluble nuclear matrix fraction. Our results further showed that sigmaA becomes arrested in the nucleoplasm of mammalian cells via association with mammalian cell-specific factors and that this association prevents nucleolar targeting. Inhibition of RNA polymerase II activity, but not of RNA polymerase I activity, in infected mammalian cells induces nucleus-to-cytoplasm sigmaA translocation through a CRM1- and RanGTP-dependent mechanism, yet a heterokaryon assay suggests that sigmaA does not shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. The scarcity of sigmaA in cytoplasmic viral factories of infected mammalian cells could be one of the factors contributing to limited ARV replication in mammalian cells.

  18. Dynamic JUNQ inclusion bodies are asymmetrically inherited in mammalian cell lines through the asymmetric partitioning of vimentin.

    PubMed

    Ogrodnik, Mikołaj; Salmonowicz, Hanna; Brown, Rachel; Turkowska, Joanna; Średniawa, Władysław; Pattabiraman, Sundararaghavan; Amen, Triana; Abraham, Ayelet-chen; Eichler, Noam; Lyakhovetsky, Roman; Kaganovich, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Aging is associated with the accumulation of several types of damage: in particular, damage to the proteome. Recent work points to a conserved replicative rejuvenation mechanism that works by preventing the inheritance of damaged and misfolded proteins by specific cells during division. Asymmetric inheritance of misfolded and aggregated proteins has been shown in bacteria and yeast, but relatively little evidence exists for a similar mechanism in mammalian cells. Here, we demonstrate, using long-term 4D imaging, that the vimentin intermediate filament establishes mitotic polarity in mammalian cell lines and mediates the asymmetric partitioning of damaged proteins. We show that mammalian JUNQ inclusion bodies containing soluble misfolded proteins are inherited asymmetrically, similarly to JUNQ quality-control inclusions observed in yeast. Mammalian IPOD-like inclusion bodies, meanwhile, are not always inherited by the same cell as the JUNQ. Our study suggests that the mammalian cytoskeleton and intermediate filaments provide the physical scaffold for asymmetric inheritance of dynamic quality-control JUNQ inclusions. Mammalian IPOD inclusions containing amyloidogenic proteins are not partitioned as effectively during mitosis as their counterparts in yeast. These findings provide a valuable mechanistic basis for studying the process of asymmetric inheritance in mammalian cells, including cells potentially undergoing polar divisions, such as differentiating stem cells and cancer cells.

  19. Selective toxicity of nitracrine to hypoxic mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W. R.; Denny, W. A.; Twigden, S. J.; Baguley, B. C.; Probert, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Hypoxic cells in solid tumours are resistant to ionizing radiation and may be refractory to treatment by many chemotherapeutic agents. For these reasons the identification of drugs with selective toxicity towards hypoxic cells is an important objective in cancer chemotherapy. Nitroimidazoles such as misonidazole demonstrate such hypoxia-selective toxicity but have very low dose potency. The 1-nitroacridine derivative 1-nitro-9-(dimethylaminopropylamino)acridine (nitracrine) binds reversibly to DNA but also forms covalent adducts with DNA in vivo. We have found nitracrine to be selectively toxic to the Chinese hamster ovary cell line AA8 under hypoxic conditions in culture, with a potency approximately 100,000 times higher than that of misonidazole. The effect of oxygen is not a simple dose-modifying one in this system, probably in part because of rapid metabolic inactivation of nitracrine under hypoxic conditions. Viscometric studies with the mini col E1 plasmid PML-21 confirmed that nitracrine binds to DNA by intercalation, and provided an unwinding angle of 16 degrees (relative to 26 degrees for ethidium). It is proposed that the cytotoxicity of nitracrine under hypoxia is due to reductive metabolism to form an alkylating species, but that intercalation of the chromophore may enhance reactivity towards DNA and hence contribute to the marked enhancement of potency with respect to simple nitroheteroaromatic drugs. PMID:6696822

  20. Antioxidant capacity of cultured mammalian cells estimated by ESRmethod.

    SciTech Connect

    Kartvelishvili, T.L.; Abuladze, M.; Asatiani, N.; Akhvlediani,J.; Asanishvili, L.; Holman, H-Y.; Sapojnikova, N.

    2004-03-03

    In the present study, the antioxidant capacity againsthydrogen peroxide (H2O2), one of the stress-inducing agents, wasinvestigated in two distinct cell lines: L-41 (human epithelial-likecells) and HLF (human diploid lung fibroblasts), which differ in tissueorigin, life span in culture, proliferate activity, and special enzymesystem activity. The cell antioxidant capacity against H2O2 was estimatedby the electron spin resonance (ESR) spin-trapping technique in theFenton reaction system via Fe+2 ion action with H2O2 resulting inhydroxyl radical generation. The effects of catalase inhibitors, such assodium azide and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, on the antioxidant capacity ofcells were tested. Based on our observation, it can be concluded that thedefensive capacity of cells against H2O2 depends on the ratio betweencatalase/GPx/SOD and H2O2, especially at high-stress situations, and theintracellular balance of these enzymes are more important than theinfluence of the single component.

  1. Dosimetry considerations in far field microwave exposure of mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Meltz, M.L.; Eagan, P.; Harris, C.R.; Erwin, D.N.

    1988-01-01

    A circulating water bath exposure system has been designed for in vitro radiofrequency radiation (RFR) exposure studies in the 915 to 2450 MHz range. A Styrofoam float, in which 10 T-25 plastic tissue culture flasks are embedded, is rotated at approximately 20 rpm in a Plexiglas water bath at a distance beneath a rectangular horn. The continuous circular rotation of the flasks is designed to average out the heterogeneity present in stationary flask exposures. The rotation also serves to prevent the establishment of chemical gradients in the medium within the flasks. Several factors have been demonstrated to affect the specific absorption rate (SAR) measured in the medium in the exposed flasks. These factors include: 1) the position of the exposure flasks relative to the long axis of the antenna horn; 2) whether the flasks are exposed while stationary or in rotation; 3) the volume of the medium contained in the flask; and 4) the depth in the medium in the flask at which temperatures for SAR calculation are measured. The presence of cells in the exposure flask (as attached monolayer or cell suspension) did not result in an SAR different from that measured in the same volume of medium without cells present.

  2. Visualizing septin and cell dynamics in mammalian brain slices.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Morishita, R; Tabata, H; Nagata, K

    2016-01-01

    Correct neuronal migration is crucial for the brain architecture and function. During brain development, excitatory and inhibitory neurons generated in the ventricular zone (VZ) of the dorsal telencephalon and ganglionic medial eminence, respectively, move to their final destinations in tightly regulated spatiotemporal manners. While a variety of morphological methods have been applied to neurobiology, in utero electroporation (IUE) technique is one of the most powerful tools for rapid gain- and loss-of-function studies of brain development. This method enables us to introduce genes of interest into VZ progenitor and stem cells of rodent embryos, and to observe resulting phenotypes such as proliferation, migration, and cell morphology at later stages. In this chapter, we first summarize basic immunohistochemistry methods that are foundations for any advanced methods and showed data on the distribution of Sept6, Sept9, and Sept14 as examples. Then, IUE method is described where functional analyses of Sept14 during brain development are used as examples. We subsequently refer to the in vivo electroporation (IVE)-mediated gene transfer, which is conceptually the same method as IUE, into granule cells of hippocampal dentate gyrus in neonatal mice. Finally, an IUE-based time-lapse imaging method is explained as an advanced technique for the analyses of cortical neuron migration. IUE and IVE methods and the application would contribute greatly to the morphological analyses of septins as well as other molecules to elucidate their neuronal functions and pathophysiological roles in various neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:27473916

  3. Replication Stress in Mammalian Cells and Its Consequences for Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Gelot, Camille; Magdalou, Indiana; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2015-01-01

    The faithful transmission of genetic information to daughter cells is central to maintaining genomic stability and relies on the accurate and complete duplication of genetic material during each cell cycle. However, the genome is routinely exposed to endogenous and exogenous stresses that can impede the progression of replication. Such replication stress can be an early cause of cancer or initiate senescence. Replication stress, which primarily occurs during S phase, results in consequences during mitosis, jeopardizing chromosome segregation and, in turn, genomic stability. The traces of replication stress can be detected in the daughter cells during G1 phase. Alterations in mitosis occur in two types: 1) local alterations that correspond to breaks, rearrangements, intertwined DNA molecules or non-separated sister chromatids that are confined to the region of the replication dysfunction; 2) genome-wide chromosome segregation resulting from centrosome amplification (although centrosomes do not contain DNA), which amplifies the local replication stress to the entire genome. Here, we discuss the endogenous causes of replication perturbations, the mechanisms of replication fork restart and the consequences for mitosis, chromosome segregation and genomic stability. PMID:26010955

  4. Biology of the Sertoli Cell in the Fetal, Pubertal, and Adult Mammalian Testis.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Zarzycka, Marta; Mruk, Dolores D

    2016-01-01

    A healthy man typically produces between 50 × 10(6) and 200 × 10(6) spermatozoa per day by spermatogenesis; in the absence of Sertoli cells in the male gonad, this individual would be infertile. In the adult testis, Sertoli cells are sustentacular cells that support germ cell development by secreting proteins and other important biomolecules that are essential for germ cell survival and maturation, establishing the blood-testis barrier, and facilitating spermatozoa detachment at spermiation. In the fetal testis, on the other hand, pre-Sertoli cells form the testis cords, the future seminiferous tubules. However, the role of pre-Sertoli cells in this process is much less clear than the function of Sertoli cells in the adult testis. Within this framework, we provide an overview of the biology of the fetal, pubertal, and adult Sertoli cell, highlighting relevant cell biology studies that have expanded our understanding of mammalian spermatogenesis. PMID:27300181

  5. Mammalian skin cell biology: at the interface between laboratory and clinic.

    PubMed

    Watt, Fiona M

    2014-11-21

    Mammalian skin research represents the convergence of three complementary disciplines: cell biology, mouse genetics, and dermatology. The skin provides a paradigm for current research in cell adhesion, inflammation, and tissue stem cells. Here, I discuss recent insights into the cell biology of skin. Single-cell analysis has revealed that human epidermal stem cells are heterogeneous and differentiate in response to multiple extrinsic signals. Live-cell imaging, optogenetics, and cell ablation experiments show skin cells to be remarkably dynamic. High-throughput, genome-wide approaches have yielded unprecedented insights into the circuitry that controls epidermal stem cell fate. Last, integrative biological analysis of human skin disorders has revealed unexpected functions for elements of the skin that were previously considered purely structural.

  6. Structural disorder of monomeric α-synuclein persists in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Theillet, Francois-Xavier; Binolfi, Andres; Bekei, Beata; Martorana, Andrea; Rose, Honor May; Stuiver, Marchel; Verzini, Silvia; Lorenz, Dorothea; van Rossum, Marleen; Goldfarb, Daniella; Selenko, Philipp

    2016-02-01

    Intracellular aggregation of the human amyloid protein α-synuclein is causally linked to Parkinson's disease. While the isolated protein is intrinsically disordered, its native structure in mammalian cells is not known. Here we use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to derive atomic-resolution insights into the structure and dynamics of α-synuclein in different mammalian cell types. We show that the disordered nature of monomeric α-synuclein is stably preserved in non-neuronal and neuronal cells. Under physiological cell conditions, α-synuclein is amino-terminally acetylated and adopts conformations that are more compact than when in buffer, with residues of the aggregation-prone non-amyloid-β component (NAC) region shielded from exposure to the cytoplasm, which presumably counteracts spontaneous aggregation. These results establish that different types of crowded intracellular environments do not inherently promote α-synuclein oligomerization and, more generally, that intrinsic structural disorder is sustainable in mammalian cells.

  7. Cultivation of mammalian cells using a single-use pneumatic bioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Obom, Kristina M; Cummings, Patrick J; Ciafardoni, Janelle A; Hashimura, Yasunori; Giroux, Daniel

    2014-10-10

    Recent advances in mammalian, insect, and stem cell cultivation and scale-up have created tremendous opportunities for new therapeutics and personalized medicine innovations. However, translating these advances into therapeutic applications will require in vitro systems that allow for robust, flexible, and cost effective bioreactor systems. There are several bioreactor systems currently utilized in research and commercial settings; however, many of these systems are not optimal for establishing, expanding, and monitoring the growth of different cell types. The culture parameters most challenging to control in these systems include, minimizing hydrodynamic shear, preventing nutrient gradient formation, establishing uniform culture medium aeration, preventing microbial contamination, and monitoring and adjusting culture conditions in real-time. Using a pneumatic single-use bioreactor system, we demonstrate the assembly and operation of this novel bioreactor for mammalian cells grown on micro-carriers. This bioreactor system eliminates many of the challenges associated with currently available systems by minimizing hydrodynamic shear and nutrient gradient formation, and allowing for uniform culture medium aeration. Moreover, the bioreactor's software allows for remote real-time monitoring and adjusting of the bioreactor run parameters. This bioreactor system also has tremendous potential for scale-up of adherent and suspension mammalian cells for production of a variety therapeutic proteins, monoclonal antibodies, stem cells, biosimilars, and vaccines.

  8. Low Levels of Aflatoxin B1, Ricin, and Milk Enhance Recombinant Protein Production in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rasooly, Reuven; Hernlem, Bradley; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression in transduced mammalian cells correlates with virus titer, but high doses of vector for gene therapy leads to toxicity in humans and in animals. Changing the optimal tissue culture medium by adding low levels of environmental stressors, such as 1 µM of the fungal toxin aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), 1 ng of the castor bean protein toxin ricin, or 1% reconstituted milk, enhances transcription and increases production of proteins in transduced mammalian cells as demonstrated by production of the following three recombinant proteins: firefly luciferase, β-galactosidase, and green fluorescent protein (GFP). Higher concentrations of the stress-producing substances damage the cells beyond recovery, resulting in inhibited gene expression and cell death. We also evaluated the effect of the stressor substances on the enhanced infectivity of virus. The presented findings extend methods for large-scale transient recombinant protein production in mammalian cells and suggest that it may be possible to reduce the cytotoxicity of the adenovirus by reducing the virus titer without adversely affecting gene expression levels. PMID:23940780

  9. Functional auditory hair cells produced in the mammalian cochlea by in utero gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Gubbels, Samuel. P.; Woessner, David W.; Mitchell, John C.; Ricci, Anthony J.; Brigande, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Sensory hair cells in the mammalian cochlea convert mechanical stimuli into electrical impulses that subserve audition1,2. Loss of hair cells and their innervating neurons is the most frequent cause of hearing impairment3. Atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1, also known as Math1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor required for hair cell development4-6 and its misexpression in vitro7,8 and in vivo9,10 generates hair-cell-like cells. Atoh1-based gene therapy to ameliorate auditory10 and vestibular11 dysfunction has been proposed. However, the biophysical properties of putative hair cells induced by Atoh1 misexpression have not been characterized. Here we show that in utero gene transfer of Atoh1 produces functional supernumerary hair cells in the mouse cochlea. The induced hair cells display stereociliary bundles, attract neuronal processes, and express the ribbon synapse marker C-terminal binding protein 2 (Ctbp2)12,13. Moreover, the hair cells are capable of mechanoelectrical transduction1,2 and display basolateral conductances with age-appropriate specializations. Our results demonstrate that manipulation of cell fate by transcription factor misexpression produces functional sensory cells in the postnatal mammalian cochlea. We anticipate that our in utero gene transfer paradigm will enable the design and validation of gene therapies to ameliorate hearing loss in mouse models of human deafness14,15. PMID:18754012

  10. [Mammalian DNA methylation and its roles during the induced re-programming of somatic cells].

    PubMed

    Hongwei, Song; Tiezhu, An; Shanhua, Piao; Chunsheng, Wang

    2014-05-01

    The technology of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) provides the possibility to reverse the terminal differentiated cells to pluripotent stem cells, and is therefore of great importance in both the theoretical research of stem cells and regenerative medicine. However, the efficiency of current induced reprogramming methods is extremely low, and the incomplete reprogramming often happens. It has been reported that some epigenetic memory of the somatic cells exists in these incomplete reprogrammed iPS cells, and DNA methylation, as a relative long-term and stable epigenetic modification, is one of the important factors that influence the efficiency of reprogramming and differentiative capacity of iPS cells. Mammalian DNA methylation, which normally appears on the CpG sites, occurs on the fifth carbon atom of the cytosine ring. DNA methylation can modulate the expression of somatic cell specific genes, and pluripotent genes; hence, it plays important roles in the processes of mammalian gene regulation, embryonic development and cell reprogramming. In addition, it has also been found that abnormal DNA methylation may lead to the disorder of genetic imprinting and the inactivation of X chromosome in iPS cells. Therefore, in order to provide a concise guidance of DNA methylation studies in iPS, we mainly review the mechanism, the distribution features of DNA methylation, and its roles in induced reprogramming of somatic cells. PMID:24846992

  11. Intracellular proteins produced by mammalian cells in response to environmental stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goochee, Charles F.; Passini, Cheryl A.

    1988-01-01

    The nature of the response of mammalian cells to environmental stress is examined by reviewing results of studies where cultured mouse L cells and baby hamster kidney cells were exposed to heat shock and the synthesis of heat-shock proteins and stress-response proteins (including HSP70, HSC70, HSP90, ubiquitin, and GRP70) in stressed and unstressed cells was evaluated using 2D-PAGE. The intracellular roles of the individual stress response proteins are discussed together with the regulation of the stress response system.

  12. Heavy metal accumulation by recombinant mammalian metallothionein within Escherichia coli protects against elevated metal exposure.

    PubMed

    Sauge-Merle, Sandrine; Lecomte-Pradines, Catherine; Carrier, Patrick; Cuiné, Stéphan; Dubow, Michael

    2012-08-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are ubiquitous metal-binding, cysteine-rich, small proteins known to provide protection against toxic heavy metals such as cadmium. In an attempt to increase the ability of bacterial cells to accumulate heavy metals, sheep MTII was produced in fusion with the maltose binding protein (MBP) and localized to the cytoplasmic or periplasmic compartments of Escherichia coli. For all metals tested, higher levels of bioaccumulation were measured with strains over-expressing MBP-MT in comparison with control strains. A marked bioaccumulation of Cd, As, Hg and Zn was observed in the strain over-expressing MBP-MT in the cytoplasm, whereas Cu was accumulated to higher levels when MBP-MT was over-expressed in the periplasm. Metal export systems may also play a role in this bioaccumulation. To illustrate this, we over-expressed MBP-MT in the cytoplasm of two mutant strains of E. coli affected in metal export. The first, deficient in the transporter ZntA described to export numerous divalent metal ions, showed increasing quantities of Zn, Cd, Hg and Pb being bioaccumulated. The second, strain LF20012, deficient in As export, showed that As was bioaccumulated in the form of arsenite. Furthermore, high quantities of accumulated metals, chelated by MBP-MT in the cytoplasm, conferred greater metal resistance levels to the cells in the presence of added toxic metals, such as Cd or Hg, while other metals showed toxic effects when the export systems were deficient. The strain over-expressing MBP-MT in the cytoplasm, in combination, with disruption of metal export systems, could be used to develop strategies for bioremediation.

  13. Luciferase reporter assay in Drosophila and mammalian tissue culture cells

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Chi

    2014-01-01

    Luciferase reporter gene assays are one of the most common methods for monitoring gene activity. Because of their sensitivity, dynamic range, and lack of endogenous activity, luciferase assays have been particularly useful for functional genomics in cell-based assays, such as RNAi screening. This unit describes delivery of two luciferase reporters with other nucleic acids (siRNA /dsRNA), measurement of the dual luciferase activities, and analysis of data generated. The systematic query of gene function (RNAi) combined with the advances in luminescent technology have made it possible to design powerful whole genome screens to address diverse and significant biological questions. PMID:24652620

  14. Whole population cell analysis of a landmark-rich mammalian epithelium reveals multiple elongation mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Andrew D.; Brock, Lara J.; Cobourne, Martyn T.; Green, Jeremy B. A.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue elongation is a fundamental component of developing and regenerating systems. Although localised proliferation is an important mechanism for tissue elongation, potentially important contributions of other elongation mechanisms, specifically cell shape change, orientated cell division and cell rearrangement, are rarely considered or quantified, particularly in mammalian systems. Their quantification, together with proliferation, provides a rigorous framework for the analysis of elongation. The mammalian palatal epithelium is a landmark-rich tissue, marked by regularly spaced ridges (rugae), making it an excellent model in which to analyse the contributions of cellular processes to directional tissue growth. We captured confocal stacks of entire fixed mouse palate epithelia throughout the mid-gestation growth period, labelled with membrane, nuclear and cell proliferation markers and segmented all cells (up to ∼20,000 per palate), allowing the quantification of cell shape and proliferation. Using the rugae as landmarks, these measures revealed that the so-called growth zone is a region of proliferation that is intermittently elevated at ruga initiation. The distribution of oriented cell division suggests that it is not a driver of tissue elongation, whereas cell shape analysis revealed that both elongation of cells leaving the growth zone and apico-basal cell rearrangements do contribute significantly to directional growth. Quantitative comparison of elongation processes indicated that proliferation contributes most to elongation at the growth zone, but cell shape change and rearrangement contribute as much as 40% of total elongation. We have demonstrated the utility of an approach to analysing the cellular mechanisms underlying tissue elongation in mammalian tissues. It should be broadly applied to higher-resolution analysis of links between genotypes and malformation phenotypes. PMID:24173805

  15. HnRNP A3 binds to and protects mammalian telomeric repeats in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Etsuko; Fukuda, Hirokazu; Nakashima, Katsuhiko; Tsuchiya, Naoto; Seimiya, Hiroyuki; Nakagama, Hitoshi . E-mail: hnakagam@gan2.res.ncc.go.jp

    2007-06-29

    The biological function of hnRNP family proteins is widely diverse and involved in pre-mRNA processing, transcriptional regulation, recombination, and telomere maintenance. In the course of our study on the elucidation of biological functions of minisatellite DNA, we isolated several nuclear proteins that bind to the mouse minisatellite Pc-1, which consists of a tandem array of d(GGCAG) repeats, from NIH3T3 cells. One of the minisatellite binding proteins, MNBP-A, which binds to a single-stranded G-rich strand of the Pc-1 repeat, was proven identical to the hnRNP A3. Recombinant hnRNP A3 was demonstrated to bind to the single-stranded telomeric d(TTAGGG) repeat with much higher affinity than the d(GGCAG) repeat. Binding of hnRNP A3 to the single-stranded telomeric repeat protected the repeat from nuclease attack, and inhibited both telomerase reaction and DNA synthesis in vitro. These results suggest a possible biological role of hnRNP A3 in the stable maintenance of telomere repeats.

  16. Gene transfer into mammalian cells by jet injection.

    PubMed

    Furth, P A; Shamay, A; Hennighausen, L

    1995-04-01

    Jet injection of DNA in solution is a technique that can be used to transfer DNA into tissues of living animals, where the introduced genes are expressed. The muscle, fat, skin, and mammary tissue of mice, and the fat, skin, and mammary tissue of sheep can be transfected with DNA. A jet injector, such as the Ped-o-jet (Stirn Industries, Dayton, NJ), is used to form a jet from 100 to 300 microliters of a DNA solution. This jet has sufficient force to travel into and through tissues of adult and juvenile animals. The introduced DNA is found in cells surrounding the path of the jet. When jet injection is performed through the surface of intact skin, underlying muscle, mammary, and fat, cells up to 2 cm distant from the point of injection are transfected with DNA. In this study, we demonstrate that the efficiency of DNA transfer is dependent upon the force of injection. Jet injection is an alternative to needle injection, lipofection, and particle bombardment for the introduction of "naked" DNA into the tissues of animals. This technique has potential for the introduction of genes into living organisms for genetic vaccination and gene therapy. PMID:7590772

  17. Gold nanoparticles delivery in mammalian live cells: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Lévy, Raphaël; Shaheen, Umbreen; Cesbron, Yann; Sée, Violaine

    2010-01-01

    Functional nanomaterials have recently attracted strong interest from the biology community, not only as potential drug delivery vehicles or diagnostic tools, but also as optical nanomaterials. This is illustrated by the explosion of publications in the field with more than 2,000 publications in the last 2 years (4,000 papers since 2000; from ISI Web of Knowledge, ‘nanoparticle and cell’ hit). Such a publication boom in this novel interdisciplinary field has resulted in papers of unequal standard, partly because it is challenging to assemble the required expertise in chemistry, physics, and biology in a single team. As an extreme example, several papers published in physical chemistry journals claim intracellular delivery of nanoparticles, but show pictures of cells that are, to the expert biologist, evidently dead (and therefore permeable). To attain proper cellular applications using nanomaterials, it is critical not only to achieve efficient delivery in healthy cells, but also to control the intracellular availability and the fate of the nanomaterial. This is still an open challenge that will only be met by innovative delivery methods combined with rigorous and quantitative characterization of the uptake and the fate of the nanoparticles. This review mainly focuses on gold nanoparticles and discusses the various approaches to nanoparticle delivery, including surface chemical modifications and several methods used to facilitate cellular uptake and endosomal escape. We will also review the main detection methods and how their optimum use can inform about intracellular localization, efficiency of delivery, and integrity of the surface capping. PMID:22110850

  18. Method for culturing mammalian cells in a perfused bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A bio-reactor system wherein a tubular housing contains an internal circularly disposed set of blade members and a central tubular filter all mounted for rotation about a common horizontal axis and each having independent rotational support and rotational drive mechanisms. The housing, blade members and filter preferably are driven at a constant slow speed for placing a fluid culture medium with discrete microbeads and cell cultures in a discrete spatial suspension in the housing. Replacement fluid medium is symmetrically input and fluid medium is symmetrically output from the housing where the input and the output are part of a loop providing a constant or intermittent flow of fluid medium in a closed loop.

  19. Endocytosis and exocytosis of nanoparticles in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Nuri; Park, Ji-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles that can be injected into the human body hold tremendous potential to detect and treat complex diseases. Understanding of the endocytosis and exocytosis mechanisms of nanoparticles is essential for safe and efficient therapeutic application. In particular, exocytosis is of significance in the removal of nanoparticles with drugs and contrast agents from the body, while endocytosis is of great importance for the targeting of nanoparticles in disease sites. Here, we review the recent research on the endocytosis and exocytosis of functionalized nanoparticles based on various sizes, shapes, and surface chemistries. We believe that this review contributes to the design of safe nanoparticles that can efficiently enter and leave human cells and tissues. PMID:24872703

  20. DNA Fragmentation in mammalian cells exposed to various light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, M.; Cherubini, R.; Dalla Vecchia, M.; Dini, V.; Esposito, G.; Moschini, G.; Sapora, O.; Signoretti, C.; Simone, G.; Sorrentino, E.; Tabocchini, M. A.

    Elucidation of how effects of densely ionizing radiation at cellular level are linked to DNA damage is fundamental for a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to genomic damage (especially chromosome aberrations) and developing biophysical models to predict space radiation effects. We have investigated the DNA fragmentation patterns induced in Chinese hamster V79 cells by 31 keV/μm protons, 123 keV/μm helium-4 ions and γ-rays in the size range 0.023-5.7 Mbp, using calibrated Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). The frequency distributions of fragments induced by the charged particles were shifted towards smaller sizes with respct to that induced by comparable doses of γ-rays. The DSB yields, evaluated from the fragments induced in the size range studied, were higher for protons and helium ions than for γ-rays by a factor of about 1.9 and 1.2, respectively. However, these ratios do not adequately reflect the RBE observed on the same cells for inactivation and mutation induced by these beams. This is a further indication for the lack of correlation between the effects exerted at cellular level and the initial yield of DSB. The dependence on radiation quality of the fragmentation pattern suggests that it may have a role in damage reparability. We have analyzed these patterns with a "random breakage" model generalized in order to consider the initial non-random distribution of the DNA molecules. Our results suggest that a random breakage mechanism can describe with a reasonable approximation the DNA fragmentation induced by γ-rays, while the approximation is not so good for light ions, likely due to the interplay between ion tracks and chromatin organization at the loop level.

  1. Large-scale RNA interference screening in mammalian cells identifies novel regulators of mutant huntingtin aggregation.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Tomoyuki; Wong, Hon Kit; Tosaki, Asako; Bauer, Peter O; Wada, Koji; Kurosawa, Masaru; Shimogori, Tomomi; Hattori, Nobutaka; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    In polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases including Huntington's disease (HD), mutant proteins containing expanded polyQ stretch form aggregates in neurons. Genetic or RNAi screenings in yeast, C. elegans or Drosophila have identified multiple genes modifying polyQ aggregation, a few of which are confirmed effective in mammals. However, the overall molecular mechanism underlying polyQ protein aggregation in mammalian cells still remains obscure. We here perform RNAi screening in mouse neuro2a cells to identify mammalian modifiers for aggregation of mutant huntingtin, a causative protein of HD. By systematic cell transfection and automated cell image analysis, we screen ∼ 12000 shRNA clones and identify 111 shRNAs that either suppress or enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation, without altering its gene expression. Classification of the shRNA-targets suggests that genes with various cellular functions such as gene transcription and protein phosphorylation are involved in modifying the aggregation. Subsequent analysis suggests that, in addition to the aggregation-modifiers sensitive to proteasome inhibition, some of them, such as a transcription factor Tcf20, and kinases Csnk1d and Pik3c2a, are insensitive to it. As for Tcf20, which contains polyQ stretches at N-terminus, its binding to mutant huntingtin aggregates is observed in neuro2a cells and in HD model mouse neurons. Notably, except Pik3c2a, the rest of the modifiers identified here are novel. Thus, our first large-scale RNAi screening in mammalian system identifies previously undescribed genetic players that regulate mutant huntingtin aggregation by several, possibly mammalian-specific mechanisms. PMID:24705917

  2. Large-Scale RNA Interference Screening in Mammalian Cells Identifies Novel Regulators of Mutant Huntingtin Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Tosaki, Asako; Bauer, Peter O.; Wada, Koji; Kurosawa, Masaru; Shimogori, Tomomi; Hattori, Nobutaka; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    In polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases including Huntington's disease (HD), mutant proteins containing expanded polyQ stretch form aggregates in neurons. Genetic or RNAi screenings in yeast, C. elegans or Drosophila have identified multiple genes modifying polyQ aggregation, a few of which are confirmed effective in mammals. However, the overall molecular mechanism underlying polyQ protein aggregation in mammalian cells still remains obscure. We here perform RNAi screening in mouse neuro2a cells to identify mammalian modifiers for aggregation of mutant huntingtin, a causative protein of HD. By systematic cell transfection and automated cell image analysis, we screen ∼12000 shRNA clones and identify 111 shRNAs that either suppress or enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation, without altering its gene expression. Classification of the shRNA-targets suggests that genes with various cellular functions such as gene transcription and protein phosphorylation are involved in modifying the aggregation. Subsequent analysis suggests that, in addition to the aggregation-modifiers sensitive to proteasome inhibition, some of them, such as a transcription factor Tcf20, and kinases Csnk1d and Pik3c2a, are insensitive to it. As for Tcf20, which contains polyQ stretches at N-terminus, its binding to mutant huntingtin aggregates is observed in neuro2a cells and in HD model mouse neurons. Notably, except Pik3c2a, the rest of the modifiers identified here are novel. Thus, our first large-scale RNAi screening in mammalian system identifies previously undescribed genetic players that regulate mutant huntingtin aggregation by several, possibly mammalian-specific mechanisms. PMID:24705917

  3. High level protein expression in mammalian cells using a safe viral vector: modified vaccinia virus Ankara.

    PubMed

    Hebben, Matthias; Brants, Jan; Birck, Catherine; Samama, Jean-Pierre; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Spehner, Danièle; Pradeau, Karine; Domi, Arban; Moss, Bernard; Schultz, Patrick; Drillien, Robert

    2007-12-01

    Vaccinia virus vectors are attractive tools to direct high level protein synthesis in mammalian cells. In one of the most efficient strategies developed so far, the gene to be expressed is positioned downstream of a bacteriophage T7 promoter within the vaccinia genome and transcribed by the T7 RNA polymerase, also encoded by the vaccinia virus genome. Tight regulation of transcription and efficient translation are ensured by control elements of the Escherichia coli lactose operon and the encephalomyocarditis virus leader sequence, respectively. We have integrated such a stringently controlled expression system, previously used successfully in a standard vaccinia virus backbone, into the modified vaccinia virus Ankara strain (MVA). In this manner, proteins of interest can be produced in mammalian cells under standard laboratory conditions because of the inherent safety of the MVA strain. Using this system for expression of beta-galactosidase, about 15 mg protein could be produced from 10(8) BHK21 cells over a 24-h period, a value 4-fold higher than the amount produced from an identical expression system based on a standard vaccinia virus strain. In another application, we employed the MVA vector to produce human tubulin tyrosine ligase and demonstrate that this protein becomes a major cellular protein upon induction conditions and displays its characteristic enzymatic activity. The MVA vector should prove useful for many other applications in which mammalian cells are required for protein production. PMID:17892951

  4. Cargo binding promotes KDEL receptor clustering at the mammalian cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Björn; Shaebani, M. Reza; Rammo, Domenik; Bubel, Tobias; Santen, Ludger; Schmitt, Manfred J.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane receptor clustering is a ubiquitous phenomenon in pro- and eukaryotic cells to physically sense receptor/ligand interactions and subsequently translate an exogenous signal into a cellular response. Despite that receptor cluster formation has been described for a wide variety of receptors, ranging from chemotactic receptors in bacteria to growth factor and neurotransmitter receptors in mammalian cells, a mechanistic understanding of the underlying molecular processes is still puzzling. In an attempt to fill this gap we followed a combined experimental and theoretical approach by dissecting and modulating cargo binding, internalization and cellular response mediated by KDEL receptors (KDELRs) at the mammalian cell surface after interaction with a model cargo/ligand. Using a fluorescent variant of ricin toxin A chain as KDELR-ligand (eGFP-RTAH/KDEL), we demonstrate that cargo binding induces dose-dependent receptor cluster formation at and subsequent internalization from the membrane which is associated and counteracted by anterograde and microtubule-assisted receptor transport to preferred docking sites at the plasma membrane. By means of analytical arguments and extensive numerical simulations we show that cargo-synchronized receptor transport from and to the membrane is causative for KDELR/cargo cluster formation at the mammalian cell surface. PMID:27353000

  5. Ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis: radiation studies in Neurospora predictive for results in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; DeMarini, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    Ionizing radiation was the first mutagen discovered and was used to develop the first mutagenicity assay. In the ensuing 70+ years, ionizing radiation became a fundamental tool in understanding mutagenesis and is still a subject of intensive research. Frederick de Serres et al. developed and used the Neurospora crassa ad-3 system initially to explore the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. Using this system, de Serres et al. demonstrated the dependence of the frequency and spectra of mutations induced by ionizing radiation on the dose, dose rate, radiation quality, repair capabilities of the cells, and the target gene employed. This work in Neurospora predicted the subsequent observations of the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Modeled originally on the mouse specific-locus system developed by William L. Russell, the N. crassa ad-3 system developed by de Serres has itself served as a model for interpreting the results in subsequent systems in mammalian cells. This review describes the primary findings on the nature of ionizing radiation-induced mutagenesis in the N. crassa ad-3 system and the parallel observations made years later in mammalian cells.

  6. Eps8 Regulates Hair Bundle Length and Functional Maturation of Mammalian Auditory Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waldhaus, Jörg; Xiong, Hao; Hackney, Carole M.; Holley, Matthew C.; Offenhauser, Nina; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Knipper, Marlies; Masetto, Sergio; Marcotti, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Hair cells of the mammalian cochlea are specialized for the dynamic coding of sound stimuli. The transduction of sound waves into electrical signals depends upon mechanosensitive hair bundles that project from the cell's apical surface. Each stereocilium within a hair bundle is composed of uniformly polarized and tightly packed actin filaments. Several stereociliary proteins have been shown to be associated with hair bundle development and function and are known to cause deafness in mice and humans when mutated. The growth of the stereociliar actin core is dynamically regulated at the actin filament barbed ends in the stereociliary tip. We show that Eps8, a protein with actin binding, bundling, and barbed-end capping activities in other systems, is a novel component of the hair bundle. Eps8 is localized predominantly at the tip of the stereocilia and is essential for their normal elongation and function. Moreover, we have found that Eps8 knockout mice are profoundly deaf and that IHCs, but not OHCs, fail to mature into fully functional sensory receptors. We propose that Eps8 directly regulates stereocilia growth in hair cells and also plays a crucial role in the physiological maturation of mammalian cochlear IHCs. Together, our results indicate that Eps8 is critical in coordinating the development and functionality of mammalian auditory hair cells. PMID:21526224

  7. Cell-Free Transcription of Mammalian Chromatin: Transcription of Globin Messenger RNA Sequences from Bone-Marrow Chromatin with Mammalian RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Steggles, A. W.; Wilson, G. N.; Kantor, J. A.; Picciano, D. J.; Falvey, A. K.; Anderson, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    A mammalian cell-free transcriptional system was developed in which mammalian RNA polymerase synthesizes globin messenger RNA sequences from bone-marrow chromatin. The messenger RNA sequences are detected by measurement of the ability of the transcribed RNA to hybridize with globin complementary DNA. The globin complementary DNA is synthesized by the enzyme from avian myeloblastosis virus, RNA-directed DNA polymerase, with purified globin messenger RNA as template. The specificity of the globin complementary DNA in annealing reactions was verified by preparing DNA complementary to liver messenger RNA and showing that the globin and liver complementary DNAs are specific for their own messenger RNAs. Both DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II from sheep liver and RNA polymerase from Escherichia coli can transcribe globin messenger RNA sequences from rabbit bone-marrow chromatin; however, the mammalian enzyme appears to be more specific in that globin gene sequences represent a higher proportion of the RNA synthesized. Neither polymerase can transcribe globin messenger RNA sequences from rabbit-liver chromatin. This cell-free assay system should be useful in searching for mammalian transcriptional regulatory factors. PMID:4364529

  8. Mutagenic effect of a keV range N + beam on mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Huiyun; Wu, Lijun; Yu, Lixiang; Han, Wei; Liu, Xuelan; Yu, Zengliang

    2005-07-01

    The radiobiological effects of a keV (5-20 keV) range nitrogen ion (N +) beam on mammalian cells were studied, particularly with regard to the induction of mutation in the cell genome. The experiment demonstrated that the 20 keV N + beam, which resulted in cell death to a certain extent, induced a 2-3 fold increase in the mutation rates at the CD59 gene locus of the mammalian A L cells as compared to the control. Within certain fluence ranges (0-6 × 10 14 N +/cm 2), the cell survival displayed a down-up-down pattern which is similar to the phenomenon known as 'hyper-radiosensitivity' manifested under low-dose irradiation; the CD59 mutation rate firstly showed a gradual rise up to a 3-fold increment above the background level as the ion fluence went up to 4 × 10 14 N +/cm 2, after this peak point however, a downtrend appeared though the ion fluence increased further. It was also observed that the fraction of CD59 mutation bears no proportional relation to ion energy in further experiments of mutation induction by N + beams with the incident energies of 5, 10, 15 and 20 keV at the same fluence of 3 × 10 14 N +/cm 2. Analyses of the deletion patterns of chromosome 11 in CD59- mutants induced by 5-20 keV N + beams showed that these ions did not result in large-size chromosome deletions in this mammalian cell system. A preliminary discussion, suggesting that the mutagenic effect of such low-energy ion influx on mammalian cells could result from multiple processes involving direct collision of particles with cellular DNA, and cascade atomic and molecular reactions due to plentiful primary and secondary particles, was also presented. The study provided the first glimpse into the roles low-energy ions may play in inducing mutagenesis in mammalian cells, and results will be of much value in helping people to understand the contribution of low-energy ions to radiological effects of various ionising radiations.

  9. Modulating Antimicrobial Activity and Mammalian Cell Biocompatibility with Glucosamine-Functionalized Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Edgar H H; Khin, Mya Mya; Ravikumar, Vikashini; Si, Zhangyong; Rice, Scott A; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2016-03-14

    The development of novel reagents and antibiotics for combating multidrug resistance bacteria has received significant attention in recent years. In this study, new antimicrobial star polymers (14-26 nm in diameter) that consist of mixtures of polylysine and glycopolymer arms were developed and were shown to possess antimicrobial efficacy toward Gram positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) (with MIC values as low as 16 μg mL(-1)) while being non-hemolytic (HC50 > 10,000 μg mL(-1)) and exhibit excellent mammalian cell biocompatibility. Structure function analysis indicated that the antimicrobial activity and mammalian cell biocompatibility of the star nanoparticles could be optimized by modifying the molar ratio of polylysine to glycopolymers arms. The technology described herein thus represents an innovative approach that could be used to fight deadly infectious diseases.

  10. A High-Throughput Microfluidic Platform for Mammalian Cell Transfection and Culturing

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Kristina; Maerkl, Sebastian J.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian synthetic biology could be augmented through the development of high-throughput microfluidic systems that integrate cellular transfection, culturing, and imaging. We created a microfluidic chip that cultures cells and implements 280 independent transfections at up to 99% efficiency. The chip can perform co-transfections, in which the number of cells expressing each protein and the average protein expression level can be precisely tuned as a function of input DNA concentration and synthetic gene circuits can be optimized on chip. We co-transfected four plasmids to test a histidine kinase signaling pathway and mapped the dose dependence of this network on the level of one of its constituents. The chip is readily integrated with high-content imaging, enabling the evaluation of cellular behavior and protein expression dynamics over time. These features make the transfection chip applicable to high-throughput mammalian protein and synthetic biology studies. PMID:27030663

  11. Differentiation of mammalian skeletal muscle cells cultured on microcarrier beads in a rotating cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgan, C. E.; Burge, S. S.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Truskey, G. A.; Kraus, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    The growth and repair of adult skeletal muscle are due in part to activation of muscle precursor cells, commonly known as satellite cells or myoblasts. These cells are responsive to a variety of environmental cues, including mechanical stimuli. The overall goal of the research is to examine the role of mechanical signalling mechanisms in muscle growth and plasticity through utilisation of cell culture systems where other potential signalling pathways (i.e. chemical and electrical stimuli) are controlled. To explore the effects of decreased mechanical loading on muscle differentiation, mammalian myoblasts are cultured in a bioreactor (rotating cell culture system), a model that has been utilised to simulate microgravity. C2C12 murine myoblasts are cultured on microcarrier beads in a bioreactor and followed throughout differentiation as they form a network of multinucleated myotubes. In comparison with three-dimensional control cultures that consist of myoblasts cultured on microcarrier beads in teflon bags, myoblasts cultured in the bioreactor exhibit an attenuation in differentiation. This is demonstrated by reduced immunohistochemical staining for myogenin and alpha-actinin. Western analysis shows a decrease, in bioreactor cultures compared with control cultures, in levels of the contractile proteins myosin (47% decrease, p < 0.01) and tropomyosin (63% decrease, p < 0.01). Hydrodynamic measurements indicate that the decrease in differentiation may be due, at least in part, to fluid stresses acting on the myotubes. In addition, constraints on aggregate size imposed by the action of fluid forces in the bioreactor affect differentiation. These results may have implications for muscle growth and repair during spaceflight.

  12. The photocytotoxicity of different lights on mammalian cells in interior lighting system.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiayin; Gao, Tingting; Ye, Maole; Bi, Hongtao; Liu, Gang

    2012-12-01

    In the present paper, two light sources commonly used in interior lighting system: incandescent light and light emitting diode (LED) were chosen to evaluate their influences on three kinds of mammalian cells, together with UVA and UVB, and the mechanism of the photocytotoxicity was investigated in terms of intracellular ROS production, lipid peroxidation, SOD activity and GSH level assays. The results showed that LED and incandescent light both had some photocytotoxicities. In the interior lighting condition (100lx-250lx), the cytotoxicities of LED and incandescent lamp on RF/6A cells (rhesus retinal pigment epithelium cell line) were stronger than that on two fibroblast cell lines, while the cytotoxicity of UVA and UVB on HS68 cells (fibroblast cell line) was highest in the tests. The mechanism analysis revealed that the photocytotoxicities of LED and incandescent lamp were both caused by cell lipid peroxidation. LED and incandescent light could promote the production of ROS, raise lipid peroxidation level and lower the activity of the antioxidant key enzymes in mammalian cells, and finally cause a number of cells death. However, the negative function of LED was significantly smaller than incandescent light and ultraviolet in daily interior lighting condition. And the significantly lower photocytotoxicity of LED might be due to the less existence of ultraviolet. Therefore, LED is an efficient and relative safe light source in interior lighting system, which should be widely used instead of traditional light source.

  13. Fate of Mammalian Cochlear Hair Cells and Stereocilia after Loss of the Stereocilia

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Shuping; Yang, Shiming; Guo, Weiwei; He, David Z.Z.

    2009-01-01

    Cochlear hair cells transduce mechanical stimuli into electrical activity. The site of hair cell transduction is the hair bundle, an array of stereocilia with different height arranged in a staircase. Tip links connect the apex of each stereocilium to the side of its taller neighbor. The hair bundle and tip links of hair cells are susceptible to acoustic trauma and ototoxic drugs. It has been shown that hair cells in lower vertebrates and in the mammalian vestibular system may survive bundle loss and undergo self-repair of the stereocilia. Our goals were to determine whether cochlear hair cells could survive the trauma and whether the tip link and/or the hair bundle could be regenerated. We simulated the acoustic trauma-induced tip link damage or stereociliary loss by disrupting tip links or ablating the hair bundles in the cultured organ of Corti from neonatal gerbils. Hair-cell fate and stereociliary morphology and function were examined using confocal and scanning electron microscopies and electrophysiology. Most bundleless hair cells survived and developed for about 2 weeks. However, no spontaneous hair-bundle regeneration was observed. When tip links were ruptured, repair of tip links and restoration of mechanotransduction were observed in less than 24 hours. Our study suggests that the dynamic nature of the hair cell's transduction apparatus is retained despite the fact that regeneration of the hair bundle is lost in mammalian cochlear hair cells. PMID:19955380

  14. Highly parallel introduction of nucleic acids into mammalian cells grown in microwell arrays

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tilak; McBride, Ryan; Head, Steven; Saez, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput cell-based screens of genome-size collections of cDNAs and siRNAs have become a powerful tool to annotate the mammalian genome, enabling the discovery of novel genes associated with normal cellular processes and pathogenic states, and the unraveling of genetic networks and signaling pathways in a systems biology approach. However, the capital expenses and the cost of reagents necessary to perform such large screens have limited application of this technology. Efforts to miniaturize the screening process have centered on the development of cellular microarrays created on microscope slides that use chemical means to introduce exogenous genetic material into mammalian cells. While this work has demonstrated the feasibility of screening in very small formats, the use of chemical transfection reagents (effective only in a subset of cell lines and not on primary cells) and the lack of defined borders between cells grown in adjacent microspots containing different genetic material (to prevent cell migration and to aid spot location recognition during imaging and phenotype deconvolution) have hampered the spread of this screening technology. Here, we describe proof-of-principles experiments to circumvent these drawbacks. We have created microwell arrays on an electroporation-ready transparent substrate and established procedures to achieve highly efficient parallel introduction of exogenous molecules into human cell lines and primary mouse macrophages. The microwells confine cells and offer multiple advantages during imaging and phenotype analysis. We have also developed a simple method to load this 484-microwell array with libraries of nucleic acids using a standard microarrayer. These advances can be elaborated upon to form the basis of a miniaturized high-throughput functional genomics screening platform to carry out genome-size screens in a variety of mammalian cells that may eventually become a mainstream tool for life science research. PMID:20024036

  15. Analyses of protein corona on bare and silica-coated gold nanorods against four mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Minakshi; Yi, Dong Kee; An, Seong Soo A

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the toxic effects of gold nanorods (AuNRs). Here, a comprehensive study was performed by examining the effects of bare (uncoated) AuNRs and AuNRs functionalized with silica (SiO2-AuNRs) against various mammalian cell lines, including cervical cancer cells, fibroblast cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and neuroblastoma cells. The interactions between AuNRs and mammalian cells were investigated with cell viability and mortality assays. Dihydrorhodamine-123 assay was carried out for evaluating reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, along with mass spectroscopy analysis for determining the composition of the protein corona. Our results suggest that even the lowest concentrations of AuNRs (0.7 μg/mL) induced ROS production leading to cell mortality. On the other hand, cellular viability and ROS production were maintained even at a higher concentration of SiO2-coated AuNRs (12 μg/mL). The increased production of ROS by AuNRs seemed to cause the toxicity observed in all four mammalian cell types. The protein corona on the bare AuNRs did not appear to reduce ROS generation; however, different compositions of the protein corona on bare and SiO2-coated AuNRs may affect cellular behavior differently. Therefore, it was determined that SiO2-coated AuNRs would be more advantageous than bare AuNRs for cellular applications. PMID:25759578

  16. Highly parallel introduction of nucleic acids into mammalian cells grown in microwell arrays.

    PubMed

    Jain, Tilak; McBride, Ryan; Head, Steven; Saez, Enrique

    2009-12-21

    High-throughput cell-based screens of genome-size collections of cDNAs and siRNAs have become a powerful tool to annotate the mammalian genome, enabling the discovery of novel genes associated with normal cellular processes and pathogenic states, and the unravelling of genetic networks and signaling pathways in a systems biology approach. However, the capital expenses and the cost of reagents necessary to perform such large screens have limited application of this technology. Efforts to miniaturize the screening process have centered on the development of cellular microarrays created on microscope slides that use chemical means to introduce exogenous genetic material into mammalian cells. While this work has demonstrated the feasibility of screening in very small formats, the use of chemical transfection reagents (effective only in a subset of cell lines and not on primary cells) and the lack of defined borders between cells grown in adjacent microspots containing different genetic material (to prevent cell migration and to aid spot location recognition during imaging and phenotype deconvolution) have hampered the spread of this screening technology. Here, we describe proof-of-principles experiments to circumvent these drawbacks. We have created microwell arrays on an electroporation-ready transparent substrate and established procedures to achieve highly efficient parallel introduction of exogenous molecules into human cell lines and primary mouse macrophages. The microwells confine cells and offer multiple advantages during imaging and phenotype analysis. We have also developed a simple method to load this 484-microwell array with libraries of nucleic acids using a standard microarrayer. These advances can be elaborated upon to form the basis of a miniaturized high-throughput functional genomics screening platform to carry out genome-size screens in a variety of mammalian cells that may eventually become a mainstream tool for life science research.

  17. Optical volume and mass measurements show that mammalian cells swell during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Zlotek-Zlotkiewicz, Ewa; Monnier, Sylvain; Cappello, Giovanni; Le Berre, Mael

    2015-01-01

    The extent, mechanism, and function of cell volume changes during specific cellular events, such as cell migration and cell division, have been poorly studied, mostly because of a lack of adequate techniques. Here we unambiguously report that a large range of mammalian cell types display a significant increase in volume during mitosis (up to 30%). We further show that this increase in volume is tightly linked to the mitotic state of the cell and not to its spread or rounded shape and is independent of the presence of an intact actomyosin cortex. Importantly, this volume increase is not accompanied by an increase in dry mass and thus corresponds to a decrease in cell density. This mitotic swelling might have important consequences for mitotic progression: it might contribute to produce strong pushing forces, allowing mitotic cells to round up; it might also, by lowering cytoplasmic density, contribute to the large change of physicochemical properties observed in mitotic cells. PMID:26598614

  18. Optical volume and mass measurements show that mammalian cells swell during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Zlotek-Zlotkiewicz, Ewa; Monnier, Sylvain; Cappello, Giovanni; Le Berre, Mael; Piel, Matthieu

    2015-11-23

    The extent, mechanism, and function of cell volume changes during specific cellular events, such as cell migration and cell division, have been poorly studied, mostly because of a lack of adequate techniques. Here we unambiguously report that a large range of mammalian cell types display a significant increase in volume during mitosis (up to 30%). We further show that this increase in volume is tightly linked to the mitotic state of the cell and not to its spread or rounded shape and is independent of the presence of an intact actomyosin cortex. Importantly, this volume increase is not accompanied by an increase in dry mass and thus corresponds to a decrease in cell density. This mitotic swelling might have important consequences for mitotic progression: it might contribute to produce strong pushing forces, allowing mitotic cells to round up; it might also, by lowering cytoplasmic density, contribute to the large change of physicochemical properties observed in mitotic cells.

  19. Multiplexed expression and screening for recombinant protein production in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Susan DJ; Crofts, Anna M; Shadbolt, S Paul; McCafferty, John; Dyson, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    Background A variety of approaches to understanding protein structure and function require production of recombinant protein. Mammalian based expression systems have advantages over bacterial systems for certain classes of protein but can be slower and more laborious. Thus the availability of a simple system for production and rapid screening of constructs or conditions for mammalian expression would be of great benefit. To this end we have coupled an efficient recombinant protein production system based on transient transfection in HEK-293 EBNA1 (HEK-293E) suspension cells with a dot blot method allowing pre-screening of proteins expressed in cells in a high throughput manner. Results A nested PCR approach was used to clone 21 extracellular domains of mouse receptors as CD4 fusions within a mammalian GATEWAY expression vector system. Following transient transfection, HEK-293E cells grown in 2 ml cultures in 24-deep well blocks showed similar growth kinetics, viability and recombinant protein expression profiles, to those grown in 50 ml shake flask cultures as judged by western blotting. Following optimisation, fluorescent dot blot analysis of transfection supernatants was shown to be a rapid method for analysing protein expression yielding similar results as western blot analysis. Addition of urea enhanced the binding of glycoproteins to a nitrocellulose membrane. A good correlation was observed between the results of a plate based small scale transient transfection dot blot pre-screen and successful purification of proteins expressed at the 50 ml scale. Conclusion The combination of small scale multi-well plate culture and dot blotting described here will allow the multiplex analysis of different mammalian expression experiments enabling a faster identification of high yield expression constructs or conditions prior to large scale protein production. The methods for parallel GATEWAY cloning and expression of multiple constructs in cell culture will also be useful

  20. Synthetic biology in mammalian cells: next generation research tools and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lienert, Florian; Lohmueller, Jason J; Garg, Abhishek; Silver, Pamela A

    2014-02-01

    Recent progress in DNA manipulation and gene circuit engineering has greatly improved our ability to programme and probe mammalian cell behaviour. These advances have led to a new generation of synthetic biology research tools and potential therapeutic applications. Programmable DNA-binding domains and RNA regulators are leading to unprecedented control of gene expression and elucidation of gene function. Rebuilding complex biological circuits such as T cell receptor signalling in isolation from their natural context has deepened our understanding of network motifs and signalling pathways. Synthetic biology is also leading to innovative therapeutic interventions based on cell-based therapies, protein drugs, vaccines and gene therapies.

  1. Mutagenicity of arsenic in mammalian cells: role of reactive oxygen species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hei, T. K.; Liu, S. X.; Waldren, C.

    1998-01-01

    Arsenite, the trivalent form of arsenic present in the environment, is a known human carcinogen that lacked mutagenic activity in bacterial and standard mammalian cell mutation assays. We show herein that when evaluated in an assay (AL cell assay), in which both intragenic and multilocus mutations are detectable, that arsenite is in fact a strong dose-dependent mutagen and that it induces mostly large deletion mutations. Cotreatment of cells with the oxygen radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide significantly reduces the mutagenicity of arsenite. Thus, the carcinogenicity of arsenite can be explained at least in part by it being a mutagen that depends on reactive oxygen species for its activity.

  2. Synthetic biology in mammalian cells: Next generation research tools and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Lienert, Florian; Lohmueller, Jason J; Garg, Abhishek; Silver, Pamela A

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in DNA manipulation and gene circuit engineering has greatly improved our ability to programme and probe mammalian cell behaviour. These advances have led to a new generation of synthetic biology research tools and potential therapeutic applications. Programmable DNA-binding domains and RNA regulators are leading to unprecedented control of gene expression and elucidation of gene function. Rebuilding complex biological circuits such as T cell receptor signalling in isolation from their natural context has deepened our understanding of network motifs and signalling pathways. Synthetic biology is also leading to innovative therapeutic interventions based on cell-based therapies, protein drugs, vaccines and gene therapies. PMID:24434884

  3. m(6)A RNA modification controls cell fate transition in mammalian embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Batista, Pedro J; Molinie, Benoit; Wang, Jinkai; Qu, Kun; Zhang, Jiajing; Li, Lingjie; Bouley, Donna M; Lujan, Ernesto; Haddad, Bahareh; Daneshvar, Kaveh; Carter, Ava C; Flynn, Ryan A; Zhou, Chan; Lim, Kok-Seong; Dedon, Peter; Wernig, Marius; Mullen, Alan C; Xing, Yi; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Chang, Howard Y

    2014-12-01

    N6-methyl-adenosine (m(6)A) is the most abundant modification on messenger RNAs and is linked to human diseases, but its functions in mammalian development are poorly understood. Here we reveal the evolutionary conservation and function of m(6)A by mapping the m(6)A methylome in mouse and human embryonic stem cells. Thousands of messenger and long noncoding RNAs show conserved m(6)A modification, including transcripts encoding core pluripotency transcription factors. m(6)A is enriched over 3' untranslated regions at defined sequence motifs and marks unstable transcripts, including transcripts turned over upon differentiation. Genetic inactivation or depletion of mouse and human Mettl3, one of the m(6)A methylases, led to m(6)A erasure on select target genes, prolonged Nanog expression upon differentiation, and impaired ESC exit from self-renewal toward differentiation into several lineages in vitro and in vivo. Thus, m(6)A is a mark of transcriptome flexibility required for stem cells to differentiate to specific lineages.

  4. m6A RNA modification controls cell fate transition in mammalian embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Pedro J; Molinie, Benoit; Wang, Jinkai; Qu, Kun; Zhang, Jiajing; Li, Lingjie; Bouley, Donna M; Lujan, Ernesto; Haddad, Bahareh; Daneshvar, Kaveh; Carter, Ava C; Flynn, Ryan A; Zhou, Chan; Lim, Kok-Seong; Dedon, Peter; Wernig, Marius; Mullen, Alan C; Xing, Yi; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Chang, Howard Y

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY N6-methyl-adenosine (m6A) is the most abundant modification on messenger RNAs and is linked to human diseases, but its functions in mammalian development are poorly understood. Here we reveal the evolutionary conservation and function of m6A by mapping the m6A methylome in mouse and human embryonic stem cells. Thousands of messenger and long noncoding RNAs show conserved m6A modification, including transcripts encoding core pluripotency transcription factors. m6A is enriched over 3′ untranslated regions at defined sequence motifs, and marks unstable transcripts, including transcripts turned over upon differentiation. Genetic inactivation or depletion of mouse and human Mettl3, one of the m6A methylases, led to m6A erasure on select target genes, prolonged Nanog expression upon differentiation, and impaired ESC’s exit from self-renewal towards differentiation into several lineages in vitro and in vivo. Thus, m6A is a mark of transcriptome flexibility required for stem cells to differentiate to specific lineages. PMID:25456834

  5. Construction and development of a mammalian cell-based full-length antibody display library for targeting hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Liu, Yan-Hong; Li, Yan-Wen; Li, Yue-Hui; Xie, Ping-Li; Ju, Qiang; Chen, Lin; Li, Guan-Cheng

    2012-12-01

    We present a detailed method for constructing a mammalian cell-based full-length antibody display library for targeting hepatocellular carcinoma. Two novel mammalian library vectors pcDNA3-CHm and pcDNA3-CLm were constructed that contained restriction enzyme sites NheI, ClaI and antibody constant domain. Mammalian expression vector pcDNA3-CHm contains IgG heavy-chain (HC) constant region and glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor (GPI) that could be anchored full-length antibodies on the surface of mammalian cells. GOLPH2 prokaryotic expression vector was carried out in Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Variable domain of heavy-chain and variable domain of light-chain genes were respectively inserted into the vector pcDNA3-CHm and pcDNA3-CLm by ligation, and antibody libraries are displayed as whole IgG molecules on the cell surface by co-transfecting this HC-GPI with a light chain. By screening the cell library using magnetic beads and cell ELISA, the cell clone that displayed GOLPH2-specific antibodies on cell surfaces was identified. The mammalian cell-based antibody display library is a great potential application for displaying full-length functional antibodies of targeting hepatocellular carcinoma on the surface of mammalian cells. Anti-GOLPH2 display antibody was successfully isolated from the library.

  6. Mammalian Cell Culture Process for Monoclonal Antibody Production: Nonlinear Modelling and Parameter Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Selişteanu, Dan; Șendrescu, Dorin; Georgeanu, Vlad

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are at present one of the fastest growing products of pharmaceutical industry, with widespread applications in biochemistry, biology, and medicine. The operation of mAbs production processes is predominantly based on empirical knowledge, the improvements being achieved by using trial-and-error experiments and precedent practices. The nonlinearity of these processes and the absence of suitable instrumentation require an enhanced modelling effort and modern kinetic parameter estimation strategies. The present work is dedicated to nonlinear dynamic modelling and parameter estimation for a mammalian cell culture process used for mAb production. By using a dynamical model of such kind of processes, an optimization-based technique for estimation of kinetic parameters in the model of mammalian cell culture process is developed. The estimation is achieved as a result of minimizing an error function by a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. The proposed estimation approach is analyzed in this work by using a particular model of mammalian cell culture, as a case study, but is generic for this class of bioprocesses. The presented case study shows that the proposed parameter estimation technique provides a more accurate simulation of the experimentally observed process behaviour than reported in previous studies. PMID:25685797

  7. Critical role of bacterial isochorismatase in the autophagic process induced by Acinetobacter baumannii in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Kaiyu; Shi, Xiaochen; Wang, Chao; Wang, Feng; Fan, Junwen; Shen, Fengge; Xu, Jiancheng; Bao, Wanguo; Liu, Mingyuan; Yu, Lu

    2016-01-01

    A recent study reported that Acinetobacter baumannii could induce autophagy, but the recognition and clearance mechanism of intracytosolic A. baumannii in the autophagic process and the molecular mechanism of autophagy induced by the pathogen remains unknown. In this study, we first demonstrated that invading A. baumannii induced a complete, ubiquitin-mediated autophagic response that is dependent upon septins SEPT2 and SEPT9 in mammalian cells. We also demonstrated that autophagy induced by A. baumannii was Beclin-1 dependent via the AMPK/ERK/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Of interest, we found that the isochorismatase mutant strain had significantly decreased siderophore-mediated ferric iron acquisition ability and had a reduced the ability to induce autophagy. We verified that isochorismatase was required for the recognition of intracytosolic A. baumannii mediated by septin cages, ubiquitinated proteins, and ubiquitin-binding adaptor proteins p62 and NDP52 in autophagic response. We also confirmed that isochorismatase was required for the clearance of invading A. baumannii by autophagy in vitro and in the mouse model of infection. Together, these findings provide insight into the distinctive recognition and clearance of intracytosolic A. baumannii by autophagy in host cells, and that isochorismatase plays a critical role in the A. baumannii–induced autophagic process.—Wang, Y., Zhang, K., Shi, X., Wang, C., Wang, F., Fan, J., Shen, F., Xu, J., Bao, W., Liu, M., Yu, L. Critical role of bacterial isochorismatase in the autophagic process induced by Acinetobacter baumannii in mammalian cells. PMID:27432399

  8. Modification of N-glycosylation sites allows secretion of bacterial chondroitinase ABC from mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Muir, Elizabeth M; Fyfe, Ian; Gardiner, Sonya; Li, Li; Warren, Philippa; Fawcett, James W; Keynes, Roger J; Rogers, John H

    2010-01-15

    Although many eukaryotic proteins have been secreted by transfected bacterial cells, little is known about how a bacterial protein is treated as it passes through the secretory pathway when expressed in a eukaryotic cell. The eukaryotic N-glycosylation system could interfere with folding and secretion of prokaryotic proteins whose sequence has not been adapted for glycosylation in structurally appropriate locations. Here we show that such interference does indeed occur for chondroitinase ABC from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris, and can be overcome by eliminating potential N-glycosylation sites. Chondroitinase ABC was heavily glycosylated when expressed in mammalian cells or in a mammalian translation system, and this process prevented secretion of functional enzyme. Directed mutagenesis of selected N-glycosylation sites allowed efficient secretion of active chondroitinase. As these proteoglycans are known to inhibit regeneration of axons in the mammalian central nervous system, the modified chondroitinase gene is a potential tool for gene therapy to promote neural regeneration, ultimately in human spinal cord injury.

  9. The Crumbs3-Pals1 complex participates in the establishment of polarity in mammalian epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Roh, Michael H; Fan, Shuling; Liu, Chia-Jen; Margolis, Ben

    2003-07-15

    In Drosophila, the Crumbs-Stardust-Discs-lost complex is required during the establishment of polarized epithelia. Embryos that lack a component of this complex or overexpress Crumbs exhibit defects in epithelial morphogenesis. We recently cloned a novel mammalian epithelial Crumbs isoform, Crumbs3 (CRB3). CRB3 exists in a complex at tight junctions (TJs) with Pals1 and PATJ, the mammalian homologues of Stardust and Discs lost, respectively. Here, we observe that overexpression of CRB3 leads to delayed TJ formation in MDCK epithelial cell monolayers and disruption of polarity in MDCK cysts cultured in collagen. Both phenomena require the last four residues of CRB3. Next, we expressed, in MDCK cells, a dominant-negative Myc-Lin-2-Pals1 chimeric protein, where the PDZ domain of Lin-2 was replaced with that of Pals1. TJ and apical polarity defects were also observed in these cells. Collectively, this suggests that the CRB-Pals1 interaction is important for formation of TJs and polarized epithelia. These results provide insight into the function of the mammalian Crumbs complex during TJ formation and epithelial polarization.

  10. Mammalian cell culture process for monoclonal antibody production: nonlinear modelling and parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Selişteanu, Dan; Șendrescu, Dorin; Georgeanu, Vlad; Roman, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are at present one of the fastest growing products of pharmaceutical industry, with widespread applications in biochemistry, biology, and medicine. The operation of mAbs production processes is predominantly based on empirical knowledge, the improvements being achieved by using trial-and-error experiments and precedent practices. The nonlinearity of these processes and the absence of suitable instrumentation require an enhanced modelling effort and modern kinetic parameter estimation strategies. The present work is dedicated to nonlinear dynamic modelling and parameter estimation for a mammalian cell culture process used for mAb production. By using a dynamical model of such kind of processes, an optimization-based technique for estimation of kinetic parameters in the model of mammalian cell culture process is developed. The estimation is achieved as a result of minimizing an error function by a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. The proposed estimation approach is analyzed in this work by using a particular model of mammalian cell culture, as a case study, but is generic for this class of bioprocesses. The presented case study shows that the proposed parameter estimation technique provides a more accurate simulation of the experimentally observed process behaviour than reported in previous studies. PMID:25685797

  11. Mammalian cell culture process for monoclonal antibody production: nonlinear modelling and parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Selişteanu, Dan; Șendrescu, Dorin; Georgeanu, Vlad; Roman, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are at present one of the fastest growing products of pharmaceutical industry, with widespread applications in biochemistry, biology, and medicine. The operation of mAbs production processes is predominantly based on empirical knowledge, the improvements being achieved by using trial-and-error experiments and precedent practices. The nonlinearity of these processes and the absence of suitable instrumentation require an enhanced modelling effort and modern kinetic parameter estimation strategies. The present work is dedicated to nonlinear dynamic modelling and parameter estimation for a mammalian cell culture process used for mAb production. By using a dynamical model of such kind of processes, an optimization-based technique for estimation of kinetic parameters in the model of mammalian cell culture process is developed. The estimation is achieved as a result of minimizing an error function by a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. The proposed estimation approach is analyzed in this work by using a particular model of mammalian cell culture, as a case study, but is generic for this class of bioprocesses. The presented case study shows that the proposed parameter estimation technique provides a more accurate simulation of the experimentally observed process behaviour than reported in previous studies.

  12. Single molecule study of non-specific binding kinetics of LacI in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Caccianini, Laura; Normanno, Davide; Izeddin, Ignacio; Dahan, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    Many key cellular processes are controlled by the association of DNA-binding proteins (DBPs) to specific sites. The kinetics of the search process leading to the binding of DBPs to their target locus are largely determined by transient interactions with non-cognate DNA. Using single-molecule microscopy, we studied the dynamics and non-specific binding to DNA of the Lac repressor (LacI) in the environment of mammalian nuclei. We measured the distribution of the LacI-DNA binding times at non-cognate sites and determined the mean residence time to be τ(1D) = 182 ms. This non-specific interaction time, measured in the context of an exogenous system such as that of human U2OS cells, is remarkably different compared to that reported for the LacI in its native environment in E. coli (<5 ms). Such a striking difference (more than 30 fold) suggests that the genome, its organization, and the nuclear environment of mammalian cells play important roles on the dynamics of DBPs and their non-specific DNA interactions. Furthermore, we found that the distribution of off-target binding times follows a power law, similar to what was reported for TetR in U2OS cells. We argue that a possible molecular origin of such a power law distribution of residence times is the large variability of non-cognate sequences found in the mammalian nucleus by the diffusing DBPs. PMID:26387491

  13. Modification of N-glycosylation sites allows secretion of bacterial chondroitinase ABC from mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Elizabeth M.; Fyfe, Ian; Gardiner, Sonya; Li, Li; Warren, Philippa; Fawcett, James W.; Keynes, Roger J.; Rogers, John H.

    2010-01-01

    Although many eukaryotic proteins have been secreted by transfected bacterial cells, little is known about how a bacterial protein is treated as it passes through the secretory pathway when expressed in a eukaryotic cell. The eukaryotic N-glycosylation system could interfere with folding and secretion of prokaryotic proteins whose sequence has not been adapted for glycosylation in structurally appropriate locations. Here we show that such interference does indeed occur for chondroitinase ABC from the bacterium Proteus vulgaris, and can be overcome by eliminating potential N-glycosylation sites. Chondroitinase ABC was heavily glycosylated when expressed in mammalian cells or in a mammalian translation system, and this process prevented secretion of functional enzyme. Directed mutagenesis of selected N-glycosylation sites allowed efficient secretion of active chondroitinase. As these proteoglycans are known to inhibit regeneration of axons in the mammalian central nervous system, the modified chondroitinase gene is a potential tool for gene therapy to promote neural regeneration, ultimately in human spinal cord injury. PMID:19900493

  14. Cytotoxic Effects of Tropodithietic Acid on Mammalian Clonal Cell Lines of Neuronal and Glial Origin.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Heidi; Vocke, Farina; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Simon, Meinhard; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2015-12-01

    The marine metabolite tropodithietic acid (TDA), produced by several Roseobacter clade bacteria, is known for its broad antimicrobial activity. TDA is of interest not only as a probiotic in aquaculture, but also because it might be of use as an antibacterial agent in non-marine or non-aquatic environments, and thus the potentially cytotoxic influences on eukaryotic cells need to be evaluated. The present study was undertaken to investigate its effects on cells of the mammalian nervous system, i.e., neuronal N2a cells and OLN-93 cells as model systems for nerve cells and glia. The data show that in both cell lines TDA exerted morphological changes and cytotoxic effects at a concentration of 0.3-0.5 µg/mL (1.4-2.4 µM). Furthermore, TDA caused a breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2, and the induction of the small heat shock protein HSP32/HO-1, which is considered as a sensor of oxidative stress. The cytotoxic effects were accompanied by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+)-levels, the disturbance of the microtubule network, and the reorganization of the microfilament system. Hence, mammalian cells are a sensitive target for the action of TDA and react by the activation of a stress response resulting in cell death. PMID:26633426

  15. Cytotoxic Effects of Tropodithietic Acid on Mammalian Clonal Cell Lines of Neuronal and Glial Origin

    PubMed Central

    Wichmann, Heidi; Vocke, Farina; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Simon, Meinhard; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The marine metabolite tropodithietic acid (TDA), produced by several Roseobacter clade bacteria, is known for its broad antimicrobial activity. TDA is of interest not only as a probiotic in aquaculture, but also because it might be of use as an antibacterial agent in non-marine or non-aquatic environments, and thus the potentially cytotoxic influences on eukaryotic cells need to be evaluated. The present study was undertaken to investigate its effects on cells of the mammalian nervous system, i.e., neuronal N2a cells and OLN-93 cells as model systems for nerve cells and glia. The data show that in both cell lines TDA exerted morphological changes and cytotoxic effects at a concentration of 0.3–0.5 µg/mL (1.4–2.4 µM). Furthermore, TDA caused a breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2, and the induction of the small heat shock protein HSP32/HO-1, which is considered as a sensor of oxidative stress. The cytotoxic effects were accompanied by an increase in intracellular Ca2+-levels, the disturbance of the microtubule network, and the reorganization of the microfilament system. Hence, mammalian cells are a sensitive target for the action of TDA and react by the activation of a stress response resulting in cell death. PMID:26633426

  16. Advances in Mammalian Cell Line Development Technologies for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Tingfeng; Yang, Yuansheng; Ng, Say Kong

    2013-01-01

    From 2006 to 2011, an average of 15 novel recombinant protein therapeutics have been approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) annually. In addition, the expiration of blockbuster biologics has also spurred the emergence of biosimilars. The increasing numbers of innovator biologic products and biosimilars have thus fuelled the demand of production cell lines with high productivity. Currently, mammalian cell line development technologies used by most biopharmaceutical companies are based on either the methotrexate (MTX) amplification technology or the glutamine synthetase (GS) system. With both systems, the cell clones obtained are highly heterogeneous, as a result of random genome integration by the gene of interest and the gene amplification process. Consequently, large numbers of cell clones have to be screened to identify rare stable high producer cell clones. As such, the cell line development process typically requires 6 to 12 months and is a time, capital and labour intensive process. This article reviews established advances in protein expression and clone screening which are the core technologies in mammalian cell line development. Advancements in these component technologies are vital to improve the speed and efficiency of generating robust and highly productive cell line for large scale production of protein therapeutics. PMID:24276168

  17. Delivery of proteins to mammalian cells via gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, D.; Kalies, S.; Schomaker, M.; Ertmer, W.; Murua Escobar, H.; Meyer, H.; Ripken, T.

    2014-06-01

    Nanoparticle laser interactions are in widespread use in cell manipulation. In particular, molecular medicine needs techniques for the directed delivery of molecules into mammalian cells. Proteins are the final mediator of most cellular cascades. However, despite several methodical approaches, the efficient delivery of proteins to cells remains challenging. This paper presents a new protein transfection technique via laser scanning of cells previously incubated with gold nanoparticles. The laser-induced plasmonic effects on the gold nanoparticles cause a transient permeabilization of the cellular membrane, allowing proteins to enter the cell. Applying this technique, it was possible to deliver green fluorescent protein into mammalian cells with an efficiency of 43%, maintaining a high level of cell viability. Furthermore, a functional delivery of Caspase 3, an apoptosis mediating protein, was demonstrated and evaluated in several cellular assays. Compared to conventional protein transfection techniques such as microinjection, the methodical approach presented here enables high-throughput transfection of about 10 000 cells per second. Moreover, a well-defined point in time of delivery is guaranteed by gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection, allowing the detailed temporal analysis of cellular pathways and protein trafficking.

  18. Novel insights into mammalian embryonic neural stem cell division: focus on microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Huttner, Wieland B.

    2015-01-01

    During stem cell divisions, mitotic microtubules do more than just segregate the chromosomes. They also determine whether a cell divides virtually symmetrically or asymmetrically by establishing spindle orientation and the plane of cell division. This can be decisive for the fate of the stem cell progeny. Spindle defects have been linked to neurodevelopmental disorders, yet the role of spindle orientation for mammalian neurogenesis has remained controversial. Here we explore recent advances in understanding how the microtubule cytoskeleton influences mammalian neural stem cell division. Our focus is primarily on the role of spindle microtubules in the development of the cerebral cortex. We also highlight unique characteristics in the architecture and dynamics of cortical stem cells that are tightly linked to their mode of division. These features contribute to setting these cells apart as mitotic “rule breakers,” control how asymmetric a division is, and, we argue, are sufficient to determine the fate of the neural stem cell progeny in mammals. PMID:26628750

  19. Pyridalyl inhibits cellular protein synthesis in insect, but not mammalian, cell lines.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Koko; Hirakura, Setsuko; Kobayashi, Jun; Ozoe, Yoshihisa; Saito, Shigeru; Utsumi, Toshihiko

    2008-09-01

    To gain insight into the mechanism of action and selectivity of the insecticidal activity of pyridalyl, the cytotoxicity of pyridalyl against various insect and mammalian cell lines was characterized by measuring the inhibition of cellular protein synthesis. When the effect of pyridalyl on the cellular protein synthesis in Sf9 cells was evaluated by measuring the incorporation of [(3)H]leucine, rapid and significant inhibition of protein synthesis was observed. However, pyridalyl did not inhibit protein synthesis in a cell-free protein synthesis system, indicating that pyridalyl does not directly inhibit protein synthesis. No obvious cytotoxicity was observed against any of the mammalian cell lines tested. In the case of insect cell lines, remarkable differences in the cytotoxicity of pyridalyl were observed: the highest cytotoxicity (IC50 mM) was found against Sf9 cells derived from Spodoptera frugiperda, whereas no obvious cytotoxicity was observed against BmN4 cells derived from Bombyx mori. Measurements of the insecticidal activity of pyridalyl against Spodoptera litura and B. mori revealed a correlation between the cytotoxicity against cultured cell lines and the insecticidal activity. From these observations, it was concluded that the selective inhibition of cellular protein synthesis by pyridalyl might contribute significantly to the insecticidal activity and the selectivity of this compound. PMID:18454491

  20. Delivery of proteins to mammalian cells via gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, D; Kalies, S; Schomaker, M; Ertmer, W; Murua Escobar, H; Meyer, H; Ripken, T

    2014-06-20

    Nanoparticle laser interactions are in widespread use in cell manipulation. In particular, molecular medicine needs techniques for the directed delivery of molecules into mammalian cells. Proteins are the final mediator of most cellular cascades. However, despite several methodical approaches, the efficient delivery of proteins to cells remains challenging. This paper presents a new protein transfection technique via laser scanning of cells previously incubated with gold nanoparticles. The laser-induced plasmonic effects on the gold nanoparticles cause a transient permeabilization of the cellular membrane, allowing proteins to enter the cell. Applying this technique, it was possible to deliver green fluorescent protein into mammalian cells with an efficiency of 43%, maintaining a high level of cell viability. Furthermore, a functional delivery of Caspase 3, an apoptosis mediating protein, was demonstrated and evaluated in several cellular assays. Compared to conventional protein transfection techniques such as microinjection, the methodical approach presented here enables high-throughput transfection of about 10 000 cells per second. Moreover, a well-defined point in time of delivery is guaranteed by gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection, allowing the detailed temporal analysis of cellular pathways and protein trafficking.

  1. Tyrosine hydroxylase positive perisomatic rings are formed around various amacrine cell types in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Debertin, Gábor; Kántor, Orsolya; Kovács-Öller, Tamás; Balogh, Lajos; Szabó-Meleg, Edina; Orbán, József; Nyitrai, Miklós; Völgyi, Béla

    2015-08-01

    Dopaminergic neurons of the central nervous system are mainly found in nuclei of the midbrain and the hypothalamus that provide subcortical and cortical targets with a rich and divergent innervation. Disturbance of signaling through this system underlies a variety of deteriorating conditions such as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia. Although retinal dopaminergic signaling is largely independent of the above circuitry, malfunction of the retinal dopaminergic system has been associated with anomalies in visual adaptation and a number of retinal disorders. Dopamine (DA) is released mainly in a paracrine manner by a population of tyrosine hydroxylase expressing (TH(+) ) amacrine cells (AC) of the mammalian retina; thus DA reaches virtually all retinal cell types by diffusion. Despite this paracrine release, however, the so called AII ACs have been considered as the main targets of DA signaling owing to a characteristic and robust ring-like TH(+) innervation to the soma/dendritic-stalk area of AII cells. This apparent selectivity of TH(+) innervation seems to contradict the divergent DAergic signaling scheme of other brain loci. In this study, however, we show evidence for intimate proximity between TH(+) rings and somata of neurochemically identified non-AII cells. We also show that this phenomenon is not species specific, as we observe it in popular mammalian animal models including the rabbit, the rat, and the mouse. Finally, our dataset suggests the existence of further, yet unidentified post-synaptic targets of TH(+) dendritic rings. Therefore, we hypothesize that TH(+) ring-like structures target the majority of ACs non-selectively and that such contacts are wide-spread among mammals. Therefore, this new view of inner retinal TH(+) innervation resembles the divergent DAergic innervation of other brain areas through the mesolimbic, mesocortical, and mesostriatal signaling streams. AII amacrine cells have been considered as the main targets of dopamine

  2. A zebrafish mosaic assay to study mammalian stem cells in real time in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chun; Qian, Meilin; Yin, Chaoran; Zhang, Yonggang; Hu, Huozhen; Yao, Shaohua

    2016-10-01

    The differentiation potentials of stem cells have been evaluated by various in vivo and in vitro assays. However, these assays have different limitations hindering efficient study of mammalian stem cells. Here we describe a rapid and powerful mosaic assay to study the differentiation potentials of stem cells in real time in vivo by using zebrafish embryo. We transplanted mouse neural stem cells into zebrafish embryos at different developmental stages and found that they mainly formed neural tissues while occasionally trans-differentiated into mesoderm- and endoderm-derived tissues. Because zebrafish embryo is transparent, the behaviors of transplanted mouse stem cells can be easily tracked in a real-time manner and at single-cell resolution. We expect that this assay may be widely applied to explore the in vivo behaviors of any stem cells available. PMID:27554369

  3. The retinoblastoma family of proteins and their regulatory functions in the mammalian cell division cycle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) family of proteins are found in organisms as distantly related as humans, plants, and insects. These proteins play a key role in regulating advancement of the cell division cycle from the G1 to S-phases. This is achieved through negative regulation of two important positive regulators of cell cycle entry, E2F transcription factors and cyclin dependent kinases. In growth arrested cells transcriptional activity by E2Fs is repressed by RB proteins. Stimulation of cell cycle entry by growth factor signaling leads to activation of cyclin dependent kinases. They in turn phosphorylate and inactivate the RB family proteins, leading to E2F activation and additional cyclin dependent kinase activity. This propels the cell cycle irreversibly forward leading to DNA synthesis. This review will focus on the basic biochemistry and cell biology governing the regulation and activity of mammalian RB family proteins in cell cycle control. PMID:22417103

  4. Microscale methods to assemble mammalian cells into tissue-like structures.

    PubMed

    Gong, Peiyuan; Zheng, Wen; Xiao, Dan; Jiang, Xingyu

    2012-10-01

    Different cell types make up tissues and organs hierarchically and communicate within a complex, three-dimensional (3D) environment. The in vitro recapitulation of tissue-like structures is meaningful, not only for fundamental cell biology research, but also for tissue engineering (TE). Currently, TE research adopts either the top-down or bottom-up approach. The top-down approach involves defining the macroscopic tissue features using biomaterial scaffolds and seeding cells into these scaffolds. Conversely, the bottom-up approach aims at crafting small tissue building blocks with precision-engineered structural and functional microscale features, using physical and/or chemical approaches. The bottom-up strategy takes advantage of the repeating structural and functional units that facilitate cell-cell interactions and cultures multiple cells together as a functional unit of tissue. In this review, we focus on currently available microscale methods that can control mammalian cells to assemble into 3D tissue-like structures.

  5. Biotransformations of Antidiabetic Vanadium Prodrugs in Mammalian Cells and Cell Culture Media: A XANES Spectroscopic Study.

    PubMed

    Levina, Aviva; McLeod, Andrew I; Pulte, Anna; Aitken, Jade B; Lay, Peter A

    2015-07-20

    The antidiabetic activities of vanadium(V) and -(IV) prodrugs are determined by their ability to release active species upon interactions with components of biological media. The first X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of the reactivity of typical vanadium (V) antidiabetics, vanadate ([V(V)O4](3-), A) and a vanadium(IV) bis(maltolato) complex (B), with mammalian cell cultures has been performed using HepG2 (human hepatoma), A549 (human lung carcinoma), and 3T3-L1 (mouse adipocytes and preadipocytes) cell lines, as well as the corresponding cell culture media. X-ray absorption near-edge structure data were analyzed using empirical correlations with a library of model vanadium(V), -(IV), and -(III) complexes. Both A and B ([V] = 1.0 mM) gradually converged into similar mixtures of predominantly five- and six-coordinate V(V) species (∼75% total V) in a cell culture medium within 24 h at 310 K. Speciation of V in intact HepG2 cells also changed with the incubation time (from ∼20% to ∼70% V(IV) of total V), but it was largely independent of the prodrug used (A or B) or of the predominant V oxidation state in the medium. Subcellular fractionation of A549 cells suggested that V(V) reduction to V(IV) occurred predominantly in the cytoplasm, while accumulation of V(V) in the nucleus was likely to have been facilitated by noncovalent bonding to histone proteins. The nuclear V(V) is likely to modulate the transcription process and to be ultimately related to cell death at high concentrations of V, which may be important in anticancer activities. Mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes (unlike for preadipocytes) showed a higher propensity to form V(IV) species, despite the prevalence of V(V) in the medium. The distinct V biochemistry in these cells is consistent with their crucial role in insulin-dependent glucose and fat metabolism and may also point to an endogenous role of V in adipocytes.

  6. Biotransformations of Antidiabetic Vanadium Prodrugs in Mammalian Cells and Cell Culture Media: A XANES Spectroscopic Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The antidiabetic activities of vanadium(V) and -(IV) prodrugs are determined by their ability to release active species upon interactions with components of biological media. The first X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of the reactivity of typical vanadium (V) antidiabetics, vanadate ([VVO4]3–, A) and a vanadium(IV) bis(maltolato) complex (B), with mammalian cell cultures has been performed using HepG2 (human hepatoma), A549 (human lung carcinoma), and 3T3-L1 (mouse adipocytes and preadipocytes) cell lines, as well as the corresponding cell culture media. X-ray absorption near-edge structure data were analyzed using empirical correlations with a library of model vanadium(V), -(IV), and -(III) complexes. Both A and B ([V] = 1.0 mM) gradually converged into similar mixtures of predominantly five- and six-coordinate VV species (∼75% total V) in a cell culture medium within 24 h at 310 K. Speciation of V in intact HepG2 cells also changed with the incubation time (from ∼20% to ∼70% VIV of total V), but it was largely independent of the prodrug used (A or B) or of the predominant V oxidation state in the medium. Subcellular fractionation of A549 cells suggested that VV reduction to VIV occurred predominantly in the cytoplasm, while accumulation of VV in the nucleus was likely to have been facilitated by noncovalent bonding to histone proteins. The nuclear VV is likely to modulate the transcription process and to be ultimately related to cell death at high concentrations of V, which may be important in anticancer activities. Mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes (unlike for preadipocytes) showed a higher propensity to form VIV species, despite the prevalence of VV in the medium. The distinct V biochemistry in these cells is consistent with their crucial role in insulin-dependent glucose and fat metabolism and may also point to an endogenous role of V in adipocytes. PMID:25906315

  7. Cytotoxicity of Clostridium septicum alpha-toxin: its oligomerization in detergent resistant membranes of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hang'ombe, Mudenda B; Mukamoto, Masafumi; Kohda, Tomoko; Sugimoto, Nakaba; Kozaki, Shunji

    2004-12-01

    Alpha-toxin is an important agent of the virulence of Clostridium septicum. We examined cytotoxicity for alpha-toxin to various mammalian cells with recombinant toxin fused with a histidine-tag at the amino-terminal. The recombinant toxin retained the activity indistinguishable from the native form. Mammalian nucleated cells examined in this study are more sensitive to the protoxin than to the trypsinized toxin, except RAW 264.7 and P3U1 cells of myeloid lineage. Cellular proteins of various molecular sizes interacted with the toxin. The size and SDS-PAGE pattern of the proteins were different among cell lines but they were liberated from the cells by the treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. The toxin appeared to target and utilize detergent resistant membranes (DRMs) for binding and subsequent oligomerization. In discontinuous sucrose density gradient, we demonstrated by immunoblotting that the toxin bound to DRMs contained in L929 cells and caused the oligomer formation. Furthermore, cholesterol depletion with cholesterol-interacting agents reduced toxin oligomerization and lowered cytotoxicity of the toxin towards cells. These results suggest that alpha-toxin preferentially exploits DRMs for oligomerization.

  8. A simple eccentric stirred tank mini-bioreactor: mixing characterization and mammalian cell culture experiments.

    PubMed

    Bulnes-Abundis, David; Carrillo-Cocom, Leydi M; Aráiz-Hernández, Diana; García-Ulloa, Alfonso; Granados-Pastor, Marisa; Sánchez-Arreola, Pamela B; Murugappan, Gayathree; Alvarez, Mario M

    2013-04-01

    In industrial practice, stirred tank bioreactors are the most common mammalian cell culture platform. However, research and screening protocols at the laboratory scale (i.e., 5-100 mL) rely primarily on Petri dishes, culture bottles, or Erlenmeyer flasks. There is a clear need for simple-easy to assemble, easy to use, easy to clean-cell culture mini-bioreactors for lab-scale and/or screening applications. Here, we study the mixing performance and culture adequacy of a 30 mL eccentric stirred tank mini-bioreactor. A detailed mixing characterization of the proposed bioreactor is presented. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations are used to identify the operational conditions required for adequate mixing. Mammalian cell culture experiments were conducted with two different cell models. The specific growth rate and the maximum cell density of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultures grown in the mini-bioreactor were comparable to those observed for 6-well culture plates, Erlenmeyer flasks, and 1 L fully instrumented bioreactors. Human hematopoietic stem cells were successfully expanded tenfold in suspension conditions using the eccentric mini-bioreactor system. Our results demonstrate good mixing performance and suggest the practicality and adequacy of the proposed mini-bioreactor.

  9. A simple eccentric stirred tank mini-bioreactor: mixing characterization and mammalian cell culture experiments.

    PubMed

    Bulnes-Abundis, David; Carrillo-Cocom, Leydi M; Aráiz-Hernández, Diana; García-Ulloa, Alfonso; Granados-Pastor, Marisa; Sánchez-Arreola, Pamela B; Murugappan, Gayathree; Alvarez, Mario M

    2013-04-01

    In industrial practice, stirred tank bioreactors are the most common mammalian cell culture platform. However, research and screening protocols at the laboratory scale (i.e., 5-100 mL) rely primarily on Petri dishes, culture bottles, or Erlenmeyer flasks. There is a clear need for simple-easy to assemble, easy to use, easy to clean-cell culture mini-bioreactors for lab-scale and/or screening applications. Here, we study the mixing performance and culture adequacy of a 30 mL eccentric stirred tank mini-bioreactor. A detailed mixing characterization of the proposed bioreactor is presented. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations are used to identify the operational conditions required for adequate mixing. Mammalian cell culture experiments were conducted with two different cell models. The specific growth rate and the maximum cell density of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultures grown in the mini-bioreactor were comparable to those observed for 6-well culture plates, Erlenmeyer flasks, and 1 L fully instrumented bioreactors. Human hematopoietic stem cells were successfully expanded tenfold in suspension conditions using the eccentric mini-bioreactor system. Our results demonstrate good mixing performance and suggest the practicality and adequacy of the proposed mini-bioreactor. PMID:23124589

  10. A high-throughput mammalian cell-based transient transfection assay.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Daniel J; Henry, Kenneth; Twaroski, Michelle L

    2004-01-01

    In eukaryotic organisms gene expression is regulated through a variety of upstream transacting factors (transcription factors) whose primary function appears to be the targeting of coregulatory protein complexes, which interact with basal transcription machinery to define the relative rate of transcription for a specific gene. Understanding the regulatory forces mediating transcription factor activity has been the focus of both academic and industrial research efforts over the past 15 yr, and in this time frame a variety of methodologies have been developed for reconstituting and assaying transcription factor activities in mammalian cell environments. Presented here is a high-throughput version of one of these methodologies that can be readily adapted to the screening of a variety of transcription factors. This technology utilizes co-transfection of mammalian expression and luciferase reporter plasmids to reconstitute transcription events in a mammalian host cell. Included is a detailed protocol for the use of a 96-well plate format, along with a variety of cost-effective measures that can be implemented to facilitate the use of the technology in the average low budget academic laboratory.

  11. How the Venom from the Ectoparasitoid Wasp Nasonia vitripennis Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Properties on Mammalian Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Danneels, Ellen L.; Gerlo, Sarah; Heyninck, Karen; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen; De Bosscher, Karolien; Haegeman, Guy; de Graaf, Dirk C.

    2014-01-01

    With more than 150,000 species, parasitoids are a large group of hymenopteran insects that inject venom into and then lay their eggs in or on other insects, eventually killing the hosts. Their venoms have evolved into different mechanisms for manipulating host immunity, physiology and behavior in such a way that enhance development of the parasitoid young. The venom from the ectoparasitoid Nasonia vitripennis inhibits the immune system in its host organism in order to protect their offspring from elimination. Since the major innate immune pathways in insects, the Toll and Imd pathways, are homologous to the NF-κB pathway in mammals, we were interested in whether a similar immune suppression seen in insects could be elicited in a mammalian cell system. A well characterized NF-κB reporter gene assay in fibrosarcoma cells showed a dose-dependent inhibition of NF-κB signaling caused by the venom. In line with this NF-κB inhibitory action, N. vitripennis venom dampened the expression of IL-6, a prototypical proinflammatory cytokine, from LPS-treated macrophages. The venom also inhibited the expression of two NF-κB target genes, IκBα and A20, that act in a negative feedback loop to prevent excessive NF-κB activity. Surprisingly, we did not detect any effect of the venom on the early events in the canonical NF-κB activation pathway, leading to NF-κB nuclear translocation, which was unaltered in venom-treated cells. The MAP kinases ERK, p38 and JNK are other crucial regulators of immune responses. We observed that venom treatment did not affect p38 and ERK activation, but induced a prolonged JNK activation. In summary, our data indicate that venom from N. vitripennis inhibits NF-κB signaling in mammalian cells. We identify venom-induced up regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor-regulated GILZ as a most likely molecular mediator for this inhibition. PMID:24821138

  12. High-Pass Filtering at Vestibular Frequencies by Transducer Adaptation in Mammalian Saccular Hair Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songer, Jocelyn E.; Eatock, Ruth Anne

    2011-11-01

    The mammalian saccule detects head tilt and low-frequency head accelerations as well as higher-frequency bone vibrations and sounds. It has two different hair cell types, I and II, dispersed throughout two morphologically distinct regions, the striola and extrastriola. Afferents from the two zones have distinct response dynamics which may arise partly from zonal differences in hair cell properties. We find that type II hair cells in the rat saccular epithelium adapt with a time course appropriate for influencing afferent responses to head motions. Moreover, striolar type II hair cells adapted by a greater extent than extrastriolar type II hair cells and had greater phase leads in the mid-frequency range (5-50 Hz). These differences suggest that hair cell transduction may contribute to zonal differences in the adaptation of vestibular afferents to head motions.

  13. The influence of high intensity terahertz radiation on mammalian cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Rachel; Schofield, Amy; Holder, Gareth; Downes, Joan; Edgar, David; Harrison, Paul; Siggel-King, Michele; Surman, Mark; Dunning, David; Hill, Stephen; Holder, David; Jackson, Frank; Jones, James; McKenzie, Julian; Saveliev, Yuri; Thomsen, Neil; Williams, Peter; Weightman, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the influence of exposure of biological systems to THz radiation is becoming increasingly important. There is some evidence to suggest that THz radiation can influence important activities within mammalian cells. This study evaluated the influence of the high peak power, low average power THz radiation produced by the ALICE (Daresbury Laboratory, UK) synchrotron source on human epithelial and embryonic stem cells. The cells were maintained under standard tissue culture conditions, during which the THz radiation was delivered directly into the incubator for various exposure times. The influence of the THz radiation on cell morphology, attachment, proliferation and differentiation was evaluated. The study demonstrated that there was no difference in any of these parameters between irradiated and control cell cultures. It is suggested that under these conditions the cells are capable of compensating for any effects caused by exposure to THz radiation with the peak powers levels employed in these studies.

  14. Synthetic Biology Platform for Sensing and Integrating Endogenous Transcriptional Inputs in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Angelici, Bartolomeo; Mailand, Erik; Haefliger, Benjamin; Benenson, Yaakov

    2016-08-30

    One of the goals of synthetic biology is to develop programmable artificial gene networks that can transduce multiple endogenous molecular cues to precisely control cell behavior. Realizing this vision requires interfacing natural molecular inputs with synthetic components that generate functional molecular outputs. Interfacing synthetic circuits with endogenous mammalian transcription factors has been particularly difficult. Here, we describe a systematic approach that enables integration and transduction of multiple mammalian transcription factor inputs by a synthetic network. The approach is facilitated by a proportional amplifier sensor based on synergistic positive autoregulation. The circuits efficiently transduce endogenous transcription factor levels into RNAi, transcriptional transactivation, and site-specific recombination. They also enable AND logic between pairs of arbitrary transcription factors. The results establish a framework for developing synthetic gene networks that interface with cellular processes through transcriptional regulators. PMID:27545896

  15. Acetylation of RNA Polymerase II Regulates Growth-Factor-Induced Gene Transcription in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Sebastian; Herker, Eva; Itzen, Friederike; He, Daniel; Thomas, Sean; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Kaehlcke, Katrin; Cho, Sungyoo; Pollard, Katherine S.; Capra, John A.; Schnölzer, Martina; Cole, Philip A.; Geyer, Matthias; Bruneau, Benoit G.; Adelman, Karen; Ott, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lysine acetylation regulates transcription by targeting histones and nonhistone proteins. Here we report that the central regulator of transcription, RNA polymerase II, is subject to acetylation in mammalian cells. Acetylation occurs at eight lysines within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest polymerase subunit and is mediated by p300/KAT3B. CTD acetylation is specifically enriched downstream of the transcription start sites of polymerase-occupied genes genome-wide, indicating a role in early stages of transcription initiation or elongation. Mutation of lysines or p300 inhibitor treatment causes the loss of epidermal growth-factor-induced expression of c-Fos and Egr2, immediate-early genes with promoter-proximally paused polymerases, but does not affect expression or polymerase occupancy at housekeeping genes. Our studies identify acetylation as a new modification of the mammalian RNA polymerase II required for the induction of growth factor response genes. PMID:24207025

  16. Expression of a preproinsulin-beta-galactosidase gene fusion in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, D A; Chou, J; MacKrell, A J; Casadaban, M J; Steiner, D F

    1983-01-01

    As an approach to the study of mammalian gene expression, the promoters and translation initiation regions of the rat preproinsulin II and the simian virus 40 early genes were fused to the structural gene of Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase, a sensitive probe for gene expression. These fusions were introduced into COS-7 cells, a simian virus 40 large tumor-antigen-producing monkey kidney cell line, where they directed the synthesis of enzymatically active hybrid beta-galactosidase proteins. Conditions for transfection were varied to optimize the expression of beta-galactosidase activity in the transfected cells. The pH optimum of this activity was found to be 7.0, the same as that of native E. coli beta-galactosidase and distinct from the major lysosomal "acid" beta-galactosidase. The fused preproinsulin-beta-galactosidase was further characterized by gel electrophoresis of nondenatured cell extracts stained by a fluorogenic substrate and by immunoprecipitation and gel electrophoresis of 3H-labeled cell proteins. These results all indicate that fully active tetrameric beta-galactosidase hybrids can be produced in mammalian cells. The expression of preproinsulin-beta-galactosidase activity was measured in the presence of high glucose, insulin, dexamethasone, or epidermal growth factor but no regulatory changes were observed. Images PMID:6310564

  17. Rapid and efficient clathrin-mediated endocytosis revealed in genome-edited mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Jeffrey B; Zeitler, Bryan; Cheng, Jackie; Cheng, Aaron T; Cherone, Jennifer M; Santiago, Yolanda; Lee, Andrew H; Vo, Thuy D; Doyon, Yannick; Miller, Jeffrey C; Paschon, David E; Zhang, Lei; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Drubin, David G

    2011-03-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is the best-studied pathway by which cells selectively internalize molecules from the plasma membrane and surrounding environment. Previous live-cell imaging studies using ectopically overexpressed fluorescent fusions of endocytic proteins indicated that mammalian CME is a highly dynamic but inefficient and heterogeneous process. In contrast, studies of endocytosis in budding yeast using fluorescent protein fusions expressed at physiological levels from native genomic loci have revealed a process that is very regular and efficient. To analyse endocytic dynamics in mammalian cells in which endogenous protein stoichiometry is preserved, we targeted zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) to the clathrin light chain A and dynamin-2 genomic loci and generated cell lines expressing fluorescent protein fusions from each locus. The genome-edited cells exhibited enhanced endocytic function, dynamics and efficiency when compared with previously studied cells, indicating that CME is highly sensitive to the levels of its protein components. Our study establishes that ZFN-mediated genome editing is a robust tool for expressing protein fusions at endogenous levels to faithfully report subcellular localization and dynamics.

  18. Cytotoxicity Analysis of Three Bacillus thuringiensis Subsp. israelensis δ-Endotoxins towards Insect and Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira Corrêa, Roberto Franco; Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel Mendes Pereira; Monnerat, Rose Gomes; Ribeiro, Bergmann Morais

    2012-01-01

    Three members of the δ-endotoxin group of toxins expressed by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, Cyt2Ba, Cry4Aa and Cry11A, were individually expressed in recombinant acrystalliferous B. thuringiensis strains for in vitro evaluation of their toxic activities against insect and mammalian cell lines. Both Cry4Aa and Cry11A toxins, activated with either trypsin or Spodoptera frugiperda gastric juice (GJ), resulted in different cleavage patterns for the activated toxins as seen by SDS-PAGE. The GJ-processed proteins were not cytotoxic to insect cell cultures. On the other hand, the combination of the trypsin-activated Cry4Aa and Cry11A toxins yielded the highest levels of cytotoxicity to all insect cells tested. The combination of activated Cyt2Ba and Cry11A also showed higher toxic activity than that of toxins activated individually. When activated Cry4Aa, Cry11A and Cyt2Ba were used simultaneously in the same assay a decrease in toxic activity was observed in all insect cells tested. No toxic effect was observed for the trypsin-activated Cry toxins in mammalian cells, but activated Cyt2Ba was toxic to human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) when tested at 20 µg/mL. PMID:23029407

  19. Cytotoxicity analysis of three Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis δ-endotoxins towards insect and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Teixeira Corrêa, Roberto Franco; Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel Mendes Pereira; Monnerat, Rose Gomes; Ribeiro, Bergmann Morais

    2012-01-01

    Three members of the δ-endotoxin group of toxins expressed by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, Cyt2Ba, Cry4Aa and Cry11A, were individually expressed in recombinant acrystalliferous B. thuringiensis strains for in vitro evaluation of their toxic activities against insect and mammalian cell lines. Both Cry4Aa and Cry11A toxins, activated with either trypsin or Spodoptera frugiperda gastric juice (GJ), resulted in different cleavage patterns for the activated toxins as seen by SDS-PAGE. The GJ-processed proteins were not cytotoxic to insect cell cultures. On the other hand, the combination of the trypsin-activated Cry4Aa and Cry11A toxins yielded the highest levels of cytotoxicity to all insect cells tested. The combination of activated Cyt2Ba and Cry11A also showed higher toxic activity than that of toxins activated individually. When activated Cry4Aa, Cry11A and Cyt2Ba were used simultaneously in the same assay a decrease in toxic activity was observed in all insect cells tested. No toxic effect was observed for the trypsin-activated Cry toxins in mammalian cells, but activated Cyt2Ba was toxic to human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) when tested at 20 µg/mL. PMID:23029407

  20. Rapid parallel measurements of macroautophagy and mitophagy in mammalian cells using a single fluorescent biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Sargsyan, A.; Cai, J.; Fandino, L. B.; Labasky, M. E.; Forostyan, T.; Colosimo, L. K.; Thompson, S. J.; Graham, T. E.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in many human diseases and occurs in normal aging. Mitochondrial health is maintained through organelle biogenesis and repair or turnover of existing mitochondria. Mitochondrial turnover is principally mediated by mitophagy, the trafficking of damaged mitochondria to lysosomes via macroautophagy (autophagy). Mitophagy requires autophagy, but is itself a selective process that relies on specific autophagy-targeting mechanisms, and thus can be dissociated from autophagy under certain circumstances. Therefore, it is important to assess autophagy and mitophagy together and separately. We sought to develop a robust, high-throughput, quantitative method for monitoring both processes in parallel. Here we report a flow cytometry-based assay capable of rapid parallel measurements of mitophagy and autophagy in mammalian cells using a single fluorescent protein biosensor. We demonstrate the ability of the assay to quantify Parkin-dependent selective mitophagy in CCCP-treated HeLa cells. In addition, we show the utility of the assay for measuring mitophagy in other cell lines, as well as for Parkin-independent mitophagy stimulated by deferiprone. The assay makes rapid measurements (10,000 cells per 6 seconds) and can be combined with other fluorescent indicators to monitor distinct cell populations, enabling design of high-throughput screening experiments to identify novel regulators of mitophagy in mammalian cells. PMID:26215030

  1. Induction of heme oxygenase: A general response to oxidant stress in cultured mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, L.A.; Luscher, P.; Tyrrell, R.M. )

    1991-02-01

    Accumulation of heme oxygenase mRNA is strongly stimulated by treatment of cultured human skin fibroblasts with ultraviolet radiation, hydrogen peroxide, or the sulfhydryl reagent sodium arsenite. Since this will result in a transient reduction in the prooxidant state of cells, the phenomenon may represent an important inducible antioxidant defense mechanism. To examine the generality of the response, we have measured the accumulation of the specific mRNA in a variety of human and mammalian cell types after inducing treatments. Induction by sodium arsenite is observed in all additional human cell types tested. This includes primary epidermal keratinocytes and lung and colon fibroblasts as well as established cell lines such as HeLa, TK6 lymphoblastoid, and transformed fetal keratinocytes. Strong induction of heme oxygenase mRNA is also observed following sodium arsenite treatment of cell lines of rat, hamster, mouse, monkey, and marsupial origin. The agents which lead to induction in cultured human skin fibroblasts fall into two categories: (a) those which are oxidants or can generate active intermediates (ultraviolet A radiation, hydrogen peroxide, menadione, and the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate); (b) agents which are known to interact with or modify cellular glutathione levels (buthionine sulfoximine, sodium arsenite, iodoacetamide, diamide, and cadmium chloride). These observations strongly support the hypothesis that induction of the enzyme is a general response to oxidant stress in mammalian cells and are consistent with the possibility that the cellular redox state plays a key role.

  2. In situ analysis of repair processes for oxidative DNA damage in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Li; Nakajima, Satoshi; Oohata, Yoshitsugu; Takao, Masashi; Okano, Satoshi; Masutani, Mitsuko; Wilson, Samuel H.; Yasui, Akira

    2004-09-01

    Oxidative DNA damage causes blocks and errors in transcription and replication, leading to cell death and genomic instability. Although repair mechanisms of the damage have been extensively analyzed in vitro, the actual in vivo repair processes remain largely unknown. Here, by irradiation with an UVA laser through a microscope lens, we have conditionally produced single-strand breaks and oxidative base damage at restricted nuclear regions of mammalian cells. We showed, in real time after irradiation by using antibodies and GFP-tagged proteins, rapid and ordered DNA repair processes of oxidative DNA damage in human cells. Furthermore, we characterized repair pathways by using repair-defective mammalian cells and found that DNA polymerase accumulated at single-strand breaks and oxidative base damage by means of its 31- and 8-kDa domains, respectively, and that XRCC1 is essential for both polymerase -dependent and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-dependent repair pathways of single-strand breaks. Thus, the repair of oxidative DNA damage is based on temporal and functional interactions among various proteins operating at the site of DNA damage in living cells.

  3. Cadmium-nickel toxicity interactions towards a bacterium, filamentous fungi, and a cultured mammalian cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, H.; Shopsis, C.; Borenfreund, E.

    1986-10-01

    The response of the biota to exposure to individual metals may differ from its response to multiple metals, as mixtures of metals may interact antagonistically or synergistically in their resultant toxicity. The present study evaluated the effects of a combination of Cd and Ni on the freshwater bacterium, Aeromonas hydrophila, the terrestrial fungi, Trichodema viride and Aspergillus niger, and the mammalian cell line, BALB/c mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. This particular spectrum of target cells was selected because studies in the literature show a wide variety of possible interactions between Cd and Ni in their combined toxicities towards bacteria cyanobacteria, slime molds, isolated rat hepatocytes, and rats.

  4. Spontaneous Packaging and Hypothermic Storage of Mammalian Cells with a Cell-Membrane-Mimetic Polymer Hydrogel in a Microchip.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Mawatari, Kazuma; Konno, Tomohiro; Kitamori, Takehiko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2015-10-21

    Currently, continuous culture/passage and cryopreservation are two major, well-established methods to provide cultivated mammalian cells for experiments in laboratories. Due to the lack of flexibility, however, both laboratory-oriented methods are unable to meet the need for rapidly growing cell-based applications, which require cell supply in a variety of occasions outside of laboratories. Herein, we report spontaneous packaging and hypothermic storage of mammalian cells under refrigerated (4 °C) and ambient conditions (25 °C) using a cell-membrane-mimetic methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymer hydrogel incorporated within a glass microchip. Its capability for hypothermic storage of cells was comparatively evaluated over 16 days. The results reveal that the cytocompatible MPC polymer hydrogel, in combination with the microchip structure, enabled hypothermic storage of cells with quite high viability, high intracellular esterase activity, maintained cell membrane integrity, and small morphological change for more than 1 week at 4 °C and at least 4 days at 25 °C. Furthermore, the stored cells could be released from the hydrogel and exhibited the ability to adhere to a surface and achieve confluence under standard cell culture conditions. Both hypothermic storage conditions are ordinary flexible conditions which can be easily established in places outside of laboratories. Therefore, cell packaging and storage using the hydrogel incorporated within the microchip would be a promising miniature and portable solution for flexible supply and delivery of small amounts of cells from bench to bedside.

  5. Spontaneous Packaging and Hypothermic Storage of Mammalian Cells with a Cell-Membrane-Mimetic Polymer Hydrogel in a Microchip.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Mawatari, Kazuma; Konno, Tomohiro; Kitamori, Takehiko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2015-10-21

    Currently, continuous culture/passage and cryopreservation are two major, well-established methods to provide cultivated mammalian cells for experiments in laboratories. Due to the lack of flexibility, however, both laboratory-oriented methods are unable to meet the need for rapidly growing cell-based applications, which require cell supply in a variety of occasions outside of laboratories. Herein, we report spontaneous packaging and hypothermic storage of mammalian cells under refrigerated (4 °C) and ambient conditions (25 °C) using a cell-membrane-mimetic methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymer hydrogel incorporated within a glass microchip. Its capability for hypothermic storage of cells was comparatively evaluated over 16 days. The results reveal that the cytocompatible MPC polymer hydrogel, in combination with the microchip structure, enabled hypothermic storage of cells with quite high viability, high intracellular esterase activity, maintained cell membrane integrity, and small morphological change for more than 1 week at 4 °C and at least 4 days at 25 °C. Furthermore, the stored cells could be released from the hydrogel and exhibited the ability to adhere to a surface and achieve confluence under standard cell culture conditions. Both hypothermic storage conditions are ordinary flexible conditions which can be easily established in places outside of laboratories. Therefore, cell packaging and storage using the hydrogel incorporated within the microchip would be a promising miniature and portable solution for flexible supply and delivery of small amounts of cells from bench to bedside. PMID:26436637

  6. Absence of mycoplasmal gene in malignant mammalian cells transformed by chronic persistent infection of mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, B; Tsai, S; Shih, J W; Wear, D J; Lo, S C

    1998-05-01

    Chronic persistent infections by mycoplasmas induced malignant transformation of C3H mouse embryo cells that normally had never been reported to undergo spontaneous transformation. This mycoplasma-mediated oncogenic process had a long latency (more than 7 weeks of continuous mycoplasmal infection) and showed a multistage progression characterized by reversibility (at least up to 11 weeks of mycoplasmal infection) and irreversibility of malignant properties upon removal of the mycoplasma from culture. Further prolonged infections (18 weeks) by Mycoplasma fermentans or M. penetrans resulted in permanent transformation of these C3H cells that no longer required the continued presence of the transformation-inducing mycoplasmas in cultures to retain their malignant properties. Previous studies of viral oncogenesis revealed that virus-transformed cells always had viral gene(s) present. Integration of viral gene(s) apparently played an important role in the process of oncogenesis. In this study, we examined if the continued presence of any mycoplasmal gene(s) in mammalian cells, in whatever form, was also crucial in causing malignant cell transformation. Representational difference analysis (RDA) was a recently developed powerful technique to compare differences between two complex genomes. In the RDA system, subtractive and kinetic enrichment was used to purify and isolate restriction endonuclease gene fragment(s) of mycoplasmal origin, presumably present only in mycoplasma-transformed C3H cells, but not in nonmycoplasma-exposed control C3H cells. After three rounds of subtractive hybridization following PCR enrichment for each of three different restriction enzymes DNA digests, no gene fragment of mycoplasmal origin was amplified or identified in the permanently transformed C3H cells. Differing from tumorigenesis in animal cells induced by most oncogenic viruses or in plant cells induced by Agrobacteria, mycoplasmas evidently did not cause malignant transformation by

  7. A small stress protein acts synergistically with trehalose to confer desiccation tolerance on mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaocui; Jamil, Kamran; Macrae, Thomas H; Clegg, James S; Russell, Joseph M; Villeneuve, Tania S; Euloth, Michelle; Sun, Yu; Crowe, John H; Tablin, Fern; Oliver, Ann E

    2005-08-01

    The ability to desiccate mammalian cells while maintaining a high degree of viability would be very important in many areas of biological science, including tissue engineering, cell transplantation, and biosensor technologies. Certain proteins and sugars found in animals capable of surviving desiccation might aid this process. We report here that human embryonic kidney (293H) cells transfected with the gene for the stress protein p26 from Artemia and loaded with trehalose showed a sharp increase in survival during air-drying. Further, we find vacuum-drying greatly improved the ability of the cells to survive, and that the physical shape and structure of the cellular sample had a large influence on recovery following rehydration. Cells suspended in a rounded droplet survived desiccation markedly better than those spread as a thin film. Finally, we used alamarBlue to monitor cellular metabolism and Hema 3 to assess colony formation after vacuum-drying. AlamarBlue fluorescence indicated that the transfected 293H cells expressing p26 (E11'L) grew much better than the control 293H cells. In fact, immediate survival and colony formation in E11'L cells increased as much as 34-fold compared with control cells when the samples were dried to a water content of 0.2 g H2O/g dry weight, as measured by gravimetric analysis. These results indicate that p26 improves cell survival following drying and rehydration, and suggest that dry storage of mammalian cells is a likely possibility in the future. PMID:15963489

  8. DNA damage response to different surface chemistry of silver nanoparticles in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Karns, Michael; Goodson, Michael; Rowe, John; Hussain, Saber M.; Schlager, John J.

    2008-12-15

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have recently received much attention for their possible applications in biotechnology and life sciences. Ag NPs are of interest to defense and engineering programs for new material applications as well as for commercial purposes as an antimicrobial. However, little is known about the genotoxicity of Ag NPs following exposure to mammalian cells. This study was undertaken to examine the DNA damage response to polysaccharide surface functionalized (coated) and non-functionalized (uncoated) Ag NPs in two types of mammalian cells; mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF). Both types of Ag NPs up-regulated the cell cycle checkpoint protein p53 and DNA damage repair proteins Rad51 and phosphorylated-H2AX expression. Furthermore both of them induced cell death as measured by the annexin V protein expression and MTT assay. Our observations also suggested that the different surface chemistry of Ag NPs induce different DNA damage response: coated Ag NPs exhibited more severe damage than uncoated Ag NPs. The results suggest that polysaccharide coated particles are more individually distributed while agglomeration of the uncoated particles limits the surface area availability and access to membrane bound organelles.

  9. Detection of PIWI and piRNAs in the mitochondria of mammalian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, ChangHyuk; Tak, Hyosun; Rho, Mina; Chang, Hae Ryung; Kim, Yon Hui; Kim, Kyung Tae; Balch, Curt; Lee, Eun Kyung; Nam, Seungyoon

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • piRNA sequences were mapped to human mitochondrial (mt) genome. • We inspected small RNA-Seq datasets from somatic cell mt subcellular fractions. • Piwi and piRNA transcripts are present in mammalian somatic cancer cell mt fractions. - Abstract: Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are 26–31 nt small noncoding RNAs that are processed from their longer precursor transcripts by Piwi proteins. Localization of Piwi and piRNA has been reported mostly in nucleus and cytoplasm of higher eukaryotes germ-line cells, where it is believed that known piRNA sequences are located in repeat regions of nuclear genome in germ-line cells. However, localization of PIWI and piRNA in mammalian somatic cell mitochondria yet remains largely unknown. We identified 29 piRNA sequence alignments from various regions of the human mitochondrial genome. Twelve out 29 piRNA sequences matched stem-loop fragment sequences of seven distinct tRNAs. We observed their actual expression in mitochondria subcellular fractions by inspecting mitochondrial-specific small RNA-Seq datasets. Of interest, the majority of the 29 piRNAs overlapped with multiple longer transcripts (expressed sequence tags) that are unique to the human mitochondrial genome. The presence of mature piRNAs in mitochondria was detected by qRT-PCR of mitochondrial subcellular RNAs. Further validation showed detection of Piwi by colocalization using anti-Piwil1 and mitochondria organelle-specific protein antibodies.

  10. Immune regulation and evasion of Mammalian host cell immunity during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Pratheek, B M; Saha, Soham; Maiti, Prasanta K; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2013-06-01

    The mammalian host immune system has wide array of defence mechanisms against viral infections. Depending on host immunity and the extent of viral persistence, either the host immune cells might clear/restrict the viral load and disease progression or the virus might evade host immunity by down regulating host immune effector response(s). Viral antigen processing and presentation in the host cells through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) elicit subsequent anti-viral effector T cell response(s). However, modulation of such response(s) might generate one of the important viral immune evasion strategies. Viral peptides are mostly generated by proteolytic cleavage in the cytosol of the infected host cells. CD8(+) T lymphocytes play critical role in the detection of viral infection by recognizing these peptides displayed at the plasma membrane by MHC-I molecules. The present review summarises the current knowledge on the regulation of mammalian host innate and adaptive immune components, which are operative in defence mechanisms against viral infections and the variety of strategies that viruses have evolved to escape host cell immunity. The understanding of viral immune evasion strategies is important for designing anti-viral immunotherapies.

  11. The methylating agent streptozotocin induces persistent telomere dysfunction in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Paviolo, Natalia S; Santiñaque, Federico F; Castrogiovanni, Daniel C; Folle, Gustavo A; Bolzán, Alejandro D

    2015-12-01

    We analyzed chromosomal aberrations involving telomeres in the progeny of mammalian cells exposed to the methylating agent and antineoplastic/diabetogenic drug streptozotocin (STZ), to test whether it induces long-term telomere instability (by chromosome end loss and/or telomere dysfunction). Rat cells (ADIPO-P2 cell line, derived from Sprague-Dawley rat adipose cells) were treated with a single concentration of STZ (2mM). Chromosomal aberrations were analyzed 18h, 10 days, and 15 days after treatment, using PNA-FISH with a pan-telomeric probe [Cy3-(CCCTAA)3] to detect (TTAGGG)n repeats. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a higher frequency of chromosomal aberrations in STZ-exposed cultures vs. untreated cultures at each time point analyzed. The yield of induced aberrations was very similar at each time point. Induction of aberrations not involving telomere dysfunction was only observed 18h and 15 days after treatment, whereas induction of telomere dysfunction-related aberrations by STZ (mainly in the form of telomere FISH signal loss and duplications, most of them chromatid-type aberrations) was observed at each time point. Our results show that STZ induces persistent telomere instability in mammalian cells, cytogenetically manifested as telomere dysfunction-related chromosomal aberrations. Neither telomere length nor telomerase activity is related to the telomere dysfunction.

  12. Simple piggyBac transposon-based mammalian cell expression system for inducible protein production

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhijie; Michael, Iacovos P.; Zhou, Dongxia; Nagy, Andras; Rini, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Reported here is a piggyBac transposon-based expression system for the generation of doxycycline-inducible, stably transfected mammalian cell cultures for large-scale protein production. The system works with commonly used adherent and suspension-adapted mammalian cell lines and requires only a single transfection step. Moreover, the high uniform expression levels observed among clones allow for the use of stable bulk cell cultures, thereby eliminating time-consuming cloning steps. Under continuous doxycycline induction, protein expression levels have been shown to be stable for at least 2 mo in the absence of drug selection. The high efficiency of the system also allows for the generation of stable bulk cell cultures in 96-well format, a capability leading to the possibility of generating stable cell cultures for entire families of membrane or secreted proteins. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the system through the large-scale production (140–750 mg scale) of an endoplasmic reticulum-resident fucosyltransferase and two potential anticancer protein therapeutic agents. PMID:23476064

  13. Palytoxin induces K+ efflux from yeast cells expressing the mammalian sodium pump.

    PubMed

    Scheiner-Bobis, G; Meyer zu Heringdorf, D; Christ, M; Habermann, E

    1994-06-01

    Palytoxin causes potassium efflux and sodium influx in all investigated animals cells. Much evidence points to the sodium pump (Na+/K(+)-ATPase) as the target of the toxin. A heterologous expression system for mammalian Na+/K(+)-ATPase in the brewers yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to test this hypothesis. Yeast cells do not contain endogenous sodium pumps but can be transformed with vectors coding for the alpha and beta subunits of the mammalian sodium pump. We now show that transformed yeast cells expressing both alpha and beta subunits of Na+/K(+)-ATPase are highly sensitive to the toxin, as measured by the loss of intracellular potassium. Palytoxin-induced potassium efflux is completely inhibited by 500 microM ouabain. In contrast, nontransformed yeast cells or cells expressing either the alpha or beta subunits are insensitive to palytoxin. Thus, the alpha/beta heterodimer of the sodium pump is required for the release of potassium induced by palytoxin. The results suggest that palytoxin converts the sodium pump into an open channel, allowing the passage of alkali ions.

  14. Repair of traumatized mammalian hair cells via sea anemone repair proteins.

    PubMed

    Tang, Pei-Ciao; Smith, Karen Müller; Watson, Glen M

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian hair cells possess only a limited ability to repair damage after trauma. In contrast, sea anemones show a marked capability to repair damaged hair bundles by means of secreted repair proteins (RPs). Previously, it was found that recovery of traumatized hair cells in blind cavefish was enhanced by anemone-derived RPs; therefore, the ability of anemone RPs to assist recovery of damaged hair cells in mammals was tested here. After a 1 h incubation in RP-enriched culture media, uptake of FM1-43 by experimentally traumatized murine cochlear hair cells was restored to levels comparable to those exhibited by healthy controls. In addition, RP-treated explants had significantly more normally structured hair bundles than time-matched traumatized control explants. Collectively, these results indicate that anemone-derived RPs assist in restoring normal function and structure of experimentally traumatized hair cells of the mouse cochlea. PMID:27489215

  15. Repair of traumatized mammalian hair cells via sea anemone repair proteins.

    PubMed

    Tang, Pei-Ciao; Smith, Karen Müller; Watson, Glen M

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian hair cells possess only a limited ability to repair damage after trauma. In contrast, sea anemones show a marked capability to repair damaged hair bundles by means of secreted repair proteins (RPs). Previously, it was found that recovery of traumatized hair cells in blind cavefish was enhanced by anemone-derived RPs; therefore, the ability of anemone RPs to assist recovery of damaged hair cells in mammals was tested here. After a 1 h incubation in RP-enriched culture media, uptake of FM1-43 by experimentally traumatized murine cochlear hair cells was restored to levels comparable to those exhibited by healthy controls. In addition, RP-treated explants had significantly more normally structured hair bundles than time-matched traumatized control explants. Collectively, these results indicate that anemone-derived RPs assist in restoring normal function and structure of experimentally traumatized hair cells of the mouse cochlea.

  16. In vitro cytocidal effect of lytic peptides on several transformed mammalian cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jaynes, J M; Julian, G R; Jeffers, G W; White, K L; Enright, F M

    1989-01-01

    Several types of transformed mammalian cells, derived from established cell lines, were found to be lysed in vitro by three novel lytic peptides (SB-37, SB-37*, and Shiva-1). This is in contrast with the behavior of normal cells, where the observed lytic activity of the peptides is greatly reduced. Based on experiments utilizing compounds which disrupt the cytoskeleton (colchicine and cytochalasin-D), it is surmised that alterations in the cytoskeleton of transformed cells increase their sensitivity to the cytolytic activity exerted by the peptides, primarily by causing a loss of osmotic integrity. Thus, a stable and regenerative cytoskeletal system, as that possessed by normal cells, would seem requisite to withstanding the lytic effects of the peptides.

  17. Genetically Encoded Sender–Receiver System in 3D Mammalian Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Engineering spatial patterning in mammalian cells, employing entirely genetically encoded components, requires solving several problems. These include how to code secreted activator or inhibitor molecules and how to send concentration-dependent signals to neighboring cells, to control gene expression. The Madin–Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell line is a potential engineering scaffold as it forms hollow spheres (cysts) in 3D culture and tubulates in response to extracellular hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). We first aimed to graft a synthetic patterning system onto single developing MDCK cysts. We therefore developed a new localized transfection method to engineer distinct sender and receiver regions. A stable reporter line enabled reversible EGFP activation by HGF and modulation by a secreted repressor (a truncated HGF variant, NK4). By expanding the scale to wide fields of cysts, we generated morphogen diffusion gradients, controlling reporter gene expression. Together, these components provide a toolkit for engineering cell–cell communication networks in 3D cell culture. PMID:24313393

  18. Proliferating subventricular zone cells in the adult mammalian forebrain can differentiate into neurons and glia.

    PubMed Central

    Lois, C; Alvarez-Buylla, A

    1993-01-01

    Subventricular zone (SVZ) cells proliferate spontaneously in vivo in the telencephalon of adult mammals. Several studies suggest that SVZ cells do not differentiate after mitosis into neurons or glia but die. In the present work, we show that SVZ cells labeled in the brains of adult mice with [3H]thymidine differentiate directly into neurons and glia in explant cultures. In vitro labeling with [3H]thymidine shows that 98% of the neurons that differentiate from the SVZ explants are derived from precursor cells that underwent their last division in vivo. This report identifies the SVZ cells as neuronal precursors in an adult mammalian brain. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8446631

  19. Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis and isotope labeling of mammalian proteins.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takaho; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the cell-free protein synthesis method, using an Escherichia coli cell extract. This is a cost-effective method for milligram-scale protein production and is particularly useful for the production of mammalian proteins, protein complexes, and membrane proteins that are difficult to synthesize by recombinant expression methods, using E. coli and eukaryotic cells. By adjusting the conditions of the cell-free method, zinc-binding proteins, disulfide-bonded proteins, ligand-bound proteins, etc., may also be produced. Stable isotope labeling of proteins can be accomplished by the cell-free method, simply by using stable isotope-labeled amino acid(s) in the cell-free reaction. Moreover, the cell-free protein synthesis method facilitates the avoidance of stable isotope scrambling and dilution over the recombinant expression methods and is therefore advantageous for amino acid-selective stable isotope labeling. Site-specific stable isotope labeling is also possible with a tRNA molecule specific to the UAG codon. By the cell-free protein synthesis method, coupled transcription-translation is performed from a plasmid vector or a PCR-amplified DNA fragment encoding the protein. A milligram quantity of protein can be produced with a milliliter-scale reaction solution in the dialysis mode. More than a thousand solution structures have been determined by NMR spectroscopy for uniformly labeled samples of human and mouse functional domain proteins, produced by the cell-free method. Here, we describe the practical aspects of mammalian protein production by the cell-free method for NMR spectroscopy.

  20. mRNA export from mammalian cell nuclei is dependent on GANP.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, Vihandha O; McMurtrie, Paul I A; Mills, Anthony D; Takei, Yoshinori; Penrhyn-Lowe, Sue; Amagase, Yoko; Main, Sarah; Marr, Jackie; Stewart, Murray; Laskey, Ronald A

    2010-01-12

    Bulk nuclear export of messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) is mediated by NXF1. It binds mRNPs through adaptor proteins such as ALY and SR splicing factors and mediates translocation through the central NPC transport channel via transient interactions with FG nucleoporins. Here, we show that mammalian cells require GANP (germinal center-associated nuclear protein) for efficient mRNP nuclear export and for efficient recruitment of NXF1 to NPCs. Separate regions of GANP show local homology to FG nucleoporins, the yeast mRNA export factor Sac3p, and the mammalian MCM3 acetyltransferase. GANP interacts with both NXF1 and NPCs and partitions between NPCs and the nuclear interior. GANP depletion inhibits mRNA export, with retention of mRNPs and NXF1 in punctate foci within the nucleus. The GANP N-terminal region that contains FG motifs interacts with the NXF1 FG-binding domain. Overexpression of this GANP fragment leads to nuclear accumulation of both poly(A)(+)RNA and NXF1. Treatment with transcription inhibitors redistributes GANP from NPCs into foci throughout the nucleus. These results establish GANP as an integral component of the mammalian mRNA export machinery and suggest a model whereby GANP facilitates the transfer of NXF1-containing mRNPs to NPCs. PMID:20005110

  1. How common is the lipid body-containing interstitial cell in the mammalian lung?

    PubMed

    Tahedl, Daniel; Wirkes, André; Tschanz, Stefan A; Ochs, Matthias; Mühlfeld, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary lipofibroblasts are thought to be involved in lung development, regeneration, vitamin A storage, and surfactant synthesis. Most of the evidence for these important functions relies on mouse or rat studies. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the presence of lipofibroblasts in a variety of early postnatal and adult mammalian species (including humans) to evaluate the ability to generalize functions of this cell type for other species. For this purpose, lung samples from 14 adult mammalian species as well as from postnatal mice, rats, and humans were investigated using light and electron microscopic stereology to obtain the volume fraction and the total volume of lipid bodies. In adult animals, lipid bodies were observed only, but not in all rodents. In all other species, no lipofibroblasts were observed. In rodents, lipid body volume scaled with body mass with an exponent b = 0.73 in the power law equation. Lipid bodies were not observed in postnatal human lungs but showed a characteristic postnatal increase in mice and rats and persisted at a lower level in the adult animals. Among 14 mammalian species, lipofibroblasts were only observed in rodents. The great increase in lipid body volume during early postnatal development of the mouse lung confirms the special role of lipofibroblasts during rodent lung development. It is evident that the cellular functions of pulmonary lipofibroblasts cannot be transferred easily from rodents to other species, in particular humans.

  2. Hierarchical micro/nanostructured titanium with balanced actions to bacterial and mammalian cells for dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Cao, Huiliang; Qiao, Shichong; Wang, Manle; Gu, Yingxin; Luo, Huiwen; Meng, Fanhao; Liu, Xuanyong; Lai, Hongchang

    2015-01-01

    A versatile strategy to endow dental implants with long-term antibacterial ability without compromising the cytocompatibility is highly desirable to combat implant-related infection. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been utilized as a highly effective and broad-spectrum antibacterial agent for surface modification of biomedical devices. However, the high mobility and subsequent hazardous effects of the particles on mammalian cells may limit its practical applications. Thus, Ag NPs were immobilized on the surface of sand-blasted, large grit, and acid-etched (SLA) titanium by manipulating the atomic-scale heating effect of silver plasma immersion ion implantation. The silver plasma immersion ion implantation-treated SLA surface gave rise to both good antibacterial activity and excellent compatibility with mammalian cells. The antibacterial activity rendered by the immobilized Ag NPs was assessed using Fusobacterium nucleatum and Staphylococcus aureus, commonly suspected pathogens for peri-implant disease. The immobilized Ag NPs offered a good defense against multiple cycles of bacteria attack in both F. nucleatum and S. aureus, and the mechanism was independent of silver release. F. nucleatum showed a higher susceptibility to Ag NPs than S. aureus, which might be explained by the presence of different wall structures. Moreover, the immobilized Ag NPs had no apparent toxic influence on the viability, proliferation, and differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. These results demonstrated that good bactericidal activity could be obtained with very small quantities of immobilized Ag NPs, which were not detrimental to the mammalian cells involved in the osseointegration process, and promising for titanium-based dental implants with commercial SLA surfaces. PMID:26604743

  3. Biological studies using mammalian cell lines and the current status of the microbeam irradiation system, SPICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Iso, H.; Yasuda, N.; Oikawa, M.; Higuchi, Y.; Kato, T.; Hafer, K.; Kodama, K.; Hamano, T.; Suya, N.; Imaseki, H.

    2009-06-01

    The development of SPICE (single-particle irradiation system to cell), a microbeam irradiation system, has been completed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The beam size has been improved to approximately 5 μm in diameter, and the cell targeting system can irradiate up to 400-500 cells per minute. Two cell dishes have been specially designed: one a Si 3N 4 plate (2.5 mm × 2.5 mm area with 1 μm thickness) supported by a 7.5 mm × 7.5 mm frame of 200 μm thickness, and the other a Mylar film stretched by pressing with a metal ring. Both dish types may be placed on a voice coil stage equipped on the cell targeting system, which includes a fluorescent microscope and a CCD camera for capturing cell images. This microscope system captures images of dyed cell nuclei, computes the location coordinates of individual cells, and synchronizes this with the voice coil motor stage and single-particle irradiation system consisting of a scintillation counter and a beam deflector. Irradiation of selected cells with a programmable number of protons is now automatable. We employed the simultaneous detection method for visualizing the position of mammalian cells and proton traversal through CR-39 to determine whether the targeted cells are actually irradiated. An immuno-assay was also performed against γ-H2AX, to confirm the induction of DNA double-strand breaks in the target cells.

  4. Cytotoxicity and negligible genotoxicity of borax and borax ores to cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Landolph, J R

    1985-01-01

    The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of refined borax and borax ores were studied in cultured mammalian cells. In V79 Chinese hamster cells, C3H/10T1/2 mouse embryo fibroblasts, and diploid human foreskin fibroblasts, crude borax ore, kernite ore, and refined borax were all cytotoxic. The lowest concentrations at which cytotoxicity was observed were 0.02 mg/ml and 0.1 mg/ml for borax ore in C3H/10T1/2 and human fibroblasts, respectively, 0.2 mg/ml for kernite ore in both cell types, and 0.1 mg/ml for refined borax in both C3H/10T1/2 and human fibroblasts. The cytotoxicity was dose dependent above these concentrations. The concentrations of borax ore, kernite ore, and refined borax that reduced the relative plating efficiency to 50% were approximately 3.2, 1.6, and 0.8 mg/ml, respectively, in human fibroblasts and were 0.8 mg/ml for all three substances in C3H/10T1/2 cells. All three borax samples were not significantly mutagenic in assays for mutation to ouabain resistance in human fibroblasts an C3H/10T1/2 cells and were at most only weakly mutagenic in an assay for mutation to 8-azaguanine resistance in V79 Chinese hamster cells. Refined borax did not induce neoplastic transformation in C3H/10T1/2 cells. Crude borax ore and kernite ore induced weak transformation that was not dose-dependent and was not reproducible in another experiment. Therefore, borax and its ores are cytotoxic to mammalian cells at high (mg/ml) concentrations and are at most weakly mutagenic but not significantly oncogenic as measured in a cell transformation assay.

  5. In vitro cytotoxicity of antimicrobial conjugated electrolytes: interactions with mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Kristin N; Whitten, David G; Canavan, Heather E

    2013-10-01

    An estimated 19 000 deaths and $3-4 billion in health care costs per year in the United States are attributed to methicillin-resistant Staphlococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Certain conjugated phenylene ethynylene (CPE)-based polymers (PPE) and oligomers (OPE) have been demonstrated to exhibit dark and light-activated antimicrobial activity. Until recently, the relative cytotoxicity of these PPEs and OPEs toward mammalian cells haas been unknown, limiting the applications for which they may be used (e.g., reducing and/or preventing the spread of untreatable bacterial strains). In this work, we examine the toxicity of CPEs to mammalian cells using cytotoxicity assays of cellular monolayers. Eight CPEs, two PPEs and six OPEs, were selected for these studies based on their biocidal activity, and diversity of repeat unit number and functional groups. Briefly, two cell types were exposed to CPEs at concentrations ranging from 1-100 ug/mL for 24 h. We find that concentration largely determines the resulting viability of cells, although at intermediate concentrations (5-10 ug/mL), the effect of light on light-activated compounds is very important. Furthermore, we find that the longer-chained compounds are cytotoxic at much higher concentrations, and therefore have the widest range of concentrations available for potential applications.

  6. Genetic encoding of caged cysteine and caged homocysteine in bacterial and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Uprety, Rajendra; Luo, Ji; Liu, Jihe; Naro, Yuta; Samanta, Subhas; Deiters, Alexander

    2014-08-18

    We report the genetic incorporation of caged cysteine and caged homocysteine into proteins in bacterial and mammalian cells. The genetic code of these cells was expanded with an engineered pyrrolysine tRNA/tRNA synthetase pair that accepts both light-activatable amino acids as substrates. Incorporation was validated by reporter assays, western blots, and mass spectrometry, and differences in incorporation efficiency were explained by molecular modeling of synthetase-amino acid interactions. As a proof-of-principle application, the genetic replacement of an active-site cysteine residue with a caged cysteine residue in Renilla luciferase led to a complete loss of enzyme activity; however, upon brief exposure to UV light, a >150-fold increase in enzymatic activity was observed, thus showcasing the applicability of the caged cysteine in live human cells. A simultaneously conducted genetic replacement with homocysteine yielded an enzyme with greatly reduced activity, thereby demonstrating the precise probing of a protein active site. These discoveries provide a new tool for the optochemical control of protein function in mammalian cells and expand the set of genetically encoded unnatural amino acids.

  7. Site-specific DNA recombination in mammalian cells by the Cre recombinase of bacteriophage P1.

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, B; Henderson, N

    1988-01-01

    The Cre protein encoded by the coliphage P1 is a 38-kDa protein that efficiently promotes both intra- and intermolecular synapsis and recombination of DNA both in Escherichia coli and in vitro. Recombination occurs at a specific site, called lox, and does not require any other protein factors. The Cre protein is shown here also to be able to cause synapsis of DNA and site-specific recombination in a mammalian cell line. A stable mouse cell line was established that expresses the Cre protein under the control of the Cd2+-inducible metallothionein I gene promoter. DNA recombination was monitored with DNA substrates containing two directly repeated lox sites. One such substrate is a circular plasmid with two directly repeated lox sites (lox2) flanking a marker gene and was introduced into cells by Ca3(PO4)2 transformation. As a second substrate we used a pseudorabies virus (a herpesvirus) containing a lox2 insertion designed to provide a sensitive detection system for recombination. In both cases, site-specific recombination in vivo is dependent on the presence of the Cre protein and occurs specifically at the 34-base-pair lox sites. These results demonstrate the controlled site-specific synapsis of DNA and recombination by a prokaryotic protein in mammalian cells and suggest that Cre-mediated site-specific recombination may be a useful tool for understanding and modulating genome rearrangements in eukaryotes. Images PMID:2839833

  8. Fluorescent protein-based detection of φC31 integrase activity in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taian; Fang, Yongxiang; Jia, Huaijie; Chen, Guohua; Guan, Qisai; He, Xiaobing; Yao, Wenjuan; Zeng, Shuang; Jing, Zhizhong

    2013-10-15

    The enzyme φC31 integrase from Streptomyces phage has been documented as functional in mammalian cells and, therefore, has the potential to be a powerful gene manipulation tool. However, the activity of this enzyme is cell-type dependent. The more active mutant forms of φC31 integrase are required. Therefore, a rapid and effective method should be developed to detect the intracellular activity of φC31 integrase. We devised in this study an integrase-inversion cassette that contains the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene and the reverse complementary DsRed gene, which are flanked by attB and reverse complementary attP. This cassette can be inverted by φC31 integrase, thereby altering the fluorescent protein expression. Thus, φC31 integrase activity can be qualitatively or quantitatively evaluated based on the detected fluorescence. Furthermore, this cassette-based method was applied to several cell types, demonstrating that it is an efficient and reliable tool for measuring φC31 integrase activity in mammalian cells.

  9. Geosmin induces genomic instability in the mammalian cell microplate-based comet assay.

    PubMed

    Silva, Aline Flor; Lehmann, Mauricio; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues

    2015-11-01

    Geosmin (GEO) (trans-1,10-dimethyl-trans-9-decalol) is a metabolite that renders earthy and musty taste and odor to water. Data of GEO genotoxicity on mammalian cells are scarce in the literature. Thus, the present study assessed the genotoxicity of GEO on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in the microplate-based comet assay. The percent of tail DNA (tail intensity (TI)), tail moment (TM), and tail length (TL) were used as parameters for DNA damage assessment. The results demonstrated that concentrations of GEO of 30 and 60 μg/mL were genotoxic to CHO cells after 4- and 24-h exposure periods, in all parameters evaluated, such as TI, TM, and TL. Additionally, GEO 15 μg/mL was genotoxic in the three parameters only in the 24-h exposure time. The same was observed for GEO 7.5 μg/mL, which induced significant DNA damage observed as TI in the 24-h treatment. The results present evidence that exposure to GEO may be associated with genomic instability in mammalian cells.

  10. Zinc sparks are triggered by fertilization and facilitate cell cycle resumption in mammalian eggs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Alison M.; Bernhardt, Miranda L.; Kong, Betty Y.; Ahn, Richard W.; Vogt, Stefan; Woodruff, Teresa K.; O’Halloran, Thomas V.

    2011-01-01

    In last few hours of maturation, the mouse oocyte takes up over twenty billion zinc atoms and arrests after the first meiotic division, until fertilization or pharmacological intervention stimulates cell cycle progression towards a new embryo. Using chemical and physical probes, we show that fertilization of the mature, zinc-enriched egg triggers the ejection of zinc into the extracellular milieu in a series of coordinated events termed zinc sparks. These events immediately follow the well-established series of calcium oscillations within the activated egg and are evolutionarily conserved in several mammalian species, including rodents and non-human primates. Functionally, the zinc sparks mediate a decrease in intracellular zinc content that is necessary for continued cell cycle progression, as increasing zinc levels within the activated egg results in the reestablishment of cell cycle arrest at metaphase. The mammalian egg thus uses a zinc-dependent switch mechanism to toggle between metaphase arrest and resumption of the meiotic cell cycle at the initiation of embryonic development. PMID:21526836

  11. Glycosylation and post-translational modification gene expression analysis by DNA microarrays for cultured mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Arthur Nathan; Caldwell, Mary; Harcum, Sarah W.

    2011-01-01

    DNA microarray analysis of gene expression has become a valuable tool for bioprocessing research aimed at improving therapeutic protein yields. The highly parallel nature of DNA microarray technology allows researchers to assess hundreds of gene simultaneously, essentially enabling genome-wide snapshots. The quality and amount of therapeutic proteins produced by cultured mammalian cells rely heavily on the culture environment. In order to implement beneficial changes to the culture environment, a better understanding of the relationship between the product quality and culture environment must be developed. By analyzing gene expression levels under various environmental conditions, light can be shed on the underlying mechanisms. This paper describes a method for evaluating gene expression changes for cultured NS0 cells, a mouse-derived myeloma cell line, under culture environment conditions, such as ammonia buildup, known to affect product quality. These procedures can be easily adapted to other environmental conditions and any mammalian cell lines cultured in suspension, so long as a sufficient number of gene sequences are publicly available. PMID:22033470

  12. Strategic cell-cycle regulatory features that provide mammalian cells with tunable G1 length and reversible G1 arrest.

    PubMed

    Pfeuty, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Transitions between consecutive phases of the eukaryotic cell cycle are driven by the catalytic activity of selected sets of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). Yet, their occurrence and precise timing is tightly scheduled by a variety of means including Cdk association with inhibitory/adaptor proteins (CKIs). Here we focus on the regulation of G1-phase duration by the end of which cells of multicelled organisms must decide whether to enter S phase or halt, and eventually then, differentiate, senesce or die to obey the homeostatic rules of their host. In mammalian cells, entry in and progression through G1 phase involve sequential phosphorylation and inactivation of the retinoblastoma Rb proteins, first, by cyclin D-Cdk4,6 with the help of CKIs of the Cip/Kip family and, next, by the cyclin E-Cdk2 complexes that are negatively regulated by Cip/Kip proteins. Using a dynamical modeling approach, we show that the very way how the Rb and Cip/Kip regulatory modules interact differentially with cyclin D-Cdk4,6 and cyclin E-Cdk2 provides to mammalian cells a powerful means to achieve an exquisitely-sensitive control of G1-phase duration and fully reversible G1 arrests. Consistently, corruption of either one of these two modules precludes G1 phase elongation and is able to convert G1 arrests from reversible to irreversible. This study unveils fundamental design principles of mammalian G1-phase regulation that are likely to confer to mammalian cells the ability to faithfully control the occurrence and timing of their division process in various conditions.

  13. Mammalian male germ cells are fertile ground for expression profiling of sexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Gunnar; Primig, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Recent large-scale transcriptional profiling experiments of mammalian spermatogenesis using rodent model systems and different types of microarrays have yielded insight into the expression program of male germ cells. These studies revealed that an astonishingly large number of loci are differentially expressed during spermatogenesis. Among them are several hundred transcripts that appear to be specific for meiotic and post-meiotic germ cells. This group includes many genes that were previously implicated in spermatogenesis and/or fertility and others that are as yet poorly characterized. Profiling experiments thus reveal candidates for regulation of spermatogenesis and fertility as well as targets for innovative contraceptives that act on gene products absent in somatic tissues. In this review, consolidated high density oligonucleotide microarray data from rodent total testis and purified germ cell samples are analyzed and their impact on our understanding of the transcriptional program governing male germ cell differentiation is discussed. PMID:15615893

  14. Transient Tissue-Scale Deformation Coordinates Alignment of Planar Cell Polarity Junctions in the Mammalian Skin.

    PubMed

    Aw, Wen Yih; Heck, Bryan W; Joyce, Bradley; Devenport, Danelle

    2016-08-22

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) refers to the collective alignment of polarity along the tissue plane. In skin, the largest mammalian organ, PCP aligns over extremely long distances, but the global cues that orient tissue polarity are unknown. Here, we show that Celsr1 asymmetry arises concomitant with a gradient of tissue deformation oriented along the medial-lateral axis. This uniaxial tissue tension, whose origin remains unknown, transiently transforms basal epithelial cells from initially isotropic and disordered states into highly elongated and aligned morphologies. Reorienting tissue deformation is sufficient to shift the global axis of polarity, suggesting that uniaxial tissue strain can act as a long-range polarizing cue. Observations both in vivo and in vitro suggest that the effect of tissue anisotropy on Celsr1 polarity is not a direct consequence of cell shape but rather reflects the restructuring of cell-cell interfaces during oriented cell divisions and cell rearrangements that serve to relax tissue strain. We demonstrate that cell intercalations remodel intercellular junctions predominantly between the mediolateral interfaces of neighboring cells. This restructuring of the cell surface polarizes Celsr1, which is slow to accumulate at nascent junctions yet stably associates with persistent junctions. We propose that tissue anisotropy globally aligns Celsr1 polarity by creating a directional bias in the formation of new cell interfaces while simultaneously aligning the persistent interfaces at which Celsr1 prefers to accumulate.

  15. Transient Tissue-Scale Deformation Coordinates Alignment of Planar Cell Polarity Junctions in the Mammalian Skin.

    PubMed

    Aw, Wen Yih; Heck, Bryan W; Joyce, Bradley; Devenport, Danelle

    2016-08-22

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) refers to the collective alignment of polarity along the tissue plane. In skin, the largest mammalian organ, PCP aligns over extremely long distances, but the global cues that orient tissue polarity are unknown. Here, we show that Celsr1 asymmetry arises concomitant with a gradient of tissue deformation oriented along the medial-lateral axis. This uniaxial tissue tension, whose origin remains unknown, transiently transforms basal epithelial cells from initially isotropic and disordered states into highly elongated and aligned morphologies. Reorienting tissue deformation is sufficient to shift the global axis of polarity, suggesting that uniaxial tissue strain can act as a long-range polarizing cue. Observations both in vivo and in vitro suggest that the effect of tissue anisotropy on Celsr1 polarity is not a direct consequence of cell shape but rather reflects the restructuring of cell-cell interfaces during oriented cell divisions and cell rearrangements that serve to relax tissue strain. We demonstrate that cell intercalations remodel intercellular junctions predominantly between the mediolateral interfaces of neighboring cells. This restructuring of the cell surface polarizes Celsr1, which is slow to accumulate at nascent junctions yet stably associates with persistent junctions. We propose that tissue anisotropy globally aligns Celsr1 polarity by creating a directional bias in the formation of new cell interfaces while simultaneously aligning the persistent interfaces at which Celsr1 prefers to accumulate. PMID:27451904

  16. Regeneration of stereocilia of hair cells by forced Atoh1 expression in the adult mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Ming; Chen, Wei; Guo, Wei-Wei; Jia, Shuping; Sun, Jian-He; Liu, Hui-Zhan; Young, Wie-Yen; He, David Z Z

    2012-01-01

    The hallmark of mechanosensory hair cells is the stereocilia, where mechanical stimuli are converted into electrical signals. These delicate stereocilia are susceptible to acoustic trauma and ototoxic drugs. While hair cells in lower vertebrates and the mammalian vestibular system can spontaneously regenerate lost stereocilia, mammalian cochlear hair cells no longer retain this capability. We explored the possibility of regenerating stereocilia in the noise-deafened guinea pig cochlea by cochlear inoculation of a viral vector carrying Atoh1, a gene critical for hair cell differentiation. Exposure to simulated gunfire resulted in a 60-70 dB hearing loss and extensive damage and loss of stereocilia bundles of both inner and outer hair cells along the entire cochlear length. However, most injured hair cells remained in the organ of Corti for up to 10 days after the trauma. A viral vector carrying an EGFP-labeled Atoh1 gene was inoculated into the cochlea through the round window on the seventh day after noise exposure. Auditory brainstem response measured one month after inoculation showed that hearing thresholds were substantially improved. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the damaged/lost stereocilia bundles were repaired or regenerated after Atoh1 treatment, suggesting that Atoh1 was able to induce repair/regeneration of the damaged or lost stereocilia. Therefore, our studies revealed a new role of Atoh1 as a gene critical for promoting repair/regeneration of stereocilia and maintaining injured hair cells in the adult mammal cochlea. Atoh1-based gene therapy, therefore, has the potential to treat noise-induced hearing loss if the treatment is carried out before hair cells die. PMID:23029493

  17. Innate Immune Response Induced by Baculovirus Attenuates Transgene Expression in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Chikako; Ninomiya, Akinori; Yamamoto, Satomi; Abe, Takayuki; Wen, Xiauyu; Fukuhara, Takasuke; Sasai, Miwa; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Satoh, Takashi; Kawai, Taro; Ishii, Ken J.; Akira, Shizuo; Okamoto, Toru

    2014-01-01

    The baculovirus Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcNPV) has been widely used to achieve a high level of foreign gene expression in insect cells, as well as for efficient gene transduction into mammalian cells without any replication. In addition to permitting efficient gene delivery, baculovirus has been shown to induce host innate immune responses in various mammalian cells and in mice. In this study, we examined the effects of the innate immune responses on gene expression by recombinant baculoviruses in cultured cells. The reporter gene expression in IRF3-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) infected with the recombinant baculovirus was shown to be enhanced in accordance with the suppression of beta interferon (IFN-β) production. Furthermore, efficient gene transduction by the recombinant baculovirus was achieved in MEFs deficient for stimulator of interferon genes (STING), TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1), IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), or IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1), but not in those deficient for IRF7, MyD88, or Z-DNA binding protein 1 (ZBP1)/DAI. Enhancement of gene expression by the recombinant baculovirus was also observed in human hepatoma cell lines replicating hepatitis C virus (HCV), in which innate immunity was impaired by the cleavage of IPS-1 by the viral protease. In addition, infection with the recombinant baculovirus expressing the BH3-only protein, BIMS, a potent inducer of apoptosis, resulted in a selective cell death in the HCV replicon cells. These results indicate that innate immune responses induced by infection with baculovirus attenuate transgene expression, and this characteristic might be useful for a selective gene transduction into cells with impaired innate immunity arising from infection with various viruses. PMID:24335288

  18. On Coupling Models Using Model-Checking: Effects of Irinotecan Injections on the Mammalian Cell Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Maria, Elisabetta; Fages, François; Soliman, Sylvain

    In systems biology, the number of models of cellular processes increases rapidly, but re-using models in different contexts or for different questions remains a challenging issue. In this paper, we show how the validation of a coupled model and the optimization of its parameters with respect to biological properties formalized in temporal logics, can be done automatically by model-checking. More specifically, we illustrate this approach with the coupling of existing models of the mammalian cell cycle, the p53-based DNA-damage repair network, and irinotecan metabolism, with respect to the biological properties of this anticancer drug.

  19. A cost-effective approach to microporate mammalian cells with the Neon Transfection System.

    PubMed

    Brees, Chantal; Fransen, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Electroporation is one of the most efficient nonviral methods for transferring exogenous DNA into mammalian cells. However, the relatively high costs of electroporation kits and reagents temper the routine use of this fast and easy to perform technique in many laboratories. Several years ago, a new flexible and easy to operate electroporation device was launched under the name Neon Transfection System. This device uses specialized pipette tips containing gold-plated electrodes as electroporation chamber. Here we report a protocol to regenerate these expensive tips as well as some other Neon kit accessories, thereby reducing the cost of electroporation at least 10-fold. PMID:25172131

  20. A cost-effective approach to microporate mammalian cells with the Neon Transfection System.

    PubMed

    Brees, Chantal; Fransen, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Electroporation is one of the most efficient nonviral methods for transferring exogenous DNA into mammalian cells. However, the relatively high costs of electroporation kits and reagents temper the routine use of this fast and easy to perform technique in many laboratories. Several years ago, a new flexible and easy to operate electroporation device was launched under the name Neon Transfection System. This device uses specialized pipette tips containing gold-plated electrodes as electroporation chamber. Here we report a protocol to regenerate these expensive tips as well as some other Neon kit accessories, thereby reducing the cost of electroporation at least 10-fold.

  1. Engineering protein-responsive mRNA switch in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Endo, Kei; Saito, Hirohide

    2014-01-01

    Engineering of translation provides an alternative regulatory layer for controlling transgene expression in addition to transcriptional regulation. Synthetic mRNA switches that modulate translation of a target gene of interest in response to an intracellular protein could be a key regulator to construct a genetic circuit. Insertion of a protein binding RNA sequence in the 5' UTR of mRNA would allow for the generation of a protein-responsive RNA switch. Here we describe the design principle of the switch and methods for tuning and analyzing its translational activity in mammalian cells. PMID:24549620

  2. Analysis of published data for top concentration considerations in mammalian cell genotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Parry, James M; Parry, Elizabeth; Phrakonkham, Pascal; Corvi, Raffaella

    2010-11-01

    The ability of the in vitro mammalian cell tests currently used to identify genotoxins has been shown to be limited by a high rate of false-positive results, triggering further unnecessary testing in vivo. During an European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods workshop on how to improve the specificity of these assays, testing at high concentrations was identified as one possible source of false positives. Thus far, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development genotoxicity test guidelines have required testing of chemicals using mammalian cells in vitro should be undertaken to concentrations as high as 10 mM (5000 μg/ml). Recently, a draft revision of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use genotoxicity test guidelines has recommended that testing concentrations should be reduced to 1 mM (500 μg/ml). To assess the impact that this lowering would have on the outcome of in vitro genotoxicity testing, we established a database of 384 chemicals classified as rodent carcinogens and reported Ames test results and the test concentrations that produced positive results in the mouse lymphoma assay (MLA), in vitro chromosome aberration (CA) assay and in vitro micronucleus test. Genotoxicity testing results were illustrated for 229 and 338 compounds in the MLA and in vitro CA assay, respectively. Of these test compounds, 62.5% produced positive results in the MLA, of which 20.3% required testing between 1 and 10 mM. A total of 58.0% produced positive results in in vitro CA assays, of which 25.0% required testing between 1 and 10 mM. If the testing concentration limit for mammalian cell assays was reduced to 1 mM, 24 (6.25%) potential carcinogens would not be detected in any part of the standard in vitro genotoxicity test battery (Ames test, MLA and in vitro CA assay). Further re-evaluation and/or retest of these compounds by Kirkland and Fowler [Kirkland, D. and Fowler

  3. The effect of replacement of methionine by homocystine on survival of malignant and normal adult mammalian cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Halpern, B C; Clark, B R; Hardy, D N; Halpern, R M; Smith, R A

    1974-04-01

    In tissue cultures of normal adult and malignant mammalian cells, homocystine has been substituted for methionine in a medium rich in folic acid and cyanocobalamin. Normal adult cells thrive. Three highly malignant cell types from three different species, including man, die.

  4. Determination of mammalian cell counts, cell size and cell health using the Moxi Z mini automated cell counter.

    PubMed

    Dittami, Gregory M; Sethi, Manju; Rabbitt, Richard D; Ayliffe, H Edward

    2012-01-01

    on the overall health of cell samples. Consequently, additional techniques must often be used in conjunction with Coulter counting to assess cell viability. This extends experimental setup time and cost since the traditional methods of viability assessment require cell staining and/or use of expensive and cumbersome equipment such as a flow cytometer. The Moxi Z mini automated cell counter, described here, is an ultra-small benchtop instrument that combines the accuracy of the Coulter Principle with a thin-film sensor technology to enable precise sizing and counting of particles ranging from 3-25 microns, depending on the cell counting cassette used. The M type cassette can be used to count particles from with average diameters of 4 - 25 microns (dynamic range 2 - 34 microns), and the Type S cassette can be used to count particles with and average diameter of 3 - 20 microns (dynamic range 2 - 26 microns). Since the system uses a volumetric measurement method, the 4-25 microns corresponds to a cell volume range of 34 - 8,180 fL and the 3 - 20 microns corresponds to a cell volume range of 14 - 4200 fL, which is relevant when non-spherical particles are being measured. To perform mammalian cell counts using the Moxi Z, the cells to be counted are first diluted with ORFLO or similar diluent. A cell counting cassette is inserted into the instrument, and the sample is loaded into the port of the cassette. Thousands of cells are pulled, single-file through a "Cell Sensing Zone" (CSZ) in the thin-film membrane over 8-15 seconds. Following the run, the instrument uses proprietary curve-fitting in conjunction with a proprietary software algorithm to provide coincidence event correction along with an assessment of overall culture health by determining the ratio of the number of cells in the population of interest to the total number of particles. The total particle counts include shrunken and broken down dead cells, as well as other debris and contaminants. The results are

  5. Determination of Mammalian Cell Counts, Cell Size and Cell Health Using the Moxi Z Mini Automated Cell Counter

    PubMed Central

    Dittami, Gregory M.; Sethi, Manju; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Ayliffe, H. Edward

    2012-01-01

    the overall health of cell samples. Consequently, additional techniques must often be used in conjunction with Coulter counting to assess cell viability. This extends experimental setup time and cost since the traditional methods of viability assessment require cell staining and/or use of expensive and cumbersome equipment such as a flow cytometer. The Moxi Z mini automated cell counter, described here, is an ultra-small benchtop instrument that combines the accuracy of the Coulter Principle with a thin-film sensor technology to enable precise sizing and counting of particles ranging from 3-25 microns, depending on the cell counting cassette used. The M type cassette can be used to count particles from with average diameters of 4 - 25 microns (dynamic range 2 - 34 microns), and the Type S cassette can be used to count particles with and average diameter of 3 - 20 microns (dynamic range 2 - 26 microns). Since the system uses a volumetric measurement method, the 4-25 microns corresponds to a cell volume range of 34 - 8,180 fL and the 3 - 20 microns corresponds to a cell volume range of 14 - 4200 fL, which is relevant when non-spherical particles are being measured. To perform mammalian cell counts using the Moxi Z, the cells to be counted are first diluted with ORFLO or similar diluent. A cell counting cassette is inserted into the instrument, and the sample is loaded into the port of the cassette. Thousands of cells are pulled, single-file through a "Cell Sensing Zone" (CSZ) in the thin-film membrane over 8-15 seconds. Following the run, the instrument uses proprietary curve-fitting in conjunction with a proprietary software algorithm to provide coincidence event correction along with an assessment of overall culture health by determining the ratio of the number of cells in the population of interest to the total number of particles. The total particle counts include shrunken and broken down dead cells, as well as other debris and contaminants. The results are

  6. Targeting of a histone acetyltransferase domain to a promoter enhances protein expression levels in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kwaks, T H J; Sewalt, R G A B; van Blokland, R; Siersma, T J; Kasiem, M; Kelder, A; Otte, A P

    2005-01-12

    Silencing of transfected genes in mammalian cells is a fundamental problem that probably involves the (in)accessibility status of chromatin. A potential solution to this problem is to provide a cell with protein factors that make the chromatin of a promoter more open or accessible for transcription. We tested this by targeting such proteins to different promoters. We found that targeting the p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain to strong viral or cellular promoters is sufficient to result in higher expression levels of a reporter protein. In contrast, targeting the chromatin-remodeling factor Brahma does not result in stable, higher protein expression levels. The long-term effects of the targeted p300HAT domain on protein expression levels are positively reinforced, when also anti-repressor elements are applied to flank the reporter construct. These elements were previously shown to be potent blockers of chromatin-associated repressors. The simultaneous application of the targeted p300HAT domain and anti-repressor elements conveys long-term stability to protein expression. Whereas no copy number dependency is achieved by targeting of the p300HAT domain alone, copy number dependency is improved when anti-repressor elements are included. We conclude that targeting of protein domains such as HAT domains helps to facilitate expression of transfected genes in mammalian cells. However, the simultaneous application of other genomic elements such as the anti-repressor elements prevents silencing more efficiently.

  7. Cell-free methods to produce structurally intact mammalian membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Takehiro; Shinya, Naoko; Ito, Kaori; Ishizuka-Katsura, Yoshiko; Ohsawa, Noboru; Terada, Takaho; Hirata, Kunio; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Tomita, Taisuke; Ishibashi, Yohei; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structures of four membrane proteins, from bacteria or a unicellular alga, have been solved with samples produced by cell-free protein synthesis. In this study, for mammalian membrane protein production, we established the precipitating and soluble membrane fragment methods: membrane proteins are synthesized with the Escherichia coli cell-free system in the presence of large and small membrane fragments, respectively, and are simultaneously integrated into the lipid environments. We applied the precipitating membrane fragment method to produce various mammalian membrane proteins, including human claudins, glucosylceramide synthase, and the γ-secretase subunits. These proteins were produced at levels of about 0.1–1.0 mg per ml cell-free reaction under the initial conditions, and were obtained as precipitates by ultracentrifugation. Larger amounts of membrane proteins were produced by the soluble membrane fragment method, collected in the ultracentrifugation supernatants, and purified directly by column chromatography. For several proteins, the conditions of the membrane fragment methods were further optimized, such as by the addition of specific lipids/detergents. The functional and structural integrities of the purified proteins were confirmed by analyses of their ligand binding activities, size-exclusion chromatography profiles, and/or thermal stabilities. We successfully obtained high-quality crystals of the complex of human claudin-4 with an enterotoxin. PMID:27465719

  8. Detection of Metabolic Fluxes of O and H Atoms into Intracellular Water in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Quaroni, Luca; Podlesak, David W.; Zlateva, Theodora; Bollinger, Nikki; McAllister, Aaron; Lott, Michael J.; Hegg, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic processes result in the release and exchange of H and O atoms from organic material as well as some inorganic salts and gases. These fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water result in an isotopic gradient that can be measured experimentally. Using isotope ratio mass spectroscopy, we revealed that slightly over 50% of the H and O atoms in the intracellular water of exponentially-growing cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts were isotopically distinct from growth medium water. We then employed infrared spectromicroscopy to detect in real time the flux of H atoms in these same cells. Importantly, both of these techniques indicate that the H and O fluxes are dependent on metabolic processes; cells that are in lag phase or are quiescent exhibit a much smaller flux. In addition, water extracted from the muscle tissue of rats contained a population of H and O atoms that were isotopically distinct from body water, consistent with the results obtained using the cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts. Together these data demonstrate that metabolic processes produce fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water, and that these fluxes can be detected and measured in both cultured mammalian cells and in mammalian tissue. PMID:22848359

  9. Evaluation of 13C isotopic tracers for metabolic flux analysis in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, Christian M.; Walther, Jason L.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    13C metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is the most comprehensive means of characterizing cellular metabolic states. Uniquely labeled isotopic tracers enable more focused analyses to probe specific reactions within the network. As a result, the choice of tracer largely determines the precision with which one can estimate metabolic fluxes, especially in complex mammalian systems that require multiple substrates. Here we have experimentally determined metabolic fluxes in a tumor cell line, successfully recapitulating the hallmarks of cancer cell metabolism. Using these data, we computationally evaluated specifically labeled 13C glucose and glutamine tracers for their ability to precisely and accurately estimate fluxes in central carbon metabolism. These methods enabled us to to identify the optimal tracer for analyzing individual fluxes, specific pathways, and central carbon metabolism as a whole. [1,2-13C2]glucose provided the most precise estimates for glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the overall network. Tracers such as [2-13C]glucose and [3-13C]glucose also outperformed the more commonly used [1-13C]glucose. [U-13C5]glutamine emerged as the preferred isotopic tracer for analysis of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. These results provide valuable, quantitative information on the performance of 13C-labeled substrates and can aid in the design of more informative MFA experiments in mammalian cell culture. PMID:19622376

  10. Detection of metabolic fluxes of O and H atoms into intracellular water in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Helen W; Quaroni, Luca; Podlesak, David W; Zlateva, Theodora; Bollinger, Nikki; McAllister, Aaron; Lott, Michael J; Hegg, Eric L

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic processes result in the release and exchange of H and O atoms from organic material as well as some inorganic salts and gases. These fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water result in an isotopic gradient that can be measured experimentally. Using isotope ratio mass spectroscopy, we revealed that slightly over 50% of the H and O atoms in the intracellular water of exponentially-growing cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts were isotopically distinct from growth medium water. We then employed infrared spectromicroscopy to detect in real time the flux of H atoms in these same cells. Importantly, both of these techniques indicate that the H and O fluxes are dependent on metabolic processes; cells that are in lag phase or are quiescent exhibit a much smaller flux. In addition, water extracted from the muscle tissue of rats contained a population of H and O atoms that were isotopically distinct from body water, consistent with the results obtained using the cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts. Together these data demonstrate that metabolic processes produce fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water, and that these fluxes can be detected and measured in both cultured mammalian cells and in mammalian tissue.

  11. Cell-free methods to produce structurally intact mammalian membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Takehiro; Shinya, Naoko; Ito, Kaori; Ishizuka-Katsura, Yoshiko; Ohsawa, Noboru; Terada, Takaho; Hirata, Kunio; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Tomita, Taisuke; Ishibashi, Yohei; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structures of four membrane proteins, from bacteria or a unicellular alga, have been solved with samples produced by cell-free protein synthesis. In this study, for mammalian membrane protein production, we established the precipitating and soluble membrane fragment methods: membrane proteins are synthesized with the Escherichia coli cell-free system in the presence of large and small membrane fragments, respectively, and are simultaneously integrated into the lipid environments. We applied the precipitating membrane fragment method to produce various mammalian membrane proteins, including human claudins, glucosylceramide synthase, and the γ-secretase subunits. These proteins were produced at levels of about 0.1-1.0 mg per ml cell-free reaction under the initial conditions, and were obtained as precipitates by ultracentrifugation. Larger amounts of membrane proteins were produced by the soluble membrane fragment method, collected in the ultracentrifugation supernatants, and purified directly by column chromatography. For several proteins, the conditions of the membrane fragment methods were further optimized, such as by the addition of specific lipids/detergents. The functional and structural integrities of the purified proteins were confirmed by analyses of their ligand binding activities, size-exclusion chromatography profiles, and/or thermal stabilities. We successfully obtained high-quality crystals of the complex of human claudin-4 with an enterotoxin. PMID:27465719

  12. Detection of Metabolic Fluxes of O and H Atoms into Intracellular Water in Mammalian Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Quaroni, Luca; Podlesak, David W.; Zlateva, Theodora; Bollinger, Nikki; McAllister, Aaron; Lott, Michael J.; Hegg, Eric L.

    2012-01-07

    Metabolic processes result in the release and exchange of H and O atoms from organic material as well as some inorganic salts and gases. These fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water result in an isotopic gradient that can be measured experimentally. Using isotope ratio mass spectroscopy, we revealed that slightly over 50% of the H and O atoms in the intracellular water of exponentially-growing cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts were isotopically distinct from growth medium water. We then employed infrared spectromicroscopy to detect in real time the flux of H atoms in these same cells. Importantly, both of these techniques indicate that the H and O fluxes are dependent on metabolic processes; cells that are in lag phase or are quiescent exhibit a much smaller flux. In addition, water extracted from the muscle tissue of rats contained a population of H and O atoms that were isotopically distinct from body, consistent with the results obtained using the cultured Rat-1 fibroblasts. Together these data demonstrate that metabolic processes produce fluxes of H and O atoms into intracellular water, and that these fluxes can be detected and measured in both cultured mammalian cells and in mammalian tissue.

  13. Genotoxicity of propoxur and its N-nitroso derivative in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, T C; Chiou, J M; Chang, Y L; Hu, M C

    1998-04-01

    N-Nitroso propoxur (NP) can be synthesized from a widely used N-methylcarbamate insecticide, propoxur, in vitro in the laboratory. Because of the extensive use of aerosol propoxur, the adverse effect on cells of respiratory origin is worth elucidating. In this report, two mammalian cell cultures from respiratory tissues [a hamster lung fibroblast, V79, and a primary rat tracheal epithelial cell (RTE)], were used to investigate the genotoxicity of propoxur and NP. NP was more cytotoxic than propoxur, with LC50s (20 and six times smaller, respectively in V79 and RTE cells. NP significantly induced sister chromatid exchange (> or = 0.01 microg/ml), chromosome aberration (> or = 2.5 microg/ml) and hprt gene mutation (> or = 0.5 microg/ml) in V79 cells, and cell transformation (> or = 0.2 microg/ml) in RTE cells. Results of chromosome aberration and hprt gene mutation indicated that the major pre-mutagenic lesion induced by NP must be the O6-methylguanine adduct, which frequently mispairs with thymine and thus gives rise to a GC-->AT transition. Propoxur was not mutagenic to either type of cells. However, it inhibited gap-junctional intercellular communication in V79 cells, which indicates that propoxur could act through some epigenetic mechanisms, such as tumor promotion or cell proliferation, in the multiple process of chemical carcinogenesis.

  14. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate

    SciTech Connect

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M.

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  15. Lipidome of midbody released from neural stem and progenitor cells during mammalian cortical neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yoko; Sampaio, Julio L.; Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela; Ettinger, Andreas W.; Haffner, Christiane; Huttner, Wieland B.

    2015-01-01

    Midbody release from proliferative neural progenitor cells is tightly associated with the neuronal commitment of neural progenitor cells during the progression of neurogenesis in the mammalian cerebral cortex. While the central portion of the midbody, a cytoplasmic bridge between nascent daughter cells, is engulfed by one of the daughter cell by most cells in vitro, it is shown to be released into the extracellular cerebrospinal fluid (CF) in vivo in mouse embryos. Several proteins have been involved in midbody release; however, few studies have addressed the participation of the plasma membrane's lipids in this process. Here, we show by Shotgun Lipidomic analysis that phosphatydylserine (PS), among other lipids, is enriched in the released midbodies compared to lipoparticles and cellular membranes, both collected from the CF of the developing mouse embryos. Moreover, the developing mouse embryo neural progenitor cells released two distinct types of midbodies carrying either internalized PS or externalized PS on their membrane. This strongly suggests that phagocytosis and an alternative fate of released midbodies exists. HeLa cells, which are known to mainly engulf the midbody show almost no PS exposure, if any, on the outer leaflet of the midbody membrane. These results point toward that PS exposure might be involved in the selection of recipients of released midbodies, either to be engulfed by daughter cells or phagocytosed by non-daughter cells or another cell type in the developing cerebral cortex. PMID:26379497

  16. Mammalian aPKC/Par polarity complex mediated regulation of epithelial division orientation and cell fate.

    PubMed

    Vorhagen, Susanne; Niessen, Carien M

    2014-11-01

    Oriented cell division is a key regulator of tissue architecture and crucial for morphogenesis and homeostasis. Balanced regulation of proliferation and differentiation is an essential property of tissues not only to drive morphogenesis but also to maintain and restore homeostasis. In many tissues orientation of cell division is coupled to the regulation of differentiation producing daughters with similar (symmetric cell division, SCD) or differential fate (asymmetric cell division, ACD). This allows the organism to generate cell lineage diversity from a small pool of stem and progenitor cells. Division orientation and/or the ratio of ACD/SCD need to be tightly controlled. Loss of orientation or an altered ratio can promote overgrowth, alter tissue architecture and induce aberrant differentiation, and have been linked to morphogenetic diseases, cancer and aging. A key requirement for oriented division is the presence of a polarity axis, which can be established through cell intrinsic and/or extrinsic signals. Polarity proteins translate such internal and external cues to drive polarization. In this review we will focus on the role of the polarity complex aPKC/Par3/Par6 in the regulation of division orientation and cell fate in different mammalian epithelia. We will compare the conserved function of this complex in mitotic spindle orientation and distribution of cell fate determinants and highlight common and differential mechanisms in which this complex is used by tissues to adapt division orientation and cell fate to the specific properties of the epithelium.

  17. Radiation effects on the cell-cell communication of mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depriest, Kendall Russell

    Recent observations of bystander effects in unirradiated cell populations have focused attention on cell-cell communication, particularly gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC), as a means through which the bystander effect may be transmitted. The bystander expression of CDKN1A in unirradiated AG1522 human fibroblast cells observed in another laboratory was verified. The dose response of the bystander effect in the AG1522 cells showed that the effect had reached its maximum at the lowest alpha-particle fluence tested, 0.013 alpha/nuclei. To test potential mechanisms for communication to bystander cells, the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique was used. Only the rat liver epithelial cell line (Clone 9) exhibited GJIC based upon a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay, and there was no change in the rate constant for GJIC following exposure to low LET or high LET radiation. The fibroblast cell lines (AG1521, AG1522, and GM5758) showed no evidence of GJIC in three separate assays including immunohistochemistry. Lindane, an inhibitor of GJIC, eliminated the bystander expression of CDKN1A in AG1522 cells while octanol, another inhibitor of GJIC, did not change the bystander expression of the protein. The two chemicals act in different ways to disrupt GJIC and each one may alter other functions as well, so the elimination of the bystander effect by lindane apparently indicates that lindane is interfering with a bystander signaling mechanism that is not mediated by gap junctions. The lack of connexin localization in the cell membrane of the fibroblast cell lines and the elimination of the bystander expression by lindane, but not octanol, indicates that the bystander effect must be mediated by a non-GJIC mechanism. The experimental evidence suggests that the mediator of the bystander expression of CDKN1A in human diploid fibroblasts is most likely an extracellular signal, such as a cytokine, that acts in a calcium-dependent signal

  18. Forced and natural convective drying of trehalose/water thin films: implication in the desiccation preservation of Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingyan; Fowler, Alex; Bhowmick, Sankha

    2006-06-01

    Trehalose is believed to offer desiccation protection to mammalian cells by forming stable glassy matrices. The goal of the current study was to explore the desiccation kinetics of thin films of trehalose-water solution under forced and natural convective conditions and to investigate the thermophysical state of mammalian cells at the bottom of the thin film. We developed a finite difference model based on the mass and energy conservation equations coupled to the water transport model from the cells. The boundary conditions were obtained from correlations or experimental measurements and the Gordon-Taylor equation was used to predict the glass transition temperature at every location. Results indicated that there are three distinct regimes for drying for both forced and natural convection, characterized by the slope of the moisture content plot as a function of time. Our results also indicate that the surface of the solution reached the glassy state in less than 10 min for the Reynolds (forced) numbers explored and approximately 30 min for some Rayleigh (natural convective) numbers; however, significant water was trapped at this instant. Larger drying force hastened quicker glass formation but trapped more water. The numerical model was capable of predicting the drying kinetics for the dilute region accurately, but deviated while predicting the other regimes. Based on these experimental validations of the model, the osmotic response of different cells located at the bottom of the solution with orders of magnitude difference in their membrane permeability (Lp) was predicted. The results suggested that extracellular glass formed around cells at the bottom of a trehalose-water solution by the propagation of glass into the solution; however it takes more than an order of magnitude time (approximately 7 min to >100 min for forced convective drying) to remove sufficient water to form glass around cells from the time when the first surface glass is formed. This is

  19. Vicenistatin induces early endosome-derived vacuole formation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Yuko; Ohmichi, Tomohiro; Kazami, Sayaka; Iwasaki, Hiroki; Mano, Kousuke; Nagumo, Yoko; Kudo, Fumitaka; Ichikawa, Sosaku; Iwabuchi, Yoshiharu; Kanoh, Naoki; Eguchi, Tadashi; Osada, Hiroyuki; Usui, Takeo

    2016-05-01

    Homotypic fusion of early endosomes is important for efficient protein trafficking and sorting. The key controller of this process is Rab5 which regulates several effectors and PtdInsPs levels, but whose mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that vicenistatin, a natural product, enhanced homotypic fusion of early endosomes and induced the formation of large vacuole-like structures in mammalian cells. Unlike YM201636, another early endosome vacuolating compound, vicenistatin did not inhibit PIKfyve activity in vitro but activated Rab5-PAS pathway in cells. Furthermore, vicenistatin increased the membrane surface fluidity of cholesterol-containing liposomes in vitro, and cholesterol deprivation from the plasma membrane stimulated vicenistatin-induced vacuolation in cells. These results suggest that vicenistatin is a novel compound that induces the formation of vacuole-like structures by activating Rab5-PAS pathway and increasing membrane fluidity. PMID:27104762

  20. A putative transcriptional elongation factor hIws1 is essential for mammalian cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhangguo; Zhou Zhongwei; Chen Guohong; Bao Shilai . E-mail: slbao@genetics.ac.cn

    2007-02-02

    Iws1 has been implicated in transcriptional elongation by interaction with RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and elongation factor Spt6 in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and association with transcription factor TFIIS in mammalian cells, but its role in controlling cell growth and proliferation remains unknown. Here we report that the human homolog of Iws1, hIws1, physically interacts with protein arginine methyltransferases PRMT5 which methylates elongation factor Spt5 and regulates its interaction with RNA polymerase II. Gene-specific silencing of hIws1 by RNA interference reveals that hIws1 is essential for cell viability. GFP fusion protein expression approaches demonstrate that the hIws1 protein is located in the nucleus, subsequently, two regions harbored within the hIws1 protein are demonstrated to contain nuclear localization signals (NLSs). In addition, mouse homolog of hiws1 is found to express ubiquitously in various tissues.

  1. Acetylcholine activates an inward current in single mammalian smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Benham, C D; Bolton, T B; Lang, R J

    Acetylcholine, the major excitatory neurotransmitter to the smooth muscle of mammalian intestine, is known to depolarize smooth muscle cells with an apparent increase in membrane conductance. However, the ionic mechanisms that are triggered by muscarinic receptor activation and underlie this response are poorly understood, due in part to the technical problems associated with the electrophysiological study of smooth muscle. The muscarinic action of acetylcholine in certain neurones has been shown to involve the switching off of a resting K+ current (M-current) and a similar mechanism has recently also been identified in smooth muscle of amphibian stomach. We have now applied the patch-clamp technique to single smooth muscle cells of rabbit jejunum and find that muscarinic receptor activation switches on a nonselective, voltage-sensitive inward current. In addition, acetylcholine activates and then suppresses spontaneous K+ current transients, which are probably triggered by rises in intracellular Ca2+ in these cells.

  2. 4D Visualization of replication foci in mammalian cells corresponding to individual replicons

    PubMed Central

    Chagin, V. O.; Casas-Delucchi, C. S.; Reinhart, M.; Schermelleh, L.; Markaki, Y.; Maiser, A.; Bolius, J. J.; Bensimon, A.; Fillies, M.; Domaing, P.; Rozanov, Y. M.; Leonhardt, H.; Cardoso, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Since the pioneering proposal of the replicon model of DNA replication 50 years ago, the predicted replicons have not been identified and quantified at the cellular level. Here, we combine conventional and super-resolution microscopy of replication sites in live and fixed cells with computational image analysis. We complement these data with genome size measurements, comprehensive analysis of S-phase dynamics and quantification of replication fork speed and replicon size in human and mouse cells. These multidimensional analyses demonstrate that replication foci (RFi) in three-dimensional (3D) preserved somatic mammalian cells can be optically resolved down to single replicons throughout S-phase. This challenges the conventional interpretation of nuclear RFi as replication factories, that is, the complex entities that process multiple clustered replicons. Accordingly, 3D genome organization and duplication can be now followed within the chromatin context at the level of individual replicons. PMID:27052570

  3. Spatial distribution of the state of water in frozen mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jinping; Malsam, Jason; Bischof, John C; Hubel, Allison; Aksan, Alptekin

    2010-10-20

    We describe direct determination of the state of intracellular water, measurement of the intercellular concentration of a cryoprotectant agent (dimethylsulfoxide), and the distribution of organic material in frozen mammalian cells. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy was utilized at cryogenic temperatures with single live cells to conduct high spatial resolution measurements (350 × 350 × 700 nm), which yielded two, we believe, novel observations: 1), intracellular ice formation during fast cooling (50°C/min) causes more pronounced intracellular dehydration than slow cooling (1°C/min); and 2), intracellular dimethylsulfoxide concentration is lower (by as much as 50%) during fast cooling, decreasing the propensity for intracellular vitrification. These observations have a very significant impact for developing successful biopreservation protocols for cells used for therapeutic purposes and for cellular biofluids.

  4. Fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance-based assay in living mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Marina; Giacomina, Francesca; Romeo, Elisa; Castellani, Beatrice; Ottonello, Giuliana; Lambruschini, Chiara; Garau, Gianpiero; Scarpelli, Rita; Bandiera, Tiziano; Piomelli, Daniele; Dalvit, Claudio

    2016-02-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based screening has been recognized as a powerful approach for the identification and characterization of molecules interacting with pharmaceutical targets. Indeed, several NMR methods have been developed and successfully applied to many drug discovery projects. Whereas most of these approaches have targeted isolated biomolecular receptors, very few cases are reported with the screening performed in intact cells and cell extracts. Here we report the first successful application of the fluorine NMR-based assay n-FABS (n-fluorine atoms for biochemical screening) in living mammalian cells expressing the membrane protein fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). This method allows the identification of both weak and potent inhibitors and the measurement of their potency in a physiological environment.

  5. STED super-resolution microscopy in Drosophila tissue and in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Lana; Lee, Yin Loon; Matis, Maja; Axelrod, Jeff; Stearns, Tim; Moerner, W. E.

    2011-03-01

    Far-field super-resolution microscopy is a rapidly emerging method that is opening up opportunities for biological imaging beyond the optical diffraction limit. We have implemented a Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscope to image single dye, cell, and tissue samples with 50-80 nm resolution. First, we compare the STED performance imaging single molecules of several common dyes and report a novel STED dye. Then we apply STED to image planar cell polarity protein complexes in intact fixed Drosophila tissue for the first time. Finally, we present a preliminary study of the centrosomal protein Cep164 in mammalian cells. Our images suggest that Cep164 is arranged in a nine-fold symmetric pattern around the centriole, consistent with findings suggested by cryoelectron tomography. Our work demonstrates that STED microscopy can be used for superresolution imaging in intact tissue and provides ultrastructural information in biological samples as an alternative to immuno-electron microscopy.

  6. DUB-resistant ubiquitin to survey ubiquitination switches in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Békés, Miklós; Okamoto, Keiji; Crist, Sarah B.; Jones, Mathew J.; Chapman, Jessica R.; Brasher, Bradley; Melandri, Francesco; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Denchi, Eros Lazzerini; Huang, Tony T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The ubiquitin-modification status of proteins in cells is highly dynamic and maintained by specific ligation machineries (E3 ligases) that tag proteins with ubiquitin or by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) that remove the ubiquitin tag. The development of tools that offset this balance is critical in characterizing signaling pathways that utilize such ubiquitination switches. Herein, we generated a DUB-resistant ubiquitin mutant that is recalcitrant to cleavage by various families of DUBs both in vitro and in mammalian cells. As a proof of principle experiment, ectopic expression of the uncleavable ubiquitin stabilized mono-ubiquitinated PCNA in the absence of DNA damage, and also revealed a defect in the clearance of the DNA damage response at unprotected telomeres. Importantly, a proteomic survey using the uncleavable ubiquitin identified previously unknown ubiquitinated substrates, validating the DUB-resistant ubiquitin expression system as a valuable tool to interrogate cell signaling pathways. PMID:24210823

  7. Fluorogenic, two-photon-triggered photoclick chemistry in live mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhipeng; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; An, Peng; Prasad, Paras N; Lin, Qing

    2013-11-13

    The tetrazole-based photoclick chemistry has provided a powerful tool to image proteins in live cells. To extend photoclick chemistry to living organisms with improved spatiotemporal control, here we report the design of naphthalene-based tetrazoles that can be efficiently activated by two-photon excitation with a 700 nm femtosecond pulsed laser. A water-soluble, cell-permeable naphthalene-based tetrazole was identified that reacts with acrylamide with the effective two-photon cross-section for the cycloaddition reaction determined to be 3.8 GM. Furthermore, the use of this naphthalene-tetrazole for real-time, spatially controlled imaging of microtubules in live mammalian cells via the fluorogenic, two-photon-triggered photoclick chemistry was demonstrated.

  8. 6-hydroxy-nicotine-inducible multilevel transgene control in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Malphettes, Laetitia; Schoenmakers, Ronald G; Fussenegger, Martin

    2006-11-01

    The precise control of transgene expression is essential for biopharmaceutical manufacturing, gene therapy and tissue engineering. We have designed a novel conditional transcription technology, which enables reversible induction, repression and adjustment of desired transgene expression using the clinically inert 6-hydroxy-nicotine (6HNic). The 6-hydroxy-nicotine oxidase (6HNO) repressor (HdnoR), which manages nicotine metabolism in Arthrobacter nicotinovorans pAO1 by binding to a specific operator of the 6-hydroxy-nicotine oxidase (O(NIC)), was fused to the Krueppel-associated box protein of the human kox-1 gene (KRAB) to create a synthetic 6HNic-dependent transsilencer (NS) that controls chimeric mammalian promoters, which are assembled by cloning tandem O(NIC) operators 3' of a constitutive promoter. In the absence of 6HNic, NS binds to O(NIC) and silences the constitutive promoter, which otherwise drives high-level transgene expression when the NS-O(NIC) interaction stops in the presence of 6HNic. Generic NICE(ON) technology was compatible with a variety of constitutive viral and mammalian housekeeping promoters, each of which enabled specific induced, repressed, adjusted and reversible transgene expression profiles in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1), baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) as well as in human fibrosarcoma (HT-1080) cells. NICE(ON) also proved successful in controlling multicistronic expression units for coordinated transcription of up to three transgenes and in the fine-tuning of transcription-translation networks, in which RNA polymerase II- and III-dependent promoters, engineered for 6HNic responsiveness, drove expression of siRNAs that triggered specific transgene knockdown. NICE(ON) represents a robust and versatile technology for the precise tuning of transgene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:16962351

  9. Mammalian cell cultures on micropatterned surfaces of weak-acid, polyelectrolyte hyperbranched thin films on gold.

    PubMed

    Amirpour, M L; Ghosh, P; Lackowski, W M; Crooks, R M; Pishko, M V

    2001-04-01

    A four-step soft lithographic process based on micro-contact printing of organic monolayers, hyperbranched polymer grafting, and subsequent polymer functionalization results in polymer/n-alkanethiol patterns that direct the growth and migration of mammalian cells. The functional units on these surfaces are three-dimensional cell "corrals" that have walls 52+/-2 nm in height and lateral dimensions on the order of 60 microm. The corrals have hydrophobic, methyl-terminated n-alkanethiol bottoms, which promote cell adhesion, and walls consisting of hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid)/poly(ethylene glycol) layered nanocomposites that inhibit cell growth. Cell viability studies indicate that cells remain viable on the patterned surfaces for up to 21 days, and fluorescence microscopy studies of stained cells demonstrate that cell growth and spreading does n