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Sample records for protects rgc-5 cells

  1. Lutein Protects RGC-5 Cells Against Hypoxia and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Suk-Yee; Lo, Amy C. Y.

    2010-01-01

    Retinal ischemia and oxidative stress lead to neuronal death in many ocular pathologies. Recently, we found that lutein, an oxy-carotenoid, protected the inner retina from ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, it is uncertain whether lutein directly protects retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Here, an in vitro model of hypoxia and oxidative stress was used to further investigate the neuroprotective role of lutein in RGCs. Cobalt chloride (CoCl2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were added to a transformed RGC cell line, RGC-5, to induce chemical hypoxia and oxidative stress, respectively. Either lutein or vehicle was added to cultured cells. A higher cell count was observed in the lutein-treated cells compared with the vehicle-treated cells. Our data from this in vitro model revealed that lutein might protect RGC-5 cells from damage when exposed to either CoCl2-induced chemical hypoxia or H2O2-induced oxidative stress. These results suggest that lutein may play a role as a neuroprotectant. PMID:20559505

  2. Protective effects of 7,8-dihydroxyflavone on retinal ganglion and RGC-5 cells against excitotoxic and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vivek K; You, Yuyi; Li, Jonathan C; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L

    2013-01-01

    A preferential loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is observed in glaucoma and optic neuritis. Loss of tropomyosin-related kinase receptor B (TrkB)-mediated signaling has been implicated in this degeneration. Our study indicates that 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8 DHF) robustly upregulates the TrkB signaling in the primary rat RGCs and the retinal neuronal precursor RGC-5 cell line by promoting phosphorylation of TrkB receptor, leading to enhanced TrkB receptor tyrosine kinase activity. The flavonoid derivative 7,8 DHF acts a potent TrkB agonist and upregulates the downstream AKT and MAPK/ERK survival signaling pathways in a TrkB-dependent manner in both primary rat RGCs as well as the RGC-5 cell line. Excitotoxicity and oxidative injury have been alleged in the specific RGC degeneration in various forms of glaucoma. A novel finding of this study is that treatment with 7,8 DHF protects these cells significantly from excitotoxic and oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and cell death. 7,8 DHF also promotes neuritogenesis by stimulating neurite outgrowth, suggesting a possible therapeutic strategy for protection of RGCs in various optic neuropathies.

  3. Pilocarpine protects cobalt chloride-induced apoptosis of RGC-5 cells: involvement of muscarinic receptors and HIF-1 alpha pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xu; Zhou, Wei; Cui, Yongyao; Zhu, Liang; Li, Juan; Feng, Xuemei; Shao, Biyun; Qi, Hong; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Hao; Chen, Hongzhuan

    2010-04-01

    The retina is the most metabolically active tissue in the human body and hypoxia-induced retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death has been implicated in glaucomatous optic neuropathy. The aim of this study is to determine whether muscarinic receptor agonist pilocarpine, a classic antiglaucoma drug, possesses neuroprotection against cobalt chloride (CoCl(2))-mimetic hypoxia-induced apoptosis of rat retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5 cells) and its underlying mechanisms. Cell viability was determined by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and apoptosis was examined by annexin V and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) assays. Expressions of hypoxia-induced factor-1 alpha (HIF-1 alpha), p53, and BNIP3 were investigated by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis. After treatment of 200 microM CoCl(2) for 24 h, RGC-5 cells showed a marked decrease of cell viability by approximately 30%, increased apoptosis rate and obvious decline in MMP, which could largely be reversed by the pretreatment of 1 microM pilocarpine mainly via the activation of muscarinic receptors. Meanwhile, pretreatment of 1 microM pilocarpine could significantly prevent CoCl(2)-induced HIF-1 alpha translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus and down-regulate the expression of HIF-1 alpha, p53, and BNIP3. These studies demonstrated that pilocarpine had effective protection against hypoxia-induced apoptosis in RGCs via muscarinic receptors and HIF-1 alpha pathway. The findings suggest that HIF-1 alpha pathway as a "master switch" may be used as a therapeutic target in the cholinergic treatment of glaucoma.

  4. Visible light may directly induce nuclear DNA damage triggering the death pathway in RGC-5 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang-Yu; Fan, Bin; Ma, Tong-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Visible light has been previously demonstrated to induce retinal ganglion cell (RGC)-5 cell death through the mitochondrial pathway. The present study was designed to determine whether visible light might also directly trigger the death pathway by damaging nuclear DNA. RGC-5 cells were exposed to various intensities and durations of visible light exposure. Cell viability and death were monitored with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and propidium iodide staining. Nuclear DNA damage caused by light was determined with the plasmid assay, genome DNA assay, and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. The subsequent activation of nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was measured with western blot, and PARP-1's role in the death pathway was assessed by using specific inhibitors. Poly (ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) inhibitors were used to show their influence on light-induced cell death. Calcium influx was examined with the fura-2 assay and calcium channel blocker. We found that visible light induced RGC-5 cell death in a time- and intensity-dependent manner. After the light intensity was increased to 2,600 lx, activation of the death pathway in RGC-5 cells was clearly observed by detecting double-strand DNA breaks and nuclear DNA damage in vitro. Nuclear enzyme PARP-1 was promptly activated after exposure to 2,600 lx of light for 2 days, and specific inhibitors of PARP-1 had significant neuroprotective effects. The poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitor tannic acid and AIF inhibitor N-phenylmaleimide partially protected RGC-5 cells from light injury. A massive calcium influx was detected after 2 days of light exposure, and a calcium channel blocker partially protected cells against light injury. These results suggest that visible light exposure may directly cause nuclear DNA damage, which consequently activates PARP-1. In addition, RGC-5 cells damaged

  5. Visible light may directly induce nuclear DNA damage triggering the death pathway in RGC-5 cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bin; Ma, Tong-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Visible light has been previously demonstrated to induce retinal ganglion cell (RGC)-5 cell death through the mitochondrial pathway. The present study was designed to determine whether visible light might also directly trigger the death pathway by damaging nuclear DNA. Methods RGC-5 cells were exposed to various intensities and durations of visible light exposure. Cell viability and death were monitored with the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and propidium iodide staining. Nuclear DNA damage caused by light was determined with the plasmid assay, genome DNA assay, and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. The subsequent activation of nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) was measured with western blot, and PARP-1’s role in the death pathway was assessed by using specific inhibitors. Poly (ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) inhibitors were used to show their influence on light-induced cell death. Calcium influx was examined with the fura-2 assay and calcium channel blocker. Results We found that visible light induced RGC-5 cell death in a time- and intensity-dependent manner. After the light intensity was increased to 2,600 lx, activation of the death pathway in RGC-5 cells was clearly observed by detecting double-strand DNA breaks and nuclear DNA damage in vitro. Nuclear enzyme PARP-1 was promptly activated after exposure to 2,600 lx of light for 2 days, and specific inhibitors of PARP-1 had significant neuroprotective effects. The poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitor tannic acid and AIF inhibitor N-phenylmaleimide partially protected RGC-5 cells from light injury. A massive calcium influx was detected after 2 days of light exposure, and a calcium channel blocker partially protected cells against light injury. Conclusions These results suggest that visible light exposure may directly cause nuclear DNA damage, which consequently activates

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor released from engineered mesenchymal stem cells attenuates glutamate- and hydrogen peroxide-mediated death of staurosporine differentiated RGC-5 cells

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Matthew M.; Adamson, Laura; Blits, Bas; Bunge, Mary Bartlett; Grozdanic, Sinisa D.; Sakaguchi, Donald S.

    2009-01-01

    The pupose of this study was to determine the viability of cell-based delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) from genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for neuroprotection of RGC-5 cells. RGC-5 cells were differentiated with the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine (SS) and exposed to the cellular stressors glutamate or H2O2. As a neuroprotective strategy, these cells were then co-cultured across a membrane insert with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) engineered with a lentiviral vector for production of BDNF (BDNF-MSCs). As a positive control, recombinant human BDNF (rhBDNF) was added to stressed RGC-5 cells. After SS differentiation RGC-5s developed neuronal-like morphologies, and a significant increase in the proportion of RGC-5s immunoreactive for TuJ-1 and Brn3a was observed. Differentiated RGC-5s also had prominent TrkB staining, demonstrating expression of the high-affinity BDNF receptor. Treatment of SS differentiated RGC-5s with glutamate or H2O2, produced significant cell death (56.0 ± 7.02 and 48.90 ± 4.58% of control cells, respectively) compared to carrier-solution treated cells. BDNF-delivery from MSCs preserved more RGC-5 cells after treatment with glutamate (80.0 ± 5.40% cells remaining) than control GFP expressing MSCs (GFP-MSCs, 57.29 ± 1.89%, p < 0.01). BDNF-MSCs also protected more RGC-5s after treatment with H2O2 (65.6 ± 3.47%) than GFP-MSCs (46.0 ± 4.20%, p < 0.01). We have shown survival of differentiated RGC-5s is reduced by the cellular stressors glutamate and H2O2. Additionally, our results demonstrate that genetically modified BDNF-producing MSCs can enhance survival of stressed RGC-5 cells and therefore, may be effective vehicles to deliver BDNF to retinal ganglion cells affected by disease. PMID:19524566

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress promotes amyloid-beta peptides production in RGC-5 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingqian; Zhu, Yingting; Zhou, Jiayi; Wei, Yantao; Long, Chongde; Chen, Mengfei; Ling, Yunlan; Ge, Jian; Zhuo, Yehong

    2014-11-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. We have previously observed amyloid production in the retina of the Tg2576 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we used tunicamycin-induced ER stress in RGC-5 cells, a cell line identical to the photoreceptor cell line 661W, to investigate the effect of ER stress on production of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides. We found that the mRNA level of amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP) remained stable, while the protein level of amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP) was decreased, the amyloid-beta precursor protein cleaving enzymes beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 and presenilin 1 were upregulated, Abeta1-40 and Abeta1-42 production were increased, and reactive oxygen species production and apoptosis markers were elevated following induction of ER stress. The protein level of Abeta degradation enzymes, neprilysin, endothelin-converting enzyme 1, and endothelin-converting enzyme 2 remained unchanged during the prolonged ER stress, showing that the generation of Abeta did not result from reduction of proteolysis by these enzymes. Inclusion of group II caspase inhibitor, Z-DEVD-FMK, increased the ER stress mediated Abeta production, suggesting that they are generated by a caspase-independent mechanism. Our findings provided evidence of a role of ER stress in Abeta peptide overproduction and apoptotic pathway activation in RGC-5 cells.

  8. Early changes in staurosporine-induced differentiated RGC-5 cells indicate cellular injury response to nonlethal blue light exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Huang, Chen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Minshu

    2015-06-01

    Blue light has been previously demonstrated to induce injury of retinal cells. The cellular responses to nonlethal blue light exposure for each type of retinal cell are of particular interest but remain undetermined. Based on the doses of blue light reported in previous research to be nonlethal to retinal pigment epithelial cells, here we investigated whether and to what extent such doses of blue light are cytotoxic to staurosporine-differentiated RGC-5 cells. RGC-5 cells were differentiated for 24 hours using 200 nM staurosporine. The resulting cells were cultured and exposed to blue light at three different energy levels (1, 10, and 50 J cm(-2)). Cellular morphologies were investigated with an inverted microscope and cell viability was assessed with a Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated by H2DCFDA. After loading of MitoTracker Green FM dye, the mitochondrial contents were analyzed using flow cytometry. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities in the media were also measured. The level of lipid peroxidation was determined by measuring the amount of malondialdehyde (MDA). Treatment of the cells for 24 hours with 200 nM staurosporine successfully induced the differentiation of RGC-5 cells. No morphological changes were observed in the ssdRGC-5 cells exposed to blue light at 50 J cm(-2), which was the highest energy level tested. Exposure of the ssdRGC-5 cells to this energy level of blue light did, however, decrease their numbers by approximately 72.1% compared to the numbers of such cells found after being left in the dark. Remarkably, the levels of ROS generation and mitochondrial contents were, respectively, increased to 142% and 118% of those of the control by a 10 J cm(-2) exposure of blue light. The LDH activities and MDA levels exhibited no obvious changes in the blue light-exposed ssdRGC-5 cells compared to the control cells. In vitro nonlethal blue light exposure led to cellular

  9. Palmitic acid triggers cell apoptosis in RGC-5 retinal ganglion cells through the Akt/FoxO1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Panshi; Tang, Shu; Zhang, Haifeng; Guo, Yuanyuan; Zeng, Zhiwen; Wen, Qiang

    2017-04-01

    Hallmarks of the pathophysiology of glaucoma are oxidative stress and apoptotic death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Lipotoxicity, involving a series of pathological cellular responses after exposure to elevated levels of fatty acids, leads to oxidative stress and cell death in various cell types. The phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B/Forkhead box O1 (PI3K/Akt/FoxO1) pathway is crucial for cell survival and apoptosis. More importantly, FoxO1 gene has been reported to confer relatively higher risks for eye diseases including glaucoma. However, little information is available regarding the interaction between FoxO1 and RGC apoptosis, much less a precise mechanism. In the present study, immortalized rat retinal ganglion cell line 5 (RGC-5) was used as a model to study the toxicity of palmitic acid (PA), as well as underlying mechanisms. We found that PA exposure significantly decreased cell viability by enhancing apoptosis in RGC-5 cells, as measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometry. PA also induced a remarkable increase in reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde. Moreover, PA significantly decreased the level of phospho-Akt and phospho-FoxO1 in cells. Finally, shRNA knockdown and plasmid overexpression studies displayed that downregulation of Akt protein or upregulation of FoxO1 protein augmented cell death, while knockdown of FoxO1 or overexpression of Akt1 abolished PA-induced cell death. Collectively, our results indicated that PA-induced cell death is mediated through modulation of Akt/FoxO1 pathway activity.

  10. Rotenone-induced death of RGC-5 cells is caspase independent, involves the JNK and p38 pathways and is attenuated by specific green tea flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Kamalden, T A; Ji, D; Osborne, N N

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present studies was to characterise cell death following inhibition of mitochondrial complex I with rotenone in a transformed cell line (RGC-5 cells) and to examine the neuroprotective properties of the flavonoids genistein, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), epicatechin (EC) and baicalin. Rotenone-induced cell death of RGC-5 cells results in a generation of reactive oxygen species, a breakdown of DNA, the translocation of membrane phosphatidylserine, an up-regulation of haemoxygenase-1 and is unaffected by necrostatin-1 (inhibitor of necroptosis), z-VAD-fmk (pan caspase inhibitor) or NU1025 (PARP inhibitor) but attenuated with SP600125 (JNK inhibitor). Rotenone-induced toxicity of RGC-5 cells also caused an activation of mitogen-activated kinases indicated by an up-regulation and translocation into mitochondria of p-c-Jun, pJNK and pp38. Exposure of RGC-5 cells to rotenone does not affect apoptosis inducing factor or significantly stimulate caspase-3 activity. EGCG and EC both significantly blunt rotenone toxicity of RGC-5 cells at concentrations of 50 μM while genistein and baicalin were without effect. Significantly, genistein is approximately 20 times less efficacious than EGCG (IC(50) 2.5 μM) and EC (IC(50) 1.5 μM) at inhibiting sodium nitroprusside-induced lipid peroxidation. These studies show that rotenone toxicity of RGC-5 cells is neither necroptosis nor caspase-dependent apoptosis but involves the activation of mitogen-activated kinases and is inhibited by a JNK inhibitor, EGCG and EC. Genistein attenuates lipid peroxidation less efficaciously than EC and EGCG and does not affect rotenone toxicity of RGC-5 cells.

  11. Light- and sodium azide-induced death of RGC-5 cells in culture occurs via different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ji, Dan; Kamalden, Tengku A; del Olmo-Aguado, Susana; Osborne, Neville N

    2011-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that light impinging on the retina in situ has the capacity to kill neuronal and non-neuronal cells in vitro by interacting directly with mitochondrial constituents. A number of fluorophores are associated with mitochondria which can potentially absorb different wave-lengths of light, including cytochrome oxidase. The aim of the present study was to compare the death mechanism of a light insult to RGC-5 cells in culture with that of sodium azide. Sodium azide's main toxic action is in inhibiting the function of cytochrome oxidase in the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Our studies showed that light and sodium azide kill RGC-5 cells via different mechanisms although some similarities do occur. Both inducers of cell death caused the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the expression of phosphatidylserine, the breakdown of DNA and the activation of p38 MAPK, resulting in its translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. However, light-induced cell death occurs via necroptosis, in that it was inhibited by necrostatin-1 and was caspase-independent. This was not the case for sodium azide, where the death process was caspase-dependent, occurred via apoptosis and was unaffected by necrostatin-1. Moreover, light caused an activation of the apoptosis inducing factor (AIF), c-Jun, JNK and HO-1, but it did not affect alpha fodrin or caspase-3. In contrast, sodium azide caused the activation of alpha fodrin and the stimulation of caspase-3 content without influencing AIF, c-Jun, JNK or HO-1. Therefore we conclude that light does not have a specific action on cytochrome oxidase in mitochondria to cause cell death.

  12. Expression of Novel Opsins and Intrinsic Light Responses in the Mammalian Retinal Ganglion Cell Line RGC-5. Presence of OPN5 in the Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Paula S.; Valdez, Diego J.; Acosta-Rodríguez, Victoria A.; Guido, Mario E.

    2011-01-01

    The vertebrate retina is known to contain three classes of photoreceptor cells: cones and rods responsible for vision, and intrinsically photoresponsive retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) involved in diverse non-visual functions such as photic entrainment of daily rhythms and pupillary light responses. In this paper we investigated the potential intrinsic photoresponsiveness of the rat RGC line, RGC-5, by testing for the presence of visual and non-visual opsins and assessing expression of the immediate-early gene protein c-Fos and changes in intracellular Ca2+mobilization in response to brief light pulses. Cultured RGC-5 cells express a number of photopigment mRNAs such as retinal G protein coupled receptor (RGR), encephalopsin/panopsin (Opn3), neuropsin (Opn5) and cone opsin (Opn1mw) but not melanopsin (Opn4) or rhodopsin. Opn5 immunoreactivity was observed in RGC-5 cells and in the inner retina of rat, mainly localized in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). Furthermore, white light pulses of different intensities and durations elicited changes both in intracellular Ca2+ levels and in the induction of c-Fos protein in RGC-5 cell cultures. The results demonstrate that RGC-5 cells expressing diverse putative functional photopigments display intrinsic photosensitivity which accounts for the photic induction of c-Fos protein and changes in intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. The presence of Opn5 in the GCL of the rat retina suggests the existence of a novel type of photoreceptor cell. PMID:22022612

  13. The D1 dopamine receptor agonist, SKF83959, attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced injury in RGC-5 cells involving the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/p38 pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang-Yu; Li, Ting; Fan, Bin; Zheng, Yong-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Oxidative stress is widely implicated in the death of retinal ganglion cells associated with various optic neuropathies. Agonists of the dopamine D1 receptor have recently been found to be potentially neuroprotective against oxidative stress–induced injury. The goal of this study was to investigate whether SKF83959, a next-generation high-affinity D1 receptor agonist, could protect retinal ganglion cell 5 (RGC-5) cells from H2O2-induced damage and the molecular mechanism involved. Methods We examined expression of the D1 receptor in RGC-5 cells with reverse-transcription–PCR and immunoblotting and assessed neuroprotection using propidium iodide staining and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. In addition, we monitored the activation and involvement of members of mitogen-activated protein kinase family, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, with western blot and specific inhibitors. Results We found that the D1 receptor was expressed in RGC-5 cells, but the sequence analysis suggested this cell line is from mouse and not rat origin. SKF83959 exhibited a remarkable neuroprotective effect on H2O2-damaged RGC-5 cells, which was blocked by the specific D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390. ERK and p38 were activated by SKF83959, and pretreatment with their inhibitors U0126 and SB203580, respectively, significantly blunted the SKF83959-induced cytoprotection. However, the specific c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase inhibitor, SP600125, had no effect on the SKF83959-induced protection. Conclusions We conclude that SKF83959 attenuates hydrogen peroxide–induced injury in RGC-5 cells via a mechanism involving activation of the ERK and p38 pathways and the D1 receptor is a potential molecular target for developing neuroprotective drugs. PMID:23233790

  14. Long-term blue light exposure induces RGC-5 cell death in vitro: involvement of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, oxidative stress, and MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen; Zhang, Pei; Wang, Wei; Xu, Yongsheng; Wang, Minshu; Chen, Xiaoyong; Dong, Xuran

    2014-06-01

    The mechanism of blue light-induced retinal ganglion cell (RGC) injury is poorly understood. In this study, we established a patented light-emitting diode-based system to study the effects of long-term blue light exposure under culture conditions on RGC-5 cells. Long-term blue light exposure significantly reduced cell viability in a time-dependent manner and induced apoptosis and necrosis in RGC-5 cells. Long-term blue light exposure marked an increase in the expression of Bax and active Caspase-3 (p17), which was accompanied by Bcl-2 down-regulation, and displayed features of the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. Blue light exposure also increased the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and was a strong inducer of ROS-sensitive protein nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. Moreover, blue light exposure constitutively activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), as well as induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase in the early phase, in blue light-exposed RGC-5 cells. The protein expression of c-jun and c-fos was further enhanced after RGC-5 cells were exposed to blue light. Taken together, these findings indicated that blue light induced RGC-5 cell line death in dependence upon exposure duration. The potential mechanisms for this phenomenon might be via activated mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, increased ROS production and protein expressions of Nrf2 and HO-1, and activated JNK/p38 MAPK signaling pathways.

  15. High-mobility group box 1 protein is implicated in advanced glycation end products-induced vascular endothelial growth factor A production in the rat retinal ganglion cell line RGC-5.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Jer; Hsiao, Chang-Chun; Yang, I-Hui; Chou, Ming-Huei; Wu, Chia-Lin; Wei, Yin-Chu; Chen, Chih-Hsin; Chuang, Jiin-Haur

    2012-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) has been reported to be a potent proangiogenic factor induced by inflammatory stress. In this study, we explore the role of HMGB1 in advanced glycation end products (AGEs)-induced vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) production in rat retinal ganglion cell line 5 (RGC-5) cells. The VEGF-A protein and mRNA levels in conditioned medium of RGC-5 cells incubated with AGE-modified BSA (AGE-BSA) were examined with real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and BSA-treated cells were used as controls. The expression of HMGB1, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) was assessed with immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) were detected with flow cytometry measurements of peroxide-dependent oxidation of 2'-7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), glycyrrhizin (GZ), and SP600125 were used to block ROS, HMGB1, and JNK, respectively. Compared with the BSA controls, the RGC-5 cells incubated with AGE-BSA showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in VEGF-A mRNA and VEGF-A protein secretion in the supernatant, with the highest levels achieved at 24 h. AGE-BSA stimulated a significant release of HMGB1 in the supernatant and a significant increase of intracellular ROS production at 3 h. NAC blocked HMGB1 production in a dose-dependent manner. Blocking with GZ, NAC, and JNK significantly suppressed AGE-induced VEGF-A production. HMGB1 is implicated in the production of VEGF-A in retinal ganglion cell line-5 (RGC-5). Blocking HMGB1, ROS, or the JNK pathway may attenuate VEGF-A production, suggesting HMGB1 and related signaling molecules play a role in diabetic retinopathy.

  16. Crude Saponins of Panax notoginseng Have Neuroprotective Effects To Inhibit Palmitate-Triggered Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Associated Apoptosis and Loss of Postsynaptic Proteins in Staurosporine Differentiated RGC-5 Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan-dan; Zhu, Hua-zhang; Li, Shi-wei; Yang, Jia-ming; Xiao, Yang; Kang, Qiang-rong; Li, Chen-yang; Zhao, Yun-shi; Zeng, Yong; Li, Yan; Zhang, Jian; He, Zhen-dan; Ying, Ying

    2016-02-24

    Increased apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) contributes to the gradual loss of retinal neurons at the early phase of diabetic retinopathy (DR). There is an urgent need to search for drugs with neuroprotective effects against apoptosis of RGCs for the early treatment of DR. This study aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of saponins extracted from Panax notoginseng, a traditional Chinese medicine, on apoptosis of RGCs stimulated by palmitate, a metabolic factor for the development of diabetes and its complications, and to explore the potential molecular mechanism. We showed that crude saponins of P. notoginseng (CSPN) inhibited the increased apoptosis and loss of postsynaptic protein PSD-95 by palmitate in staurosporine-differentiated RGC-5 cells. Moreover, CSPN suppressed palmitate-induced reactive oxygen species generation and endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP and caspase 12 pathways. Thus, our findings address the potential therapeutic significance of CSPN for the early stage of DR.

  17. Imipramine protects retinal ganglion cells from oxidative stress through the tyrosine kinase receptor B signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ming-lei; Liu, Guo-hua; Guo, Jin; Yu, Shu-juan; Huang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration is irreversible in glaucoma and tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB)-associated signaling pathways have been implicated in the process. In this study, we attempted to examine whether imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant, may protect hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced RGC degeneration through the activation of the TrkB pathway in RGC-5 cell lines. RGC-5 cell lines were pre-treated with imipramine 30 minutes before exposure to H2O2. Western blot assay showed that in H2O2 -damaged RGC-5 cells, imipramine activated TrkB pathways through extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase/TrkB phosphorylation. TUNEL staining assay also demonstrated that imipramine ameliorated H2O2 -induced apoptosis in RGC-5 cells. Finally, TrkB-IgG intervention was able to reverse the protective effect of imipramine on H2O2 -induced RGC-5 apoptosis. Imipramine therefore protects RGCs from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through the TrkB signaling pathway. PMID:27127489

  18. Nerve growth factor protects against palmitic acid-induced injury in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Pan-shi; Tang, Shu; Zhang, Hai-feng; Guo, Yuan-yuan; Zeng, Zhi-wen; Wen, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports an important role for nerve growth factor (NGF) in diabetic retinopathy. We hypothesized that NGF has a protective effect on rat retinal ganglion RGC-5 cells injured by palmitic acid (PA), a metabolic factor implicated in the development of diabetes and its complications. Our results show that PA exposure caused apoptosis of RGC-5 cells, while NGF protected against PA insult in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, NGF significantly attenuated the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in RGC-5 cells. Pathway inhibitor tests showed that the protective effect of NGF was completely reversed by LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor), Akt VIII inhibitor, and PD98059 (ERK1/2 inhibitor). Western blot analysis revealed that NGF induced the phosphorylation of Akt/FoxO1 and ERK1/2 and reversed the PA-evoked reduction in the levels of these proteins. These results indicate that NGF protects RGC-5 cells against PA-induced injury through anti-oxidation and inhibition of apoptosis by modulation of the PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. PMID:28123432

  19. Oligomeric proanthocyanidin protects retinal ganglion cells against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Chanjuan; Lu, Dan; Shu, Xiaoming; Zhu, Lihong; Qi, Renbing; So, Kwok-Fai; Lu, Daxiang; Xu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The death of retinal ganglion cells is a hallmark of many optic neurodegenerative diseases such as glaucoma and retinopathy. Oxidative stress is one of the major reasons to cause the cell death. Oligomeric proanthocyanidin has many health beneficial effects including antioxidative and neuroprotective actions. Here we tested whether oligomeric proanthocyanidin may protect retinal ganglion cells against oxidative stress induced-apoptosis in vitro. Retinal ganglion cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide with or without oligomeric proanthocyanidin. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay showed that treating retinal ganglion cell line RGC-5 cells with 20 μmol/L oligomeric proanthocyanidin significantly decreased the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced death. Results of flow cytometry and Hoechst staining demonstrated that the death of RGC-5 cells was mainly caused by cell apoptosis. We further found that expression of pro-apoptotic Bax and caspase-3 were significantly decreased while anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 was greatly increased in H2O2 damaged RGC-5 cells with oligomeric proanthocyanidin by western blot assay. Furthermore, in retinal explant culture, the number of surviving retinal ganglion cells in H2O2-damaged retinal ganglion cells with oligomeric proanthocyanidin was significantly increased. Our studies thus demonstrate that oligomeric proanthocyanidin can protect oxidative stress-injured retinal ganglion cells by inhibiting apoptotic process. PMID:25206541

  20. Overexpression of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Mesenchymal Stem Cells Augments Their Protection on Retinal Cells In Vitro and Attenuates Retinal Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury In Vivo against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Du, GaiPing; Wang, DaJiang; Zhou, Jin; Jiang, Guomin

    2017-01-01

    Retinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, involving several ocular diseases, seriously threatens human ocular health, mainly treated by attenuating I/R-induced oxidative stress. Currently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could restore I/R-injured retina through paracrine secretion. Additionally, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) could ameliorate oxidative stress and thus retinal apoptosis, but the expression of HO-1 in MSC is limited. Here, we hypothesized that overexpression of HO-1 in MSC (MSC-HO-1) may significantly improve their retina-protective potentials. The overexpression of HO-1 in MSC was achieved by lentivirus transduction. Then, MSC or MSC-HO-1 was cocultured with retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5) in H2O2-simulated oxidative condition and their protection on RGC-5 was systemically valuated in vitro. Compared with MSC, MSC-HO-1 significantly attenuated H2O2-induced injury of RGC-5, including decrease in cellular ROS level and apoptosis, activation of antiapoptotic proteins p-Akt and Bcl-2, and blockage of proapoptotic proteins cleaved caspase 3 and Bax. In retinal I/R rats model, compared with control MSC, MSC-HO-1-treated retina significantly retrieved its structural thickness, reduced cell apoptosis, markedly attenuated retinal oxidative stress level, and largely regained the activities of typical antioxidant enzymes, SOD and CAT. Therefore, it could be concluded that overexpression of HO-1 provides a promising strategy to enhance the MSC-based therapy for I/R-related retinal injury. PMID:28255307

  1. Inhibition on Apoptosis Induced by Elevated Hydrostatic Pressure in Retinal Ganglion Cell-5 via Laminin Upregulating β1-integrin/Focal Adhesion Kinase/Protein Kinase B Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Chen, Yan-Ming; Sun, Ming-Ming; Guo, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Ya-Chen; Zhang, Zhong-Zhi

    2016-04-20

    Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy characterized by degeneration of neurons due to loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). High intraocular pressure (HIOP), the main risk factor, causes the optic nerve damage. However, the precise mechanism of HIOP-induced RGC death is not yet completely understood. This study was conducted to determine apoptosis of RGC-5 cells induced by elevated hydrostatic pressures, explore whether laminin is associated with apoptosis under pressure, whether laminin can protect RGCs from apoptosis and affirm the mechanism that regulates the process of RGCs survival. RGC-5 cells were exposed to 0, 20, 40, and 60 mmHg in a pressurized incubator for 6, 12, and 24 h, respectively. The effect of elevated hydrostatic pressure on RGC-5 cells was measured by Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and Western blotting of cleaved caspase-3 protein. Location and expression of laminin were detected by immunofluorescence. The expression of β1-integrin, phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and protein kinase B (PKB, or AKT) were investigated with real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analysis. Elevated hydrostatic pressure induced apoptosis in cultured RGC-5 cells. Pressure with 40 mmHg for 24 h induced a maximum apoptosis. Laminin was declined in RGC-5 cells after exposing to 40 mmHg for 24 h. After pretreating with laminin, RGC-5 cells survived from elevated pressure. Furthermore, β1-integrin and phosphorylation of FAK and AKT were increased compared to 40 mmHg group. The data show apoptosis tendency of RGC-5 cells with elevated hydrostatic pressure. Laminin can protect RGC-5 cells against high pressure via β1-integrin/FAK/AKT signaling pathway. These results suggest that the decreased laminin of RGC-5 cells might be responsible for apoptosis induced by elevated hydrostatic pressure, and laminin or activating β1-integrin

  2. Edible wild vegetable, Gymnaster koraiensis protects retinal ganglion cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-A; Kang, Kui Dong; Lee, Eun Ha; Nho, Chu Won; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2011-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether Gymnaster koraiensis is effective at blunting the negative influence of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on the retinas of rats and on oxidative stress induced cell death in transformed retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5). The ethyl acetate fraction of G. koraiensis (EAGK) and the isolated compound, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (3,5-DCQA), were shown to significantly attenuate the negative effect of H(2)O(2) on the RGC-5 cells tested by various procedures. The inclusion of EAGK or 3,5-DCQA in the culture reduced the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and replenished the reduced glutathione levels caused by various radical species such as H(2)O(2,) O(2)()(-) or ()OH. Moreover, EAGK or 3,5-DCQA inhibited lipid peroxidation caused by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in rat brain homogenates. From in vivo experiments, the presence of NMDA in the retina affected the thickness of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) in positive ganglion cells. EAGK or 3,5-DCQA protected the thinning of the IPL and increased TUNEL positive cells in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). Our results clearly demonstrate the neuroprotective effect of EAGK both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, 3,5-DCQA is suggested to be the active compound of EAGK. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. RTP801 immunoreactivity in retinal ganglion cells and its down-regulation in cultured cells protect them from light and cobalt chloride.

    PubMed

    del Olmo-Aguado, Susana; Núñez-Álvarez, Claudia; Ji, Dan; Manso, Alberto García; Osborne, Neville N

    2013-09-01

    RTP801, a stress-related protein, is activated by adverse environmental conditions and inhibits the activity of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in promoting oxidative stress-dependent cell death. RTP801 exists both in the mammalian retina and the lens of the eye. Here, we observed RTP801 immunoreactivity in some retinal ganglion cells. Intravitreal injection of cobalt chloride (CoCl2) to mimick hypoxia influenced retinal GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) levels, but did not affect RTP801 immunoreactivity or mRNA content relative to GAPDH. However, RTP801 mRNA was elevated when compared with Brn3a mRNA, suggesting that RTP801 is activated in stressed Brn3a retinal ganglion cells. In cultures of RGC-5 cells, RTP801 immunoreactivity was located in the cytoplasm and partly present in the mitochondria. An insult of blue light or CoCl2 increased RTP801 expression, which was accompanied by cell death. However, in cultures where RTP801 mRNA was down-regulated, the negative influence of blue light and CoCl2 was blunted. Rapamycin nullified the CoCl2-induced up-regulation of RTP801 and attenuated cell death. Moreover, rapamycin was non-toxic to RGC-5 cells, even at a high concentration (10μM). The protective effect of rapamycin on RGC-5 cells caused by the inhibition of RTP801 suggests that rapamycin might attenuate retinal ganglion cell death in situ, as in glaucoma.

  4. Protective action of nipradilol mediated through S-nitrosylation of Keap1 and HO-1 induction in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Koriyama, Yoshiki; Kamiya, Marie; Takadera, Tsuneo; Arai, Kunizo; Sugitani, Kayo; Ogai, Kazuhiro; Kato, Satoru

    2012-12-01

    Nipradilol (Nip), which has α1- and β-adrenoceptor antagonist and nitric oxide (NO)-donating properties, has clinically been used as an anti-glaucomatous agent in Japan. NO mediates cellular signaling pathways that regulate physiological functions. The major signaling mechanisms mediated by NO are cGMP-dependent signaling and protein S-nitrosylation-dependent signalings. Nip has been described as having neuroprotective effects through cGMP-dependent pathway in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). However, the effect seems to be partial. On the other hand, whether Nip can prevent cell death through S-nitrosylation is not yet clarified. In this study, we therefore focused on the neuroprotective mechanism of Nip through S-nitrosylation. Nip showed a dramatic neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress-induced death of RGC-5 cells. However, denitro-nipradilol, which does not have NO-donating properties, was not protective against oxidative stress. Furthermore, an NO scavenger significantly reversed the protective action of Nip against oxidative stress. In addition, we demonstrated that α1- or β-adrenoceptor antagonists (prazosin or timolol) did not show any neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress in RGC-5 cells. We also demonstrated that Nip induced the expression of the NO-dependent antioxidant enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). S-nitrosylation of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein by Nip was shown to contribute to the translocation of NF-E2-related factor 2 to the nucleus, and triggered transcriptional activation of HO-1. Furthermore, RGC death and levels of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE) were increased after optic nerve injury in vivo. Pretreatment with Nip significantly suppressed RGC death and accumulation of 4HNE after injury through an HO-1 activity-dependent mechanism. These data demonstrate a novel neuroprotective action of Nip against oxidative stress-induced RGC death in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Effect of Heat Shock Protein 72 Expression on Etoposide-induced Cell Death of Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Seongsoo; Im, Ji-Eun; Kim, Tae Eun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether the expression of heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72) protects rat retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5) from apoptotic cell death. Methods Hsp72 expression in RGC-5 cells transduced with replication-deficient recombinant adenovirus was analyzed by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. The effect of Hsp72 expression on etoposide-induced apoptotic cell death was examined by microscopic analysis and confirmed by cell proliferation assay. Results Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence clearly showed adenovirus-mediated Hsp72 expression in RGC-5 cells. Treatment with etoposide resulted in the death of a proportion of the cells by apoptosis. However, this apoptotic cell death was significantly reduced in cells expressing Hsp72, with the reduction in cell death correlating to the level of Hsp72 expression. Conclusions Over-expression of Hsp72 alone is sufficient to rescue neuronal cells from apoptotic cell death, suggesting that fine-tuning its expression may be an effective neuroprotective approach in retinal degenerative disease. PMID:23372380

  6. Protective effects of fluoroquinolones on UV-induced damage of cultured ocular cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Takashi; Kuse, Yoshiki; Mochizuki, Kiyofumi; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-07-05

    Although the fluoroquinolones have strong antibacterial effects, some of them also have adverse ocular effects such as diplopia, uveitis, optic neuropathy, and retinal detachment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether low concentrations of fluoroquinolones can lessen the cytotoxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light on different kinds of cultured ocular cells. We studied cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs), a retinal ganglion cell line (RGC-5), a mouse-derived photoreceptor cell line (661W), a human adult retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19), primary retinal cells, and primary human RPE cells. Levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and clinafloxacin were selected as the fluoroquinolones to test. The viabilities of the 661W, ARPE-19, and hRPE cells were assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8, and that of HCECs, 661W cells, and ARPE-19 cells by double fluorescent staining with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide (PI). Damage of retinal primary culture cells was assessed by immunostaining. Intracellular production of reactive oxygen species was measured in ARPE-19 cells by CM-H2DCFDA after UV light exposure. An activation of caspase by UV light in ARPE-19 cells was detected with a caspase-3/7 assay kit. UV exposure increased the number of dead cells, and the three fluoroquinolones tested suppressed this increase. Fluoroquinolones also protected the cells against the hydroxyperoxide (H2O2)-induced cell damage. Moreover, the fluoroquinolones decreased the production of reactive oxygen species and the activity of caspase-3/7, and low concentrations of fluoroquinolones reduced the oxidative stress in cultured ocular cell lines. We conclude that fluoroquinolones may have protective effects in these cells against UV exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells attenuate hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress and enhance neuroprotective effects in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yi; Xu, Nuo; Xu, Wei; Xu, Guoxing

    2017-04-01

    The apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells leads to visual impairment and blindness in ocular neurodegenerative diseases, especially in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Mounting evidence suggests that oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of DR. In the present study, we investigated whether bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have protective ability to relieve hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced injury on retinal ganglion cells in vitro. An immortalized retinal ganglion cells, RGC-5 cells, were exposed to an indicated concentration of H2O2 for 24 h. Cell viability was analyzed by CCK-8 assay to find out a certain concentration to build H2O2 oxidative damage model. Morphological changes in RGC-5 cells were observed under optical microscope, and cell apoptosis was detected with Hoechst fluorescence staining. Then, BMSCs were co-cultured with RGC-5 cells in a transwell culture system for 24 h and 48 h. Flow cytometry was performed to qualify the apoptosis rate of RGC-5 cells. Conditioned medium was collected for evaluation the inflammatory cytokines by ELISA. The content of intracellular malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was assayed by thiobarbituric acid and xanthine oxidase method, respectively. qRT-PCR and ELISA were conducted for analysis of the expression changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), respectively. After H2O2 exposure, the morphological varieties were observed as cytoplasm shrinking and paramorphia together with nuclear gathering. Meanwhile, the apoptotic cells had hyperfluorescence with Hoechst 33258 staining. Co-culture with BMSCs significantly inhibited retinal cell death. It was found that BMSCs reduced H2O2-induced inflammatory factors IL-1β and TNF-α, down-regulated intracellular oxidant factor MDA, up-regulated intracellular antioxidant factor SOD, and increased neurotrophins BDNF and CNTF expression. BMSCs may enhance protective effect of RGC-5 cells in H2O2-induced

  8. Ginsenoside Rb1 protects rat retinal ganglion cells against hypoxia and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaochun; Chen, Juying; Huang, Wendong; Zeng, Zhi; Yang, Yongfei; Zhu, Banghao

    2013-11-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the effect of ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1) on apoptosis induced by hypoxia and oxidative stress in a retinal ganglion cell line (RGC-5). The underlying mechanism was also investigated. RGC-5 cells were pretreated with 10 µmol/l Rb1 for 24 h and exposed to 400 µmol/l cobalt chloride (CoCl2) for 48 h or 600 µmol/l H2O2 for 24 h. The percentage of cells actively undergoing apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry with Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining. The expression of caspases was determined using western blot analysis. CoCl2 and H2O2 treatments significantly increased the apoptotic percentages to 24.5 and 21.63%, respectively. Pretreatment of Rb1 reduced the total apoptotic percentages to 15.12 and 12.03%, respectively. The expression of cleaved caspase-3, -9 and -8 was increased in the CoCl2-treated group, however, caspase-3 was not increased in the H2O2-treated group. Pretreatment of Rb1 reduced the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and -9 in the CoCl2-treated group, but reduced only cleaved caspase-9 in the H2O2-treated group. These results suggest that Rb1 may prevent RGC-5 cells from apoptosis against hypoxia and oxidative stress via the mitochondrial pathway.

  9. Nuclear translocation and overexpression of GAPDH by the hyper-pressure in retinal ganglion cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Choong-Il; Lee, Sung-Ho; Seong, Gong-Je; Kim, Yeon-Hyang; Lee, Mi-Young . E-mail: miyoung@sch.ac.kr

    2006-03-24

    To investigate the effect of hyper-pressure on retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5), RGC-5 cells were exposed to an ambient hydrostatic pressure of 100 mm Hg. Upon treatment, the proliferation of RGC-5 cells was inhibited and neuronal apoptosis was detected by specific apoptosis marker TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling). To probe into the mechanism mediating the apoptosis of RGC-5 cells in 100 mm Hg, protein profile alterations following hyper-pressure treatment were examined using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by MALDI-TOF. Out of the 400 protein spots of RGC-5 cells detected on 2-DE gels, 37 differentially expressed protein spots were further identified using in gel tryptic digestion and mass spectrometry. Among these proteins, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was significantly expressed 10 times more in 100 mm Hg than in normal pressure. The accumulation of GAPDH in the nucleus and its translocation from the cytosol to the nucleus in 100 mm Hg were observed using a microscope. These results suggest that the hyper-pressure-induced apoptosis in RGC-5 cells may be involved with not only the increase of GAPDH expression, but also the accumulation and the translocalization of GAPDH to the nucleus.

  10. Sickle cell protection from malaria

    PubMed Central

    Eridani, Sandro

    2011-01-01

    A linkage between presence of Sickle Haemoglobin (HbS) and protection from malaria infection and clinical manifestations in certain areas was suspected from early observations and progressively elucidated by more recent studies. Research has confirmed the abovementioned connection, but also clarified how such protection may be abolished by coexistence of sickle cell trait (HbS trait) and alpha thalassemia, which may explain the relatively low incidence of HbS trait in the Mediterranean. The mechanisms of such protective effect are now being investigated: factors of genetic, molecular and immunological nature are prominent. As for genetic factors attention is given to the role of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane complement regulatory proteins as polymorphisms of these components seem to be associated with resistance to severe malaria; genetic ligands like the Duffy group blood antigen, necessary for erythrocytic invasion, and human protein CD36, a major receptor for P. falciparum-infected RBC's, are also under scrutiny: attention is focused also on plasmodium erythrocyte-binding antigens, which bind to RBC surface components. Genome-wide linkage and association studies are now carried out too, in order to identify genes associated with malaria resistance. Only a minor role is attributed to intravascular sickling, phagocytosis and haemolysis, while specific molecular mechanisms are the object of intensive research: among these a decisive role is played by a biochemical sequence, involving activation of haeme oxygenase (HMO-1), whose effect appears mediated by carbon monoxide (CO). A central role in protection from malaria is also played by immunological factors, which may stimulate antibody production to plasmodium antigens in the early years of life; the role of agents like pathogenic CD8 T-cells has been suggested while the effects of molecular actions on the immunity mechanism are presently investigated. It thus appears that protection from malaria can be

  11. Effect of ATF3-deletion on apoptosis of cultured retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ming-Ming; Wang, Ya-Chen; Li, Yi; Guo, Xiao-Dan; Chen, Yan-Ming; Zhang, Zhong-Zhi

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effect of activating transcription factor-3 (ATF3)-deletion on apoptosis of cultured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). METHODS Three ATF3 siRNA (ATF3-rat-651, ATF3-rat-319, ATF3-rat-520) were constructed, and were transiently transfected into RGC-5 cells. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to examine ATF3 expression and the most effective ATF3 siRNA was selected for further studies. Flow cytometry was applied to investigate the effects of ATF3 deletion on RGC-5 apoptosis under elevated hydrostatic pressure. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot were performed to validate differentially expressed genes and proteins in ATF3-knockdown RGC-5 cells. RESULTS ATF3 specific siRNA effectively down-regulated ATF3 expression and significantly inhibited cell apoptosis in RGC-5 cells. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot confirmed that ATF3 knockdown remarkably decreased Jun-B and increased c-Jun at both mRNA and protein levels in RGC-5 cells. CONCLUSION ATF/cAMP-response element-binding family of transcription factors may be involved in the development of glaucoma and could be novel treatment targets for glaucoma. PMID:28546922

  12. Protective effects of the compounds isolated from the seed of Psoralea corylifolia on oxidative stress-induced retinal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung-A; Shim, Sang Hee; Ahn, Hong Ryul; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2013-06-01

    The mechanism underlying glaucoma remains controversial, but apoptosis caused by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to play a role in its pathogenesis. We investigated the effects of compounds isolated from Psoralea corylifolia on oxidative stress-induced cell death in vitro and in vivo. Transformed retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5) were treated with L-buthione-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) and glutamate in the presence or with pre-treatment with compound 6, bakuchiol isolated from P. corylifolia. We observed reduced cell death in cells pre-treated with bakuchiol. Moreover, bakuchiol inhibited the oxidative stress-induced decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, ΔΨm). Furthermore, while intracellular Ca{sup 2+} was high in RGC-5 cells after exposure to oxidative stress, bakuchiol reduced these levels. In an in vivo study, in which rat retinal damage was induced by intravitreal injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), bakuchiol markedly reduced translocation of AIF and release of cytochrome c, and inhibited up-regulation of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9, and cleaved PARP. The survival rate of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) 7 days after optic nerve crush (ONC) in mice was significantly decreased; however, bakuchiol attenuated the loss of RGCs. Moreover, bakuchiol attenuated ONC-induced up-regulation of apoptotic proteins, including cleaved PARP, cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved caspase-9. Bakuchiol also significantly inhibited translocation of mitochondrial AIF into the nuclear fraction and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into the cytosol. These results demonstrate that bakuchiol isolated from P. corylifolia has protective effects against oxidative stress-induced retinal damage, and may be considered as an agent for treating or preventing retinal degeneration. - Highlights: • Psoralea corylifolia have neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. • Bakuchiol attenuated the increase of apoptotic proteins induced by oxidative

  13. Safety testing of blue vital dyes using cell culture models.

    PubMed

    Giansanti, Fabrizio; Schiavone, Nicola; Papucci, Laura; Bitossi, Alice; Andreucci, Elena; Pontenani, Federica; Cutrì, Marco; Menchini, Ugo

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the safety of trypan blue, brilliant blue G (BBG), Evans blue (EB), patent blue, Chicago blue (CB), and bromophenol blue (BB), with and without halogen and xenon light exposure. All dyes were diluted in a balanced saline solution at a concentration of 0.5%. Cells of the human RPE line ARPE-19 and rat RGC5 were exposed to vital dyes for 5 min. Experiments with and without xenon or halogen illumination were performed. The viability of ARPE-19 and RGC5 cells was determined at 12, 24, or 120 h by a cell proliferation assay using WST-1 reagent. The apoptotic events as well as cell numbers were registered for 72 h and counted by time-lapse videomicroscopy. There was no evidence of ARPE-19 or RGC5 toxicity, immediate (0 and 24 h) or delayed (120 h), following exclusive exposure to each single dye. After halogen light exposure, ARPE-19 cell lines did not show any significant toxicity, except for when they were exposed to EB. After xenon illumination, ARPE-19 cells showed a marked decrease in cell viability when exposed to EB or CB and a moderate decrease when exposed to BBG and BB. After xenon illumination, RGC5 cells showed the highest decrease in cell viability when exposed to EB and CB; BB caused the same decrease in cell viability as in ARPE-19 cells. Interaction of light from endo-illumination source and blue vital dyes may increase the risk of retinal toxicity.

  14. Hot electron plasmon-protected solar cell.

    PubMed

    Kong, J; Rose, A H; Yang, C; Wu, X; Merlo, J M; Burns, M J; Naughton, M J; Kempa, K

    2015-09-21

    A solar cell based on a hot electron plasmon protection effect is proposed and made plausible by simulations, non-local modeling of the response, and quantum mechanical calculations. In this cell, a thin-film, plasmonic metamaterial structure acts as both an efficient photon absorber in the visible frequency range and a plasmonic resonator in the IR range, the latter of which absorbs and protects against phonon emission the free energy of the hot electrons in an adjacent semiconductor junction. We show that in this structure, electron-plasmon scattering is much more efficient than electron-phonon scattering in cooling-off hot electrons, and the plasmon-stored energy is recoverable as an additional cell voltage. The proposed structure could become a prototype of a new generation of high efficiency solar cells.

  15. Specifying and protecting germ cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Strome, Susan; Updike, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Germ cells are the special cells in the body that undergo meiosis to generate gametes and subsequently entire new organisms after fertilization, a process that continues generation after generation. Recent studies have expanded our understanding of the factors and mechanisms that specify germ cell fate, including the partitioning of maternally supplied ‘germ plasm’, inheritance of epigenetic memory and expression of transcription factors crucial for primordial germ cell (PGC) development. Even after PGCs are specified, germline fate is labile and thus requires protective mechanisms, such as global transcriptional repression, chromatin state alteration and translation of only germline-appropriate transcripts. Findings from diverse species continue to provide insights into the shared and divergent needs of these special reproductive cells. PMID:26122616

  16. Autotaxin protects microglial cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Awada, Rana; Rondeau, Philippe; Grès, Sandra; Saulnier-Blache, Jean Sébastien; Lefebvre d'Hellencourt, Christian; Bourdon, Emmanuel

    2012-01-15

    Oxidative stress occurs when antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed by oxygen-reactive species and can lead to cellular damage, as seen in several neurodegenerative disorders. Microglia are specialized cells in the central nervous system that act as the first and main form of active immune defense in the response to pathological events. Autotaxin (ATX) plays an important role in the modulation of critical cellular functions, through its enzymatic production of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). In this study, we investigated the potential role of ATX in the response of microglial cells to oxidative stress. We show that treatment of a microglial BV2 cell line with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) stimulates ATX expression and LPA production. Stable overexpression of ATX inhibits microglial activation (CD11b expression) and protects against H(2)O(2)-treatment-induced cellular damage. This protective effect of ATX was partially reduced in the presence of the LPA-receptor antagonist Ki16425. ATX overexpression was also associated with a reduction in intracellular ROS formation, carbonylated protein accumulation, proteasomal activity, and catalase expression. Our results suggest that up-regulation of ATX expression in microglia could be a mechanism for protection against oxidative stress, thereby reducing inflammation in the nervous system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Persimmon Leaves (Diospyros kaki) Extract Protects Optic Nerve Crush-Induced Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ryul Ahn, Hong; Kim, Kyung-A; Kang, Suk Woo; Lee, Joo Young; Kim, Tae-Jin; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2017-04-20

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death is part of many retinal diseases. Here, we report that the ethanol extract of Diospyros kaki (EEDK) exhibits protective properties against retinal degeneration, both in vitro and in vivo. Upon exposure to cytotoxic compounds, RGC-5 cells showed approximately 40% cell viability versus the control, while pre-treatment with EEDK markedly increased cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. Further studies revealed that cell survival induced by EEDK was associated with decreased levels of apoptotic proteins, such as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, p53, and cleaved caspase-3. In addition to apoptotic pathways, we demonstrated that expression levels of antioxidant-associated proteins, such as superoxide dismutase-1, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase-1, were positively modulated by EEDK. In a partial optic nerve crush mouse model, EEDK had similar ameliorating effects on retinal degeneration resulting from mechanical damages. Therefore, our results suggest that EEDK may have therapeutic potential against retinal degenerative disorders, such as glaucoma.

  18. Persimmon Leaves (Diospyros kaki) Extract Protects Optic Nerve Crush-Induced Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ryul Ahn, Hong; Kim, Kyung-A; Kang, Suk Woo; Lee, Joo Young; Kim, Tae-Jin; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death is part of many retinal diseases. Here, we report that the ethanol extract of Diospyros kaki (EEDK) exhibits protective properties against retinal degeneration, both in vitro and in vivo. Upon exposure to cytotoxic compounds, RGC-5 cells showed approximately 40% cell viability versus the control, while pre-treatment with EEDK markedly increased cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. Further studies revealed that cell survival induced by EEDK was associated with decreased levels of apoptotic proteins, such as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, p53, and cleaved caspase-3. In addition to apoptotic pathways, we demonstrated that expression levels of antioxidant-associated proteins, such as superoxide dismutase-1, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase-1, were positively modulated by EEDK. In a partial optic nerve crush mouse model, EEDK had similar ameliorating effects on retinal degeneration resulting from mechanical damages. Therefore, our results suggest that EEDK may have therapeutic potential against retinal degenerative disorders, such as glaucoma. PMID:28425487

  19. Ferroelectric symmetry-protected multibit memory cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudry, Laurent; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Vinokur, Valerii M.

    2017-02-01

    The tunability of electrical polarization in ferroelectrics is instrumental to their applications in information-storage devices. The existing ferroelectric memory cells are based on the two-level storage capacity with the standard binary logics. However, the latter have reached its fundamental limitations. Here we propose ferroelectric multibit cells (FMBC) utilizing the ability of multiaxial ferroelectric materials to pin the polarization at a sequence of the multistable states. Employing the catastrophe theory principles we show that these states are symmetry-protected against the information loss and thus realize novel topologically-controlled access memory (TAM). Our findings enable developing a platform for the emergent many-valued non-Boolean information technology and target challenges posed by needs of quantum and neuromorphic computing.

  20. Ferroelectric symmetry-protected multibit memory cell

    DOE PAGES

    Baudry, Laurent; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Vinokur, Valerii M.

    2017-02-08

    Here, the tunability of electrical polarization in ferroelectrics is instrumental to their applications in information-storage devices. The existing ferroelectric memory cells are based on the two-level storage capacity with the standard binary logics. However, the latter have reached its fundamental limitations. Here we propose ferroelectric multibit cells (FMBC) utilizing the ability of multiaxial ferroelectric materials to pin the polarization at a sequence of the multistable states. Employing the catastrophe theory principles we show that these states are symmetry-protected against the information loss and thus realize novel topologically-controlled access memory (TAM). Our findings enable developing a platform for the emergent many-valuedmore » non-Boolean information technology and target challenges posed by needs of quantum and neuromorphic computing.« less

  1. Ferroelectric symmetry-protected multibit memory cell

    PubMed Central

    Baudry, Laurent; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Vinokur, Valerii M.

    2017-01-01

    The tunability of electrical polarization in ferroelectrics is instrumental to their applications in information-storage devices. The existing ferroelectric memory cells are based on the two-level storage capacity with the standard binary logics. However, the latter have reached its fundamental limitations. Here we propose ferroelectric multibit cells (FMBC) utilizing the ability of multiaxial ferroelectric materials to pin the polarization at a sequence of the multistable states. Employing the catastrophe theory principles we show that these states are symmetry-protected against the information loss and thus realize novel topologically-controlled access memory (TAM). Our findings enable developing a platform for the emergent many-valued non-Boolean information technology and target challenges posed by needs of quantum and neuromorphic computing. PMID:28176866

  2. Hydroxycinnamic acids in Crepidiastrum denticulatum protect oxidative stress-induced retinal damage.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hong Ryul; Lee, Hee Ju; Kim, Kyung-A; Kim, Chul Young; Nho, Chu Won; Jang, Holim; Pan, Cheol-Ho; Lee, Chang Yong; Jung, Sang Hoon

    2014-02-12

    We investigated the effects of an ethanol extract of C. denticulatum (EECD) in a mouse model of glaucoma established by optic nerve crush (ONC), and found that EECD significantly protected against retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death caused by ONC. Furthermore, EECD effectively protected against N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced damage to the rat retinas. In vitro, EECD attenuated transformed retinal ganglion cell (RGC-5) death and significantly blunted the up-regulation of apoptotic proteins and mRNA level induced by 1-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine combined with glutamate, reduced reactive oxygen species production by radical species, and inhibited lipid peroxidation. The major EECD components were found to be chicoric acid and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (3,5-DCQA) that have shown beneficial effects on retinal degeneration both in vitro and in vivo studies. Thus, EECD could be used as a natural neuroprotective agent for glaucoma, and chicoric acid and 3,5-DCQA as mark compounds for the development of functional food.

  3. Protection of cumulus cells following dehydroepiandrosterone supplementation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Te; Wang, Peng-Hui; Chen, San-Nung; Li, Chia-Jung; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Cheng, Jiin-Tsuey; Tsui, Kuan-Hao

    2017-02-01

    Growing studies have demonstrated that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) may improve fertility outcomes in poor ovarian responders (PORs). The aim of this study was to compare clinical outcomes and cumulus cell (CC) expression before and after DHEA treatment in PORs undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles. Six patients with poor ovarian response were enrolled in the study according to Bologna criteria. DHEA was supplied at least 2 months before patients entered into the next IVF cycle. Expression of apoptosis-related genes in CCs was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity of CCs was assessed by cell counting kit-8 assay. Metaphase II oocytes, maturation rate, embryos at Day 3, and fertilization rate significantly increased following DHEA treatment. Expression of cytochrome c, caspase 9, and caspase 3 genes in CCs were significantly reduced after DHEA therapy. Additionally, increased mitochondrial activity of CCs was observed following DHEA supplementation. DHEA supplementation may protect CCs via improved mitochondrial activity and decreased apoptosis, leading to better clinical outcomes in PORs.

  4. Osteoblasts Protect AML Cells from SDF-1-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Kimberly N.; Dudakovic, Amel; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Philips, Rachael L.; Hess, Allan D.; Smith, B. Douglas; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Karp, Judith E.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Hedin, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The bone marrow provides a protective environment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells that often allows leukemic stem cells to survive standard chemotherapeutic regimens. Targeting these leukemic stem cells within the bone marrow is critical for preventing relapse. We recently demonstrated that SDF-1, a chemokine abundant in the bone marrow, induces apoptosis in AML cell lines and in patient samples expressing high levels of its receptor, CXCR4. Here we show that a subset of osteoblast lineage cells within the bone marrow can protect AML cells from undergoing apoptosis in response to the SDF-1 naturally present in that location. In co-culture systems, osteoblasts at various stages of differentiation protected AML cell lines and patient isolates from SDF-1-induced apoptosis. The differentiation of the osteoblast cell lines, MC3T3 and W-20-17, mediated this protection via a cell contact-independent mechanism. In contrast, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, the precursors of osteoblasts, induced apoptosis in AML cells via a CXCR4-dependent mechanism and failed to protect AML cells from exogenously added SDF-1. These results indicate that osteoblasts in the process of differentiation potently inhibit the SDF-1-driven apoptotic pathway of CXCR4-expressing AML cells residing in the bone marrow. Drugs targeting this protective mechanism could potentially provide a new approach to treating AML by enhancing the SDF-1-induced apoptosis of AML cells residing within the bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:24851270

  5. Protective mechanism against cancer found in progeria patient cells

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have studied cells of patients with an extremely rare genetic disease that is characterized by drastic premature aging and discovered a new protective cellular mechanism against cancer. They found that cells from patients with Hutchinson Gi

  6. Statins, Bcl-2, and apoptosis: cell death or cell protection?

    PubMed

    Wood, W Gibson; Igbavboa, Urule; Muller, Walter E; Eckert, Gunter P

    2013-10-01

    Statins have proven their effectiveness in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. This class of drugs has also attracted attention as a potential treatment for dissimilar diseases such as certain types of cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. What appears to be a contradiction is that, in the case of cancer, it has been suggested that statins increase apoptosis and alter levels of Bcl-2 family members (e.g., reduce Bcl-2 and increase Bax), whereas studies mainly using noncancerous cells report opposite effects. This review examined studies reporting on the effects of statins on Bcl-2 family members, apoptosis, cell death, and cell protection. Much, but not all, of the evidence supporting the pro-apoptotic effects of statins is based on data in cancer cell lines and the use of relatively high drug concentrations. Studies indicating an anti-apoptotic effect of statins are fewer in number and generally used much lower drug concentrations and normal cells. Those conclusions are not definitive, and certainly, there is a need for additional research to determine if statin repositioning is justified for noncardiovascular diseases.

  7. Dendritic Cell Targeting of Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen Expressed by Lactobacillus acidophilus Protects Mice from Lethal Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-28

    Dendritic cell targeting of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen expressed by Lactobacillus acidophilus protects mice from lethal challenge M...lethal chal- lenge. A vaccine strategy was established by using Lactobacillus acidophilus to deliver Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) via...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dendritic cell targeting of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen expressed by Lactobacillus acidophilus protects mice

  8. Inhibition of high glucose-induced VEGF release in retinal ganglion cells by RNA interference targeting G protein-coupled receptor 91.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianyan; Wu, Qiang; Li, Tingting; Chen, Yongdong; Wang, Shuai

    2013-04-01

    Recent research using a rat oxygen-induced retinopathy model has demonstrated that the G protein-coupled receptor 91 (GPR91) of retinal ganglion neurons is the principal respondent to succinate and consequently induces the release of angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The aim of this study was to determine whether GPR91 modulate the release of VEGF from retinal ganglion cells in a high-glucose model in vitro and to dissect the role of GPR91 in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. We constructed a lentiviral small hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vector targeting GPR91 (LV.shGPR91) and infected the retinal ganglion cell line RGC-5 to obtain stably transduction system. The knockdown effect of GPR91 was detected by Western blotting. After incubation with succinate and various concentrations of glucose, the expression of VEGF in RGC-5 cells was evaluated by real-time PCR and Western blotting, and the release of VEGF protein was measured using an ELISA assay. Conditioned media were also collected, and the effects of proliferation and migration of RF/6A cells, a vascular endothelial cell line, were evaluated by CCK-8 and Transwell assays. The phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in RGC-5 cells after exposure to high glucose were evaluated by Western blotting. Following a single exposure of RGC-5 cells to the encoding lentivirus, more than 80% of infected cells expressed GFP at 72 h, and the level of GPR91 protein was significantly downregulated. GPR91 shRNA inhibited the cell survival rates of RGC-5 cells incubated with high glucose (F = 21.36, P = 0.002). The mRNA and protein expression of VEGF in LV.shGPR91 RGC-5 cells decreased markedly compared to that of LV.shScrambled or untransduced control cells incubated with different concentrations of glucose or succinate (P < 0.01). The VEGF protein level in medium

  9. Immune signatures of protective spleen memory CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Brinza, Lilia; Djebali, Sophia; Tomkowiak, Martine; Mafille, Julien; Loiseau, Céline; Jouve, Pierre-Emmanuel; de Bernard, Simon; Buffat, Laurent; Lina, Bruno; Ottmann, Michèle; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Schicklin, Stéphane; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Lauvau, Grégoire; Grau, Morgan; Wencker, Mélanie; Arpin, Christophe; Walzer, Thierry; Leverrier, Yann; Marvel, Jacqueline

    2016-11-24

    Memory CD8 T lymphocyte populations are remarkably heterogeneous and differ in their ability to protect the host. In order to identify the whole range of qualities uniquely associated with protective memory cells we compared the gene expression signatures of two qualities of memory CD8 T cells sharing the same antigenic-specificity: protective (Influenza-induced, Flu-TM) and non-protective (peptide-induced, TIM) spleen memory CD8 T cells. Although Flu-TM and TIM express classical phenotypic memory markers and are polyfunctional, only Flu-TM protects against a lethal viral challenge. Protective memory CD8 T cells express a unique set of genes involved in migration and survival that correlate with their unique capacity to rapidly migrate within the infected lung parenchyma in response to influenza infection. We also enlighten a new set of poised genes expressed by protective cells that is strongly enriched in cytokines and chemokines such as Ccl1, Ccl9 and Gm-csf. CCL1 and GM-CSF genes are also poised in human memory CD8 T cells. These immune signatures are also induced by two other pathogens (vaccinia virus and Listeria monocytogenes). The immune signatures associated with immune protection were identified on circulating cells, i.e. those that are easily accessible for immuno-monitoring and could help predict vaccines efficacy.

  10. Immune signatures of protective spleen memory CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Brinza, Lilia; Djebali, Sophia; Tomkowiak, Martine; Mafille, Julien; Loiseau, Céline; Jouve, Pierre-Emmanuel; de Bernard, Simon; Buffat, Laurent; Lina, Bruno; Ottmann, Michèle; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Schicklin, Stéphane; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Lauvau, Grégoire; Grau, Morgan; Wencker, Mélanie; Arpin, Christophe; Walzer, Thierry; Leverrier, Yann; Marvel, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Memory CD8 T lymphocyte populations are remarkably heterogeneous and differ in their ability to protect the host. In order to identify the whole range of qualities uniquely associated with protective memory cells we compared the gene expression signatures of two qualities of memory CD8 T cells sharing the same antigenic-specificity: protective (Influenza-induced, Flu-TM) and non-protective (peptide-induced, TIM) spleen memory CD8 T cells. Although Flu-TM and TIM express classical phenotypic memory markers and are polyfunctional, only Flu-TM protects against a lethal viral challenge. Protective memory CD8 T cells express a unique set of genes involved in migration and survival that correlate with their unique capacity to rapidly migrate within the infected lung parenchyma in response to influenza infection. We also enlighten a new set of poised genes expressed by protective cells that is strongly enriched in cytokines and chemokines such as Ccl1, Ccl9 and Gm-csf. CCL1 and GM-CSF genes are also poised in human memory CD8 T cells. These immune signatures are also induced by two other pathogens (vaccinia virus and Listeria monocytogenes). The immune signatures associated with immune protection were identified on circulating cells, i.e. those that are easily accessible for immuno-monitoring and could help predict vaccines efficacy. PMID:27883012

  11. Improved Short-Circuit Protection for Power Cells in Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Francis

    2008-01-01

    A scheme for protection against short circuits has been devised for series strings of lithium electrochemical cells that contain built-in short-circuit protection devices, which go into a high-resistance, current-limiting state when heated by excessive current. If cells are simply connected in a long series string to obtain a high voltage and a short circuit occurs, whichever short-circuit protection device trips first is exposed to nearly the full string voltage, which, typically, is large enough to damage the device. Depending on the specific cell design, the damage can defeat the protective function, cause a dangerous internal short circuit in the affected cell, and/or cascade to other cells. In the present scheme, reverse diodes rated at a suitably high current are connected across short series sub-strings, the lengths of which are chosen so that when a short-circuit protection device is tripped, the voltage across it does not exceed its rated voltage. This scheme preserves the resetting properties of the protective devices. It provides for bypassing of cells that fail open and limits cell reversal, though not as well as does the more-expensive scheme of connecting a diode across every cell.

  12. Overdischarge protection in high-temperature cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Redey, Laszlo

    1990-01-01

    Overdischarge indication and protection is provided in a lithium alloy - metal sulfide, secondary electrochemical cell and batteries of such cells through use of a low lithium activity phase that ordinarily is not matched with positive electrode material. Low lithium activity phases such as Li.sub.0.1 Al.sub.0.9 and LiAlSi in correspondence with positive electrode material cause a downward gradient in cell voltage as an indication of overdischarge prior to damage to the cell. Moreover, the low lithium activity phase contributes lithium into the electrolyte and provides a lithium shuttling current as overdischarge protection after all of the positive electrode material is discharged.

  13. Small Molecule Protection of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0297 TITLE: Small Molecule Protection of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Raymond J...Molecule Protection of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells Stem Cells ’ 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0297 W81XWH-14-1-0297 W81XWH-14-1-0297 5b...hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from damage or killing by endogenous aldehydes. Proof-of-concept for these experiments has been developed using isogenic

  14. Protective role of Th17 cells in pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Jitendra Singh; Wang, Yan

    2016-03-18

    Th17 cells are characterized as preferential producer of interleukins including IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21 and IL-22. Corresponding receptors of these cytokines are expressed on number of cell types found in the mucosa, including epithelial cells and fibroblasts which constitute the prime targets of the Th17-associated cytokines. Binding of IL-17 family members to their corresponding receptors lead to modulation of antimicrobial functions of target cells including alveolar epithelial cells. Stimulated alveolar epithelial cells produce antimicrobial peptides and are involved in granulepoesis, neutrophil recruitment and tissue repair. Mucosal immunity mediated by Th17 cells is protective against numerous pulmonary pathogens including extracellular bacterial and fungal pathogens. This review focuses on the protective role of Th17 cells during pulmonary infection, highlighting subset differentiation, effector cytokines production, followed by study of the binding of these cytokines to their corresponding receptors, the subsequent signaling pathway they engender and their effector role in host defense.

  15. Phlorhizin protects against erythrocyte cell membrane scrambling.

    PubMed

    Gatidis, Sergios; Meier, Anja; Jilani, Kashif; Lang, Elisabeth; Zelenak, Christine; Qadri, Syed M; Lang, Florian

    2011-08-10

    Phlorhizin interferes with glucose transport. Glucose depletion triggers suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, characterized by cell shrinkage and cell membrane scrambling. Eryptosis is further triggered by oxidative stress. The present study explored whether phlorhizin influences eryptosis following glucose depletion or oxidative stress. Cell membrane scrambling was estimated from annexin binding, cell volume from forward scatter (FSC), and cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration from Fluo-3 fluorescence. Phlorhizin (10-100 μM) added alone did not modify scrambling, FSC, or Fluo-3 fluorescence. Glucose depletion (48 h) significantly increased Fluo-3 fluorescence, decreased FSC, and increased annexin binding, effects in part significantly blunted by phlorhizin (annexin binding ≥ 10 μM, FSC ≥ 50 μM). Oxidative stress (30 min 0.3 mM tert-butylhydroperoxide) again significantly increased Fluo-3 fluorescence and triggered annexin binding, effects again in part significantly blunted by phlorhizin (Fluo-3 fluorescence ≥ 50 μM, annexin-binding ≥ 10 μM). Phlorhizin did not blunt the cell shrinkage induced by oxidative stress. The present observations disclose a novel effect of phlorhizin, that is, an influence on suicidal erythrocyte death following energy depletion and oxidative stress.

  16. New immobilized cell system with protection against toxic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, H.; Harada, S.; Kurosawa, H.; Yajima, M.

    1987-01-01

    A new immobilized cell system providing protection against toxic solvents was investigated so that normal fermentations could be carried out in a medium containing toxic solvents. The system consists of immobilized growing cells in Ca-alginate gel beads to which vegetable oils, which are inexpensive absorbents of solvents, had been added. The ethanol fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 26603 was used as a model fermentation to study the protection afforded by the system against solvent toxicities. The fermentation was inhibited by solvents such as 2-octanol, benzene, toluene, and phenol. Ethanol production of one batch was not finished even after 35 h using immobilized growing yeast cells in conventional Ca-alginate gel beads in an ethanol production medium (5% glucose) containing 0.1% 2-octanol, which is used as a solvent for liquid-liquid extraction and is one of the most toxic solvents in our experiments. With the new immobilized growing cell system using vegetable oils, however, four repeated batch fermentations were completed in 35 h. Castor oil provided even more protection than soy bean, olive, and tung oils, and it was possible to complete six repeated batches in 35 h. The immobilized cell system with vegetable oils also provided protection against other toxic solvents such as benzene and toluene. A possible mechanism for the protective function of the new immobilized cell system is discussed.

  17. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, Alexander B; Zholobak, Nadezhda M; Baranchikov, Alexander E; Ryabova, Anastasia V; Ivanov, Vladimir K

    2015-05-01

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF3:Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF3 nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Regulatory T cells protect from autoimmune arthritis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Munoz-Suano, Alba; Kallikourdis, Marinos; Sarris, Milka; Betz, Alexander G

    2012-05-01

    Pregnancy frequently has a beneficial effect on the autoimmune disease Rheumatoid Arthritis, ranging from improvement in clinical symptoms to complete remission. Despite decades of study, a mechanistic explanation remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that an analogous pregnancy-induced remission can be observed in a mouse model of arthritis. We demonstrate that during pregnancy mice are protected from collagen-induced arthritis, but are still capable of launching normal immune responses to influenza infections. We examine the role of regulatory T (T(R)) cells in this beneficial effect. T(R) cells are essential for many aspects of immune tolerance, including the suppression of autoimmune responses. Remarkably, transfer of regulatory T cells from pregnant 'protected' mice was sufficient to confer protection to non-pregnant mice. These results suggest that regulatory T cells are responsible for the pregnancy-induced amelioration of arthritis.

  19. Oral administration of geranylgeranylacetone to protect vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Nagato, Shinpei; Sugahara, Kazuma; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Takemoto, Yousuke; Hashimoto, Makoto; Fujii, Hironori; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2017-08-03

    We recently reported that the heat shock response played a major role in the protection of hair cells against stress. Oral administration of the heat shock inducer, geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) protected hair cells against intense noise. In our present study, we investigated the effect of GGA on vestibular hair cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. We used CBA/N mice aged 4-6 weeks. The mice were divided into two groups, GGA and control. Mice in the GGA group were fed a diet containing GGA (0.5%) for 4 weeks, and those in the control group were fed a standard diet. Immunohistochemical analyses for Hsp70 were performed in four animals. The utricles of the remaining animals were cultured in medium for 24h with neomycin to induce hair cell death. After fixation, the vestibular hair cells were immunohistochemically stained against calmodulin, and hair cell survival was evaluated. The vestibular hair cells of mice in the GGA group expressed Hsp70. In addition, after exposure to neomycin, vestibular hair cell survival was higher in the GGA group than in the control group. Our results demonstrated the oral administration of GGA induced the heat shock response in the vestibule and could protect sensory cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Memory T cells maintain protracted protection against malaria.

    PubMed

    Krzych, Urszula; Zarling, Stasya; Pichugin, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Immunologic memory is one of the cardinal features of antigen-specific immune responses, and the persistence of memory cells contributes to prophylactic immunizations against infectious agents. Adequately maintained memory T and B cell pools assure a fast, effective and specific response against re-infections. However, many aspects of immunologic memory are still poorly understood, particularly immunologic memory inducible by parasites, for example, Plasmodium spp., the causative agents of malaria. For example, memory responses to Plasmodium antigens amongst residents of malaria endemic areas appear to be either inadequately developed or maintained, because persons who survive episodes of childhood malaria remain vulnerable to intermittent malaria infections. By contrast, multiple exposures of humans and laboratory rodents to radiation-attenuated Plasmodium sporozoites (γ-spz) induce sterile and long-lasting protection against experimental sporozoite challenge. Multifactorial immune mechanisms maintain this protracted and sterile protection. While the presence of memory CD4 T cell subsets has been associated with lasting protection in humans exposed to multiple bites from Anopheles mosquitoes infected with attenuated Plasmodium falciparum, memory CD8 T cells maintain protection induced with Plasmodium yoelii and Plasmodium berghei γ-spz in murine models. In this review, we discuss our observations that show memory CD8 T cells specific for antigens expressed by P. berghei liver stage parasites as an indispensable component for the maintenance of protracted protective immunity against experimental malaria infection; moreover, the provision of an Ag-depot assures a quick recall of memory T cells as IFN-γ-producing effector CD8 T cells and IL-4- producing CD4 T cells that collaborate with B cells for an effective antibody response. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Protective interlayer for high temperature solid electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1986-01-01

    A high temperature, solid electrolyte electrochemical cell is made, having a first and second electrode with solid electrolyte between them, where the electrolyte is formed by hot chemical vapor deposition, where a solid, interlayer material, which is electrically conductive, oxygen permeable, and protective of electrode material from hot metal halide vapor attack, is placed between the first electrode and the electrolyte, to protect the first electrode from the hot metal halide vapors during vapor deposition.

  2. Protective interlayer for high temperature solid electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.; Ruka, Roswell J.; Zymboly, Gregory E.

    1985-01-01

    A high temperature, solid electrolyte electrochemical cell is made, having a first and second electrode with solid electrolyte between them, where the electrolyte is formed by hot chemical vapor deposition, where a solid, interlayer material, which is electrically conductive, oxygen permeable, and protective of electrode material from hot metal halide vapor attack, is placed between the first electrode and the electrolyte, to protect the first electrode from the hot metal halide vapors during vapor deposition.

  3. Protective interlayer for high temperature solid electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1987-01-01

    A high temperature, solid electrolyte electrochemical cell is made, having a first and second electrode with solid electrolyte between them, where the electrolyte is formed by hot chemical vapor deposition, where a solid, interlayer material, which is electrically conductive, oxygen permeable, and protective of electrode material from hot metal halide vapor attack, is placed between the first electrode and the electrolyte, to protect the first electrode from the hot metal halide vapors during vapor deposition.

  4. The neuroprotective effect of resveratrol on retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve transection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Yu Jeong; Park, Ki Ho

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effect of resveratrol in an optic nerve transection (ONT) model and to identify the neuroprotective mechanism of resveratrol in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Methods ONT and retrograde labeling were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats. Various concentrations of resveratrol were injected intravitreally immediately after ONT. The number of labeled RGCs was determined at 1 and 2 weeks after ONT. The effect of resveratrol and sirtinol (a sirtuin 1 inhibitor) co-injection was investigated. RGC-5 cells were cultured and treated with staurosporine to induce differentiation. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was performed to evaluate the effect of resveratrol on RGC-5 cell survival under serum-free conditions. RGC-5 cells were cultured with sirtinol to investigate the neuroprotective mechanism of resveratrol. Results A dose–response relationship was observed between resveratrol and RGC survival. A single intravitreal injection of resveratrol was neuroprotective in RGCs at 1 week after ONT (p<0.01). Repeated intravitreal injection of resveratrol showed a neuroprotective effect at 2 weeks after ONT (p<0.01). However, co-injection of resveratrol and sirtinol diminished the neuroprotective effect of resveratrol (p<0.05). The neuroprotective effect of resveratrol was observed in RGC-5 cells under serum-free conditions, and sirtinol diminished this neuroprotective effect. Conclusions Resveratrol exerts its neuroprotective effect on RGCs via activation of the sirtuin 1 pathway in an ONT model. This finding demonstrates the therapeutic potential of resveratrol in treating optic nerve diseases. PMID:23901250

  5. Peptide-Induced Antiviral Protection by Cytotoxic T Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Manfred; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Hengartner, Hans

    1991-02-01

    A specific antiviral cytotoxic immune response in vivo could be induced by the subcutaneous injection of the T-cell epitope of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) nucleoprotein as an unmodified free synthetic peptide (Arg-Pro-Gln-Ala-Ser-Gly-Val-Tyr-Met-Gly-Asn-Leu-Thr-Ala-Gln) emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant. This immunization rendered mice into a LCMV-specific protective state as shown by the inhibition of LCMV replication in spleens of such mice. The protection level of these mice correlated with the ability to respond to the peptide challenge by CD8^+ virus-specific cytotoxic T cells. This is a direct demonstration that peptide vaccines can be antivirally protective in vivo, thus encouraging further search for appropriate mixtures of stable peptides that may be used as T-cell vaccines.

  6. Protecting the Health and Safety of Cell and Tissue Donors

    PubMed Central

    Stroncek, David F.; England, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Centers involved with collecting the starting material for cell and tissue therapies are obligated to protect the recipient’s and donor’s health and safety. All donors face risks during and after the collection which can be minimized by prescreening donors and excluding those that the collection would place at increased risk of physical harm. Another important part of protecting donors is the use of appropriate collection facilities. Donor risk can also be reduced by using specially designed collection devices and ancillary equipment, using only trained collection staff and limiting the volume or quantity of biologic material collected. Donors should be monitored during and after the collection for adverse events, and should adverse events occur, they should be promptly and appropriately treated. Protecting the safety of cell, gene and tissue donors is particularly difficult because of the wide variety in the types of donors and material collected. Biological material used to manufacture cell and tissue therapies is collected from healthy volunteers, matched-related, matched-unrelated and autologous donors. Precautions should be taken to ensure that the team of medical professionals evaluating related donors is not the same as the team caring for the transplant recipient in order to be sure that the donor evaluation is not biased and the donor is not coerced into donating. In conclusion, protecting cell and tissue donors requires the use of the practices developed to protect blood donors and the implementation of many other measures. PMID:25937830

  7. Protecting the Health and Safety of Cell and Tissue Donors.

    PubMed

    Stroncek, David F; England, Lee

    2015-04-01

    Centers involved with collecting the starting material for cell and tissue therapies are obligated to protect the recipient's and donor's health and safety. All donors face risks during and after the collection which can be minimized by prescreening donors and excluding those that the collection would place at increased risk of physical harm. Another important part of protecting donors is the use of appropriate collection facilities. Donor risk can also be reduced by using specially designed collection devices and ancillary equipment, using only trained collection staff and limiting the volume or quantity of biologic material collected. Donors should be monitored during and after the collection for adverse events, and should adverse events occur, they should be promptly and appropriately treated. Protecting the safety of cell, gene and tissue donors is particularly difficult because of the wide variety in the types of donors and material collected. Biological material used to manufacture cell and tissue therapies is collected from healthy volunteers, matched-related, matched-unrelated and autologous donors. Precautions should be taken to ensure that the team of medical professionals evaluating related donors is not the same as the team caring for the transplant recipient in order to be sure that the donor evaluation is not biased and the donor is not coerced into donating. In conclusion, protecting cell and tissue donors requires the use of the practices developed to protect blood donors and the implementation of many other measures.

  8. Cocoa phenolic extract protects pancreatic beta cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Martín, María Angeles; Ramos, Sonia; Cordero-Herrero, Isabel; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2013-07-31

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE) containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5-20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult.

  9. Cocoa Phenolic Extract Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Martín, María Ángeles; Ramos, Sonia; Cordero-Herrero, Isabel; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE) containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5–20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult. PMID:23912326

  10. Discriminating protective from non-protective Plasmodium-specific CD8+ T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Katherine L.; Pewe, Lecia L.; Kurup, Samarchith P.; Harty, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of research, malaria remains a global health crisis. Current subunit vaccine approaches do not provide efficient long-term, sterilizing immunity against Plasmodium infections in humans. Conversely, whole parasite vaccinations with their larger array of target antigens have conferred long lasting sterilizing protection to humans. Similar studies in rodent models of malaria reveal that CD8+ T cells play a critical role in liver-stage immunity after whole parasite vaccination. However, it is unknown whether all CD8+ T cell specificities elicited by whole parasite vaccination contribute to protection, an issue of great relevance for enhanced subunit vaccination. Here we show that robust CD8+ T cell responses of similar phenotype are mounted following prime-boost immunization against Plasmodium berghei GAP5041-48, S20318-325, TRAP130-138 or CSP252-260 protein-derived epitopes in mice, but only CSP252-260- and TRAP130-138-specific CD8+ T cells provide sterilizing immunity and reduce liver parasite burden following sporozoite challenge. Further, CD8+ T cells specific to sporozoite surface-expressed CSP and TRAP proteins, but not the intracellular GAP50 and S20 proteins, are efficiently recognized by sporozoite-infected hepatocytes in vitro. These results suggest that 1) protection-relevant antigenic targets, regardless of their immunogenic potential, must be efficiently presented by infected hepatocytes for CD8+ T cells to eliminate liver-stage Plasmodium infection and 2) proteins expressed on the surface of sporozoites may be good target antigens for protective CD8+ T cells. PMID:27084099

  11. Coenzyme Q10 protects hair cells against aminoglycoside.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Kazuma; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Mikuriya, Takefumi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Kanagawa, Eiju; Hara, Hirotaka; Shimogori, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the production of free radicals is associated with sensory cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. Many researchers have reported that antioxidant reagents protect sensory cells in the inner ear, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an antioxidant that is consumed as a health food in many countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CoQ10 in mammalian vestibular hair cell death induced by aminoglycoside. Cultured utricles of CBA/CaN mice were divided into three groups (control group, neomycin group, and neomycin + CoQ10 group). In the neomycin group, utricles were cultured with neomycin (1 mM) to induce hair cell death. In the neomycin + CoQ10 group, utricles were cultured with neomycin and water-soluble CoQ10 (30-0.3 µM). Twenty-four hours after exposure to neomycin, the cultured tissues were fixed, and vestibular hair cells were labeled using an anti-calmodulin antibody. Significantly more hair cells survived in the neomycin + CoQ10 group than in the neomycin group. These data indicate that CoQ10 protects sensory hair cells against neomycin-induced death in the mammalian vestibular epithelium; therefore, CoQ10 may be useful as a protective drug in the inner ear.

  12. Coenzyme Q10 Protects Hair Cells against Aminoglycoside

    PubMed Central

    Sugahara, Kazuma; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Mikuriya, Takefumi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Kanagawa, Eiju; Hara, Hirotaka; Shimogori, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the production of free radicals is associated with sensory cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. Many researchers have reported that antioxidant reagents protect sensory cells in the inner ear, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an antioxidant that is consumed as a health food in many countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CoQ10 in mammalian vestibular hair cell death induced by aminoglycoside. Cultured utricles of CBA/CaN mice were divided into three groups (control group, neomycin group, and neomycin + CoQ10 group). In the neomycin group, utricles were cultured with neomycin (1 mM) to induce hair cell death. In the neomycin + CoQ10 group, utricles were cultured with neomycin and water-soluble CoQ10 (30–0.3 µM). Twenty-four hours after exposure to neomycin, the cultured tissues were fixed, and vestibular hair cells were labeled using an anti-calmodulin antibody. Significantly more hair cells survived in the neomycin + CoQ10 group than in the neomycin group. These data indicate that CoQ10 protects sensory hair cells against neomycin-induced death in the mammalian vestibular epithelium; therefore, CoQ10 may be useful as a protective drug in the inner ear. PMID:25265538

  13. Overdischarge protection in high-temperature cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Redey, L.

    1990-06-19

    Overdischarge indication and protection is provided in a lithium alloy metal sulfide, secondary electrochemical cell and batteries of such cells through use of a low lithium activity phase that ordinarily is not matched with positive electrode material. Low lithium activity phases such as Li[sub 0.1]Al[sub 0.9] and LiAlSi in correspondence with positive electrode material cause a downward gradient in cell voltage as an indication of overdischarge prior to damage to the cell. Moreover, the low lithium activity phase contributes lithium into the electrolyte and provides a lithium shuttling current as overdischarge protection after all of the positive electrode material is discharged. 8 figs.

  14. Artemin protects cells and proteins against oxidative and salt stress.

    PubMed

    Takalloo, Zeinab; Sajedi, Reza H; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Moazzenzade, Taghi

    2017-02-01

    Artemin is an abundant thermostable protein in Artemia encysted embryos under environmental stresses. It is confirmed that high regulatory expression of artemin is relevant to stress resistance in this crustacean. Here, the protective role of artemin from Artemia urmiana has been investigated on survival of bacterial cells under salt and oxidative shocks. Also, for continuous monitoring of the effect of artemin in prevention of proteins aggregation/inactivation, co-expression of artemin and luciferase (as an intracellular reporter) in bacterial cells was performed. According to the results, residual activity of luciferase in artemin expressing E. coli cells exposing to different concentrations of H2O2 and NaCl was significantly higher than non-expressing cells. The luciferase activity was rapidly lost in control cells under salt treatments while in co-transformed cells, the activity was considerably retained at higher salt concentrations. Also, analysis from cell viability assays showed that artemin-expressing cells exhibited more resistance to both stress conditions. In the present study, we document for the first time that artemin can protect proteins and bacterial cells against oxidative and salt stress conditions. These results can declare the resistance property of this crustacean against harsh environmental conditions.

  15. Imipramine protects mouse hippocampus against tunicamycin-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yoko; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Ishisaka, Mitsue; Oyagi, Atsushi; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Hara, Hideaki

    2012-12-05

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in various diseases. Recently, some reports have suggested that the sigma-1 receptor may play a role in ER stress, and many antidepressants have a high affinity for the sigma-1 receptor. In the present study, we focused on imipramine, a widely used antidepressant, and investigated whether it might protect against the neuronal cell death induced by tunicamycin, an ER stress inducer. In mouse cultured hippocampal HT22 cells, imipramine inhibited cell death and caspase-3 activation induced by tunicamycin, although it did not alter the elevated expressions of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP). Interestingly, in such cells application of imipramine normalized the expression of the sigma-1 receptor, which was decreased by treatment with tunicamycin alone. Additionally, NE-100, a selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist, abolished the protective effect of imipramine against such tunicamycin-induced cell death. Imipramine inhibited the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by tunicamycin, and NE-100 blocked this modulating effect of imipramine. Furthermore, in anesthetized mice intracerebroventricular administration of tunicamycin decreased the number of neuronal cells in the hippocampus, particularly in the CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) areas, and 7 days' imipramine treatment (10mg/kg/day; i.p.) significantly suppressed these reductions in CA1 and DG. These findings suggest that imipramine protects against ER stress-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death both in vitro and in vivo. Such protection may be partly due to the sigma-1 receptor.

  16. Phenylpropenoic Acid Glucoside from Rooibos Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Cell Death Induced by Acute Injury

    PubMed Central

    Himpe, Eddy; Cunha, Daniel A.; Song, Imane; Bugliani, Marco; Marchetti, Piero; Cnop, Miriam; Bouwens, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous studies demonstrated that a phenylpropenoic acid glucoside (PPAG) from rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) extract had anti-hyperglycemic activity and significant protective effects on the pancreatic beta cell mass in a chronic diet-induced diabetes model. The present study evaluated the cytoprotective effect of the phytochemical on beta cells exposed to acute cell stress. Methods Synthetically prepared PPAG was administered orally in mice treated with a single dose of streptozotocin to acutely induce beta cell death and hyperglycemia. Its effect was assessed on beta cell mass, proliferation and apoptotic cell death. Its cytoprotective effect was also studied in vitro on INS-1E beta cells and on human pancreatic islet cells. Results Treatment with the phytochemical PPAG protected beta cells during the first days after the insult against apoptotic cell death, as evidenced by TUNEL staining, and prevented loss of expression of anti-apoptotic protein BCL2 in vivo. In vitro, PPAG protected INS-1E beta cells from streptozotocin-induced apoptosis and necrosis in a BCL2-dependent and independent way, respectively, depending on glucose concentration. PPAG also protected human pancreatic islet cells against the cytotoxic action of the fatty acid palmitate. Conclusions These findings show the potential use of PPAG as phytomedicine which protects the beta cell mass exposed to acute diabetogenic stress. PMID:27299564

  17. Hydroxytyrosol protects against oxidative DNA damage in human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Warleta, Fernando; Quesada, Cristina Sánchez; Campos, María; Allouche, Yosra; Beltrán, Gabriel; Gaforio, José J

    2011-10-01

    Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol's effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7). We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells.

  18. Hydroxytyrosol Protects against Oxidative DNA Damage in Human Breast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Warleta, Fernando; Quesada, Cristina Sánchez; Campos, María; Allouche, Yosra; Beltrán, Gabriel; Gaforio, José J.

    2011-01-01

    Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol’s effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7). We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells. PMID:22254082

  19. Mast Cell Proteases as Protective and Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Caughey, George H.

    2014-01-01

    Proteases are the most abundant class of proteins produced by mast cells. Many of these are stored in membrane-enclosed intracellular granules until liberated by degranulating stimuli, which include cross-linking of high affinity IgE receptor FcεRI by IgE bound to multivalent allergen. Understanding and separating the functions of the proteases is important because expression differs among mast cells in different tissue locations. Differences between laboratory animals and humans in protease expression also influence the degree of confidence with which results obtained in animal models of mast cell function can be extrapolated to humans. The inflammatory potential of mast cell proteases was the first aspect of their biology to be explored and has received the most attention, in part because some of them—notably tryptases and chymases—are biomarkers of local and systemic mast cell degranulation and anaphylaxis. Although some of the proteases indeed augment allergic inflammation and are potential targets for inhibition to treat asthma and related allergic disorders, they are protective and even anti-inflammatory in some settings. For example, mast cell tryptases may protect from serious bacterial lung infections and may limit the “rubor” component of inflammation caused by vasodilating neuropeptides in the skin. Chymases help to maintain intestinal barrier function and to expel parasitic worms, and may support blood pressure during anaphylaxis by generating angiotensin II. In other life-or-death examples, carboxypeptidase A3 and other mast cell peptidases limit systemic toxicity of endogenous peptides like endothelin and neurotensin during septic peritonitis, and inactivate venom-associated peptides. On the other hand, mast cell peptidase-mediated destruction of protective cytokines, like IL-6, can enhance mortality from sepsis. Peptidases released from mast cells also influence non-mast cell proteases, such as by activating matrix metalloproteinase cascades

  20. Autophagy protects renal tubular cells against cyclosporine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Pallet, Nicolas; Bouvier, Nicolas; Legendre, Christophe; Gilleron, Jerome; Codogno, Patrice; Beaune, Philippe; Thervet, Eric; Anglicheau, Dany

    2008-08-01

    A major side effect of the powerful immunosuppressive drug cyclosporine (CsA) is the development of a chronic nephrotoxicity whose mechanisms are not fully understood. Recent data suggest that tubular cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of chronic nephropathies. We have shown that CsA is responsible for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in tubular cells. Autophagy has recently been described to be induced by ER stress and to alleviate its deleterious effects. In this study, we demonstrate that CsA induces autophagy in primary cultured human renal tubular cells through LC3II expression and autophagosomes visualization by electron microscopy. Autophagy is dependant on ER stress because various ER stress inducers activate autophagy, and salubrinal, an inhibitor of eIF2alpha dephosphorylation that protects cells against ER stress, inhibited LC3II expression. Furthermore, autophagy inhibition during CsA treatment with beclin1 siRNA significantly increases tubular cell death. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis of rat kidneys demonstrates a positive LC3 staining on injured tubular cells, suggesting that CsA induces autophagy in vivo. Taken together, these results demonstrate that CsA, through ER stress induction, activates autophagy as a protection against cell death.

  1. CXCR5+ T helper cells mediate protective immunity against tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Slight, Samantha R.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Gopal, Radha; Lin, Yinyao; Fallert Junecko, Beth A.; Mehra, Smriti; Selman, Moises; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Baquera-Heredia, Javier; Pavon, Lenin; Kaushal, Deepak; Reinhart, Todd A.; Randall, Troy D.; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2013-01-01

    One third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Although most infected people remain asymptomatic, they have a 10% lifetime risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB). Thus, the current challenge is to identify immune parameters that distinguish individuals with latent TB from those with active TB. Using human and experimental models of Mtb infection, we demonstrated that organized ectopic lymphoid structures containing CXCR5+ T cells were present in Mtb-infected lungs. In addition, we found that in experimental Mtb infection models, the presence of CXCR5+ T cells within ectopic lymphoid structures was associated with immune control. Furthermore, in a mouse model of Mtb infection, we showed that activated CD4+CXCR5+ T cells accumulated in Mtb-infected lungs and produced proinflammatory cytokines. Mice deficient in Cxcr5 had increased susceptibility to TB due to defective T cell localization within the lung parenchyma. We demonstrated that CXCR5 expression in T cells mediated correct T cell localization within TB granulomas, promoted efficient macrophage activation, protected against Mtb infection, and facilitated lymphoid follicle formation. These data demonstrate that CD4+CXCR5+ T cells play a protective role in the immune response against TB and highlight their potential use for future TB vaccine design and therapy. PMID:23281399

  2. TH17 Cells in Autoimmunity and Immunodeficiency: Protective or Pathogenic?

    PubMed

    Marwaha, Ashish K; Leung, Nicole J; McMurchy, Alicia N; Levings, Megan K

    2012-01-01

    In 2005 a newly discovered T helper cell subset that secreted interleukin (IL)-17 became the center of attention in immunology. Initial studies painted Th17 cells as the culprit for destruction in many different autoimmune and auto-inflammatory diseases. Subsequently, the discovery of patients with primary immunodeficiencies in the IL-17 pathway taught us that Th17 cells have a critical role in defense against certain fungal and bacterial infections. Moreover, the paradoxical exacerbation of Crohn's disease in the clinical trials of a Secukinumab (AIN457), a fully human neutralizing antibody to IL-17A, has cast into doubt a universal pro-inflammatory and harmful role for Th17 cells. Evidence now suggests that depending on the environment Th17 cells can alter their differentiation program, ultimately giving rise to either protective or pro-inflammatory cells. In this review we will summarize the evidence from patients with immunodeficiencies, autoimmune, or auto-inflammatory diseases that teaches us how the pro-inflammatory versus protective function of Th17 cells varies within the context of different human diseases.

  3. Tibolone protects T98G cells from glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Ávila Rodriguez, Marco; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Cabezas, Ricardo; Torrente, Daniel; Capani, Francisco; Gonzalez, Janneth; Barreto, George E

    2014-10-01

    The steroidal drug Tibolone is used for the treatment of climacteric symptoms and osteoporosis in post-menopausal women. Although Tibolone has been shown to exert neuroprotective actions after middle cerebral artery occlusion, its specific actions on glial cells have received very little attention. In the present study we have assessed whether Tibolone exerts protective actions in a human astrocyte cell model, the T98G cells, subjected to glucose deprivation. Our findings indicate that Tibolone decreases the effects of glucose deprivation on cell death, nuclear fragmentation, superoxide ion production, mitochondrial membrane potential, cytoplasmic calcium concentration and morphological parameters. These findings suggest that glial cells may participate in the neuroprotective actions of Tibolone in the brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Intestinal stem cell injury and protection during cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Radiation and chemotherapy remain the most effective and widely used cancer treatments. These treatments cause DNA damage and selectively target rapidly proliferating cells such as cancer cells, as well as inevitably cause damage to normal tissues, particularly those undergoing rapid self renewal. The side effects associated with radiation and chemotherapy are most pronounced in the hematopoietic (HP) system and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. These tissues are fast renewing and have a well-defined stem cell compartment that plays an essential role in homeostasis, and in treatment-induced acute injury that is dose limiting. Using recently defined intestinal stem cell markers and mouse models, a great deal of insight has been gained in the biology of intestinal stem cells (ISCs), which will undoubtedly help further mechanistic understanding of their injury. This review will cover historic discoveries and recent advances in the identification and characterization of intestinal stem cells, their responses to genotoxic stress, and a new crypt and intestinal stem cell culture system. The discussion will include key pathways regulating intestinal crypt and stem cell injury and regeneration caused by cancer treatments, and strategies for their protection. The focus will be on the acute phase of cell killing in mouse radiation models, where our understanding of the mechanisms in relation to intestinal stem cells is most advanced and interventions appear most effective. PMID:24683536

  5. The versatile low-molecular-weight thiols: Beyond cell protection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Zhao, Qunfei; Liu, Wen

    2015-12-01

    Low-molecular-weight (LMW) thiols are extensively involved in the maintenance of cellular redox potentials and the protection of cells from a variety of reactive chemical and electrophilic species. However, we recently found that the metabolic coupling of two LMW thiols - mycothiol (MSH) and ergothioneine (EGT) - programs the biosynthesis of the anti-infective agent lincomycin A. Remarkably, such a constructive role of the thiols in the biosynthesis of natural products has so far received relatively little attention. We speculate that the unusual thiol EGT might function as a chiral thiolation carrier (for modification) and a novel activator (for glycosylation) of sugar. Additionally, we examine recent evidence for LMW thiols (MSH and others) as sulfur donors of sulfur-containing natural products. Clearly, the LMW thiols have more diverse activities beyond cell protection, and more attention should be paid to the correlation of their functions with thiol-dependent enzymes.

  6. Mechanisms of Aminoglycoside Ototoxicity and Targets of Hair Cell Protection

    PubMed Central

    Huth, M. E.; Ricci, A. J.; Cheng, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are commonly prescribed antibiotics with deleterious side effects to the inner ear. Due to their popular application as a result of their potent antimicrobial activities, many efforts have been undertaken to prevent aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Over the years, understanding of the antimicrobial as well as ototoxic mechanisms of aminoglycosides has increased. These mechanisms are reviewed in regard to established and potential future targets of hair cell protection. PMID:22121370

  7. Thermal Protection during Percutaneous Thermal Ablation of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Anthony W.; Littrup, Peter J.; Walther, McClellan M.; Hvizda, Julia; Wood, Bradford J.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal injury to collateral structures is a known complication of thermal ablation of tumors. The authors present the use of CO2 dissection and inserted balloons to protect the bowel during percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation and cryotherapy of primary and locally recurrent renal cell carcinoma. These techniques offer the potential to increase the number of tumors that can be treated with RF ablation or cryotherapy from a percutaneous approach. PMID:15231890

  8. Short protection device for stack of electrolytic cells

    DOEpatents

    Katz, Murray; Schroll, Craig R.

    1985-10-22

    Electrical short protection is provided in an electrolytic cell stack by the combination of a thin, nonporous ceramic shield and a noble metal foil disposed on opposite sides of the sealing medium in a gas manifold gasket. The thin ceramic shield, such as alumina, is placed between the porous gasket and the cell stack face at the margins of the negative end plate to the most negative cells to impede ion current flow. The noble metal foil, for instance gold, is electrically coupled to the negative potential of the stack to collect positive ions at a harmless location away from the stack face. Consequently, corrosion products from the stack structure deposit on the foil rather than on the stack face to eliminate electrical shorting of cells at the negative end of the stack.

  9. Glutamine protects Chinese Hamster Ovary cells from radiation killing

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, R.; Matthews, R.; Ercal, N.; Krishnan, K. )

    1994-01-01

    Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were propagated in vitro and exposed to varying doses of ionizing radiation. The surviving fraction of cells was determined, being found to be a function of the radiation dose. The cell survival curves obtained as a function of radiation dose were modified by the inclusion of varying doses of glutamine in the medium, with glutamine demonstrating a radioprotective effect. The radioprotectant effect of glutamine for CHO cells was more pronounced at higher radiation doses. These results support the idea that glutamine protects body systems such as the gut more directly as a radioprotector as opposed to a more indirect route, such as preventing bacterial translocation from the gut. 16 refs.

  10. Calcium protects differentiating neuroblastoma cells during 50 Hz electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Tonini, R; Baroni, M D; Masala, E; Micheletti, M; Ferroni, A; Mazzanti, M

    2001-11-01

    Despite growing concern about electromagnetic radiation, the interaction between 50- to 60-Hz fields and biological structures remains obscure. Epidemiological studies have failed to prove a significantly correlation between exposure to radiation fields and particular pathologies. We demonstrate that a 50- to 60-Hz magnetic field interacts with cell differentiation through two opposing mechanisms: it antagonizes the shift in cell membrane surface charges that occur during the early phases of differentiation and it modulates hyperpolarizing K channels by increasing intracellular Ca. The simultaneous onset of both mechanisms prevents alterations in cell differentiation. We propose that cells are normally protected against electromagnetic insult. Pathologies may arise, however, if intracellular Ca regulation or K channel activation malfunctions.

  11. NETRIN-4 protects glioblastoma cells FROM temozolomide induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Hu, Yizhou; Ylivinkka, Irene; Li, Huini; Chen, Ping; Keski-Oja, Jorma; Hyytiäinen, Marko

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary tumor of the central nervous system. The drug temozolomide (TMZ) prolongs lifespan in many glioblastoma patients. The sensitivity of glioblastoma cells to TMZ is interfered by many factors, such as the expression of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and activation of AKT signaling. We have recently identified the interaction between netrin-4 (NTN4) and integrin beta-4 (ITGB4), which promotes glioblastoma cell proliferation via activating AKT-mTOR signaling pathway. In the current work we have explored the effect of NTN4/ITGB4 interaction on TMZ induced glioblastoma cell senescence. We report here that the suppression of either ITGB4 or NTN4 in glioblastoma cell lines significantly enhances cellular senescence. The sensitivity of GBM cells to TMZ was primarily determined by the expression of MGMT. To omit the effect of MGMT, we concentrated on the cell lines devoid of expression of MGMT. NTN4 partially inhibited TMZ induced cell senescence and rescued AKT from dephosphorylation in U251MG cells, a cell line bearing decent levels of ITGB4. However, addition of exogenous NTN4 displayed no significant effect on TMZ induced senescence rescue or AKT activation in U87MG cells, which expressed ITGB4 at low levels. Furthermore, overexpression of ITGB4 combined with exogenous NTN4 significantly attenuated U87MG cell senescence induced by TMZ. These data suggest that NTN4 protects glioblastoma cells from TMZ induced senescence, probably via rescuing TMZ triggered ITGB4 dependent AKT dephosphorylation. This suggests that interfering the interaction between NTN4 and ITGB4 or concomitant use of the inhibitors of the AKT pathway may improve the therapeutic efficiency of TMZ.

  12. Caffeic acid protects hydrogen peroxide induced cell damage in WI-38 human lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Kyoung Hwa; Zhang, Rui; Piao, Meijing; Chae, Sungwook; Kim, Kil Nam; Jeon, You Jin; Park, Doek Bae; You, Ho Jin; Kim, Jin Sook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2006-09-01

    Cytoprotective effect of caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxy cinnamic acid) on human lung fibroblast (WI-38) cells against hydrogen peroxide induced damage was investigated. Caffeic acid was found to scavenge intracellular reactive oxygen species, and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, and thus prevented lipid peroxidation. The caffeic acid protected cell damage of WI-38 cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), via the activation of extracellular signal regulated kinase protein. Caffeic acid increased the activity of catalase and its protein expression. Hence, from the present study, it is suggestive that caffeic acid protects WI-38 cells against H2O2 damage by enhancing the cellular antioxidant activity.

  13. Nerve growth factor protects against aluminum-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Ohyashiki, Takao; Satoh, Eiko; Okada, Morihiro; Takadera, Tsuneo; Sahara, Masako

    2002-07-15

    In the present study, we examined the effect of two salts of aluminum (Al), aluminum maltolate (Almal) and aluminum chloride (AlCl(3)), on the cell viability of PC12 cells in the absence and presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). A 72-h exposure of PC12 cells to Almal (300 microM) resulted in a marked increase of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) release from the cells and a decrease of 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) activity. These results indicate that Almal induces a decrease in the cell viability. Under the same conditions, Almal also caused DNA ladder formation and chromatin condensation. In contrast, AlCl(3) did not showed an increased LDH release and a decreased MTT activity in the concentration range of the salt tested (0.1-1 mM). The extent of LDH release and MTT activity decrease induced by Almal treatment closely depended on the amount of Almal incorporated into the cells. An increase in the fluorescence intensity of 6-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, di(acetoxymethyl ester) (C-DCDHF-DA) which was loaded into the cell by Almal treatment and its prevention by pyrrolodine dithiocarbamate, a potent antioxidant, suggested that Almal-induced cell death partly proceeds via reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. NGF effectively inhibited the increase of LDH release and the decrease of MTT activity, as well as DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation. However, NGF did not inhibit the increase of C-DCDHF-DA fluorescence in the cells induced by Almal treatment. From these results, it is suggested that ROS production associated with accumulation of Al is one possible important factor in the onset of Al neurotoxicity via apoptotic cell death and that NGF protects against cell degeneration associated with Al accumulation, but independently of ROS production.

  14. Output-increasing, protective cover for a solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Hammerbacher, Milfred D.

    1995-11-21

    A flexible cover (14) for a flexible solar cell (12) protects the cell from the ambient and increases the cell's efficiency. The cell(12)includes silicon spheres (16) held in a flexible aluminum sheet matrix (20,22). The cover (14) is a flexible, protective layer (60) of light-transparent material having a relatively flat upper, free surface (64) and an irregular opposed surface (66). The irregular surface (66) includes first portions (68) which conform to the polar regions (31R) of the spheres (16) and second convex (72) or concave (90) portions (72 or 90) which define spaces (78) in conjunction with the reflective surface (20T) of one aluminum sheet (20). Without the cover (14) light (50) falling on the surface (20T) between the spheres (16) is wasted, that is, it does not fall on a sphere (16). The surfaces of the second portions are non-parallel to the direction of the otherwise wasted light (50), which fact, together with a selected relationship between the refractive indices of the cover and the spaces, result in sufficient diffraction of the otherwise wasted light (50) so that about 25% of it is reflected from the surface (20T) onto a sphere (16).

  15. Gentiana asclepiadea protects human cells against oxidation DNA lesions.

    PubMed

    Hudecová, Alexandra; Hašplová, Katarína; Miadoková, Eva; Magdolenová, Zuzana; Rinna, Alessandra; Collins, Andrew R; Gálová, Eliška; Vaculčíková, Dagmar; Gregáň, Fridrich; Dušinská, Mária

    2012-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine whether the methanolic and aqueous extracts from the haulm and flower of Gentiana asclepiadea exhibited free radical scavenging and protective (antigenotoxic) effect against DNA oxidation induced by H(2)O(2) in human lymphocytes and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293). All four extracts exhibited high scavenging effect on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals at concentrations 2.5 and 25 mg ml(-1). The level of DNA damage was measured using the alkaline version of single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Challenge with H(2)O(2) shows that the pre-treatment of the cells with non-genotoxic doses of Gentiana extracts protected human DNA-either eliminated or significantly reduced H(2)O(2) induced DNA damage. The genotoxic activity of H(2)O(2) was most effectively decreased after 30 min of pre-incubation with 0.05 mg ml(-1) (range, 93.5%-96.3% of reduction in lymphocytes) and 0.25 mg ml(-1) (range, 59.5%-71.4% and 52.7%-66.4% of reduction in lymphocytes and HEK 293 cells, respectively) of G. asclepiadea extracts. These results suggest that the tested G. asclepiadea extracts could be considered as an effective natural antioxidant source.

  16. Type I collagen gel protects murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells from TNFα-induced cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong-Ju; He, Wen-Qi; Chen, Ling; Liu, Wei-Wei; Xu, Qian; Xia, Ming-Yu; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Fujisaki, Hitomi; Hattori, Shunji; Tashiro, Shin-ichi; Onodera, Satoshi; Ikejima, Takashi

    2015-02-20

    Murine fibrosarcoma L929 cells have been used to test efficacy of proinflammatory cytokine TNFα. In the present study, we reported on protective effect of type I collagen gel used as L929 cell culture. L929 cell grew and proliferated well on collagen gel. However, the L929 cells exhibited cobblestone-like morphology which was much different from the spread fusiform shape when cultured on conventional cell dishes as well as the cells tended to aggregate. On conventional cell culture dishes, the cells treated with TNFα became round in shape and eventually died in a necroptotic manner. The cells cultured on collagen gel, however, were completely unaffected. TNFα treatment was reported to induce autophagy in L929 cells on the plastic dish, and therefore we investigated the effect of collagen gel on induction of autophagy. The results indicated that autophagy induced by TNFα treatment was much reduced when the cells were cultured on collagen gel. In conclusion, type I collagen gel protected L929 cell from TNFα-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Collagen gel culture changed the morphology of L929 cells. • L929 cell cultured on collagen gel were resistant to TNFα-induced cell death. • Collagen gel culture inhibited TNFα-induced autophagy in L929 cells.

  17. Cysteamine protects gastric epithelial cell monolayers against drug induced damage: evidence for direct cellular protection by sulphydryl compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, M; Razandi, M; Raza, A; Szabo, S; Ivey, J

    1992-01-01

    The sulphydryl containing drug cysteamine protects gastric mucosa in vivo against acute injury. It is not known whether this protection includes a direct effect on gastric cells. Using gastric epithelial cell monolayers derived from a well differentiated human cell line, we evaluated whether cysteamine protects against taurocholate or indomethacin induced damage in conditions which completely exclude the influence of vascular, hormonal, and neural factors. The effect of cysteamine on prostaglandin production by monolayer cells in vitro was also assessed. Cysteamine decreased damage brought about by sodium taurocholate and indomethacin by 40% (p less than 0.01) and 50% (p less than 0.01) respectively. The sulphydryl blocker iodoacetamide prevented the protective effect of cysteamine. Pretreatment with indomethacin, which inhibited prostaglandin E2 output by 60%, did not prevent protection by cysteamine; incubation with cysteamine decreased prostaglandin E2 production by cultured cells. We conclude that (i) cysteamine directly protected gastric epithelial cells in vitro (ii) this protection occurred with indomethacin, which interferes with cellular metabolism of prostaglandins, and taurocholate, whose damaging action at neutral pH is unrelated to interference with prostanoid metabolism, (iii) cysteamine protection in vitro is unrelated to endogenous prostaglandins and is probably mediated by endogenous sulphydryl compounds. Images Figure 1A-1B Figure 1C-1E PMID:1740273

  18. Roscovitine protects murine Leydig cells from lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tiancheng; Hu, Guanghui; Dong, Binbin; Yan, Yangye; Liu, Min; Yao, Xudong; Zheng, Junhua; Xu, Yunfei

    2017-05-01

    Roscovitine is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, which has been previously investigated for its anticancer effects. It has also been confirmed that roscovitine can downregulate the expression of myeloid cell leukemia-1 protein to inhibit inflammation. In the present study, roscovitine was used to treat inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced model mice. At the cellular level, Leydig cells isolated from mouse testis were assessed for inflammatory factors. It was revealed that roscovitine successfully reduced inflammation-associated injury induced by LPS pretreatment. At the molecular level, roscovitine was found to exert this effect through promotion of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to suggest that roscovitine has a protective role in Leydig cells through its anti-inflammatory action.

  19. L-carnitine protects C2C12 cells against mitochondrial superoxide overproduction and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Le Borgne, Françoise; Ravaut, Gaétan; Bernard, Arnaud; Demarquoy, Jean

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify and characterize the protective effect that L-carnitine exerted against an oxidative stress in C2C12 cells. METHODS Myoblastic C2C12 cells were treated with menadione, a vitamin K analog that engenders oxidative stress, and the protective effect of L-carnitine (a nutrient involved in fatty acid metabolism and the control of the oxidative process), was assessed by monitoring various parameters related to the oxidative stress, autophagy and cell death. RESULTS Associated with its physiological function, a muscle cell metabolism is highly dependent on oxygen and may produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially under pathological conditions. High levels of ROS are known to induce injuries in cell structure as they interact at many levels in cell function. In C2C12 cells, a treatment with menadione induced a loss of transmembrane mitochondrial potential, an increase in mitochondrial production of ROS; it also induces autophagy and was able to provoke cell death. Pre-treatment of the cells with L-carnitine reduced ROS production, diminished autophagy and protected C2C12 cells against menadione-induced deleterious effects. CONCLUSION In conclusion, L-carnitine limits the oxidative stress in these cells and prevents cell death. PMID:28289521

  20. Reliability Through Life of Internal Protection Devices in Small-Cell ABSL Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubauer, Jeremy; Ng, Ka Lok; Bennetti, Andrea; Pearson, Chris; Rao, gopal

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews a reliability analysis of small cell protection batteries. The contents include: 1) The s-p Topology; 2) Cell Level Protection Devices; 3) Battery Level Fault Protection; 4) Large Cell Comparison; and 5) Battery Level Testing and Results.

  1. Selenium hyperaccumulation offers protection from cell disruptor herbivores

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hyperaccumulation, the rare capacity of certain plant species to accumulate toxic trace elements to levels several orders of magnitude higher than other species growing on the same site, is thought to be an elemental defense mechanism against herbivores and pathogens. Previous research has shown that selenium (Se) hyperaccumulation protects plants from a variety of herbivores and pathogens. Selenium hyperaccumulating plants sequester Se in discrete locations in the leaf periphery, making them potentially more susceptible to some herbivore feeding modes than others. In this study we investigate the protective function of Se in the Se hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata and Astragalus bisulcatus against two cell disrupting herbivores, the western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) and the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae). Results Astragalus bisulcatus and S. pinnata with high Se concentrations (greater than 650 mg Se kg-1) were less subject to thrips herbivory than plants with low Se levels (less than 150 mg Se kg-1). Furthermore, in plants containing elevated Se levels, leaves with higher concentrations of Se suffered less herbivory than leaves with less Se. Spider mites also preferred to feed on low-Se A. bisulcatus and S. pinnata plants rather than high-Se plants. Spider mite populations on A. bisulcatus decreased after plants were given a higher concentration of Se. Interestingly, spider mites could colonize A. bisulcatus plants containing up to 200 mg Se kg-1 dry weight, concentrations which are toxic to many other herbivores. Selenium distribution and speciation studies using micro-focused X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) mapping and Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the spider mites accumulated primarily methylselenocysteine, the relatively non-toxic form of Se that is also the predominant form of Se in hyperaccumulators. Conclusions This is the first reported study investigating the protective effect of

  2. Selenium hyperaccumulation offers protection from cell disruptor herbivores.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Colin F; Freeman, John L; Reynolds, Ray J B; Cappa, Jennifer J; Fakra, Sirine C; Marcus, Matthew A; Lindblom, Stormy D; Quinn, Erin K; Bennett, Lindsay E; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2010-08-27

    Hyperaccumulation, the rare capacity of certain plant species to accumulate toxic trace elements to levels several orders of magnitude higher than other species growing on the same site, is thought to be an elemental defense mechanism against herbivores and pathogens. Previous research has shown that selenium (Se) hyperaccumulation protects plants from a variety of herbivores and pathogens. Selenium hyperaccumulating plants sequester Se in discrete locations in the leaf periphery, making them potentially more susceptible to some herbivore feeding modes than others. In this study we investigate the protective function of Se in the Se hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata and Astragalus bisulcatus against two cell disrupting herbivores, the western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) and the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae). Astragalus bisulcatus and S. pinnata with high Se concentrations (greater than 650 mg Se kg(-1)) were less subject to thrips herbivory than plants with low Se levels (less than 150 mg Se kg(-1)). Furthermore, in plants containing elevated Se levels, leaves with higher concentrations of Se suffered less herbivory than leaves with less Se. Spider mites also preferred to feed on low-Se A. bisulcatus and S. pinnata plants rather than high-Se plants. Spider mite populations on A. bisulcatus decreased after plants were given a higher concentration of Se. Interestingly, spider mites could colonize A. bisulcatus plants containing up to 200 mg Se kg(-1) dry weight, concentrations which are toxic to many other herbivores. Selenium distribution and speciation studies using micro-focused X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) mapping and Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the spider mites accumulated primarily methylselenocysteine, the relatively non-toxic form of Se that is also the predominant form of Se in hyperaccumulators. This is the first reported study investigating the protective effect of hyperaccumulated Se against cell

  3. TMIGD1 is a novel adhesion molecule that protects epithelial cells from oxidative cell injury.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Emad; Bondzie, Philip A; Rezazadeh, Kobra; Meyer, Rosana D; Hartsough, Edward; Henderson, Joel M; Schwartz, John H; Chitalia, Vipul; Rahimi, Nader

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative damage to renal tubular epithelial cells is a fundamental pathogenic mechanism implicated in both acute kidney injury and chronic kidney diseases. Because epithelial cell survival influences the outcome of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney diseases, identifying its molecular regulators could provide new insight into pathobiology and possible new therapeutic strategies for these diseases. We have identified transmembrane and immunoglobulin domain-containing 1 (TMIGD1) as a novel adhesion molecule, which is highly conserved in humans and other species. TMIGD1 is expressed in renal tubular epithelial cells and promotes cell survival. The extracellular domain of TMIGD1 contains two putative immunoglobulin domains and mediates self-dimerization. Our data suggest that TMIGD1 regulates transepithelial electric resistance and permeability of renal epithelial cells. TMIGD1 controls cell migration, cell morphology, and protects renal epithelial cells from oxidative- and nutrient-deprivation-induced cell injury. Hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative cell injury downregulates TMIGD1 expression and targets it for ubiquitination. Moreover, TMIGD1 expression is significantly affected in both acute kidney injury and in deoxy-corticosterone acetate and sodium chloride (deoxy-corticosterone acetate salt)-induced chronic hypertensive kidney disease mouse models. Taken together, we have identified TMIGD1 as a novel cell adhesion molecule expressed in kidney epithelial cells that protects kidney epithelial cells from oxidative cell injury to promote cell survival.

  4. Protection against fat cell hyperplasia in a hibernator, Glis glis.

    PubMed

    Mrosovsky, N; Nash, P; Faust, I M

    1987-10-01

    Dormice, Glis glis, were fed a high-fat diet for 11 mo in one experiment: in another experiment they were fed a high-fat diet for 5 mo, either at room temperature (21.5 degrees C) or in a warm room (27 degrees C). Only in the latter group did adipocyte hyperplasia occur; this was significant in all the fat depots studied (inguinal, retroperitoneal, and gonadal). In the other groups there was no evidence of fat cell hyperplasia, despite weight gains from approximately 160 g (peaks on chow diet) to approximately 250 g (maximums on high-fat diet). Instead, fat cell size, assessed from biopsies of the inguinal area, became considerably enlarged. Taken together with earlier data from other species, the results suggest that hibernators are protected against fat cell hyperplasia. In dormice this protection appears to be present at all phases of their seasonal weight cycles. For species that experience several cycles of weight gain and loss in their lives, it may be adaptive to avoid increases in adipocyte number.

  5. A Translocated Bacterial Protein Protects Vascular Endothelial Cells from Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Michael C; Scheidegger, Florine; Dehio, Michaela; Balmelle-Devaux, Nadège; Schulein, Ralf; Guye, Patrick; Chennakesava, Cuddapah S; Biedermann, Barbara; Dehio, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    The modulation of host cell apoptosis by bacterial pathogens is of critical importance for the outcome of the infection process. The capacity of Bartonella henselae and B. quintana to cause vascular tumor formation in immunocompromised patients is linked to the inhibition of vascular endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis. Here, we show that translocation of BepA, a type IV secretion (T4S) substrate, is necessary and sufficient to inhibit EC apoptosis. Ectopic expression in ECs allowed mapping of the anti-apoptotic activity of BepA to the Bep intracellular delivery domain, which, as part of the signal for T4S, is conserved in other T4S substrates. The anti-apoptotic activity appeared to be limited to BepA orthologs of B. henselae and B. quintana and correlated with (i) protein localization to the host cell plasma membrane, (ii) elevated levels of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), and (iii) increased expression of cAMP-responsive genes. The pharmacological elevation of cAMP levels protected ECs from apoptosis, indicating that BepA mediates anti-apoptosis by heightening cAMP levels by a plasma membrane–associated mechanism. Finally, we demonstrate that BepA mediates protection of ECs against apoptosis triggered by cytotoxic T lymphocytes, suggesting a physiological context in which the anti-apoptotic activity of BepA contributes to tumor formation in the chronically infected vascular endothelium. PMID:17121462

  6. CDDO-Me protects normal lung and breast epithelial cells but not cancer cells from radiation.

    PubMed

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Delgado, Oliver; Cardentey, Agnelio; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2014-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs). In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF) = 1.3), and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients.

  7. CDDO-Me Protects Normal Lung and Breast Epithelial Cells but Not Cancer Cells from Radiation

    PubMed Central

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Delgado, Oliver; Cardentey, Agnelio; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2014-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs). In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF) = 1.3), and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients. PMID:25536195

  8. Interfacial properties of cell culture media with cell-protecting additives.

    PubMed

    Michaels, J D; Nowak, J E; Mallik, A K; Koczo, K; Wasan, D T; Papoutsakis, E T

    1995-08-20

    In an effort to identify key rheological properties that contribute to cell protection against shear damage, we have measured surface shear and dilatationai viscosities, dynamic surface tension, foaminess, and foam stability for media containing cell-protecting additives. In a companion article,(18) we found that cell-to-bubble attachment was decreased in media containing Methocel, Pluronic F68, or polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). In medium containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) or potyvinyl-pyrrolidone (PVP), attachment was increased. PEG, PVP, serum (FBS), and serum albumin (BSA) increased the surface viscosity of the air/medium surface (thus, producing a more rigid interface), whereas F68 and PVA lowered it greatly. Foaming experiments showed that Methocel, PEG, PVA, and F68 decreased the foam half-life while FBS, BSA, and PVP were foam stabilizers. Interestingly, the foam stability of CHO cell suspensions decreased significantly for cell concentrations higher than ca. 2 x 10(6) cells/mL. Nonviable CHO cells reduced foam stability further. Dynamic surface tension values of the media tested were found significantly differentfrom their static surface tension values. The interfacial properties measured and the results presented in the companion study suggest that the additives that lower dynamic surface tension the most (Methocel, F68, and PVA) correlate well with reduced cell-to-bubble attachment, and thus, cell protection. Reduced dynamic surface tension with these additives implies faster surfactant adsorption, mobile interfaces, lower surface viscosity, and foam destabilization. Because PEG and PVP resulted in increased cell-to-bubble attachment and had different interfacial properties, a different mechanism (compared with Methocel, PVP, and F68) is apparently responsible for their protective effect. Finally, cell protection offered by FBS and BSA is attributed to the foam stabilization properties provided by these additives. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons Inc.

  9. Morphinane alkaloids with cell protective effects from Sinomenium acutum.

    PubMed

    Bao, Guan-Hu; Qin, Guo-Wei; Wang, Rui; Tang, Xi-Can

    2005-07-01

    One new morphinane alkaloid, sinomenine N-oxide (1), and one new natural occurring morphinane alkaloid, N-demethylsinomenine (2), together with six known alkaloids, 7,8-didehydro-4-hydroxy-3,7-dimethoxymorphinan-6-ol (3), sinomenine (4), sinoacutine (5), N-norsinoacutine, acutumine, and acutumidine, were isolated from the stems of Sinomenium acutum. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and chemical methods. Compounds 2, 3, and 5 have protective effects against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell injury.

  10. Dying Cells Protect Survivors from Radiation-Induced Cell Death in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bilak, Amber; Uyetake, Lyle; Su, Tin Tin

    2014-01-01

    We report a phenomenon wherein induction of cell death by a variety of means in wing imaginal discs of Drosophila larvae resulted in the activation of an anti-apoptotic microRNA, bantam. Cells in the vicinity of dying cells also become harder to kill by ionizing radiation (IR)-induced apoptosis. Both ban activation and increased protection from IR required receptor tyrosine kinase Tie, which we identified in a genetic screen for modifiers of ban. tie mutants were hypersensitive to radiation, and radiation sensitivity of tie mutants was rescued by increased ban gene dosage. We propose that dying cells activate ban in surviving cells through Tie to make the latter cells harder to kill, thereby preserving tissues and ensuring organism survival. The protective effect we report differs from classical radiation bystander effect in which neighbors of irradiated cells become more prone to death. The protective effect also differs from the previously described effect of dying cells that results in proliferation of nearby cells in Drosophila larval discs. If conserved in mammals, a phenomenon in which dying cells make the rest harder to kill by IR could have implications for treatments that involve the sequential use of cytotoxic agents and radiation therapy. PMID:24675716

  11. Dying cells protect survivors from radiation-induced cell death in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bilak, Amber; Uyetake, Lyle; Su, Tin Tin

    2014-03-01

    We report a phenomenon wherein induction of cell death by a variety of means in wing imaginal discs of Drosophila larvae resulted in the activation of an anti-apoptotic microRNA, bantam. Cells in the vicinity of dying cells also become harder to kill by ionizing radiation (IR)-induced apoptosis. Both ban activation and increased protection from IR required receptor tyrosine kinase Tie, which we identified in a genetic screen for modifiers of ban. tie mutants were hypersensitive to radiation, and radiation sensitivity of tie mutants was rescued by increased ban gene dosage. We propose that dying cells activate ban in surviving cells through Tie to make the latter cells harder to kill, thereby preserving tissues and ensuring organism survival. The protective effect we report differs from classical radiation bystander effect in which neighbors of irradiated cells become more prone to death. The protective effect also differs from the previously described effect of dying cells that results in proliferation of nearby cells in Drosophila larval discs. If conserved in mammals, a phenomenon in which dying cells make the rest harder to kill by IR could have implications for treatments that involve the sequential use of cytotoxic agents and radiation therapy.

  12. Dichloroacetate induces protective autophagy in esophageal squamous carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hong-Yu; Wang, He-Nan; Xia, Feng-Yu; Sun, Yan; Liu, Hong-Li; Yan, Li-Li; Li, Shan-Shan; Jiang, Dong-Chun; Xu, Mei-Mei

    2017-09-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) is an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, which promotes the flux of carbohydrates into mitochondria and enhances the aerobic oxidation of glucose. DCA has previously been demonstrated to exhibit antitumor properties. The present study revealed that treatment with DCA induced increased levels of autophagy-associated proteins in esophageal squamous carcinoma cells while minimally affecting apoptosis. The present study examined the localization of light chain (LC)-3 by adenovirus infection with a green fluorescent protein (FP)-red FP-LC3 reporter construction and confirmed that DCA treatment induced significant autophagy. Furthermore, the inhibition of DCA-induced autophagy facilitated cell apoptosis and improved the drug sensitivity of esophageal squamous carcinoma cells to DCA and 5-FU (5-fluorouracil). The proliferation of TE-1 cells was markedly inhibited at low concentrations of DCA and 5-FU treatment when subjected to Atg5 mRNA interference, indicating that autophagy performed a protective role in cell survival upon DCA treatment. To determine the underlying mechanism of DCA-induced autophagy, the present study measured alterations in autophagy-associated signaling pathways. Notably, the protein kinase B (Akt)-mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, an important negative regulator of autophagy, was demonstrated to be suppressed by DCA treatment. These results may direct the development of novel strategies for the treatment of esophageal squamous carcinoma based on the combined use of DCA and autophagy inhibitors.

  13. An Engineered Herpesvirus Activates Dendritic Cells and Induces Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yijie; Chen, Min; Jin, Huali; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; He, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV) are human pathogens that switch between lytic and latent infection. While attenuated HSV is explored for vaccine, the underlying event remains poorly defined. Here we report that recombinant HSV-1 with a mutation in the γ134.5 protein, a virulence factor, stimulates dendritic cell (DC) maturation which is dependent on TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1). When exposed to CD11+ DCs, the mutant virus that lacks the amino terminus of γ134.5 undergoes temporal replication without production of infectious virus. Mechanistically, this leads to sequential phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and p65/RelA. In correlation, DCs up-regulate the expression of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines. However, selective inhibition of TBK1 precludes phosphorylation of IRF3 and subsequent DC activation by the γ134.5 mutant. Herein, the γ134.5 mutant is immune-stimulatory and non-destructive to DCs. Remarkably, upon immunization the γ134.5 mutant induces protection against lethal challenge by the wild type virus, indicative of its vaccine potential. Furthermore, CD11+ DCs primed by the γ134.5 mutant in vivo mediate protection upon adoptive transfer. These results suggest that activation of TBK1 by engineered HSV is crucial for DC maturation, which may contribute to protective immunity. PMID:28150813

  14. Sickle Cell Trait Protects Against Plasmodium falciparum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Billo, Mounkaila A.; Johnson, Eric S.; Doumbia, Seydou O.; Poudiougou, Belco; Sagara, Issaka; Diawara, Sory I.; Diakité, Mahamadou; Diallo, Mouctar; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Tounkara, Anatole; Rice, Janet; James, Mark A.; Krogstad, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Although sickle cell trait protects against severe disease due to Plasmodium falciparum, it has not been clear whether sickle trait also protects against asymptomatic infection (parasitemia). To address this question, the authors identified 171 persistently smear-negative children and 450 asymptomatic persistently smear-positive children in Bancoumana, Mali (June 1996 to June 1998). They then followed both groups for 2 years using a cohort-based strategy. Among the 171 children with persistently negative smears, the median time for conversion to smear-positive was longer for children with sickle trait than for children without (274 vs. 108 days, P < 0.001; Cox hazard ratio = 0.56, 95% confidence interval: 0.33, 0.96; P = 0.036). Similar differences were found in the median times to reinfection after spontaneous clearance without treatment (365 days vs. 184 days; P = 0.01). Alternatively, among the 450 asymptomatic children with persistently positive smears, the median time for conversion to smear-negative (spontaneous clearance) was shorter for children with sickle trait than for children without (190 vs. 365 days; P = 0.02). These protective effects of sickle trait against asymptomatic P. falciparum infection under conditions of natural transmission were demonstrable using a cohort-based approach but not when the same data were examined using a cross-sectional approach. PMID:23035141

  15. Defining Features of Protective CD4 T cell responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Shunsuke; Mayer-Barber, Katrin D.; Barber, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    CD4 T cells are critical for control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection and represent the best hope for vaccine-elicited protection. However, little is understood about the properties of Mtb-specific CD4 T cells that mediate control, and the lack of correlates of protection present a significant barrier to the rational development of new vaccination and therapeutic strategies which are sorely needed. Here we discuss the features of protective CD4 T cells including recent evidence for IFN-γ dependent and independent mechanisms of protection, poor protection by terminally differentiated cells and the importance of T cell migratory capacity for the control of Mtb infection. PMID:25000593

  16. [Garlic compounds protect vascular endothelial cells from oxidant injury].

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, T; Lau, B H

    1997-10-01

    Oxygen radical injury and lipid peroxidation have been suggested as major causes of cancer, atherosclerosis and the aging process. We examined in vitro the effect of garlic on H2O2-induced oxidant injury in bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAEC). After overnight preincubation with Aged Garlic Extract (AGE, from Wakunaga Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Japan) or S-allyl cysteine (SAC), PAEC monolayers were exposed to H2O2 for 3 h. Cell viability (MTT assay), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and lipid peroxidation (TBA-RS) were measured to assess oxidant injury. AGE (1-4 mg/ml) pretreatment significantly reduced the loss of cell viability induced by 50-100 microM of H2O2. AGE and SAC exhibited dose dependent inhibition of both LDH release and TBA-RS production induced by 50 microM of H2O2. The results show that AGE and SAC can protect vascular endothelial cells from oxidant injury. Numerous garlic compounds could be involved in the antioxidant properties of garlic, while there could be some prooxidant compounds derived from garlic. It is important to keep an array of antioxidant compounds to develop good herbal preparation, like AGE.

  17. Nanomaterial Solutions for the Protection of Insulin Producing Beta Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchison, Nicole Ann

    Islet transplantation is a promising treatment for type 1 diabetes. However, even with the many successes, islet transplantation has yet to reach its full potential. Limited islet sources, loss of cell viability during isolation and culture, and post-transplant graft loss are a few of the issues preventing extensive use of islet transplantation. The application of biomaterial systems to alleviate some of the stresses affecting islet viability has led to improvements in isolation and transplantation outcomes, but problems persist. In this work we approach two distinct issues affecting islet viability; ischemic conditions and immunological attack post-transplant. Ischemic conditions have been linked to a loss of islet graft function and occur during organ preservation, islet isolation and culture, and after islets are transplanted. We show that liposomal delivery of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to beta cells can limit cell death and loss of function in ischemic conditions. We demonstrate that by functionalizing liposomes with the fibronectin-mimetic peptide PR_b, delivery of liposomes to porcine islets and rat beta cells is increased compared to nontargeted controls. Additionally, liposomes are shown to protect by providing both ATP and lipids to the ischemic cells. The delivery of ATP was investigated here but application of PR_b functionalized liposomes could be extended to other interesting cargos as well. The second area of investigation involves encapsulation of islets with silica nanoparticles to create a permselective barrier. Silica nanoparticles are an interesting material for encapsulation given their ability to be fine-tuned and further functionalized. We demonstrate that size-tunable, fluorescent silica nanoparticles can be assembled layer-by-layer on the surface of cells and that silica nanoparticle encapsulated islets are able to secrete insulin in response to a glucose challenge.

  18. Fetal cell microchimerism: a protective role in autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Cirello, Valentina; Rizzo, Roberta; Crippa, Milena; Campi, Irene; Bortolotti, Daria; Bolzani, Silvia; Colombo, Carla; Vannucchi, Guia; Maffini, Maria Antonia; de Liso, Federica; Ferrero, Stefano; Finelli, Palma; Fugazzola, Laura

    2015-07-01

    The physiological persistence of fetal cells in the circulation and tissue of a previously pregnant woman is called fetal cell microchimerism (FCM). It has been hypothesized to play a role in systemic autoimmune disease; however, only limited data are available regarding its role in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Circulating FCM was analyzed in a large series of previously pregnant women with Graves' disease (GD), Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), or no disease (healthy controls (HCs)). To exclude the possible bias related to placental factors, the polymorphic pattern of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) gene, which is known to be involved in the tolerance of fetal cells by the maternal immune system, was investigated. FCM was evaluated by PCR in the peripheral blood, and the Y chromosome was identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization in some GD tissues. HLA-G polymorphism typing was assessed by real-time PCR. FCM was significantly more frequent in HC (63.6%) than in GD (33.3%) or HT (27.8%) women (P=0.0004 and P=0.001 respectively). A quantitative analysis confirmed that circulating male DNA was more abundant in HC than it was in GD or HT. Microchimeric cells were documented in vessels and in thyroid follicles. In neither GD/HT patients nor HC women was the HLA-G typing different between FCM-positive and FCM-negative cases. The higher prevalence of FCM in HC as compared to GD and HT patients suggests that it plays a possible protective role in autoimmune thyroid disorders. Placental factors have been excluded as determinants of the differences found. The vascular and tissue localization of microchimeric cells further highlights the ability of those cells to migrate to damaged tissues. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  19. Are natural killer cells protecting the metabolically healthy obese patient?

    PubMed

    Lynch, Lydia A; O'Connell, Jean M; Kwasnik, Anna K; Cawood, Thomas J; O'Farrelly, Cliona; O'Shea, Donal B

    2009-03-01

    With the emerging obesity pandemic, identifying those who appear to be protected from adverse consequences such as type 2 diabetes and certain malignancies will become important. We propose that the circulating immune system plays a role in the development of these comorbidities. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 52 patients with severe obesity attending a hospital weight-management clinic and 11 lean healthy controls. Patients were classified into metabolically "healthy obese" (n = 26; mean age 42.6 years, mean BMI 46.8 kg/m(2)) or "unhealthy obese" (n = 26; mean age 45 years, mean BMI 47.5 kg/m(2)) groups, based upon standard cutoff points for blood pressure, lipid profile, and fasting glucose. Circulating lymphoid populations and phenotypes were assessed by flow cytometry. Obese patients had significantly less circulating natural killer (NK) and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) compared to lean controls. There were significantly higher levels of NK cells and CTLs in the healthy obese group compared to the unhealthy obese group (NK: 11.7% vs. 6.5%, P < 0.0001, CD8 13.4% vs. 9.3%, P = 0.04), independent of age and BMI and these NK cells were also less activated in the healthy compared to the unhealthy group (CD69, 4.1% vs. 11.8%, P = 0.03). This is the first time that quantitative differences in the circulating immune system of obese patients with similar BMI but different metabolic profiles have been described. The significantly higher levels of CTLs and NK cells, which express fewer inhibitory molecules, could protect against malignancy, infection, and metabolic disease seen in obesity.

  20. Somatostatin protects photoreceptor cells against high glucose–induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeo, Aurora; Cazzoni, Daniele; Beltramo, Elena; Hernández, Cristina; Porta, Massimo; Simó, Rafael; Valverde, Ángela M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many cellular and molecular studies in experimental animals and early retinal function tests in patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR) have shown that retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of the disease. Somatostatin (SST) is one of the most important neuroprotective factors synthesized by the retina: SST levels are decreased in parallel to retinal neurodegeneration in early stages of DR. In this study, we characterized the induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death) in a 661W photoreceptor-like cell line cultured under high glucose (HG) conditions and the effect of SST. Methods A 661W photoreceptor-like cell line and retinal explants from 10-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were cultured under HG conditions and treated with SST. Results Hyperglycemia significantly reduced the cellular viability by increasing the percentage of apoptotic cells, and this effect was ameliorated by SST (p˂0.05). Activation of caspase-8 by hyperglycemia was found in the 661W cells and retinal explants and decreased in the presence of SST (p˂0.05). Moreover, we detected activation of calpain-2 associated with hyperglycemia-induced cell death, as well as increased protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) protein levels; both had a pattern of cleavage that was absent in the presence of SST (p˂0.05). Treatment of the 661W cells and retinal explants with SST for 24 h increased the phosphorylation of type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR; tyrosine 1165/1166) and protein kinase B (Akt; serine 473), suggesting this survival signaling is activated in the neuroretina by SST (p˂0.05). Conclusions This study has provided new mechanistic insights first into the involvement of calpain-2 and PTP1B in the loss of cell survival and increased caspase-8-dependent apoptosis induced by hyperglycemia in photoreceptor cells and second, on the protective effect of SST against apoptosis by the enhancement of IGF-IR-mediated Akt phosphorylation. PMID:28050125

  1. Somatostatin protects photoreceptor cells against high glucose-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Arroba, Ana I; Mazzeo, Aurora; Cazzoni, Daniele; Beltramo, Elena; Hernández, Cristina; Porta, Massimo; Simó, Rafael; Valverde, Ángela M

    2016-01-01

    Many cellular and molecular studies in experimental animals and early retinal function tests in patients with diabetic retinopathy (DR) have shown that retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of the disease. Somatostatin (SST) is one of the most important neuroprotective factors synthesized by the retina: SST levels are decreased in parallel to retinal neurodegeneration in early stages of DR. In this study, we characterized the induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death) in a 661W photoreceptor-like cell line cultured under high glucose (HG) conditions and the effect of SST. A 661W photoreceptor-like cell line and retinal explants from 10-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were cultured under HG conditions and treated with SST. Hyperglycemia significantly reduced the cellular viability by increasing the percentage of apoptotic cells, and this effect was ameliorated by SST (p˂0.05). Activation of caspase-8 by hyperglycemia was found in the 661W cells and retinal explants and decreased in the presence of SST (p˂0.05). Moreover, we detected activation of calpain-2 associated with hyperglycemia-induced cell death, as well as increased protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) protein levels; both had a pattern of cleavage that was absent in the presence of SST (p˂0.05). Treatment of the 661W cells and retinal explants with SST for 24 h increased the phosphorylation of type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR; tyrosine 1165/1166) and protein kinase B (Akt; serine 473), suggesting this survival signaling is activated in the neuroretina by SST (p˂0.05). This study has provided new mechanistic insights first into the involvement of calpain-2 and PTP1B in the loss of cell survival and increased caspase-8-dependent apoptosis induced by hyperglycemia in photoreceptor cells and second, on the protective effect of SST against apoptosis by the enhancement of IGF-IR-mediated Akt phosphorylation.

  2. Curcumin Protects Retinal Cells from Light- and Oxidant Stress-induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Md Nawajes A.; Patlolla, Jagan M.R.; Zheng, Lixin; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Tran, Julie-Thu A.; Wicker, Lea; Kasus-Jacobi, Anne; Elliott, Michael H.; Rao, Chinthalapally V.; Anderson, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease that has potential involvement of inflammatory and oxidative stress-related pathways in its pathogenesis. In search of effective therapeutic agents, we tested curcumin, a naturally-occurring compound with known anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties, in rat model of light induced retinal degeneration (LIRD) and in retina derived cell lines. We hypothesized that any compound effective against LIRD, which involves significant oxidative stress and inflammation, would be a candidate for further characterization for its potential application in AMD. We observed significant retinal neuroprotection in rats fed diets supplemented with curcumin (0.2% in diet) for 2 weeks. The mechanism of retinal protection from LIRD by curcumin involves inhibition of NF-κB activation and down-regulation of cellular inflammatory genes. When tested on retina-derived cell lines (661W and ARPE-19), pre-treatment of curcumin protected these cells from H2O2-induced cell death by up-regulating cellular protective enzymes, such as HO-1, thioredoxin. Since, curcumin with its pleiotropic activities can modulate the expression and activation of many cellular regulatory proteins such as NF-κB, AKT, NRF2 and growth factors, which in turn inhibit cellular inflammatory responses and protect cells; we speculate that curcumin would be an effective nutraceutical compound for preventive and augmentative therapy of AMD. PMID:19121385

  3. Life span extension and neuronal cell protection by Drosophila nicotinamidase.

    PubMed

    Balan, Vitaly; Miller, Gregory S; Kaplun, Ludmila; Balan, Karina; Chong, Zhao-Zhong; Li, Faqi; Kaplun, Alexander; VanBerkum, Mark F A; Arking, Robert; Freeman, D Carl; Maiese, Kenneth; Tzivion, Guri

    2008-10-10

    The life span of model organisms can be modulated by environmental conditions that influence cellular metabolism, oxidation, or DNA integrity. The yeast nicotinamidase gene pnc1 was identified as a key transcriptional target and mediator of calorie restriction and stress-induced life span extension. PNC1 is thought to exert its effect on yeast life span by modulating cellular nicotinamide and NAD levels, resulting in increased activity of Sir2 family class III histone deacetylases. In Caenorhabditis elegans, knockdown of a pnc1 homolog was shown recently to shorten the worm life span, whereas its overexpression increased survival under conditions of oxidative stress. The function and regulation of nicotinamidases in higher organisms has not been determined. Here, we report the identification and biochemical characterization of the Drosophila nicotinamidase, D-NAAM, and demonstrate that its overexpression significantly increases median and maximal fly life span. The life span extension was reversed in Sir2 mutant flies, suggesting Sir2 dependence. Testing for physiological effectors of D-NAAM in Drosophila S2 cells, we identified oxidative stress as a primary regulator, both at the transcription level and protein activity. In contrast to the yeast model, stress factors such as high osmolarity and heat shock, calorie restriction, or inhibitors of TOR and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways do not appear to regulate D-NAAM in S2 cells. Interestingly, the expression of D-NAAM in human neuronal cells conferred protection from oxidative stress-induced cell death in a sirtuin-dependent manner. Together, our findings establish a life span extending the ability of nicotinamidase in flies and offer a role for nicotinamide-modulating genes in oxidative stress regulated pathways influencing longevity and neuronal cell survival.

  4. Clonogenicity of human leukemic cells protected from cell-lethal agents by heat shock protein 70

    PubMed Central

    Bases, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Pretreatment of human leukemia THP-1 cells with heat shock protein Hsp70 (Hsp70) protected them from the cell-lethal effects of the topoisomerase II inhibitor, lucanthone and from ionizing radiation. Cell viability was scored in clonogenic assays of single cells grown in liquid medium containing 0.5% methyl cellulose. Colonies were observed and rapidly scored after staining with the tetrazolium salt, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide. The frequency of abasic sites in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of THP-1 cells was reduced when these cells were treated with Hsp70. Hsp70 is presumed to have protected the cells by promoting repair of cell DNA, in agreement with previous studies that showed that Hsp70 enhanced base excision repair by purified enzymes. The shoulders of radiation dose-response curves were enhanced by pretreatment of cells with Hsp70 and, importantly, were reduced when cells were transfected with ribonucleic acid designed to silence Hsp70. Hsp70 influenced repair of sublethal damage after radiation. PMID:15832946

  5. Vanillin protects human keratinocyte stem cells against ultraviolet B irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jienny; Cho, Jae Youl; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Kyung-Woo; Lee, Jongsung; Song, Jae-Young

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiation is one of major factors which induce cellular damages in the epidermis. We investigated protective effects and mechanisms of vanillin, a main constituent of vanilla beans, against UVB-induced cellular damages in keratinocyte stem cells (KSC). Here, vanillin significantly attenuated UVB irradiation-induced cytotoxicity. The vanillin effects were also demonstrated by the results of the senescence-associated β-galactosidase and alkaline comet assays. In addition, vanillin induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Attempts to elucidate a possible mechanism underlying the vanillin-mediated effects revealed that vanillin significantly reduced UVB-induced phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), serine threonine kinase checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2), tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53), p38/mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK), S6 ribosomal protein (S6RP), and histone 2A family member X (H2A.X). UVB-induced activation of p53 luciferase reporter was also significantly inhibited by vanillin. In addition, while ATM inhibitor had no effect on the vanillin effects, mouse double minute 2 homolog (MDM2) inhibitor significantly attenuated suppressive effects of vanillin on UVB-induced activation of p53 reporter in KSC. Taken together, these findings suggest that vanillin protects KSC from UVB irradiation and its effects may occur through the suppression of downstream step of MDM2 in UVB irradiation-induced p53 activation.

  6. Evaluation of overcharge protection life in nickel cadmium cells with non-nylon separators

    SciTech Connect

    Scoles, D.L.; Johnson, Z.W.; Hayden, J.W.; Pickett, D.F. Jr.

    1997-12-01

    Hydrogen gassing and the potential for cell rupture in aerospace nickel cadmium cells is directly related to loss of overcharge protection built into the cell during manufacturing. It is well known that cells having nylon separators contribute to this loss via a hydrolysis reaction of the nylon in the potassium hydroxide electrolyte environment in the cell. The hydrolysis reaction produces lower chain organics which are oxidized by the positive electrode and oxygen. Oxidation of the organics diminishes the overcharge protection. With introduction of the Super NiCd and the Magnum nickel cadmium cells the nylon hydrolysis reaction is eliminated, but any reducing agent in the cell such as nickel or an organic additive can contribute to loss of overcharge protection. The present effort describes analyses made to evaluate the extent of overcharge protection loss in cells which do not have nylon hydrolysis and quantifies the diminished amount of overcharge protection loss as a result of eliminating nylon from aerospace cells.

  7. FTY720 protects retinal ganglion cells in experimental glaucoma.

    PubMed

    You, Yuyi; Gupta, Vivek K; Li, Jonathan C; Al-Adawy, Nadia; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L

    2014-04-17

    To investigate the neuroprotective effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) analogue fingolimod (FTY720) in experimental glaucoma in rats. A unilateral chronic ocular hypertensive model was established by injections of microbeads into the anterior eye chamber of adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Fingolimod was administered to one group of rats intraperitoneally every week for 3 months. The scotopic threshold response (STR) was recorded to assess the function of the inner retina. Changes in cell density in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) were evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin staining on retinal sections and axonal count of the optic nerve was performed using Bielschowsky's silver staining. Effects of drug treatment on activation of Akt and Erk1/2 were evaluated using Western blotting by assessing phosphorylation levels of these proteins. The expression of S1P receptors in the optic nerve head region was also evaluated using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Administration of FTY720 reduced the loss of STR amplitude in glaucomatous eyes (P < 0.05). Counting and plotting the cell numbers/axonal density showed significant neural preservation in the GCL and the optic nerve (P < 0.05). An increased phosphorylation level of Akt and Erk1/2 following FTY720 administration was observed. Both S1P1 and S1P5 receptors were found to be expressed in the retina and the expression of S1P1R was upregulated in experimentally-induced glaucoma. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that FTY720 could act as a neuroprotective agent to protect retinal ganglion cells in experimental glaucoma. Administration of this drug significantly reduces the structural and functional loss of the inner retina elicited indicating that it may potentially be used to attenuate neuronal loss and optic nerve damage in glaucomatous patients. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  8. Dendritic cell based genetic immunization stimulates potent tumor protection dependent on CD8 CTL cells in the absence of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng; Huang, Weiyi

    2008-09-01

    Although antibodies (Abs) produced by B cells can treat cancer in certain models, T cells have been accountable for the major effector to control cancer. Immune recognition toward tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1), a melanoma associated antigen up-regulated on the surface of B16F10 melanomas, generally leads to tumor protection mediated by Abs. In this study, immunization with dendritic cells ex vivo transduced with adenovirus encoding TRP-1 stimulates immune activation and potent tumor protection mediated by CD8 T cells in the absence of autoimmune consequence. Transfer of CD8 T cells from immunized mice also leads to tumor protection. The immune activation and CD8 T cell mediated tumor protection rely on the CD4 T cell help. Thus DC based genetic immunization targeting TRP-1, an antigen usually causes Ab predominant immune recognition, is capable of stimulating potent tumor protection dependent on CD8 T cells in the absence of autoimmunity.

  9. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, So Young; Lee, Kang-Woo; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-09-21

    Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV) extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A₂. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death.

  10. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jung, So Young; Lee, Kang-Woo; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV) extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A2. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death. PMID:26402700

  11. Protective interlayer for high temperature solid electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Vasilow, Theodore R.; Richards, Von L.

    1996-01-01

    The invention comprises of an electrically conducting doped or admixed cerium oxide composition with niobium oxide and/or tantalum oxide for electrochemical devices, characterized by the general formula: Nb.sub.x Ta.sub.y Ce.sub.1-x-y O.sub.2 where x is about 0.0 to 0.05, y is about 0.0 to 0.05, and x+y is about 0.02 to 0.05, and where x is preferably about 0.02 to 0.05 and y is 0, and a method of making the same. This novel composition is particularly applicable in forming a protective interlayer of a high temperature, solid electrolyte electrochemical cell (10), characterized by a first electrode (12); an electrically conductive interlayer (14) of niobium and/or tantalum doped cerium oxide deposited over at least a first portion (R) of the first electrode; an interconnect (16) deposited over the interlayer; a solid electrolyte (18) deposited over a second portion of the first electrode, the first portion being discontinuous from the second portion; and, a second electrode (20) deposited over the solid electrolyte. The interlayer (14) is characterized as being porous and selected from the group consisting of niobium doped cerium oxide, tantalum doped cerium oxide, and niobium and tantalum doped cerium oxide or admixtures of the same. The first electrode (12), an air electrode, is a porous layer of doped lanthanum manganite, the solid electrolyte layer (18) is a dense yttria stabilized zirconium oxide, the interconnect layer (16) is a dense, doped lanthanum chromite, and the second electrode (20), a fuel electrode, is a porous layer of nickel-zirconium oxide cermet. The electrochemical cell (10) can take on a plurality of shapes such as annular, planar, etc. and can be connected to a plurality of electrochemical cells in series and/or in parallel to generate electrical energy.

  12. Protective interlayer for high temperature solid electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Singh, P.; Vasilow, T.R.; Richards, V.L.

    1996-05-14

    The invention is comprised of an electrically conducting doped or admixed cerium oxide composition with niobium oxide and/or tantalum oxide for electrochemical devices, characterized by the general formula: Nb{sub x}Ta{sub y}Ce{sub 1{minus}x{minus}y}O{sub 2} where x is about 0.0 to 0.05, y is about 0.0 to 0.05, and x+y is about 0.02 to 0.05, and where x is preferably about 0.02 to 0.05 and y is 0, and a method of making the same is also described. This novel composition is particularly applicable in forming a protective interlayer of a high temperature, solid electrolyte electrochemical cell, characterized by a first electrode; an electrically conductive interlayer of niobium and/or tantalum doped cerium oxide deposited over at least a first portion of the first electrode; an interconnect deposited over the interlayer; a solid electrolyte deposited over a second portion of the first electrode, the first portion being discontinuous from the second portion; and, a second electrode deposited over the solid electrolyte. The interlayer is characterized as being porous and selected from the group consisting of niobium doped cerium oxide, tantalum doped cerium oxide, and niobium and tantalum doped cerium oxide or admixtures of the same. The first electrode, an air electrode, is a porous layer of doped lanthanum manganite, the solid electrolyte layer is a dense yttria stabilized zirconium oxide, the interconnect layer is a dense, doped lanthanum chromite, and the second electrode, a fuel electrode, is a porous layer of nickel-zirconium oxide cermet. The electrochemical cell can take on a plurality of shapes such as annular, planar, etc. and can be connected to a plurality of electrochemical cells in series and/or in parallel to generate electrical energy. 5 figs.

  13. DJ-1 Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells from Cytokine- and Streptozotocin-Mediated Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepak; Weber, Gesine; Eberhard, Daniel; Mehana, Amir E; Eglinger, Jan; Welters, Alena; Bartosinska, Barbara; Jeruschke, Kay; Weiss, Jürgen; Päth, Günter; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Seufert, Jochen; Lammert, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark feature of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus is the progressive dysfunction and loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, and inflammatory cytokines are known to trigger beta cell death. Here we asked whether the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 encoded by the Parkinson's disease gene PARK7 protects islet cells from cytokine- and streptozotocin-mediated cell death. Wild type and DJ-1 knockout mice (KO) were treated with multiple low doses of streptozotocin (MLDS) to induce inflammatory beta cell stress and cell death. Subsequently, glucose tolerance tests were performed, and plasma insulin as well as fasting and random blood glucose concentrations were monitored. Mitochondrial morphology and number of insulin granules were quantified in beta cells. Moreover, islet cell damage was determined in vitro after streptozotocin and cytokine treatment of isolated wild type and DJ-1 KO islets using calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 staining and TUNEL staining. Compared to wild type mice, DJ-1 KO mice became diabetic following MLDS treatment. Insulin concentrations were substantially reduced, and fasting blood glucose concentrations were significantly higher in MLDS-treated DJ-1 KO mice compared to equally treated wild type mice. Rates of beta cell apoptosis upon MLDS treatment were twofold higher in DJ-1 KO mice compared to wild type mice, and in vitro inflammatory cytokines led to twice as much beta cell death in pancreatic islets from DJ-1 KO mice versus those of wild type mice. In conclusion, this study identified the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 as being capable of protecting pancreatic islet cells from cell death induced by an inflammatory and cytotoxic setting.

  14. A Novel Cell-Associated Protection Assay Demonstrates the Ability of Certain Antibiotics To Protect Ocular Surface Cell Lines from Subsequent Clinical Staphylococcus aureus Challenge▿†

    PubMed Central

    Wingard, J. B.; Romanowski, E. G.; Kowalski, R. P.; Mah, F. S.; Ling, Y.; Bilonick, R. A.; Shanks, R. M. Q.

    2011-01-01

    In vivo effectiveness of topical antibiotics may depend on their ability to associate with epithelial cells to provide continued protection, but this contribution is not measured by standard antibiotic susceptibility tests. We report a new in vitro method that measures the ability of test antibiotics azithromycin (AZM), erythromycin (ERY), tetracycline (TET), and bacitracin (BAC) to associate with mammalian cells and to protect these cells from destruction by bacteria. Mammalian cell lines were grown to confluence using antibiotic-free medium and then incubated in medium containing a single antibiotic (0 to 512 μg/ml). After incubation, the cells were challenged with Staphylococcus aureus ocular isolates, without antibiotics added to the culture medium. Epithelial cell layer integrity was assessed by gentian violet staining, and the minimum cell layer protective concentration (MCPC) of an antibiotic sufficient to protect the mammalian cells from S. aureus was determined. Staining was also quantified and analyzed. Bacterial viability was determined by culture turbidity and growth on agar plates. Preincubation of Chang and human corneal limbal epithelial cells with AZM, ERY, and TET at ≥64 μg/ml provided protection against AZM-susceptible S. aureus strains, with increasing protection at higher concentrations. TET toxicity was demonstrated at >64 μg/ml, whereas AZM displayed toxicity to one cell line at 512 μg/ml. BAC failed to show consistent protection at any dose, despite bacterial susceptibility to BAC as determined by traditional antibiotic susceptibility testing. A range of antibiotic effectiveness was displayed in this cell association assay, providing data that may be considered in addition to traditional testing when determining therapeutic dosing regimens. PMID:21628536

  15. Tie-mediated signal from apoptotic cells protects stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yalan; Su, Tin Tin; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2015-01-01

    Many types of normal and cancer stem cells are resistant to killing by genotoxins, but the mechanism for this resistance is poorly understood. Here we show that adult stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster germline and midgut are resistant to ionizing radiation (IR) or chemically induced apoptosis and dissect the mechanism for this protection. We find that upon IR the receptor tyrosine kinase Tie/Tie-2 is activated, leading to the upregulation of microRNA bantam that represses FOXO-mediated transcription of pro-apoptotic Smac/DIA-BLO orthologue, Hid in germline stem cells. Knockdown of the IR-induced putative Tie ligand, Pvf1, a functional homologue of human Angiopoietin, in differentiating daughter cells renders germline stem cells sensitive to IR, suggesting that the dying daughters send a survival signal to protect their stem cells for future repopulation of the tissue. If conserved in cancer stem cells, this mechanism may provide therapeutic options for the eradication of cancer. PMID:25959206

  16. Culture media from hypoxia conditioned endothelial cells protect human intestinal cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury.

    PubMed

    Hummitzsch, Lars; Zitta, Karina; Bein, Berthold; Steinfath, Markus; Albrecht, Martin

    2014-03-10

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is a phenomenon, whereby short episodes of non-lethal ischemia to an organ or tissue exert protection against ischemia/reperfusion injury in a distant organ. However, there is still an apparent lack of knowledge concerning the RIPC-mediated mechanisms within the target organ and the released factors. Here we established a human cell culture model to investigate cellular and molecular effects of RIPC and to identify factors responsible for RIPC-mediated intestinal protection. Human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC) were exposed to repeated episodes of hypoxia (3 × 15 min) and conditioned culture media (CM) were collected after 24h. Human intestinal cells (CaCo-2) were cultured with or without CM and subjected to 90 min of hypoxia/reoxygenation injury. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, gelatin zymography, hydrogen peroxide measurements and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays were performed. In HUVEC cultures hypoxic conditioning did not influence the profile of secreted proteins but led to an increased gelatinase activity (P<0.05) in CM. In CaCo-2 cultures 90 min of hypoxia/reoxygenation resulted in morphological signs of cell damage, increased LDH levels (P<0.001) and elevated levels of hydrogen peroxide (P<0.01). Incubation of CaCo-2 cells with CM reduced the hypoxia-induced signs of cell damage and LDH release (P<0.01) and abrogated the hypoxia-induced increase of hydrogen peroxide. These events were associated with an enhanced phosphorylation status of the prosurvival kinase Erk1/2 (P<0.05) but not Akt and STAT-5. Taken together, CM of hypoxia conditioned endothelial cells protect human intestinal cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury. The established culture model may help to unravel RIPC-mediated cellular events and to identify molecules released by RIPC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The thread-protective cell, a new cell performing multiple tasks.

    PubMed

    Dănăilă, L; Păiş, V

    2011-01-01

    Our research work, which has led us to discovering the new cerebral cell, has started 30 years ago. An important moment was the year 1986, when we have highlighted it for the first time, during a study upon the clarification of some undiscovered aspects of cerebral atherosclerosis. In 2006 we have initiated the publishing of our results at three congresses (Cape Town - 2006; San Diego - 2009 and Los Angeles - 2011) as well as in three Atlases, form 2006, 2008 and 2010. By means of the electronic microscope we have analyzed to this purpose alone, a number of neurosurgery patients, with 1176 cerebral, vascular, tumoral, cortical, choroid plexus tumor and infectious biopsies. The cell in question was named cordocit-protectocit (thread-protective cell) in order to highlight its morphological aspect of a belt band and its functional one, of protective element of the noble substance of the brain, acting for its defense against various aggressions, especially hemorrhagic. On this occasion we have discovered that the pia mater is made up of such protective cells, which also play a role in preventing the neuroblasts from migrating. When the chemotactants of our cells are not numerous enough, subcortical cell heterotopias will occur, at the level of the corona radiata, double cortex and other neuronal migration disorders which may generate epilepsy. Therefore, the pia mater should be considered from a cytodynamic perspective. The telocyte at the internal organs level (intestine, heart etc.) is nothing else but the interstitial cell of Cajal (ICC), described by Cajal more than 100 years ago. The ICC spontaneously initiate rhythmic electrical activity, much like the peacemaker cells of the heart.

  18. Lipoxygenase inhibitors protect acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from ferroptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Probst, Lukas; Dächert, Jasmin; Schenk, Barbara; Fulda, Simone

    2017-09-15

    Ferroptosis has recently been identified as a mode of programmed cell death. However, little is yet known about the signaling mechanism. Here, we report that lipoxygenases (LOX) contribute to the regulation of RSL3-induced ferroptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. We show that the glutathione (GSH) peroxidase 4 (GPX4) inhibitor RSL3 triggers lipid peroxidation, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death in ALL cells. All these events are impeded in the presence of Ferrostatin-1 (Fer-1), a small-molecule inhibitor of lipid peroxidation. Also, lipid peroxidation and ROS production precede the induction of cell death, underscoring their contribution to cell death upon exposure to RSL3. Importantly, LOX inhibitors, including the selective 12/15-LOX inhibitor Baicalein and the pan-LOX inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), protect ALL cells from RSL3-stimulated lipid peroxidation, ROS generation and cell death, indicating that LOX contribute to ferroptosis. RSL3 triggers lipid peroxidation and cell death also in FAS-associated Death Domain (FADD)-deficient cells which are resistant to death receptor-induced apoptosis indicating that the induction of ferroptosis may bypass apoptosis resistance. By providing new insights into the molecular regulation of ferroptosis, our study contributes to the development of novel treatment strategies to reactivate programmed cell death in ALL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Type I IFN promotes NK cell expansion during viral infection by protecting NK cells against fratricide.

    PubMed

    Madera, Sharline; Rapp, Moritz; Firth, Matthew A; Beilke, Joshua N; Lanier, Lewis L; Sun, Joseph C

    2016-02-08

    Type I interferon (IFN) is crucial in host antiviral defense. Previous studies have described the pleiotropic role of type I IFNs on innate and adaptive immune cells during viral infection. Here, we demonstrate that natural killer (NK) cells from mice lacking the type I IFN-α receptor (Ifnar(-/-)) or STAT1 (which signals downstream of IFNAR) are defective in expansion and memory cell formation after mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Despite comparable proliferation, Ifnar(-/-) NK cells showed diminished protection against MCMV infection and exhibited more apoptosis compared with wild-type NK cells. Furthermore, we show that Ifnar(-/-) NK cells express increased levels of NK group 2 member D (NKG2D) ligands during viral infection and are susceptible to NK cell-mediated fratricide in a perforin- and NKG2D-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of Ifnar(-/-) NK cells into NK cell-deficient mice reverses the defect in survival and expansion. Our study reveals a novel type I IFN-dependent mechanism by which NK cells evade mechanisms of cell death after viral infection.

  20. Protective layer formation on magnesium in cell culture medium.

    PubMed

    Wagener, V; Virtanen, S

    2016-06-01

    In the past, different studies showed that hydroxyapatite (HA) or similar calcium phosphates can be precipitated on Mg during immersion in simulated body fluids. However, at the same time, in most cases a dark grey or black layer is built under the white HA crystals. This layer seems to consist as well of calcium phosphates. Until now, neither the morphology nor its influence on Mg corrosion have been investigated in detail. In this work commercially pure magnesium (cp) was immersed in cell culture medium for one, three and five days at room temperature and in the incubator (37 °C, 5% CO2). In addition, the influence of proteins on the formation of a corrosion layer was investigated by adding 20% of fetal calf serum (FCS) to the cell culture medium in the incubator. In order to analyze the formed layers, SEM images of cross sections, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements were carried out. Characterization of the corrosion behavior was achieved by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and by potentio-dynamic polarization in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) at 37°C. Surface analysis showed that all formed layers consist mainly of amorphous calcium phosphate compounds. For the immersion at room temperature the Ca/P ratio indicates the formation of HA, while in the incubator probably pre-stages to HA are formed. The different immersion conditions lead to a variation in layer thicknesses. However, electrochemical characterization shows that the layer thickness does not influence the corrosion resistance of magnesium. The main influencing factor for the corrosion behavior is the layer morphology. Thus, immersion at room temperature leads to the highest corrosion protection due to the formation of a compact outer layer. Layers formed in the incubator show much worse performances due to completely porous structures. The

  1. TNFα protects cardiac mitochondria independently of its cell surface receptors.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Lydia; McCarthy, Joy; Mungly, Shazia F K; Lynn, Edward G; Sack, Michael N; Opie, Lionel H; Lecour, Sandrine

    2010-11-01

    Our novel proposal is that TNFα exerts a direct effect on mitochondrial respiratory function in the heart, independently of its cell surface receptors. TNFα-induced cardioprotection is known to involve reactive oxygen species (ROS) and sphingolipids. We therefore further propose that this direct mitochondrial effect is mediated via ROS and sphingolipids. The protective concentration of TNFα (0.5 ng/ml) was added to isolated heart mitochondria from black 6 × 129 mice (WT) and double TNF receptor knockout mice (TNFR1&2(-/-)). Respiratory parameters and inner mitochondrial membrane potential were analyzed in the presence/absence of two antioxidants, N-acetyl-L: -cysteine or N-tert-butyl-α-(2-sulfophenyl)nitrone or two antagonists of the sphingolipid pathway, N-oleoylethanolamine (NOE) or imipramine. In WT, TNFα reduced State 3 respiration from 279.3 ± 3 to 119.3 ± 2 (nmol O₂/mg protein/min), increased proton leak from 15.7 ± 0.6% (control) to 36.6 ± 4.4%, and decreased membrane potential by 20.5 ± 3.1% compared to control groups. In TNFR1&2(-/-) mice, TNFα reduced State 3 respiration from 205.2 ± 4 to 75.7 ± 1 (p < 0.05 vs. respective control). In WT mice, both antioxidants added with TNFα restored State 3 respiration to 269.2 ± 2 and 257.6 ± 2, respectively. Imipramine and NOE also restored State 3 respiration to 248.4 ± 2 and 249.0 ± 2, respectively (p < 0.01 vs. TNFα alone). Similarly, both antioxidant and inhibitors of the sphingolipid pathway restored the proton leak to pre-TNF values. TNFα-treated mitochondria or isolated cardiac muscle fibers showed an increase in respiration after anoxia-reoxygenation, but this effect was lost in the presence of an antioxidant or NOE. Similar data were obtained in TNFR1&2(-/-) mice. TNFα exerts a protective effect on respiratory function in isolated mitochondria subjected to an anoxia-reoxygenation insult. This effect appears to be independent of its cell surface receptors, but is likely to be mediated

  2. The preparation of immunogenic cell walls from a highly protective strain of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Chandler, H M; Hamilton, R C

    1975-05-01

    Conventional methods for the preparation of cell walls of a highly protective strain of Clostridium chauvoei destroy the protective antigen. Bacteria were therefore lysed by the enzyme pronase instead of by the mechanical disintegration methods commonly employed. Final purification and separation of cell walls and membranes was achieved by equilibrium density-gradient centrifugation with sodium iodide in a zonal rotor. The resultant cell walls had a two-layered structure when seen in ultra-thin section and were highly immunogenic when used to immunize mice against challenge with C. chauvoei. Rabbit antisera raised against the cell walls provided passive protection against challenge in mice and the level of protection was not diminished by the absorption of all agglutinins from the sera. These results confirm previous observations that the protective antigen is a heatlabile cell wall antigen which stimulates the production of non-agglutinating protective antibody.

  3. Sirtuin1 and autophagy protect cells from fluoride-induced cell stress

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Maiko; Bartlett, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) is an (NAD+)-dependent deacetylase functioning in the regulation of metabolism, cell survival and organismal lifespan. Active SIRT1 regulates autophagy during cell stress, including calorie restriction, endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress. Previously, we reported that fluoride induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in ameloblasts responsible for enamel formation, suggesting that ER-stress plays a role in dental fluorosis. However, the molecular mechanism of how cells respond to fluoride-induced cell stress is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that fluoride activates SIRT1 and initiates autophagy to protect cells from fluoride exposure. Fluoride treatment of ameloblast-derived cells (LS8) significantly increased Sirt1 expression and induced SIRT1 phosphorylation resulting in the augmentation of SIRT1 deacetylase activity. To demonstrate that fluoride exposure initiates autophagy, we characterized the expression of autophagy related genes (Atg); Atg5, Atg7 and Atg8/LC3 and showed that both their transcript and protein levels were significantly increased following fluoride treatment. To confirm that SIRT1 plays a protective role in fluoride toxicity, we used resveratrol (RES) to augmented SIRT1 activity in fluoride treated LS8 cells. RES increased autophagy, inhibited apoptosis, and decreased fluoride cytotoxicity. Rats treated with fluoride (0, 50 and 100 ppm) in drinking water for 6 weeks had significantly elevated expression levels of Sirt1, Atg5, Atg7 and Atg8/LC3 in their maturation stage enamel organs. Increased protein levels of p-SIRT1, ATG5 and ATG8/LC3 were present in fluoride-treated rat maturation stage ameloblasts. Therefore, the SIRT1/autophagy pathway may play a critical role as a protective response to help prevent dental fluorosis. PMID:24296261

  4. Sirtuin1 and autophagy protect cells from fluoride-induced cell stress.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Maiko; Bartlett, John D

    2014-02-01

    Sirtuin1 (SIRT1) is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent deacetylase functioning in the regulation of metabolism, cell survival and organismal lifespan. Active SIRT1 regulates autophagy during cell stress, including calorie restriction, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and oxidative stress. Previously, we reported that fluoride induces ER-stress in ameloblasts responsible for enamel formation, suggesting that ER-stress plays a role in dental fluorosis. However, the molecular mechanism of how cells respond to fluoride-induced cell stress is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that fluoride activates SIRT1 and initiates autophagy to protect cells from fluoride exposure. Fluoride treatment of ameloblast-derived cells (LS8) significantly increased Sirt1 expression and induced SIRT1 phosphorylation resulting in the augmentation of SIRT1 deacetylase activity. To demonstrate that fluoride exposure initiates autophagy, we characterized the expression of autophagy related genes (Atg); Atg5, Atg7 and Atg8/LC3 and showed that both their transcript and protein levels were significantly increased following fluoride treatment. To confirm that SIRT1 plays a protective role in fluoride toxicity, we used resveratrol (RES) to augment SIRT1 activity in fluoride treated LS8 cells. RES increased autophagy, inhibited apoptosis, and decreased fluoride cytotoxicity. Rats treated with fluoride (0, 50, 100 and 125ppm) in drinking water for 6weeks had significantly elevated expression levels of Sirt1, Atg5, Atg7 and Atg8/LC3 in their maturation stage enamel organs. Increased protein levels of p-SIRT1, ATG5 and ATG8/LC3 were present in fluoride-treated rat maturation stage ameloblasts. Therefore, the SIRT1/autophagy pathway may play a critical role as a protective response to help prevent dental fluorosis.

  5. Meninges: from protective membrane to stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Decimo, Ilaria; Fumagalli, Guido; Berton, Valeria; Krampera, Mauro; Bifari, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Meninges are a three tissue membrane primarily known as coverings of the brain. More in depth studies on meningeal function and ultrastructure have recently changed the view of meninges as a merely protective membrane. Accurate evaluation of the anatomical distribution in the CNS reveals that meninges largely penetrate inside the neural tissue. Meninges enter the CNS by projecting between structures, in the stroma of choroid plexus and form the perivascular space (Virchow-Robin) of every parenchymal vessel. Thus, meninges may modulate most of the physiological and pathological events of the CNS throughout the life. Meninges are present since the very early embryonic stages of cortical development and appear to be necessary for normal corticogenesis and brain structures formation. In adulthood meninges contribute to neural tissue homeostasis by secreting several trophic factors including FGF2 and SDF-1. Recently, for the first time, we have identified the presence of a stem cell population with neural differentiation potential in meninges. In addition, we and other groups have further described the presence in meninges of injury responsive neural precursors. In this review we will give a comprehensive view of meninges and their multiple roles in the context of a functional network with the neural tissue. We will highlight the current literature on the developmental feature of meninges and their role in cortical development. Moreover, we will elucidate the anatomical distribution of the meninges and their trophic properties in adult CNS. Finally, we will emphasize recent evidences suggesting the potential role of meninges as stem cell niche harbouring endogenous precursors that can be activated by injury and are able to contribute to CNS parenchymal reaction. PMID:23671802

  6. Semicarbazone EGA Inhibits Uptake of Diphtheria Toxin into Human Cells and Protects Cells from Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin is a single-chain protein toxin that invades human cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In acidic endosomes, its translocation domain inserts into endosomal membranes and facilitates the transport of the catalytic domain (DTA) from endosomal lumen into the host cell cytosol. Here, DTA ADP-ribosylates elongation factor 2 inhibits protein synthesis and leads to cell death. The compound 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA) has been previously shown to protect cells from various bacterial protein toxins which deliver their enzymatic subunits from acidic endosomes to the cytosol, including Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin and the binary clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins C2, iota and Clostridium difficile binary toxin (CDT). Here, we demonstrate that EGA also protects human cells from diphtheria toxin by inhibiting the pH-dependent translocation of DTA across cell membranes. The results suggest that EGA might serve for treatment and/or prevention of the severe disease diphtheria. PMID:27428999

  7. Spirulina Promotes Stem Cell Genesis and Protects against LPS Induced Declines in Neural Stem Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bachstetter, Adam D.; Jernberg, Jennifer; Schlunk, Andrea; Vila, Jennifer L.; Hudson, Charles; Cole, Michael J.; Shytle, R. Douglas; Tan, Jun; Sanberg, Paul R.; Sanberg, Cyndy D.; Borlongan, Cesario; Kaneko, Yuji; Tajiri, Naoki; Gemma, Carmelina; Bickford, Paula C.

    2010-01-01

    Adult stem cells are present in many tissues including, skin, muscle, adipose, bone marrow, and in the brain. Neuroinflammation has been shown to be a potent negative regulator of stem cell and progenitor cell proliferation in the neurogenic regions of the brain. Recently we demonstrated that decreasing a key neuroinflammatory cytokine IL-1β in the hippocampus of aged rats reversed the age-related cognitive decline and increased neurogenesis in the age rats. We also have found that nutraceuticals have the potential to reduce neuroinflammation, and decrease oxidative stress. The objectives of this study were to determine if spirulina could protect the proliferative potential of hippocampal neural progenitor cells from an acute systemic inflammatory insult of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To this end, young rats were fed for 30 days a control diet or a diet supplemented with 0.1% spirulina. On day 28 the rats were given a single i.p. injection of LPS (1 mg/kg). The following day the rats were injected with BrdU (50 mg/kg b.i.d. i.p.) and were sacrificed 24 hours after the first injection of BrdU. Quantification of the BrdU positive cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus demonstrated a decrease in proliferation of the stem/progenitor cells in the hippocampus as a result of the LPS insult. Furthermore, the diet supplemented with spirulina was able to negate the LPS induced decrease in stem/progenitor cell proliferation. In a second set of studies we examined the effects of spirulina either alone or in combination with a proprietary formulation (NT-020) of blueberry, green tea, vitamin D3 and carnosine on the function of bone marrow and CD34+ cells in vitro. Spirulina had small effects on its own and more than additive effects in combination with NT-020 to promote mitochondrial respiration and/or proliferation of these cells in culture. When examined on neural stem cells in culture spirulina increased proliferation at baseline and protected against the negative

  8. Type I IFN promotes NK cell expansion during viral infection by protecting NK cells against fratricide

    PubMed Central

    Madera, Sharline; Rapp, Moritz; Firth, Matthew A.; Beilke, Joshua N.; Lanier, Lewis L.

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) is crucial in host antiviral defense. Previous studies have described the pleiotropic role of type I IFNs on innate and adaptive immune cells during viral infection. Here, we demonstrate that natural killer (NK) cells from mice lacking the type I IFN-α receptor (Ifnar−/−) or STAT1 (which signals downstream of IFNAR) are defective in expansion and memory cell formation after mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Despite comparable proliferation, Ifnar−/− NK cells showed diminished protection against MCMV infection and exhibited more apoptosis compared with wild-type NK cells. Furthermore, we show that Ifnar−/− NK cells express increased levels of NK group 2 member D (NKG2D) ligands during viral infection and are susceptible to NK cell–mediated fratricide in a perforin- and NKG2D-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of Ifnar−/− NK cells into NK cell–deficient mice reverses the defect in survival and expansion. Our study reveals a novel type I IFN–dependent mechanism by which NK cells evade mechanisms of cell death after viral infection. PMID:26755706

  9. Cocaine- and Amphetamine-regulated Transcript (CART) Protects Beta Cells against Glucotoxicity and Increases Cell Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    Sathanoori, Ramasri; Olde, Björn; Erlinge, David; Göransson, Olga; Wierup, Nils

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is an islet peptide that promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in beta cells via cAMP/PKA-dependent pathways. In addition, CART is a regulator of neuronal survival. In this study, we examined the effect of exogenous CART 55–102 on beta cell viability and dissected its signaling mechanisms. Evaluation of DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation revealed that CART 55–102 reduced glucotoxicity-induced apoptosis in both INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets. Glucotoxicity in INS-1 (832/13) cells also caused a 50% reduction of endogenous CART protein. We show that CART increased proliferation in INS-1 (832/13) cells, an effect that was blocked by PKA, PKB, and MEK1 inhibitors. In addition, CART induced phosphorylation of CREB, IRS, PKB, FoxO1, p44/42 MAPK, and p90RSK in INS-1 (832/13) cells and isolated rat islets, all key mediators of cell survival and proliferation. Thus, we demonstrate that CART 55-102 protects beta cells against glucotoxicity and promotes proliferation. Taken together our data point to the potential use of CART in therapeutic interventions targeted at enhancing functional beta cell mass and long-term insulin secretion in T2D. PMID:23250745

  10. Intestinal epithelial cell secretion of RELM-beta protects against gastrointestinal worm infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    IL-4 and IL-13 protect against parasitic helminths, but little is known about the mechanism of host protection. We show that IL-4/IL-13 confer immunity against worms by inducing intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) to differentiate into goblet cells that secrete resistin-like molecule beta (RELMB). R...

  11. γδ T Cells Confer Protection against Murine Cytomegalovirus (MCMV)

    PubMed Central

    Villacreces, Arnaud; Juzan, Marina; Rousseau, Benoît; Dulanto, Sara; Giese, Alban; Costet, Pierre; Praloran, Vincent; Moreau, Jean-François; Dubus, Pierre; Vermijlen, David

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a leading infectious cause of morbidity in immune-compromised patients. γδ T cells have been involved in the response to CMV but their role in protection has not been firmly established and their dependency on other lymphocytes has not been addressed. Using C57BL/6 αβ and/or γδ T cell-deficient mice, we here show that γδ T cells are as competent as αβ T cells to protect mice from CMV-induced death. γδ T cell-mediated protection involved control of viral load and prevented organ damage. γδ T cell recovery by bone marrow transplant or adoptive transfer experiments rescued CD3ε−/− mice from CMV-induced death confirming the protective antiviral role of γδ T cells. As observed in humans, different γδ T cell subsets were induced upon CMV challenge, which differentiated into effector memory cells. This response was observed in the liver and lungs and implicated both CD27+ and CD27− γδ T cells. NK cells were the largely preponderant producers of IFNγ and cytotoxic granules throughout the infection, suggesting that the protective role of γδ T cells did not principally rely on either of these two functions. Finally, γδ T cells were strikingly sufficient to fully protect Rag−/−γc−/− mice from death, demonstrating that they can act in the absence of B and NK cells. Altogether our results uncover an autonomous protective antiviral function of γδ T cells, and open new perspectives for the characterization of a non classical mode of action which should foster the design of new γδ T cell based therapies, especially useful in αβ T cell compromised patients. PMID:25747674

  12. Synthetic molecules that protect cells from anoikis and their use in cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Frisco-Cabanos, Heidie L; Watanabe, Mizuki; Okumura, Naoki; Kusamori, Kosuke; Takemoto, Naohiro; Takaya, Junichiro; Sato, Shin-ichi; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Nishikawa, Makiya; Koizumi, Noriko; Uesugi, Motonari

    2014-10-13

    One of the major problems encountered in cell transplantation is the low level of survival of transplanted cells due to detachment-induced apoptosis, called anoikis. The present study reports on the chemical synthesis and biological evaluation of water-soluble molecules that protect suspended cells from anoikis. The synthetic molecules bind to and induce clusters of integrins and heparan-sulfate-bound syndecans, two classes of receptors that are important for extracellular matrix-mediated cell survival. Molecular biological analysis indicates that such molecules prolong the survival of suspended NIH3T3 cells, at least in part, by promoting clustering of syndecan-4 and integrin β1 on the cell surface, leading to the activation of small GTPase Rac-1 and Akt. In vivo experiments using animal disease models demonstrated the ability of the molecules to improve cell engraftment. The cluster-inducing molecules may provide a starting point for the design of new synthetic tools for cell-based therapy. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Autophagy Protects Against Aminochrome-Induced Cell Death in Substantia Nigra-Derived Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Irmgard; Muñoz, Patricia; Huenchuguala, Sandro; Couve, Eduardo; Sanders, Laurie H.; Greenamyre, John Timothy; Caviedes, Pablo; Segura-Aguilar, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Aminochrome, the precursor of neuromelanin, has been proposed to be involved in the neurodegeneration neuromelanin-containing dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson’s disease. We aimed to study the mechanism of aminochrome-dependent cell death in a cell line derived from rat substantia nigra. We found that aminochrome (50μM), in the presence of NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.99.2 (DT)-diaphorase inhibitor dicoumarol (DIC) (100μM), induces significant cell death (62 ± 3%; p < 0.01), increase in caspase-3 activation (p < 0.001), release of cytochrome C, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (p < 0.01), damage of mitochondrial DNA, damage of mitochondria determined with transmission electron microscopy, a dramatic morphological change characterized as cell shrinkage, and significant increase in number of autophagic vacuoles. To determine the role of autophagy on aminochrome-induced cell death, we incubated the cells in the presence of vinblastine and rapamycin. Interestingly, 10μM vinblastine induces a 5.9-fold (p < 0.001) and twofold (p < 0.01) significant increase in cell death when the cells were incubated with 30μM aminochrome in the absence and presence of DIC, respectively, whereas 10μM rapamycin preincubated 24 h before addition of 50μM aminochrome in the absence and the presence of 100μM DIC induces a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in cell death. In conclusion, autophagy seems to be an important protective mechanism against two different aminochrome-induced cell deaths that initially showed apoptotic features. The cell death induced by aminochrome when DT-diaphorase is inhibited requires activation of mitochondrial pathway, whereas the cell death induced by aminochrome alone requires inhibition of autophagy-dependent degrading of damaged organelles and recycling through lysosomes. PMID:21427056

  14. Minocycline fails to protect cerebellar granular cell cultures against malonate-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gomez, F J; Gomez-Lazaro, M; Pastor, D; Calvo, S; Aguirre, N; Galindo, M F; Jordán, J

    2005-11-01

    Experimental and clinical studies support the view that the semisynthetic tetracycline minocycline exhibits neuroprotective roles in several models of neurodegenerative diseases, including ischemia, Huntington, Parkinson diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, recent evidence indicates that minocycline does not always present beneficial actions. For instance, in an in vivo model of Huntington's disease, it fails to afford protection after malonate intrastriatal injection. Moreover, it reverses the neuroprotective effect of creatine in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. This apparent contradiction prompted us to analyze the effect of this antibiotic on malonate-induced cell death. We show that, in rat cerebellar granular cells, the succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor malonate induces cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. By using DFCA, monochlorobimane and 10-N-nonyl-Acridin Orange to measure, respectively, H2O2-derived oxidant species and reduced forms of GSH and cardiolipin, we observed that malonate induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production to an extent that surpasses the antioxidant defense capacity of the cells, resulting in GSH depletion and cardiolipin oxidation. The pre-treatment for 4 h with minocycline (10-100 microM) did not present cytoprotective actions. Moreover, minocycline failed to block ROS production and to abrogate malonate-induced oxidation of GSH and cardiolipin. Additional experiments revealed that minocycline was also unsuccessful to prevent the mitochondrial swelling induced by malonate. Furthermore, malonate did not induce the expression of the iNOS, caspase-3, -8, and -9 genes which have been shown to be up-regulated in several models where minocycline resulted cytoprotective. In addition, malonate-induced down-regulation of the antiapoptotic gene Bcl-2 was not prevented by minocycline, controversially the mechanism previously proposed to explain minocycline protective action. These results suggest that the

  15. An AD-related neuroprotector rescues transformed rat retinal ganglion cells from CoCl₂-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Men, Jie; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yang, Yang; Gao, Dianwen

    2012-05-01

    Some ocular diseases characterized by apoptotic death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are chronic neurodegenerative disorders and have similarities in neuropathology. Humanin (HN) is known for its ability to suppress neuronal death induced by AD-related insults. In present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of HN on hypoxia-induced toxicity in RGC-5 cells. Hypoxia mimetic compound cobalt chloride (CoCl₂) could increase the cell viability loss and apoptosis, whereas HN can significantly attenuate these effects. This finding may provide new therapeutics for the retinal neurodegenerative diseases targeting neuroprotection.

  16. B cells have distinct roles in host protection against different nematode parasites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    B cells may mediate protective responses against nematode parasites by supporting Th2 cell development and/or by producing antibodies. To examine this, B cell-deficient mice were inoculated with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Nb) or Heligmosomoides polygyrus (Hp). B cell-deficient and wild type (WT...

  17. The protective effect of a constant magnetic field. [reduction of molecular cell pathology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosunov, A. V.; Tripuzov, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    The protective effect of a constant magnetic field sharply reduced spontaneous lysis of E. coli cells when subjected to ultraviolet radiation. A protective effect of a CMF was found in a study of tissue cultures of normally growing cells (kidney epithelium) and cancer cells (cells from a cancer of the larynx). The protective effect of a CMF is also seen in a combined exposure of tissue cultures to X-rays and CMF energy (strength of the CMF was 2000 oersteds with a gradient of 500 oersteds/cm). The data obtained are of interest to experimental oncology (development of new methods of treating malignant tumors).

  18. The protective effect of a constant magnetic field. [reduction of molecular cell pathology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosunov, A. V.; Tripuzov, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    The protective effect of a constant magnetic field sharply reduced spontaneous lysis of E. coli cells when subjected to ultraviolet radiation. A protective effect of a CMF was found in a study of tissue cultures of normally growing cells (kidney epithelium) and cancer cells (cells from a cancer of the larynx). The protective effect of a CMF is also seen in a combined exposure of tissue cultures to X-rays and CMF energy (strength of the CMF was 2000 oersteds with a gradient of 500 oersteds/cm). The data obtained are of interest to experimental oncology (development of new methods of treating malignant tumors).

  19. Open end protection for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Zafred, Paolo R.; Dederer, Jeffrey T.; Tomlins, Gregory W.; Toms, James M.; Folser, George R.; Schmidt, Douglas S.; Singh, Prabhakar; Hager, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell (40) having a closed end (44) and an open end (42) operates in a fuel cell generator (10) where the fuel cell open end (42) of each fuel cell contains a sleeve (60, 64) fitted over the open end (42), where the sleeve (60, 64) extends beyond the open end (42) of the fuel cell (40) to prevent degradation of the interior air electrode of the fuel cell by fuel gas during operation of the generator (10).

  20. Venlafaxine protects methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis in the cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qinghua; Gu, Chengyao; Chen, Caijing

    2014-05-21

    It was reported that venlafaxine protects microvascular endothelial cells injury in several models. But the mechanisms of venlafaxine protects cell injury still poor understanding. Here, we shows that in the cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), we found that venlafaxine protects methylglyoxal (MGO)-induced cell injury, and the venlafaxine significant reduction in the level of reactive oxygen species, down-regulated expression of pro-apoptotic activated caspase-3 and Bax, increased BDNF release and expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 in the cultured HBMEC. Furthermore, we found that venlafaxine inhibits MGO-induced phosphorylation of JNK. Moreover, venlafaxine increased AKT phosphorylation and the protective effects of venlafaxine was inhibited by PI3K/AKT inhibitor. These findings suggest that venlafaxine protects MGO-induced HBMEC injury through PI3K/AKT and JNK pathway as the potential underlying mechanisms of HBMEC injury in diabetes.

  1. Mucosal BCG Vaccination Induces Protective Lung-Resident Memory T Cell Populations against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Carolina; Zedler, Ulrike; Kühl, Anja A.; Lozza, Laura; Saikali, Philippe; Sander, Leif E.; Vogelzang, Alexis; Kupz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), yet its moderate efficacy against pulmonary TB calls for improved vaccination strategies. Mucosal BCG vaccination generates superior protection against TB in animal models; however, the mechanisms of protection remain elusive. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have been implicated in protective immune responses against viral infections, but the role of TRM cells following mycobacterial infection is unknown. Using a mouse model of TB, we compared protection and lung cellular infiltrates of parenteral and mucosal BCG vaccination. Adoptive transfer and gene expression analyses of lung airway cells were performed to determine the protective capacities and phenotypes of different memory T cell subsets. In comparison to subcutaneous vaccination, intratracheal and intranasal BCG vaccination generated T effector memory and TRM cells in the lung, as defined by surface marker phenotype. Adoptive mucosal transfer of these airway-resident memory T cells into naive mice mediated protection against TB. Whereas airway-resident memory CD4+ T cells displayed a mixture of effector and regulatory phenotype, airway-resident memory CD8+ T cells displayed prototypical TRM features. Our data demonstrate a key role for mucosal vaccination-induced airway-resident T cells in the host defense against pulmonary TB. These results have direct implications for the design of refined vaccination strategies. PMID:27879332

  2. Inflammation driven by tumour-specific Th1 cells protects against B-cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haabeth, Ole Audun Werner; Lorvik, Kristina Berg; Hammarström, Clara; Donaldson, Ian M.; Haraldsen, Guttorm; Bogen, Bjarne; Corthay, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    The immune system can both promote and suppress cancer. Chronic inflammation and proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 are considered to be tumour promoting. In contrast, the exact nature of protective antitumour immunity remains obscure. Here, we quantify locally secreted cytokines during primary immune responses against myeloma and B-cell lymphoma in mice. Strikingly, successful cancer immunosurveillance mediated by tumour-specific CD4+ T cells is consistently associated with elevated local levels of both proinflammatory (IL-1α, IL-1β and IL-6) and T helper 1 (Th1)-associated cytokines (interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-2 and IL-12). Cancer eradication is achieved by a collaboration between tumour-specific Th1 cells and tumour-infiltrating, antigen-presenting macrophages. Th1 cells induce secretion of IL-1β and IL-6 by macrophages. Th1-derived IFN-γ is shown to render macrophages directly cytotoxic to cancer cells, and to induce macrophages to secrete the angiostatic chemokines CXCL9/MIG and CXCL10/IP-10. Thus, inflammation, when driven by tumour-specific Th1 cells, may prevent rather than promote cancer. PMID:21407206

  3. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells protect against atherosclerosis by tuning T cell proliferation and activity

    PubMed Central

    Daissormont, Isabelle T.M.N.; Christ, Anette; Temmerman, Lieve; Millares, Stefan Sampedro; Seijkens, Tom; Rousch, Mat; Poggi, Marjorie; Boon, Louis; van der Loos, Chris; Daemen, Mat; Lutgens, Esther; Halvorsen, Bente; Aukrust, Pal; Janssen, Edith; Biessen, Erik A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Unlike conventional dendritic cells (cDC), plasmacytoid DCs (pDC) are poor in antigen presentation and critical for type I interferon response. While proposed to be present in human atherosclerotic lesions, their role in atherosclerosis remains elusive. Objective To investigate the role of pDC in atherosclerosis. Methods and Results We show that pDC are scarcely present in human atherosclerotic lesions, and almost absent in mouse plaques. Surprisingly, pDC depletion by 120G8 mAb administration was seen to promote plaque T cell accumulation and exacerbate lesion development and progression in LDLr−/− mice. PDC depletion was accompanied by increased CD4+ T cell proliferation, IFN-γ expression by splenic T cells and plasma IFN-γ levels. Lymphoid tissue pDC from atherosclerotic mice showed increased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) expression and IDO blockage abrogated the pDC suppressive effect on T cell proliferation. Conclusion Our data reveal a protective role for pDC in atherosclerosis, possibly by dampening T cell proliferation and activity in peripheral lymphoid tissue, rendering pDC an interesting target for future therapeutic interventions. PMID:22021930

  4. Regulatory T cells participate in CD39-mediated protection from renal injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan Min; McRae, Jennifer L; Robson, Simon C; Cowan, Peter J; Zhang, Geoff Yu; Hu, Min; Polhill, Tania; Wang, Yiping; Zheng, Guoping; Wang, Ya; Lee, Vincent W S; Unwin, Robert J; Harris, David C H; Dwyer, Karen M; Alexander, Stephen I

    2012-09-01

    CD39 is an ecto-enzyme that degrades extracellular nucleotides, such as ATP, and is highly expressed on by the vasculature and circulating cells including Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells. To study the role of purinergic regulation in renal disease, we used the adriamycin nephropathy (AN) mouse model of chronic renal injury, using human CD39-transgenic (hCD39Tg) and wild-type (WT) BALB/c mice. Effects of CD39 expression by Treg cells were assessed in AN by adoptive transfer of CD4(+) CD25(+) and CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells isolated from hCD39Tg and WT mice. hCD39Tg mice were protected from renal injury in AN with decreased urinary protein and serum creatinine, and significantly less renal injury compared with WT mice. While WT CD25(+) and hCD39Tg CD25(-) T cells conferred some protection against AN, hCD39Tg CD25(+) Treg cells offered greater protection. In vitro studies showed direct pro-apoptotic effects of ATP on renal tubular cells. In conclusion, hCD39 expressed by circulating leukocytes and intrinsic renal cells limits innate AN injury. Specifically, CD39 expression by Treg cells contributes to its protective role in renal injury. These findings suggest that extracellular nucleotides mediate AN kidney injury and that CD39, expressed by Treg cells and other cells, is protective in this model.

  5. Hyperthermia With Mild Electrical Stimulation Protects Pancreatic β-Cells From Cell Stresses and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Kazunari; Matsuyama, Rina; Morino-Koga, Saori; Adachi, Hironori; Suico, Mary Ann; Kawashima, Junji; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Furukawa, Noboru; Kai, Hirofumi; Araki, Eiichi

    2012-01-01

    Induction of heat shock protein (HSP) 72 improves metabolic profiles in diabetic model mice. However, its effect on pancreatic β-cells is not known. The current study investigated whether HSP72 induction can reduce β-cell stress signaling and apoptosis and preserve β-cell mass. MIN6 cells and db/db mice were sham-treated or treated with heat shock (HS) and mild electrical stimulation (MES) (HS+MES) to induce HSP72. Several cellular markers, metabolic parameters, and β-cell mass were evaluated. HS+MES treatment or HSP72 overexpression increased HSP72 protein levels and decreased tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α–induced Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and proapoptotic signal in MIN6 cells. In db/db mice, HS+MES treatment for 12 weeks significantly improved insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis. Upon glucose challenge, a significant increase in insulin secretion was observed in vivo. Compared with sham treatment, levels of HSP72, insulin, pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1, GLUT2, and insulin receptor substrate-2 were upregulated in the pancreatic islets of HS+MES-treated mice, whereas JNK phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of forkhead box class O-1, and nuclear factor-κB p65 were reduced. Apoptotic signals, ER stress, and oxidative stress markers were attenuated. Thus, HSP72 induction by HS+MES treatment protects β-cells from apoptosis by attenuating JNK activation and cell stresses. HS+MES combination therapy may preserve pancreatic β-cell volume to ameliorate glucose homeostasis in diabetes. PMID:22362176

  6. Cochlear efferent neurones and protection against acoustic trauma: protection of outer hair cell receptor current and interanimal variability.

    PubMed

    Patuzzi, R B; Thompson, M L

    1991-07-01

    We have measured the changes in neural and microphonic sensitivity in the basal turn of the guinea-pig cochlea produced by intense acoustic overstimulation (10 kHz, 115 dB SPL for 60 s and 150 s). As reported previously, the drop in neural and microphonic sensitivities observed after overstimulation were highly correlated [Patuzzi et al. (1989) Hear. Res. 39, 189-202]. Presentation of a non-traumatizing pure-tone to the contralateral ear (10 kHz, 80 dB SPL) during acoustic overstimulation reduced the amount of acoustic trauma measured using the neural response or the microphonic response. Transection of the medial olivo-cochlear system of efferent fibres at the floor of the fourth ventricle abolished this protective effect of contralateral sound and dramatically reduced the variability in the data. Since the low-frequency microphonic is a simple measure of the receptor current through the outer hair cells, and this current probably plays a part in enhancing the mechanical sensitivity of the cochlea, the protection of the microphonic we have observed suggests that the efferent system protects neural sensitivity by protecting the mechano-electrical transduction of outer hair cells. The drop in variability after sectioning the efferents also suggests that inter-animal variations in susceptibility to noise trauma may be a consequence of differing tonic activity of the efferents, and/or a variation in the sensitivity of the efferent pathway.

  7. Vitamin B12 protects against superoxide-induced cell injury in human aortic endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Edward S.; Brasch, Nicola E.; Yun, June

    2011-01-01

    Superoxide (O2•−) is implicated in inflammatory states including arteriosclerosis and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Cobalamin (Cbl) supplementation is beneficial for treating many inflammatory diseases and also provides protection in oxidative-stress-associated pathologies. Reduced Cbl reacts with O2•− at rates approaching that of superoxide dismutase (SOD), suggesting a plausible mechanism for its anti-inflammatory properties. Elevated homocysteine (Hcy) is an independent risk factor for vascular disease and endothelial dysfunction. Hcy increases O2•− levels in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). Here, we explore protective effects of Cbl in HAEC exposed to various O2•− sources, including increased Hcy levels. Hcy increased O2•− levels (1.6-fold) in HAEC, concomitant with a 20% reduction in cell viability and a 1.5-fold increase in apoptotic death. Pre-treatment of HAEC with physiologically relevant concentrations of cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) (10 – 50 nM) prevented Hcy-induced increases in O2•− and cell death. CNCbl inhibited both Hcy and rotenone- induced mitochondrial O2•− production. Similarly, HAEC challenged with paraquat showed a 1.5-fold increase in O2•− levels and a 30% decrease in cell viability, both of which were prevented with CNCbl (10 nM) pre-treatment. CNCbl also attenuated elevated O2•− levels following exposure of cells to a Cu/Zn-SOD inhibitor. Our data suggest that Cbl acts as an efficient intracellular O2•− scavenger. PMID:21672628

  8. Protection of cultured mammalian cells by S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721)

    SciTech Connect

    Antoku, S.

    1983-10-01

    The ability of WR-2721 to protect cultured mammalian cells against radiation-induced killing was nearly the same as that of cysteamine when WR-2721 was activated by mouse liver extract. Without the liver extract, protection by WR-2721 required long incubations with the cells prior to irradiation. The protective activity increased in proportion to the cell concentration. The dose reduction factor at a concentration of 4 mM WR-2721 was 1.11 and 1.41 for 1.5 x 10/sup 5/ cells/ml and 15 x 10/sup 5/ cells/ml of cultured cells, respectively. A non-protein bound sulfhydryl group was detected in cell suspensions after incubation with WR-2721, but it was not a dephosphorylated product of WR-2721.

  9. Adipose tissue attracts and protects acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pramanik, Rocky; Sheng, Xia; Ichihara, Brian; Heisterkamp, Nora; Mittelman, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) relapse. Using mouse and cell co-culture models, we investigated whether adipose tissue attracts ALL to a protective microenvironment. Syngeneically implanted ALL cells migrated into adipose tissue within ten days. In vitro, murine ALL cells migrated towards adipose tissue explants and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Human and mouse ALL cells migrated toward adipocyte conditioned media, which was mediated by SDF-1α. In addition, adipose tissue explants protected ALL cells against daunorubicin and vincristine. Our findings suggest that ALL migration into adipose tissue could contribute to drug resistance and potentially relapse. PMID:23332453

  10. Mechanisms of endothelial cell protection by hydroxycinnamic acids.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván

    2014-12-01

    An endothelial dysfunction generates a proatherogenic environment characterized by stimulating thrombus formation. Epidemiological studies have provided evidence of a protective role of healthy diets in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Hydroxycinnamic acids constitute abundant polyphenols in our diets as they are present in high levels in many widely consumed foods, such as fruit, vegetables and beverages. Therefore, it can be established that due to the hydroxycinnamic acid content (caffeic, chlorogenic, feluric and p-coumaric acids), fruit, vegetables and beverages contribute to endothelial protection (attenuates oxidative stress, improved nitric oxide bioavailability and decreased E-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression, among others). In this article, we systematically examine the mechanisms of endothelium protection of hydroxycinnamic acids.

  11. Cell killing by Simian virus 40: protective effect of chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Norkin, L C; Einck, K H

    1978-12-01

    Treatment of CV-1 cells with chloroquine before infection by simian virus 40 resulted in the accumulation of fewer nonviable, trypan blue-stainable cells at 72 h. The drug did not affect the fraction of infected T-antigen-producing cells or the viral yields. It did diminish the apparent redistribution of lysosomal N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase from a particulate to a soluble cell fraction, and it caused an increase in the size and number of lysosomes.

  12. Cell Killing by Simian Virus 40: Protective Effect of Chloroquine

    PubMed Central

    Norkin, Leonard C.; Einck, Katie H.

    1978-01-01

    Treatment of CV-1 cells with chloroquine before infection by simian virus 40 resulted in the accumulation of fewer nonviable, trypan blue-stainable cells at 72 h. The drug did not affect the fraction of infected T-antigen-producing cells or the viral yields. It did diminish the apparent redistribution of lysosomal N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase from a particulate to a soluble cell fraction, and it caused an increase in the size and number of lysosomes. Images PMID:217304

  13. Farm dust and endotoxin protect against allergy through A20 induction in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Schuijs, Martijn J; Willart, Monique A; Vergote, Karl; Gras, Delphine; Deswarte, Kim; Ege, Markus J; Madeira, Filipe Branco; Beyaert, Rudi; van Loo, Geert; Bracher, Franz; von Mutius, Erika; Chanez, Pascal; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida

    2015-09-04

    Growing up on a dairy farm protects children from allergy, hay fever, and asthma. A mechanism linking exposure to this endotoxin (bacterial lipopolysaccharide)-rich environment with protection has remained elusive. Here we show that chronic exposure to low-dose endotoxin or farm dust protects mice from developing house dust mite (HDM)-induced asthma. Endotoxin reduced epithelial cell cytokines that activate dendritic cells (DCs), thus suppressing type 2 immunity to HDMs. Loss of the ubiquitin-modifying enzyme A20 in lung epithelium abolished the protective effect. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in the gene encoding A20 was associated with allergy and asthma risk in children growing up on farms. Thus, the farming environment protects from allergy by modifying the communication between barrier epithelial cells and DCs through A20 induction. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Anti-apoptotic peptides protect against radiation-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Kevin W; Muenzer, Jared T; Chang, Kathy C; Davis, Chris G; McDunn, Jonathan E; Coopersmith, Craig M; Hilliard, Carolyn A; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Grigsby, Perry W; Hunt, Clayton R

    2007-04-06

    The risk of terrorist attacks utilizing either nuclear or radiological weapons has raised concerns about the current lack of effective radioprotectants. Here it is demonstrated that the BH4 peptide domain of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL can be delivered to cells by covalent attachment to the TAT peptide transduction domain (TAT-BH4) and provide protection in vitro and in vivo from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Isolated human lymphocytes treated with TAT-BH4 were protected against apoptosis following exposure to 15Gy radiation. In mice exposed to 5Gy radiation, TAT-BH4 treatment protected splenocytes and thymocytes from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Most importantly, in vivo radiation protection was observed in mice whether TAT-BH4 treatment was given prior to or after irradiation. Thus, by targeting steps within the apoptosis signaling pathway it is possible to develop post-exposure treatments to protect radio-sensitive tissues.

  15. Mucosal BCG Vaccination Induces Protective Lung-Resident Memory T Cell Populations against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Perdomo, Carolina; Zedler, Ulrike; Kühl, Anja A; Lozza, Laura; Saikali, Philippe; Sander, Leif E; Vogelzang, Alexis; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Kupz, Andreas

    2016-11-22

    Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), yet its moderate efficacy against pulmonary TB calls for improved vaccination strategies. Mucosal BCG vaccination generates superior protection against TB in animal models; however, the mechanisms of protection remain elusive. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have been implicated in protective immune responses against viral infections, but the role of TRM cells following mycobacterial infection is unknown. Using a mouse model of TB, we compared protection and lung cellular infiltrates of parenteral and mucosal BCG vaccination. Adoptive transfer and gene expression analyses of lung airway cells were performed to determine the protective capacities and phenotypes of different memory T cell subsets. In comparison to subcutaneous vaccination, intratracheal and intranasal BCG vaccination generated T effector memory and TRM cells in the lung, as defined by surface marker phenotype. Adoptive mucosal transfer of these airway-resident memory T cells into naive mice mediated protection against TB. Whereas airway-resident memory CD4(+) T cells displayed a mixture of effector and regulatory phenotype, airway-resident memory CD8(+) T cells displayed prototypical TRM features. Our data demonstrate a key role for mucosal vaccination-induced airway-resident T cells in the host defense against pulmonary TB. These results have direct implications for the design of refined vaccination strategies. BCG remains the only licensed vaccine against TB. Parenterally administered BCG has variable efficacy against pulmonary TB, and thus, improved prevention strategies and a more refined understanding of correlates of vaccine protection are required. Induction of memory T cells has been shown to be essential for protective TB vaccines. Mimicking the natural infection route by mucosal vaccination has been known to generate superior protection against TB in animal models; however, the

  16. Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells Protect Intervertebral Disc Cells in Compression: Implications for Stem Cell Regenerative Disc Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhen; Luo, Beier; Liu, Zhi-Heng; Samartzis, Dino; Liu, Zhongyang; Gao, Bo; Huang, Liangliang; Luo, Zhuo-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Abnormal biomechanics plays a role in intervertebral disc degeneration. Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) have been implicated in disc integrity; however, their role in the setting of mechanical stimuli upon the disc's nucleus pulposus (NP) remains unknown. As such, the present study aimed to evaluate the influence of ADSCs upon NP cells in compressive load culture. Methods: Human NP cells were cultured in compressive load at 3.0MPa for 48 hours with or without ADSCs co-culture (the ratio was 50:50). We used flow cytometry, live/dead staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to evaluate cell death, and determined the expression of specific apoptotic pathways by characterizing the expression of activated caspases-3, -8 and -9. We further used real-time (RT-) PCR and immunostaining to determine the expression of the extracellular matrix (ECM), mediators of matrix degradation (e.g. MMPs, TIMPs and ADAMTSs), pro-inflammatory factors and NP cell phenotype markers. Results: ADSCs inhibited human NP cell apoptosis via suppression of activated caspase-9 and caspase-3. Furthermore, ADSCs protected NP cells from the degradative effects of compressive load by significantly up-regulating the expression of ECM genes (SOX9, COL2A1 and ACAN), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) genes (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2) and cytokeratin 8 (CK8) protein expression. Alternatively, ADSCs showed protective effect by inhibiting compressive load mediated increase of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs; MMP-3 and MMP-13), disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTSs; ADAMTS-1 and 5), and pro-inflammatory factors (IL-1beta, IL-6, TGF-beta1 and TNF-alpha). Conclusions: Our study is the first in vitro study assessing the impact of ADSCs on NP cells in an un-physiological mechanical stimulation culture environment. Our study noted that ADSCs protect compressive load induced NP cell death and degradation by inhibition of activated caspase-9 and -3

  17. CD8 T cells protect adult naive mice from JEV-induced morbidity via lytic function

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Amanpreet Singh; Agrawal, Tanvi; Biswas, Moanaro; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Rath, Satyajit; George, Anna; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R.

    2017-01-01

    Following Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection neutralizing antibodies are shown to provide protection in a significant proportion of cases, but not all, suggesting additional components of immune system might also contribute to elicit protective immune response. Here we have characterized the role of T cells in offering protection in adult mice infected with JEV. Mice lacking α/β–T cells (TCRβ–null) are highly susceptible and die over 10–18 day period as compared to the wild-type (WT) mice which are resistant. This is associated with high viral load, higher mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines and breach in the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Infected WT mice do not show a breach in BBB; however, in contrast to TCRβ-null, they show the presence of T cells in the brain. Using adoptive transfer of cells with specific genetic deficiencies we see that neither the presence of CD4 T cells nor cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10 or interferon-gamma have any significant role in offering protection from primary infection. In contrast, we show that CD8 T cell deficiency is more critical as absence of CD8 T cells alone increases mortality in mice infected with JEV. Further, transfer of T cells from beige mice with defects in granular lytic function into TCRβ-null mice shows poor protection implicating granule-mediated target cell lysis as an essential component for survival. In addition, for the first time we report that γ/δ-T cells also make significant contribution to confer protection from JEV infection. Our data show that effector CD8 T cells play a protective role during primary infection possibly by preventing the breach in BBB and neuronal damage. PMID:28151989

  18. Short protection device for stack of electrolytic cells

    DOEpatents

    Katz, M.; Schroll, C.R.

    1984-11-29

    The present invention relates to a device for preventing the electrical shorting of a stack of electrolytic cells during an extended period of operation. The device has application to fuel cell and other electrolytic cell stacks operating in low or high temperature corrosive environments. It is of particular importance for use in a stack of fuel cells operating with molten metal carbonate electrolyte for the production of electric power. Also, the device may have application in similar technology involving stacks of electrolytic cells for electrolysis to decompose chemical compounds.

  19. Different biocompatibility of crystalline triamcinolone deposits on retinal cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Szurman, Peter; Sierra, Ana; Kaczmarek, Radoslaw; Jaissle, Gesine B; Wallenfels-Thilo, Barbara; Grisanti, Salvatore; Lüke, Matthias; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl U; Spitzer, Martin S

    2007-07-01

    Epiretinal deposits of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) can be detrimental to retinal cells in vitro as several laboratory studies have shown. This contrasts with the good clinical experience of intravitreal TA use. We investigated the effect of TA crystals on retinal cells concerning the critical dose range, a potential cell recovery, the drug-tissue interaction and what protective biological factors could explain the discrepancy between in vivo and in vitro results. A human retinal pigment epithelium cell line (ARPE19) and transformed rat retinal ganglion cells (RGC5) were used. Purified TA crystals were either added directly on top of the cell cultures or on top of membrane filter inserts, basement membrane sheets or porcine vitreous with the cells growing underneath. To determine the number of live versus dead cells fluorescent stains were used. Proliferation and viability were measured using the MTT assay and the mean inhibitory dose (ID(50)) calculated with or without a filter. Cell recovery was measured after transient TA exposure (0.01-1 mg/ml) compared to continuous exposure after 7 days. To exclude a mere mechanical effect of epicellular deposits the TA crystals were replaced by glass pearls in a serum-free medium and the MTT toxicity assay was performed after 24 h. Without direct contact of TA crystals with the cells only a moderate decrease of mitochondrial activity was observed that fully recovered after transient exposure and showed a clinically safe ID(50) of 7.7 mg/ml. In contrast, direct exposure to even minute crystalline deposits for 7 days caused a rapid progressive and irreversible cell death being significant far below clinically used concentrations (ID(50) 0.058 mg/ml). Direct exposure to glass pearls did not show any loss of viability. Both basement membrane sheets and vitreous reliably prevented direct cytotoxicity to underlying retinal ganglion cells. Our findings suggest that irreversible TA cytotoxicity in a cell culture setting occurs

  20. Worker protection during mercury electrolysis cell plant decommissioning.

    PubMed

    Besson, Jean-Claude; Augarde, Estelle; Nasterlack, Michael

    2012-06-01

    This article brings information on how to protect worker health during the decommissioning of mercury-based electrolysis facilities. It relies on the Euro Chlor document "Health 2, Code of practice, Control of worker exposure to mercury in the chlor-alkali industry" that provides protection guidelines for both normal production and decommissioning activities, and on hands-on experience gained during chlor-alkali plant decommissioning operations.Decommissioning and dismantling of mercury-containing chlorine production plants presents challenges to industrial hygiene and health protection that are usually not present during normal operations. These involve meticulous training and enforcement of the appropriate use of personal protective equipment to prevent excessive mercury exposure.The best practice guidelines and recommendations available from Euro Chlor can help employers and occupational physicians to manage these challenges, as they provide state-of-the-art procedures. Our experience is that rigorous implementation of these procedures and worker training ensured acceptable hygiene at the workplace and prevented mercury-related adverse health effects.

  1. EFFECT OF SIVANAAR AMIRTHAM AND AYAKKANTHA CHENDOORAM IN EXPERIMENTAL INFLAMMATION AND MAST CELL PROTECTION

    PubMed Central

    Jaswanth, A.; Ravikumar, Akila; Robert, S. Jerry Heison; Jayakar, B.

    1998-01-01

    The Siddha Drugs Sivannar Amirthan (SA), Ayakkantha chendooram (AC) and their combinations were screened for their anti-inflammatory effect against carrageenin induced paw edema and for its protective effect on mast cellos against degranulation, A significant anti-inflammatory and mast cell protective effects were observed. PMID:22556884

  2. Peroxiredoxin IV Protects Cells From Radiation-Induced Apoptosis in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jung Je; Chang, Hyo Won; Jeong, Eun-Jeong; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Choi, Seung-Ho; Jeon, Sea-Yuong; Ko, Gyung Hyuck; Kim, Sang Yoon

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: Human peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are known as a family of thiol-specific antioxidant enzymes, among which Prx-I and -II play an important role in protecting cells from irradiation-induced cell death. It is not known whether Prx-IV also protects cells from ionizing radiation (IR). Methods and Materials: To evaluate the protective role of Prx-IV in IR, we transfected full-length Prx-IV cDNA into AMC-HN3 cells, which weakly express endogenous Prx-IV, and knocked down the expression of Prx-IV with siRNA methods using AMC-HN7 cells, which express high levels of endogenous Prx-IV. Radiosensitivity profiles in these cells were evaluated using clonogenic assay, FACS analysis, cell viability, and TUNEL assay. Results: Three Prx-IV expressing clones were isolated. Prx-IV regulated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and made cells more resistant to IR-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, the knockdown of Prx-IV with siRNA made cells more sensitive to IR-induced apoptosis. Conclusion: The results of these studies suggest that Prx-IV may play an important role in protecting cells from IR-induced apoptosis in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma.

  3. Baicalein Protects Human Skin Cells against Ultraviolet B-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Min Chang; Piao, Mei Jing; Fernando, Pattage Madushan Dilhara Jayatissa; Han, Xia; Hewage, Susara Ruwan Kumara Madduma; Park, Jeong Eon; Ko, Mi Sung; Jung, Uhee; Kim, In Gyu; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxy-2-phenyl-chromen-4-one) is a flavone, a type of flavonoid, originally isolated from the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis. This study evaluated the protective effects of baicalein against oxidative damage-mediated apoptosis induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation in a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). Baicalein absorbed light within the wavelength range of UVB. In addition, baicalein decreased the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to UVB radiation. Baicalein protected cells against UVB radiation-induced DNA breaks, 8-isoprostane generation and protein modification in HaCaT cells. Furthermore, baicalein suppressed the apoptotic cell death by UVB radiation. These findings suggest that baicalein protected HaCaT cells against UVB radiation-induced cell damage and apoptosis by absorbing UVB radiation and scavenging ROS. PMID:27257012

  4. Pigment developed to protect spacecraft/solar cells from Sun's harmful rays.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A pigment (phthalocyanine) is studied at the Marshall Materials and Processes Lab. The pigment has the ability to protect spacecraft against the harmful effects of the Sun's ultraviolet rays, and to increase the efficiency and life of solar cells.

  5. Pigment developed to protect spacecraft/solar cells from Sun's harmful rays.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A pigment (phthalocyanine) is studied at the Marshall Materials and Processes Lab. The pigment has the ability to protect spacecraft against the harmful effects of the Sun's ultraviolet rays, and to increase the efficiency and life of solar cells.

  6. Protective role of curcumin in oxidative stress of breast cells.

    PubMed

    Calaf, Gloria M; Echiburú-Chau, Carlos; Roy, Debasish; Chai, Yunfei; Wen, Gengyun; Balajee, Adayabalam S

    2011-10-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a well known antioxidant that exerts anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects. The effects of curcumin were evaluated in a breast cancer model that was developed with the immortalized breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10F after exposure to low doses of high LET (linear energy transfer) α particles (150 keV/µm) of radiation, and subsequently cultured in the presence of 17β-estradiol (estrogen). This model consisted of human breast epithelial cells in different stages of transformation: i) a control cell line, MCF-10F, ii) an estrogen-treated cell line, named Estrogen, iii) a malignant cell line, named Alpha3 and iv) a malignant and tumorigenic, cell line named Alpha5. Curcumin decreased the formation of hydrogen peroxide in the control MCF-10F, Estrogen and Alpha5 cell lines in comparison to their counterparts. Curcumin had little effect on NFκB (50 kDa) but decreased the protein expression in the Estrogen cell line in comparison to their counterparts. Curcumin enhanced manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) protein expression in the MCF-10F and Alpha3 cell lines. Results indicated that catalase protein expression increased in curcumin treated-Alpha3 and Alpha5 cell lines. Curcumin slightly decreased lipid peroxidation in the MCF-10F cell lines, but significantly (P<0.05) decreased it in the Alpha5 cell line treated with curcumin in comparison to their counterparts as demonstrated by the 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (8-iso-PGF2α) levels. It can be concluded that curcumin acted upon oxidative stress in human breast epithelial cells transformed by the effect of radiation in the presence of estrogen.

  7. CD8+ T cells complement antibodies in protecting against yellow fever virus.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Maria R; Kongsgaard, Michael; Steffensen, Maria A; Fenger, Christina; Rasmussen, Michael; Skjødt, Karsten; Finsen, Bente; Stryhn, Anette; Buus, Søren; Christensen, Jan P; Thomsen, Allan R

    2015-02-01

    The attenuated yellow fever (YF) vaccine (YF-17D) was developed in the 1930s, yet little is known about the protective mechanisms underlying its efficiency. In this study, we analyzed the relative contribution of cell-mediated and humoral immunity to the vaccine-induced protection in a murine model of YF-17D infection. Using different strains of knockout mice, we found that CD4(+) T cells, B cells, and Abs are required for full clinical protection of vaccinated mice, whereas CD8(+) T cells are dispensable for long-term survival after intracerebral challenge. However, by analyzing the immune response inside the infected CNS, we observed an accelerated T cell influx into the brain after intracerebral challenge of vaccinated mice, and this T cell recruitment correlated with improved virus control in the brain. Using mice deficient in B cells we found that, in the absence of Abs, YF vaccination can still induce some antiviral protection, and in vivo depletion of CD8(+) T cells from these animals revealed a pivotal role for CD8(+) T cells in controlling virus replication in the absence of a humoral response. Finally, we demonstrated that effector CD8(+) T cells also contribute to viral control in the presence of circulating YF-specific Abs. To our knowledge, this is the first time that YF-specific CD8(+) T cells have been demonstrated to possess antiviral activity in vivo. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Cross Protective Mucosal Immunity Mediated by Memory Th17 Cells against Streptococcus pneumoniae Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Yongli; Li, Wenchao; Tian, Ying; Sonnenberg, Gregory F; Weiser, Jeffery N.; Ni, Xin; Shen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) remains a leading cause of serious illness and death worldwide. Immunization with conjugated pneumococcal vaccine has lowered the colonization rate and consequently invasive diseases by inducing serotype-specific antibodies. However, many of current pneumonia cases result from infection by serotype strains not included in the vaccine. In this study, we asked if cross-protection against lung infection by heterologous strains can be induced and investigated the underlying immune mechanism. We found that immune mice recovered from a prior infection were protected against heterologous Sp strains in the pneumonia challenge model, as evident by accelerated bacterial clearance, reduced pathology and apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. Sp infection in the lung induced strong Th17 responses at the lung mucosal site. Transfer of CD4+ T cells from immune mice provided heterologous protection against pneumonia, and this protection was abrogated by IL-17A blockade. Transfer of memory CD4+ T cells from IL-17A knockout mice failed to provide protection. These results indicate that memory Th17 cells played a key role in providing protection against pneumonia in a serotype independent manner and suggest the feasibility of developing a broadly protective vaccine against bacterial pneumonia by targeting mucosal Th17 T cells. PMID:27118490

  9. Lung dendritic cells induce migration of protective T cells to the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Ruane, Darren; Brane, Lucas; Reis, Bernardo Sgarbi; Cheong, Cheolho; Poles, Jordan; Do, Yoonkyung; Zhu, Hongfa; Velinzon, Klara; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Studt, Natalie; Mayer, Lloyd; Lavelle, Ed C; Steinman, Ralph M; Mucida, Daniel; Mehandru, Saurabh

    2013-08-26

    Developing efficacious vaccines against enteric diseases is a global challenge that requires a better understanding of cellular recruitment dynamics at the mucosal surfaces. The current paradigm of T cell homing to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract involves the induction of α4β7 and CCR9 by Peyer's patch and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) dendritic cells (DCs) in a retinoic acid-dependent manner. This paradigm, however, cannot be reconciled with reports of GI T cell responses after intranasal (i.n.) delivery of antigens that do not directly target the GI lymphoid tissue. To explore alternative pathways of cellular migration, we have investigated the ability of DCs from mucosal and nonmucosal tissues to recruit lymphocytes to the GI tract. Unexpectedly, we found that lung DCs, like CD103(+) MLN DCs, up-regulate the gut-homing integrin α4β7 in vitro and in vivo, and induce T cell migration to the GI tract in vivo. Consistent with a role for this pathway in generating mucosal immune responses, lung DC targeting by i.n. immunization induced protective immunity against enteric challenge with a highly pathogenic strain of Salmonella. The present report demonstrates novel functional evidence of mucosal cross talk mediated by DCs, which has the potential to inform the design of novel vaccines against mucosal pathogens.

  10. ABCA3 protects alveolar epithelial cells against free cholesterol induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Zarbock, Ralf; Kaltenborn, Eva; Frixel, Sabrina; Wittmann, Thomas; Liebisch, Gerhard; Schmitz, Gerd; Griese, Matthias

    2015-07-01

    Diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs) are characterized by chronic inflammation and fibrotic remodeling of the interstitial tissue. A small fraction of DPLD cases can be genetically defined by mutations in certain genes, with ABCA3 being the gene most commonly affected. However, the pathomechanisms underlying ABCA3-induced DPLD are far from clear. To investigate whether ABCA3 plays a role in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, phospholipids, free cholesterol, and cholesteryl esters were quantified in cells stably expressing ABCA3 using mass spectrometry. Cellular free cholesterol and lipid droplets were visualized by filipin or oil red staining, respectively. Expression of SREBP regulated genes was measured using qPCR. Cell viability was assessed using the XTT assay. We found that wild type ABCA3 reduces cellular free cholesterol levels, induces the SREBP pathway, and renders cells more resistant to loading with exogenous cholesterol. Moreover, ABCA3 mutations found in patients with DPLD interfere with this protective effect of ABCA3, resulting in free cholesterol induced cell death. We conclude that ABCA3 plays a previously unrecognized role in the regulation of cellular cholesterol levels. Accumulation of free cholesterol as a result of a loss of ABCA3 export function represents a novel pathomechanism in ABCA3-induced DPLD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Epithelial Immunization Induces Polyfunctional CD8+ T Cells and Optimal Mousepox Protection

    PubMed Central

    Siciliano, Nicholas A.; DeHaven, Brian C.; Snook, Adam E.

    2014-01-01

    We assessed several routes of immunization with vaccinia virus (VACV) in protecting mice against ectromelia virus (ECTV). By a wide margin, skin scarification provided the greatest protection. Humoral immunity and resident-memory T cells notwithstanding, several approaches revealed that circulating, memory CD8+ T cells primed via scarification were functionally superior and conferred enhanced virus control. Immunization via the epithelial route warrants further investigation, as it may also provide enhanced defense against other infectious agents. PMID:24899206

  12. Fas Protects Breast Cancer Stem Cells from Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    sensitive to Fas-mediated apoptosis , while the BCSCs part is more sensitive to the death induced by the elimination of CD95 (a phenomenon we have recently...simultaneously inducing apoptosis and DICE in breast cancer cells, with many potential therapeutic applications. I could also demonstrate the involvement...published in conferences and scientific journals. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Fas, FasL, Cancer, Cancer Stem cells, Apoptosis , miRNA, EMT, cell death. 16. SECURITY

  13. Development of a new integral solar cell protective cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naselow, A. B.; Dupont, P. S.; Scott-Monck, J.

    1983-01-01

    A unique polyimide polymer has been developed which shows promise as an encapsulant for interconnected solar cell modules. Such an integral cover offers important weight and cost advantages. The polymer has been characterized on silicon solar cells with respect to electrical output and spectral response. The response of the material-coated cells to electron, low-energy proton, and vacuum-ultraviolet radiation, thermal shock and humidity tests was determined.

  14. Development of a new integral solar cell protective cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naselow, A. B.; Dupont, P. S.; Scott-Monck, J.

    1983-01-01

    A unique polyimide polymer has been developed which shows promise as an encapsulant for interconnected solar cell modules. Such an integral cover offers important weight and cost advantages. The polymer has been characterized on silicon solar cells with respect to electrical output and spectral response. The response of the material-coated cells to electron, low-energy proton, and vacuum-ultraviolet radiation, thermal shock and humidity tests was determined.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of retinal ganglion cell degeneration in glaucoma and future prospects for cell body and axonal protection

    PubMed Central

    Munemasa, Yasunari; Kitaoka, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma, which affects more than 70 million people worldwide, is a heterogeneous group of disorders with a resultant common denominator; optic neuropathy, eventually leading to irreversible blindness. The clinical manifestations of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), the most common subtype of glaucoma, include excavation of the optic disc and progressive loss of visual field. Axonal degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and apoptotic death of their cell bodies are observed in glaucoma, in which the reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) is known to slow progression of the disease. A pattern of localized retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) defects in glaucoma patients indicates that axonal degeneration may precede RGC body death in this condition. The mechanisms of degeneration of neuronal cell bodies and their axons may differ. In this review, we addressed the molecular mechanisms of cell body death and axonal degeneration in glaucoma and proposed axonal protection in addition to cell body protection. The concept of axonal protection may become a new therapeutic strategy to prevent further axonal degeneration or revive dying axons in patients with preperimetric glaucoma. Further study will be needed to clarify whether the combination therapy of axonal protection and cell body protection will have greater protective effects in early or progressive glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON). PMID:23316132

  16. Cytoplasmic PELP1 and ERRgamma Protect Human Mammary Epithelial Cells from Tam-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Brian J.; Regan Anderson, Tarah M.; Welch, Siya Lem; Nicely, Julie; Seewaldt, Victoria L.; Ostrander, Julie H.

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is the only FDA-approved chemoprevention agent for pre-menopausal women at high risk for developing breast cancer. While Tam reduces a woman's risk of developing estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms associated with risk reduction are poorly understood. Prior studies have shown that cytoplasmic proline, glutamic acid and leucine rich protein 1 (PELP1) promotes Tam resistance in breast cancer cell lines. Herein, we tested for PELP1 localization in breast epithelial cells from women at high risk for developing breast cancer and found that PELP1 was localized to the cytoplasm in 36% of samples. In vitro, immortalized HMECs expressing a nuclear localization signal (NLS) mutant of PELP1 (PELP1-cyto) were resistant to Tam-induced death. Furthermore, PELP1-cyto signaling through estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) promoted cell survival in the presence of Tam. Overexpression of ERRγ in immortalized HMECs protected cells from Tam-induced death, while knockdown of ERRγ sensitized PELP1-cyto expressing HMECs to Tam. Moreover, Tam-induced HMEC cell death was independent of apoptosis and involved accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II. Expression of PELP1-cyto and ERRγ reduced Tam-induced LC3-II accumulation, and knockdown of ERRγ increased LC3-II levels in response to Tam. Additionally, PELP1-cyto expression led to the upregulation of MMP-3 and MAOB, known PELP1 and ERRγ target genes, respectively. Our data indicate that cytoplasmic PELP1 induces signaling pathways that converge on ERRγ to promote cell survival in the presence of Tam. These data suggest that PELP1 localization and/or ERRγ activation could be developed as tissue biomarkers for Tam responsiveness. PMID:25789479

  17. Protective cellular retroviral immunity requires both CD4+ and CD8+ immune T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hom, R C; Finberg, R W; Mullaney, S; Ruprecht, R M

    1991-01-01

    We have found previously that postexposure chemoprophylaxis with 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (also known as zidovudine or AZT) in combination with recombinant human alpha A/D interferon fully protected mice exposed to a lethal dose of Rauscher murine leukemia virus (RLV) against viremia and disease. After cessation of therapy, over 90% of these mice were able to resist rechallenge with live RLV, thus demonstrating an acquired immunity. Adoptive cell transfer of 4 x 10(7) cells from immunized mice fully protected naive recipients from viremia and splenomegaly after RLV challenge. However, when these immune T cells were fractionated into CD4+ and CD8+ subpopulations, only partial protection was found when 4 x 10(7) T cells of either subset were given. Full protection against RLV challenge was seen again when the T-cell subsets from immunized mice were recombined and transferred at the same number into naive mice. We conclude that cellular immunity alone is protective and that both CD4+ and CD8+ cell types are required for conferring full protection against live virus challenge. Images PMID:1898666

  18. Protective effect of resveratrol against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in HEI-OC1 auditory cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se Hee; Kim, Hyung Sub; An, Yun Suk; Chang, Jiwon; Choi, June; Im, Gi Jung

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic drug, but it generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) that induce severe adverse effects such as ototoxicity. Resveratrol reportedly prevents oxidative stress-induced cell death. Thus, we hypothesized that the anti-oxidative effect of resveratrol could protect against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. The present study examined the protective effect of resveratrol against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in HEI-OC1 auditory cells. HEI-OC1 cells were pretreated with resveratrol at 1μM for 24h and then exposed to 15μM cisplatin for 48h. Resulting cytotoxicity was measured by the MTT method, and intracellular ROS was measured using flow cytometry. Protective effect of resveratrol was compared with other anti-oxidants. Pretreatment with resveratrol 1μM protected HEI-OC1 auditory cells against cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and significantly reduced a cisplatin-induced increase in ROS. Resveratrol provided significant protection against 15μM cisplatin applied for 48h (50.8% cell viability in the cisplatin group vs. 57.6% in the cisplatin-plus-resveratrol group), and there was a 9% decrease in cisplatin-induced ROS associated with resveratrol. This is the study investigating the protective effects of resveratrol against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in an auditory cell line. Resveratrol significantly reduced a cisplatin-induced increase in ROS and thereby inhibited cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mitochondrial transfer of mesenchymal stem cells effectively protects corneal epithelial cells from mitochondrial damage

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dan; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Yuelin; Wong, David Sai Hung; Li, Qing; Tse, Hung-fat; Xu, Goufeng; Yu, Zhendong; Lian, Qizhou

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can donate mitochondria to airway epithelial cells and rescue mitochondrial damage in lung injury. We sought to determine whether MSCs could donate mitochondria and protect against oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in the cornea. Co-culturing of MSCs and corneal epithelial cells (CECs) indicated that the efficiency of mitochondrial transfer from MSCs to CECs was enhanced by Rotenone (Rot)-induced oxidative stress. The efficient mitochondrial transfer was associated with increased formation of tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) between MSCs and CECs, tubular connections that allowed direct intercellular communication. Separation of MSCs and CECs by a transwell culture system revealed no mitochiondrial transfer from MSCs to CECs and mitochondrial function was impaired when CECs were exposed to Rot challenge. CECs with or without mitochondrial transfer from MSCs displayed a distinct survival capacity and mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate. Mechanistically, increased filopodia outgrowth in CECs for TNT formation was associated with oxidative inflammation-activated NFκB/TNFαip2 signaling pathways that could be attenuated by reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) treatment. Furthermore, MSCs grown on a decellularized porcine corneal scaffold were transplanted onto an alkali-injured eye in a rabbit model. Enhanced corneal wound healing was evident following healthy MSC scaffold transplantation. And transferred mitochondria was detected in corneal epithelium. In conclusion, mitochondrial transfer from MSCs provides novel protection for the cornea against oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial damage. This therapeutic strategy may prove relevant for a broad range of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:27831562

  20. Moonlight-like proteins of the cell wall protect sessile cells of Candida from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Fujarte, Isela; López-Romero, Everardo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms of Candida species are associated with high morbidity and hospital mortality. Candida forms biofilms by adhering to human host epithelium through cell wall proteins (CWP) and simultaneously neutralizing the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during the respiratory burst by phagocytic cells. The purpose of this paper is to identify the CWP of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida krusei and Candida parapsilosis expressed after exposure to different concentrations of H2O2 using a proteomic approach. CWP obtained from sessile cells, both treated and untreated with the oxidizing agent, were resolved by one and two-dimensional (2D-PAGE) gels and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Some of these proteins were identified and found to correspond to moonlighting CWP such as: (i) glycolytic enzymes, (ii) heat shock, (iii) OSR proteins, (iv) general metabolic enzymes and (v) highly conserved proteins, which are up- or down-regulated in the presence or absence of ROS. We also found that the expression of these CWP is different for each Candida species. Moreover, RT-PCR assays allowed us to demonstrate that transcription of the gene coding for Eno1, one of the moonlight-like CWP identified in response to the oxidant agent, is differentially regulated. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration that, in response to oxidative stress, each species of Candida, differentially regulates the expression of moonlighting CWP, which may protect the organism from the ROS generated during phagocytosis. Presumptively, these proteins allow the pathogen to adhere and form a biofilm, and eventually cause invasive candidiasis in the human host. We propose that, in addition to the antioxidant mechanisms present in Candida, the moonlighting CWP also confer protection to these pathogens from oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evidence for direct cellular protective effect of PL-10 substances (synthesized parts of body protection compound, BPC) and their specificity to gastric mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Bódis, B; Karádi, O; Németh, P; Dohoczky, C; Kolega, M; Mózsik, G

    1997-01-01

    The direct gastric mucosal cellular effect of four PL-10 substances (a synthesized part of human body protection compound, BPC containing 14 or 15 amino acids) was studied on freshly isolated rat gastric mucosal cells and on a mouse myeloma cell line (Sp2/0-Ag14) in an ethanol-induced cell injury model. The examined substances were not toxic for the cells. Two of them proved to be significantly protective against the direct cellular damaging effect of ethanol (PL 10.1.15AK-3 in 5 microg/ml dose and PL 10.1.AK14-2 dose-dependently, ED50=50 ng/ml) on gastric mucosal cells. This cytoprotective effect was failured on mouse myeloma cells. Based on these results a part of the in vivo protection induced by BPC seems to be a direct cellular protective effect to gastric mucosal cells.

  2. Plant cell walls: Protecting the barrier from degradation by microbial enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lagaert, Stijn; Beliën, Tim; Volckaert, Guido

    2009-12-01

    Plant cell walls are predominantly composed of polysaccharides, which are connected in a strong, yet resilient network. They determine the size and shape of plant cells and form the interface between the cell and its often hostile environment. To penetrate the cell wall and thus infect plants, most phytopathogens secrete numerous cell wall degrading enzymes. Conversely, as a first line of defense, plant cell walls contain an array of inhibitors of these enzymes. Scientific knowledge on these inhibitors significantly progressed in the past years and this review is meant to give a comprehensive overview of plant inhibitors against microbial cell wall degrading enzymes and their role in plant protection.

  3. Protective effect of creatine against inhibition by methylglyoxal of mitochondrial respiration of cardiac cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Soumya Sinha; Biswas, Swati; Ray, Manju; Ray, Subhankar

    2003-06-01

    Previous publications from our laboratory have shown that methylglyoxal inhibits mitochondrial respiration of malignant and cardiac cells, but it has no effect on mitochondrial respiration of other normal cells [Biswas, Ray, Misra, Dutta and Ray (1997) Biochem. J. 323, 343-348; Ray, Biswas and Ray (1997) Mol. Cell. Biochem. 171, 95-103]. However, this inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal is not significant in cardiac tissue slices. Moreover, post-mitochondrial supernatant (PMS) of cardiac cells could almost completely protect the mitochondrial respiration against the inhibitory effect of methylglyoxal. A systematic search indicated that creatine present in cardiac cells is responsible for this protective effect. Glutathione has also some protective effect. However, creatine phosphate, creatinine, urea, glutathione disulphide and beta-mercaptoethanol have no protective effect. The inhibitory and protective effects of methylglyoxal and creatine respectively on cardiac mitochondrial respiration were studied with various concentrations of both methylglyoxal and creatine. Interestingly, neither creatine nor glutathione have any protective effect on the inhibition by methylglyoxal on the mitochondrial respiration of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells. The creatine and glutathione contents of several PMS, which were tested for the possible protective effect, were measured. The activities of two important enzymes, namely glyoxalase I and creatine kinase, which act upon glutathione plus methylglyoxal and creatine respectively, were also measured in different PMS. Whether mitochondrial creatine kinase had any role in the protective effect of creatine had also been investigated using 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, an inhibitor of creatine kinase. The differential effect of creatine on mitochondria of cardiac and malignant cells has been discussed with reference to the therapeutic potential of methylglyoxal.

  4. Foxp3-transduced polyclonal regulatory T cells protect against chronic renal injury from adriamycin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan Min; Zhang, Geoff Yu; Wang, Yiping; Hu, Min; Wu, Huiling; Watson, Debbie; Hori, Shohei; Alexander, Ian E; Harris, David C H; Alexander, Stephen I

    2006-03-01

    Chronic proteinuric renal injury is a major cause of ESRD. Adriamycin nephropathy is a murine model of chronic proteinuric renal disease whereby chemical injury is followed by immune and structural changes that mimic human disease. Foxp3 is a gene that induces a regulatory T cell (Treg) phenotype. It was hypothesized that Foxp3-transduced Treg could protect against renal injury in Adriamycin nephropathy. CD4+ T cells were transduced with either a Foxp3-containing retrovirus or a control retrovirus. Foxp3-transduced T cells had a regulatory phenotype by functional and phenotypic assays. Adoptive transfer of Foxp3-transduced T cells protected against renal injury. Urinary protein excretion and serum creatinine were reduced (P<0.05), and there was significantly less glomerulosclerosis, tubular damage, and interstitial infiltrates (P<0.01). It is concluded that Foxp3-transduced Treg cells may have a therapeutic role in protecting against immune injury and disease progression in chronic proteinuric renal disease.

  5. Mast cells protect against Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Junkins, Robert D; Carrigan, Svetlana O; Wu, Zhengli; Stadnyk, Andrew W; Cowley, Elizabeth; Issekutz, Thomas; Berman, Jason; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in immune-compromised individuals. Maintaining the integrity of the respiratory epithelium is critical for an effective host response to P. aeruginosa. Given the close spatial relationship between mast cells and the respiratory epithelium, and the importance of tightly regulated epithelial permeability during lung infections, we examined whether mast cells influence airway epithelial integrity during P. aeruginosa lung infection in a mouse model. We found that mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh)/Kit(W-sh) mice displayed greatly increased epithelial permeability, bacterial dissemination, and neutrophil accumulation compared with wild-type animals after P. aeruginosa infection; these defects were corrected on reconstitution with mast cells. An in vitro Transwell co-culture model further demonstrated that a secreted mast cell factor decreased epithelial cell apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor production after P. aeruginosa infection. Together, our data demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for mast cells in the maintenance of epithelial integrity during P. aeruginosa infection, through a mechanism that likely involves prevention of epithelial apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor production. Our understanding of mechanisms of the host response to P. aeruginosa will open new avenues for the development of successful preventative and treatment strategies.

  6. Fibroblasts Protect Melanoma Cells from the Cytotoxic Effects of Doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Tiago, Manoela; de Oliveira, Edson Mendes; Brohem, Carla Abdo; Pennacchi, Paula Comune; Paes, Rafael Duarte; Haga, Raquel Brandão; Campa, Ana; de Moraes Barros, Silvia Berlanga; Smalley, Keiran S.

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and until recently, it was extremely resistant to radio-, immuno-, and chemotherapy. Despite the latest success of BRAF V600E-targeted therapies, responses are typically short lived and relapse is all but certain. Furthermore, a percentage (40%) of melanoma cells is BRAF wild type. Emerging evidence suggests a role for normal host cells in the occurrence of drug resistance. In the current study, we compared a variety of cell culture models with an organotypic incomplete skin culture model (the “dermal equivalent”) to investigate the role of the tissue microenvironment in the response of melanoma cells to the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (Dox). In the dermal equivalent model, consisting of fibroblasts embedded in type I collagen matrix, melanoma cells showed a decreased cytotoxic response when compared with less complex culture conditions, such as seeding on plastic cell culture plate (as monolayers cultures) or on collagen gel. We further investigated the role of the microenvironment in p53 induction and caspase 3 and 9 cleavage. Melanoma cell lines cultured on dermal equivalent showed decreased expression of p53 after Dox treatment, and this outcome was accompanied by induction of interleukin IL-6, IL-8, and matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. Here, we show that the growth of melanoma cells in the dermal equivalent model inflects drug responses by recapitulating important pro-survival features of the tumor microenvironment. These studies indicate that the presence of stroma enhances the drug resistance of melanoma in vitro, more closely mirroring the in vivo phenotype. Our data, thus, demonstrate the utility of organotypic cell culture models in providing essential context-dependent information critical for the development of new therapeutic strategies for melanoma. We believe that the organotypic model represents an improved screening platform to investigate novel anti-cancer agents, as it provides

  7. Filamin A protects cells against force-induced apoptosis by stabilizing talin- and vinculin-containing cell adhesions.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Vanessa I; Senini, Vincent W; Wang, Yongqiang; Kazembe, Mwayi P; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    In mechanically loaded tissues such as weight-bearing joints, myocardium, and periodontal ligament, pathophysiological forces can disrupt cell-matrix contacts, which can induce cell death, leading to tissue and organ dysfunction. Protection against force-induced cell death may be mediated by filamin A (FLNa), an actin-binding protein that regulates β1 integrin-mediated cell adhesion. We examined the affect of filamin expression on collagen distribution and cell death in the periodontal ligament, a force-loaded tissue. Conditional deletion of FLNa in fibroblasts was associated with 2-fold increase of acellular areas in periodontal ligament and 7-fold higher proportions of apoptotic cells. In cultured fibroblasts with FLNa knockdown, we examined the affect of supraphysiological forces (1 pN/μm(2) cell area; applied through the β1 integrin) on recruitment of talin and vinculin to focal adhesions and on apoptosis. Compared with the wild type, FLNa-knockdown cells exhibited 3-fold increases in floating cells after overnight force application and a 2-fold increase in cell detachment. Force induced time-dependent reductions (P<0.05) in the numbers of activated β1 integrin-, talin-, and vinculin-stained adhesions in FLNa-knockdown compared with those in wild-type cells. We conclude that FLNa protects against apoptosis in force-loaded cells, and this protection is mediated by enhanced formation and maturation of matrix adhesions.

  8. Fas Protects Breast Cancer Stem Cells from Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    apoptosis and DICE in breast cancer cells, with many potential therapeutical applications. I could also demonstrate the involvement of miRNA in the...process. Moreover, I have developed a novel plasmid-based tool to isolate BCSCS by the activity of miRNAs , and I am going to optimize and test the...relevance of its use in the next reporting period. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Fas, FasL, Cancer, Cancer Stem cells, Apoptosis, miRNA , EMT, cell death. 16

  9. Sun protection for preventing basal cell and squamous cell skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Guillermo; Nova, John; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Andrea Esperanza; Medina, Roger David; Solorzano-Restrepo, Carolina; Gonzalez, Jenny; Olmos, Miguel; Godfrey, Kathie; Arevalo-Rodriguez, Ingrid

    2016-07-25

    'Keratinocyte cancer' is now the preferred term for the most commonly identified skin cancers basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), which were previously commonly categorised as non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC). Keratinocyte cancer (KC) represents about 95% of malignant skin tumours. Lifestyle changes have led to increased exposure to the sun, which has, in turn, led to a significant increase of new cases of KC, with a worldwide annual incidence of between 3% and 8%. The successful use of preventive measures could mean a significant reduction in the resources used by health systems, compared with the high cost of the treatment of these conditions. At present, there is no information about the quality of the evidence for the use of these sun protection strategies with an assessment of their benefits and risks. To assess the effects of sun protection strategies (i.e. sunscreen and barrier methods) for preventing keratinocyte cancer (that is, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) of the skin) in the general population. We searched the following databases up to May 2016: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and LILACS. We also searched five trial registries and the bibliographies of included studies for further references to relevant trials. We included randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs) of preventive strategies for keratinocyte cancer, such as physical barriers and sunscreens, in the general population (children and adults), which may provide information about benefits and adverse events related to the use of solar protection measures. We did not include trials focused on educational strategies to prevent KC or preventive strategies in high-risk groups. Our prespecified primary outcomes were BCC or cSCC confirmed clinically or by histopathology at any follow-up and adverse events. Two review authors independently selected studies for eligibility using

  10. Fibroblast growth factor 8 increases breast cancer cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Emeli M.; Brokken, Leon J.S.; Haerkoenen, Pirkko L.

    2010-03-10

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancers, whereas its level in normal mammary gland epithelium is low. Previous studies have shown that FGF-8b stimulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. To explore the mechanisms by which FGF-8b promotes growth, we studied its effects on cell cycle regulatory proteins and signalling pathways in mouse S115 and human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We also studied the effect of FGF-8b on cell survival. FGF-8b induced cell cycle progression and up-regulated particularly cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in S115 cells. Silencing cyclin D1 with siRNA inhibited most but not all FGF-8b-induced proliferation. Inhibition of the FGF-8b-activated ERK/MAPK pathway decreased FGF-8b-stimulated proliferation. Blocking the constitutively active PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways also lowered FGF-8b-induced cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Corresponding results were obtained in MCF-7 cells. In S115 and MCF-7 mouse tumours, FGF-8b increased cyclin D1 and Ki67 levels. Moreover, FGF-8b opposed staurosporine-induced S115 cell death which effect was blocked by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that FGF-8b increases breast cancer cell growth both by stimulating cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death.

  11. Mucosal poly IC improves protection elicited by replicating influenza vaccines via enhanced dendritic cell function and T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Girón, José V.; Belicha-Villanueva, Alan; Hassan, Ebrahim; Gómez-Medina, Sergio; Cruz, Jazmina L.G.; Lüdtke, Anja; Ruibal, Paula; Albrecht, Randy A.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Muñoz-Fontela, César

    2014-01-01

    Live-attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV) have the potential to generate CD8 T cell immunity that may limit the virulence of an antigenically shifted influenza strain in a population lacking protective antibodies. However, current LAIVs exert limited T cell immunity restricted to the vaccine strains. One approach to improve LAIV-induced T cell responses could be to use specific adjuvants to enhance T cell priming by respiratory dendritic cells (rDCs), but this hypothesis has not been addressed. Here we studied the effect of the toll-like receptor (TLR)-3 ligand poly IC on CD8 T cell immunity and protection elicited by LAIVs. Mucosal treatment with poly IC shortly after vaccination enhanced rDC function, CD8 T cell formation, and production of neutralizing antibodies. This adjuvant effect of poly IC was dependent on amplification of TLR3 signaling by non-hematopoietic radio-resistant cells, and enhanced mouse protection to homosubtypic as well as heterosubtypic virus challenge. Our findings indicate that mucosal TLR3 ligation may be utilized to improve CD8 T cell responses to replicating vaccines, which has implications for protection in the absence of pre-existing antibody immunity. PMID:24958904

  12. Biochemical and immunological mechanisms by which sickle cell trait protects against malaria.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lauren; Parikh, Sunil; Rosenthal, Philip J; Greenhouse, Bryan

    2013-09-11

    Sickle cell trait (HbAS) is the best-characterized genetic polymorphism known to protect against falciparum malaria. Although the protective effect of HbAS against malaria is well known, the mechanism(s) of protection remain unclear. A number of biochemical and immune-mediated mechanisms have been proposed, and it is likely that multiple complex mechanisms are responsible for the observed protection. Increased evidence for an immune component of protection as well as novel mechanisms, such as enhanced tolerance to disease mediated by HO-1 and reduced parasitic growth due to translocation of host micro-RNA into the parasite, have recently been described. A better understanding of relevant mechanisms will provide valuable insight into the host-parasite relationship, including the role of the host immune system in protection against malaria.

  13. Biochemical and immunological mechanisms by which sickle cell trait protects against malaria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell trait (HbAS) is the best-characterized genetic polymorphism known to protect against falciparum malaria. Although the protective effect of HbAS against malaria is well known, the mechanism(s) of protection remain unclear. A number of biochemical and immune-mediated mechanisms have been proposed, and it is likely that multiple complex mechanisms are responsible for the observed protection. Increased evidence for an immune component of protection as well as novel mechanisms, such as enhanced tolerance to disease mediated by HO-1 and reduced parasitic growth due to translocation of host micro-RNA into the parasite, have recently been described. A better understanding of relevant mechanisms will provide valuable insight into the host-parasite relationship, including the role of the host immune system in protection against malaria. PMID:24025776

  14. Arthritis protective regulatory potential of self–heat shock protein cross-reactive T cells

    PubMed Central

    van Eden, Willem; Wendling, Uwe; Paul, Liesbeth; Prakken, Berent; van Kooten, Peter; van der Zee, Ruurd

    2000-01-01

    Immunization with heat shock proteins has protective effects in models of induced arthritis. Analysis has shown a reduced synovial inflammation in such protected animals. Adoptive transfer and immunization with selected T cell epitopes (synthetic peptides) have indicated the protection to be mediated by T cells directed to conserved hsp epitopes. This was shown first for mycobacterial hsp60 and later for mycobacterial hsp70. Fine specificity analysis showed that such T cells were cross-reactive with the homologous self hsp. Therefore protection by microbial hsp reactive T cells can be by cross-recognition of self hsp overexpressed in the inflamed tissue. Preimmunization with hsp leads to a relative expansion of such self hsp cross-responsive T cells. The regulatory nature of such T cells may originate from mucosal tolerance maintained by commensal flora derived hsp or from partial activation through recognition of self hsp as a partial agonist (Altered Peptide Ligand) or in the absence of proper costimulation. Recently, we reported the selective upregulation of B7.2 on microbial hsp60 specific T cells in response to self hsp60. Through a preferred interaction with CTLA-4 on proinflammatory T cells this may constitute an effector mechanism of regulation. Also, regulatory T cells produced IL10. PMID:11189451

  15. Corrosion protected, multi-layer fuel cell interface

    DOEpatents

    Feigenbaum, Haim; Pudick, Sheldon; Wang, Chiu L.

    1986-01-01

    An improved interface configuration for use between adjacent elements of a fuel cell stack. The interface is impervious to gas and liquid and provides resistance to corrosion by the electrolyte of the fuel cell. The multi-layer configuration for the interface comprises a non-cupreous metal-coated metallic element to which is film-bonded a conductive layer by hot pressing a resin therebetween. The multi-layer arrangement provides bridging electrical contact.

  16. Alpha1-antitrypsin protects beta-cells from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Lu, Yuanqing; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Spencer, Terry; Wasserfall, Clive; Atkinson, Mark; Song, Sihong

    2007-05-01

    Beta-cell apoptosis appears to represent a key event in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. Previous studies have demonstrated that administration of the serine proteinase inhibitor alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) prevents type 1 diabetes development in NOD mice and prolongs islet allograft survival in rodents; yet the mechanisms underlying this therapeutic benefit remain largely unclear. Herein we describe novel findings indicating that AAT significantly reduces cytokine- and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced beta-cell apoptosis. Specifically, strong antiapoptotic activities for AAT (Prolastin, human) were observed when murine insulinoma cells (MIN6) were exposed to tumor necrosis factor-alpha. In a second model system involving STZ-induced beta-cell apoptosis, treatment of MIN6 cells with AAT similarly induced a significant increase in cellular viability and a reduction in apoptosis. Importantly, in both model systems, treatment with AAT completely abolished induced caspase-3 activity. In terms of its activities in vivo, treatment of C57BL/6 mice with AAT prevented STZ-induced diabetes and, in agreement with the in vitro analyses, supported the concept of a mechanism involving the disruption of beta-cell apoptosis. These results propose a novel biological function for this molecule and suggest it may represent an effective candidate for attempts seeking to prevent or reverse type 1 diabetes.

  17. Angiopoietin1 Inhibits Mast Cell Activation and Protects against Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-Tao; Liu, Yi-Nan; He, Qi-Hua; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Bai, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Since morbidity and mortality rates of anaphylaxis diseases have been increasing year by year, how to prevent and manage these diseases effectively has become an important issue. Mast cells play a central regulatory role in allergic diseases. Angiopoietin1 (Ang-1) exhibits anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting vascular permeability, leukocyte migration and cytokine production. However, Ang-1's function in mast cell activation and anaphylaxis diseases is unknown. The results of our study suggest that Ang-1 decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines production of mast cells by suppressing IκB phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Ang-1 also strongly inhibited compound 48/80 induced and FcεRI-mediated mast cells degranulation by decreasing intracellular calcium levels in vitro. In vivo lentivirus-mediated delivery of Ang-1 in mice exhibited alleviated leakage in IgE-dependent passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA). Furthermore, exogenous Ang-1 intervention treatment prevented mice from compound 48/80-induced mesentery mast cell degranulation, attenuated increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines, relieved lung injury, and improved survival in anaphylaxis shock. The results of our study reveal, for the first time, the important role of Ang-1 in the activation of mast cells, and identify a therapeutic effect of Ang-1 on anaphylaxis diseases. PMID:24586553

  18. The multifunctional role of ectoine as a natural cell protectant.

    PubMed

    Graf, Ruediger; Anzali, Soheila; Buenger, Joachim; Pfluecker, Frank; Driller, Hansjuergen

    2008-01-01

    The protective properties of ectoine, formerly described for only extremophilic microorganisms, can be transferred to human skin. Our present data show that the compatible solute ectoine protects the cellular membrane from damage caused by surfactants. Transepidermal water loss measurements in vivo suggest that the barrier function of the skin is strengthened after the topical application of an oil in water emulsion containing ectoine. Ectoine functions as a superior moisturizer with long-term efficacy. These findings indicating that ectoine is a strong water structure-forming solute are explained in silico by means of molecular dynamic simulations. Spherical clusters containing (1) water, (2) water with ectoine, and (3) water with glycerol are created as model systems. The stronger the water-binding activity of the solute, the greater the quantity of water molecules remaining in the cluster at high temperatures. Water clusters around ectoine molecules remain stable for a long period of time, whereas mixtures of water and glycerol break down and water molecules diffuse out of the spheres. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that the hydrogen bond properties of solutes are not solely responsible for maintaining the water structure form. Moreover, the particular electrostatic potential of ectoine as an amphoteric molecule with zwitterionic character is the major cause for its strong affinity to water. Because of its outstanding water-binding activity, ectoine might be especially useful in preventing water loss in dry atopic skin and in recovering skin viability and preventing skin aging.

  19. Taurine Protects Lens Epithelial Cells Against Ultraviolet B-Induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dayang, Wu; Dongbo, Pang

    2017-10-01

    The massive uptake of compatible osmolytes is a self-protective response shared by lens exposed to hypertonic stress and ultraviolet stress. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of taurine against ultraviolet B-induced cytotoxicity in the lens epithelial cells. Real-time PCR was used to measure osmolytes transport. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure osmolytes uptake. Cell counting kit-8 assays were used to measure cellular viability. Flow cytometry analysis was used to measure apoptosis level. Compared with normotonic stress, hypertonic stress-induced osmolytes uptake into the lens epithelial cells such as betaine, myoinositol and taurine. UVB exposure increased osmolytes transporter mRNA expression together with osmolytes uptake. Moreover, taurine suppressed UVB-induced cell apoptosis in the lens epithelial cells significantly. The effect of compatible osmolyte taurine on cell survival rate may play an important role in cell resistance and adaption to UVB exposure.

  20. In vitro protection of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells by erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Ertugrul; Bagla, Aysel Guven; Aksoy, Ayca; Gacar, Gulcin; Unal, Z Seda; Asgun, H Fatih; Karaoz, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    Mobilization of stem cells and their differentiation into cardiomyocytes are known to have protective effects after myocardial infarction. The integrity of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells for cardiac regeneration is dependent on cell-cell or cell-matrix interaction, which is adversely affected by reactive oxygen species in an ischemic environment. Treatment with erythropoietin was shown to protect human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells in an ischemic injury in vitro model. The analyses indicated that expression of erythropoietin receptors played a pivotal role in erythropoietin mediated cell survival. In this study, the anti-apoptotic effect of erythropoietin on stem cells was analyzed in apoptosis-induced human mesenchymal stem cells. Apoptosis was induced in cultured adult human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells by hydrogen peroxide. A group of cultured cells was also treated with recombinant human erythropoietin in a concentration of 50 ng mL(-1). The degree of apoptosis was analyzed by flow-cytometry and immunohistochemical staining for Caspase 3. The average percentages of apoptotic cells were significantly higher in H2O2-induced stem cells than in cells co-cultured with erythropoietin (63.03 ± 4.96% vs 29 ± 3.41%, p<0.01). We conclude that preconditioning with erythropoietin suppresses apoptosis of mesenchymal stem cells and enhances their survival. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Compatibility Study of Protective Relaying in a Grid-Connected Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Staunton, R.H.

    2004-04-15

    A 200-kW fuel cell produced by International Fuel Cells (IFC), a United Technologies Company, began operation at the National Transportation Research Center (NTRC) in early June 2003. The NTRC is a joint Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) and University of Tennessee research facility located in Knoxville, Tennessee. This research activity investigated the protective relaying functions of this fully commercialized fuel cell power plant, which uses ''synthesized'' protective relays. The project's goal is to characterize the compatibility between the fuel cell's interconnection protection system and the local distribution system or electric power system (EPS). ORNL, with assistance from the Electric Power Research Institute-Power Electronics Applications Center (EPRI-PEAC) in Knoxville, Tennessee, monitored and characterized the system compatibility over a period of 6 months. Distribution utility engineers are distrustful of or simply uncomfortable with the protective relaying and hardware provided as part of distributed generation (DG) plants. Part of this mistrust is due to the fact that utilities generally rely on hardware from certain manufacturers whose reliability is well established based on performance over many years or even decades. Another source of concern is the fact that fuel cells and other types of DG do not use conventional relays but, instead, the protective functions of conventional relays are simulated by digital circuits in the distributed generator's grid interface control unit. Furthermore, the testing and validation of internal protection circuits of DG are difficult to accomplish and can be changed by the vendor at any time. This study investigated and documented the safety and protective relaying present in the IFC fuel cell, collected data on the operation of the fuel cell, recorded event data during EPS disturbances, and assessed the compatibility of the synthesized protective circuits and the local distribution system. The project also

  2. Human T-cell leukemia virus types I and II exhibit different DNase I protection patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, R.; Harrich, D.; Garcia, J.A. ); Gaynor, R.B. Wadsworth Veterans Hospital, Los Angeles, CA )

    1988-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus types I (HTLV-I) and II (HTLV-II) are human retroviruses which normally infect T-lymphoid cells. HTLV-I infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, and HTLV-II is associated with an indolent form of hairy-cell leukemia. To identify potential transcriptional regulatory elements of these two related human retroviruses, the authors performed DNase I footprinting of both the HTLV-I and HTLV-II long terminal repeats (LTRs) by using extracts prepared from uninfected T cells, HTLV-I and HTLV-II transformed T cells, and HeLa cells. Five regions of the HTLV-I LTR and three regions of the HTLV-II LTR showed protection by DNase I footprinting. All three of the 21-base-pair repeats previously shown to be important in HTLV transcriptional regulation were protected in the HTLV-I LTR, whereas only one of these repeats was protected in the HTLV-II LTR. Several regions exhibited altered protection in extracts prepared from lymphoid cells as compared with HeLa cells, but there were minimal differences in the protection patterns between HTLV-infected and uninfected lymphoid extracts. A number of HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTR fragments which contained regions showing protection in DNase I footprinting were able to function as inducible enhancer elements in transient CAT gene expression assays in the presence of the HTLV-II tat protein. The alterations in the pattern of the cellular proteins which bind to the HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTRs may in part be responsible for differences in the transcriptional regulation of these two related viruses.

  3. Notochordal cells protect nucleus pulposus cells from degradation and apoptosis: implications for the mechanisms of intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The relative resistance of non-chondrodystrophic (NCD) canines to degenerative disc disease (DDD) may be due to a combination of anabolic and anti-catabolic factors secreted by notochordal cells within the intervertebral disc (IVD) nucleus pulposus (NP). Factors known to induce DDD include interleukin-1 beta (IL-1ß) and/or Fas-Ligand (Fas-L). Therefore we evaluated the ability of notochordal cell conditioned medium (NCCM) to protect NP cells from IL-1ß and IL-1ß +FasL-mediated cell death and degeneration. Methods We cultured bovine NP cells with IL-1ß or IL-1ß+FasL under hypoxic serum-free conditions (3.5% O2) and treated the cells with either serum-free NCCM or basal medium (Advanced DMEM/F-12). We used flow cytometry to evaluate cell death and real-time (RT-)PCR to determine the gene expression of aggrecan, collagen 2, and link protein, mediators of matrix degradation ADAMTS-4 and MMP3, the matrix protection molecule TIMP1, the cluster of differentiation (CD)44 receptor, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and Ank. We then determined the expression of specific apoptotic pathways in bovine NP cells by characterizing the expression of activated caspases-3, -8 and -9 in the presence of IL-1ß+FasL when cultured with NCCM, conditioned medium obtained using bovine NP cells (BCCM), and basal medium all supplemented with 2% FBS. Results NCCM inhibits bovine NP cell death and apoptosis via suppression of activated caspase-9 and caspase-3/7. Furthermore, NCCM protects NP cells from the degradative effects of IL-1ß and IL-1ß+Fas-L by up-regulating the expression of anabolic/matrix protective genes (aggrecan, collagen type 2, CD44, link protein and TIMP-1) and down-regulating matrix degrading genes such as MMP-3. Expression of ADAMTS-4, which encodes a protein for aggrecan remodeling, is increased. NCCM also protects against IL-1+FasL-mediated down-regulation of Ank expression. Furthermore, NP cells treated with NCCM in the presence of IL-1ß+Fas-L down

  4. Inhibition of Granzyme B by PI-9 protects prostate cancer cells from apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Manisha; Hostetter, Daniel R.; Loeb, Carly RK; Simko, Jeffry; Craik, Charles S.

    2012-01-01

    Background In order for tumors to grow and proliferate, they must avoid recognition by immune cells and subsequent death by apoptosis. Granzyme B, a protease located in natural killer cells, initiates apoptosis in target cells. Inhibition of Granzyme B by PI-9, its natural inhibitor, can prevent apoptosis. Here we investigate whether PI-9 protects prostate cancer cells from apoptosis. Methods The expression of PI-9 was quantified by qPCR in several prostate cancer cell lines, and Granzyme B activity was tested in each cell line. PI-9 was overexpressed in LNCaP cells, which lack endogenous PI-9. Apoptosis was induced by natural killer cells in LNCaP cells that either contained or lacked PI-9, and the percent cell death in was quantified. Lastly, PI-9 levels were examined by qPCR and immunohistochemistry in prostate tumor tissue. Results Prostate cancer cell lines that expressed PI-9 could inhibit Granzyme B. Overexpression of PI-9 protected LNCaP cells from natural killer cell-mediated apoptosis. Examination of the levels of PI-9 in tissue from prostate tumors showed that PI-9 could be upregulated in low grade tumors and stochastically dysregulated in high grade tumors. Additionally, PI-9 is found consistently in high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and atrophic lesions. Conclusions These results indicate that overexpression of PI-9 can protect prostate cancer cells from apoptosis, and this effect may occur in human prostate tumors. These findings imply that early prostatic inflammation may trigger this increase in PI-9. This suggests that PI-9 upregulation is needed early in tumor progression, before additional protective mechanisms are in place. PMID:21919028

  5. Role of natural killer cells in innate protection against lethal ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Warfield, Kelly L; Perkins, Jeremy G; Swenson, Dana L; Deal, Emily M; Bosio, Catharine M; Aman, M Javad; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Young, Howard A; Bavari, Sina

    2004-07-19

    Ebola virus is a highly lethal human pathogen and is rapidly driving many wild primate populations toward extinction. Several lines of evidence suggest that innate, nonspecific host factors are potentially critical for survival after Ebola virus infection. Here, we show that nonreplicating Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs), containing the glycoprotein (GP) and matrix protein virus protein (VP)40, administered 1-3 d before Ebola virus infection rapidly induced protective immunity. VLP injection enhanced the numbers of natural killer (NK) cells in lymphoid tissues. In contrast to live Ebola virus, VLP treatment of NK cells enhanced cytokine secretion and cytolytic activity against NK-sensitive targets. Unlike wild-type mice, treatment of NK-deficient or -depleted mice with VLPs had no protective effect against Ebola virus infection and NK cells treated with VLPs protected against Ebola virus infection when adoptively transferred to naive mice. The mechanism of NK cell-mediated protection clearly depended on perforin, but not interferon-gamma secretion. Particles containing only VP40 were sufficient to induce NK cell responses and provide protection from infection in the absence of the viral GP. These findings revealed a decisive role for NK cells during lethal Ebola virus infection. This work should open new doors for better understanding of Ebola virus pathogenesis and direct the development of immunotherapeutics, which target the innate immune system, for treatment of Ebola virus infection.

  6. Induction of phase 2 genes by sulforaphane protects retinal pigment epithelial cells against photooxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiangqun; Talalay, Paul

    2004-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelial cell (RPE cell) layer protects the photoreceptors of the retina against oxidative stress. The decline of this capacity is believed to be a major factor in the impairment of vision in age-related macular degeneration. Exposure of human adult RPE cells to UV light at predominantly 320–400 nm (UVA light) in the presence of all-trans-retinaldehyde results in photooxidative cytotoxicity. Significant protection of RPE cells was obtained by prior treatment with phase 2 gene inducers, such as the isothiocyanate sulforaphane or a bis-2-hydroxybenzylideneacetone Michael reaction acceptor. The degree of protection was correlated with the potencies of these inducers in elevating cytoprotective glutathione levels and activities of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase. In embryonic fibroblasts derived from mice in which the genes for the transcription factor Nrf2, the repressor Keap1, or both Nrf2 and Keap1 were disrupted, the magnitude of resistance to photooxidative damage paralleled the basal levels of glutathione and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase in each cell type. Demonstration of protection of RPE cells against photooxidative damage by induction of phase 2 proteins may shed light on the role of oxidative injury in ocular disease. Moreover, the finding that dietary inducers provide indirect antioxidant protection suggests novel strategies for preventing chronic degenerative diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration. PMID:15229324

  7. A new potent natural antioxidant mixture provides global protection against oxidative skin cell damage.

    PubMed

    Jorge, A T S; Arroteia, K F; Lago, J C; de Sá-Rocha, V M; Gesztesi, J; Moreira, P L

    2011-04-01

    Oxidative stress occurs when there is an over production of free radicals and cells are not able to neutralize them by their own antioxidant mechanisms. These excess of free radicals will attack cellular macromolecules leading to cell damage, function impairment or death. Because of that, antioxidant substances have been largely used in products to offer complementary protection. In this study a new mixture of three known antioxidants (cocoa, green tea and alpha-tocopherol) was evaluated and its antioxidant protection was assessed focusing on its capacity to protect main cell macromolecules. Results have shown that it has a high antioxidant capacity by protecting lipids, DNA and proteins against oxidative damage. The antioxidant effect of the mixture on cells was also investigated and it was able to reduce oxidative stress generated by lipopolisacharide in human fibroblasts. Finally, as the mixture has proved to be highly antioxidant, its effect on cell senescence was evaluated, and it was demonstrated that fibroblasts in culture had delayed senescence when treated with these actives on a mixture. All results together provide important data about a new antioxidant mixture that uses a small amount of actives and is able to protect cell against oxidative damages in a global way.

  8. Melissa Officinalis L. Extracts Protect Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells against Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jeung, In Cheul; Jee, Donghyun; Rho, Chang-Rae; Kang, Seungbum

    2016-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the protective effect of ALS-L1023, an extract of Melissa officinalis L. (Labiatae; lemon balm) against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 cells). Methods: ARPE-19 cells were incubated with ALS-L1023 for 24 h and then treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed by flow cytometry. Caspase-3/7 activation and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) were measured to investigate the protective role of ALS-L1023 against apoptosis. The protective effect of ALS-L1023 against oxidative stress through activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) was evaluated by Western blot analysis. Results: ALS-L1023 clearly reduced H2O2-induced cell apoptosis and intracellular production of ROS. H2O2-induced oxidative stress increased caspase-3/7 activity and apoptotic PARP cleavage, which were significantly inhibited by ALS-L1023. Activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway was associated with the protective effect of ALS-L1023 on ARPE-19 cells. Conclusions: ALS-L1023 protected human RPE cells against oxidative damage. This suggests that ALS-L1023 has therapeutic potential for the prevention of dry age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26941573

  9. "Untangling Sickle-Cell Anemia and the Teaching of Heterozygote Protection"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Eric Michael

    2007-01-01

    Introductory biology textbooks often use the example of sickle-cell anemia to illustrate the concept of heterozygote protection. Ordinarily scientists expect the frequency of a gene associated with a debilitating illness would be low owing to its continual elimination by natural selection. The gene that causes sickle-cell anemia, however, has a…

  10. "Untangling Sickle-Cell Anemia and the Teaching of Heterozygote Protection"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Eric Michael

    2007-01-01

    Introductory biology textbooks often use the example of sickle-cell anemia to illustrate the concept of heterozygote protection. Ordinarily scientists expect the frequency of a gene associated with a debilitating illness would be low owing to its continual elimination by natural selection. The gene that causes sickle-cell anemia, however, has a…

  11. Wharton's Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells Protect the Immature Brain in Rats and Modulate Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Martin; Oppliger, Byron; Joerger-Messerli, Marianne; Reinhart, Ursula; Barnea, Eytan; Paidas, Michael; Kramer, Boris W; Surbek, Daniel V; Schoeberlein, Andreina

    2017-02-15

    The development of a mammalian brain is a complex and long-lasting process. Not surprisingly, preterm birth is the leading cause of death in newborns and children. Advances in perinatal care reduced mortality, but morbidity still represents a major burden. New therapeutic approaches are thus desperately needed. Given that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) emerged as a promising candidate for cell therapy, we transplanted MSCs derived from the Wharton's Jelly (WJ-MSCs) to reduce the burden of immature brain injury in a murine animal model. WJ-MSCs transplantation resulted in protective activity characterized by reduced myelin loss and astroglial activation. WJ-MSCs improved locomotor behavior as well. To address the underlying mechanisms, we tested the key regulators of responses to DNA-damaging agents, such as cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase/calcium-dependent protein kinase (PKA/PKC), cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated/ATM- and Rad3-related (ATM/ATR) substrates, protein kinase B (Akt), and 14-3-3 binding protein partners. We characterized WJ-MSCs using a specific profiler polymerase chain reaction array. We provide evidence that WJ-MSCs target pivotal regulators of the cell fate such as CDK/14-3-3/Akt signaling. We identified leukemia inhibitory factor as a potential candidate of WJ-MSCs' induced modifications as well. We hypothesize that WJ-MSCs may exert adaptive responses depending on the type of injury they are facing, making them prominent candidates for cell therapy in perinatal injuries.

  12. Acetaminophen protects brain endothelial cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Debjani; Grammas, Paula

    2009-05-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that acetaminophen has unappreciated anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Drugs that affect oxidant and inflammatory stress in the brain are of interest because both processes are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disease. The objective of this study is to determine whether acetaminophen affects the response of brain endothelial cells to oxidative stress. Cultured brain endothelial cells are pre-treated with acetaminophen and then exposed to the superoxide-generating compound menadione (25 microM). Cell survival, inflammatory protein expression, and anti-oxidant enzyme activity are measured. Menadione causes a significant (p<0.001) increase in endothelial cell death as well as an increase in RNA and protein levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1, macrophage inflammatory protein alpha, and RANTES. Menadione also evokes a significant (p<0.001) increase in the activity of the anti-oxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD). Pre-treatment of endothelial cell cultures with acetaminophen (25-100 microM) increases endothelial cell survival and inhibits menadione-induced expression of inflammatory proteins and SOD activity. In addition, we document, for the first time, that acetaminophen increases expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2. Suppressing Bcl2 with siRNA blocks the pro-survival effect of acetaminophen. These data show that acetaminophen has anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects on the cerebrovasculature and suggest a heretofore unappreciated therapeutic potential for this drug in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease that are characterized by oxidant and inflammatory stress.

  13. Acetaminophen protects brain endothelial cells against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Debjani; Grammas, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that acetaminophen has unappreciated anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Drugs that affect oxidant and inflammatory stress in the brain are of interest because both processes are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disease. The objective of this study is to determine whether acetaminophen affects the response of brain endothelial cells to oxidative stress. Cultured brain endothelial cells are pretreated with acetaminophen and then exposed to the superoxide-generating compound menadione (25 µM). Cell survival, inflammatory protein expression, and antioxidant enzyme activity are measured. Menadione causes a significant (p<0.001) increase in endothelial cell death as well as an increase in RNA and protein levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1, macrophage inflammatory protein alpha, and RANTES. Menadione also evokes a significant (p<0.001) increase in the activity of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD). Pretreatment of endothelial cell cultures with acetaminophen (25–100 µM) increases endothelial cell survival and inhibits menadione-induced expression of inflammatory proteins and SOD activity. In addition, we document, for the first time, that acetaminophen increases expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2. Suppressing Bcl2 with siRNA blocks the pro-survival effect of acetaminophen. These data show that acetaminophen has anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects on the cerebrovasculature and suggest a heretofore unappreciated therapeutic potential for this drug in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease that are characterized by oxidant and inflammatory stress. PMID:19265712

  14. In vivo tracking and protective properties of Yersinia-specific intestinal T cells.

    PubMed

    Kempf, V A; Bohn, E; Noll, A; Bielfeldt, C; Autenrieth, I B

    1998-09-01

    After invasion via M cells enteropathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica subsequently establish an infection at three different sites: (i) Peyer's patches (PP), (ii) mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), and after systemic dissemination in (iii) spleen, liver and lung. In order to characterize protective properties of intestinal T cells at the different sites of Y. enterocolitica infection, PP and MLN T cells were isolated from Y. enterocolitica-infected C57B1/6 mice and Yersinia-specific T cell lines were generated. These T cells exhibited the phenotype of CD4 Th1 cells. The adoptive transfer of Yersinia-specific Th1 cells from PP and MLN conferred protection against a lethal orogastric inoculum with Y. enterocolitica as revealed by survival post-infection. However, determination of bacterial counts in infected organs revealed that the transfer of PP T cells conferred protection in spleen but not in MLN and PP, whereas the transfer of T cells from MLN reduced bacterial counts in both spleen and MLN but not in PP. To elucidate the different protection pattern we wanted to track the transferred cells in vivo. For this purpose the cells were labelled with the stable green fluorescent cell linker PKH2-GL prior to the adoptive transfer. In vivo tracking of these cells revealed that the distribution pattern of transferred T cells in spleen, MLN and PP correlated closely with the protection pattern observed after Yersinia infection. Thus, most cells were recovered from the spleen, while only few cells were recovered from MLN and PP. In keeping with these results a rapid and significant increase in interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production in the spleen of mice after adoptive transfer of T cell lines was observed. Taken together, the present results demonstrate that intestinal CD4 Th1 cells from PP and MLN may be involved in the defence against Y. enterocolitica at different sites of the infection, and that PKH2-GL labelling is a suitable tool to characterize T cell functions in vivo.

  15. Protective role of quercetin against cisplatin-induced hair cell damage in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Lee, S K; Oh, K H; Chung, A Y; Park, H C; Lee, S H; Kwon, S Y; Choi, J

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of quercetin on cisplatin-induced hair cell damage in transgenic zebrafish embryos. Five days postfertilization zebrafish embryos were exposed to 1 mM cisplatin and quercetin at 10, 50, 100, or 200 μM for 4 h. Hair cells within neuromasts of the supraorbital, otic, and occipital lateral lines were analyzed by fluorescent microscopy (n = 10). Survival of hair cells was calculated as the average number of hair cells in the control group that were not exposed to cisplatin. Ultrastructural changes were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. Hair cell damage in neuromasts was decreased by co-treatment of quercetin and cisplatin (quercetin 100 μM: 8.6 ± 1.1 cells; 1 mM cisplatin only: 5.0 ± 0.5 cells; n = 10, p < 0.05); apoptosis of hair cells examined by special stain was also decreased by quercetin. The ultrastructure of hair cells within neuromasts was preserved in zebrafish by the combination of quercetin (100 μM) and cisplatin (1 mM). In conclusion, quercetin showed protective effects against cisplatin-induced toxicity in a zebrafish model. The results of this study suggest the possibility of a protective role of quercetin against cisplatin-induced apoptotic cell death in zebrafish. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. [In vitro protective effect of methionine against cisplatin's damage to the cochlear hair cell of mice].

    PubMed

    Xue, Chan; Zhou, Yong-Qing; Gao, Hai-Tao; Ma, Ying-Yu; Wang, Na; Qu, Yan

    2011-02-01

    To establish an in vitro model of mouse cochlear basilar membrane impairment using cisplatin, and observe the protective effect of methionine on the hair cells. The cochlear basilar membrane samples of thirty two Kunming mice were harvested on the 2nd day after birth and randomly divided into four groups. Each group had 16 samples. Overnight preincubation the cochlear organ followed by appropriate treatment respectively as follows: the serum-free culture medium, the serum-free culture medium with methionine and cisplatin, the cisplatinum-containing serum-free culture medium, and the methionine-containing serum-free culture medium. The protective effect of methionine for injury of cochlea hair cells induced by cisplatin was observed by myosin-VI immunofluorescence, light microscopy, laser confocal scanning microscope and hair cells counting. The outer hair cells (OHC) and inner hair cells (IHC) of control group and methionine group were not damaged. The outer and inner hair cells of cisplatin group were damaged in various degree, and had remarkable difference compared with control group and methionine group (P < 0.05). The outer hair cells and inner hair cells of cisplatin + methionine group were damaged less than the cisplatin group with remarkable difference (t(IHC) = 3.929, t(OHC) = 8.582, P < 0.05). Cisplatinum could damage the cochlear hair cells of the basal membrane in Kunming mice. Methionine might protect against cisplatin's damage on the cochlear hair cells.

  17. Cabergoline protects dopaminergic neurons against rotenone-induced cell death in primary mesencephalic cell culture.

    PubMed

    Meinel, J; Radad, K; Rausch, W-D; Reichmann, H; Gille, G

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, primary mesencephalic cell cultures prepared from embryonic mouse mesencephala were used to investigate the neuroprotective effect of cabergoline, an ergoline D2 receptor agonist, against the pesticide and neurotoxin rotenone relevant to Parkinson disease (PD). Treatment of cultures with cabergoline alone significantly increased the number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive (THir) neurons and reduced the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) into the culture medium compared to untreated controls. Against rotenone toxicity, cabergoline significantly rescued degenerating THir neurons, reduced the release of LDH into the culture medium and improved the morphology of surviving THir neurons. The neuroprotective effects afforded by cabergoline were independent of dopaminergic stimulation as blocking of dopamine receptors by the dopamine receptor antagonist sulpiride did not prevent them. Furthermore, rotenone-induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was significantly reduced by cabergoline. Although cabergoline increased the glutathione (GSH) content in the culture, the protective effect for dopaminergic neurons seemed not to be predominantly mediated by increasing GSH, as depletion of GSH by L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), a GSH biosynthesis inhibitor, did not prevent cabergoline-mediated neuroprotection of THir neurons in rotenone-treated cultures. Moreover, cabergoline significantly increased the ATP/protein ratio in primary mesencephalic cell cultures when added alone or prior to rotenone treatment. These results indicate a neuroprotective effect of cabergoline for dopaminergic neurons against rotenone toxicity. This effect was independent of dopamine receptor stimulation and was at least partially mediated by reducing ROS production and increasing the ATP/protein ratio.

  18. Curcumin confers protection to irradiated THP-1 cells while its nanoformulation sensitizes these cells via apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Behrooz; Ghaemi, Nasser; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Najafi, Farhood

    2016-12-01

    Protection against ionizing radiation (IR) and sensitization of cancer cells to IR are apparently contrasting phenomena. However, curcumin takes on these contrasting roles leading to either protection or enhanced apoptosis in different irradiated cells. Here we studied whether pretreatment with free curcumin or a novel dendrosomal nanoformulation of curcumin (DNC) could exert protective/sensitizing effects on irradiated THP-1 leukemia cells. We employed assays including MTT viability, clonogenic survival, DNA fragmentation, PI/Annexin V flow cytometry, antioxidant system (ROS, TBARS for lipid peroxidation, 8-OHdG and γH2AX for DNA damage, glutathione, CAT and GPx activity, enzymes gene expression), ELISA (NF-κB and Nrf2 binding, TNF-α release), caspase assay, siRNA silencing of caspase-3, and western blotting to illustrate the observed protective role of curcumin in comparison with the opposite sensitizing role of its nanoformulation at a similar 10 μM concentration. The in vivo relevance of this concentration was determined via intraperitoneal administration in mice. Curcumin significantly enhanced the antioxidant defense, while DNC induced apoptosis and reduced viability as well as survival of irradiated THP-1 cells. Nrf2 binding showed an early rise and fall in DNC-treated cells, despite a gradual increase in curcumin-treated cells. We also demonstrated that DNC induced apoptosis in THP-1 cells via caspase-3 activation; whereas in combination with radiation, DNC alternatively employed a caspase-independent apoptosis pathway involving cytochrome c release from mitochondria.

  19. Autophagy Protects from Raddeanin A-Induced Apoptosis in SGC-7901 Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shen-lin; Fang, Liang-hua; Zhou, Jin-yong; Wu, Jian; Xi, Song-yang; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Ying-ying; Xu, Song

    2016-01-01

    Raddeanin A (RA) is an extractive from Anemone raddeana Regel, a traditional Chinese medicine. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of RA against human gastric cancer (GC) cells (SGC-7901) and explore its mechanism. MTT assay showed that RA inhibition of proliferation of SGC-7901 cells increased in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis and Hoechst 33258 staining showed that RA induced apoptosis on SGC-7901 cells. Meanwhile, it induced autophagy. Western blotting analysis showed that the RA induces apoptosis and autophagy by activating p38 MAPK pathway and inhibiting mTOR pathway. Further studies showed that autophagy inhibition could protect from RA-induced apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells. In conclusion, RA can induce SGC-7901 cell apoptosis and autophagy by activating p38 MAPK pathway. And autophagy can protect SGC-7901 cells from apoptosis induced by RA. PMID:27974905

  20. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A protects neuronal cells against brief hypoxia/reoxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaieva, Olena; Xu, Rong; Schinstock, Carrie; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2004-02-01

    Hypoxia/reoxygenation induces cellular injury by promoting oxidative stress. Reversible oxidation of methionine in proteins involving the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase type A (MSRA) is postulated to serve a general antioxidant role. Therefore, we examined whether overexpression of MSRA protected cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury. Brief hypoxia increased the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in PC12 cells and promoted apoptotic cell death. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of MSRA significantly diminished the hypoxia-induced increase in ROS and facilitated cell survival. Measurements of the membrane potentials of intact mitochondria in PC12 cells and of isolated rat liver mitochondria showed that hypoxia induced depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane. The results demonstrate that MSRA plays a protective role against hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced cell injury and suggest the therapeutic potential of MSRA in ischemic heart and brain disease.

  1. Pharmacological protection of retinal pigmented epithelial cells by sulindac involves PPAR-α.

    PubMed

    Sur, Arunodoy; Kesaraju, Shailaja; Prentice, Howard; Ayyanathan, Kasirajan; Baronas-Lowell, Diane; Zhu, Danhong; Hinton, David R; Blanks, Janet; Weissbach, Herbert

    2014-11-25

    The retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) layer is one of the major ocular tissues affected by oxidative stress and is known to play an important role in the etiology of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the major cause of blinding in the elderly. In the present study, sulindac, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID), was tested for protection against oxidative stress-induced damage in an established RPE cell line (ARPE-19). Besides its established antiinflammatory activity, sulindac has previously been shown to protect cardiac tissue against ischemia/reperfusion damage, although the exact mechanism was not elucidated. As shown here, sulindac can also protect RPE cells from chemical oxidative damage or UV light by initiating a protective mechanism similar to what is observed in ischemic preconditioning (IPC) response. The mechanism of protection appears to be triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and involves known IPC signaling components such as PKG and PKC epsilon in addition to the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+) channel. Sulindac induced iNOS and Hsp70, late-phase IPC markers in the RPE cells. A unique feature of the sulindac protective response is that it involves activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α). We have also used low-passage human fetal RPE and polarized primary fetal RPE cells to validate the basic observation that sulindac can protect retinal cells against oxidative stress. These findings indicate a mechanism for preventing oxidative stress in RPE cells and suggest that sulindac could be used therapeutically for slowing the progression of AMD.

  2. Pharmacological protection of retinal pigmented epithelial cells by sulindac involves PPAR-α

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Arunodoy; Kesaraju, Shailaja; Prentice, Howard; Ayyanathan, Kasirajan; Baronas-Lowell, Diane; Zhu, Danhong; Hinton, David R.; Blanks, Janet; Weissbach, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    The retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) layer is one of the major ocular tissues affected by oxidative stress and is known to play an important role in the etiology of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the major cause of blinding in the elderly. In the present study, sulindac, a nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID), was tested for protection against oxidative stress-induced damage in an established RPE cell line (ARPE-19). Besides its established antiinflammatory activity, sulindac has previously been shown to protect cardiac tissue against ischemia/reperfusion damage, although the exact mechanism was not elucidated. As shown here, sulindac can also protect RPE cells from chemical oxidative damage or UV light by initiating a protective mechanism similar to what is observed in ischemic preconditioning (IPC) response. The mechanism of protection appears to be triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and involves known IPC signaling components such as PKG and PKC epsilon in addition to the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channel. Sulindac induced iNOS and Hsp70, late-phase IPC markers in the RPE cells. A unique feature of the sulindac protective response is that it involves activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α). We have also used low-passage human fetal RPE and polarized primary fetal RPE cells to validate the basic observation that sulindac can protect retinal cells against oxidative stress. These findings indicate a mechanism for preventing oxidative stress in RPE cells and suggest that sulindac could be used therapeutically for slowing the progression of AMD. PMID:25385631

  3. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lalor, Stephen J.; Leech, John M.; O’Keeffe, Kate M.; Mac Aogáin, Micheál; O’Halloran, Dara P.; Lacey, Keenan A.; Tavakol, Mehri; Hearnden, Claire H.; Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre; Humphreys, Hilary; Fennell, Jérôme P.; van Wamel, Willem J.; Foster, Timothy J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Lavelle, Ed C.; Rogers, Thomas R.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrated that prior exposure to S. aureus enhanced IFNγ responses upon subsequent infection, while adoptive transfer of S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells was protective in naïve mice. Translating these findings, we found that S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells were also significantly expanded during human S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI). These Th1 cells were CD45RO+, indicative of a memory phenotype. Thus, exposure to S. aureus induces memory Th1 cells in mice and humans, identifying Th1 cells as potential S. aureus vaccine targets. Consequently, we developed a model vaccine comprising staphylococcal clumping factor A, which we demonstrate to be an effective human T cell antigen, combined with the Th1-driving adjuvant CpG. This novel Th1-inducing vaccine conferred significant protection during S. aureus infection in mice. This study notably advances our understanding of S. aureus cellular immunity, and demonstrates for the first time that a correlate of S. aureus protective immunity identified in mice may be relevant in humans. PMID:26539822

  4. Protective and dysregulated T cell immunity in RSV infection.

    PubMed

    Openshaw, Peter J; Chiu, Christopher

    2013-08-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of infantile bronchiolitis and a major pathogen in elderly and immunosuppressed persons. Although RSV shows limited antigenic diversity, repeated infections occur throughout life. Vaccine development has been delayed by poor immunogenicity, production issues and the fear of causing enhanced disease. T cells assist in viral clearance, but immune regulation serves to limit these responses and to prevent the exaggerated inflammatory response to RSV infection seen in children with bronchiolitis. Severe RSV disease can therefore be regarded as a dysregulated response to an otherwise trivial infection. Further insights into the role of T cells (including Th17) are needed to enable the rational design of safe, effective vaccines and novel treatments.

  5. Protective and dysregulated T cell immunity in RSV infection☆

    PubMed Central

    Openshaw, Peter J; Chiu, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of infantile bronchiolitis and a major pathogen in elderly and immunosuppressed persons. Although RSV shows limited antigenic diversity, repeated infections occur throughout life. Vaccine development has been delayed by poor immunogenicity, production issues and the fear of causing enhanced disease. T cells assist in viral clearance, but immune regulation serves to limit these responses and to prevent the exaggerated inflammatory response to RSV infection seen in children with bronchiolitis. Severe RSV disease can therefore be regarded as a dysregulated response to an otherwise trivial infection. Further insights into the role of T cells (including Th17) are needed to enable the rational design of safe, effective vaccines and novel treatments. PMID:23806514

  6. Curcumin protects neuronal-like cells against acrolein by restoring Akt and redox signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Doggui, Sihem; Belkacemi, Abdenour; Paka, Ghislain Djiokeng; Perrotte, Morgane; Pi, Rongbiao; Ramassamy, Charles

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the neuroprotective effect of curcumin against the toxicity induced by acrolein and to identify its cellular mechanisms and targets. Human neuroblastoma cells SK-N-SH were treated with acrolein. Curcumin, from 5 μM, was able to protect SK-N-SH cells against acrolein toxicity. The addition of curcumin restored the expression of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, reactive oxygen species, and reactive nitrogen species levels but had no effect on the decrease of glutathione (GSH) and on the elevation of protein carbonyls. Acrolein induced the activity of Nrf2, NF-κB, and Sirt1. These activations were prevented by the presence of curcumin. Acrolein also induced a decrease of the pAkt, which was counteracted by curcumin. To increase its solubility, we have encapsulated curcumin in a biodegradable poly(lactide-co-glycolide) based nanoparticulate formulation (Nps-Cur). Our results showed that 0.5 μM of Nps-Cur can protect neuronal cells challenged with acrolein while free curcumin was not able to display neuroprotection. Our results provided evidence that curcumin was able to protect SK-N-SH cells against acrolein toxicity. This protection is mediated through the antioxidant, the redox, and the survival regulated pathways by curcumin. Moreover, our results demonstrated that Nps-Cur had higher capacity than curcumin to protect SK-N-SH cells against acrolein. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Fisetin and luteolin protect human retinal pigment epithelial cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death and regulate inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hytti, Maria; Piippo, Niina; Korhonen, Eveliina; Honkakoski, Paavo; Kaarniranta, Kai; Kauppinen, Anu

    2015-01-01

    Degeneration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is a clinical hallmark of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness among aged people in the Western world. Both inflammation and oxidative stress are known to play vital roles in the development of this disease. Here, we assess the ability of fisetin and luteolin, to protect ARPE-19 cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death and to decrease intracellular inflammation. We also compare the growth and reactivity of human ARPE-19 cells in serum-free and serum-containing conditions. The absence of serum in the culture medium did not prevent ARPE-19 cells from reaching full confluency but caused an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress-induced cell death. Both fisetin and luteolin protected ARPE-19 cells from oxidative stress-induced cell death. They also significantly decreased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines into the culture medium. The decrease in inflammation was associated with reduced activation of MAPKs and CREB, but was not linked to NF- κB or SIRT1. The ability of fisetin and luteolin to protect and repair stressed RPE cells even after the oxidative insult make them attractive in the search for treatments for AMD. PMID:26619957

  8. Brazilian propolis protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Rafael A.; de Castro, Frederico A.V.; Eleutherio, Elis C.A.; de Souza, Raquel M.; da Silva, Joaquim F.M.; Pereira, Marcos D.

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product widely used for humans. Due to its complex composition, a number of applications (antimicrobial, antiinflammatory, anesthetic, cytostatic and antioxidant) have been attributed to this substance. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a eukaryotic model we investigated the mechanisms underlying the antioxidant effect of propolis from Guarapari against oxidative stress. Submitting a wild type (BY4741) and antioxidant deficient strains (ctt1Δ, sod1Δ, gsh1Δ, gtt1Δ and gtt2Δ) either to 15 mM menadione or to 2 mM hydrogen peroxide during 60 min, we observed that all strains, except the mutant sod1Δ, acquired tolerance when previously treated with 25 μg/mL of alcoholic propolis extract. Such a treatment reduced the levels of ROS generation and of lipid peroxidation, after oxidative stress. The increase in Cu/Zn-Sod activity by propolis suggests that the protection might be acting synergistically with Cu/Zn-Sod. PMID:24516431

  9. TNF-α-stimulated macrophages protect A549 lung cells against iron and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Persson, H Lennart; Vainikka, Linda K; Eriksson, Ida; Wennerström, Urban

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that TNF-α protects iron-exposed J774 macrophages against iron-catalyzed oxidative lysosomal disruption and cell death by increasing reduced glutathione and H-ferritin in cells. Because J774 cells are able to harbor large amounts of iron, which is potentially harmful in a redox-active state, we hypothesized that TNF-α-stimulated J774 macrophages will prevent iron-driven oxidative killing of alveolar epithelial A549 cells in co-culture. In the present study, iron trichloride (which is endocytosed by cells as hydrated iron-phosphate complexes) was mainly deposited inside the lysosomes of J774 macrophages, while A549 cells, equally iron exposed, accumulated much less iron. When challenged by oxidants, however, reactive lysosomal iron in A549 cells promoted lysosomal disruption and cell death, particularly in the presence of TNF-α. This effect resulted from an elevation in ROS generation by TNF-α, while a compensatory upregulation of protective molecules (H-ferritin and/or reduced glutathione) by TNF-α was absent. A549 cell death was particularly pronounced when iron and TNF-α were present in the conditioned medium during oxidant challenge; thus, iron-driven oxidative reactions in the culture medium were a much greater hazard to A549 cells than those taking place inside their lysosomes. Consequently, the iron chelator, deferoxamine, efficiently prevented A549 cell death when added to the culture medium during an oxidant challenge. In co-cultures of TNF-α-stimulated lung cells, J774 macrophages sequestered iron inside their lysosomes and protected A549 cells from oxidative reactions and cell death. Thus, the collective effect of TNF-α on co-cultured lung cells was mainly cytoprotective. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Protection of A549 cells against the toxic effects of sulphur mustard by hexamethylenetetramine.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, C D; Hambrook, J L

    1997-02-01

    The A549 cell line was used as a model of the deep lung to study the toxicity and mechanism of action of sulphur mustard (HD), using the neutral red (NR) dye retention and gentian violet (GV) assays as indices of cell viability. It was found that exposure to concentrations in excess of 40 microM HD resulted in a rapid onset of toxicity. Exposure to 1000 microM HD reduced viability in A549 cell cultures to 61% after 2 h (control cultures = 100%), whereas exposure to 40 microM HD did not result in deleterious effects until 26 h at which point viability fell to only 84% (NR assay). Agarose gel electrophoresis of cell cultures exposed to 40 and 1000 microM HD and harvested at 4.5, 19 and 43 h after exposure to HD, indicated that cell death was due to necrosis, despite the observation that at the higher concentration of HD cells displayed many of the features common to cells undergoing apoptotic death. The ability of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) to protect A549 cells against the effects of an LC50 challenge dose of HD was assessed using the GV and NR assays. It was found that HMT (15 mM) could protect cells against the effects of HD though HMT had to be present at the time of HD challenge. Cultures treated with HD only were 49% viable at 48 h after HD challenge, compared to 101% for protected cultures (NR assay) and 58% and 91% for unprotected and protected cultures respectively using the GV assay. Morphological observations of GV and NR stained cultures confirmed these findings. HMT concentrations of 2.5 to 25 mM were used. Maximal protection against the toxic effects of HD (LC50) was found at 10 to 25 mM HMT. Over this concentration range, HMT did not exert any toxic effects on A549 cells. Pretreatment of A549 cultures with HMT followed by its removal prior to HD challenge had no protective effect. Similarly, treating cultures with HD followed by addition of HMT did not increase the viability of the cultures, even if the HMT was added immediately after HD exposure

  11. Nrf2 protects human bladder urothelial cells from arsenite and monomethylarsonous acid toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaojun; Sun Zheng; Chen Weimin; Eblin, Kylee E.; Gandolfi, Jay A.; Zhang, Donna D.

    2007-12-01

    Arsenic is widely spread in our living environment and imposes a big challenge on human health worldwide. Arsenic damages biological systems through multiple mechanisms including the generation of reactive oxygen species. The transcription factor Nrf2 regulates the cellular antioxidant response that protects cells from various insults. In this study, the protective role of Nrf2 in arsenic toxicity was investigated in a human bladder urothelial cell line, UROtsa. Using a UROtsa cell line stably infected with Nrf2-siRNA, we clearly demonstrate that compromised Nrf2 expression sensitized the cells to As(III)- and MMA(III)-induced toxicity. On the other hand, the activation of the Nrf2 pathway by tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) and sulforaphane (SF), the known Nrf2-inducers, rendered UROtsa cells more resistant to As(III) and MMA(III). Furthermore, the wild-type mouse embryo fibroblast (WT-MEF) cells were protected from As(III)- and MMA(III)-induced toxicity following Nrf2 activation by tBHQ or SF, whereas neither tBHQ nor SF conferred protection in the Nrf2{sup -/-}MEF cells, demonstrating that tBHQ- or SF-mediated protection against As(III)- and MMA(III)-induced toxicity depends on Nrf2 activation. These results, obtained by both loss of function and gain of function analyses, clearly demonstrate the protective role of Nrf2 in arsenic-induced toxicity. The current work lays the groundwork for using Nrf2 activators for therapeutic and dietary interventions against adverse effects of arsenic.

  12. Improved antioxidative defence protects insulin-producing cells against homocysteine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Scullion, Siobhan M; Hahn, Claudine; Tyka, Karolina; Flatt, Peter R; McClenaghan, Neville H; Lenzen, Sigurd; Gurgul-Convey, Ewa

    2016-08-25

    Homocysteine (HC) is considered to play an important role in the development of metabolic syndrome complications. Insulin-producing cells are prone to HC toxicity and this has been linked to oxidative stress. However, the exact mechanisms remain unknown. Therefore it was the aim of this study to determine the nature of reactive oxygen species responsible for HC toxicity. Chronic exposure of RINm5F and INS1E insulin-producing cells to HC decreased cell viability and glucose-induced insulin secretion in a concentration-dependent manner and led to a significant induction of hydrogen peroxide generation in the cytosolic, but not the mitochondrial compartment of the cell. Cytosolic overexpression of catalase, a hydrogen peroxide detoxifying enzyme, provided a significant protection against viability loss and hydrogen peroxide generation, while mitochondrial overexpression of catalase did not protect against HC toxicity. Overexpression of CuZnSOD, a cytosolic superoxide dismutating enzyme, also protected against HC toxicity. However, the best protection was achieved in the case of a combined overexpression of CuZnSOD and catalase. Incubation of cells in combination with alloxan resulted in a significant increase of HC toxicity and an increase of hydrogen peroxide generation. Overexpression of CuZnSOD or catalase protected against the toxicity of HC plus alloxan, with a superior protection achieved again by combined overexpression. The results indicate that HC induces oxidative stress in insulin-producing cells by stimulation of superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide generation in the cytoplasm. The low antioxidative defence status makes the insulin-producing cells very vulnerable to HC toxicity.

  13. Nrf2 protects human bladder urothelial cells from arsenite and monomethylarsonous acid toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Jun; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Weimin; Eblin, Kylee E.; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Zhang, Donna D.

    2007-01-01

    Arsenic is widely spread in our living environment and imposes a big challenge on human health worldwide. Arsenic damages biological systems through multiple mechanisms including the generation of reactive oxygen species. The transcription factor Nrf2 regulates the cellular antioxidant response that protects cells from various insults. In this study, the protective role of Nrf2 in arsenic toxicity was investigated in a human bladder urothelial cell line, UROtsa. Using an UROtsa cell line stably infected with Nrf2-siRNA, we clearly demonstrate that compromised Nrf2 expression sensitized the cells to As(III)- and MMA(III)-induced toxicity. On the other hand, the activation of the Nrf2 pathway by tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) and sulforaphane (SF), the known Nrf2-inducers, rendered UROtsa cells more resistant to As(III)- and MMA(III). Furthermore, the wild type mouse embryo fibroblast (WT-MEF) cells were protected from As(III)- and MMA(III)-induced toxicity following Nrf2 activation by tBHQ or SF whereas neither tBHQ nor SF conferred protection in the Nrf2−/−-MEF cells, demonstrating that tBHQ- or SF-mediated protection against As(III)- and MMA(III)-induced toxicity depends on Nrf2 activation. These results, obtained by both loss of function and gain of function analyses, clearly demonstrate the protective role of Nrf2 in arsenic-induced toxicity. The current work lays the groundwork for using Nrf2 activators for therapeutic and dietary interventions against adverse effects of arsenic. PMID:17765279

  14. Heat Shield Employing Cured Thermal Protection Material Blocks Bonded in a Large-Cell Honeycomb Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A document describes a new way to integrate thermal protection materials on external surfaces of vehicles that experience the severe heating environments of atmospheric entry from space. Cured blocks of thermal protection materials are bonded into a compatible, large-cell honeycomb matrix that can be applied on the external surfaces of the vehicles. The honeycomb matrix cell size, and corresponding thermal protection material block size, is envisioned to be between 1 and 4 in. (.2.5 and 10 cm) on a side, with a depth required to protect the vehicle. The cell wall thickness is thin, between 0.01 and 0.10 in. (.0.025 and 0.25 cm). A key feature is that the honeycomb matrix is attached to the vehicle fs unprotected external surface prior to insertion of the thermal protection material blocks. The attachment integrity of the honeycomb can then be confirmed over the full range of temperature and loads that the vehicle will experience. Another key feature of the innovation is the use of uniform-sized thermal protection material blocks. This feature allows for the mass production of these blocks at a size that is convenient for quality control inspection. The honeycomb that receives the blocks must have cells with a compatible set of internal dimensions. The innovation involves the use of a faceted subsurface under the honeycomb. This provides a predictable surface with perpendicular cell walls for the majority of the blocks. Some cells will have positive tapers to accommodate mitered joints between honeycomb panels on each facet of the subsurface. These tapered cells have dimensions that may fall within the boundaries of the uniform-sized blocks.

  15. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides protected human retinal pigment epithelial cells against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lian; Lao, Wei; Ji, Qing-Shan; Yang, Zhi-Hao; Yu, Guo-Cheng; Zhong, Jing-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the protective effect and its mechanism of lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. METHODS ARPE-19 cells, a human retinal pigment epithelial cell lines, were exposed to different concentrations of H2O2 for 24h, then cell viability was measured by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay to get the properly concentration of H2O2 which can induce half apoptosis of APRE-19. With different concentrations of LBP pretreatment, the ARPE-19 cells were then exposed to appropriate concentration of H2O2, cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometric analysis. Expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bax were measured by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. RSULTS LBP significantly reduced the H2O2-induced ARPE-19 cells' apoptosis. LBP inhibited the H2O2-induced down-regulation of Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bax. CONCLUSION LBP could protect ARPE-19 cells from H2O2-induced apoptosis. The Bcl-2 family had relationship with the protective effects of LBP. PMID:25709900

  16. Cocoa flavonoid epicatechin protects pancreatic beta cell viability and function against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Martín, María Ángeles; Fernández-Millán, Elisa; Ramos, Sonia; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids such as epicatechin (EC) constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in green tea, grapes, and cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of EC against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability, oxidative status, phosphorylated Jun kinase (p-JNK) expression, and insulin secretion were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5-20 μM EC for 20 h evoked no cell damage and enhanced antioxidant enzymes and insulin secretion. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h induced reactive oxygen species, p-JNK, and carbonyl groups and decreased GSH and insulin secretion. Pretreatment of cells with EC prevented the t-BOOH-induced reactive oxygen species, carbonyl groups, p-JNK expression and cell death, and recovered insulin secretion. Ins-1E cells treated with EC showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability and insulin secretion damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of secreting and surviving machineries in the EC-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Baicalein protects rat insulinoma INS-1 cells from palmitate-induced lipotoxicity by inducing HO-1.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyun Jeong; Yang, Dongki; Hwang, Yongha; Jun, Hee-Sook; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2017-01-01

    β-Cell dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and the identification of novel approaches to improve β-cell function is essential to treat this disease. Baicalein, a flavonoid originally isolated from the root of Scutellaria Baicalensis, has been shown to have beneficial effects on β-cell function. Here, the authors investigated the molecular mechanism responsible for the protective effects of baicalein against palmitate (PA)-induced impaired β-cell function, and placed focus on the role of heme oxygenase (HO)-1. Rat pancreatic β-cell line INS-1 cells or mouse pancreatic islets were cultured with PA (500 μM) to induce lipotoxicity in the presence or absence of baicalein (50 μM), and the expressions of the ER stress markers, ATF-3, CHOP and GRP78 were detected by Western blotting and/or qPCR. The involvement of HO-1 was evaluated by HO-1 siRNA transfection and using the HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP. Baicalein reduced PA-induced ER stress and inflammation and enhanced insulin secretion, and these effects were associated with the induction of HO-1. Furthermore, these protective effects were attenuated by ZnPP and by HO-1 siRNA. Pretreatment of PD98059 (an ERK inhibitor) significantly inhibited the protective effects of baicalein and blocked HO-1 induction. On the other hand, CO production by RuCO (a CO donor) ameliorated PA-induced ER stress, suggesting that CO production followed by HO-1 induction may contribute to the protective effects of baicalein against PA-induced β-cell dysfunction. Baicalein protects pancreatic β-cells from PA-induced ER stress and inflammation via an ERK-HO-1 dependent pathway. The authors suggest HO-1 induction in pancreatic β-cells appears to be a promising therapeutic strategy for T2D.

  18. [Effect of vitrification state of protective solutions on recovery of red blood cells after lyophilization preservation].

    PubMed

    Quan, Guo-Bo; Han, Ying; Liu, Xiu-Zhen; Liu, An; Jin, Peng; Cao, Wei

    2003-06-01

    To study effect of vitrification state of protective solutions on recovery of red blood cells after lyophilization, four protective solutions composed of isotonic buffers containing 7% DMSO (v/v) and 20%, 30%, 40% or 50% polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) (w/v) were adopted. Vitrification state of protective solutions was examined first when white ice crystal appeared in any protective solution during freezing or thawing, if the used solution was not a vitrification solution. Red blood cells were lyophilized in MINILYO45 freeze-dryer after washing, mixing with protective solutions and prefreezing. After lyophilization, the samples were quickly rehydrated by 37 degrees C rehydration solution. The results showed that in vitrification and devitrification experiments, white ice crystal appeared in solution of 20% PVP + 7% DMSO and 30% PVP + 7% DMSO during freezing and thawing; vitrification appeared in solution of 40% PVP + 7% DMSO during freezing, but devitrification appeared during thawing; vitrification appeared in solution of 50% PVP + 7% DMSO during freezing and thawing. After rehydration, the recoveries of red blood cells and hemoglobin in 40% PVP + 7% DMSO group were (81.36 +/- 14.94)% and (77.54 +/- 12.86)%, which were significantly higher than that in 20% PVP + 7% DMSO, 30% PVP + 7% DMSO and 50% PVP + 7% DMSO groups (P < 0.01). The concentration of free hemoglobin in 40% PVP + 7% DMSO group was also significantly lower than that in other three groups (P < 0.01). With increase of PVP concentration in protective solutions, vitrification state and protective effect of these solutions also increased; when concentration of PVP in protective solution was 40% though it was not a vitrification solution, the effect of lyophilization was the best; but when concentration of PVP further increased to 50%, though it was a vitrification solution, the effect decreased. It is concluded that excessive vitrification state could not benefit lyophilization of red blood cells.

  19. Stem cell factor (SCF) protects osteoblasts from oxidative stress through activating c-Kit-Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lei; Wu, Zhong; Yin, Gang; Liu, Haifeng; Guan, Xiaojun; Zhao, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Jianguang; Zhu, Jianguo

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • SCF receptor c-Kit is functionally expressed in primary and transformed osteoblasts. • SCF protects primary and transformed osteoblasts from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • SCF activation of c-Kit in osteoblasts, required for its cyto-protective effects. • c-Kit mediates SCF-induced Akt activation in cultured osteoblasts. • Akt activation is required for SCF-regulated cyto-protective effects in osteoblasts. - Abstract: Osteoblasts regulate bone formation and remodeling, and are main target cells of oxidative stress in the progression of osteonecrosis. The stem cell factor (SCF)-c-Kit pathway plays important roles in the proliferation, differentiation and survival in a range of cell types, but little is known about its functions in osteoblasts. In this study, we found that c-Kit is functionally expressed in both osteoblastic-like MC3T3-E1 cells and primary murine osteoblasts. Its ligand SCF exerted significant cyto-protective effects against hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). SCF activated its receptor c-Kit in osteoblasts, which was required for its cyto-protective effects against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Pharmacological inhibition (by Imatinib and Dasatinib) or shRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Kit thus inhibited SCF-mediated osteoblast protection. Further investigations showed that protection by SCF against H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was mediated via activation of c-Kit-dependent Akt pathway. Inhibition of Akt activation, through pharmacological or genetic means, suppressed SCF-mediated anti-H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activity in osteoblasts. In summary, we have identified a new SCF-c-Kit-Akt physiologic pathway that protects osteoblasts from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced damages, and might minimize the risk of osteonecrosis caused by oxidative stress.

  20. Resveratrol protects adult cardiomyocytes against oxidative stress mediated cell injury.

    PubMed

    Movahed, A; Yu, L; Thandapilly, S J; Louis, X L; Netticadan, T

    2012-11-15

    Recent studies from our laboratory have showed that resveratrol, a polyphenol found predominantly in grapes rendered strong cardioprotection in animal models of heart disease. The cardioprotection which was observed was primarily associated with the ability of resveratrol to reduce oxidative stress in these models. The aim of the current study was to corroborate the role of resveratrol as an inhibitor of oxidative stress and explore the underlying mechanisms of its action in heart disease. For this purpose, we used a cell model of oxidative stress, the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) exposed adult rat cardiomyocytes, which was treated with and without resveratrol (30 μM); cardiomyocytes which were not exposed to resveratrol served as controls. Cell injury, cell death and oxidative stress measurements as well as the activities of the major endogenous antioxidants superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were carried out in control and H(2)O(2) exposed cardiomyocytes, treated with and without resveratrol. Pharmacological blockade using specific blockers of the antioxidant enzymes were used to confirm their role in mediating resveratrol action in H(2)O(2) exposed cardiomyocytes. The status of H(2)O(2) and antioxidant enzymes in serum samples from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) treated with and without resveratrol (2.5 mg/kg body weight) was also examined. Our results showed significant cell injury and death in H(2)O(2) exposed cardiomyocytes which was prevented upon resveratrol treatment. SOD and CAT activities were decreased in H(2)O(2) exposed adult rat cardiomyocytes; treatment with resveratrol significantly prevented this reduction. However, GPx activity was not altered in the H(2)O(2) exposed cardiomyocytes in comparison to controls. Pharmacological blockade of SOD and/or CAT prevented the beneficial effect of resveratrol. In SHR, H(2)O(2) levels were increased, but CAT activity was decreased, while SOD remained unchanged

  1. Engineered Mesenchymal Cells Improve Passive Immune Protection Against Lethal Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Exposure.

    PubMed

    Braid, Lorena R; Hu, Wei-Gang; Davies, John E; Nagata, Les P

    2016-08-01

    : Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are being exploited as gene delivery vectors for various disease and injury therapies. We provide proof-of-concept that engineered MSCs can provide a useful, effective platform for protection against infectious disease. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen affecting humans and equines and can be used in bio-warfare. No licensed vaccine or antiviral agent currently exists to combat VEEV infection in humans. Direct antibody administration (passive immunity) is an effective, but short-lived, method of providing immediate protection against a pathogen. We compared the protective efficacy of human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs; a rich source of MSCs), engineered with a transgene encoding a humanized VEEV-neutralizing antibody (anti-VEEV), to the purified antibody. In athymic mice, the anti-VEEV antibody had a half-life of 3.7 days, limiting protection to 2 or 3 days after administration. In contrast, engineered HUCPVCs generated protective anti-VEEV serum titers for 21-38 days after a single intramuscular injection. At 109 days after transplantation, 10% of the mice still had circulating anti-VEEV antibody. The mice were protected against exposure to a lethal dose of VEEV by an intramuscular pretreatment injection with engineered HUCPVCs 24 hours or 10 days before exposure, demonstrating both rapid and prolonged immune protection. The present study is the first to describe engineered MSCs as gene delivery vehicles for passive immunity and supports their utility as antibody delivery vehicles for improved, single-dose prophylaxis against endemic and intentionally disseminated pathogens. Direct injection of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is an important strategy to immediately protect the recipient from a pathogen. This strategy is critical during natural outbreaks or after the intentional release of bio-weapons. Vaccines require weeks to become effective, which is not practical for first

  2. Quercetin protects against atherosclerosis by inhibiting dendritic cell activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weiqun; Wang, Wenting; Wang, Dongliang; Ling, Wenhua

    2017-09-01

    Quercetin is a typical flavonol with atheroprotective effects, but the effect of quercetin on dendritic cell (DC) maturation in relation to atherosclerosis has not yet been clearly defined. Thus, we investigated whether quercetin can inhibit DC maturation and evaluated its potential value in atherosclerosis progression in ApoE(-/-) mice. Quercetin consumption inhibited DC activation, inflammatory response and suppressed the progression of atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice. Subsequently, quercetin treatment inhibited the phenotypic and functional maturation of DCs, as evidenced not only by downregulation of CD80, CD86, MHC-II, IL-6 and IL-12 but also by a reduction in the ability to stimulate T cell allogeneic proliferation. Finally, an in vitro study demonstrated that quercetin inhibited DC maturation via upregulation of Dabs, which then downregulated the Src/PI3K/Akt-NF-κB-inflammatory pathways. Our data indicate that quercetin attenuates atherosclerosis progression by regulating DC activation via Dab2 protein expression. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Patent protection for stem cell procedures under the law of the European Union.

    PubMed

    Spranger, Tade Matthias

    2003-01-01

    Stem cell research shows an immense diagnostic and therapeutic potential. The procedures based on human stem cells seem to allow new medical treatments for serious diseases like Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease, leukaemia or diabetes. However, as no company or inventor would take the risk of immense investments without an adequate legal protection of the possible benefits arising out of their work, intellectual property law plays a pivotal role for the further development of stem cell techniques. Although international patent law knows protection of inventions using biological substances and living matter for about 160 years, patents on stem cells, DNA and other parts of the human body raise specific objections. Nevertheless, from a strictly legal angle, there are no barriers to patents on stem cell procedures. In particular, Art. 6 of the "Directive 98/44/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of the European Union of July 6, 1998 on the legal protection of biotechnological inventions" - which qualifies inventions as unpatentable where their commercial exploitation would be contrary to ordre public or morality - does not hinder patent protection for stem cell research.

  4. Mechanism of T-cell mediated protection in newborn mice against a Chlamydia infection.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sukumar; de la Maza, Luis M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the immune components needed for protection of newborn mice against Chlamydia muridarum, animals born to Chlamydia-immunized and to sham-immunized dams were infected intranasally with C. muridarum at 2 post-natal days. T-cells isolated from immunized or sham-immunized adult mice were adoptively transferred to newborn mice at the time of infection. Also, to establish what cytokines are involved in protection, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-12 were passively transferred to newborn mice. To assess the Chlamydia burden in the lungs mice were euthanized at 12 post-natal days. When T-cells from immunized adult mice were transferred, mice born to and fed by immunized dams were significantly protected as evidenced by the reduced number of Chlamydia isolated from the lungs compared to mice born to and fed by sham-immunized dams. Transfer of IFN-γ and TNF-α also significantly reduced the number of Chlamydia in the lungs of mice born to immunized dams. Transfer of IL-10 or IL-12 did not result in a significant reduction of Chlamydia. In vitro T-cell proliferation data suggest that neonatal antigen presenting cells can present Chlamydia antigens to adult T-cells. In conclusion, maternal antibodies and Chlamydia specific T-cells or Th1 cytokines are required for protection of neonates against this pathogen.

  5. Corrosion Protection of Al/Au/ZnO Anode for Hybrid Cell Application

    PubMed Central

    Slaughter, Gymama; Stevens, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Effective protection of power sources from corrosion is critical in the development of abiotic fuel cells, biofuel cells, hybrid cells and biobateries for implantable bioelectronics. Corrosion of these bioelectronic devices result in device inability to generate bioelectricity. In this paper Al/Au/ZnO was considered as a possible anodic substrate for the development of a hybrid cell. The protective abilities of corrosive resistant aluminum hydroxide and zinc phosphite composite films formed on the surface of Al/Au/ZnO anode in various electrolyte environments were examined by electrochemical methods. The presence of phosphate buffer and physiological saline (NaCl) buffer allows for the formation of aluminum hyrdroxide and zinc phosphite composite films on the surface of the Al/Au/ZnO anode that prevent further corrosion of the anode. The highly protective films formed on the Al/Au/ZnO anode during energy harvesting in a physiological saline environment resulted in 98.5% corrosion protective efficiency, thereby demonstrating that the formation of aluminum hydroxide and zinc phosphite composite films are effective in the prevention of anode corrosion during energy harvesting. A cell assembly consisting of the Al/Au/ZnO anode and platinum cathode resulted in an open circuit voltage of 1.03 V. A maximum power density of 955.3 μW/ cm2 in physiological saline buffer at a cell voltage and current density of 345 mV and 2.89 mA/ cm2, respectively. PMID:26580661

  6. Carvedilol protects bone marrow stem cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death via PI3K-AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meihui; Chen, Shudong; Lin, Dingkun

    2016-03-01

    Carvedilol, a nonselective β-adrenergic receptor blocker, has been reported to exert potent anti-oxidative activities. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of carvedilol against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) death, which imitate the microenvironment surrounding transplanted cells in the injured spinal cord in vitro. Carvedilol significantly reduced H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species production, apoptosis and subsequent cell death. LY294002, the PI3K inhibitor, blocked the protective effects and up-regulation of Akt phosphorylation of carvedilol. Together, our results showed that carvedilol protects H2O2-induced BMSCs cell death partly through PI3K-Akt pathway, suggesting carvedilol could be used in combination with BMSCs for the treatment of spinal cord injury by improving the cell survival and oxidative stress microenvironments.

  7. Normal Cellular Prion Protein Protects against Manganese-induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Christopher J.; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Saetveit, Nathan J.; Houk, Robert. S.; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2012-01-01

    The normal prion protein is abundantly expressed in the CNS, but its biological function remains unclear. The prion protein has octapeptide repeat regions that bind to several divalent metals, suggesting that the prion proteins may alter the toxic effect of environmental neurotoxic metals. In the present study, we systematically examined whether prion protein modifies the neurotoxicity of manganese (Mn) by comparing the effect of Mn on mouse neural cells expressing prion protein (PrPC -cells) and prion-knockout (PrPKO -cells). Exposure to Mn (10 μM-1 mM) for 24 hr produced a dose-dependent cytotoxic response in both PrPC -cells and PrPKO -cells. Interestingly, PrPC -cells (EC50 117.6μM) were more resistant to Mn-induced cytotoxicity, as compared to PrPKO -cells (EC50 59.9μM), suggesting a protective role for PrPC against Mn neurotoxicity. Analysis of intracellular Mn levels showed less Mn accumulation in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Furthermore, Mn-induced mitochondrial depolarization and ROS generation were significantly attenuated in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Measurement of antioxidant status revealed similar basal levels of glutathione (GSH) in PrPC -cells and PrPKO -cells; however, Mn treatment caused greater depletion of GSH in PrPKO -cells. Mn-induced mitochondrial depolarization and ROS production were followed by time- and dose-dependent activation of the apoptotic cell death cascade involving caspase-9 and -3. Notably, DNA fragmentation induced by both Mn treatment and oxidative stress-inducer hydrogen peroxide (100μM) was significantly suppressed in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Together, these results demonstrate that prion protein interferes with divalent metal Mn uptake and protects against Mn-induced oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death. PMID:17483122

  8. Alpha-crystallin-mediated protection of lens cells against heat and oxidative stress-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Karen L; Pedler, Michelle G; Shieh, Biehuoy; Ammar, David A; Petrash, J Mark; Mueller, Niklaus H

    2014-02-01

    In addition to their key role as structural lens proteins, α-crystallins also appear to confer protection against many eye diseases, including cataract, retinitis pigmentosa, and macular degeneration. Exogenous recombinant α-crystallin proteins were examined for their ability to prevent cell death induced by heat or oxidative stress in a human lens epithelial cell line (HLE-B3). Wild type αA- or αB-crystallin (WT-αA and WT-αB) and αA- or αB-crystallins, modified by the addition of a cell penetration peptide (CPP) designed to enhance the uptake of proteins into cells (gC-αB, TAT-αB, gC-αA), were produced by recombinant methods. In vitro chaperone-like assays were used to assay the ability of α-crystallins to protect client proteins from chemical or heat induced aggregation. In vivo viability assays were performed in HLE-B3 to determine whether pre-treatment with α-crystallins reduced death after exposure to oxidative or heat stress. Most of the five recombinant α-crystallin proteins tested conferred some in vitro protection from protein aggregation, with the greatest effect seen with WT-αB and gC-αB. All α-crystallins displayed significant protection to oxidative stress induced cell death, while only the αB-crystallins reduced cell death induced by thermal stress. Our findings indicate that the addition of the gC tag enhanced the protective effect of αB-crystallin against oxidative but not thermally-induced cell death. In conclusion, modifications that increase the uptake of α-crystallin proteins into cells, without destroying their chaperone-like activity and anti-apoptotic functions, create the potential to use these proteins therapeutically. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Polysaccharides purified from Cordyceps cicadae protects PC12 cells against glutamate-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Opeyemi J; Feng, Yan; Olatunji, Oyenike O; Tang, Jian; Wei, Yuan; Ouyang, Zhen; Su, Zhaoliang

    2016-11-20

    Two polysaccharides CPA-1 and CPB-2 were isolated purified from Cordyceps cicadae by hot water extraction, ethanol precipitation and purification using anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Preliminary structural characterization of CPA-1 and CPB-2 were performed. The protective effect of CPA-1 and CPB-2 against glutamate-induced oxidative toxicity in PC12 cells was analyzed. The results indicated that pretreatment of PC12 cells with CPA-1 and CPB-2 significantly increased cell survival, Ca(2+) overload and ROS generation. CPA-1 and CPB-2 also markedly up-regulated the antioxidant status of pretreated PC12 cells. Our results suggested that Cordyceps cicadae polysaccharides can protect PC12 cells against glutamate excitotoxicity and might serve as therapeutic agents for neuronal disorders.

  10. Autophagy may protect MC3T3-E1 cells from fluoride-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Duan, Dongmei; Liu, Yujie; Wang, Zhigang; Li, Zhongli

    2014-06-01

    Fluoride is an essential trace element for all mammalian species; however, excess fluoride intake is known to be toxic to cells in animals and humans. The toxicity of fluoride is mainly exerted via induction of apoptosis. Autophagy is induced by numerous cytotoxic stimuli; however, it is often unclear whether, under specific conditions, autophagy has a pro‑survival or a pro‑apoptotic role. To answer this critical question, the present study assessed autophagy and apoptosis simultaneously in single cells. It was demonstrated that fluoride was able to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis and autophagy, whereas autophagy appeared to be protective. Further analysis revealed that MAPK/JNK‑dependent autophagy may be protective in fluoride‑induced apoptosis. It is anticipated that the presented single‑cell approach may be a powerful tool for gaining a quantitative understanding of the complex regulation of autophagy, its effect on cell fate and its association with other cellular pathways.

  11. HDLs protect pancreatic β-cells against ER stress by restoring protein folding and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Pétremand, Jannick; Puyal, Julien; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Duprez, Jessica; Allagnat, Florent; Frias, Miguel; James, Richard W; Waeber, Gérard; Jonas, Jean-Christophe; Widmann, Christian

    2012-05-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis alteration contributes to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and death and favors the development of diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that HDLs protect β-cells against ER stress induced by thapsigargin, cyclopiazonic acid, palmitate, insulin overexpression, and high glucose concentrations. ER stress marker induction and ER morphology disruption mediated by these stimuli were inhibited by HDLs. Using a temperature-sensitive viral glycoprotein folding mutant, we show that HDLs correct impaired protein trafficking and folding induced by thapsigargin and palmitate. The ability of HDLs to protect β-cells against ER stress was inhibited by brefeldin A, an ER to Golgi trafficking blocker. These results indicate that HDLs restore ER homeostasis in response to ER stress, which is required for their ability to promote β-cell survival. This study identifies a cellular mechanism mediating the beneficial effect of HDLs on β-cells against ER stress-inducing factors.

  12. HDLs Protect Pancreatic β-Cells Against ER Stress by Restoring Protein Folding and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Pétremand, Jannick; Puyal, Julien; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Duprez, Jessica; Allagnat, Florent; Frias, Miguel; James, Richard W.; Waeber, Gérard; Jonas, Jean-Christophe; Widmann, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis alteration contributes to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and death and favors the development of diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that HDLs protect β-cells against ER stress induced by thapsigargin, cyclopiazonic acid, palmitate, insulin overexpression, and high glucose concentrations. ER stress marker induction and ER morphology disruption mediated by these stimuli were inhibited by HDLs. Using a temperature-sensitive viral glycoprotein folding mutant, we show that HDLs correct impaired protein trafficking and folding induced by thapsigargin and palmitate. The ability of HDLs to protect β-cells against ER stress was inhibited by brefeldin A, an ER to Golgi trafficking blocker. These results indicate that HDLs restore ER homeostasis in response to ER stress, which is required for their ability to promote β-cell survival. This study identifies a cellular mechanism mediating the beneficial effect of HDLs on β-cells against ER stress-inducing factors. PMID:22399686

  13. Induction of broad cytotoxic T cells by protective DNA vaccination against Marburg and Ebola.

    PubMed

    Shedlock, Devon J; Aviles, Jenna; Talbott, Kendra T; Wong, Gary; Wu, Stephan J; Villarreal, Daniel O; Myles, Devin Jf; Croyle, Maria A; Yan, Jian; Kobinger, Gary P; Weiner, David B

    2013-07-01

    Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers have been described as the most virulent viral diseases known to man due to associative lethality rates of up to 90%. Death can occur within days to weeks of exposure and there is currently no licensed vaccine or therapeutic. Recent evidence suggests an important role for antiviral T cells in conferring protection, but little detailed analysis of this response as driven by a protective vaccine has been reported. We developed a synthetic polyvalent-filovirus DNA vaccine against Marburg marburgvirus (MARV), Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV), and Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV). Preclinical efficacy studies were performed in guinea pigs and mice using rodent-adapted viruses, whereas murine T-cell responses were extensively analyzed using a novel modified assay described herein. Vaccination was highly potent, elicited robust neutralizing antibodies, and completely protected against MARV and ZEBOV challenge. Comprehensive T-cell analysis revealed cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) of great magnitude, epitopic breadth, and Th1-type marker expression. This model provides an important preclinical tool for studying protective immune correlates that could be applied to existing platforms. Data herein support further evaluation of this enhanced gene-based approach in nonhuman primate studies for in depth analyses of T-cell epitopes in understanding protective efficacy.

  14. Stem cell factor (SCF) protects osteoblasts from oxidative stress through activating c-Kit-Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Wu, Zhong; Yin, Gang; Liu, Haifeng; Guan, Xiaojun; Zhao, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Jianguang; Zhu, Jianguo

    2014-12-12

    Osteoblasts regulate bone formation and remodeling, and are main target cells of oxidative stress in the progression of osteonecrosis. The stem cell factor (SCF)-c-Kit pathway plays important roles in the proliferation, differentiation and survival in a range of cell types, but little is known about its functions in osteoblasts. In this study, we found that c-Kit is functionally expressed in both osteoblastic-like MC3T3-E1 cells and primary murine osteoblasts. Its ligand SCF exerted significant cyto-protective effects against hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). SCF activated its receptor c-Kit in osteoblasts, which was required for its cyto-protective effects against H₂O₂. Pharmacological inhibition (by Imatinib and Dasatinib) or shRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Kit thus inhibited SCF-mediated osteoblast protection. Further investigations showed that protection by SCF against H₂O₂ was mediated via activation of c-Kit-dependent Akt pathway. Inhibition of Akt activation, through pharmacological or genetic means, suppressed SCF-mediated anti-H₂O₂ activity in osteoblasts. In summary, we have identified a new SCF-c-Kit-Akt physiologic pathway that protects osteoblasts from H₂O₂-induced damages, and might minimize the risk of osteonecrosis caused by oxidative stress.

  15. Discovering naturally processed antigenic determinants that confer protective T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Gilchuk, Pavlo; Spencer, Charles T.; Conant, Stephanie B.; Hill, Timothy; Gray, Jennifer J.; Niu, Xinnan; Zheng, Mu; Erickson, John J.; Boyd, Kelli L.; McAfee, K. Jill; Oseroff, Carla; Hadrup, Sine R.; Bennink, Jack R.; Hildebrand, William; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Crowe, James E.; Williams, John V.; Buus, Søren; Sette, Alessandro; Schumacher, Ton N.M.; Link, Andrew J.; Joyce, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    CD8+ T cells (TCD8) confer protective immunity against many infectious diseases, suggesting that microbial TCD8 determinants are promising vaccine targets. Nevertheless, current T cell antigen identification approaches do not discern which epitopes drive protective immunity during active infection — information that is critical for the rational design of TCD8-targeted vaccines. We employed a proteomics-based approach for large-scale discovery of naturally processed determinants derived from a complex pathogen, vaccinia virus (VACV), that are presented by the most frequent representatives of four major HLA class I supertypes. Immunologic characterization revealed that many previously unidentified VACV determinants were recognized by smallpox-vaccinated human peripheral blood cells in a variegated manner. Many such determinants were recognized by HLA class I–transgenic mouse immune TCD8 too and elicited protective TCD8 immunity against lethal intranasal VACV infection. Notably, efficient processing and stable presentation of immune determinants as well as the availability of naive TCD8 precursors were sufficient to drive a multifunctional, protective TCD8 response. Our approach uses fundamental insights into T cell epitope processing and presentation to define targets of protective TCD8 immunity within human pathogens that have complex proteomes, suggesting that this approach has general applicability in vaccine sciences. PMID:23543059

  16. AMP-18 protects barrier function of colonic epithelial cells: role of tight junction proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh-Reitz, Margaret M.; Huang, Erick F.; Musch, Mark W.; Chang, Eugene B.; Martin, Terence E.; Kartha, Sreedharan; Toback, F. Gary

    2005-01-01

    AMP-18, a novel gastric antrum mucosal protein, and a synthetic peptide of amino acids 77-97, have mitogenic and motogenic properties for epithelial cells. The possibility that AMP-18 is also protective was evaluated in the colonic mucosa of mice and monolayer cultures of human colonic epithelial Caco2/bbe (C2) cells. Administration of AMP peptide to mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colonic injury delayed the onset of bloody diarrhea, and reduced weight loss. Treatment of C2 cells with AMP peptide protected monolayers against decreases in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) induced by the oxidant monochloramine, indomethacin, or DSS. A molecular mechanism for these barrier-protective effects was sought by asking if AMP peptide acted on specific tight junction (TJ) proteins. Immunoblots of detergent-insoluble fractions of C2 cells treated with AMP peptide exhibited increased accumulation of specific TJ proteins. Occludin immunoreactivity was also increased in detergent-insoluble fractions obtained from colonic mucosal cells of mice injected with AMP peptide. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (CF) supported the capacity of AMP peptide to enhance accumulation of occludin and ZO-1 in TJ domains of C2 cell monolayers, and together with immunoblot analysis showed that the peptide protected against loss of these TJ proteins following oxidant injury. AMP peptide also protected against a fall in TER during disruption of actin filaments by cytochalasin D, and stabilized perijunctional actin during oxidant injury when assessed by CF. These findings suggest that AMP-18 could protect the intestinal mucosal barrier by acting on specific TJ proteins and stabilizing perijunctional actin. PMID:15961882

  17. Isoflurane protects against human endothelial cell apoptosis by inducing sphingosine kinase-1 via ERK MAPK.

    PubMed

    Bakar, Adnan M; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Mihwa; Lee, H Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a major clinical problem affecting virtually every patient requiring critical care. Volatile anesthetics are frequently used during the perioperative period and protect the heart and kidney against ischemia and reperfusion injury. We aimed to determine whether isoflurane, the most commonly used volatile anesthetic in the USA, protects against endothelial apoptosis and necrosis and the mechanisms involved in this protection. Human endothelial EA.hy926 cells were pretreated with isoflurane or carrier gas (95% room air + 5% CO(2)) then subjected to apoptosis with tumor necrosis factor-α or to necrosis with hydrogen peroxide. DNA laddering and in situ Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase Biotin-dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) staining determined EA.hy926 cell apoptosis and percent LDH released determined necrosis. We also determined whether isoflurane modulates the expression and activity of sphingosine kinase-1 (SK1) and induces the phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK MAPK) as both enzymes are known to protect against cell death. Isoflurane pretreatment significantly decreased apoptosis in EA.hy926 cells as evidenced by reduced TUNEL staining and DNA laddering without affecting necrosis. Mechanistically, isoflurane induces the phosphorylation of ERK MAPK and increased SK1 expression and activity in EA.hy926 cells. Finally, selective blockade of SK1 (with SKI-II) or S1P(1) receptor (with W146) abolished the anti-apoptotic effects of isoflurane. Taken together, we demonstrate that isoflurane, in addition to its potent analgesic and anesthetic properties, protects against endothelial apoptosis most likely via SK1 and ERK MAPK activation. Our findings have significant clinical implication for protection of endothelial cells during the perioperative period and patients requiring critical care.

  18. Protective natural autoantibodies to apoptotic cells: evidence of convergent selection of recurrent innate-like clones.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Gregg J

    2015-12-01

    During murine immune development, recurrent B cell clones arise in a predictable fashion. Among these B cells, an archetypical clonotypic set that recognizes phosphorylcholine (PC) antigens and produces anti-PC IgM, first implicated for roles in microbial protection, was later found to become expanded in hyperlipidemic mice and in response to an increased in vivo burden of apoptotic cells. These IgM natural antibodies can enhance clearance of damaged cells and induce intracellular blockade of inflammatory signaling cascades. In clinical populations, raised levels of anti-PC IgM correlate with protection from atherosclerosis and may also downmodulate the severity of autoimmune disease. Human anti-PC-producing clones without hypermutation have been isolated that can similarly discriminate apoptotic from healthy cells. An independent report on unrelated adults has described anti-PC-producing B cells with IgM genes that have conserved CDR3 motifs, similar to stereotypic clonal sets of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Taken together, emerging evidence suggests that, despite the capacity to form an effectively limitless range of Ig receptors, the human immune system may often recurrently generate lymphocytes expressing structurally convergent B cell receptors with protective and homeostatic roles.

  19. Ferritin protects endothelial cells from oxidized low density lipoprotein in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Juckett, M. B.; Balla, J.; Balla, G.; Jessurun, J.; Jacob, H. S.; Vercellotti, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL), if it becomes oxidized, develops several unique properties including the capacity to provoke endothelial cytotoxicity via metal-catalyzed free radical-mediated mechanisms. As were previously have shown that iron-catalyzed oxidant injury to endothelial cells can be attenuated by the addition of exogenous iron chelators such as the lazaroids and deferoxamine, we have examined whether the endogenous iron chelator, ferritin, might provide protection from oxidized LDL. LDL oxidized by iron-containing hemin and H2O2 is toxic to endothelial cells in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Endothelial cell ferritin content is increased by pretreatment of cells with iron compounds or by the direct addition of exogenous apoferritin; ferritin-loaded cells are markedly resistant to the toxicity caused by oxidized LDL. Iron inactivation by ferritin depends on its ferroxidase activity. When a recombinant human ferritin heavy chain mutant, 222, which is devoid of ferroxidase activity, is added to endothelial cells, unlike the excellent protection afforded by the wild-type recombinant heavy chain, endothelial cells are not protected from oxidized LDL. To assess the in vivo relevance of our observation, we examined human coronary arteries of cardiac explants taken from patients with end-stage atherosclerosis. Large amounts of immunoreactive ferritin are focally detected in atherosclerotic lesions, specifically in the myofibroblasts, macrophages, and endothelium without a notable increase in Prussian blue-detectable iron. These findings suggest that ferritin may modulate vascular cell injury in vivo. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7677189

  20. Natural Bizbenzoquinoline Derivatives Protect Zebrafish Lateral Line Sensory Hair Cells from Aminoglycoside Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Matthew; Boney, Robert; Ordoobadi, Alexander J.; Sommers, Thomas F.; Trapani, Josef G.; Coffin, Allison B.

    2016-01-01

    Moderate to severe hearing loss affects 360 million people worldwide and most often results from damage to sensory hair cells. Hair cell damage can result from aging, genetic mutations, excess noise exposure, and certain medications including aminoglycoside antibiotics. Aminoglycosides are effective at treating infections associated with cystic fibrosis and other life-threatening conditions such as sepsis, but cause hearing loss in 20–30% of patients. It is therefore imperative to develop new therapies to combat hearing loss and allow safe use of these potent antibiotics. We approach this drug discovery question using the larval zebrafish lateral line because zebrafish hair cells are structurally and functionally similar to mammalian inner ear hair cells and respond similarly to toxins. We screened a library of 502 natural compounds in order to identify novel hair cell protectants. Our screen identified four bisbenzylisoquinoline derivatives: berbamine, E6 berbamine, hernandezine, and isotetrandrine, each of which robustly protected hair cells from aminoglycoside-induced damage. Using fluorescence microscopy and electrophysiology, we demonstrated that the natural compounds confer protection by reducing antibiotic uptake into hair cells and showed that hair cells remain functional during and after incubation in E6 berbamine. We also determined that these natural compounds do not reduce antibiotic efficacy. Together, these natural compounds represent a novel source of possible otoprotective drugs that may offer therapeutic options for patients receiving aminoglycoside treatment. PMID:27065807

  1. Protective Role of Cross-Reactive CD8 T Cells Against Dengue Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Elong Ngono, Annie; Chen, Hui-Wen; Tang, William W; Joo, Yunichel; King, Kevin; Weiskopf, Daniela; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Shresta, Sujan

    2016-11-01

    Infection with one of the four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1-4) presumably leads to lifelong immunity against the infecting serotype but not against heterotypic reinfection, resulting in a greater risk of developing Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever/Dengue Shock Syndrome (DHF/DSS) during secondary infection. Both antibodies and T cell responses have been implicated in DHF/DSS pathogenesis. According to the T cell-based hypothesis termed "original antigenic sin," secondary DENV infection is dominated by non-protective, cross-reactive T cells that elicit an aberrant immune response. The goal of our study was to compare the roles of serotype-specific and cross-reactive T cells in protection vs. pathogenesis during DENV infection in vivo. Specifically, we utilized IFN-α/βR(-/-) HLA*B0702 transgenic mice in the context of peptide vaccination with relevant human CD8 T cell epitopes. IFN-α/βR(-/-) HLA*B0702 transgenic mice were immunized with DENV serotype 2 (DENV2)-specific epitopes or variants found in any of the other three serotypes (DENV1, DENV3 or DENV4), followed by challenge with DENV. Although cross-reactive T cell responses were lower than responses elicited by serotype-specific T cells, immunization with either serotype-specific or variant peptide epitopes enhanced viral clearance, demonstrating that both serotype-specific and cross-reactive T cells can contribute to protection in vivo against DENV infection.

  2. Quercetin protects hamster spermatogenic cells from oxidative damage induced by diethylstilboestrol.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Ma, Aituan; Shi, W; Zhong, Xiuhui

    2010-10-01

    Quercetin has been reported to be an efficient antioxidant which protects chicken spermatogonial cells from oxidative damage through increasing intracellular antioxidants and decreasing lipid peroxidation. Exposure to diethylstilboestrol (DES) could cause reproductive damage in males, which is associated with oxidative stress. This study was conducted to investigate the protective effects of quercetin on DES-induced oxidative damage in cultured hamster spermatogenic cells. The cells were treated with different concentrations of DES, and their growth status was observed under inverted microscope. The viability of spermatogenic cells was detected by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT). The contents of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in supernatants and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in cells were detected with spectrophotography. The results showed that quercetin significantly inhibited the DES-induced damage on spermatogenic cells, with the exception of the low-dose group in which no significant difference was observed. The cell survival rate increased significantly in the middle- and high-dose groups. The contents of SOD and GSH-Px were significantly elevated after medication with quercetin (P < 0.01). It can be concluded that quercetin protects spermatogenic cells against DES-induced oxidative damage through increasing intracellular antioxidants and decreasing lipid peroxidation. Quercetin plays a very important role in ameliorating reproductive toxicity induced by environmental oestrogens.

  3. SOD2 Mediates Amifostine-Induced Protection against Glutamate in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ji; Zhang, Lei; Shi, Xiaolei; Wu, Mingchun; Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Xiaonan; Huo, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cytoprotectant amifostine attenuates radiation-induced oxidative injury by increasing intracellular manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in peripheral tissue. However, whether amifostine could protect neuronal cells against oxidative injury has not been reported. The purpose of this study is to explore the protection of amifostine in PC12 cells. Methods. PC12 cells exposed to glutamate were used to mimic neuronal oxidative injury. SOD assay kit was taken to evaluate intracellular Cu/Zn SOD (SOD1) and SOD2 activities; western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining were performed to investigate SOD2 protein expression; MTT, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), release and cell morphology were used to evaluate cell injury degree, and apoptotic rate and cleaved caspase-3 expression were taken to assess apoptosis; mitochondrial superoxide production, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) levels were evaluated by reagent kits. Results. Amifostine increased SOD2 activity and expression, decreased cell injury and apoptosis, reduced mitochondrial superoxide production and intracellular ROS generation, and restored intracellular GSH and CAT levels in PC12 cells exposed to glutamate. SOD2-siRNA, however, significantly reversed the amifostine-induced cytoprotective and antioxidative actions. Conclusion. SOD2 mediates amifostine-induced protection in PC12 cells exposed to glutamate. PMID:26770652

  4. New homoisoflavonoid analogues protect cells by regulating autophagy.

    PubMed

    Gan, Li-She; Zeng, Lin-Wei; Li, Xiang-Rong; Zhou, Chang-Xin; Li, Jie

    2017-03-15

    As a special group of naturally occurring flavonoids, homoisoflavonoids have been discovered as active components of several traditional Chinese medicines for nourishing heart and mind. In this study, twenty homoisoflavonoid analogues, including different substitution groups on rings A and B, as well as heteroaromatic B ring, were synthesized and evaluated for their cardioprotective and neuroprotective activities. In a H2O2-induced H9c2 cardiomyocytes injury assay, nine homoisoflavonoid analogues showed promising activities in the same level as the positive control, diazoxide. Six cardioprotective compounds with representative structure diversities were then evaluated for their neuroprotective effects on MPP+ induced SH-SY5Y cell injury model. Furthermore, autophagy inducing monodansylcadaverine (MDC) fluorescence staining methods and molecular docking studies indicated the action mechanism of these compounds may involve autophagy regulating via class I PI3K signaling pathway.

  5. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack

    SciTech Connect

    Scherbakov, Alexander M.; Stefanova, Lidia B.; Sorokin, Danila V.; Semina, Svetlana E.; Berstein, Lev M.; Krasil’nikov, Mikhail A.

    2013-12-10

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors – from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O{sub 2} atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK – the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well

  6. Barrier-protective effects of activated protein C in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Puig, Ferranda; Fuster, Gemma; Adda, Mélanie; Blanch, Lluís; Farre, Ramon; Navajas, Daniel; Artigas, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a clinical manifestation of respiratory failure, caused by lung inflammation and the disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier. Preservation of the physical integrity of the alveolar epithelial monolayer is of critical importance to prevent alveolar edema. Barrier integrity depends largely on the balance between physical forces on cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, and this balance might be affected by alterations in the coagulation cascade in patients with ALI. We aimed to study the effects of activated protein C (APC) on mechanical tension and barrier integrity in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) exposed to thrombin. Cells were pretreated for 3 h with APC (50 µg/ml) or vehicle (control). Subsequently, thrombin (50 nM) or medium was added to the cell culture. APC significantly reduced thrombin-induced cell monolayer permeability, cell stiffening, and cell contraction, measured by electrical impedance, optical magnetic twisting cytometry, and traction microscopy, respectively, suggesting a barrier-protective response. The dynamics of the barrier integrity was also assessed by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis of the tight junction ZO-1. Thrombin resulted in more elongated ZO-1 aggregates at cell-cell interface areas and induced an increase in ZO-1 membrane protein content. APC attenuated the length of these ZO-1 aggregates and reduced the ZO-1 membrane protein levels induced by thrombin. In conclusion, pretreatment with APC reduced the disruption of barrier integrity induced by thrombin, thus contributing to alveolar epithelial barrier protection.

  7. ICRP Publication 131: Stem cell biology with respect to carcinogenesis aspects of radiological protection.

    PubMed

    Hendry, J H; Niwa, O; Barcellos-Hoff, M H; Globus, R K; Harrison, J D; Martin, M T; Seed, T M; Shay, J W; Story, M D; Suzuki, K; Yamashita, S

    2016-06-01

    Current knowledge of stem cell characteristics, maintenance and renewal, evolution with age, location in 'niches', and radiosensitivity to acute and protracted exposures is reviewed regarding haematopoietic tissue, mammary gland, thyroid, digestive tract, lung, skin, and bone. The identity of the target cells for carcinogenesis continues to point to the more primitive and mostly quiescent stem cell population (able to accumulate the protracted sequence of mutations necessary to result in malignancy), and, in a few tissues, to daughter progenitor cells. Several biological processes could contribute to the protection of stem cells from mutation accumulation: (1) accurate DNA repair; (2) rapid induced death of injured stem cells; (3) retention of the intact parental strand during divisions in some tissues so that mutations are passed to the daughter differentiating cells; and (4) stem cell competition, whereby undamaged stem cells outcompete damaged stem cells for residence in the vital niche. DNA repair mainly operates within a few days of irradiation, while stem cell replications and competition require weeks or many months depending on the tissue type. This foundation is used to provide a biological insight to protection issues including the linear-non-threshold and relative risk models, differences in cancer risk between tissues, dose-rate effects, and changes in the risk of radiation carcinogenesis by age at exposure and attained age. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics.

  8. Anti-CD79 Antibody Induces B cell Anergy That Protects Against Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Ian R.; Anceriz, Nadia; Rousseau, François; Seefeldt, Matt B.; Hatterer, Eric; Irla, Magali; Buatois, Vanessa; Chatel, Laurence E.; Getahun, Andrew; Fletcher, Ashley; Cons, Laura; Pontini, Guillemette; Hertzberg, Nicole A.; Magistrelli, Giovanni; Malinge, Pauline; Smith, Mia J.; Reith, Walter; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie H.; Ferlin, Walter G.; Cambier, John C.

    2014-01-01

    B cells play a major role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune disorders including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes mellitus, as indicated by the efficacy of B cell-targeted therapies in these diseases. Therapeutic effects of the most commonly used B cell-targeted therapy, anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, are contingent upon long-term depletion of peripheral B cells. Here, we describe an alternative approach involving the targeting of CD79, the transducer subunit of the B cell antigen receptor. Unlike anti-CD20 mAbs, the protective effects of CD79-targeted mAb are do not require cell depletion, but rather act by inducing an anergic-like state. Thus, we describe a novel B cell-targeted approach predicated on the induction of B cell anergy. PMID:24442438

  9. Simplified Bryostatin Analogues Protect Cells from Chikungunya Virus-Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Staveness, Daryl; Abdelnabi, Rana; Schrier, Adam J; Loy, Brian A; Verma, Vishal A; DeChristopher, Brian A; Near, Katherine E; Neyts, Johan; Delang, Leen; Leyssen, Pieter; Wender, Paul A

    2016-04-22

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus showing a recent resurgence and rapid spread worldwide. While vaccines are under development, there are currently no therapies to treat this disease, except for over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics, which alleviate the devastating arthritic and arthralgic symptoms. To identify novel inhibitors of the virus, analogues of the natural product bryostatin 1, a clinical lead for the treatment of cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and HIV eradication, were investigated for in vitro antiviral activity and were found to be among the most potent inhibitors of CHIKV replication reported to date. Bryostatin-based therapeutic efforts and even recent anti-CHIKV strategies have centered on modulation of protein kinase C (PKC). Intriguingly, while the C ring of bryostatin primarily drives interactions with PKC, A- and B-ring functionality in these analogues has a significant effect on the observed cell-protective activity. Significantly, bryostatin 1 itself, a potent pan-PKC modulator, is inactive in these assays. These new findings indicate that the observed anti-CHIKV activity is not solely mediated by PKC modulation, suggesting possible as yet unidentified targets for CHIKV therapeutic intervention. The high potency and low toxicity of these bryologs make them promising new leads for the development of a CHIKV treatment.

  10. Simplified Bryostatin Analogues Protect Cells from Chikungunya Virus-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus showing a recent resurgence and rapid spread worldwide. While vaccines are under development, there are currently no therapies to treat this disease, except for over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics, which alleviate the devastating arthritic and arthralgic symptoms. To identify novel inhibitors of the virus, analogues of the natural product bryostatin 1, a clinical lead for the treatment of cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, and HIV eradication, were investigated for in vitro antiviral activity and were found to be among the most potent inhibitors of CHIKV replication reported to date. Bryostatin-based therapeutic efforts and even recent anti-CHIKV strategies have centered on modulation of protein kinase C (PKC). Intriguingly, while the C ring of bryostatin primarily drives interactions with PKC, A- and B-ring functionality in these analogues has a significant effect on the observed cell-protective activity. Significantly, bryostatin 1 itself, a potent pan-PKC modulator, is inactive in these assays. These new findings indicate that the observed anti-CHIKV activity is not solely mediated by PKC modulation, suggesting possible as yet unidentified targets for CHIKV therapeutic intervention. The high potency and low toxicity of these bryologs make them promising new leads for the development of a CHIKV treatment. PMID:26900625

  11. Dendritic cell editing by activated natural killer cells results in a more protective cancer-specific immune response.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Barbara; Mortara, Lorenzo; Chiossone, Laura; Accolla, Roberto S; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Moretta, Alessandro; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, several studies have extensively reported that activated natural killer (NK) cells can kill autologous immature dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro, whereas they spare fully activated DCs. This led to the proposal that activated NK cells might select a more immunogenic subset of DCs during a protective immune response. However, there is no demonstration that autologous DC killing by NK cells is an event occurring in vivo and, consequently, the functional relevance of this killing remains elusive. Here we report that a significant decrease of CD11c(+) DCs was observed in draining lymph nodes of mice inoculated with MHC-devoid cells as NK cell targets able to induce NK cell activation. This in vivo DC editing by NK cells was perforin-dependent and it was functionally relevant, since residual lymph node DCs displayed an improved capability to induce T cell proliferation. In addition, in a model of anti-cancer vaccination, the administration of MHC-devoid cells together with tumor cells increased the number of tumor-specific CTLs and resulted in a significant increase in survival of mice upon challenge with a lethal dose of tumor cells. Depletion of NK cells or the use of perforin knockout mice strongly decreased the tumor-specific CTL expansion and its protective role against tumor cell challenge. As a whole, our data support the hypothesis that NK cell-mediated DC killing takes place in vivo and is able to promote expansion of cancer-specific CTLs. Our results also indicate that cancer vaccines could be improved by strategies aimed at activating NK cells.

  12. Cyclic AMP can promote APL progression and protect myeloid leukemia cells against anthracycline-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Gausdal, G; Wergeland, A; Skavland, J; Nguyen, E; Pendino, F; Rouhee, N; McCormack, E; Herfindal, L; Kleppe, R; Havemann, U; Schwede, F; Bruserud, Ø; Gjertsen, B T; Lanotte, M; Ségal-Bendirdjian, E; Døskeland, S O

    2013-01-01

    We show that cyclic AMP (cAMP) elevating agents protect blasts from patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) against death induced by first-line anti-leukemic anthracyclines like daunorubicin (DNR). The cAMP effect was reproduced in NB4 APL cells, and shown to depend on activation of the generally cytoplasmic cAMP-kinase type I (PKA-I) rather than the perinuclear PKA-II. The protection of both NB4 cells and APL blasts was associated with (inactivating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser118 of pro-apoptotic Bad and (activating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser133 of the AML oncogene CREB. Either event would be expected to protect broadly against cell death, and we found cAMP elevation to protect also against 2-deoxyglucose, rotenone, proteasome inhibitor and a BH3-only mimetic. The in vitro findings were mirrored by the findings in NSG mice with orthotopic NB4 cell leukemia. The mice showed more rapid disease progression when given cAMP-increasing agents (prostaglandin E2 analog and theophylline), both with and without DNR chemotherapy. The all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced terminal APL cell differentiation is a cornerstone in current APL treatment and is enhanced by cAMP. We show also that ATRA-resistant APL cells, believed to be responsible for treatment failure with current ATRA-based treatment protocols, were protected by cAMP against death. This suggests that the beneficial pro-differentiating and non-beneficial pro-survival APL cell effects of cAMP should be weighed against each other. The results suggest also general awareness toward drugs that can affect bone marrow cAMP levels in leukemia patients. PMID:23449452

  13. Cyclic AMP can promote APL progression and protect myeloid leukemia cells against anthracycline-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gausdal, G; Wergeland, A; Skavland, J; Nguyen, E; Pendino, F; Rouhee, N; McCormack, E; Herfindal, L; Kleppe, R; Havemann, U; Schwede, F; Bruserud, O; Gjertsen, B T; Lanotte, M; Ségal-Bendirdjian, E; Døskeland, S O

    2013-02-28

    We show that cyclic AMP (cAMP) elevating agents protect blasts from patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) against death induced by first-line anti-leukemic anthracyclines like daunorubicin (DNR). The cAMP effect was reproduced in NB4 APL cells, and shown to depend on activation of the generally cytoplasmic cAMP-kinase type I (PKA-I) rather than the perinuclear PKA-II. The protection of both NB4 cells and APL blasts was associated with (inactivating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser118 of pro-apoptotic Bad and (activating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser133 of the AML oncogene CREB. Either event would be expected to protect broadly against cell death, and we found cAMP elevation to protect also against 2-deoxyglucose, rotenone, proteasome inhibitor and a BH3-only mimetic. The in vitro findings were mirrored by the findings in NSG mice with orthotopic NB4 cell leukemia. The mice showed more rapid disease progression when given cAMP-increasing agents (prostaglandin E2 analog and theophylline), both with and without DNR chemotherapy. The all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced terminal APL cell differentiation is a cornerstone in current APL treatment and is enhanced by cAMP. We show also that ATRA-resistant APL cells, believed to be responsible for treatment failure with current ATRA-based treatment protocols, were protected by cAMP against death. This suggests that the beneficial pro-differentiating and non-beneficial pro-survival APL cell effects of cAMP should be weighed against each other. The results suggest also general awareness toward drugs that can affect bone marrow cAMP levels in leukemia patients.

  14. Human Prostate Cancer Cells Secrete Neuro-Protective Factors in Response to Cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Seema; Varghese, Mini; Shareef, Mohammed M.; Ahmed, Mansoor M.

    2010-01-01

    Cryoablation is one of the established treatment modalities for prostate cancer management. Although, it is target specific, it may still lead to damage to the nerve fibers around the prostate tumor. In this study, by directly exposing the co-cultures of prostate cancer cells, PC-3 and Schwann cell-Dorsal Root Ganglion neuron (SC-DRG) to cryo-shock and by exposing SC-DRG to cryo-shock conditioned media (CSCM) obtained from PC-3 cells, robust neuro-protective effects were observed. Since this neuro-protective effect originated from cryotherapy-treated PC-3 cells, the presence of putative factors secreted by PC-3 cells in the medium following cryo-shock was analyzed. Using human cytokine antibody array analysis, differential release of cytokines in CSCM was observed with induced release of cytokines involved in neuro-protection like IL-1α, MIP-4, MIP-5, Leptin, IL-15 and ICAM-1 with simultaneous inhibition of TNFRI and TNFRII that are implicated in killing of nerve cells. Further, using Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time Of Flight (MALDI-TOF) sequencing, two proteins were identified namely, CypA (cyclophilin A) and NM23 (nonmetastatic protein 23) in the CSCM. CypA functions as a mediator of intracellular as well as extracellular neuro-protective mechanisms and NM23 has been implicated as a potential suppressor protein of tumor metastasis. Thus, this study revealed the presence of factors in CSCM that has the potential to protect normal neuronal cells and suppress metastasis. PMID:20401329

  15. Remote ischemic preconditioning protects human neural stem cells from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Motomura, Ayako; Shimizu, Mikiko; Kato, Akira; Motomura, Kazuya; Yamamichi, Akane; Koyama, Hiroko; Ohka, Fumiharu; Nishikawa, Tomohide; Nishimura, Yusuke; Hara, Masahito; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Bando, Yasuhiko; Nishimura, Toshihide; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Natsume, Atsushi

    2017-09-26

    In previous clinical trials, we showed that remote ischemic preconditioning (rIPC) reduced myocardial damage in children undergoing treatment for congenital heart defects and postoperative renal failure in patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery. In rabbit experiments, pre-treatment with plasma and plasma dialysate (obtained using 15-kDa cut-off dialysis membrane) from donor rabbits subjected to rIPC similarly protected against cardiac infarction. However, the protective substances containing in rIPC plasma have been unknown. In the present study, we showed that rIPC plasma exerted anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative effects on human neural stem cells under oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) that mimics brain ischemia. Additionally, we applied the sample to the liquid chromatography integrated with mass spectrometry to identify candidate key molecules in the rIPC plasma and determine its role in protecting neural stem cells from OGD-induced cell death. Thioredoxin increased significantly after rIPC compared to pre-IPC. Pretreatment with thioredoxin, the antioxidant protein, markedly protected human neural stem cells from OGD-induced cell death. The effect of thioredoxin on brain ischemia in animals should be further evaluated. However, the present study first evaluated the effect of rIPC in the ischemic cellular model.

  16. Metformin protects against apoptosis and senescence in nucleus pulposus cells and ameliorates disc degeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deheng; Xia, Dongdong; Pan, Zongyou; Xu, Daoliang; Zhou, Yifei; Wu, Yaosen; Cai, Ningyu; Tang, Qian; Wang, Chenggui; Yan, Meijun; Zhang, Jing Jie; Zhou, Kailiang; Wang, Quan; Feng, Yongzeng; Wang, Xiangyang; Xu, Huazi; Zhang, Xiaolei; Tian, Naifeng

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD) is a complicated process that involves both cellular apoptosis and senescence. Metformin has been reported to stimulate autophagy, whereas autophagy is shown to protect against apoptosis and senescence. Therefore, we hypothesize that metformin may have therapeutic effect on IDD through autophagy stimulation. The effect of metformin on IDD was investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Our study showed that metformin attenuated cellular apoptosis and senescence induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide in nucleus pulposus cells. Autophagy, as well as its upstream regulator AMPK, was activated by metformin in nucleus pulposus cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA partially abolished the protective effect of metformin against nucleus pulposus cells' apoptosis and senescence, indicating that autophagy was involved in the protective effect of metformin on IDD. In addition, metformin was shown to promote the expression of anabolic genes such as Col2a1 and Acan expression while inhibiting the expression of catabolic genes such as Mmp3 and Adamts5 in nucleus pulposus cells. In vivo study illustrated that metformin treatment could ameliorate IDD in a puncture-induced rat model. Thus, our study showed that metformin could protect nucleus pulposus cells against apoptosis and senescence via autophagy stimulation and ameliorate disc degeneration in vivo, revealing its potential to be a therapeutic agent for IDD. PMID:27787519

  17. Intestinal epithelial cell secretion of RELM-beta protects against gastrointestinal worm infection.

    PubMed

    Herbert, De'Broski R; Yang, Jun-Qi; Hogan, Simon P; Groschwitz, Kathryn; Khodoun, Marat; Munitz, Ariel; Orekov, Tatyana; Perkins, Charles; Wang, Quan; Brombacher, Frank; Urban, Joseph F; Rothenberg, Marc E; Finkelman, Fred D

    2009-12-21

    Th2 cells drive protective immunity against most parasitic helminths, but few mechanisms have been demonstrated that facilitate pathogen clearance. We show that IL-4 and IL-13 protect against intestinal lumen-dwelling worms primarily by inducing intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) to differentiate into goblet cells that secrete resistin-like molecule (RELM) beta. RELM-beta is essential for normal spontaneous expulsion and IL-4-induced expulsion of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Heligmosomoides polygyrus, which both live in the intestinal lumen, but it does not contribute to immunity against Trichinella spiralis, which lives within IEC. RELM-beta is nontoxic for H. polygyrus in vitro but directly inhibits the ability of worms to feed on host tissues during infection. This decreases H. polygyrus adenosine triphosphate content and fecundity. Importantly, RELM-beta-driven immunity does not require T or B cells, alternative macrophage activation, or increased gut permeability. Thus, we demonstrate a novel mechanism for host protection at the mucosal interface that explains how stimulation of epithelial cells by IL-4 and IL-13 contributes to protection against parasitic helminthes that dwell in the intestinal lumen.

  18. Protection of human upper respiratory tract cell lines against sulphur mustard toxicity by hexamethylenetetramine (HMT).

    PubMed

    Andrew, D J; Lindsay, C D

    1998-07-01

    1. Sulphur mustard ('mustard gas', HD) is a highly toxic chemical warfare agent which affects the skin and respiratory tract. The primary targets of inhaled HD are the epithelia of the upper respiratory tract. Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) has been shown to protect human lung cells against HD toxicity and has also been shown to be effective in vivo against the chemical warfare agent phosgene. The ability of HMT to protect against the toxicity of HD was investigated in the human upper respiratory tract cell lines BEAS-2B and RPMI 2650. 2. HD was highly toxic to both cell lines, with LC50 values of 15-30 microM. HMT, at a concentration of 10 mM, was shown to protect the cell lines against the toxic effects of 20 microM and 40 microM HD. Results demonstrated that it was necessary for HMT to be in situ at the time of exposure to HD for effective cytoprotection. No protection was seen when cells were treated with HMT following exposure to HD, or where HMT was removed prior to HD exposure. 3. Results suggest that HMT may be effective prophylaxis for exposure to HD by inhalation.

  19. The Plant Hormone Cytokinin Confers Protection against Oxidative Stress in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Eman; Stopper, Helga

    2016-01-01

    Modulating key dynamics of plant growth and development, the effects of the plant hormone cytokinin on animal cells gained much attention recently. Most previous studies on cytokinin effects on mammalian cells have been conducted with elevated cytokinin concentration (in the μM range). However, to examine physiologically relevant dose effects of cytokinins on animal cells, we systematically analyzed the impact of kinetin in cultured cells at low and high concentrations (1nM-10μM) and examined cytotoxic and genotoxic conditions. We furthermore measured the intrinsic antioxidant activity of kinetin in a cell-free system using the Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assay and in cells using the dihydroethidium staining method. Monitoring viability, we looked at kinetin effects in mammalian cells such as HL60 cells, HaCaT human keratinocyte cells, NRK rat epithelial kidney cells and human peripheral lymphocytes. Kinetin manifests no antioxidant activity in the cell free system and high doses of kinetin (500 nM and higher) reduce cell viability and mediate DNA damage in vitro. In contrast, low doses (concentrations up to 100 nM) of kinetin confer protection in cells against oxidative stress. Moreover, our results show that pretreatment of the cells with kinetin significantly reduces 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide mediated reactive oxygen species production. Also, pretreatment with kinetin retains cellular GSH levels when they are also treated with the GSH-depleting agent patulin. Our results explicitly show that low kinetin doses reduce apoptosis and protect cells from oxidative stress mediated cell death. Future studies on the interaction between cytokinins and human cellular pathway targets will be intriguing. PMID:28005918

  20. NK Cell-Mediated Regulation of Protective Memory Responses against Intracellular Ehrlichial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Samar; El Andaloussi, Abdeljabar; Hisham, Ahmed; Ismail, Nahed

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichiae are gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria that cause potentially fatal human monocytic ehrlichiosis. We previously showed that natural killer (NK) cells play a critical role in host defense against Ehrlichia during primary infection. However, the contribution of NK cells to the memory response against Ehrlichia remains elusive. Primary infection of C57BL/6 mice with Ehrlichia muris provides long-term protection against a second challenge with the highly virulent Ixodes ovatus Ehrlichia (IOE), which ordinarily causes fatal disease in naïve mice. Here, we show that the depletion of NK cells in E. muris-primed mice abrogates the protective memory response against IOE. Approximately, 80% of NK cell-depleted E. muris-primed mice succumbed to lethal IOE infection on days 8–10 after IOE infection, similar to naïve mice infected with the same dose of IOE. The lack of a recall response in NK cell-depleted mice correlated with an increased bacterial burden, extensive liver injury, decreased frequency of Ehrlichia-specific IFN-γ-producing memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, and a low titer of Ehrlichia-specific antibodies. Intraperitoneal infection of mice with E. muris resulted in the production of IL-15, IL-12, and IFN-γ as well as an expansion of activated NKG2D+ NK cells. The adoptive transfer of purified E. muris-primed hepatic and splenic NK cells into Rag2-/-Il2rg-/- recipient mice provided protective immunity against challenge with E. muris. Together, these data suggest that E. muris-induced memory-like NK cells, which contribute to the protective, recall response against Ehrlichia. PMID:27092553

  1. (R)-α-Lipoic Acid Protects Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells from Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Voloboueva, Ludmila A.; Liu, Jiankang; Suh, Jung H.; Ames, Bruce N.; Miller, Sheldon S.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine whether (R)-α-lipoic acid (LA) protects cultured human fetal retinal pigment epithelial (hfRPE) cells against oxidative injury and identify the pathways that may mediate protection. METHODS Cultured hfRPE cells were pretreated with various concentrations of LA for 14 to 16 hours followed by treatment with a chemical oxidant, tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BuOOH; 0.8 mM, 3 hours). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cell viability were measured using H2DCF and MTT assays, respectively. RPE cells were evaluated with fluorescent dyes (SYTOX Orange and SYTO Green; Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR), which differentiate between live and dead cells. Apoptosis was visualized by using the TUNEL assay. Changes in mitochondrial membrane potential were detected by JC-1 dye. Intracellular levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were measured by HPLC. Regulation of γ-glutamylcysteine ligase (GCL), the rate-controlling enzyme of GSH production, was assayed by RT-PCR. RESULTS Pretreatment of hfRPE cells with LA, 0.2 mM and 0.5 mM, significantly reduced the levels of t-BuOOH-induced intra-cellular ROS, by 23% and 49%, respectively. LA (0.5 mM) prevented oxidant-induced cell death and apoptosis and also increased the viability of oxidant-treated hfRPE cells from 38% to 90% of control. LA upregulated the mRNA expression of GCL, and was protective against t-BuOOH-induced decreases in both mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular levels of GSH and GSH/GSSG. CONCLUSIONS The present study suggests that the protective effect of LA involves multiple pathways and that LA could be effective against age-associated increase in oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in RPE cells. PMID:16249512

  2. Protection of human HepG2 cells against oxidative stress by cocoa phenolic extract.

    PubMed

    Martín, María Angeles; Ramos, Sonia; Mateos, Raquel; Granado Serrano, Ana Belén; Izquierdo-Pulido, María; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2008-09-10

    Cocoa is a rich source of flavanols and procyanidin oligomers with antioxidative properties, providing protection against oxidation and nitration. The present study investigated the potential protective effect of a polyphenolic extract from cocoa on cell viability and antioxidant defenses of cultured human HepG2 cells submitted to oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH). Pretreatment of cells with 0.05-50 microg/mL of cocoa polyphenolic extract (CPE) for 2 or 20 h completely prevented cell damage and enhanced activity of antioxidant enzymes induced by a treatment with t-BOOH. Moreover, lower levels of GSH caused by t-BOOH in HepG2 cells were partly recovered by a pretreatment with CPE. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by t-BOOH was dose-dependently prevented when cells were pretreated for 2 or 20 h with CPE. These results show that treatment of HepG2 in culture with CPE (within the physiological range of concentrations) confers a significant protection against oxidation to the cells.

  3. Discovery of a Benzamide Derivative That Protects Pancreatic β-Cells against Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongliang; Li, Yu; Arora, Daleep; Xu, Depeng; Lim, Hui-Ying; Wang, Weidong

    2017-07-27

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated pancreatic insulin-producing β-cell dysfunction and death are critical elements in the onset and progression of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Here, through cell-based high throughput screening we identified benzamide derivatives as a novel class of β-cell protective agents against ER stress-induced dysfunction and death. Through structure-activity relationship optimization, a 3-(N-piperidinyl)methylbenzamide derivative 13d markedly protects β-cells against ER stress-induced dysfunction and death with near 100% maximum rescue activity and an EC50 of 0.032 μM. Compound 13d alleviates ER stress in β-cells by suppressing ER stress-mediated activation of all three branches of unfolded protein response (UPR) and apoptotic genes. Finally, we show that 13d significantly lowers blood glucose levels and increases concomitant β-cell survival and number in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model. Identification of β-cell-protective small molecules against ER stress provides a new promising modality for the treatment of diabetes.

  4. Tanshinone IIA Protects Endothelial Cells from H2O2-Induced Injuries via PXR Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiyan; Chen, Zhiwu; Ma, Zengchun; Tan, Hongling; Xiao, Chengrong; Tang, Xianglin; Zhang, Boli; Wang, Yuguang; Gao, Yue

    2017-02-06

    Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA) is a pharmacologically active substance extracted from the rhizome of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (also known as the Chinese herb Danshen), and is widely used to treat atherosclerosis. The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a nuclear receptor that is a key regulator of xenobiotic and endobiotic detoxification. Tan IIA is an efficacious PXR agonist that has a potential protective effect on endothelial injuries induced by xenobiotics and endobiotics via PXR activation. Previously numerous studies have demonstrated the possible effects of Tan IIA on human umbilical vein endothelial cells, but the further mechanism for its exerts the protective effect is not well established. To study the protective effects of Tan IIA against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we pretreated cells with or without different concentrations of Tan IIA for 24 h, then exposed the cells to 400 μM H2O2 for another 3 h. Therefore, our data strongly suggests that Tan IIA may lead to increased regeneration of glutathione (GSH) from the glutathione disulfide (GSSG) produced during the GSH peroxidase-catalyzed decomposition of H2O2 in HUVECs, and the PXR plays a significant role in this process. Tan IIA may also exert protective effects against H2O2-induced apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway associated with the participation of PXR. Tan IIA protected HUVECs from inflammatory mediators triggered by H2O2 via PXR activation. In conclusion, Tan IIA protected HUVECs against H2O2-induced cell injury through PXR-dependent mechanisms.

  5. Conditional and specific NF-kappaB blockade protects pancreatic beta cells from diabetogenic agents.

    PubMed

    Eldor, R; Yeffet, A; Baum, K; Doviner, V; Amar, D; Ben-Neriah, Y; Christofori, G; Peled, A; Carel, J C; Boitard, C; Klein, T; Serup, P; Eizirik, D L; Melloul, D

    2006-03-28

    Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the infiltration of inflammatory cells into pancreatic islets of Langerhans, followed by the selective and progressive destruction of insulin-secreting beta cells. Islet-infiltrating leukocytes secrete cytokines such as IL-1beta and IFN-gamma, which contribute to beta cell death. In vitro evidence suggests that cytokine-induced activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB is an important component of the signal triggering beta cell apoptosis. To study the in vivo role of NF-kappaB in beta cell death, we generated a transgenic mouse line expressing a degradation-resistant NF-kappaB protein inhibitor (DeltaNIkappaBalpha), acting specifically in beta cells, in an inducible and reversible manner, by using the tet-on regulation system. In vitro, islets expressing the DeltaNIkappaBalpha protein were resistant to the deleterious effects of IL-1beta and IFN-gamma, as assessed by reduced NO production and beta-cell apoptosis. This effect was even more striking in vivo, where nearly complete protection against multiple low-dose streptozocin-induced diabetes was observed, with reduced intraislet lymphocytic infiltration. Our results show in vivo that beta cell-specific activation of NF-kappaB is a key event in the progressive loss of beta cells in diabetes. Inhibition of this process could be a potential effective strategy for beta-cell protection.

  6. Lutein protects against methotrexate-induced and reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptotic cell injury of IEC-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Jen; Lin, Ji-Fan; Chang, Hsun-Hsien; Lee, Gon-Ann; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2013-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy using methotrexate (MTX) frequently induces side effects such as mucositis that leads to intestinal damage and diarrhea. Several natural compounds have been demonstrated of their effectiveness in protecting intestinal epithelial cells from these adverse effects. In this paper, we investigated the protection mechanism of lutein against MTX-induced damage in IEC-6 cells originating from the rat jejunum crypt. The cell viability, induced-apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and mitochondrial membrane potential in IEC-6 cells under MTX treatment were examined in the presence or absence of lutein. Expression level of Bcl2, Bad and ROS scavenging enzymes (including SOD, catalase and Prdx1) were detected by quantitative RT-PCR. The cell viability of IEC-6 cells exposed to MTX was decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MTX induces mitochondrial membrane potential loss, ROS generation and caspase 3 activation in IEC-6 cells. The cytotoxicity of MTX was reduced in IEC-6 cells by the 24 h pre-treatment of lutein. We found that pre-treatment of lutein significantly reduces MTX-induced ROS and apoptosis. The expression of SOD was up-regulated by the pre-treatment of lutein in the MTX-treated IEC-6 cells. These results indicated that lutein can protect IEC-6 cells from the chemo-drugs induced damage through increasing ROS scavenging ability. The MTX-induced apoptosis of IEC-6 cells was shown to be repressed by the pre-treatment of lutein, which may represent a promising adjunct to conventional chemotherapy for preventing intestinal damages.

  7. Lutein Protects against Methotrexate-Induced and Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Apoptotic Cell Injury of IEC-6 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chi-Jen; Lin, Ji-Fan; Chang, Hsun-Hsien; Lee, Gon-Ann; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose High-dose chemotherapy using methotrexate (MTX) frequently induces side effects such as mucositis that leads to intestinal damage and diarrhea. Several natural compounds have been demonstrated of their effectiveness in protecting intestinal epithelial cells from these adverse effects. In this paper, we investigated the protection mechanism of lutein against MTX-induced damage in IEC-6 cells originating from the rat jejunum crypt. Methods The cell viability, induced-apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and mitochondrial membrane potential in IEC-6 cells under MTX treatment were examined in the presence or absence of lutein. Expression level of Bcl2, Bad and ROS scavenging enzymes (including SOD, catalase and Prdx1) were detected by quantitative RT-PCR. Results The cell viability of IEC-6 cells exposed to MTX was decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MTX induces mitochondrial membrane potential loss, ROS generation and caspase 3 activation in IEC-6 cells. The cytotoxicity of MTX was reduced in IEC-6 cells by the 24 h pre-treatment of lutein. We found that pre-treatment of lutein significantly reduces MTX-induced ROS and apoptosis. The expression of SOD was up-regulated by the pre-treatment of lutein in the MTX-treated IEC-6 cells. These results indicated that lutein can protect IEC-6 cells from the chemo-drugs induced damage through increasing ROS scavenging ability. Conclusion The MTX-induced apoptosis of IEC-6 cells was shown to be repressed by the pre-treatment of lutein, which may represent a promising adjunct to conventional chemotherapy for preventing intestinal damages. PMID:24039779

  8. Vaccination with Leishmania histone H1-pulsed dendritic cells confers protection in murine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Agallou, Maria; Smirlis, Despina; Soteriadou, Ketty P; Karagouni, Evdokia

    2012-07-20

    Visceral leishmaniasis is the most severe form of leishmaniases affecting millions of people worldwide often resulting in death despite optimal therapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of effective anti-infective vaccine(s). In the present study, we evaluated the prophylactic value of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) pulsed with the Leishmania (L.) infantum histone H1. We developed fully mature BM-DCs characterized by enhanced capacity of IL-12 production after ex vivo pulsing with GST-LeishH1. Intravenous administration of these BM-DCs in naive BALB/c mice resulted in antigen-specific spleenocyte proliferation and IgG1 isotype antibody production and conferred protection against experimental challenge with L. infantum independently of CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs) co-administration. Protection was associated with a pronounced enhancement of parasite-specific IFNγ-producing cells and reduction of cells producing IL-10, whereas IL-4 production was comparable in protected and non-protected mice. The polarization of immune responses to Th1 type was further confirmed by the elevation of parasite-specific IgG2a/IgG1 ratio in protected mice. The above data indicate the immunostimulatory capacity of Leishmania histone H1 and further support its exploitation as a candidate protein for vaccine development against leishmaniasis.

  9. Ankyrin-mediated self-protection during cell invasion by the bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Carey; Cadby, Ian T.; Till, Rob; Bui, Nhat Khai; Lerner, Thomas R.; Hughes, William S.; Lee, David J.; Alderwick, Luke J.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Sockett, Elizabeth R.; Lovering, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Predatory Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus are natural antimicrobial organisms, killing other bacteria by whole-cell invasion. Self-protection against prey-metabolizing enzymes is important for the evolution of predation. Initial prey entry involves the predator's peptidoglycan DD-endopeptidases, which decrosslink cell walls and prevent wasteful entry by a second predator. Here we identify and characterize a self-protection protein from B. bacteriovorus, Bd3460, which displays an ankyrin-based fold common to intracellular pathogens of eukaryotes. Co-crystal structures reveal Bd3460 complexation of dual targets, binding a conserved epitope of each of the Bd3459 and Bd0816 endopeptidases. Complexation inhibits endopeptidase activity and cell wall decrosslinking in vitro. Self-protection is vital — ΔBd3460 Bdellovibrio deleteriously decrosslink self-peptidoglycan upon invasion, adopt a round morphology, and lose predatory capacity and cellular integrity. Our analysis provides the first mechanistic examination of self-protection in Bdellovibrio, documents protection-multiplicity for products of two different genomic loci, and reveals an important evolutionary adaptation to an invasive predatory bacterial lifestyle. PMID:26626559

  10. Ankyrin-mediated self-protection during cell invasion by the bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Carey; Cadby, Ian T; Till, Rob; Bui, Nhat Khai; Lerner, Thomas R; Hughes, William S; Lee, David J; Alderwick, Luke J; Vollmer, Waldemar; Sockett, R Elizabeth; Sockett, Elizabeth R; Lovering, Andrew L

    2015-12-02

    Predatory Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus are natural antimicrobial organisms, killing other bacteria by whole-cell invasion. Self-protection against prey-metabolizing enzymes is important for the evolution of predation. Initial prey entry involves the predator's peptidoglycan DD-endopeptidases, which decrosslink cell walls and prevent wasteful entry by a second predator. Here we identify and characterize a self-protection protein from B. bacteriovorus, Bd3460, which displays an ankyrin-based fold common to intracellular pathogens of eukaryotes. Co-crystal structures reveal Bd3460 complexation of dual targets, binding a conserved epitope of each of the Bd3459 and Bd0816 endopeptidases. Complexation inhibits endopeptidase activity and cell wall decrosslinking in vitro. Self-protection is vital - ΔBd3460 Bdellovibrio deleteriously decrosslink self-peptidoglycan upon invasion, adopt a round morphology, and lose predatory capacity and cellular integrity. Our analysis provides the first mechanistic examination of self-protection in Bdellovibrio, documents protection-multiplicity for products of two different genomic loci, and reveals an important evolutionary adaptation to an invasive predatory bacterial lifestyle.

  11. Benzimidazole derivatives protect against cytokine-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Zawawi, Nik Khairunissa Nik Abdullah; Rajput, Sajid Ali; Taha, Muhammad; Ahmat, Norizan; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Abdullah, Noraishah; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Choudhary, M Iqbal

    2015-10-15

    Apoptotic cell death is the cause of the loss of insulin-producing β-cells in all forms of diabetes mellitus. The identification of small molecules capable of protecting cytokine-induced apoptosis could form the basis of useful therapeutic interventions. Here in, we present the discovery and synthesis of new benzimidazole derivatives, capable of rescuing pancreatic β-cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis. Three hydrazone derivatives of benzimidazole significantly increased the cellular ATP levels, reduced caspase-3 activity, reduced nitrite production and increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the presence of proinflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that these compounds may protect β-cells from the harmful effects of cytokines and may serve as candidates for therapeutic intervention for diabetes.

  12. Kynurenic acid protects against the homocysteine-induced impairment of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wejksza, Katarzyna; Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Waldemar A

    2009-01-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is a tryptophan metabolite produced in the kynurenine pathway. In the central nervous system, KYNA exerts neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effects by mechanisms associated with its antagonist activity against the ionotropic glutamate and alpha-7 nicotinic receptors. Its presence has been documented not only in cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue, but also in the periphery. However, KYNA's function outside the brain has not been fully elucidated. In this study, experiments performed on bovine aorta endothelial cell cultures showed for the first time that KYNA exerts a protective activity against the homocysteine-induced impairment of endothelial cells. The addition of KYNA significantly increased endothelial cell migration and proliferation, which is diminished by homocysteine. KYNA also protected cells against homocysteine-induced cytotoxicity. Our data suggest that increasing KYNA levels in blood vessels may have a significant impact on the endothelium in hyperhomocysteinemia.

  13. Protective effects of HGF gene-expressing human mesenchymal stem cells in acetaminophen-treated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yun Ho; You, Dong Hun; Nam, Myeong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) secrete a great variety of cytokines that have beneficial paracrine actions. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) promotes proliferation in several cell types. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of HGF gene-transfected MSC (HGF-MSC) in acetaminophen (AAP)-treated hepatocytes. We transfected the HGF gene into MSCs and confirmed HGF expression by RT-PCR and western blot. The concentration of HGF in HGF-MSC conditioned media (HGFCM) was upregulated compared with that in control MSCCM samples. Cell viability was increased in HGFCM-treated hepatocytes. Expression of Mcl-1, an anti-apoptosis protein, was increased and expression of pro-apoptosis proteins (Bad, Bik and Bid) was decreased in HGFCM-treated hepatocytes. HGF-MSC had protective effects on AAP-induced hepatocyte damage by enhancing proliferation. These results suggest that HGF-expressing MSCs may provide regenerative potential for liver cell damage.

  14. Mast cells control insulitis and increase Treg cells to confer protection against STZ-induced type 1 diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Daniela; Yaochite, Juliana N U; Rocha, Fernanda A; Toso, Vanina D; Malmegrim, Kelen C R; Ramos, Simone G; Jamur, Maria C; Oliver, Constance; Camara, Niels O; Andrade, Marcus V M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Silva, João S

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative alterations in mast cell numbers in pancreatic lymph nodes (PLNs) have been reported to be associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) progression, but their potential role during T1D remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the role of mast cells in T1D induced by multiple low-dose streptozotocin (MLD-STZ) treatments, using two strains of mast cell-deficient mice (W/W(v) or Wsh/Wsh) and the adoptive transfer of mast cells. Mast cell deficient mice developed severe insulitis and accelerated hyperglycemia, with 100% of mice becoming diabetic compared to their littermates. In parallel, these diabetic mice had decreased numbers of T regulatory (Treg) cells in the PLNs. Additionally, mast cell deficiency caused a significant reduction in IL-10, TGF-β, and IL-6 expression in the pancreatic tissue. Interestingly, IL-6-deficient mice are more susceptible to T1D associated with reduced Treg-cell numbers in the PLNs, but mast cell transfer from wild-type mice induced protection to T1D in these mice. Finally, mast cell adoptive transfer prior to MLD-STZ administration conferred resistance to T1D, promoted increased Treg cells, and decreased IL-17-producing T cells in the PLNs. Taken together, our results indicate that mast cells are implicated in resistance to STZ-induced T1D via an immunological tolerance mechanism mediated by Treg cells.

  15. Selenite protects human endothelial cells from oxidative damage and induces thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Miller, S; Walker, S W; Arthur, J R; Nicol, F; Pickard, K; Lewin, M H; Howie, A F; Beckett, G J

    2001-05-01

    The ability of selenium to protect cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC), human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) from oxidative damage induced by 100 microM t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) was compared. Preincubation of human endothelial cells for 24 h with sodium selenite at concentrations as low as 5 nM provided significant protection against the harmful effects of 100 microM t-BuOOH, with complete protection being achieved with 40 nM selenite. The preincubation period was required for selenite to exert this protective effect on endothelial cells. When compared with selenium-deficient cells, the activities of cytoplasmic glutathione peroxidase (GPX-1), phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (GPX-4) and thioredoxin reductase (TR) were each induced approx. 3--4-fold by 40 nM selenite. HCAEC and HUVEC showed great similarity in their relative abilities to resist oxidative damage in the presence and absence of selenite, and the activities of TR and the GPXs were also similar in these cell types. BAEC were more susceptible to damage by 100 microM t-BuOOH than were human endothelial cells, and could not be protected completely by incubation with selenite at concentrations up to 160 nM. The activity of TR in human endothelial cells was approx. 25-fold greater than that in BAEC of a similar selenium status, but GPX-1 and GPX-4 activities were not significantly different between the human and bovine cells. These studies, although performed with a small number of cultures, show for the first time that selenium at low doses can provide significant protection of the human coronary artery endothelium against damage by oxidative stress. TR may be an important antioxidant selenoprotein in this regard, in addition to the GPXs. The data also suggest that HUVEC, but not BAEC, represent a suitable model system in which to study the effects of selenium on the endothelium of human coronary arteries.

  16. Salubrinal protects against Clostridium difficile toxin B-induced CT26 cell death.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuyi; Sun, Chunli; Gu, Huawei; Wang, Haiying; Li, Shan; Ma, Yi; Wang, Jufang

    2017-03-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is considered to be the major cause of the antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis in animals and humans. The prevalence of C. difficile infections (CDI) has been increasing since 2000. Two exotoxins of C. difficile, Toxin A (TcdA) and Toxin B (TcdB), are the main virulence factors of CDI, which can induce glucosylation of Rho GTPases in host cytosol, leading to cell morphological changes, cell apoptosis, and cell death. The mechanism of TcdB-induced cell death has been investigated for decades, but it is still not completely understood. It has been reported that TcdB induces endoplasmic reticulum stress via PERK-eIF2α signaling pathway in CT26 cell line (BALB/C mouse colon tumor cells). In this study, we found that salubrinal, a selective inhibitor of eIF2α dephosphorylation, efficiently protects CT26 cell line against TcdB-induced cell death and tried to explore the mechanism underlying in this protective effect. Our results demonstrated that salubrinal protects CT26 cells from TcdB-mediated cytotoxic and cytopathic effect, inhibits apoptosis and death of the toxin-exposed cells via caspase-9-dependent pathway, eIF2α signaling pathway, and autophagy. These findings will be helpful for the development of CDI therapies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Activation of glutathione peroxidase via Nrf1 mediates genistein's protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Montes, Eva; Pollard, Susan E.; Vauzour, David; Jofre-Montseny, Laia; Rota, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Weinberg, Peter D.; Spencer, Jeremy P.E. . E-mail: j.p.e.spencer@reading.ac.uk

    2006-08-04

    Cellular actions of isoflavones may mediate the beneficial health effects associated with high soy consumption. We have investigated protection by genistein and daidzein against oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Genistein but not daidzein protected endothelial cells from damage induced by oxidative stress. This protection was accompanied by decreases in intracellular glutathione levels that could be explained by the generation of glutathionyl conjugates of the oxidised genistein metabolite, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone. Both isoflavones evoked increased protein expression of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase-heavy subunit ({gamma}-GCS-HS) and increased cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. However, only genistein led to increases in the cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf1 and the increased expression of and activity of glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that genistein-induced protective effects depend primarily on the activation of glutathione peroxidase mediated by Nrf1 activation, and not on Nrf2 activation or increases in glutathione synthesis.

  18. Effects of dextromethorphan on glial cell function: proliferation, maturation, and protection from cytotoxic molecules.

    PubMed

    Lisak, Robert P; Nedelkoska, Liljana; Benjamins, Joyce A

    2014-05-01

    Dextromethorphan (DM), a sigma receptor agonist and NMDA receptor antagonist, protects neurons from glutamate excitotoxicity, hypoxia and ischemia, and inhibits microglial activation, but its effects on differentiation and protection of cells in the oligodendroglial lineage are unknown. It is important to protect oligodendroglia (OL) to prevent demyelination and preserve axons, and to protect oligodendroglial progenitors (OPC) to optimize myelination during development and remyelination following damage. Enriched glial cultures from newborn rat brain were used 1-2 days or 6-8 days after shakeoff for OPC or mature OL. DM had large effects on glial proliferation in less mature cultures in contrast to small variable effects in mature cultures; 1 μM DM stimulated proliferation of OPC by 4-fold, microglia (MG) by 2.5-fold and astroglia (AS) by 2-fold. In agreement with increased OPC proliferation, treatment of OPC with DM for 3 days increased the % of OPC relative to OL, with a smaller difference by 5 days, suggesting that maturation of OPC to OL was "catching up" by 5 days. DM at 2 and 20 μM protected both OL and OPC from killing by glutamate as well as NMDA, AMPA, quinolinic acid, staurosporine, and reactive oxygen species (ROS). DM did not protect against kynurenic acid, and only modestly against NO. These agents and DM were not toxic to AS or MG at the concentrations used. Thus, DM stimulates proliferation of OPC, and protects both OL and OPC against excitotoxic and inflammatory insults. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. S1 kills MCF-7/ADR cells more than MCF-7 cells: A protective mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Song, Ting; Liang, Furong; Zhang, Zhichao; Liu, Yubo; Sheng, Hongkun; Xie, Mingzhou

    2013-10-01

    Drug resistance in chemotherapy for breast cancer is associated with high levels of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) as well as endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In this paper, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a pan-BH3 mimetic S1 on drug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells, and the roles of S1-induced ER stress in cell death. S1 exhibited greater and faster mitochondrial apoptosis in MCF-7/ADR cells than in MCF-7 cells. We demonstrated by Bax/Bak activation and cyrochrome c release that the p-glycprotein had little influence on S1 entering cells and hitting its targets in MCF-7/ADR cells. An IRE1-mediated ER stress response followed by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) activation was specifically induced by S1 in MCF-7 cells, but not in MCF-7/ADR cells. Coimmunoprecipitation and western blotting analysis determined that ER stress played a protective role in S1-induced apoptosis by triggering Bcl-2 phosphorylation, which grabbed more pro-apoptotic proteins. The synergism effect of ERK inhibitor PD98059 with S1 confirmed the protective role of ER stress. Defective ER stress in MCF-7/ADR cells confers the more sensitivity toward S1. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Surface glycosaminoglycans protect eukaryotic cells against membrane-driven peptide bacteriocins.

    PubMed

    Martín, Rebeca; Escobedo, Susana; Martín, Carla; Crespo, Ainara; Quiros, Luis M; Suarez, Juan E

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic elimination of surface glycosaminoglycans or inhibition of their sulfation provokes sensitizing of HT-29 and HeLa cells toward the peptide bacteriocins nisin A, plantaricin C, and pediocin PA-1/AcH. The effect can be partially reversed by heparin, which also lowers the susceptibility of Lactococcus lactis to nisin A. These data indicate that the negative charge of the glycosaminoglycan sulfate residues binds the positively charged bacteriocins, thus protecting eukaryotic cells from plasma membrane damage.

  1. Protective effect of a Phyllanthus orbicularis aqueous extract against UVB light in human cells.

    PubMed

    Vernhes, Marioly; González-Pumariega, Maribel; Andrade, Luciana; Schuch, Andre Passaglia; de Lima-Bessa, Keronninn Moreno; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins; Sánchez-Lamar, Angel

    2013-01-01

    One approach to protect human skin against the dangerous effects of solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is the use of natural products, such as photoprotectors. Phyllanthus orbicularis Kunth (Euphorbiaceae) is a Cuban endemic plant used in popular medicine. Its antigenotoxicity effect against some harmful agents has been investigated. However, the effect in ultraviolet B (UVB)-irradiated human cells has not been previously assessed. The protective effect of a P. orbicularis extract against UVB light-induced damage in human cells was evaluated. DNA repair proficient (MRC5-SV) and deficient (XP4PA, complementation group XPC) cell-lines were used. Damaging effects of UVB light were evaluated by clonogenic assay and apoptosis induction by flow cytometry techniques. The extent of DNA repair itself was determined by the removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). The CPDs were detected and quantified by slot-blot assay. Treatment of UVB-irradiated MRC5-SV cells with P. orbicularis extract increased the percentage of colony-forming cells from 36.03 ± 3.59 and 4.42 ± 1.45 to 53.14 ± 8.8 and 14.52 ± 1.97, for 400 and 600 J/m(2), respectively. A decrease in apoptotic cell population was observed in cells maintained within the extract. The P. orbicularis extract enhanced the removal of CPD from genomic DNA. The CPDs remaining were found to be about 27.7 and 1.1%, while with plant extract, treatment these values decreased to 16.1 and 0.2%, for 3 and 24 h, respectively. P. orbicularis aqueous extract protects human cells against UVB damage. This protective effect is through the modulation of DNA repair effectiveness.

  2. Surface Glycosaminoglycans Protect Eukaryotic Cells against Membrane-Driven Peptide Bacteriocins

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Rebeca; Escobedo, Susana; Martín, Carla; Crespo, Ainara; Quiros, Luis M.

    2014-01-01

    Enzymatic elimination of surface glycosaminoglycans or inhibition of their sulfation provokes sensitizing of HT-29 and HeLa cells toward the peptide bacteriocins nisin A, plantaricin C, and pediocin PA-1/AcH. The effect can be partially reversed by heparin, which also lowers the susceptibility of Lactococcus lactis to nisin A. These data indicate that the negative charge of the glycosaminoglycan sulfate residues binds the positively charged bacteriocins, thus protecting eukaryotic cells from plasma membrane damage. PMID:25331698

  3. Protective effect of hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol against oxidative stress in kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Loru, D; Incani, A; Deiana, M; Corona, G; Atzeri, A; Melis, M P; Rosa, A; Dessì, M A

    2009-01-01

    Bioavailability studies in animals and humans fed with extravirgin olive oil demonstrated that hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol, the major simple phenolic compounds in extravirgin olive oil, are dose-dependently absorbed and excreted. Once absorbed, they undergo extensive metabolism; hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol concentrate mainly in the kidney, where they may exert an important role in the prevention of oxidative stress induced renal dysfunction. In this study we monitored the ability of hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol to protect renal cells (LLC-PK1) following oxidative damage induced by H2O2. Oxidative stress was evaluated by monitoring the changes of the membrane lipid fraction. Hydroxytyrosol exerted a significant antioxidant action, inhibiting the production of MDA, fatty acids hydroperoxides and 7-ketocholesterol, major oxidation products of unsaturated fatty acids and cholesterol, and thus protecting the cells from H2O2-induced damage. Tyrosol, instead, in this experimental model, did not exert any protective effect.

  4. Acetyl-L-carnitine protects yeast cells from apoptosis and aging and inhibits mitochondrial fission.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Vanessa; Falcone, Claudio; Calvani, Menotti; Mazzoni, Cristina

    2010-08-01

    In this work we report that carnitines, in particular acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC), are able to prolong the chronological aging of yeast cells during the stationary phase. Lifespan extension is significantly reduced in yca1 mutants as well in rho(0) strains, suggesting that the protective effects pass through the Yca1 caspase and mitochondrial functions. ALC can also prevent apoptosis in pro-apoptotic mutants, pointing to the importance of mitochondrial functions in regulating yeast apoptosis and aging. We also demonstrate that ALC attenuates mitochondrial fission in aged yeast cells, indicating a correlation between its protective effect and this process. Our findings suggest that ALC, used as therapeutic for stroke, myocardial infarction and neurodegenerative diseases, besides the well-known anti-oxidant effects, might exert protective effects also acting on mitochondrial morphology.

  5. Discovery of protective B-cell epitopes for development of antimicrobial vaccines and antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Jacqueline; Rynkiewicz, Michael J; Lu, Zhaohua; Yang, Chiou-Ying

    2014-05-01

    Protective antibodies play an essential role in immunity to infection by neutralizing microbes or their toxins and recruiting microbicidal effector functions. Identification of the protective B-cell epitopes, those parts of microbial antigens that contact the variable regions of the protective antibodies, can lead to development of antibody therapeutics, guide vaccine design, enable assessment of protective antibody responses in infected or vaccinated individuals, and uncover or localize pathogenic microbial functions that could be targeted by novel antimicrobials. Monoclonal antibodies are required to link in vivo or in vitro protective effects to specific epitopes and may be obtained from experimental animals or from humans, and their binding can be localized to specific regions of antigens by immunochemical assays. The epitopes are then identified with mapping methods such as X-ray crystallography of antigen-antibody complexes, antibody inhibition of hydrogen-deuterium exchange in the antigen, antibody-induced alteration of the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the antigen, and experimentally validated computational docking of antigen-antibody complexes. The diversity in shape, size and structure of protective B-cell epitopes, and the increasing importance of protective B-cell epitope discovery to development of vaccines and antibody therapeutics are illustrated through examples from different microbe categories, with emphasis on epitopes targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies to pathogens of high antigenic variation. Examples include the V-shaped Ab52 glycan epitope in the O-antigen of Francisella tularensis, the concave CR6261 peptidic epitope in the haemagglutinin stem of influenza virus H1N1, and the convex/concave PG16 glycopeptidic epitope in the gp120 V1/V2 loop of HIV type 1.

  6. [Protective effect of baicalin against rotenone induced injury on PC12 cells].

    PubMed

    Ji, Hai-Lie; Tong, Li-Guo; Bai, Chong-Zhi; Song, Mei-Qing; Chen, Nai-Hong; Feng, Ma-Li

    2014-08-01

    To explore the protective effect of baicalin against rotenone-induced injury on PC12 cells, and the po-tential mechanism of action action was also explored. PC12 cells were injured by rotenone and were treated with different concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 μmol x L(-1)) of baicalin at the same time. Cell viability was analyzed by MTT, and morphology was observed by phase-contrast microscopy. The cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry by Annexin V-FITC/PI staining. The intracellular ROS level was determined by fluorescence microscope with DCF-DA staining. The expression of Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3 was analyzed by Western blot. The viability of PC12 cells exposure to rotenone for 24 hour was gradually decreased with dose escalating and 1.5 μmol x L was adopted to do the following experiment. Baicalin increased cell viability, improved cell morphology and decreased intracellular ROS level. Moreover, FACS indicated baicalin attenuated the apoptosis induced by rotenone significantly. Western blot showed that Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3 expression in rotenone-induced PC12 cells was reversed by baicalin. This study has demonstrated that baicalin protects PC12 cells against rotenone-induced apoptosis, at least in part, by scavenging excessive ROS and inhibiting the mitochondrion-dependent apoptotic pathway.

  7. VACCINES. A mucosal vaccine against Chlamydia trachomatis generates two waves of protective memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Stary, Georg; Olive, Andrew; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F; Gondek, David; Alvarez, David; Basto, Pamela A; Perro, Mario; Vrbanac, Vladimir D; Tager, Andrew M; Shi, Jinjun; Yethon, Jeremy A; Farokhzad, Omid C; Langer, Robert; Starnbach, Michael N; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2015-06-19

    Genital Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) infection induces protective immunity that depends on interferon-γ-producing CD4 T cells. By contrast, we report that mucosal exposure to ultraviolet light (UV)-inactivated Ct (UV-Ct) generated regulatory T cells that exacerbated subsequent Ct infection. We show that mucosal immunization with UV-Ct complexed with charge-switching synthetic adjuvant particles (cSAPs) elicited long-lived protection in conventional and humanized mice. UV-Ct-cSAP targeted immunogenic uterine CD11b(+)CD103(-) dendritic cells (DCs), whereas UV-Ct accumulated in tolerogenic CD11b(-)CD103(+) DCs. Regardless of vaccination route, UV-Ct-cSAP induced systemic memory T cells, but only mucosal vaccination induced effector T cells that rapidly seeded uterine mucosa with resident memory T cells (T(RM) cells). Optimal Ct clearance required both T(RM) seeding and subsequent infection-induced recruitment of circulating memory T cells. Thus, UV-Ct-cSAP vaccination generated two synergistic memory T cell subsets with distinct migratory properties.

  8. Th22 cells are an important source of IL-22 for host protection against enteropathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Basu, Rajatava; O'Quinn, Darrell B; Silberger, Daniel J; Schoeb, Trenton R; Fouser, Lynette; Ouyang, Wenjun; Hatton, Robin D; Weaver, Casey T

    2012-12-14

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is central to host protection against bacterial infections at barrier sites. Both innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and T cells produce IL-22. However, the specific contributions of CD4(+) T cells and their developmental origins are unclear. We found that the enteric pathogen Citrobacter rodentium induced sequential waves of IL-22-producing ILCs and CD4(+) T cells that were each critical to host defense during a primary infection. Whereas IL-22 production by ILCs was strictly IL-23 dependent, development of IL-22-producing CD4(+) T cells occurred via an IL-6-dependent mechanism that was augmented by, but not dependent on, IL-23 and was dependent on both transcription factors T-bet and AhR. Transfer of CD4(+) T cells differentiated with IL-6 in the absence of TGF-β ("Th22" cells) conferred complete protection of infected IL-22-deficient mice whereas transferred Th17 cells did not. These findings establish Th22 cells as an important component of mucosal antimicrobial host defense. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Th22 Cells are an Important Source of IL-22 for Host Protection against Enteropathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Rajatava; O’Quinn, Darrell B.; Silberger, Daniel J.; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Fouser, Lynette; Ouyang, Wenjun; Hatton, Robin D.; Weaver, Casey T.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is central to host protection against bacterial infections at barrier sites. Both innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and T cells produce IL-22. However, the specific contributions of CD4+ T cells and their developmental origins are unclear. We found that the enteric pathogen Citrobacter rodentium induced sequential waves of IL-22 producing ILCs and CD4+ T cells that were each critical to host defense during a primary infection. Whereas IL-22 production by ILCs was strictly IL-23–dependent, development of IL-22 producing CD4+ T cells occurred via an IL-6–dependent mechanism that was augmented by, but not dependent on, IL-23, and was dependent on both transcription factors T-bet and AhR. Transfer of CD4+ T cells differentiated with IL-6 in the absence of TGF-β (“Th22” cells) conferred protection of infected IL-22-deficient mice whereas transferred Th17 cells did not. These findings establish Th22 cells as an important component of mucosal anti-microbial host defense. PMID:23200827

  10. Nifedipine Protects INS-1 β-Cell from High Glucose-Induced ER Stress and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao; Gao, Lu; Li, Yuan; Chen, Hong; Sun, Zilin

    2011-01-01

    Sustained high concentration of glucose has been verified toxic to β-cells. Glucose augments Ca2+-stimulated insulin release in pancreatic β-cells, but chronic high concentration of glucose could induce a sustained level of Ca2+ in β-cells, which leads to cell apoptosis. However, the mechanism of high glucose-induced β-cell apoptosis remains unclear. In this study, we use a calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, to investigate whether the inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ concentration could protect β-cells from chronic high glucose-induced apoptosis. It was found that in a concentration of 33.3 mM, chronic stimulation of glucose could induce INS-1 β-cells apoptosis at least through the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway and 10 μM nifedipine inhibited Ca2+ release to protect β-cells from high glucose-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis. These results indicated that inhibition of Ca2+ over-accumulation might provide benefit to attenuate islet β-cell decompensation in a high glucose environment. PMID:22174617

  11. Antigen Exposure History Defines CD8 T Cell Dynamics and Protection during Localized Pulmonary Infections

    PubMed Central

    Van Braeckel-Budimir, Natalija; Martin, Matthew D.; Hartwig, Stacey M.; Legge, Kevin L.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Harty, John T.

    2017-01-01

    Unlike systemic infections, little is known about the role of repeated localized infections on (re)shaping pathogen-specific memory CD8 T cell responses. Here, we used primary (1°) and secondary (2°) intranasal influenza virus infections of mice as a model to study intrinsic memory CD8 T cell properties. We show that secondary antigen exposure, relative to a single infection, generates memory CD8 T cell responses of superior magnitude in multiple tissue compartments including blood, spleen, draining lymph nodes, and lung. Unexpectedly, regardless of the significantly higher number of 2° memory CD8 T cells, similar degree of protection against pulmonary challenge was observed in both groups of mice containing 1° or 2° memory CD8 T cells. Mechanistically, using pertussis toxin-induced migration block, we showed that superior antigen-driven proliferation and ability to relocate to the site of infection allowed 1° memory CD8 T cells to accumulate in the infected lung during the first few days after challenge, compensating for the initially lower cell numbers. Taken together, the history of antigen exposures to localized pulmonary infections, through altering basic cell biology, dictates dynamic properties of protective memory CD8 T cell responses. This knowledge has important implications for a design of novel and an improvement of existing vaccines and immunization strategies. PMID:28191007

  12. Ginseng Protects Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus by Modulating Multiple Immune Cells and Inhibiting Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Yu-Na; Lee, Young-Tae; Hwang, Hye Suk; Kim, Ki-Hye; Ko, Eun-Ju; Kim, Min-Chul; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng has been used in humans for thousands of years but its effects on viral infection have not been well understood. We investigated the effects of red ginseng extract (RGE) on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection using in vitro cell culture and in vivo mouse models. RGE partially protected human epithelial (HEp2) cells from RSV-induced cell death and viral replication. In addition, RGE significantly inhibited the production of RSV-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α) in murine dendritic and macrophage-like cells. More importantly, RGE intranasal pre-treatment prevented loss of mouse body weight after RSV infection. RGE treatment improved lung viral clearance and enhanced the production of interferon (IFN-γ) in bronchoalveolar lavage cells upon RSV infection of mice. Analysis of cellular phenotypes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids showed that RGE treatment increased the populations of CD8+ T cells and CD11c+ dendritic cells upon RSV infection of mice. Taken together, these results provide evidence that ginseng has protective effects against RSV infection through multiple mechanisms, which include improving cell survival, partial inhibition of viral replication and modulation of cytokine production and types of immune cells migrating into the lung. PMID:25658239

  13. Protective effect of arctigenin on ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jia; Xiao, Lan; Wei, Jing-Xiang; Shu, Ya-Hai; Fang, Shi-Qi; Wang, Yong-Tang; Lu, Xiu-Min

    2017-04-01

    As a neurotropic substance, ethanol can damage nerve cells through an increase in the production of free radicals, interference of neurotrophic factor signaling pathways, activation of endogenous apoptotic signals and other molecular mechanisms. Previous studies have revealed that a number of natural drugs extracted from plants offer protection of nerve cells from damage. Among these, arctigenin (ATG) is a lignine extracted from Arctium lappa (L.), which has been found to exert a neuroprotective effect on scopolamine‑induced memory deficits in mice with Alzheimer's disease and glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in primary neurons. As a result, it may offer beneficial effects on ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. However, the effects of ATG on ethanol‑induced nerve damage remain to be elucidated. To address this issue, the present study used rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells to investigate the neuroprotective effects of ATG on ethanol-induced cell damage by performing an MTT reduction assay, cell cycle analysis, Hoechst33342/propidium iodide fluorescence staining and flow cytometry to examine apoptosis. The results showed that 10 µM ATG effectively promoted the proliferation of damaged cells, and increased the distribution ratio of the cells at the G2/M and S phases (P<0.05). In addition, the apoptosis and necrosis of the PC12 cells were significantly decreased following treatment with ATG. Therefore, it was concluded that 10 µM ATG had a protective effect on ethanol‑induced injury in PC12 cells.

  14. MUC16 provides immune protection by inhibiting synapse formation between NK and ovarian tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cancer cells utilize a variety of mechanisms to evade immune detection and attack. Effective immune detection largely relies on the formation of an immune synapse which requires close contact between immune cells and their targets. Here, we show that MUC16, a heavily glycosylated 3-5 million Da mucin expressed on the surface of ovarian tumor cells, inhibits the formation of immune synapses between NK cells and ovarian tumor targets. Our results indicate that MUC16-mediated inhibition of immune synapse formation is an effective mechanism employed by ovarian tumors to evade immune recognition. Results Expression of low levels of MUC16 strongly correlated with an increased number of conjugates and activating immune synapses between ovarian tumor cells and primary naïve NK cells. MUC16-knockdown ovarian tumor cells were more susceptible to lysis by primary NK cells than MUC16 expressing controls. This increased lysis was not due to differences in the expression levels of the ligands for the activating receptors DNAM-1 and NKG2D. The NK cell leukemia cell line (NKL), which does not express KIRs but are positive for DNAM-1 and NKG2D, also conjugated and lysed MUC16-knockdown cells more efficiently than MUC16 expressing controls. Tumor cells that survived the NKL challenge expressed higher levels of MUC16 indicating selective lysis of MUC16low targets. The higher csMUC16 levels on the NKL resistant tumor cells correlated with more protection from lysis as compared to target cells that were never exposed to the effectors. Conclusion MUC16, a carrier of the tumor marker CA125, has previously been shown to facilitate ovarian tumor metastasis and inhibits NK cell mediated lysis of tumor targets. Our data now demonstrates that MUC16 expressing ovarian cancer cells are protected from recognition by NK cells. The immune protection provided by MUC16 may lead to selective survival of ovarian cancer cells that are more efficient in metastasizing within the peritoneal

  15. MUC16 provides immune protection by inhibiting synapse formation between NK and ovarian tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, Jennifer A A; Felder, Mildred; Horibata, Sachi; Belisle, Jennifer A; Kapur, Arvinder; Holden, Helen; Petrie, Sarah; Migneault, Martine; Rancourt, Claudine; Connor, Joseph P; Patankar, Manish S

    2010-01-20

    Cancer cells utilize a variety of mechanisms to evade immune detection and attack. Effective immune detection largely relies on the formation of an immune synapse which requires close contact between immune cells and their targets. Here, we show that MUC16, a heavily glycosylated 3-5 million Da mucin expressed on the surface of ovarian tumor cells, inhibits the formation of immune synapses between NK cells and ovarian tumor targets. Our results indicate that MUC16-mediated inhibition of immune synapse formation is an effective mechanism employed by ovarian tumors to evade immune recognition. Expression of low levels of MUC16 strongly correlated with an increased number of conjugates and activating immune synapses between ovarian tumor cells and primary naïve NK cells. MUC16-knockdown ovarian tumor cells were more susceptible to lysis by primary NK cells than MUC16 expressing controls. This increased lysis was not due to differences in the expression levels of the ligands for the activating receptors DNAM-1 and NKG2D. The NK cell leukemia cell line (NKL), which does not express KIRs but are positive for DNAM-1 and NKG2D, also conjugated and lysed MUC16-knockdown cells more efficiently than MUC16 expressing controls. Tumor cells that survived the NKL challenge expressed higher levels of MUC16 indicating selective lysis of MUC16(low) targets. The higher csMUC16 levels on the NKL resistant tumor cells correlated with more protection from lysis as compared to target cells that were never exposed to the effectors. MUC16, a carrier of the tumor marker CA125, has previously been shown to facilitate ovarian tumor metastasis and inhibits NK cell mediated lysis of tumor targets. Our data now demonstrates that MUC16 expressing ovarian cancer cells are protected from recognition by NK cells. The immune protection provided by MUC16 may lead to selective survival of ovarian cancer cells that are more efficient in metastasizing within the peritoneal cavity and also at overcoming

  16. Chlorella protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced pancreatic β-cell damage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Yu; Huang, Pei-Jane; Chao, Che-Yi

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the etiology of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and diabetes. Studies have shown that chlorella could be important in health promotion or disease prevention through its antioxidant capacity. However, whether chlorella has a cytoprotective effect in pancreatic β-cells remains to be elucidated. We investigated the protective effects of chlorella on H2O2-induced oxidative damage in INS-1 (832/13) cells. Chlorella partially restored cell viability after H2O2 toxicity. To further investigate the effects of chlorella on mitochondria function and cellular oxidative stress, we analyzed mitochondria membrane potential, ATP concentrations, and cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Chlorella prevented mitochondria disruption and maintained cellular ATP levels after H2O2 toxicity. It also normalized intracellular levels of ROS to that of control in the presence of H2O2. Chlorella protected cells from apoptosis as indicated by less p-Histone and caspase 3 activation. In addition, chlorella not only enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), but also partially restored the reduced GSIS after H2O2 toxicity. Our results suggest that chlorella is effective in amelioration of cellular oxidative stress and destruction, and therefore protects INS-1 (832/13) cells from H2O2-induced apoptosis and increases insulin secretion. Chlorella should be studied for use in the prevention or treatment of diabetes.

  17. Protective Effects of Baicalin on Decidua Cells of LPS-Induced Mice Abortion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Yantao; Zhong, Xiuhui

    2014-01-01

    The study was carried out to investigate the protective effects of Baicalin on decidual cells of LPS-induced abortion mice. In the in vitro experiment, the decidual cells were cultured by uterus tissue mass cultivation sampled at day 6 of pregnancy, and gradient concentrations of LPS were used to determine the optimal LPS concentration of the injured decidual cells model. The injured decidual cells were treated with Baicalin (4 μg/mL) to determine the protective role of Baicalin. In the in vivo experiment, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was injected intravenously via the tail vein to induce abortion at day 6 of pregnancy, and the mice were given different concentrations of Baicalin by oral gavage consecutively at days 7 to 8 of pregnancy. On day 9 of gestation, the mice were sacrificed. The TNF and progesterone contents in the serum were assayed by ELISA. The results clearly revealed that Baicalin can prevent the injury to decidual cells from LPS dose dependently, TNF was decreased significantly (P < 0.01) compared to LPS group, and there was no effect on the progesterone. These findings suggest that Baicalin has protective effects on the injured decidual cells in the pregnant mice. PMID:25386564

  18. PD-1 suppresses protective immunity to Streptococcus pneumoniae through a B cell-intrinsic mechanism.

    PubMed

    McKay, Jerome T; Egan, Ryan P; Yammani, Rama D; Chen, Lieping; Shin, Tahiro; Yagita, Hideo; Haas, Karen M

    2015-03-01

    Despite the emergence of the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1):PD-1 ligand (PD-L) regulatory axis as a promising target for treating multiple human diseases, remarkably little is known about how this pathway regulates responses to extracellular bacterial infections. We found that PD-1(-/-) mice, as well as wild-type mice treated with a PD-1 blocking Ab, exhibited significantly increased survival against lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection following either priming with low-dose pneumococcal respiratory infection or S. pneumoniae-capsular polysaccharide immunization. Enhanced survival in mice with disrupted PD-1:PD-L interactions was explained by significantly increased proliferation, isotype switching, and IgG production by pneumococcal capsule-specific B cells. Both PD-L, B7-H1 and B7-DC, contributed to PD-1-mediated suppression of protective capsule-specific IgG. Importantly, PD-1 was induced on capsule-specific B cells and suppressed IgG production and protection against pneumococcal infection in a B cell-intrinsic manner. To our knowledge, these results provide the first demonstration of a physiologic role for B cell-intrinsic PD-1 expression in vivo. In summary, our study reveals that B cell-expressed PD-1 plays a central role in regulating protection against S. pneumoniae, and thereby represents a promising target for bolstering immunity to encapsulated bacteria.

  19. Age intrinsic loss of telomere protection via TRF1 reduction in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hohensinner, P J; Kaun, C; Buchberger, E; Ebenbauer, B; Demyanets, S; Huk, I; Eppel, W; Maurer, G; Huber, K; Wojta, J

    2016-02-01

    Aging is a major factor predisposing for multiple diseases. Telomeres at the ends of chromosomes protect the integrity of chromosomal DNA. A specialized six-protein complex termed shelterin protects the telomere from unwanted interaction with DNA damage pathways. The aim of our study was to evaluate the integrity of telomeres and the stability of telomere protection during aging in endothelial cells (EC). We describe that aging EC can be characterized by an increased cell size (40%, p=0.02) and increased expression of PAI 1 (4 fold, p=0.02), MCP1 (10 fold, p=0.001) and GMCSF (15 fold, p=0.004). Telomeric state in aging cells is defined by an increased telomere oxidation (27%, p=0.01), reduced telomere length (62%, p=0.02), and increased DNA damage foci formation (5% in young EC versus 16% in aged EC, p=0.003). This telomeric dysfunction is accompanied by a reduction in the shelterin component TRF1 (33% mRNA, p=0.001; 24% protein, p=0.007). Overexpression of TRF1 in aging EC reduced telomere-associated DNA damage foci to 5% (p=0.02) and reduced expression levels of MCP1 (18% reduction, p=0.008). Aged EC have increased telomere damage and an intrinsic loss of telomere protection. Reestablishing telomere integrity could therefore be a target for rejuvenating endothelial cell function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Testosterone Protects Mitochondrial Function and Regulates Neuroglobin Expression in Astrocytic Cells Exposed to Glucose Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Urrego, Nicolas; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Echeverria, Valentina; Barreto, George E.

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is a hormone that has been shown to confer neuroprotection from different insults affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Testosterone induces this protection by different mechanisms that include the activation of anti-apoptotic pathways that are directly implicated in neuronal survival. However, little attention has been devoted to its actions on glial cells. In the present study, we have assessed whether testosterone exerts protection in a human astrocyte cell model, the T98G cells. Our results indicate that testosterone improves cell survival and mitochondrial membrane potential and reduces nuclear fragmentation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. These effects were accompanied by a positive regulation of neuroglobin, an oxygen-binding and sensor protein, which may serve as a regulator of ROS and nitrogen reactive species (NOS), and these protective effects of testosterone may be at least in part mediated by estradiol and DHT. In conclusion, these findings suggest that astroglia may mediate some of the protective actions of testosterone in the brain upon pathological conditions. PMID:27445795

  1. Protective T cell immunity against respiratory syncytial virus is efficiently induced by recombinant BCG

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Susan M.; González, Pablo A.; Cautivo, Kelly M.; Mora, Jorge E.; Leiva, Eduardo D.; Tobar, Hugo E.; Fennelly, Glenn J.; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Jacobs, William R.; Riedel, Claudia A.; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the leading causes of childhood hospitalization and a major health burden worldwide. Unfortunately, because of an inefficient immunological memory, RSV infection provides limited immune protection against reinfection. Furthermore, RSV can induce an inadequate Th2-type immune response that causes severe respiratory tract inflammation and obstruction. It is thought that effective RSV clearance requires the induction of balanced Th1-type immunity, involving the activation of IFN-γ-secreting cytotoxic T cells. A recognized inducer of Th1 immunity is Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG), which has been used in newborns for decades in several countries as a tuberculosis vaccine. Here, we show that immunization with recombinant BCG strains expressing RSV antigens promotes protective Th1-type immunity against RSV in mice. Activation of RSV-specific T cells producing IFN-γ and IL-2 was efficiently obtained after immunization with recombinant BCG. This type of T cell immunity was protective against RSV challenge and caused a significant reduction of inflammatory cell infiltration in the airways. Furthermore, mice immunized with recombinant BCG showed no weight loss and reduced lung viral loads. These data strongly support recombinant BCG as an efficient vaccine against RSV because of its capacity to promote protective Th1 immunity. PMID:19075247

  2. Core-Protected Platinum Monolayer Shell High-Stability Electrocatalysts for Fuel-Cell Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    K Sasaki; H Naohara; Y Cai; Y Choi; P Liu; M Vukmirovic; J Wang; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    Platinum monolayers can act as shells for palladium nanoparticles to lead to electrocatalysts with high activities and an ultralow platinum content, but high platinum utilization. The stability derives from the core protecting the shell from dissolution. In fuel-cell tests, no loss of platinum was observed in 200,000 potential cycles, whereas loss of palladium was significant.

  3. Core-Protected Platinum Monolayer Shell High-Stability Electrocatalysts for Fuel-Cell Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Adzic, R.R.; Sasaki, K.; Naohara, H.; Cai, Y.; Choi, Y.M.; Liu, P.; Vukmirovic, M.B.; Wang, J.X.

    2010-11-08

    More than skin deep: Platinum monolayers can act as shells for palladium nanoparticles to lead to electrocatalysts with high activities and an ultralow platinum content, but high platinum utilization. The stability derives from the core protecting the shell from dissolution. In fuel-cell tests, no loss of platinum was observed in 200?000 potential cycles, whereas loss of palladium was significant.

  4. Teduglutide ([Gly2]GLP-2) protects small intestinal stem cells from radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Booth, C; Booth, D; Williamson, S; Demchyshyn, L L; Potten, C S

    2004-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 and its dipeptidyl peptidase (DP-IV) resistant analogue teduglutide are trophic for the gastrointestinal epithelium. Exposure increases villus height and crypt size and results in increased overall intestinal weight. As these effects may be mediated through stimulation of the stem cell compartment, they may promote intestinal healing and act as potential anti-mucositis agents in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy. A study was initiated to investigate the protective effects of teduglutide on the murine small intestinal epithelium following gamma-irradiation using the crypt microcolony assay as a measure of stem cell survival and functional competence. Teduglutide demonstrated intestinotrophic effects in both CD1 and BDF1 mouse strains. In BDF1 mice, subcutaneous injection of GLP-2 or teduglutide (0.2 mg/kg/day, b.i.d.) for 14 days increased intestinal weight by 28% and resulted in comparable increases in crypt size, villus height and area. Teduglutide given daily for 6 or 14 days prior to whole body, gamma-irradiation significantly increased crypt stem cell survival when compared with vehicle-treated controls. The mean levels of protection over a range of doses provided protection factors from 1.3 to 1.5. A protective effect was only observed when teduglutide was given before irradiation. These results suggest that teduglutide has the ability to modulate clonogenic stem cell survival in the small intestine and this may have a useful clinical application in the prevention of cancer therapy-induced mucositis.

  5. Emulsions Made of Oils from Seeds of GM Flax Protect V79 Cells against Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Skorkowska-Telichowska, Katarzyna; Hasiewicz-Derkacz, Karolina; Gębarowski, Tomasz; Kulma, Anna; Moreira, Helena; Kostyn, Kamil; Gębczak, Katarzyna; Szyjka, Anna; Wojtasik, Wioleta; Gąsiorowski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids, sterols, and hydrophilic phenolic compounds are components of flax oil that act as antioxidants. We investigated the impact of flax oil from transgenic flax in the form of emulsions on stressed Chinese hamster pulmonary fibroblasts. We found that the emulsions protect V79 cells against the H2O2 and the effect is dose dependent. They reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species and protected genomic DNA against damage. The rate of cell proliferation increased upon treatment with the emulsions at a low concentration, while at a high concentration it decreased significantly, accompanied by increased frequency of apoptotic cell death. Expression analysis of selected genes revealed the upregulatory impact of the emulsions on the histones, acetylases, and deacetylases. Expression of apoptotic, proinflammatory, and anti-inflammatory genes was also altered. It is thus suggested that flax oil emulsions might be useful as a basis for biomedical products that actively protect cells against inflammation and degeneration. The beneficial effect on fibroblast resistance to oxidative damage was superior in the emulsion made of oil from transgenic plants which was correlated with the quantity of antioxidants and squalene. The emulsions from transgenic flax are promising candidates for skin protection against oxidative damage.

  6. Emulsions Made of Oils from Seeds of GM Flax Protect V79 Cells against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Skorkowska-Telichowska, Katarzyna; Hasiewicz-Derkacz, Karolina; Gębarowski, Tomasz; Kulma, Anna; Kostyn, Kamil; Gębczak, Katarzyna; Szyjka, Anna; Wojtasik, Wioleta; Gąsiorowski, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids, sterols, and hydrophilic phenolic compounds are components of flax oil that act as antioxidants. We investigated the impact of flax oil from transgenic flax in the form of emulsions on stressed Chinese hamster pulmonary fibroblasts. We found that the emulsions protect V79 cells against the H2O2 and the effect is dose dependent. They reduced the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species and protected genomic DNA against damage. The rate of cell proliferation increased upon treatment with the emulsions at a low concentration, while at a high concentration it decreased significantly, accompanied by increased frequency of apoptotic cell death. Expression analysis of selected genes revealed the upregulatory impact of the emulsions on the histones, acetylases, and deacetylases. Expression of apoptotic, proinflammatory, and anti-inflammatory genes was also altered. It is thus suggested that flax oil emulsions might be useful as a basis for biomedical products that actively protect cells against inflammation and degeneration. The beneficial effect on fibroblast resistance to oxidative damage was superior in the emulsion made of oil from transgenic plants which was correlated with the quantity of antioxidants and squalene. The emulsions from transgenic flax are promising candidates for skin protection against oxidative damage. PMID:26779302

  7. The Caenorhabditis elegans pvl-5 gene protects hypodermal cells from ced-3-dependent, ced-4-independent cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pradeep; Eisenmann, David M

    2004-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is regulated by multiple evolutionarily conserved mechanisms to ensure the survival of the cell. Here we describe pvl-5, a gene that likely regulates PCD in Caenorhabditis elegans. In wild-type hermaphrodites at the L2 stage there are 11 Pn.p hypodermal cells in the ventral midline arrayed along the anterior-posterior axis and 6 of these cells become the vulval precursor cells. In pvl-5(ga87) animals there are fewer Pn.p cells (average of 7.0) present at this time. Lineage analysis reveals that the missing Pn.p cells die around the time of the L1 molt in a manner that often resembles the programmed cell deaths that occur normally in C. elegans development. This Pn.p cell death is suppressed by mutations in the caspase gene ced-3 and in the bcl-2 homolog ced-9, suggesting that the Pn.p cells are dying by PCD in pvl-5 mutants. Surprisingly, the Pn.p cell death is not suppressed by loss of ced-4 function. ced-4 (Apaf-1) is required for all previously known apoptotic cell deaths in C. elegans. This suggests that loss of pvl-5 function leads to the activation of a ced-3-dependent, ced-4-independent form of PCD and that pvl-5 may normally function to protect cells from inappropriate activation of the apoptotic pathway. PMID:15238520

  8. Borrelia burgdorferi-pulsed dendritic cells induce a protective immune response against tick-transmitted spirochetes.

    PubMed Central

    Mbow, M L; Zeidner, N; Panella, N; Titus, R G; Piesman, J

    1997-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi-pulsed dendritic cells and epidermal cells were able to initiate the production of anti-outer surface protein A (OspA) antibody in vitro with normal T and B cells from either BALB/c or C3H/HeJ mice. Inhibition of anti-B. burgdorferi antibody production was observed after 3 days, but not after 2 days, of exposure of the antigen-presenting cells to tumor necrosis factor alpha +/- granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Furthermore, splenic dendritic cells pulsed in vitro with live B. burgdorferi spirochetes and then adoptively transferred into naive syngeneic mice mediated a protective immune response against tick-transmitted spirochetes. This protection appeared not to be due to killing of spirochetes in the feeding ticks, since ticks fed to repletion on B. burgdorferi-pulsed dendritic cell-sensitized mice still harbored live spirochetes. Western blot analysis of the sera collected from dendritic cell-sensitized mice demonstrated that the mice responded to a limited set of B. burgdorferi antigens, including OspA, -B, and -C compared to control groups that either had received unpulsed dendritic cells or were not treated. Finally, mice in the early stage of B. burgdorferi infection were able to develop anti-OspA antibody following injection with B. burgdorferi-pulsed dendritic cells. Our results demonstrate for the first time that adoptive transfer of B. burgdorferi-pulsed dendritic cells induces a protective immune response against tick-transmitted B. burgdorferi and stimulates the production of antibodies specific for a limited set of B. burgdorferi antigens in vivo. PMID:9234802

  9. Protective effect of zinc chloride against cobalt chloride-induced cytotoxicity on vero cells: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Gürbay, Aylin

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible time- and dose-dependent cytotoxic effects of cobalt chloride on Vero cells. The cultured cells were incubated with different concentrations of cobalt chloride ranging from 0.5 to 1,000 μM, and cytotoxicity was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and resazurin assays. Possible protective effects of vitamin E, coenzyme Q(10), and zinc chloride were also tested in this system. A gradual decrease in cell proliferation was observed at concentrations ~≥ 200 μM in incubation periods of 24, 48, 72, and 96 h with MTT assay. Exposure of cells to 500 and 1,000 μM cobalt chloride caused significant decrease in cell survival. A biphasic survival profile of cells was observed at 1-25 μM concentration range following 96 h of incubation. With resazurin assay, cytotoxicity profile of CoCl(2) was found comparable to the results of MTT assay, particularly at high concentrations and long incubation periods. Dose-dependent cytotoxicity was noted following exposure of cells to ≥ 250 μM of CoCl(2) for 24 h and ≥ 100 μM concentrations of CoCl(2) for 48-96 h. Pretreatment of cells with ZnCl(2) for 4 or 24 h provided significant protection against cobalt chloride-induced cytotoxicity when measured with MTT assay. However, vitamin E or coenzyme Q(10) was not protective. CoCl(2) had dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effects in Vero cells. Preventive effect of ZnCl(2) against CoCl(2)-induced cytotoxicity should be considered in detail to define exact mechanism of toxicity in Vero cells.

  10. Osteocalcin protects pancreatic beta cell function and survival under high glucose conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kover, Karen; Yan, Yun; Tong, Pei Ying; Watkins, Dara; Li, Xiaoyu; Tasch, James; Hager, Melissa; Clements, Mark; Moore, Wayne V.

    2015-06-19

    Diabetes is characterized by progressive beta cell dysfunction and loss due in part to oxidative stress that occurs from gluco/lipotoxicity. Treatments that directly protect beta cell function and survival in the diabetic milieu are of particular interest. A growing body of evidence suggests that osteocalcin, an abundant non-collagenous protein of bone, supports beta cell function and proliferation. Based on previous gene expression data by microarray, we hypothesized that osteocalcin protects beta cells from glucose-induced oxidative stress. To test our hypothesis we cultured isolated rat islets and INS-1E cells in the presence of normal, high, or high glucose ± osteocalcin for up to 72 h. Oxidative stress and viability/mitochondrial function were measured by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} assay and Alamar Blue assay, respectively. Caspase 3/7 activity was also measured as a marker of apoptosis. A functional test, glucose stimulated insulin release, was conducted and expression of genes/protein was measured by qRT-PCR/western blot/ELISA. Osteocalcin treatment significantly reduced high glucose-induced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels while maintaining viability/mitochondrial function. Osteocalcin also significantly improved glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin content in rat islets after 48 h of high glucose exposure compared to untreated islets. As expected sustained high glucose down-regulated gene/protein expression of INS1 and BCL2 while increasing TXNIP expression. Interestingly, osteocalcin treatment reversed the effects of high glucose on gene/protein expression. We conclude that osteocalcin can protect beta cells from the negative effects of glucose-induced oxidative stress, in part, by reducing TXNIP expression, thereby preserving beta cell function and survival. - Highlights: • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced oxidative stress in beta cells. • Osteocalcin preserves beta cell function and survival under stress conditions. • Osteocalcin reduces glucose

  11. CD8+ T Cells Define an Unexpected Role in Live-Attenuated Vaccine Protective Immunity against Chlamydia trachomatis infection

    PubMed Central

    Olivares-Zavaleta, Norma; Whitmire, William M.; Kari, Laszlo; Sturdevant, Gail L.; Caldwell, Harlan D.

    2014-01-01

    Trachoma, caused by the obligate intracellular organism Chlamydia trachomatis, is the world’s leading cause of preventable blindness for which a vaccine is needed. We have previously shown that a plasmid-deficient live-attenuated trachoma vaccine delivered ocularly to macaques elicited either solid or partial protective immunity against a virulent ocular challenge. Solidly protected macaques shared the same MHC class II alleles implicating CD4+ T cells in superior protective immunity. Understandably, we sought to define T cell immune correlates in these animals to potentially improve vaccine efficacy. Here, following a two year resting period, these macaques were boosted intramuscularly with the live-attenuated trachoma vaccine and their peripheral T cell anamnestic responses studied. Both solidly and partially protected macaques exhibited a CD4+ and CD8+ T cell anamnestic response following booster immunization. CD8+ but not CD4+ T cells from solidly protected macaques proliferated against soluble chlamydial antigen. We observed a more rapid T cell inflammatory cytokine response in tears of solidly protected animals following ocular re-challenge. Most notably, depletion of CD8+ T cells in solidly protected macaques completely abrogated protective immunity. Collectively, our findings support the conclusion that CD8+ T cells play an important but unexpected role in live-attenuated trachoma vaccine mediated protective immunity. PMID:24711617

  12. Olfactory ensheathing cell-conditioned medium protects astrocytes exposed to hydrogen peroxide stress.

    PubMed

    Jinbo, Liu; Zhiyuan, Liu; Zhijian, Zhang; WenGe, Ding

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of olfactory ensheathing cell conditioned medium (OECCM) on damaged astrocytes after exposure to H2O2 in vitro. OECCM was used to treat astrocytes after injury, which was induced by exposure to 500 μmol/L H2O2 for 20 min. The cell morphology was then observed under a light microscope, cell viability assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell ultrastructure observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and apoptosis assessed by Annexin V staining followed by cytometry and Western blot. H2O2 induced severe damage to astrocytes as evidenced by decreased cell number, pathological changes in cell morphology, and significantly elevated cell apoptosis. Cells incubated with OECCM displayed significantly improved cell viability and decreased cell apoptotic rate. Under TEM, H2O2-treated cells showed partially broken plasma membranes, swollen rough endoplasmic reticula, visible vacuoles, and swollen or deformed mitochondria with ruptured cristae. Incubation with OECCM significantly ameliorated these pathological changes in astrocytes. These results suggest that OECCM may protect astrocytes from oxidative damage by promoting cell survival while reducing apoptosis of the damaged cells.

  13. Humanin protects against chemotherapy-induced stage-specific male germ cell apoptosis in rats*

    PubMed Central

    Lue, Y.; Doumit, T.; Jia, Y.; Atienza, V.; Liu, P. Y.; Swerdloff, R. S.; Wang, C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Humanin (HN) has cytoprotective action on male germ cells after testicular stress induced by heat and hormonal deprivation. To examine whether HN has protective effects on chemotherapy-induced male germ cell apoptosis, we treated four groups of adult rats with (i) vehicle (control), (ii) HN, (iii) cyclophosphamide (CP); or (iv) HN+CP. To investigate whether the protective effects of HN on germ cells require the presence of Leydig cells, another four groups of rats were pre-treated with ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS), a Leydig cell toxicant, to eliminate Leydig cells. After 3 days, when Leydig cells were depleted by EDS, we administered: (i) vehicle, (ii) HN, (iii) CP; or (iv) HN+CP to rats. All rats were killed 12 h after the injection of HN and/or CP. Germ cell apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay and quantified by numerical count. Compared with control and HN (alone), CP significantly increased germ cell apoptosis; HN +CP significantly reduced CP-induced apoptosis at early (I–VI) and late stages (IX–XIV) but not at middle stages (VII–VIII) of the seminiferous epithelial cycle. Pre-treatment with EDS markedly suppressed serum and intratesticular testosterone (T) levels, and significantly increased germ cell apoptosis at the middle (VII–VIII) stages. CP did not further increase germ cell apoptosis in the EDS-pre-treated rats. HN significantly attenuated germ cell apoptosis at the middle stages in EDS pre-treated rats. To investigate whether HN has any direct effects on Leydig cell function, adult Leydig cells were isolated and treated with ketoconazole (KTZ) to block testosterone synthesis. HN was not effective in preventing the reduction of T production by KTZ in vitro. We conclude that HN decreases CP and/or EDS-induced germ cell apoptosis in a stage-specific fashion. HN acts directly on germ cells to protect against EDS-induced apoptosis in the absence of Leydig cells and intratesticular testosterone levels are very low. PMID:25891800

  14. Thermal Properties of Microstrain Gauges Used for Protection of Lithium-Ion Cells of Different Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Judith

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this innovation is to use microstrain gauges to monitor minute changes in temperature along with material properties of the metal cans and pouches used in the construction of lithium-ion cells. The sensitivity of the microstrain gauges to extremely small changes in temperatures internal to the cells makes them a valuable asset in controlling the hazards in lithium-ion cells. The test program on lithium-ion cells included various cell configurations, including the pouch type configurations. The thermal properties of microstrain gauges have been found to contribute significantly as safety monitors in lithium-ion cells that are designed even with hard metal cases. Although the metal cans do not undergo changes in material property, even under worst-case unsafe conditions, the small changes in thermal properties observed during charge and discharge of the cell provide an observable change in resistance of the strain gauge. Under abusive or unsafe conditions, the change in the resistance is large. This large change is observed as a significant change in slope, and this can be used to prevent cells from going into a thermal runaway condition. For flexible metal cans or pouch-type lithium-ion cells, combinations of changes in material properties along with thermal changes can be used as an indication for the initiation of an unsafe condition. Lithium-ion cells have a very high energy density, no memory effect, and almost 100-percent efficiency of charge and discharge. However, due to the presence of a flammable electrolyte, along with the very high energy density and the capability of releasing oxygen from the cathode, these cells can go into a hazardous condition of venting, fire, and thermal runaway. Commercial lithium-ion cells have current and voltage monitoring devices that are used to control the charge and discharge of the batteries. Some lithium-ion cells have internal protective devices, but when used in multi-cell configurations, these protective

  15. Concerted action of p62 and Nrf2 protects cells from palmitic acid-induced lipotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong Su; Kang, Dong Hoon; Lee, Da Hyun; Bae, Soo Han

    2015-10-09

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), frequently associated with obesity and diabetes mellitus, is caused by the accumulation of excess fatty acids within liver cells. Palmitic acid (PA), a common saturated fatty acid found in mammals, induces the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and elicits apoptotic cell death, known as lipotoxicity. However, protective mechanisms against PA-induced lipotoxicity have not been elucidated. In this study, we aimed to clarify the role of p62, an adapter protein in the autophagic process, as well as the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway, in protecting cells from PA-induced lipotoxicity. The Nrf2-Keap1 pathway is essential for the protection of cells from oxidative stress. p62 enhances its binding to Keap1 and leads to Nrf2 activation. Here, we show that PA potentiates Keap1 degradation and thereby activates the transcription of Nrf2 target genes partially through autophagy. Furthermore, this PA-mediated Keap1 degradation depends on p62. Correspondingly, a lack of p62 attenuates the PA-mediated Nrf2 activation and increases the susceptibility of cells to oxidative stress. These results indicate that p62 plays an important role in protecting cells against lipotoxicity through Keap1 degradation-mediated Nrf2 activation. - Highlights: • PA induces Keap1 downregulation and activates Nrf2 target gene transcription. • PA-induced Keap1 degradation is partly mediated by the autophagic pathway. • PA-induced Keap1 degradation depends on p62. • Ablation of p62 exacerbates PA-mediated apoptotic cell death.

  16. Protective effect of catechin in type I Gaucher disease cells by reducing endoplasmic reticulum stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yea-Jin; Kim, Sung-Jo; Heo, Tae-Hwe

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Catechin reduces the expression level of ER stress marker protein in type I Gaucher disease cells. {yields} Catechin induces the proliferation rate of GD cells similar levels to normal cells. {yields} Catechin improves wound healing activity. {yields} Catechin-mediated reductions in ER stress may be associated with enhanced cell survival. {yields} We identified catechin as a protective agent against ER stress in GD cells. -- Abstract: Gaucher disease (GD) is the most common lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) and is divided into three phenotypes, I, II, and III. Type I is the most prevalent form and has its onset in adulthood. The degree of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is one of the factors that determine GD severity. It has recently been reported that antioxidants reduce ER stress and apoptosis by scavenging the oxidants that cause oxidative stress. For this report, we investigated the possibility that catechin can act on type I GD patient cells to alleviate the pathogenic conditions of GD. We treated GD cells with catechin and examined the expression level of GRP78/BiP (an ER stress marker) by western blots and fluorescence microscopy, the proliferation rate of GD cells, and scratch-induced wound healing activity. Our results show that catechin reduces the expression level of GRP78/BiP, leads to cell proliferation rates of GD cells similar levels to normal cells, and improves wound healing activity. We conclude that catechin protects against ER stress in GD cells and catechin-mediated reductions in ER stress may be associated with enhanced cell survival.

  17. Adverse effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on human dermal fibroblasts and how to protect cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhi; Lee, Wilson; Slutsky, Lenny; Clark, Richard A F; Pernodet, Nadine; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2009-04-01

    The effects of exposure of human dermal fibroblasts to rutile and anatase TiO(2) nanoparticles are reported. These particles can impair cell function, with the latter being more potent at producing damage. The exposure to nanoparticles decreases cell area, cell proliferation, mobility, and ability to contract collagen. Individual particles are shown to penetrate easily through the cell membrane in the absence of endocytosis, while some endocytosis is observed for larger particle clusters. Once inside, the particles are sequestered in vesicles, which continue to fill up with increasing incubation time till they rupture. Particles coated with a dense grafted polymer brush are also tested, and, using flow cytometry, are shown to prevent adherence to the cell membrane and hence penetration of the cell, which effectively decreases reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and protects cells, even in the absence of light exposure. Considering the broad applications of these nanoparticles in personal health care products, the functionalized polymer coating can potentially play an important role in protecting cells and tissue from damage.

  18. Proline modulates the intracellular redox environment and protects mammalian cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Navasona; Dickman, Martin B; Becker, Donald F

    2008-02-15

    The potential of proline to suppress reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis in mammalian cells was tested by manipulating intracellular proline levels exogenously and endogenously by overexpression of proline metabolic enzymes. Proline was observed to protect cells against H(2)O(2), tert-butyl hydroperoxide, and a carcinogenic oxidative stress inducer but was not effective against superoxide generators such as menadione. Oxidative stress protection by proline requires the secondary amine of the pyrrolidine ring and involves preservation of the glutathione redox environment. Overexpression of proline dehydrogenase (PRODH), a mitochondrial flavoenzyme that oxidizes proline, resulted in 6-fold lower intracellular proline content and decreased cell survival relative to control cells. Cells overexpressing PRODH were rescued by pipecolate, an analog that mimics the antioxidant properties of proline, and by tetrahydro-2-furoic acid, a specific inhibitor of PRODH. In contrast, overexpression of the proline biosynthetic enzymes Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) synthetase (P5CS) and P5C reductase (P5CR) resulted in 2-fold higher proline content, significantly lower ROS levels, and increased cell survival relative to control cells. In different mammalian cell lines exposed to physiological H(2)O(2) levels, increased endogenous P5CS and P5CR expression was observed, indicating that upregulation of proline biosynthesis is an oxidative stress response.

  19. Drug Transporter-Mediated Protection of Cancer Stem Cells From Ionophore Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G; Rumpold, Holger; Gastl, Guenther; Sopper, Sieghart; Wolf, Dominik

    2015-09-01

    Ionophore antibiotics were reported to selectively kill cancer stem cells and to overcome multidrug resistance, but mechanistic studies of the significance of drug transporters for treatment with these compounds are lacking. We applied chemosensitivity testing of well-characterized human cancer cell lines to elaborate on whether drug transporters are involved in protection from the cytotoxic effects of the ionophore antibiotics salinomycin and nigericin. Our experiments demonstrated that ionophore antibiotics were ineffective against both stem-like ovarian cancer side population cells (expressing either ABCB1 or ABCG2) and K562/Dox-H1 cells, which constitute a genetically defined model system for ABCB1 expression. Considering that cancer stem cells often express high levels of drug transporters, we deduced from our results that ionophore antibiotics are less suited to cancer stem cell-targeted treatment than previously thought. Ionophore antibiotics such as salinomycin have repeatedly been shown to target cancer stem and progenitor cells from various tumor entities. Meanwhile, cancer stem cell (CSC)-selective toxicity of ionophore antibiotics seems to be a commonly accepted concept that is about to encourage their clinical testing. This study provides data that challenge the concept of targeted elimination of CSC by ionophore antibiotics. Stem-like ovarian cancer side population (SP) cells expressing high levels of ABC drug transporters are shown to largely resist the cytotoxic effects of salinomycin and nigericin. Furthermore, using a small interfering RNA-based knockdown model specific for ABCB1, this study demonstrates that ABC drug transporters are indeed causally involved in mediating protection from ionophore antibiotics. Considering that it is a hallmark of CSCs to exhibit drug resistance conferred by ABC drug transporters, it must be deduced from these results that CSCs may also be protected from ionophore antibiotics by means of drug-transporter mediated

  20. Drug Transporter-Mediated Protection of Cancer Stem Cells From Ionophore Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Zeimet, Alain G.; Rumpold, Holger; Gastl, Guenther; Sopper, Sieghart; Wolf, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Ionophore antibiotics were reported to selectively kill cancer stem cells and to overcome multidrug resistance, but mechanistic studies of the significance of drug transporters for treatment with these compounds are lacking. We applied chemosensitivity testing of well-characterized human cancer cell lines to elaborate on whether drug transporters are involved in protection from the cytotoxic effects of the ionophore antibiotics salinomycin and nigericin. Our experiments demonstrated that ionophore antibiotics were ineffective against both stem-like ovarian cancer side population cells (expressing either ABCB1 or ABCG2) and K562/Dox-H1 cells, which constitute a genetically defined model system for ABCB1 expression. Considering that cancer stem cells often express high levels of drug transporters, we deduced from our results that ionophore antibiotics are less suited to cancer stem cell-targeted treatment than previously thought. Significance Ionophore antibiotics such as salinomycin have repeatedly been shown to target cancer stem and progenitor cells from various tumor entities. Meanwhile, cancer stem cell (CSC)-selective toxicity of ionophore antibiotics seems to be a commonly accepted concept that is about to encourage their clinical testing. This study provides data that challenge the concept of targeted elimination of CSC by ionophore antibiotics. Stem-like ovarian cancer side population (SP) cells expressing high levels of ABC drug transporters are shown to largely resist the cytotoxic effects of salinomycin and nigericin. Furthermore, using a small interfering RNA-based knockdown model specific for ABCB1, this study demonstrates that ABC drug transporters are indeed causally involved in mediating protection from ionophore antibiotics. Considering that it is a hallmark of CSCs to exhibit drug resistance conferred by ABC drug transporters, it must be deduced from these results that CSCs may also be protected from ionophore antibiotics by means of drug

  1. Fasting protects mice from lethal DNA damage by promoting small intestinal epithelial stem cell survival.

    PubMed

    Tinkum, Kelsey L; Stemler, Kristina M; White, Lynn S; Loza, Andrew J; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Michalski, Basia M; Kuzmicki, Catherine; Pless, Robert; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2015-12-22

    Short-term fasting protects mice from lethal doses of chemotherapy through undetermined mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that fasting preserves small intestinal (SI) architecture by maintaining SI stem cell viability and SI barrier function following exposure to high-dose etoposide. Nearly all SI stem cells were lost in fed mice, whereas fasting promoted sufficient SI stem cell survival to preserve SI integrity after etoposide treatment. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple SI stem cell populations, marked by Lgr5, Bmi1, or HopX expression, contributed to fasting-induced survival. DNA repair and DNA damage response genes were elevated in SI stem/progenitor cells of fasted etoposide-treated mice, which importantly correlated with faster resolution of DNA double-strand breaks and less apoptosis. Thus, fasting preserved SI stem cell viability as well as SI architecture and barrier function suggesting that fasting may reduce host toxicity in patients undergoing dose intensive chemotherapy.

  2. Myeloid and T Cell-Derived TNF Protects against Central Nervous System Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Nai-Jen; Francisco, Ngiambudulu M; Keeton, Roanne; Allie, Nasiema; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Ryffel, Bernhard; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the central nervous system (CNS-TB) is a devastating complication of tuberculosis, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is crucial for innate immunity and controlling the infection. TNF is produced by many cell types upon activation, in particularly the myeloid and T cells during neuroinflammation. Here we used mice with TNF ablation targeted to myeloid and T cell (MT-TNF(-/-)) to assess the contribution of myeloid and T cell-derived TNF in immune responses during CNS-TB. These mice exhibited impaired innate immunity and high susceptibility to cerebral Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, a similar phenotype to complete TNF-deficient mice. Further, MT-TNF(-/-) mice were not able to control T cell responses and cytokine/chemokine production. Thus, our data suggested that collective TNF production by both myeloid and T cells are required to provide overall protective immunity against CNS-TB infection.

  3. Fasting protects mice from lethal DNA damage by promoting small intestinal epithelial stem cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Tinkum, Kelsey L.; Stemler, Kristina M.; White, Lynn S.; Loza, Andrew J.; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Michalski, Basia M.; Kuzmicki, Catherine; Pless, Robert; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Short-term fasting protects mice from lethal doses of chemotherapy through undetermined mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that fasting preserves small intestinal (SI) architecture by maintaining SI stem cell viability and SI barrier function following exposure to high-dose etoposide. Nearly all SI stem cells were lost in fed mice, whereas fasting promoted sufficient SI stem cell survival to preserve SI integrity after etoposide treatment. Lineage tracing demonstrated that multiple SI stem cell populations, marked by Lgr5, Bmi1, or HopX expression, contributed to fasting-induced survival. DNA repair and DNA damage response genes were elevated in SI stem/progenitor cells of fasted etoposide-treated mice, which importantly correlated with faster resolution of DNA double-strand breaks and less apoptosis. Thus, fasting preserved SI stem cell viability as well as SI architecture and barrier function suggesting that fasting may reduce host toxicity in patients undergoing dose intensive chemotherapy. PMID:26644583

  4. Myeloid and T Cell-Derived TNF Protects against Central Nervous System Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Nai-Jen; Francisco, Ngiambudulu M.; Keeton, Roanne; Allie, Nasiema; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Ryffel, Bernhard; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the central nervous system (CNS-TB) is a devastating complication of tuberculosis, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is crucial for innate immunity and controlling the infection. TNF is produced by many cell types upon activation, in particularly the myeloid and T cells during neuroinflammation. Here we used mice with TNF ablation targeted to myeloid and T cell (MT-TNF−/−) to assess the contribution of myeloid and T cell-derived TNF in immune responses during CNS-TB. These mice exhibited impaired innate immunity and high susceptibility to cerebral Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, a similar phenotype to complete TNF-deficient mice. Further, MT-TNF−/− mice were not able to control T cell responses and cytokine/chemokine production. Thus, our data suggested that collective TNF production by both myeloid and T cells are required to provide overall protective immunity against CNS-TB infection. PMID:28280495

  5. Functionality of NGF-protected PC12 cells following exposure to 6-hydroxydopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanagh, Edel T.; Loughlin, John P.; Herbert, Kate Reed; Dockery, Peter; Samali, Afshin; Doyle, Karen M.; Gorman, Adrienne M. . E-mail: adrienne.gorman@nuigalway.ie

    2006-12-29

    6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is often used in models of Parkinson's disease since it can selectively target and kill dopaminergic cells of the substantia nigra. In this study, pre-treatment of PC12 cells with nerve growth factor (NGF) inhibited apoptosis and necrosis by 6-OHDA, including caspase activity and lactate dehydrogenase release. Notably, cells exposed to 6-OHDA in the presence of NGF were subsequently capable of proliferation (when replated without NGF), or neurite outgrowth (with continued presence of NGF). Following 7 days growth in the presence of NGF, expression of {beta}III tubulin and tyrosine hydroxylase and increased intracellular catecholamines was detectable in PC12 cells, features characteristic of functional dopaminergic neurons. NGF-pre-treated PC12 cells retained expression of {beta}III-tubulin and tyrosine hydroxylase, but not catecholamine content following 6-OHDA exposure. These data indicate that NGF-protected cells maintained some aspects of functionality and were subsequently capable of proliferation or differentiation.

  6. Allicin protects auditory hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons from cisplatin - Induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianmin; Li, Xiaofei; Song, Yongdong; Li, He; Bai, Xiaohui; Liu, Wenwen; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Li, Jianfeng; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo; Fan, Zhaomin

    2017-04-01

    Cisplatin is a broad-spectrum anticancer drug that is commonly used in the clinic. Ototoxicity is one of the major side effects of this drug, which caused irreversible sensorineural hearing loss. Allicin, the main biologically active compound derived from garlic, has been shown to exert various anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative activities in vitro and in vivo studies. We took advantage of C57 mice intraperitoneally injected with cisplatin alone or with cisplatin and allicin combined, to investigate whether allicin plays a protective role in vivo against cisplatin ototoxicity. The result showed that C57 mice in cisplatin group exhibited increased shift in auditory brainstem response, whereas the auditory fuction of mice in allicin + cisplatin group was protected in most frequencies, which was accordance with observed damages of outer hair cells (OHCs) and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the cochlea. Allicin markedly protected SGN mitochondria from damage and releasing cytochrome c, and significantly reduced pro-apoptosis factor expressions activated by cisplatin, including Bax, cleaved-caspase-9, cleaved-caspase-3and p53. Furthermore, allicin reduced the level of Malondialdehyde (MDA), but increased the level of superoxide dismutase (SOD). All data suggested that allicin could prevent hearing loss induced by cisplatin effectively, of which allicin protected SGNs from apoptosis via mitochondrial pathway while protected OHCs and supporting cells (SCs) from apoptosis through p53 pathway.

  7. Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC) Protect Islet Transplants via B7-H1 Mediated Enhancement of T Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hong-Shiue; Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Charles, Ronald; Wang, Lianfu; Wagner, Timothy; Fung, John J.; Qian, Shiguang; L, Lina Lu

    2011-01-01

    Background Side effects of lifetime immunosuppression for cell transplants often outweigh the benefits, therefore, induction of transplant tolerance is needed. We have shown that cotransplantation with myeoid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) effectively protect islet allografts from rejection without requirement of immunosuppression. This study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Methods MDSC were generated by addition of hepatic stellate cells (HpSC) from various stain mice into dendritic cell (DC) culture. The quality of MDSC was monitored by phenotype and function analyses. MDSC mixed with islet allografts were transplanted into diabetic recipients. T cell response was analyzed following transplant by flow and histochemical analyses, and compared to islet alone and islet/DC transplant groups. B7-H1 knockout mice were used to determine the role of B7-H1 on MDSC in regulation of T cell response. Results Cotransplantation with MDSC (not DC) effectively protected islet allografts without requirement of immunosuppression. This is associated with attenuation of CD8 T cells in the grafts and marked expansion of T regulatory (Treg) cells, which contributed to MDSC-induced T cell hyporesponsiveness. Antigen-specific Treg cells were prone to accumulate in lymphoid organs close to the grafts. Both in vitro and in vivo data demonstrated that B7-H1 was absolutely required for MDSC to exert immune regulatory activity and induction of Treg cells. Conclusion The described approach holds great clinical application potential, and may overcome the limitation of requiring chronic administration of immunosuppression in cell transplants. Understanding the underlying mechanisms will facilitate the development of this novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:22179405

  8. Protective autophagy is involved in resistance towards MET inhibitors in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Magali; Medová, Michaela; Aebersold, Daniel M; Blaukat, Andree; Bladt, Friedhelm; Fey, Martin F; Zimmer, Yitzhak; Tschan, Mario P

    2013-02-08

    MET, also known as hepatocyte growth factor receptor (HGFR), is a receptor tyrosine kinase with an important role, both in normal cellular function as well as in oncogenesis. In many cancer types, abnormal activation of MET is related to poor prognosis and various strategies to inhibit its function, including small molecule inhibitors, are currently in preclinical and clinical evaluation. Autophagy, a self-digesting recycling mechanism with cytoprotective functions, is induced by cellular stress. This process is also induced upon cytotoxic drug treatment of cancer cells and partially allows these cells to escape cell death. Thus, since autophagy protects different tumor cells from chemotherapy-induced cell death, current clinical trials aim at combining autophagy inhibitors with different cancer treatments. We found that in a gastric adenocarcinoma cell line GTL-16, where MET activity is deregulated due to receptor overexpression, two different MET inhibitors PHA665752 and EMD1214063 lead to cell death paralleled by the induction of autophagy. A combined treatment of MET inhibitors together with the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA or genetically impairing autophagy by knocking down the key autophagy gene ATG7 further decreased cell viability of gastric cancer cells. In general, we observed the induction of cytoprotective autophagy in MET expressing cells upon MET inhibition and a combination of MET and autophagy inhibition resulted in significantly decreased cell viability in gastric cancer cells.

  9. 17-DMAG induces Hsp70 and protects the auditory hair cells from kanamycin ototoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Yu, Yang; Chu, Hanqi; Bing, Dan; Wang, Shaoli; Zhou, Liangqiang; Chen, Jin; Chen, Qingguo; Pan, Chunchen; Sun, Yanbo; Cui, Yonghua

    2015-02-19

    Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) has been known to be able to play a protective role in the cochlea. The aim of this study was to investigate whether geldanamycin hydrosoluble derivative 17-(dimethylaminoethylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG) has the ability to induce Hsp70 up-regulation to protect hair cells from kanamycin-induced ototoxicity in vitro. The organ of Corti (OC) explants were isolated from mice at postnatal day 3-5. Then, the explants were exposed to kanamycin with or without pre-incubation with 17-DMAG. The expression of Hsp70 was assessed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, ELISA, and immunofluorescent staining. The surviving hair cells were examined by phalloidin labeling and were counted. We found that Hsp70 expression in the explants after pre-incubation with 17-DMAG was significantly increased at both mRNA and protein levels. Immunofluorescent staining showed that Hsp70 was mainly located in the auditory hair cells. Compared with kanamycin group, the loss of hair cells was inhibited significantly in 17-DMAG+kanamycin group. Our study demonstrated that 17-DMAG induces Hsp70 in the hair cells, and has a significant protective effect against kanamycin ototoxicity in vitro. 17-DMAG has the possibility to be a safe and effective anti-ototoxic drug.

  10. Heterologous Ferredoxin Reductase and Flavodoxin Protect Cos-7 Cells from Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mediavilla, María G.; Di Venanzio, Gisela A.; Guibert, Edgardo E.; Tiribelli, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Background Ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase (FNR) from Pisum sativum and Flavodoxin (Fld) from Anabaena PCC 7119 have been reported to protect a variety of cells and organisms from oxidative insults. In this work, these two proteins were expressed in mitochondria of Cos-7 cells and tested for their efficacy to protect these cells from oxidative stress in vitro. Principal Findings Cos-7/pFNR and Cos-7/pFld cell lines expressing FNR and Fld, respectively, showed a significantly higher resistance to 24 h exposure to 300–600 µM hydrogen peroxide measured by LDH retention, MTT reduction, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and lipid peroxide (LPO; FOX assay) levels. However, FNR and Fld did not exhibit any protection at shorter incubation times (2 h and 4 h) to 4 mM hydrogen peroxide or to a 48 h exposure to 300 µM methyl viologen. We found enhanced methyl viologen damage exerted by FNR that may be due to depletion of NADPH pools through NADPH-MV diaphorase activity as previously observed for other overexpressed enzymes. Significance The results presented are a first report of antioxidant function of these heterologous enzymes of vegetal and cyanobacterial origin in mammalian cells. PMID:20976072

  11. Hyperglycemia abolishes the protective effect of ischemic preconditioning in glomerular endothelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Schenning, Katie J; Anderson, Sharon; Alkayed, Nabil J; Hutchens, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    In preclinical investigations, ischemic preconditioning (IPC) protects kidneys from ischemia/reperfusion injury. The direct effects of IPC on glomerular endothelial cells have not been studied in detail. Most investigations of IPC have focused on healthy cells and animals, and it remains unknown whether IPC is renoprotective in the setting of medical comorbidities such as diabetes. In this study, we determined the preventive potential of IPC in healthy glomerular endothelial cell monolayers, and compared these results to monolayers cultured under hyperglycemic conditions. We exposed glomerular endothelial monolayers to 1 h of IPC 24 h prior to oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro model of ischemia/reperfusion injury. Glomerular endothelial monolayer integrity was assessed by measuring transendothelial electrical resistance, albumin flux, and cell survival. We found that IPC protected healthy but not hyperglycemic glomerular endothelial monolayers from ischemia/reperfusion injury. Furthermore, not only was the protective effect of IPC lost in the setting of hyperglycemia, but IPC was actually deleterious to the integrity of hyperglycemic glomerular endothelial cell monolayers. PMID:25804266

  12. Cystatin C protects neuronal cells from amyloid β-induced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tizon, Belen; Ribe, Elena M.; Mi, Weiqian; Troy, Carol M.; Levy, Efrat

    2010-01-01

    Multiple studies suggest that cystatin C (CysC) has a role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and a decrease in CysC secretion is linked to the disease in patients with a polymorphism in the CysC gene. CysC binds amyloid β (Aβ) and inhibits formation of Aβ fibrils and oligomers both in vitro and in mouse models of amyloid deposition. Here we studied the effect of CysC on cultured primary hippocampal neurons and a neuronal cell line exposed to either oligomeric or fibrillar cytotoxic forms of Aβ. The extracellular addition of the secreted human CysC together with preformed either oligomeric or fibrillar Aβ increased cell survival. While CysC inhibits Aβ aggregation, it does not dissolve preformed Aβ fibrils or oligomers. Thus, CysC has multiple protective effects in AD, by preventing the formation of the toxic forms of Aβ and by direct protection of neuronal cells from Aβ toxicity. Therapeutic manipulation of CysC levels, resulting in slightly higher concentrations than physiological could protect neuronal cells from cell death in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:20157244

  13. Airway Memory CD4+ T Cells Mediate Protective Immunity against Emerging Respiratory Coronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jincun; Zhao, Jingxian; Mangalam, Ashutosh K.; Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Fett, Craig; Meyerholz, David K.; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Baric, Ralph S.; David, Chella S.; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Two zoonotic coronaviruses (CoV), SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV have crossed species to cause severe human respiratory disease. Here, we showed that induction of airway memory CD4+ T cells specific for a conserved epitope shared by SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV is a potential strategy for developing pan-coronavirus vaccines. Airway memory CD4+ T cells differed phenotypically and functionally from lung-derived cells and were crucial for protection against both CoVs in mice. Protection was interferon-γ-dependent and required early induction of robust innate and virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses. The conserved epitope was also recognized in SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV-infected human leukocyte antigen DR2 and DR3 transgenic mice, indicating potential relevance in human populations. Additionally, this epitope was cross-protective between human and bat CoVs, the progenitors for many human CoVs. Vaccine strategies that induce airway memory CD4+ T cells targeting conserved epitopes may have broad applicability in the context of new CoV and other respiratory virus outbreaks. PMID:27287409

  14. Programmed cell death in plants: protective effect of mitochondrial-targeted quinones.

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, L A; Dzyubinskaya, E V; Kiselevsky, D B; Shestak, A A; Samuilov, V D

    2011-10-01

    Ubiquinone or plastoquinone covalently linked to synthetic decyltriphenylphosphonium (DTPP(+)) or rhodamine cations prevent programmed cell death (PCD) in pea leaf epidermis induced by chitosan or CN(-). PCD was monitored by recording the destruction of cell nuclei. CN(-) induced the destruction of nuclei in both epidermal cells (EC) and guard cells (GC), whereas chitosan destroyed nuclei in EC not in GC. The half-maximum concentrations for the protective effects of the quinone derivatives were within the pico- and nanomolar range. The protective effect of the quinones was removed by a protonophoric uncoupler and reduced by tetraphenylphosphonium cations. CN(-)-Induced PCD was accelerated by the tested quinone derivatives at concentrations above 10(-8)-10(-7) M. Unlike plastoquinone linked to the rhodamine cation (SkQR1), DTPP(+) derivatives of quinones suppressed menadione-induced H(2)O(2) generation in the cells. The CN(-)-induced destruction of GC nuclei was prevented by DTPP(+) derivatives in the dark not in the light. SkQR1 inhibited this process both in the dark and in the light, and its effect in the light was similar to that of rhodamine 6G. The data on the protective effect of cationic quinone derivatives indicate that mitochondria are involved in PCD in plants.

  15. Airway Memory CD4(+) T Cells Mediate Protective Immunity against Emerging Respiratory Coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jincun; Zhao, Jingxian; Mangalam, Ashutosh K; Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Fett, Craig; Meyerholz, David K; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Baric, Ralph S; David, Chella S; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-06-21

    Two zoonotic coronaviruses (CoVs)-SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV-have crossed species to cause severe human respiratory disease. Here, we showed that induction of airway memory CD4(+) T cells specific for a conserved epitope shared by SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV is a potential strategy for developing pan-coronavirus vaccines. Airway memory CD4(+) T cells differed phenotypically and functionally from lung-derived cells and were crucial for protection against both CoVs in mice. Protection was dependent on interferon-γ and required early induction of robust innate and virus-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. The conserved epitope was also recognized in SARS-CoV- and MERS-CoV-infected human leukocyte antigen DR2 and DR3 transgenic mice, indicating potential relevance in human populations. Additionally, this epitope was cross-protective between human and bat CoVs, the progenitors for many human CoVs. Vaccine strategies that induce airway memory CD4(+) T cells targeting conserved epitopes might have broad applicability in the context of new CoVs and other respiratory virus outbreaks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Antibodies to a cell surface histone-like protein protect against Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Steenbergen, Judith N.; Shi, Li; Deepe, George S.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2003-01-01

    A protective role for antibodies has not previously been described for host defense against the pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum (Hc). Mouse mAb’s were generated from mice immunized with Hc yeast that binds the cell surface of Hc. Administration of mAb’s before Hc infection reduced fungal burden, decreased pulmonary inflammation, and prolonged survival in a murine infection model. Protection mediated by mAb’s was associated with enhanced levels of IL-4, IL-6, and IFN-γ in the lungs of infected mice. The mAb’s increased phagocytosis of yeast by J774.16 cells through a CR3-dependent process. Ingestion of mAb-opsonized Hc by J774.16 macrophage-like cells was associated with yeast cell growth inhibition and killing. The mAb’s bound to a 17-kDa antigen expressed on the surface of Hc. The antigen was identified as a histone H2B–like protein. This study establishes that mAb’s to a cell surface protein of Hc alter the intracellular fate of the fungus and mediate protection in a murine model of lethal histoplasmosis, and it suggests a new candidate antigen for vaccine development. PMID:14561701

  17. Glucocorticoid receptor in T cells mediates protection from autoimmunity in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Engler, Jan Broder; Kursawe, Nina; Solano, María Emilia; Patas, Kostas; Wehrmann, Sabine; Heckmann, Nina; Lühder, Fred; Reichardt, Holger M.; Arck, Petra Clara; Gold, Stefan M.

    2017-01-01

    Pregnancy is one of the strongest inducers of immunological tolerance. Disease activity of many autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS) is temporarily suppressed by pregnancy, but little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here, we investigated the endocrine regulation of conventional and regulatory T cells (Tregs) during reproduction. In vitro, we found the pregnancy hormone progesterone to robustly increase Treg frequencies via promiscuous binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in T cells. In vivo, T-cell–specific GR deletion in pregnant animals undergoing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of MS, resulted in a reduced Treg increase and a selective loss of pregnancy-induced protection, whereas reproductive success was unaffected. Our data imply that steroid hormones can shift the immunological balance in favor of Tregs via differential engagement of the GR in T cells. This newly defined mechanism confers protection from autoimmunity during pregnancy and represents a potential target for future therapy. PMID:28049829

  18. Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by adoptive immunotherapy. Requirement for T cell-deficient recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, I.M.; Collins, F.M.

    1983-07-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that spleen cells taken from mice at the height of the primary immune response to intravenous infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis possess the capacity to transfer adoptive protection to M. tuberculosis-infected recipients, but only if these recipients are first rendered T cell-deficient, either by thymectomy and gamma irradiation, or by sublethal irradiation. A similar requirement was necessary to demonstrate the adoptive protection of the lungs after exposure to an acute aerosol-delivered M. tuberculosis infection. In both infectious models successful adoptive immunotherapy was shown to be mediated by T lymphocytes, which were acquired in the donor animals in response to the immunizing infection. It is proposed that the results of this study may serve as a basic model for the subsequent analysis of the nature of the T cell-mediated immune response to both systemic and aerogenic infections with M. tuberculosis.

  19. Sirt1 Protects Stressed Adult Hematopoietic Stem Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The immune system relies on a stable pool of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) to respond properly to injury or stress. Maintaining genomic integrity and appropriate gene expression is essential for HSPC homeostasis, and dysregulation can result in myeloproliferative disorders or loss of immune function. Sirt1 is a histone deacetylase that can protect embryonic stem (ES) cells from accumulating DNA damage and has been linked to hematopoietic differentiation of ES cells. Satyendra Singh, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow working with Philipp Oberdoerffer, Ph.D., in CCR’s Laboratory of Receptor Biology and Gene Expression, and their colleagues set out to determine whether Sirt1 could play a similar protective role in adult HSPCs.

  20. Compromising the 19S proteasome complex protects cells from reduced flux through the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Peter; Mendillo, Marc L; Zhao, Jinghui; Carette, Jan E; Merrill, Parker H; Cikes, Domagoj; Varadarajan, Malini; van Diemen, Ferdy R; Penninger, Josef M; Goldberg, Alfred L; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Santagata, Sandro; Lindquist, Susan

    2015-09-01

    Proteasomes are central regulators of protein homeostasis in eukaryotes. Proteasome function is vulnerable to environmental insults, cellular protein imbalance and targeted pharmaceuticals. Yet, mechanisms that cells deploy to counteract inhibition of this central regulator are little understood. To find such mechanisms, we reduced flux through the proteasome to the point of toxicity with specific inhibitors and performed genome-wide screens for mutations that allowed cells to survive. Counter to expectation, reducing expression of individual subunits of the proteasome's 19S regulatory complex increased survival. Strong 19S reduction was cytotoxic but modest reduction protected cells from inhibitors. Protection was accompanied by an increased ratio of 20S to 26S proteasomes, preservation of protein degradation capacity and reduced proteotoxic stress. While compromise of 19S function can have a fitness cost under basal conditions, it provided a powerful survival advantage when proteasome function was impaired. This means of rebalancing proteostasis is conserved from yeast to humans.

  1. Antigen-specific T-cell lines transfer protective immunity against Trichinella spiralis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Riedlinger, J; Grencis, R K; Wakelin, D

    1986-01-01

    T-cell lines specific for infective muscle larvae antigens of the intestinal nematode Trichinella spiralis have been generated in vitro. These antigen-specific T-cell lines express the L3T4+ Ly2- phenotype and secrete the lymphokines IL-2, IL-3 and gamma-IFN. They are stable in culture for up to 15 weeks and are protective when adoptively transferred into naive recipients. As few as 2 x 10(5) T. spiralis-specific tract. In addition, intestinal mastocytosis and peripheral blood eosinophilia were accelerated after adoptive transfer of T. spiralis-specific T-cell lines. PMID:2423438

  2. Curcumin protects endothelial cells against homocysteine induced injury through inhibiting inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Luo, Ming; Xie, Nanzi; Wang, Jianxin; Chen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of curcumin on the homocysteine (HCY) induced injury to the endothelial cells. Methods: Endothelial cells were treated with HCY at different concentrations, and MTT assay was employed to determine an optimal concentration of HCY. Cells were divided into 3 groups: normal control group, HCY group and HCY + curcumin group. In curcumin group, cells were pretreated with 2.5 mmol/L HCY for 2 h and then incubated with curcumin at different concentrations. MTT assay was employed to detect the cell viability. ELISA was performed to detect the content of IL-8 in the supernatant. Western blotting was used to detect NF-κB expression in cells. Results: (1) Endothelial cells were polygonal or stone-like, or aggregated to form masses, and then gradually became long spindle shaped, cell body enlarged, cells were rich in cytoplasm, and immunohistochemistry for factor VIII showed positive. (2) MTT assay showed HCY at ≥2.5 mmol/L caused significant damage to endothelial cells as compared to control group. Thus, 2.5 mmol/L HCY was used in following experiments. (3) ELISA showed IL-8 in the supernatant increased significantly in a time dependent manner after HCY treatment (P<0.01), but curcumin could significantly inhibit the IL-8 secretion in endothelial cells after HCY treatment. (4) Western blotting showed HCY was able to markedly increase NF-κB expression, which, however, was significantly inhibited by curcumin. Conclusion: Curcumin is able to protect the endothelial cells against HCY induced injury through inhibiting NF-κB activation and down-regulating IL-8 expression. PMID:27904665

  3. Plasma from human volunteers subjected to remote ischemic preconditioning protects human endothelial cells from hypoxia-induced cell damage.

    PubMed

    Weber, Nina C; Riedemann, Isabelle; Smit, Kirsten F; Zitta, Karina; van de Vondervoort, Djai; Zuurbier, Coert J; Hollmann, Markus W; Preckel, Benedikt; Albrecht, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Short repeated cycles of peripheral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) can protect distant organs from subsequent prolonged I/R injury; a phenomenon known as remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC). A RIPC-mediated release of humoral factors might play a key role in this protection and vascular endothelial cells are potential targets for these secreted factors. In the present study, RIPC-plasma obtained from healthy male volunteers was tested for its ability to protect human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) from hypoxia-induced cell damage. 10 healthy male volunteers were subjected to a RIPC-protocol consisting of 4 × 5 min inflation/deflation of a blood pressure cuff located at the upper arm. Plasma was collected before (T0; control), directly after (T1) and 1 h after (T2) the RIPC procedure. HUVEC were subjected to 24 h hypoxia damage and simultaneously incubated with 5% of the respective RIPC-plasma. Cell damage was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-measurements. Western blot experiments of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1alpha), phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5), protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK-1/2) were performed. Furthermore, the concentrations of hVEGF were evaluated in the RIPC-plasma by sandwich ELISA. Hypoxia-induced cell damage was significantly reduced by plasma T1 (p = 0.02 vs T0). The protective effect of plasma T1 was accompanied by an augmentation of the intracellular HIF1alpha (p = 0.01 vs T0) and increased phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 (p = 0.03 vs T0). Phosphorylation of AKT and STAT5 remained unchanged. Analysis of the protective RIPC-plasma T1 showed significantly reduced levels of hVEGF (p = 0.01 vs T0). RIPC plasma protects endothelial cells from hypoxia-induced cell damage and humoral mediators as well as intracellular HIF1alpha may be involved.

  4. Protecting cells by protecting their vulnerable lysosomes: Identification of a new mechanism for preserving lysosomal functional integrity upon oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Pascua-Maestro, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Environmental insults such as oxidative stress can damage cell membranes. Lysosomes are particularly sensitive to membrane permeabilization since their function depends on intraluminal acidic pH and requires stable membrane-dependent proton gradients. Among the catalog of oxidative stress-responsive genes is the Lipocalin Apolipoprotein D (ApoD), an extracellular lipid binding protein endowed with antioxidant capacity. Within the nervous system, cell types in the defense frontline, such as astrocytes, secrete ApoD to help neurons cope with the challenge. The protecting role of ApoD is known from cellular to organism level, and many of its downstream effects, including optimization of autophagy upon neurodegeneration, have been described. However, we still cannot assign a cellular mechanism to ApoD gene that explains how this protection is accomplished. Here we perform a comprehensive analysis of ApoD intracellular traffic and demonstrate its role in lysosomal pH homeostasis upon paraquat-induced oxidative stress. By combining single-lysosome in vivo pH measurements with immunodetection, we demonstrate that ApoD is endocytosed and targeted to a subset of vulnerable lysosomes in a stress-dependent manner. ApoD is functionally stable in this acidic environment, and its presence is sufficient and necessary for lysosomes to recover from oxidation-induced alkalinization, both in astrocytes and neurons. This function is accomplished by preventing lysosomal membrane permeabilization. Two lysosomal-dependent biological processes, myelin phagocytosis by astrocytes and optimization of neurodegeneration-triggered autophagy in a Drosophila in vivo model, require ApoD-related Lipocalins. Our results uncover a previously unknown biological function of ApoD, member of the finely regulated and evolutionary conserved gene family of extracellular Lipocalins. They set a lipoprotein-mediated regulation of lysosomal membrane integrity as a new mechanism at the hub of many cellular

  5. Protecting cells by protecting their vulnerable lysosomes: Identification of a new mechanism for preserving lysosomal functional integrity upon oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pascua-Maestro, Raquel; Diez-Hermano, Sergio; Lillo, Concepción; Ganfornina, Maria D; Sanchez, Diego

    2017-02-01

    Environmental insults such as oxidative stress can damage cell membranes. Lysosomes are particularly sensitive to membrane permeabilization since their function depends on intraluminal acidic pH and requires stable membrane-dependent proton gradients. Among the catalog of oxidative stress-responsive genes is the Lipocalin Apolipoprotein D (ApoD), an extracellular lipid binding protein endowed with antioxidant capacity. Within the nervous system, cell types in the defense frontline, such as astrocytes, secrete ApoD to help neurons cope with the challenge. The protecting role of ApoD is known from cellular to organism level, and many of its downstream effects, including optimization of autophagy upon neurodegeneration, have been described. However, we still cannot assign a cellular mechanism to ApoD gene that explains how this protection is accomplished. Here we perform a comprehensive analysis of ApoD intracellular traffic and demonstrate its role in lysosomal pH homeostasis upon paraquat-induced oxidative stress. By combining single-lysosome in vivo pH measurements with immunodetection, we demonstrate that ApoD is endocytosed and targeted to a subset of vulnerable lysosomes in a stress-dependent manner. ApoD is functionally stable in this acidic environment, and its presence is sufficient and necessary for lysosomes to recover from oxidation-induced alkalinization, both in astrocytes and neurons. This function is accomplished by preventing lysosomal membrane permeabilization. Two lysosomal-dependent biological processes, myelin phagocytosis by astrocytes and optimization of neurodegeneration-triggered autophagy in a Drosophila in vivo model, require ApoD-related Lipocalins. Our results uncover a previously unknown biological function of ApoD, member of the finely regulated and evolutionary conserved gene family of extracellular Lipocalins. They set a lipoprotein-mediated regulation of lysosomal membrane integrity as a new mechanism at the hub of many cellular

  6. Hydrogen protects auditory hair cells from cisplatin-induced free radicals.

    PubMed

    Kikkawa, Yayoi S; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Mirei; Ito, Juichi

    2014-09-05

    Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various malignancies. However, its maximum dose is often limited by severe ototoxicity. Cisplatin ototoxicity may require the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the inner ear by activating enzymes specific to the cochlea. Molecular hydrogen was recently established as an antioxidant that selectively reduces ROS, and has been reported to protect the central nervous system, liver, kidney and cochlea from oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of molecular hydrogen to protect cochleae against cisplatin. We cultured mouse cochlear explants in medium containing various concentrations of cisplatin and examined the effects of hydrogen gas dissolved directly into the media. Following 48-h incubation, the presence of intact auditory hair cells was assayed by phalloidin staining. Cisplatin caused hair cell loss in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the addition of hydrogen gas significantly increased the numbers of remaining auditory hair cells. Additionally, hydroxyphenyl fluorescein (HPF) staining of the spiral ganglion showed that formation of hydroxyl radicals was successfully reduced in hydrogen-treated cochleae. These data suggest that molecular hydrogen can protect auditory tissues against cisplatin toxicity, thus providing an additional strategy to protect against drug-induced inner ear damage.

  7. Protective Effect of an Isoflavone, Tectorigenin, Against Oxidative Stress-induced Cell Death via Catalase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Piao, Mei Jing; Oh, Min Chang; Park, Jeong Eon; Shilnikova, Kristina; Moon, Yu Jin; Kim, Dong Hyun; Jung, Uhee; Kim, In Gyu; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Isoflavones are biologically active compounds that occur naturally in a variety of plants, with relatively high levels in soybean. Tectorigenin, an isoflavone, protects against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cell damage. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Methods The MTT assay was performed to determine cell viability. Catalase activity was assessed by determining the amount of enzyme required to degrade 1 μM H2O2. Protein expression of catalase, phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), IκB-α, and NF-κB were evaluated by Western blot analysis. A mobility shift assay was performed to assess the DNA-binding ability of NF-κB. Transient transfection and a NF-κB luciferase assay were performed to assess transcriptional activity. Results Tectorigenin reduced H2O2-induced death of Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79-4). In addition, tectorigenin increased the activity and protein expression of catalase. Blockade of catalase activity attenuated the protective effect of tectorigenin against oxidative stress. Furthermore, tectorigenin enhanced phosphorylation of ERK and nuclear expression of NF-κB, while inhibition of ERK and NF-κB attenuated the protective effect of tectorigenin against oxidative stress. Conclusions Tectorigenin protects cells against oxidative damage by activating catalase and modulating the ERK and NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:28053960

  8. Insulin Protects Pancreatic Acinar Cells from Cytosolic Calcium Overload and Inhibition of Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump*

    PubMed Central

    Mankad, Parini; James, Andrew; Siriwardena, Ajith K.; Elliott, Austin C.; Bruce, Jason I. E.

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a serious and sometimes fatal inflammatory disease of the pancreas without any reliable treatment or imminent cure. In recent years, impaired metabolism and cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) overload in pancreatic acinar cells have been implicated as the cardinal pathological events common to most forms of pancreatitis, regardless of the precise causative factor. Therefore, restoration of metabolism and protection against cytosolic Ca2+ overload likely represent key therapeutic untapped strategies for the treatment of this disease. The plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) provides a final common path for cells to “defend” [Ca2+]i during cellular injury. In this paper, we use fluorescence imaging to show for the first time that insulin treatment, which is protective in animal models and clinical studies of human pancreatitis, directly protects pancreatic acinar cells from oxidant-induced cytosolic Ca2+ overload and inhibition of the PMCA. This protection was independent of oxidative stress or mitochondrial membrane potential but appeared to involve the activation of Akt and an acute metabolic switch from mitochondrial to predominantly glycolytic metabolism. This switch to glycolysis appeared to be sufficient to maintain cellular ATP and thus PMCA activity, thereby preventing Ca2+ overload, even in the face of impaired mitochondrial function. PMID:22128146

  9. Subdominant CD8 T-cell epitopes account for protection against cytomegalovirus independent of immunodomination.

    PubMed

    Holtappels, Rafaela; Simon, Christian O; Munks, Michael W; Thomas, Doris; Deegen, Petra; Kühnapfel, Birgit; Däubner, Torsten; Emde, Simone F; Podlech, Jürgen; Grzimek, Natascha K A; Oehrlein-Karpi, Silke A; Hill, Ann B; Reddehase, Matthias J

    2008-06-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection continues to be a complication in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Preexisting donor immunity is recognized as a favorable prognostic factor for the reconstitution of protective antiviral immunity mediated primarily by CD8 T cells. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of CMV-specific memory CD8 T (CD8-T(M)) cells is a therapeutic option for preventing CMV disease in HSCT recipients. Given the different CMV infection histories of donor and recipient, a problem may arise from an antigenic mismatch between the CMV variant that has primed donor immunity and the CMV variant acquired by the recipient. Here, we have used the BALB/c mouse model of CMV infection in the immunocompromised host to evaluate the importance of donor-recipient CMV matching in immundominant epitopes (IDEs). For this, we generated the murine CMV (mCMV) recombinant virus mCMV-DeltaIDE, in which the two memory repertoire IDEs, the IE1-derived peptide 168-YPHFMPTNL-176 presented by the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecule L(d) and the m164-derived peptide 257-AGPPRYSRI-265 presented by the MHC-I molecule D(d), are both functionally deleted. Upon adoptive transfer, polyclonal donor CD8-T(M) cells primed by mCMV-DeltaIDE and the corresponding revertant virus mCMV-revDeltaIDE controlled infection of immunocompromised recipients with comparable efficacy and regardless of whether or not IDEs were presented in the recipients. Importantly, CD8-T(M) cells primed under conditions of immunodomination by IDEs protected recipients in which IDEs were absent. This shows that protection does not depend on compensatory expansion of non-IDE-specific CD8-T(M) cells liberated from immunodomination by the deletion of IDEs. We conclude that protection is, rather, based on the collective antiviral potential of non-IDEs independent of the presence or absence of IDE-mediated immunodomination.

  10. Protective effect of Phyllanthus emblica fruit extract against hydrogen peroxide-induced endothelial cell death.

    PubMed

    Wongpradabchai, Sudjai; Chularojmontri, Linda; Phornchirasilp, Srichan; Wattanapitayakul, Suvara K

    2013-01-01

    Numerous antioxidants from natural products have been shown to lower ROS levels and enhance vascular endothelial function. The fruits of Phyllanthus emblica are well-known in possessing antioxidative properties but its role and mechanisms in the protection of vascular endothelial cells from ROS damage have not yet been established. The present study was aimed to determine the possible protective effect of P. emblica fruit extract (PE) on human EA.hy926 endothelial cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and PE protective mechanisms. Following incubation of endothelial cells with 300 microM H2O2 for 2 h, cell viability was decreased to 50.65 +/- 0.94% and intracellular ROS levels was increased to 159.01% +/- 6.27% as measured by MTT assay and DCF fluorescent intensity, respectively. Cytotoxic effect of PE was not observed in the range of 0.1 to 100 microM Pretreatment with PE (20 to 100 microg/mL) for 48 h significantly ameliorated the cytotoxic effect of H2O2 and attenuated the excessive intracellular ROS formation in endothelial cells. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that PE pretreatment (40 microg/L) induced Akt phosphorylation but did not activate NF-kappaB pathway. These findings suggest that PE could effectively protect human endothelial cell death induced by H2O2 via modification of ROS-related mechanism along with activation of PI3K/Akt pathway. However the value of this plant in vivo needs further investigations in supporting them to be developed as nutraceuticals for cardiovascular disease prevention.

  11. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Is Required for Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Protection Against Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Emer F.; Kennelly, Helen; Carty, Fiona; Mahon, Bernard P.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is on the rise and existing treatments have failed to halt or reverse disease progression. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have potent cytoprotective effects, can promote tissue repair, and have demonstrated efficacy in a range of fibrotic lung diseases; however, the exact mechanisms of action remain to be elucidated. Chemical antagonists and short hairpin RNA knockdown were used to identify the mechanisms of action used by MSCs in promoting wound healing, proliferation, and inhibiting apoptosis. Using the bleomycin induced fibrosis model, the protective effects of early or late MSC administration were examined. The role for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in MSC protection against bleomycin lung injury was examined using HGF knockdown MSC. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) dUTP nick-end labeling assay was performed on ex vivo lung sections to examine the effects of MSC on apoptosis. MSC conditioned media (CM) enhanced wound closure and inhibited apoptosis of pulmonary cells in vitro. HGF was required for MSC CM enhancement of epithelial cell proliferation and inhibition of apoptosis. In contrast, MSC required COX-2 for CM to inhibit fibroblast proliferation. In a murine model, early administration of MSC protected against bleomycin induced lung fibrosis and correlated with reduced levels of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β, reduced levels of apoptosis, and significantly increased levels of HGF. These protective effects were in part mediated by MSC derived HGF as HGF knockdown MSC were unable to protect against fibrosis in vivo. These findings delineate the mechanisms of MSC protection in a preclinical model of fibrotic lung disease. Significance The mechanisms used by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in mediating protective effects in chronic models of lung disease are not understood and remain to be elucidated. These findings from in vitro studies highlight an important role for the MSC

  12. Cells of Escherichia coli are protected against severe chemical stress by co-habiting cell aggregates formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Jagmann, Nina; Henke, Sebastian Franz; Philipp, Bodo

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial cells within biofilms and cell aggregates show increased resistance against chemical stress compared with suspended cells. It is not known whether bacteria that co-habit biofilms formed by other bacteria also acquire such resistance. This scenario was investigated in a proof-of-principle experiment with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 as cell aggregate-forming bacterium and Escherichia coli strain MG1655 as potential co-habiting bacterium equipped with an inducible bioluminescence system. Cell aggregation of strain PAO1 can be induced by the toxic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). In single cultures of strain MG1655, bioluminescence was inhibited by the protonophor carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) but the cells were still viable. By applying CCCP and SDS together, cells of strain MG1655 lost their bioluminescence and viability indicating the importance of energy-dependent resistance mechanisms against SDS. In co-suspensions with strain PAO1, bioluminescence of strain MG1655 was sustained in the presence of SDS and CCCP. Image analysis showed that bioluminescent cells were located in cell aggregates formed by strain PAO1. Thus, cells of strain MG1655 that co-habited cell aggregates formed by strain PAO1 were protected against a severe chemical stress that was lethal to them in single cultures. Co-habiting could lead to increased survival of pathogens in clinical settings and could be employed in biotechnological applications involving toxic milieus.

  13. Notch protection against apoptosis in T-ALL cells mediated by GIMAP5.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Nicholas; Zeef, Leo; Portillo, Virginia; Boros, Joanna; Hoyle, Sarah; van Doesburg, Jaap C L; Buckle, Anne-Marie

    2010-10-15

    Recent studies have highlighted the role of Notch signalling in the development of T cell acute lymphoblasic leukaemia (T-ALL). Over-expression of Notch3 and gain of function mutations in the Notch1 gene have been reported. The aims of this study were to determine the effect of Notch signalling on apoptosis in human T-ALL cell lines and to identify targets of Notch signalling that may mediate this effect. Functional studies showed that inhibition of Notch signalling using gamma secretase inhibitors promoted glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis in cells carrying gain of function mutations in Notch1. Moreover, ectopic expression of constitutively activated Notch provided protection against glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis, indicating that signalling via Notch may also contribute to the development of T-ALL by conferring resistance to apoptosis. Microarray analysis revealed that GIMAP5, a gene coding for an anti-apoptotic intracellular protein, is upregulated by Notch in T-ALL cell lines. Knockdown of GIMAP5 expression using siRNA promoted glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis in T-ALL cells carrying gain of function mutations in Notch1 and in T-ALL cells engineered to express ectopic constitutively activated Notch indicating that Notch signalling protects T-ALL cells from apoptosis by upregulating the expression of GIMAP5.

  14. Induction and expression of protective T cells during Mycobacterium avium infections in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R; Pedrosa, J

    1992-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an opportunistic pathogen that infects individuals suffering from chronic lung disease or immunocompromised patients such as AIDS patients. Here we show that a highly virulent isolate of M. avium proliferated as extensively in T cell deficient as in immunocompetent mice. T cell deficient mice allowed a progressive growth of a less virulent AIDS-derived isolate of M. avium while immunocompetent mice arrested the growth of this isolate. Adoptive transfer of T cell enriched spleen cells between congenic strains of mice differing at the Bcg/Ity/Lsh locus showed that only naturally resistant BALB/c.Bcgr (C.D2) mice infected with the highly virulent strain of M. avium or the naturally susceptible BALB/c mice infected with the lower virulence isolate developed protective T cells and that these cells only mediated protection when transferred to naturally susceptible, but not to naturally resistant, mice. Both strains of M. avium proliferated in bone marrow-derived macrophages cultured in vitro and they were both susceptible to the bacteriostatic effects induced in the macrophages by crude lymphokines produced by concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells. PMID:1544223

  15. Recombinant Reg3β protein protects against streptozotocin-induced β-cell damage and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chen; Yu, Lu-Ting; Yang, Meng-Qi; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Alfred, Martin O; Liu, Jun-Li; Wang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Regenerating genes (Reg) have been found during the search for factors involved in pancreatic islet regeneration. Our recent study discovered that pancreatic β-cell-specific overexpression of Reg3β protects against streptozotocin (Stz) -induced diabetes in mice. To investigate its potential roles in the treatment of diabetes, we produced a recombinant Reg3β protein and provided evidence that it is active in promoting islet β-cell survival against Stz- triggered cell death. Though ineffective in alleviating preexisting diabetes, pretreatment of recombinant Reg3β was capable of minimizing the Stz-induced hyperglycemia and weight loss, by preserving serum and pancreatic insulin levels, and islet β-cell mass. No obvious changes were observed in the rate of cell proliferation and hypertrophy in α- or acinar-cells after treatment with recombinant Reg3β. The underlying mechanism of Reg3β-mediated protection seems to involve Akt activation which upregulates Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL levels and consequently promotes cell survival. PMID:27767186

  16. CXCR5⁺ T helper cells mediate protective immunity against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Slight, Samantha R; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Gopal, Radha; Lin, Yinyao; Fallert Junecko, Beth A; Mehra, Smriti; Selman, Moises; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Baquera-Heredia, Javier; Pavon, Lenin; Kaushal, Deepak; Reinhart, Todd A; Randall, Troy D; Khader, Shabaana A

    2013-02-01

    One third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Although most infected people remain asymptomatic, they have a 10% lifetime risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB). Thus, the current challenge is to identify immune parameters that distinguish individuals with latent TB from those with active TB. Using human and experimental models of Mtb infection, we demonstrated that organized ectopic lymphoid structures containing CXCR5+ T cells were present in Mtb-infected lungs. In addition, we found that in experimental Mtb infection models, the presence of CXCR5+ T cells within ectopic lymphoid structures was associated with immune control. Furthermore, in a mouse model of Mtb infection, we showed that activated CD4+CXCR5+ T cells accumulated in Mtb-infected lungs and produced proinflammatory cytokines. Mice deficient in Cxcr5 had increased susceptibility to TB due to defective T cell localization within the lung parenchyma. We demonstrated that CXCR5 expression in T cells mediated correct T cell localization within TB granulomas, promoted efficient macrophage activation, protected against Mtb infection, and facilitated lymphoid follicle formation. These data demonstrate that CD4+CXCR5+ T cells play a protective role in the immune response against TB and highlight their potential use for future TB vaccine design and therapy.

  17. MDCK cell-cultured influenza virus vaccine protects mice from lethal challenge with different influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Yao, Zhidong; Zhang, Liangyan; Li, Junli; Xing, Li; Wang, Xiliang

    2012-06-01

    Influenza epidemics are major health concern worldwide. Vaccination is the major strategy to protect the general population from a pandemic. Currently, most influenza vaccines are manufactured using chicken embroynated eggs, but this manufacturing method has potential limitations, and cell-based vaccines offer a number of advantages over the traditional method. We reported here using the scalable bioreactor to produce pandemic influenza virus vaccine in a Madin-Darby canine kidney cell culture system. In the 7.5-L bioreactor, the cell concentration reached to 3.2 × 10(6) cells/mL and the highest virus titers of 256 HAU/50 μL and 1 × 10(7) TCID50/mL. The HA concentration was found to be 11.2 μg/mL. The vaccines produced by the cell-cultured system induced neutralization antibodies, cross-reactive T-cell responses, and were protective in a mouse model against different lethal influenza virus challenge. These data indicate that microcarrier-based cell-cultured influenza virus vaccine manufacture system in scalable bioreactor could be used to produce effective pandemic influenza virus vaccines.

  18. Ceramide-1-phosphate protection of cochlear hair cells against cisplatin ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Le, Quang; Tabuchi, Keiji; Hara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) is a phosphorylated form of ceramide. While ceramide is known to be an inducer of apoptosis of cochlear hair cells in cisplatin ototoxicity, little is known about the function of C1P in cochlear diseases. The present study was designed to examine whether C1P could protect cochlear hair cells against cisplatin ototoxicity. Explants of cochlear basal turns collected from C57BL/6J mice at postnatal days 3-5 were used in all experiments. Cochlear explants were exposed to 5 or 10 μM cisplatin for 48 h to assess the effects of C1P, NVP-231 (a ceramide kinase inhibitor), or ceramide. Western blotting of pAkt/Akt and pMAPK/MAPK was examined to check whether this pathway was modulated by C1P. C1P activated the Akt and MAPK pathway and significantly reduced cochlear cell death induced by cisplatin. Coadministration of cisplatin and ceramide significantly increased cochlear hair cell death. In addition, when treating cochlear hair cells with NVP-231 in the presence of cisplatin or ceramide, a remarkable increase in apoptosis of hair cells was observed. The present findings confirmed the protective effects of C1P in the cisplatin ototoxicity. The balance between ceramide and C1P may play a critical role in the determination of hair cell fate in cisplatin ototoxicity.

  19. Protection of human HepG2 cells against oxidative stress by the flavonoid epicatechin.

    PubMed

    Martín, María Angeles; Ramos, Sonia; Mateos, Raquel; Izquierdo-Pulido, María; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2010-04-01

    Flavanols, such as epicatechin (EC), constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in green tea, grapes and cocoa and possess different biological activities such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic. This study investigated the potential chemo-protective effect of EC against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) on human HepG2 cells. Cell viability by lactate dehydrogenase assay and markers of oxidative status: reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) were evaluated. Pretreatment of cells with EC for 20 h prevented the enhanced cell damage and GPx and GR activities as well as the decrease in GSH induced by t-BOOH. The increased ROS generation induced by t-BOOH was also partly prevented by a pretreatment for 20 h with EC. In addition, pretreatment of cells with EC for 20 h recovered the t-BOOH-induced MDA concentration to control values. A pretreatment for 2 h with EC did not reduce cell damage but partly recovered GSH, reduced ROS levels and muffled the increase of GPx and GR after exposure to t-BOOH. Treatment of HepG2 cells with concentrations of EC in the micromolar range confers a significant protection against oxidative stress.

  20. Silymarin protects against acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity via Nrf2 signalling in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Sun, Hong-Yang; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Hong-Yu; Shao, Mei-Li

    2017-04-01

    Silymarin (SM) is a well-known antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer compound extracted from the milk thistle. Here, we investigated the protective effect of SM against acrylamide (AA)-induced neurotoxicity, mainly caused by oxidative stress, via activation of the nuclear transcription factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signalling pathway in PC12 cells. The MTT reduction assay was used to measure cell viability in various drug-treated groups and demonstrated that SM could increase cell viability in AA-treated PC12 cells. We then measured the reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels by the peroxide-sensitive fluorescent probe DCFH-DA and intracellular glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels by absorption spectrophotometry. Our data revealed that SM could reduce ROS and MDA levels and increase GSH levels in AA-induced PC12 cells. To identify a potential mechanism for SM-induced protection, we measured the mRNA and protein expression levels of Nrf2 and its downstream target antioxidants glutathione peroxidase (Gpx), glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) and glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM) by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. The results suggested that SM could activate Nrf2 signalling and increase the expression of Nrf2, Gpx, GCLC and GCLM in AA-treated PC12 cells. In conclusion, SM can effectively alleviate AA-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells.

  1. Curcumin Protects β-Lactoglobulin Fibril Formation and Fibril-Induced Neurotoxicity in PC12Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mazaheri, Mansooreh; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Khodagholi, Fariba; Shaerzadeh, Fatemeh; Sheibani, Nader

    2015-01-01

    In this study the β-lactoglobulin fibrillation, in the presence or absence of lead ions, aflatoxin M1 and curcumin, was evaluated using ThT fluorescence, Circular dichroism spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. To investigate the toxicity of the different form of β-Lg fibrils, in the presence or absence of above toxins and curcumin, we monitored changes in the level of reactive oxygen species and morphology of the differentiated neuron-like PC12 cells. The cell viability, cell body area, average neurite length, neurite width, number of primary neurites, percent of bipolar cells and node/primary neurite ratios were used to assess the growth and complexity of PC12 cells exposed to different form of β-Lg fibrils. Incubation of β-Lg with curcumin resulted in a significant decrease in ROS levels even in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1. The β-Lg fibrils formed in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1 attenuated the growth and complexity of PC12 cells compared with other form of β-Lg fibrils. However, the adverse effects of these toxins and protein fibrils were negated in the presence of curcumin. Furthermore, the antioxidant and inhibitory effects of curcumin protected PC12 cells against fibril neurotoxicity and enhanced their survival. Thus, curcumin may provide a protective effect toward β-Lg, and perhaps other protein, fibrils mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:26186474

  2. A20 Deficiency in Lung Epithelial Cells Protects against Influenza A Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vereecke, Lars; Mc Guire, Conor; Sze, Mozes; Schuijs, Martijn J.; Willart, Monique; Itati Ibañez, Lorena; Hammad, Hamida; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Beyaert, Rudi; Saelens, Xavier; van Loo, Geert

    2016-01-01

    A20 negatively regulates multiple inflammatory signalling pathways. We here addressed the role of A20 in club cells (also known as Clara cells) of the bronchial epithelium in their response to influenza A virus infection. Club cells provide a niche for influenza virus replication, but little is known about the functions of these cells in antiviral immunity. Using airway epithelial cell-specific A20 knockout (A20AEC-KO) mice, we show that A20 in club cells critically controls innate immune responses upon TNF or double stranded RNA stimulation. Surprisingly, A20AEC-KO mice are better protected against influenza A virus challenge than their wild type littermates. This phenotype is not due to decreased viral replication. Instead host innate and adaptive immune responses and lung damage are reduced in A20AEC-KO mice. These attenuated responses correlate with a dampened cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response at later stages during infection, indicating that A20AEC-KO mice are better equipped to tolerate Influenza A virus infection. Expression of the chemokine CCL2 (also named MCP-1) is particularly suppressed in the lungs of A20AEC-KO mice during later stages of infection. When A20AEC-KO mice were treated with recombinant CCL2 the protective effect was abrogated demonstrating the crucial contribution of this chemokine to the protection of A20AEC-KO mice to Influenza A virus infection. Taken together, we propose a mechanism of action by which A20 expression in club cells controls inflammation and antiviral CTL responses in response to influenza virus infection. PMID:26815999

  3. B-Cell Depletion Promotes Aortic Infiltration of Immunosuppressive Cells and Is Protective of Experimental Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Schaheen, Basil; Downs, Emily A; Serbulea, Vlad; Almenara, Camila C P; Spinosa, Michael; Su, Gang; Zhao, Yunge; Srikakulapu, Prasad; Butts, Cherié; McNamara, Coleen A; Leitinger, Norbert; Upchurch, Gilbert R; Meher, Akshaya K; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2016-11-01

    B-cell depletion therapy is widely used for treatment of cancers and autoimmune diseases. B cells are abundant in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA); however, it is unknown whether B-cell depletion therapy affects AAA growth. Using experimental models of murine AAA, we aim to examine the effect of B-cell depletion on AAA formation. Wild-type or apolipoprotein E-knockout mice were treated with mouse monoclonal anti-CD20 or control antibodies and subjected to an elastase perfusion or angiotensin II infusion model to induce AAA, respectively. Anti-CD20 antibody treatment significantly depleted B1 and B2 cells, and strikingly suppressed AAA growth in both models. B-cell depletion resulted in lower circulating IgM levels, but did not affect the levels of IgG or cytokine/chemokine levels. Although the total number of leukocyte remained unchanged in elastase-perfused aortas after anti-CD20 antibody treatment, the number of B-cell subtypes was significantly lower. Interestingly, plasmacytoid dendritic cells expressing the immunomodulatory enzyme indole 2,3-dioxygenase were detected in the aortas of B-cell-depleted mice. In accordance with an increase in indole 2,3-dioxygenase+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells, the number of regulatory T cells was higher, whereas the expression of proinflammatory genes was lower in aortas of B-cell-depleted mice. In a coculture model, the presence of B cells significantly lowered the number of indole 2,3-dioxygenase+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells without affecting total plasmacytoid dendritic cell number. The present results demonstrate that B-cell depletion protects mice from experimental AAA formation and promotes emergence of an immunosuppressive environment in aorta. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Cell division in the CNS: protective response or lethal event in post-mitotic neurons?

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Herrup, Karl

    2007-04-01

    Cell cycle events have been documented to be associated with several human neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on two diseases--Alzheimer's disease and ataxia telangiectasia--as well as their mouse models. Cell cycle studies have shown that ectopic expression of cell cycle markers is spatially and regional correlated well with neuronal cell death in both disease conditions. Further evidence of ectopic cell cycling is found in both human diseases and in its mouse models. These findings suggest that loss of cell cycle control represents a common pathological root of disease, which underlies the defects in the affected brain tissues in both human and mouse. Loss of cell cycle control is a unifying hypothesis for inducing neuronal death in CNS. In the disease models we have examined, cell cycle markers appear before the more well-recognized pathological changes and thus could serve as early stress markers--outcome measures for preclinical trials of potential disease therapies. As a marker these events could serve as a new criterion in human pathological diagnosis. The evidence to date is compatible with the requirement for a second "hit" for a neuron to progress cell cycle initiation and DNA replication to death. If this were true, any intervention of blocking 'second' processes might prevent or slow the neuronal cell death in the process of disease. What is not known is whether, in an adult neuron, the cell cycle event is part of the pathology or rather a desperate attempt of a neuron under stress to protect itself.

  5. Exogenous TNFR2 activation protects from acute GvHD via host T reg cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Martin; Brandl, Andreas; Amich, Jorge; Mottok, Anja; Jordán-Garrote, Ana-Laura; Bäuerlein, Carina A.; Brede, Christian; Ribechini, Eliana; Fick, Andrea; Polz, Johannes; Nishikii, Hidekazu; Mattenheimer, Katharina; Schwinn, Stefanie; Winter, Thorsten; Krappmann, Sven; Einsele, Hermann; Reddehase, Matthias J.; Lutz, Manfred B.

    2016-01-01

    Donor CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (T reg cells) suppress graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT [allo-HCT]). Current clinical study protocols rely on the ex vivo expansion of donor T reg cells and their infusion in high numbers. In this study, we present a novel strategy for inhibiting GvHD that is based on the in vivo expansion of recipient T reg cells before allo-HCT, exploiting the crucial role of tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) in T reg cell biology. Expanding radiation-resistant host T reg cells in recipient mice using a mouse TNFR2-selective agonist before allo-HCT significantly prolonged survival and reduced GvHD severity in a TNFR2- and T reg cell–dependent manner. The beneficial effects of transplanted T cells against leukemia cells and infectious pathogens remained unaffected. A corresponding human TNFR2-specific agonist expanded human T reg cells in vitro. These observations indicate the potential of our strategy to protect allo-HCT patients from acute GvHD by expanding T reg cells via selective TNFR2 activation in vivo. PMID:27526711

  6. Protection against apoptosis in chicken bursa and thymus cells by phorbol ester in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Asakawa, J.; Thorbecke, G.J. )

    1991-03-15

    Programmed suicide or apoptosis, due to activation of endogenous nucleases, occurs in immature CD4{sup {minus}}85{sup {minus}} mammalian thymus cells. Like the thymus, the bursa of Fabricius is a site of massive lymphopoiesis accompanied by cell death in vivo. In the present study the authors have, therefore, examined whether chicken bursa and thymus cells exhibit apoptosis. Bursa and thymus cells from SC chickens, 4-10 weeks of age, were incubated for 8-24 hrs with various reagents. Genomic DNA was isolated, electrophoresed in 3% Nusieve agarose gels, and examined for patterns of DNA fragmentation. A laddering of DNA in multiples of 200 base pairs, indicative of apoptosis, was observed with both bursa and thymus cells. These patterns of DNA fragmentation from bursa cells could be prevented by adding phorbol myristic acetate during culture and, more effectively, by PMA plus ionomycin, but not by ionomycin alone or by anti-{mu}. PMA did not affect the patterns of DNA fragmentation seen with spleen cells. Addition of the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporin inhibited the preventive effect of PMA on apoptosis. PMA also greatly promoted the survival of bursa cells in culture, as assayed by percentage cell death and by {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation. It is concluded that bursa and thymus cells from the chicken exhibit apoptosis. The data further suggest that protein kinase C activation protects apoptosis in cultured bursa cells.

  7. Activation of mitochondrial ERK protects cancer cells from death through inhibition of the permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Rasola, Andrea; Sciacovelli, Marco; Chiara, Federica; Pantic, Boris; Brusilow, William S; Bernardi, Paolo

    2010-01-12

    We studied human cancer cell models in which we detected constitutive activation of ERK. A fraction of active ERK was found to be located in mitochondria in RWPE-2 cells, obtained by v-Ki-Ras transformation of the epithelial prostate RWPE-1 cell line; in metastatic prostate cancer DU145 cells; and in osteosarcoma SAOS-2 cells. All these tumor cells displayed marked resistance to death caused by apoptotic stimuli like arachidonic acid and the BH3 mimetic EM20-25, which cause cell death through the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP). PTP desensitization and the ensuing resistance to cell death induced by arachidonic acid or EM20-25 could be ablated by inhibiting ERK with the drug PD98059 or with a selective ERK activation inhibitor peptide. ERK inhibition enhanced glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3)-dependent phosphorylation of the pore regulator cyclophilin D, whereas GSK-3 inhibition protected from PTP opening. Neither active ERK in mitochondria nor pore desensitization was observed in non-transformed RWPE-1 cells. Thus, in tumor cells mitochondrial ERK activation desensitizes the PTP through a signaling axis that involves GSK-3 and cyclophilin D, a finding that provides a mechanistic basis for increased resistance to apoptosis of neoplastic cells.

  8. REDD1 protects osteoblast cells from gamma radiation-induced premature senescence.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang Hong; Ha, Cam T; Fu, Dadin; Xiao, Mang

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is commonly used for cancer treatment. However, it often results in side effects due to radiation damage in normal tissue, such as bone marrow (BM) failure. Adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) reside in BM next to the endosteal bone surface, which is lined primarily by hematopoietic niche osteoblastic cells. Osteoblasts are relatively more radiation-resistant than HSPCs, but the mechanisms are not well understood. In the present study, we demonstrated that the stress response gene REDD1 (regulated in development and DNA damage responses 1) was highly expressed in human osteoblast cell line (hFOB) cells after γ irradiation. Knockdown of REDD1 with siRNA resulted in a decrease in hFOB cell numbers, whereas transfection of PCMV6-AC-GFP-REDD1 plasmid DNA into hFOB cells inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and p21 expression and protected these cells from radiation-induced premature senescence (PS). The PS in irradiated hFOB cells were characterized by significant inhibition of clonogenicity, activation of senescence biomarker SA-β-gal, and the senescence-associated cytokine secretory phenotype (SASP) after 4 or 8 Gy irradiation. Immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the stress response proteins p53 and nuclear factor κ B (NFkB) interacted with REDD1 in hFOB cells. Knockdown of NFkB or p53 gene dramatically suppressed REDD1 protein expression in these cells, indicating that REDD1 was regulated by both factors. Our data demonstrated that REDD1 is a protective factor in radiation-induced osteoblast cell premature senescence.

  9. The Mitochondrial-Derived Peptide Humanin Protects RPE Cells From Oxidative Stress, Senescence, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sreekumar, Parameswaran G.; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Spee, Chris; Mehta, Hemal H.; Wan, Junxiang; Yen, Kelvin; Cohen, Pinchas; Kannan, Ram; Hinton, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the expression of humanin (HN) in human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells and its effect on oxidative stress–induced cell death, mitochondrial bioenergetics, and senescence. Methods Humanin localization in RPE cells and polarized RPE monolayers was assessed by confocal microscopy. Human RPE cells were treated with 150 μM tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (tBH) in the absence/presence of HN (0.5–10 μg/mL) for 24 hours. Mitochondrial respiration was measured by XF96 analyzer. Retinal pigment epithelial cell death and caspase-3 activation, mitochondrial biogenesis and senescence were analyzed by TUNEL, immunoblot analysis, mitochondrial DNA copy number, SA-β-Gal staining, and p16INK4a expression and HN levels by ELISA. Oxidative stress–induced changes in transepithelial resistance were studied in RPE monolayers with and without HN cotreatment. Results A prominent localization of HN was found in the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial compartments of hRPE. Humanin cotreatment inhibited tBH-induced reactive oxygen species formation and significantly restored mitochondrial bioenergetics in hRPE cells. Exogenous HN was taken up by RPE and colocalized with mitochondria. The oxidative stress–induced decrease in mitochondrial bioenergetics was prevented by HN cotreatment. Humanin treatment increased mitochondrial DNA copy number and upregulated mitochondrial transcription factor A, a key biogenesis regulator protein. Humanin protected RPE cells from oxidative stress–induced cell death by STAT3 phosphorylation and inhibiting caspase-3 activation. Humanin treatment inhibited oxidant-induced senescence. Polarized RPE demonstrated elevated cellular HN and increased resistance to cell death. Conclusions Humanin protected RPE cells against oxidative stress–induced cell death and restored mitochondrial function. Our data suggest a potential role for HN therapy in the prevention of retinal degeneration, including AMD. PMID:26990160

  10. ICRP Publication 131: Stem Cell Biology with Respect to Carcinogenesis Aspects of Radiological Protection.

    PubMed

    Niwa, O; Barcellos-Hoff, M H; Globus, R K; Harrison, J D; Hendry, J H; Jacob, P; Martin, M T; Seed, T M; Shay, J W; Story, M D; Suzuki, K; Yamashita, S

    2015-12-01

    This report provides a review of stem cells/progenitor cells and their responses to ionising radiation in relation to issues relevant to stochastic effects of radiation that form a major part of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's system of radiological protection. Current information on stem cell characteristics, maintenance and renewal, evolution with age, location in stem cell 'niches', and radiosensitivity to acute and protracted exposures is presented in a series of substantial reviews as annexes concerning haematopoietic tissue, mammary gland, thyroid, digestive tract, lung, skin, and bone. This foundation of knowledge of stem cells is used in the main text of the report to provide a biological insight into issues such as the linear-no-threshold (LNT) model, cancer risk among tissues, dose-rate effects, and changes in the risk of radiation carcinogenesis by age at exposure and attained age. Knowledge of the biology and associated radiation biology of stem cells and progenitor cells is more developed in tissues that renew fairly rapidly, such as haematopoietic tissue, intestinal mucosa, and epidermis, although all the tissues considered here possess stem cell populations. Important features of stem cell maintenance, renewal, and response are the microenvironmental signals operating in the niche residence, for which a well-defined spatial location has been identified in some tissues. The identity of the target cell for carcinogenesis continues to point to the more primitive stem cell population that is mostly quiescent, and hence able to accumulate the protracted sequence of mutations necessary to result in malignancy. In addition, there is some potential for daughter progenitor cells to be target cells in particular cases, such as in haematopoietic tissue and in skin. Several biological processes could contribute to protecting stem cells from mutation accumulation: (a) accurate DNA repair; (b) rapidly induced death of injured stem cells

  11. Transfer of protective immunity in murine histoplasmosis by a CD4+ T-cell clone.

    PubMed

    Allendoerfer, R; Magee, D M; Deepe, G S; Graybill, J R

    1993-02-01

    We have reported that a murine Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive CD4+ T-cell line and clones thereof did not adoptively transfer protection against H. capsulatum infection in normal or cyclophosphamide-treated C57BL/6 mice. One explanation for the results was that the T cells failed to traffic to lymphoid organs in these animals. In this study, we have sought to determine whether one of these clones, 2.3H3, could mediate protection in nude (C57BL/10) or irradiated (5 Gy) heterozygous nude (nu/+) C57BL/6 mice. Mice were inoculated intravenously with 10(7) resting 2.3H3 cells or with an equal number of cells of the ovalbumin-reactive clone 1S6; 2 h later, the mice were challenged intranasally with 5 x 10(6) yeast cells. By day 5 of infection, lungs, livers, and spleens of nude and irradiated nu/+ mice given 2.3H3 contained significantly fewer (P < 0.05) CFU than the same organs from mice inoculated with 1S6. This effect was specific for H. capsulatum, since 2.3H3 did not reduce the number of Coccidioides immitis CFU in lungs, livers, and spleens of irradiated nu/+ mice. By day 10, the amounts of H. capsulatum CFU in lungs, livers, or spleens of nude and irradiated nu/+ mice inoculated with 2.3H3 were smaller than those in 1S6-inoculated mice, but these differences did not reach statistical significance (P > 0.05). The mortality rate of mice inoculated with 2.3H3 and that of mice inoculated with 1S6 were similar. Histopathological examination of tissues from 2.3H3- and 1S6-inoculated mice demonstrated the presence of granulomatous inflammation in organs from both groups. Tissues from 2.3H3-treated mice contained fewer yeasts per high-power field than tissues from 1S6-treated mice. Thus, irradiated or nude mice are permissive for the expression of protective immunity by a CD4+ T-cell clone. Although the protective capacity of T cells in these animals is transient, these animals will be useful for differentiating protective from nonprotective T-cell clones.

  12. α1-Antitrypsin modifies general NK cell interactions with dendritic cells and specific interactions with islet β-cells in favor of protection from autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Ofer; Yossef, Rami; Freixo-Lima, Gabriella; Rider, Peleg; Porgador, Angel; Lewis, Eli C

    2014-10-13

    The autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β-cells is the hallmark of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Failure of anti-CD3 antibodies to provide long-lasting reversal of T1D and the expression of an NK cell ligand on β-cells suggest that NK cells play a role in disease pathogenesis. Indeed, killing of β-cells by NK cells has been shown to occur, mediated by activation of the NK cell activating receptor, NKp46. α1-antitrypsin (AAT), an anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory glycoprotein, protects β-cells from injurious immune responses and is currently evaluated as a therapeutic for recent onset T1D. While isolated T lymphocytes are not inhibited by AAT, dendritic cells (DCs) become tolerogenic in its presence and other innate immune cells become less inflammatory. Yet a comprehensive profile of NK cell responses in the presence of AAT has yet to be described. In the present study, we demonstrate that AAT significantly reduces NK cell degranulation against β-cells, albeit in the whole animal and not in isolated NK cell cultures. AAT-treated mice, and not isolated cultured β-cells, exhibited a marked reduction in NKp46 ligand levels on β-cells. In related experiments, AAT-treated DCs exhibited reduced inducible DC-expressed IL-15 levels and evoked a weaker NK cell response. NK cell depletion in a T1D mouse model resulted in improved β-cell function and survival, similar to the effects observed by AAT treatment alone; nonetheless, the two approaches were non-synergistic. Our data suggest that AAT is a selective immunomodulator that retains pivotal NK cell responses, while diverting their activities away from islet β-cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial dysfunction and a protective unfolded protein response in RPE cells.

    PubMed

    Cano, Marisol; Wang, Lei; Wan, Jun; Barnett, Bradley P; Ebrahimi, Katayoon; Qian, Jiang; Handa, James T

    2014-04-01

    How cells degenerate from oxidative stress in aging-related disease is incompletely understood. This study's intent was to identify key cytoprotective pathways activated by oxidative stress and determine the extent of their protection. Using an unbiased strategy with microarray analysis, we found that retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells treated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) had overrepresented genes involved in the antioxidant and unfolded protein response (UPR). Differentially expressed antioxidant genes were predominantly located in the cytoplasm, with no induction of genes that neutralize superoxide and H2O2 in the mitochondria, resulting in accumulation of superoxide and decreased ATP production. Simultaneously, CSE induced the UPR sensors IRE1α, p-PERK, and ATP6, including CHOP, which was cytoprotective because CHOP knockdown decreased cell viability. In mice given intravitreal CSE, the RPE had increased IRE1α and decreased ATP and developed epithelial-mesenchymal transition, as suggested by decreased LRAT abundance, altered ZO-1 immunolabeling, and dysmorphic cell shape. Mildly degenerated RPE from early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) samples had prominent IRE1α, but minimal mitochondrial TOM20 immunolabeling. Although oxidative stress is thought to induce an antioxidant response with cooperation between the mitochondria and the ER, herein we show that mitochondria become impaired sufficiently to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition despite a protective UPR. With similar responses in early AMD samples, these results suggest that mitochondria are vulnerable to oxidative stress despite a protective UPR during the early phases of aging-related disease.

  14. Ghrelin protects MES23.5 cells against rotenone via inhibiting mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianhan; Xu, Huamin; Shen, Xiaoli; Jiang, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Ghrelin is an endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) receptor and has several important physiological functions. Recently, particular attention has been paid to its neuroprotective effect. Rotenone is used to investigate the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) for its ability to inhibit mitochondrial complex I. The current study was carried out to investigate the neuroprotective effects of ghrelin against rotenone in MES 23.5 dopaminergic cells and explored the possible mechanisms underlying this protection. Our results showed that rotenone induced significant decrease in cell viability which was counteracted by ghrelin treatment. In addition, rotenone challenge reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited the activity of mitochondrial complex I and depressed cytochrome C release from mitochondria. This mitochondrial dysfunction was reversed by ghrelin treatment. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that ghrelin protected MES23.5 cells against rotenone-induced apoptosis by inhibiting activation of caspase-3. Overall, our findings showed ghrelin provided protective effects on MES23.5 dopaminergic cells against rotenone via restoring mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting mitochondrial dependent apoptosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phytochemical activation of Nrf2 protects human coronary artery endothelial cells against an oxidative challenge.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Elise L; McCord, Joe M; Reuland, Danielle J; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2012-01-01

    Activation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a potential therapeutic intervention against endothelial cell oxidative stress and associated vascular disease. We hypothesized that treatment with the phytochemicals in the patented dietary supplement Protandim would induce Nrf2 nuclear localization and phase II antioxidant enzyme protein in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs), protecting against an oxidant challenge in an Nrf2- dependent manner. Protandim treatment induced Nrf2 nuclear localization, and HO-1 (778% of control ± 82.25 P < 0.01), SOD1 (125.9% of control ± 6.05 P < 0.01), NQO1 (126% of control ± 6.5 P < 0.01), and GR (119.5% of control ± 7.00 P < 0.05) protein expression in HCAEC. Treatment of HCAEC with H(2)O(2) induced apoptosis in 34% of cells while pretreatment with Protandim resulted in only 6% apoptotic cells (P < 0.01). Nrf2 silencing significantly decreased the Protandim-induced increase in HO-1 protein (P < 0.01). Nrf2 silencing also significantly decreased the protection afforded by Protandim against H(2)O(2)- induced apoptosis (P < 0.01 compared to no RNA, and P < 0.05 compared to control RNA). These results show that Protandim induces Nrf2 nuclear localization and antioxidant enzyme expression, and protection of HCAEC from an oxidative challenge is Nrf2 dependent.

  16. Phytochemical Activation of Nrf2 Protects Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells against an Oxidative Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Elise L.; McCord, Joe M.; Reuland, Danielle J.; Miller, Benjamin F.; Hamilton, Karyn L.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a potential therapeutic intervention against endothelial cell oxidative stress and associated vascular disease. We hypothesized that treatment with the phytochemicals in the patented dietary supplement Protandim would induce Nrf2 nuclear localization and phase II antioxidant enzyme protein in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs), protecting against an oxidant challenge in an Nrf2- dependent manner. Protandim treatment induced Nrf2 nuclear localization, and HO-1 (778% of control ± 82.25 P < 0.01), SOD1 (125.9% of control ± 6.05 P < 0.01), NQO1 (126% of control ± 6.5 P < 0.01), and GR (119.5% of control ± 7.00 P < 0.05) protein expression in HCAEC. Treatment of HCAEC with H2O2 induced apoptosis in 34% of cells while pretreatment with Protandim resulted in only 6% apoptotic cells (P < 0.01). Nrf2 silencing significantly decreased the Protandim-induced increase in HO-1 protein (P < 0.01). Nrf2 silencing also significantly decreased the protection afforded by Protandim against H2O2- induced apoptosis (P < 0.01 compared to no RNA, and P < 0.05 compared to control RNA). These results show that Protandim induces Nrf2 nuclear localization and antioxidant enzyme expression, and protection of HCAEC from an oxidative challenge is Nrf2 dependent. PMID:22685617

  17. SIRT1 protects against apoptosis by promoting autophagy in degenerative human disc nucleus pulposus cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Xuemei; Hao, Jie; Shen, Jieliang; Fang, Ji; Dong, Wen; Wang, Dawu; Zhang, Xiaojun; Shui, Wei; Luo, Yi; Lin, Liangbo; Qiu, Quanhe; Liu, Bin; Hu, Zhenming

    2014-01-01

    SIRT1 could protect degenerative human NP cells against apoptosis, and there were extensive and intimate connection between apoptosis and autophagy. Up to now, the role of autophagy in the process of human IVD degeneration is unclear. We sought to explore the relationship between autophagy and human IVD degeneration and to understand whether autophagy is involved in the protective effect of SIRT1 against apoptosis in NP cells. Our results showed that the autophagosomes number, the mRNA level of LC3 and Beclin-1, the protein expression of LC3-II/I and Beclin-1, decreased in NP from DDD. Resveratrol could increase the protein expression of LC3-II/I and Beclin-1, and reduce apoptosis in degenerative NP cells. In contrast, the protein levels of LC3-II/I and Beclin-1 were down-regulated and apoptosis level was significantly up-regulated in treatment with nicotinamide or SIRT1-siRNA transfection. Further analysis identified that the expression of cleaved Caspase3 and apoptosis incidence significantly increased with the pretreatment of bafilomycin A, whether resveratrol was added or not. These suggested that autophagy may play an important role in IVD degeneration, and SIRT1 protected degenerative human NP cells against apoptosis via promoting autophagy. These findings would aid in the development of novel therapeutic approaches for degenerative disc disease treatment. PMID:25503852

  18. Role of interleukin-6 in the induction of protective T cells during mycobacterial infections in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R; Castro, A G; Pedrosa, J; Minóprio, P

    1994-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) has been shown to regulate numerous functions of the immune system including the differentiation of T-cell subpopulations. Here we examined the involvement of this cytokine in the in vivo generation of a population of T cells able to protect mice against mycobacterial infections. BALB/c mice were infected intravenously with Mycobacterium avium 2447 and anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies were administered intraperitoneally throughout the course of the infection. Control mice were able to control the mycobacterial proliferation 1 month after inoculation, whereas mice whose IL-6 had been blocked showed progressive bacterial growth. To distinguish a role for IL-6 associated to the induction or expression of immunity mediated by T cells, we immunized mice with M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Pasteur and challenged them 2 months later with M. avium. One group of mice received anti-IL-6 during the BCG vaccination and another during the M. avium challenge. When M. avium proliferation was assessed at day 30 of the challenge, it was found that the administration of anti-IL-6 during vaccination reduced the protection afforded by BCG compared to administration of the isotype control antibody. No difference in bacterial proliferation was observed at day 30 of challenge when antibodies were administered during M. avium challenge. Our results show that protective T cells arise during M. avium infections in mice after differentiating in the presence of IL-6. PMID:7959868

  19. Oxidative stress protective effect of Dracocephalum multicaule essential oil against human cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Mohammad Ali; Sonboli, Ali; Mirjalili, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report the antioxidative and protective effect of essential oil of Dracocephalum multicaule on K562 cells. Our results demonstrated that monoterpenoids, including oxygenated and hydrocarbons, 71.5% and 28.3%, respectively, were the principal essential oils of D. multicaule. Perilla aldehyde (71.5%) and limonene (28.1%) were identified as the main components. Antioxidant studies based on the 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl assay indicated that the D. multicaule essential oil possesses a marked antioxidant and radical-scavenging activity with an IC₅₀ value of 438.2 μg/mL. Pretreatment with essential oil and main constituents protected K562 cells 49.5% against H₂O₂-induced oxidative damage throughout increasing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione content in K562 cells. Collectively, D. multicaule essential oil and its main compounds especially in combinatory condition at a ratio of 7:3 with high antioxidant properties may be able to protect cells against oxidative stress induced by H₂O₂ through antioxidative mechanisms.

  20. Ammonia impairs glutamatergic communication in astroglial cells: protective role of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Hansel, Gisele; Scherer, Emilene B S; Wyse, Angela T S; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Quincozes-Santos, André; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia is a key toxin in the precipitation of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with liver failure. In response to ammonia, various toxic events are triggered in astroglial cells, and alterations in brain glutamate communication are common. Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound that has been extensively studied in pathological events because it presents several beneficial effects, including some in the central nervous system (CNS). We previously described that resveratrol is able to significantly modulate glial functioning and has a protective effect during ammonia challenge in vitro. In this study, we addressed the mechanisms by which resveratrol can protect C6 astroglial cells from glutamatergic alterations induced by ammonia. Resveratrol was able to prevent all the effects triggered by ammonia: (i) decrease in glutamate uptake activity and expression of the EAAC1 glutamate transporter, the main glutamate transporter present in C6 cells; (ii) increase of glutamate release, which was also dependent on the activation of the Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter NKCC1; (iii) reduction in GS activity and intracellular GSH content; and (iv) impairment of Na(+)K(+)-ATPase activity. Interestingly, resveratrol, per se, also positively modulated the astroglial functions evaluated. Moreover, we demonstrated that heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), an enzyme that is part of the cellular defense system, mediated some of the effects of resveratrol. In conclusion, the mechanisms of the putative protective role of resveratrol against ammonia toxicity involve the modulation of pathways and molecules related to glutamate communication in astroglial cells.

  1. The protective effect of curcumin in Olfactory Ensheathing Cells exposed to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Bonfanti, Roberta; Musumeci, Teresa; Russo, Cristina; Pellitteri, Rosalia

    2017-02-05

    Curcumin, a phytochemical component derived from the rhizomes of Curcuma longa, has shown a great variety of pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, anti-depression and anti-oxidant activity. Therefore, in the last years it has been used as a therapeutic agent since it confers protection in different neurodegenerative diseases, cerebral ischemia and excitotoxicity. Olfactory Ensheathing Cells (OECs) are glial cells of the olfactory system. They are able to secrete several neurotrophic growth factors, promote axonal growth and support the remyelination of damaged axons. OEC transplantation has emerged as a possible experimental therapy to induce repair of spinal cord injury, even if the functional recovery is still limited. Since hypoxia is a secondary effect in spinal cord injury, this in vitro study investigates the protective effect of curcumin in OECs exposed to hypoxia. Primary OECs were obtained from neonatal rat olfactory bulbs and placed both in normal and hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, some cells were grown with basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) and/or curcumin at different concentration and times. The results obtained through immunocytochemical procedures and MTT test show that curcumin stimulates cell viability in OECs grown in normal and hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, the synergistic effect of curcumin and bFGF is the most effective exerting protection on OECs. Since spinal cord injury is often accompanied by secondary insults, such as ischemia or hypoxia, our results suggest that curcumin in combination with bFGF might be considered a possible approach for restoration in injuries.

  2. Protective effect of oleanolic acid on oxidized-low density lipoprotein induced endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianhua; Li, Guanghui; Wang, Meizhi; Li, Hui; Han, Zhiwu

    2015-10-01

    Oleanolic acid (3β-hydroxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid, OA) is a naturally-occurring triterpenoid with various promising pharmacological properties. The present study was conducted to determine the protective effects of OA against oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced endothelial cell apoptosis and the possible underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that ox-LDL significantly decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). OA in the co-treatment showed a protective effect against ox-LDL induced loss in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis, which was associated with the modulating effect of OA on ox-LDL induced hypoxia-inducible factor 1α(HIF-1α) expression. Moreover, our results showed that the modulating effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HIF-1α expression was obtained via inhibition of lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1)/reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling. Collectively, we suggested that the protective effect of OA against ox-LDL induced HUVEC apoptosis might, at least in part, be obtained via inhibition of the LOX-1/ROS/HIF-1α signaling pathway.

  3. Extracellular renalase protects cells and organs by outside-in signalling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Safirstein, Robert; Velazquez, Heino; Guo, Xiao-Jia; Hollander, Lindsay; Chang, John; Chen, Tian-Min; Mu, Jian-Jun; Desir, Gary V

    2017-02-26

    Renalase was discovered as a protein synthesized by the kidney and secreted in blood where it circulates at a concentration of approximately 3-5 μg/ml. Initial reports suggested that it functioned as an NAD(P)H oxidase and could oxidize catecholamines. Administration of renalase lowers blood pressure and heart rate and also protects cells and organs against ischaemic and toxic injury. Although renalase's protective effect was initially ascribed to its oxidase properties, a paradigm shift in our understanding of the cellular actions of renalase is underway. We now understand that, independent of its enzymatic properties, renalase functions as a cytokine that provides protection to cells, tissues and organs by interacting with its receptor to activate protein kinase B, JAK/STAT, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. In addition, recent studies suggest that dysregulated renalase signalling may promote survival of several tumour cells due to its capacity to augment expression of growth-related genes. In this review, we focus on the cytoprotective actions of renalase and its capacity to sustain cancer cell growth and also the translational opportunities these findings represent for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for organ injury and cancer.

  4. Overexpression of Annexin II Receptor-Induced Autophagy Protects Against Apoptosis in Uveal Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuelu; Song, Hongyuan; Guo, Ting; Zhu, Yongzhe; Tang, Hailin; Qi, Zhongtian; Zhao, Ping; Zhao, Shihong

    2016-05-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor in adults and still lacks effective systemic therapies. Annexin A2 receptor (AXIIR), a receptor for Annexin II, was demonstrated to play an important role in multiple cells, but its role in uveal melanoma cells remains exclusive. Herein, the authors reported that overexpression of AXIIR was able to reduce cell viability and activate apoptosis apparently in the Mum2C uveal melanoma cell line. Meanwhile, overexpression of AXIIR could induce autophagy and increase autophagy flux. After autophagy was inhibited by chloroquine, enhanced apoptosis and cytotoxicity could be detected. In summary, these data highlighted the crucial role of AXIIR in reducing Mum2C cell viability through inducing apoptosis, while autophagy played a protective role in this process. Interference of this gene may be a promising method for uveal melanoma therapy and combination with specific inhibitor of autophagy may serve as a supplementary.

  5. Protective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 against colistin sulfate-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guo-Zheng; Li, Ji-Chang

    2014-03-01

    The present study aimed to examine the protective effect of ginsenoside Rg1 against colistin-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Ginsenoside Rg1 was shown to elevate cell viability, decrease levels of malondialdehyde and intracellular reactive oxygen species, enhance activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione, and decrease the release of cytochrome-c, formation of DNA fragmentation in colistin-treated PC12 cells. Ginsenoside Rg1 also reversed the increased caspase-9 and -3 mRNA levels caused by colistin in PC12 cells. These results suggest that ginsenoside Rg1 exerts a neuroprotective effect on colistin-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells, at least in part, via the inhibition of oxidative stress, prevention of apoptosis mediated via mitochondria pathway. Co-administration of ginsenoside Rg1 highlights the potential to increase the therapeutic index of colistin.

  6. The protective effects of resveratrol on Schwann cells with toxicity induced by ethanol in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hongtu; Zhang, Jingfen; Liu, Huaxiang; Li, Zhenzhong

    2013-09-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are the myelin forming cells in the peripheral nervous system, they play a key role in the pathology of various polyneuropathies and provide trophic support to axons via expression of various neurotrophic factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Ethanol (EtOH) adversely affected both SCs proliferation and myelin formation in culture. Resveratrol (Res) has been shown to regulate many cellular processes and to display multiple protective and therapeutic effects. Whether Res has protective effects on SCs with EtOH-induced toxicity is still unclear. The protective efficacy of Res on EtOH-treated SCs in vitro was investigated in the pre